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Sample records for fuel mixture due

  1. Stabilizer for fuel mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, M.; Moriyama, N.; Yamamura, M.

    1981-02-24

    A stabilizer for fuel mixtures of finely divided coal and fuel oil is composed of an active ingredient, a non-ionic surface active agent consisting of a block copolymer represented by the following general formula (I): R/sub 1/O-(C/sub 2/H/sup 4/O)l-(C/sub 3/H/sup 6/O)m-(C/sub 2/H/sup 4/O)n-R/sub 2/ (I) wherein r/sub 1/ and r/sub 2/ stand for a hydrogen atom or an alklyl group having 1 to 6 carbon atoms, the mole number (L+n) of added ethylene oxide is in the range of from 30 to 300, the mole number (M) of added propylene oxide is in the range of from 15 to 80, and the content of ethylene oxide in the whole molecule is 40 to 85% by weight.

  2. Coal-water mixture fuel burner

    DOEpatents

    Brown, T.D.; Reehl, D.P.; Walbert, G.F.

    1985-04-29

    The present invention represents an improvement over the prior art by providing a rotating cup burner arrangement for use with a coal-water mixture fuel which applies a thin, uniform sheet of fuel onto the inner surface of the rotating cup, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel on the inner surface of the cup, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge from the rotating cup, and further atomizes the fuel as it enters the combustion chamber by subjecting it to the high shear force of a high velocity air flow. Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide for improved combustion of a coal-water mixture fuel. It is another object of the present invention to provide an arrangement for introducing a coal-water mixture fuel into a combustion chamber in a manner which provides improved flame control and stability, more efficient combustion of the hydrocarbon fuel, and continuous, reliable burner operation. Yet another object of the present invention is to provide for the continuous, sustained combustion of a coal-water mixture fuel without the need for a secondary combustion source such as natural gas or a liquid hydrocarbon fuel. Still another object of the present invention is to provide a burner arrangement capable of accommodating a coal-water mixture fuel having a wide range of rheological and combustion characteristics in providing for its efficient combustion. 7 figs.

  3. Dual-water mixture fuel burner

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Thomas D.; Reehl, Douglas P.; Walbert, Gary F.

    1986-08-05

    A coal-water mixture (CWM) burner includes a conically shaped rotating cup into which fuel comprised of coal particles suspended in a slurry is introduced via a first, elongated inner tube coupled to a narrow first end portion of the cup. A second, elongated outer tube is coaxially positioned about the first tube and delivers steam to the narrow first end of the cup. The fuel delivery end of the inner first tube is provided with a helical slot on its lateral surface for directing the CWM onto the inner surface of the rotating cup in the form of a uniform, thin sheet which, under the influence of the cup's centrifugal force, flows toward a second, open, expanded end portion of the rotating cup positioned immediately adjacent to a combustion chamber. The steam delivered to the rotating cup wets its inner surface and inhibits the coal within the CWM from adhering to the rotating cup. A primary air source directs a high velocity air flow coaxially about the expanded discharge end of the rotating cup for applying a shear force to the CWM in atomizing the fuel mixture for improved combustion. A secondary air source directs secondary air into the combustion chamber adjacent to the outlet of the rotating cup at a desired pitch angle relative to the fuel mixture/steam flow to promote recirculation of hot combustion gases within the ignition zone for increased flame stability.

  4. Fuel compositions comprising coal-liquid fuel mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Niimi, H.; Nobe, T.; Wada, T.

    1981-01-20

    The invention provides: a fuel composition comprising 100 parts by weight of a coal-liquid fuel mixture and 0.02 to 1.0 part by weight of at least one additive selected from the group consisting of dibenzylidene sorbitol, ditoluylidene sorbitol, tribenzylidene sorbitol, tritoluylidene sorbitol and hydrogenated castor oil; and a fuel composition comprising 100 parts by weight of a coal-liquid fuel mixture, 0.02 to 1.0 part by weight of at least one additive selected from the group consisting of dibenzylidene sorbitol, ditoluylidene sorbitol, tribenzylidene sorbitol, tritoluylidene sorbitol and hydrogenated castor oil, and 1 to 10 parts by weight of water. The composition shows high stability over a prolonged period of time, preventing the separation into layers of the components.

  5. Examination of physical properties of fuels and mixtures with alternative fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lown, Anne Lauren

    ABSTRACT. EXAMINATION OF PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF FUELS AND MIXTURES WITH ALTERNATIVE FUELS. By. Anne Lauren Lown. The diversity of alternative fuels is increasing due to new second generation biofuels. By modeling alternative fuels and fuel mixtures, types of fuels can be selected based on their properties, without producing and testing large batches. A number of potential alternative fuels have been tested and modeled to determine their impact when blended with traditional diesel and jet fuels. The properties evaluated include cloud point and pour point temperature, cetane number, distillation curve, and speed of sound. This work represents a novel approach to evaluating the properties of alternative fuels and their mixtures with petroleum fuels. Low temperature properties were evaluated for twelve potential biofuel compounds in mixtures with three diesel fuels and one jet fuel. Functional groups tested included diesters, esters, ketones, and ethers, and alkanes were used for comparison. Alkanes, ethers, esters, and ketones with a low melting point temperature were found to decrease the fuel cloud point temperature. Diesters added to fuels display an upper critical solution temperature, and multiple methods were used to confirm the presence of liquid-liquid immiscibility. These behaviors are independent of chain length and branching, as long as the melting point temperature of the additive is not significantly higher than the cloud point temperature of the fuel. Physical properties were estimated for several potential fuel additive molecules using group contribution methods. Quantum chemical calculations were used for ideal gas heat capacities. Fuel surrogates for three petroleum based fuels and six alternative fuels were developed. The cloud point temperature, distillation curve, cetane number, and average molecular weight for different fuel surrogates were simultaneously represented. The proposed surrogates use the experimental mass fractions of paraffins, and

  6. Nuclear fuel alloys or mixtures and method of making thereof

    DOEpatents

    Mariani, Robert Dominick; Porter, Douglas Lloyd

    2016-04-05

    Nuclear fuel alloys or mixtures and methods of making nuclear fuel mixtures are provided. Pseudo-binary actinide-M fuel mixtures form alloys and exhibit: body-centered cubic solid phases at low temperatures; high solidus temperatures; and/or minimal or no reaction or inter-diffusion with steel and other cladding materials. Methods described herein through metallurgical and thermodynamics advancements guide the selection of amounts of fuel mixture components by use of phase diagrams. Weight percentages for components of a metallic additive to an actinide fuel are selected in a solid phase region of an isothermal phase diagram taken at a temperature below an upper temperature limit for the resulting fuel mixture in reactor use. Fuel mixtures include uranium-molybdenum-tungsten, uranium-molybdenum-tantalum, molybdenum-titanium-zirconium, and uranium-molybdenum-titanium systems.

  7. Inorganic salt mixtures as electrolyte media in fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, Charles Austen (Inventor); Belieres, Jean-Philippe (Inventor); Francis-Gervasio, Dominic (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Fuel cell designs and techniques for converting chemical energy into electrical energy uses a fuel cell are disclosed. The designs and techniques include an anode to receive fuel, a cathode to receive oxygen, and an electrolyte chamber in the fuel cell, including an electrolyte medium, where the electrolyte medium includes an inorganic salt mixture in the fuel cell. The salt mixture includes pre-determined quantities of at least two salts chosen from a group consisting of ammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate, ammonium trifluoroacetate, and ammonium nitrate, to conduct charge from the anode to the cathode. The fuel cell includes an electrical circuit operatively coupled to the fuel cell to transport electrons from the cathode.

  8. Additive for otto cycle engines and fuel mixture so obtained

    SciTech Connect

    Scifoni, M.

    1985-02-12

    The additive for Otto cycle engines according to the present invention consists of a mixture of water, ethanol, methanol and butanol to which is added a determined quantity of a liquid obtained by pressing prickly pear leaves. Added in a small percentage to the fuel, gasoline, LP or methane, this additive prevents the oxidation associated with the use of water and/or alcohols in Otto cycle engines, lowers fuel consumption and allows the use of low octane fuel.

  9. Catalytic ignition of fuel/oxygen/nitrogen mixtures over platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, P.; Law, C.K.

    1986-11-01

    Ignition of fuel/oxygen/nitrogen mixtures over platinum wire is experimentally studied by using microcalorimetry and by restricting the flow to the low Reynolds number range so that axisymmetry prevails. The fuels studied are propane, butane, propylene, ethylene, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen. Parameters investigated include flow velocity, fuel type and concentration, and oxygen concentration. The catalytic ignition temperatures of the various fuels are accurately determined over extensive ranges of fuel/oxygen/nitrogen concentrations. Results show two distinctly opposite ignition trends depending on the nature of the fuel. That is, the ignition temperature of lean propane/air and butane/air mixtures decreases as their fuel concentration is increased, while the reverse trend is observed for lean mixtures of propylene, ethylene, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen with air. Furthermore, the ignition of propane depends primarily on fuel concentration, while the ignition of carbon monoxide depends on fuel and oxygen concentrations to a comparable extent. These results are explained on the basis of hierarchical surface adsorption strengths of the different reactants in effecting catalytic ignition. Additional phenomena of interest are observed and discussed.

  10. Catalytic oxidation of very fuel rich mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of using a catalytic reactor as a tool to study soot formation from the fuel rich side of the soot limit (null set = 3 - 6). The experimental approach to be taken in the first phase of the research is to document that a hydrocarbon fuel can be burnt at very rich equivalence ratios without forming soot. A simple mono-component fuel, iso-octane, will be used as the test fuel. To insure that combustion is uniform across the catalyst bed, measurements will be made of the fuel-air equivalence ratio profile across the inlet and the temperature and product distribution across the outlet. Phase Two will be to use this environment as a testing ground for determining the effect the structure of a hydrocarbon fuel has on its tendency to form soot. Various amounts of organic compounds such as benzene will be added to the iso-octane and the reaction products studied. Other compounds to be tested will xylene, toluene, and naphthalene.

  11. Spontaneous ignition delay characteristics of hydrocarbon fuel-air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, A. H.; Freeman, W. G.; Cowell, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of pressure on the autoignition characteristics of homogeneous mixtures of hydrocarbon fuels in air is examined. Autoignition delay times are measured for propane, ethylene, methane, and acetylene in a continuous flow apparatus featuring a multi-point fuel injector. Results are presented for mixture temperatures from 670K to 1020K, pressures from 1 to 10 atmospheres, equivalence ratios from 0.2 to 0.7, and velocities from 5 to 30 m/s. Delay time is related to pressure, temperature, and fuel concentration by global reaction theory. The results show variations in global activation energy from 25 to 38 kcal/kg-mol, pressure exponents from 0.66 to 1.21, and fuel concentration exponents from 0.19 to 0.75 for the fuels studied. These results are generally in good agreement with previous studies carried out under similar conditions.

  12. Fuel properties of bituminous coal and pyrolytic oil mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Hazlin; Sharuddin, Munawar Zaman; Daud, Ahmad Rafizan Mohamad; Syed-Hassan, Syed Shatir A.

    2014-10-01

    Investigation on the thermal decomposition kinetics of coal-biooil slurry (CBS) fuel prepared at different ratios (100:0,70:30,60:40,0:100) was conducted using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The materials consisted of Clermont bituminous coal (Australia) and bio-oil (also known as pyrolytic oil) from the source of Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) that was thermally converted by means of pyrolysis. Thermal decomposition of CBS fuel was performed in an inert atmosphere (50mL/min nitrogen) under non-isothermal conditions from room temperature to 1000°C at heating rate of 10°C/min. The apparent activation energy (Ea.) and pre-exponential factor (A) were calculated from the experimental results by using an Arrhenius-type kinetic model which first-order decomposition reaction was assumed. All kinetic parameters were tabulated based on the TG data obtained from the experiment. It was found that, the CBS fuel has higher reactivity than Clermont coal fuel during pyrolysis process, as the addition of pyrolytic oil will reduce the Ea values of the fuel. The thermal profiles of the mixtures showed potential trends that followed the characteristics of an ideal slurry fuel where high degradation rate is desirable. Among the mixture, the optimum fuel was found at the ratio of 60:40 of pyrolytic oil/coal mixtures with highest degradation rate. These findings may contribute to the development of a slurry fuel to be used in the vast existing conventional power plants.

  13. Fuel moisture content enhances nonadditive effects of plant mixtures on flammability and fire behavior

    PubMed Central

    Blauw, Luke G; Wensink, Niki; Bakker, Lisette; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Aerts, Rien; Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A; Cornelissen, J Hans C

    2015-01-01

    Fire behavior of plant mixtures includes a complex set of processes for which the interactive contributions of its drivers, such as plant identity and moisture, have not yet been unraveled fully. Plant flammability parameters of species mixtures can show substantial deviations of fire properties from those expected based on the component species when burnt alone; that is, there are nonadditive mixture effects. Here, we investigated how fuel moisture content affects nonadditive effects in fire behavior. We hypothesized that both the magnitude and variance of nonadditivity in flammability parameters are greater in moist than in dry fuel beds. We conducted a series of experimental burns in monocultures and 2-species mixtures with two ericaceous dwarf shrubs and two bryophyte species from temperate fire-prone heathlands. For a set of fire behavior parameters, we found that magnitude and variability of nonadditive effects are, on average, respectively 5.8 and 1.8 times larger in moist (30% MC) species mixtures compared to dry (10% MC) mixed fuel beds. In general, the moist mixtures caused negative nonadditive effects, but due to the larger variability these mixtures occasionally caused large positive nonadditive effects, while this did not occur in dry mixtures. Thus, at moister conditions, mixtures occasionally pass the moisture threshold for ignition and fire spread, which the monospecific fuel beds are unable to pass. We also show that the magnitude of nonadditivity is highly species dependent. Thus, contrary to common belief, the strong nonadditive effects in mixtures can cause higher fire occurrence at moister conditions. This new integration of surface fuel moisture and species interactions will help us to better understand fire behavior in the complexity of natural ecosystems. PMID:26380709

  14. Minimally refined biomass fuel. [carbohydrate-water-alcohol mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, R.K.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1981-03-26

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water-solubilizes the carbohydrate; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the viscosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  15. Wavelength and energy dependent absorption of unconventional fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, N.; Saleem, Z.; Mirza, A. A.

    2005-11-01

    Economic considerations of laser induced ignition over the normal electrical ignition of direct injected Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) engines has motivated automobile industry to go for extensive research on basic characteristics of leaner unconventional fuel mixtures to evaluate practical possibility of switching over to the emerging technologies. This paper briefly reviews the ongoing research activities on minimum ignition energy and power requirements of natural gas fuels and reports results of present laser air/CNG mixture absorption coefficient study. This study was arranged to determine the thermo-optical characteristics of high air/fuel ratio mixtures using laser techniques. We measured the absorption coefficient using four lasers of multiple wavelengths over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. The absorption coefficient of mixture was found to vary significantly over change of mixture temperature and probe laser wavelengths. The absorption coefficients of air/CNG mixtures were measured using 20 watts CW/pulsed CO2 laser at 10.6μm, Pulsed Nd:Yag laser at 1.06μm, 532 nm (2nd harmonic) and 4 mW CW HeNe laser at 645 nm and 580 nm for temperatures varying from 290 to 1000K using optical transmission loss technique.

  16. Flame propagation in heterogeneous mixtures of fuel drops and air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, G. D.; Lefebvre, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    Photographic methods are used to measure flame speeds in flowing mixtures of fuel props and air at atmospheric pressure. The fuels employed include a conventional fuel oil plus various blends JP 7 with stocks containing single-ring and mullti-ring aromatics. The results for stoichiometric mixtures show that flame propagation cannot occur in mixtures containing mean drop sizes larger than 300 to 400 microns, depending on the fuel type. For smaller drop sizes, down to around 60 microns, flame speed is inversely proportional to drop size, indicating that evaporation rates are limiting to flame speed. Below around 60 microns, the curves of flame speed versus mean drop size flatten out, thereby demonstrating that for finely atomized sprays flame speeds are much less dependent on evaporation rates, and are governed primarily by mixing and/or chemical reaction rates. The fuels exhibiting the highest flame speeds are those containing multi-ring aromatics. This is attributed to the higher radiative heat flux emanating from their soot-bearing flames which enhances the rate of evaporation of the fuel drops approaching the flame front.

  17. Characterization of a nose-only inhalation exposure system for hydrocarbon mixtures and jet fuels.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sheppard A; Tremblay, Raphael T; Brunson, Kristyn F; Kendrick, Christine; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2010-04-01

    A directed-flow nose-only inhalation exposure system was constructed to support development of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for complex hydrocarbon mixtures, such as jet fuels. Due to the complex nature of the aerosol and vapor-phase hydrocarbon exposures, care was taken to investigate the chamber hydrocarbon stability, vapor and aerosol droplet compositions, and droplet size distribution. Two-generation systems for aerosolizing fuel and hydrocarbons were compared and characterized for use with either jet fuels or a simple mixture of eight hydrocarbons. Total hydrocarbon concentration was monitored via online gas chromatography (GC). Aerosol/vapor (A/V) ratios, and total and individual hydrocarbon concentrations, were determined using adsorbent tubes analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TDS-GC-MS). Droplet size distribution was assessed via seven-stage cascade impactor. Droplet mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) was between 1 and 3 mum, depending on the generator and mixture utilized. A/V hydrocarbon concentrations ranged from approximately 200 to 1300 mg/m(3), with between 20% and 80% aerosol content, depending on the mixture. The aerosolized hydrocarbon mixtures remained stable during the 4-h exposure periods, with coefficients of variation (CV) of less than 10% for the total hydrocarbon concentrations. There was greater variability in the measurement of individual hydrocarbons in the A-V phase. In conclusion, modern analytical chemistry instruments allow for improved descriptions of inhalation exposures of rodents to aerosolized fuel. PMID:20109056

  18. Isentropic Compression of Multicomponent Mixtures of Fuels and Inert Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barragan, Michelle; Julien, Howard L.; Woods, Stephen S.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2000-01-01

    In selected aerospace applications of the fuels hydrazine and monomethythydrazine, there occur conditions which can result in the isentropic compression of a multicomponent mixture of fuel and inert gas. One such example is when a driver gas such as helium comes out of solution and mixes with the fuel vapor, which is being compressed. A second example is when product gas from an energetic device mixes with the fuel vapor which is being compressed. Thermodynamic analysis has shown that under isentropic compression, the fuels hydrazine and monomethylhydrazine must be treated as real fluids using appropriate equations of state. The appropriate equations of state are the Peng-Robinson equation of state for hydrazine and the Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state for monomethylhydrazine. The addition of an inert gas of variable quantity and input temperature and pressure to the fuel compounds the problem for safety design or analysis. This work provides the appropriate thermodynamic analysis of isentropic compression of the two examples cited. In addition to an entropy balance describing the change of state, an enthalpy balance is required. The presence of multicomponents in the system requires that appropriate mixing rules are identified and applied to the analysis. This analysis is not currently available.

  19. Method and apparatus for controlling fuel/air mixture in a lean burn engine

    DOEpatents

    Kubesh, John Thomas; Dodge, Lee Gene; Podnar, Daniel James

    1998-04-07

    The system for controlling the fuel/air mixture supplied to a lean burn engine when operating on natural gas, gasoline, hydrogen, alcohol, propane, butane, diesel or any other fuel as desired. As specific humidity of air supplied to the lean burn engine increases, the oxygen concentration of exhaust gas discharged by the engine for a given equivalence ratio will decrease. Closed loop fuel control systems typically attempt to maintain a constant exhaust gas oxygen concentration. Therefore, the decrease in the exhaust gas oxygen concentration resulting from increased specific humidity will often be improperly attributed to an excessive supply of fuel and the control system will incorrectly reduce the amount of fuel supplied to the engine. Also, the minimum fuel/air equivalence ratio for a lean burn engine to avoid misfiring will increase as specific humidity increases. A relative humidity sensor to allow the control system to provide a more enriched fuel/air mixture at high specific humidity levels. The level of specific humidity may be used to compensate an output signal from a universal exhaust gas oxygen sensor for changing oxygen concentrations at a desired equivalence ratio due to variation in specific humidity specific humidity. As a result, the control system will maintain the desired efficiency, low exhaust emissions and power level for the associated lean burn engine regardless of the specific humidity level of intake air supplied to the lean burn engine.

  20. Mach 2 combustion characteristics of hydrogen/hydrocarbon fuel mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Diskin, G.S.; Jachimowski, C.J.; Northam, G.B.; Bell, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The combustion of H/sub 2//CH/sub 4/ and H/sub 2//C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ mixtures containing 10 to 70 vol pct hydrocarbon at combustor inlet Mach number 2 and temperatures 2000 to 4000 R is investigated experimentally, applying direct-connect test hardware and techniques similar to those described by Diskin and Northam (1987) in the facilities of the NASA Langley Hypersonic Propulsion Branch. The experimental setup, procedures, and data-reduction methods are described; and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Fuel type and mixture are found to have little effect on the wall heating rate measured near the combustor exit, but H/sub 2//C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ is shown to burn much more efficiently than H/sub 2//CH/sub 4/, with no pilot-off blowout equivalence ratios greater than 0.5. It is suggested that H/sub 2//hydrocarbon mixtures are feasible fuels (at least in terms of combustion efficiency) for scramjet SSTO vehicles operating at freestream Mach numbers above 4.

  1. Apparatus and method for burning a lean, premixed fuel/air mixture with low NOx emission

    DOEpatents

    Kostiuk, Larry W.; Cheng, Robert K.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for enabling a burner to stably burn a lean fuel/air mixture. The burner directs the lean fuel/air mixture in a stream. The apparatus comprises an annular flame stabilizer; and a device for mounting the flame stabilizer in the fuel/air mixture stream. The burner may include a body having an internal bore, in which case, the annular flame stabilizer is shaped to conform to the cross-sectional shape of the bore, is spaced from the bore by a distance greater than about 0.5 mm, and the mounting device mounts the flame stabilizer in the bore. An apparatus for burning a gaseous fuel with low NOx emissions comprises a device for premixing air with the fuel to provide a lean fuel/air mixture; a nozzle having an internal bore through which the lean fuel/air mixture passes in a stream; and a flame stabilizer mounted in the stream of the lean fuel/air mixture. The flame stabilizer may be mounted in the internal bore, in which case, it is shaped and is spaced from the bore as just described. In a method of burning a lean fuel/air mixture, a lean fuel/air mixture is provided, and is directed in a stream; an annular eddy is created in the stream of the lean fuel/air mixture; and the lean fuel/air mixture is ignited at the eddy.

  2. Ignition strategies for fuel mixtures in catalytic microburners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Vikram; Kaisare, Niket S.

    2010-03-01

    Ignition of methane-air and propane-air mixtures over platinum catalyst in a parallel-plate microburner is studied numerically and a comparison of their ignition characteristics is presented. The ignition behaviour of the two fuels is compared for the case of heated feed and the strategy of using propane-methane mixed fuel is analysed. We show that adding small quantities of propane reduces the ignition temperature of lean methane-air mixture. Transient response of the mixed methane-propane fuel reveals sequential ignition of propane followed by methane. Sensitivity analysis on physical properties of methane and propane shows that the higher apparent activation energy of methane combustion accounts for most of the observed differences in their ignition behaviour. Ignition by resistive preheating, specifically the effect of locally preheating initial section of the burner is investigated. The amount of electric power required for ignition decreases with decrease in the electrical preheating length. This reduction in ignition power is especially significant for low conductivity walls, compared to highly conducting walls. Finally, the gap size of the channel has a relatively small effect on ignition in catalytic microburners.

  3. Determining size of drops in fuel mixture of internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauter, J

    1926-01-01

    In compressorless Diesel engines and in explosion engines using fuels with high boiling points it is difficult to effect a good combustion of the fuel mixture. This report presents different methods for calculating the size and uniformity of fuel droplets and mixtures.

  4. Electrochemical cell apparatus having axially distributed entry of a fuel-spent fuel mixture transverse to the cell lengths

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, P.; Dollard, W.J.

    1991-01-08

    An electrochemical apparatus is made having a generator section containing axially elongated electrochemical cells, a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet, a gaseous feed oxidant inlet, and at least one gaseous spent fuel exit channel, where the spent fuel exit channel passes from the generator chamber to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet at a mixing apparatus, reformable fuel mixture channel passes through the length of the generator chamber and connects with the mixing apparatus, that channel containing entry ports within the generator chamber, where the axis of the ports is transverse to the fuel electrode surfaces, where a catalytic reforming material is distributed near the reformable fuel mixture entry ports. 2 figures.

  5. Analysis of an energy recovery system for reformate-based PEM fuel cells involving a binary two-phase mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yiding

    A comprehensive analysis on a novel energy recovery system for reformate-based proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems is presented. The energy recovery system includes a throttling valve, a heat exchanger, a compressor, and is coupled with a coolant loop for the fuel cell stack. The feed stock of the fuel reformer, which is primarily a mixture of water and fuel, is vaporized in the heat exchanger and is then compressed to a sufficiently high pressure before it is ducted into the fuel reformer. The analysis includes the throttling of two-phase fuel/water mixture and vaporization in the heat exchanger to obtain the temperature and pressure of the mixture at the inlet of the compressor. The results indicate that the power plant efficiency with the energy recovery system can be increased by more than 20% compared to that of a fuel cell power plant without the energy recovery system. Additionally, more than 25% of the waste heat generated by the fuel cell stack can be removed due to the energy recovery system, and the fuel burned for the fuel reforming purpose is reduced by more than 70%.

  6. Laser-induced breakdown emission in hydrocarbon fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Bak, Moon Soo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Carter, Campbell; Do, Hyungrok

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved emission measurements of laser-induced breakdown plasmas have been carried out to investigate the effect that gas species might have on the kinetics, particularly in excited states, and the resulting plasma properties. For this purpose, fuel-oxygen (O2)-carbon dioxide (CO2) mixtures with either helium (He) or nitrogen (N2) balance are prepared while maintaining their atomic compositions. The fuels tested in this study are methane (CH4), ethylene (C2H4), propane (C3H8), and butane (C4H10). The breakdown is produced in the mixtures (CH4/CO2/O2/He, C2H4/O2/He, C3H8/CO2/O2/He and C4H10/CO2/O2/He or CH4/CO2/O2/N2, C2H4/O2/N2, C3H8/CO2/O2/N2 and C4H10/CO2/O2/N2) at room conditions using the second harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (with pulse duration of 10 ns). The temporal evolution of plasma temperature is deduced from the ratio of two oxygen lines (777 nm and 823 nm) through Boltzmann analysis, while the evolution of electron number density is estimated based on Stark broadening of the Balmer-alpha (H α ) line at 656 nm and the measured plasma temperature. From the results, the temporal evolution of emission spectra and decay rates of atomic line-intensities are found to be almost identical between the breakdown plasma in the different mixtures given balancing gases. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of plasma temperature and electron number density are also found to be independent of the species compositions. Therefore, this behavior—of the breakdown emissions and plasma properties in the different mixtures with identical atomic composition—may be because the breakdown gases reach similar thermodynamic and physiochemical states immediately after the breakdown.

  7. Bragg diffraction for normal and obliquely circularly polarized light due a new chiral mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Garay, P.; Manzanares-Martinez, J.; Corella-Madueño, A.; Rosas-Burgos, A.; Lizola, Josue; Clark, Marielena; Palma, Lillian

    2015-09-01

    We have found experimentally the transmittance of normal incident circularly polarized light due to new chiral mixture that was distorted by electric field. The chiral mixture was achieved by mixtures of two nematic liquid crystals (5OCB and 5CB) and S-1-bromo-2-methylbutane. We have found a regime of circular Bragg diffraction for certain values of concentrations and thickness. Optical diffraction phenomenon have received particular attention in research for optical and electro-optical applications, such as low -voltage modulators, reflective phase gratings and smart reflectors.

  8. Method and apparatus for varying the fuel ratio of an air-fuel mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Leonardi, S.

    1981-03-24

    A method and apparatus is described for varying the fuel ratio of an air-fuel mixture supplied to the carburetor of an internal combustion engine. In a first embodiment, a valve opens and closes a port in an aluminum block between a passage coupled to the pcv and carburetor and a second passage open to the atmosphere. A spring in the second passage modulates the air flow as a function of vacuum pressure and thermally responsive means maintains the valve closed until the engine reaches its operating temperature. In a second embodiment the valve is opened as a function of the wind pressure produced during vehicle movement.

  9. The quantification of mixture stoichiometry when fuel molecules contain oxidizer elements or oxidizer molecules contain fuel elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Charles J.

    2005-05-01

    The accurate quantification and control of mixture stoichiometry is critical in many applications using new combustion strategies and fuels (e.g., homogeneous charge compression ignition, gasoline direct injection, and oxygenated fuels). The parameter typically used to quantify mixture stoichiometry (i.e., the proximity of a reactant mixture to its stoichiometric condition) is the equivalence ratio, /gf. The traditional definition of /gf is based on the relative amounts of fuel and oxidizer molecules in a mixture. This definition provides an accurate measure of mixture stoichiometry when the fuel molecule does not contain oxidizer elements and when the oxidizer molecule does not contain fuel elements. However, the traditional definition of /gf leads to problems when the fuel molecule contains an oxidizer element, as is the case when an oxygenated fuel is used, or once reactions have started and the fuel has begun to oxidize. The problems arise because an oxidizer element in a fuel molecule is counted as part of the fuel, even though it acts as an oxidizer. Similarly, if an oxidizer molecule contains fuel elements, the fuel elements in the oxidizer molecule are misleadingly lumped in with the oxidizer in the traditional definition of /gf. In either case, use of the traditional definition of /gf to quantify the mixture stoichiometry can lead to significant errors. This paper introduces the oxygen equivalence ratio, /gf/gV, a parameter that properly characterizes the instantaneous mixture stoichiometry for a broader class of reactant mixtures than does /gf. Because it is an instantaneous measure of mixture stoichiometry,/gf/gV can be used to track the time-evolution of stoichiometry as a reaction progresses. The relationship between /gf/gV and /gf is shown. Errors are involved when the traditional definition of /gf is used as a measure of mixture stoichiometry with fuels that contain oxidizer elements or oxidizers that contain fuel elements; /gf/gV is used to quantify

  10. Electrochemical cell apparatus having axially distributed entry of a fuel-spent fuel mixture transverse to the cell lengths

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, Philip; Dollard, Walter J.

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical apparatus (10) is made having a generator section (22) containing axially elongated electrochemical cells (16), a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet (28), a gaseous feed oxidant inlet (30), and at least one gaseous spent fuel exit channel (46), where the spent fuel exit channel (46) passes from the generator chamber (22) to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet (28) at a mixing apparatus (50), reformable fuel mixture channel (52) passes through the length of the generator chamber (22) and connects with the mixing apparatus (50), that channel containing entry ports (54) within the generator chamber (22), where the axis of the ports is transverse to the fuel electrode surfaces (18), where a catalytic reforming material is distributed near the reformable fuel mixture entry ports (54).

  11. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome in housewives due to a bleach-hydrochloric acid mixture.

    PubMed

    Gorguner, Metin; Aslan, Sahin; Inandi, Tacettin; Cakir, Zeynep

    2004-02-01

    The sudden onset of asthmalike symptoms and persistence of airway reactivity following an acute exposure to an irritant gas or vapor has been termed reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). A mixture of sodium hypochlorite (bleach, 40%) and hydrochloric acid (18%) is commonly used as a household cleaning solution in our region. From this mixture, chlorine gas is produced, which can cause airway damage and ensuing RADS. Here we describe findings of patients with RADS due to this cleaning mixture, and determine factors associated with a favorable outcome. Data were collected retrospectively on 55 symptomatic patients presenting to our emergency department after inhalation exposure to a mixture of bleach and hydrochloric acid. Symptoms, past medical and smoking history, details of the exposure, initial peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and oxygenation, and acute reversibility of airways obstruction were documented. All patients met previously defined criteria for the diagnosis of RADS, but did not undergo methacholine challenge testing and bronchoalveolar lavage or histopathologic study. Fifty patients were followed over the course of 3 mo. The majority of exposures (64%) occurred in the bathroom or kitchen. Only 21 of 55 (38%) patients showed an improvement in PEFR of 15% or greater following two beta(2)-agonist inhalation treatments. In follow-up, 48 patients (87%) improved clinically and functionally (FEV(1)). Seven patients (13%) deteriorated, with ARDS developing in two, one of whom died from respiratory failure. Advanced age, initial low PEFR, exposure in a small enclosed area, use immediately after mixing, and prolonged short- and long-term exposures were associated with a poorer prognosis. This descriptive study is the largest case series in the literature of RADS developing after exposure to a bleach-hydrochloric acid mixture. The optimum acute treatment and long-term outcomes for patients with RADS due to this combination still need to be determined

  12. Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels

    DOEpatents

    Heffel, James W.; Scott, Paul B.

    2003-09-02

    An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

  13. Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Heffel, James W.; Scott, Paul B.; Park, Chan Seung

    2011-11-01

    An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

  14. CO2 capture from simulated fuel gas mixtures using semiclathrate hydrates formed by quaternary ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungwon; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Youngjun; Seo, Yongwon

    2013-07-01

    In order to investigate the feasibility of semiclathrate hydrate-based precombustion CO2 capture, thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic studies were undertaken on the semiclathrate hydrates formed from a fuel gas mixture of H2 (60%) + CO2 (40%) in the presence of quaternary ammonium salts (QASs) such as tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (TBAB) and fluoride (TBAF). The inclusion of QASs demonstrated significantly stabilized hydrate dissociation conditions. This effect was greater for TBAF than TBAB. However, due to the presence of dodecahedral cages that are partially filled with water molecules, TBAF showed a relatively lower gas uptake than TBAB. From the stability condition measurements and compositional analyses, it was found that with only one step of semiclathrate hydrate formation with the fuel gas mixture from the IGCC plants, 95% CO2 can be enriched in the semiclathrate hydrate phase at room temperature. The enclathration of both CO2 and H2 in the cages of the QAS semiclathrate hydrates and the structural transition that results from the inclusion of QASs were confirmed through Raman and (1)H NMR measurements. The experimental results obtained in this study provide the physicochemical background required for understanding selective partitioning and distributions of guest gases in the QAS semiclathrate hydrates and for investigating the feasibility of a semiclathrate hydrate-based precombustion CO2 capture process. PMID:23718261

  15. Multiple recycle of REMIX fuel based on reprocessed uranium and plutonium mixture in thermal reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Y.S.; Bibichev, B.A.; Zilberman, B.Y.; Baryshnikov, M.V.; Kryukov, O.V.; Khaperskaya, A.V.

    2013-07-01

    REMIX fuel consumption in WWER-1000 is considered. REMIX fuel is fabricated from non-separated mixture of uranium and plutonium obtained during NPP spent fuel reprocessing with further makeup by enriched natural uranium. It makes possible to recycle several times the total amount of uranium and plutonium obtained from spent fuel with 100% loading of the WWER-1000 core. The stored SNF could be also involved in REMIX fuel cycle by enrichment of regenerated uranium. The same approach could be applied to closing the fuel cycle of CANDU reactors. (authors)

  16. Spontaneous Ignition Characteristics of Hydrocarbon Fuel-air Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, A. H.; Freeman, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Although the subject of spontaneous ignition of liquid fuels has received considerable attention in the past, the role of fuel evaporation in the overall spontaneous ignition process is still unclear. A main purpose of this research is to carry out measurements of ignition delay times, using fuels of current and anticipated future aeronautical interest, at test conditions that are representative of those encountered in modern gas turbine engines. Attention is focused on the fuel injection process, in particlar the measurement and control of man fuel drop size and fuel-air spatial distribution. The experiments are designed to provide accurate information on the role of fuel evaporation processes in determining the overall ignition delay time. The second objective is to examine in detail the theoretical aspects of spontaneous ignition in order to improve upon current knowledge and understanding of the basic processes involved, so that the results of the investigation can find general and widespead application.

  17. Sensor for measuring alcohol content of alcohol/gasoline fuel mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.J.; Swarin, S.J.; Sultan, M.F.; Lambert, D.K.; Jack, M.D.

    1993-08-31

    A sensing device is described for determining the alcohol content of an alcohol/gasoline mixture comprising: a light source emitting a light beam containing at least a first and a second wavelengths within the near-infrared spectrum, said light beam being transmitted through the alcohol/gasoline fuel mixture; means for switching the current through said light source between at least two fixed values, so as to correspondingly switch the light intensity at said first and second wavelengths which is emitted by said light source; first and second detectors which are disposed so as to receive said emitted light beam after its transmission through the alcohol/gasoline fuel mixture, said first detector determines a first amount of absorption by the alcohol/gasoline fuel mixture at said first wavelength for each of said fixed values of current, and said second detector determines a second amount of absorption by the alcohol/gasoline fuel mixture at said second wavelength for each of said fixed values of current; means for separately measuring the output voltage from said first and second detectors for each of said power settings; and computational means for determining, from said output voltages, the ratio of said first and second absorbances by the alcohol/gasoline fuel mixture at said first and said second wavelengths for each of said fixed values of current such that said ratio of absorbances provide an output indicative of the alcohol content within the alcohol/gasoline mixture.

  18. Preparation and Fuel Properties of Mixtures of Soybean Oil Methyl and Ethyl Esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean oil was transesterified using various mixtures of methanol and ethanol at a constant molar ratio of alcohol to oil of 12:1 in the presence of 1 wt% potassium hydroxide catalyst at 30 degrees C for 60 min. The effect of mixtures of methanol and ethanol on percentage yields and fuel propertie...

  19. Air blast and heat radiation from fuel-rich mixture detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorofeev, S. B.; Sidorov, V. P.; Kuznetsov, M. S.; Dvoinishnikov, A. E.; Alekseev, V. I.; Efimenko, A. A.

    1996-06-01

    Large scale experiments were carried out to study the effect fuel concentration on air blast parameters and heart radiation from gaseous detonations. Hemispheric plastic envelope (4 meters in radius) was used with propane-air mixtures containing from 4 to 7 vol. % of fuel. The expressions for overpressures and impulses were determined in Sachs variables. The effect of fuel concentration on blast parameters is shown to be insignificant for the same amount of oxygen in the mixture volume. Thus the blast wave parameters can be described as for stoichiometric mixtures using additional scaling for the explosion energy according to oxygen content (cloud volume). The results of large scale experiments with fuel spray clouds containing 0.16-100 tons of fuel with mean concentration from stoichiometric ( C 0) up to 3 C 0 are reconsidered. These results confirm the proposed scaling of air blast parameters for a wide range of fuel types, cloud volumes and fuel concentrations. Detonations of fuel rich gaseous mixtures result in a strong heat radiation. Heat radiation energy, time and size of the fireball formed are studied as a function of fuel concentration.

  20. The influence of oxygen concentration on the combustion of a fuel/oxidizer mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Biteau, H.; Fuentes, A.; Marlair, G.; Torero, J.L.

    2010-04-15

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the influence of the O{sub 2} concentration on the combustion behaviour of a fuel/oxidizer mixture. The material tested is a ternary mixture of lactose, starch, and potassium nitrate, which has already been used in an attempt to estimate heat release rate using the FM-Global Fire Propagation Apparatus. It provides a well-controlled combustion chamber to study the evolution of the combustion products when varying the O{sub 2} concentration, between air and low oxidizer conditions. Different chemical behaviours have been exhibited. When the O{sub 2} concentration was reduced beyond 18%, large variations were observed in the CO{sub 2} and CO concentrations. This critical O{sub 2} concentration seems to be the limit before which the material only uses its own oxidizer to react. On the other hand, mass loss did not highlight this change in chemical reactions and remained similar whatever the test conditions. This presumes that the oxidation of CO into CO{sub 2} are due to reactions occurring in the gas phase especially for large O{sub 2} concentrations. This actual behaviour can be verified using a simplified flammability limit model adapted for the current work. Finally, a sensitivity analysis has been carried out to underline the influence of CO concentration in the evaluation of heat release rate using typical calorimetric methods. The results of this study provide a critical basis for the investigation of the combustion of a fuel/oxidizer mixture and for the validation of future numerical models. (author)

  1. Compression-ignition engine performance with undoped and doped fuel oils and alcohol mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Charles S; Foster, Hampton H

    1939-01-01

    Several fuel oils, doped fuel oils, and mixtures of alcohol and fuel oil were tested in a high-speed, single-cylinder, compression-ignition engine to determine power output, fuel consumption, and ignition and combustion characteristics. Fuel oils or doped fuel oils of high octane number had shorter ignition lags, lower rates of pressure rise, and gave smoother engine operation than fuel oils or doped fuel oils of low octane number. Higher engine rotative speeds and boost pressures resulted in smoother engine operation and permitted the use of fuel oils of relatively low octane number. Although the addition of a dope to a fuel oil decreased the ignition lag and the rate of pressure rise, the ensuing rate of combustion was somewhat slower than for the undoped fuel oil so that the effectiveness of combustion was practically unchanged. Alcohol used as an auxiliary fuel, either as a mixture or by separate injection, increased the rates of pressure rise and induced roughness. In general, the power output decreased as the proportion of alcohol increased and, below maximum power, varied with the heating value of the total fuel charge.

  2. Testing to determine chemical stability, handling characteristics, and reactivity of energetic-fuel mixtures: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lackey, M.E.

    1988-04-01

    The US Army generates approximately 2.5 million pounds of waste explosives each year as a result of explosives production and the loading of ordnance. In addition, the US Army currently stores >200,000 tons of obsolete munitions. The current alternative to storage is open-air burning, open-air detonation, or incineration. The US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency is currently developing methods and procedures for the utilization of energetic materials blended with fuel oil as supplemental fuel in Army industrial combustors. A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the chemical compatibility, reactivity, and handling characteristics of energetic-fuel mixtures. The energetics studied were TNT, RDX, and Composition B. Results indicated that under specific conditions of energetic content, energetic/fuel oil preparation, and system design, energetic/fuel oil mixtures can successfully be used as supplemental fuel in Army industrial combustors. 9 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Performance of Pentaborane, Pentaborane - JP-4 Fuel Mixtures, and Trimethylborate Azeotrope Fuel in a Full-scale Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breitwiesser, Roland; Useller, James W.

    1956-01-01

    This report summarizes the full-scale engine tests of pentaborane, pentaborane - JP-4 fuel mixtures, and trimethylborate azeotrope fuel. The tests were conducted in a full-scale turbojet engine at a simulated altitude of 50,000 feet and Mach number of 0.08. Engine speeds were 90 to 100 percent of rated speed. Pentaborane reduced the the specific fuel consumption to two-thirds that of JP-4 fuel. However, because boron oxide collected in the engine, the performance deteriorated with continued operation of pentaborane in each of the short-duration tests reported.

  4. Suppression of turbulent energy cascade due to phase separation in homogenous binary mixture fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Youhei; Okamoto, Sachiya

    2015-11-01

    When a multi-component fluid mixture becomes themophysically unstable state by quenching from well-melting condition, phase separation due to spinodal decomposition occurs, and a self-organized structure is formed. During phase separation, free energy is consumed for the structure formation. In our previous report, the phase separation in homogenous turbulence was numerically simulated and the coarsening process of phase separation was discussed. In this study, we extended our numerical model to a high Schmidt number fluid corresponding to actual polymer solution. The governing equations were continuity, Navier-Stokes, and Chan-Hiliard equations as same as our previous report. The flow filed was an isotropic homogenous turbulence, and the dimensionless parameters in the Chan-Hilliard equation were estimated based on the thermophysical condition of binary mixture. From the numerical results, it was found that turbulent energy cascade was drastically suppressed in the inertial subrange by phase separation for the high Schmidt number flow. By using the identification of turbulent and phase separation structure, we discussed the relation between total energy balance and the structures formation processes. This study is financially supported by the Grand-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) (No. T26820045) from the Ministry of Education, Cul-ture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  5. The Oxygen Ratio: A Fuel-Independent Measure of Mixture Stoichiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C J; Musculus, M P; Pickett, L M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2003-12-19

    The pollutant-formation characteristics and other properties of a combustion reaction typically depend strongly on the proximity of the mixture to its stoichiometric condition, i.e., the ''mixture stoichiometry.'' A quantitative, widely applicable measure of this mixture property is therefore a critical independent variable in the study of combustion systems. Such a parameter enables the clear separation of mixture stoichiometry effects from other effects (e.g., fuel molecular structure, product temperature, diluent concentration, pressure). The parameter most often used to quantify mixture stoichiometry is the equivalence ratio. Unfortunately, the equivalence ratio fails to properly account for oxygen in oxygenates, i.e., compounds that have oxygen chemically bound within the fuel molecule. This manuscript introduces the oxygen ratio, a parameter that properly characterizes mixture stoichiometry for a broader class of reactants than does the equivalence ratio, including oxygenates. A detailed definition of the oxygen ratio is provided and used to show its relationship to the equivalence ratio. The definition is also used to quantify errors involved when the equivalence ratio is used as a measure of mixture stoichiometry with oxygenates. Proper usage of the oxygen ratio is discussed and the oxygen ratio is used to interpret results in a practical example.

  6. Ways of solving environmental problems while transferring the boilers for burning water-bitumen mixture instead of fuel oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, V. R.; Sosin, D. V.

    2009-03-01

    Information concerning a new kind (for Russia) of liquid fuel, i.e., water-bitumen mixture (orimulsion), is presented. The application of the new fuel instead of the fuel oil at a boiler of a power unit of 350-MW capacity makes it possible to decrease sufficiently the expenditures for fuel while keeping the main environmental indices.

  7. Fuel and lubricant additives from acid treated mixtures of vegetable oil derived amides and esters

    SciTech Connect

    Bonazza, B.R.; Devault, A.N.

    1981-05-26

    Vegetable oils such as corn oil, peanut oil, and soy oil are reacted with polyamines to form a mixture containing amides, imides, half esters, and glycerol with subsequent treatment with a strong acid such as sulfonic acid to produce a product mix that has good detergent properties in fuels and lubricants.

  8. An Experimental Investigation of Hypergolic Ignition Delay of Hydrogen Peroxide with Fuel Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, John A.; Gostowski, Rudy; Chianese, Silvio

    2003-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of decomposition and ignition delay of hydrogen peroxide at concentrations of 80% to 98% with combinations of hydrocarbon fuels, tertiary amines and transition metal chelates will be presented in the proposed paper. The results will be compared to hydrazine ignition delays with hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid mixtures using the same test apparatus.

  9. Chemically authentic surrogate mixture model for the thermophysical properties of a coal-derived liquid fuel

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Huber; E.W. Lemmon; V. Diky; B.L. Smith; T.J. Bruno

    2008-09-15

    We developed a surrogate mixture model to represent the physical properties of a coal-derived liquid fuel using only information obtained from a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the fuel and a recently developed 'advanced distillation curve'. We then predicted the density, speed of sound, and viscosity of the fuel and compared them to limited experimental data. The surrogate contains five components (n-propylcyclohexane, trans-decalin, {alpha}-methyldecalin, bicyclohexane, and n-hexadecane), yet comparisons to limited experimental data demonstrate that the model is able to represent the density, sound speed, and viscosity to within 1, 4, and 5%, respectively. 102 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Chemical Composition of Aerosol Particles Emitted by a Passenger Car Engine Fueled by Ethanol/Gasoline Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrano, J. M.; Gross, D. S.; Dutcher, D. D.; Drayton, M.; Kittelson, D.; McMurry, P.

    2007-12-01

    With concerns of national security, climate change, and human health, many people have called for oil independence for the United States and for the creation of alternative fuels. Ethanol has been widely praised as a viable alternative to petroleum-based fuels, due to the fact that it can be produced locally. A great deal of work has been done to characterize the energy balance of ethanol production versus consumption, but there have been fewer studies of the environmental and health impacts of emissions from combustion of ethanol/gasoline mixtures such as those burned in the modern vehicle fleet. To study the particulate emissions from such fuels, different ethanol/gasoline fuel mixtures with 0, 20, 40, and 85% ethanol were burned in a dynamometer-mounted automobile engine. The engine exhaust was diluted and sampled with two aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometers (TSI 3800 ATOFMS), sampling different particle size ranges (50-500 nm and 150-3000 nm, respectively), to measure size and composition of the emitted aerosol particles. A variety of other aerosol characterization techniques were also employed to determine the size distribution of the aerosol particles, the mass emission rate from the engine, and the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and elemental carbon (EC) in the particle emissions. Here we will focus on results from the ATOFMS, which provides us with a particle size and mass spectra - for both negative and positive ions - for each particle that is sampled. Particles being emitted were found to contain primarily PAHs, elemental carbon (EC), nitrates, and sulfates. Particles were analyzed to investigate trends in particle composition as a function of fuel ethanol content, particle size, and for the types of particles emitted. A trend in particle type as a function of fuel ethanol content was evident in smaller particles, and trends in composition as a function of particle size were visible across the entire size range sampled.

  11. Combustion of hydrogen-based mixtures in gas-fueled reciprocating engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smygalina, A. E.; Zaitchenko, V. M.; Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    The research is devoted to the possibility for application of hydrogen accumulated from renewable energy sources as a fuel for a reciprocating engine, which serves as an electrical generator drive. Hydrogen combustion in the chamber of a reciprocating engine, as a rule, occurs in a detonation mode. In order to obtain less hard modes, the present research proposes the usage of steam additions to hydrogen-air mixture or lean hydrogen-air mixtures. Mathematical simulation is used for investigation of combustion of mentioned mixtures in the combustion chamber of a reciprocating engine with a spark-plug ignition. The comparison of the usage of hydrogen-steam-air mixtures and lean hydrogen-air mixtures as fuels is given. The dependence of arising combustion modes and its quantitative characteristics on hydrogen content in combustible composition is investigated. The analysis of optimal combustion is presented, which is based on the consideration of two parameters: peak pressure in one cycle and the crankshaft angle corresponding to the achievement of the peak pressure.

  12. PEM fuel cell stack performance using dilute hydrogen mixture. Implications on electrochemical engine system performance and design

    SciTech Connect

    Inbody, M.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Tafoya, J.I.

    1996-12-31

    Onboard fuel processing to generate a hydrogen-rich fuel for PEM fuel cells is being considered as an alternative to stored hydrogen fuel for transportation applications. If successful, this approach, contrasted to operating with onboard hydrogen, utilizes the existing fuels infrastructure and provides required vehicle range. One attractive, commercial liquid fuels option is steam reforming of methanol. However, expanding the liquid methanol infrastructure will take both time and capital. Consequently technology is also being developed to utilize existing transportation fuels, such as gasoline or diesel, to power PEM fuel cell systems. Steam reforming of methanol generates a mixture with a dry gas composition of 75% hydrogen and 25% carbon dioxide. Steam reforming, autothermal reforming, and partial oxidation reforming of C{sub 2} and larger hydrocarbons produces a mixture with a more dilute hydrogen concentration (65%-40%) along with carbon dioxide ({approx}20%) and nitrogen ({approx}10%-40%). Performance of PEM fuel cell stacks on these dilute hydrogen mixtures will affect the overall electrochemical engine system design as well as the overall efficiency. The Los Alamos Fuel Cell Stack Test facility was used to access the performance of a PEM Fuel cell stack over the range of gas compositions chosen to replicate anode feeds from various fuel processing options for hydrocarbon and alcohol fuels. The focus of the experiments was on the anode performance with dilute hydrogen mixtures with carbon dioxide and nitrogen diluents. Performance with other anode feed contaminants, such as carbon monoxide, are not reported here.

  13. Thyroid toxicity due to subchronic exposure to a complex mixture of 16 organochlorines, lead, and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wade, Michael G; Parent, Sophie; Finnson, Kenneth W; Foster, Warren; Younglai, Edward; McMahon, Avril; Cyr, Daniel G; Hughes, Claude

    2002-06-01

    The human population in the industrialized world is ubiquitously exposed to complex mixtures of persistent pollutants that contaminate food, water, and air. A large number of these contaminants have been shown to cause significant toxicity to the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in laboratory animal studies, through a variety of mechanisms, although these effects occur at levels of exposure greatly in excess of common human exposure. While many of the mechanisms of thyroid toxicity of these substances are potentially complementary, little is known of the degree of interaction of common persistent contaminants on responses of the HPT axis. To investigate the potential effects of a complex, environmentally relevant mixture on the HPT axis, sexually mature male rats were administered a mixture of 16 common organochlorines (dichlorodiphenoxytrichloroethane [DDT], p,p'-dichlorodiphenoxydichloroethylene [p,p'-DDE], hexachlorobenzene [HCB], tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin [TCDD], polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], methoxychlor, endosulfan, heptachlor, hexachlorocyclohexane, dieldrin, aldrin, mirex, and several chlorinated benzenes, and metal contaminants [lead, cadmium]). The doses of the mixture that were administered were related to minimum risk levels or tolerable daily intakes of these substances, as derived by risk assessment with the 1x, 10x, 100x, and 1000x groups receiving mixture components at doses equivalent to 1x, 10x, 100x, or 1000x the minimum risk level (or tolerable daily intake, reference dose), respectively. After 70 daily treatments by gavage, endpoints related to circulating thyroid hormone (serum thyroxine [T(4)], triiodothyronine [T(3)], thyroid stimulating hormone [TSH], and serum T(3) uptake [T(3)-up]), thyroid gland histomorphology (thyroid follicle cross sectional area, epithelial height, follicle roundness or aspect ratio, colloid/epithelial ratio) and hepatic metabolism of thyroid hormone (UDP-glucuronyl transferase [UGT] and outer

  14. An Experimental Investigation of Hypergolic Ignition Delay of Hydrogen Peroxide with Fuel Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, John A.; Gostowski, Rudy; Chianese, Silvio

    2003-01-01

    An experimental investigation of hypergolicity and ignition delay of fuel mixtures with hydrogen peroxide is presented. Example results of high speed photography and schleiren from drop tests are shown. Also, a discussion of the sensitivity to experimental parameters such as drop size and subsequent uncertainty considerations of ignition delay results is presented. It is shown that using the described setup on the mixtures presented, the precision uncertainty is on the order of 6% of average ignition delay and 5% of average decomposition delay. This represents sufficient repeatability for first order discrimination of ignition delay for propellant development and screening. Two mixtures, each using commonly available amines and transition metal compounds, are presented as examples that result in ignition delays on the order of 10 milliseconds.

  15. Detonation propagation through methane-air mixtures with fuel concentration gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, David; Gamezo, Vadim; Oran, Elaine

    2010-11-01

    The complex structure of a multidimensional detonation front consists of constantly changing, multiply intersecting incident shocks and Mach stems followed by growing and shrinking regions of reacted and unreacted gases. Because these flow structures change in time, the energy release in the shocked and compressed gases varies in space and time. Trajectories of triple points formed at shock intersections create cellular patterns whose size and structure are characteristic of the particular material and the background condition. In high-activation-energy fuel-air mixtures, such as methane in air, cellular patterns are relatively large, very irregular, and have complex and changing substructures. Here we use numerical simulations to study the behavior of detonations propagating through methane-air mixtures with a spatial gradient of fuel concentration. When the mixture stoichiometry varies from stoichiometric, the detonation propagation speed slows and sizes of cellular structures grow. In partially premixed systems with a nonuniform concentration of fuel -- a condition that can occur, for example, naturally in sealed underground coal mine tunnels -- both the propagation speed and the characteristic detonation cell size vary spatially.

  16. Heat transfer correlations for kerosene fuels and mixtures and physical properties for Jet A fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, G. H.; Faith, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    Heat transfer correlations are reported for conventional Jet A fuel for both laminar and turbulent flow in circular tubes. Correlations were developed for cooling in turbine engines, but have broader applications in petroleum and chemical processing, and other industrial applications.

  17. The Effects of Engine Speed and Mixture Temperature on the Knocking Characteristics of Several Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1940-01-01

    Six 100-octane and two 87-octane aviation engine fuels were tested in a modified C.F.R. variable-compression engine at 1,500, 2,000 and 2,500 rpm. The mixture temperature was raised from 50 to 300 F in approximately 50 degree steps and, at each temperature, the compression ratio was adjusted to give incipient knock as shown by a cathode ray indicator. The results are presented in tabular form. The results are analyzed on the assumption that the conditions which determine whether a given fuel will knock are the maximum values of density and temperature reached by the burning gases. A maximum permissible density factor, proportional to the maximum density of the burning gases just prior to incipient knock, and the temperature of the burning gases at that time were computed for each of the test conditions. Values of the density factors were plotted against the corresponding end-gas temperatures for the three engine speeds and also against engine speed for several and end-gas temperatures. The maximum permissible density factor varied only slightly with engine speed but decreased rapidly with an increase in the end-gas temperature. The effect of changing the mixture temperature was different for fuels of different types. The results emphasize the desirability of determining the anti knock values of fuels over a wide range of engine and intake-air conditions rather that at a single set of conditions.

  18. Effects of two diesel fuel mixtures on fecal coliform bacteria densities

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, J.M.; Scott, G.I.

    1989-03-01

    One of the major potential environmental impacts from synthetic fuel production plants and conventional petroleum refinement operations is the spillage of the refined product into natural waters. Impacts upon aquatic ecosystems resulting from spills of synthetic fuel would likely be different from those associated with conventional petroleum since products extracted from coal or shale are generally richer in phenolics, aromatic amines and other soluble organic compounds. Also, synfuels have higher water solubilities than equivalent petroleum products giving the potential for higher water concentrations of hydrocarbons. This study tested the effects of the water soluble fractions (WSFs) of a shale diesel fuel mixture (SDFM) and a petroleum diesel fuel mixture (PDFM) on the growth of fecal coliform bacteria, the group used almost universally as an indicator of bacteriological water quality. The WSF was tested instead of whole oil because acute toxicity results primarily from this fraction. A wild group of fecal coliform bacteria was used since the objective was to observe effects upon this indicator group encountered in the environment instead of pure laboratory cultures by the routine ambient monitoring and measurement technique of membrane filter colony counts as employed by most water quality management agencies.

  19. Performance of an internal reforming molten carbonate fuel cell supplied with ethanol/water mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Freni, S.; Maggio, G.; Barone, F.

    1996-12-31

    The state of an on the field of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) systems covers many technological aspects related to the use of these systems for the production of electricity. In this respect, extensive research efforts have been made to develop a technology using the methane based on the steam reforming process, and different configurations have been analyzed and their performance determined for several operative cell conditions. However, the operative temperature (T-923 K) of the MCFC. that allows the direct conversion of hydrocarbons or alcohols into H{sub 2} and CO, promotes researches in the field of alternative fuels, more easily transported and reformed compared to methane. In this paper are described the most indicative results obtained by a study that considers the use of water/ethanol mixture as an attractive alternative to the methane for a molten carbonate fuel cell.

  20. Unsteady Extinction of Opposed Jet Ethylene/Methane HIFiRE Surrogate Fuel Mixtures vs Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaden, Sarah N.; Debes, Rachel L.; Lash, E. Lara; Burk, Rachel S.; Boyd, C. Merritt; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Pellett, Gerald L.

    2009-01-01

    A unique idealized study of the subject fuel vs. air systems was conducted using an Oscillatory-input Opposed Jet Burner (OOJB) system and a newly refined analysis. Extensive dynamic-extinction measurements were obtained on unanchored (free-floating) laminar Counter Flow Diffusion Flames (CFDFs) at 1-atm, stabilized by steady input velocities (e.g., U(sub air)) and perturbed by superimposed in-phase sinusoidal velocity inputs at fuel and air nozzle exits. Ethylene (C2H4) and methane (CH4), and intermediate 64/36 and 15/85 molar percent mixtures were studied. The latter gaseous surrogates were chosen earlier to mimic ignition and respective steady Flame Strengths (FS = U(sub air)) of vaporized and cracked, and un-cracked, JP-7 "like" kerosene for a Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) scramjet. For steady idealized flameholding, the 100% C2H4 flame is respectively approx. 1.3 and approx.2.7 times stronger than a 64/36 mix and CH4; but is still 12.0 times weaker than a 100% H2-air flame. Limited Hot-Wire (HW) measurements of velocity oscillations at convergent-nozzle exits, and more extensive Probe Microphone (PM) measurements of acoustic pressures, were used to normalize Dynamic FSs, which decayed linearly with pk/pk U(sub air) (velocity magnitude, HW), and also pk/pk P (pressure magnitude, PM). Thus Dynamic Flame Weakening (DFW) is defined as % decrease in FS per Pascal of pk/pk P oscillation, namely, DFW = -100 d(U(sub air)/U(sub air),0Hz)/d(pkpk P). Key findings are: (1) Ethylene flames are uniquely strong and resilient to extinction by oscillating inflows below 150 Hz; (2) Methane flames are uniquely weak; (3) Ethylene / methane surrogate flames are disproportionately strong with respect to ethylene content; and (4) Flame weakening is consistent with limited published results on forced unsteady CFDFs. Thus from 0 to approx. 10 Hz and slightly higher, lagging diffusive responses of key species led to progressive phase lags (relative

  1. Evaluation of lower flammability limits of fuel-air-diluent mixtures using calculated adiabatic flame temperatures.

    PubMed

    Vidal, M; Wong, W; Rogers, W J; Mannan, M S

    2006-03-17

    The lower flammability limit (LFL) of a fuel is the minimum composition in air over which a flame can propagate. Calculated adiabatic flame temperatures (CAFT) are a powerful tool to estimate the LFL of gas mixtures. Different CAFT values are used for the estimation of LFL. SuperChems is used by industry to perform flammability calculations under different initial conditions which depends on the selection of a threshold temperature. In this work, the CAFT at the LFL is suggested for mixtures of fuel-air and fuel-air-diluents. These CAFT can be used as the threshold values in SuperChems to calculate the LFL. This paper discusses an approach to evaluate the LFL in the presence of diluents such as N2 and CO2 by an algebraic method and by the application of SuperChems using CAFT as the basis of the calculations. The CAFT for different paraffinic and unsaturated hydrocarbons are presented as well as an average value per family of chemicals. PMID:16309829

  2. Catalytic and electrochemical behaviour of solid oxide fuel cell operated with simulated-biogas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang-Long, T.; Quang-Tuyen, T.; Shiratori, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Being produced from organic matters of wastes (bio-wastes) through a fermentation process, biogas mainly composed of CH4 and CO2 and can be considered as a secondary energy carrier derived from solar energy. To generate electricity from biogas through the electrochemical process in fuel cells is a state-of-the-art technology possessing higher energy conversion efficiency without harmful emissions compared to combustion process in heat engines. Getting benefits from high operating temperature such as direct internal reforming ability and activation of electrochemical reactions to increase overall system efficiency, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system operated with biogas becomes a promising candidate for distributed power generator for rural applications leading to reductions of environmental issues caused by greenhouse effects and bio-wastes. CO2 reforming of CH4 and electrochemical oxidation of the produced syngas (H2-CO mixture) are two main reaction processes within porous anode material of SOFC. Here catalytic and electrochemical behavior of Ni-ScSZ (scandia stabilized-zirconia) anode in the feed of CH4-CO2 mixtures as simulated-biogas at 800 °C were evaluated. The results showed that CO2 had strong influences on both reaction processes. The increase in CO2 partial pressure resulted in the decrease in anode overvoltage, although open-circuit voltage was dropped. Besides that, the simulation result based on a power-law model for equimolar CH4-CO2 mixture revealed that coking hazard could be suppressed along the fuel flow channel in both open-circuit and closed-circuit conditions.

  3. Theoretical rocket performance of JP-4 fuel with mixtures of liquid ozone and fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Vearl N; Gordon, Sanford

    1957-01-01

    Data were estimated by means of a heat correction equation using data for JP-4 fuel with mixtures of oxygen and flourine. The estimated data were checked for several cases by direct calculations. The difference in specific impulse between the estimated and directly calculated values was from 0.2 to 0.8 pound-second per pound. The maximum value of specific impulse was 334.9 pound-seconds per pound for a combustion-chamber pressure of 600 pounds per square inch absolute and an exit pressure of 1 atmosphere.

  4. Reductions in aircraft particulate emissions due to the use of Fischer-Tropsch fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Timko, M. T.; Ziemba, L. D.; Bulzan, D.; Corporan, E.; Herndon, S. C.; Howard, R.; Miake-Lye, R.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Wey, C.; Yu, Z.; Anderson, B. E.

    2013-06-01

    The use of alternative fuels for aviation is likely to increase due to concerns over fuel security, price stability and the sustainability of fuel sources. Concurrent reductions in particulate emissions from these alternative fuels are expected because of changes in fuel composition including reduced sulfur and aromatic content. The NASA Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX) was conducted in January-February 2009 to investigate the effects of synthetic fuels on gas-phase and particulate emissions. Standard petroleum JP-8 fuel, pure synthetic fuels produced from natural gas and coal feedstocks using the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process, and 50% blends of both fuels were tested in the CFM-56 engines on a DC-8 aircraft. To examine plume chemistry and particle evolution with time, samples were drawn from inlet probes positioned 1, 30, and 145 m downstream of the aircraft engines. No significant alteration to engine performance was measured when burning the alternative fuels. However, leaks in the aircraft fuel system were detected when operated with the pure FT fuels as a result of the absence of aromatic compounds in the fuel. Dramatic reductions in soot emissions were measured for both the pure FT fuels (reductions of 84% averaged over all powers) and blended fuels (64%) relative to the JP-8 baseline with the largest reductions at idle conditions. The alternative fuels also produced smaller soot (e.g. at 85% power, volume mean diameters were reduced from 78 nm for JP-8 to 51 nm for the FT fuel), which may reduce their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The reductions in particulate emissions are expected for all alternative fuels with similar reductions in fuel sulfur and aromatic content regardless of the feedstock. As the plume cools downwind of the engine, nucleation-mode aerosols form. For the pure FT fuels, reductions (94% averaged over all powers) in downwind particle number emissions were similar to those measured at the exhaust plane (84

  5. Performance of winter rape (Brassica napus) based fuel mixtures in diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, G.L.; Peterson, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    Winter rape is well adapted to the Palouse region of Northern Idaho and Eastern Washington. Nearly all of the current US production is grown in this region. Yields of 2200 to 2700 kg/ha with 45 percent oil content are common. Even though present production only 2000 to 2500 ha per year, the long history of production and good yields of oil make winter rape the best potential fuel vegetable oil crop for the region. Winter rape oil is more viscous than sunflower oil (50 cSt at 40/sup 0/C for winter rape and 35 cSt at 40/sup 0/C for sunflower oil) and about 17 times more viscous than diesel. The viscosity of the pure oil has been found too high for operation in typical diesel injector systems. Mixtures and/or additives are essential if the oil is to be a satisfactory fuel. Conversely, the fatty acid composition of witer rape oils is such that it is potentially a more favorable fuel because of reduced rates of oxidation and thermal polymerization. This paper will report on results of short and long term engine tests using winter rape, diesel, and commercial additives as the components. Selection of mixtures for long term screening tests was based on laboratory studies which included high temperature oxidation studies and temperature-viscosity data. Fuel temperature has been monitored at the outlet of the injector nozzle on operating engines so that viscosity comparisons at the actual injector temperature can be made. 1 figure, 3 tables.

  6. A Method for Microscale Combustion of Near Stoichiometric Energy Dense Liquid Fuel Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolmachoff, E. D.; Allmon, W. R.; Waits, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports on the potential of a heterogeneous/homogeneous (HH) reactor for use as a fuel-flexible heat source, meeting the needs of the next generation of high temperature thermal-to-electric (TEC) portable power converters. In this class of reactor, low activation energy catalytic reactions provide a means to stabilize high activation energy homogeneous reactions. Diffusion limited surface reactions play a critical role in HH reactor operation. Surface conversion must be sufficiently fast to generate the high temperatures (~1000 K) necessary to initiate gas phase reactions. Therefore, fuel diffusivity and the reactor dimension are important parameters in governing HH reactor operation. We examine the performance of an HH reactor fuelled by propane and n-dodecane, representing two extremes of liquid hydrocarbon diffusivity, as a function of confining reactor dimension. Unburned fuel/air mixtures are close to stoichiometric, which is an important factor in minimizing the amount of excess air and, therefore, balance of plant energy costs. At moderate levels of confinement, the reactor is capable producing high, uniform temperatures for both fuels.

  7. INITIAL ANALYSIS OF TRANSIENT POWER TIME LAG DUE TO HETEROGENEITY WITHIN THE TREAT FUEL MATRIX.

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Wachs; A.X. Zabriskie, W.R. Marcum

    2014-06-01

    The topic Nuclear Safety encompasses a broad spectrum of focal areas within the nuclear industry; one specific aspect centers on the performance and integrity of nuclear fuel during a reactivity insertion accident (RIA). This specific accident has proven to be fundamentally difficult to theoretically characterize due to the numerous empirically driven characteristics that quantify the fuel and reactor performance. The Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility was designed and operated to better understand fuel behavior under extreme (i.e. accident) conditions; it was shutdown in 1994. Recently, efforts have been underway to commission the TREAT facility to continue testing of advanced accident tolerant fuels (i.e. recently developed fuel concepts). To aid in the restart effort, new simulation tools are being used to investigate the behavior of nuclear fuels during facility’s transient events. This study focuses specifically on the characterizing modeled effects of fuel particles within the fuel matrix of the TREAT. The objective of this study was to (1) identify the impact of modeled heterogeneity within the fuel matrix during a transient event, and (2) demonstrate acceptable modeling processes for the purpose of TREAT safety analyses, specific to fuel matrix and particle size. Hypothetically, a fuel that is dominantly heterogeneous will demonstrate a clearly different temporal heating response to that of a modeled homogeneous fuel. This time difference is a result of the uniqueness of the thermal diffusivity within the fuel particle and fuel matrix. Using MOOSE/BISON to simulate the temperature time-lag effect of fuel particle diameter during a transient event, a comparison of the average graphite moderator temperature surrounding a spherical particle of fuel was made for both types of fuel simulations. This comparison showed that at a given time and with a specific fuel particle diameter, the fuel particle (heterogeneous) simulation and the homogeneous simulation

  8. Increase in ozone due to the use of biodiesel fuel rather than diesel fuel.

    PubMed

    Thang, Phan Quang; Muto, Yusuke; Maeda, Yasuaki; Trung, Nguyen Quang; Itano, Yasuyuki; Takenaka, Norimichi

    2016-09-01

    The consumption of fuel by vehicles emits nitrogen oxides (NOx) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) into the atmosphere, which are important ozone precursors. Ozone is formed as a secondary pollutant via photochemical processes and is not emitted directly into the atmosphere. In this paper, the ozone increase resulting from the use of biodiesel and diesel fuels was investigated, and the different ozone formation trends were experimentally evaluated. Known amounts of exhaust gas from a power generator operated using biodiesel and diesel fuels were added to ambient air. The quality of the ambient air, such as the initial NMHC and NOx concentrations, and the irradiation intensity have an effect on the ozone levels. When 30 cm(3) of biodiesel fuel exhaust gas (BFEG) or diesel fuel exhausted gas (DFEG) was added to 18 dm(3) of ambient air, the highest ratios of ozone increase from BFEG compared with DFEG in Japan and Vietnam were 31.2 and 42.8%, respectively, and the maximum ozone increases resulting from DFEG and BFEG compared with the ambient air in Japan were 17.4 and 26.4 ppb, respectively. The ozone increase resulting from the use of BFEG was large and significant compared to that from DFEG under all experimental conditions. The ozone concentration increased as the amount of added exhaust gas increased. The ozone increase from the Jatropha-BFEG was slightly higher than that from waste cooking oil-BFEG. PMID:27396671

  9. Dip-in Indicators for Visual Differentiation of Fuel Mixtures Based on Wettability of Fluoroalkylchlorosilane-Coated Inverse Opal Films.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, Abootaleb; Qiu, Shuang; Wong, Michael C K; Li, Paul C H

    2015-12-30

    We have developed the dip-in indicator based on the inverse opal film (IOF) for visual differentiation of organic liquid mixtures, such as oil/gasoline or ethanol/gasoline fuel mixtures. The IOF consists of a three-dimensional porous structure with a highly ordered periodic arrangement of nanopores. The specularly reflected light at the interface of the nanopores and silica walls contributes to the structural color of the IOF film. This color disappears when the nanopores are infiltrated by a liquid with a similar refractive index to silica. The disappearance of the structural color provides a means to differentiate various liquid fuel mixtures based on their wettability of the nanopores in the IOF-based indicators. For differentiation of various liquid mixtures, we tune the wettability threshold of the indicator in such a way that it is wetted (color disappears) by one liquid but is not wetted by the other (color remains). Although colorimetric differentiation of liquids based on IOF wettability has been reported, differentiation of highly similar liquid mixtures require complicated readout approaches. It is known that the IOF wettability is controlled by multiple surface properties (e.g., oleophobicity) and structural properties (e.g., neck angle and film thickness) of the nanostructure. Therefore, we aim to exploit the combined tuning of these properties for differentiation of fuel mixtures with close compositions. In this study, we have demonstrated that, for the first time, the IOF-based dip-in indicator is able to detect a slight difference in the fuel mixture composition (i.e., 0.4% of oil content). Moreover, the color/no-color differentiation platform is simple, powerful, and easy-to-read. This platform makes the dip-in indicator a promising tool for authentication and determination of fuel composition at the point-of-purchase or point-of-use. PMID:26634404

  10. Analysis of effect of flameholder characteristics on lean, premixed, partially vaporized fuel-air mixtures quality and nitrogen oxides emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, L. P.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis was conducted of the effect of flameholding devices on the precombustion fuel-air characteristics and on oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for combustion of premixed partially vaporized mixtures. The analysis includes the interrelationships of flameholder droplet collection efficiency, reatomization efficiency and blockage, and the initial droplet size distribution and accounts for the contribution of droplet combustion in partially vaporized mixtures to NOx emissions. Application of the analytical procedures is illustrated and parametric predictions of NOx emissions are presented.

  11. Experimental research on the rotating detonation in gaseous fuels-oxygen mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindracki, J.; Wolański, P.; Gut, Z.

    2011-04-01

    An experimental study on rotating detonation is presented in this paper. The study was focused on the possibility of using rotating detonation in a rocket engine. The research was divided into two parts: the first part was devoted to obtaining the initiation of rotating detonation in fuel-oxygen mixture; the second was aimed at determination of the range of propagation stability as a function of chamber pressure, composition, and geometry. Additionally, thrust and specific impulse were determined in the latter stage. In the paper, only rich mixture is described, because using such a composition in rocket combustion chambers maximizes the specific impulse and thrust. In the experiments, two kinds of geometry were examined: cylindrical and cylindrical-conic, the latter can be simulated by a simple aerospike nozzle. Methane, ethane, and propane were used as fuel. The pressure-time courses in the manifolds and in the chamber are presented. The thrust-time profile and detonation velocity calculated from measured pressure peaks are shown. To confirm the performance of a rocket engine with rotating detonation as a high energy gas generator, a model of a simple engine was designed, built, and tested. In the tests, the model of the engine was connected to the dump tank. This solution enables different environmental conditions from a range of flight from 16 km altitude to sea level to be simulated. The obtained specific impulse for pressure in the chamber of max. 1.2 bar and a small nozzle expansion ratio of about 3.5 was close to 1,500 m/s.

  12. Nuclear Criticality Control and Safety of Plutonium-Uranium Fuel Mixtures Outside Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, D; Mennerdahl, D

    2008-06-23

    The ANSI/ANS 8.12 standard was first approved in July 1978. At that time, this edition was applicable to operations with plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel mixtures outside reactors and was limited to subcritical limits for homogeneous systems. The next major revision, ANSI/ANS-8.12-1987, included the addition of subcritical limits for heterogeneous systems. The standard was subsequently reaffirmed in February 1993. During late 1990s, substantial work was done by the ANS 8.12 Standard Working Group to re-examine the technical data presented in the standard using the latest codes and cross section sets. Calculations performed showed good agreement with the values published in the standard. This effort resulted in the reaffirmation of the standard in March 2002. The standard is currently in a maintenance mode. After 2002, activities included discussions to determine the future direction of the standard and to follow the MOX standard development by the International Standard Organization (ISO). In 2007, the Working Group decided to revise the standard to extend the areas of applicability by providing a wider range of subcritical data. The intent is to cover a wider domain of MOX fuel fabrication and operations. It was also decided to follow the ISO MOX standard specifications (related to MOX density and isotopics) and develop a new set of subcritical limits for homogeneous systems. This has resulted in the submittal (and subsequent approval) of the project initiation notification system form (PINS) in 2007.

  13. Reductions in aircraft particulate emissions due to the use of Fischer-Tropsch fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Timko, M. T.; Ziemba, L. D.; Bulzan, D.; Corporan, E.; Herndon, S. C.; Howard, R.; Miake-Lye, R.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Wey, C.; Yu, Z.; Anderson, B. E.

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative fuels for aviation is likely to increase due to concerns over fuel security, price stability, and the sustainability of fuel sources. Concurrent reductions in particulate emissions from these alternative fuels are expected because of changes in fuel composition including reduced sulfur and aromatic content. The NASA Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX) was conducted in January-February 2009 to investigate the effects of synthetic fuels on gas-phase and particulate emissions. Standard petroleum JP-8 fuel, pure synthetic fuels produced from natural gas and coal feedstocks using the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process, and 50% blends of both fuels were tested in the CFM-56 engines on a DC-8 aircraft. To examine plume chemistry and particle evolution with time, samples were drawn from inlet probes positioned 1, 30, and 145 m downstream of the aircraft engines. No significant alteration to engine performance was measured when burning the alternative fuels. However, leaks in the aircraft fuel system were detected when operated with the pure FT fuels as a result of the absence of aromatic compounds in the fuel. Dramatic reductions in soot emissions were measured for both the pure FT fuels (reductions in mass of 86% averaged over all powers) and blended fuels (66%) relative to the JP-8 baseline with the largest reductions at idle conditions. At 7% power, this corresponds to a reduction from 7.6 mg kg-1 for JP-8 to 1.2 mg kg-1 for the natural gas FT fuel. At full power, soot emissions were reduced from 103 to 24 mg kg-1 (JP-8 and natural gas FT, respectively). The alternative fuels also produced smaller soot (e.g., at 85% power, volume mean diameters were reduced from 78 nm for JP-8 to 51 nm for the natural gas FT fuel), which may reduce their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The reductions in particulate emissions are expected for all alternative fuels with similar reductions in fuel sulfur and aromatic content regardless of the

  14. Electrorefining process and apparatus for recovery of uranium and a mixture of uranium and plutonium from spent fuels

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, John P.; Miller, William E.

    1989-01-01

    An electrorefining process and apparatus for the recovery of uranium and a mixture of uranium and plutonium from spent fuel using an electrolytic cell having a lower molten cadmium pool containing spent nuclear fuel, an intermediate electrolyte pool, an anode basket containing spent fuel, and two cathodes, the first cathode composed of either a solid alloy or molten cadmium and the second cathode composed of molten cadmium. Using this cell, additional amounts of uranium and plutonium from the anode basket are dissolved in the lower molten cadmium pool, and then substantially pure uranium is electrolytically transported and deposited on the first alloy or molten cadmium cathode. Subsequently, a mixture of uranium and plutonium is electrotransported and deposited on the second molten cadmium cathode.

  15. Electrorefining process and apparatus for recovery of uranium and a mixture of uranium and plutonium from spent fuels

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, J.P.; Miller, W.E.

    1987-11-05

    An electrorefining process and apparatus for the recovery of uranium and a mixture of uranium and plutonium from spent fuels is disclosed using an electrolytic cell having a lower molten cadmium pool containing spent nuclear fuel, an intermediate electrolyte pool, an anode basket containing spent fuels, two cathodes and electrical power means connected to the anode basket, cathodes and lower molten cadmium pool for providing electrical power to the cell. Using this cell, additional amounts of uranium and plutonium from the anode basket are dissolved in the lower molten cadmium pool, and then purified uranium is electrolytically transported and deposited on a first molten cadmium cathode. Subsequently, a mixture of uranium and plutonium is electrotransported and deposited on a second cathode. 3 figs.

  16. Vibrational and rotational CARS measurements of nitrogen in afterglow of streamer discharge in atmospheric pressure fuel/air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendleton, S. J.; Montello, A.; Carter, C.; Lempert, W.; Gundersen, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The use of nonequilibrium plasma generated by nanosecond discharges to ignite fuel/air mixtures, known as transient plasma ignition (TPI), has been shown to effectively reduce ignition delay and improve engine performance relative to spark ignition for combustion engines. While this method is potentially useful for many engine applications, at present the underlying physics are poorly understood. This work uses coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) to measure the rotational and vibrational excitation of nitrogen molecules in the discharge afterglow in a variety of fuel/air mixtures outside the limits of combustion in order to elucidate the thermal behaviour of TPI. The time evolution of relative populations of vibrationally excited states of nitrogen in the electronic ground state are reported for each gas mixture; it is shown that generation of these vibrationally excited states is inefficient during the discharge in air but that generation occurs at a high rate roughly 5 µs following the discharge; with the addition of fuels vibrationally excited states are observed during the discharge but an increase in population is still seen at 5 µs. Possible mechanisms for this behaviour are discussed. In addition, rotational temperature increases of at least 500 K are reported for all gas mixtures. The effect of this temperature increase on ignition, reaction rates, and thermal energy pathways are discussed.

  17. Preliminary evaluation of instruments for on-line characterization of coal-oil mixture fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, M. P.; Ekmann, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Results of recent tests on coal-oil mixtures (COM) indicate that on-line continuous monitoring of key parameters - mass flow, coal content, and viscosity - is possible. Availability of this instrumentation can enhance the operation of control systems for COM preparation and combustion. Accurate measurement of density or coal content in COM is needed to monitor the reproducibility of preparation processes. Accurate mass flow measurements, coupled with data on the coal content, can be used to determine the instantaneous Btu input to a burner. Atomization characteristics, partly dependent on the fluid viscosity, can be adjusted using on-line viscometers linked to the fuel preheater. A number on-line instruments to measure mass flow, coal content or density, and viscosity in a flow system are examined. Instruments under study include a Micro Motion mass flow meter, which uses the Coriolis force exerted by a fluid flowing through a U-tube; n instrument manufactured by Aurburn International, Inc., which relies on the dielectric properties of COM to determine coal content: and a Brookfield on-line concentric cylinder viscometer.

  18. Disease burden due to biomass cooking-fuel-related household air pollution among women in India

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Meena; Rizwan, Suliankatchi Abdulkader; Krishnan, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Background Household air pollution (HAP) due to biomass cooking fuel use is an important risk factor for a range of diseases, especially among adult women who are primary cooks, in India. About 80% of rural households in India use biomass fuel for cooking. The aim of this study is to estimate the attributable cases (AC) for four major diseases/conditions associated with biomass cooking fuel use among adult Indian women. Methods We used the population attributable fraction (PAF) method to calculate the AC of chronic bronchitis, tuberculosis (TB), cataract, and stillbirths due to exposure to biomass cooking fuel. A number of data sources were accessed to obtain population totals and disease prevalence rates. A meta-analysis was conducted to obtain adjusted pooled odds ratios (ORs) for strength of association. Using this, PAF and AC were calculated using a standard formula. Results were presented as number of AC and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results The fixed effects pooled OR obtained from the meta-analysis were 2.37 (95% CI: 1.59, 3.54) for chronic bronchitis, 2.33 (1.65, 3.28) for TB, 2.16 (1.42, 3.26) for cataract, and 1.26 (1.12, 1.43) for stillbirths. PAF varied across conditions being maximum (53%) for chronic bronchitis in rural areas and least (1%) for cataract in older age and urban areas. About 2.4 (95% CI: 1.4, 3.1) of 5.6 m cases of chronic bronchitis, 0.3 (0.2, 0.4) of 0.76 m cases of TB, 5.0 (2.8, 6.7) of 51.4 m cases of cataract among adult Indian women and 0.02 (0.01, 0.03) of 0.15 m stillbirths across India are attributable to HAP due to biomass cooking fuel. These estimates should be cautiously interpreted in the light of limitations discussed which relate to exposure assessment, exposure characterization, and age-specific prevalence of disease. Conclusions HAP due to biomass fuel has diverse and major impacts on women’s health in India. Although challenging, incorporating the agenda of universal clean fuel access or cleaner technology within

  19. 10 CFR 503.38 - Permanent exemption for certain fuel mixtures containing natural gas or petroleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... alternate power supply exists, as required under § 503.8 of these regulations. (b) Evidence required in... these regulations. (c) Solar mixtures. OFE will grant a permanent mixtures exemption for the use of a mixture of solar energy (including wind, tide, and other intermittent sources) and petroleum or...

  20. 10 CFR 503.38 - Permanent exemption for certain fuel mixtures containing natural gas or petroleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... alternate power supply exists, as required under § 503.8 of these regulations. (b) Evidence required in... these regulations. (c) Solar mixtures. OFE will grant a permanent mixtures exemption for the use of a mixture of solar energy (including wind, tide, and other intermittent sources) and petroleum or...

  1. 10 CFR 503.38 - Permanent exemption for certain fuel mixtures containing natural gas or petroleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... alternate power supply exists, as required under § 503.8 of these regulations. (b) Evidence required in... these regulations. (c) Solar mixtures. OFE will grant a permanent mixtures exemption for the use of a mixture of solar energy (including wind, tide, and other intermittent sources) and petroleum or...

  2. 10 CFR 503.38 - Permanent exemption for certain fuel mixtures containing natural gas or petroleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... alternate power supply exists, as required under § 503.8 of these regulations. (b) Evidence required in... these regulations. (c) Solar mixtures. OFE will grant a permanent mixtures exemption for the use of a mixture of solar energy (including wind, tide, and other intermittent sources) and petroleum or...

  3. 10 CFR 503.38 - Permanent exemption for certain fuel mixtures containing natural gas or petroleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... alternate power supply exists, as required under § 503.8 of these regulations. (b) Evidence required in... these regulations. (c) Solar mixtures. OFE will grant a permanent mixtures exemption for the use of a mixture of solar energy (including wind, tide, and other intermittent sources) and petroleum or...

  4. Method and apparatus for determining the proportions of the constituents of the air-fuel mixture supplied to an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, C.

    1980-11-04

    A method and apparatus are described for determining the proportions of the air-fuel mixture constituents supplied to an internal combustion engine from a mixture preparing device such as a carburator, a fuel injection device or other suitable mixture preparing device. The method according to the invention serves to simplify the processing of output signals that are supplied to a mixture preparing device having at least two lambda sensors. The invention is especially suitable for use with large engines with several exhaust conduit systems, such as so-called v-engines, in which generally there is an unequal mixture distribution between the two rows of cylinders. By employing at least two lambda sensors in the exhaust gas conduit system for monitoring the exhaust gas composition, one succeeds in determining the mixture composition of the air-fuel mixture applied to all cylinders, and in influencing the air-fuel mixture in a suitable supplementary manner by a feed back of the actual value signals generated by the lambda sensors to the fuel preparation device, so that a desirable overall exhaust gas average value can be achieved. The apparatus employs two integrators and suitable logic circuitry for applying the lambda sensor signals to the integrators in such a manner that one integrator regulates the entire mixture in the desired direction, according to the sensor signals supplied to it, while the other integrator sets the amplitude of the oscillation fluctuations at a value that corresponds to the lambda differential.

  5. Experimental investigation of homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion of biodiesel fuel with external mixture formation in a CI engine.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, D; Nagarajan, G; Ganesan, S

    2014-01-01

    In parallel to the interest in renewable fuels, there has also been increased interest in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion. HCCI engines are being actively developed because they have the potential to be highly efficient and to produce low emissions. Even though HCCI has been researched extensively, few challenges still exist. These include controlling the combustion at higher loads and the formation of a homogeneous mixture. To obtain better homogeneity, in the present investigation external mixture formation method was adopted, in which the fuel vaporiser was used to achieve excellent HCCI combustion in a single cylinder air-cooled direct injection diesel engine. In continuation of our previous works, in the current study a vaporised jatropha methyl ester (JME) was mixed with air to form a homogeneous mixture and inducted into the cylinder during the intake stroke to analyze the combustion, emission and performance characteristics. To control the early ignition of JME vapor-air mixture, cooled (30 °C) Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technique was adopted. The experimental result shows 81% reduction in NOx and 72% reduction in smoke emission. PMID:24383396

  6. Fuel mixture stratification as a method for improving homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operation

    DOEpatents

    Dec, John E.; Sjoberg, Carl-Magnus G.

    2006-10-31

    A method for slowing the heat-release rate in homogeneous charge compression ignition ("HCCI") engines that allows operation without excessive knock at higher engine loads than are possible with conventional HCCI. This method comprises injecting a fuel charge in a manner that creates a stratified fuel charge in the engine cylinder to provide a range of fuel concentrations in the in-cylinder gases (typically with enough oxygen for complete combustion) using a fuel with two-stage ignition fuel having appropriate cool-flame chemistry so that regions of different fuel concentrations autoignite sequentially.

  7. Preparation and Fuel Properties of Mixtures of Soybean Oil Methyl and Ethyl Esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean oil was transesterified using methanol, ethanol, and various mixtures of methanol and ethanol at a constant mole ratio of alcohol to oil of 12:1 in the presence of 1 wt % potassium hydroxide (KOH) catalyst at 30 deg C for 60 minutes. The effect of mixtures of methanol and ethanol on percent...

  8. Thermodynamic substantiation of the existence of a phase transition point with a change in the structure of the solid-fuel mixture glycidyl azide Polymer/RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futko, S. I.

    2012-09-01

    With the help of thermodynamic calculations for a wide range of solid-fuel mixtures glycidyl azide polymer (GAP)/RDX with a component ratio from 100% GAP/0% RDX to 0% GAP/100% RDX we have found a structural transition point corresponding to a mixture of 60.8 mass % of RDX in GAP at which a sharp change in the trend of thermodynamic combustion characteristics of these mixtures occurs. The given point is determined from the condition of equality of molar fractions of C and O atoms in the above mixtures. It is pressure-independent, corresponds to the minimum point on the curve of the rate of combustion of the mixture as a function of its composition and to the structural change in the solid-fuel mixture GAP/RDX from amorphous to polycrystalline, and is a phase transition point.

  9. Degradation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells due to CO and CO 2 poisoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei-Mon; Chu, Hsin-Sen; Lu, Meng-Xi; Weng, Fang-Bor; Jung, Guo-Bin; Lee, Chi-Yuan

    The CO and CO 2 poisoning effects on the degradation of cell performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) under transient stage were investigated. The mechanism of CO poisoning lies in the preferential adsorbing of CO to the platinum surface and the blocking of active sites of hydrogen. These phenomena were described with adsorption, desorption, and electro-oxidation processes of CO and hydrogen in the present work. In addition, it is well known that the reverse water gas shift reaction (RWGS) is the main effect of the CO 2 poisoning, through which a large part of the catalytic surface area becomes inactive due to the hydrogen dissociation. The predicted results showed that, by contaminating the fuel with 10 ppm CO at the condition of P H = 0.8 atm and PCO2 = 0.2 atm , the current density of the PEM fuel cell was lowered 28% with rate constant of RWGS k rs from zero to 0.02. With 50 ppm CO, the performance drop was only 18%. For the reformed gas, CO 2 poisoning became much more significantly when the CO content in the reactant gas was small.

  10. An experimental study of the autoignition characteristics of conventional jet fuel/oxidizer mixtures: Jet-A and JP-8

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Kamal; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2010-04-15

    Ignition delay times of Jet-A/oxidizer and JP-8/oxidizer mixtures are measured using a heated rapid compression machine at compressed charge pressures corresponding to 7, 15, and 30 bar, compressed temperatures ranging from 650 to 1100 K, and equivalence ratios varying from 0.42 to 2.26. When using air as the oxidant, two oxidizer-to-fuel mass ratios of 13 and 19 are investigated. To achieve higher compressed temperatures for fuel lean mixtures (equivalence ratio of {proportional_to}0.42), argon dilution is also used and the corresponding oxidizer-to-fuel mass ratio is 84.9. For the conditions studied, experimental results show two-stage ignition characteristics for both Jet-A and JP-8. Variations of both the first-stage and overall ignition delays with compressed temperature, compressed pressure, and equivalence ratio are reported and correlated. It is noted that the negative temperature coefficient phenomenon becomes more prominent at relatively lower pressures. Furthermore, the first-stage-ignition delay is found to be less sensitive to changes in equivalence ratio and primarily dependent on temperature. (author)

  11. Ignition of lean fuel-air mixtures in a premixing-prevaporizing duct at temperatures up to 1000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    Conditions were determined in a premixing prevaporizing fuel preparation duct at which ignition occurred. An air blast type fuel injector with nineteen fuel injection points was used to provide a uniform spatial fuel air mixture. The range of inlet conditions where ignition occurred were: inlet air temperatures of 600 to 1000 K air pressures of 180 to 660 kPa, equivalence ratios (fuel air ratio divided by stoichiometric fuel air ratio) from 0.12 to 1.05, and velocities from 3.5 to 30 m/s. The duct was insulated and the diameter was 12 cm. Mixing lengths were varied from 16.5 to 47.6 and residence times ranged from 4.6 to 107 ms. The fuel was no. 2 diesel. Results show a strong effect of equivalence ratio, pressure and temperature on the conditions where ignition occurred. The data did not fit the most commonly used model of auto-ignition. A correlation of the conditions where ignition would occur which apply to this test apparatus over the conditions tested is (p/V) phi to the 1.3 power = 0.62 e to the 2804/T power where p is the pressure in kPa, V is the velocity in m/e, phi is the equivalence ratio, and T is the temperature in K. The data scatter was considerable, varying by a maximum value of 5 at a given temperature and equivalence ratio. There was wide spread in the autoignition data contained in the references.

  12. Bioaccumulation of fossil fuel components during single-compound and complex-mixture exposures of Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, D.D.; Carlile, D.W.; Hanf, R.W. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    The authors conducted tests with the water flea (Daphnia magna) to compare the bioaccumulation of compounds presented alone with the bioaccumulation of these same compounds when they were presented within a complex coal liquid, water-soluble fraction. Phenol and aniline were used as representative compounds because they are highly soluble, moderately toxic, and common to many fossil fuel liquid products and corresponding wastes. The tests were primarily designed to aid in development of predictive models relating to the transport and fate of components from complex mixtures in aquatic biota.

  13. Plasma barodiffusion in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions: application to observed yield anomalies in thermonuclear fuel mixtures.

    PubMed

    Amendt, Peter; Landen, O L; Robey, H F; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D

    2010-09-10

    The observation of large, self-generated electric fields (≥10(9)  V/m) in imploding capsules using proton radiography has been reported [C. K. Li, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 225001 (2008)]. A model of pressure gradient-driven diffusion in a plasma with self-generated electric fields is developed and applied to reported neutron yield deficits for equimolar D3He [J. R. Rygg, Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)] and (DT)3He [H. W. Herrmann, Phys. Plasmas 16, 056312 (2009)] fuel mixtures and Ar-doped deuterium fuels [J. D. Lindl, Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. The observed anomalies are explained as a mild loss of deuterium nuclei near capsule center arising from shock-driven diffusion in the high-field limit. PMID:20867580

  14. Notes from the Field: Intoxication and Deaths Associated with Ingestion of a Racing Fuel and Carbonated Soft Drink Mixture - Tennessee, January 2016.

    PubMed

    Fill, Mary-Margaret A; Seger, Donna L; Dunn, John R; Schaffner, William; Jones, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    In January 2016, the Tennessee Poison Center and Tennessee Department of Health learned of the deaths of two adolescents, and the nonfatal intoxication of two other adolescents, after ingestion of a mixture of racing fuel (approximately 100% methanol) and a carbonated soft drink. The Tennessee Department of Health reviewed medical records and police reports to learn more about the racing fuel source, assess ongoing risk, and guide prevention efforts. These are the first reported deaths in the United States associated with ingestion of this racing fuel mixture. PMID:27281631

  15. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Sultan; Cess, Robert D.; Hogan, Joseph S.

    1980-12-01

    Recent modeling of atmospheric chemical processes (Logan et al., 1978; Hameed et al., 1979) suggests that tropospheric ozone and methane might significantly increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx, and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test the possible climatic impact of changes in tropospheric chemical composition, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4, and NOx. The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NOx, and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could augment global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  16. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Hameed, S.; Hogan, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone and methane might increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test this possible climatic impact, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically-averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4 and NOx. The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NOx and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could enhance global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  17. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hameed, S.; Cess, R. D.; Hogan, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent modeling of atmospheric chemical processes (Logan et al, 1978; Hameed et al, 1979) suggests that tropospheric ozone and methane might significantly increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NO(x), and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test the possible climatic impact of changes in tropospheric chemical composition, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4, and NO(x). The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NO(x) and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could augment global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  18. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    SciTech Connect

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  19. Freshwater benthic algal population and community changes due to acidity and aluminum-acid mixtures in artificial streams

    SciTech Connect

    Genter, R.B.; Amyot, D.J. )

    1994-03-01

    Communities of freshwater benthic algae were exposed to water acidified daily to pH 4.8 along and in mixtures with 50, 100, or 500 [mu]g L[sup [minus]1] Al. Daily acidification to nominal pH 4.8 in acidified treatments exposed algae to a range of pHs that led to a variety of Al species of different toxicity. Calcium concentrations in stream were higher in acidified and Al treatments on day 1, and dissolved Al in stream water was higher in the highest Al treatment on days 1, 7, and 28; otherwise acid and Al treatments did not significantly alter Al and Ca in the exposure water. Calcium bioaccumulation by periphyton was lower in acidified and Al treatments on all sampling days. Concentrations of Mg in water and periphyton did not differ between treatments. The artificial stream system generated alkalinity to buffer acidified water; the amount of generated alkalinity returned to approximately the same levels for the first week, but the amount of alkalinity generated during the second week appeared to decline, and acid-only and acid-Al mixtures diverged in their ability to generate alkalinity during the third and fourth weeks. Aluminum in acidified water inhibited abundance of diatoms and green and blue-green algae more than the effects of acid stress alone. The green filamentous alga Mougeotia showed a slight increase in abundance in the acid-only treatment. The middle-Al treatment generated more alkalinity and had higher abundance of some algal taxa on days 14 and 28, even though measured Al concentrations in water and periphyton fell between low- and high-Al-treatment levels. Community-level tests, combining a taxonomic analysis of algal population abundance with chemical analysis of water and bioaccumulation, provide valuable insight to assess anthropogenic stress.

  20. Calculated flame temperature (CFT) modeling of fuel mixture lower flammability limits.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fuman; Rogers, William J; Mannan, M Sam

    2010-02-15

    Heat loss can affect experimental flammability limits, and it becomes indispensable to quantify flammability limits when apparatus quenching effect becomes significant. In this research, the lower flammability limits of binary hydrocarbon mixtures are predicted using calculated flame temperature (CFT) modeling, which is based on the principle of energy conservation. Specifically, the hydrocarbon mixture lower flammability limit is quantitatively correlated to its final flame temperature at non-adiabatic conditions. The modeling predictions are compared with experimental observations to verify the validity of CFT modeling, and the minor deviations between them indicated that CFT modeling can represent experimental measurements very well. Moreover, the CFT modeling results and Le Chatelier's Law predictions are also compared, and the agreement between them indicates that CFT modeling provides a theoretical justification for the Le Chatelier's Law. PMID:19819067

  1. Lean mixture engine testing and evaluation program. [for automobile engine pollution and fuel performances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, M. W.; Hoehn, F. W.; Griffin, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental results for fuel consumption and emissions are presented for a 350 CID (5.7 liter) Chevrolet V-8 engine modified for lean operation with gasoline. The lean burn engine achieved peak thermal efficiency at an equivalence ratio of 0.75 and a spark advance of 60 deg BTDC. At this condition the lean burn engine demonstrated a 10% reduction in brake specific fuel consumption compared with the stock engine; however, NOx and hydrocarbon emissions were higher. With the use of spark retard and/or slightly lower equivalence ratios, the NOx emissions performance of the stock engine was matched while showing a 6% reduction in brake specific fuel consumption. Hydrocarbon emissions exceeded the stock values in all cases. Diagnostic data indicate that lean performance in the engine configuration tested is limited by ignition delay, cycle-to-cycle pressure variations, and cylinder-to-cylinder distribution.

  2. Experimental analysis of performance degradation of micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells fed by different fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calise, F.; Restucccia, G.; Sammes, N.

    This paper analyzes the thermodynamic and electrochemical dynamic performance of an anode supported micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) fed by different types of fuel. The micro-tubular SOFC used is anode supported, consisting of a NiO and Gd 0.2Ce 0.8O 2- x (GDC) cermet anode, thin GDC electrolyte, and a La 0.6Sr 0.4Co 0.2Fe 0.8O 3- y (LSCF) and GDC cermet cathode. The fabrication of the cells under investigation is briefly summarized, with emphasis on the innovations with respect to traditional techniques. Such micro-tubular cells were tested using a Test Stand consisting of: a vertical tubular furnace, an electrical load, a galvanostast, a bubbler, gas pipelines, temperature, pressure and flow meters. The tests on the micro-SOFC were performed using H 2, CO, CH 4 and H 2O in different combinations at 550 °C, to determine the cell polarization curves under several load cycles. Long-term experimental tests were also performed in order to assess degradation of the electrochemical performance of the cell. Results of the tests were analyzed aiming at determining the sources of the cell performance degradation. Authors concluded that the cell under investigation is particularly sensitive to the carbon deposition which significantly reduces cell performance, after few cycles, when fed by light hydrocarbons. A significant performance degradation is also detected when hydrogen is used as fuel. In this case, the authors ascribe the degradation to the micro-cracks, the change in materials crystalline structure and problems with electrical connections.

  3. Trace element partitioning in ashes from boilers firing pure wood or mixtures of solid waste with respect to fuel composition, chlorine content and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Saqib, Naeem Bäckström, Mattias

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Different solids waste incineration is discussed in grate fired and fluidized bed boilers. • We explained waste composition, temperature and chlorine effects on metal partitioning. • Excessive chlorine content can change oxide to chloride equilibrium partitioning the trace elements in fly ash. • Volatility increases with temperature due to increase in vapor pressure of metals and compounds. • In Fluidized bed boiler, most metals find themselves in fly ash, especially for wood incineration. - Abstract: Trace element partitioning in solid waste (household waste, industrial waste, waste wood chips and waste mixtures) incineration residues was investigated. Samples of fly ash and bottom ash were collected from six incineration facilities across Sweden including two grate fired and four fluidized bed incinerators, to have a variation in the input fuel composition (from pure biofuel to mixture of waste) and different temperature boiler conditions. As trace element concentrations in the input waste at the same facilities have already been analyzed, the present study focuses on the concentration of trace elements in the waste fuel, their distribution in the incineration residues with respect to chlorine content of waste and combustion temperature. Results indicate that Zn, Cu and Pb are dominating trace elements in the waste fuel. Highly volatile elements mercury and cadmium are mainly found in fly ash in all cases; 2/3 of lead also end up in fly ash while Zn, As and Sb show a large variation in distribution with most of them residing in the fly ash. Lithophilic elements such as copper and chromium are mainly found in bottom ash from grate fired facilities while partition mostly into fly ash from fluidized bed incinerators, especially for plants fuelled by waste wood or ordinary wood chips. There is no specific correlation between input concentration of an element in the waste fuel and fraction partitioned to fly ash. Temperature and chlorine

  4. Dermal, eye, and oral toxicologic evaluations of brass powder, fog oil, diesel fuel, and their mixtures. Report for 1 May-30 September 1985 on Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhew, D.A.; Smith, S.H.; Doyle, G.L.; Kreuger, J.C.; Mellon, K.A.

    1985-12-01

    Five test articles were evaluated to establish their eye and skin irritation potential and their oral and dermal toxicity. The test articles evaluated were as followed: 1) Brass Powder, 2) Fog Oil, 3) Diesel Fuel, 4) 0.75 parts Fog Oil:1 part Brass Powder (w/w mixture), and 5) 0.7 parts Diesel Fuel: 1 part Brass Powder (w/w mixture). Oral studies were conducted utilizing the Fischer-344 albino rat as the test system; all other studies utilized the New Zealand White Albino Rabbit as the test system. Results obtained in these studies are summarized.

  5. Separation of gaseous hydrogen from a water-hydrogen mixture in a fuel cell power system operating in a weightless environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanowski, William E. (Inventor); Suljak, George T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A fuel cell power system for use in a weightless environment, such as in space, includes a device for removing water from a water-hydrogen mixture condensed from the exhaust from the fuel cell power section of the system. Water is removed from the mixture in a centrifugal separator, and is fed into a holding, pressure operated water discharge valve via a Pitot tube. Entrained nondissolved hydrogen is removed from the Pitot tube by a bleed orifice in the Pitot tube before the water reaches the water discharge valve. Water discharged from the valve thus has a substantially reduced hydrogen content.

  6. Numerical modeling of flame-balls in fuel-air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smooke, Mitchell D.; Ern, Alexandre

    1995-01-01

    At low gravity, when buoyancy effects are small, flame-balls can be generated. These are stationary spherical structures whose existence appears to require a near-limit mixture, a small Lewis number and heat losses from radiation. It is our goal to combine computational modeling with existing experimental and theoretical studies (NASA) of these structures so that an improved understanding of flammability limits and near-limit phenomena will occur. The question of flammability limits is of fundamental importance and has long been examined. It is of great practical importance to predict, from first principles, a limit mixture strength that agrees with experimental values for the configuration at hand. Flame-balls provide an excellent configuration in which convective losses can be eliminated and the resulting stable solutions are produced from a diffusive, reactive and radiative balance. Although analytical modeling provides convincing evidence that the key physical ingredients of flame-balls have been identified, quantitative confirmation can only come from detailed numerical simulations. Our goal is to predict theoretically the mass fractions of the species and the temperature as functions of the independent coordinate r.

  7. Response of selected plant and insect species to simulated SRM exhaust mixtures and to exhaust components from SRM fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    The possible biologic effects of exhaust products from solid rocket motor (SRM) burns associated with the space shuttle are examined. The major components of the exhaust that might have an adverse effect on vegetation, HCl and Al2O3 are studied. Dose response curves for native and cultivated plants and selected insects exposed to simulated exhaust and component chemicals from SRM exhaust are presented. A system for dispensing and monitoring component chemicals of SRM exhaust (HCl and Al2O3) and a system for exposing test plants to simulated SRM exhaust (controlled fuel burns) are described. The effects of HCl, Al2O3, and mixtures of the two on the honeybee, the corn earworm, and the common lacewing and the effects of simulated exhaust on the honeybee are discussed.

  8. Solution combustion synthesis of CeO{sub 2}-CeAlO{sub 3} nano-composites by mixture-of-fuels approach

    SciTech Connect

    Aruna, S.T.; Kini, N.S. Rajam, K.S.

    2009-04-02

    Nano-composites of CeO{sub 2}-CeAlO{sub 3} are synthesised by solution combustion method employing (a) urea and (b) a mixture of urea and glycine as fuels with corresponding metal nitrates. The as-prepared powders are all nano-sized (5-30 nm) and the same is confirmed by broadening of the X-ray diffraction peaks and transmission electron microscopy. A starting composition of Ce:Al in the atomic ratio 4:6 gives rise to different phases depending on the fuel being used for combustion. When urea alone is used as fuel, nano-crystalline CeO{sub 2} phase is formed with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} being in the amorphous state. When the mixture of fuels is used, a mixture of nano-sized CeO{sub 2} and CeAlO{sub 3} phases is obtained. However, upon sintering at 1400 deg. C in air, the stable phases CeO{sub 2} and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are formed in both the cases. Combustion synthesis using mixture-of-fuels is proposed to be a route to stabilise low oxidation compounds such as CeAlO{sub 3}.

  9. Novel process and catalytic materials for converting CO2 and H2 containing mixtures to liquid fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Meiri, Nora; Dinburg, Yakov; Amoyal, Meital; Koukouliev, Viatcheslav; Nehemya, Roxana Vidruk; Landau, Miron V; Herskowitz, Moti

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and water are renewable and the most abundant feedstocks for the production of chemicals and fungible fuels. However, the current technologies for production of hydrogen from water are not competitive. Therefore, reacting carbon dioxide with hydrogen is not economically viable in the near future. Other alternatives include natural gas, biogas or biomass for the production of carbon dioxide, hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures that react to yield chemicals and fungible fuels. The latter process requires a high performance catalyst that enhances the reverse water-gas-shift (RWGS) reaction and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) to higher hydrocarbons combined with an optimal reactor system. Important aspects of a novel catalyst, based on a Fe spinel and three-reactor system developed for this purpose published in our recent paper and patent, were investigated in this study. Potassium was found to be a key promoter that improves the reaction rates of the RWGS and FTS and increases the selectivity of higher hydrocarbons while producing mostly olefins. It changed the texture of the catalyst, stabilized the Fe-Al-O spinel, thus preventing decomposition into Fe3O4 and Al2O3. Potassium also increased the content of Fe5C2 while shifting Fe in the oxide and carbide phases to a more reduced state. In addition, it increased the relative exposure of carbide iron on the catalysts surface, the CO2 adsorption and the adsorption strength. A detailed kinetic model of the RWGS, FTS and methanation reactions was developed for the Fe spinel catalyst based on extensive experimental data measured over a range of operating conditions. Significant oligomerization activity of the catalyst was found. Testing the pelletized catalyst with CO2, CO and H2 mixtures over a range of operating conditions demonstrated its high productivity to higher hydrocarbons. The composition of the liquid (C5+) was found to be a function of the potassium content and the composition of the feedstock

  10. Greenhouse impact due to the use of combustible fuels: life cycle viewpoint and relative radiative forcing commitment.

    PubMed

    Kirkinen, Johanna; Palosuo, Taru; Holmgren, Kristina; Savolainen, Ilkka

    2008-09-01

    Extensive information on the greenhouse impacts of various human actions is important in developing effective climate change mitigation strategies. The greenhouse impacts of combustible fuels consist not only of combustion emissions but also of emissions from the fuel production chain and possible effects on the ecosystem carbon storages. It is important to be able to assess the combined, total effect of these different emissions and to express the results in a comprehensive way. In this study, a new concept called relative radiative forcing commitment (RRFC) is presented and applied to depict the greenhouse impact of some combustible fuels currently used in Finland. RRFC is a ratio that accounts for the energy absorbed in the Earth system due to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations (production and combustion of fuel) compared to the energy released in the combustion of fuel. RRFC can also be expressed as a function of time in order to give a dynamic cumulative picture on the caused effect. Varying time horizons can be studied separately, as is the case when studying the effects of different climate policies on varying time scales. The RRFC for coal for 100 years is about 170, which means that in 100 years 170 times more energy is absorbed in the atmosphere due to the emissions of coal combustion activity than is released in combustion itself. RRFC values of the other studied fuel production chains varied from about 30 (forest residues fuel) to 190 (peat fuel) for the 100-year study period. The length of the studied time horizon had an impact on the RRFC values and, to some extent, on the relative positions of various fuels. PMID:18521657

  11. Greenhouse Impact Due to the Use of Combustible Fuels: Life Cycle Viewpoint and Relative Radiative Forcing Commitment

    PubMed Central

    Palosuo, Taru; Holmgren, Kristina; Savolainen, Ilkka

    2008-01-01

    Extensive information on the greenhouse impacts of various human actions is important in developing effective climate change mitigation strategies. The greenhouse impacts of combustible fuels consist not only of combustion emissions but also of emissions from the fuel production chain and possible effects on the ecosystem carbon storages. It is important to be able to assess the combined, total effect of these different emissions and to express the results in a comprehensive way. In this study, a new concept called relative radiative forcing commitment (RRFC) is presented and applied to depict the greenhouse impact of some combustible fuels currently used in Finland. RRFC is a ratio that accounts for the energy absorbed in the Earth system due to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations (production and combustion of fuel) compared to the energy released in the combustion of fuel. RRFC can also be expressed as a function of time in order to give a dynamic cumulative picture on the caused effect. Varying time horizons can be studied separately, as is the case when studying the effects of different climate policies on varying time scales. The RRFC for coal for 100 years is about 170, which means that in 100 years 170 times more energy is absorbed in the atmosphere due to the emissions of coal combustion activity than is released in combustion itself. RRFC values of the other studied fuel production chains varied from about 30 (forest residues fuel) to 190 (peat fuel) for the 100-year study period. The length of the studied time horizon had an impact on the RRFC values and, to some extent, on the relative positions of various fuels. PMID:18521657

  12. Greenhouse impact due to the use of combustible fuels: Life cycle viewpoint and relative radiative forcing commitment

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkinen, J.; Palosuo, T.; Holmgren, K.; Savolainen, I.

    2008-09-15

    Extensive information on the greenhouse impacts of various human actions is important in developing effective climate change mitigation strategies. The greenhouse impacts of combustible fuels consist not only of combustion emissions but also of emissions from the fuel production chain and possible effects on the ecosystem carbon storages. It is important to be able to assess the combined, total effect of these different emissions and to express the results in a comprehensive way. In this study, a new concept called relative radiative forcing commitment (RRFC) is presented and applied to depict the greenhouse impact of some combustible fuels currently used in Finland. RRFC is a ratio that accounts for the energy absorbed in the Earth system due to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations (production and combustion of fuel) compared to the energy released in the combustion of fuel. RRFC can also be expressed as a function of time in order to give a dynamic cumulative picture on the caused effect. Varying time horizons can be studied separately, as is the case when studying the effects of different climate policies on varying time scales. The RRFC for coal for 100 years is about 170, which means that in 100 years 170 times more energy is absorbed in the atmosphere due to the emissions of coal combustion activity than is released in combustion itself. RRFC values of the other studied fuel production chains varied from about 30 (forest residues fuel) to 190 (peat fuel) for the 100-year study period. The length of the studied time horizon had an impact on the RRFC values and, to some extent, on the relative positions of various fuels.

  13. 33 CFR 155.370 - Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of 10,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of 10,000 gross tons and above and oceangoing ships of 400 gross tons and above that carry ballast water in their fuel oil tanks. 155.370 Section 155.370 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  14. 33 CFR 155.370 - Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of 10,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of 10,000 gross tons and above and oceangoing ships of 400 gross tons and above that carry ballast water in their fuel oil tanks. 155.370 Section 155.370 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  15. In situ measurements of water transfer due to different mechanisms in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husar, Attila; Higier, Andrew; Liu, Hongtan

    Water management is of critical importance in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, in particular, those based on a sulfonic acid polymer, which requires water to conduct protons. Yet there are limited in situ studies of water transfer through the membrane and no data are available for water transfer due to individual mechanisms through the membrane in an operational fuel cell. Thus it is the objective of this study to measure water transfer through the membrane due to each individual mechanism in an operational PEM fuel cell. The three different mechanisms of water transfer, i.e., electro-osmotic drag, diffusion and hydraulic permeation are isolated by specially imposed boundary conditions. Therefore water transfer through the membrane due to each mechanism is measured separately. In this study, all the data is collected in an actual assembled operational fuel cell. The experimental results show that water transfer due to hydraulic permeation, i.e. the pressure difference between the anode and cathode is at least an order of magnitude lower than those due to the other two mechanisms. The data for water transfer due to diffusion through the membrane are in good agreement with some of the ex situ data in the literature. The data for electro-osmosis show that the number of water molecules dragged per proton increases not only with temperature but also with current density, which is different from existing data in the literature. The methodology used in this study is simple and can be easily adopted for in situ water transfer measurement due to different mechanisms in other PEM fuel cells without any cell modifications.

  16. Fuel mixture approach for solution combustion synthesis of Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} powders

    SciTech Connect

    Ianos, Robert Lazau, Ioan; Pacurariu, Cornelia; Barvinschi, Paul

    2009-07-15

    Single-phase 3CaO.Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders were prepared via solution combustion synthesis using a fuel mixture of urea and {beta}-alanine. The concept of using this fuel mixture comes from the individual reactivity of calcium nitrate and aluminum nitrate with respect to urea and {beta}-alanine. It was proved that urea is the optimum fuel for Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} whereas {beta}-alanine is the most suitable fuel for Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis investigations revealed that heating at 300 deg. C the precursor mixture containing the desired metal nitrates, urea and {beta}-alanine triggers a vigorous combustion reaction, which yields single-phase nanocrystalline 3CaO.Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder (33.3 nm). In this case additional annealing was no longer required. The use of a single fuel failed to ensure the formation of 3CaO.Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} directly from the combustion reaction. After annealing at 900 deg. C for 1 h, the powders obtained by using a single fuel (urea or {beta}-alanine) developed a phase composition comprising of 3CaO.Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 12CaO.7Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO.

  17. Reduction of fuel side costs due to biomass co-combustion.

    PubMed

    Wils, Andrea; Calmano, Wolfgang; Dettmann, Peter; Kaltschmitt, Martin; Ecke, Holger

    2012-03-15

    The feasibility and influence of co-combustion of woody biomass on the fuel side costs is discussed for three hard coal power plants located in Berlin, Germany. Fuel side costs are defined as the costs resulting from flue gas cleaning and by-products. To have reliable data, co-firing tests were conducted in two power plants (i.e., slag tap furnace and circulating fluidising bed combustion). The amount of wood which was co-fired varied at levels below 11% of the fuel heat input. Wood chips originating from landscape management were used. The analyses show that co-combustion of woody biomass can lower the fuel side costs and that the co-combustion at a level below 10% of the thermal capacity is technically feasible without major problems. Furthermore, a flexible spreadsheet tool was developed for the calculation of fuel side costs and suggestions for operational improvements were made. For example, the adaptation of the Ca/S ratio (mass ratio of calcium in limestone to sulphur in the fuel) in one plant could reduce the fuel side costs up to 135 k€ yr(-1) (0.09 €M Wh(-1)). PMID:21514049

  18. Ignition delay of a gas mixture above a liquid fuel pool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, D. N.; Sirignano, W. A.

    1991-01-01

    A computational study has been made of transient heat transfer and fluid flow of an axisymmetric two-layer gas-and-liquid system heated from above by a small hot spot (e.g., a hot wire or pilot flame) located close to the liquid surface. The gas phase is unconfined above the liquid pool. The effects of varying gravity level (0.0001 to 1 gn), liquid pool height, and heater height are investigated. Thermocapillary convection induced by the nonuniform heating of the liquid surface combines with buoyancy forces to affect the heat transfer and the transport of fuel vapor toward the heat source. At reduced gravity, gas-phase conduction is comparable to the incident radiation at the liquid surface, whereas at 1 gn, buoyant convection carries the heat upward from the heat source and, therefore, the liquid is heated primarily by radiation.

  19. Quantification of Back-End Nuclear Fuel Cycle Metrics Uncertainties Due to Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy E. Stover, Jr.

    2007-11-01

    This work examines uncertainties in the back end fuel cycle metrics of isotopic composition, decay heat, radioactivity, and radiotoxicity. Most advanced fuel cycle scenarios, including the ones represented in this work, are limited by one or more of these metrics, so that quantification of them becomes of great importance in order to optimize or select one of these scenarios. Uncertainty quantification, in this work, is performed by propagating cross-section covariance data, and later number density covariance data, through a reactor physics and depletion code sequence. Propagation of uncertainty is performed primarily via the Efficient Subspace Method (ESM). ESM decomposes the covariance data into singular pairs and perturbs input data along independent directions of the uncertainty and only for the most significant values of that uncertainty. Results of these perturbations being collected, ESM directly calculates the covariance of the observed output posteriori. By exploiting the rank deficient nature of the uncertainty data, ESM works more efficiently than traditional stochastic sampling, but is shown to produce equivalent results. ESM is beneficial for very detailed models with large amounts of input data that make stochastic sampling impractical. In this study various fuel cycle scenarios are examined. Simplified, representative models of pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuels composed of both uranium oxide and mixed oxides are examined. These simple models are intended to give a representation of the uncertainty that can be associated with open uranium oxide fuel cycles and closed mixed oxide fuel cycles. The simplified models also serve as a demonstration to show that ESM and stochastic sampling produce equivalent results, because these models require minimum computer resources and have amounts of input data small enough such that either method can be quickly implemented and a numerical experiment performed. The simplified

  20. Fuel additives from SO/sub 2/ treated mixtures of amides and esters derived from vegetable oil, tall oil acid, or aralkyl acid

    SciTech Connect

    Efner, H. F.; Schiff, S.

    1985-03-12

    Vegetable oils, particularly soybean oil, tall oil acid, or aralkyl acids, particularly phenylstearic acid, are reacted with multiamines, particularly tetraethylenepentamine, to form a product mixture for subsequent reaction with SO/sub 2/ to produce a product mix that has good detergent properties in fuels.

  1. 33 CFR 155.330 - Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships. 155.330 Section 155.330 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS...

  2. 33 CFR 155.330 - Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships. 155.330 Section 155.330 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS...

  3. Simulation of detonation of ammonium nitrate fuel oil mixture confined by aluminum: edge angles for DSD

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Mark; Quirk, James J; Kiyanda, Charles B; Jackson, Scott I; Briggs, Matthew E; Shinas, Micheal A

    2010-01-01

    Non-ideal high explosives are typically porous, low-density materials with a low detonation velocity (3--5 km/s) and long detonation reaction zone ({approx} cms). As a result, the interaction of a non-ideal high explosive with an inert confiner can be markedly different than for a conventional high explosive. Issues arise, for example, with light stiff confiners where the confiner can drive the high explosive (HE) through a Prandtl-Meyer fan at the HE/confiner interface rather than the HE driving the confiner. For a non-ideal high explosive confined by a high sound speed inert such that the detonation velocity is lower than the inert sound speed, the flow is subsonic and thus shockless in the confiner. In such cases, the standard detonation shock dynamics methodology, which requires a positive edge-angle be specified at the HE/confiner interface in order that the detonation shape be divergent, cannot be directly utilized. In order to study how detonation shock dynamics can be utilized in such cases, numerical simulations of the detonation of ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) confined by aluminum 6061 are conducted.

  4. Estimation of wildfire size and risk changes due to fuels treatments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, M.A.; Moran, C.J.; Wimberly, M.C.; Baer, A.D.; Finney, M.A.; Beckendorf, K.L.; Eidenshink, J.; Zhu, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Human land use practices, altered climates, and shifting forest and fire management policies have increased the frequency of large wildfires several-fold. Mitigation of potential fire behaviour and fire severity have increasingly been attempted through pre-fire alteration of wildland fuels using mechanical treatments and prescribed fires. Despite annual treatment of more than a million hectares of land, quantitative assessments of the effectiveness of existing fuel treatments at reducing the size of actual wildfires or how they might alter the risk of burning across landscapes are currently lacking. Here, we present a method for estimating spatial probabilities of burning as a function of extant fuels treatments for any wildland fire-affected landscape. We examined the landscape effects of more than 72 000 ha of wildland fuel treatments involved in 14 large wildfires that burned 314 000 ha of forests in nine US states between 2002 and 2010. Fuels treatments altered the probability of fire occurrence both positively and negatively across landscapes, effectively redistributing fire risk by changing surface fire spread rates and reducing the likelihood of crowning behaviour. Trade offs are created between formation of large areas with low probabilities of increased burning and smaller, well-defined regions with reduced fire risk.

  5. Reductions in vehicle fuel consumption due to refinements in aerodynamic design. [for trailer trucks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Over-the-highway fuel consumption and coastdown drag tests were performed on cab-over-engine, van type trailer trucks and modifications of these vehicles incorporating refinements in aerodynamic design. In addition, 1/25-scale models of these configurations, and derivatives of these configurations were tested in a wind tunnel to determine the effects of wind on the magnitude of the benefits that aerodynamic refinements can provide. The results of these tests are presented for a vehicle incorporating major redesign features and for a relatively simple add-on modification. These results include projected fuel savings on the basis of annual savings per vehicle year as well as probable nationwide fuel savings.

  6. Advanced LMFBR fuel cladding susceptability to stress corrosion due to reprocessing impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Henslee, S.P.

    1987-03-01

    The potential degradation of LMFBR fuel cladding alloys by chlorides, when used in metallic fuel systems, was evaluated. The alloys tested were D-9 and HT-9 stainless steels, austenitic and ferritic alloys respectively. These two alloys were tested in parallel with and their performance compared to the austenitic stainless steel Type 316. All alloys were tested for 7400 hours in a stress rupture environment with chloride exposure at either 550/degree/C 650/degree/C. None of the alloys tested were found to exhibit any degradation in time-to-rupture by the presence of chlorides under the conditions imposed during testing. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Reducing the deactivation of Ni-metal during the catalytic partial oxidation of a surrogate diesel fuel mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Daniel J.; Campos, Andrew; Smith, Mark W.; Berry, David A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Spivey, James J.

    2010-09-01

    Ni catalysts are active and selective for the conversion of hydrocarbon into synthesis gas. However, conventional supported Ni catalysts rapidly deactivate at the high temperatures required for partial oxidation of diesel fuel by sintering and metal vaporization, as well as by carbon deposition and sulfur poisoning. Thus, to reduce deactivation Ni (3 wt%) was substituted into the structures of Ba-hexaaluminate (BNHA) and La–Sr–Zr pyrochlore (LSZN), and their activity was compared to a supported Ni/Al2O3 for the catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) of a surrogate diesel fuel. Characterization by XRD showed a single phase β-alumina for the hexaaluminate, while LSZN had a pyrochlore structure with a defect SrZrO3 perovskite phase. Temperature programmed reduction experiments confirmed Ni was reducible in all catalysts. XANES results confirmed that Ni atoms were substituted into the hexaaluminate and pyrochlore structures, as spectra for each catalyst showed different coordination environments for Ni compared to a NiO standard. During CPOX activity tests (T = 900 °C and WHSV = 50,000 scc/gcat/h), the LSZN pyrochlore produced stable H2 and CO yields in the presence of 5 wt% 1-methylnaphthalene and 50 ppmw dibenzothiophene/n-tetradecane for 2 h, while both Ni/Al2O3 and BNHA catalysts were irreversibly deactivated by this mixture over the same time. Finally, activity loss was strongly linked to carbon formation.

  8. How Grain Size Ratio and Fine Sediment Feed Concentration Influence Channel Slope Evolution Due to Grain Size Sorting in Bimodal Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudill, A. R.; Frey, P.; Church, M. A.; Hassan, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    It is essential that understanding of grain size sorting and its influence upon sediment transport in gravel-bed rivers is deepened due to implications for channel stability, ecology and stratigraphy. Previous work has shown how the addition of finer material to a coarse channel bed can enhance the mobility of the coarser sediment due to a reduced entrainment threshold. This enhanced mobility has been indexed using the change in equilibrium slope within the channel. However, it is not yet known how variations in the grain size ratio (diameter of coarse/diameter of fine), along with the concentration of fine material, influences this behavior. New experiments undertaken with bimodal mixtures of spherical glass particles in a relatively narrow sediment-feed flume permit observation of the individual and bulk particle motion. These experiments demonstrate that degradation can occur when fine sediment is added to a coarse bed (Figure 1), and show the grain size ratios and fine sediment feed concentrations at which this arises. The research also shows that under certain conditions, aggradation can also occur due to the addition of finer sediment to a coarse channel bed. The amount of degradation and aggradation under varying conditions is quantified using the change in equilibrium bed slope. Figure 1: Channel degradation (flow from right to left)

  9. Design Concepts for Co-Production of Power, Fuels & Chemicals Via Coal/Biomass Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, A. D.; Chen, Q.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    2012-09-30

    The overall goal of the program is to develop design concepts, incorporating advanced technologies in areas such as oxygen production, feed systems, gas cleanup, component separations and gas turbines, for integrated and economically viable coal and biomass fed gasification facilities equipped with carbon capture and storage for the following scenarios: (i) coproduction of power along with hydrogen, (ii) coproduction of power along with fuels, (iii) coproduction of power along with petrochemicals, and (iv) coproduction of power along with agricultural chemicals. To achieve this goal, specifically the following objectives are met in this proposed project: (i) identify advanced technology options and innovative preliminary design concepts that synergistically integrate plant subsections, (ii) develop steady state system simulations to predict plant efficiency and environmental signature, (iii) develop plant cost estimates by capacity factoring major subsystems or by major equipment items where required, and then capital, operating and maintenance cost estimates, and (iv) perform techno- economic analyses for the above described coproduction facilities. Thermal efficiencies for the electricity only cases with 90% carbon capture are 38.26% and 36.76% (HHV basis) with the bituminous and the lignite feedstocks respectively. For the coproduction cases (where 50% of the energy exported is in the form of electricity), the electrical efficiency, as expected, is highest for the hydrogen coproduction cases while lowest for the higher alcohols (ethanol) coproduction cases. The electrical efficiencies for Fischer-Tropsch coproduction cases are slightly higher than those for the methanol coproduction cases but it should be noted that the methanol (as well as the higher alcohol) coproduction cases produce the finished coproduct while the Fischer-Tropsch coproduction cases produce a coproduct that requires further processing in a refinery. The cross comparison of the thermal

  10. Structural and magnetic properties of manganese zinc ferrite nanoparticles prepared by solution combustion method using mixture of fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angadi, V. Jagadeesha; Rudraswamy, B.; Sadhana, K.; Praveena, K.

    2016-07-01

    The structural analysis and magnetic investigation Mn1-xZnxFe2O4 with stoichiometry (x=0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9 and 1.0) were synthesized by solution combustion method using mixture of fuel this is first of its kind. As synthesized Mn-Zn nanoferrites were characterized by X-ray Diffractometer (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at room temperature. The magnetic domain relaxation was investigated by inductance spectroscopy (IS) and the observed magnetic domain relaxation frequency (fr) was increased with the increase in grain size. The Room temperature magnetic properties were studied using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). It was observed that the real and imaginary part of permeability (μ‧ and μ″), saturation magnetization (Ms), remanance magnetization (Mr) and magneton number (Mr/Ms) were decreases gradually with increasing Zn2+ concentration. The decrease in the saturation magnetization may be explained as, the Zn2+ concentration increases the relative number of ferric ions on the A sites diminishes and this reduces the A-B interaction. Hence synthesized materials are good for high frequency applications.

  11. Effect of fuel mixture fraction and velocity perturbations on the flame transfer function of swirl stabilized flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocki, Stefan; Di-Chiaro, Giacomo; Biagioli, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    A novel methodology is developed to decompose the classic Flame Transfer Function (FTF) used in the thermo-acoustic stability analysis of lean premix combustors into contributions of different types. The approach is applied, in the context of Large Eddy Simulation (LES), to partially-premixed and fully-premixed flames, which are stabilized via a central recirculation zone as a result of the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The first type of decomposition is into contributions driven by fuel mixture fraction and dynamic velocity fluctuations. Each of these two contributions is further split into the components of turbulent flame speed and flame surface area. The flame surface area component, driven by the pure dynamic velocity fluctuation, which is shown to be a dominant contribution to the overall FTF, is also additionally decomposed over the coherent flow structures using proper orthogonal decomposition. Using a simplified model for the dynamic response of premixed flames, it is shown that the distribution of the FTF, as obtained from LES, is closely related to the characteristics of the velocity field frequency response to the inlet perturbation. Initially, the proposed method is tested and validated with a well characterized laboratory burner geometry. Subsequently, the method is applied to an industrial gas turbine burner.

  12. High-speed mixture fraction and temperature imaging of pulsed, turbulent fuel jets auto-igniting in high-temperature, vitiated co-flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papageorge, Michael J.; Arndt, Christoph; Fuest, Frederik; Meier, Wolfgang; Sutton, Jeffrey A.

    2014-07-01

    In this manuscript, we describe an experimental approach to simultaneously measure high-speed image sequences of the mixture fraction and temperature fields during pulsed, turbulent fuel injection into a high-temperature, co-flowing, and vitiated oxidizer stream. The quantitative mixture fraction and temperature measurements are determined from 10-kHz-rate planar Rayleigh scattering and a robust data processing methodology which is accurate from fuel injection to the onset of auto-ignition. In addition, the data processing is shown to yield accurate temperature measurements following ignition to observe the initial evolution of the "burning" temperature field. High-speed OH* chemiluminescence (CL) was used to determine the spatial location of the initial auto-ignition kernel. In order to ensure that the ignition kernel formed inside of the Rayleigh scattering laser light sheet, OH* CL was observed in two viewing planes, one near-parallel to the laser sheet and one perpendicular to the laser sheet. The high-speed laser measurements are enabled through the use of the unique high-energy pulse burst laser system which generates long-duration bursts of ultra-high pulse energies at 532 nm (>1 J) suitable for planar Rayleigh scattering imaging. A particular focus of this study was to characterize the fidelity of the measurements both in the context of the precision and accuracy, which includes facility operating and boundary conditions and measurement of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The mixture fraction and temperature fields deduced from the high-speed planar Rayleigh scattering measurements exhibited SNR values greater than 100 at temperatures exceeding 1,300 K. The accuracy of the measurements was determined by comparing the current mixture fraction results to that of "cold", isothermal, non-reacting jets. All profiles, when properly normalized, exhibited self-similarity and collapsed upon one another. Finally, example mixture fraction, temperature, and OH* emission

  13. Results of turbojet engine operation tests using a 50-50 mixture of JP-4 and tributyl borate as the fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, Louis J , Jr; Stepka, Francis S

    1957-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on a centrifugal-type turbojet engine using a 50-50 mixture of tributyl borate and JP-4 as the fuel to determine the magnitude and the location of the boric oxide deposits in the engine as well as the effect of these deposits on the engine performance. Large deposits of boric acid formed in the combustor walls and on the turbine rotor and stator blades. The deposits had no effect on the engine thrust.

  14. The Utility of Fire Radiative Energy for Understanding Fuel Consumption due to Wildfire in Boreal Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banskota, A.; Falkowski, M. J.; Kane, E. S.; Smith, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Radiative energy from active fire has been found to correlate well with the amount of fuel consumed during the lifetime of a fire event. Fire radiative power (FRP) detected by sensors onboard MODIS satellites may therefore provide direct estimates of CO2 emissions related to biomass burning. Less known is the ability of satellite data to detect active fire from predominantly smoldering burns in boreal peatlands. Boreal peatlands store a large amount of soil carbon that is likely to become increasingly vulnerable to wildfire as climate change lowers water tables and exposes C-rich peat to burning. In this study, we investigate the utility of fire radiative energy (FRE) to estimate fuel consumption associated with wildfire in 2004 in boreal peatlands in Alaska. FRE values are generally estimated from FRP retrieved at detected active fire locations and times by summing the FRP values multiplied by the time difference between acquisitions. One central issue in deriving reliable FRE estimates by such approach is the requirement for sufficient sampling of the FRP to capture spatiotemporal variability in the fire. Our preliminary analysis confirms that the detection of active fire in peatlands are indeed not spatially exhaustive and temporally continuous. Thus we are further investigating the fusion of instantaneous FRP from MODIS active fire detection with the MODIS burned area product to derive FRE estimates across the burned area. We are following a previously tested strategy for such fusion for temporal integration of instantaneous FRP to derive FRE and spatial extrapolation of FRE over the burned area. The FRE estimates are then related to ground-measured peatland burn depths across different wildfire locations. The results of this study will ultimately indicate the utility of MODIS fire products for providing reliable biomass burned estimates in boreal peatlands.

  15. System for transport of mixtures of solid particulate fuel and air, and rotary distributor suitable for use therein

    SciTech Connect

    Boldt, D.M.; Mcclellan, E.

    1982-02-02

    Fine particulate solid fuel particles are delivered from a venturi ejector to a rotating double-armed distributor which distributes fuel and air sequentially to conduits leading to the burner ejector of a kiln. The distributor is sealed and pressurized with air so as to provide the conduits with additional pulses of air following the times at which they receive fuel and air from the distributing operation.

  16. Theoretical performance of JP-4 fuel with a 70-30 mixture of fluorine and oxygen as a rocket propellant : equilibrium composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; Huff, Vearl N

    1956-01-01

    Data were calculated for equivalence ratios of 1 to 4, chamber pressures of 300 and 600 pounds per square inch absolute, and pressure ratios of 1 to 1500. Parameters included are specific impulse, combustion and exit temperatures, molecular weight, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust, ratio of nozzle-exit area to throat area, specific heat at constant pressure, isentropic exponent, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. A correlation is given which permits determination of performance for a wide range of chamber pressures. A method for obtaining specific impulse of JP-4 fuel with OF2 and O3-F2 mixtures is given.

  17. Modeling the Risk of Fire/Explosion Due to Oxidizer/Fuel Leaks in the Ares I Interstage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ring, Robert W.; Stott, James E.; Hales, Christy

    2008-01-01

    A significant flight hazard associated with liquid propellants, such as those used in the upper stage of NASA's new Ares I launch vehicle, is the possibility of leakage of hazardous fluids resulting in a catastrophic fire/explosion. The enclosed and vented interstage of the Ares I contains numerous oxidizer and fuel supply lines as well as ignition sources. The potential for fire/explosion due to leaks during ascent depends on the relative concentrations of hazardous and inert fluids within the interstage along with other variables such as pressure, temperature, leak rates, and fluid outgasing rates. This analysis improves on previous NASA Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) estimates of the probability of deflagration, in which many of the variables pertinent to the problem were not explicitly modeled as a function of time. This paper presents the modeling methodology developed to analyze these risks.

  18. Hazards Induced by Breach of Liquid Rocket Fuel Tanks: Conditions and Risks of Cryogenic Liquid Hydrogen-Oxygen Mixture Explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osipov, Viatcheslav; Muratov, Cyrill; Hafiychuk, Halyna; Ponizovskya-Devine, Ekaterina; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Mathias, Donovan; Lawrence, Scott; Werkheiser, Mary

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the data of purposeful rupture experiments with LOx and LH2 tanks, the Hydrogen-Oxygen Vertical Impact (HOVI) tests that were performed to clarify the ignition mechanisms, the explosive power of cryogenic H2/Ox mixtures under different conditions, and to elucidate the puzzling source of the initial formation of flames near the intertank section during the Challenger disaster. We carry out a physics-based analysis of general explosions scenarios for cryogenic gaseous H2/Ox mixtures and determine their realizability conditions, using the well-established simplified models from the detonation and deflagration theory. We study the features of aerosol H2/Ox mixture combustion and show, in particular, that aerosols intensify the deflagration flames and can induce detonation for any ignition mechanism. We propose a cavitation-induced mechanism of self-ignition of cryogenic H2/Ox mixtures that may be realized when gaseous H2 and Ox flows are mixed with a liquid Ox turbulent stream, as occurred in all HOVI tests. We present an overview of the HOVI tests to make conclusion on the risk of strong explosions in possible liquid rocket incidents and provide a semi-quantitative interpretation of the HOVI data based on aerosol combustion. We uncover the most dangerous situations and discuss the foreseeable risks which can arise in space missions and lead to tragic outcomes. Our analysis relates to only unconfined mixtures that are likely to arise as a result of liquid propellant space vehicle incidents.

  19. Response of selected plant and insect species to simulated solid rocket exhaust mixtures and to exhaust components from solid rocket fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, W. W.; Knott, W. M.; Stahel, E. P.; Ambrose, J. T.; Mccrimmon, J. N.; Engle, M.; Romanow, L. A.; Sawyer, A. G.; Tyson, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of solid rocket fuel (SRF) exhaust on selected plant and and insect species in the Merritt Island, Florida area was investigated in order to determine if the exhaust clouds generated by shuttle launches would adversely affect the native, plants of the Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge, the citrus production, or the beekeeping industry of the island. Conditions were simulated in greenhouse exposure chambers and field chambers constructed to model the ideal continuous stirred tank reactor. A plant exposure system was developed for dispensing and monitoring the two major chemicals in SRF exhaust, HCl and Al203, and for dispensing and monitoring SRF exhaust (controlled fuel burns). Plants native to Merritt Island, Florida were grown and used as test species. Dose-response relationships were determined for short term exposure of selected plant species to HCl, Al203, and mixtures of the two to SRF exhaust.

  20. Trace element partitioning in ashes from boilers firing pure wood or mixtures of solid waste with respect to fuel composition, chlorine content and temperature.

    PubMed

    Saqib, Naeem; Bäckström, Mattias

    2014-12-01

    Trace element partitioning in solid waste (household waste, industrial waste, waste wood chips and waste mixtures) incineration residues was investigated. Samples of fly ash and bottom ash were collected from six incineration facilities across Sweden including two grate fired and four fluidized bed incinerators, to have a variation in the input fuel composition (from pure biofuel to mixture of waste) and different temperature boiler conditions. As trace element concentrations in the input waste at the same facilities have already been analyzed, the present study focuses on the concentration of trace elements in the waste fuel, their distribution in the incineration residues with respect to chlorine content of waste and combustion temperature. Results indicate that Zn, Cu and Pb are dominating trace elements in the waste fuel. Highly volatile elements mercury and cadmium are mainly found in fly ash in all cases; 2/3 of lead also end up in fly ash while Zn, As and Sb show a large variation in distribution with most of them residing in the fly ash. Lithophilic elements such as copper and chromium are mainly found in bottom ash from grate fired facilities while partition mostly into fly ash from fluidized bed incinerators, especially for plants fuelled by waste wood or ordinary wood chips. There is no specific correlation between input concentration of an element in the waste fuel and fraction partitioned to fly ash. Temperature and chlorine content have significant effects on partitioning characteristics by increasing the formation and vaporization of highly volatile metal chlorides. Zinc and cadmium concentrations in fly ash increase with the incineration temperature. PMID:25263218

  1. Measurements of some parameters of thermal sparks with respect to their ability to ignite aviation fuel/air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haigh, S. J.; Hardwick, C. J.; Baldwin, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    A method used to generate thermal sparks for experimental purposes and methods by which parameters of the sparks, such as speed, size, and temperature, were measured are described. Values are given of the range of such parameters within these spark showers. Titanium sparks were used almost exclusively, since it is particles of this metal which are found to be ejected during simulation tests to carbon fiber composite (CFC) joints. Tests were then carried out in which titanium sparks and spark showers were injected into JP4/(AVTAG F40) mixtures with air. Single large sparks and dense showers of small sparks were found to be capable of causing ignition. Tests were then repeated using ethylene/air mixtures, which were found to be more easily ignited by thermal sparks than the JP4/ air mixtures.

  2. Novel anisole mixture and gasoline containing the same

    DOEpatents

    Singerman, Gary M.

    1982-01-26

    A novel anisole mixture containing anisole and a mixture of alkyl anisoles and liquid hydrocarbon fuels containing said novel anisole mixture in an amount sufficient to increase the octane number of said liquid fuel composition.

  3. Advanced Systems for Preprocessing and Characterizing Coal-Biomass Mixtures as Next-Generation Fuels and Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Karmis, Michael; Luttrell, Gerald; Ripepi, Nino; Bratton, Robert; Dohm, Erich

    2014-06-30

    The research activities presented in this report are intended to address the most critical technical challenges pertaining to coal-biomass briquette feedstocks. Several detailed investigations were conducted using a variety of coal and biomass feedstocks on the topics of (1) coal-biomass briquette production and characterization, (2) gasification of coal-biomass mixtures and briquettes, (3) combustion of coal-biomass mixtures and briquettes, and (4) conceptual engineering design and economic feasibility of briquette production. The briquette production studies indicate that strong and durable co-firing feedstocks can be produced by co-briquetting coal and biomass resources commonly available in the United States. It is demonstrated that binderless coal-biomass briquettes produced at optimized conditions exhibit very high strength and durability, which indicates that such briquettes would remain competent in the presence of forces encountered in handling, storage and transportation. The gasification studies conducted demonstrate that coal-biomass mixtures and briquettes are exceptional gasification feedstocks, particularly with regard to the synergistic effects realized during devolatilization of the blended materials. The mixture combustion studies indicate that coal-biomass mixtures are exceptional combustion feedstocks, while the briquette combustion study indicates that the use of blended briquettes reduces NO{sub x}, CO{sub 2}, and CO emissions, and requires the least amount of changes in the operating conditions of an existing coal-fired power plant. Similar results were obtained for the physical durability of the pilot-scale briquettes compared to the bench-scale tests. Finally, the conceptual engineering and feasibility analysis study for a commercial-scale briquetting production facility provides preliminary flowsheet and cost simulations to evaluate the various feedstocks, equipment selection and operating parameters.

  4. [Hypoxic gas mixture delivery due to a defective vaporiser manifold: case report, review of the literature and suggested emergency management algorithm].

    PubMed

    Berlet, T

    2014-04-01

    A case of delivery of a hypoxic gas mixture to a patient during total intravenous anesthesia is described. A progressive fall in inspiratory oxygen concentration followed by a drop in oxygen saturation below 90 % occurred during the advanced stages of a hitherto uneventful general anesthesia of a female patient undergoing anterior cervical fusion surgery. A malfunctioning defective rubber seal of a vaporizer manifold was identified as the cause of the gas leak. The leak had not been detected during the preanesthesia leak test. The problem of hypoxic gas mixtures and uncommon leaks in modern anesthesia equipment is discussed. The importance of locating a leak in the high or low pressure circuits is explained. An algorithm for the management of an unexpected decrease of inspiratory oxygen concentration or any other manifestation of a gas leak along with a systematic approach to locating the source of a gas leak is presented. PMID:24584839

  5. FUEL 84: CO2/SO2 sequestration via brine/bauxite residue mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Yee; Dilmore, R, M.; Hedges, Sheila W.; Griffith, Craig A.; Romanov, V.; Allen, D. E.; Zhu, Chen; Fu, J. K.

    2008-08-17

    A novel concept that can achieve neutralization of bauxite residue through reaction with acidic oil and gas field wastewater brines with subsequent carbonation with flue gas has been explored. Experiments were conducted to determine the ability of bauxite residue brine reactant mixtures to absorb and sequester CO2 and SO2 both from a concentrated stream and as components of a mixed flue gas. The use of bauxite residue/brine mixtures to capture and store CO2 can serve to not only help mitigate the impact of anthropogenic CO2 on global warming but also serve to achieve neutralization of the caustic industrial waste for safe storage.

  6. Thermodynamic analysis of a new combined cooling, heat and power system driven by solid oxide fuel cell based on ammonia-water mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shaolin; Wang, Jiangfeng; Yan, Zhequan; Dai, Yiping; Lu, Bingheng

    2011-10-01

    Although a solid oxide fuel cell combined with a gas turbine (SOFC-GT) has good performance, the temperature of exhaust from gas turbine is still relatively high. In order to recover the waste heat of exhaust from the SOFC-GT to enhance energy conversion efficiency as well as to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases and pollutants, in this study a new combined cooling, heat and power (CCHP) system driven by the SOFC is proposed to perform the trigeneration by using ammonia-water mixture to recover the waste heat of exhaust from the SOFC-GT. The CCHP system, whose main fuel is methane, can generate electricity, cooling effect and heat effect simultaneously. The overall system performance has been evaluated by mathematical models and thermodynamic laws. A parametric analysis is also conducted to examine the effects of some key thermodynamic parameters on the system performance. Results indicate that the overall energy conversion efficiency exceeds 80% under the given conditions, and it is also found that the increasing the fuel flow rate can improve overall energy conversion efficiency, even though both the SOFC efficiency and electricity efficiency decrease. Moreover, with an increased compressor pressure ratio, the SOFC efficiency, electricity efficiency and overall energy conversion efficiency all increase. Ammonia concentration and pressure entering ammonia-water turbine can also affect the CCHP system performance.

  7. Flame acceleration and the development of detonation in fuel-oxygen mixtures at elevated temperatures and pressures.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G O

    2009-04-30

    Experimental measurements of the conditions required for the development of detonation in a 7 mm tube following ignition by a low energy spark are reported. There are then compared to previous experimental propagation limit criterion using theoretical predictions of detonation cell sizes based on a one-dimensional detonation length scale computed using a detailed chemical kinetic scheme. Technical difficulties precluded direct cell size measurements. Ethylene-oxygen and hydrogen-methane-oxygen mixtures were investigated as well as methane-ammonia-oxygen, at initial pressures and temperatures in the ranges 1-7 bar and 293-540 K, respectively. The likelihood of detonation in ethylene-air mixtures in 150 mm and 50mm pipes at ambient initial conditions is also discussed in relation to published cell width data.The results indicate that whilst detonation cell width predictions do not provide a quantitative measure of the conditions for which detonation may develop in a pipe of given diameter, for prescribed initial conditions, predicted detonation cell size data does provide useful qualitative guidance as to possible hazardous compositions, particularly if preliminary experimental safety testing is thought to be necessary. PMID:18782653

  8. Upgrading of consumer characteristics of granulated solid fuel from mixture of low-grade coal and biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmina, J. S.; Milovanov, O. Yu; Sinelshchikov, V. A.; Sytchev, G. A.; Zaichenko, V. M.

    2015-11-01

    Effect of torrefaction on consumer characteristics of fuel pellets made of low-grade and agricultural waste is shown. Data on the volatile content, ash content, calorific value and hygroscopicity for initial pellets and pellets, heat-treated at various temperatures are presented. The experimental study of the combustion process of initial and heat-treated pellets showed that torrefaction of pellets leads to a decreasing of the ignition temperature and an increasing of the efficiency of boiler plant.

  9. A Kinetic Modeling study on the Oxidation of Primary Reference Fuel?Toluene Mixtures Including Cross Reactions between Aromatics and Aliphatics

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Y; Miyoshi, A; Koshi, M; Pitz, W J

    2008-01-09

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for the mixtures of Primary Reference Fuel (PRF: n-heptane and iso-octane) and toluene has been proposed. This model is divided into three parts; a PRF mechanism [T. Ogura et al., Energy & Fuels 21 (2007) 3233-3239], toluene sub-mechanism and cross reactions between PRF and toluene. Toluene sub-mechanism includes the low temperature kinetics relevant to engine conditions. A chemical kinetic mechanism proposed by Pitz et al. [Proc. the 2nd Joint Meeting of the U.S. Combust. Institute (2001)] was used as a starting model and modified by updating rate coefficients. Theoretical estimations of rate coefficients were performed for toluene and benzyl radical reactions important at low temperatures. Cross-reactions between alkane, alkene, and aromatics were also included in order to account for the acceleration by the addition of toluene into iso-octane recently found in the shock tube study of the ignition delay [Y. Sakai et al, SAE 2007-01-4014 (2007)]. Validations of the model were performed with existing shock tube and flow tube data. The model well predicts the ignition characteristics of toluene and PRF/Toluene mixtures under the wide range of temperatures (500-1700 K) and pressures (2-50 atm). It is found that reactions of benzyl radical with oxygen molecule determine the reactivity of toluene at low temperature. Although the effect of toluene addition to iso-octane is not fully resolved, the reactions of alkene with benzyl radical have the possibility to account for the kinetic interactions between PRF and toluene.

  10. MnO2 nanotube-Pt/graphene mixture as an ORR catalyst for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya, P.; Ramaprabhu, S.

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, MnO2 nanotubes are synthesized by hydrothermal method and Pt/graphene by co reduction of hexachloroplatinic acid and graphite oxide. The formation of MnO2 nanotubes and Pt/graphene are confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy. MnO2 nanotubes are mixed with Pt/graphene is applied as the ORR catalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cell. The single cell measurement is carried out after fabricating the membrane electrode assembly and polarization curves are recorded at different temperatures and the results are discussed.

  11. Influence of the composition of isopropyl alcohol/water mixture solvents in catalyst ink solutions on proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Trung Truc; Yu, T. Leon; Lin, Hsiu-Li

    2013-03-01

    We study the morphology of Nafion in the dilute IPA (isopropyl alcohol)/water mixture solutions containing 20-100 wt.% of IPA and in the Pt-C/Nafion gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs; where Pt-C is the carbon powder deposited on its surface with Pt particles), which are prepared by spraying on the carbon paper surfaces with a layer of Pt-C, Nafion and IPA/water ink solution. The fuel cell performance of the GDEs strongly depends on the Nafion morphology in the ink solutions. A lower IPA content in the Pt-C/Nafion ink solutions results in the formation of larger and higher negatively charged Nafion aggregated particles, which leads to higher steric hindrance of the deposition of Nafion ionomer on the surface of Pt-C particles and thus a thinner Nafion film in contact on the Pt-C particle surfaces. The thinner Nafion film in contact with the Pt particles in the CL increases the chances of the Pt particles in contact with the H2/O2 gas, leading to a higher fuel cell performance.

  12. Time scales and ratios of climate forcing due to thermal versus carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaochun; Caldeira, Ken

    2015-06-01

    The Earth warms both when fossil fuel carbon is oxidized to carbon dioxide and when greenhouse effect of carbon dioxide inhibits longwave radiation from escaping to space. Various important time scales and ratios comparing these two climate forcings have not previously been quantified. For example, the global and time-integrated radiative forcing from burning a fossil fuel exceeds the heat released upon combustion within 2 months. Over the long lifetime of CO2 in the atmosphere, the cumulative CO2-radiative forcing exceeds the amount of energy released upon combustion by a factor >100,000. For a new power plant, the radiative forcing from the accumulation of released CO2 exceeds the direct thermal emissions in less than half a year. Furthermore, we show that the energy released from the combustion of fossil fuels is now about 1.71% of the radiative forcing from CO2 that has accumulated in the atmosphere as a consequence of historical fossil fuel combustion.

  13. Effects of hydrogen preconversion on the homogeneous ignition of fuel-lean H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures over platinum at moderate pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Ghermay, Yohannes; Mantzaras, John; Bombach, Rolf

    2010-10-15

    The impact of fractional hydrogen preconversion on the subsequent homogeneous ignition characteristics of fuel-lean (equivalence ratio {phi} = 0.30) H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures over platinum was investigated experimentally and numerically at pressures of 1, 5 and 8 bar. Experiments were performed in an optically accessible channel-flow reactor and involved Raman measurements of major species over the catalyst boundary layer and planar laser induced fluorescence (LIF) of the OH radical. Simulations were carried out with a 2-D elliptic code that included detailed hetero-/homogeneous chemistry. The predictions reproduced the LIF-measured onset of homogeneous ignition and the Raman-measured transport-limited catalytic hydrogen consumption. For 0% preconversion and wall temperatures in the range 900 K {<=} T{sub w} {<=} 1100 K, homogeneous ignition was largely suppressed for p {>=} 5 bar due to the combined effects of intrinsic gas-phase hydrogen kinetics and the competition between the catalytic and gas-phase pathways for fuel consumption. A moderate increase of preconversion to 30% restored homogeneous combustion for p {>=} 5 bar, despite the fact that the water formed due to the upstream preconversion inhibited homogeneous ignition. The catalytically-produced water inhibited gas-phase combustion, particularly at higher pressures, and this kinetic inhibition was exacerbated by the diffusional imbalance of hydrogen that led to over-stoichiometric amounts of water in the near-wall hot ignitable regions. Radical adsorption/desorption reactions hindered the onset of homogeneous ignition and this effect was more pronounced at 1 bar. On the other hand, over the post-ignition reactor length, radical adsorption/desorption reactions significantly suppressed gas-phase combustion at 5 and 8 bar while their impact at 1 bar was weaker. By increasing hydrogen preconversion, the attained superadiabatic surface temperatures could be effectively suppressed. An

  14. Alternatives to Diesel Fuel in California - Fuel Cycle Energy and Emission Effects of Possible Replacements Due to the TAC Diesel Particulate Decision

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher L. Saraicks; Donald M. Rote; Frank Stodolsky; James J. Eberhardt

    2000-05-01

    Limitations on petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies, each of which results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, with substantial displacement of compression ignition by spark ignition engines, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles. Gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters (8.5 million gallons) per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter (3.6 million gallon) equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, ressionignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Fuel replacement by di-methyl ether yields the greatest overall reduction in NOx emissions, though all scenarios bring about PM10 reductions relative to the 2010 baseline, with greatest reductions from the first case described above and the least from fuel replacement by Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not formally evaluated.

  15. Alternatives to diesel fuel in California - fuel cycle energy and emission effects of possible replacements due to the TAC diesel particulate decision.

    SciTech Connect

    Saricks, C. L.; Rote, D. M.; Stodolsky, F.; Eberhardt, J. J.

    1999-12-03

    Limitations on petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible mid-course strategies, each of which results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, with substantial displacement of compression-ignition by spark-ignition engines, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles. Gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters (8.5 million gallons) per day overall, about 21% above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter (3.6 million gallon) equivalents per day, about 7% above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case the authors estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Fuel replacement by di-methyl ether yields the greatest overall reduction in NOX emissions, though all scenarios bring about PM{sub 10} reductions relative to the 2010 baseline, with greatest reductions from the first case described above and the least from fuel replacement by Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not formally evaluated.

  16. Comparison of quartz tuning forks and AlN-based extensional microresonators for viscosity measurements in oil/fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, J.; Manzaneque, T.; Hernando-García, J.; Vazquez, J.; Ababneh, A.; Seidel, H.; Lapuerta, M.; Sánchez-Rojas, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    In-situ monitoring of the physical properties of liquids is of great interest in the automotive industry. For example, lubricants are subject to dilution with diesel fuel as a consequence of late-injection processes, which are necessary for regenerating diesel particulate filters. This dilution can be determined by tracking the viscosity and the density of the lubricant. Here we report the test of two in-plane movement based resonators to explore their capability to monitor oil dilution with diesel and biodiesel. One of the resonators is the commercially available millimeter-sized quartz tuning fork, working at 32.7 kHz. The second resonator is a state-of-the-art micron-sized AlN-based rectangular plate, actuated in the first extensional mode in the MHz range. Electrical impedance measurements were carried out to characterize the performance of the structures in various liquid media in a wide range of viscosities. These measurements were completed with the development of low-cost electronic circuits to track the resonance frequency and the quality factor automatically, these two parameters allow to obtain the viscosity of various fluids under investigation, as in the case of dilution of lubricant SAE 15W40 and biodiesel.

  17. Improvement of performance in low temperature solid oxide fuel cells operated on ethanol and air mixtures using Cu-ZnO-Al2O3 catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, M.; Espiell, F.; Segarra, M.

    2015-10-01

    Anode-supported single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells with and without Cu-ZnO-Al2O3 catalyst layers deposited on the anode support have been operated on ethanol and air mixtures. The cells consist of gadolinia-doped ceria electrolyte, Ni-doped ceria anode, and La0.6Sr0.4CoO3-δ-doped ceria cathode. Catalyst layers with different Cu-ZnO-Al2O3 ratios are deposited and sintered at several temperatures. Since the performance of single-chamber fuel cells strongly depends on catalytic properties of electrodes for partial oxidation of ethanol, the cells are electrochemically characterized as a function of the temperature, ethanol-air molar ratio and gas flow rate. In addition, catalytic activities of supported anode, catalytic layer-supported anode and cathode for partial oxidation of ethanol are analysed. Afterwards, the effect of composition and sintering temperature of catalyst layer on the cell performance are determined. The results indicate that the cell performance can be significantly enhanced using catalyst layers of 30:35:35 and 40:30:30 wt.% Cu-ZnO-Al2O3 sintered at 1100 °C, achieving power densities above 50 mW cm-2 under 0.45 ethanol-air ratio at temperatures as low as 450 °C. After testing for 15 h, all cells present a gradual loss of power density, without carbon deposition, which is mainly attributed to the partial re-oxidation of Ni at the anode.

  18. End-to-end testing. [to verify electrical equipment failure due to carbon fibers released in aircraft-fuel fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The principle objective of the kinds of demonstration tests that are discussed is to try to verify whether or not carbon fibers that are released by burning composite parts in an aircraft-fuel fires can produce failures in electrical equipment. A secondary objective discussed is to experimentally validate the analytical models for some of the key elements in the risk analysis. The approach to this demonstration testing is twofold: limited end-to-end test are to be conducted in a shock tube; and planning for some large outdoor burn tests is being done.

  19. Stochastic simulation of fission product activity in primary coolant due to fuel rod failures in typical PWRs under power transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed Iqbal, M.; Mirza, Nasir M.; Mirza, Sikander M.

    2008-01-01

    During normal operation of PWRs, routine fuel rods failures result in release of radioactive fission products (RFPs) in the primary coolant of PWRs. In this work, a stochastic model has been developed for simulation of failure time sequences and release rates for the estimation of fission product activity in primary coolant of a typical PWR under power perturbations. In the first part, a stochastic approach is developed, based on generation of fuel failure event sequences by sampling the time dependent intensity functions. Then a three-stage model based deterministic methodology of the FPCART code has been extended to include failure sequences and random release rates in a computer code FPCART-ST, which uses state-of-the-art LEOPARD and ODMUG codes as its subroutines. The value of the 131I activity in primary coolant predicted by FPCART-ST code has been found in good agreement with the corresponding values measured at ANGRA-1 nuclear power plant. The predictions of FPCART-ST code with constant release option have also been found to have good agreement with corresponding experimental values for time dependent 135I, 135Xe and 89Kr concentrations in primary coolant measured during EDITHMOX-1 experiments.

  20. Analysis of the electrochemical performance of MoNi-CeO2 cermet as anode material for solid oxide fuel cell. Part I. H2, CH4 and H2/CH4 mixtures as fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, M. J.; Gómez de Parada, I.; Fuerte, A.; Serrano, J. L.

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the catalytic activity and the electrochemical performance of bimetallic formulation combining Mo and Ni with CeO2 (MoNi-Ce) in relation its potential use as anode material for SOFC. The catalytic properties were evaluated for methane partial oxidation as function of temperature and the carbon deposition on the anode surface was analysed by TG-MS. A conversion of 12.8% was reached for partial methane oxidation at 850 °C as well as a high coke resistance. The electrochemical performance was studied in a single cell with La0.58Sr0.4Fe0.8Co0.2O3-δ (LSCF) as cathode, La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.8Mg0.2O2.85 (LSGM) as electrolyte and MoNi-Ce as anode. A thin buffer layer of La0.4Ce0.6O4-δ (LCD) between anode and electrolyte was used to avoid possible interfacial reactions. The cell was tested in different humidified fuels (H2, CH4 and H2/CH4 mixtures) and static air at 750, 800 and 850 °C. The electrochemical behaviour was evaluated by current-voltage curves, impedance spectroscopy and load demand. Stability tests were also performed in pure CH4 at each studied temperature in order to assess degradation of the electrochemical cell performance. No significant performance degradation was detected in all studied fuels even pure methane, which suggests that MoNi-Ce is a suitable anode material for direct methane SOFC.

  1. Numerical investigation of interfacial transport resistance due to water droplets in proton exchange membrane fuel cell air channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koz, Mustafa; Kandlikar, Satish G.

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen transport resistance at the air flow channel and gas diffusion layer (GDL) interface is needed in modelling the performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). This resistance is expressed through the non-dimensional Sherwood number (Sh). The effect of the presence of a droplet on Sh is studied numerically in an isolated air flow channel using a commercially available package, COMSOL Multiphysics®. A droplet is represented as a solid obstruction placed on the GDL-channel interface and centred along the channel width. The effect of a single droplet is first studied for a range of superficial mean air velocities and droplet sizes. Secondly, the effect of droplet spacing on Sh is studied through simulations of two consecutive droplets. Lastly, multiple droplets in a row are studied as a more representative case of a PEMFC air flow channel. The results show that the droplets significantly increase Sh above the fully developed value in the wake region. This enhancement increases with the number of droplets, droplet size, and superficial mean air velocity. Moreover, the analogy between mass and heat transfer is investigated by comparing Sh to the equivalent Nusselt number.

  2. Studies of Temperature Elevation Due to the Pre-flame Reaction in a Spark-ignition Engine with CARS Temperature Measurements Using Fuels of Various Octane Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Inyong; Chun, Kwang Min; Hahn, Jae Won; Park, Chul-Woung

    The unburned end-gas temperatures in a combustion chamber of a conventional 4-cylinder DOHC spark-ignition engine were measured using the broadband CARS temperature measurement technique. The test engine was fueled with primary reference fuel 80 and gasoline with research octane numbers of 70.9, 83.4, 91.5 and 100.4. The measured CARS temperatures were compared with the adiabatic core temperatures calculated from the measured pressures. Significant heating by pre-flame reaction in the end gas zone was observed in the late part of compression stroke under both knocking and non-knocking conditions. The measured CARS temperatures when the cylinder pressures were above 1400kPa were higher than the calculated adiabatic core temperatures. These results indicate that some exothermic reactions exist in relatively low pressure and temperature regions. The CARS temperatures began to be higher than the adiabatic core temperature when the end-gas temperatures reached 700K. The temperature elevation due to the pre-flame reaction correlated well with the unburned gas CARS temperature for different research octane number fuels tested.

  3. Fuel composition

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.H.

    1990-06-26

    This patent describes a motor fuel composition. It comprises: a mixture of hydrocarbons in the gasoline boiling range containing a deposit preventing or reducing effective amount of poly(olefin)-N-substituted- carbamate.

  4. 33 CFR 155.370 - Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of 10,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... approved under paragraph (a) of this section, it must meet current standards in 46 CFR part 162, subpart... oily mixtures on ships certificated under 46 CFR Chapter I shall meet the requirements of 46 CFR...

  5. Sooting characteristics of surrogates for jet fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Mensch, Amy; Santoro, Robert J.; Litzinger, Thomas A.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2010-06-15

    Currently, modeling the combustion of aviation fuels, such as JP-8 and JetA, is not feasible due to the complexity and compositional variation of these practical fuels. Surrogate fuel mixtures, composed of a few pure hydrocarbon compounds, are a key step toward modeling the combustion of practical aviation fuels. For the surrogate to simulate the practical fuel, the composition must be designed to reproduce certain pre-designated chemical parameters such as sooting tendency, H/C ratio, autoignition, as well as physical parameters such as boiling range and density. In this study, we focused only on the sooting characteristics based on the Threshold Soot Index (TSI). New measurements of TSI values derived from the smoke point along with other sooting tendency data from the literature have been combined to develop a set of recommended TSI values for pure compounds used to make surrogate mixtures. When formulating the surrogate fuel mixtures, the TSI values of the components are used to predict the TSI of the mixture. To verify the empirical mixture rule for TSI, the TSI values of several binary mixtures of candidate surrogate components were measured. Binary mixtures were also used to derive a TSI for iso-cetane, which had not previously been measured, and to verify the TSI for 1-methylnaphthalene, which had a low smoke point and large relative uncertainty as a pure compound. Lastly, surrogate mixtures containing three components were tested to see how well the measured TSI values matched the predicted values, and to demonstrate that a target value for TSI can be maintained using various components, while also holding the H/C ratio constant. (author)

  6. Parametric studies with an atmospheric diffusion model that assesses toxic fuel hazards due to the ground clouds generated by rocket launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. B.; Grose, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Parametric studies were made with a multilayer atmospheric diffusion model to place quantitative limits on the uncertainty of predicting ground-level toxic rocket-fuel concentrations. Exhaust distributions in the ground cloud, cloud stabilized geometry, atmospheric coefficients, the effects of exhaust plume afterburning of carbon monoxide CO, assumed surface mixing-layer division in the model, and model sensitivity to different meteorological regimes were studied. Large-scale differences in ground-level predictions are quantitatively described. Cloud alongwind growth for several meteorological conditions is shown to be in error because of incorrect application of previous diffusion theory. In addition, rocket-plume calculations indicate that almost all of the rocket-motor carbon monoxide is afterburned to carbon dioxide CO2, thus reducing toxic hazards due to CO. The afterburning is also shown to have a significant effect on cloud stabilization height and on ground-level concentrations of exhaust products.

  7. Laminar burning speed measurements of indolene-air-diluent mixtures at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, D.B.; Keck, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The laminar burning speeds of two practical multi-component hydrocarbon fuels similar to automotive gasoline were measured using a spherical combustion bomb with central ignition. Mixtures with equivalence ratios between 0.7 and 1.6, and volume fractions of simulated residual gas between 0 and 0.3 were tested at pressures from 0.4 atm to 12 atm and unburned gas temperatures from 350 K to 550 K. The laminar burning speeds were fitted to a power function expression involving the unburned gas pressure and temperature, and the diluent fraction. The pressure and temperature dependences of the laminar burning speed for undiluted mixtures agreed well with values reported by other investigators for various fuels, indicating that these dependences are independent of fuel type. The percentage reduction in laminar burning speed due to the addition of simulated residual gas was found to be a function only of the amount added, independent of the properties of the mixture.

  8. Program of basic research on the utilization of coal-water mixture fuels. Quarterly report for the period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Casassa, E.Z.; Padmanaban, J.; Parfitt, G.D.; Rao, S.A.; Rubin, E.S.; Sommer, H.T.; Toor, E.W.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this research involves improving basic understanding of two areas of special importance to the successful use of coal-water slurries: mixture stability and atomization. The present report covers progress for the calendar quarter ending September 30, 1981; hence, reivews the start-up activities for the first three weeks of the project. Section 2 of this report reviews activities in the study of mixture stability. Section 3 discusses studies on the atomization of coal-water slurries. Sections 2 and 3 each are organized according to specific tasks listed in the proposal Statement of Work.

  9. Utilization of the heat of catalytic combustion of low-calorie gaseous fuel mixtures by reversing the direction of their input

    SciTech Connect

    Boreskov, G.K.; Ivanov, A.G.; Matros, Y.S.

    1986-05-01

    In the recovery and processing of various industrial raw materials, gas-air mixtures are formed which contain small quantities of carbon monoxide, methane, and other combustible substances. This paper proposes and discusses a method of obtaining high-level heat from these low concentration gases. A nonsteady-state method is proposed in which the reaction mixture is fed at low temperature into a reactor and onto an initially warmed-up stationary catalyst bed; the direction of the feed is periodically reversed. This process forms a slowly migrating front of an exothermic chemical reaction in the bed.

  10. Fuel compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Zaweski, E.F.; Niebylski, L.M.

    1986-09-23

    This patent describes a distillate fuel for indirect injection compression ignition engines containing at least the combination of (i) organic nitrate ignition accelerator, and (ii) an additive selected from the group consisting of alkenyl substituted succinimide, alkenyl substituted succinamide and mixtures thereof. The alkenyl substituent contains about 12-36 carbon atoms, the additive being made by the process comprising (a) isomerizing the double bond of an ..cap alpha..-olefin containing about 12-36 carbon atoms to obtain a mixture of internal olefins, (b) reacting the mixture of internal olefins with maleic acid, anhydride or ester to obtain an intermediate alkenyl substituted succinic acid, anhydride or ester, and (c) reacting the intermediate with ammonia to form a succinimide, succinamide or mixture thereof. The combination is present in an amount sufficient to minimize the coking characteristics of such fuel, especially throttling nozzle coking in the prechambers or swirl chambers of indirect injection compression ignition engines operated on such fuel.

  11. Neutronics Benchmarks for the Utilization of Mixed-Oxide Fuel: Joint U.S./ Russian Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1997, Volume 4, Part 8 - Neutron Poison Plates in Assemblies Containing Homogeneous Mixtures of Polystyrene-Moderated Plutonium and Uranium Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Yavuz, M.

    1999-05-01

    In the 1970s at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), a series of critical experiments using a remotely operated Split-Table Machine was performed with homogeneous mixtures of (Pu-U)O{sub 2}-polystyrene fuels in the form of square compacts having different heights. The experiments determined the critical geometric configurations of MOX fuel assemblies with and without neutron poison plates. With respect to PuO{sub 2} content and moderation [H/(Pu+U)atomic] ratio (MR), two different homogeneous (Pu-U) O{sub 2}-polystyrene mixtures were considered: Mixture (1) 14.62 wt% PuO{sub 2} with 30.6 MR, and Mixture (2) 30.3 wt% PuO{sub 2} with 2.8 MR. In all mixtures, the uranium was depleted to about O.151 wt% U{sup 235}. Assemblies contained copper, copper-cadmium or aluminum neutron poison plates having thicknesses up to {approximately}2.5 cm. This evaluation contains 22 experiments for Mixture 1, and 10 for Mixture 2 compacts. For Mixture 1, there are 10 configurations with copper plates, 6 with aluminum, and 5 with copper-cadmium. One experiment contained no poison plate. For Mixture 2 compacts, there are 3 configurations with copper, 3 with aluminum, and 3 with copper-cadmium poison plates. One experiment contained no poison plate.

  12. 33 CFR 155.370 - Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of 10,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... approved under paragraph (a) of this section, it must meet current standards in 46 CFR part 162, subpart... oily mixtures on ships certificated under 46 CFR Chapter I shall meet the requirements of 46 CFR 56.50... oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of 10,000 gross tons and above and...

  13. 33 CFR 155.370 - Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of 10,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... approved under paragraph (a) of this section, it must meet current standards in 46 CFR part 162, subpart... oily mixtures on ships certificated under 46 CFR Chapter I shall meet the requirements of 46 CFR 56.50... oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of 10,000 gross tons and above and...

  14. Modeling of molten-fuel-moderator interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diab, Aya K.

    CANDU reactors are pressurized heavy-water moderated and cooled reactor designs. During commissioning of nuclear power plants a range of possible accidents must be considered to assure the plants' robust design. Consider a complete channel blockage in the CANDU reactor. Such an extreme flow blockage event would result in fuel overheating, pressure tube failure, partial melting of fuel rods and possible molten fuel-moderator interactions (MFMI). The MFMI phenomenon would occur immediately after tube rupture, and would involve a mixture of steam, hydrogen and molten fuel being ejected into the surrounding moderator water in the form of a high-pressure vapor bubble mixture. This bubble mixture would accelerate the surrounding denser water, causing interfacial mixing due to hydrodynamic instabilities at the interface. As a result of these interfacial instabilities, water is entrained into the growing two-phase bubble mixture with the attendant mass and heat transfer; e.g., water vaporization, fuel oxidation. A comprehensive model is developed to investigate these complex phenomena resulting from a postulated complete flow blockage and complete pressure tube failure. This dynamic model serves as a baseline to characterize the pressure response due to a pressure tube rupture and the associated MFMI phenomena. Theoretical modeling of these interrelated complex phenomena is not known a priori and therefore a semi-empirical approach is adopted. Consequently, experimental work is being proposed as part of the thesis work to verify key hypotheses regarding these interfacial fluid instabilities, such as the entrainment fraction into the rapidly expanding bubble.

  15. Combustion of Gaseous Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duchene, R

    1932-01-01

    This report not only presents matters of practical importance in the classification of engine fuels, for which other means have proved inadequate, but also makes a few suggestions. It confirms the results of Withrow and Boyd which localize the explosive wave in the last portions of the mixture burned. This being the case, it may be assumed that the greater the normal combustion, the less the energy developed in the explosive form. In order to combat the detonation, it is therefore necessary to try to render the normal combustion swift and complete, as produced in carbureted mixtures containing benzene (benzol), in which the flame propagation, beginning at the spark, yields a progressive and pronounced darkening on the photographic film.

  16. Simple binary mixtures of hydrogen and ammonia under extreme pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borstad, Gustav; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-03-01

    Binary mixtures under pressure are of interest as fundamental systems in physics and chemistry as they allow the effects of the environment on the behavior of different chemical compounds to be examined. Furthermore, mixtures of simple molecular systems are of interest for applications in fuel cells and also to planetary science due to their presence in the interiors of the giant gas planets. In this presentation, Raman data on the ammonia and hydrogen system under pressure will be presented, and the extent and nature of the interactions in this mixture will be discussed. The work has been supported by NSF (DMR-0854618 and DMR-1203834); GB was also supported by the ISP scholarship at WSU.

  17. Solid fuel applications to transportation engines

    SciTech Connect

    Rentz, Richard L.; Renner, Roy A.

    1980-06-01

    The utilization of solid fuels as alternatives to liquid fuels for future transportation engines is reviewed. Alternative liquid fuels will not be addressed nor will petroleum/solid fuel blends except for the case of diesel engines. With respect to diesel engines, coal/oil mixtures will be addressed because of the high interest in this specific application as a result of the large number of diesel engines currently in transportation use. Final assessments refer to solid fuels only for diesel engines. The technical assessments of solid fuels utilization for transportation engines is summarized: solid fuel combustion in transportation engines is in a non-developed state; highway transportation is not amenable to solid fuels utilization due to severe environmental, packaging, control, and disposal problems; diesel and open-cycle gas turbines do not appear worthy of further development, although coal/oil mixtures for slow speed diesels may offer some promise as a transition technology; closed-cycle gas turbines show some promise for solid fuels utilization for limited applications as does the Stirling engine for use of cleaner solid fuels; Rankine cycle engines show good potential for limited applications, such as for locomotives and ships; and any development program will require large resources and sophisticated equipment in order to advance the state-of-the-art.

  18. Variable mixture ratio performance through nitrogen augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichel, R.; Obrien, C. J.; Bair, E. K.

    1988-01-01

    High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 candidate engine cycles are examined for earth-to-orbit vehicle application. Engine performance and power balance information are presented for the candidate cycles relative to chamber pressure, bulk density, and mixture ratio. Included in the cycle screening are concepts where a third fluid (liquid nitrogen) is used to achieve a variable mixture ratio over the trajectory from liftoff to earth orbit. The third fluid cycles offer a very low risk, fully reusable, low operation cost alternative to high/variable mixture ratio bipropellant cycles. Variable mixture ratio engines with extendible nozzle are slightly lower performing than a single mixture ratio engine (MR = 7:1) with extendible nozzle. Dual expander engines (MR = 7:1) have slightly better performance than the single mixture ratio engine. Dual fuel dual expander engines offer a 16 percent improvement over the single mixture ratio engine.

  19. A multivariate assessment of innate immune-related gene expressions due to exposure to low concentration individual and mixtures of four kinds of heavy metals on zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Cobbina, Samuel Jerry; Xu, Hai; Zhao, Ting; Mao, Guanghua; Zhou, Zhaoxiang; Wu, Xueshan; Liu, Hongyang; Zou, Yanmin; Wu, Xiangyang; Yang, Liuqing

    2015-12-01

    Concerns over the potential health effects of mixtures of low concentration heavy metals on living organisms keep growing by the day. However, the toxicity of low concentration metal mixtures on the immune system of fish species has rarely been investigated. In this study, the zebrafish model was employed to investigate the effect on innate immune and antioxidant-related gene expressions, on exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of individual and mixtures of Pb (0.01 mg/L), Hg (0.001 mg/L), As (0.01 mg/L) and Cd (0.005 mg/L). Messenger-RNA (mRNA) levels of IL1β, TNF-α, IFNγ, Mx, Lyz, C3B and CXCL-Clc which are closely associated with the innate immune system were affected after exposing zebrafish embryos to metals for 120 h post fertilization (hpf). Individual and mixtures of metals exhibited different potentials to modulate innate-immune gene transcription. IL1β genes were significantly up regulated on exposure to Pb + As (2.01-fold) and inhibited on exposure to Pb + Hg + Cd (0.13-fold). TNF-α was significantly inhibited on exposure to As (0.40-fold) and Pb + As (0.32-fold) compared to control. Metal mixtures generally up regulated IFNγ compared to individual metals. Additionally, antioxidant genes were affected, as CAT and GPx gene expressions generally increased, whiles Mn-SOD and Zn/Cu-SOD reduced. Multivariate analysis showed that exposure to individual metals greatly influenced modulation of innate immune genes; whiles metal mixtures influenced antioxidant gene expressions. This suggests that beside oxidative stress, there may be other pathways influencing gene expressions of innate immune and antioxidant-related genes. Low concentration heavy metals also affect expression of development-related (wnt8a and vegf) genes. Altogether, the results of this study clearly demonstrate that low concentration individual and mixtures of metals in aquatic systems will greatly influence the immune system. It is indicative that mechanisms associated with

  20. 33 CFR 155.330 - Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships. 155.330 Section 155.330 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS...)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships. (a) No person may operate a...

  1. 33 CFR 155.330 - Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships. 155.330 Section 155.330 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS...)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships. (a) No person may operate a...

  2. 33 CFR 155.330 - Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships. 155.330 Section 155.330 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS...)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on U.S. non-oceangoing ships. (a) No person may operate a...

  3. Investigation of structural and chemical transitions in copper oxide microstructures produced by combustion waves in a mixture of CuO-Cu2O-Cu and fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hayoung; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2015-12-01

    The application of micro/nanostructured materials to combustion enables distinctive chemical reactions that can be used to modulate the reaction rates. Simultaneously, combustion is capable of changing the intrinsic properties of micro/nanostructured materials based on chemical interactions in high-temperature conditions. In this work, we investigate the structural-chemical transition of copper oxide microstructures exposed to interfacially driven combustion waves. The high thermal energy and exchange of chemical compounds resulting from the instant combustion waves cause direct transition without any further processes. The precise characterization of the structural and chemical transitions in the copper oxide microstructures and chemical fuels confirm that the self-propagating combustion waves in the layered composites of Cu/Cu2O/CuO microparticle-based films and the chemical fuel layers yield the direct synthesis of Cu(OH)2 flower-like structures and nanowires. The propagation of combustion waves at the interface induces an increase of the surface temperatures over 650 °C and the direct interaction between the copper oxide and chemical compounds of the fuel layers. Further application of these interfacially driven combustion waves will contribute to the development of one-step, fast, low-cost methods for the synthesis of micro/nanostructured materials.

  4. Small global effect on terrestrial net primary production due to increased fossil fuel aerosol emissions from East Asia during the last decade.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Michael; Rap, Alex; Reddington, Carly; Spracklen, Dominick; Buermann, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    The global terrestrial carbon sink has increased since the start of this century at a time of rapidly growing carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel burning. Here we test the hypothesis that increases in atmospheric aerosols from fossil fuel burning have increased the diffuse fraction of incoming solar radiation and the efficiency of photosynthesis leading to increased plant carbon uptake. Using a combination of atmospheric and biospheric models, we find that changes in diffuse light associated with fossil fuel aerosol emission accounts for only 2.8% of the increase in global net primary production (1.221 PgC/yr) over the study period 1998 to 2007. This relatively small global signal is however a result of large regional compensations. Over East Asia, the strong increase in fossil fuel emissions contributed nearly 70% of the increased plant carbon uptake (21 TgC/yr), whereas the declining fossil fuel aerosol emissions in Europe and North America contributed negatively (-16% and -54%, respectively) to increased plant carbon uptake. At global scale, we also find the CO2 fertilization effect on photosynthesis to be the dominant driver of increased plant carbon uptake, in line with previous studies. These results suggest that further research into alternative mechanisms by which fossil fuel emissions could increase carbon uptake, such as nitrogen deposition and carbon-nitrogen interactions, is required to better understand a potential link between the recent changes in fossil fuel emissions and terrestrial carbon uptake.

  5. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  6. Method for producing hydrocarbon and alcohol mixtures. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Griffith, W.L.

    1980-12-01

    It is an object of this invention to provide an efficient process for extracting alcohols and ketones from an aqueous solution containing the same into hydrocarbon fuel mixtures, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel oil. Another object of the invention is to provide a mixture consisting of hydrocarbon, alcohols or ketones, polyoxyalkylene polymer and water which can be directly added to fuels or further purified. The above stated objects are achieved in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention by contacting an aqueous fermentation liquor with a hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture containing carbon compounds having 5 to 18 carbon atoms, which may include gasoline, diesel fuel or fuel oil. The hydrocarbon-aqueous alcohol solution is mixed in the presence or one or more of a group of polyoxyalkylene polymers described in detail hereinafter; the fermentation alcohol being extracted into the hydrocarbon fuel-polyoxyalkylene polymer mixture.

  7. Fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananyev, S. S.; Spitsyn, A. V.; Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a tokamak-based stationary fusion neutron source (FNS) for scientific research (neutron diffraction, etc.), tests of structural materials for future fusion reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, fission reactor fuel production, and control of subcritical nuclear systems (fusion-fission hybrid reactor) is being developed in Russia. The fuel cycle system is one of the most important systems of FNS that provides circulation and reprocessing of the deuterium-tritium fuel mixture in all fusion reactor systems: the vacuum chamber, neutral injection system, cryogenic pumps, tritium purification system, separation system, storage system, and tritium-breeding blanket. The existing technologies need to be significantly upgraded since the engineering solutions adopted in the ITER project can be only partially used in the FNS (considering the capacity factor higher than 0.3, tritium flow up to 200 m3Pa/s, and temperature of reactor elements up to 650°C). The deuterium-tritium fuel cycle of the stationary FNS is considered. The TC-FNS computer code developed for estimating the tritium distribution in the systems of FNS is described. The code calculates tritium flows and inventory in tokamak systems (vacuum chamber, cryogenic pumps, neutral injection system, fuel mixture purification system, isotope separation system, tritium storage system) and takes into account tritium loss in the fuel cycle due to thermonuclear burnup and β decay. For the two facility versions considered, FNS-ST and DEMO-FNS, the amount of fuel mixture needed for uninterrupted operation of all fuel cycle systems is 0.9 and 1.4 kg, consequently, and the tritium consumption is 0.3 and 1.8 kg per year, including 35 and 55 g/yr, respectively, due to tritium decay.

  8. Fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Ananyev, S. S. Spitsyn, A. V. Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-12-15

    The concept of a tokamak-based stationary fusion neutron source (FNS) for scientific research (neutron diffraction, etc.), tests of structural materials for future fusion reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, fission reactor fuel production, and control of subcritical nuclear systems (fusion–fission hybrid reactor) is being developed in Russia. The fuel cycle system is one of the most important systems of FNS that provides circulation and reprocessing of the deuterium–tritium fuel mixture in all fusion reactor systems: the vacuum chamber, neutral injection system, cryogenic pumps, tritium purification system, separation system, storage system, and tritium-breeding blanket. The existing technologies need to be significantly upgraded since the engineering solutions adopted in the ITER project can be only partially used in the FNS (considering the capacity factor higher than 0.3, tritium flow up to 200 m{sup 3}Pa/s, and temperature of reactor elements up to 650°C). The deuterium–tritium fuel cycle of the stationary FNS is considered. The TC-FNS computer code developed for estimating the tritium distribution in the systems of FNS is described. The code calculates tritium flows and inventory in tokamak systems (vacuum chamber, cryogenic pumps, neutral injection system, fuel mixture purification system, isotope separation system, tritium storage system) and takes into account tritium loss in the fuel cycle due to thermonuclear burnup and β decay. For the two facility versions considered, FNS-ST and DEMO-FNS, the amount of fuel mixture needed for uninterrupted operation of all fuel cycle systems is 0.9 and 1.4 kg, consequently, and the tritium consumption is 0.3 and 1.8 kg per year, including 35 and 55 g/yr, respectively, due to tritium decay.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of a lithium/sodium carbonate mixture.

    PubMed

    Ottochian, Alistar; Ricca, Chiara; Labat, Frederic; Adamo, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    The diffusion and ionic conductivity of Li x Na1-x CO3 salt mixtures were studied by means of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, using the Janssen and Tissen model (Janssen and Tissen, Mol Simul 5:83-98; 1990). These salts have received particular attention due to their central role in fuel cells technology, and reliable numerical methods that could perform as important interpretative tool of experimental data are thus required but still lacking. The chosen computational model nicely reproduces the main structural behaviour of the pure Li2CO3, Na2CO3 and K2CO3 carbonates, but also of their Li/K and Li/Na mixtures. However, it fails to accurately describe dynamic properties such as activation energies of diffusion and conduction processes, outlining the need to develop more accurate models for the simulation of molten salt carbonates. PMID:26897519

  10. Chemical characterization and toxicologic evaluation of airborne mixtures: inhalation toxicology of diesel fuel obscurant aerosol in Spargue-Dawley rats. Final report, phase 2, repeated exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Dalbey, W.; Lock, S., Schmoyer, R.

    1982-07-01

    A series of repeated exposures of rats to aerosolized diesel fuel was performed to help establish indices of potential toxicity resulting from aerosol exposure and the relative importance of duration of exposures, the frequence of exposures, and aerosol concentration in the induction of observed lesions. Body weight and food consumption were recorded on a weekly basis. Assays were performed on selected animals within 1-2 days after the last exposure or after 2 weeks without exposure. Endpoints included number and phagocytic activity of pulmonary free cells, pulmonary function tests, neurotoxicity assays, clinical chemistry, organ weights, and histopathology. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance. After exposure, the primary target organ was the lungs. Focal accumulations of pulmonary free cells were observed in the lung parenchyma, associated with thickening and hypercellularity of alveolar walls. The number of lavaged pulmonary free cells correlated well with histologic observations, remaining elevated after two weeks without exposure. Lung volumes were altered by exposure, including increased FRC, decreased TLC, and decreased VC. Carbon monoxide diffusing capacity was decreased in several exposed groups also. None of the more systemic changes observed were considered to be of biologic significance, even though the exposure conditions were considered to result in a maximum tolerated dose. Frequency of exposure was the dominant variable over the range of parameters used in this study, 3 exposures/wk being more deleterious than 1/week. Variation in duration of exposure appeared to have very little effect and a dose-response was often not apparent with differences in concentration. 12 references, 13 figures, 18 tables.

  11. Gas-phase detonation propagation in mixture composition gradients.

    PubMed

    Kessler, D A; Gamezo, V N; Oran, E S

    2012-02-13

    The propagation of detonations through several fuel-air mixtures with spatially varying fuel concentrations is examined numerically. The detonations propagate through two-dimensional channels, inside of which the gradient of mixture composition is oriented normal to the direction of propagation. The simulations are performed using a two-component, single-step reaction model calibrated so that one-dimensional detonation properties of model low- and high-activation-energy mixtures are similar to those observed in a typical hydrocarbon-air mixture. In the low-activation-energy mixture, the reaction zone structure is complex, consisting of curved fuel-lean and fuel-rich detonations near the line of stoichiometry that transition to decoupled shocks and turbulent deflagrations near the channel walls where the mixture is extremely fuel-lean or fuel-rich. Reactants that are not consumed by the leading detonation combine downstream and burn in a diffusion flame. Detonation cells produced by the unstable reaction front vary in size across the channel, growing larger away from the line of stoichiometry. As the size of the channel decreases relative to the size of a detonation cell, the effect of the mixture composition gradient is lessened and cells of similar sizes form. In the high-activation-energy mixture, detonations propagate more slowly as the magnitude of the mixture composition gradient is increased and can be quenched in a large enough gradient. PMID:22213660

  12. Systematic approach on the fabrication of Co doped ZnO semiconducting nanoparticles by mixture of fuel approach for Antibacterial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendar, V.; Dayakar, T.; Shobhan, K.; Srikanth, I.; Venkateswara Rao, K.

    2014-11-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide band gap semiconductor (3.2 eV) with a high exciton binding energy (60 meV), where it has wide applications in advanced spintronic devices. The theoretical prediction of room temperature ferromagnetism and also antibacterial activity will be possible through the investigation of diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS), such as transition metal doped ZnO, especially Cobalt doped ZnO. The aim of the work is the synthesis of Cobalt (Co) doped ZnO nanopowders were prepared Zn1-xCoxO (0 ⩽ x ⩾ 0.09) nanopowders from Sol-Gel auto combustion method have been synthesized with precursors such as Zinc and Cobalt nitrates with the assistance Ammonium acetate & Urea as fuel by increasing the cobalt concentration in zinc oxide and their structural, morphological, optical, Thermal, magnetic and antibacterial properties were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), Transmission Electron microscope (TEM), UV-visible spectroscopy, thermo gravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) and vibrating sample magneto meter (VSM). From the antibacterial studies, against gram positive Bacillus subtilis bacteria is most abundant bacteria in soil and indoor atmosphere, which affects the stored spintronic devices so that the devices should be made with antibacterial activity of DMS like Co doped ZnO. In this article is found that ZnO:Co nanopowders with higher Co doping level (0.07 and 0.09 wt%) exhibit good antibacterial efficiency. The magnetization curves obtained using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) show a sign of strong room temperature ferromagnetic behavior when the Co doping level is 0.05 wt% and a weak room temperature ferromagnetic behavior Co doping level is below 0.07 wt%, and also they found to exhibit antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic properties, when the Co doping levels are 0.07 and 0.09 wt%, respectively, to enhance and increase the special magnetic and antibacterial property for

  13. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-03-09

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  14. Modeling of non-thermal plasma in flammable gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napartovich, A. P.; Kochetov, I. V.; Leonov, S. B.

    2008-07-01

    An idea of using plasma-assisted methods of fuel ignition is based on non-equilibrium generation of chemically active species that speed up the combustion process. It is believed that gain in energy consumed for combustion acceleration by plasmas is due to the non-equilibrium nature of discharge plasma, which allows radicals to be produced in an above-equilibrium amount. Evidently, the size of the effect is strongly dependent on the initial temperature, pressure, and composition of the mixture. Of particular interest is comparison between thermal ignition of a fuel-air mixture and non-thermal plasma initiation of the combustion. Mechanisms of thermal ignition in various fuel-air mixtures have been studied for years, and a number of different mechanisms are known providing an agreement with experiments at various conditions. The problem is -- how to conform thermal chemistry approach to essentially non-equilibrium plasma description. The electric discharge produces much above-equilibrium amounts of chemically active species: atoms, radicals and ions. The point is that despite excess concentrations of a number of species, total concentration of these species is far below concentrations of the initial gas mixture. Therefore, rate coefficients for reactions of these discharge produced species with other gas mixture components are well known quantities controlled by the translational temperature, which can be calculated from the energy balance equation taking into account numerous processes initiated by plasma. A numerical model was developed combining traditional approach of thermal combustion chemistry with advanced description of the plasma kinetics based on solution of electron Boltzmann equation. This approach allows us to describe self-consistently strongly non-equilibrium electric discharge in chemically unstable (ignited) gas. Equations of pseudo-one-dimensional gas dynamics were solved in parallel with a system of thermal chemistry equations, kinetic equations

  15. Effect of Cement on Emulsified Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruc, Seref; Celik, Fazil; Akpinar, M. Vefa

    2007-10-01

    Emulsified asphalt mixtures have environmental, economical, and logistical advantages over hot mixtures. However, they have attracted little attention as structural layers due to their inadequate performance and susceptibility to early life damage by rainfall. The objective of this article is to provide an improved insight into how the mechanical properties of emulsion mixtures may be improved and to determine the influence of cement on emulsified asphalt mixtures. Laboratory tests on strength, temperature susceptibility, water damage, creep and permanent deformation were implemented to evaluate the mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures. The test results showed that mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures have significantly improved with Portland cement addition. This experimental study suggested that cement modified asphalt emulsion mixtures might be an alternate way of a structural layer material in pavement.

  16. Ionization coefficients in gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marić, D.; Šašić, O.; Jovanović, J.; Radmilović-Rađenović, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2007-03-01

    We have tested the application of the common E/N ( E—electric field, N—gas number density) or Wieland approximation [Van Brunt, R.J., 1987. Common parametrizations of electron transport, collision cross section, and dielectric strength data for binary gas mixtures. J. Appl. Phys. 61 (5), 1773-1787.] and the common mean energy (CME) combination of the data for pure gases to obtain ionization coefficients for mixtures. Test calculations were made for Ar-CH4, Ar-N2, He-Xe and CH4-N2 mixtures. Standard combination procedure gives poor results in general, due to the fact that the electron energy distribution is considerably different in mixtures and in individual gases at the same values of E/N. The CME method may be used for mixtures of gases with ionization coefficients that do not differ by more than two orders of magnitude which is better than any other technique that was proposed [Marić, D., Radmilović-Rađenović, M., Petrović, Z.Lj., 2005. On parametrization and mixture laws for electron ionization coefficients. Eur. Phys. J. D 35, 313-321.].

  17. Carburetor fuel discharge assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, R.M.

    1993-06-29

    An improved carburetor for use on an internal combustion engine is described, the carburetor having an airflow passage and fuel discharge means for admitting fuel into the airflow passage for mixing the fuel with air flowing in the airflow passage to form a fuel/air mixture to be supplied to the combustion chamber(s) of the engine, the fuel discharge means including a fuel discharge assembly which comprises a hollow discharge tube and fuel supplying means connected to the discharge tube for admitting fuel into the interior of the discharge tube, wherein the discharge tube has a longitudinal internal bore in fluid communication with the fuel supplying means, wherein the internal bore extends between an inlet that is closest to the fuel supplying means and an outlet that is furthest from the fuel supplying means with the outlet of the bore being located within the airflow passage of the carburetor to supply fuel into this passage after the fuel passes from the fuel supplying means through the internal bore of the discharge tube, wherein the improvement relates to the fuel discharge assembly and comprises: a hollow fuel flow guide tube telescopically received inside the internal bore of the discharge tube, wherein the fuel flow guide tube extends from approximately the location of the inlet of the bore up at least a portion of the length of the bore towards the outlet of the bore to conduct fuel from the fuel supplying means into the bore of the discharge tube.

  18. 10 CFR 503.9 - Use of mixtures-general requirement for certain permanent exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and petroleum and an alternate fuel for which an exemption under 10 CFR 503.38 (Fuel mixtures) would... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of mixtures-general requirement for certain permanent exemptions. 503.9 Section 503.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW...

  19. 10 CFR 503.9 - Use of mixtures-general requirement for certain permanent exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and petroleum and an alternate fuel for which an exemption under 10 CFR 503.38 (Fuel mixtures) would... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of mixtures-general requirement for certain permanent exemptions. 503.9 Section 503.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW...

  20. 10 CFR 503.9 - Use of mixtures-general requirement for certain permanent exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and petroleum and an alternate fuel for which an exemption under 10 CFR 503.38 (Fuel mixtures) would... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of mixtures-general requirement for certain permanent exemptions. 503.9 Section 503.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW...

  1. 10 CFR 503.9 - Use of mixtures-general requirement for certain permanent exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and petroleum and an alternate fuel for which an exemption under 10 CFR 503.38 (Fuel mixtures) would... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of mixtures-general requirement for certain permanent exemptions. 503.9 Section 503.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW...

  2. 10 CFR 503.9 - Use of mixtures-general requirement for certain permanent exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and petroleum and an alternate fuel for which an exemption under 10 CFR 503.38 (Fuel mixtures) would... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of mixtures-general requirement for certain permanent exemptions. 503.9 Section 503.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW...

  3. A shift in emission time profiles of fossil fuel combustion due to energy transitions impacts source receptor matrices for air quality.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Carlijn; Kuenen, Jeroen; Kranenburg, Richard; Scholz, Yvonne; Schaap, Martijn

    2015-03-01

    Effective air pollution and short-lived climate forcer mitigation strategies can only be designed when the effect of emission reductions on pollutant concentrations and health and ecosystem impacts are quantified. Within integrated assessment modeling source-receptor relationships (SRRs) based on chemistry transport modeling are used to this end. Currently, these SRRs are made using invariant emission time profiles. The LOTOS-EUROS model equipped with a source attribution module was used to test this assumption for renewable energy scenarios. Renewable energy availability and thereby fossil fuel back up are strongly dependent on meteorological conditions. We have used the spatially and temporally explicit energy model REMix to derive time profiles for backup power generation. These time profiles were used in LOTOS-EUROS to investigate the effect of emission timing on air pollutant concentrations and SRRs. It is found that the effectiveness of emission reduction in the power sector is significantly lower when accounting for the shift in the way emissions are divided over the year and the correlation of emissions with synoptic situations. The source receptor relationships also changed significantly. This effect was found for both primary and secondary pollutants. Our results indicate that emission timing deserves explicit attention when assessing the impacts of system changes on air quality and climate forcing from short lived substances. PMID:25594282

  4. Pt/C catalyst degradation in proton exchange membrane fuel cells due to high-frequency potential cycling induced by switching power converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Koji

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are operated using switching power converters that produce high-frequency ripple currents. These ripples cause high-frequency potential cycling of cells, which is believed to lead premature deterioration in the electrochemical surface area (ECA) of Pt/C catalysts. The qualitative relationship between ECA losses and the frequency of potential cycling was investigated in the range of 1 Hz to 1 kHz. For frequencies higher than 100 Hz, ECA losses were comparable with those at the potential hold condition. However, for lower frequencies, ECA decreased significantly with decreasing frequency. TEM observations showed that there was marked Pt particle growth for the 1-Hz cycling condition, whereas particle size distributions at 100 Hz and potential hold conditions were comparable. The currents associated with Pt oxidation and reduction during potential cycling were also investigated at various potentials and frequencies, and the charges associated with Pt loss (Δ Q) were determined by integrating the measured current. A correlation between the ECA trend and Δ Q was observed. The results obtained in this study are considered informative for electrical engineering research, because it relates to the design of switching power converters that do not negatively influence the Pt/C catalyst durability.

  5. Supercritical fuel injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J.; Cooper, L. P. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    a fuel injection system for gas turbines is described including a pair of high pressure pumps. The pumps provide fuel and a carrier fluid such as air at pressures above the critical pressure of the fuel. A supercritical mixing chamber mixes the fuel and carrier fluid and the mixture is sprayed into a combustion chamber. The use of fuel and a carrier fluid at supercritical pressures promotes rapid mixing of the fuel in the combustion chamber so as to reduce the formation of pollutants and promote cleaner burning.

  6. Positive and Negative Contributions in the Solvation Enthalpy due to Specific Interactions in Binary Mixtures of C1-C4 n-Alkanols and Chloroform with Butan-2-one.

    PubMed

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A; Rakipov, Ilnaz T; Solomonov, Boris N; Lodowski, Piotr; Marczak, Wojciech

    2015-06-25

    In the paper, results of calorimetric measurements, IR spectra, and calculated ab initio stabilization energies of dimers are reported for binary systems butan-2-one + (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, butan-1-ol, and chloroform). Changes in the total enthalpy of specific interactions due to dissolution of butan-2-one in the alcohols, calculated using equations derived in previous works, are positive. That results from the endothermic breaking of the O-H···O-H bonds not completely compensated by the exothermic effects of formation of the O-H···O═C ones. Moreover, the concentration of nonbonded molecules of butan-2-one is significant even in dilute solutions, as is evidenced by the shape of the C═O stretching vibrations band in the IR spectra. Apart from that, the spectra do not confirm 1:2 complexes in spite of two lone electron pairs in the carbonyl group of butan-2-one capable of forming the hydrogen bonds. The changes in enthalpy of specific interactions are negative for dilute solutions of alcohols and chloroform in butan-2-one and of butan-2-one in chloroform, because no hydrogen bonds occur in pure butan-2-one. The experimental results are positively correlated with the enthalpies estimated from the ab initio energies using a simple "chemical reaction" approach. PMID:26012694

  7. The Gaseous Explosive Reaction : A Study of the Kinetics of Composite Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1929-01-01

    This report deals with the results of a series of studies of the kinetics of gaseous explosive reactions where the fuel under observation, instead of being a simple gas, is a known mixture of simple gases. In the practical application of the gaseous explosive reaction as a source of power in the gas engine, the fuels employed are composite, with characteristics that are apt to be due to the characteristics of their components and hence may be somewhat complex. The simplest problem that could be proposed in an investigation either of the thermodynamics or kinetics of the gaseous explosive reaction of a composite fuel would seem to be a separate study of the reaction characteristics of each component of the fuel and then a study of the reaction characteristics of the various known mixtures of those components forming composite fuels more and more complex. (author)

  8. Fuel cell integrated with steam reformer

    DOEpatents

    Beshty, Bahjat S.; Whelan, James A.

    1987-01-01

    A H.sub.2 -air fuel cell integrated with a steam reformer is disclosed wherein a superheated water/methanol mixture is fed to a catalytic reformer to provide a continuous supply of hydrogen to the fuel cell, the gases exhausted from the anode of the fuel cell providing the thermal energy, via combustion, for superheating the water/methanol mixture.

  9. Alcohol based fuels for automotive engines

    SciTech Connect

    Menrad, H.K.

    1980-02-01

    The effects of methanol and/or ethanol additions on various properties of gasolines are discussed. Both advantages and disadvantages of such mixtures are set forth. The necessary changes in engine design to accommodate such fuel mixtures are described. Successful use of blended fuels in diesel engines is described. The current status of alcohol fuels in actual use is also reported. (BLM)

  10. Strategies for toxicological evaluation of mixtures.

    PubMed

    Eide, I

    1996-01-01

    Different strategies for the toxicological evaluation of mixtures are presented. The purpose is to determine the effects of each component (variable) in the mixture, and possible interactions between variables. The examples presented have 3-5 predictor variables and 1-3 responses, and are based on statistical experimental design, multivariate data analysis and modelling. The following examples are presented: (1) inhalation experiments with synthetic vapour mixtures of hydrocarbons formulated by means of mixture design at different vapour concentrations (the experimental) region covers both partial and complete evaporation of the liquid mixtures); (2) combination of refinery streams for fuel blending by means of mixture design with constraints, followed by engine tests and determination of exhaust particles; (3) fractionation of organic extracts of diesel exhaust particles, and recombination of the extracts by means of mixture design, followed by mutagenicity testing of the recombined extracts in the Ames Salmonella assay; (4) spiking complex mixtures with individual compounds using factorial design, and subsequent mutagenicity testing. The data obtained from these four examples were analysed by means of Projections to Latent Structures (PLS). The effects of each variable and possible interactions, were quantified by means of PLS regression coefficients. Furthermore, the empirical models obtained were evaluated by means of correlation coefficients, cross validation and predictions. PMID:9119328

  11. Instantaneous Measurement of Local Concentration and Vapor Fraction in Liquid-Gas Mixtures by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Akihiro; Hoshi, Kenji; Kusaka, Hiroto; Ogawa, Hideyuki; Miyamoto, Noboru

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with atomic emission excited with a focused high-energy ND: YAG laser was applied to quantify the concentration and the vapor fraction of liquid-gas mixtures. With LIBS it is possible to quantify local concentrations accurately even in liquid-gas mixtures as the ratio of the number of fuel-borne hydrogen atoms to nitrogen or oxygen atoms in the ambient gas. The ratio has a strong linear relation with the ratio of the peak emission intensities regardless of phase of the fuel. As the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the emission peak from the fuel-borne hydrogen increases linearly with the liquid fraction due to the Doppler shift with micro-explosions, the FWHM yields the fuel vapor fraction. Simultaneous, high-resolution measurements of equivalence ratios and vapor fractions in an intermittent fuel spray in a pressurized atmosphere were obtained with this method. The results showed that the tip of the intermittent spray has a richer mixture with a lower vapor fraction.

  12. Nitration by a simulated fuel technique for nitride fuel re-fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young.-Woo; Ryu, Ho Jin; Lee, Jae Won; Lee, Jung Won; Park, Geun Il

    2009-07-01

    Nitration reaction of a spent nuclear oxide fuel through a carbothermic reduction and the change in thermal conductivity of the resultant nitride specimens were investigated by a simulated fuel technique for use in nitride fuel re-fabrication from spent oxide fuel. The simulated spent oxide fuel was formed by compacting and sintering a powder mixture of UO 2 and stable oxide fission product impurities. It was pulverized by a 3-cycle successive oxidation-reduction treatment and converted into nitride pellet specimens through the carbothermic reduction. The rate of the nitration reaction of the simulated spent oxide fuel was decreased due to the fission product impurities when compared with pure uranium dioxide. The amount of Ba and Sr in the simulated spent oxide fuel was considerably reduced after the nitride fuel re-fabrication. The thermal conductivity of the nitride pellet specimen in the range 295-373 K was lower than that of the pure uranium nitride but higher than the simulated spent oxide fuel containing fission product impurities.

  13. Improved 02/H2 Gas Mixture Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moulthrop, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    Monitor of mixture concentrations uses catalyzed and uncatalyzed temperature probe. Sensor includes Pt-catalyzed temperature probe mounted in line with similar uncatalyzed temperature probe. Use of common temperature probes and standard, flareless, high-pressure tubefittings resulted in design conductive to installation in almost any system. Suitable for use in regenerative fuel cells, life-support systems, and other closed systems.

  14. Hydrocarbon fuel detergent

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, G.R.; Lyons, W.R.

    1990-01-23

    This patent describes a hydrocarbon fuel composition comprising: a hydrocarbon fuel; and a detergent amount of a detergent comprising an alkenylsuccinimide prepared by reacting an alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride with a mixture of amines, wherein at least 90 weight percent of the alkenyl substituent is derived from an olefin having a carbon chain of from 10 to 30 carbons or mixtures thereof, and wherein the alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride is reacted with the mixture of amines at a mole ratio of 0.8 to 1.5 moles of the amines per mole of the alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride.

  15. Influence of propane additives on the detonation characteristics of H2-air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanbing; Bauer, Pascal; Zitoun, Ratiba

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogen is more and more considered as a potential fuel for propulsion applications. However, due to its low ignition energy and wide flammability limits, H2-air mixtures raise a concern in terms of safety. This aspect can be partly solved by adding an alkane to these mixtures, which plays the role of an inhibitor. The present paper provides data on such binary fuel-air mixtures where various amounts of propane are added to hydrogen. The behavior of the corresponding mixtures, in terms of detonation characteristics and other fundamental properties, such as the cell size of the detonation front and induction delay, are presented and discussed for a series of equivalence ratios and propane addition. The experimental detonation velocity is in good agreement with calculated theoretical Chapman-Jouguet values. Based on soot tracks records, the cell size λ is measured, whereas the induction length L i is derived from data using a GRI-Mech kinetic mechanism. These data allow providing a value of the coefficient K = λ/L i .

  16. Mixture including hydrogen and hydrocarbon having pressure-temperature stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Wendy L. (Inventor); Mao, Ho-Kwang (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of storing hydrogen that employs a mixture of hydrogen and a hydrocarbon that can both be used as fuel. In one embodiment, the method involves maintaining a mixture including hydrogen and a hydrocarbon in the solid state at ambient pressure and a temperature in excess of about 10 K.

  17. Radiation intensity of lignite-fired oxy-fuel flames

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Klas; Johansson, Robert; Hjaertstam, Stefan; Johnsson, Filip; Leckner, Bo

    2008-10-15

    The radiative heat transfer in oxy-fuel flames is compared to corresponding conditions in air-fuel flames during combustion of lignite in the Chalmers 100 kW oxy-fuel test facility. In the oxy-fuel cases the flue-gas recycle rate was varied, so that, in principle, the same stoichiometry was kept in all cases, whereas the oxygen fraction in the recycled flue-gas mixture ranged from 25 to 29 vol.%. Radial profiles of gas concentration, temperature and total radiation intensity were measured in the furnace. The temperature, and thereby the total radiation intensity of the oxy-fuel flames, increases with decreasing flue-gas recycle rate. The ratio of gas and total radiation intensities increases under oxy-fuel conditions compared to air-firing. However, when radiation overlap between gas and particles is considered the ratios for air-firing and oxy-fuel conditions become more similar, since the gas-particle overlap is increased in the CO{sub 2}-rich atmosphere. A large fraction of the radiation in these lignite flames is emitted by particles whose radiation was not significantly influenced by oxy-fuel operation. Therefore, an increment of gas radiation due to higher CO{sub 2} concentration is not evident because of the background of particle radiation, and, the total radiation intensities are similar during oxy-fuel and air-fuel operation as long as the temperature distributions are similar. (author)

  18. Autoignition characteristics of aircraft-type fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spadaccini, L. J.; Tevelde, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The ignition delay characteristics of Jet A, JP 4, no. 2 diesel, cetane and an experimental referee broad specification (ERBS) fuel in air at inlet temperatures up to 1000 K, pressures of 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 atm, and fuel air equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 1.0 were mapped. Ignition delay times in the range of 1 to 50 msec at freestream flow velocities ranging from 20 to 100 m/sec were obtained using a continuous flow test apparatus which permitted independent variation and evaluation of the effect of temperature, pressure, flow rate, and fuel/air ratio. The ignition delay times for all fuels tested appeared to correlate with the inverse of pressure and the inverse exponent of temperature. With the exception of pure cetane, which had the shortest ignition delay times, the differences between the fuels tested did not appear to be significant. The apparent global activation energies for the typical gas turbine fuels ranged from 38 to 40 kcal/mole, while the activation energy determined for cetane was 50 kcal/mole. In addition, the data indicate that for lean mixtures, ignition delay times decrease with increasing equivalence ratio. It was also noted that physical (apparatus dependent) phenomena, such as mixing (i.e., length and number of injection sites) and airstream cooling (due to fuel heating, vaporization and convective heat loss) can have an important effect on the ignition delay.

  19. Mixture of Skewed α-Stable Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, S. R. Hosseini; Nassiri, V.; Mohammadian, Gh. R.; Mohammadpour, A.

    2011-03-01

    Expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and the Bayesian techniques are two approaches for statistical inference of mixture models [3, 4]. By noting the advantages of the Bayesian methods, practitioners prefer them. However, implementing Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms can be very complicated for stable distributions, due to the non-analytic density or distribution function formulas. In this paper, we introduce a new class of mixture of heavy-tailed distributions, called mixture of skewed stable distributions. Skewed stable distributions belongs to the exponential family and they have analytic density representation. It is shown that skewed stable distributions dominate skew stable distribution functions and they can be used to model heavy-tailed data. The class of skewed stable distributions has an analytic representation for its density function and the Bayesian inference can be done similar to the exponential family of distributions. Finally, mixture of skewed stable distributions are compared to the mixture of stable distributions through a simulations study.

  20. Safety Testing of Ammonium Nitrate Based Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jason; Lappo, Karmen; Phelan, James; Peterson, Nathan; Gilbert, Don

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN)/ammonium nitrate based explosives have a lengthy documented history of use by adversaries in acts of terror. While historical research has been conducted on AN-based explosive mixtures, it has primarily focused on detonation performance while varying the oxygen balance between the oxidizer and fuel components. Similarly, historical safety data on these materials is often lacking in pertinent details such as specific fuel type, particle size parameters, oxidizer form, etc. A variety of AN-based fuel-oxidizer mixtures were tested for small-scale sensitivity in preparation for large-scale testing. Current efforts focus on maintaining a zero oxygen-balance (a stoichiometric ratio for active chemical participants) while varying factors such as charge geometry, oxidizer form, particle size, and inert diluent ratios. Small-scale safety testing was conducted on various mixtures and fuels. It was found that ESD sensitivity is significantly affected by particle size, while this is less so for impact and friction. Thermal testing is in progress to evaluate hazards that may be experienced during large-scale testing.

  1. Fully ceramic nuclear fuel and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Venneri, Francesco; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-03-29

    Various embodiments of a nuclear fuel for use in various types of nuclear reactors and/or waste disposal systems are disclosed. One exemplary embodiment of a nuclear fuel may include a fuel element having a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix. An exemplary method of manufacturing a nuclear fuel is also disclosed. The method may include providing a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles, mixing the plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles with silicon carbide powder to form a precursor mixture, and compacting the precursor mixture at a predetermined pressure and temperature.

  2. Air/fuel ratio controller

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1980-12-23

    An internal combustion engine has a fuel injection pump and an air/fuel ratio controller. The controller has a lever that is connected to the pump lever. An aneroid moves the controller lever as a function of changes in intake manifold vacuum to maintain a constant air/fuel ratio to the mixture charge. A fuel enrichment linkage is provided that modifies the movement of the fuel flow control lever by the aneroid in response to changes in manifold gas temperature levels and exhaust gas recirculation to maintain the constant air/fuel ratio. A manual override is provided to obtain a richer air/fuel ratio for maximum acceleration.

  3. Napalm as an energy resource: a study of the molecular weight distribution of polystyrene in napalm and its use in middle distillate fuels.

    PubMed

    Mushrush; Beal; Hardy; Hughes

    1999-09-01

    The large quantity of napalm that is currently being treated as hazardous waste represents a viable energy resource that is too valuable to waste. However, there are significant problems to be overcome before this material can be used as an energy source. The scientific and environmental problems include: the broad molecular weight distribution of polystyrene, solubility and compatibility in a fuel matrix, methods to ensure complete combustion, high benzene concentration, low flash point due to the presence of gasoline, and safety in transportation and handling. In this paper, we present data on the molecular weight distribution of the polystyrene present in the napalm mixture, extraction of the gasoline and benzene from napalm, solubility of napalm in middle distillate fuels, simulated burner characteristics of napalm fuel mixtures, and accelerated storage stability studies of napalm fuel mixtures. PMID:10502603

  4. Near azeotropic mixture substitute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention comprises a refrigerant mixture consisting of a first mole fraction of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) and a second mole fraction of a component selected from the group consisting of a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); and a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124), CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b) and CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a).

  5. Monitoring oil-water mixture separation by time domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruvik, E. M.; Hjertaker, B. T.; Folgerø, K.; Meyer, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    Effective separation of water and oil is an essential part of petroleum production. Time domain reflectometry (TDR) can be used to profile the separation of hydrocarbon oil-water mixtures. In such two-component systems, metal electrodes will become oil-coated due to their affinity to oil. This coating layer will impact water content measurements. By combining the TDR signals from two probes in a novel configuration, the thickness of the oil layer on the electrodes can be estimated and its effect on the TDR measurements corrected for. The probes consist of two rods of different diameter and spacing to a common ground/guard electrode. The measurement principle is demonstrated using a light fuel oil and a thicker organic oil. The results indicate that oil and water levels can be monitored during separation if the metal electrode oil-coating effect is accounted for.

  6. NUCLEAR FUEL MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Goeddel, W.V.

    1962-06-26

    An improved method is given for making the carbides of nuclear fuel material. The metal of the fuel material, which may be a fissile and/or fertile material, is transformed into a silicide, after which the silicide is comminuted to the desired particle size. This silicide is then carburized at an elevated temperature, either above or below the melting point of the silicide, to produce an intimate mixture of the carbide of the fuel material and the carbide of silicon. This mixture of the fuel material carbide and the silicon carbide is relatively stable in the presence of moisture and does not exhibit the highly reactive surface condition which is observed with fuel material carbides made by most other known methods. (AEC)

  7. Fuel Vapor Pressures and the Relation of Vapor Pressure to the Preparation of Fuel for Combustion in Fuel Injection Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joachim, William F; Rothrock, A M

    1930-01-01

    This investigation on the vapor pressure of fuels was conducted in connection with the general research on combustion in fuel injection engines. The purpose of the investigation was to study the effects of high temperatures such as exist during the first stages of injection on the vapor pressures of several fuels and certain fuel mixtures, and the relation of these vapor pressures to the preparation of the fuel for combustion in high-speed fuel injection engines.

  8. Effect of Initial Mixture Temperature on Flame Speed of Methane-Air, Propane-Air, and Ethylene-Air Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugger, Gordon L

    1952-01-01

    Flame speeds based on the outer edge of the shadow cast by the laminar Bunsen cone were determined as functions of composition for methane-air mixtures at initial mixture temperatures ranging from -132 degrees to 342 degrees c and for propane-air and ethylene-air mixtures at initial mixture temperatures ranging from -73 degrees to 344 degrees c. The data showed that maximum flame speed increased with temperature at an increasing rate. The percentage change in flame speed with change in initial temperature for the three fuels followed the decreasing order, methane, propane, and ethylene. Empirical equations were determined for maximum flame speed as a function of initial temperature over the temperature range covered for each fuel. The observed effect of temperature on flame speed for each of the fuels was reasonably well predicted by either the thermal theory as presented by Semenov or the square-root law of Tanford and Pease.

  9. The determination of water in biomass-derived liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, C.; De Caumia, B.

    1986-01-01

    The Dean and Stark distillation is an appropriate method for the determination of water in coal tar, bitumen and petroleum-like products. This article shows, however, that a direct application of the Dean and Stark method for the determination of water in biomass-derived liquid fuels results in incorrect estimates. Inaccuracies are due to the presence of soluble organics in the aqueous phase, which apparently form azeotropic mixtures with water and xylene and which condense and are trapped as distillate in the graduated cylinder. Instead, a Karl Fischer determination of water is recommended in the case of biomass-derived liquid fuels.

  10. Turbulent Flame Propagation Characteristics of High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Seitzman, Jerry; Lieuwen, Timothy

    2014-09-30

    This final report describes the results of an effort to better understand turbulent flame propagation, especially at conditions relevant to gas turbines employing fuels with syngas or hydrogen mixtures. Turbulent flame speeds were measured for a variety of hydrogen/carbon monoxide (H2/CO) and hydrogen/methane (H2/CH4) fuel mixtures with air as the oxidizer. The measurements include global consumption speeds (ST,GC) acquired in a turbulent jet flame at pressures of 1-10 atm and local displacement speeds (ST,LD) acquired in a low-swirl burner at atmospheric pressure. The results verify the importance of fuel composition in determining turbulent flame speeds. For example, different fuel-air mixtures having the same unstretched laminar flame speed (SL,0) but different fuel compositions resulted in significantly different ST,GC for the same turbulence levels (u'). This demonstrates the weakness of turbulent flame speed correlations based simply on u'/SL,0. The results were analyzed using a steady-steady leading points concept to explain the sensitivity of turbulent burning rates to fuel (and oxidizer) composition. Leading point theories suggest that the premixed turbulent flame speed is controlled by the flame front characteristics at the flame brush leading edge, or, in other words, by the flamelets that advance farthest into the unburned mixture (the so-called leading points). For negative Markstein length mixtures, this is assumed to be close to the maximum stretched laminar flame speed (SL,max) for the given fuel-oxidizer mixture. For the ST,GC measurements, the data at a given pressure were well-correlated with an SL,max scaling. However the variation with pressure was not captured, which may be due to non-quasi-steady effects that are not included in the current model. For the ST,LD data, the leading points model again faithfully captured the variation of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of fuel-compositions and turbulence intensities. These results provide

  11. Premixed flame propagation in combustible particle cloud mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, K.; Yang, B.

    1993-01-01

    The structures of premixed flames propagating in combustible systems, containing uniformly distributed volatile fuel particles, in an oxidizing gas mixtures is analyzed. The experimental results show that steady flame propagation occurs even if the initial equivalence ratio of the combustible mixture based on the gaseous fuel available in the particles, phi(u) is substantially larger than unity. A model is developed to explain these experimental observations. In the model it is presumed that the fuel particles vaporize first to yield a gaseous fuel of known chemical composition which then reacts with oxygen in a one-step overall process. It is shown that the interplay of vaporization kinetics and oxidation process, can result in steady flame propagation in combustible mixtures where the value of phi(u) is substantially larger than unity. This prediction is in agreement with experimental observations.

  12. Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Dooley, S; Westbrook, C K

    2008-05-29

    Detailed kinetic models of pyrolysis and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels are nowadays widely used in the design of internal combustion engines and these models are effectively applied to help meet the increasingly stringent environmental and energetic standards. In previous studies by the combustion community, such models not only contributed to the understanding of pure component combustion, but also provided a deeper insight into the combustion behavior of complex mixtures. One of the major challenges in this field is now the definition and the development of appropriate surrogate models able to mimic the actual features of real fuels. Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. Their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. Aside the most commonly used surrogates containing iso-octane and n-heptane only, the so called Primary Reference Fuels (PRF), new mixtures have recently been suggested to extend the reference components in surrogate mixtures to also include alkenes and aromatics. It is generally agreed that, including representative species for all the main classes of hydrocarbons which can be found in real fuels, it is possible to reproduce very effectively in a wide range of operating conditions not just the auto-ignition propensity of gasoline or Diesel fuels, but also their physical properties and their combustion residuals [1]. In this work, the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation is computationally examined. The attention is focused on the autoignition of iso-octane, hexene and their mixtures. Some important issues relevant to the experimental and modeling investigation of such fuels are discussed with the help of rapid compression machine data and calculations. Following the model validation, the behavior of mixtures is discussed on the

  13. Experience with coal-water mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1983-06-01

    A demonstration of coal-water mixture at Florida Power and Light's Sanford plant was a technological success, but not without some difficulty. Extensive accumulation of melted ash, and atomizer wear, made the demonstration only marginal economically. Falling oil prices in 1981-82 made the conversion to COM even less attractive. Combustion tests on the suitability of several candidate coal mixtures concluded that the quantity and characteristics of the ash in the coal is the most important variable in predicting fuel performance. An examination of the characteristics of CWM with various coal-water ratios shows that the ''water penalty'' is not as severe as believed. Yet it is NOT a foregone conclusion that CWM fuels will be economical in the future.

  14. SEPARATION OF FLUID MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Lipscomb, R.; Craig, A.; Labrow, S.; Dunn, J.F.

    1958-10-28

    An apparatus is presented for separating gaseous mixtures by selectively freezing a constituent of the mixture and subsequently separating the frozen gas. The gas mixture is passed through a cylinder fltted with a cooling jacket, causing one gas to freeze on the walls of the cylinder. A set of scraper blades are provided in the interior of the cyllnder, and as the blades oscillate, the frozen gas is scraped to the bottom of the cylinder. Means are provided for the frozen material to pass into a heating chamber where it is vaporized and the product gas collected.

  15. A numerical study of laminar flames propagating in stratified mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiacheng

    Numerical simulations are carried out to study the structure and speed of laminar flames propagating in compositionally and thermally stratified fuel-air mixtures. The study is motivated by the need to understand the physics of flame propagation in stratified-charge engines and model it. The specific question of interest in this work is: how does the structure and speed of the flame in the stratified mixture differ from that of the flame in a corresponding homogeneous mixture at the same equivalence ratio, temperature, and pressure? The studies are carried out in hydrogen-air, methane-air, and n-heptane-air mixtures. A 30-species 184-step skeletal mechanism is employed for methane oxidation, a 9-species 21-step mechanism for hydrogen oxidation, and a 37-species 56-step skeletal mechanism for n-heptane oxidation. Flame speed and structure are compared with corresponding values for homogeneous mixtures. For compositionally stratified mixtures, as shown in prior experimental work, the numerical results suggest that when the flame propagates from a richer mixture to a leaner mixture, the flame speed is faster than the corresponding speed in the homogeneous mixture. This is caused by enhanced diffusion of heat and species from the richer mixture to the leaner mixture. In fact, the effects become more pronounced in leaner mixtures. Not surprisingly, the stratification gradient influences the results with shallower gradients showing less effect. The controlling role that diffusion plays is further assessed and confirmed by studying the effect of a unity Lewis number assumption in the hydrogen/air mixtures. Furthermore, the effect of stratification becomes less important when using methane or n-heptane as fuel. The laminar flame speed in a thermally stratified mixture is similar to the laminar flame speed in homogeneous mixture at corresponding unburned temperature. Theoretical analysis is performed and the ratio of extra thermal diffusion rate to flame heat release rate

  16. Minimally refined biomass fuel

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1984-01-01

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  17. Fuel processing device

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    2011-08-02

    An improved fuel processor for fuel cells is provided whereby the startup time of the processor is less than sixty seconds and can be as low as 30 seconds, if not less. A rapid startup time is achieved by either igniting or allowing a small mixture of air and fuel to react over and warm up the catalyst of an autothermal reformer (ATR). The ATR then produces combustible gases to be subsequently oxidized on and simultaneously warm up water-gas shift zone catalysts. After normal operating temperature has been achieved, the proportion of air included with the fuel is greatly diminished.

  18. Pulverized coal fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Rini, Michael J.; Towle, David P.

    1992-01-01

    A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO.sub.2 formation.

  19. Kinematic separation of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Goldshtik, M.; Husain, H.S.; Hussain, F. )

    1992-06-15

    A phenomenon of spontaneous separation of components in an initially uniform fluid mixture is found experimentally. A qualitative explanation of the effect is proposed in terms of nonparallel streamlines in the medium.

  20. Possibility of using alternate fuels in Hungary

    SciTech Connect

    Zombori, J.

    1982-12-01

    In Hungary investigations are aimed at the use of fuel mixtures having a moderate ration of alternate fuels in them. For the last two years engine tests have been carried out with the mixture of diesel oil and sunflower oil, and that of diesel oil and ethanol and they show positive results.

  1. High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Young, John E.; Jalan, Vinod M.

    1984-01-01

    A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

  2. High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

    1984-06-19

    A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

  3. High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur-containing gases from gaseous mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

    1982-07-07

    A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorbtion capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

  4. Instability of a solidifying binary mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, B. N.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis is performed on the stability of a solidifying binary mixture due to surface tension variation of the free liquid surface. The basic state solution is obtained numerically as a nonstationary function of time. Due to the time dependence of the basic state, the stability analysis is of the global type which utilizes a variational technique. Also due to the fact that the basic state is a complex function of both space and time, the stability analysis is performed through numerical means.

  5. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  6. MOLTEN FLUORIDE NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Barton, C.J.; Grimes, W.R.

    1960-01-01

    Molten-salt reactor fuel compositions consisting of mixtures of fluoride salts are reported. In its broadest form, the composition contains an alkali fluoride such as sodium fluoride, zirconium tetrafluoride, and a uranium fluoride, the latter being the tetrafluoride or trifluoride or a mixture of the two. An outstanding property of these fuel compositions is a high coeffieient of thermal expansion which provides a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in reactors in which they are used.

  7. Combustor with fuel preparation chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelina, Joseph (Inventor); Myers, Geoffrey D. (Inventor); Srinivasan, Ram (Inventor); Reynolds, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An annular combustor having fuel preparation chambers mounted in the dome of the combustor. The fuel preparation chamber comprises an annular wall extending axially from an inlet to an exit that defines a mixing chamber. Mounted to the inlet are an air swirler and a fuel atomizer. The air swirler provides swirled air to the mixing chamber while the atomizer provides a fuel spray. On the downstream side of the exit, the fuel preparation chamber has an inwardly extending conical wall that compresses the swirling mixture of fuel and air exiting the mixing chamber.

  8. Foaming of mixtures of pure hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. V.; Woods, W. W.

    1950-01-01

    Mixtures of pure liquid hydrocarbons are capable of foaming. Nine hydrocarbons were mixed in pairs, in all possible combinations, and four proportions of each combination. These mixtures were sealed in glass tubes, and the foaming was tested by shaking. Mixtures of aliphatic with other aliphatic hydrocarbons, or of alkyl benzenes with other alkyl benzenes, did not foam. Mixtures of aliphatic hydrocarbons with alkyl benzenes did foam. The proportions of the mixtures greatly affected the foaming, the maximum foaming of 12 of 20 pairs being at the composition 20 percent aliphatic hydrocarbon, 80 percent alkyl benzene. Six seconds was the maximum foam lifetime of any of these mixtures. Aeroshell 120 lubricating oil was fractionated into 52 fractions and a residue by extraction with acetone in a fractionating extractor. The index of refraction, foam lifetime, color, and viscosity of these fractions were measured. Low viscosity and high index fractions were extracted first. The viscosity of the fractions extracted rose and the index decreased as fractionation proceeded. Foam lifetimes and color were lowest in the middle fractions. Significance is attached to the observation that none of the foam lifetimes of the fractions or residue is as high as the foam lifetime of the original Aeroshell, indicating that the foaming is not due to a particular foaming constituent, but rather to the entire mixture.

  9. Carburetor and fuel preconditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.M.

    1991-12-24

    This patent describes an improved carburetor and fuel preconditioner device for internal combustion engines. It comprises a first atmospheric air intake conduit; a bubble chamber operable to hold liquid fuel at a selected level therein, the bubble chamber provided with one or more air ports located below the fuel level for receiving atmospheric air from the first air intake conduit for bubbling air through the fuel and the bubble chamber defining an air-fuel vapor chamber above the fuel level; a multiplicity of catalytic beads located within the bubble chamber in contact with the fuel and with air drawn through the ports; a second atmospheric air intake conduit for receiving an air supply separate from the first conduit, the second conduit provided with at least one venturi, the venturi in fluid communication with the vapor chamber of the bubble chamber for receiving a fuel-air vapor mixture therefrom and for mixing and conducting the same to an intake manifold of the internal combustion engine; and, control means consisting of at least one pill can, located between the vapor chamber of the bubble chamber and the second conduit for controlling the amount of fuel-air mixture entering the second conduit.

  10. Naval fuel saltstone formulation change

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, J.P. Jr.; Langton, C.A.

    1987-10-19

    Laboratory results support a formulation change for Naval Fuels saltstone from a cement-only waste form to a cement and Class F fly ash waste form. The recommended base formulation is waste, concentrated to a SpG of 1.35, mixed with a 1:1 ratio of Type 1 Portland cement and class F fly ash to achieve a water to cementitious materials (includes fly ash) ratio of 0.4. Due to variations in waste water chemistry, permit modifications should specify formulation ranges such that saltstone physical and chemical properties are enhanced. Operations should be based on pretesting each waste batch and adjusting the base formulation within specified ranges (ie. Draft DPSOL 247 WW-0312, ``Saltcrete Formulation Testing for Rapid Set and Excess Water.``) EP toxicity and TCLP tests are included and show comparable results for both cement-only and cement/fly ash waste forms. Heat generation due to hydration, a current problem with the cementonly formulation, is significantly reduced in the cement/fly ash mixture. In addition to the improved physical characteristics of the cement/fly ash formulation, savings of approximately 33% in raw materials cost may be obtained due to the substitution of the lower cost fly ash for cement in the Naval Fuels waste solidification process.