Science.gov

Sample records for fuel reactivity formation

  1. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  2. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-11-25

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  3. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  4. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2015-07-14

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  5. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2013-12-31

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  6. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    DOEpatents

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2016-06-28

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  7. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    SciTech Connect

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Glasauer, Susan; Korenevsky, Anton; Ferris, F. Grant

    2000-08-08

    The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  8. Biodiesel Fuel Property Effects on Particulate Matter Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.; Black, S.; McCormick, R. L.

    2010-06-01

    Controlling diesel particulate emissions to meet the 2007 U.S. standard requires the use of a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The reactivity of soot, or the carbon fraction of particulate matter, in the DPF and the kinetics of soot oxidation are important in achieving better control of aftertreatment devices. Studies showed that biodiesel in the fuel can increase soot reactivity. This study therefore investigated which biodiesel fuel properties impact reactivity. Three fuel properties of interest included fuel oxygen content and functionality, fuel aromatic content, and the presence of alkali metals. To determine fuel effects on soot reactivity, the performance of a catalyzed DPF was measured with different test fuels through engine testing and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Results showed no dependence on the aromatic content or the presence of alkali metals in the fuel. The presence and form of fuel oxygen was the dominant contributor to faster DPF regeneration times and soot reactivity.

  9. Assessment of reactivity transient experiments with high burnup fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ozer, O.; Yang, R.L.; Rashid, Y.R.; Montgomery, R.O.

    1996-03-01

    A few recent experiments aimed at determining the response of high-burnup LWR fuel during a reactivity initiated accident (RIA) have raised concerns that existing failure criteria may be inappropriate for such fuel. In particular, three experiments (SPERT CDC-859, NSRR HBO-1 and CABRI REP Na-1) appear to have resulted in fuel failures at only a fraction of the anticipated enthalpy levels. In evaluating the results of such RIA simulation experiments, however, it is necessary that the following two key considerations be taken into account: (1) Are the experiments representative of conditions that LWR fuel would experience during an in-reactor RIA event? (2) Is the fuel that is being utilized in the tests representative of the present (or anticipated) population of LWR fuel? Conducting experiments under conditions that can not occur in-reactor can trigger response modes that could not take place during in-reactor operation. Similarly, using unrepresentative fuel samples for the tests will produce failure information that is of limited relevance to commercial LWR fuel. This is particularly important for high-burnup fuel since the manner under which the test samples are base-irradiated prior to the test will impact the mechanical properties of the cladding and will therefore affect the RIA response. A good example of this effect can be seen in the results of the SPERT CDC-859 test and in the NSRR JM-4 and JM-5 tests. The conditions under which the fuel used for these tests was fabricated and/or base-irradiated prior to the RIA pulse resulted in the formation of multiple cladding defects in the form of hydride blisters. When this fuel was subjected to the RIA power pulse, it failed by developing multiple cracks that were closely correlated with the locations of the pre-existing hydride blisters. In the case of the JM tests, many of the cracks formed within the blisters themselves and did not propagate beyond the heavily hydrided regions.

  10. Reactive spreading: Adsorption, ridging and compound formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, E.; Cannon, R.M.; Tomsia, A.P.

    2000-09-11

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the necessary steps involved in spreading are outlined and compared to the steps in compound formation that typically accompany reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. All of these can be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. Analysis and assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than believed, and perhaps the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  11. Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier

    DOEpatents

    Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-10-02

    A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

  12. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    PubMed Central

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production. PMID:21687599

  13. Critical Role of Water Content in the Formation and Reactivity of Uraniu, Neptunium, and Plutonium Iodates Under Hydrothermal Conditions: Implications for the Oxidative Dissolution of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, T. H.; Ling, Jie; Choi, E- Sang; Brooks, James S.; Beitz, James V.; Sykora, Richard E.; Haire, Richard {Dick} G; Stanbury, David M.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The reactions of {sup 237}NpO{sub 2} with excess iodate under acidic hydrothermal conditions result in the isolation of the neptunium(IV), neptunium(V), and neptunium(VI) iodates, Np(IO{sub 3}){sub 4}, Np(IO{sub 3}){sub 4}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O{center_dot}nHIO{sub 3}, NpO2(IO3), NpO2(IO3)2(H2O), and NpO{sub 2}(IO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, depending on both the pH and the amount of water present in the reactions. Reactions with less water and lower pH favor reduced products. Although the initial redox processes involved in the reactions between {sup 237}NpO{sub 2} or {sup 242}PuO{sub 2} and iodate are similar, the low solubility of Pu(IO{sub 3}){sub 4} dominates product formation in plutonium iodate reactions to a much greater extent than does Np(IO{sub 3}){sub 4} in the neptunium iodate system. UO{sub 2} reacts with iodate under these conditions to yield uranium(VI) iodates solely. The isotypic structures of the actinide(IV) iodates, An(IO{sub 3}){sub 4} (An = Np, Pu), are reported and consist of one-dimensional chains of dodecahedral An(IV) cations bridged by iodate anions. The structure of Np(IO3)4{center_dot}nH2O{center_dot}nHIO3 is constructed from NpO9 tricapped-trigonal prisms that are bridged by iodate into a polar three-dimensional framework structure. Second-harmonic-generation measurements on a polycrystalline sample of the Th analogue of Np(IO{sub 3}){sub 4}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O{center_dot}nHIO{sub 3} reveal a response of approximately 12x that of {alpha}-SiO{sub 2}. Single-crystal magnetic susceptibility measurements of Np(IO{sub 3}){sub 4} show magnetically isolated Np(IV) ions.

  14. Effects of poison panel shrinkage and gaps on fuel storage rack reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, W.A.; Mueller, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Fixed poison panels are used in spent fuel rack designs to increase enrichment limits and reduce cell spacing; therefore, assurances that the maximum rack reactivity will meet the design limit (0.95) throughout the lifetime of the racks depend on the continued effectiveness of the poison with time. Industry data have shown that poison panels will shrink under irradiated conditions. From recent data, however, poison panels have been found to have gaps spanning their width after relatively short operating periods. This paper presents results of studies showing the fuel rack reactivity changes associated with poison panel shrinkage and formation of gaps. The discovery of gaps in the fuel rack poison panels at an operating plant raises concerns regarding the effectiveness of the poison over the lifetime of the fuel racks. Studies performed to evaluate the effect of the poison panel shrinkage on reactivity show that reactivity changes from zero to several percent are possible depending on the initial panel size. Results of recent studies show that some gaps can be accommodated in the fuel rack poison panels at the fuel midplane without causing the fuel rack K{sub eff} limit to be exceeded. With worst-case assumptions concerning gap size and the number of panels affected, other actions will likely be required to show that the rack K{sub eff} design limit will not be exceeded.

  15. Reactive flash volatilization of fluid fuels

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.; Dreyer, Bradon J.; Salge, James R.

    2013-01-08

    The invention provides methods for the production of synthesis gas. More particularly, various embodiments of the invention relate to systems and methods for volatilizing fluid fuel to produce synthesis gas by using a metal catalyst on a solid support matrix.

  16. Gasification reactivities of solid biomass fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Moilanen, A.; Kurkela, E.

    1995-12-31

    The design and operation of the biomass based gasification processes require knowledge about the biomass feedstocks characteristics and their typical gasification behaviour in the process. In this study, the gasification reactivities of various biomasses were investigated in laboratory scale Pressurized Thermogravimetric apparatus (PTG) and in the PDU-scale (Process Development Unit) Pressurized Fluidized-Bed (PFB) gasification test facility of VTT.

  17. Innovative Fast Reactors: Impact of Fuel Composition on Reactivity Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores; M. Asswaroongruengchot

    2009-12-01

    A major challenge for future Fast Reactors could be the recycling of minor actinides (MA) in the core fuel, in order to minimize wastes and contribute to meet both the sustainability objective and the reduction of the burden on a geological disposal. Although the most outstanding issues will be found in the development and validation of the appropriate fuels, the presence of MA in the core can potentially deteriorate the core reactivity coefficients. In the present paper we will show however that there is no physical limit to the amount of MA in the core fuel, but that a careful physics analysis can indicate the most appropriate measures to reduce the MA impact on the reactivity coefficients, and in particular, for Na cooled reactors, on the Na void reactivity coefficient.

  18. Formation and Detoxification of Reactive Oxygen Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuciel, Radoslawa; Mazurkiewicz, Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    A model of reactive oxygen species metabolism is proposed as a laboratory exercise for students. The superoxide ion in this model is generated during the reaction of oxidation of xanthine, catalyzed by xanthine oxidase. The effect of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and allopurinol on superoxide ion generation and removal in this system is also…

  19. Fuel temperature reactivity coefficient calculation by Monte Carlo perturbation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, H. J.; Kim, C. H.

    2013-07-01

    We present an efficient method to estimate the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient (FTC) by the Monte Carlo adjoint-weighted correlated sampling method. In this method, a fuel temperature change is regarded as variations of the microscopic cross sections and the temperature in the free gas model which is adopted to correct the asymptotic double differential scattering kernel. The effectiveness of the new method is examined through the continuous energy MC neutronics calculations for PWR pin cell problems. The isotope-wise and reaction-type-wise contributions to the FTCs are investigated for two free gas models - the constant scattering cross section model and the exact model. It is shown that the proposed method can efficiently predict the reactivity change due to the fuel temperature variation. (authors)

  20. Engine combustion control at low loads via fuel reactivity stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2014-10-07

    A compression ignition (diesel) engine uses two or more fuel charges during a combustion cycle, with the fuel charges having two or more reactivities (e.g., different cetane numbers), in order to control the timing and duration of combustion. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot). At low load and no load (idling) conditions, the aforementioned results are attained by restricting airflow to the combustion chamber during the intake stroke (as by throttling the incoming air at or prior to the combustion chamber's intake port) so that the cylinder air pressure is below ambient pressure at the start of the compression stroke.

  1. Deposit formation in hydrocarbon rocket fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, R.; Szetela, E. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study deposit formation in hydrocarbon fuels under flow conditions that exist in high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. A high pressure fuel coking test apparatus was designed and developed and was used to evaluate thermal decomposition (coking) limits and carbon deposition rates in heated copper tubes for two hydrocarbon rocket fuels, RP-1 and commercial-grade propane. Tests were also conducted using JP-7 and chemically-pure propane as being representative of more refined cuts of the baseline fuels. A parametric evaluation of fuel thermal stability was performed at pressures of 136 atm to 340 atm, bulk fuel velocities in the range 6 to 30 m/sec, and tube wall temperatures in the range 422 to 811 K. Results indicated that substantial deposit formation occurs with RP-1 fuel at wall temperatures between 600 and 800 K, with peak deposit formation occurring near 700 K. No improvements were obtained when deoxygenated JP-7 fuel was substituted for RP-1. The carbon deposition rates for the propane fuels were generally higher than those obtained for either of the kerosene fuels at any given wall temperature. There appeared to be little difference between commercial-grade and chemically-pure propane with regard to type and quantity of deposit. Results of tests conducted with RP-1 indicated that the rate of deposit formation increased slightly with pressure over the range 136 atm to 340 atm. Finally, lating the inside wall of the tubes with nickel was found to significantly reduce carbon deposition rates for RP-1 fuel.

  2. Direct formate fuel cells: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Chen, R.

    2016-07-01

    Direct formate fuel cells (DFFC), which convert the chemical energy stored in formate directly into electricity, are recently attracting more attention, primarily because of the use of the carbon-neutral fuel and the low-cost electrocatalytic and membrane materials. As an emerging energy technology, the DFFC has made a rapid progress in recent years (currently, the state-of-the-art power density is 591 mW cm-2 at 60 °C). This article provides a review of past research on the development of this type of fuel cell, including the working principle, mechanisms and materials of the electrocatalytic oxidation of formate, singe-cell designs and performance, as well as innovative system designs. In addition, future perspectives with regard to the development of this fuel cell system are also highlighted.

  3. Cerium Oxyhydroxide Clusters: Formation, Structure and Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Aubriet, F.; Gaumet, Jean-Jacques; De Jong, Wibe A.; Groenewold, G. S.; Gianotto, Anita K.; McIIwain, Michael E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Leavitt, Christopher M.

    2009-05-11

    Cerium oxyhydroxide cluster anions were produced by irradiating ceric oxide particles using 355 nm laser pulses that were synchronized with pulses of nitrogen gas admitted to the irradiation chamber. The gas pulse stabilized the nascent clusters that are largely anhydrous [CexOy] ions and neutrals. These initially-formed species react with water, principally forming closed-shell (c-s) oxohydroxy species that are described by the general formula [CexOy(OH)z]-. In general, the extent of hydroxylation varies from a value of 3 OH per Ce atom when x = 1 to a value slightly greater than 1 for x > 8. The Ce3 and Ce6 species deviate significantly from this trend: the x = 3 cluster accommodates more hydroxyl moieties compared to neighboring congeners at x = 2 and x = 4. Conversely, the x = 6 cluster is significantly less hydroxylated. Density functional theory (DFT) modeling of the cluster structures show that the hydrated clusters are hydrolyzed, and contain one-to-multiple hydroxide moieties, but not datively bound water. DFT also predicts an energetic preference for formation of highly symmetric structures as the size of the clusters increases. The calculated structures indicate that the ability of the Ce3 oxyhydroxide to accommodate more extensive hydroxylation is due to a more open, hexagonal structure in which the Ce atoms can participate in multiple hydrolysis reactions. Conversely the Ce6 oxyhydroxide has an octahedral structure that is not conducive to hydrolysis. In addition to the c-s clusters, open-shell (o-s) oxyhydroxides and superoxides are also formed, and they become more prominent as the size of the clusters increases, suggesting that the larger ceria clusters have an increased ability to stabilize a non-bonding electron. The overall intensity of the clusters tends to monotonically decrease as the cluster size increases, however this trend is interrupted at Ce13, which is significantly more stable compared to neighboring congeners, suggesting formation of

  4. Cerium Oxyhydroxide Clusters: Formation, Structure and Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Frederic Aubriet; Jean-Jacques Gaumet; Wibe A de Jong; Groenewold, Gary S; Gianotto, Anita K; McIlwain, Michael E; Michael J. Van Stipdonk; Christopher M. Leavitt

    2009-06-01

    Cerium oxyhydroxide cluster anions were produced by irradiating ceric oxide particles using 355 nm laser pulses that were synchronized with pulses of nitrogen gas admitted to the irradiation chamber. The gas pulse stabilized the nascent clusters that are largely anhydrous [CexOy] ions and neutrals. These initially-formed species react with water, principally forming closed-shell (c-s) oxohydroxy species that are described by the general formula [CexOy(OH)z]-. In general, the extent of hydroxylation varies from a value of 3 OH per Ce atom when x = 1 to a value slightly greater than 1 for x > 8. The Ce3 and Ce6 species deviate significantly from this trend: the x = 3 cluster accommodates more hydroxyl moieties compared to neighboring congeners at x = 2 and x = 4. Conversely, the x = 6 cluster is significantly less hydroxylated. Density functional theory (DFT) modeling of the cluster structures show that the hydrated clusters are hydrolyzed, and contain one-to-multiple hydroxide moieties, but not datively bound water. DFT also predicts an energetic preference for formation of highly symmetric structures as the size of the clusters increases. The calculated structures indicate that the ability of the Ce3 oxyhydroxide to accommodate more extensive hydroxylation is due to a more open, hexagonal structure in which the Ce atoms can participate in multiple hydrolysis reactions. Conversely the Ce6 oxyhydroxide has an octahedral structure that is not conducive to hydrolysis. In addition to the c-s clusters, open-shell (o-s) oxyhydroxides and superoxides are also formed, and they become more prominent as the size of the clusters increases, suggesting that the larger ceria clusters have an increased ability to stabilize a non-bonding electron. The overall intensity of the clusters tends to monotonically decrease as the cluster size increases, however this trend is interrupted at Ce13, which is significantly more stable compared to neighboring congeners, suggesting formation of

  5. Experimental study of fuel cloud formation inside aircraft fuel tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putthawong, Panu

    The design of fuel tank flammability has relied on the flammability envelope of a homogeneous mixture. There are researches indicated that the presence of droplets could cause such mixture to be flammable even the fuel-to-air ratio was below the Lower Flammability Limit. This research aims to investigate the formation of fuel cloud/droplets by a condensation process and its effect on tank flammability. The center-wing tank is the main interest because the fuel vapor in the ullage space can condense when its temperature and pressure are changed. The Fuel Tank Test Facility has proven that a cloud or group of droplets is produced under normal operating condition of the center-wing tank. Results from the experiments show the number densities of droplets on the order of 103--105 and the maximum drop size being recorded is 18 mum. The experiments also indicate that Jet A vapor and droplets must have different properties from its liquid form because of the volatility difference among species in fuel. The new parameter for droplets flammability, i.e., non-dimensional droplet spacing, suggested by Hayashi et al. (1984) is employed for a flammability assessment. The non-dimensional droplet spacings from the experiments have found to be in the vicinity of the critical value. It points toward the high possibility of having flammable center-wing tank. The explosion strength calculation of droplets-vapor-air mixture implies the sufficient explosive condition if an ignition source is introduced.

  6. Fuels for fuel cells: Fuel and catalyst effects on carbon formation

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, R. L.; Inbody, M. A.; Perry, W. L.; Parkinson, W. J. ,

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this research is to explore the effects of fuels, fuel constituents, additives and impurities on the performance of on-board hydrogen generation devices and consequently on the overall performance of fuel cell systems using reformed hydrocarbon fuels. Different fuels and components have been tested in automotive scale, adiabatic autothermal reactors to observe their relative reforming characteristics with various operating conditions. Carbon formation has been modeled and was experimentally monitored in situ during operation by laser measurements of the effluent reformate. Ammonia formation was monitored, and conditions varied to observe under what conditions N H 3 is made.

  7. Reactive vaporization of oxides in solid oxide fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Camas Fought

    Metals such as chromium, aluminum and silicon are of extreme technological and industrial importance due to the corrosion resistance they offer in oxidizing environments at high temperature. Much of this robustness is based on the formation of a thin, well-adhered metal-oxide (MO) layer on the surface of the metal. In particularly corrosive environments or at high-enough temperatures and or pressures, the MO will chemically react with constituents in the surrounding gas, removing atoms from the solid. For many systems, material loss and subsequent mechanical failure is the foremost concern. However, in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems, the presence of gaseous metal species leads to severe degradation in electrochemical performance well before mechanical limits are reached. Reactive vaporization from ferritic stainless steels, chromia, aluminosilicates and a candidate electrode material (Sr2VMoO6), was investigated using the transpiration method. Two novel collection methods were employed: condensation of vapors on wafer collectors analyzed with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS); and, condensation of vapors on quartz wool analyzed via inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Identification and quantification of vapor species provided assessment of material performance in SOFC environments. Experiments demonstrated that Cr vapor species from ferritic stainless steels used for SOFC interconnect applications could be reduced by as much as one order of magnitude through the application of barrier coatings. Base alloys were compared and exhibited a variety of Cr vaporization rates despite being similar in composition, thus illustrating the importance of minor elemental constituents in the alloy. Measurements identified Si as the primary volatile element in aluminosilicate materials when Si concentrations in the bulk material were as low as one percent. Aluminosilicate materials demonstrated a burn out phase during the first hundred hours at

  8. Formation, structure, and reactivity of palladium superoxo complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Talsi, E.P.; Babenko, V.P.; Shubin, A.A.; Chinakov, V.D.; Nekipelov, V.M.; Zamaraev, K.I.

    1987-11-18

    The mechanism of formation of palladium superoxo complexes, their structure, and their reactivity are discussed. The formation of the palladium superoxo complexes in the reaction of palladium(II) acetate, propionate, trifluororacetate, and bis(acetylacetonate) and palladium(0) tetrakis(triphenylphosphine) with hydrogen peroxide and potassium superoxide has been detected in solution by electron proton resonance. The oxidation of olefins and carbon monoxide by these complexes is considered. Reaction mechanisms and reaction kinetics for these oxidations are reported using the palladium superoxo complexes. 44 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Reactivity effects of void formations in a solution critical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    SHEBA II (Solution High Energy Burst Assembly) was constructed in order to better understand the neutronics of solutions of fissile materials. In order to estimate the effect on criticality from the formation of bubbles, models were devised in MCNP (Monte Carlo Neutron Photon transport code) and THREEDANT (THREE dimensional, Diffusion-Accelerated, Neutral-Particle Transport). It was found that the formation of voids in all but the outside bottom edge of the assembly cylinder tend to act as a negative insertion of reactivity. Also, an experiment has been designed which will verify the results of the codes.

  10. FORMATION PROCESSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF REACTIVE AND NON-REACTIVE MINERAL PRECIPITATES IN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral precipitates in zero-valent iron PRBs can be classified by formation processes into three groups: 1) those that result from changes in chemical conditions (i.e., change in pH, e.g., calcite); 2) those that are a consequence of microbial activity (i.e., sulfate reduction, ...

  11. On mechanisms of reactive metabolite formation from drugs.

    PubMed

    Claesson, Alf; Spjuth, Ola

    2013-04-01

    Idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs) cause a broad range of clinically severe conditions of which drug induced liver injury (DILI) in particular is one of the most frequent causes of safety-related drug withdrawals. The underlying cause is almost invariably formation of reactive metabolites (RM) which by attacking macromolecules induc eorgan injuries. Attempts are being made in the pharmaceutical industry to lower the risk of selecting unfit compounds as clinical candidates. Approaches vary but do not seem to be overly successful at the initial design/synthesis stage. We review here the most frequent categories of mechanisms for RM formation and propose that many cases of RMs encountered within early ADME screening can be foreseen by applying chemical and metabolic knowledge. We also mention a web tool, SpotRM, which can be used for efficient look-up and learning about drugs that have recognized IADRs likely caused by RM formation. PMID:23035789

  12. Pollutant Formation in Monodisperse Fuel Spray Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cernansky, N. P.; Sarv, H.

    1983-01-01

    The combustion of liquid sprays represents an extremely important class of combustion processes. In the transition region, encompassing droplet sizes in the range of 25-80 micron diameter, the mixing and evaporation processes are both incomplete at the flame front and burning occurs in a combined diffusive and premixed fashion. Under these conditions, the relative importance of heterogeneous and homogeneous effects in dominating the combustion process is switched and gives rise to a number of interesting phenomena. NO (sub x) formation in monodisperse spray combustion was investigated with the following specific objectives: (1) to quantitatively determine the effect of droplet size, number density, etc. on NO sub x formation in monodisperse fuel spray combustion; and (2) to isolate the important physical and chemical phenomena in NO sub x formation in these combustion systems.

  13. Molten salt extraction of transuranic and reactive fission products from used uranium oxide fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Steven Douglas

    2014-05-27

    Used uranium oxide fuel is detoxified by extracting transuranic and reactive fission products into molten salt. By contacting declad and crushed used uranium oxide fuel with a molten halide salt containing a minor fraction of the respective uranium trihalide, transuranic and reactive fission products partition from the fuel to the molten salt phase, while uranium oxide and non-reactive, or noble metal, fission products remain in an insoluble solid phase. The salt is then separated from the fuel via draining and distillation. By this method, the bulk of the decay heat, fission poisoning capacity, and radiotoxicity are removed from the used fuel. The remaining radioactivity from the noble metal fission products in the detoxified fuel is primarily limited to soft beta emitters. The extracted transuranic and reactive fission products are amenable to existing technologies for group uranium/transuranic product recovery and fission product immobilization in engineered waste forms.

  14. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, Dennis D.; Dee, Louis A.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1997-01-01

    Fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), the product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants prepared under laboratory conditions and from firings of Shuttle Reaction Control System thrusters, has been characterized by chemical and thermal analysis. The composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depend on three factors: the fuel-oxidizer ratio at the time of formation; whether the composition of the post-formation atmosphere is reducing or oxidizing; and the reaction or post-reaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, methylammonium nitrate, and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. Thermal decomposition reactions of the FORP compositions used in this study were unremarkable. Neither the various compositions of FORP, the pure major components of FORP, nor mixtures of FORP with propellant system corrosion products showed any unusual thermal activity when decomposed under laboratory conditions. Off-limit thruster operations were simulated by rapid mixing of liquid monomethylhydrazine and liquid nitrogen tetroxide in a confined space. These tests demonstrated that monomethylhydrazine, methylhydrazinium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, or Inconel corrosion products can induce a mixture of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide to produce component-damaging energies. Damaging events required FORP or metal salts to be present at the initial mixing of monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide.

  15. Formation, stability, and reactivity studies of neutral iron sulfide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shi; Wang, Zhechen; Bernstein, Elliot

    2014-03-01

    Different methods are used to generate neutral iron sulfide clusters to study their formation, stability, and reactivity, employing a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) with VUV (118 nm) radiation single photon ionization (SPI). Neutral FemSn (m = 1-4, n = 1-6), and hydrogen containing FemSnHx (x >0, n > m) clusters are generated by the reaction of seeded H2S in a helium carrier gas with laser ablated iron metal within a supersonic nozzle. The observed strong signal of association products Fe2S2(SH)0,1 M (M = CO, C2H4, C3H6) suggest that the Fe2S2(SH)0,1 clusters have the high activity for interactions with these small molecules. In order to avoid the effect for reactivity from hydrogen containing clusters, pure FemSnclusters are generated through laser ablation of a mixed iron/sulfur target in the presence of a pure helium carrier gas. (FeS)m (m = 1-4) is observed to be the most stable series. Reaction of CO and H2 on neutral (FeS)1,2clusters is farther investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A size dependent reactivity of iron sulfide clusters toward CO is characterized. The reaction FeS + CO --> Fe + OCS is found for the FeS cluster. Products Fe2S 213COH2 and Fe2S 213COH4 are identified for reactions of 13CO and H2 on Fe2S2 clusters: this suggests that the Fe2S2 cluster has a high catalytic activity for hydrogenation reactions of CO to form formaldehyde and methanol. DFT calculations are performed to explore the potential energy surfaces for the two reactions: Fe2S2 + CO + 2H2 --> Fe2S2 + CH3OH; and Fe2S2 + CO + H2 --> Fe2S2 + CH2O.

  16. Reactive oxygen species promote raft formation in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shu-Ping; Lin Feng, Ming-Hsien; Huang, Huey-Lan; Huang, Ya-Ching; Tsou, Wen-I; Lai, Ming-Zong

    2007-04-01

    Lipid rafts are involved in many cell biology events, yet the molecular mechanisms on how rafts are formed are poorly understood. In this study we probed the possible requirement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for T-cell receptor (TCR)-induced lipid raft formation. Microscopy and biochemical analyses illustrated that blockage of ROS production, by superoxide dismutase-mimic MnTBAP, significantly reduced partitioning of LAT, phospho-LAT, and PLC-gamma in lipid rafts. Another antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) displayed a similar suppressive effect on the entry of phospho-LAT into raft microdomains. The involvement of ROS in TCR-mediated raft assembly was observed in T-cell hybridomas, T leukemia cells, and normal T cells. Removal of ROS was accompanied by an attenuated activation of LAT and PKCtheta, with reduced production of IL-2. Consistently, treating T cells with the ROS-producer tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (TBHP) greatly enhanced membrane raft formation, distribution of phospho-LAT into lipid rafts, and increased IL-2 production. Our results indicate for the first time that ROS contribute to TCR-induced membrane raft formation. PMID:17349922

  17. Black Silicon Formation in Cryogenic Reactive Ion Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Saab, David; Basset, Philippe; Pierotti, Matthew J.; Trawick, Matthew L.; Angelescu, Dan E.

    2015-03-01

    We present both experimental data and computational modeling that explain some aspects of the formation of black silicon during cryogenic reactive ion etching (RIE) processes. We generate a phase diagram that predicts combinations of RIE parameters that lead to different black silicon geometries. We also show that the combination of needle- and hole-like features of various heights and depths in black silicon creates a uniquely smooth transition in refractive index that is responsible for the material's low optical reflectivity. These details are captured by our model and confirmed by focused ion beam (FIB) nanotomography and scanning electron microscopy of black silicon surfaces during various stages of development. The model also correctly describes dynamical characteristics such as the dependence of aspect ratio on process time, and the prediction of new etching fronts appearing at topographical saddle points.

  18. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of reactivities for UO2 and MOX fueled PWR cells

    SciTech Connect

    Foad, Basma; Takeda, Toshikazu

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to apply our improved method for calculating sensitivities and uncertainties of reactivity responses for UO{sub 2} and MOX fueled pressurized water reactor cells. The improved method has been used to calculate sensitivity coefficients relative to infinite dilution cross-sections, where the self-shielding effect is taken into account. Two types of reactivities are considered: Doppler reactivity and coolant void reactivity, for each type of reactivity, the sensitivities are calculated for small and large perturbations. The results have demonstrated that the reactivity responses have larger relative uncertainty than eigenvalue responses. In addition, the uncertainty of coolant void reactivity is much greater than Doppler reactivity especially for large perturbations. The sensitivity coefficients and uncertainties of both reactivities were verified by comparing with SCALE code results using ENDF/B-VII library and good agreements have been found.

  19. Two-Dimensional Diffusion Theory Analysis of Reactivity Effects of a Fuel-Plate-Removal Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsky, Edward R.; Cusick, James P.; Bogart, Donald

    1959-01-01

    Two-dimensional two-group diffusion calculations were performed on the NASA reactor simulator in order to evaluate the reactivity effects of fuel plates removed successively from the center experimental fuel element of a seven- by three-element core loading at the Oak Ridge Bulk Shielding Facility. The reactivity calculations were performed by two methods: In the first, the slowing-down properties of the experimental fuel element were represented by its infinite media parameters; and, in the second, the finite size of the experimental fuel element was recognized, and the slowing-down properties of the surrounding core were attributed to this small region. The latter calculation method agreed very well with the experimented reactivity effects; the former method underestimated the experimental reactivity effects.

  20. Reactivity-controlled compression ignition drive cycle emissions and fuel economy estimations using vehicle system simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Curran, Scott J.; Gao, Zhiming; Wagner, Robert M.

    2014-12-22

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve reactivity-controlled compression ignition has been shown to reduce NOX and soot emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared with conventional diesel combustion. The reactivity-controlled compression ignition concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that the fuel reactivity can be tailored to the engine speed and load, allowing stable low-temperature combustion to be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. In this paper, a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition strategy is employed where the engine switches from reactivity-controlled compression ignition to conventional diesel combustion whenmore » speed and load demand are outside of the experimentally determined reactivity-controlled compression ignition range. The potential for reactivity-controlled compression ignition to reduce drive cycle fuel economy and emissions is not clearly understood and is explored here by simulating the fuel economy and emissions for a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition–enabled vehicle operating over a variety of US drive cycles using experimental engine maps for multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition, conventional diesel combustion, and a 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine. Drive cycle simulations are completed assuming a conventional mid-size passenger vehicle with an automatic transmission. Multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition fuel economy simulation results are compared with the same vehicle powered by a representative 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine over multiple drive cycles. Finally, engine-out drive cycle emissions are compared with conventional diesel combustion, and observations regarding relative gasoline and diesel tank sizes needed for the various drive cycles are also summarized.« less

  1. Reactivity-controlled compression ignition drive cycle emissions and fuel economy estimations using vehicle system simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, Scott J.; Gao, Zhiming; Wagner, Robert M.

    2014-12-22

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve reactivity-controlled compression ignition has been shown to reduce NOX and soot emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared with conventional diesel combustion. The reactivity-controlled compression ignition concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that the fuel reactivity can be tailored to the engine speed and load, allowing stable low-temperature combustion to be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. In this paper, a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition strategy is employed where the engine switches from reactivity-controlled compression ignition to conventional diesel combustion when speed and load demand are outside of the experimentally determined reactivity-controlled compression ignition range. The potential for reactivity-controlled compression ignition to reduce drive cycle fuel economy and emissions is not clearly understood and is explored here by simulating the fuel economy and emissions for a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition–enabled vehicle operating over a variety of US drive cycles using experimental engine maps for multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition, conventional diesel combustion, and a 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine. Drive cycle simulations are completed assuming a conventional mid-size passenger vehicle with an automatic transmission. Multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition fuel economy simulation results are compared with the same vehicle powered by a representative 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine over multiple drive cycles. Finally, engine-out drive cycle emissions are compared with conventional diesel combustion, and observations regarding relative gasoline and diesel tank sizes needed for the various drive cycles are also summarized.

  2. Reactive thrust cruise for a geosynchronous satellite with minimum fuel consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidi, Marcel

    1993-02-01

    A simple control concept utilizing product of inertia is used to provide active nutation control of a reactive thrust control system of a geosynchronous momentum-based satellite. The reactive thrust control system itself is immune to sensor noise and thus prevents unnecessary thrust firings. Any nutation excitation is damped in a small number of nutational periods, with no fuel consumption.

  3. Premixed direct injection nozzle for highly reactive fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Uhm, Jong Ho; Zuo, Baifang

    2013-09-24

    A fuel/air mixing tube for use in a fuel/air mixing tube bundle is provided. The fuel/air mixing tube includes an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis between an inlet end and an exit end, the outer tube wall having a thickness extending between an inner tube surface having a inner diameter and an outer tube surface having an outer tube diameter. The tube further includes at least one fuel injection hole having a fuel injection hole diameter extending through the outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  4. Low-Toxicity Reactive Hypergolic Fuels for Use with Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. K.; Rusek, J. J.

    2004-10-01

    The need for low toxicity hypergolic fuels has brought rocket grade hydrogen peroxide (RGHP) to the forefront as the oxidizer of choice for future hypergolic systems. The search for a hypergolic mate for RGHP has been primarily focused on using transition metal salts dissolved in energetic liquids to create hypergolic fuels. These dissolved salts catalytically decompose RGHP on contact, producing heated oxygen and steam which ignite the remainder of the fuel. The use of transition metal salts in these fuels is therefore necessary to induce hypergolicity, but these compounds reduce the specific impulse of these fuels due to the presence of high molecular weight transition metal oxides in the exhaust. Reactive hypergolic fuels can eliminate this problem by using light metal hydrides dissolved in energetic liquids for fuels. These metal hydrides combust directly with RGHP upon contact and ignite the remainder of the fuel. Due to the low atomic weights of the metals used, these metal hydrides can enhance the specific impulse of such fuels instead of degrading the performance as transitional metal salts do. Tests of such reactive fuels are promising and indicate that fuels of this type can be successful hypergolic fuels for use with hydrogen peroxide.

  5. Reactivity Descriptors for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrin, Peter; Nilekar, Anand U.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2008-11-01

    We have investigated the anode reaction in direct methanol fuel cells using a database of adsorption free energies for 16 intermediates on 12 close-packed transition metal surfaces calculated with periodic, selfconsistent, density functional theory (DFT–GGA). This database, combined with a simple electrokinetic model of the methanol electrooxidation reaction, yields mechanistic insights that are consistent with previous experimental and theoretical studies on Pt, and extends these insights to a broad spectrum of other transition metals. In addition, by using linear scaling relations between the adsorption free energies of various intermediates in the reaction network, we find that the results determined with the full database of adsorption energies can be estimated by knowing only two key descriptors for each metal surface: the free energies of OH and CO on the surface. Two mechanisms for methanol oxidation to CO₂ are investigated: an indirect mechanism that goes through a CO intermediate and a direct mechanism where methanol is oxidized to CO₂ without the formation of a CO intermediate. For the direct mechanism, we find that, because of CO poisoning, only a small current will result on all non-group 11 transition metals; of these metals, Pt is predicted to be the most active. For methanol decomposition via the indirect mechanism, we find that the onset potential is limited either by the ability to activate methanol, by the ability to activate water, or by surface poisoning by CO* or OH*/O*. Among pure metals, there is no obvious candidate for a good anode catalyst, and in order to design a better catalyst, one has to look for bi-functional surfaces such as the well-studied PtRu alloy.

  6. Mathematical modeling of biomass fuels formation process

    SciTech Connect

    Gaska, Krzysztof Wandrasz, Andrzej J.

    2008-07-01

    The increasing demand for thermal and electric energy in many branches of industry and municipal management accounts for a drastic diminishing of natural resources (fossil fuels). Meanwhile, in numerous technical processes, a huge mass of wastes is produced. A segregated and converted combustible fraction of the wastes, with relatively high calorific value, may be used as a component of formed fuels. The utilization of the formed fuel components from segregated groups of waste in associated processes of co-combustion with conventional fuels causes significant savings resulting from partial replacement of fossil fuels, and reduction of environmental pollution resulting directly from the limitation of waste migration to the environment (soil, atmospheric air, surface and underground water). The realization of technological processes with the utilization of formed fuel in associated thermal systems should be qualified by technical criteria, which means that elementary processes as well as factors of sustainable development, from a global viewpoint, must not be disturbed. The utilization of post-process waste should be preceded by detailed technical, ecological and economic analyses. In order to optimize the mixing process of fuel components, a mathematical model of the forming process was created. The model is defined as a group of data structures which uniquely identify a real process and conversion of this data in algorithms based on a problem of linear programming. The paper also presents the optimization of parameters in the process of forming fuels using a modified simplex algorithm with a polynomial worktime. This model is a datum-point in the numerical modeling of real processes, allowing a precise determination of the optimal elementary composition of formed fuels components, with assumed constraints and decision variables of the task.

  7. Deposit formation in hydrocarbon rocket fuels: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, R.; Szetela, E. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study deposit formation in hydrocarbon fuels under flow conditions that exist in high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. A high pressure fuel coking test apparatus was designed and developed and was used to evaluate thermal decomposition (coking) limits and carbon deposition rates in heated copper tubes for two hydrocarbon rocket fuels, RP-1 and commercial-grade propane. Tests were also conducted using JP-7 and chemically-pure propane as being representative of more refined cuts of the baseline fuels. A parametric evaluation of fuel thermal stability was performed at pressures of 136 atm to 340 atm, bulk fuel velocities in the range 6 to 30 m/sec, and tube wall temperatures in the range 422 to 811K. In addition, the effect of the inside wall material on deposit formation was evaluated in selected tests which were conducted using nickel-plated tubes. The results of the tests indicated that substantial deposit formation occurs with RP-1 fuel at wall temperatures between 600 and 800K, with peak deposit formation occurring near 700K. No improvements were obtained when de-oxygenated JP-7 fuel was substituted for RP-1. The carbon deposition rates for the propane fuels were generally higher than those obtained for either of the kerosene fuels at any given wall temperature. There appeared to be little difference between commercial-grade and chemically-pure propane with regard to type and quantity of deposit. The results of tests conducted with RP-1 indicated that the rate of deposit formation increased slightly with pressure over the range 136 atm to 340 atm. Finally, plating the inside wall of the tubes with nickel was found to significantly reduce carbon deposition rates for RP-1 fuel.

  8. Assessment of light water reactor fuel damage during a reactivity initiated accident

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Seiffert, S.L.; Martinson, Z.R.; McCardell, R.K.; Owen, D.E.; Fukuda, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of LWR fuel damage during a reactivity initiated accident and comments on the adequacy of the present USNRC design requirements. Results from early SPERT tests are reviewed and compared with results from recent computer simulations and PBF tests. A progression of fuel rod and cladding damage events is presented. High strain rate deformation of relatively cool irradiated cladding early in the transient may result in fracture at a radial average peak fuel enthalpy of approximately 140 cal/g UO/sub 2/. Volume expansion of previously irradiated fuel upon melting may cause deformation and rupture of the cladding, and coolant channel blockage at higher peak enthalpies.

  9. Reactivity of NH{sub 3} and HCN during low-grade fuel combustion in a swirling flow burner

    SciTech Connect

    Chunyang Wu; Dale Tree; Larry Baxter

    2007-07-01

    The experimentally measured major gas species profiles in the near-burner region provide insight on flame structure and pollutant formation mechanisms during pilot-scale biomass, coal, and biomass-coal cofiring tests. All tests involved separately metered but jointly fed coal and biomass in a variable-swirl burner. Locally fuel-rich regions form under overall fuel-lean conditions, as is typical of such flames, although there are no regions of the combustor that indicate average oxygen concentration reaches zero. The data strongly suggest that instantaneous oxygen concentrations reach zero, so the average finite values are indicative of turbulent intermittency between fuel-rich and fuel-lean eddies. Such intermittency impacts the entire flame structure in these and many previously published flames, though this feature may not be widely appreciated. Detectable HCN concentrations appear in the fuel-rich eddies in the coal-dominated flames with little or no detectable NH{sub 3}, whereas NH{sub 3} appears in the biomass-dominated flames with little or no detectable HCN. These data indicate that biomass predominantly forms NH{sub 3} whereas coal predominantly forms HCN as stable, fuel-rich, gas-phase compounds. Kinetics calculations demonstrate that NH{sub 3} has higher thermal stability and is more reactive within the flame front than HCN. Both species have similar conversion to NO at the same temperatures. The results confirm that NOx precursor formation depends on the parent fuel and form of nitrogen, at least for the coal and biomass fuels investigated here. 24 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Fuel composition and secondary organic aerosol formation: gas-turbine exhaust and alternative aviation fuels.

    PubMed

    Miracolo, Marissa A; Drozd, Greg T; Jathar, Shantanu H; Presto, Albert A; Lipsky, Eric M; Corporan, Edwin; Robinson, Allen L

    2012-08-01

    A series of smog chamber experiments were performed to investigate the effects of fuel composition on secondary particulate matter (PM) formation from dilute exhaust from a T63 gas-turbine engine. Tests were performed at idle and cruise loads with the engine fueled on conventional military jet fuel (JP-8), Fischer-Tropsch synthetic jet fuel (FT), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. Emissions were sampled into a portable smog chamber and exposed to sunlight or artificial UV light to initiate photo-oxidation. Similar to previous studies, neat FT fuel and a 50/50 FT/JP-8 blend reduced the primary particulate matter emissions compared to neat JP-8. After only one hour of photo-oxidation at typical atmospheric OH levels, the secondary PM production in dilute exhaust exceeded primary PM emissions, except when operating the engine at high load on FT fuel. Therefore, accounting for secondary PM production should be considered when assessing the contribution of gas-turbine engine emissions to ambient PM levels. FT fuel substantially reduced secondary PM formation in dilute exhaust compared to neat JP-8 at both idle and cruise loads. At idle load, the secondary PM formation was reduced by a factor of 20 with the use of neat FT fuel, and a factor of 2 with the use of the blend fuel. At cruise load, the use of FT fuel resulted in no measured formation of secondary PM. In every experiment, the secondary PM was dominated by organics with minor contributions from sulfate when the engine was operated on JP-8 fuel. At both loads, FT fuel produces less secondary organic aerosol than JP-8 because of differences in the composition of the fuels and the resultant emissions. This work indicates that fuel reformulation may be a viable strategy to reduce the contribution of emissions from combustion systems to secondary organic aerosol production and ultimately ambient PM levels. PMID:22732009

  11. Impact investigation of reactor fuel operating parameters on reactivity for use in burnup credit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloma, Tanya Noel

    When representing the behavior of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF), credit is sought for the reduced reactivity associated with the net depletion of fissile isotopes and the creation of neutron-absorbing isotopes, a process that begins when a commercial nuclear reactor is first operated at power. Burnup credit accounts for the reduced reactivity potential of a fuel assembly and varies with the fuel burnup, cooling time, and the initial enrichment of fissile material in the fuel. With regard to long-term SNF disposal and transportation, tremendous benefits, such as increased capacity, flexibility of design and system operations, and reduced overall costs, provide an incentive to seek burnup credit for criticality safety evaluations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Interim Staff Guidance 8, Revision 2 in 2002, endorsing burnup credit of actinide composition changes only; credit due to actinides encompasses approximately 30% of exiting pressurized water reactor SNF inventory and could potentially be increased to 90% if fission product credit were accepted. However, one significant issue for utilizing full burnup credit, compensating for actinide and fission product composition changes, is establishing a set of depletion parameters that produce an adequately conservative representation of the fuel's isotopic inventory. Depletion parameters can have a significant effect on the isotopic inventory of the fuel, and thus the residual reactivity. This research seeks to quantify the reactivity impact on a system from dominant depletion parameters (i.e., fuel temperature, moderator density, burnable poison rod, burnable poison rod history, and soluble boron concentration). Bounding depletion parameters were developed by statistical evaluation of a database containing reactor operating histories. The database was generated from summary reports of commercial reactor criticality data. Through depletion calculations, utilizing the SCALE 6 code package, several light

  12. REACTIVE MINERALS IN AQUIFERS: FORMATION PROCESSES AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation will focus on the occurrence, form, and characterization of reactive iron minerals in aquifers and soils. The potential for abiotic reductive transformations of contaminants at the mineral-water interface will be discussed along with available tools for site min...

  13. Deposit formation and heat transfer in hydrocarbon rocket fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanetti, A. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.; Szetela, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental research program was undertaken to investigate the thermal stability and heat transfer characteristics of several hydrocarbon fuels under conditions that simulate high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. The rates of carbon deposition in heated copper and nickel-plated copper tubes were determined for RP-1, propane, and natural gas using a continuous flow test apparatus which permitted independent variation and evaluation of the effect on deposit formation of wall temperature, fuel pressure, and fuel velocity. In addition, the effects of fuel additives and contaminants, cryogenic fuel temperatures, and extended duration testing with intermittent operation were examined. Parametric tests to map the thermal stability characteristics of RP-1, commercial-grade propane, and natural gas were conducted at pressures of 6.9 to 13.8 MPa, bulk fuel velocities of 30 to 90 m/s, and tube wall temperatures in the range of 230 to 810 K. Also, tests were run in which propane and natural gas fuels were chilled to 230 and 160 K, respectively. Corrosion of the copper tube surface was detected for all fuels tested. Plating the inside of the copper tubes with nickel reduced deposit formation and eliminated tube corrosion in most cases. The lowest rates of carbon deposition were obtained for natural gas, and the highest rates were obtained for propane. For all fuels tested, the forced-convection heat transfer film coefficients were satisfactorily correlated using a Nusselt-Reynolds-Prandtl number equation.

  14. NOx formation in combustion of gaseous fuel in ejection burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimár, Miroslav; Kulikov, Andrii

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work is to prepare model for researching of the formation in combustion of gaseous fuels. NOx formation is one of the main ecological problems nowadays as nitrogen oxides is one of main reasons of acid rains. The ANSYS model was designed according to the calculation to provide full combustion and good mixing of the fuel and air. The current model is appropriate to research NOx formation and the influence of the different principles of NOx reduction method. Applying of designed model should spare both time of calculations and research and also money as you do not need to measure the burner characteristics.

  15. Testing to determine chemical stability, handling characteristics, and reactivity of energetic-fuel mixtures: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lackey, M.E.

    1988-04-01

    The US Army generates approximately 2.5 million pounds of waste explosives each year as a result of explosives production and the loading of ordnance. In addition, the US Army currently stores >200,000 tons of obsolete munitions. The current alternative to storage is open-air burning, open-air detonation, or incineration. The US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency is currently developing methods and procedures for the utilization of energetic materials blended with fuel oil as supplemental fuel in Army industrial combustors. A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the chemical compatibility, reactivity, and handling characteristics of energetic-fuel mixtures. The energetics studied were TNT, RDX, and Composition B. Results indicated that under specific conditions of energetic content, energetic/fuel oil preparation, and system design, energetic/fuel oil mixtures can successfully be used as supplemental fuel in Army industrial combustors. 9 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Ceramic-metal composite formation by reactive metal penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Loehman, R.E.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Fahrenholtz, W.G.; Lakshman, B.B.

    1996-11-01

    Ceramic-metal composites can be made to near-net-shape by reactive penetration of dense ceramic preforms by molten metals. Reactive metal penetration is driven by a strongly negative Gibbs energy for reaction. For Al, the general form of the reaction is (x+2) Al + (3/y) MO[sub y] yields Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] + M[sub 3/y]Al[sub x], where MO[sub y] is an oxide that is wet by molten Al. In low PO[sub 2] atmospheres and at temperatures above about 900 degrees C, molten Al reduces mullite to produce Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Si. The Al/mullite reaction has a delta G[sub r] degree(927 degrees C) of -338 per mole of mullite and, for fully dense mullite, the theoretical volume change on reaction is less than 1%. Experiments with commercial mullite containing a silicate grain boundary phase average less than 2% volume change on reaction. In the Al/mullite system, reactive metal penetration produces a fine-grained alumina skeleton with an interspersed metal phase. With > or =15 vol.% excess aluminum, mutually interpenetrating ceramic-metal composites are produced. Properties measurements show that ceramic-metal composites produced by reactive metal penetration of mullite by Al have a Young`s modulus and hardness similar to that of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], with improved fracture toughness. Other compositions also are candidates for in- situ reaction synthesis, but they exhibit differences in reaction kinetics, most probably due to different wetting behavior.

  17. A Critical Review of Practice of Equating the Reactivity of Spent Fuel to Fresh Fuel in Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses for PWR Spent Fuel Pool Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Parks, C.V.

    2000-09-01

    This research examines the practice of equating the reactivity of spent fuel to that of fresh fuel for the purpose of performing burnup credit criticality safety analyses for PWR spent fuel pool (SFP) storage conditions. The investigation consists of comparing k{sub inf} estimates based on reactivity equivalent fresh fuel enrichment (REFFE) to k{sub inf} estimates using the actual spent fuel isotopics. Analyses of selected storage configurations common in PWR SFPs show that this practice yields nonconservative results (on the order of a few tenths of a percent) in configurations in which the spent fuel is adjacent to higher-reactivity assemblies (e.g., fresh or lower-burned assemblies) and yields conservative results in configurations in which spent fuel is adjacent to lower-reactivity assemblies (e.g., higher-burned fuel or empty cells). When the REFFE is determined based on unborated water moderation, analyses for storage conditions with soluble boron present reveal significant nonconservative results associated with the use of the REFFE. This observation is considered to be important, especially considering the recent allowance of credit for soluble boron up to 5% in reactivity. Finally, it is shown that the practice of equating the reactivity of spent fuel to fresh fuel is acceptable, provided the conditions for which the REFFE was determined remain unchanged. Determination of the REFFE for a reference configuration and subsequent use of the REFFE for different configurations violates the basis used for the determination of the REFFE and, thus, may lead to inaccurate, and possibly, nonconservative estimates of reactivity. A significant concentration ({approximately}2000 ppm) of soluble boron is typically (but not necessarily required to be) present in PWR SFPs, of which only a portion ({le} 500 ppm) may be credited in safety analyses. Thus, a large subcritical margin currently exists that more than accounts for errors or uncertainties associated with the use of

  18. Incremental Reactivity Effects of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacarab, M.; Li, L.; Carter, W. P. L.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2015-12-01

    Two surrogate reactive organic gas (ROG) mixtures were developed to create a controlled reactivity environment simulating different urban atmospheres with varying levels of anthropogenic (e.g. Los Angeles reactivity) and biogenic (e.g. Atlanta reactivity) influences. Traditional chamber experiments focus on the oxidation of one or two volatile organic compound (VOC) precursors, allowing the reactivity of the system to be dictated by those compounds. Surrogate ROG mixtures control the overall reactivity of the system, allowing for the incremental aerosol formation from an added VOC to be observed. The surrogate ROG mixtures were developed based on that used to determine maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scales for O3 formation from VOC precursors in a Los Angeles smog environment. Environmental chamber experiments were designed to highlight the incremental aerosol formation in the simulated environment due to the addition of an added anthropogenic (aromatic) or biogenic (terpene) VOC. All experiments were conducted in the UC Riverside/CE-CERT dual 90m3 environmental chambers. It was found that the aerosol precursors behaved differently under the two altered reactivity conditions, with more incremental aerosol being formed in the anthropogenic ROG system than in the biogenic ROG system. Further, the biogenic reactivity condition inhibited the oxidation of added anthropogenic aerosol precursors, such as m-xylene. Data will be presented on aerosol properties (density, volatility, hygroscopicity) and bulk chemical composition in the gas and particle phases (from a SYFT Technologies selected ion flow tube mass spectrometer, SIFT-MS, and Aerodyne high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer, HR-ToF-AMS, respectively) comparing the two controlled reactivity systems and single precursor VOC/NOx studies. Incremental aerosol yield data at different controlled reactivities provide a novel and valuable insight in the attempt to extrapolate environmental chamber

  19. Characterization of the sodium void reactivity effect for advanced liquid metal reactor fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, S.F.

    1993-12-01

    This report discusses the problems of a large positive sodium void reactivity effect in liquid metal reactors which have received increased attention following the accident at Chernobyl, a light water reactor with a positive coolant void coefficient. While the probability of voiding sodium is small, a large positive sodium void reactivity effect is, in many minds, unacceptable. Analyses were performed on models of an advanced liquid metal reactors to determine the effects fuel type have on the sodium void reactivity effect. Three fuel types were considered; metal, oxide, and nitride. Calculations were performed using three-dimensional, multigroup diffusion theory. Two programs were developed to aid the analyses. One calculated the capture-to-fission ratio and the other calculated reaction rates of selected materials. A one-group equation was derived to determine a theoretical basis for the sodium void reactivity effect. An option was presented for a shortened core having a near-zero sodium-void worth. The effect on the sodium void reactivity effect of using actinides as fuel is also considered.

  20. ReaxFF Reactive Force-Field Modeling of the Triple-Phase Boundary in a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Merinov, Boris V; Mueller, Jonathan E; van Duin, Adri C T; An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2014-11-20

    In our study, the Ni/YSZ ReaxFF reactive force field was developed by combining the YSZ and Ni/C/H descriptions. ReaxFF reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) were applied to model chemical reactions, diffusion, and other physicochemical processes at the fuel/Ni/YSZ interface. The ReaxFF RMD simulations were performed on the H2/Ni/YSZ and C4H10/Ni/YSZ triple-phase boundary (TPB) systems at 1250 and 2000 K, respectively. The simulations indicate amorphization of the Ni surface, partial decohesion (delamination) at the interface, and coking, which have indeed all been observed experimentally. They also allowed us to derive the mechanism of the butane conversion at the Ni/YSZ interface. Many steps of this mechanism are similar to the pyrolysis of butane. The products obtained in our simulations are the same as those in experiment, which indicates that the developed ReaxFF potential properly describes complex physicochemical processes, such as the oxide-ion diffusion, fuel conversion, water formation reaction, coking, and delamination, occurring at the TPB and can be recommended for further computational studies of the fuel/electrode/electrolyte interfaces in a SOFC. PMID:26276491

  1. Formation of tetragonal hydrogen tungsten bronze by reactive mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Urretavizcaya, G. Tonus, F.; Gaudin, E.; Bobet, J.-L.; Castro, F.J.

    2007-10-15

    Hydrogen tungsten bronzes have been synthesized by reactive mechanical alloying monoclinic tungsten (VI) oxide under hydrogen atmosphere. Two milling devices with different energy ranges were used. Regardless of the distinct reaction times, a similar phase evolution was observed with both apparatus. The characterization of the materials was performed by XRD, SEM, DSC and total hydrogen content determination. The final product obtained was a mixture of tetragonal H{sub 0.33}WO{sub 3} and H{sub 0.23}WO{sub 3} bronzes. - Graphical abstract: Hydrogen tungsten bronzes have been synthesized by reactive mechanical alloying (RMA) monoclinic WO{sub 3} under H{sub 2} atmosphere. By using two milling devices with different energy ranges a similar phase evolution with distinct reaction times was observed. The materials were characterized by XRD, SEM, DSC and total hydrogen content determination. The final product obtained was a mixture of tetragonal H{sub 0.33}WO{sub 3} and H{sub 0.23}WO{sub 3} bronzes. Display Omitted.

  2. Deposit formation and heat transfer in hydrocarbon rocket fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanetti, A. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.; Szetela, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental research program was undertaken to investigate the thermal stability and heat transfer characteristics of several hydrocarbon fuels under conditions that simulate high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. The rates of carbon deposition in heated copper and nickel-plated copper tubes were determined for RP-1, propane, and natural gas using a continuous flow test apparatus which permitted independent variation and evaluation of the effect on deposit formation of wall temperature, fuel pressure, and fuel velocity. In addition, the effects of fuel additives and contaminants, cryogenic fuel temperatures, and extended duration testing with intermittent operation were examined. Corrosion of the copper tube surface was detected for all fuels tested; however, plating the insides of the tubes with nickel reduced deposit formation and eliminated corrosion in most cases. The lowest rates of carbon deposition were obtained for natural gas, and the highest rates were obtained for propane. Forced-convection heat transfer film coefficients were satisfactorily correlated using a Nusselt-Reynolds-Prandtl number equation for all the fuels tested.

  3. Formation and control of aldehydes in alcohol fueled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyasamy, R.; Nagalingam, B.; Ganesan, V.; Gopalakrishnan, K.V.; Murthy, B.S.

    1981-01-01

    Aldehyde formation and emissions from alcohol fueled engines are presented in this paper. Several chemical kinetic models on the mechanism leading to aldehyde formation have been examined to explore the appropriate control methods to reduce exhaust aldehyde emissions. Control of aldehydes in exhaust emissions by suitable alteration of engine operating parameters, by in cylinder treatment with additives like aniline and water, by external treatment like airpreheating, secondary air injection cooling water rate and exhaust treatment are examined. The concept of surface ignition for alcohol fuels is briefly presented as a long range objective for using alcohols with minimal aldehyde emissions. 27 refs.

  4. Performance of direct formate-peroxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinshi; Wu, Hao; He, Yaling; Liu, Yue; Jin, Lei

    2015-08-01

    We report the high-performance direct formate-peroxide fuel cells (DFPFCs) that consist of a cation-exchange membrane sandwiched between an alkaline formate anode and an acid peroxide cathode. Much attention has been paid to investigate the effects of different composite parameters and operating parameters, including catalyst loadings at both anode and cathode electrodes, operating temperatures, as well as the concentrations of both formate and electrolyte solutions. It is demonstrated that the optimization of both the electrode composition (anode 2.0 mgPd cm-2, cathode 2.0 mgPt cm-2) and the solution concentration (1.0 M HCOONa-3.0 M NaOH) enables the DFPFC to yield a peak power density as high as 591 mW cm-2 at 60 °C, which is about one times higher than that of state-of-the-art anion-exchange membrane direct formate fuel cells.

  5. Strategies and chemical design approaches to reduce the potential for formation of reactive metabolic species.

    PubMed

    Argikar, Upendra A; Mangold, James B; Harriman, Shawn P

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic activation of new chemical entities to reactive intermediates is routinely monitored in drug discovery and development. Reactive intermediates may bind to cellular macromolecules such as proteins, DNA and may eventually lead to cell death via necrosis, apoptosis or oxidative stress. The evidence that the ultimate outcome of metabolic activation is an adverse drug reaction manifested as in vivo toxicity, is at best circumstantial. However, understanding the process of bioactivation of structural alerts by trapping the reactive intermediates is critical to guide medicinal chemistry efforts in quest for safer and potent molecules. This commentary provides a brief introduction to adverse drug reactions and mechanisms of reactive intermediate formation for various functional groups, followed by a review of chemical design approaches, examples of such strategies, possible isosteric replacements for structural alerts and rationalization of laboratory approaches to determine reactive intermediates, as a guide to today's medicinal chemist. PMID:21320068

  6. Formation Processes and Impacts of Reactive and Nonreactive Minerals in Permeable Reactive Barriers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral precipitates in zero-valent iron PRBs can be classified by formation processes into three groups: 1) those that result from changes in chemical conditions (i.e., changes in pH, e.g., calcite); 2) those that are a consequence of microbial activity (i.e., sulfate reduction,...

  7. CASMO5/TSUNAMI-3D spent nuclear fuel reactivity uncertainty analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, R.; Rhodes, J.; Smith, K.

    2012-07-01

    The CASMO5 lattice physics code is used in conjunction with the TSUNAMI-3D sequence in ORNL's SCALE 6 code system to estimate the uncertainties in hot-to-cold reactivity changes due to cross-section uncertainty for PWR assemblies at various burnup points. The goal of the analysis is to establish the multiplication factor uncertainty similarity between various fuel assemblies at different conditions in a quantifiable manner and to obtain a bound on the hot-to-cold reactivity uncertainty over the various assembly types and burnup attributed to fundamental cross-section data uncertainty. (authors)

  8. Impacts of fuel formulation and engine operating parameters on the nanostructure and reactivity of diesel soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehliu, Kuen

    This study focuses on the impacts of fuel formulations on the reactivity and nanostructure of diesel soot. A 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine was used in generating soot samples. The impacts of engine operating modes and the start of combustion on soot reactivity were investigated first. Based on preliminary investigations, a test condition of 2400 rpm and 64 Nm, with single and split injection strategies, was chosen for studying the impacts of fuel formulation on the characteristics of diesel soot. Three test fuels were used: an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (BP15), a pure soybean methyl-ester (B100), and a synthetic Fischer-Tropsch fuel (FT) produced in a gas-to-liquid process. The start of injection (SOI) and fuel rail pressures were adjusted such that the three test fuels have similar combustion phasing, thereby facilitating comparisons between soots from the different fuels. Soot reactivity was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). According to TGA, B100 soot exhibits the fastest oxidation on a mass basis followed by BP15 and FT derived soots in order of apparent rate constant. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates no relation between the surface oxygen content and the soot reactivity. Crystalline information for the soot samples was obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The basal plane diameter obtained from XRD was inversely related to the apparent rate constants for soot oxidation. For comparison, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) provided images of the graphene layers. Quantitative image analysis proceeded by a custom algorithm. B100 derived soot possessed the shortest mean fringe length and greatest mean fringe tortuosity. This suggests soot (nano)structural disorder correlates with a faster oxidation rate. Such results are in agreement with the X-ray analysis, as the observed fringe length is a measure of basal plane diameter. Moreover the relation

  9. Oxidation and formation of deposit precursors in hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, F. R.; Lan, B.; Cotts, D. B.; Buttrill, S. E., Jr.; St.john, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    The oxidation of two jet turbine fuels and some pure hydrocarbons was studied at 130 C with and without the presence of small amounts of N-methyl pyrrole (NMP) or indene. Tendency to form solid-deposit precursors was studied by measuring soluble gum formation as well as dimer and trimer formation using field ionization mass spectrometry. Pure n-dodecane oxidized fastest and gave the smallest amount of procursors. An unstable fuel oil oxidized much slower but formed large amounts of precursors. Stable Jet A fuel oxidized slowest and gave little precursors. Indene either retarded or accelerated the oxidation of n-dodecane, depending on its concentration, but always caused more gum formation. The NMP greatly retarded n-dodecane oxidation but accelerated Jet A oxidation and greatly increased the latter's gum formation. In general, the additive reacted faster and formed most of the gum. Results are interpreted in terms of classical cooxidation theory. The effect of oxygen pressure on gum formation is also reported.

  10. Chemical Characterization and Reactivity Testing of Fuel-Oxidizer Reaction Product (Test Report)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The product of incomplete reaction of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) propellants, or fuel-oxidizer reaction product (FORP), has been hypothesized as a contributory cause of an anomaly which occurred in the chamber pressure (PC) transducer tube on the Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) aft thruster 467 on flight STS-51. A small hole was found in the titanium-alloy PC tube at the first bend below the pressure transducer. It was surmised that the hole may have been caused by heat and pressure resulting from ignition of FORP. The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to define the chemical characteristics of FORP, characterize its reactivity, and simulate the events in a controlled environment which may have lead to the Pc-tube failure. Samples of FORP were obtained from the gas-phase reaction of MMH with NTO under laboratory conditions, the pulsed firings of RCS thrusters with modified PC tubes using varied oxidizer or fuel lead times, and the nominal RCS thruster firings at WSTF and Kaiser-Marquardt. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC), ion chromatography (IC), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled to FTIR (TGA/FTIR), and mechanical impact testing were used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the chemical, thermal, and ignition properties of FORP. These studies showed that the composition of FORP is variable but falls within a limited range of compositions that depends on the fuel loxidizer ratio at the time of formation, composition of the post-formation atmosphere (reducing or oxidizing), and reaction or postreaction temperature. A typical composition contains methylhydrazinium nitrate (MMHN), ammonium nitrate (AN), methylammonium nitrate (MAN), and trace amounts of hydrazinium nitrate and 1,1-dimethylhydrazinium nitrate. The thermal decomposition

  11. Chemical Reactivity Testing for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program. Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, H.C.

    1999-01-24

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) summarizes requirements used by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (LMES) Development Division at Y-12 for conducting chemical reactivity testing of Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel, sponsored by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). The requirements are based on the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 (Statement of Work for Laboratory Determination of Uranium Hydride Oxidation Reaction Kinetics.) This QAPjP will utilize the quality assurance program at Y-12, QA-101PD, revision 1, and existing implementing procedures for the most part in meeting the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 requirements, exceptions will be noted.

  12. A microfluidic direct formate fuel cell on paper.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Thomas S; Purohit, Krutarth H; Domalaon, Kryls; Pham, Linda; Burgess, Brianna J; Manorothkul, Natalie; Galvan, Vicente; Sotez, Samantha; Gomez, Frank A; Haan, John L

    2015-08-01

    We describe the first direct formate fuel cell on a paper microfluidic platform. In traditional membrane-less microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs), external pumping consumes power produced by the fuel cell in order to maintain co-laminar flow of the anode stream and oxidant stream to prevent mixing. However, in paper microfluidics, capillary action drives flow while minimizing stream mixing. In this work, we demonstrate a paper MFC that uses formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. Using these materials we achieve a maximum power density of nearly 2.5 mW/mg Pd. In a series configuration, our MFC achieves an open circuit voltage just over 1 V, and in a parallel configuration, short circuit of 20 mA absolute current. We also demonstrate that the MFC does not require continuous flow of fuel and oxidant to produce power. We found that we can pre-saturate the materials on the paper, stop the electrolyte flow, and still produce approximately 0.5 V for 15 min. This type of paper MFC has potential applications in point-of-care diagnostic devices and other electrochemical sensors. PMID:25546700

  13. Visible contrail formation from fuels with different sulfur contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busen, R.; Schumann, U.

    As a test for postulated influences of sulfur emissions on nucleation, the contrail formation from a two-engine jet aircraft was investigated using fuels with different sulfur contents for the two engines during the same flight. The sulfur mass fractions in the fuels were about 2 and 250 ppm, respectively, typical for aviation fuels. Other engine and fuel parameters were about the same for both engines. Contrail formation was observed visually from distances as close as 100 m and documented by video and photos. The flight took place at 302 hPa (9 km altitude), at ambient temperatures of about -50°C, and relative humidity for liquid water of about 34%. Short contrails formed about 30 m after the engines. No visible differences were detected in the contrails forming from the two engines. The observed conditions for contrail formation are close to those predicted by Appleman [1953] if the propulsion efficiency of the aircraft/engine combination during flight is taken into account.

  14. Formation mechanisms, structure, solution behavior, and reactivity of aminodiborane.

    PubMed

    Li, Huizhen; Ma, Nana; Meng, Wenjuan; Gallucci, Judith; Qiu, Yongqing; Li, Shujun; Zhao, Qianyi; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Ji-Cheng; Chen, Xuenian

    2015-09-30

    A facile synthesis of cyclic aminodiborane (NH2B2H5, ADB) from ammonia borane (NH3·BH3, AB) and THF·BH3 has made it possible to determine its important characteristics. Ammonia diborane (NH3BH2(μ-H)BH3, AaDB) and aminoborane (NH2BH2, AoB) were identified as key intermediates in the formation of ADB. Elimination of molecular hydrogen occurred from an ion pair, [H2B(NH3) (THF)](+)[BH4](-). Protic-hydridic hydrogen scrambling was proved on the basis of analysis of the molecular hydrogen products, ADB and other reagents through (2)H NMR and MS, and it was proposed that the scrambling occurred as the ion pair reversibly formed a BH5-like intermediate, [(THF)BH2NH2](η(2)-H2)BH3. Loss of molecular hydrogen from the ion pair led to the formation of AoB, most of which was trapped by BH3 to form ADB with a small amount oligomerizing to (NH2BH2)n. Theoretical calculations showed the thermodynamic feasibility of the proposed intermediates and the activation processes. The structure of the ADB·THF complex was found from X-ray single crystal analysis to be a three-dimensional array of zigzag chains of ADB and THF, maintained by hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Room temperature exchange of terminal and bridge hydrogens in ADB was observed in THF solution, while such exchange was not observed in diethyl ether or toluene. Both experimental and theoretical results confirm that the B-H-B bridge in ADB is stronger than that in diborane (B2H6, DB). The B-H-B bridge is opened when ADB and NaH react to form sodium aminodiboronate, Na[NH2(BH3)2]. The structure of the sodium salt as its 18-crown-6 ether adduct was determined by X-ray single crystal analysis. PMID:26335760

  15. Technical Basis for Peak Reactivity Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, William BJ J; Ade, Brian J; Bowman, Stephen M; Gauld, Ian C; Ilas, Germina; Mertyurek, Ugur; Radulescu, Georgeta

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate application of burnup credit for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase (1) investigates applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in spent fuel pools (SFPs) to storage and transportation systems and (2) evaluates validation of both reactivity (keff) calculations and burnup credit nuclide concentrations within these methods. The second phase will focus on extending burnup credit beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the first phase, including an analysis of lattice design parameters and depletion effects, as well as both validation components. Initial efforts related to extended burnup credit are discussed in a companion paper. Peak reactivity analyses have been used in criticality analyses for licensing of BWR fuel in SFPs over the last 20 years. These analyses typically combine credit for the gadolinium burnable absorber present in the fuel with a modest amount of burnup credit. Gadolinium burnable absorbers are used in BWR assemblies to control core reactivity. The burnable absorber significantly reduces assembly reactivity at beginning of life, potentially leading to significant increases in assembly reactivity for burnups less than 15–20 GWd/MTU. The reactivity of each fuel lattice is dependent on gadolinium loading. The number of gadolinium-bearing fuel pins lowers initial lattice reactivity, but it has a small impact on the burnup and reactivity of the peak. The gadolinium concentration in each pin has a small impact on initial lattice reactivity but a significant effect on the reactivity of the peak and the burnup at which the peak occurs. The importance of the lattice parameters and depletion conditions are primarily determined by their impact on the gadolinium depletion. Criticality code validation for BWR burnup

  16. Involvement of Cytochrome P450 in Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hrycay, Eugene G; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the involvement of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the formation of reactive oxygen species in biological systems and discusses the possible involvement of reactive oxygen species and CYP enzymes in cancer. Reactive oxygen species are formed in biological systems as byproducts of the reduction of molecular oxygen and include the superoxide radical anion (∙O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (∙OH), hydroperoxyl radical (HOO∙), singlet oxygen ((1)O2), and peroxyl radical (ROO∙). Two endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species are the mammalian CYP-dependent microsomal electron transport system and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. CYP enzymes catalyze the oxygenation of an organic substrate and the simultaneous reduction of molecular oxygen. If the transfer of oxygen to a substrate is not tightly controlled, uncoupling occurs and leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species are capable of causing oxidative damage to cellular membranes and macromolecules that can lead to the development of human diseases such as cancer. In normal cells, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species are maintained in balance with intracellular biochemical antioxidants to prevent cellular damage. Oxidative stress occurs when this critical balance is disrupted. Topics covered in this review include the role of reactive oxygen species in intracellular cell signaling and the relationship between CYP enzymes and cancer. Outlines of CYP expression in neoplastic tissues, CYP enzyme polymorphism and cancer risk, CYP enzymes in cancer therapy and the metabolic activation of chemical procarcinogens by CYP enzymes are also provided. PMID:26233903

  17. Reactive Tracer Techniques to Quantitatively Monitor Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, J. M.; Carson, C.; Stute, M.; Broecker, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    Injection of CO2 into geologic storage reservoirs induces fluid-rock reactions that may lead to the mineralization of the injected CO2. The long-term safety of geologic CO2 storage is, therefore, determined by in situ CO2-fluid-rock reactions. Currently existing monitoring and verification techniques for CO2 storage are insufficient to characterize the solubility and reactivity of the injected CO2, and to establish a mass balance of the stored CO2. Dissolved and chemically transformed CO2 thus avoid detection. We developed and are testing a new reactive tracer technique for quantitative monitoring and detection of dissolved and chemically transformed CO2 in geologic storage reservoirs. The technique involves tagging the injected carbon with radiocarbon (14C). Carbon-14 is a naturally occurring radioisotope produced by cosmic radiation and made artificially by 14N neutron capture. The ambient concentration is very low with a 14C/12C ratio of 10-12. The concentration of 14C in deep geologic formations and fossil fuels is at least two orders of magnitude lower. This makes 14C an ideal quantitative tracer for tagging underground injections of anthropogenic CO2. We are testing the feasibility of this tracer technique at the CarbFix pilot injection site in Iceland, where approximately 2,000 tons of CO2 dissolved in water are currently injected into a deep basalt aquifer. The injected CO2 is tagged with 14C by dynamically adding calibrated amounts of H14CO3 solution to the injection stream. The target concentration is 12 Bq/kg of injected water, which results in a 14C activity that is 5 times enriched compared to the 1850 background. In addition to 14C as a reactive tracer, trifluormethylsulphur pentafluoride (SF5CF3) and sulfurhexafluoride (SF6) are used as conservative tracers to monitor the transport of the injected CO2 in the subsurface. Fluid samples are collected for tracer analysis from the injection and monitoring wells on a regular basis. Results show a fast

  18. Fuel Cell Manufacturing Diagnostic Techniques: IR Thermography with Reactive Flow through Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Manak, A. J.; Ulsh, M.; Bender, G.

    2012-01-01

    While design and material considerations for PEMFCs have a large impact on cost, it is also necessary to consider a transition to high volume production of fuel cell systems, including MEA components, to enable economies of scale and reduce per unit cost. One of the critical manufacturing tasks is developing and deploying techniques to provide in‐process measurement of fuel cell components for quality control. This effort requires a subsidiary task: The study of the effect of manufacturing defects on performance and durability with the objective to establish validated manufacturing tolerances for fuel cell components. This work focuses on the development of a potential quality control method for gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs). The method consists of infrared (IR) thermography combined with reactive flow through (RFT) excitation. Detection of catalyst loading reduction defects in GDE catalyst layers will be presented.

  19. Performance of Trasuranic-Loaded Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel in LWRs Interim Report, Including Void Reactivity Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Pope; Brian Boer; Gilles Youinou; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-03-01

    The current focus of the Deep Burn Project is on once-through burning of transuranice (TRU) in light water reactors (LWRs). The fuel form is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle design from high-temperature reactor technology. In the Deep Burn LWR (DB-LWR) concept, these fuel particles would be pressed into compacts using SiC matrix material and loaded into fuel pins for use in conventional LWRs. The TRU loading comes from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Unit cell calculations have been performed using the DRAGON-4 code in order assess the physics attributes of TRU-only FCM fuel in an LWR lattice. Depletion calculations assuming an infinite lattice condition were performed with calculations of various reactivity coefficients performed at each step. Unit cells containing typical UO2 and MOX fuel were analyzed in the same way to provide a baseline against which to compare the TRU-only FCM fuel. Loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into a pin without significant quantities of uranium challenges the design from the standpoint of several key reactivity parameters, particularly void reactivity, and to some degree, the Doppler coefficient. These unit cells, while providing an indication of how a whole core of similar fuel would behave, also provide information of how individual pins of TRU-only FCM fuel would influence the reactivity behavior of a heterogeneous assembly. If these FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly with LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance of the TRU-only FCM fuel pins may be preserved. A configuration such as this would be similar to CONFU assemblies analyzed in previous studies. Analogous to the plutonium content limits imposed on MOX fuel, some amount of TRU-only FCM pins in an otherwise-uranium fuel assembly may give acceptable reactivity

  20. LOX/hydrocarbon fuel carbon formation and mixing data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, J.

    1983-01-01

    By applying the Priem-Heidmann Generalized-Length vaporization correlation, the computer model developed by the present study predicts the spatial variation of propellant vaporization rate using the injector cold flow results to define the streamtubes. The calculations show that the overall and local propellant vaporization rate and mixture ratio change drastically as the injection element type or the injector operating condition is changed. These results are compared with the regions of carbon formation observed in the photographic combustion testing. The correlation shows that the fuel vaporization rate and the local mixture ratio produced by the injector element have first order effects on the degree of carbon formation.

  1. FUEL EFFICIENT GALAXIES: SUSTAINING STAR FORMATION WITH STELLAR MASS LOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Samuel N.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2011-06-10

    We examine the importance of secular stellar mass loss for fueling ongoing star formation in disk galaxies during the late stages of their evolution. For a galaxy of a given stellar mass, we calculate the total mass loss rate of its entire stellar population using star formation histories derived from the observed evolution of the M{sub *}-star formation rate (SFR) relation, along with the predictions of standard stellar evolution models for stellar mass loss for a variety of initial stellar mass functions. Our model shows that recycled gas from stellar mass loss can provide most or all of the fuel required to sustain the current level of star formation in late-type galaxies. Stellar mass loss can therefore remove the tension between the low gas infall rates that are derived from observations and the relatively rapid star formation occurring in disk galaxies. For galaxies where cold gas infall rates have been estimated, we demonstrate explicitly that stellar mass loss can account for most of the deficit between their SFR and infall rate.

  2. A Study on Reactive Spray Deposition Technology Processing Parameters in the Context of Pt Nanoparticle Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, Justin M.; Maric, Radenka

    2015-12-01

    Catalytic materials are complex systems in which achieving the desired properties (i.e., activity, selectivity and stability) depends on exploiting the many degrees of freedom in surface and bulk composition, geometry, and defects. Flame aerosol synthesis is a process for producing nanoparticles with ample processing parameter space to tune the desired properties. Flame dynamics inside the reactor are determined by the input process variables such as solubility of precursor in the fuel; solvent boiling point; reactant flow rate and concentration; flow rates of air, fuel and the carrier gas; and the burner geometry. In this study, the processing parameters for reactive spray deposition technology, a flame-based synthesis method, are systematically evaluated to understand the residence times, reactant mixing, and temperature profiles of flames used in the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles. This provides a framework for further study and modeling. The flame temperature and length are also studied as a function of O2 and fuel flow rates.

  3. 78 FR 8050 - Spent Fuel Cask Certificate of Compliance Format and Content

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 72 Spent Fuel Cask Certificate of Compliance Format and Content AGENCY: Nuclear... that governs the format and content of spent fuel storage cask Certificates of Compliance (CoCs... criteria for the format and content to be included in a spent fuel storage cask Certificate of...

  4. Incremental Reactivity Effects on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in Urban Atmospheres with and without Biogenic Influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacarab, Mary; Li, Lijie; Carter, William P. L.; Cocker, David R., III

    2016-04-01

    Two different surrogate mixtures of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were developed to study secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation at atmospheric reactivities similar to urban regions with varying biogenic influence levels. Environmental chamber simulations were designed to enable the study of the incremental aerosol formation from select anthropogenic (m‑Xylene, 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene, and 1-Methylnaphthalene) and biogenic (α-pinene) precursors under the chemical reactivity set by the two different surrogate mixtures. The surrogate reactive organic gas (ROG) mixtures were based on that used to develop the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) factors for evaluation of O3 forming potential. Multiple incremental aerosol formation experiments were performed in the University of California Riverside (UCR) College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) dual 90m3 environmental chambers. Incremental aerosol yields were determined for each of the VOCs studied and compared to yields found from single precursor studies. Aerosol physical properties of density, volatility, and hygroscopicity were monitored throughout experiments. Bulk elemental chemical composition from high-resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) data will also be presented. Incremental yields and SOA chemical and physical characteristics will be compared with data from previous single VOC studies conducted for these aerosol precursors following traditional VOC/NOx chamber experiments. Evaluation of the incremental effects of VOCs on SOA formation and properties are paramount in evaluating how to best extrapolate environmental chamber observations to the ambient atmosphere and provides useful insights into current SOA formation models. Further, the comparison of incremental SOA from VOCs in varying surrogate urban atmospheres (with and without strong biogenic influence) allows for a unique perspective on the impacts

  5. Reactivity controlled compression ignition drive cycle emissions and fuel economy estimations using vehicle systems simulations - IJER

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Curran, Scott; Gao, Zhiming; Wagner, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve reactivity- controlled compression ignition (RCCI) has been shown to reduce NOX and soot emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared with conventional diesel combustion (CDC). The RCCI concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that the fuel reactivity can be tailored to the engine speed and load, allowing stable low-temperature combustion to be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. However, the current range of the experimental RCCI engine map investigated here does not allow for RCCI operation over the entirety of somemore » drive cycles. A multi-mode RCCI strategy is employed where the engine switches from RCCI to CDC when speed and load fall outside of the experimentally determined RCCI range. The potential for RCCI to reduce drive cycle fuel economy and emissions is not clearly understood and is explored here by simulating the fuel economy and emissions for a multi-mode RCCI-enabled vehicle operating over a variety of US drive cycles using experimental engine maps for multi-mode RCCI, CDC, and a 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine. Simulations are completed assuming a conventional mid-size passenger vehicle with an automatic transmission. RCCI fuel economy simulation results are compared with the same vehicle powered by a representative 2009 PFI gasoline engine over multiple drive cycles. Engine-out drive cycle emissions are compared to CDC, and observations regarding relative gasoline and diesel tank sizes needed for the various drive cycles are also summarized.« less

  6. Micro-crack formation in direct methanol fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Spernjak, Dusan; Zelenay, Piotr; Kim, Yu Seung

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on the micro-crack formation of Nafion®-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) after extended direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) operation. All electrodes, both with metal-black and carbon-supported catalysts, contain some micro-cracks initially; the area covered by these cracks increases both in the anode and cathode after 100-hours of DMFC test. X-ray tomography shows an increase in the crack area in both anode and cathode that correlates with methanol feed concentration and methanol crossover. The MEAs with carbon-supported catalysts and thicker membrane are more resistant to the formation of micro-cracks compared to those with metal-black catalysts and thinner membrane, respectively. The impact of the micro-crack formation on cell performance and durability is limited over the 100-hour DMFC operation, with the long-term impact remaining unknown.

  7. Effects of fracture reactivation and diagenesis on fracture network evolution: Cambrian Eriboll Formation, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, J. N.; Eichhubl, P.; Xu, G.; Ahn, H.; Fall, A.; Hargrove, P.; Laubach, S.; Ukar, E.

    2011-12-01

    The Cambrian Eriboll Formation quartzarenites contain abundant fractures with varying degrees of quartz cement infill. Fractures exist that are entirely sealed; are locally sealed by bridging cements but preserve pore space among bridges; are mostly open but lined with veneers of cement; or are devoid of cement. Fracture propagation in the Eriboll Formation is highly sensitive to the presence of pre-existing fractures. Fracture reactivation occurs in opening mode as individual fractures repeatedly open and are filled or bridged by syn-kinematic cements. As well, reactivation occurs in shear as opening of one fracture orientation coincides with shear displacement along pre-existing fractures of different orientations. The tendency for pre-existing fractures to slip varies in part by the extent of cement infill, yet we observe shear and opening-mode reactivation even among sealed fractures. Paleotemperature analysis of fluid inclusions within fracture cements suggests some fractures now in outcrop formed deep in the subsurface. Fractures within the Eriboll Formation may therefore affect later fracture propagation throughout geologic time. With progressive strain, fault zones develop within fracture networks by a sequence of opening-mode fracture formation, fracture reactivation and linkage, fragmentation, cataclasis, and the formation of slip surfaces. Cataclasite within fault zones is commonly more thoroughly cemented than fractures in the damage zone or outside the fault zone. This variance of cement abundance is likely the result of (1) continued exposure of freshly broken quartz surfaces within cataclasite, promoting quartz precipitation, and (2) possibly more interconnected pathways for mass transfer within the fault zone. Enhanced cementation of cataclasite results in strengthening or diagenetic strain hardening of the evolving fault zone. Further slip is accommodated by shear localization along discrete slip surfaces. With further linkage of fault segments

  8. Stabilization of thylakoid membranes in isoprene-emitting plants reduces formation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Velikova, Violeta; Sharkey, Thomas D; Loreto, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Isoprene is emitted by a significant fraction of the world's vegetation. Isoprene makes leaves more thermotolerant, yet we do not fully understand how. We have recently shown that isoprene stabilizes thylakoid membranes under heat stress. Here we show that heat-stressed, isoprene-emitting transgenic Arabidopsis plants also produce a lower pool of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, and that this was especially due to a lower accumulation of H2O2 in isoprene emitting plants. It remains difficult to disentangle whether in heat stressed plants isoprene also directly reacts with and quenches reactive oxygen species (ROS), or reduces ROS formation by stabilizing thylakoids. We present considerations that make the latter a more likely mechanism, under our experimental circumstances. PMID:22301981

  9. The Suitable Geological Formations for Spent Fuel Disposal in Romania

    SciTech Connect

    Marunteanu, C.; Ionita, G.; Durdun, I.

    2007-07-01

    Using the experience in the field of advanced countries and formerly Romanian program data, ANDRAD, the agency responsible for the disposal of radioactive wastes, started the program for spent fuel disposal in deep geological formations with a documentary analysis at the national scale. The potential geological formations properly characterized elsewhere in the world: salt, clay, volcanic tuff, granite and crystalline rocks,. are all present in Romania. Using general or specific selection criteria, we presently consider the following two areas for candidate geological formations: 1. Clay formations in two areas in the western part of Romania: (1) The Pannonian basin Socodor - Zarand, where the clay formation is 3000 m thick, with many bentonitic strata and undisturbed structure, and (2) The Eocene Red Clay on the Somes River, extending 1200 m below the surface. They both need a large investigation program in order to establish and select the required homogeneous, dry and undisturbed zones at a suitable depth. 2. Old platform green schist formations, low metamorphosed, quartz and feldspar rich rocks, in the Central Dobrogea structural unit, not far from Cernavoda NPP (30 km average distance), 3000 m thick and including many homogeneous, fine granular, undisturbed, up to 300 m thick layers. (authors)

  10. An improved alkaline direct formate paper microfluidic fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Vicente; Domalaon, Kryls; Tang, Catherine; Sotez, Samantha; Mendez, Alex; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Purohit, Krutarth; Pham, Linda; Haan, John; Gomez, Frank A

    2016-02-01

    Paper-based microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs) are a potential replacement for traditional FCs and batteries due to their low cost, portability, and simplicity to operate. In MFCs, separate solutions of fuel and oxidant migrate through paper due to capillary action and laminar flow and, upon contact with each other and catalyst, produce electricity. In the present work, we describe an improved microfluidic paper-based direct formate FC (DFFC) employing formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. The dimensions of the lateral column, current collectors, and cathode were optimized. A maximum power density of 2.53 mW/cm(2) was achieved with a DFFC of surface area 3.0 cm(2) , steel mesh as current collector, 5% carbon to paint mass ratio for cathode electrode and, 30% hydrogen peroxide. The longevity of the MFC's detailed herein is greater than eight hours with continuous flow of streams. In a series configuration, the MFCs generate sufficient energy to power light-emitting diodes and a handheld calculator. PMID:26572774

  11. Chemical reactivity testing for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, L.W.

    2000-02-08

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) summarizes requirements used by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (LMES) Development Division at Y-12 for conducting chemical reactivity testing of Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel, sponsored by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). The requirements are based on the NSNFP Statement of work PRO-007 (Statement of Work for Laboratory Determination of Uranium Hydride Oxidation Reaction Kinetics.) This QAPjP will utilize the quality assurance program at Y-12, Y60-101PD, Quality Program Description, and existing implementing procedures for the most part in meeting the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 requirements, exceptions will be noted. The project consists of conducting three separate series of related experiments, ''Passivation of Uranium Hydride Powder With Oxygen and Water'', '''Passivation of Uranium Hydride Powder with Surface Characterization'', and ''Electrochemical Measure of Uranium Hydride Corrosion Rate''.

  12. Non-destructive assay of spent nuclear fuel using passive neutron Albedo reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L G; Schear, M A; Croft, S; Tobin, S J; Swinhoe, M T; Menlove, H O

    2010-01-01

    Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) is one of fourteen techniques that has been researched and evaluated to form part of a comprehensive and integrated detection system for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. PNAR implemented with {sup 3}He tubes for neutron detection (PNAR-{sup 3}He) is the measurement of time correlated neutrons from a spent fuel assembly with and without a Cadmium (Cd) layer surrounding the assembly. PNAR utilizes the self-interrogation of the fuel via reflection of neutrons born in the fuel assembly back in to the fuel assembly. The neutrons originate primarily from spontaneous fission events within the fuel itself (Curium-244) but are amplified by multiplication. The presence and removal of the Cd provides two measurement conditions with different neutron energy spectra and therefore different interrogating neutron characteristics. Cd has a high cross-section of absorption for slow neutrons and therefore greatly reduces the low energy (thermal) neutron fluence rate returning. The ratios of the Singles, Doubles and Triples count rates obtained in each case are known as the Cd ratios, which are related to fissile content. A potential safeguards application for which PNAR-{sup 3}He is particularly suited is 'fingerprinting'. Fingerprinting could function as an alternative to plutonium (Pu) mass determination; providing confidence that material was not diverted during transport between sites. PNAR-{sup 3}He has six primary NDA signatures: Singles, Doubles and Triples count rates measured with two energy spectra at both shipping and receiving sites. This is to uniquely identify the fuel assembly, and confirm no changes have taken place during transport. Changes may indicate all attempt to divert material for example. Here, the physics of the PNAR-{sup 3}He concept will be explained, alongside a discussion on the development of a prototypical PNAR-{sup 3}He instrument using simulation. The capabilities and performance of the

  13. Endogenous and endobiotic induced reactive oxygen species formation by isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Siraki, Arno G; Pourahmad, Jalal; Chan, Tom S; Khan, Sumsullah; O'Brien, Peter J

    2002-01-01

    The rat hepatocyte catalyzed oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin to form the fluorescent 2,7'-dichlorofluorescein was used to measure endogenous and xenobiotic-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation by intact isolated rat hepatocytes. Various oxidase substrates and inhibitors were then used to identify the intracellular oxidases responsible. Endogenous ROS formation was markedly increased in catalase-inhibited or GSH-depleted hepatocytes, and was inhibited by ROS scavengers or desferoxamine. Endogenous ROS formation was also inhibited by cytochrome P450 inhibitors, but was not affected by oxypurinol, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, or phenelzine, a monoamine oxidase inhibitor. Mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors or hypoxia, on the other hand, markedly increased ROS formation before cytotoxicity ensued. Furthermore, uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation inhibited endogenous ROS formation. This suggests endogenous ROS formation can largely be attributed to oxygen reduction by reduced mitochondrial electron transport components and reduced cytochrome P450 isozymes. Addition of monoamine oxidase substrates increased antimycin A-resistant respiration and ROS formation before cytotoxicity ensued. Addition of peroxisomal substrates also increased antimycin A-resistant respiration but they were less effective at inducing ROS formation and were not cytotoxic. However, peroxisomal substrates readily induced ROS formation and were cytotoxic towards catalase-inhibited hepatocytes, which suggests that peroxisomal catalase removes endogenous H(2)O(2) formed in the peroxisomes. Hepatocyte catalyzed dichlorofluorescin oxidation induced by oxidase substrates, e.g., benzylamine, was correlated with the cytotoxicity induced in catalase-inhibited hepatocytes. PMID:11755311

  14. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Per; Greenspan, Ehud

    2015-02-09

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m3. This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X

  15. Formation of reactive oxygen species in rat epithelial cells upon stimulation with fly ash.

    PubMed

    Voelkel, K; Krug, H F; Diabaté, S

    2003-02-01

    Fly ash was used as a model for ambient particulate matter which is under suspicion to cause adverse pulmonary health effects. The fly ash was pre-sized and contained only particles < 20 microm including an ultrafine fraction (< 100 nm) that contributed 31% to the particle number. In our study, we investigated the influence of fly ash on the promotion of early inflammatory reactions like the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat lung epithelial cells (RLE-6TN). Furthermore, we determined the formation of nitric oxide (NO). The cells show a clear dose-response relationship concerning the formation of ROS with regard to the mass of particles applied. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) added as a co-stimulus did not increase the formation of ROS induced by fly ash. Furthermore, in LPS (0.1 microg/ml) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha; 1 ng/ml) pre-treated cells no increase in reactive oxygen species comparable to fly ash alone is observable. In presence of the metal chelator, desferrioxamine (DFO), ROS formation can be significantly reduced. Neither fly ash nor LPS induced a significant NO release in RLE-6TN cells. PMID:12682424

  16. Investigation of the Effect of Fixed Absorbers on the Reactivity of PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel for Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, John C.; Sanders, Charlotta E.

    2002-08-15

    The effect of fixed absorbers on the reactivity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in support of burnup-credit criticality safety analyses is examined. A fuel assembly burned in conjunction with fixed absorbers may have a higher reactivity for a given burnup than an assembly that has not used fixed absorbers. As a result, guidance on burnup credit, issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Spent Fuel Project Office, recommends restricting the use of burnup credit to assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers. This recommendation eliminates a large portion of the currently discharged SNF from loading in burnup credit casks and thus severely limits the practical usefulness of burnup credit. Therefore, data are needed to support the extension of burnup credit to additional SNF. This research investigates the effect of various fixed absorbers, including integral burnable absorbers, burnable poison rods, control rods, and axial power shaping rods, on the reactivity of PWR SNF. Trends in reactivity with relevant parameters (e.g., initial fuel enrichment, burnup and absorber type, exposure, and design) are established, and anticipated reactivity effects are quantified. Where appropriate, recommendations are offered for addressing the reactivity effects of the fixed absorbers in burnup-credit safety analyses.

  17. The direct formate fuel cell with an alkaline anion exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartrom, Amy M.; Haan, John L.

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate for the first time an operating Direct Formate Fuel Cell employing formate salts as the anode fuel, air or oxygen as the oxidant, a polymer anion exchange membrane, and metal catalysts at the anode and cathode. Operation of the DFFC at 60 °C using 1 M KOOCH and 2 M KOH as the anode fuel and electrolyte and oxygen gas at the cathode produces 144 mW cm-2 of peak power density, 181 mA cm-2 current density at 0.6 V, and an open circuit voltage of 0.931 V. This performance is competitive with alkaline Direct Liquid Fuel Cells (DLFCs) previously reported in the literature and demonstrates that formate fuel is a legitimate contender with alcohol fuels for alkaline DLFCs. A survey of the literature shows that a formate-oxygen fuel cell has a high theoretical potential, and the safe, renewable formate fuel does not poison the anode catalyst.

  18. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 600 - Fuel Economy Label Formats

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel Economy Label Formats VIII... POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. VIII Appendix VIII to Part 600—Fuel Economy Label Formats EC01MY92.117 EC01MY92.118 EC01MY92.119...

  19. 40 CFR 600.302-08 - Fuel economy label format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel economy label format requirements. 600.302-08 Section 600.302-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.302-08 Fuel economy label...

  20. 40 CFR 600.302-08 - Fuel economy label format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel economy label format requirements. 600.302-08 Section 600.302-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.302-08 Fuel economy label...

  1. In situ formation of magnetite reactive barriers in soil for waste stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    Reactive barriers containing magnetite and methods for making magnetite reactive barriers in situ in soil for sequestering soil contaminants including actinides and heavy metals, organic materials, iodine and technetium are disclosed. According to one embodiment, a two-step reagent introduction into soil takes place. In the first step, free oxygen is removed from the soil by separately injecting into the soil aqueous solutions of iron (II) salt, for example FeCl.sub.2, and base, for example NaOH or NH.sub.3 in about a 1:1 volume ratio. Then, in the second step, similar reagents are injected a second time (however, according to about a 1:2 volume ratio, iron to salt) to form magnetite. The magnetite formation is facilitated, in part, due to slow intrusion of oxygen into the soil from the surface. The invention techniques are suited to injection of reagents into soil in proximity to a contamination plume or source allowing in situ formation of the reactive barrier at the location of waste or hazardous material. Mixing of reagents to form. precipitate is mediated and enhanced through movement of reagents in soil as a result of phenomena including capillary action, movement of groundwater, soil washing and reagent injection pressure.

  2. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Maksymovych, Petro; Yates, Jr, John T.

    2016-01-12

    Here, we report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10^ 8 to 10^ 4 Torr (dosage up to 10^6 langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au CO complex formation and diffusion, and Aumore » adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au CO complex result from the reduced Au Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO +) on Au. These studies indicate that the mobile Au CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers.« less

  3. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au-CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; Baddorf, Arthur P; Maksymovych, Petro; Yates, John T

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au-CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au-CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10(-8) to 10(-4) Torr (dosage up to 10(6) langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au-CO complex formation and diffusion, and Au adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au-CO complex result from the reduced Au-Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au-CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO(δ+)) on Au. Our studies indicate that the mobile Au-CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers. PMID:26754257

  4. Crystal structure induced residue formation on 4H-SiC by reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-hong; Sun, Yu-jun; Zhao, Gao-jie; Liao, Li-ming; Wang, Tao; Chen, Zhi-zhan

    2016-06-01

    The (000 1 ¯) C face of 4H-SiC wafer was etched by reactive ion etching in SF6/O2 plasma. The effect of etching parameters, such as work pressure, SF6:O2 ratio and etching time, on the residue formation were systematically investigated. The residue morphologies were observed by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The residues have spike shape and their facets are defined as { 1 1 ¯ 0 2 ¯ } crystal planes. They are formed at beginning of the etching and no new spikes are generated as prolonging etching time. Both work pressure and SF6:O2 ratio play significant role in the spike formation. The residues can be eliminated completely by increasing the SF6:O2 ratio and work pressure. On the basis of experimental results and of 4H-SiC crystal structure, the spike formation model is proposed.

  5. The Effects of Fuel Stratification and Heat Release Rate Shaping in Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelVescovo, Dan A.

    Low temperature combustion strategies have demonstrated high thermal efficiency with low emissions of pollutants, including oxides of nitrogen and particulate matter. One such combustion strategy, called Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI), which involves the port injection of a low reactivity fuel such as gasoline, ethanol, or natural gas, and a direct injection of a high reactivity fuel, such as diesel, has demonstrated excellent control over the heat release event due to the introduction of in-cylinder stratification of equivalence ratio and reactivity. The RCCI strategy is inherently fuel flexible, however the direct injection strategy needs to be tailored to the combination of premixed and direct injected fuels. Experimental results demonstrate that, when comparing different premixed fuels, matching combustion phasing with premixed mass percentage or SOI timing is not sufficient to retain baseline efficiency and emissions results. If the bulk characteristics of the heat release event can be matched, however, then the efficiency and emissions can be maintained. A 0-D methodology for predicting the required fuel stratification for a desired heat release for kinetically-controlled stratified-charge combustion strategies is proposed and validated with 3-D reacting and non-reacting CFD simulations performed with KIVA3Vr2 in this work. Various heat release rate shapes, phasing, duration, and premixed and DI fuel chemistries are explored using this analysis. This methodology provides a means by which the combustion process of a stratified-charge, kinetically-controlled combustion strategy could be optimized for any fuel combination, assuming that the fuel chemistry is well characterized.

  6. Extracellular ultrathin fibers sensitive to intracellular reactive oxygen species: Formation of intercellular membrane bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Se-Hui; Park, Jin-Young; Joo, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2011-07-15

    Membrane bridges are key cellular structures involved in intercellular communication; however, dynamics for their formation are not well understood. We demonstrated the formation and regulation of novel extracellular ultrathin fibers in NIH3T3 cells using confocal and atomic force microscopy. At adjacent regions of neighboring cells, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and glucose oxidase induced ultrathin fiber formation, which was prevented by Trolox, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. The height of ROS-sensitive ultrathin fibers ranged from 2 to 4 nm. PMA-induced formation of ultrathin fibers was inhibited by cytochalasin D, but not by Taxol or colchicine, indicating that ultrathin fibers mainly comprise microfilaments. PMA-induced ultrathin fibers underwent dynamic structural changes, resulting in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Thus, these fibers are formed by a mechanism(s) involving ROS and involved in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Furthermore, ultrastructural imaging of ultrathin fibers may contribute to understanding the diverse mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication and the intercellular transfer of biomolecules, including proteins and cell organelles.

  7. Analyzing the impact of reactive transport on the repository performance of TRISO fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gregory

    graphite surrounding the spent HTGR fuel will impact the release of aqueous uranium from the TRISO fuel. In order to answer this question, the sorption and partitioning behavior of uranium to graphite under a variety of conditions was investigated. Key systematic variables that were analyzed include solution pH, dissolved carbonate concentration, uranium metal concentration and ionic strength. The kinetics and desorption characteristics of uranium/graphite partitioning were studied as well. The graphite used in these experiments was also characterized by a variety of techniques and conclusions are drawn about the relevant surface chemistry of graphite. This data was then used to generate a model for the reactive transport of uranium in a graphite matrix. This model was implemented with the software code CXTFIT and validated through the use of column studies mirroring the predicted system.

  8. Winter ozone formation and VOC incremental reactivities in the Upper Green River Basin of Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, William P. L.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2012-04-01

    The Upper Green River Basin (UGRB) in Wyoming experiences ozone episodes in the winter when the air is relatively stagnant and the ground is covered by snow. A modeling study was carried out to assess relative contributions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and nitrous acid (HONO) in winter ozone formation episodes in this region. The conditions of two ozone episodes, one in February 2008 and one in March 2011, were represented using a simplified box model with all pollutants present initially, but with the detailed SAPRC-07 chemical mechanism adapted for the temperature and radiation conditions arising from the high surface albedo of the snow that was present. Sensitivity calculations were conducted to assess effects of varying HONO inputs, ambient VOC speciation, and changing treatments of temperature and lighting conditions. The locations modeled were found to be quite different in VOC speciation and sensitivities to VOC and NOx emissions, with one site modeled for the 2008 episode being highly NOx-sensitive and insensitive to VOCs and HONO, and the other 2008 site and both 2011 sites being very sensitive to changes in VOC and HONO inputs. Incremental reactivity scales calculated for VOC-sensitive conditions in the UGRB predict far lower relative contributions of alkanes to ozone formation than in the traditional urban-based MIR scale and that the major contributors to ozone formation were the alkenes and the aromatics, despite their relatively small mass contributions. The reactivity scales are affected by the variable ambient VOC speciation and uncertainties in ambient HONO levels. These box model calculations are useful for indicating general sensitivities and reactivity characteristics of these winter UGRB episodes, but fully three-dimensional models will be required to assess ozone abatement strategies in the UGRB.

  9. Iron hydroxy carbonate formation in zerovalent iron permeable reactive barriers: Characterization and evaluation of phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, Richard T.; Lee, T.R.

    2010-10-22

    Predicting the long-term potential of permeable reactive barriers for treating contaminated groundwater relies on understanding the endpoints of biogeochemical reactions between influent groundwater and the reactive medium. Iron hydroxy carbonate (chukanovite) is frequently observed as a secondary mineral precipitate in granular iron PRBs. Mineralogical characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy on materials collected from three field-based PRBs in the US (East Helena, MT; Elizabeth City, NC; Denver Federal Center, CO). These PRBs were installed to treat a range of contaminants, including chlorinated organics, hexavalent chromium, and arsenic. Results obtained indicate that chukanovite is a prevalent secondary precipitate in the PRBs. Laboratory experiments on high-purity chukanovite separates were carried out to constrain the room-temperature solubility for this mineral. An estimated Gibbs energy of formation ({Delta}{sub f}G{sup o}) for chukanovite is - 1174.4 {+-} 6 kJ/mol. A mineral stability diagram is consistent with observations from the field. Water chemistry from the three reactive barriers falls inside the predicted stability field for chukanovite, at inorganic carbon concentrations intermediate to the stability fields of siderite and ferrous hydroxide. These new data will aid in developing better predictive models of mineral accumulation in zerovalent iron PRBs.

  10. Iron hydroxy carbonate formation in zerovalent iron permeable reactive barriers: characterization and evaluation of phase stability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tony R; Wilkin, Richard T

    2010-07-30

    Predicting the long-term potential of permeable reactive barriers for treating contaminated groundwater relies on understanding the endpoints of biogeochemical reactions between influent groundwater and the reactive medium. Iron hydroxy carbonate (chukanovite) is frequently observed as a secondary mineral precipitate in granular iron PRBs. Mineralogical characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy on materials collected from three field-based PRBs in the US (East Helena, MT; Elizabeth City, NC; Denver Federal Center, CO). These PRBs were installed to treat a range of contaminants, including chlorinated organics, hexavalent chromium, and arsenic. Results obtained indicate that chukanovite is a prevalent secondary precipitate in the PRBs. Laboratory experiments on high-purity chukanovite separates were carried out to constrain the room-temperature solubility for this mineral. An estimated Gibbs energy of formation (Delta(f)G degrees) for chukanovite is -1174.4 +/- 6 kJ/mol. A mineral stability diagram is consistent with observations from the field. Water chemistry from the three reactive barriers falls inside the predicted stability field for chukanovite, at inorganic carbon concentrations intermediate to the stability fields of siderite and ferrous hydroxide. These new data will aid in developing better predictive models of mineral accumulation in zerovalent iron PRBs. PMID:20554346

  11. Tks5-dependent, Nox-mediated Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species is Necessary for Invadopodia Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Begoña; Shani, Gidon; Pass, Ian; Anderson, Diana; Quintavalle, Manuela; Courtneidge, Sara A.

    2009-01-01

    Invadopodia are actin-rich membrane protrusions of cancer cells which facilitate pericellular proteolysis and invasive behavior. We show here that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the NADPH oxidase (Nox) system are necessary for invadopodia formation and function. The invadopodia protein Tks5 is structurally related to p47phox, a Nox component in phagocytic cells. Knockdown of Tks5 reduces total ROS levels in cancer cells. Furthermore, Tks5 and p22phox can associate with each other, suggesting that Tks5 is part of the Nox complex. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Tks5 and Tks4, but not other Src substrates, is reduced by Nox inhibition. We propose that Tks5 facilitates the production of ROS necessary for invadopodia formation, and that in turn ROS modulates Tks5 tyrosine phosphorylation in a positive feedback loop. PMID:19755709

  12. Formation of metal nanoparticles by short-distance sputter deposition in a reactive ion etching chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Nie Min; Meng, Dennis Desheng; Sun Kai

    2009-09-01

    A new method is reported to form metal nanoparticles by sputter deposition inside a reactive ion etching chamber with a very short target-substrate distance. The distribution and morphology of nanoparticles are found to be affected by the distance, the ion concentration, and the sputtering time. Densely distributed nanoparticles of various compositions were fabricated on the substrates that were kept at a distance of 130 mum or smaller from the target. When the distance was increased to 510 mum, island structures were formed, indicating the tendency to form continuous thin film with longer distance. The observed trend for nanoparticle formation is opposite to the previously reported mechanism for the formation of nanoparticles by sputtering. A new mechanism based on the seeding effect of the substrate is proposed to interpret the experimental results.

  13. Controlled formation of anatase and rutile TiO2 thin films by reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafieian, Damon; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Savenije, Tom; Lammertink, Rob G. H.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the formation of TiO2 thin films via DC reactive magnetron sputtering. The oxygen concentration during sputtering proved to be a crucial parameter with respect to the final film structure and properties. The initial deposition provided amorphous films that crystallise upon annealing to anatase or rutile, depending on the initial sputtering conditions. Substoichiometric films (TiOx<2), obtained by sputtering at relatively low oxygen concentration, formed rutile upon annealing in air, whereas stoichiometric films formed anatase. This route therefore presents a formation route for rutile films via lower (<500 °C) temperature pathways. The dynamics of the annealing process were followed by in situ ellipsometry, showing the optical properties transformation. The final crystal structures were identified by XRD. The anatase film obtained by this deposition method displayed high carriers mobility as measured by time-resolved microwave conductance. This also confirms the high photocatalytic activity of the anatase films.

  14. Rapid detection of defects in fuel-cell electrodes using infrared reactive-flow-through technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Prodip K.; Weber, Adam Z.; Bender, Guido; Manak, Austin; Bittinat, Daniel; Herring, Andrew M.; Ulsh, Michael

    2014-09-01

    As fuel cells become more prominent, new manufacturing and production methods will need to be developed to deal efficiently and effectively with increased demand. One necessary component of this industrial growth is the accurate measurement of the variability in the manufacturing process. In this study, we present a diagnostic system that combines infrared thermography with a reactive-flow-through technique to detect catalyst-loading defects in fuel-cell gas-diffusion electrodes accurately with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Experimental results are compared with model predictions of thermal response with good agreement. Data analysis, operating-condition impacts, and detection limits are explored using both experiments and simulation. Overall, the results demonstrate the potential of this technique to measure defects on the millimeter length scale with temporal resolutions appropriate for use on a web-line. Thus we present the first development stage of a next-generation non-destructive diagnostic tool, which may be amenable to eventual use on roll-to-roll manufacturing lines.

  15. Importance of thermal reactivity for hexamethylenetetramine formation from simulated interstellar ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Duvernay, F.; Briani, G.; Danger, G.; Cottin, H.; Theulé, P.; Chiavassa, T.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Complex organic molecules are observed in a broad variety of astrophysical objects, but little is known about their formation mechanism. Laboratory simulations on interstellar ice analogues are therefore crucial for understanding the origin of these complex organic molecules. In this context, we focus on the thermal reactivity for the formation of the organic residue obtained after photolysis at 25 K of the interstellar ice analogue (H2O:CH3OH:NH3) warmed to 300 K. Aims: We determine the formation mechanism of one major product detected in the organic residue: hexamethylenetetramine (HMT). We compare the warming of the photolysed interstellar ice analogue with the warming of the two non-photolysed specific ice mixtures H2CO:NH3:HCOOH and CH2NH:HCOOH, which are used as references. Using both general and specific approaches, we show the precise role of the UV photons and the thermal processing in the HMT formation. Methods: We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to monitor the chemical changes induced by the heating of the photolysed ice analogue and characterize some important species that will subsequently evolve in the formation of HMT in the residue. Results: We show that the thermal processes play a key role in the HMT formation in photolysed ice analogues heated at 300 K. We identify the stable intermediates in the HMT formation that are formed during the warming: the aminomethanol (NH2CH2OH) and the protonated ion trimethyletriamine (TMTH+, C3H10N3+). We also identify for the first time a new product in the organic residue, the polymethylenimine PMI (-(CH2 -NH)n). Results from this study will be interesting for the analysis of the forthcoming Rosetta mission.

  16. Performance of Transuranic-Loaded Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel in LWRs Final Report, Including Void Reactivity Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou

    2011-09-01

    The current focus of the Deep Burn Project is on once-through burning of transuranics (TRU) in light-water reactors (LWRs). The fuel form is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle design from high-temperature reactor technology. In the Deep Burn LWR (DB-LWR) concept, these fuel particles are pressed into compacts using SiC matrix material and loaded into fuel pins for use in conventional LWRs. The TRU loading comes from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Unit cell and assembly calculations have been performed using the DRAGON-4 code to assess the physics attributes of TRU-only FCM fuel in an LWR lattice. Depletion calculations assuming an infinite lattice condition were performed with calculations of various reactivity coefficients performed at each step. Unit cells and assemblies containing typical UO2 and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel were analyzed in the same way to provide a baseline against which to compare the TRU-only FCM fuel. Then, assembly calculations were performed evaluating the performance of heterogeneous arrangements of TRU-only FCM fuel pins along with UO2 pins.

  17. Wax D of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced osteomyelitis accompanied by reactive bone formation in Buffalo rats.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Y; Semba, I; Hirayama, Y; Koga, T; Nagao, S; Takada, H

    1998-12-01

    A suspension of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis in liquid paraffin has been reported to induce foot swelling accompanied by new bone formation in Buffalo (BUF) rats, which are low responders to the induction of adjuvant arthritis. In the present study, we found that wax D, a mycobacterial cell wall peptidoglycan fragment-arabinogalactan-mycolic acid complex, was an effective component of this bacterium for the induction of osteomyelitis accompanied by reactive bone formation in BUF rats. Chronic inflammation was produced in BUF rats by a single subcutaneous injection of wax D suspended in liquid paraffin. Other Mycobacterium species and Gordona bronchialis were also capable of inducing this reaction. Other bacterial cells including the acid-fast bacteria Nocardia and Rhodococcus, purified cell walls and peptidoglycans from Lactobacillus plantarum, wax C, cord factor, arabinogalactan and mycolic acid prepared from M. tuberculosis were inactive in this respect. In addition, when wax D was administered as a water-in-oil emulsion (Freund's type adjuvant), bone formation scarcely occurred in BUF rats. In Fisher (F344) and Wistar rats, both of which are responder strains to adjuvant arthritis, wax D in liquid paraffin did not induce bone formation. PMID:9879920

  18. 40 CFR 600.307-95 - Fuel economy label format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel economy label format requirements. 600.307-95 Section 600.307-95 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year...

  19. 40 CFR 600.307-86 - Fuel economy label format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel economy label format requirements. 600.307-86 Section 600.307-86 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year...

  20. 40 CFR 600.307-08 - Fuel economy label format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel economy label format requirements. 600.307-08 Section 600.307-08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year...

  1. Environmental implications of iron fuel borne catalysts and their effects on diesel particulate formation and composition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metal fuel borne catalysts can be used with diesel fuels to effectively reduce engine out particle mass emissions. Mixed with the fuel, the metals become incorporated as nanometer-scale occlusions with soot during its formation and are available to promote in-cylinder soot oxida...

  2. Effect of Fuel Variables on Carbon Formation in Turbojet-Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonash, Edmund R; Wear, Jerrold D; Cook, William P

    1958-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation of the effects of fuel properties and of a number of fuel additives on combustion-chamber carbon deposition and exhaust-gas smoke formation in a single tubular turbojet-engine combustor. Limited tests were conducted with a number of the fuels in several full-scale turbojet engines to verify single-combustor data.

  3. 76 FR 65544 - Standard Format and Content of License Applications for Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... issuance of the guide (74 FR 36780). The comment period closed on September 21, 2009. The staff's responses... COMMISSION Standard Format and Content of License Applications for Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facilities... Format and Content of License Applications for Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facilities.'' This...

  4. 40 CFR 600.307-95 - Fuel economy label format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel economy label format requirements... Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Labeling § 600.307-95 Fuel economy label format...) Printed in a color which contrasts with the paper color. (iii) The label shall have a contrasting...

  5. Effect of petrochemical industrial emissions of reactive alkenes and NOx on tropospheric ozone formation in Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Angevine, W. M.; Brock, C. A.; Dissly, R. W.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Frost, G. J.; Goldan, P. D.; Holloway, J. S.; Hübler, G.; Jakoubek, R. O.; Kuster, W. C.; Neuman, J. A.; Nicks, D. K.; Parrish, D. D.; Roberts, J. M.; Sueper, D. T.; Atlas, E. L.; Donnelly, S. G.; Flocke, F.; Fried, A.; Potter, W. T.; Schauffler, S.; Stroud, V.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Wert, B. P.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Alvarez, R. J.; Banta, R. M.; Darby, L. S.; Senff, C. J.

    2003-04-01

    Petrochemical industrial facilities can emit large amounts of highly reactive hydrocarbons and NOx to the atmosphere; in the summertime, such colocated emissions are shown to consistently result in rapid and efficient ozone (O3) formation downwind. Airborne measurements show initial hydrocarbon reactivity in petrochemical source plumes in the Houston, TX, metropolitan area is primarily due to routine emissions of the alkenes propene and ethene. Reported emissions of these highly reactive compounds are substantially lower than emissions inferred from measurements in the plumes from these sources. Net O3 formation rates and yields per NOx molecule oxidized in these petrochemical industrial source plumes are substantially higher than rates and yields observed in urban or rural power plant plumes. These observations suggest that reductions in reactive alkene emissions from petrochemical industrial sources are required to effectively address the most extreme O3 exceedences in the Houston metropolitan area.

  6. Formation of thin walled ceramic solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Claar, Terry D.; Busch, Donald E.; Picciolo, John J.

    1989-01-01

    To reduce thermal stress and improve bonding in a high temperature monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), intermediate layers are provided between the SOFC's electrodes and electrolyte which are of different compositions. The intermediate layers are comprised of a blend of some of the materials used in the electrode and electrolyte compositions. Particle size is controlled to reduce problems involving differential shrinkage rates of the various layers when the entire structure is fired at a single temperature, while pore formers are provided in the electrolyte layers to be removed during firing for the formation of desired pores in the electrode layers. Each layer includes a binder in the form of a thermosetting acrylic which during initial processing is cured to provide a self-supporting structure with the ceramic components in the green state. A self-supporting corrugated structure is thus formed prior to firing, which the organic components of the binder and plasticizer removed during firing to provide a high strength, high temperature resistant ceramic structure of low weight and density.

  7. Formation rates, stability and reactivity of sulfuric acid - amine clusters predicted by computational chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtén, Theo; Ortega, Ismael; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Loukonen, Ville; Reiman, Heidi; McGrath, Matthew; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Despite the importance of atmospheric particle formation for both climate and air quality, both experiments and non-empirical models using e.g. sulfuric acid, ammonia and water as condensing vapors have so far been unable to reproduce atmospheric observations using realistic trace gas concentrations. Recent experimental and theoretical evidence has shown that this mystery is likely resolved by amines. Combining first-principles evaporation rates for sulfuric acid - dimethylamine clusters with cluster kinetic modeling, we show that even sub-ppt concentrations of amines, together with atmospherically realistic concentrations of sulfuric acid, result in formation rates close to those observed in the atmosphere. Our simulated cluster formation rates are also close to, though somewhat larger than, those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN for both sulfuric acid - ammonia and sulfuric acid - dimethylamine systems. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the remaining discrepancy for the sulfuric acid - amine particle formation rates is likely caused by steric hindrances to cluster formation (due to alkyl groups of the amine molecules) rather than by significant errors in the evaporation rates. First-principles molecular dynamic and reaction kinetic modeling shed further light on the microscopic physics and chemistry of sulfuric acid - amine clusters. For example, while the number and type of hydrogen bonds in the clusters typically reach their equilibrium values on a picosecond timescale, and the overall bonding patterns predicted by traditional "static" quantum chemical calculations seem to be stable, the individual atoms participating in the hydrogen bonds continuously change at atmospherically realistic temperatures. From a chemical reactivity perspective, we have also discovered a surprising phenomenon: clustering with sulfuric acid molecules slightly increases the activation energy required for the abstraction of alkyl hydrogens from amine molecules. This implies

  8. Glucocorticoids: Dose-related effects on osteoclast formation and function via reactive oxygen species and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun; Wang, Long; Zhang, Hongyang; Jie, Qiang; Li, Xiaojie; Shi, Qiyue; Huang, Qiang; Gao, Bo; Han, Yuehu; Guo, Kai; Liu, Jian; Yang, Liu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2015-10-01

    Whether glucocorticoids directly enhance or interrupt osteoclastogenesis is still a controversial subject. In this study, we ascertained the dose-dependent positive effects of glucocorticoids on osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro as well as investigated the mechanism in vitro. As the dose of glucocorticoids increased, osteoclastogenesis was stimulated at 0.1 μM, a peak was achieved at 1 μM and a corresponding decrease occurred at 10 μM. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play a crucial role in osteoclastogenesis, and autophagy flux activity, a cellular recycling process, were consistently up-regulated along with the dose-dependent effects of the glucocorticoids on osteoclast formation and function. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, abrogated the effects of the glucocorticoids on autophagy and osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), an autophagy inhibitor, interrupted osteoclastogenesis stimulation by the glucocorticoids. These results implied that with glucocorticoid administration, ROS and autophagy, as a downstream factor of ROS, played vital roles in osteoclast formation and function. 3-MA administration did not enhance ROS accumulation, so that autophagy had no effect on ROS induced by glucocorticoids. Our investigation demonstrated that glucocorticoids had dose-dependent positive effects on osteoclast formation and function via ROS and autophagy. These results provide support for ROS and autophagy as therapeutic targets in glucocorticoid-related bone loss diseases such as glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. PMID:26115910

  9. Negative oxygen ion formation in reactive magnetron sputtering processes for transparent conductive oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Welzel, Thomas; Ellmer, Klaus

    2012-11-15

    Reactive d.c. magnetron sputtering in Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixtures has been investigated with energy-resolved mass spectrometry. Different metal targets (Mg, Ti, Zn, In, InSn, and Sn), which are of importance for transparent conductive oxide thin film deposition, have been used to study the formation of negative ions, mainly high-energetic O{sup -}, which are supposed to induce radiation damage in thin films. Besides their energy distribution, the ions have been particularly investigated with respect to their intensity in comparison of the different target materials. To realize the comparability, various calibration factors had to be introduced. After their application, major differences in the negative ion production have been observed for the target materials. The intensity, especially of O{sup -}, differs by about two orders of magnitude. It is shown that this difference results almost exclusively from ions that gain their energy in the target sheath. Those may gain additional energy from the sputtering process or reflection at the target. Low-energetic negative ions are, however, less affected by changes of the target material. The results concerning O{sup -} formation are discussed in term of the sputtering rate from the target and are compared to models for negative ion formation.

  10. Photo-Reactive Nanogel as a Means to Tune Properties during Polymer Network Formation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, JianCheng; Rad, Ima Y.; Sun, Fang; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Photo-reactive nanogels with an integrated photoinitiator-based functionality were synthesized via a Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) process. Without additional free initiators, this nanogel is capable of radical generation and initiating polymerization of a secondary monomer (i.e. dimethacrylate) that infiltrates and disperses the nanogel particles. Due to the presence of RAFT functionality and the fact that all initiating sites are initially located within the nanogel structure, gelation can be delayed by sequencing the polymerization from the nanogel to the bulk matrix. During polymerization of a nanogel-filled resin system, a progressive delay of gelation conversion from about 2 % for conventional chain growth polymerization to 18 % for the same monomer containing 20 wt% nanogel additive was achieved. A significant delay of stress development was also observed with much lower final stress achieved with the nanogel-modified systems due to the change of network formation mechanics. Compared with the nanogel-free dimethacrylate control, which contained uniformly distributed free initiator, the flexural modulus and mechanical strength results were maintained for the photopolymers with nanogel contents greater than 10 wt%. There appears to be a critical interparticle spacing of the photo-reactive nanogel that provides effective photopolymerization while providing delayed gelation and substantial stress reduction. PMID:24348753

  11. Divergent reactivity of homologue ortho-allenylbenzaldehydes controlled by the tether length: chromone versus chromene formation.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Benito; Almendros, Pedro; Fernández, Israel; Martínez del Campo, Teresa; Naranjo, Teresa

    2015-01-19

    The divergent behavior of two homologue allenals, namely, 2-(buta-2,3-dienyloxy)- and 2-(propa-1,2-dienyloxy)benzaldehydes, as cyclization substrates is described. 2-(Buta-2,3-dienyloxy)benzaldehydes suffers a formal allenic carbocyclization reaction to afford chromenes, whereas 2-(propa-1,2-dienyloxy)benzaldehydes react to yield chromones. The formation of chromenes is strictly a formal hydroarylation process divided into two parts, namely, allenic Claisen-type rearrangement and oxycyclization. An unknown N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-catalyzed allenic hydroacylation reaction must be invoked to account for the preparation of chromones. ortho-Allenylbenzaldehydes bearing either electron-donating substituents or electron-withdrawing substituents worked well to afford both the hydroarylation and hydroacylation products. This unexpected difference in reactivity can be rationalized by means of density functional theory calculations. PMID:25418081

  12. Conclusive evidence of abrupt coagulation inside the void during cyclic nanoparticle formation in reactive plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Nijdam, S.; Beckers, J.

    2016-07-01

    In this letter, we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results that confirm in a direct way our earlier explanation of an abrupt coagulation event as the cause for the void hiccup. In a recent paper, we reported on the fast and interrupted expansion of voids in a reactive dusty argon-acetylene plasma. The voids appeared one after the other, each showing a peculiar, though reproducible, behavior of successive periods of fast expansion, abrupt contraction, and continued expansion. The abrupt contraction was termed "hiccup" and was related to collective coagulation of a new generation of nanoparticles growing in the void using relatively indirect methods: electron density measurements and optical emission spectroscopy. In this letter, we present conclusive evidence using SEM of particles collected at different moments in time spanning several growth cycles, which enables us to follow the nanoparticle formation process in great detail.

  13. Oncogene-induced reactive oxygen species fuel hyperproliferation and DNA damage response activation

    PubMed Central

    Ogrunc, M; Di Micco, R; Liontos, M; Bombardelli, L; Mione, M; Fumagalli, M; Gorgoulis, V G; d'Adda di Fagagna, F

    2014-01-01

    Oncogene-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been proposed to be signaling molecules that mediate proliferative cues. However, ROS may also cause DNA damage and proliferative arrest. How these apparently opposite roles can be reconciled, especially in the context of oncogene-induced cellular senescence, which is associated both with aberrant mitogenic signaling and DNA damage response (DDR)-mediated arrest, is unclear. Here, we show that ROS are indeed mitogenic signaling molecules that fuel oncogene-driven aberrant cell proliferation. However, by their very same ability to mediate cell hyperproliferation, ROS eventually cause DDR activation. We also show that oncogenic Ras-induced ROS are produced in a Rac1 and NADPH oxidase (Nox4)-dependent manner. In addition, we show that Ras-induced ROS can be detected and modulated in a living transparent animal: the zebrafish. Finally, in cancer we show that Nox4 is increased in both human tumors and a mouse model of pancreatic cancer and specific Nox4 small-molecule inhibitors act synergistically with existing chemotherapic agents. PMID:24583638

  14. Predicting fissile content of spent nuclear fuel assemblies with the passive neutron Albedo reactivity technique and Monte Carlo code emulation

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Tobin, Stephen J

    2010-10-13

    There is a great need in the safeguards community to be able to nondestructively quantify the mass of plutonium of a spent nuclear fuel assembly. As part of the Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative, we are investigating several techniques, or detector systems, which, when integrated, will be capable of quantifying the plutonium mass of a spent fuel assembly without dismantling the assembly. This paper reports on the simulation of one of these techniques, the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity with Fission Chambers (PNAR-FC) system. The response of this system over a wide range of spent fuel assemblies with different burnup, initial enrichment, and cooling time characteristics is shown. A Monte Carlo method of using these modeled results to estimate the fissile content of a spent fuel assembly has been developed. A few numerical simulations of using this method are shown. Finally, additional developments still needed and being worked on are discussed.

  15. Methylmercury-induced reactive oxygen species formation in neonatal cerebral astrocytic cultures is attenuated by antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Shanker, Gouri; Aschner, Michael

    2003-01-31

    Excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been suggested as a causal factor in various neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease [Brain Res. 830 (1999) 10-15; Biochem. J. 310 (1995) 83-90; Free Radic. Biol. Med. 27 (1999) 612-616]. The present work examined the role of ROS in the neurotoxicity of methylmercury (MeHg). ROS formation in primary astrocytic cultures of neonatal rat cerebral cortex was monitored by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H(2)DCF-DA) fluorescence. MeHg, at 10 and 20 microM caused a significant increase in ROS formation (10 microM, P<0.01; 20 microM, P<0.001). Additional studies established the effectiveness of antioxidants/free radical scavengers in attenuating the MeHg-stimulated ROS formation in the following rank-order: (1) Trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), a non-thiol containing antioxidant, (2) n-propyl gallate (PG), a free radical scavenger, (3) superoxide dismutase (SOD), an antioxidant enzyme that dismutates superoxide anion radical, (4) alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN), a lipophilic hydroxyl radical spin trapping agent. A significant inhibition of MeHg-induced ROS generation was also noted in astrocytes preincubated (3 h) with arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone (AACOCF(3,) 20 microM, P<0.05), a specific inhibitor of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)). Conversely, pretreatment (24 h) with 100 microM buthionine-L-sulfoxamine [BSO, a glutathione (GSH) synthesis inhibitor], significantly increased (P<0.05) ROS formation in MeHg treated astrocytes compared to controls. Combined, these studies invoke ROS as potent mediators of MeHg cytotoxicity and support the hypothesis that excessive ROS generation, at least in part, plays an important role in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:12573536

  16. Modeling the Influence of Interaction Layer Formation on Thermal Conductivity of U–Mo Dispersion Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Andrew M.; Huber, Tanja K.

    2015-01-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative Program continues to develop existing and new plate- and rod-type research and test reactor fuels with maximum attainable uranium loadings capable of potentially converting a number of the world’s remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. Currently, the program is focused on assisting with the development and qualification of an even higher density fuel type consisting of a uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix. Thermal conductivity is an important consideration in determining the operational temperature of the fuel plate and can be influenced by interaction layer formation between the fuel and matrix, porosity that forms during fabrication of the fuel plates, and upon the concentration of the dispersed phase within the matrix. This paper develops and validates a simple model to study the influence of interaction layer formation and conductivity, fuel particle size, and volume fraction of fuel dispersed in the matrix on the effective conductivity of the composite. The model shows excellent agreement with results previously presented in the literature. In particular, the thermal conductivity of the interaction layer does not appear to be important in determining the overall conductivity of the composite, while formation of the interaction layer and subsequent consumption of the matrix reveals a rather significant effect. The effective thermal conductivity of the composite can be influenced by the fuel particle distribution by minimizing interaction layer formation and preserving the higher thermal conductivity matrix.

  17. Oxidation and formation of deposit precursors in hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttrill, S. E., Jr.; Mayo, F. R.; Lan, B.; St.john, G. A.; Dulin, D.

    1982-01-01

    A practical fuel, home heating oil no. 2 (Fuel C), and the pure hydrocarbon, n-dodecane, were subjected to mild oxidation at 130 C and the resulting oxygenated reaction products, deposit precursors, were analyzed using field ionization mass spectrometry. Results for fuel C indicated that, as oxidation was initially extended, certain oxygenated reaction products of increasing molecular weights in the form of monomers, dimers and some trimers were produced. Further oxidation time increase resulted in further increase in monomers but a marked decrease in dimers and trimers. This suggests that these larger molecular weight products have proceeded to form deposit and separated from the fuel mixture. Results for a dodecane indicated that yields for dimers and trimers were very low. Dimers were produced as a result of interaction between oxygenated products with each other rather than with another fuel molecule. This occurred even though fuel molecule concentration was 50 times, or more greater than that for these oxygenated reaction products.

  18. Effect of process conditions on the microstructural formation of dc reactively sputter deposited AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Ekpe, Samuel D.; Jimenez, Francisco J.; Dew, Steven K.

    2010-09-15

    Thin film aluminum nitride (AlN), because of its attractive properties, is a material with many applications. Its microstructure and hence properties are greatly influenced by the deposition process conditions. In this work, AlN was reactively deposited in a dc magnetron sputtering system at different proportions of nitrogen in the process gas mixture and at different process conditions. The microstructure and composition of the films were analyzed using x-ray diffraction data, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that for a process gas pressure of 0.67 Pa, a magnetron power of 100 W, and a substrate-target distance of 10 cm, a near stoichiometeric AlN can be prepared at nitrogen proportions as low as 20%. At these process conditions, (002) was the preferred crystal orientation. Dense fibrous structures were obtained, especially at low deposition rates with high proportions of nitrogen. Increase in magnetron power and decrease in distance result in a more porous structure. High kinetic energies (average) of the sputtered Al particles and high deposition rates tend to favor AlN(101) formation, while low kinetic energies of the Al particles and low deposition rates generally favor more of the AlN(100) formation.

  19. Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Oxidative Stress in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mateen, Somaiya; Moin, Shagufta; Khan, Abdul Qayyum; Zafar, Atif; Fatima, Naureen

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disorder. Highly reactive oxygen free radicals are believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, RA patients were sub-grouped depending upon the presence or absence of rheumatoid factor, disease activity score and disease duration. RA Patients (120) and healthy controls (53) were evaluated for the oxidant—antioxidant status by monitoring ROS production, biomarkers of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage. The level of various enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants was also monitored. Correlation analysis was also performed for analysing the association between ROS and various other parameters. Methods Intracellular ROS formation, lipid peroxidation (MDA level), protein oxidation (carbonyl level and thiol level) and DNA damage were detected in the blood of RA patients. Antioxidant status was evaluated by FRAP assay, DPPH reduction assay and enzymatic (SOD, catalase, GST, GR) and non-enzymatic (vitamin C and GSH) antioxidants. Results RA patients showed a higher ROS production, increased lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage. A significant decline in the ferric reducing ability, DPPH radical quenching ability and the levels of antioxidants has also been observed. Significant correlation has been found between ROS and various other parameters studied. Conclusion RA patients showed a marked increase in ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, DNA damage and decrease in the activity of antioxidant defence system leading to oxidative stress which may contribute to tissue damage and hence to the chronicity of the disease. PMID:27043143

  20. Absence of reactive intermediates in the formation of catechol estrogens by rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Jellinck, P H; Hahn, E F; Fishman, J

    1986-06-15

    Release of 3H2O from regiospecifically labeled estradiol was measured during 2-hydroxylation of this estrogen by rat liver microsomes. The amount of tritium remaining in the isolated catechol estrogen was also determined. Virtually all the tritium was removed from C-2 during the reaction confirming the absence of an NIH shift. About 20% of the tritium at C-1 was also lost without any such change occurring at C-4 or C-6,7 of the steroid molecule. These findings provide evidence for the formation of an arene oxide or o-semiquinone intermediate during the conversion of estradiol to 2-hydroxyestradiol. No indication of adduct formation at either C-1 or C-4 during this biotransformation was obtained although the 2-hydroxylated product was able to react with a nucleophile such as glutathione. The different regiospecificity of tritium loss in the generation of catechol estrogens and in their subsequent reaction leads to the important conclusion that the reactive intermediates in the two processes must be different. The possible role of catechol estrogens in neoplastic transformation is discussed. PMID:3011797

  1. Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Induces Apoptosis of Endothelial Progenitor Cells Through Reactive Oxygen Species Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuqi; Xie, Xiaoyun; Jia, Fengpeng; He, Jianfeng; Li, Zhihong; Fu, Minghuan; Hao, Hong; Liu, Ying; Liu, Jason Z.; Cowan, Peter J.; Zhu, Hua; Sun, Qinghua; Liu, Zhenguo

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a critical role in angiogenesis and vascular repair. Some environmental insults, like fine particulate matter (PM) exposure, significantly impair cardiovascular functions. However, the mechanisms for PM-induced adverse effects on cardiovascular system remain largely unknown. The present research was to study the detrimental effects of PM on EPCs and explore the potential mechanisms. Methods PM was intranasal-distilled into male C57BL/6 mice for one month. Flow cytometry was used to measure the number of EPCs, apoptosis level of circulating EPCs and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Serum TNF-α and IL-1β were measured using ELISA. To determine the role of PM-induced ROS in EPC apoptosis, PM was co-administrated with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in wild type mice or used in a triple transgenic mouse line (TG) with overexpression of antioxidant enzyme network (AON) composed of superoxide dismutase (SOD)1, SOD3, and glutathione peroxidase (Gpx-1) with decreased in vivo ROS production. Results PM treatment significantly decreased circulating EPC population, promoted apoptosis of EPCs in association with increased ROS production and serum TNF-α and IL-1β levels, which could be effectively reversed by either NAC treatment or overexpression of AON. Conclusion PM exposure significantly decreased circulating EPCs population due to increased apoptosis via ROS formation in mice. PMID:25591776

  2. Coupled Reactive Transport Modeling of CO2 Injection in Mt. Simon Sandstone Formation, Midwest USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Lu, P.; Zhu, C.; Xiao, Y.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 sequestration in deep geological formations is one of the promising options for CO2 emission reduction. While several large scale CO2 injections in saline aquifers have shown to be successful for the short-term, there is still a lack of fundamental understanding on key issues such as CO2 storage capacity, injectivity, and security over multiple spatial and temporal scales that need to be addressed. To advance these understandings, we applied multi-phase coupled reactive mass transport modeling to investigate the fate of injected CO2 and reservoir responses to the injection into Mt. Simon Formation. We developed both 1-D and 2-D reactive transport models in a radial region of 10,000 m surrounding a CO2 injection well to represent the Mt. Simon sandstone formation, which is a major regional deep saline reservoir in the Midwest, USA. Supercritical CO2 is injected into the formation for 100 years, and the modeling continues till 10,000 years to monitor both short-term and long-term behavior of injected CO2 and the associated rock-fluid interactions. CO2 co-injection with H2S and SO2 is also simulated to represent the flue gases from coal gasification and combustion in the Illinois Basin. The injection of CO2 results in acidified zones (pH ~3 and 5) adjacent to the wellbore, causing progressive water-rock interactions in the surrounding region. In accordance with the extensive dissolution of authigenic K-feldspar, sequential precipitations of secondary carbonates and clay minerals are predicted in this zone. The vertical profiles of CO2 show fingering pattern from the top of the reservoir to the bottom due to the density variation of CO2-impregnated brine, which facilitate convection induced mixing and solubility trapping. Most of the injected CO2 remains within a radial distance of 2500 m at the end of 10,000 years and is sequestered and immobilized by solubility and residual trapping. Mineral trapping via secondary carbonates, including calcite, magnesite

  3. A Study of Pollutant Formation from the Lean Premixed Combustion of Gaseous Fuel Alternatives to Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fackler, Keith Boyd, Jr.

    emissions decrease with increasing H2 fuel fraction for combustion of CH4/H2 blends. This appears to be caused by a reduction in the amount of NO made by the prompt pathway involving the reaction of N2 with hydrocarbon radicals as the CH4 is replaced by H2. 2.) For category 2 (the process and refinery blend) and category 5 (the LNG, shale, and associated gases), NOx emissions increase with the addition of C2 and C3 hydrocarbons. This could be due to an increased production of free radicals resulting from increasing CO production when higher molecular weight hydrocarbons are broken down. 3.) For category 3 (the O2 blown gasified coal/petcoke), NOx emissions increase with increasing CO fuel fraction. The reason for this is attributed to CO producing more radicals per unit heat release than H2. When CO replaces H2, an increase in NOx emissions is seen due to an increase in the productivity of the N2O, NNH, and Zeldovich pathways. 4.) For category 4 (the landfill gas) the addition of diluents such as CO2 and N2 at constant air flow produces more NOx per kg of CH4 consumed, and N2 is more effective than CO 2 in increasing the NOx emission index. The increase in emission index appears to be due to an enhancement of the prompt NOx pathway as the diluents are added and the mixture moves towards stoichiometric. In addition, the presence of CO2 as a diluent catalyzes the loss of flame radicals, leading to less NOx formation than when an equivalent amount of N2 is used as a diluent. For a selected set of fuels, detailed spacial reactor probing is carried out. At the nominal temperature and residence time, the experimental results show the following trends for flame structure as a function of fuel type: 1.) Pure H2 is far more reactive in comparison to CH4 and all other pure alkane fuels. This results in relatively flat NO x and temperature profiles; whereas, the alkane fuels drop in both temperature and NOx production in the jet, where more fresh reactor feed gases are present. 2

  4. A Statistical Approach to Predict the Failure Enthalpy and Reliability of Irradiated PWR Fuel Rods During Reactivity-Initiated Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Cheol; Jeong, Yong-Hwan; Jung, Youn-Ho

    2001-11-15

    During the last decade, the failure behavior of high-burnup fuel rods under a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) condition has been a serious concern since fuel rod failures at low enthalpy have been observed. This has resulted in the reassessment of existing licensing criteria and failure-mode study. To address the issue, a statistics-based methodology is suggested to predict failure probability of irradiated fuel rods under an RIA. Based on RIA simulation results in the literature, a failure enthalpy correlation for an irradiated fuel rod is constructed as a function of oxide thickness, fuel burnup, and pulse width. Using the failure enthalpy correlation, a new concept of ''equivalent enthalpy'' is introduced to reflect the effects of the three primary factors as well as peak fuel enthalpy into a single damage parameter. Moreover, the failure distribution function with equivalent enthalpy is derived, applying a two-parameter Weibull statistical model. Finally, the sensitivity analysis is carried out to estimate the effects of burnup, corrosion, peak fuel enthalpy, pulse width, and cladding materials used.

  5. Fuel Efficient Strategies for Reducing Contrail Formations in United States Air Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, Banavar; Chen, Neil Y.; Ng, Hok K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a class of strategies for reducing persistent contrail formation in the United States airspace. The primary objective is to minimize potential contrail formation regions by altering the aircraft's cruising altitude in a fuel-efficient way. The results show that the contrail formations can be reduced significantly without extra fuel consumption and without adversely affecting congestion in the airspace. The contrail formations can be further reduced by using extra fuel. For the day tested, the maximal reduction strategy has a 53% contrail reduction rate. The most fuel-efficient strategy has an 8% reduction rate with 2.86% less fuel-burnt compared to the maximal reduction strategy. Using a cost function which penalizes extra fuel consumed while maximizing the amount of contrail reduction provides a flexible way to trade off between contrail reduction and fuel consumption. It can achieve a 35% contrail reduction rate with only 0.23% extra fuel consumption. The proposed fuel-efficient contrail reduction strategy provides a solution to reduce aviation-induced environmental impact on a daily basis.

  6. Iron Hydroxy Carbonate Formation in Zerovalent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: Characterization and Evaluation of Phase Stability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting the long-term potential of permeable reactive barriers for treating contaminated groundwater relies on understanding the endpoints of biogeochemical reactions between influent groundwater and the reactive medium. Iron hydroxy carbonate (chukanovite) is frequently obs...

  7. Computation Sheds Insight into Iron Porphyrin Carbenes' Electronic Structure, Formation, and N-H Insertion Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Dina A; Mallick, Dibyendu; Wang, Binju; Shaik, Sason

    2016-08-01

    Iron porphyrin carbenes constitute a new frontier of species with considerable synthetic potential. Exquisitely engineered myoglobin and cytochrome P450 enzymes can generate these complexes and facilitate the transformations they mediate. The current work harnesses density functional theoretical methods to provide insight into the electronic structure, formation, and N-H insertion reactivity of an iron porphyrin carbene, [Fe(Por)(SCH3)(CHCO2Et)](-), a model of a complex believed to exist in an experimentally studied artificial metalloenzyme. The ground state electronic structure of the terminal form of this complex is an open-shell singlet, with two antiferromagnetically coupled electrons residing on the iron center and carbene ligand. As we shall reveal, the bonding properties of [Fe(Por)(SCH3)(CHCO2Et)](-) are remarkably analogous to those of ferric heme superoxide complexes. The carbene forms by dinitrogen loss from ethyl diazoacetate. This reaction occurs preferentially through an open-shell singlet transition state: iron donates electron density to weaken the C-N bond undergoing cleavage. Once formed, the iron porphyrin carbene accomplishes N-H insertion via nucleophilic attack. The resulting ylide then rearranges, using an internal carbonyl base, to form an enol that leads to the product. The findings rationalize experimentally observed reactivity trends reported in artificial metalloenzymes employing iron porphyrin carbenes. Furthermore, these results suggest a possible expansion of enzymatic substrate scope, to include aliphatic amines. Thus, this work, among the first several computational explorations of these species, contributes insights and predictions to the surging interest in iron porphyrin carbenes and their synthetic potential. PMID:27347808

  8. Role of Reactive Intermediates in Manganese Oxide Formation By Filamentous Ascomycete Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiner, C. A.; Anderton, C.; Wu, S.; Purvine, S.; Zink, E.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Santelli, C. M.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Biogenic manganese (Mn) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in the environment, and their high reactivity can profoundly impact the fate of contaminants and cycling of carbon and nutrients. In contrast to bacteria, the pathways utilized by fungi to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III,IV) oxides remain largely unknown. Here, we explore the mechanisms of Mn(II) oxidation by a phylogenetically diverse group of filamentous Ascomycete fungi using a combination of chemical assays and bulk and spatially-resolved mass spectrometry. We show that the mechanisms of Mn(II) oxidation vary with fungal species, over time during secretome compositional changes, and in the presence of other fungi. Specifically, our work implicates a dynamic transition in Mn(II) oxidation pathways that varies between species. In particular, while reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced via transmembrane NADPH oxidases are involved in initial oxidation, over time, secreted enzymes become important Mn(II) oxidation mediators for some species. In addition, the overall secretome oxidation capacity varies with time and fungal species. Secretome analysis reveals a surprising absence of enzymes currently considered to be Mn(II)-oxidizing enzymes in these organisms, and instead highlights a wide variety of redox-active enzymes. Furthermore, we implicate fungal cell defense mechanisms in the formation of distinct Mn oxide patterns when fungi are grown in head-to-head competition. The identification and regulation of these secreted enzymes are under current investigation within the bulk secretome and within the interaction zone of structured fungal communities. Overall, our findings illustrate that Ascomycete Mn(II) oxidation mechanisms are highly variable and are dictated by complex environmental and ecological interactions. Future work will explore the connection between Ascomycete Mn(II) oxidation and the ability to degrade cellulose, a key carbon reservoir for biofuel production.

  9. Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaO/Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Mei, Donghai; Yi, Cheol-Woo; Weaver, Jason F.; Szanyi, Janos

    2010-12-02

    The formation of adsorbed O (Oad) species and their reactivities in CO oxidation on BaO/Pt(111) (at two BaO coverages) were studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD), infrared reflection absorption (IRA) and X-ray photoelectron (XP) spectroscopies. In neither of these two systems was the Pt(111) surface completely covered with BaO. On the system with lower BaO coverage (~45 % of the Pt(111) surface is covered by BaO), two different Oad species form following the adsorption of O2 at 300 K: O adsorbed on BaO-free Pt(111) sites (OPt) and at the Pt-BaO interface (Oint). On the system with higher BaO coverage (~60 % of the Pt(111) surface is covered by BaO), two types of Oint are seen at the Pt-BaO interface. The desorption of OPt from the BaO-free portion of the Pt(111) surface gives an O2 desorption peak with a maximum desorption rate at ~690 K. Migration of Oint to the Pt(111) sites and their recombinative desorption give two explosive desorption features at ~760 and ~790 K in the TPD spectrum. The reactivities of these Oad species with CO to form CO2 follow their sequence of desorption; i.e., the OPt associated with the BaO-free Pt(111) surface, which desorbs at 690 K, reacts first with CO, followed by the Oint species at the Pt-BaO interface (first the one that desorbs at ~760 K and finally the one that is bound the most strongly to the interface, and desorbs at ~790 K). This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  10. Impacts of powdered activated carbon addition on trihalomethane formation reactivity of dissolved organic matter in membrane bioreactor effluent.

    PubMed

    Ma, Defang; Gao, Yue; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Yan; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Qian

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics and trihalomethane (THM) formation reactivity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in effluents from two membrane bioreactors (MBRs) with and without powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition (referred to as PAC/MBR and MBR, respectively) were examined to investigate the effects of PAC addition on THM formation of MBR effluent during chlorination. PAC addition increased the specific UV absorbance. Hydrophobic DOM especially hydrophobic acids in PAC/MBR effluent (50%) were more than MBR effluent (42%). DOM with molecular weight <1 kDa constituted 12% of PAC/MBR effluent DOM, which was less than that of MBR effluent (16%). Data obtained from excitation and emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that PAC/MBR effluent DOM contained more simple aromatic protein, but had less fulvic acid-like and soluble microbial by-product-like. PAC addition reduced the formation of bromine-containing THMs during chlorination of effluents, but increased THM formation reactivity of effluent DOM. PMID:25150685

  11. Chemical functionalities at the silica surface determining its reactivity when inhaled. Formation and reactivity of surface radicals.

    PubMed

    Fubini, B; Giamello, E; Volante, M; Bolis, V

    1990-12-01

    Reactive radicals at the surface of quartz or other SiO2 polymorphs have been studied by EPR in relation to their possible role in pathogenicity. All the examined dusts bear the characteristic radicals of silica ground in air: Si, SiO., SiO.2 (peroxyradical) and O2.- (superoxide ion), but some also show additional spectral lines belonging to other radical forms. Comparison of standard quartz dusts (DQ-12, Min-u-sil 5) with a natural quartz and with what obtained by grinding a very pure quartz crystal indicates that to a higher purity corresponds a higher radical population. Cristobalite and vitreous silica exhibit similar spectra, with larger proportion by respect to quartz, of partially reduced oxygen forms. The reactivity of the silica surface towards O2 and NaClO aqueous solutions are investigated by examining the modification in the EPR spectra induced by these treatments. A possible mechanism for fibrogenicity is proposed whereby, within the activated macrophage, a catalytic reaction occurs between surface functionalities and macrophage oxygen metabolites. This reaction would trigger the abnormal production of fibroblast stimulating factors, ending up with silicosis. PMID:1965871

  12. Uncertainty in the reactive transport model response to analkaline perturbation in a clay formation

    SciTech Connect

    Burnol, A.; Blanc, P.; Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Gaucher, E.C.

    2006-03-15

    The mineral alteration in the concrete barrier and in the clay formation around long-lived intermediate-level radioactive waste in the French deep geological disposal concept is evaluated using numerical modeling. There are concerns that the mineralogical composition of the surrounded clay will not be stable under the high alkaline pore fluid conditions caused by concrete (pH {approx} 12). Conversely, the infiltration of CO{sub 2}-rich groundwater from the clay formation into initially unsaturated concrete, at the high temperature (T {approx} 70 C) produced from the decay of radionuclides, could cause carbonation, thereby potentially affecting critical performance functions of this barrier. This could also lead to significant changes in porosity, which would affect aqueous diffusive transport of long-lived radionuclides. All these processes are therefore intimately coupled and advanced reactive transport models are required for long-term performance assessment. The uncertainty in predictions of these models is one major question that must be answered. A mass-transfer model response to an alkaline perturbation in clay with standard model values is first simulated using the two-phase non-isothermal reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. The selection of input parameters is thereafter designed to sample uncertainties in a wide range of physico-chemical processes without making a priori assumptions about the relative importance of different feedbacks. This 'base-case' simulation is perturbed by setting a parameter to a minimum, intermediate or maximum value or by switching on/off a process. This sensitivity analysis is conducted using grid computing facilities of BRGM (http://iggi.imag.fr). Our evaluation of the preliminary results suggests that the resaturation and the heating of the near-field will be of long enough duration to cause a limited carbonation through all the width of the concrete barrier. Another prediction is the possibility of self-sealing at the concrete

  13. Using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry to determine reactive oxygen species formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in viable boar spermatozoa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry analyses were developed for determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in live spermatozoa loaded with, respectively, hydroethidine (HE) or the lipophilic probe 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-d...

  14. COMBINED EFFECTS OF ORGANIC REACTIVITY AND NMHC/NOX RATIO ON PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDANT FORMATION - A MODELING STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modeling study was undertaken to assess the effect of organic reactivity on photochemical oxidant formation. A six-component hydrocarbon model was developed and tested against data collected in a smog chamber study of irradiated auto exhaust and oxides of nitrogen (NO sub x) mi...

  15. JAEA Studies on High Burnup Fuel Behaviors during Reactivity-Initiated Accident and Loss-of-Coolant Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Fuketa, Toyoshi; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Nagase, Fumihisa; Suzuki, Motoe

    2007-07-01

    The objectives of fuel safety research program at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) are; to evaluate adequacy of present safety criteria and safety margins; to provide a database for future regulation on higher burnup UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels, new cladding and pellets; and to provide reasonably mechanistic computer codes for regulatory application. The JAEA program is comprised of reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) studies including pulse-irradiation experiments in the NSRR and cladding mechanical tests, loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) tests including integral thermal shock test and oxidation rate measurement, development and verification of computer codes FEMAXI-6 and RANNS, and so on. In addition to an overview of the fuel safety research at JAEA, most recent progresses in the RIA and LOCA tests programs and the codes development are described and discussed in the paper. (authors)

  16. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 600 - Fuel Economy Label Formats

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel Economy Label Formats VIII Appendix VIII to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. VIII...

  17. Sucrose-fueled, energy dissipative, transient formation of molecular hydrogels mediated by yeast activity.

    PubMed

    Angulo-Pachón, César A; Miravet, Juan F

    2016-04-01

    A biologically mediated, energy dissipative, reversible formation of fibrillar networks is reported. The process of gelation is linked to sucrose-fueled production of CO2 by baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Continuous fueling of the system is required to maintain the self-assembled fibrillar network. PMID:27009800

  18. 40 CFR 600.310-12 - Fuel economy label format requirements-electric vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-electric vehicles. 600.310-12 Section 600.310-12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Labeling § 600.310-12 Fuel economy label format requirements—electric vehicles. Fuel economy labels for electric vehicles must meet the specifications described in § 600.302, with the following modifications:...

  19. IGNITION AND COMBUSTION OF LIQUID FUEL DROPLETS. PART 1: IMPACT ON POLLUTANT FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the ignition process of liquid fuel droplets and its impact on the formation of soot and nitrogen oxides (NOx). The system studied consists of a laboratory flame maintained by a vertical, monosized liquid fuel droplet array surrounded by a la...

  20. Kinetics of ceramic-metal composite formation by reactive metal penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrenholtz, W.G.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Loehman, R.E.; Lu, P.

    1998-10-01

    The rate of composite formation via reactive metal penetration has been determined. The metal penetration depth (i.e., the reaction-layer thickness) was measured from cross sections of partially reacted samples. Samples were fabricated by immersing dense mullite preforms in a bath of molten aluminum at temperatures of 900--1300 C and reacting the combination for up to 250 min. In general, the reaction-layer thickness increased linearly as the time increased. Penetration rates as high as 6.0 mm/h were measured; however, the aluminum penetration rate varied dramatically with time and temperature. The penetration rate increased when the reaction temperature was increased from 900 C to 1100 C, and the reaction-layer thickness increased linearly as the time increased in this temperature range. At temperatures of 1150 C and above, reaction-layer formation slowed or stopped after a relatively short period of rapid linear growth, because of an increase in silicon concentration near the reaction interface. The duration of the rapid linear growth, because of an increase in silicon concentration near the reaction interface. The duration of the rapid linear growth period decreased from 25 min at 1150 C to <1 min at 1250 C. At temperatures of 1300 C and above, no reaction layer was detected by using optical microscopy. Kinetics data and transmission electron microscopy analysis suggest that the reaction was inhibited at higher reaction temperatures and longer times, because of silicon buildup and saturation at the reaction front. Calculations show that, as the reaction temperature increased, the silicon production increased aster than the silicon transport. The two gates were approximately equal at a temperature of 1100 C.

  1. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation by Reactive Condensation of Glyoxal and Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, W. P.; Koehler, C. A.; de Haan, D. O.

    2004-05-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol particles by particle-phase reactions is currently of great interest. Glyoxal has been identified as a significant component in the particle phase in recent smog chamber aromatic oxidation studies. This is surprising because glyoxal has a high vapor pressure and phase partitioning theory would predict that it remain almost entirely in the gas phase. Growth of inorganic seed aerosol in a particle chamber was monitored by scanning mobility particle sizing during addition of gas-phase glyoxal and small amounts of water vapor. Glyoxal was observed to condense on inorganic seed aerosol at concentrations that are at least 100 times below its vapor pressure. This behavior can be explained by a chemical reaction: glyoxal is known to polymerize when exposed to water vapor. This polymerization may be a general mechanism for secondary aerosol formation by alpha-dicarbonyl compounds. The reactivity of hydrated and polymerized forms of glyoxal during analysis by gas chromatography was assessed. Hydrated glyoxal was found to convert to glyoxal at even slightly elevated temperatures in GC injection ports. We then showed that breakdown of solid-phase glyoxal trimer dihydrate, forming gas phase glyoxal and water vapor, occurs at temperatures just above 50 *C, the boiling point of glyoxal. These observations suggest that reports of particle-phase glyoxal are likely caused by GC sampling artifacts, and that the actual particulate species are instead polymerized forms of glyoxal. It does not appear that chemical derivatization protects glyoxal polymers from thermal breakdown during GC analysis. The existence in the particle phase of glyoxal polymers with negligable vapor pressures, rather than volatile glyoxal, is consistent with phase partitioning theory.

  2. Iberis amara Extract Induces Intracellular Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Inhibits Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Plauth, Annabell; Wowro, Sylvia J.; Fischer, Cornelius; Abdel-Aziz, Heba; Sauer, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    Massively increasing global incidences of colorectal cancer require efficient treatment and prevention strategies. Here, we report unexpected anticancerogenic effects of hydroethanolic Iberis amara extract (IAE), which is known as a widely used phytomedical product for treating gastrointestinal complaints. IAE significantly inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 and T84 colon carcinoma cells with an inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 6 and 9 μg/ml, respectively, and further generated inhibitory effects in PC-3 prostate and MCF7 breast cancer cells. Inhibition of proliferation in HT-29 cells was associated with a G2/M phase cell cycle arrest including reduced expression of various regulatory marker proteins. Notably, in HT-29 cells IAE further induced apoptosis by intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Consistent with predictions derived from our in vitro experiments, bidaily oral gavage of 50 mg/kg of IAE over 4 weeks resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth in a mouse HT-29 tumor xenograft model. Taken together, Iberis amara extracts could become useful alternatives for preventing and treating the progression of colon cancer. PMID:27050665

  3. Modulation of reactivity in the cavity of liposomes promotes the formation of peptide bonds.

    PubMed

    Grochmal, Anna; Prout, Luba; Makin-Taylor, Robert; Prohens, Rafel; Tomas, Salvador

    2015-09-30

    In living cells, reactions take place in membrane-bound compartments, often in response to changes in the environment. Learning how the reactions are influenced by this compartmentalization will help us gain an optimal understanding of living organisms at the molecular level and, at the same time, will offer vital clues on the behavior of simple compartmentalized systems, such as prebiotic precursors of cells and cell-inspired artificial systems. In this work we show that a reactive building block (an activated amino acid derivative) trapped in the cavity of a liposome is protected against hydrolysis and reacts nearly quantitatively with another building block, which is membrane-permeable and free in solution, to form the dipeptide. By contrast, when the activated amino acid is found outside the liposome, hydrolysis is the prevalent reaction, showing that the cavity of the liposomes promotes the formation of peptide bonds. We attribute this result to the large lipid concentration in small compartments from the point of view of a membrane-impermeable molecule. Based on this result, we show how the outcome of the reaction can be predicted as a function of the size of the compartment. The implications of these results on the behavior of biomolecules in cell compartments, abiogenesis, and the design of artificial cell-inspired systems are considered. PMID:26356087

  4. Study of net soot formation in hydrocarbon reforming for hydrogen fuel cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, R. B.; Farmer, R. C.; Wang, T. S.

    1982-08-01

    The hydrogen fuel cell is expected to be a valuable addition to the electric utility industry; however, the current fuel supply availability requires that conventional heavier hydrocarbon fuels also be considered as primary fuels. Typical heavier fuels would be No. 2 fuel oil with its accompanying sulfur impurities, compared with the currently used light hydrocarbon gases. The potential future use of alternate fuels which are rich in aromatics would exacerbate the problems associated with hydrogen production. Among the more severe of these problems, is the greater tendency of heavier hydrocarbons to form soot. The development of a quasi-global kinetics model to represent the homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions which control the autothermal hydrogen reforming process and the accompanying soot formation and gasification was the objective of this study.

  5. Reassessment of the basis for NRC fuel damage criteria for reactivity transients

    SciTech Connect

    McCardell, R.K.

    1994-10-01

    The present basis for NRC Fuel Damage Criteria was obtained from experiments performed in the Special Power Excursion Reactor Test (SPERT) IV Reactor Capsule Driver Core (CDC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) between 1967 and 1970. Most of the CDC test fuel rods were previously unirradiated and the failure threshold for these unirradiated fuel rods was measured to be about 200 calories per gram of UO{sub 2} radially averaged fuel enthalpy at the axial peak.

  6. The contribution of lubricant to the formation of particulate matter with reactivity controlled compression ignition in light-duty diesel engines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Storey, John Morse; Curran, Scott; Dempsey, Adam B.; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur; Reitz, Rolf; Walker, N. Ryan; Wright, Chris

    2014-12-25

    Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) has been shown in single- and multi-cylinder engine research to achieve high thermal efficiencies with ultra-low NOX and soot emissions. The nature of the particulate matter (PM) produced by RCCI operation has been shown in recent research to be different than that of conventional diesel combustion and even diesel low-temperature combustion. Previous research has shown that the PM from RCCI operation contains a large amount of organic material that is volatile and semi-volatile. However, it is unclear if the organic compounds are stemming from fuel or lubricant oil. The PM emissions from dual-fuel RCCI weremore » investigated in this study using two engine platforms, with an emphasis on the potential contribution of lubricant. Both engine platforms used the same base General Motors (GM) 1.9-L diesel engine geometry. The first study was conducted on a single-cylinder research engine with primary reference fuels (PRFs), n-heptane, and iso-octane. The second study was conducted on a four-cylinder GM 1.9-L ZDTH engine which was modified with a port fuel injection (PFI) system while maintaining the stock direct injection fuel system. Multi-cylinder RCCI experiments were run with PFI gasoline and direct injection of 2-ethylhexyl nitrate (EHN) mixed with gasoline at 5 % EHN by volume. In addition, comparison cases of conventional diesel combustion (CDC) were performed. Particulate size distributions were measured, and PM filter samples were collected for analysis of lube oil components. Triplicate PM filter samples (i.e., three individual filter samples) for both gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS; organic) analysis and X-ray fluorescence (XRF; metals) were obtained at each operating point and queued for analysis of both organic species and lubricant metals. Here, the results give a clear indication that lubricants do not contribute significantly to the formation of RCCI PM.« less

  7. The contribution of lubricant to the formation of particulate matter with reactivity controlled compression ignition in light-duty diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Storey, John Morse; Curran, Scott; Dempsey, Adam B.; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur; Reitz, Rolf; Walker, N. Ryan; Wright, Chris

    2014-12-25

    Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) has been shown in single- and multi-cylinder engine research to achieve high thermal efficiencies with ultra-low NOX and soot emissions. The nature of the particulate matter (PM) produced by RCCI operation has been shown in recent research to be different than that of conventional diesel combustion and even diesel low-temperature combustion. Previous research has shown that the PM from RCCI operation contains a large amount of organic material that is volatile and semi-volatile. However, it is unclear if the organic compounds are stemming from fuel or lubricant oil. The PM emissions from dual-fuel RCCI were investigated in this study using two engine platforms, with an emphasis on the potential contribution of lubricant. Both engine platforms used the same base General Motors (GM) 1.9-L diesel engine geometry. The first study was conducted on a single-cylinder research engine with primary reference fuels (PRFs), n-heptane, and iso-octane. The second study was conducted on a four-cylinder GM 1.9-L ZDTH engine which was modified with a port fuel injection (PFI) system while maintaining the stock direct injection fuel system. Multi-cylinder RCCI experiments were run with PFI gasoline and direct injection of 2-ethylhexyl nitrate (EHN) mixed with gasoline at 5 % EHN by volume. In addition, comparison cases of conventional diesel combustion (CDC) were performed. Particulate size distributions were measured, and PM filter samples were collected for analysis of lube oil components. Triplicate PM filter samples (i.e., three individual filter samples) for both gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS; organic) analysis and X-ray fluorescence (XRF; metals) were obtained at each operating point and queued for analysis of both organic species and lubricant metals. Here, the results give a clear indication that lubricants do not contribute significantly to the formation of RCCI PM.

  8. Fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration via Radau pseudospectral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration near circular orbit. Based on the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations, first-order necessary optimality conditions are derived from the Pontryagin's maximum principle. The fuel-optimal impulsive solution is utilized to divide the low-thrust trajectory into thrust and coast arcs. By introducing the switching times as optimization variables, the fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration is posed as a nonlinear programming problem (NLP) via direct transcription using multiple-phase Radau pseudospectral method (RPM), which is then solved by a sparse nonlinear optimization software SNOPT. To facilitate optimality verification and, if necessary, further refinement of the optimized solution of the NLP, formulas for mass costate estimation and initial costates scaling are presented. Numerical examples are given to show the application of the proposed optimization method. To fix the problem, generic fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration can be simplified as reconfiguration without any initial and terminal coast arcs, whose optimal solutions can be efficiently obtained from the multiple-phase RPM at the cost of a slight fuel increment. Finally, influence of the specific impulse and maximum thrust magnitude on the fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration is analyzed. Numerical results shown the links and differences between the fuel-optimal impulsive and low-thrust solutions.

  9. Soot formation in synthetic-fuel droplets. First quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    England, G.; Kramlich, J.; Payne, R.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide detailed information on methods of minimizing soot formation during synthetic liquid fuel combustion under conditions which minimize fuel nitrogen conversion to nitric oxide. The program consists of two tasks. The purpose of the first task, Fuel Screening Studies, is to investigate the impact of fuel properties on particulate production, to establish the importance of droplet size and examine atomizer effects, and to develop techniques for surrogate fuels productions. In the second task, Flame Studies, the fundamental details of soot formation from synfuel droplet combustion will be investigated in variable slip velocity configurations. This present report describes technical progress during the first three months of the program effort (October-December 1980). During this initial period, attention has focused on the definition of the different experimental efforts and on the design and construction of the required hardware. Aspects of this work are discussed.

  10. Inhibitors of biofilm formation by fuel ethanol contaminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Industrial fuel ethanol production suffers from chronic and acute infections that reduce yields and cause “stuck fermentations” that result in costly shutdowns. Lactic acid bacteria, particularly Lactobacillus sp., are recognized as major contaminants. In previous studies, we observed that certain...

  11. Pyrite-driven reactive oxygen species formation in simulated lung fluid: implications for coal workers' pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea D; Hylton, Shavonne; Schoonen, Martin A A

    2012-08-01

    The origin of coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) has been long debated. A recent epidemiological study shows a correlation between what is essentially the concentration of pyrite within coal and the prevalence of CWP in miners. Hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical, both reactive oxygen species (ROS), form as byproducts of pyrite oxidative dissolution in air-saturated water. Motivated by the possible importance of ROS in the pathogenesis of CWP, we conducted an experimental study to evaluate if ROS form as byproducts in the oxidative dissolution of pyrite in simulated lung fluid (SLF) under biologically applicable conditions and to determine the persistence of pyrite in SLF. While the rate of pyrite oxidative dissolution in SLF is suppressed by 51% when compared to that in air-saturated water, the initial amount of hydrogen peroxide formed as a byproduct in SLF is nearly doubled. Hydroxyl radical is also formed in the experiments with SLF, but at lower concentrations than in the experiments with water. The formation of these ROS indicates that the reaction mechanism for pyrite oxidative dissolution in SLF is no different from that in water. The elevated hydrogen peroxide concentration in SLF suggests that the decomposition, via the Fenton mechanism to hydroxyl radical or with Fe(III) to form water and molecular oxygen, is initially inhibited by the presence of SLF components. On the basis of the oxidative dissolution rate of pyrite measured in this paper, it is calculated that a respirable two micron pyrite particle will take over 3 years to dissolve completely. PMID:21989857

  12. Photoirradiation of dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids--formation of reactive oxygen species and induction of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuewei; Xia, Qingsu; Yin, Jun Jie; Lin, Ge; Fu, Peter P

    2011-09-10

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA)-containing plants are widespread in the world and are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and human. PAs require metabolic activation to generate pyrrolic metabolites (dehydro-PAs) that bind cellular protein and DNA, leading to hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity, including tumorigenicity. In this study we report that UVA photoirradiation of a series of dehydro-PAs, e.g., dehydromonocrotaline, dehydroriddelliine, dehydroretrorsine, dehydrosenecionine, dehydroseneciphylline, dehydrolasiocarpine, dehydroheliotrine, and dehydroretronecine (DHR) at 0-70 J/cm2 in the presence of a lipid, methyl linoleate, resulted in lipid peroxidation in a light dose-responsive manner. When irradiated in the presence of sodium azide, the level of lipid peroxidation decreased; lipid peroxidation was enhanced when methanol was replaced by deuterated methanol. These results suggest that singlet oxygen is a photo-induced product. When irradiated in the presence of superoxide dismutase, the level of lipid peroxidation decreased, indicating that lipid peroxidation is also mediated by superoxide. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spin trapping studies confirmed that both singlet oxygen and superoxide anion radical were formed during photoirradiation. These results indicate that UVA photoirradiation of dehydro-PAs generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that mediated the initiation of lipid peroxidation. UVA irradiation of the parent PAs and other PA metabolites, including PA N-oxides, under similar experimental conditions did not produce lipid peroxidation. It is known that PAs induce skin cancer and are secondary (hepatogenous) photosensitization agents. Our results suggest that dehydro-PAs are the active metabolites responsible for skin cancer formation and PA-induced secondary photosensitization. PMID:21723383

  13. Partial reactivation of a huge deep-seated ancient rock slide: recognition, formation mechanism, and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Minggao; Xu, Qiang; Li, Yusheng; Huang, Runqiu; Rengers, Niek; Zhu, Xing

    2016-08-01

    About 18 years ago, a large-scale discontinuous layer in properties and colour was found in the new Fengjie town at the shore of the Three Gorges Reservoir area in China. There are many resettled residents and buildings on the sloping area, the safety of which is potentially affected by this layer, so it has become the focus of attention. Before this study started there were two viewpoints regarding the origin of this layer. One was that is was from a huge ancient slide and the other was that is was from a fault graben. In order to find out how it was formed and to be able to carry out a stability analysis of the slope the authors have carried out a research program, including geological field investigations and mapping, a deep drilling hole, a geotechnical centrifuge model test, and a simulation analysis. The results of the research led to the conclusion that the layer is the sliding plane of a huge deep-seated ancient rock slide, which we called the Sanmashan landslide. An important argument for the conclusion is the recognition of a regional compressive tectonic stress field in this area, which cannot lead to the formation of a fault graben because it needs a tensional tectonic stress field. Moreover, numerous unique geological features, sliding marks, and other relics of the ancient slide have been discovered in the field. The formation process of the ancient slide could be repeated in a large geotechnical centrifuge model test. The test shows that a deformation and failure process of "creep-crack-cut" has occurred. The type of the ancient slide can be classified as a "successive rotational rock slide". Finally, the role of seepage in the stability of the Sanmashan landslide has been analysed. Our final conclusions are that, during rainfall and filling-drawdown cycles in the Three Gorges Reservoir, the Sanmashan landslide as a whole is dormant and stable and the secondary landslides in the toe area of the slope are presently stable but can be reactivated. This

  14. Liquid phase products and solid deposit formation from thermally stressed model jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W. S.; Bittker, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between solid deposit formation and liquid degradation product concentration was studied for the high temperature (400 C) stressing of three hydrocarbon model fuels. A Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Tester was used to simulate actual engine fuel system conditions. The effects of fuel type, dissolved oxygen concentration, and hot surface contact time (reaction time) were studied. Effects of reaction time and removal of dissolved oxygen on deposit formation were found to be different for n-dodecane and for 2-ethylnaphthalene. When ten percent tetralin is added to n-dodecane to give a simpler model of an actual jet fuel, the tetralin inhibits both the deposit formation and the degradation of n-dodecane. For 2-ethylnaphthalene primary product analyses indicate a possible self-inhibition at long reaction times of the secondary reactions which form the deposit precursors. The mechanism of the primary breakdown of these fuels is suggested and the primary products which participate in these precursor-forming reactions are identified. Some implications of the results to the thermal degradation of real jet fuels are given.

  15. The development of reactive fuel grains for pyrophoric relight of in-space hybrid rocket thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Matthew Wellington

    This study presents and investigates a novel hybrid fuel grain that reacts pyrophorically with gaseous oxidizer to achieve restart of a hybrid rocket motor propulsion system while reducing cost and handling concerns. This reactive fuel grain (RFG) relies on the pyrophoric nature of finely divided metal particles dispersed in a solid dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) binder, which has been shown to encapsulate air-sensitive additives until they are exposed to combustion gases. An RFG is thus effectively inert in open air in the absence of an ignition source, though the particles encapsulated within remain pyrophoric. In practice, this means that an RFG that is ignited in the vacuum of space and then extinguished will expose unoxidized pyrophoric particles, which can be used to generate sufficient heat to relight the propellant when oxidizer is flowed. The experiments outlined in this work aim to develop a suitable pyrophoric material for use in an RFG, demonstrate pyrophoric relight, and characterize performance under conditions relevant to a hybrid rocket thruster. Magnesium, lithium, calcium, and an alloy of titanium, chromium, and manganese (TiCrMn) were investigated to determine suitability of pure metals as RFG additives. Additionally, aluminum hydride (AlH3), lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH4), lithium borohydride (LiBH4), and magnesium hydride (MgH2) were investigated to determine suitability of metals hydrides as RFG additives or as precursors for pure-metal RFG additives. Pyrophoric metals have been previously investigated as additives for increasing the regression rate of hybrid fuels, but to the author's knowledge, these materials have not been specifically investigated for their ability to ignite a propellant pyrophorically. Commercial research-grade metals were obtained as coarse powders, then ball-milled to attempt to reduce particle size below a critical diameter needed for pyrophoricity. Magnesium hydride was ball-milled and then cycled in a hydride cycling

  16. Spacecraft fuel-optimal and balancing maneuvers for a class of formation reconfiguration problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Sung-Moon; Lee, Sangjin; Park, Chandeok; Park, Sang-Young

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents fuel optimal and balancing methodologies for reconfiguring multiple spacecraft in formation subject to a Newtonian gravity field. For a kind of continuous-thrust propulsion system, a fuel-optimal control problem is formulated to minimize the integral squared control subject to the linearized Hill or Clohessy-Wiltshire dynamics of relative motion with respect to a circular reference orbit. Palmer's analytical solution for general reconfiguration is adapted to maneuvers between projected circular orbits, resulting in the optimal fuel consumption index as a function of configuration parameters such as orbit radius, phase angle, and transfer time. Parametric analyses reveal unique characteristics of individual fuel optimality and gross fuel consumption: for an arbitrary selection of initial/terminal orbit radii, (i) there exist special transfer times such that individual fuel consumption is optimally uniform for all phase angles, and (ii) the total fuel expenditure for a group of three or more spacecraft is invariant for the relatively same configuration with respect to the departure phase. These results serve to effectively design fuel balancing strategies for formation reconfiguration of multiple spacecraft.

  17. Formation and reactivation ages of a lunar mare ridge in northern Imbrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daket, Yuko; Yamaji, Atsushi; Sato, Katsushi; Morota, Tomokatsu; Haruyama, Junichi; Ohtake, Makiko; Matsunaga, Tsuneo

    2013-04-01

    Mare ridges and lobate scarps are the manifestations of ancient or recent horizontal compression in the shallow part of the Moon. Regional and global stress fields have been controlled possibly by mascon loading (e.g., Solomon and Head, 1980) and/or global cooling, the latter of which is affected by the origin of the Moon (e.g., Prichard and Stevenson, 2000). On the other hand, mascon loading results in tectonic deformations immediately after the deposition of mare fills (Mohit and Phillips, 2006). Therefore, the timing of deformations is a clue to distinguish the mechanisms. We constrained the formation age of a mare ridge in northern Mare Imbrium as follows. Mare basalts were so inviscid that their lava fields have level surfaces. And, lava flows would have been dammed by pre-existing mare ridges. Therefore, the depositional ages of the mare units-the one involved in the ridge and the other dammed by the ridge, indicate the range of the formation age of the ridge. Using images taken by SELENE (Kaguya), we found such an ENE-WSW trending ridge in northern Imbrium with the height, width and length of 300-400 m, 30 km and ~150 km, respectively. We defined spectrally distinctive two basaltic units in this area: Ti-poor basalt makes up the ridge, and relatively Ti-rich one lies on the plain at the foot of the ridge. Their boundary runs along the southern foot of the ridge. There are no fissures along the boundary that could have fed the Ti-rich basalt. Their model ages were estimated by crater-size frequency distribution measurements using craters of 250 m to 1 km in diameter. As a result, the Ti-poor and Ti-rich units gave the ages at 2.97 +0.16/-0.23 and 2.07 +0.17/-0.17 Ga, respectively, indicating the ridge was formed between ~3.0 and ~2.0 Ga. The majority of mare basalts in mare Imbrium were deposited before ~3.0 Ga (Solomon and Head, 1980), indicating that the ridge formation is explained as a latest event of the mascon loading. However, the unit boundary does

  18. Characteristics and trihalomethane formation reactivity of dissolved organic matter in effluents from membrane bioreactors with and without filamentous bulking.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chufan; Ma, Defang; Gao, Baoyu; Hu, Xinxiao; Yue, Qinyan; Meng, Yingjie; Kang, Shuyu; Zhang, Bei; Qi, Yuanfeng

    2016-07-01

    In this study, synthetic wastewater was treated by two identical membrane bioreactors (MBRs): the normal sludge MBR (NS-MBR) and the bulking sludge MBR (BS-MBR). Effects of filamentous bulking on the characteristics and trihalomethane (THM) formation reactivity of MBR effluent dissolved organic matter (EfOM) were investigated. Filamentous sludge bulking had no significant influence on the regulated MBR effluent water quality except NO2-N and NO3-N. NS-MBR effluent had more low molecular weight (LMW) (<5kDa) EfOM (92.43%) than BS-MBR (75.18%). About two-thirds of EfOM from BS-MBR were hydrophilic substances. On the contrary, EfOM from NS-MBR exhibited higher hydrophobicity. The ratio of polysaccharides and proteins in MBR effluents increased after filamentous bulking. There were more protein-like materials, fulvic acid-like and humic acid-like in BS-MBR EfOM. The THM formation reactivity of BS-MBR EfOM was 30.15% of NS-MBR EfOM, whereas BS-MBR EfOM exhibited higher formation reactivity of bromine containing species. PMID:27017128

  19. (Formation of fuel via photochemical electron transfer). Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.

    1985-03-04

    Accomplishments for the past year are reported under the following three main headings, in addition to several other related studies: (1) heterocyclic sulfur compounds which display unusual properties as electron relays which may be important in chemical or fuel forming reactions; (2) cationic dyes which tend to aggregate in interesting ways when bound to polyanion in water; and (3) photochemistry of viologen or pyridinium ions which are complexed or ion-paired with electron donors. A publications update is appended with references cited in this report.

  20. Effects of uncertainty in SAPRC90 rate constants and selected product yields on reactivity adjustment factors for alternative fuel vehicle emissions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bergin, M.S.; Russell, A.G.; Yang, Y.J.; Milford, J.B.; Kirchner, F.; Stockwell, W.R.

    1996-07-01

    Tropospheric ozone is formed in the atmosphere by a series of reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}). While NOx emissions are primarily composed of only two compounds, nitrogen oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), there are hundreds of different VOCs being emitted. In general, VOCs promote ozone formation, however, the rate and extent of ozone produced by the individual VOCs varies considerably. For example, it is widely acknowledged that formaldehyde (HCHO) is a very reactive VOC, and produces ozone rapidly and efficiently under most conditions. On the other hand, VOCs such as methane, ethane, propane, and methanol do not react as quickly, and are likely to form less urban ozone than a comparable mass of HCHO. The difference in ozone forming potential is one of the bases for the use of alternative fuels. The fuels considered in this study included compressed natural gas, LPG, mixtures of methanol and gasoline, ethanol and gasoline, and a reformulated gasoline.

  1. Electrochemical synthesis and reactivity screening of a ternary composition gradient for combinatorial discovery of fuel cell catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, S.; Hillier, A. C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a method for synthesis of multi-component gradient libraries for combinatorial catalyst discovery. A 'gel-transfer' synthesis method is demonstrated that involves localized diffusion of aqueous precursor metal salts into a hydrated gel to establish spatially varying concentration fields. Electrodeposition is then used to transfer the gradient in metal precursors to a surface. To illustrate the utility of this method, a platinum-ruthenium-rhodium (PtxRuyRhz) catalyst gradient was constructed, and its reactivity towards several fuel cell reactions evaluated. An optical screening technique based upon the pH-sensitive fluorescence of quinine was used to visualize the spatial onset of reactivity on the ternary catalyst gradient. The evolution of protons from several reactions of interest for low temperature fuel cells was visualized by quinine fluorescence. The oxidation of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methanol and ethanol were tested on the catalyst library. Catalyst regions that exhibited fluorescence (and hence the onset of activity) at lowest potentials were identified for each of the above reactions.

  2. Manipulation of combustion waves in carbon-nanotube/fuel composites by highly reactive Mg nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Yeol; Hwang, Hayoung; Shin, Dongjoon; Choi, Wonjoon

    2015-10-28

    Manipulating the interface of micro/nanostructured materials and chemical fuels can change the fundamental characteristics of combustion waves that are generated during a reaction. In this study, we report that Mg/MgO nanoparticles actively amplify the propagation of combustion waves at the interface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and chemical fuels. Fuel/MWCNT and fuel/MWCNT-Mg/MgO composite films were prepared by a facile synthetic method. We present complete physiochemical characterization of these composite films and evaluate the propagating velocities and real-time surface temperatures of combustion waves. Mg/MgO nanoparticles at the interface enhanced the reaction front velocity by 41%. The resulting explosive reactions supplied additional thermal energy to the chemical fuel, accelerating flame propagation. Furthermore, the surface temperatures of the composites with Mg/MgO nanoparticles were much lower, indicating how the transient heat from the reaction would ignite the unreacted fuels at lower surface temperatures despite not reaching the necessary activation energy for a chain reaction. This mechanism contributed to thermopower waves that amplified the output voltage. Furthermore, large temperature gradients due to the presence of nanoparticles increased charge transport inside the nanostructured material, due to the increased thermoelectric effects. This manipulation could contribute to the active control of interfacially driven combustion waves along nanostructured materials, yielding many potential applications. PMID:26419765

  3. Mechanical performance of reactive-air-brazed (RAB) ceramic/metal joints for solid oxide fuel cells at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, B.; Wetzel, F. J.; Malzbender, J.; Steinbrech, R. W.; Singheiser, L.

    Mechanical integrity of the sealants in planar SOFC stacks is a key prerequisite for reliable operation. In this respect joining with metals rather than brittle glass-ceramics is considered to have advantages. Hence, as one of the joining solutions for SOFCs of planar design, reactive air brazing of ceramic cells into metallic frames gains increasing interest. Fracture experiments are carried out to characterize fracture energy and failure mechanisms of silver-based reactive-air-brazes, used for joining the zirconia electrolytes of anode supported planar cells with metallic Crofer22APU frames. The specimens are mechanically tested in notched beam bending geometry. In-situ observation in optical and SEM resolution reveals specific failure mechanisms. The influence of braze formulation and associated interfacial reactions on the crack path location is addressed. Discussion of the results focuses in particular on the role of oxide scale formation.

  4. Methods and apparatuses for reagent delivery, reactive barrier formation, and pest control

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Tyler [Pasco, WA; Kaplan, Daniel I [Aiken, SC; Last, George [Richland, WA

    2002-07-09

    A reagent delivery method includes positioning reagent delivery tubes in contact with soil. The tubes can include a wall that is permeable to a soil-modifying reagent. The method further includes supplying the reagent in the tubes, diffusing the reagent through the permeable wall and into the soil, and chemically modifying a selected component of the soil using the reagent. The tubes can be in subsurface contact with soil, including groundwater, and can be placed with directional drilling equipment independent of groundwater well casings. The soil-modifying reagent includes a variety of gases, liquids, colloids, and adsorbents that may be reactive or non-reactive with soil components. The method may be used inter alia to form reactive barriers, control pests, and enhance soil nutrients for microbes and plants.

  5. The effect of the composition of plutonium loaded on the reactivity change and the isotopic composition of fuel produced in a fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blandinskiy, V. Yu.

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents the results of a numerical investigation into burnup and breeding of nuclides in metallic fuel consisting of a mixture of plutonium and depleted uranium in a fast reactor with sodium coolant. The feasibility of using plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel from domestic thermal reactors and weapons-grade plutonium is discussed. It is shown that the largest production of secondary fuel and the least change in the reactivity over the reactor lifetime can be achieved when employing plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel from a reactor of the RBMK-1000 type.

  6. The effect of the composition of plutonium loaded on the reactivity change and the isotopic composition of fuel produced in a fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandinskiy, V. Yu.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a numerical investigation into burnup and breeding of nuclides in metallic fuel consisting of a mixture of plutonium and depleted uranium in a fast reactor with sodium coolant. The feasibility of using plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel from domestic thermal reactors and weapons-grade plutonium is discussed. It is shown that the largest production of secondary fuel and the least change in the reactivity over the reactor lifetime can be achieved when employing plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel from a reactor of the RBMK-1000 type.

  7. Isotope effects in methanol synthesis and the reactivity of copper formates on a Cu/SiO2 catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yong; Mims, Charles A.; Disselkamp, Robert S.; Mei, Donghai; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF; Campbell, C. T.

    2008-10-01

    Here we investigate isotope effects on the catalytic methanol synthesis reaction and the reactivity of copper-bound formate species in CO2-H2 atmospheres on Cu/SiO2 catalysts by simultaneous IR and MS measurements, both steady-state and transient. Studies of isotopic variants (H/D, 12C/13C) reveal that bidentate formate dominates the copper surface at steady state. The steady-state formate coverages of HCOO (in 6 bar 3:1 H2:CO2) and DCOO (in D2:CO2) are similar and the steady-state formate coverages in both systems decrease by ~80% from 350 K to 550 K. Over the temperature range 413K – 553K, the steady-state methanol synthesis rate shows a weak H/D isotope effect (1.05 ± 0.05) with somewhat higher activation energies in H2:CO2 (79 kJ/mole) than D2:CO2 (71 kJ/mole) over the range 473K-553K. The reverse water gas shift (RWGS) rates are higher than methanol synthesis and also shows a weak positive H/D isotope effect with higher activation energy for H2/CO2 than D2/CO2 (108 vs. and 102 kJ/mole). The reactivity of the resulting formate species in 6 bar H2, 6 bar D2 and 6 bar Ar is strongly dominated by decomposition back to CO2 and H2. H2 and D2 exposure compared to Ar do not enhance the formate decomposition rate. The decomposition profiles on the supported catalyst deviate from first order decay, indicating distributed surface reactivity. The average decomposition rates are similar to values previously reported on single crystals. The average activation energies for formate decomposition are 90 ± 17 kJ/mole for HCOO and 119 ± 11 kJ/mole for DCOO. By contrast to the catalytic reaction rates, the formate decomposition rate shows a strong H/D kinetic isotope effect (H/D ~ 8 at 413K), similar to previously observed values on Cu(110).

  8. Long-term kinetic effects and colloid formations in dissolution of LWR spent fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, T.M.

    1996-11-01

    This report evaluates continuous dissolution and colloid formation during spent-fuel performance under repository conditions in high-level waste disposal. Various observations suggest that reprecipitated layers formed on spent-fuel surfaces may not be protective. This situation may lead to continuous dissolution of highly soluble radionuclides such as C-14, Cl-36, Tc-99, I-129, and Cs-135. However, the diffusion limits of various species involved may retard dissolution significantly. For low-solubility actinides such as Pu-(239+240) or Am-(241+243), various processes regarding colloid formation have been analyzed. The processes analyzed are condensation, dispersion, and sorption. Colloid formation may lead to significant releases of low-solubility actinides. However, because there are only limited data available on matrix dissolution, colloid formation, and solubility limits, many uncertainties still exist. These uncertainties must be addressed before the significance of radionuclide releases can be determined. 118 refs.

  9. Electrospray formation of gelled nano-aluminum microspheres with superior reactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyang; Jian, Guoqiang; Yan, Shi; DeLisio, Jeffery B; Huang, Chuan; Zachariah, Michael R

    2013-08-14

    Nanometallic fuels with high combustion enthalpy, such as aluminum, have been proposed as a potential fuel replacement for conventional metallic fuel to improve propellant performance in a variety of propulsive systems. Nevertheless, nanometallic fuels suffer from the processing challenges in polymer formulations such as increased viscosity and large agglomeration, which hinder their implementation. In this letter, we employ electrospray as a means to create a gel within a droplet, via a rapid, solvent evaporation-induced aggregation of aluminum nanoparticles, containing a small mass fraction of an energetic binder. The gelled aluminum microspheres were characterized and tested for their burning behavior by rapid wire heating ignition experiments. The gelled aluminum microspheres show enhanced combustion behavior compared to nanoaluminum, which possibly benefits from the nitrocellulose coating and the gelled microstructure, and is far superior to the corresponding dense micrometer-sized aluminum. PMID:23875780

  10. Photocatalytic Reactive Oxygen Species Formation by Semiconductor-Metal Hybrid Nanoparticles. Toward Light-Induced Modulation of Biological Processes.

    PubMed

    Waiskopf, Nir; Ben-Shahar, Yuval; Galchenko, Michael; Carmel, Inbal; Moshitzky, Gilli; Soreq, Hermona; Banin, Uri

    2016-07-13

    Semiconductor-metal hybrid nanoparticles manifest efficient light-induced spatial charge separation at the semiconductor-metal interface, as demonstrated by their use for hydrogen generation via water splitting. Here, we pioneer a study of their functionality as efficient photocatalysts for the formation of reactive oxygen species. We observed enhanced photocatalytic activity forming hydrogen peroxide, superoxide, and hydroxyl radicals upon light excitation, which was significantly larger than that of the semiconductor nanocrystals, attributed to the charge separation and the catalytic function of the metal tip. We used this photocatalytic functionality for modulating the enzymatic activity of horseradish peroxidase as a model system, demonstrating the potential use of hybrid nanoparticles as active agents for controlling biological processes through illumination. The capability to produce reactive oxygen species by illumination on-demand enhances the available peroxidase-based tools for research and opens the path for studying biological processes at high spatiotemporal resolution, laying the foundation for developing novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27224678

  11. Reactive retinal microglia, neuronal survival and the formation of retinal folds and detachments

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Andy J.; Zelinka, Christopher; Milani-Nejad, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Reactive microglia and macrophages are prevalent in damaged retinas. Accordingly, we investigate how the activation or ablation of microglia/macrophages influences the survival of neurons in the chick retina in vivo. We applied intraocular injections of interleukin 6 (IL6) to stimulate the reactivity of microglia/macrophages and clodronate-liposomes to ablate microglia/macrophages. Activation of the microglia/macrophages with IL6 delays the death of retinal neurons from N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) -induced excitotoxicity. In addition, activation of microglia/macrophages combined with colchicine-mediated retinal damage diminished the survival of ganglion cells. Application of IL6 after an excitotoxic insult greatly exacerbates the damage, and causes widespread retinal detachments and folds, accompanied by accumulation of microglia/macrophages in the subretinal space. Damage-induced retinal folds and detachments were significantly reduced by the ablation of microglia/macrophages. We conclude that microglial reactivity is detrimental to the survival of ganglion cells in colchicine-damaged retinas and detrimental to the survival of photoreceptors in retinal folds. In addition, we conclude that IL6-treatment transiently protects amacrine and bipolar cells against an excitotoxic insult. We propose that suppressing reactivity of microglia/macrophages may be an effective means to lessen the damage and vision loss resulting from damage, in particular during retinal detachment injuries. PMID:25231952

  12. Electrochemistry-Mass Spectrometry Unveils the Formation of Reactive Triclocarban MetabolitesS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, A.; Lohmann, W.; Rose, T.; Ahn, K. C.; Hammock, B. D.; Karst, U.

    2010-01-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4′-trichlorocarbanilide, TCC) is a widely used antibacterial agent in personal care products and is frequently detected as an environmental pollutant in waste waters and surface waters. In this study, we report novel reactive metabolites potentially formed during biotransformation of TCC. The oxidative metabolism of TCC has been predicted using an electrochemical cell coupled online to liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The electrochemical oxidation unveils the fact that hydroxylated metabolites of TCC may form reactive quinone imines. Moreover, a so-far unknown dechlorinated and hydroxylated TCC metabolite has been identified. The results were confirmed by in vitro studies with human and rat liver microsomes. The reactivity of the newly discovered quinone imines was demonstrated by their covalent binding to glutathione and macromolecules, using β-lactoglobulin A as a model protein. The results regarding the capability of the electrochemical cell to mimic the oxidative metabolism of TCC are discussed. Moreover, the occurrence of reactive metabolites is compared with findings from earlier in vivo studies and their relevance in vivo is argued. PMID:20861155

  13. The Role of Proactive and Reactive Aggression in the Formation and Development of Boys' Friendships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulin, Francois; Boivin, Michel

    2000-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that friends are more similar in proactive aggression than in reactive aggression with 185 fourth- to sixth-grade boys and examined interpersonal processes that may account for this similarity. Suggested that proactively aggressive boys tended to select proactively aggressive peers as friends; however, mutual influence…

  14. Electrochemistry-mass spectrometry unveils the formation of reactive triclocarban metabolites.

    PubMed

    Baumann, A; Lohmann, W; Rose, T; Ahn, K C; Hammock, B D; Karst, U; Schebb, N H

    2010-12-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide, TCC) is a widely used antibacterial agent in personal care products and is frequently detected as an environmental pollutant in waste waters and surface waters. In this study, we report novel reactive metabolites potentially formed during biotransformation of TCC. The oxidative metabolism of TCC has been predicted using an electrochemical cell coupled online to liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The electrochemical oxidation unveils the fact that hydroxylated metabolites of TCC may form reactive quinone imines. Moreover, a so-far unknown dechlorinated and hydroxylated TCC metabolite has been identified. The results were confirmed by in vitro studies with human and rat liver microsomes. The reactivity of the newly discovered quinone imines was demonstrated by their covalent binding to glutathione and macromolecules, using β-lactoglobulin A as a model protein. The results regarding the capability of the electrochemical cell to mimic the oxidative metabolism of TCC are discussed. Moreover, the occurrence of reactive metabolites is compared with findings from earlier in vivo studies and their relevance in vivo is argued. PMID:20861155

  15. MODELING THE ATMOSPHERE FORMATION OF REACTIVE MERCURY IN FLORIDA AND THE GREAT LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive mercury in the troposphere is affected by a complex mix of local emissions, global-scale transport, and gas and aqueous-phase chemistry. Here, we describe a modified version of the EPA model for urban/regional air quality (CMAQ) to include the chemistry of mercury, and m...

  16. Manipulation of combustion waves in carbon-nanotube/fuel composites by highly reactive Mg nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang Yeol; Hwang, Hayoung; Shin, Dongjoon; Choi, Wonjoon

    2015-10-01

    Manipulating the interface of micro/nanostructured materials and chemical fuels can change the fundamental characteristics of combustion waves that are generated during a reaction. In this study, we report that Mg/MgO nanoparticles actively amplify the propagation of combustion waves at the interface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and chemical fuels. Fuel/MWCNT and fuel/MWCNT-Mg/MgO composite films were prepared by a facile synthetic method. We present complete physiochemical characterization of these composite films and evaluate the propagating velocities and real-time surface temperatures of combustion waves. Mg/MgO nanoparticles at the interface enhanced the reaction front velocity by 41%. The resulting explosive reactions supplied additional thermal energy to the chemical fuel, accelerating flame propagation. Furthermore, the surface temperatures of the composites with Mg/MgO nanoparticles were much lower, indicating how the transient heat from the reaction would ignite the unreacted fuels at lower surface temperatures despite not reaching the necessary activation energy for a chain reaction. This mechanism contributed to thermopower waves that amplified the output voltage. Furthermore, large temperature gradients due to the presence of nanoparticles increased charge transport inside the nanostructured material, due to the increased thermoelectric effects. This manipulation could contribute to the active control of interfacially driven combustion waves along nanostructured materials, yielding many potential applications.Manipulating the interface of micro/nanostructured materials and chemical fuels can change the fundamental characteristics of combustion waves that are generated during a reaction. In this study, we report that Mg/MgO nanoparticles actively amplify the propagation of combustion waves at the interface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and chemical fuels. Fuel/MWCNT and fuel/MWCNT-Mg/MgO composite films were prepared by a facile

  17. Nondestructive determination of plutonium mass in spent fuel: prelliminary modeling results using the passive neutron Albedo reactivity technique

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Tobin, Stephen J; Schear, Melissa A; Menlove, Howard O; Lee, Sang Y; Swinhoe, Martyn T

    2009-01-01

    There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium (Pu) in spent fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthening the capability of the International Atomic Energy Agency (LAEA) to safeguard nuclear facilities, quantifying shipper/receiver difference, determining the input accountability value at pyrochemical processing facilities, providing quantitative input to burnup credit and final safeguards measurements at a long-term repository. In order to determine Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies, thirteen NDA techniques were identified that provide information about the composition of an assembly. A key motivation of the present research is the realization that none of these techniques, in isolation, is capable of both (1) quantifying the Pu mass of an assembly and (2) detecting the diversion of a significant number of rods. It is therefore anticipated that a combination of techniques will be required. A 5 year effort funded by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. DOE was recently started in pursuit of these goals. The first two years involves researching all thirteen techniques using Monte Carlo modeling while the final three years involves fabricating hardware and measuring spent fuel. Here, we present the work in two main parts: (1) an overview of this NGSI effort describing the motivations and approach being taken; (2) The preliminary results for one of the NDA techniques - Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR). The PNAR technique functions by using the intrinsic neutron emission of the fuel (primarily from the spontaneous fission of curium) to self-interrogate any fissile material present. Two separate measurements of the spent fuel are made, both with and without cadmium (Cd) present. The ratios of the Singles, Doubles and Triples count rates obtained in each case are analyzed; known as the Cd ratio. The primary differences between the two measurements are the neutron energy spectrum

  18. Using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry to determine reactive oxygen species formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in viable boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H David; Welch, Glenn R

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry analyses were developed for determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in live spermatozoa loaded with, respectively, hydroethidine (HE) or the lipophilic probe 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-undecanoic acid, C(11)BODIPY(581/591) (BODIPY). ROS was detected by red fluorescence emission from oxidization of HE and membrane lipid peroxidation was detected by green fluorescence emission from oxidation of BODIPY in individual live sperm. Of the reactive oxygen species generators tested, BODIPY oxidation was specific for FeSo4/ascorbate (FeAc), because menadione and H(2)O(2) had little or no effect. The oxidization of hydroethidine to ethidium was specific for menadione and H(2)O(2); FeAc had no effect. The incidence of basal or spontaneous ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation were low in boar sperm (<1% of live sperm) in fresh semen or after low temperature storage; however the sperm were quite susceptible to treatment-induced ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation. PMID:20072917

  19. Formate: an Energy Storage and Transport Bridge between Carbon Dioxide and a Formate Fuel Cell in a Single Device.

    PubMed

    Vo, Tracy; Purohit, Krutarth; Nguyen, Christopher; Biggs, Brenna; Mayoral, Salvador; Haan, John L

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the first device to our knowledge that uses a solar panel to power the electrochemical reduction of dissolved carbon dioxide (carbonate) into formate that is then used in the same device to operate a direct formate fuel cell (DFFC). The electrochemical reduction of carbonate is carried out on a Sn electrode in a reservoir that maintains a constant carbon balance between carbonate and formate. The electron-rich formate species is converted by the DFFC into electrical energy through electron release. The product of DFFC operation is the electron-deficient carbonate species that diffuses back to the reservoir bulk. It is possible to continuously charge the device using alternative energy (e.g., solar) to convert carbonate to formate for on-demand use in the DFFC; the intermittent nature of alternative energy makes this an attractive design. In this work, we demonstrate a proof-of-concept device that performs reduction of carbonate, storage of formate, and operation of a DFFC. PMID:26510492

  20. The role of proactive and reactive aggression in the formation and development of boys' friendships.

    PubMed

    Poulin, F; Boivin, M

    2000-03-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that friends are more similar in proactive aggression than in reactive aggression. Interpersonal processes that may account for this similarity (i.e., selection and mutual influence) were also examined. In the fall and spring of the school year, the friendships of 185 4th-, 5th-, and 6th-grade boys were identified. Proactive and reactive aggressive behavior were assessed with a teacher-rating instrument for each boy. The results support the general hypothesis and suggest that proactively aggressive boys tend to select proactively aggressive peers as friends; however, mutual influence between stable friends does not appear to account for similarity. These findings are discussed within the framework of G. R. Patterson, J. B. Reid, and T. J. Dishion's (1992) theory of antisocial behavior. PMID:10749080

  1. A Study of Pollutant Formation from the Lean Premixed Combustion of Gaseous Fuel Alternatives to Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fackler, Keith Boyd, Jr.

    emissions decrease with increasing H2 fuel fraction for combustion of CH4/H2 blends. This appears to be caused by a reduction in the amount of NO made by the prompt pathway involving the reaction of N2 with hydrocarbon radicals as the CH4 is replaced by H2. 2.) For category 2 (the process and refinery blend) and category 5 (the LNG, shale, and associated gases), NOx emissions increase with the addition of C2 and C3 hydrocarbons. This could be due to an increased production of free radicals resulting from increasing CO production when higher molecular weight hydrocarbons are broken down. 3.) For category 3 (the O2 blown gasified coal/petcoke), NOx emissions increase with increasing CO fuel fraction. The reason for this is attributed to CO producing more radicals per unit heat release than H2. When CO replaces H2, an increase in NOx emissions is seen due to an increase in the productivity of the N2O, NNH, and Zeldovich pathways. 4.) For category 4 (the landfill gas) the addition of diluents such as CO2 and N2 at constant air flow produces more NOx per kg of CH4 consumed, and N2 is more effective than CO 2 in increasing the NOx emission index. The increase in emission index appears to be due to an enhancement of the prompt NOx pathway as the diluents are added and the mixture moves towards stoichiometric. In addition, the presence of CO2 as a diluent catalyzes the loss of flame radicals, leading to less NOx formation than when an equivalent amount of N2 is used as a diluent. For a selected set of fuels, detailed spacial reactor probing is carried out. At the nominal temperature and residence time, the experimental results show the following trends for flame structure as a function of fuel type: 1.) Pure H2 is far more reactive in comparison to CH4 and all other pure alkane fuels. This results in relatively flat NO x and temperature profiles; whereas, the alkane fuels drop in both temperature and NOx production in the jet, where more fresh reactor feed gases are present. 2

  2. ICP-Enhanced Sputter Deposition for Reactivity Control and Low-Temperature Formation of a-IGZO Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setsuhara, Yuichi; Nakata, Keitaro; Satake, Yoshikatsu; Takenaka, Kosuke; Uchida, Giichiro; Ebe, Akinori

    2015-09-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) - enhanced sputter deposition for a-IGZO channel TFTs fabrication have been performed. This advantage of fine control of reactivity during the deposition process is of great significance for film deposition of the transparent amorphous oxide semiconductor, a-InGaZnOx (a-IGZO), whose electrical properties are significantly sensitive to the reactivity during the film deposition. The a-IGZO film deposition with addition of H2 gas were performed in order to control oxidation process during a-IGZO film formation via balance between oxidation-reduction. The results of optical emission spectrum indicate the possibility for the suppression of oxidation by oxygen atoms of a-IGZO films during deposition due to addition of H2 gas. The characteristics of TFT fabricated with IGZO film via plasma-enhanced magnetron sputter deposition system have been investigated. The result exhibits that the possibility of expanding process window for control of balance between oxidization and reduction by addition of H2 gas. The a-IGZO channel TFTs fabricated plasma-enhanced reactive sputtering system with addition of H2 gas exhibited good performance of field-effect mobility 15.3 cm2(Vs)-1 and subthreshold gate voltage swing (S) of 0.48 V decade-1. This work was partly supported by ASTEP (JST) and Grant-in-Aid for Challenging Exploratory Research (JSPS).

  3. Measurement of the atmospheric reactivity of emissions from gasoline and alternative-fueled vehicles: Assessment of available methodologies. Part 1. Indoor smog chamber study of reactivity. Final report for the first year, January 1-December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, N.A.; Wang, P.; Japar, S.M.; Hurley, M.D.; Wallington, T.J.

    1994-06-30

    A set of multiple indoor smog chambers were used to measure the increase in smog formation (smog = NO oxidation + O3 formation) from a series of individual test volatile organic compounds (VOC`s), as well as carbon monoxide (CO), when they were added to a standard urban mixture and irradiated for 10-12 hours with a solar simulator. The chambers and the mixtures were designed to simulate the Carter incremental reactivity concept that is being used in California. The test compounds covered a wide range of mechanistic uncertainties and predicted reactivities (reactivity is the increase in smog divided by the amount of test compound added). Also, the chambers were used to test the recently developed Integrated Empirical Rate (IER) Model which predicts that the smog formation of a mixture is constant and independent of NOx in the so-called light-limited regime.

  4. REACTIVE DESORPTION AND RADIATIVE ASSOCIATION AS POSSIBLE DRIVERS OF COMPLEX MOLECULE FORMATION IN THE COLD INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Vasyunin, A. I.; Herbst, Eric E-mail: eh2ef@virginia.edu

    2013-05-20

    The recent discovery of terrestrial-type organic species such as methyl formate and dimethyl ether in the cold interstellar gas has proved that the formation of organic matter in the Galaxy begins at a much earlier stage of star formation than was previously thought. This discovery represents a challenge for astrochemical modelers. The abundances of these molecules cannot be explained by the previously developed ''warm-up'' scenario, in which organic molecules are formed via diffusive chemistry on surfaces of interstellar grains starting at 30 K, and then released to the gas at higher temperatures during later stages of star formation. In this article, we investigate an alternative scenario in which complex organic species are formed via a sequence of gas-phase reactions between precursor species formed on grain surfaces and then ejected into the gas via efficient reactive desorption, a process in which non-thermal desorption occurs as a result of conversion of the exothermicity of chemical reactions into the ejection of products from the surface. The proposed scenario leads to reasonable if somewhat mixed results at temperatures as low as 10 K and may be considered as a step toward the explanation of abundances of terrestrial-like organic species observed during the earliest stages of star formation.

  5. From the Nano- to the Formation Scale: Accessible Reactive Surface Area in a CO2 Saline Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, A.; Cole, D. R.; Sheets, J. M.; Anovitz, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Among the outstanding subsurface science challenges today is the translation of our improved understanding of pore-scale reactive transport and bench-scale geochemical rates of reaction to the prediction of long-term formation response to the sequestration of carbon dioxide. The emergent complexity of CO2-brine-rock interactions, on a large scale, over long periods of time (up to 1000 years) arises from a number of imperfectly understood factors. Of these, the accessibility of reactive surfaces distinguishes natural materials from powders commonly used in reaction rate studies, and geologic heterogeneity requires a workflow that connects samples, not to depths, but to material types that, combined, constitute a subsurface formation. To this end, core samples targeting every lithology type (quartz arenite, quartz-feldspar arenite, hematitic matrix-rich sandstone, clay-silt lens) observed in two bore holes through the Mt. Simon Sandstone of Ohio have been interrogated. Small- and ultra small-angle neutron scattering (SANS, USANS) and mercury and gas porosimetry (MICP, BET) have been used to quantify pore and pore throat distributions, and therefore pore volume accessibility at any given intrusion pressure. Mineral surface area is calculated using high-resolution SEM-BSE imagery combined with energy dispersive X-ray mineral mapping, and then extended beyond the limit of image-based techniques by using BET estimates for specific minerals. Combined, these datasets enable the quantification of mineral-specific, connected surface area as a function of pore/fracture scale. This is a defining feature of a pore-mineral assemblage, the microanalysis analogue of a macroscale lithology. The whole formation is then reconstructed by connecting pore-mineral assemblages to lithologies, defined by permeability/porosity and by mineralogy, and these in turn to the whole vertical extent of the formation using coarser-scale images of whole core. This effort therefore contributes both to

  6. Organic aerosol formation from the reactive uptake of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto non-acidified inorganic seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. B.; Coggon, M. M.; Bates, K. H.; Zhang, X.; Schwantes, R. H.; Schilling, K. A.; Loza, C. L.; Flagan, R. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    The reactive partitioning of cis and trans β-IEPOX was investigated on hydrated inorganic seed particles, without the addition of acids. No organic aerosol (OA) formation was observed on dry ammonium sulfate (AS); however, prompt and efficient OA growth was observed for the cis and trans β-IEPOX on AS seeds at liquid water contents of 40-75% of the total particle mass. OA formation from IEPOX is a kinetically limited process, thus the OA growth continues if there is a reservoir of gas-phase IEPOX. There appears to be no differences, within error, in the OA growth or composition attributable to the cis / trans isomeric structures. Reactive uptake of IEPOX onto hydrated AS seeds with added base (NaOH) also produced high OA loadings, suggesting the pH dependence for OA formation from IEPOX is weak for AS particles. No OA formation, after particle drying, was observed on seed particles where Na+ was substituted for NH4+. The Henry's Law partitioning of IEPOX was measured on NaCl particles (ionic strength ~9 M) to be 3 × 107 M atm-1 (-50 / +100%). A small quantity of OA was produced when NH4+ was present in the particles, but the chloride (Cl-) anion was substituted for sulfate (SO42-), possibly suggesting differences in nucleophilic strength of the anions. Online time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry and offline filter analysis provide evidence of oxygenated hydrocarbons, organosulfates, and amines in the particle organic composition. The results are consistent with weak correlations between IEPOX-derived OA and particle acidity or liquid water observed in field studies, as the chemical system is nucleophile-limited and not limited in water or catalyst activity.

  7. Pore Scale Modeling of the Reactive Transport of Chromium in the Cathode of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Emily M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Amon, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    We present a pore scale model of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode. Volatile chromium species are known to migrate from the current collector of the SOFC into the cathode where over time they decrease the voltage output of the fuel cell. A pore scale model is used to investigate the reactive transport of chromium species in the cathode and to study the driving forces of chromium poisoning. A multi-scale modeling approach is proposed which uses a cell level model of the cathode, air channel and current collector to determine the boundary conditions for a pore scale model of a section of the cathode. The pore scale model uses a discrete representation of the cathode to explicitly model the surface reactions of oxygen and chromium with a cathode material. The pore scale model is used to study the reaction mechanisms of chromium by considering the effects of reaction rates, diffusion coefficients, chromium vaporization, and oxygen consumption on chromium’s deposition in the cathode. The study shows that chromium poisoning is most significantly affected by the chromium reaction rates in the cathode and that the reaction rates are a function of the local current density in the cathode.

  8. Formation of Reactive Sulfite-Derived Free Radicals by the Activation of Human Neutrophils: An ESR Study

    PubMed Central

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Rice, Annette B.; Khajo, Abdelahad; Triquigneaux, Mathilde; Garantziotis, Stavros; Magliozzo, Richard S.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine the effect of (bi)sulfite (hydrated sulfur dioxide) on human neutrophils and the ability of these immune cells to produce reactive free radicals due to (bi)sulfite oxidation. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an abundant heme protein in neutrophils that catalyzes the formation of cytotoxic oxidants implicated in asthma and inflammatory disorders. In the present study sulfite (•SO3−) and sulfate (SO4•−) anion radicals are characterized with the ESR spin-trapping technique using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) in the reaction of (bi)sulfite oxidation by human MPO and human neutrophils via sulfite radical chain reaction chemistry. After treatment with (bi)sulfite, PMA-stimulated neutrophils produced DMPO-sulfite anion radical, -superoxide, and -hydroxyl radical adducts. The latter adduct probably resulted, in part, from the conversion of DMPO-sulfate to DMPO-hydroxyl radical adduct via a nucleophilic substitution reaction of the radical adduct. This anion radical (SO4•−) is highly reactive and, presumably, can oxidize target proteins to protein radicals, thereby initiating protein oxidation. Therefore, we propose that the potential toxicity of (bi)sulfite during pulmonary inflammation or lung-associated diseases such as asthma may be related to free radical formation. PMID:22326772

  9. Evaluation of a High-Throughput Peptide Reactivity Format Assay for Assessment of the Skin Sensitization Potential of Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chin Lin; Lam, Ai-Leen; Smith, Maree T.; Ghassabian, Sussan

    2016-01-01

    The direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) is a validated method for in vitro assessment of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals. In the present work, we describe a peptide reactivity assay using 96-well plate format and systematically identified the optimal assay conditions for accurate and reproducible classification of chemicals with known sensitizing capacity. The aim of the research is to ensure that the analytical component of the peptide reactivity assay is robust, accurate, and reproducible in accordance with criteria that are used for the validation of bioanalytical methods. Analytical performance was evaluated using quality control samples (QCs; heptapeptides at low, medium, and high concentrations) and incubation of control chemicals (chemicals with known sensitization capacity, weak, moderate, strong, extreme, and non-sensitizers) with each of three synthetic heptapeptides, viz Cor1-C420 (Ac-NKKCDLF), cysteine- (Ac-RFAACAA), and lysine- (Ac-RFAAKAA) containing heptapeptides. The optimal incubation temperature for all three heptapeptides was 25°C. Apparent heptapeptide depletion was affected by vial material composition. Incubation of test chemicals with Cor1-C420, showed that peptide depletion was unchanged in polypropylene vials over 3-days storage in an autosampler but this was not the case for borosilicate glass vials. For cysteine-containing heptapeptide, the concentration was not stable by day 3 post-incubation in borosilicate glass vials. Although the lysine-containing heptapeptide concentration was unchanged in both polypropylene and borosilicate glass vials, the apparent extent of lysine-containing heptapeptide depletion by ethyl acrylate, differed between polypropylene (24.7%) and glass (47.3%) vials. Additionally, the peptide-chemical complexes for Cor1-C420-cinnamaldehyde and cysteine-containing heptapeptide-2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene were partially reversible during 3-days of autosampler storage. These observations further highlight

  10. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as radiosensitizer via enhanced reactive oxygen species formation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Stefanie; Sommer, Anja; Distel, Luitpold V R; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kryschi, Carola

    2012-08-24

    Internalization of citrate-coated and uncoated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy imaging. Cytotoxicity studies employing metabolic and trypan blue assays manifested their excellent biocompatibility. The production of reactive oxygen species in iron oxide nanoparticle loaded MCF-7 cells was explained to originate from both, the release of iron ions and their catalytically active surfaces. Both initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Additional oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells was attributed to the increase of catalytically active iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces. PMID:22842461

  11. Nanograss and nanostructure formation on silicon using a modified deep reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Mehran, M.; Mohajerzadeh, S.; Sanaee, Z.; Abdi, Y.

    2010-05-17

    Silicon nanograss and nanostructures are realized using a modified deep reactive ion etching technique on both plane and vertical surfaces of a silicon substrate. The etching process is based on a sequential passivation and etching cycle, and it can be adjusted to achieve grassless high aspect ratio features as well as grass-full surfaces. The incorporation of nanostructures onto vertically placed parallel fingers of an interdigital capacitive accelerometer increases the total capacitance from 0.45 to 30 pF. Vertical structures with features below 100 nm have been realized.

  12. Chemical reactivity parameters (HSAB) applied to magma evolution and ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneresse, Jean-Louis

    2012-11-01

    Magmas are commonly described through the usual content of 10 major oxides. This requires a complex dimensional plot. Concepts of hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) interactions allow estimating chemical reactivity of elements, such as electronegativity, i.e. the chemical potential changed of sign, hardness and electrophilicity. For complex system, those values result from equalization methods, i.e. the equalization of the respective chemical potentials, or from ab-initio computations through density functional theory (DFT). They help to characterize silicate magmas by a single value describing their reactivity. Principles of minimum electrophilicity (mEP), maximum hardness (MHP) and minimum polarizability (mPP) indicate trends towards regions of higher stability. Those parameters are plotted within a fitness landscape diagram, highlighting toward which principle reactions trend. Major oxides, main minerals and magmas determine the respective fields in which evolve natural rocks. Three poles are identified, represented by silica and alkalis, whereas oxidation forms the third trend. Mantle-derived rocks show a large variation in electrophilicity compared to hardness. They present all characters of a closed chemical system, being simply described by the free Gibbs energy. Conversely, rocks contaminated within the continental crust show a large variation in hardness between a silica pole and an alkaline, defining two separate trends. The trends show the character of an open chemical system, requiring a Grand Potential description (i.e. taking into account the difference in chemical potential). The terms open and closed systems refer to thermodynamical description, implying contamination for the crust and recycling for the mantle. The specific role of alkalis contrasts with other cations, pointing to their behavior in modifying silicate polymer structures. A second application deals with the reactivity of the melt and its fluid phase. It leads to a better understanding on the

  13. Formation of cubic boron-nitride by the reactive sputter deposition of boron

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Hayes, J.P.; Makowiecki, D.W.; McKeman, M.A.

    1997-03-01

    Boron-nitride films are synthesized by RF magnetron sputtering boron targets where the deposition parameters of gas pressure, flow and composition are varied along with substrate temperature and applied bias. The films are analyzed using Auger electron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nanoindentation, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. These techniques provide characterization of film composition, crystalline structure, hardness and chemical bonding, respectively. Reactive, rf-sputtering process parameters are established which lead to the growth of crystalline BN phases. The deposition of stable and adherent boron nitride coatings consisting of the cubic phase requires 400 `C substrate heating and the application of a 300 V negative bias.

  14. Lens proteins block the copper-mediated formation of reactive oxygen species during glycation reactions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ortwerth, B J; James, H L

    1999-06-16

    The formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) from glucose in vitro requires both oxygen and a transition metal ion, usually copper. These elements combine to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) which degrade glucose to AGE-forming compounds. We measured the ability of Cu(2+) to accelerate ROS formation, and the effect of added lens proteins on these reactions. Increasing levels of Cu(2+) accelerated the formation of superoxide anion with glucose and fructosyl-lysine, but the addition of 2.0 mg/ml calf lens proteins completely blocked superoxide formation up to 100 microM of added Cu(2+). Lens proteins, however, had no effect on superoxide generated by the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system. The oxidation of ascorbic acid was increased 170-fold by the addition of 10 microM Cu(2+), but was also completely prevented by added lens proteins. Hydroxyl radical formation, as measured by the conversion of benzoate to salicylate, was increased to 30 nmoles/ml after 18 h by the addition of 100 microM Cu(2+) and 2.5 mM H2O2. This increase was also blocked by the addition of lens proteins. However, hydroxyl radical formation, as estimated by the crosslinking and fragmentation of lens proteins, was observed in the presence of 100 microM Cu(2+), likely at the sites of Cu(2+) binding. Since the ratio of lens proteins to Cu(2+) in human lens is at least 1000-fold higher than those used here, the data argue that Cu(2+) in the lens would be tightly bound to protein, preventing ROS-mediated AGE formation from glucose in vivo. PMID:10364483

  15. Determining fissile content in PWR spent fuel assemblies using a passive neutron Albedo reactivity with fission chambers technique

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Tobin, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    State regulatory bodies and organizations such as the IAEA that are concerned with preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons are interested in a means of quantifying the amount of plutonium in a given spent fuel assembly. The complexity of spent nuclear fuel makes the measurement of plutonium content challenging. There are a variety of techniques that can measure various properties of spent nuclear fuel including burnup, and mass of fissile content. No single technique can provide all desired information, necessitating an approach using multiple detector systems and types. This paper presents our analysis of the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity Fission Chamber (PNAR-FC) detector system. PNAR-FC is a simplified version of the PNAR technique originally developed in 1997. This earlier research was performed with a high efficiency, {sup 3}He-based system (PNAR-3He) with which multiplicty analysis was performed. With the PNAR technique a portion of the spent fuel assembly is wrapped in a 1 mm thick cadmium liner. Neutron count rates are measured both with and without the cadmium liner present. The ratio of the count rate with the cadmium liner to the count rate without the cadmium liner is calculated and called the cadmium ratio. In the PNAR-3He technique, multiplicity measurements were made and the cadmium ratio was shown to scale with the fissile content of the material being measured. PNAR-FC simplifies the PNAR technique by using only a few fission chambers instead of many {sup 3}He tubes. Using a simplified PNAR-FC technique provides for a cheaper, lighter, and thus more portable detector system than was possible with the PNAR-3He system. The challenge with the PNAR-FC system are two-fold: (1) the change in the cadmium ratio is weaker as a afunction of the changing fissile content relative to multiplicity count rates, and (2) the efficiency for the fission chamber based system are poorer than for the {sup 3}He based detectors. In this paper, we present our

  16. Reactive oxygen product formation by human neutrophils as an early marker for biocompatibility of dialysis membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, A R; Templ, E; Traindl, O; Heinzl, H; Zlabinger, G J

    1994-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) by neutrophils (PMN) in vivo was examined by a whole blood assay using dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) in 10 patients each dialysed consecutively with two different dialyser membranes. Haemodialysis (HD) with cuprophan membrane (CM) led to a significantly (P < 0.001) more pronounced ROI production by PMN (2.4 +/- 0.5-fold increase in intracellular oxidation of DCFH-DA) compared with HD with polysulfone membranes (PM; 1.5 +/- 0.2-fold). HD with CM induced a decrease in PMN count by about 90%, whereas PM induced a decrease by only 25% (P < 0.001). In CM patients maximal ROI production coincided with the nadir in PMN count. All patients dialysed with CM showed a clear increase in serum levels of Bb fragments, whereas PM-dialysed patients did not. In this respect, however, no clear time relationship was seen to the kinetics of ROI production, nor to the disappearance of neutrophils from the circulation. Evaluating a direct effect of the dialysis membranes on PMN demonstrated that incubation of neutrophils with hollow fibres of the CM but not of the PM in the absence of plasma induces significant ROI production by PMN. Our study thus indicates that ROI production by PMN during HD correlates to membrane biocompatibility. Furthermore, one might speculate that also independently from but perhaps in addition to complement activation, reactive oxygen products are critically involved in the generation of haemodialysis-associated neutrophil emigration. PMID:7955536

  17. Formation, Reactivity, and Properties of Nondative Late Transition Metal–Oxygen and–Nitrogen Bonds

    PubMed Central

    FULTON, J. ROBIN; HOLLAND, ANDREW W.; FOX, DANIEL J.; BERGMAN*, ROBERT G.

    2005-01-01

    Complexes containing bonds between heteroatoms such as nitrogen and oxygen and “late” transition metals (i.e., those located on the right side of the transition series) have been implicated as reactive intermediates in numerous important catalytic systems. Despite this, our understanding of such M–X linkages still lags behind that of their M–H and M–C analogues. New synthetic strategies have now made possible the isolation and study of a variety of monomeric late-metal alkoxide, aryloxide, and amide complexes, including parent hydroxide and amide species. The heteroatoms in these materials form surprisingly strong bonds to their metal centers, and their bond energies do not necessarily correlate with the energies of the corresponding H–X bonds. The M–X complexes typically exhibit nucleophilic reactivity, in some cases form strong hydrogen bonds to proton donors, and even deprotonate relatively weak acids. These observations, as well as thermodynamic investigations, suggest that late metal–heteroatom bonds are strongly polarized and possess significant ionic character, properties that play an important role in their interactions with organic compounds. PMID:11790088

  18. Modeling the influence of precursor volatility and molecular structure on secondary organic aerosol formation using evaporated fuel experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jathar, S. H.; Donahue, N. M.; Adams, P. J.; Robinson, A. L.

    2013-09-01

    We use SOA production data from an ensemble of evaporated fuels to test various SOA formation models. Except for gasoline, traditional SOA models focusing exclusively on volatile species in the fuels under-predict the observed SOA formation. These models can be improved dramatically by accounting for lower volatility species, but at the cost of a large set of free parameters. In contrast, a SOA model based only on the volatility of the precursor, starting with the volatility distribution of the evaporated fuels and optimized for the volatility reduction of first-generation products, reasonably reproduces the observed SOA formation with relatively few free parameters. The exceptions are exotic fuels such as Fischer-Tropsch fuels that expose the central assumption of the volatility based model that most emissions consist of complex mixtures displaying reasonably average behavior. However, for the vast majority of fuels, the volatility based model performs well.

  19. Importance of solid fuel properties to nitrogen oxide formation through HCN and NH[sub 3] in small particle combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, M.J.; Haemaelaeinen, J.P.; Tummavuori, J.L. Univ. of Jyvaeskylae . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1993-10-01

    The formation of nitrogen oxides from fuel-nitrogen through intermediates was studied by measuring first fuel-O/fuel-N ratios and nitrogen functionality in selected solid fuels. Then the ratios of the yields (fuel-N [r arrow] HCN)/(fuel-N [r arrow] NH[sub 3]) in a nearly inert atmosphere at 800 C in an entrained flow reactor was measured and finally the ratio (fuel-N [r arrow] N[sub 2]O)/(fuel-N [r arrow] NO) in an oxidizing atmosphere at 800 C The fuels studied were coal, brown coal, S- and C-type peat, fir bark, birch bark and pine bark, all milled to a particle size < 63[mu]m. The ratios of O/N in the fuel, measured by elemental analysis, ranged from 7 to 150. Nitrogen functionality (mass percent of the total nitrogen content) was determined by XPS. the (fuel-N [r arrow] HCN)/(fuel-N [r arrow] NH[sub 3]) conversion ratio in the absence of O[sub 2], and also the (fuel-N [r arrow] N[sub 2]O)/(fuel-N [r arrow] NO) conversion ratio with O[sub 2] present, decreased with increasing ratio of fuel-O/fuel-N, but neither ratio decreased regularly with the increasing ratio of pyrrolic to pyridinic nitrogen in the fuel. Thus, fuel-oxygen plays a more important role than nitrogen functionality in the chemistry of nitrogen oxide formation. The strong effect of (fuel-O/fuel-N) ratio on the (fuel-N [r arrow] HCN)/(fuel-N [r arrow] NH[sub 3]) ratio may be due to the reaction between OH radicals and HCN to form NH[sub 3] near the fuel particle. The importance of this reaction is considered. Charring the fuel sample before combustion led to a sharp drop in the conversion of fuel-N to N[sub 2]O compared with the virgin fuels. Thus, heterogeneous combustion reactions produced much less N[sub 2]O than homogeneous combustion reactions.

  20. Effects of Air-Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    High-speed motion pictures were taken at the rate of 2,500 frames per second of the fuel spray and flame formation in the combustion chamber of the NACA combustion apparatus. The compression ratio was 13.2 and the speed 1,500 revolutions per minute. An optical indicator was used to record the time-pressure relationship in the combustion chamber. The air-fuel ratio was varied from 10.4 to 365. The results showed that as the air-fuel ratio was increased definite stratification of the charge occurred in the combustion chamber even though moderate air flow existed. The results also showed the rate of vapor diffusion to be relatively slow.

  1. Characteristics of Reactive Ni3Sn4 Formation and Growth in Ni-Sn Interlayer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, Adrian; Kenel, Christoph; Leinenbach, Christian

    2016-03-01

    The near-isothermal growth and formation of Ni3Sn4 intermetallic compounds (IMC) in Ni-Sn interlayer systems was studied in the solid state at 473 K (200 °C) and under solid-liquid conditions at 523 and 573 K (250 °C and 300 °C) from an initial state of a few seconds. Scalloped solid-state IMC formation was mainly driven by grain boundary diffusion of Ni through the IMC layer combined with the grain coarsening of the IMC layer. Under solid-liquid conditions, the formation of faceted and needle-shaped Ni3Sn4 grains as well as an atypical IMC growth behavior with similar parabolic growth constants for 523 K and 573 K (250 °C and 300 °C) was observed within the first 180 seconds of the holding time, and IMC growth occurred as an isothermal solidification from the Ni-saturated Sn melt. Due to the progressive densification of the IMC layer and the diffusion-controlled growth, the kinetics slowed down by approximately one order of magnitude after 180 seconds of annealing. The final stage was characterized by the formation of IMC islands ahead of the interfacial Ni3Sn4 layer. Needle-like IMC growth was effectively suppressed under combined solid-state and solid-liquid conditions. Textured Ni3Sn4 IMC formation at the Ni-Sn interface was approved with pole figure measurements. The activation energy Q for solid-liquid IMC formation was calculated as 43.3 kJ/mol, and processing maps for IMC growth and Sn consumption were derived as functions of temperature and time, respectively.

  2. Characteristics of Reactive Ni3Sn4 Formation and Growth in Ni-Sn Interlayer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, Adrian; Kenel, Christoph; Leinenbach, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The near-isothermal growth and formation of Ni3Sn4 intermetallic compounds (IMC) in Ni-Sn interlayer systems was studied in the solid state at 473 K (200 °C) and under solid-liquid conditions at 523 and 573 K (250 °C and 300 °C) from an initial state of a few seconds. Scalloped solid-state IMC formation was mainly driven by grain boundary diffusion of Ni through the IMC layer combined with the grain coarsening of the IMC layer. Under solid-liquid conditions, the formation of faceted and needle-shaped Ni3Sn4 grains as well as an atypical IMC growth behavior with similar parabolic growth constants for 523 K and 573 K (250 °C and 300 °C) was observed within the first 180 seconds of the holding time, and IMC growth occurred as an isothermal solidification from the Ni-saturated Sn melt. Due to the progressive densification of the IMC layer and the diffusion-controlled growth, the kinetics slowed down by approximately one order of magnitude after 180 seconds of annealing. The final stage was characterized by the formation of IMC islands ahead of the interfacial Ni3Sn4 layer. Needle-like IMC growth was effectively suppressed under combined solid-state and solid-liquid conditions. Textured Ni3Sn4 IMC formation at the Ni-Sn interface was approved with pole figure measurements. The activation energy Q for solid-liquid IMC formation was calculated as 43.3 kJ/mol, and processing maps for IMC growth and Sn consumption were derived as functions of temperature and time, respectively.

  3. A Terminal Osmium(IV) Nitride: Ammonia Formation and Ambiphilic Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Schendzielorz, Florian S; Finger, Markus; Volkmann, Christian; Würtele, Christian; Schneider, Sven

    2016-09-12

    Low-valent osmium nitrides are discussed as intermediates in nitrogen fixation schemes. However, rational synthetic routes that lead to isolable examples are currently unknown. Here, the synthesis of the square-planar osmium(IV) nitride [OsN(PNP)] (PNP=N(CH2 CH2 P(tBu)2 )2 ) is reported upon reversible deprotonation of osmium(VI) hydride [Os(N)H(PNP)](+) . The Os(IV) complex shows ambiphilic nitride reactivity with SiMe3 Br and PMe3 , respectively. Importantly, the hydrogenolysis with H2 gives ammonia and the polyhydride complex [OsH4 (HPNP)] in 80 % yield. Hence, our results directly demonstrate the role of low-valent osmium nitrides and of heterolytic H2 activation for ammonia synthesis with H2 under basic conditions. PMID:27529412

  4. Multilayered Al/CuO thermite formation by reactive magnetron sputtering: Nano versus micro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrantoni, M.; Rossi, C.; Salvagnac, L.; Conédéra, V.; Estève, A.; Tenailleau, C.; Alphonse, P.; Chabal, Y. J.

    2010-10-01

    Multilayered Al/CuO thermite was deposited by a dc reactive magnetron sputtering method. Pure Al and Cu targets were used in argon-oxygen gas mixture plasma and with an oxygen partial pressure of 0.13 Pa. The process was designed to produce low stress (<50 MPa) multilayered nanoenergetic material, each layer being in the range of tens nanometer to one micron. The reaction temperature and heat of reaction were measured using differential scanning calorimetry and thermal analysis to compare nanostructured layered materials to microstructured materials. For the nanostructured multilayers, all the energy is released before the Al melting point. In the case of the microstructured samples at least 2/3 of the energy is released at higher temperatures, between 1036 and 1356 K.

  5. Formation and chemical reactivity of carbon fibers prepared by defluorination of graphite fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1994-01-01

    Defluorination of graphite fluoride (CFX) by heating to temperatures of 250 to 450 C in chemically reactive environments was studied. This is a new and possibly inexpensive process to produce new carbon-based materials. For example, CF 0.68 fibers, made from P-100 carbon fibers, can be defluorinated in BrH2C-CH = CH-CH2Br (1,4-dibromo-2butene) heated to 370 C, and graphitized to produce fibers with an unusually high modulus and a graphite layer structure that is healed and cross-linked. Conversely, a sulfur-doped, visibly soft carbon fiber was produced by defluorinating CF 0.9 fibers, made from P-25, in sulfur (S) vapor at 370 C and then heating to 660 C in nitrogen (N2). Furthermore, defluorination of the CF 0.68 fibers in bromine (Br2) produced fragile, structurally damaged carbon fibers. Heating these fragile fibers to 1100 C in N2 caused further structural damage, whereas heating to 150 C in bromoform (CHBr3) and then to 1100 C in N2 healed the structural defects. The defluorination product of CFX, tentatively called activated graphite, has the composition and molecular structure of graphite, but is chemically more reactive. Activated graphite is a scavenger of manganese (Mn), and can be intercalated with magnesium (Mg). Also, it can easily collect large amounts of an alloy made from copper (Cu) and type 304 stainless steel to form a composite. Finally, there are indications that activated graphite can wet metals or ceramics, thereby forming stronger composites with them than the pristine carbon fibers can form.

  6. Effects of the Oxygenation level on Formation of Different Reactive Oxygen Species During Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Price, Michael; Heilbrun, Lance; Kessel, David

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effect of the oxygenation level on efficacy of two photosensitizing agents, both of which target lysosomes for photodamage but via different photochemical pathways. Upon irradiation, the chlorin termed NPe6 forms singlet oxygen in high yield while the bacteriopheophorbide WST11 forms only oxygen radicals (in an aqueous environment). Photokilling efficacy by WST11 in cell culture was impaired when the atmospheric oxygen concentration was reduced from 20% to 1%, while photokilling by NPe6 was unaffected. Studies in a cell-free system revealed that rates of photobleaching of these agents, as a function of the oxygenation level, were correlated with results described above. Moreover, the rate of formation of oxygen radicals by either agent was more sensitive to the level of oxygenation than was singlet oxygen formation by NPe6. These data indicate that the photochemical process that leads to oxygen radical formation is more dependent on the oxygenation level than is the pathway leading to formation of singlet oxygen. PMID:23216021

  7. Reactivity of atomically dispersed Pt(2+) species towards H2: model Pt-CeO2 fuel cell catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lykhach, Yaroslava; Figueroba, Alberto; Camellone, Matteo Farnesi; Neitzel, Armin; Skála, Tomáš; Negreiros, Fabio R; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Tsud, Nataliya; Prince, Kevin C; Fabris, Stefano; Neyman, Konstantin M; Matolín, Vladimír; Libuda, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    The reactivity of atomically dispersed Pt(2+) species on the surface of nanostructured CeO2 films and the mechanism of H2 activation on these sites have been investigated by means of synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and resonant photoemission spectroscopy in combination with density functional calculations. Isolated Pt(2+) sites are found to be inactive towards H2 dissociation due to high activation energy required for H-H bond scission. Trace amounts of metallic Pt are necessary to initiate H2 dissociation on Pt-CeO2 films. H2 dissociation triggers the reduction of Ce(4+) cations which, in turn, is coupled with the reduction of Pt(2+) species. The mechanism of Pt(2+) reduction involves reverse oxygen spillover and formation of oxygen vacancies on Pt-CeO2 films. Our calculations suggest the existence of a threshold concentration of oxygen vacancies associated with the onset of Pt(2+) reduction. PMID:26908194

  8. Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine Employing Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    The effects of air flow on fuel spray and flame formation in a high-speed compression-ignition engine have been investigated by means of the NACA combustion apparatus. The process was studied by examining high-speed motion pictures taken at the rate of 2,200 frames a second. The combustion chamber was of the flat-disk type used in previous experiments with this apparatus. The air flow was produced by a rectangular displacer mounted on top of the engine piston. Three fuel-injection nozzles were tested: a 0.020-inch single-orifice nozzle, a 6-orifice nozzle, and a slit nozzle. The air velocity within the combustion chamber was estimated to reach a value of 425 feet a second. The results show that in no case was the form of the fuel spray completely destroyed by the air jet although in some cases the direction of the spray was changed and the spray envelope was carried away by the moving air. The distribution of the fuel in the combustion chamber of a compression-ignition engine can be regulated to some extent by the design of the combustion chamber, by the design of the fuel-injection nozzle, and by the use of air flow.

  9. Reactivity of Iron-bearing Minerals in Deep Saline Formations subjected to Carbon Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonen, M. A.; Sklute, E. C.; Strongin, D. R.; Dyar, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Deep saline aquifers are being considered as repositories for captured CO2. Here the influence of co-injected hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide on the reactivity of hematite-bearing sandstones was evaluated as a function of salt content and water/rock ratio. The reactivity of the Triassic Moenkopi red sandstone under scCO2-dominated conditions (supercritical fluid around the point of injection) and water-dominated conditions (aqueous phase influenced by the injection of scCO2) was studied. Flow-through experiments were used to simulate scCO2-dominated conditions. Crushed sandstone packed in a column was exposed to a co-mingled stream of supercritical CO2 and an aqueous H2S or SO2 solution (75°C). Batch experiments to simulate water-dominated conditions were conducted in small autoclaves that were loaded with crushed sandstone, a small amount of water, and dry ice before to 75°C. The role of water/rock ratio was explored by conducting experiments at a water/rock ratio of 4.3/1 and 1.4/1. The reacted sandstones were recovered at the conclusion of each type of experiment and analyzed for changes in mineralogical composition using X-ray Diffraction. Selected reaction products were also studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy, FTIR, and Visible Near Infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy. The results of the flow through experiments, simulating scCO2-dominated conditions, showed no changes in the iron mineralogy of the sand, regardless of whether pure scCO2 or scCO2 co-mingled with SO2 or H2S was used. By contrast, batch experiments, simulating water-dominated conditions, showed significant changes in iron mineralogy. The presence of sulfide led to the conversion of the hematite component in the sandstone to pyrite at all salt concentrations (0-6M NaCl). In experiments with sulfide and sulfite, siderite and pyrite formed, but siderite was favored at higher salinity and lower water/rock ratio. Availability of water at the mineral surface might be a critical factor in the

  10. Highly reactive {001} facets of TiO2-based composites: synthesis, formation mechanism and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Wee-Jun; Tan, Lling-Lling; Chai, Siang-Piao; Yong, Siek-Ting; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most widely investigated metal oxides due to its extraordinary surface, electronic and catalytic properties. However, the large band gap of TiO2 and massive recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs limit its photocatalytic and photovoltaic efficiency. Therefore, increasing research attention is now being directed towards engineering the surface structure of TiO2 at the most fundamental and atomic level namely morphological control of {001} facets in the range of microscale and nanoscale to fine-tune its physicochemical properties, which could ultimately lead to the optimization of its selectivity and reactivity. The synthesis of {001}-faceted TiO2 is currently one of the most active interdisciplinary research areas and demonstrations of catalytic enhancement are abundant. Modifications such as metal and non-metal doping have also been extensively studied to extend its band gap to the visible light region. This steady progress has demonstrated that TiO2-based composites with {001} facets are playing and will continue to play an indispensable role in the environmental remediation and in the search for clean and renewable energy technologies. This review encompasses the state-of-the-art research activities and latest advancements in the design of highly reactive {001} facet-dominated TiO2via various strategies, including hydrothermal/solvothermal, high temperature gas phase reactions and non-hydrolytic alcoholysis methods. The stabilization of {001} facets using fluorine-containing species and fluorine-free capping agents is also critically discussed in this review. To overcome the large band gap of TiO2 and rapid recombination of photogenerated charge carriers, modifications are carried out to manipulate its electronic band structure, including transition metal doping, noble metal doping, non-metal doping and incorporating graphene as a two-dimensional (2D) catalyst support. The advancements made in these aspects are

  11. Highly reactive {001} facets of TiO2-based composites: synthesis, formation mechanism and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wee-Jun; Tan, Lling-Lling; Chai, Siang-Piao; Yong, Siek-Ting; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2014-02-21

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most widely investigated metal oxides due to its extraordinary surface, electronic and catalytic properties. However, the large band gap of TiO2 and massive recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs limit its photocatalytic and photovoltaic efficiency. Therefore, increasing research attention is now being directed towards engineering the surface structure of TiO2 at the most fundamental and atomic level namely morphological control of {001} facets in the range of microscale and nanoscale to fine-tune its physicochemical properties, which could ultimately lead to the optimization of its selectivity and reactivity. The synthesis of {001}-faceted TiO2 is currently one of the most active interdisciplinary research areas and demonstrations of catalytic enhancement are abundant. Modifications such as metal and non-metal doping have also been extensively studied to extend its band gap to the visible light region. This steady progress has demonstrated that TiO2-based composites with {001} facets are playing and will continue to play an indispensable role in the environmental remediation and in the search for clean and renewable energy technologies. This review encompasses the state-of-the-art research activities and latest advancements in the design of highly reactive {001} facet-dominated TiO2via various strategies, including hydrothermal/solvothermal, high temperature gas phase reactions and non-hydrolytic alcoholysis methods. The stabilization of {001} facets using fluorine-containing species and fluorine-free capping agents is also critically discussed in this review. To overcome the large band gap of TiO2 and rapid recombination of photogenerated charge carriers, modifications are carried out to manipulate its electronic band structure, including transition metal doping, noble metal doping, non-metal doping and incorporating graphene as a two-dimensional (2D) catalyst support. The advancements made in these aspects are

  12. Hematin−Hematin Self-Association States Involved in the Formation and Reactivity of the Malaria Parasite Pigment, Hemozoin

    SciTech Connect

    Klonis, Nectarios; Dilanian, Ruben; Hanssen, Eric; Darmanin, Connie; Streltsov, Victor; Deed, Samantha; Quiney, Harry; Tilley, Leann

    2010-10-22

    The malaria parasite pigment, hemozoin, is a crystal of ferriprotoporphyrin IX (FP-Fe(III)), a product of hemoglobin digestion. Hemozoin formation is essential for FP-Fe(III) detoxification in the parasite; it is the main target of quinoline antimalarials and can modulate immune and inflammation responses. To gain further insight into the likely mechanisms of crystal formation and hemozoin reactivity, we have reanalyzed the crystal structure data for {beta}-hematin and solved the crystal structure of Plasmodium falciparum hemozoin. The analysis reveals that the structures are very similar and highlights two previously unexplored modes of FP-Fe(III) self-association involving {pi}-{pi} interactions that may initiate crystal formation and help to stabilize the extended structure. Hemozoin can be considered to be a crystal composed of {pi}-{pi} dimers stabilized by iron-carboxylate linkages. As a result, it is predicted that two surfaces of the crystal would consist of {pi}-{pi} dimers with Fe(III) partly exposed to solvent and capable of undergoing redox reactions. Accordingly, we demonstrate that the crystal possesses both general peroxidase activity and the ability to cause lipid oxidation.

  13. Nanopore formation process in artificial cell membrane induced by plasma-generated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    We investigated morphological change of an artificial lipid bilayer membrane induced by oxygen radicals which were generated by non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma. Neutral oxygen species, O((3)Pj) and O2((1)Δg), were irradiated of a supported lipid bilayer existing under a buffer solution at various conditions of dose time and distances, at which the dose amounts of the oxygen species were calculated quantitatively. Observation using an atomic force microscope and a fluorescence microscope revealed that dose of the neutral oxygen species generated nanopores with the diameter of 10-50 nm in a phospholipid bilayer, and finally destructed the bilayer structure. We found that protrusions appeared on the lipid bilayer surface prior to the formation of nanopores, and we attributed the protrusions to the precursor of the nanopores. We propose a mechanism of the pore formation induced by lipid oxidation on the basis of previous experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:27216034

  14. Isoprene Epoxydiols as Precursors to Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation: Acid-Catalyzed Reactive Uptake Studies with Authentic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Zhang, Zhenfa; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Zhang, Haofei; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Knipping, Eladio M.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), formed from the photooxidation of isoprene under low-NOx conditions, have recently been proposed as precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) on the basis of mass spectrometric evidence. In the present study, IEPOX isomers were synthesized in high purity (> 99%) to investigate their potential to form SOA via reactive uptake in a series of controlled dark chamber studies followed by reaction product analyses. IEPOX-derived SOA was substantially observed only in the presence of acidic aerosols, with conservative lower-bound yields of 4.7–6.4% for β-IEPOX and 3.4–5.5% for δ-IEPOX, providing direct evidence for IEPOX isomers as precursors to isoprene SOA. These chamber studies demonstrate that IEPOX uptake explains the formation of known isoprene SOA tracers found in ambient aerosols, including 2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, dimers, and IEPOX-derived organosulfates. Additionally, we show reactive uptake on the acidified sulfate aerosols supports a previously unreported acid-catalyzed intramolecular rearrangement of IEPOX to cis- and trans-3-methyltetrahydrofuran-3,4-diols (3-MeTHF-3,4-diols) in the particle phase. Analysis of these novel tracer compounds by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) suggests that they contribute to a unique factor resolved from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of AMS organic aerosol spectra collected from low-NOx, isoprene-dominated regions influenced by the presence of acidic aerosols. PMID:22103348

  15. Reactive uptake of Isoprene-derived epoxydiols to submicron aerosol particles: implications for IEPOX lifetime and SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, J. A.; Gaston, C.; Riedel, T.; Zhang, Z.; Gold, A.; Surratt, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The reactive uptake of isoprene-derived epoxydiols (IEPOX) is thought to be a significant source of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, the IEPOX reaction probability (γIEPOX) and its dependence upon particle composition remain poorly constrained. We report measurements of γIEPOX for trans-b-IEPOX, the predominant IEPOX isomer, on submicron particles as a function of composition, acidity, and relative humidity (RH). Particle acidity had the strongest effect. γIEPOX is more than 500 times larger on ammonium bisulfate (γ ~ 0.05) than on ammonium sulfate (γ ≤ 1 x 10-4). We could accurately predict γIEPOX using an acid-catalyzed, epoxide ring-opening mechanism and a high Henry's law coefficient (1.6 x 108 M/atm). Suppression of γIEPOX was observed in particles containing both ammonium bisulfate and polyethylene glycol (PEG-300), likely due to diffusion and solubility limitations within a PEG-300 coating, suggesting that IEPOX uptake could be self-limiting. Using the measured uptake kinetics, the predicted atmospheric lifetime of IEPOX is a few hours in the presence of highly acidic particles (pH < 0), but is greater than a day on less acidic particles (pH > 3). We connect these net reactive uptake measurements to chamber studies of the SOA yield from IEPOX multiphase chemistry and discuss the implications of these findings for modeling the anthropogenic influence upon SOA formation from isoprene.

  16. Overexpression of FGF9 in prostate epithelial cells augments reactive stroma formation and promotes prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanqing; Jin, Chengliu; Hamana, Tomoaki; Liu, Junchen; Wang, Cong; An, Lei; McKeehan, Wallace L; Wang, Fen

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality of prostate cancer (PCa). Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) has been reported to promote PCa bone metastasis. However, the mechanism by which overexpression of FGF9 promotes PCa progression and metastasis is still unknown. Herein, we report that transgenic mice forced to express FGF9 in prostate epithelial cells (F9TG) developed high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in an expression level- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, FGF9/TRAMP bigenic mice (F9TRAMP) grew advanced PCa earlier and had higher frequencies of metastasis than TRAMP littermates. We observed tumor microenvironmental changes including hypercellularity and hyperproliferation in the stromal compartment of F9TG and F9TRAMP mice. Expression of TGFβ1, a key signaling molecule overexpressed in reactive stroma, was increased in F9TG and F9TRAMP prostates. Both in vivo and in vitro data indicated that FGF9 promoted TGFβ1 expression via increasing cJun-mediated signaling. Moreover, in silico analyses showed that the expression level of FGF9 was positively associated with expression of TGFβ1 and its downstream signaling molecules in human prostate cancers. Collectively, our data demonstrated that overexpressing FGF9 in PCa cells augmented the formation of reactive stroma and promoted PCa initiation and progression. PMID:26157349

  17. Respiratory long-term facilitation following intermittent hypoxia requires reactive oxygen species formation

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, PM; Mitchell, GS

    2008-01-01

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) elicits a form of respiratory plasticity known as long-term facilitation (LTF). LTF is a progressive and sustained increase in respiratory motor output as expressed in phrenic and hypoglossal (XII) nerve activity. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in several forms of neuroplasticity, and ROS production is increased by intermittent hypoxia, we tested the hypothesis that ROS are necessary for phrenic and hypoglossal LTF following AIH. Urethane anesthetized, paralyzed, vagotomized and pump ventilated Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to AIH (11% O2, 3, 5 min episodes, 5 min intervals), and both phrenic and XII nerve activity were monitored for 60 min post-AIH. Although phrenic and XII LTF were observed in control rats, intravenous Manganese (III) tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin pentachloride (MnTMPyP), a superoxide anion scavenger, attenuated both phrenic and XII LTF in a dose dependent manner. Localized application of MnTMPyP (5.5mM; 10µl) to the intrathecal space of the cervical spinal cord (C4) abolished phrenic, but not XII LTF. Thus, ROS are necessary for AIH-induced respiratory LTF, and the relevant ROS appear to be localized near respiratory motor nuclei since cervical MnTMPyP injections impaired phrenic (and not XII) LTF. Phrenic LTF is a novel form of ROS-dependent neuroplasticity since its ROS-dependence resides in the spinal cord. PMID:18207649

  18. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase and its substrates: formation of specific markers and reactive compounds during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoji

    2016-03-01

    Myeloperoxidase is an inflammatory enzyme that generates reactive hypochlorous acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and chloride ion. However, this enzyme also uses bromide ion or thiocyanate as a substrate to form hypobromous or hypothiocyanous acid, respectively. These species play important roles in host defense against the invasion of microorganisms. In contrast, these enzyme products modify biomolecules in hosts during excess inflammation, indicating that the action of myeloperoxidase is both beneficial and harmful. Myeloperoxidase uses other endogenous compounds, such as serotonin, urate, and l-tyrosine, as substrates. This broad-range specificity may have some biological implications. Target molecules of this enzyme and its products vary, including low-molecular weight thiols, proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. The modified products represent biomarkers of myeloperoxidase action. Moderate inhibition of this enzyme might be critical for the prevention/modulation of excess, uncontrolled inflammatory events. Some phytochemicals inhibit myeloperoxidase, which might explain the reductive effect caused by the intake of vegetables and fruits on cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27013775

  19. Drug 9AA reactivates p21/Waf1 and Inhibits HIV-1 progeny formation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weilin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Pedati, Caitlin; Zweier, Lynnsey; Castro, Iris; Klase, Zachary; Dowd, Cynthia S; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Bukrinsky, Michael; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2008-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the p53 pathway plays an important role in HIV-1 infection. Previous work from our lab has established a model demonstrating how p53 could become inactivated in HIV-1 infected cells through binding to Tat. Subsequently, p53 was inactivated and lost its ability to transactivate its downstream target gene p21/waf1. P21/waf1 is a well-known cdk inhibitor (CKI) that can lead to cell cycle arrest upon DNA damage. Most recently, the p21/waf1 function was further investigated as a molecular barrier for HIV-1 infection of stem cells. Therefore, we reason that the restoration of the p53 and p21/waf1 pathways could be a possible theraputical arsenal for combating HIV-1 infection. In this current study, we show that a small chemical molecule, 9-aminoacridine (9AA) at low concentrations, could efficiently reactivate p53 pathway and thereby restoring the p21/waf1 function. Further, we show that the 9AA could significantly inhibit virus replication in activated PBMCs, likely through a mechanism of inhibiting the viral replication machinery. A mechanism study reveals that the phosphorylated p53ser15 may be dissociated from binding to HIV-1 Tat protein, thereby activating the p21/waf1 gene. Finally, we also show that the 9AA-activated p21/waf1 is recruited to HIV-1 preintegration complex, through a mechanism yet to be elucidated. PMID:18348731

  20. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as radiosensitizer via enhanced reactive oxygen species formation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Stefanie; Sommer, Anja; Distel, Luitpold V.R.; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kryschi, Carola

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasmall citrate-coated SPIONs with {gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPIONs uptaken by MCF-7 cells increase the ROS production for about 240%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SPION induced ROS production is due to released iron ions and catalytically active surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Released iron ions and SPION surfaces initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray irradiation of internalized SPIONs leads to an increase of catalytically active surfaces. -- Abstract: Internalization of citrate-coated and uncoated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy imaging. Cytotoxicity studies employing metabolic and trypan blue assays manifested their excellent biocompatibility. The production of reactive oxygen species in iron oxide nanoparticle loaded MCF-7 cells was explained to originate from both, the release of iron ions and their catalytically active surfaces. Both initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Additional oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells was attributed to the increase of catalytically active iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

  1. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase and its substrates: formation of specific markers and reactive compounds during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yoji

    2016-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase is an inflammatory enzyme that generates reactive hypochlorous acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and chloride ion. However, this enzyme also uses bromide ion or thiocyanate as a substrate to form hypobromous or hypothiocyanous acid, respectively. These species play important roles in host defense against the invasion of microorganisms. In contrast, these enzyme products modify biomolecules in hosts during excess inflammation, indicating that the action of myeloperoxidase is both beneficial and harmful. Myeloperoxidase uses other endogenous compounds, such as serotonin, urate, and l-tyrosine, as substrates. This broad-range specificity may have some biological implications. Target molecules of this enzyme and its products vary, including low-molecular weight thiols, proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. The modified products represent biomarkers of myeloperoxidase action. Moderate inhibition of this enzyme might be critical for the prevention/modulation of excess, uncontrolled inflammatory events. Some phytochemicals inhibit myeloperoxidase, which might explain the reductive effect caused by the intake of vegetables and fruits on cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27013775

  2. Evaluating temperature and fuel stratification for heat-release rate control in a reactivity-controlled compression-ignition engine using optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Musculus, Mark P. B.; Kokjohn, Sage L.; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2015-04-23

    We investigated the combustion process in a dual-fuel, reactivity-controlled compression-ignition (RCCI) engine using a combination of optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling to explain the role of equivalence ratio, temperature, and fuel reactivity stratification for heat-release rate control. An optically accessible engine is operated in the RCCI combustion mode using gasoline primary reference fuels (PRF). A well-mixed charge of iso-octane (PRF = 100) is created by injecting fuel into the engine cylinder during the intake stroke using a gasoline-type direct injector. Later in the cycle, n-heptane (PRF = 0) is delivered through a centrally mounted diesel-type common-rail injector. This injection strategy generates stratification in equivalence ratio, fuel blend, and temperature. The first part of this study uses a high-speed camera to image the injection events and record high-temperature combustion chemiluminescence. Moreover, the chemiluminescence imaging showed that, at the operating condition studied in the present work, mixtures in the squish region ignite first, and the reaction zone proceeds inward toward the center of the combustion chamber. The second part of this study investigates the charge preparation of the RCCI strategy using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a fuel tracer under non-reacting conditions to quantify fuel concentration distributions prior to ignition. The fuel-tracer PLIF data show that the combustion event proceeds down gradients in the n-heptane distribution. The third part of the study uses chemical kinetics modeling over a range of mixtures spanning the distributions observed from the fuel-tracer fluorescence imaging to isolate the roles of temperature, equivalence ratio, and PRF number stratification. The simulations predict that PRF number stratification is the dominant factor controlling the ignition location and growth rate of the reaction zone. Equivalence ratio has a smaller, but still significant

  3. Reactive magnetron sputtering of Cu{sub 2}O: Dependence on oxygen pressure and interface formation with indium tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Deuermeier, Jonas; Gassmann, Juergen; Broetz, Joachim; Klein, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Thin films of copper oxides were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering and structural, morphological, chemical, and electronic properties were analyzed using x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, in situ photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrical resistance measurements. The deposition conditions for preparation of Cu(I)-oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) are identified. In addition, the interface formation between Cu{sub 2}O and Sn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (ITO) was studied by stepwise deposition of Cu{sub 2}O onto ITO and vice versa. A type II (staggered) band alignment with a valence band offset {Delta}E{sub VB} 2.1-2.6 eV depending on interface preparation is observed. The band alignment explains the nonrectifying behavior of p-Cu{sub 2}O/n-ITO junctions, which have been investigated for thin film solar cells.

  4. Reactive magnetron sputtering of Cu2O: Dependence on oxygen pressure and interface formation with indium tin oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deuermeier, Jonas; Gassmann, Jürgen; Brötz, Joachim; Klein, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Thin films of copper oxides were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering and structural, morphological, chemical, and electronic properties were analyzed using x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, in situ photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrical resistance measurements. The deposition conditions for preparation of Cu(I)-oxide (Cu2O) are identified. In addition, the interface formation between Cu2O and Sn-doped In2O3 (ITO) was studied by stepwise deposition of Cu2O onto ITO and vice versa. A type II (staggered) band alignment with a valence band offset ΔEVB = 2.1-2.6 eV depending on interface preparation is observed. The band alignment explains the nonrectifying behavior of p-Cu2O/n-ITO junctions, which have been investigated for thin film solar cells.

  5. A study of carbon formation and prevention in hydrocarbon-fueled SOFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Liu, G.; Boaro, M.; Lee, S.-I.; Vohs, J. M.; Gorte, R. J.; Al-Madhi, O. H.; Dabbousi, B. O.

    The formation and removal of the carbonaceous deposits formed by n-butane and liquid hydrocarbons, such as n-decane and proprietary light and heavy naphthas, between 973 and 1073 K on YSZ and ceria-YSZ, has been studied to determine conditions for stable operation of direct-utilization SOFC. First, it is shown that deactivation of SOFC with Cu-ceria-YSZ anodes operating on undiluted n-decane, a mixture of 80% n-decane and 20% toluene, or light naphtha at temperatures above 973 K is due to filling of the pores with polyaromatic compounds formed by gas-phase, free-radical reactions. Formation of these compounds occurs at a negligible rate below 973 K but increases rapidly above this temperature. The rate of formation also depends on the residence time of the fuel in the anode compartment. Because steam does not participate in the gas-phase reactions, carbonaceous deposits could form even at a H 2O:C ratio of 1.5, a value greater than the stability threshold predicted by thermodynamic calculations. Temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) measurements with 20% H 2O in He demonstrated that carbon deposits formed in pure YSZ were unreactive below 1073 K, while deposits formed on ceria-YSZ could be removed at temperatures as low as 923 K. Based on these results, we discuss strategies for avoiding carbon formation during the operation of direct-utilization anodes on oil-based liquid fuels.

  6. Reactive uptake of ammonia to secondary organic aerosols: kinetics of organonitrogen formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Liggio, J.; Staebler, R.; Li, S.-M.

    2015-06-01

    As a class of brown carbon, organonitrogen compounds originating from the heterogeneous uptake of NH3 by secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have received significant attention recently. In the current work, particulate organonitrogen formation during the ozonolysis of α-pinene and the OH oxidation of m-xylene in the presence of ammonia (34-125 ppb) is studied in a smog chamber equipped with a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Quantum Cascade Laser instrument. A large diversity of nitrogen containing organic (NOC) fragments was observed which were consistent with the reaction of ammonia with carbonyl containing SOA. The uptake coefficients of NH3 to SOA leading to organonitrogen compounds are reported for the first time and were in the range of ∼ 10-3-10-2, decreasing significantly to < 10-5 after 6 h of reaction. At the end of experiments (∼ 6 h) the NOC mass contributed 8.9 ± 1.7 and 31.5 ± 4.4 wt% to the total α-pinene and m-xylene derived SOA, and 4-15 wt% of the total nitrogen in the system. Uptake coefficients were also found to be positively correlated with particle acidity and negatively correlated with NH3 concentration, indicating that heterogeneous reactions were responsible for the observed NOC mass, possibly limited by liquid phase diffusion. Under these conditions, the data also indicate that the formation of NOC can compete kinetically with inorganic acid neutralization. The formation of NOC in this study suggests that a significant portion of the ambient particle associated N may be derived from NH3 heterogeneous reactions with SOA. NOC from such a mechanism may be an important and unaccounted for source of PM associated nitrogen, and a mechanism for medium or long-range transport and dry/wet deposition of atmospheric nitrogen.

  7. Reactive uptake of ammonia to secondary organic aerosols: kinetics of organonitrogen formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Liggio, J.; Staebler, R.; Li, S.-M.

    2015-12-01

    As a class of brown carbon, organonitrogen compounds originating from the heterogeneous uptake of NH3 by secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have received significant attention recently. In the current work, particulate organonitrogen formation during the ozonolysis of α-pinene and the OH oxidation of m-xylene in the presence of ammonia (34-125 ppb) was studied in a smog chamber equipped with a high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer and a quantum cascade laser instrument. A large diversity of nitrogen-containing organic (NOC) fragments was observed which were consistent with the reactions between ammonia and carbonyl-containing SOA. Ammonia uptake coefficients onto SOA which led to organonitrogen compounds were reported for the first time, and were in the range of ∼ 10-3-10-2, decreasing significantly to < 10-5 after 6 h of reaction. At the end of experiments (~ 6 h) the NOC mass contributed 8.9 ± 1.7 and 31.5 ± 4.4 wt % to the total α-pinene- and m-xylene-derived SOA, respectively, and 4-15 wt % of the total nitrogen in the system. Uptake coefficients were also found to be positively correlated with particle acidity and negatively correlated with NH3 concentration, indicating that heterogeneous reactions were responsible for the observed NOC mass, possibly limited by liquid phase diffusion. Under these conditions, the data also indicate that the formation of NOC can compete kinetically with inorganic acid neutralization. The formation of NOC in this study suggests that a significant portion of the ambient particle associated N may be derived from NH3 heterogeneous reactions with SOA. NOC from such a mechanism may be an important and unaccounted for source of PM associated nitrogen. This mechanism may also contribute to the medium or long-range transport and wet/dry deposition of atmospheric nitrogen.

  8. Measurement of the atmospheric reactivity of emissions from gasoline and alternative-fueled vehicles: Assessment of available methodologies. Part 1. Indoor smog chamber study of reactivity. Part 2. Assessment of airtrak as a reactivity analyzer. Final report for the second year, March 1, 1994-February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, N.A.; Wang, P.; Hurley, M.D.; Japar, S.M.; Chang, T.

    1996-06-13

    During the second year of the GM smog chamber study of incremental reactivity the authors performed smog chamber experiments to measure three important properties of incremental reactivity. First, they challenged the linear relationship between the Carter factors and the chamber-measured reactivities found during the first-year smog chamber study. Second, they compared the predicted and measured smog formation in simple and complex mixtures. Third, they measured the incremental reactivities of three hydrocarbons (n-butane, propene, and p-xylene) as well as the urban-surrogate mixture at three different temperatures, 22 deg C, 32 deg C (the default), and 42 deg C, to determine how temperature affects both the absolute and the relative reactivity. Finally, they conducted experiments in which the incremental reactivity of NO2 was measured in order to test the Integrated Empirical Rate (IER) model.

  9. Mechanism of Pinhole Formation in Membrane Electrode Assemblies for PEM Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanic, Vesna; Hoberecht, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The pinhole formation mechanism was studied with a variety of MEAs using ex-situ and in-situ methods. The ex-situ tests included the MEA aging in oxygen and MEA heat of ignition. In-situ durability tests were performed in fuel cells at different operating conditions with hydrogen and oxygen. After the in-situ failure, MEAs were analyzed with an Olympus BX 60 optical microscope and Cambridge 120 scanning electron microscope. MEA chemical analysis was performed with an IXRF EDS microanalysis system. The MEA failure analyses showed that pinholes and tears were the MEA failure modes. The pinholes appeared in MEA areas where the membrane thickness was drastically reduced. Their location coincided with the stress concentration points, indicating that membrane creep was responsible for their formation. Some of the pinholes detected had contaminant particles precipitated within the membrane. This mechanism of pinhole formation was correlated to the polymer blistering.

  10. Miniature fuel cell with monolithically fabricated Si electrodes - Alloy catalyst formation -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Daiki; Suzuki, Takahiro; Katayama, Noboru; Dowaki, Kiyoshi; Hayase, Masanori

    2013-12-01

    A novel Pd-Pt catalyst formation process was proposed for reduction of Pt usage. In our miniature fuel cells, porous Pt was used as the catalyst, and the Pt usage was quite high. To reduce the Pt usage, we have attempted to deposit Pt on porous Pd by galvanic replacement, and relatively large output was demonstrated. In this study, in order to reduce more Pt usage and explore the alloy catalyst formation process, atomic layer deposition by UPD-SLRR (Under Potential Deposition - Surface Limited Redox Replacement) was applied to the Pd-Pt catalyst formation. The new process was verified at each process steps by EDS elemental analysis, and the expected spectra were obtained. Prototype cells were constructed by the new process, and cell output was raised to 420mW/cm2 by the Pd-Pt catalyst from 125mW/cm2 with Pd catalyst.

  11. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in the Formation of Extracellular Traps (ETs) in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Stoiber, Walter; Obermayer, Astrid; Steinbacher, Peter; Krautgartner, Wolf-Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular traps (ETs) are reticulate structures of extracellular DNA associated with antimicrobial molecules. Their formation by phagocytes (mainly by neutrophils: NETs) has been identified as an essential element of vertebrate innate immune defense. However, as ETs are also toxic to host cells and potent triggers of autoimmunity, their role between pathogen defense and human pathogenesis is ambiguous, and they contribute to a variety of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Since the discovery of ET formation (ETosis) a decade ago, evidence has accumulated that most reaction cascades leading to ET release involve ROS. An important new facet was added when it became apparent that ETosis might be directly linked to, or be a variant of, the autophagy cell death pathway. The present review analyzes the evidence to date on the interplay between ROS, autophagy and ETosis, and highlights and discusses several further aspects of the ROS-ET relationship that are incompletely understood. These aspects include the role of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS, the molecular requirements of NADPH oxidase-dependent ETosis, the roles of NADPH oxidase subtypes, extracellular ROS and of ROS from sources other than NADPH oxidase, and the present evidence for ROS-independent ETosis. We conclude that ROS interact with ETosis in a multidimensional manner, with influence on whether ETosis shows beneficial or detrimental effects. PMID:25946076

  12. Control of Reactivity and Regioselectivity for On-Surface Dehydrogenative Aryl-Aryl Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Kocić, Nemanja; Liu, Xunshan; Chen, Songjie; Decurtins, Silvio; Krejčí, Ondřej; Jelínek, Pavel; Repp, Jascha; Liu, Shi-Xia

    2016-05-01

    Regioselectivity is of fundamental importance in chemical synthesis. Although many concepts for site-selective reactions are well established for solution chemistry, it is not a priori clear whether they can easily be transferred to reactions taking place on a metal surface. A metal will fix the chemical potential of the electrons and perturb the electronic states of the reactants because of hybridization. Additionally, techniques to characterize chemical reactions in solution are generally not applicable to on-surface reactions. Only recent developments in resolving chemical structures by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) paved the way for identifying individual reaction products on surfaces. Here we exploit a combined STM/AFM technique to demonstrate the on-surface formation of complex molecular architectures built up from a heteroaromatic precursor, the tetracyclic pyrazino[2,3-f][4,7]phenanthroline (pap) molecule. Selective intermolecular aryl-aryl coupling via dehydrogenative C-H activation occurs on Au(111) upon thermal annealing under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. A full atomistic description of the different reaction products based on an unambiguous discrimination between pyrazine and pyridine moieties is presented. Our work not only elucidates that ortho-hydrogen atoms of the pyrazine rings are preferentially activated over their pyridine equivalents, but also sheds new light onto the participation of substrate atoms in metal-organic coordination bonding during covalent C-C bond formation. PMID:27059121

  13. Nanostructured diffusion-limited-aggregation crystal pattern formation in a reactive microemulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Rohit; Srivastava, P. K.

    2014-03-01

    Nanostructured diffusion-limited-aggregation (DLA) crystal pattern formation in microemulsion consisting of water, styrene, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTACl), potassium persulphate and an oscillating Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reactant is reported. A variety of spatiotemporal patterns like concentric wave, spatial (stripe) and chaotic patterns appear. A colloidal phase composed of numerous nano-sized particles has been observed. The solid phase nucleation has been found to occur in the colloidal phase and has been found to grow in a symmetric crystal pattern with the progress of the reaction finally exhibiting DLA structures. We show that the formation of a nanostructured DLA crystal pattern is governed by spatial structures emerging in the BZ microemulsion system. Without any spatial structure in the microemulsion system only hydrogel of high viscosity is formed. A nano-sized branched crystal pattern was formed with a particle diameter in the range of 60-100 nm, as evident by transmission electron microscope, powder x-ray diffraction and particle size analyser studies.

  14. 40 CFR 600.308-12 - Fuel economy label format requirements-plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... electric range” if the vehicle's engine starts only after the battery is fully discharged, or “Electricity...-plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. 600.308-12 Section 600.308-12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.308-12 Fuel economy label format requirements—plug-in hybrid...

  15. 40 CFR 600.308-12 - Fuel economy label format requirements-plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... electric range” if the vehicle's engine starts only after the battery is fully discharged, or “Electricity...-plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. 600.308-12 Section 600.308-12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.308-12 Fuel economy label format requirements—plug-in hybrid...

  16. 40 CFR 600.308-12 - Fuel economy label format requirements-plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... electric range” if the vehicle's engine starts only after the battery is fully discharged, or “Electricity...-plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. 600.308-12 Section 600.308-12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... VEHICLES Fuel Economy Labeling § 600.308-12 Fuel economy label format requirements—plug-in hybrid...

  17. Calcite formation in soft coral sclerites is determined by a single reactive extracellular protein.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-09-01

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called "calcite and aragonite seas." Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that -OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature. PMID:21768106

  18. Calcite Formation in Soft Coral Sclerites Is Determined by a Single Reactive Extracellular Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called “calcite and aragonite seas.” Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that –OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature. PMID:21768106

  19. Role of carbon in the formation of hard Ge1-xCx thin films by reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chaoquan; Qiao, Liang; Tian, Hongwei; Lu, Xianyi; Jiang, Qing; Zheng, Weitao

    2011-07-01

    We have deposited germanium carbide (Ge1-xCx) films on Si(1 0 0) substrate via radio-frequency (RF) reactive magnetron sputtering in a CH4/Ar mixture discharge, and explored the effects of carbon content (x) on the chemical bonding and hardness for the obtained films. We find that x significantly influences the chemical bonding, which leads to a pronounced change in the hardness of the film. To reveal the relationship between the chemical bonding and hardness, first-principles calculations have been carried out. It is shown that as x increases from 0 to 0.33, the fraction of sp3 C-Ge bonds in the film increases at the expense of Ge-Ge bonds, which promotes formation of a strong covalently bonded network, and thus enhances the hardness of the film. However, as x further increases from 0.33 to 0.59, the fraction of sp3 C-Ge bonds in the film gradually reduces, while that of sp3 C-H and graphite-like sp2 C-C bonds increases, which damages the compact network structure, resulting in a sharp decrease in the hardness. This investigation suggests that the medium x (0.17formation of dominant sp3 C-Ge bonds.

  20. Emerging Disinfection Byproducts, Halobenzoquinones: Effects of Isomeric Structure and Halogen Substitution on Cytotoxicity, Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species, and Genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Moe, Birget; Vemula, Sai; Wang, Wei; Li, Xing-Fang

    2016-07-01

    Halobenzoquinones (HBQs) are a structurally diverse class of water disinfection byproducts. Here, we report a systematic study on the effects of isomeric structure and the type and number of halogen substitutions of HBQs on their cytotoxicity, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and genotoxicity. Dynamic responses and IC50 histograms were obtained using real-time cell analysis, clearly ranking the cytotoxicity of the HBQs in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. Strong isomeric structure effects were shown with 2,5-HBQ isomers inducing greater cytotoxicity than their corresponding 2,6-HBQ isomers (P < 0.05). HBQ-halogen substitution groups also influence cytotoxicity, as cytotoxicity increases across the dihalogenated HBQs: iodo- > bromo- > chloro-HBQs (P < 0.05). Determination of HBQ-induced ROS further supports isomeric structure and halogen substitution effects. HBQ-induced genotoxicity was shown as increased levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and p53 protein. Pearson correlation analysis of the HBQ toxicity measurements with their physicochemical parameters demonstrates that dipole moment and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy are two major structural influences on toxicity (r = -0.721 or -0.766, P < 0.05). Dipole moment also correlates with isomer toxicity. This study suggests that formation and occurrence of highly toxic iodo-HBQs and 2,5-HBQs warrant further investigation to fully assess the impact of HBQs in drinking water. PMID:26812484

  1. Phlorotannins from brown algae (Fucus vesiculosus) inhibited the formation of advanced glycation endproducts by scavenging reactive carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Gu, Liwei

    2012-02-01

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in vivo is associated with aging, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, renal failure, etc. The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of brown algae Fucus vesiculosus phlorotannins on the formation of AGEs. F. vesiculosus phlorotannins were extracted using 70% acetone. The resultant extract was fractionated into dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, butanol, and water fractions. The ethyl acetate fraction was further fractionated into four subfractions (Ethyl-F1 to -F4) using a Sephadex LH-20 column. F. vesiculosus acetone extract or fractions significantly inhibited the formation of AGEs mediated by glucose and methylglyoxal in a concentration-dependent manner. The concentrations of F. vesiculosus extracts required to inhibit 50% of albumin glycation (EC(50)) in the bovine serum albumin (BSA)-methylglyoxal assay were lower than those of aminoguanidine (a drug candidate for diabetic complication), except for F. vesiculosus acetone extract and dichloromethane fraction. In the BSA-glucose assay, F. vesiculosus extracts inhibited BSA glycation more than or as effectively as aminoguanidine, except for Ethyl-F3 and -F4. The ethyl acetate fraction and its four subfractions scavenged more than 50% of methylglyoxal in two hours. The hypothesis whether F. vesiculosus phlorotannins scavenged reactive carbonyls by forming adducts was tested. Phloroglucinol, the constituent unit of phlorotannins, reacted with glyoxal and methylglyoxal. Five phloroglucinol-carbonyl adducts were detected and tentatively identified using HPLC-ESI-MS(n). PMID:22248148

  2. Low CD3+CD28-induced interleukin-2 production correlates with decreased reactive oxygen intermediate formation in neonatal T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kilpinen, S; Hurme, M

    1998-01-01

    The capacity of neonatal T cells to secrete interleukin-2 (IL-2) has been reported to be variable. We analysed IL-2 production in purified neonatal and adult T cells using polyclonal activator phorbol ester + calcium ionophore (PDBu + iono) or receptor-mediated anti-CD3/anti-CD3+ anti-CD28 stimulation. PDBu + iono induced equally high IL-2 levels in both groups and, when stimulated with plate-bound anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb), the IL-2 secretion by neonatal cells was undetectable and adult cells produced low amounts of IL-2 (mean 331 +/- 86 pg/ml). The addition of anti-CD28 mAb to anti-CD3-stimulated cells markedly increased IL-2 production in both cell types, but levels of IL-2 in neonatal T cells remained clearly lower than those of adult T cells (respective mean values: 385 +/- 109 pg/ml and 4494 +/- 1199 pg/ml). As NF-kappa B is a critical transcription factor in the control of IL-2 expression, we next analysed its nuclear translocation in neonatal and adult T cells using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and, because induction of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) is required for the activation of NF-kappa B, we also analysed levels of intracellular ROI in these cells using the ROI-reactive fluorochrome DCFH-DA and flow cytometry. In neonatal T cells NF-kappa B activation and ROI formation after anti-CD3 stimulation were low compared with adult T cells and, although addition of anti-CD28 mAb increased induction of NF-kappa B and ROI formation, levels similar to those of adults were not achieved. After PDBu + iono stimulation, the cells showed similar ROI formation and IL-2 secretion. Our results suggest that reduced IL-2 production by neonatal T cells is specific for anti-CD3 and anti-CD3+ anti-CD28-mediated stimulation and that these activators cannot effectively activate the ROI-NF-kappa B signalling pathway in neonatal T cells. Images Figure 3 PMID:9741337

  3. Reactivity of thiosemicarbazides with redox active metal ions: controlled formation of coordination complexes versus heterocyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    López-Torres, Elena; Dilworth, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    The reactions of 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylthiosemicarbazide (LH) with Cu(II) and Sn(IV) have been investigated. If THF or methanol is used as solvent with Cu(II), oxidative cyclisation and coupling are observed, yielding a 1,2,4-thiadiazole or a 1,3,4-thiadiazolium salt. SnI(4) is also able to induce oxidative coupling of two thiosemicarbazide ligands, yielding 1,2,4-thiadiazolium or 1,2,4-triazolium salts, with I(3)(-) as the counterion, depending on the reaction conditions. By contrast, reaction of LH with SnI(4) in acetone yields a 1,3-thiazolium salt, with I(-) as counterion. Reaction with Cu(II) salts or SnI(4) in basic media leads to the formation of metal complexes containing two deprotonated thiosemicarbazide ligands. In the reaction of CuCl(2) in water in the presence of acid a complex containing two neutral ligands is obtained. Reactions with SnCl(4) are not able to induce ligand cyclisation, although a coordination compound with two neutral ligands was isolated from methanol. PMID:19180593

  4. Hydroxyl radical formation during ozonation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes: performance optimization and demonstration of a reactive CNT filter.

    PubMed

    Oulton, Rebekah; Haase, Jason P; Kaalberg, Sara; Redmond, Connor T; Nalbandian, Michael J; Cwiertny, David M

    2015-03-17

    We explored factors influencing hydroxyl radical (•OH) formation during ozonation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and assessed this system's viability as a next-generation advanced oxidation process (AOP). Using standard reactivity metrics for ozone-based AOPs (RCT values), MWCNTs promoted •OH formation during ozonation to levels exceeding ozone (both alone and with activated carbon) and equivalent to ozone with hydrogen peroxide. MWCNTs oxidized with nitric acid exhibited vastly greater rates of ozone consumption and •OH formation relative to as-received MWCNTs. While some of this enhancement reflects their greater suspension stability, a strong correlation between RCT values and surface oxygen concentrations from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggests that surface sites generated during MWCNT oxidation promote •OH exposure. Removal of several ozone-recalcitrant species [para-chlorobenzoic acid (p-CBA), atrazine, DEET, and ibuprofen] was not significantly inhibited in the presence of radical scavengers (humic acid, carbonate), in complex aquatic matrices (Iowa River water) and after 12 h of continuous exposure of MWCNTs to concentrated ozone solutions. As a proof-of-concept, oxidized MWCNTs deposited on a ceramic membrane chemically oxidized p-CBA in a flow through system, with removal increasing with influent ozone concentration and mass of deposited MWCNTs (in mg/cm2). This hybrid membrane platform, which integrates adsorption, oxidation, and filtration via an immobilized MWCNT layer, may serve as the basis for future novel nanomaterial-enabled technologies, although long-term performance trials under representative treatment scenarios remain necessary. PMID:25730285

  5. Assessment of groundwater chemical evolution for a spent nuclear fuel repository under prolonged temperate conditions: an application of efficient coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gylling, B.; Hartley, L. J.; Joyce, S. J.; Woollard, H.; Marsic, N.; Sidborn, M.; Puigdomenech, I.; Selroos, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    SKB has submitted a license application for a spent nuclear fuel repository at Forsmark sited in crystalline rocks of the Fennoscandian shield. In support of this application various quantitative assessments were made to demonstrate the long-term safety of the proposed repository. One such assessment involved simulation of groundwater chemical evolution to quantify impacts on safety functions for the disposal system related to the geochemical conditions, particularly salinity, pH and redox conditions. In the reference case the current temperate period lasts until 12,000 AD. A case of prolonged meteoric infiltration to 60,000 AD is also considered resulting from e.g. global warming. This is to fulfil a regulatory request to assess whether extended dilute water infiltration might lead to a rise in redox potential and also to an increase in erosion of the bentonite barrier due to formation of colloids. In order to perform long transient simulations of groundwater flow and solute transport with water-solute-rock interactions, new tools have been developed to closely couple geochemical, groundwater flow and transport calculations, and perform these efficiently using parallel computing techniques. In assessing this case, sensitivities are tested to the geochemical reaction schemes appropriate to the site. The results of this work predict that the chemical environment at repository depth stabilises at around 20,000 AD and shows little change beyond that. The salinity of the groundwater is governed by the low permeability (c. 10-19 m2) of the bedrock and by rock matrix diffusion, resulting in relatively shallow and slow circulation of groundwater. The chemical reactions influence concentrations of reactive species, the calculated pH and redox potential. In particular, the redox reactions thought to be relevant for the Forsmark site maintain reducing conditions at repository depth, even with infiltration at the ground surface of meteoric water with relatively high redox

  6. In situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction of tobermorite formation in autoclaved aerated concrete: Influence of silica source reactivity and Al addition

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Kunio; Kikuma, Jun; Tsunashima, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuji; Matsuno, Shin-ya; Ogawa, Akihiro; Sato, Masugu

    2011-05-15

    The hydrothermal formation of tobermorite during the processing of autoclaved aerated concrete was investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. High-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source in combination with a newly developed autoclave cell and a photon-counting pixel array detector were used. To investigate the effects of the silica source, reactive quartz from chert and less-reactive quartz from quartz sand were used as starting materials. The effect of Al addition on tobermorite formation was also studied. In all cases, C-S-H, hydroxylellestadite and katoite were clearly observed as intermediates. Acceleration of tobermorite formation by Al addition was clearly observed. However, Al addition did not affect the dissolution rate of quartz. Two pathways, via C-S-H and katoite, were also observed in the Al-containing system. These results suggest that the structure of initially formed C-S-H is important for the subsequent tobermorite formation reactions.

  7. Fuel swelling and interaction layer formation in the SELENIUM Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) dispersion fuel plates irradiated at high power in BR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V.; Detavernier, C.

    2015-03-01

    In the framework of the SELENIUM project two full size flat fuel plates were produced with respectively Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) particles and irradiated in the BR2 reactor at SCK•CEN. Non-destructive analysis of the plates showed that the fuel swelling profiles of both SELENIUM plates were very similar to each other and none of the plates showed signs of pillowing or excessive swelling at the end of irradiation at the highest power position (local maximum 70% 235U). The microstructural analysis showed that the Si coated fuel has less interaction phase formation at low burn-up but at the highest burn-ups, defects start to develop on the IL-matrix interface. The ZrN coated fuel, shows a virtual absence of reaction between the U(Mo) and the Al, up to high fission densities after which the interaction layer formation starts and defects develop in the matrix near the U(Mo) particles. It was found and is confirmed by the SELENIUM (Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium-Molybdenum) experiment that there are two phenomena at play that need to be controlled: the formation of an interaction layer and swelling of the fuel. As the interaction layer formation occurs at the U(Mo)-matrix interface, applying a diffusion barrier (coating) at that interface should prevent the interaction between U(Mo) and the matrix. The U(Mo) swelling, observed to proceed at an accelerating rate with respect to fission density accumulation, is governed by linear solid state swelling and fission gas bubble swelling due to recrystallization of the fuel. The examination of the SELENIUM fuel plates clearly show that for the U(Mo) dispersion fuel to be qualified, the swelling rate at high burn-up needs to be reduced.

  8. Phase Formation and Transformations in Transmutation Fuel Materials for the LIFE Engine Part I - Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P E; Kaufman, L; Fluss, M J

    2008-11-10

    The current specifications of the LLNL fusion-fission hybrid proposal, namely LIFE, impose severe constraints on materials, and in particular on the nuclear fissile or fertile nuclear fuel and its immediate environment. This constitutes the focus of the present report with special emphasis on phase formation and phase transformations of the transmutation fuel and their consequences on particle and pebble thermal, chemical and mechanical integrities. We first review the work that has been done in recent years to improve materials properties under the Gen-IV project, and with in particular applications to HTGR and MSR, and also under GNEP and AFCI in the USA. Our goal is to assess the nuclear fuel options that currently exist together with their issues. Among the options, it is worth mentioning TRISO, IMF, and molten salts. The later option will not be discussed in details since an entire report is dedicated to it. Then, in a second part, with the specific LIFE specifications in mind, the various fuel options with their most critical issues are revisited with a path forward for each of them in terms of research, both experimental and theoretical. Since LIFE is applicable to very high burn-up of various fuels, distinctions will be made depending on the mission, i.e., energy production or incineration. Finally a few conclusions are drawn in terms of the specific needs for integrated materials modeling and the in depth knowledge on time-evolution thermochemistry that controls and drastically affects the performance of the nuclear materials and their immediate environment. Although LIFE demands materials that very likely have not yet been fully optimized, the challenge are not insurmountable and a well concerted experimental-modeling effort should lead to dramatic advances that should well serve other fission programs such as Gen-IV, GNEP, AFCI as well as the international fusion program, ITER.

  9. Synergistic effect of mixing dimethyl ether with methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and soot formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, S.S.; Anh, D.H.; Chung, S.H.

    2008-08-15

    Characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and soot formation in counterflow diffusion flames of methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels mixed with dimethyl ether (DME) have been investigated. Planar laser-induced incandescence and fluorescence techniques were employed to measure relative soot volume fractions and PAH concentrations, respectively. Results showed that even though DME is known to be a clean fuel in terms of soot formation, DME mixture with ethylene fuel increases PAH and soot formation significantly as compared to the pure ethylene case, while the mixture of DME with methane, ethane, and propane decreases PAH and soot formation. Numerical calculations adopting a detailed kinetics showed that DME can be decomposed to produce a relatively large number of methyl radicals in the low-temperature region where PAH forms and grows; thus the mixture of DME with ethylene increases CH{sub 3} radicals significantly in the PAH formation region. Considering that the increase in the concentration of O radicals is minimal in the PAH formation region with DME mixture, the enhancement of PAH and soot formation in the mixture flames of DME and ethylene can be explained based on the role of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation. Methyl radicals can increase the concentration of propargyls, which could enhance incipient benzene ring formation through the propargyl recombination reaction and subsequent PAH growth. Thus, the result substantiates the importance of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation, especially in the PAH formation region of diffusion flames. (author)

  10. Reactivity of elemental sulfur nanoparticles and their role on the formation of sulfur intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafantaris, F. C. A.; Druschel, G.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur biogeochemical cycling involves a vast network of chemical reactions including oxidation, reduction and disproportionation, polymerization (S-S bonding), and aggregation that leads to nanoparticulate elemental sulfur (S8(nano)) and eventually the most stable bulk mineral form, a-S8. These reactions can occur in aqueous systems inorganically, intracellularly as assimilatory or dissimilatory reactions in microbial cells, or in presence of microbial organic exudates (e.g. surfactants). Elemental sulfur participates in nucleophilic and hydrolysis reactions to form sulfur intermediates, such as polysulfide ions. The nucleophilic reaction with sulfide (as H2S or HS-, reaction 1), is a key process in the dissolution of elemental sulfur: xS8 + H2S = Sx2- + 2 H+ (1) Polysulfides are inherently unstable in acidic conditions, experiencing a series of chain elongation reactions to form the S8 ring form of molecular elemental sulfur (overall this is the reverse of reaction 1). S8 rings are also inherently insoluble in water and undergo a very rapid coarsening process to form S8nano that then coarsens more slowly via an Ostwald ripening process to form colloidal particles of a-S8. Coarsening kinetics are influenced by temperature, and the presence/absence and type of surfactants [1]. The amount of polysulfide at any point is thus a balance between the forward and reverse overall reactions represented in reaction 1, and influenced by microbial generation of reduced sulfide and/or microbial production of organic surfactants, and the size of the elemental sulfur particles. Here we present some preliminary data on the kinetics of elemental sulfur consumption (reaction 1) that have been tested in various sizes and surface properties of the sulfur nanoparticles. The surface area and presence (or absence) of surfactant molecules influences the kinetics of polysulfide formation. The cycling of that reaction may play a significant role to the element's bioavailability to

  11. Chemical mechanistic approaches for the suppression of soot formation in the combustion of high energy density fuels. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.J.

    1996-09-01

    Significant advantages can be gained by the use of high energy density fuels in volume limited applications. However, excessive soot formation that accompanies the combustion of these fuels presently limits their application. Fuel additive approaches prove attractive as they require minimal modifications to already existing equipment. In the present study, a variety of flame configurations were used to study the additive effects on soot formation. Through tests conducted on laminar diffusion flames carbon disulfide (CS2) and methanol (CH3OH) were found to be the most effective soot suppressants. Chemical interaction by either additive was found to far surpass the physical influences. However, the exact nature of the chemical action could not be established with the current set of experiments. Additionally, both of these additives were found to reduce soot formation in at least one high energy density fuel - quadricyclane (C7H8). To further validate this approach, studies were conducted using droplet flames and high-pressure spray flames.

  12. Effects of hypothermic storage of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm on intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial function, motility, and viability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of hypothermic 24 h storage of striped bass sperm cells (Morone saxatilis) on viability, intracellular Ca2+ [Ca2+]i, mitochondrial membrane potential (''m), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation as determined by flow cytometry; motion activati...

  13. Effects of hypothermic storage of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm on intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial function, motility, and viability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of hypothermic 24 h storage of striped bass sperm cells on viability, intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), mitochondrial membrane potential (D'm), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation (oxidation of hydroethidine to ethidium) as determined by flow cy...

  14. Fluid mechanics simulation of fog formation associated with polluted atmosphere produced by energy related fuel combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that large quantities of atmospheric aerosols with composition SO4(-2), NO3(-1), and NH4(+1) have been detected in highly industrialized areas. Most aerosol products come from energy-related fuel combustion. Fluid mechanics simulation of both microphysical and macrophysical processes is considered in studying the time dependent evolution of the saturation spectra of condensation nuclei associated with polluted and clean atmospheres during the time periods of advection fog formation. The results demonstrate that the condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere provide more favorable conditions than condensation nuclei associated with a clean atmosphere to produce dense advection fog, and that attaining a certain degree of supersaturation is not necessarily required for the formation of advection fog having condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere.

  15. Production of hybrid diesel fuel precursors from carbohydrates and petrochemicals using formic acid as a reactive solvent.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Rauchfuss, Thomas B

    2013-02-01

    We report the one-pot alkylation of mesitylene with carbohydrate-derived 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) as a step toward diesel-range liquids. Using FeCl(3) as a catalyst, HMF is shown to alkylate toluene, xylene, and mesitylene in high yields in CH(2)Cl(2) and MeNO(2) solvents. Efforts to extend this reaction to greener or safer solvents showed that most ether-based solvents are unsatisfactory. Acid catalysts (e.g, p-TsOH) also proved to be ineffective. Using formic acid as a reactive solvent, mesitylene could be alkylated to give mesitylmethylfurfural (MMF) starting from fructose with yields up to approximately 70 %. The reaction of fructose with formic acid in the absence of mesitylene gave rise to low yields of the formate ester of HMF, which indicates the stabilizing effect of replacing the hydroxyl substituent with mesityl. The arene also serves as a second phase into which the product is extracted. Even by using formic acid, the mesitylation of less expensive precursors such as glucose and cellulose proceeded only in modest yields (ca. 20 %). These simpler substrates were found to undergo mesitylation by using hydrogen chloride/formic acid via the intermediate chloromethylfurfural. PMID:23281330

  16. 78 FR 73566 - Standard Format and Content for a License Application for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... COMMISSION Standard Format and Content for a License Application for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage... public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-3042, ``Standard Format and Content for a License... Waste'' (Ref. 1), Subpart B, ``License Application, Form, and Contents,'' specifies the information...

  17. Reactivity and isotopic composition of spent PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) fuel as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time

    SciTech Connect

    Cerne, S.P.; Hermann, O.W.; Westfall, R.M.

    1987-10-01

    This study presents the reactivity loss of spent PWR fuel due to burnup in terms of the infinite lattice multiplications factor, k/sub infinity/. Calculations were performed using the SAS2 and CSAS1 control modules of the SCALE system. The k/sub infinity/ values calculated for all combinations of six enrichments, seven burnups, and five cooling times. The results are presented as a primary function of enrichment in both tabular and graphic form. An equation has been developed to estimate the tabulated values of k/sub infinity/'s by specifying enrichment, cooling time, and burnup. Atom densities for fresh fuel, and spent fuel at cooling times of 2, 10, and 20 years are included. 13 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Ice formation in PEM fuel cells operated isothermally at sub-freezing temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary; Luhan, Roger W; Davey, John R; Spendelow, Jacob S; Borup, Rodney L; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David L; Arif, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    The effect of MEA and GDL structure and composition on the performance of single-PEM fuel cells operated isothermally at subfreezing temperatures is presented. The cell performance and durability are not only dependent on the MEA/GDL materials used but also on their interfaces. When a cell is operated isothermally at sub-freezing temperatures in constant current mode, the water formation due to the current density initially hydrates the membrane/ionomer and then forms ice in the catalyst layer/GDL. An increase in high frequency resistance was also observed in certain MEAs where there is a possibility of ice formation between the catalyst layer and GDL leading to a loss in contact area. The total water/ice holding capacity for any MEA was lower at lower temperatures and higher current densities. The durability of MEAs subjected to multiple isothermal starts was better for LANL prepared MEAs as compared to commercial MEAs, and cloth GDLs when compared to paper GDLs. The ice formation was monitored using high-resolution neutron radiography and was found to be concentrated near the cathode catalyst layer. However, there was significant ice formation in the GDLs especially at the higher temperature ({approx} -10 C) and lower current density (0.02 A/cm{sup 2}) operations. These results are consistent with the longer-term durability observations that show more severe degradation at the lower temperatures.

  19. Protective nitride formation on stainless steel alloys for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Brady, M. P.; Wang, H.; Turner, J. A.; More, K. L.; Young, D. J.; Tortorelli, P. F.; Payzant, E. A.; Walker, L. R.

    Gas nitridation has shown excellent promise to form dense, electrically conductive and corrosion-resistant Cr-nitride surface layers on Ni-Cr base alloys for use as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) bipolar plates. Due to the high cost of nickel, Fe-base bipolar plate alloys are needed to meet the cost targets for many PEMFC applications. Unfortunately, nitridation of Fe-base stainless steel alloys typically leads to internal Cr-nitride precipitation rather than the desired protective surface nitride layer formation, due to the high permeability of nitrogen in these alloys. This paper reports the finding that it is possible to form a continuous, protective Cr-nitride (CrN and Cr 2N) surface layer through nitridation of Fe-base stainless steel alloys. The key to form a protective Cr-nitride surface layer was found to be the initial formation of oxide during nitridation, which prevented the internal nitridation typically observed for these alloys, and resulted in external Cr-nitride layer formation. The addition of V to the alloy, which resulted in the initial formation of V 2O 3-Cr 2O 3, was found to enhance this effect, by making the initially formed oxide more amenable to subsequent nitridation. The Cr-nitride surface layer formed on model V-modified Fe-27Cr alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance and low interfacial contact resistance under simulated PEMFC bipolar plate conditions.

  20. Understanding and controlling nanoporosity formation for improving the stability of bimetallic fuel cell catalysts.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lin; Heggen, Marc; O'Malley, Rachel; Theobald, Brian; Strasser, Peter

    2013-03-13

    Nanoporosity is a frequently reported phenomenon in bimetallic particle ensembles used as electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. It is generally considered a favorable characteristic, because it increases the catalytically active surface area. However, the effect of nanoporosity on the intrinsic activity and stability of a nanoparticle electrocatalyst has remained unclear. Here, we present a facile atmosphere-controlled acid leaching technique to control the formation of nanoporosity in Pt-Ni bimetallic nanoparticles. By statistical analysis of particle size, composition, nanoporosity, and atomic-scale core-shell fine structures before and after electrochemical stability test, we uncover that nanoporosity formation in particles larger than ca. 10 nm is intrinsically tied to a drastic dissolution of Ni and, as a result of this, a rapid drop in intrinsic catalytic activity during ORR testing, translating into severe catalyst performance degradation. In contrast, O2-free acid leaching enabled the suppression of nanoporosity resulting in more solid core-shell particle architectures with thin Pt-enriched shells; surprisingly, such particles maintained high intrinsic activity and improved catalytic durability under otherwise identical ORR tests. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that catalytic stability could further improve by controlling the particle size below ca. 10 nm to avoid nanoporosity. Our findings provide an explanation for the degradation of bimetallic particle ensembles and show an easy to implement pathway toward more durable fuel cell cathode catalysts. PMID:23360425

  1. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls increase reactive oxygen species formation and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiem, Anne Rykken, Sidsel; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Fonnum, Frode

    2009-10-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that bioaccumulate in the body, however, they can be metabolized to more water-soluble products. Although they are more readily excreted than the parent compounds, some of the metabolites are still hydrophobic and may be more available to target tissues, such as the brain. They can also cross the placenta and reach a developing foetus. Much less is known about the toxicity of PCB metabolites than about the parent compounds. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of eight hydroxylated (OH) PCB congeners (2'-OH PCB 3, 4-OH PCB 14, 4-OH PCB 34, 4'-OH PCB 35, 4-OH PCB 36, 4'-OH PCB 36, 4-OH PCB 39, and 4'-OH PCB 68) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and cell viability in rat cerebellar granule cells. We found that, similar to their parent compounds, OH-PCBs are potent ROS inducers with potency 4-OH PCB 14 < 4-OH PCB 36 < 4-OH PCB 34 < 4'-OH PCB 36 < 4'-OH PCB 68 < 4-OH PCB 39 < 4'-OH PCB 35. 4-OH PCB 36 was the most potent cell death inducer, and caused apoptotic or necrotic morphology depending on concentration. Inhibition of ERK1/2 kinase with U0126 reduced both cell death and ROS formation, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is involved in OH-PCB toxicity. The results indicate that the hydroxylation of PCBs may not constitute a detoxification reaction. Since OH-PCBs like their parent compounds are retained in the body and may be more widely distributed to sensitive tissues, it is important that not only the levels of the parent compounds but also the levels of their metabolites are taken into account during risk assessment of PCBs and related compounds.

  2. Formation of ferrihydrite and associated iron corrosion products in permeable reactive barriers of zero-valent iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furukawa, Yoko; Kim, Jin-Wook; Watkins, Janet; Wilkin, Richard T.

    2002-01-01

    Ferrihydrite, which is known to form in the presence of oxygen and to be stabilized by the adsorption of Si, PO4 and SO4, is ubiquitous in the fine-grained fractions of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) samples from the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center (Elizabeth City, NC) and the Denver Federal Center (Lakewood, CO) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The concurrent energy-dispersive X-ray data indicate a strong association between ferrihydrite and metals such as Si, Ca, and Cr. Magnetite, green rust 1, aragonite, calcite, mackinawite, greigite and lepidocrocite were also present, indicative of a geochemical environment that is temporally and spatially heterogeneous. Whereas magnetite, which is known to form due to anaerobic Fe0 corrosion, passivates the Fe0 surface, ferrihydrite precipitation occurs away from the immediate Fe0 surface, forming small (<0.1 microm) discrete clusters. Consequently, Fe0-PRBs may remain effective for a longer period of time in slightly oxidized groundwater systems where ferrihydrite formation occurs compared to oxygen-depleted systems where magnetite passivation occurs. The ubiquitous presence of ferrihydrite suggests that the use of Fe0-PRBs may be extended to applications that require contaminant adsorption rather than, or in addition to, redox-promoted contaminant degradation.

  3. Formation of ferrihydrite and associated iron corrosion products in permeable reactive barriers of zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yoko; Kim, Jin-Wook; Watkins, Janet; Wilkin, Richard T

    2002-12-15

    Ferrihydrite, which is known to form in the presence of oxygen and to be stabilized by the adsorption of Si, PO4 and SO4, is ubiquitous in the fine-grained fractions of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) samples from the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center (Elizabeth City, NC) and the Denver Federal Center (Lakewood, CO) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The concurrent energy-dispersive X-ray data indicate a strong association between ferrihydrite and metals such as Si, Ca, and Cr. Magnetite, green rust 1, aragonite, calcite, mackinawite, greigite and lepidocrocite were also present, indicative of a geochemical environment that is temporally and spatially heterogeneous. Whereas magnetite, which is known to form due to anaerobic Fe0 corrosion, passivates the Fe0 surface, ferrihydrite precipitation occurs away from the immediate Fe0 surface, forming small (<0.1 microm) discrete clusters. Consequently, Fe0-PRBs may remain effective for a longer period of time in slightly oxidized groundwater systems where ferrihydrite formation occurs compared to oxygen-depleted systems where magnetite passivation occurs. The ubiquitous presence of ferrihydrite suggests that the use of Fe0-PRBs may be extended to applications that require contaminant adsorption rather than, or in addition to, redox-promoted contaminant degradation. PMID:12521177

  4. PEX13 deficiency in mouse brain as a model of Zellweger syndrome: abnormal cerebellum formation, reactive gliosis and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Müller, C. Catharina; Nguyen, Tam H.; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Meshram, Mallika; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Cao, Siyu; Sharp, Peter; Fietz, Pamela B.; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline; Crane, Denis I.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Delayed cerebellar development is a hallmark of Zellweger syndrome (ZS), a severe neonatal neurodegenerative disorder. ZS is caused by mutations in PEX genes, such as PEX13, which encodes a protein required for import of proteins into the peroxisome. The molecular basis of ZS pathogenesis is not known. We have created a conditional mouse mutant with brain-restricted deficiency of PEX13 that exhibits cerebellar morphological defects. PEX13 brain mutants survive into the postnatal period, with the majority dying by 35 days, and with survival inversely related to litter size and weaning body weight. The impact on peroxisomal metabolism in the mutant brain is mixed: plasmalogen content is reduced, but very-long-chain fatty acids are normal. PEX13 brain mutants exhibit defects in reflex and motor development that correlate with impaired cerebellar fissure and cortical layer formation, granule cell migration and Purkinje cell layer development. Astrogliosis and microgliosis are prominent features of the mutant cerebellum. At the molecular level, cultured cerebellar neurons from E19 PEX13-null mice exhibit elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase-2 (MnSOD), and show enhanced apoptosis together with mitochondrial dysfunction. PEX13 brain mutants show increased levels of MnSOD in cerebellum. Our findings suggest that PEX13 deficiency leads to mitochondria-mediated oxidative stress, neuronal cell death and impairment of cerebellar development. Thus, PEX13-deficient mice provide a valuable animal model for investigating the molecular basis and treatment of ZS cerebellar pathology. PMID:20959636

  5. Basin and range-age reactivation of the ancestral Rocky Mountains in Texas Panhandle: evidence from Ogallala Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Budnik, R.T.

    1984-04-01

    The Ogallala Formation (Neogene) is a widespread syntectonic alluvial apron that was shed eastward from the Rio Grande rift and related uplifts in Colorado and New Mexico during Basin and Range extension. In the Texas Panhandle, the Ogallala completely buried Ancestral Rocky Mountain (Pennsylvanian) structures. Renewed movement on these older structures during the Neogene influenced the thickness and facies distribution of the Ogallala. The Ogallala thickens into the Palo Duro, Dalhart, and Anadarko basins. Major distributary channels on Ogallala alluvial fans coincide with the axes of these basins, whereas major interchannel areas overlie intervening uplifts. Second-order structures subtly influenced the unit as well. For example, the Carson basin, a Pennsylvanian rhomb graben along the Amarillo uplift, the Ogallala is over 250 m (820 ft) thick compared with 90 m (275 ft) in adjacent areas. Within the Palo Duro basin, local highs controlled the distribution of thin, interchannel flood-basin and lacustrine deposits. Thicker, braided-stream channel deposits follow local lows. Later movement on the Amarillo uplift broadly folded the Ogallala. The southern high plains surface subtly reflects basement structure, with topographic highs overlying basement highs, suggesting post-Ogallala deformation within the Palo Duro basin. The Amarillo uplift is approximately perpendicular to the Rio Grande rift and parallel to the direction of Basin and Range extension. Thus, the stress field that produced the rift may have caused strike-slip movement and reactivation of the Carson basin along the Amarillo uplift.

  6. High-pressure soot formation and diffusion flame extinction characteristics of gaseous and liquid fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatas, Ahmet Emre

    High-pressure soot formation and flame stability characteristics were studied experimentally in laminar diffusion flames. For the former, radially resolved soot volume fraction and temperature profiles were measured in axisymmetric co-flow laminar diffusion flames of pre-vaporized n-heptane-air, undiluted ethylene-air, and nitrogen and carbon dioxide diluted ethylene-air at elevated pressures. Abel inversion was used to re-construct radially resolved data from the line-of-sight spectral soot emission measurements. For the latter, flame extinction strain rate was measured in counterflow laminar diffusion flames of C1-4 alcohols and hydrocarbon fuels of n-heptane, n-octane, iso-octane, toluene, Jet-A, and biodiesel. The luminous flame height, as marked by visible soot radiation, of the nitrogen- and helium-diluted n-heptane and nitrogen- and carbon dioxide-diluted ethylene flames stayed constant at all pressures. In pure ethylene flames, flame heights initially increased with pressure, but changed little above 5 atm. The maximum soot yield as a function of pressure in nitrogen-diluted n-heptane diffusion flames indicate that n-heptane flames are slightly more sensitive to pressure than gaseous alkane hydrocarbon flames at least up to 7 atm. Ethylene's maximum soot volume fractions were much higher than those of ethane and n-heptane diluted with nitrogen (fuel to nitrogen mass flow ratio is about 0.5). Pressure dependence of the peak carbon conversion to soot, defined as the percentage of fuel's carbon content converted to soot, was assessed and compared to previous measurements with other gaseous fuels. Maximum soot volume fractions were consistently lower in carbon dioxide-diluted flames between 5 and 15 atm but approached similar values to those in nitrogen-diluted flames at 20 atm. This observation implies that the chemical soot suppression effect of carbon dioxide, previously demonstrated at atmospheric pressure, is also present at elevated pressures up to 15 atm

  7. The Effect of the Hydrogen to Heavy Metal Ratio (H/HM) on Reactivity and Discharge Isotopics of Homogeneous Thoria-Urania Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Kevan D.; Herring, J. Stephen

    2002-07-01

    Calculations were performed using MOCUP, which includes the use of MCNP for neutron transport and ORIGEN for depletion. The MOCUP calculations were done using a unit cell (pin cell) model, where the ThO{sub 2} varied from 65-75 wt% and the UO{sub 2} varied from 25-35 wt%. The fission products and actinides being tracked in the calculations account for >97% of the parasitic captures in the fuel. The fuel pin was surrounded by four reflecting planes, where typical parameters were used for a 17 x 17 PWR assembly. The hydrogen to heavy metal ratio (H/HM) was varied by increasing or decreasing the water density in the cell. The results show that the drier lattices have insufficient reactivity due to the limited enrichment of the uranium. However, a slightly wetter lattice will increase the reactivity-limited burnup by 26% for the 25% UO{sub 2} 75% ThO{sub 2}, and 19% for the 35% UO{sub 2} 65% ThO{sub 2} as compared to the standard coolant density. This is appears to be consistent with similar studies done with all-uranium lattices, where advantages are gained by hardening or further softening the neutron spectrum. Although some advantage is gained by softening the spectrum, the same can be said of all-uranium fueled cores. The spectral changes and, to a lesser extent, competing resonances between the {sup 238}U and bred-in {sup 233}U appear to hamper advantages in the conversion of thorium in homogeneous fuel that might otherwise be gained by shifting the neutron spectrum. Physically separating the uranium and thorium (e.g., in micro-heterogeneous and seed-and-blanket arrangements) have been shown alleviate this problem. A change in moderation may further enhance the reactivity-limited burnup of these lattices, and will be the focus of future work. (authors)

  8. The Affect of the Hydrogen to Heavy Metal Ratio (H/HM) on Reactivity and Discharge Isotopics of Homogeneous Thoria-Urania Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Herring, James Stephen

    2002-04-01

    Calculations were performed using MOCUP, which includes the use of MCNP for neutron transport and ORIGEN for depletion. The MOCUP calculations were done using a unit cell (pin cell) model, where the ThO2 varied from 65-75wt% and the UO2 varied from 25-35wt%. The fission products and actinides being tracked in the calculations account for >97% of the parasitic captures in the fuel. The fuel pin was surrounded by four reflecting planes, where typical parameters were used for a 17x17 PWR assembly. The hydrogen to heavy metal ratio (H/HM) was varied by increasing or decreasing the water density in the cell. The results show that the drier lattices have insufficient reactivity due to the limited enrichment of the uranium. However, a slightly wetter lattice will increase the reactivity-limited burnup by 26% for the 25% UO2 – 75% ThO2, and 19% for the 35% UO2 – 65% ThO2 as compared to the standard coolant density. This is appears to be consistent with similar studies done with all-uranium lattices, where advantages are gained by hardening or further softening the neutron spectrum. Although some advantage is gained by softening the spectrum, the same can be said of all-uranium fueled cores. The spectral changes and, to a lesser extent, competing resonances between the 238U and bred-in 233U appear to hamper advantages in the conversion of thorium in homogeneous fuel that might otherwise be gained by shifting the neutron spectrum. Physically separating the uranium and thorium (e.g., in micro-heterogeneous and seed-and-blanket arrangements) have been shown alleviate this problem. A change in moderation may further enhance the reactivity-limited burnup of these lattices, and will be the focus of future work.

  9. Improving the chemical compatibility of sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cells: Blocking the reactive species by controlled crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Teng; Zou, Qi; Zeng, Fanrong; Wang, Shaorong; Tang, Dian; Yang, Hiswen

    2012-10-01

    The chemical compatibility of sealing glass is of great importance for Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). In this work, the interfacial reaction between sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloy is characterized by reacting Cr2O3 powders with a representative SrO-containing glass crystallized by different heat-treatment schedules. The crystalline structure and crystalline content of sealing glass are determined by X-ray diffraction. The results show that the fraction of Cr6+ decreases from 39.8 ± 1.9% for quenched glass to 8.2 ± 0.4% for glass crystallized at 900 °C for 2 h. In addition, the interfacial reaction can be further reduced with increasing crystallization temperature and time as well as the addition of nucleation agent (TiO2). The formation of some Sr-containing crystalline phases, Sr2SiO4 and Sr(TiO3), contributes to the improvement of chemical compatibility of sealing glass, in agreement with the results of thermodynamic calculations.

  10. Evaluating temperature and fuel stratification for heat-release rate control in a reactivity-controlled compression-ignition engine using optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Musculus, Mark P. B.; Kokjohn, Sage L.; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2015-04-23

    We investigated the combustion process in a dual-fuel, reactivity-controlled compression-ignition (RCCI) engine using a combination of optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling to explain the role of equivalence ratio, temperature, and fuel reactivity stratification for heat-release rate control. An optically accessible engine is operated in the RCCI combustion mode using gasoline primary reference fuels (PRF). A well-mixed charge of iso-octane (PRF = 100) is created by injecting fuel into the engine cylinder during the intake stroke using a gasoline-type direct injector. Later in the cycle, n-heptane (PRF = 0) is delivered through a centrally mounted diesel-type common-rail injector. This injectionmore » strategy generates stratification in equivalence ratio, fuel blend, and temperature. The first part of this study uses a high-speed camera to image the injection events and record high-temperature combustion chemiluminescence. Moreover, the chemiluminescence imaging showed that, at the operating condition studied in the present work, mixtures in the squish region ignite first, and the reaction zone proceeds inward toward the center of the combustion chamber. The second part of this study investigates the charge preparation of the RCCI strategy using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a fuel tracer under non-reacting conditions to quantify fuel concentration distributions prior to ignition. The fuel-tracer PLIF data show that the combustion event proceeds down gradients in the n-heptane distribution. The third part of the study uses chemical kinetics modeling over a range of mixtures spanning the distributions observed from the fuel-tracer fluorescence imaging to isolate the roles of temperature, equivalence ratio, and PRF number stratification. The simulations predict that PRF number stratification is the dominant factor controlling the ignition location and growth rate of the reaction zone. Equivalence ratio has a smaller, but still

  11. Hot-gas cleanup for molten carbonate fuel cells-dechlorination and soot formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D.; Gelb, A.; Lord, G.; Simons, G.

    1984-01-01

    Two separate aspects of hot-gas conditioning for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) were investigated: potential high temperature chloride sorbent materials were screened and tested and carbon deposition on MCFC components was studied experimentally to determine guidelines for maximizing MCFC efficiency while avoiding carbon fouling. Natural minerals containing sodium carbonate were identified as the most promising candidates for economical removal of chlorides from coal gasifier effluents at temperatures of about 800 K (980 F). The mineral Shortite was tested in a fixed bed and found to perform remarkably well with no calcination. Measurements showed that carbon deposition can occur in the equilibrium carbon free region because of the relative rates of the relevant reactions. On all surfaces tested, the Boudouard carbon formation reaction is much faster than the water-gas shift reaction which is much faster than the methanation reaction. This means that the normal practice of adding steam to prevent carbon formation will only succeed if flows are slow enough for the water shift reaction to go substantially to completion. More direct suppression of carbon formation can be achieved by CO2 addition through anode recycle to force the Boudouard reaction backward.

  12. Metabolic activation of tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate to reactive intermediates. I. Covalent binding and reactive metabolite formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pearson, P G; Omichinski, J G; McClanahan, R H; Søderlund, E J; Dybing, E; Nelson, S D

    1993-02-01

    Analogs of tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate (Tris-BP) either labeled at specific positions with carbon-14, phosphorus-32, or oxygen-18 or dual-labeled with both deuterium and tritium were used as metabolic probes to study the chemical and metabolic events in the bioactivation of Tris-BP to chemically reactive metabolites in liver microsomal preparations. Oxidation at the terminal (C-3) carbon atom of the propyl groups of Tris-BP yielded the direct-acting mutagen 2-bromoacrolein as the major metabolite that binds to DNA. Although this reactive metabolite also appears to bind to microsomal protein, the rate of binding of radiolabeled Tris-BP to protein is 15-20x greater than binding to DNA, and some metabolites that retain the phosphate group are bound. Studies with deuterated analogs of Tris-BP implicate oxidation at C-2 of the propyl group as a major pathway that leads to protein binding which is enhanced by phenobarbital pretreatment of rats. Moreover, investigations with 18O-Tris-BP and H2(18)O show that Bis-BP that is formed from oxidation of Tris-BP incorporates one atom of oxygen from water. Deuterium isotope studies suggest that most of the Bis-BP arises from initial oxidation at C-2. Taken together these studies indicate that P-450 oxidation of Tris-BP at C-2 of the propyl group yields a reactive alpha-bromoketone metabolite of Tris-BP that can either alkylate proteins directly or be hydrolyzed to Bis-BP and an alpha-bromo-alpha'-hydroxyketone that can alkylate microsomal proteins. PMID:8441997

  13. The effects of localized heating and disbudding on cambial reactivation and formation of earlywood vessels in seedlings of the deciduous ring-porous hardwood, Quercus serrata

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Kayo; Nabeshima, Eri; Begum, Shahanara; Yamagishi, Yusuke; Nakaba, Satoshi; Oribe, Yuichiro; Yasue, Koh; Funada, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The networks of vessel elements play a vital role in the transport of water from roots to leaves, and the continuous formation of earlywood vessels is crucial for the growth of ring-porous hardwoods. The differentiation of earlywood vessels is controlled by external and internal factors. The present study was designed to identify the limiting factors in the induction of cambial reactivation and the differentiation of earlywood vessels, using localized heating and disbudding of dormant stems of seedlings of a deciduous ring-porous hardwood, Quercus serrata. Methods Localized heating was achieved by wrapping an electric heating ribbon around stems. Disbudding involved removal of all buds. Three treatments were initiated on 1 February 2012, namely heating, disbudding and a combination of heating and disbudding, with untreated dormant stems as controls. Cambial reactivation and differentiation of vessel elements were monitored by light and polarized-light microscopy, and the growth of buds was followed. Key Results Cambial reactivation and differentiation of vessel elements occurred sooner in heated seedlings than in non-heated seedlings before bud break. The combination of heating and disbudding of seedlings also resulted in earlier cambial reactivation and differentiation of first vessel elements than in non-heated seedlings. A few narrow vessel elements were formed during heating after disbudding, while many large earlywood vessel elements were formed in heated seedlings with buds. Conclusions The results suggested that, in seedlings of the deciduous ring-porous hardwood Quercus serrata, elevated temperature was a direct trigger for cambial reactivation and differentiation of first vessel elements. Bud growth was not essential for cambial reactivation and differentiation of first vessel elements, but might be important for the continuous formation of wide vessel elements. PMID:24685716

  14. Experimental and Numerical Studies for Soot Formation in Laminar Coflow Diffusion Flames of Jet A-1 and Synthetic Jet Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffaripour, Meghdad

    In the present doctoral thesis, fundamental experimental and numerical studies are conducted for the laminar, atmospheric pressure, sooting, coflow diffusion flames of Jet A-1 and synthetic jet fuels. The first part of this thesis presents a comparative experimental study for Jet A-1, which is a widely used petroleum-based fuel, and four synthetically produced alternative jet fuels. The main goals of this part of the thesis are to compare the soot emission levels of the alternative fuels to those of a standard fuel, Jet A-1, and to determine the effect of fuel chemical composition on soot formation characteristics. To achieve these goals, experimental measurements are constructed and performed for flame temperature, soot concentration, soot particle size, and soot aggregate structure in the flames of pre-vaporized jet fuels. The results show that a considerable reduction in soot production, compared to the standard fuel, can be obtained by using synthetic fuels which will help in addressing future regulations. A strong correlation between the aromatic content of the fuels and the soot concentration levels in the flames is observed. The second part of this thesis presents the development and experimental validation of a fully-coupled soot formation model for laminar coflow jet fuel diffusion flames. The model is coupled to a detailed kinetic mechanism to predict the chemical structure of the flames and soot precursor concentrations. This model also provides information on size and morphology of soot particles. The flames of a three-component surrogate for Jet A-1, a three-component surrogate for a synthetic jet fuel, and pure n-decane are simulated using this model. Concentrations of major gaseous species and flame temperatures are well predicted by the model. Soot volume fractions are predicted reasonably well everywhere in the flame, except near the flame centerline where soot concentrations are underpredicted by a factor of up to five. There is an excellent

  15. Control Capabilities of Reactive Sputter Deposition Process via ICPs Driven by Low-Inductance Antenna for Large-Area Formation of Thin Film Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setsuhara, Yuichi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Ebe, Akinori

    2012-10-01

    Novel plasma-enhanced reactive sputter-deposition system has been developed with a new type of low-inductance antenna (inner-type LIA) consisting of an RF antenna conductor with a length much shorter than the RF wavelength, which is embedded in a hall region dug in the chamber wall and the dielectric window plate for insulation. This new type of the reactive sputter-deposition system has been developed for enhancement of sputter discharge and excellent control of reactivity during film growth. The ICP-enhanced sputter system has been applied to film formations of micro-crystalline silicon (intrinsic layer) and transparent amorphous oxide semiconductor, a-InGaZnO4 (a-IGZO), aiming at low-temperature formation of high-quality functional films for development of next-generation flexible devices. The newly developed process can offer independent control of the flux ratio of the reactive species (ions and radicals) to the deposited species sputtered out of the target. With this new method, micro-crystalline silicon films with crystallinity of 74% and a-IGZO films with mobility as high as 18 cm^2(Vs)-1 have been successfully formed without substrate heating. Furthermore, for development of large-area deposition, uniformity control capabilities with a linear rectangular sputter target with 500 mm length have been examined via variation of power deposition profiles with multiple LIAs.

  16. 3,3'-Dihydroxyisorenieratene prevents UV-induced formation of reactive oxygen species and the release of protein-bound zinc ions in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lutter, Kaya; De Spirt, Silke; Kock, Sebastian; Kröncke, Klaus-Dietrich; Martin, Hans-Dieter; Wagener, Tanja; Stahl, Wilhelm

    2010-02-01

    3,3'-Dihydroxyisorenieratene (DHIR) is a structurally unusual carotenoid exhibiting bifunctional antioxidant properties. It is synthesized by Brevibacterium linens, used in dairy industry for the production of red smear cheeses. The compound protects cellular structures against photo-oxidative damage and inhibits the UV-dependent formation of thymidine dimers. Here we show that DHIR prevents a UV-induced intracellular release of zinc ions from proteins in human dermal fibroblasts. The effect is correlated with a decreased formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. In contrast, zinc release from cellular proteins induced by hyperthermia is not affected by pretreatment of cells with the antioxidant DHIR. It is suggested that the intracellular zinc release upon UV irradiation is due to oxidative modifications of the zinc ligands in proteins (e.g. cysteine) and that protection by DHIR is due to intracellular scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated in photo-oxidation. PMID:19862772

  17. Monitoring of fuel consumption and aromatics formation in a kerosene spray flame as characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Allouis, C; Apicella, B; Barbella, R; Beretta, F; Ciajolo, A; Tregrossi, A

    2003-06-01

    The large presence of aromatic compounds in distillate fossil fuels should allow, in line of principle, to follow the fuel consumption and/or the presence of unburned fuel in a high temperature environment like a burner or the exhaust of combustion systems by exploiting the high fluorescence emission of aromatic fuel components. To this aim an UV-excited fluorescence source has to be used since the aromatic fuel components are strongly fluorescing in the UV region of the emission spectrum. In this work UV-excited laser induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostics was applied to spray flames of kerosene in order to follow the fuel consumption and the formation of aromatic species. A strong UV signal was detected in the spray region of the flame that presented a shape similar to that found in the LIF spectra preliminary measured on the cold spray and in the room-temperature fluorescence of fuel solutions. The decrease of UV signal along the spray flame region was associated to the consumption of the fuel, but more difficult seems to be the attribution of a broad visible emission, that is present downstream of the flame. The visible emission feature could be assigned to flame-formed PAH species contained in the high molecular weight species, hypothesizing that their fluorescence spectra are shifted toward the visible for effect of the high temperature flame environment. PMID:12718975

  18. Shock tube study of the fuel structure effects on the chemical kinetic mechanisms responsible for soot formation, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.; Clary, D. W.; Ramachandra, M. K.

    1985-01-01

    Soot formation in oxidation of allene, 1,3-butadiene, vinylacetylene and chlorobenzene and in pyrolysis of ethylene, vinylacetylene, 1-butene, chlorobenzene, acetylen-hydrogen, benzene-acetylene, benzene-butadiene and chlorobenzene-acetylene argon-diluted mixtures was studied behind reflected shock waves. The results are rationalized within the framework of the conceptual models. It is shown that vinylacetylene is much less sooty than allene, which indicates that conjugation by itself is not a sufficient factor for determining the sooting tendency of a molecule. Structural reactivity in the context of the chemical kinetics is the dominant factor in soot formation. Detailed chemical kinetic modeling of soot formation in pyrolysis of acetylene is reported. The main mass growth was found to proceed through a single dominant route composed of conventional radical reactions. The practically irreversible formation reactions of the fused polycyclic aromatics and the overshoot by hydrogen atom over its equilibrium concentration are the g-driving kinetic forces for soot formation.

  19. Combustion of Various Highly Reactive Fuels in a 3.84- by 10-inch Mach 2 Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Harrison, Jr.; Fletcher, Edward A.

    1959-01-01

    The following fuels and fuel combinations injected from the top wall of a Mach 2 wind tunnel were successfully burned and gave associated pressure rises: aluminum borohydride, pentaborane, mixtures containing up to 41 percent JP-4 fuel in aluminum borohydride, tandem injections of aluminum borohydride, tandem injections of JP-4 fuel and aluminum borohydride, trimethyl aluminum with water injections, and diethyl aluminum hydride with water injections. The following fuels could not be ignited at the tunnel conditions (static pressure, 5.6 in. Hg; static temperature, -148 F): trimethylborane, triethylborane, propylpentaborane, ethyl- decaborane, and vinylsilane. Studies in which the heated region was probed by water injections indicated that the flow downstream of the flame front is subsonic and recirculating.

  20. Fuel injector utilizing non-thermal plasma activation

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, Don M.; Rosocha, Louis A.

    2009-12-01

    A non-thermal plasma assisted combustion fuel injector that uses an inner and outer electrode to create an electric field from a high voltage power supply. A dielectric material is operatively disposed between the two electrodes to prevent arcing and to promote the formation of a non-thermal plasma. A fuel injector, which converts a liquid fuel into a dispersed mist, vapor, or aerosolized fuel, injects into the non-thermal plasma generating energetic electrons and other highly reactive chemical species.

  1. Prediction of in vivo potential for metabolic activation of drugs into chemically reactive intermediate: correlation of in vitro and in vivo generation of reactive intermediates and in vitro glutathione conjugate formation in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Masubuchi, Noriko; Makino, Chie; Murayama, Nobuyuki

    2007-03-01

    The covalent binding of reactive intermediates to macromolecules might have potential involvement in severe adverse drug reactions. Thus, quantification of reactive metabolites is necessary during the early stage of drug discovery to avoid serious toxicity. In this study, the relationship between covalent binding and glutathione (GSH) conjugate formation in rat and human liver microsomes were investigated using 10 representative radioactive compounds that have been reported as hepatotoxic or having other toxicity derived from their reactive intermediates: acetaminophen, amodiaquine, carbamazepine, clozapine, diclofenac, furosemide, imipramine, indomethacin, isoniazid, and tienilic acid, all at a concentration of 10 microM. The GSH conjugate formation rate correlates well with the covalent binding of radioactivity (both rat and human, r2 = 0.93), which suggests that quantification of the GSH conjugate can be used to estimate covalent binding. To quantify the GSH-conjugation rate with non-radiolabeled compounds in vitro, the validation study for the determination of GSH conjugate formation using 35S-GSH by radio-HPLC was useful to predict metabolic activation. Following oral administration of 20 mg/kg of the radiolabeled compounds to rats, radioactivity that covalently bound to plasma and liver proteins was determined. The in vivo maximum covalent binding level in liver based on the free fraction of plasma area under the concentration curve (AUC) and in vitro covalent binding rate was found to correlate well (r2 = 0.79). Therefore, this model for in vitro covalent binding studies in human and rat and in vivo rat studies might be useful in predicting human metabolic activation of compounds. PMID:17309281

  2. Ozone uptake and formation of reactive oxygen intermediates on glassy, semi-solid and liquid organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Steimer, Sarah S.; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Peter, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous and multiphase reactions of ozone are important pathways for chemical ageing of atmospheric organic aerosols (Abbatt, Lee and Thornton, 2012). The effects of particle phase state on the reaction kinetics are still not fully elucidated and cannot be described by classical models assuming a homogeneous condensed phase (Berkemeier et al., 2013). We apply a kinetic multi-layer model, explicitly resolving gas adsorption, condensed phase diffusion and condensed phase chemistry (Shiraiwa et al., 2010), to systematic measurements of ozone uptake onto proxies for secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Our findings show how moisture-induced phase changes affect the gas uptake and chemical transformation of organic matter through change in the physicochemical properties of the substrate: the diffusion coefficients are found to be low under dry conditions, but increase by several orders of magnitude toward higher relative humidity (RH). The solubility of ozone in the dry organic matrix is found to be one order of magnitude higher than in the dilute aqueous solution. The model simulations reveal that at high RH, ozone uptake is mainly controlled by reaction throughout the particle bulk, whereas at low RH, bulk diffusion is retarded severely and reaction at the surface becomes the dominant pathway, with ozone uptake being limited by replenishment of unreacted organic molecules from the bulk phase. The experimental results can only be reconciled including a pathway for ozone self-reaction, which becomes especially important under dry and polluted conditions. Ozone self-reaction can be interpreted as formation and recombination of long-lived reactive oxygen intermediates at the aerosol surface, which could also explain several kinetic parameters and has implications for the health effects of organic aerosol particles. This study hence outlines how kinetic modelling can be used to gain mechanistic insight into the coupling of mass transport, phase changes, and chemical

  3. Experimental investigation of aminoacetonitrile formation through the Strecker synthesis in astrophysical-like conditions: reactivity of methanimine (CH2NH), ammonia (NH3), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danger, G.; Borget, F.; Chomat, M.; Duvernay, F.; Theulé, P.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Le Sergeant D'Hendecourt, L.; Chiavassa, T.

    2011-11-01

    Context. Studing chemical reactivity in astrophysical environments is an important means for improving our understanding of the origin of the organic matter in molecular clouds, in protoplanetary disks, and possibly, as a final destination, in our solar system. Laboratory simulations of the reactivity of ice analogs provide important insight into the reactivity in these environments. Here, we use these experimental simulations to investigate the Strecker synthesis leading to the formation of aminoacetonitrile in astrophysical-like conditions. The aminoacetonitrile is an interesting compound because it was detected in SgrB2, hence could be a precursor of the smallest amino acid molecule, glycine, in astrophysical environments. Aims: We present the first experimental investigation of the formation of aminoacetonitrile NH2CH2CN from the thermal processing of ices including methanimine (CH2NH), ammonia (NH3), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in interstellar-like conditions without VUV photons or particules. Methods: We use Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy to monitor the ice evolution during its warming. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy are then used to identify the aminoacetonitrile formation. Results: We demonstrate that methanimine can react with -CN during the warming of ice analogs containing at 20 K methanimine, ammonia, and [NH4+ -CN] salt. During the ice warming, this reaction leads to the formation of poly(methylene-imine) polymers. The polymer length depend on the initial ratio of mass contained in methanimine to that in the [NH4+ -CN] salt. In a methanimine excess, long polymers are formed. As the methanimine is progressively diluted in the [NH4+ -CN] salt, the polymer length decreases until the aminoacetonitrile formation at 135 K. Therefore, these results demonstrate that aminoacetonitrile can be formed through the second step of the Strecker synthesis in astrophysical-like conditions.

  4. Role of sulfonation in the stability, reactivity, and selectivity of poly(ether imide) used to develop ion exchange membranes: DFT study with application to fuel cells.

    PubMed

    López-Chávez, Ernesto; Peña-Castañeda, Yésica A; de la Portilla-Maldonado, L César; Guzmán-Pantoja, Javier; Martínez-Magadán, José Manuel; Oviedo-Roa, Raúl; de Landa Castillo-Alvarado, Fray; Cruz-Torres, Armando

    2014-07-01

    The design of polymer electrolyte membranes for fuel cells must satisfy two equally important fundamental principles: optimization of the reactivity and the selectivity in order to improve the ion transport properties of the membrane as well as its long-term stability in the hydrated state at high temperature (above 100 °C). A study utilizing density functional theory (DFT) to elucidate the effect of the degree of sulfonation on the chemical stability, reactivity, and selectivity of poly(ether imide) (PEI), which allows the ionic transport properties of the membrane to be predicted, is reported here. Sulfonated poly(ether imide) (SPEI) structures with (-SO3H) n (n = 1-6) groups were built and optimized in order to calculate the above properties as functions of the number of sulfonyl groups. A comparative study demonstrated that the SPEI with four sulfonyl groups in its backbone is the polymer with the properties best suited for use in fuel cells. PMID:24958304

  5. Fundamental Studies of Irradiation-Induced Defect Formation and Fission Product Dynamics in Oxide Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, James

    2012-12-19

    The objective of this research program is to address major nuclear fuels performance issues for the design and use of oxide-type fuels in the current and advanced nuclear reactor applications. Fuel performance is a major issue for extending fuel burn-up which has the added advantage of reducing the used fuel waste stream. It will also be a significant issue with respect to developing advanced fuel cycle processes where it may be possible to incorporate minor actinides in various fuel forms so that they can be 'burned' rather than join the used fuel waste stream. The potential to fission or transmute minor actinides and certain long-lived fission product isotopes would transform the high level waste storage strategy by removing the need to consider fuel storage on the millennium time scale.

  6. Chemical analysis and ozone formation potential of exhaust from dual-fuel (liquefied petroleum gas/gasoline) light duty vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, T. W.; Astorga, C.; Clairotte, M.; Duane, M.; Elsasser, M.; Krasenbrink, A.; Larsen, B. R.; Manfredi, U.; Martini, G.; Montero, L.; Sklorz, M.; Zimmermann, R.; Perujo, A.

    2011-06-01

    Measures must be undertaken to lower the transport sector's contribution to anthropogenic emissions. Vehicles powered by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are an option due to their reduced emissions of air pollutants compared to engines with conventional fuels. In the present study, ten different dual-fuel LPG/gasoline light duty vehicles were tested, which all complied with European emission level legislation EURO-4. Tests with LPG and gasoline were performed on a chassis dynamometer by applying the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and emission factors and ozone formation potentials of both kinds of fuels were compared. The components investigated comprised regulated compounds, CO 2, volatile hydrocarbons and carbonyls. On-line analysis of aromatic species was carried out by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOFMS). We demonstrate that utilization of LPG can entail some environmental benefits by reducing emissions. However, for dual-fuel LPG/gasoline vehicles running on LPG the benefits are less than expected. The main reason is that dual-fuel vehicles usually start the engine up on gasoline even when LPG is selected as fuel. This cold-start phase is crucial for the quality of the emissions. Moreover, we demonstrate an influence on the chemical composition of emissions of vehicle performance, fuel and the evaporative emission system of the vehicles.

  7. Effects of sludge retention times on reactivity of effluent dissolved organic matter for trihalomethane formation in hybrid powdered activated carbon membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Ma, Defang; Gao, Baoyu; Xia, Chufan; Wang, Yan; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Qian

    2014-08-01

    In this study, real municipal wastewater intended for reuse was treated by two identical hybrid PAC/MBRs (membrane bioreactors with powdered activated carbon addition), which were operated at sludge retention times (SRTs) of 30 and 180 days, respectively. In order to investigate the effects of SRT on trihalomethane (THM) formation in chlorinated PAC/MBR effluents, characteristics and THM formation reactivity of effluent dissolved organic matter (EfOM) at different SRTs were examined. PAC/MBR-180 had higher level of EfOM, which contained less simple aromatic proteins and exhibited lower specific UV absorbance. EfOM with molecular weight <5 kDa from PAC/MBR-30 (23%) was lower than PAC/MBR-180 (26%). About 50% of EfOM from PAC/MBR-30 was hydrophobic acids, which was higher than that from PAC/MBR-180 (about 36%). EfOM at SRT 180 days exhibited higher hydrophilicity. Prolonging SRT greatly reduced THM formation reactivity of EfOM, but increased the formation of bromine-containing species during chlorination of PAC/MBR effluents. PMID:24929809

  8. 40 CFR 600.307-86 - Fuel economy label format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy... overstrikes to form a reasonably dark and continuous line that approximates a single large character....

  9. Metabolic activation of tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate to reactive intermediates. II. Covalent binding, reactive metabolite formation, and differential metabolite-specific DNA damage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pearson, P G; Omichinski, J G; Holme, J A; McClanahan, R H; Brunborg, G; Søderlund, E J; Dybing, E; Nelson, S D

    1993-02-01

    to primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects is proposed. The Tris-BP metabolite, Bis-BP, is subsequently metabolized to reactive intermediates that cause DNA damage and bind to kidney proteins in a mechanism independent of cytochrome P-450. PMID:8441998

  10. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, A.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S.; Urbanski, S.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Weise, D. R.

    2012-09-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC), US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4-27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) and ~21% of organic aerosol (mass basis) suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3), aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13-195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The SC results also support an

  11. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, A.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S.; Urbanski, S.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Weise, D. R.

    2013-02-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC), US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4-27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) and ~ 21% of organic aerosol (mass basis) suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3), aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in the first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13-195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~ 20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The SC results also

  12. Formation, reactivity, and aging of ferric oxide particles formed from Fe(II) and Fe(III) sources: Implications for iron bioavailability in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bligh, Mark W.; Waite, T. David

    2011-12-01

    Freshly formed amorphous ferric oxides (AFO) in the water column are potentially highly reactive, but with reactivity declining rapidly with age, and have the capacity to partake in reactions with dissolved species and to be a significant source of bioavailable iron. However, the controls on reactivity in aggregated oxides are not well understood. Additionally, the mechanism by which early rapid aging occurs is not clear. Aging is typically considered in terms of changes in crystallinity as the structure of an iron oxide becomes more stable and ordered with time thus leading to declining reactivity. However, there has been recognition of the role that aggregation can play in determining reactivity, although it has received limited attention. Here, we have formed AFO in seawater in the laboratory from either an Fe(II) or Fe(III) source to produce either AFO(II) or AFO(III). The changes in reactivity of these two oxides following formation was measured using both ligand-promoted dissolution (LPD) and reductive dissolution (RD). The structure of the two oxides was examined using light scattering and X-ray adsorption techniques. The dissolution rate of AFO(III) was greater than that of AFO(II), as measured by both dissolution techniques, and could be attributed to both the less ordered molecular structure and smaller primary particle size of AFO(III). From EXAFS analysis shortly (90 min) following formation, AFO(II) and AFO(III) were shown to have the same structure as aged lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite respectively. Both oxides displayed a rapid decrease in dissolution rate over the first hours following formation in a pattern that was very similar when normalised. The early establishment and little subsequent change of crystal structure for both oxides undermined the hypothesis that increasing crystallinity was responsible for early rapid aging. Also, an aging model describing this proposed process could only be fitted to the data with kinetic parameters that were

  13. In situ formation of graphene layers on graphite surfaces for efficient anodes of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiahuan; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Cai, Xixi; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-09-15

    Graphene can be used to improve the performance of the anode in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) due to its good biocompatibility, high electrical conductivity and large surface area. However, the chemical production and modification of the graphene on the anode are environmentally hazardous because of the use of various harmful chemicals. This study reports a novel method based on the electrochemical exfoliation of a graphite plate (GP) for the in situ formation of graphene layers on the surface of a graphite electrode. When the resultant graphene-layer-based graphite plate electrode (GL/GP) was used as an anode in an MFC, a maximum power density of 0.67 ± 0.034 W/m(2) was achieved. This value corresponds to 1.72-, 1.56- and 1.26-times the maximum power densities of the original GP, exfoliated-graphene-modified GP (EG/GP) and chemically-reduced-graphene-modified GP (rGO/GP) anodes, respectively. Electrochemical measurements revealed that the high performance of the GL/GP anode was attributable to its macroporous structure, improved electron transfer and high electrochemical capacitance. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is a facile and environmentally friendly synthesis technique for the fabrication of high-performance graphene-based electrodes for use in microbial energy harvesting. PMID:25950933

  14. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL TRENDS IN GROUNDWATER CHEMISTRY AND PRECIPITATE FORMATION AT THE ELIZABETH CITY PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accumulation of mineral precipitates and microbial biomass are key factors that impact the long-term performance of PRBs. Both processes can impact remedial performance by affecting zero-valent iron reactivity and permeability. Results will be presented from solid-phase and gro...

  15. Fine ash morphology and aerosol formation: A comparison of coal and biomass fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenevert, Blake Charles

    1998-12-01

    Modeling and experimental methods were used to investigate ash formation mechanisms of four industrially significant high-alkali biomass (sawdust/sanderdust) fuels. Alkali minerals tend to vaporize and recondense to form sub-micron aerosol, which poses health risks and causes special operational problems for industrial combustors. Sawdust/sanderdust was burned in a 15 kW natural gas-fired tunnel furnace. The resulting ash was collected by a water-cooled probe, and size sorted by cascade impaction and Electrical Aerosol Size Analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy techniques were used to determine morphology and composition by size cut. Three ash modes were present: (1) A residual mode composed primarily of porous calcium structures with a scale length of 8 microns and larger. This mode was likely the result of direct oxide and carbonate formation. (2) A secondary residual mode near 2 microns composed of fluxed and fragmented calcium, but also containing significant amounts of Si, Fe, Mn and Al. This mode appeared to be composed of eutectic melts separated from the parent ash particle. (3) An aerosol mode composed of Na and K with Cl anion, or sulfate anion when Cl was not present. The aerosol mode diameter was found to be a function of initial nucleate number density and coagulation time. Long coagulation time or high initial number density resulted in an aerosol mode diameter near 0.1 micron. Modeling was composed of three elements: (1) Equilibrium modeling---These calculations validated experimental evidence for alkali vaporization and condensation, predicting all alkali to enter the vapor phase as NaCl or KCl when Cl is available, or NaOH and KOH otherwise. (2) Condensation modeling---This model was used to determine the partitioning of alkali metal between homogeneous particulate matter formation (self-nucleation) and deposition on existing residual particles. It was shown that vaporized alkali can be collected on the

  16. Comparative study of soot formation on the centerline of axisymmetric laminar diffusion flames: Fuel and temperature effects

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, A.; Littman, M.G.; Glassman, I.

    1987-11-01

    The appearance of soot on the centerline aof axisymmetric laminar diffusion flames has been studied by monitoring (i) the gas temperature by thermocouples; (ii) the soot particle field by laser scattering/extinction; (iii) the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PCAH) by laser induced fluorescence. Four fuels were used: butene, acetylene, butadiene, and benzene. All but one flame were at the smoke height condition and were characterized by different levels of N/sub 2/ dilution aimed at controlling the temperature field. It was observed that (i) soot nucleation occurs at the centerline; (ii) the soot onset on the centerline occurs when a characteristic temperature of 1350K is measured, regardless of fuel type or level of dilution; (iii) butene and benzene have similar fluorescence patterns, in contrast with premixed flame environments. These last two observations are consistent with the proposal that, though the extent of conversion of fuel into soot may significantly change from fuel to fuel, there is a common mechanism of soot formation for all fuels. Results are discussed.

  17. Analysis of liquid water formation in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell flow fields with a dry cathode supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gößling, Sönke; Klages, Merle; Haußmann, Jan; Beckhaus, Peter; Messerschmidt, Matthias; Arlt, Tobias; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Manke, Ingo; Scholta, Joachim; Heinzel, Angelika

    2016-02-01

    PEM fuel cells can be operated within a wide range of different operating conditions. In this paper, the special case of operating a PEM fuel cell with a dry cathode supply and without external humidification of the cathode, is considered. A deeper understanding of the water management in the cells is essential for choosing the optimal operation strategy for a specific system. In this study a theoretical model is presented which aims to predict the location in the flow field at which liquid water forms at the cathode. It is validated with neutron images of a PEM fuel cell visualizing the locations at which liquid water forms in the fuel cell flow field channels. It is shown that the inclusion of the GDL diffusion resistance in the model is essential to describe the liquid water formation process inside the fuel cell. Good agreement of model predictions and measurement results has been achieved. While the model has been developed and validated especially for the operation with a dry cathode supply, the model is also applicable to fuel cells with a humidified cathode stream.

  18. Halogen-induced organic aerosol (XOA) formation and decarboxylation of carboxylic acids by reactive halogen species - a time-resolved aerosol flow-reactor study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, Johannes; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2013-04-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS) are released to the atmosphere from various sources like photo-activated sea-salt aerosol and salt lakes. Recent studies (Cai et al., 2006 and 2008, Ofner et al., 2012) indicate that RHS are able to interact with SOA precursors similarly to common atmospheric oxidizing gases like OH radicals and ozone. The reaction of RHS with SOA precursors like terpenes forms so-called halogen-induced organic aerosol (XOA). On the other hand, RHS are also able to change the composition of functional groups, e.g. to initiate the decarboxylation of carboxylic acids (Ofner et al., 2012). The present study uses a 50 cm aerosol flow-reactor, equipped with a solar simulator to investigate the time-resolved evolution and transformation of vibrational features in the mid-infrared region. The aerosol flow-reactor is coupled to a home-made multi-reflection cell (Ofner et al., 2010), integrated into a Bruker IFS 113v FTIR spectrometer. The reactor is operated with an inlet feed (organic compound) and a surrounding feed (reactive halogen species). The moveable inlet of the flow reactor allows us to vary reaction times between a few seconds and up to about 3 minutes. Saturated vapours of different SOA precursors and carboxylic acids were fed into the flow reactor using the moveable inlet. The surrounding feed inside the flow reactor was a mixture of zero air with molecular chlorine as the precursor for the formation of reactive halogen species. Using this setup, the formation of halogen-induced organic aerosol could be monitored with a high time resolution using FTIR spectroscopy. XOA formation is characterized by hydrogen-atom abstraction, carbon-chlorine bond formation and later, even formation of carboxylic acids. Several changes of the entire structure of the organic precursor, caused by the reaction of RHS, are visible. While XOA formation is a very fast process, the decarboxylation of carboxylic acids, induced by RHS is rather slow. However, XOA formation

  19. PLUVIUS: a generalized one-dimensional model of reactive pollutant behavior, including dry deposition, precipitation formation, and wet removal. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Easter, R.C.; Hales, J.M.

    1984-11-01

    This report is a second-edition user's manual for the PLUVIUS reactive-storm model. The PLUVIUS code simulates the formation of storm systems of a variety of types, and characterizes the behavior of air pollutants as they flow through, react within, and are scavenged by the storms. The computer code supplied with this report is known as PLUVIUS MOD 5.0, and is a substantial improvement over the MOD 3.1 version given in the original user's manual. Example applications of MOD 5.0 are given in the report to facilitate rapid application of the code for a variety of specific uses. 22 references, 7 figures, 48 tables.

  20. Long term deposit formation in aviation turbine fuel at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanetti, A. J.; Szetela, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental characterization is conducted for the relationships between deposit mass, operating time, and temperature, in coking associated with aviation fuels under conditions simulating those typical of turbine engine fuel systems. Jet A and Suntech A fuels were tested in stainless steel tubing heated to 420-750 K, over test durations of between 3 and 730 hr and at fuel velocities of 0.07-1.3 m/sec. Deposit rates are noted to be a strong function of tube temperature; for a given set of test conditions, deposition rates for Suntech A exceed those of Jet A by a factor of 10. Deposition rates increased markedly with test duration for both fuels. The heated tube data obtained are used to develop a global chemical kinetic model for fuel oxidation and carbon deposition.

  1. Is sperm freezability related to the post-thaw lipid peroxidation and the formation of reactive oxygen species in boars?

    PubMed

    Gómez-Fernández, J; Gómez-Izquierdo, E; Tomás, C; Mocé, E; de Mercado, E

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) substances production and the levels of lipid peroxidation of the sperm membrane were related to the quality that the ejaculates exhibited after cryopreservation in boars. Ejaculates from 42 healthy boars were used in this study and they were cryopreserved with the lactose-egg yolk extender (LEY). Several sperm quality parameters were assessed by flow cytometry in samples incubated for 30 and 150 min at 37 °C after thawing: the percentage of sperm with intact plasma membrane (SIPM), intracellular reactive oxygen substances production through mean of DCF fluorescence intensity of total sperm (mean-DCF) and the percentage of viable and non-viable sperm containing oxidized BODIPY (VSOB and NVSOB). In addition, the percentages of total motile (TMS) and progressively motile sperm (PMS) were assessed at the same incubation times with a computer-assisted sperm analysis system. The classification of the ejaculates into good or bad freezers was performed through hierarchical cluster analysis from SIPM and TMS at 150 min post-thawing. The ejaculates of those males classified as good freezers exhibited higher (p < 0.05) SPIM, TMS and PMS than the bad freezers, although both groups presented similar (p > 0.05) VSOB, NVSOB and mean-DCF. Therefore, these results show that lipid peroxidation and the amount of reactive oxygen substances in the sperm after cryopreservation are similar between boars classified as good or bad freezers. PMID:22681414

  2. Formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by repetitive negatively pulsed helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets propagating into humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets have many beneficial effects in their use in surface treatment and, in particular, plasma medicine. One of these benefits is the controlled production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the active discharge through the molecular gases added to the primary noble gas in the input mixture, and through the interaction of reactive species in the plasma effluent with the ambient air. In this computational investigation, a parametric study was performed on the production of RONS in a multiply pulsed atmospheric pressure plasma jet sustained in a He/O2 mixture and flowing into ambient humid air. The consequences of flow rate, O2 fraction, voltage, and repetition rate on reactant densities after a single discharge pulse, after 30 pulses, and after the same total elapsed time were investigated. At the end of the first discharge pulse, voltage has the greatest influence on RONS production. However, the systematic trends for production of RONS depend on repetition rate and flow rate in large part due to the residence time of RONS in the plasma zone. Short residence times result in reactive species produced by the previous pulse still being in the discharge tube or in the path of the ionization wave at the next pulse. The RONS therefore accumulate in the tube and in the near effluent on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This accumulation enables species requiring multiple reactions among the primary RONS species to be produced in greater numbers.

  3. A high-performance direct formate-peroxide fuel cell with palladium-gold alloy coated foam electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinshi; He, Yaling; Yang, Weiwei

    2015-03-01

    We herein report a new type of direct formate fuel cell (DFFC) coupling an alkaline formate anode with an acid peroxide cathode (DFPFC), and its theoretical cell voltage reaches as high as 2.83 V. A proof-of-concept experimental study indicates that when using the as-proposed spontaneous-deposited PdAu foam electrodes, the DFPFC can yield an open-circuit voltage of 1.51 V and a peak power density of 331 mW cm-2 at 60 °C, which are higher than the state-of-the-art anion-exchange membrane DFFC.

  4. Combustion characteristics and air pollutant formation during oxy-fuel co-combustion of microalgae and lignite.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Tahmasebi, Arash; Dou, Jinxiao; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-05-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels is seen as one of the key technologies for carbon capture to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The combustion characteristics of lignite coal, Chlorella vulgaris microalgae, and their blends under O2/N2 and O2/CO2 conditions were studied using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer-Mass Spectroscopy (TG-MS). During co-combustion of blends, three distinct peaks were observed and were attributed to C. vulgaris volatiles combustion, combustion of lignite, and combustion of microalgae char. Activation energy during combustion was calculated using iso-conventional method. Increasing the microalgae content in the blend resulted in an increase in activation energy for the blends combustion. The emissions of S- and N-species during blend fuel combustion were also investigated. The addition of microalgae to lignite during air combustion resulted in lower CO2, CO, and NO2 yields but enhanced NO, COS, and SO2 formation. During oxy-fuel co-combustion, the addition of microalgae to lignite enhanced the formation of gaseous species. PMID:26894568

  5. Fuel constituent effects on fuel reforming properties for fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.; Haynes, D.; Spivey, J.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of different types of compounds commonly found in diesel fuel (e.g., paraffins, naphthenes, and aromatics), as well as their chemical structure (e.g., branched versus linear paraffins) on fuel reforming has been investigated. Diesel reforming is very complicated because diesel is a complex mixture of hundreds of compounds with greatly different reactivities. The syngas production rates at the same conditions were observed in this order: paraffins > naphthenes aromatics. Additionally, the type of reforming performed (OSR, CPOX, or SR) as well as the process parameters (space velocity and reaction temperature) significantly affected the syngas production rates as well as carbon formation. The reactivity of one fuel component can affect the conversion pattern of others, e.g., overall yields from the reforming of a fuel mixture are not additive of yields from individual fuel components, rather the more reactive component is consumed first. Furthermore, the type of substituent in aromatics and naphthenes, the carbon chain length in n-paraffins, branching in paraffins, and degree of aromatic saturation affect the overall hydrocarbon conversion, syngas selectivity, and carbon formation. The presence of sulfur compounds in the fuel caused significant drops in H2 yields compared to CO yields.

  6. Relationships Between Base-Catalyzed Hydrolysis Rates or Glutathione Reactivity for Acrylates and Methacrylates and Their NMR Spectra or Heat of Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Seiichiro; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    The NMR chemical shift, i.e., the π-electron density of the double bond, of acrylates and methacrylates is related to the reactivity of their monomers. We investigated quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs) between the base-catalyzed hydrolysis rate constants (k1) or the rate constant with glutathione (GSH) (log kGSH) for acrylates and methacrylates and the 13C NMR chemical shifts of their α,β-unsaturated carbonyl groups (δCα and δCβ) or heat of formation (Hf) calculated by the semi-empirical MO method. Reported data for the independent variables were employed. A significant linear relationship between k1 and δCβ, but not δCα, was obtained for methacrylates (r2 = 0.93), but not for acrylates. Also, a significant relationship between k1 and Hf was obtained for both acrylates and methacrylates (r2 = 0.89). By contrast, log kGSH for acrylates and methacrylates was linearly related to their δCβ (r2 = 0.99), but not to Hf. These findings indicate that the 13C NMR chemical shifts and calculated Hf values for acrylates and methacrylates could be valuable for estimating the hydrolysis rate constants and GSH reactivity of these compounds. Also, these data for monomers may be an important tool for examining mechanisms of reactivity. PMID:22754331

  7. Simultaneous MS-IR Studies of Surface Formate Reactivity Under Methanol Synthesis Conditions on Cu/SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yong; Mims, Charles A.; Disselkamp, Robert S.; Peden, Charles HF; Campbell, C. T.

    2009-06-09

    The coverages and surface lifetimes of copper-bound formates on Cu/SiO2 catalysts, and the steady-state rates of reverse water-gas shift and methanol synthesis have been measured simultaneously by mass (MS) and infrared (IR) spectroscopies under a variety of elevated pressure conditions at temperatures between 140 and 160°C. DCOO lifetimes under steady state catalytic conditions in CO2:D2 atmospheres were measured by 12C – 13C isotope transients (SSITKA). The values range from 220s at 160°C to 660s at 140°C. The catalytic rates of both reverse water gas shift (RWGS) and methanol synthesis are ~100-fold slower than this formate removal rate back to CO2+1/2 H2, and thus they do not significantly influence the formate lifetime or coverage at steady state. The formate coverage is instead determined by formate’s rapid production / decomposition equilibrium with gas phase CO2+H2. The results are consistent with formate being an intermediate in methanol synthesis, but with the rate-controlling step being after formate production (for example, its further hydrogenation to methoxy). A 2-3 fold shorter life time (faster decomposition rate) was observed for formate under reactions conditions when both D2 and CO2 are present than in pure Ar or D2+Ar alone, attributed to effects of coadsorbates (produced in D2 and CO2) on adsorbed formate reaction pathways. The carbon which appears in the methanol product spends a longer time on the surface than the formate species, 1.8 times as long at 140°C. The additional delay on the surface is attributed in part to readsorption of methanol on the catalyst, thus obscuring the mechanistic link between formate and methanol.

  8. Dynamics of localized charges in dopamine-modified TiO{sub 2} and their effect on the formation of reactive oxygen species.

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrijevic, N.; Rozhkova, E.; Rajh, T.

    2009-03-04

    Modification of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with dopamine enables harvesting of visible light and promotes spatial separation of charges. The formation of reactive oxygen species (OH, {sup 1}O{sub 2}, O{sub 2}{sup -}, HO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) upon illumination of TiO{sub 2}/dopamine was studied using complementary spin-trap EPR and radical-induced fluorescence techniques. The localization of holes on dopamine suppresses oxidation of adsorbed water molecules at the surface of nanoparticles, and thus formation of OH radicals. At the same time, dopamine does not affect electronic properties of photogenerated electrons and their reaction with dissolved oxygen to produce superoxide anions. Superoxide anions are proposed to generate singlet oxygen through dismutation reaction, resulting in a low yield of {sup 1}O{sub 2} detected.

  9. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of environmental barrier coatings for the inhibition of solid deposit formation from heated jet fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Arun Ram

    Solid deposit formation from jet fuel compromises the fuel handling system of an aviation turbine engine and increases the maintenance downtime of an aircraft. The deposit formation process depends upon the composition of the fuel, the nature of metal surfaces that come in contact with the heated fuel and the operating conditions of the engine. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of substrate surfaces on the amount and nature of solid deposits in the intermediate regime where both autoxidation and pyrolysis play an important role in deposit formation. A particular focus has been directed to examining the effectiveness of barrier coatings produced by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on metal surfaces for inhibiting the solid deposit formation from jet fuel degradation. In the first part of the experimental study, a commercial Jet-A sample was stressed in a flow reactor on seven different metal surfaces: AISI316, AISI 321, AISI 304, AISI 347, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Inconel 750X and FecrAlloy. Examination of deposits by thermal and microscopic analysis shows that the solid deposit formation is influenced by the interaction of organosulfur compounds and autoxidation products with the metal surfaces. The nature of metal sulfides was predicted by Fe-Ni-S ternary phase diagram. Thermal stressing on uncoated surfaces produced coke deposits with varying degree of structural order. They are hydrogen-rich and structurally disordered deposits, spherulitic deposits, small carbon particles with relatively ordered structures and large platelets of ordered carbon structures formed by metal catalysis. In the second part of the study, environmental barrier coatings were deposited on tube surfaces to inhibit solid deposit formation from the heated fuel. A new CVD system was configured by the proper choice of components for mass flow, pressure and temperature control in the reactor. A bubbler was designed to deliver the precursor into the reactor

  10. Hot spot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shocked HMX crystals with nanovoids: a large-scale reactive molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tingting; Lou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yangeng; Song, Huajie; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-07-14

    We report million-atom reactive molecular dynamic simulations of shock initiation of β-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (β-HMX) single crystals containing nanometer-scale spherical voids. Shock induced void collapse and subsequent hot spot formation as well as chemical reaction initiation are observed which depend on the void size and impact strength. For an impact velocity of 1 km s(-1) and a void radius of 4 nm, the void collapse process includes three stages; the dominant mechanism is the convergence of upstream molecules toward the centerline and the downstream surface of the void forming flowing molecules. Hot spot formation also undergoes three stages, and the principal mechanism is kinetic energy transforming to thermal energy due to the collision of flowing molecules on the downstream surface. The high temperature of the hot spot initiates a local chemical reaction, and the breakage of the N-NO2 bond plays the key role in the initial reaction mechanism. The impact strength and void size have noticeable effects on the shock dynamical process, resulting in a variation of the predominant mechanisms leading to void collapse and hot spot formation. Larger voids or stronger shocks result in more intense hot spots and, thus, more violent chemical reactions, promoting more reaction channels and generating more reaction products in a shorter duration. The reaction products are mainly concentrated in the developed hot spot, indicating that the chemical reactivity of the hmx crystal is greatly enhanced by void collapse. The detailed information derived from this study can aid a thorough understanding of the role of void collapse in hot spot formation and the chemical reaction initiation of explosives. PMID:27307079

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF CARBON BURNOUT ON SUBMICRON PARTICLE FORMATION FROM EMULSIFIED FUEL OIL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an examination of particle behavior and particle size distributions from the combustion of different fuel oils and emulsified fuels in three experimental combusators. Results indicate that improved carbon (C) burnout from fule oil combustion, either by...

  12. Formation of oxides of nitrogen in monodisperse spray combustion of hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nizami, A. A.; Singh, S.; Cernansky, N. P.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results of exit plane NO/NO(x) emissions from atmospheric monodisperse fuel spray combustion are presented. Six different hydrocarbon fuels were studied: isopropanol, n-propanol, n-octane, iso-octane, n-heptane and methanol. The results indicate an optimum droplet size for minimizing NO/NO(x) production for all of the test fuels. At the optimum droplet diameter, reductions in NO/NO(x) relative to the NO(x) occurred at droplet diameters of 55 and 48 microns respectively, as compared to a 50-micron droplet size for isopropanol. The occurrence of the minimum NO(x) point at different droplet diameters for the different fuels appears to be governed by the extent of prevaporization of the fuel in the spray, and is consistent with theoretical calculations based on each fuel's physical properties. Estimates are also given for the behavior of heavy fuels and of polydisperse fuel sprays in shifting the minimum NO(x) point compared to a monodisperse situation.

  13. Formation of diatomic molecular radicals in reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance discharge and pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Peipei; Li, Yanli; You, Qinghu; Cai, Hua; Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-04-15

    The reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge of N{sub 2} gas and pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target was characterized spectroscopically by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy with space resolution for a study of gas-phase reactions and molecular radical formation in the plasma. The plasma exhibits very high reactivity compared with the plasma generated solely by ECR discharge or by pulsed laser ablation and contains highly excited species originally present in the ambient gaseous environment and directly ablated from the target as well as formed as the products of gas-phase reactions occurring in the plasma. The space distribution and the time evolution of the plasma emission give an access to the gas-phase reactions for the formation of C{sub 2} and CN radicals, revealing that C{sub 2} radicals are formed mainly in the region near the target while CN radicals can be formed in a much larger region not only in the vicinity of the target, but especially in the region near a substrate far away from the target.

  14. Menadione induces the formation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of GSH-mediated apoptosis and inhibits the FAK-mediated cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Jeong; Shin, Yong Kyoo; Sohn, Dong Suep; Lee, Chung Soo

    2014-09-01

    Menadione induces apoptosis in tumor cells. However, the mechanism of apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells exposed to menadione is not clear. In addition, it is unclear whether menadione-induced apoptosis is mediated by the depletion of glutathione (GSH) contents that is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, the effect of menadione on the invasion and migration of human epithelial ovarian cancer cells has not been studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of menadione exposure on apoptosis, cell adhesion, and cell migration using the human epithelial ovarian carcinoma cell lines OVCAR-3 and SK-OV-3. The results suggest that menadione may induce apoptotic cell death in ovarian carcinoma cell lines by activating the mitochondrial pathway and the caspase-8- and Bid-dependent pathways. The apoptotic effect of menadione appears to be mediated by the formation of reactive oxygen species and the depletion of GSH. Menadione inhibited fetal-bovine-serum-induced cell adhesion and migration of OVCAR-3 cells, possibly through the suppression the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-dependent activation of cytoskeletal-associated components. Therefore, menadione might be beneficial in the treatment of epithelial ovarian adenocarcinoma and combination therapy. PMID:24879465

  15. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from 2-Methyl-3-Buten-2-ol Photooxidation: Evidence of Acid-Catalyzed Reactive Uptake of Epoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haofei; Zhang, Zhenfa; Cui, Tianqu; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Bhathela, Neil A.; Ortega, John; Worton, David; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2014-04-08

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) photooxidation has recently been observed in both field and laboratory studies. Similar to isoprene, MBO-derived SOA increases with elevated aerosol acidity in the absence of nitric oxide; therefore, an epoxide intermediate, (3,3-dimethyloxiran-2-yl)methanol (MBO epoxide) was synthesized and tentatively proposed here to explain this enhancement. In the present study, the potential of the synthetic MBO epoxide to form SOA via reactive uptake was systematically examined. SOA was observed only in the presence of acidic aerosols. Major SOA constituents, 2,3-dihydroxyisopentanol (DHIP) and MBO-derived organosulfate isomers, were chemically characterized in both laboratory-generated SOA and in ambient fine aerosols collected from the BEACHON-RoMBAS field campaign during summer 2011, where MBO emissions are substantial. Our results support epoxides as potential products of MBO photooxidation leading to formation of atmospheric SOA and suggest that reactive uptake of epoxides may generally explain acid enhancement of SOA observed from other biogenic hydrocarbons.

  16. Comparative reactivity of the myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants HOCl and HOSCN with low-density lipoprotein (LDL): Implications for foam cell formation in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ismael, Fahd O; Proudfoot, Julie M; Brown, Bronwyn E; van Reyk, David M; Croft, Kevin D; Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterised by the accumulation of lipids within macrophages in the artery wall. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is the source of this lipid, owing to the uptake of oxidised LDL by scavenger receptors. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) released by leukocytes during inflammation produces oxidants that are implicated in atherosclerosis. Modification of LDL by the MPO oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl), results in extensive lipid accumulation by macrophages. However, the reactivity of the other major MPO oxidant, hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) with LDL is poorly characterised, which is significant given that thiocyanate is the favoured substrate for MPO. In this study, we comprehensively compare the reactivity of HOCl and HOSCN with LDL, and show key differences in the profile of oxidative damage observed. HOSCN selectively modifies Cys residues on apolipoprotein B100, and oxidises cholesteryl esters resulting in formation of lipid hydroperoxides, 9-hydroxy-10,12-octadecadienoic acid (9-HODE) and F2-isoprostanes. The modification of LDL by HOSCN results macrophage lipid accumulation, though generally to a lesser extent than HOCl-modified LDL. This suggests that a change in the ratio of HOSCN:HOCl formation by MPO from variations in plasma thiocyanate levels, will influence the nature of LDL oxidation in vivo, and has implications for the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25795019

  17. Thermal formation of hydroxynitriles, precursors of hydroxyacids in astrophysical ice analogs: Acetone ((CH3)2Cdbnd O) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresneau, Aurélien; Danger, Grégoire; Rimola, Albert; Duvernay, Fabrice; Theulé, Patrice; Chiavassa, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    Reactivity in astrophysical environments is still poorly understood. In this contribution, we investigate the thermal reactivity of interstellar ice analogs containing acetone ((CH3)2CO), ammonia (NH3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and water (H2O) by means of infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry techniques, complemented by quantum chemical calculations. We show that no reaction occurs in H2O:HCN:(CH3)2CO ices. Nevertheless, HCN does indeed react with acetone once activated by NH3 into CN- to form 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropanenitrile (HOsbnd C(CH3)2sbnd CN), with a calculated activation energy associated with the rate determining step of about 51 kJ mol-1. This reaction inhibits the formation of 2-aminopropan-2-ol (HOsbnd C(CH3)2sbnd NH2) from acetone and NH3, even in the presence of water, which is the first step of the Strecker synthesis to form 2-aminoisobutyric acid (NH2C(CH3)2COOH). However, HOsbnd C(CH3)2sbnd CN formation could be part of an alternative chemical pathway leading to 2-hydroxy-2-methyl-propanoic acid (HOC(CH3)2COOH), which could explain the presence of hydroxy acids in some meteorites.

  18. REACTIVE FORCE FIELDS FOR Y-DOPED BaZrO3 ELECTROLYTE AND NI-ANODE. POTENTIAL CATHODE MATERIALS FOR APPLICATION IN PROTON CERAMIC FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Boris Merinov; Adri van Duin; Sossina Haile; William A. Goddard III

    2004-10-30

    Based on quantum mechanical data obtained for the Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} electrolyte and Ni-anode Reactive Force Field parameters have been developed for further molecular dynamics simulations of the proton diffusion and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. Electronic and atomic structures of different terminations of the (001) BaZrO{sub 3} surface have been studied using first-principles calculations. Several potential cathode materials for the Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} system were synthesized via glycine nitrate combustion method. Of the five potential cathode materials examined BaZr{sub 0.40}Pr{sub 0.40}Gd{sub 0.20}O{sub 3} and BaZr{sub 0.60}Y{sub 0.20}Co{sub 0.20}O{sub 3} appear to be the most promising for further applications in proton ceramic fuel cells. Fuel cell test of a Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} thin film using platinum ink for both electrodes have been performed. The obtained results shows that a robust method for fabricating crack-free thin membranes, as well as methods for sealing anode and cathode chambers, have successfully been developed.

  19. Reduction of carbon dioxide gas formation at the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell using chemically enhanced solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Michael D.; McCready, Mark J.

    The production of CO 2 gas at the DMFC anode leads to dramatic increases in pumping power requirements and reduced power output because of mass transfer limitations as bubble trains form in the channels of larger stacks. Experimental observations taken in a 5 cm 2 DMFC test cell operated at 60 °C, 1 atm, and with a methanol/water fuel flow rates of 5-10 cm 3 min -1 indicate that the rate of bubble formation can be reduced by increasing the fuel flow because more liquid is available for the CO 2 to dissolve in. Further observations indicate that KOH and LiOH added to the fuel eliminates CO 2 gas formation in situ at low concentrations because of the greatly increased solubility that results. A mathematical model for the volumetric rate of CO 2 gas production that includes effects of temperature and solubility is developed and extended to include the effects of hydroxide ions in solution. The model is used to predict the onset location of gas formation in the flow field as well as the void fraction at any point in the flow field. Predictions from the model agree very well with our experiments. Model predictions explain differences in the initial location of bubble formation for fuel solutions pre-saturated with CO 2 as opposed to CO 2-free solutions. Experiments with KOH and LiOH added to fuel solutions confirm the validity of the model extension that includes solubility that is enhanced by chemical reaction. Experiments with LiOH, KOH, and ammonium hydroxide show that the long-term durability of standard Pt-Ru/Nafion ®/Pt membrane electrode assemblies is compromised because of the presence of lithium, potassium, and ammonium cations that interact with the Nafion ® membrane and result in increasing the ohmic limitations of the polymer electrolyte membrane. Experiments with Ca(OH) 2, while reducing gas formation, precipitate the product CaCO 3 out of solution too rapidly for downstream filtering, blocking channels in the flow field.

  20. Basic combustion and pollutant-formation processes for pulverized fuels. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, 1 July 1981-30 September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Germane, G.J.; Smoot, L.D.

    1981-10-15

    This contract study of basic combustion and pollutant formation processes for pulverized solid fossil fuels includes coal-water mixtures and chars derived from coal pyrolysis, liquefaction or gasification processes. The factors that affect the physical properties of coal-water mixtures (CWM) have been identified and characterization tests initiated to determine how these variables (e.g., solids loading, particle size, particle size distribution, additives) affect the coal slurries. A bench-scale apparatus consisting of a pressure vessel and an atomizing nozzle was designed and is being fabricated. This apparatus will assist in the development of handling and atomization techniques for the combustion tests. It will also aid in comparing viscosities of slurries of different solids loadings and coal types. Chars were obtained for characterization tests. A series of potential tests to characterize the chars was identified. Grading and sizing of the chars was begun as well as elemental analysis. Samples of the chars were sent to Phillips for CO/sub 2/ reactivity tests to be performed. Coding for incorporation of swirling flows into the two-dimensional coal combustion model (PCGC-2) was completed. Debugging was initiated and sample computations are performed for a gaseous, isothermal system for low swirl numbers. Convergence problems were encountered when attempts were made to complete runs at higher swirl numbers.

  1. The metabolism of 17 alpha-ethinyloestradiol by human liver microsomes: formation of catechol and chemically reactive metabolites.

    PubMed

    Purba, H S; Maggs, J L; Orme, M L; Back, D J; Park, B K

    1987-04-01

    The metabolism of 17 alpha-ethinyloestradiol (EE2) to catechol and reactive metabolites by human liver microsomes was investigated. 2-Hydroxyethinyloestradiol (2-OHEE2) was either the sole or principal metabolite. Small amounts of 6-hydroxyethinyloestradiol and 16-hydroxyethinyloestradiol were produced by some of the livers. EE2 (10 microM) underwent substantial (5-20% of incubated drug), though highly variable, NADPH-dependent metabolism to material irreversibly bound to microsomal protein. 2-OHEE2 appeared to be the pro-reactive metabolite. The maximum EE2 2-hydroxylase activity was 0.67 nmol min-1 mg-1 microsomal protein, with a Km value of 8.6 microM. Oestradiol, which is mainly hydroxylated to 2-hydroxyoestradiol, was the most potent inhibitor of hydroxylase activity and exhibited competitive inhibition. Progesterone, which undergoes 2-hydroxylation to a minor extent was also a competitive inhibitor, whereas cholesterol and cortisol did not have any appreciable inhibitory effect. Primaquine was the most potent non-steroidal inhibitor but was non-competitive. Other non-steroidal compounds investigated, e.g. antipyrine, did not show any significant effect on EE2 2-hydroxylation. The results of this study suggest that EE2 2-hydroxylation is metabolised by a form(s) of cytochrome P-450 which has affinity for endogenous steroids. PMID:3555579

  2. Evaluation of Liquid Fuel Spray Models for Hybrid RANS/LES and DLES Prediction of Turbulent Reactive Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar, Ali

    An evaluation of Lagrangian-based, discrete-phase models for multi-component liquid sprays encountered in the combustors of gas turbine engines is considered. In particular, the spray modeling capabilities of the commercial software, ANSYS Fluent, was evaluated. Spray modeling was performed for various cold flow validation cases. These validation cases include a liquid jet in a cross-flow, an airblast atomizer, and a high shear fuel nozzle. Droplet properties including velocity and diameter were investigated and compared with previous experimental and numerical results. Different primary and secondary breakup models were evaluated in this thesis. The secondary breakup models investigated include the Taylor analogy breakup (TAB) model, the wave model, the Kelvin-Helmholtz Rayleigh-Taylor model (KHRT), and the Stochastic secondary droplet (SSD) approach. The modeling of fuel sprays requires a proper treatment for the turbulence. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), large eddy simulation (LES), hybrid RANS/LES, and dynamic LES (DLES) were also considered for the turbulent flows involving sprays. The spray and turbulence models were evaluated using the available benchmark experimental data.

  3. Cenosphere formation from heavy fuel oil: a numerical analysis accounting for the balance between porous shells and internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Vanteru M.; Rahman, Mustafa M.; Gandi, Appala N.; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Schrecengost, Robert A.; Roberts, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) as a fuel in industrial and power generation plants ensures the availability of energy at economy. Coke and cenosphere emissions from HFO combustion need to be controlled by particulate control equipment such as electrostatic precipitators, and collection effectiveness is impacted by the properties of these particulates. The cenosphere formation is a function of HFO composition, which varies depending on the source of the HFO. Numerical modelling of the cenosphere formation mechanism presented in this paper is an economical method of characterising cenosphere formation potential for HFO in comparison to experimental analysis of individual HFO samples, leading to better control and collection. In the present work, a novel numerical model is developed for understanding the global cenosphere formation mechanism. The critical diameter of the cenosphere is modelled based on the balance between two pressures developed in an HFO droplet. First is the pressure (Prpf) developed at the interface of the liquid surface and the inner surface of the accumulated coke due to the flow restriction of volatile components from the interior of the droplet. Second is the pressure due to the outer shell strength (PrC) gained from van der Walls energy of the coke layers and surface energy. In this present study it is considered that when PrC ≥ Prpf the outer shell starts to harden. The internal motion in the shell layer ceases and the outer diameter (DSOut) of the shell is then fixed. The entire process of cenosphere formation in this study is analysed in three phases: regression, shell formation and hardening, and post shell hardening. Variations in pressures during shell formation are analysed. Shell (cenosphere) dimensions are evaluated at the completion of droplet evaporation. The rate of fuel evaporation, rate of coke formation and coke accumulation are analysed. The model predicts shell outer diameters of 650, 860 and 1040 µm, and inner diameters are 360, 410

  4. Role played by paxillin and paxillin tyrosine phosphorylation in hepatocyte growth factor/sphingosine-1-phosphate-mediated reactive oxygen species generation, lamellipodia formation, and endothelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Usatyuk, Peter V.; Jacobson, Jeffrey; Cress, Anne E.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Salgia, Ravi; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Paxillin is a multifunctional and multidomain focal adhesion adaptor protein. It serves as an important scaffolding protein at focal adhesions by recruiting and binding to structural and signaling molecules. Paxillin tyrosine phosphorylation at Y31 and Y118 is important for paxillin redistribution to focal adhesions and angiogenesis. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are potent stimulators of lamellipodia formation, a prerequisite for endothelial cell migration. The role played by paxillin and its tyrosine phosphorylated forms in HGF- or S1P-induced lamellipodia formation and barrier function is unclear. HGF or S1P stimulated lamellipodia formation, tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin at Y31 and Y118, and c-Abl in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). Knockdown of paxillin with small interfering RNA (siRNA) or transfection with paxillin mutants (Y31F or Y118F) mitigated HGF- or S1P-induced lamellipodia formation, translocation of p47phox to lamellipodia, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in HLMVECs. Furthermore, exposure of HLMVECs to HGF or S1P stimulated c-Abl-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin at Y31 and Y118 in a time-dependent fashion, and down-regulation of c-Abl with siRNA attenuated HGF- or S1P-mediated lamellipodia formation, translocation of p47phox to lamellipodia, and endothelial barrier enhancement. In vivo, knockdown of paxillin with siRNA in mouse lungs attenuated ventilator-induced lung injury. Together, these results suggest that c-Abl-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin at Y31 and Y118 regulates HGF- or S1P-mediated lamellipodia formation, ROS generation in lamellipodia, and endothelial permeability. PMID:26697169

  5. Prooxidant action of furanone compounds: implication of reactive oxygen species in the metal-dependent strand breaks and the formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Murakami, K; Haneda, M; Makino, T; Yoshino, M

    2007-07-01

    Prooxidant properties of furanone compounds including 2,5-furanone (furaneol, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-furan-3-one), 4,5-furanone (4,5-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone) (sotolone) and cyclotene (2-hydroxy-3-methyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one) were analyzed in relation to the metal-reducing activity. Only 2.5-furanone known as a "strawberry or pineapple furanone" inactivated aconitase the most sensitive enzyme to active oxygen in the presence of ferrous sulfate, suggesting the furaneol/iron-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species. 2,5-Furanone caused strand scission of pBR322 DNA in the presence of copper. Treatment of calf thymus DNA with 2,5-furanone plus copper produced 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in DNA. 2,5-Furanone showed a potent copper-reducing activity, and thus, DNA strand breaks and the formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine by 2,5-furanone can be initiated by the production of superoxide radical through the reduction of cupric ion to cuprous ion, resulting in the conversion to hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical. However, an isomer and analog of 2,5-furanone, 4,5-furanone and cyclotene, respectively, did not show an inactivation of aconitase, DNA injuries including strand breakage and the formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, and copper-reducing activity. Cytotoxic effect of 2,5-furanone with hydroxyketone structure can be explained by its prooxidant properties: furaneol/transition metal complex generates reactive oxygen species causing the inactivation of aconitase and the formation of DNA base damage by hydroxyl radical. PMID:17316945

  6. 40 CFR 600.307-08 - Fuel economy label format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... appendix IV of this part 600. These types of vehicles may include, but are not limited to battery electric vehicles, fuel cell vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and vehicles equipped with hydrogen internal... hybrid electric vehicles....

  7. Methods and apparatus for burning fuel with low NO sub x formation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.E.; Waibel, R.T.; Rodden, P.M.; Napier, S.O.

    1992-03-24

    This patent describes an improved burner apparatus for discharging a mixture of fuel and air into a furnace space wherein the mixture is burned and flue gases having low NO{sub x} content are formed. It comprises: a housing having an open end attached to the furnace space; means for introducing a controlled quantity of air into the housing and into the furnace space attached to the housing; primary mixer-nozzle means for mixing fuel with flue gases from the furnace space and discharging the resulting mixture into the furnace space disposed within the housing, the primary mixer-nozzle means including a pressurized fuel inlet for connection to a source of pressurized fuel and at least one flue gases inlet connection.

  8. Methods and apparatus for burning fuel with low NO[sub x] formation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.E.; Waibel, R.T.; Rodden, P.M.; Napier, S.O.

    1992-10-13

    This patent describes an improved burner aparatus for discharging a mixture of fuel and air into a furnace space wherein the mixture is burned and flue gases having low NO[sub x] content are formed therefrom. It comprises: A housing; primary mixer-nozzle means; flue gases passageway means; at least one secondary fuel nozzel means. This patent also describes a method of discharging an at least substanitally stoichiometric mixture of fuel and air into a furnace wherein the mixture is burned and flue gases having low NO[sub x] content are formed therefrom. It comprises: discharging air into the furnace; discharging the remaining portion of the fuel into a secondary zone.

  9. Investigation of spray dispersion and particulate formation in diesel fuel flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Bankston, C. P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Bellan, J.; Harstad, K.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study of electrostatical atomized and dispersed diesel fuel jets was conducted at various back pressures to 40 atm. A new electrostatic injection technique was utilized to generate continuous, stable fuel sprays at charge densities of 1.5 to 2.0 C/m3 of fluid at one atm, and about 1.0 C/m3 at 40 atm. Flowrates were varied from 0.5 to 2.5 ml/s and electric potentials to -18 kV. Visual observations showed that significant enhanced dispersion of charged fuel jets occurred at high back pressures compared to aerodynamic breakup and dispersion. The average drop size was about the same as the spray triode orifice diameter, and was between the Kelly theory and the Rayleigh limit. The ignition tests, done only at one atm, indicated stable combustion of the electrostatically dispersed fuel jets.

  10. LIFE Materials: Phase Formation and Transformations in Transmutation Fuel Materials for the LIFE Engine Part I - Path Forward Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P A; Kaufman, L; Fluss, M

    2008-12-19

    The current specifications of the LLNL fusion-fission hybrid proposal, namely LIFE, impose severe constraints on materials, and in particular on the nuclear fissile or fertile nuclear fuel and its immediate environment. This constitutes the focus of the present report with special emphasis on phase formation and phase transformations of the transmutation fuel and their consequences on particle and pebble thermal, chemical, and mechanical integrities. We first review the work that has been done in recent years to improve materials properties under the Gen-IV project, and with in particular applications to HTGR and MSR, and also under GNEP and AFCI in the USA. Our goal is to assess the nuclear fuel options that currently exist together with their issues. Among the options, it is worth mentioning TRISO, IMF, and molten salts. The later option will not be discussed in details since an entire report (Volume 8 - Molten-salt Fuels) is dedicated to it. Then, in a second part, with the specific LIFE specifications in mind, the various fuel options with their most critical issues are revisited with a path forward for each of them in terms of research, both experimental and theoretical. Since LIFE is applicable to very high burn-up of various fuels, distinctions will be made depending on the mission, i.e., energy production or incineration. Finally a few conclusions are drawn in terms of the specific needs for integrated materials modeling and the in depth knowledge on time-evolution thermo-chemistry that controls and drastically affects the performance of the nuclear materials and their immediate environment. Although LIFE demands materials that very likely have not yet been fully optimized, the challenges are not insurmountable, and a well concerted experimental-modeling effort should lead to dramatic advances that should well serve other fission programs such as Gen-IV, GNEP, AFCI as well as the international fusion program, ITER.

  11. Primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol formation from the exhaust of a flex-fuel (ethanol) vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Bertoa, R.; Zardini, A. A.; Platt, S. M.; Hellebust, S.; Pieber, S. M.; El Haddad, I.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Baltensperger, U.; Marchand, N.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Astorga, C.

    2015-09-01

    Incentives to use biofuels may result in increasing vehicular emissions of compounds detrimental to air quality. Therefore, regulated and unregulated emissions from a Euro 5a flex-fuel vehicle, tested using E85 and E75 blends (gasoline containing 85% and 75% of ethanol (vol/vol), respectively), were investigated at 22 and -7 °C over the New European Driving Cycle, at the Vehicle Emission Laboratory at the European Commission Joint Research Centre Ispra, Italy. Vehicle exhaust was comprehensively analyzed at the tailpipe and in a dilution tunnel. A fraction of the exhaust was injected into a mobile smog chamber to study the photochemical aging of the mixture. We found that emissions from a flex-fuel vehicle, fueled by E85 and E75, led to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, despite the low aromatic content of these fuel blends. Emissions of regulated and unregulated compounds, as well as emissions of black carbon (BC) and primary organic aerosol (POA) and SOA formation were higher at -7 °C. The flex-fuel unregulated emissions, mainly composed of ethanol and acetaldehyde, resulted in very high ozone formation potential and SOA, especially at low temperature (860 mg O3 km-1 and up to 38 mg C kg-1). After an OH exposure of 10 × 106 cm-3 h, SOA mass was, on average, 3 times larger than total primary particle mass emissions (BC + POA) with a high O:C ratio (up to 0.7 and 0.5 at 22 and -7 °C, respectively) typical of highly oxidized mixtures. Furthermore, high resolution organic mass spectra showed high 44/43 ratios (ratio of the ions m/z 44 and m/z 43) characteristic of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol. We also hypothesize that SOA formation from vehicular emissions could be due to oxidation products of ethanol and acetaldehyde, both short-chain oxygenated VOCs, e.g. methylglyoxal and acetic acid, and not only from aromatic compounds.

  12. Reactive Uptake of Ammonia and Formation of Organic Nitrogen Species for Non-Liquid/Liquid Secondary Organic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. T.; Li, Y.; Liu, P.

    2015-12-01

    Formation of ammonium and organic nitrogen (ON) species was studied for secondary organic material (SOM) of variable viscosity, ranging from non-liquid to liquid physical states. The SOM was produced as particles of 50 to 150 nm in diameter in aerosol form from six precursors, including three terpenoid and three aromatic species. The viscosity of the hygroscopic SOM was adjusted by exposure to relative humidity (RH) from <5% to >90% RH in steps of 10% at 293 ± 2 K. The aerosol was subsequently exposed to 5 ppm NH3 for mean reaction times of 30, 370, or 5230 s. Ammonium and ON were characterized by high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-AMS). The ammonium-to-organic ratio of mass concentrations (MNH4/MOrg) in the particles increased monotonically from <5% RH to a limiting value at a threshold RH, implicating a switchover in the reaction kinetics from a system limited by diffusivity within the SOM for low RH to one limited by other factors, such as saturated uptake, at higher RH. Formation of ON was observed for aromatic-derived SOMs, but not significant for terpenoid-derived SOMs. For aromatic-derived SOMs, the ON-to-organic ratio of mass concentrations (MON/MOrg) was negligible for RH <20%, increased monotonically from 20% to 60% RH, and stayed constant for RH >60%. The threshold RH for the switchover from kinetically controlled regime to a non-kinetically-controlled one was thus different between formation of ammonium and ON. This difference suggests that water may play a role in the slow reactions of ON formation as a reactant or a catalyst, in addition to affecting the reactant diffusion as in the fast reaction of ammonium formation. The implication is that formation of ammonium salts and organic nitrogen species by certain SOMs should be treated separately in chemical transport models to reflect the different roles of water that may affect the phase state of the SOMs or may act as a reactant or a catalyst.

  13. Reactive oxygen species at the oxide/water interface: Formation mechanisms and implications for prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Sahai, Nita; Eggleston, Carrick M.; Schoonen, Martin A. A.

    2013-02-01

    The goal of our study is to identify free radical formation pathways on mineral surfaces. Organic molecules on early Earth might have been modified or decomposed by such pathways, thus affecting the total organic inventory for prebiotic synthesis reactions. Specifically, we evaluated several common oxide minerals under a range of environmental conditions and combinations of conditions (pH, O2 level, UV-wavelength, and particle loading), for formation of highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the oxide surfaces by quantifying the generated [OHrad ] and [H2O2]. We identified anatase/rutile (β-TiO2/α-TiO2) and hematite (α-Fe2O3) as active in ROS production and, importantly, found different dominant pathways for ROS formation on anatase/rutile versus hematite. Hydroxyl radicals (OHrad ) in anatase and rutile suspensions were generated mainly through the oxidation of OH- by photo-generated holes and H2O2 was generated through the combination of an OHrad radical with an OH- and a hole. This pathway for the TiO2 phases did not require the presence of O2, and was not shut down under anaerobic conditions. In contrast, formation of H2O2 and OHrad in hematite suspensions involved reduction of O2 by electrons, which was inhibited under anaerobic conditions. The surface ROS as well as free radicals formed by reactions with other gases on early Earth atmosphere were capable of destroying molecules such as lipids and pre-RNA or RNA essential to assembly of protocells and survival of the earliest cells. At the same time, surface associated ROS and other free radicals may also have promoted aminoamide formation. Thus, the surface ROS would have affected prebiotic organic compound inventory and protocell/early life evolution.

  14. Formation of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites in human liver microsomes, S9 fraction, HepaRG-cells, and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Toni; Rousu, Timo; Mattila, Sampo; Chesné, Christophe; Pelkonen, Olavi; Turpeinen, Miia; Tolonen, Ari

    2015-11-10

    The objective was to compare several in vitro human liver-derived subcellular and cellular incubation systems for the formation of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites. Incubations of pooled human liver microsomes, human liver S9 fractions, HepaRG-cells, and human hepatocytes were performed with glutathione as a trapping agent. Experiments with liver S9 were performed under two conditions, using only NADPH and using a full set of cofactors enabling also conjugative metabolism. Ten structurally different compounds were used as a test set, chosen as either "positive" (ciprofloxacin, clozapine, diclofenac, ethinyl estradiol, pulegone, and ticlopidine) or "negative" (caffeine, citalopram, losartan, montelukast) compounds, based on their known adverse reactions on liver or bone marrow. GSH conjugates were observed for seven of the ten compounds; while no conjugates were observed for caffeine, citalopram, or ciprofloxacin. Hepatocyte and HepaRG assays produced a clearly lower number and lower relative abundance of GSH conjugates compared to assays with microsomes and S9 fractions. The major GSH conjugates were different for many compounds in cellular subfractions and cell-based systems. Hepatocytes generally produced a higher number of GSH conjugates than HepaRG cells, although the differences were minor. The results show that the hepatic enzyme system used for screening of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites do have a high impact on the results, and results between different systems are comparable only qualitatively. PMID:26263063

  15. Novel studies on the formation and chemical reactivity of compound clusters and their precursors in the gas and liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, James Adam Ferguson

    Presented are four separate and unique studies on molecular and nanoscale systems: Atmospheric hydration and aggregation of NaCl clusters, highly water-soluble aurous-thiolate oligomers, water-soluble gold clusters from aurous-thiolate oligomer precursors, and gold iodide clusters. Adsorption of water on cationic and anionic sodium chloride clusters is investigated to elucidate active sites of molecular interaction as well as primary aggregate formation kinetics. Considered an exceptionally abundant atmospheric species, experiments are conducted to further quantify gas phase chemistry and hydration/solvation of alkali halides. Currently the most soluble of all known gold-thiolates, para-mercaptobenzoic acid-based (pMBA) aurous-thiolate oligomers are investigated and physical and chemical properties quantified. Solubility, structural conformation, and poly-dispersity of higher homologs are observed with the goal of further applications in clusters research, medical and biomedical, and industry. Gold thiolate clusters, synthesized using pMBA-based oligomers, are investigated through reductive formation in solution. UV-VIS and UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy is undertaken to assign structures based on predictions of the HOMO-LUMO gap and other electronic transitions. Gold iodide is investigated in relation to the common thiolate-halide analogy. Synthesis and characterization of a solid precursor as well as anion and cation cluster formation is presented as part of an ongoing collaboration.

  16. Structure and formation kinetics of MoSi{sub 2} composites formed by reactive vapor infiltration process

    SciTech Connect

    Hillig, W.B.; Broglio, M.; Ramakrishnan, R.M.; Patibandla, N.

    1995-10-01

    Reactive Vapor Infiltration is a convenient new process for producing high purity MoSi{sub 2} matrix composites by reacting compacted mixed Mo + MoSi{sub 2} powders ranging from 0 to 80 wt. % MoSi{sub 2} with H{sub 2} + SiCl{sub 4} vapors at temperatures from 1,000 to 1,400 C. Consideration must be taken of the volumetric increase that accompanies this conversion. The kinetics of the advance of the MoSi{sub 2} growth layer and the gravimetric uptake are given as a function of temperature and the composition. The parabolic growth rate constant was independent of composition at least up to 30% MoSi{sub 2} composition, but then showed a strong, linear increase with increasing MoSi{sub 2} content. There appeared to be a leveling off of rate above 70% MoSi{sub 2}. The corresponding gravimetric rate constant was relatively insensitive to the starting MoSi{sub 2} content. This behavior is at variance with a simple one-dimensional diffusive growth model. Possible reasons for this variance are offered.

  17. How covalent heme to protein bonds influence the formation and reactivity of redox intermediates of a bacterial peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Auer, Markus; Nicolussi, Andrea; Schütz, Georg; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The most striking feature of mammalian peroxidases, including myeloperoxidase and lactoperoxidase (LPO) is the existence of covalent bonds between the prosthetic group and the protein, which has a strong impact on their (electronic) structure and biophysical and chemical properties. Recently, a novel bacterial heme peroxidase with high structural and functional similarities to LPO was described. Being released from Escherichia coli, it contains mainly heme b, which can be autocatalytically modified and covalently bound to the protein by incubation with hydrogen peroxide. In the present study, we investigated the reactivity of these two forms in their ferric, compound I and compound II state in a multi-mixing stopped-flow study. Upon heme modification, the reactions between the ferric proteins with cyanide or H2O2 were accelerated. Moreover, apparent bimolecular rate constants of the reaction of compound I with iodide, thiocyanate, bromide, and tyrosine increased significantly and became similar to LPO. Kinetic data are discussed and compared with known structure-function relationships of the mammalian peroxidases LPO and myeloperoxidase. PMID:25246525

  18. UVA Photoirradiation of Nitro-Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons—Induction of Reactive Oxygen Species and Formation of Lipid Peroxides †

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qingsu; Yin, Jun J.; Zhao, Yuewei; Wu, Yuh-Sen; Wang, Yu-Qui; Ma, Liang; Chen, Shoujun; Sun, Xin; Fu, Peter P.; Yu, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) are a class of genotoxic environmental contaminants. We have long been interested in determining the mechanisms by which nitro-PAHs induce genotoxicity. Although the metabolic activation of nitro-PAHs leading to toxicological activities has been well studied, the photo-induced activation of nitro-PAHs has seldom been reported. In this paper, we report photo-induced lipid peroxidation by 19 nitro-PAHs. The results indicated that all but two of the nitro-PAHs can induce lipid peroxidation. Mechanistic studies suggest that lipid peroxidation by nitro-PAHs is mediated by free radicals generated in the reaction. There was no structural correlation between the nitro-PAHs and their ability to induce lipid peroxidation upon UVA irradiation, or between the HOMO-LUMO gap and the ability to cause lipid peroxidation. Most of the nitro-PAHs are less potent in terms of causing lipid peroxidation than their parent PAHs. The lack of correlation is attributed to the complex photophysics and photochemistry of the nitro-PAHs and the yield of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other factors. PMID:23493032

  19. How Covalent Heme to Protein Bonds Influence the Formation and Reactivity of Redox Intermediates of a Bacterial Peroxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Markus; Nicolussi, Andrea; Schütz, Georg; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The most striking feature of mammalian peroxidases, including myeloperoxidase and lactoperoxidase (LPO) is the existence of covalent bonds between the prosthetic group and the protein, which has a strong impact on their (electronic) structure and biophysical and chemical properties. Recently, a novel bacterial heme peroxidase with high structural and functional similarities to LPO was described. Being released from Escherichia coli, it contains mainly heme b, which can be autocatalytically modified and covalently bound to the protein by incubation with hydrogen peroxide. In the present study, we investigated the reactivity of these two forms in their ferric, compound I and compound II state in a multi-mixing stopped-flow study. Upon heme modification, the reactions between the ferric proteins with cyanide or H2O2 were accelerated. Moreover, apparent bimolecular rate constants of the reaction of compound I with iodide, thiocyanate, bromide, and tyrosine increased significantly and became similar to LPO. Kinetic data are discussed and compared with known structure-function relationships of the mammalian peroxidases LPO and myeloperoxidase. PMID:25246525

  20. Metformin prevents ischemia reperfusion-induced oxidative stress in the fatty liver by attenuation of reactive oxygen species formation.

    PubMed

    Cahova, Monika; Palenickova, Eliska; Dankova, Helena; Sticova, Eva; Burian, Martin; Drahota, Zdenek; Cervinkova, Zuzana; Kucera, Otto; Gladkova, Christina; Stopka, Pavel; Krizova, Jana; Papackova, Zuzana; Oliyarnyk, Olena; Kazdova, Ludmila

    2015-07-15

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with chronic oxidative stress. In our study, we explored the antioxidant effect of antidiabetic metformin on chronic [high-fat diet (HFD)-induced] and acute oxidative stress induced by short-term warm partial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) or on a combination of both in the liver. Wistar rats were fed a standard diet (SD) or HFD for 10 wk, half of them being administered metformin (150 mg·kg body wt(-1)·day(-1)). Metformin treatment prevented acute stress-induced necroinflammatory reaction, reduced alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase serum activity, and diminished lipoperoxidation. The effect was more pronounced in the HFD than in the SD group. The metformin-treated groups exhibited less severe mitochondrial damage (markers: cytochrome c release, citrate synthase activity, mtDNA copy number, mitochondrial respiration) and apoptosis (caspase 9 and caspase 3 activation). Metformin-treated HFD-fed rats subjected to I/R exhibited increased antioxidant enzyme activity as well as attenuated mitochondrial respiratory capacity and ATP resynthesis. The exposure to I/R significantly increased NADH- and succinate-related reactive oxygen species (ROS) mitochondrial production in vitro. The effect of I/R was significantly alleviated by previous metformin treatment. Metformin downregulated the I/R-induced expression of proinflammatory (TNF-α, TLR4, IL-1β, Ccr2) and infiltrating monocyte (Ly6c) and macrophage (CD11b) markers. Our data indicate that metformin reduces mitochondrial performance but concomitantly protects the liver from I/R-induced injury. We propose that the beneficial effect of metformin action is based on a combination of three contributory mechanisms: increased antioxidant enzyme activity, lower mitochondrial ROS production, and reduction of postischemic inflammation. PMID:26045616

  1. Light-independent reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation through electron transfer from carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes in water.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hsin-Se; Wu, Renren; Jafvert, Chad T

    2014-10-01

    Promising developments in application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have raised concern regarding potential biological and environmental effects upon their inevitable release to the environment. Although some CNTs have been reported to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under light, limited information exists on ROS generation by these materials in the dark. In this study, generation of ROS was examined, initiated by electron transfer from biological electron donors through carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (C-SWCNT) to molecular oxygen in water in the dark. In the presence of C-SWCNT, the oxidation of NADH (β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form) and DTTre (DL-dithiothreitol, reduced form) was confirmed by light absorbance shifts (340 nm to 260 nm during oxidation of NADH to NAD(+), and increased light absorbance at 280 nm during oxidation of DTTre). Production of superoxide anion (O2(•-)) was detected by its selective reaction with a tetrazolium salt (NBT(2+)), forming a formazan product that is visible at 530 nm. A modified acid-quenched N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPD) assay was used to measure the accumulation of H2O2 in C-SWCNT suspensions containing O2 and NADH. In the same suspensions (i.e., containing C-SWCNT, NADH, and O2), pBR322 DNA plasmid was cleaved, although •OH was not detected when using •OH scavenging molecular probes. These results indicate that the oxidation of electron donors by C-SWCNT can be a light-independent source of ROS in water, and that electron shuttling through CNTs to molecular oxygen may be a potential mechanism for DNA damage by this specific CNT and potentially other carbon-based nanomaterials. PMID:25171301

  2. Formation, characterization, and dynamics of onion-like carbon structures for electrical energy storage from nanodiamonds using reactive force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesh, P.; Kent, P. R. C.; Mochalin, V.

    2011-10-01

    We simulate the experimentally observed graphitization of nanodiamonds into multi-shell onion-like carbonnanostructures, also called carbon onions, at different temperatures, using reactive force fields. The simulations include long-range Coulomb and van der Waals interactions. Our results suggest that long-range interactions play a crucial role in the phase-stability and the graphitization process. Graphitization is both enthalpically and entropically driven and can hence be controlled with temperature. The outer layers of the nanodiamond have a lower kinetic barrier toward graphitization irrespective of the size of the nanodiamond and graphitize within a few-hundred picoseconds, with a large volume increase. The inner core of the nanodiamonds displays a large size-dependent kinetic barrier, and graphitizes much more slowly with abrupt jumps in the internal energy. It eventually graphitizes by releasing pressure and expands once the outer shells have graphitized. The degree of transformation at a particular temperature is thereby determined by a delicate balance between the thermal energy, long-range interactions, and the entropic/enthalpic free energy gained by graphitization. Upon full graphitization, a multi-shell carbonnanostructure appears, with a shell-shell spacing of about ~3.4 Å for all sizes. The shells are highly defective with predominantly five- and seven-membered rings to curve space. Larger nanodiamonds with a diameter of 4 nm can graphitize into spiral structures with a large (~29-atom carbon ring) pore opening on the outermost shell. Such a large one-way channel is most attractive for a controlled insertion of molecules/ions such as Li ions, water, or ionic liquids, for increased electrochemical capacitor or battery electrode applications.

  3. Formation, characterization and dynamics of onion like carbon structures from nanodiamonds using reactive force-fields for electrical energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    We simulate the experimentally observed graphitization of nanodiamonds into multi-shell onion-like carbon nanostructures, also called carbon onions, at different temperatures, using reactive force fields. The simulations include long-range Coulomb and van der Waals interactions. Our results suggest that long-range interactions play a crucial role in the phase-stability and the graphitization process. Graphitization is both enthalpically and entropically driven and can hence be controlled with temperature. The outer layers of the nanodiamond have a lower kinetic barrier toward graphitization irrespective of the size of the nanodiamond and graphitize within a few-hundred picoseconds, with a large volume increase. The inner core of the nanodiamonds displays a large size-dependent kinetic barrier, and graphitizes much more slowly with abrupt jumps in the internal energy. It eventually graphitizes by releasing pressure and expands once the outer shells have graphitized. The degree of transformation at a particular temperature is thereby determined by a delicate balance between the thermal energy, long-range interactions, and the entropic/enthalpic free energy gained by graphitization. Upon full graphitization, a multi-shell carbon nanostructure appears, with a shell-shell spacing of about {approx}3.4 {angstrom} for all sizes. The shells are highly defective with predominantly five- and seven-membered rings to curve space. Larger nanodiamonds with a diameter of 4 nm can graphitize into spiral structures with a large ({approx}29-atom carbon ring) pore opening on the outermost shell. Such a large one-way channel is most attractive for a controlled insertion of molecules/ions such as Li ions, water, or ionic liquids, for increased electrochemical capacitor or battery electrode applications.

  4. FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS FROM RESIDUAL FUEL OIL COMBUSTION: CHARACTERIZATION AND MECHANISMS OF FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a comparison of the characteristics of particulate matter (PM) emitted from residual fuel oil combustion in two types of combustion equipment. A small commercial 732-kW-rated fire-tube boiler yielded a weakly bimodal PM size distribution (PSD) with over...

  5. FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS FROM RESIDUAL FUEL OIL COMBUSTION: CHARACTERIZATION AND MECHANISMS OF FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a comparison of the characteristics of particulate matter (PM) emitted from residual fuel oil combustion in two types of combustion equipment. A small commercial 732-kW fire-tube boiler yielded a weakly bi-modal particulate size distribution (PSD) with...

  6. Studies of the formation, chemical reactivity, and properties of small clusters: Application to an understanding of aerosol formation and heterogeneous chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The small cluster program involves (1) studies of reactions related to formation and growth of heteromolecular clusters and their thermochemical properties, (2) studies of photoinitiated processes in clusters, (3) investigations related to heterogeneous reactions including the influence of reaction centers on the interconversion, and (4) theoretical calculations of properties, dynamics, and structure. A major thrust of the work during the past year has been devoted to a study of the role of ionization and the presence of ions on reactions and energetics. During the past few months, particular attention has been paid to systems having varying proton affinities. From the data, we can determine the influence of these values on the nature of the reactions and ascertain the ultimate chemical nature of the ionization center formed as a result of the reactions. 83 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Redox Reactivity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Induces the Formation of Disulfide Bridges in Thiol-Containing Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Rollin-Genetet, Françoise; Seidel, Caroline; Artells, Ester; Auffan, Mélanie; Thiéry, Alain; Vidaud, Claude

    2015-12-21

    The redox state of disulfide bonds is implicated in many redox control systems, such as the cysteine-cystine couple. Among proteins, ubiquitous cysteine-rich metallothioneins possess thiolate metal binding groups susceptible to metal exchange in detoxification processes. CeO2 NPs are commonly used in various industrial applications due to their redox properties. These redox properties that enable dual oxidation states (Ce(IV)/Ce(III)) to exist at their surface may act as oxidants for biomolecules. The interaction among metallothioneins, cysteine, and CeO2 NPs was investigated through various biophysical approaches to shed light on the potential effects of the Ce(4+)/Ce(3+) redox system on the thiol groups of these biomolecules. The possible reaction mechanisms include the formation of a disulfide bridge/Ce(III) complex resulting from the interaction between Ce(IV) and the thiol groups, leading to metal unloading from the MTs, depending on their metal content and cluster type. The formation of stable Ce(3+) disulfide complexes has been demonstrated via their fluorescence properties. This work provides the first evidence of thiol concentration-dependent catalytic oxidation mechanisms between pristine CeO2 NPs and thiol-containing biomolecules. PMID:26566067

  8. Simulated Performance of the Integrated Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity and Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry Detector Designed for Spent Fuel Measurement at the Fugen Reactor in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II; Lafleur, Adrienne M.; Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Seya, Michio; Bolind, Alan M.

    2012-07-16

    An integrated nondestructive assay instrument, which combined the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) and the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) techniques, is the research focus for a collaborative effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative. We will quantify the anticipated performance of this experimental system in two physical environments: (1) At LANL we will measure fresh Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) assemblies for which the average enrichment can be varied from 0.2% to 3.2% and for which Gd laced rods will be included. (2) At Fugen we will measure spent Mixed Oxide (MOX-B) and LEU spent fuel assemblies from the heavy water moderated Fugen reactor. The MOX-B assemblies will vary in burnup from {approx}3 GWd/tHM to {approx}20 GWd/tHM while the LEU assemblies ({approx}1.9% initial enrichment) will vary from {approx}2 GWd/tHM to {approx}7 GWd/tHM. The estimated count rates will be calculated using MCNPX. These preliminary results will help the finalization of the hardware design and also serve a guide for the experiment. The hardware of the detector is expected to be fabricated in 2012 with measurements expected to take place in 2012 and 2013. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  9. Titanium oxynitride films for a bipolar plate of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell prepared by inductively coupled plasma assisted reactive sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. Y.; Han, D. H.; Kim, J. N.; Lee, J. J.

    Titanium oxynitride (TiN xO y) films are investigated for application as a bipolar plate coating material in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). TiN xO y films with various amounts of oxygen are deposited on stainless-steel substrates by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) assisted reactive sputtering by changing the oxygen gas flow rate. The interfacial contact resistance (ICR) and the corrosion resistance of the TiN xO y films are measured under PEMFC simulated conditions. When the amount of oxygen in the TiN xO y film is approximately <12 at.% (O 2 flow rate ≤0.2 sccm), the corrosion resistance is enhanced considerably, whereas the interfacial contact resistance does not change. The corrosion current density decreases from 8 × 10 -6 A cm -2 for the TiN-coated sample to 2.7 × 10 -6 A cm -2 at 0.6 V vs. SCE as a result of oxygen incorporation in the TiN film. The ICR value remains at 2.5 mΩ cm 2 at 150 N cm -2. When a small amount of oxygen is added to the TiN film, it is postulated that the oxygen atoms locate at the column and grain boundaries, and thus prevent corrosive media from penetrating into the substrate while not deteriorating the electrical property of the film.

  10. Reactive overprint of the Central Indian Ridge mantle and formation of hybrid troctolites: reassessing the significance of bulk oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfilippo, A.; Morishita, T.; Kumagai, H.; Nakamura, K.; Okino, K.; Tamura, A.; Arai, S.

    2014-12-01

    The idea that hybridized mantle rocks can contribute to the oceanic crust composition has recently emerged thanks to studies on primitive (olivine-rich) troctolites [e.g. 1]. These rocks are considered to be formed by melt-rock interaction, but the exact reaction process by which they originate is still debated and their role on the bulk oceanic crust composition has been never defined. Olivine-rich troctolites have been mostly found at slow spreading ridges [2] or at their fossil analogues [3]. Similar rocks have been recently collected in the 25ºS area of the intermediate spreading Central Indian Ridge (CIR), and rarely characterize the crust mantle boundary at fast spreading ridges [4]. We show that textural and chemical inheritances of the pre-existing mantle are preserved in the CIR troctolites. In particular, the local occurrence of granular, mantle-derived orthopyroxenes and the composition of the associated clinopyroxene indicate that these crustal rocks formed through a direct (one-stage) conversion of a mantle peridotite. We use chemical evidence to infer the same origin of the olivine-rich troctolites worldwide, concluding that the reactive overprint of the oceanic mantle is a process diffused over the entire spreading rate spectrum. Bulk oceanic crust estimates of the Hess Deep (Pacific) and Atlantis Massif (Atlantic) crustal sections are used to quantify and compare the effect of these rocks on the bulk crust composition at fast and slow spreading ridges. Our inferences suggest that the significance of the bulk oceanic crust should be reassessed. When hybrid troctolites are included at crustal levels, the oceanic crust cannot be considered equal to the composition of the melt extracted from the mantle, but it results more primitive and importantly thicker. References: [1] Suhr G., Hellebrand E., Johnson K., Brunelli D., 2008, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 9, doi:10.1029/2008GC002012; [2] Drouin M., Godard M., Ildefonse B., Bruguier O., Garrido C

  11. Cryptotanshinone inhibits TNF-α-induced LOX-1 expression by suppressing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ran, Xiaoli; Zhao, Wenwen; Li, Wenping; Shi, Jingshan; Chen, Xiuping

    2016-07-01

    Cryptotanshinone (CPT) is a natural compound isolated from traditional Chinese medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. In the present study, the regulatory effect and potential mechanisms of CPT on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) induced lectin-like receptor for oxidized low density lipoprotein (LOX-1) were investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured and the effect of TNF-α on LOX-1 expression at mRNA and protein levels was determined by Real-time PCR and Western blotting respectively. The formation of intracellular ROS was determined with fluorescence probe CM-DCFH2-DA. The endothelial ox-LDL uptake was evaluated with DiI-ox-LDL. The effect of CPT on LOX-1 expression was also evaluated with SD rats. TNF-α induced LOX-1 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in endothelial cells. TNF-α induced ROS formation, phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and ERK, and LOX-1 expression, which were suppressed by rotenone, DPI, NAC, and CPT. NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 and ERK inhibitor PD98059 inhibited TNF-α-induced LOX-1 expression. CPT and NAC suppressed TNF-α-induced LOX-1 expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and ERK in rat aorta. These data suggested that TNF-α induced LOX-1 expression via ROS activated NF-κB/ERK pathway, which could be inhibited by CPT. This study provides new insights for the anti-atherosclerotic effect of CPT. PMID:27382351

  12. Cryptotanshinone inhibits TNF-α-induced LOX-1 expression by suppressing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Xiaoli; Zhao, Wenwen; Li, Wenping

    2016-01-01

    Cryptotanshinone (CPT) is a natural compound isolated from traditional Chinese medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. In the present study, the regulatory effect and potential mechanisms of CPT on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) induced lectin-like receptor for oxidized low density lipoprotein (LOX-1) were investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured and the effect of TNF-α on LOX-1 expression at mRNA and protein levels was determined by Real-time PCR and Western blotting respectively. The formation of intracellular ROS was determined with fluorescence probe CM-DCFH2-DA. The endothelial ox-LDL uptake was evaluated with DiI-ox-LDL. The effect of CPT on LOX-1 expression was also evaluated with SD rats. TNF-α induced LOX-1 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in endothelial cells. TNF-α induced ROS formation, phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and ERK, and LOX-1 expression, which were suppressed by rotenone, DPI, NAC, and CPT. NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 and ERK inhibitor PD98059 inhibited TNF-α-induced LOX-1 expression. CPT and NAC suppressed TNF-α-induced LOX-1 expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and ERK in rat aorta. These data suggested that TNF-α induced LOX-1 expression via ROS activated NF-κB/ERK pathway, which could be inhibited by CPT. This study provides new insights for the anti-atherosclerotic effect of CPT. PMID:27382351

  13. Experimental investigation of homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion of biodiesel fuel with external mixture formation in a CI engine.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, D; Nagarajan, G; Ganesan, S

    2014-01-01

    In parallel to the interest in renewable fuels, there has also been increased interest in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion. HCCI engines are being actively developed because they have the potential to be highly efficient and to produce low emissions. Even though HCCI has been researched extensively, few challenges still exist. These include controlling the combustion at higher loads and the formation of a homogeneous mixture. To obtain better homogeneity, in the present investigation external mixture formation method was adopted, in which the fuel vaporiser was used to achieve excellent HCCI combustion in a single cylinder air-cooled direct injection diesel engine. In continuation of our previous works, in the current study a vaporised jatropha methyl ester (JME) was mixed with air to form a homogeneous mixture and inducted into the cylinder during the intake stroke to analyze the combustion, emission and performance characteristics. To control the early ignition of JME vapor-air mixture, cooled (30 °C) Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technique was adopted. The experimental result shows 81% reduction in NOx and 72% reduction in smoke emission. PMID:24383396

  14. On the phase formation of titanium oxide thin films deposited by reactive DC magnetron sputtering: influence of oxygen partial pressure and nitrogen doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandian, Ramanathaswamy; Natarajan, Gomathi; Rajagopalan, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2014-09-01

    This work describes about the control on phase formation in titanium oxide thin films deposited by reactive dc magnetron sputtering. Various phases of titanium oxide thin films were deposited by controlling the oxygen partial pressure during the sputtering process. By adding nitrogen gas to sputter gas mixture of oxygen and argon, the oxygen partial pressure was decreased further below the usual critical value, below and above which the sputtering yields metallic and oxide films, respectively. Furthermore, nitrogen addition eliminated the typical hysteretic behaviour between the flow rate and oxygen partial pressure, and significantly influenced the sputter rate. On increasing the oxygen partial pressure, the ratio between anatase and rutile fraction and grain size increases. The fracture cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy together with the complementary information from X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman investigations revealed the evolution and spatial distribution of the anatase and rutile phases. Both the energy delivered to the growing film and oxygen vacancy concentrations are correlated with the formation of various phases upon varying the oxygen partial pressure.

  15. Formation of CuO on thermal and laser-induced oxidation of Cu3N thin films prepared by modified activated reactive evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Guruprasad; Jain, Mahaveer K.

    2015-03-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) thin films were prepared by direct oxidation of modified activated reactive evaporated copper nitride (Cu3N) thin films in air ambience. When annealed in air at higher temperatures, Cu3N films undergo complete decomposition and the residual Cu gets easily bonded with the atmospheric oxygen to form CuO. Annealing provides required activation energy for the formation of CuO. The formation of fairly crystallized CuO was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy studies. However, the crystallite size of CuO films is smaller than their corresponding Cu3N phase. The surface morphology of the CuO films obtained through this method shows grains of non-uniform size distribution. Furthermore, Raman spectra on the as-grown Cu3N films were taken by varying the laser power. At higher laser power, microscopic CuO dots are formed due to laser-induced oxidation. It is proposed that p-type CuO can be easily grown over suitably prepared n-type Cu3N by local heating or laser irradiation in air.

  16. An Alternative Thiol-Reactive Dye to Analyze Ligand Interactions with the Chemokine Receptor CXCR2 Using a New Thermal Shift Assay Format.

    PubMed

    Bergsdorf, Christian; Fiez-Vandal, Cédric; Sykes, David A; Bernet, Pascal; Aussenac, Sonia; Charlton, Steven J; Schopfer, Ulrich; Ottl, Johannes; Duckely, Myriam

    2016-03-01

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) play an important role in many cellular events and are involved in numerous pathological processes. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of IMPs is a crucial prerequisite to enable successful targeting of these proteins with low molecular weight (LMW) ligands early on in the discovery process. To optimize IMP purification/crystallization and to identify/characterize LMW ligand-target interactions, robust, reliable, high-throughput, and sensitive biophysical methods are needed. Here, we describe a differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) screening method using the thiol-reactive BODIPY FL-cystine dye to monitor thermal unfolding of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), CXCR2. To validate this method, the seven-transmembrane protein CXCR2 was analyzed with a set of well-characterized antagonists. This study showed that the new DSF assay assessed reliably the stability of CXCR2 in a 384-well format. The analysis of 14 ligands with a potency range over 4 log units demonstrated the detection/characterization of LMW ligands binding to the membrane protein target. Furthermore, DSF results cross-validated with the label-free differential static light scattering (DSLS) thermal denaturation method. These results underline the potential of the BODIPY assay format as a general tool to investigate membrane proteins and their interaction partners. PMID:26644402

  17. Transcellular signalling pathways and TNF-alpha release involved in formation of reactive oxygen species in rat alveolar macrophages exposed to tert-butylcyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Aam, Berit Bjugan; Myhre, Oddvar; Fonnum, Frode

    2003-12-01

    In the present work, the effects of aliphatic ( n-nonane and n-decane), alicyclic (1,2,4-trimethylcyclohexane and tert-butylcyclohexane, t-BCH) and aromatic (trimethylbenzene and tert-butylbenzene) hydrocarbon solvents on formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha in rat alveolar macrophages (AM) have been investigated. Formation of ROS was assessed by monitoring oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin to 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), and the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. DCF fluorescence was elevated in a concentration-dependent manner by the alicyclic hydrocarbons. The involvement of transcellular signalling pathways in the production of ROS by t-BCH, the most active compound, was elucidated by use of specific inhibitors. Preincubation of the AM with the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK 1/2) inhibitor U0126, the protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide, the superoxide dismutase inhibitor diethyldithiocarbamate, and the iron ion chelating agent deferoxamine reduced the DCF fluorescence significantly. t-BCH gave an increase in TNF-alpha release. Further, nitric oxide production measured by a modified Griess method, and intracellular calcium concentration measured by fura-2, were increased in the rat AM after exposure to t-BCH. PMID:13680096

  18. Sun-drying diminishes the antioxidative potentials of leaves of Eugenia uniflora against formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances induced in homogenates of rat brain and liver.

    PubMed

    Kade, Ige Joseph; Ibukun, Emmanuel Oluwafemi; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; da Rocha, Joao Batista Teixeira

    2008-08-01

    Extracts from leaves of Pitanga cherry (Eugenia uniflora) are considered to be effective against many diseases, and are therefore used in popular traditional medicines. In the present study, the antioxidative effect of sun-dried (PCS) and air-dried (PCA) ethanolic extracts of Pitanga cherry leaves were investigated. The antioxidant effects were tested by measuring the ability of both PCS and PCA to inhibit the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) induced by prooxidant agents such as iron (II) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in rat brain and liver tissues. The results showed that while PCA significantly (P<0.0001) inhibited the formation of TBARS in both liver and brain tissues homogenates, PCS did not. Further investigation reveals that the phenolic content of the PCS was significantly (P<0.0001) lower compared to PCA. Since phenolics in plants largely contributed to the antioxidative potency of plants, we conclude that air-drying should be employed in the preparation of extracts of Pitanga cherry leaves before it is administered empirically as a traditional medicament, and hence this study serves a public awareness to traditional medical practitioners. PMID:18539016

  19. Heavy fuels ash deposit formation and removal in watercooled high-temperature gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, J.C.; Durgin, G.A.; Palko, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data obtained in heavy fuels operation of a gas turbine simulator with a water-cooled, transonic turbine nozzle cascade are presented. The ash fouling is characterized by the rate of decrease of the aerodynamic throat area. Particular attention is given to the cleanability of the ash deposits. A simple heat transfer analysis was performed to assist in evaluating the data. The rate of ash fouling in the water-cooled nozzle was found to be of the same order of magntude as for conventional air-cooled designs. Cleanability, both on and off-line, was found to be significantly enhanced, thus making the water-cooled gas turbine an attractive alternative for heavy fuels applications.

  20. The formation of protective nitride surfaces for PEM fuel cell metallic bipolar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, M. P.; Yang, B.; Wang, H.; Turner, J. A.; More, K. L.; Wilson, M.; Garzon, F.

    2006-08-01

    The selective gas nitridation of model nickel-based alloys was used to form dense, electrically conductive and corrosion-resistant nitride surface layers, including TiN, VN, CrN, Cr2N, as wellas a complex NiNbVN phase. Evaluation for use as a protective surface for metallic bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) indicated that CrN/Cr2N based surfaces holdpromise to meet U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) performance goals for automative applications. The thermally grown CrN/Cr2N surface formed on model Ni-Cr based alloys exhibited good stability and low electrical resistance in single-cell fuel cell testing under simulated drive-cycle conditions. Recent results indicate that similar protective chromium nitride surfaces can be formed on less expensive Fe-Cr based alloys potentially capable of meeting DOE cost goals.

  1. Deposit formation in hydrocarbon rocket fuels with an evaluation of a propane heat transfer correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, P. A.; Aukerman, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    A high pressure fuel coking testing apparatus was designed and developed and was used to evaluate thermal decomposition limits and carbon decomposition rates in heated copper tubes for hydrocarbon fuels. A commercial propane (90% grade) and chemically pure (CP) propane were tested. Heat transfer to supercritical propane was evaluated at 136 atm, bulk fluid velocities of 6 to 30 m/s, and tube wall temperatures in the range of 422 to 811 K. A forced convection heat transfer correlation developed in a previous test effort verified a prediction of most of the experimental data within a + or - 30% range, with good agreement for the CP propane data. No significant differences were apparent in the predictions derived from the correlation when the carbon resistance was included with the film resistance. A post-test scanning electron microprobe analysis indicated occurrences of migration and interdiffusion of copper into the carbon deposit.

  2. Recycled stellar ejecta as fuel for star formation and implications for the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segers, Marijke C.; Crain, Robert A.; Schaye, Joop; Bower, Richard G.; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2016-02-01

    We use cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations from the Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments and OverWhelmingly Large Simulations projects to assess the significance of recycled stellar ejecta as fuel for star formation. The fractional contributions of stellar mass-loss to the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass densities increase with time, reaching 35 and 19 per cent, respectively, at z = 0. The importance of recycling increases steeply with galaxy stellar mass for M* < 1010.5 M⊙, and decreases mildly at higher mass. This trend arises from the mass dependence of feedback associated with star formation and AGN, which preferentially suppresses star formation fuelled by recycling. Recycling is more important for satellites than centrals and its contribution decreases with galactocentric radius. The relative contribution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars increases with time and towards galaxy centres. This is a consequence of the more gradual release of AGB ejecta compared to that of massive stars, and the preferential removal of the latter by star formation-driven outflows and by lock up in stellar remnants. Recycling-fuelled star formation exhibits a tight, positive correlation with galaxy metallicity, with a secondary dependence on the relative abundance of alpha elements (which are predominantly synthesized in massive stars), that is insensitive to the subgrid models for feedback. Hence, our conclusions are directly relevant for the origin of the mass-metallicity relation and metallicity gradients. Applying the relation between recycling and metallicity to the observed mass-metallicity relation yields our best estimate of the mass-dependent contribution of recycling. For centrals with a mass similar to that of the Milky Way, we infer the contributions of recycled stellar ejecta to the SFR and stellar mass to be 35 and 20 per cent, respectively.

  3. Quantitative Surface Emissivity and Temperature Measurements of a Burning Solid Fuel Accompanied by Soot Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piltch, Nancy D.; Pettegrew, Richard D.; Ferkul, Paul; Sacksteder, K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Surface radiometry is an established technique for noncontact temperature measurement of solids. We adapt this technique to the study of solid surface combustion where the solid fuel undergoes physical and chemical changes as pyrolysis proceeds, and additionally may produce soot. The physical and chemical changes alter the fuel surface emissivity, and soot contributes to the infrared signature in the same spectral band as the signal of interest. We have developed a measurement that isolates the fuel's surface emissions in the presence of soot, and determine the surface emissivity as a function of temperature. A commercially available infrared camera images the two-dimensional surface of ashless filter paper burning in concurrent flow. The camera is sensitive in the 2 to 5 gm band, but spectrally filtered to reduce the interference from hot gas phase combustion products. Results show a strong functional dependence of emissivity on temperature, attributed to the combined effects of thermal and oxidative processes. Using the measured emissivity, radiance measurements from several burning samples were corrected for the presence of soot and for changes in emissivity, to yield quantitative surface temperature measurements. Ultimately the results will be used to develop a full-field, non-contact temperature measurement that will be used in spacebased combustion investigations.

  4. Fracture Reactivation in Chemically Reactive Rock Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Hooker, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Reactivation of existing fractures is a fundamental process of brittle failure that controls the nucleation of earthquake ruptures, propagation and linkage of hydraulic fractures in oil and gas production, and the evolution of fault and fracture networks and thus of fluid and heat transport in the upper crust. At depths below 2-3 km, and frequently shallower, brittle processes of fracture growth, linkage, and reactivation compete with chemical processes of fracture sealing by mineral precipitation, with precipitation rates similar to fracture opening rates. We recently found rates of fracture opening in tectonically quiescent settings of 10-20 μm/m.y., rates similar to euhedral quartz precipitation under these conditions. The tendency of existing partially or completely cemented fractures to reactivate will vary depending on strain rate, mineral precipitation kinetics, strength contrast between host rock and fracture cement, stress conditions, degree of fracture infill, and fracture network geometry. Natural fractures in quartzite of the Cambrian Eriboll Formation, NW Scotland, exhibit a complex history of fracture formation and reactivation, with reactivation involving both repeated crack-seal opening-mode failure and shear failure of fractures that formed in opening mode. Fractures are partially to completely sealed with crack-seal or euhedral quartz cement or quartz cement fragmented by shear reactivation. Degree of cementation controls the tendency of fractures for later shear reactivation, to interact elastically with adjacent open fractures, and their intersection behavior. Using kinematic, dynamic, and diagenetic criteria, we determine the sequence of opening-mode fracture formation and later shear reactivation. We find that sheared fracture systems of similar orientation display spatially varying sense of slip We attribute these inconsistent directions of shear reactivation to 1) a heterogeneous stress field in this highly fractured rock unit and 2

  5. Enhanced reactivity of hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to birnessite in soil: reaction kinetics and nonextractable residue formation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Woong; Lee, Seunghwan; Ryu, Hyerim; Nam, Kyoungphile; Kang, Ki-Hoon

    2008-05-01

    Phenanthrene and pyrene were not transformed by birnessite (delta-MnO2) in the presence of phenol. The phenoxy radicals generated from phenol by birnessite did not act as a mediator for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical reaction under the studied conditions. In contrast, 9-hydroxyphenanthrene and 1-hydroxypyrene were remarkably sensitive to birnessite. The disappearance patterns of the test compounds both in the aqueous phase and soil followed first-order kinetics, with a linear relationship found between the rate constants and the surface area of birnessite. Moreover, the data indicated that the reaction was faster in the presence of soil than in the aqueous phase probably because of the presence of hydroxyl groups in soil organic matter. Sequential solvent extraction was not successful in the recovery of 9-hydroxyphenanthrene from the birnessite-treated soil samples, and capillary electrophoresis data suggest the formation of nonextractable residues of the compound in soil. In addition, the acute toxicity determined by Microtox declined approximately 8.3 times in the soil samples treated with birnessite compared to untreated samples, demonstrating that the toxic compound was no longer present as its parent form. PMID:18419188

  6. Mitochondrial permeability transition in rat hepatocytes after anoxia/reoxygenation: role of Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin-Hee; Lemasters, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Onset of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) is the penultimate event leading to lethal cellular ischemia-reperfusion injury, but the mechanisms precipitating the MPT after reperfusion remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of mitochondrial free Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in pH- and MPT-dependent reperfusion injury to hepatocytes. Cultured rat hepatocytes were incubated in anoxic Krebs-Ringer-HEPES buffer at pH 6.2 for 4 h and then reoxygenated at pH 7.4 to simulate ischemia-reperfusion. Some cells were loaded with the Ca2+ chelators, BAPTA/AM and 2-[(2-bis-[carboxymethyl]aono-5-methoxyphenyl)-methyl-6-methoxy-8-bis[carboxymethyl]aminoquinoline, either by a cold loading protocol for intramitochondrial loading or by warm incubation for cytosolic loading. Cell death was assessed by propidium iodide fluorometry and immunoblotting. Mitochondrial Ca2+, inner membrane permeability, membrane potential, and ROS formation were monitored with Rhod-2, calcein, tetramethylrhodamine methylester, and dihydrodichlorofluorescein, respectively. Necrotic cell death increased after reoxygenation. Necrosis was blocked by 1 μM cyclosporin A, an MPT inhibitor, and by reoxygenation at pH 6.2. Confocal imaging of Rhod-2, calcein, and dichlorofluorescein revealed that an increase of mitochondrial Ca2+ and ROS preceded onset of the MPT after reoxygenation. Intramitochondrial Ca2+ chelation, but not cytosolic Ca2+ chelation, prevented ROS formation and subsequent necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Reoxygenation with the antioxidants, desferal or diphenylphenylenediamine, also suppressed MPT-mediated cell death. However, inhibition of cytosolic ROS by apocynin or diphenyleneiodonium chloride failed to prevent reoxygenation-induced cell death. In conclusion, Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial ROS formation is the molecular signal culminating in onset of the MPT after reoxygenation of anoxic hepatocytes, leading to cell death. PMID:22241863

  7. Atmospheric reactivity of hydroxyl radicals with guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), a biomass burning emitted compound: Secondary organic aerosol formation and gas-phase oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauraguais, Amélie; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Cassez, Andy; Deboudt, Karine; Fourmentin, Marc; Choël, Marie

    2014-04-01

    Methoxyphenols are low molecular weight semi-volatile polar aromatic compounds produced from the pyrolysis of wood lignin. The reaction of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) with hydroxyl radicals has been studied in the LPCA simulation chamber at (294 ± 2) K, atmospheric pressure, low relative humidity (RH < 1%) and under high-NOx conditions using CH3ONO as OH source. The aerosol production was monitored using a SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer); the SOA yields were in the range from 0.003 to 0.87 and the organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. Transmission (TEM) and Scanning (SEM) Electron Microscopy observations were performed to characterize the physical state of SOA produced from the OH reaction with guaiacol; they display both liquid and solid particles (in an amorphous state). GC-FID (Gas Chromatography - Flame Ionization Detection) and GC-MS (Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry) analysis show the formation of nitroguaiacol isomers as main oxidation products in the gas- and aerosol-phases. In the gas-phase, the formation yields were (10 ± 2) % for 4-nitroguaiacol (1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-4-nitrobenzene; 4-NG) and (6 ± 2) % for 3- or 6-nitroguaiacol (1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-3-nitrobenzene or 1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-6-nitrobenzene; 3/6-NG; the standards are not commercially available so both isomers cannot be distinguished) whereas in SOA their yield were much lower (≤0.1%). To our knowledge, this work represents the first identification of nitroguaiacols as gaseous oxidation products of the OH reaction with guaiacol. As the reactivity of nitroguaiacols with atmospheric oxidants is probably low, we suggest using them as biomass burning emission gas tracers. The atmospheric implications of the guaiacol + OH reaction are also discussed.

  8. Metabolism of isoniazid by neutrophil myeloperoxidase leads to isoniazid-NAD(+) adduct formation: A comparison of the reactivity of isoniazid with its known human metabolites.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saifur R; Morgan, Andrew G M; Michail, Karim; Srivastava, Nutan; Whittal, Randy M; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2016-04-15

    The formation of isonicotinyl-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (INH-NAD(+)) via the mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase enzyme, KatG, has been described as the major component of the mode of action of isoniazid (INH). However, there are numerous human peroxidases that may catalyze this reaction. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) in INH-NAD(+) adduct formation has never been explored; this is important, as neutrophils are recruited at the site of tuberculosis infection (granuloma) through infected macrophages' cell death signals. In our studies, we showed that neutrophil MPO is capable of INH metabolism using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping and UV-Vis spectroscopy. MPO or activated human neutrophils (by phorbol myristate acetate) catalyzed the oxidation of INH and formed several free radical intermediates; the inclusion of superoxide dismutase revealed a carbon-centered radical which is considered to be the reactive metabolite that binds with NAD(+). Other human metabolites, including N-acetyl-INH, N-acetylhydrazine, and hydrazine did not show formation of carbon-centered radicals, and either produced no detectable free radicals, N-centered free radicals, or superoxide, respectively. A comparison of these free radical products indicated that only the carbon-centered radical from INH is reducing in nature, based on UV-Vis measurement of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. Furthermore, only INH oxidation by MPO led to a new product (λmax=326nm) in the presence of NAD(+). This adduct was confirmed to be isonicotinyl-NAD(+) using LC-MS analysis where the intact adduct was detected (m/z=769). The findings of this study suggest that neutrophil MPO may also play a role in INH pharmacological activity. PMID:26867495

  9. Reactive Sulfur Species-Mediated Activation of the Keap1-Nrf2 Pathway by 1,2-Naphthoquinone through Sulfenic Acids Formation under Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Abiko, Yumi; Ida, Tomoaki; Miura, Takashi; Kakehashi, Hidenao; Ishii, Isao; Nishida, Motohiro; Sawa, Tomohiro; Akaike, Takaaki; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2015-05-18

    Sulfhydration by a hydrogen sulfide anion and electrophile thiolation by reactive sulfur species (RSS) such as persulfides/polysulfides (e.g., R-S-SH/R-S-Sn-H(R)) are unique reactions in electrophilic signaling. Using 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene-4-thioacetate (1,2-NQH2-SAc) as a precursor to 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene-4-thiol (1,2-NQH2-SH) and a generator of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we demonstrate that protein thiols can be modified by a reactive sulfenic acid to form disulfide adducts that undergo rapid cleavage in the presence of glutathione (GSH). As expected, 1,2-NQH2-SAc is rapidly hydrolyzed and partially oxidized to yield 1,2-NQ-SH, resulting in a redox cycling reaction that produces ROS through a chemical disproportionation reaction. The sulfenic acid forms of 1,2-NQ-SH and 1,2-NQH2-SH were detected by derivatization experiments with dimedone. 1,2-NQH2-SOH modified Keap1 at Cys171 to produce a Keap1-S-S-1,2-NQH2 adduct. Subsequent exposure of A431 cells to 1,2-NQ or 1,2-NQH2-SAc caused an extensive chemical modification of cellular proteins in both cases. Protein adduction by 1,2-NQ through a thio ether (C-S-C) bond slowly declined through a GSH-dependent S-transarylation reaction, whereas that originating from 1,2-NQH2-SAc through a disulfide (C-S-S-C) bond was rapidly restored to the free protein thiol in the cells. Under these conditions, 1,2-NQH2-SAc activated Nrf2 and upregulated its target genes, which were enhanced by pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), to deplete cellular GSH. Pretreatment of catalase conjugated with poly(ethylene glycol) suppressed Nrf2 activation by 1,2-NQH2-SAc. These results suggest that RSS-mediated reversible electrophilic signaling takes place through sulfenic acids formation under oxidative stress. PMID:25807370

  10. Fuel structure and pressure effects on the formation of soot particles in diffusion flames. Annual technical report, 15 January 1988-15 January 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.J.

    1989-02-15

    Studies emphasizing the effects of fuel molecular structure on soot formation processes in laminar-diffusion flames were investigated. Particular attention was given to the particle inception and surface growth processes for a series of fuels. Studies of butane, 1-butene, and 1,3 butadiene have revealed that fuel structure strongly affects the soot-particle-inception process. However, subsequent surface-growth processes are largely determined by the available surface area. Thus, the surface growth process is independent of the fuel molecular structure following the initial particle-inception stage. Studies of the particle-inception region indicate that increased soot formation is strongly correlated with visible-fluorescence measurements attributed to large polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon species in the flame.

  11. Effects of diesel fuel combustion-modifier additives on In-cylinder soot formation in a heavy-duty Dl diesel engine.

    SciTech Connect

    Musculus, Mark P. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dietz, Jeff

    2005-07-01

    Based on a phenomenological model of diesel combustion and pollutant-formation processes, a number of fuel additives that could potentially reduce in-cylinder soot formation by altering combustion chemistry have been identified. These fuel additives, or ''combustion modifiers'', included ethanol and ethylene glycol dimethyl ether, polyethylene glycol dinitrate (a cetane improver), succinimide (a dispersant), as well as nitromethane and another nitro-compound mixture. To better understand the chemical and physical mechanisms by which these combustion modifiers may affect soot formation in diesel engines, in-cylinder soot and diffusion flame lift-off were measured, using an optically-accessible, heavy-duty, direct-injection diesel engine. A line-of-sight laser extinction diagnostic was employed to measure the relative soot concentration within the diesel jets (''jetsoot'') as well as the rates of deposition of soot on the piston bowl-rim (''wall-soot''). An OH chemiluminescence imaging technique was utilized to measure the lift-off lengths of the diesel diffusion flames so that fresh oxygen entrainment rates could be compared among the fuels. Measurements were obtained at two operating conditions, using blends of a base commercial diesel fuel with various combinations of the fuel additives. The ethanol additive, at 10% by mass, reduced jet-soot by up to 15%, and reduced wall-soot by 30-40%. The other fuel additives also affected in-cylinder soot, but unlike the ethanol blends, changes in in-cylinder soot could be attributed solely to differences in the ignition delay. No statistically-significant differences in the diesel flame lift-off lengths were observed among any of the fuel additive formulations at the operating conditions examined in this study. Accordingly, the observed differences in in-cylinder soot among the fuel formulations cannot be attributed to differences in fresh oxygen entrainment upstream of the soot-formation zones after ignition.

  12. Standard format and content for emergency plans for fuel cycle and materials facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This regulatory guides is being developed to provide guidance acceptable to the NRC staff on the information to be included in emergency plans and to establish a format for presenting the information. Use of a standard format will help ensure uniformity and completeness in the preparation of emergency plans. An acceptable emergency plan should describe the licensed activities conducted at the facility and the types of accidents that might occur. It should provide information on classifying postulated accidents and the licensee's procedures for notifying and coordinating with offsite authorities. The plan should provide information on emergency response measures that might be necessary, the equipment and facilities available to respond to an emergency, and how the licensee will maintain emergency preparedness capability. It should describe the records and reports that will be maintained. There should also be a section on recovery after an accident and plans for restoring the facility to a safe condition. 4 refs.

  13. Berkeley Prize: Mapping the Fuel for Star Formation in Early Universe Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacconi, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Stars form from cold molecular interstellar gas, which is relatively rare in galaxies like the Milky Way, which form only a few new stars per year. Massive galaxies in the distant universe formed stars much more rapidly. Was star formation more efficient in the past, and/or were early galaxies richer in molecular gas? The answer was elusive when our instruments could probe molecules only in the most luminous and rare objects such as mergers and quasars. But a new survey of molecular gas in typical massive star-forming galaxies at redshifts from about 1.2 to 2.3 (corresponding to when the universe was 24% to 40% of its current age) reveals that distant star-forming galaxies were indeed molecular-gas rich and that the star-formation efficiency is not strongly dependent on cosmic epoch.

  14. Scale formation on Ni-based alloys in simulated solid oxide fuel cell interconnect environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Singh, P.; Windisch, C.F.; Johnson, C.D.; Schaeffer, C.

    2004-11-01

    Recent publications suggest that the environment on the fuel side of the bi-polar stainless steel SOFC interconnects changes the oxidation behavior and morphology of the scale formed on the air side. The U.S. Department of Energy Albany Research Center (ARC), has examined the role of such exposure conditions on advanced nickel base alloys. Alloy formulations developed at ARC and commercial alloys were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The electrical property of oxide scales formed on selected alloys was determined in terms of areaspecific resistance (ASR). The corrosion behavior of ARC nickel-based alloys exposed to a dual environment of air/ H2 were compared to those of Crofer 22APU and Haynes 230.

  15. Evaluation of a zirconium additive for the mitigation of molten ash formation during combustion of residual fuel oil

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Florida Power & Light Company (FP&L) currently fires a residual fuel oil (RFO) containing catalyst fines, which results in a troublesome black aluminosilicate liquid phase that forms on heat-transfer surfaces, remains molten, and flows to the bottom of the boiler. When the unit is shut down for a scheduled outage, this liquid phase freezes to a hard black glass that damages the contracting waterwalls of the boiler. Cleaning the boiler bottom and repairing damaged surfaces increase the boiler downtime, at a significant cost to FP&L. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) proposed to perform a series of tests for FP&L to evaluate the effectiveness of a zirconium additive to modify the mechanism that forms this liquid phase, resulting in the formation of a dry refractory phase that may be easily handled during cleanup of the boiler.

  16. Experimental study of soot formation from a diesel fuel surrogate in a shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Olivier; Djebaili-Chaumeix, Nabiha; Paillard, Claude-Etienne; Douce, Francoise

    2009-08-15

    The soot tendency (soot induction delay time and soot yield) of a diesel fuel surrogate and of the hydrocarbons that constitute this mixture was studied in a heated shock tube. The surrogate is composed of three hydrocarbons representative of major chemical families of diesel fuels (39% n-propylcyclohexane, 28% n-butylbenzene, and 33% 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane in mass proportion). Experiments were carried out for highly diluted mixtures in argon; in the case of pyrolysis and at two equivalence ratios: 18 and 5. The pressure range was relatively high (1090-1870 kPa) and the carbon atom concentration was kept constant at around 2 x 10{sup +18} atoms cm{sup -3}. The effects of the nature of the hydrocarbon, the oxygen addition, and the temperature on the soot induction delay time and soot yield were investigated. A second growth stage of the soot volume fraction was observed. The influence of several parameters on the existence and/or on the amplitude of this second growth seems to indicate the chemical nature of this phenomenon. Results for the soot tendency show that the soot induction delay time and soot yield depend strongly on the structure of the hydrocarbon and on the concentration of oxygen. The study of the diesel surrogate shows that the soot inception process does not depend on synergistic effects between hydrocarbons but seems to be initiated by the constituent of the surrogate that produces soot fastest, while other constituents were consumed later during the soot growth. (author)

  17. Formation of reactive aldehydes (MDA, HHE, HNE) during the digestion of cod liver oil: comparison of human and porcine in vitro digestion models.

    PubMed

    Tullberg, Cecilia; Larsson, Karin; Carlsson, Nils-Gunnar; Comi, Irene; Scheers, Nathalie; Vegarud, Gerd; Undeland, Ingrid

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we investigated lipid oxidation of cod liver oil during gastrointestinal (GI) digestion using two types of in vitro digestion models. In the first type of model, we used human GI juices, while we used digestive enzymes and bile from porcine origin in the second type of model. Human and porcine models were matched with respect to factors important for lipolysis, using a standardized digestion protocol. The digests were analysed for reactive oxidation products: malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE), and 4-hydroxy-trans-2-hexenal (HHE) by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS), and for free fatty acids (FFA) obtained during the digestion by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The formation of the oxidation products MDA, HHE, and HNE was low during the gastric digestion, however, it increased during the duodenal digestion. The formation of the oxidation products reached higher levels when digestive juices of human origin were used (60 μM of MDA, 0.96 μM of HHE, and 1.6 μM of HNE) compared to when using enzymes and bile of porcine origin (9.8, and 0.36 μM of MDA; 0.16, and 0.026 μM of HHE; 0.23, and 0.005 μM of HNE, respectively, in porcine models I and II). In all models, FFA release was only detected during the intestinal step, and reached up to 31% of total fatty acids (FA). The findings in this work may be of importance when designing oxidation oriented lipid digestion studies. PMID:26838473

  18. Central role of endogenous Toll-like receptor-2 activation in regulating inflammation, reactive oxygen species production, and subsequent neointimal formation after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Shishido, Tetsuro . E-mail: Tetsuro_Shishido@URMC.Rochester.edu; Nozaki, Naoki; Takahashi, Hiroki; Arimoto, Takanori; Niizeki, Takeshi; Koyama, Yo; Abe, Jun-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao

    2006-07-14

    Background: It is now evident that inflammation after vascular injury has significant impact on the restenosis after revascularization procedures such as angioplasty, stenting, and bypass grafting. However, the mechanisms that regulate inflammation and repair after vascular injury are incompletely understood. Here, we report that vascular injury-mediated cytokine expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, as well as subsequent neointimal formation requires Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2) mediated signaling pathway in vivo. Methods and results: Vascular injury was induced by cuff-placement around the femoral artery in non-transgenic littermates (NLC) and TLR-2 knockout (TLR-2KO) mice. After cuff-placement in NLC mice, expression of TLR-2 was significantly increased in both smooth muscle medial layer and adventitia. Interestingly, we found that inflammatory genes expression such as tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were markedly decreased in TLR-2KO mice compared with NLC mice. In addition, ROS production after vascular injury was attenuated in TLR-2KO mice compared with NLC mice. Since we observed the significant role of endogenous TLR-2 activation in regulating inflammatory responses and ROS production after vascular injury, we determined whether inhibition of endogenous TLR-2 activation can inhibit neointimal proliferation after vascular injury. Neointimal hyperplasia was markedly suppressed in TLR-2KO mice compared with WT mice at both 2 and 4 weeks after vascular injury. Conclusions: These findings suggested that endogenous TLR-2 activation might play a central role in the regulation of vascular inflammation as well as subsequent neointimal formation in injured vessels.

  19. Tuning Lewis acidity using the reactivity of "frustrated Lewis pairs": facile formation of phosphine-boranes and cationic phosphonium-boranes.

    PubMed

    Welch, Gregory C; Cabrera, Lourdes; Chase, Preston A; Hollink, Emily; Masuda, Jason D; Wei, Pingrong; Stephan, Douglas W

    2007-08-21

    The concept of "frustrated Lewis pairs" involves donor and acceptor sites in which steric congestion precludes Lewis acid-base adduct formation. In the case of sterically demanding phosphines and boranes, this lack of self-quenching prompts nucleophilic attack at a carbon para to B followed by fluoride transfer affording zwitterionic phosphonium borates [R(3)P(C(6)F(4))BF(C(6)F(5))(2)] and [R(2)PH(C(6)F(4))BF(C(6)F(5))(2)]. These can be easily transformed into the cationic phosphonium-boranes [R(3)P(C(6)F(4))B(C(6)F(5))(2)](+) and [R(2)PH(C(6)F(4))B(C(6)F(5))(2)](+) or into the neutral phosphino-boranes R(2)P(C(6)F(4))B(C(6)F(5))(2). This new reactivity provides a modular route to a family of boranes in which the steric features about the Lewis acidic center remains constant and yet the variation in substitution provides a facile avenue for the tuning of the Lewis acidity. Employing the Gutmann-Beckett and Childs methods for determining Lewis acid strength, it is demonstrated that the cationic boranes are much more Lewis acidic than B(C(6)F(5))(3), while the acidity of the phosphine-boranes is diminished. PMID:17664977

  20. A newly discovered oxidant defence system and its involvement in the development of Aurelia aurita (Scyphozoa, Cnidaria): reactive oxygen species and elemental iodine control medusa formation.

    PubMed

    Berking, Stefan; Czech, Nicole; Gerharz, Melanie; Herrmann, Klaus; Hoffmann, Uwe; Raifer, Hartmann; Sekul, Guy; Siefker, Barbara; Sommerei, Andrea; Vedder, Fritz

    2005-01-01

    In Aurelia aurita, applied iodine induces medusa formation (strobilation). This process also occurs when the temperature is lowered. This was found to increase oxidative stress resulting in an increased production of iodine from iodide. One polyp produces several medusae (initially termed ephyrae) starting at the polyp's oral end. The spreading of strobilation down the body column is controlled by a feedback loop: ephyra anlagen decrease the tyrosine content in adjacent polyp tissue by producing melanin from tyrosine. Endogenous tyrosine is able to remove iodine by forming iodiferous tyrosine compounds. The reduced level of tyrosine causes the ephyra-polyp-border to move towards the basal end of the former polyp. We argue that an oxidant defence system may exist which makes use of iodide and tyrosine. Like other marine invertebrates, polyps of Aurelia contain iodide ions. Inevitably produced peroxides oxidise iodide into iodine. The danger to be harmed by iodine is strongly decreased by endogenous tyrosine which reacts with iodine to form iodiferous tyrosine compounds including thyroxin. Both substances together, iodide and tyrosine, form an efficient oxidant defence system which shields the tissue against damage by reactive oxygen species. In the course of evolution (from a species at the basis of the animal kingdom like Aurelia to a highly evolved species like man) the waste product thyroxin (indicating a high metabolic rate) has developed into a hormone which controls the metabolic rate. PMID:16281174

  1. UV-B Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Promotes Formation of BFA-Induced Compartments in Cells of Arabidopsis Root Apices

    PubMed Central

    Yokawa, Ken; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    UV-B radiation is an important part of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted by the sun. For much of the period of biological evolution organisms have been exposed to UV radiation, and have developed diverse mechanisms to cope with this potential stress factor. Roots are usually shielded from exposure to UV by the surrounding soil, but may nevertheless be exposed to high energy radiation on the soil surface. Due to their high sensitivity to UV-B radiation, plant roots need to respond rapidly in order to minimize exposure on the surface. In addition to root gravitropism, effective light perception by roots has recently been discovered to be essential for triggering negative root phototropism in Arabidopsis. However, it is not fully understood how UV-B affects root growth and phototropism. Here, we report that UV-B induces rapid generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn promotes the formation of BFA-induced compartments in the Arabidopsis root apex. During unilateral UV-B irradiation of roots changes in auxin concentration on the illuminated side have been recorded. In conclusion, UV-B-induced and ROS-mediated stimulation of vesicle recycling promotes root growth and induces negative phototropism. PMID:26793199

  2. JAK2V617F leads to intrinsic changes in platelet formation and reactivity in a knock-in mouse model of essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Catherine M; Manning, Harriet; Bennett, Cavan; Vasquez, Louella; Severin, Sonia; Brain, Lauren; Mazharian, Alexandra; Guerrero, Jose A; Li, Juan; Soranzo, Nicole; Green, Anthony R; Watson, Steve P; Ghevaert, Cedric

    2013-11-28

    The principal morbidity and mortality in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) and polycythemia rubra vera (PV) stems from thrombotic events. Most patients with ET/PV harbor a JAK2V617F mutation, but its role in the thrombotic diathesis remains obscure. Platelet function studies in patients are difficult to interpret because of interindividual heterogeneity, reflecting variations in the proportion of platelets derived from the malignant clone, differences in the presence of additional mutations, and the effects of medical treatments. To circumvent these issues, we have studied a JAK2V617F knock-in mouse model of ET in which all megakaryocytes and platelets express JAK2V617F at a physiological level, equivalent to that present in human ET patients. We show that, in addition to increased differentiation, JAK2V617F-positive megakaryocytes display greater migratory ability and proplatelet formation. We demonstrate in a range of assays that platelet reactivity to agonists is enhanced, with a concomitant increase in platelet aggregation in vitro and a reduced duration of bleeding in vivo. These data suggest that JAK2V617F leads to intrinsic changes in both megakaryocyte and platelet biology beyond an increase in cell number. In support of this hypothesis, we identify multiple differentially expressed genes in JAK2V617F megakaryocytes that may underlie the observed biological differences. PMID:24085768

  3. Macrophage uptake of low-density lipoprotein bound to aggregated C-reactive protein: possible mechanism of foam-cell formation in atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tao; Borensztajn, Jayme

    2002-01-01

    Foam cells found in atherosclerotic lesions are believed to derive from macrophages that take up aggregated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles bound to the extracellular matrix of arterial walls. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase protein found in atherosclerotic lesions, which when immobilized on a solid phase, can bind and cluster LDL particles in a calcium-dependent manner. In the present study, we examined whether CRP-bound aggregated LDL could be taken up by macrophages in culture. CRP molecules were aggregated in the presence of calcium and immobilized on the surface of polystyrene microtitre wells. Human LDL added to the wells bound to and aggregated on the immobilized CRP, also in a calcium-dependent manner. On incubation with macrophages, the immobilized CRP-bound LDL aggregates were readily taken up by the cells, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy, by the cellular accumulation of cholesterol and by the overexpression of adipophilin. Immunofluorescence microscopy and flow-cytometry analysis established that the uptake of the LDL-CRP complex was not mediated by the CRP receptor CD32. These observations with immobilized CRP and LDL, approximating the conditions that exist in the extracellular matrix of the arterial wall, thus suggest that CRP may contribute to the formation of foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions by causing the aggregation of LDL molecules that are then taken up by macrophages through a CD32-independent pathway. PMID:12033985

  4. Reactive geothermal transport simulation to study the formation mechanism of impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe geothermal field, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Todaka, Noritumi; Akasaka, Chitosi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-03-06

    Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir (Japan): One is neutral and the other is acidic. It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone from magma and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. To test such a conceptual model and to study the geochemical behavior due to mixing of the two fluids, reactive geothermal transport simulations under both natural and production conditions were carried out using the code TOUGHREACT. Results indicate Mn-rich smectite precipitates near the mixing front. Precipitation of sphalerite and galena occurs in a similar region as the Mn-rich smectite. Precipitation of these minerals depends on pH and temperature. In addition, quartz, pyrite, and calcite precipitate in the shallow zone resulting in further development of caprock. The changes in porosity and permeability due to precipitation of Mn-rich smectite are small compared with that of quartz, calcite, and pyrite. However, the smectite precipitation is likely to fill open fractures and to form an impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid regions. The simulated mineral assemblage is generally consistent with observations in the Onikobe field. The numerical simulations described here provide useful insight into geochemical behavior and formation of impermeable barriers from fluid mixing. The method presented in this paper may be useful in fundamental analysis of hydrothermal systems and in the exploration of geothermal reservoirs, including chemical evolution, mineral alteration, mineral scaling, and changes in porosity and permeability.

  5. Reactive geothermal transport simulations to study the formation mechanism of an impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid zones in the Onikobe Geothermal Field, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todaka, Norifumi; Akasaka, Chitoshi; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-05-01

    Two types of fluids are encountered in the Onikobe geothermal reservoir (Japan): one is neutral and the other is acidic. It is hypothesized that acidic fluid might be upwelling along a fault zone from magma and that an impermeable barrier might be present between the acidic and neutral fluid zones. To test such a conceptual model and to study the geochemical behavior due to mixing of the two fluids, reactive geothermal transport simulations under both natural and production conditions were carried out using the code TOUGHREACT. Results indicate Mn-rich smectite precipitates near the mixing front. Precipitation of sphalerite and galena occurs in a similar region as the Mn-rich smectite. Precipitation of these minerals depends on pH and temperature. In addition, quartz, pyrite, and calcite precipitate in the shallow zone resulting in further development of caprock. The changes in porosity and permeability due to precipitation of Mn-rich smectite are small compared with that of quartz, calcite, and pyrite. However, the smectite precipitation is likely to fill open fractures and to form an impermeable barrier between acidic and neutral fluid regions. The simulated mineral assemblage is generally consistent with observations in the Onikobe field. The numerical simulations described here provide useful insight into geochemical behavior and formation of impermeable barriers from fluid mixing. The method presented in this paper may be useful in fundamental analysis of hydrothermal systems and in the exploration of geothermal reservoirs, including chemical evolution, mineral alteration, mineral scaling, and changes in porosity and permeability.

  6. UV-B Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Promotes Formation of BFA-Induced Compartments in Cells of Arabidopsis Root Apices.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Ken; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Baluška, František

    2015-01-01

    UV-B radiation is an important part of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted by the sun. For much of the period of biological evolution organisms have been exposed to UV radiation, and have developed diverse mechanisms to cope with this potential stress factor. Roots are usually shielded from exposure to UV by the surrounding soil, but may nevertheless be exposed to high energy radiation on the soil surface. Due to their high sensitivity to UV-B radiation, plant roots need to respond rapidly in order to minimize exposure on the surface. In addition to root gravitropism, effective light perception by roots has recently been discovered to be essential for triggering negative root phototropism in Arabidopsis. However, it is not fully understood how UV-B affects root growth and phototropism. Here, we report that UV-B induces rapid generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn promotes the formation of BFA-induced compartments in the Arabidopsis root apex. During unilateral UV-B irradiation of roots changes in auxin concentration on the illuminated side have been recorded. In conclusion, UV-B-induced and ROS-mediated stimulation of vesicle recycling promotes root growth and induces negative phototropism. PMID:26793199

  7. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, M.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Carvou, E.; Menneveux, J.; Yu, J.; Ouf, F.-X.; Carles, S.; Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S.; Perez, J.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Lavisse, L.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O2-N2 gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2-5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O2 percentage in the O2-N2 gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  8. Positronium Formation Of Glyeisdyl Methacrylic Acid (GMA)/Styrene Grafted On PVDF Membrane For Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Hady, E. E.; Abdel-Hamed, M. O.; Eltonny, M. M.

    2011-06-01

    Simultaneous gamma irradiation was used effectively for grafting of glycidyl methacrylic acid and styrene onto Poly vinyldine fluoride (PVDF). Membranes were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The properties of the obtained membranes were evaluated in terms of proton conductivity, methanol permeability and positron annihilation lifetime (PALS) parameters. The high probability of Positronium formation enables the application of PALS to the study of free volume. Good property values approved the applicability of the membrane from the cost benefit point of view.

  9. Chemical and glutathione conjugation-related degradation of fotemustine: formation and characterization of a glutathione conjugate of diethyl (1-isocyanatoethyl)phosphonate, a reactive metabolite of fotemustine.

    PubMed

    Brakenhoff, J P; Commandeur, J N; de Kanter, F J; van Baar, B L; Luijten, W C; Vermeulen, N P

    1994-01-01

    Fotemustine is a chemotherapeutic drug for the treatment of melanoma. In this study, we investigated the metabolic and chemical stability of fotemustine with 31P-NMR and FAB-MS. In the absence of GSH, 95% of fotemustine decomposed rapidly into a reactive diethyl ethylphosphonate (DEP) isocyanate, both in rat liver S9 fraction and in HEPES buffer (pH = 7.4). DEP-isocyanate in turn hydrolyzed rapidly into diethyl (1-aminoethyl)phosphonate, which reacted subsequently with the parent DEP-isocyanate. The remaining 5% of fotemustine was shown to decompose via dechlorination into diethyl [1-(3-nitroso-2-oxoimidazolidin-1-yl)ethyl]-phosphonate. In the presence of GSH, hydrolysis of DEP-isocyanate was blocked, and a glutathione conjugate (DEP-SG) was formed instead. DEP-SG was relatively stable at 37 degrees C in HEPES buffer. Only two minor and as yet unidentified decomposition products were formed. Addition of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) to DEP-SG in HEPES buffer converted DEP-SG rapidly into the corresponding NAC conjugate of DEP-isocyanate (DEP-NAC). The formation of DEP-SG from DEP-isocyanate and GSH appeared to be spontaneous. The extent of formation of DEP-SG from fotemustine and GSH was equal in both enzymatically active and inactive rat liver S9 fractions. In the presence and in the absence of GSH, the half-lives of decomposition (t1/2) of fotemustine were 33 +/- 6 and 27 +/- 3 min, respectively. The formation of the DEP-isocyanate and 2-chloroethanediazohydroxide intermediates from fotemustine appeared to be rate limiting, and not the hydrolysis of the DEP-isocyanate nor its conjugation to GSH. Active or inactive rat liver S9 fractions accelerated the decomposition of fotemustine slightly; i.e., the t1/2 of fotemustine decreased from 39 +/- 3 to 29 +/- 1 min. Further knowledge of the metabolic and chemical stability of fotemustine and DEP-isocyanate will contribute to a better understanding of fotemustine-related cytostatic effects and toxic side effects and to the

  10. Initial Steps of Aromatic Ring Formation in a Laminar Premixed Fuel-Rich Cyclopentene Flame†

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, N.; Kasper, T.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Westmoreland, P. R.; Law, M. E.; Taatjes, C. A.; Kohse-Höinghaus, K.; Wang, J.; Cool, T. A.

    2007-05-01

    A fuel-rich, nonsooting, premixed laminar cyclopentene flame (phi = 2.0) at 37.6 Torr (50 mbar) is investigated by flame-sampling photoionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry utilizing vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. Mole fractions as a function of distance from the burner are measured for 49 intermediates with ion masses ranging from 2 (H-2) to 106 (C8H10), providing a broad database for flame modeling studies. The isomeric composition is resolved for most species, and the identification of several C4Hx, C7H6, and C7H8 isomers is discussed in detail. The presence of C5H5CCH/C5H4CCH2 and cycloheptatriene is revealed by comparisons between flame-sampled photoionization efficiency data and theoretical simulations, based on calculated ionization energies and Franck-Condon factors. This insight suggests a new potential molecular- weight growth mechanism that is characterized by C-5-C-7 ring enlargement reactions.

  11. Influence of fuel on phase formation of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} prepared by self-propagated combustion route

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesan, K.; Babu, D. Rajan

    2015-06-24

    Zinc iron oxide (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were prepared by self-propagated combustion route.The fuel plays a major role on the formation of structure and particle size. Here three different fuels like alanine, glycine and proline were used to synthesis the zinc iron oxide nanoparticle. Influence of combustion nature through the fuel, the phase formation, particle size, band gap and surface morphology has been modified. The prepared powder was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction method (PXRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and the composition of the material was analysed by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDAX).The elemental mapping was confirmed the uniform distribution of Zn, Fe and O elements in the prepared material of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  12. A diet rich in fat and poor in dietary fiber increases the in vitro formation of reactive oxygen species in human feces.

    PubMed

    Erhardt, J G; Lim, S S; Bode, J C; Bode, C

    1997-05-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species in the lumen of the colon, a process that is influenced by nutritional factors, may be important in the etiology of colorectal cancer. Because research on humans in support of this hypothesis is lacking, the objective of this study was to measure the effect of different dietary compositions on the in vitro oxygen radical production in human feces. Over a period of 12 d, seven healthy subjects received a diet rich in fat (50%) and meat and poor in dietary fiber. After a period of 1 wk, they received a vegetarian diet poor in fat (20%) and rich in dietary fiber. At the end of each study period, feces were collected and analyzed for in vitro oxygen radical production with dimethylsulfoxide as the free radical scavenger. The mean hydroxyl radical production was 13 times greater in feces of subjects when they consumed the diet rich in fat and poor in dietary fiber [52.7 +/- 29.5 micromol/(g feces x h)] than when they consumed the diet poor in fat and rich in dietary fiber [3.9 +/- 3.9 micromol/(g feces x h); P < 0.05]. This difference was associated with a 42% higher fecal iron concentration when they consumed the first diet (7.0 +/- 19.2 micromol/g feces) than when they consumed the second (4.9 +/- 1.9 micromol/g feces; P < 0.05). The results of this study confirm that diets high in fat and meat and low in fiber markedly increase the potential for hydroxyl radical formation in the feces, which in turn may contribute to an enhanced risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:9164990

  13. Secretoglobin 1A1 and 1A1A Differentially Regulate Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species Production, Phagocytosis and Extracellular Trap Formation

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Olivier; Clark, Mary Ellen; Viel, Laurent; Labbé, Geneviève; Seah, Stephen Y. K.; Khan, Meraj A.; Douda, David N.; Palaniyar, Nades; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2014-01-01

    Secretoglobin family 1A member 1 (SCGB 1A1) is a small protein mainly secreted by mucosal epithelial cells of the lungs and uterus. SCGB 1A1, also known as club (Clara) cell secretory protein, represents a major constituent of airway surface fluid. The protein has anti-inflammatory properties, and its concentration is reduced in equine recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) and human asthma. RAO is characterized by reversible airway obstruction, bronchoconstriction and neutrophilic inflammation. Direct effects of SCGB 1A1 on neutrophil functions are unknown. We have recently identified that the SCGB1A1 gene is triplicated in equids and gives rise to two distinct proteins. In this study we produced the endogenously expressed forms of SCGBs (SCGB 1A1 and 1A1A) as recombinant proteins, and analyzed their effects on reactive oxygen species production, phagocytosis, chemotaxis and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation ex vivo. We further evaluated whether NETs are present in vivo in control and inflamed lungs. Our data show that SCGB 1A1A but not SCGB 1A1 increase neutrophil oxidative burst and phagocytosis; and that both proteins markedly reduce neutrophil chemotaxis. SCGB 1A1A reduced chemotaxis significantly more than SCGB 1A1. NET formation was significantly reduced in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by SCGB 1A1 and 1A1A. SCGB mRNA in bronchial biopsies, and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, was lower in horses with RAO. NETs were present in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from horses with exacerbated RAO, but not in fluid from horses with RAO in remission or in challenged healthy horses. These findings indicate that SCGB 1A1 and 1A1A have overlapping and diverging functions. Considering disparities in the relative abundance of SCGB 1A1 and 1A1A in airway secretions of animals with RAO suggests that these functional differences may contribute to the pathogenesis of RAO and other neutrophilic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:24777050

  14. Chemical Characterization and Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species by PM2.5 during Summer in North China Plain of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, M.; Li, X.; Kuang, X.; Yan, C.; Guo, X.; Paulson, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) could cause adverse health effects by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) including superoxide (·O2-), hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), and hydroxyl radical (·OH). A number of studies have shown that transition metals, quinones, as well as other unknown organics in particles, may contribute to ROS formation. North China Plain (NCP) is one of the most populated and polluted areas in the world, where Beijing, the capital of China, is located. NCP have been suffering from severe air pollution, and health effects of fine PM have drawn great attentions of both the government and the public. To study the chemical characterization and ROS generation of PM, airborne PM2.5 was collected at two sites, with one urban site on the campus of Peking University in Beijing and one suburban site in Wangdu, Hebei Province, which is located in the south of Beijing and was significantly influenced by biomass burning during the study period. Previous studies have shown that Beijing can be more influenced by regional transport when the prevailing wind is from the south. PM2.5 samples were collected on 47 mm Teflon filter and Quartz filter using the four-channel low-volume sampler, and organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water soluble organic carbon (WSOC), soluble ions and trace metals have been analyzed. The formation of ·OH induced by PM2.5 was also measured to characterize the chemical generation of ROS from ambient particles in a cell-free solution. Preliminary analysis showed that during biomass burning periods, OC and EC concentrations in Wangdu were significantly higher than that in Beijing. The average concentration of WSOC in Beijing was comparable to that in Wangdu, while during biomass burning period, that in Wangdu was much higher than that in Beijing. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to identify the major contributing sources of PM2.5. More detailed information about chemical compositions, sources and ROS generation of

  15. mGluR5 stimulating Homer–PIKE formation initiates icariin induced cardiomyogenesis of mouse embryonic stem cells by activating reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Limin; Huang, Yujie; Zhang, Yingying; Zhao, Qingwei; Zheng, Bei; Lou, Yijia; Zhu, Danyan

    2013-06-10

    Icariin (ICA) has been reported to facilitate cardiac differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells; however, the mechanism by which ICA induced cardiomyogenesis has not been fully elucidated yet. Here, an underlying signaling network including metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), Homer, phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Enhancer (PIKE), phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) was investigated in ICA induced cardiomyogenesis. Our results showed that the co-expression of mGluR5 together with α-actinin or Troponin T in embryoid bodies (EBs) treated with ICA was elevated to 10.86% and 9.62%, compared with the case in the control (4.04% and 3.45%, respectively). Exposure of EBs to ICA for 2 h remarkably increased the dimeric form of mGluR5, which was inhibited by small interfering RNA targeting mGluR5 (si-mGluR5). Moreover, the extracellular glutamate concentration in ICA treatment medium was elevated to 28.9±3.5 μM. Furthermore, the activation of mGluR5 by ICA triggered the formation of Homer–PIKE complex and activated PI3K, stimulating ROS generation and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Knockdown of mGluR5 or inhibition of PI3K by LY294002 blocked ICA induced cardiomyogenesis via repressing mGluR5 pathway, reducing ROS and NF-κB activation. These results revealed that the inducible mechanisms of ICA were related to activate mGluR5 pathway. -- Highlights: • ICA increased mGluR5 expression in cardiac differentiation of ES cells. • ICA enhanced the glutamate level and the receptor mGluR5 dimerization, stimulating the formation of Homer–PIKE complex. • Knockdown of mGluR5 or inhibition of PI3K by LY294002 inhibited ICA induced ROS generation and NF-κB nuclear translocation.

  16. Decreased PCDD/F formation when co-firing a waste fuel and biomass in a CFB boiler by addition of sulphates or municipal sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Åmand, Lars-Erik; Kassman, Håkan

    2013-08-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are formed during waste incineration and in waste-to-energy boilers. Incomplete combustion, too short residence times at low combustion temperatures (<700 °C), incineration of electronic waste and plastic waste containing chlorine are all factors influencing the formation of PCDD/Fs in boilers. The impact of chlorine and catalysing metals (such as copper and iron) in the fuel on PCDD/F formation was studied in a 12 MW(th) circulating fluidised bed (CFB) boiler. The PCDD/F concentrations in the raw gas after the convection pass of the boiler and in the fly ashes were compared. The fuel types were a so-called clean biomass with low content of chlorine, biomass with enhanced content of chlorine from supply of PVC, and solid recovered fuel (SRF) which is a waste fuel containing higher concentrations of both chlorine, and catalysing metals. The PCDD/F formation increased for the biomass with enhanced chlorine content and it was significantly reduced in the raw gas as well as in the fly ashes by injection of ammonium sulphate. A link, the alkali chloride track, is demonstrated between the level of alkali chlorides in the gas phase, the chlorine content in the deposits in the convection pass and finally the PCDD/F formation. The formation of PCDD/Fs was also significantly reduced during co-combustion of SRF with municipal sewage sludge (MSS) compared to when SRF was fired without MSS as additional fuel. PMID:23684693

  17. Decreased PCDD/F formation when co-firing a waste fuel and biomass in a CFB boiler by addition of sulphates or municipal sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Åmand, Lars-Erik; Kassman, Håkan

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • Two strategies to reduce PCDD/F formation when co-firing solid recovered fuel (SRF) and biomass. • They were co-combustion with municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and addition of ammonium sulphate. • PCDD/Fs were significantly reduced for a biomass rich in chlorine when adding ammonium sulphate. • MSS had a suppressing effect on PCDD/F formation during co-combustion with SRF. • A link is presented between gaseous alkali chlorides, chlorine in deposits and PCDD/F formation. - Abstract: Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are formed during waste incineration and in waste-to-energy boilers. Incomplete combustion, too short residence times at low combustion temperatures (<700 °C), incineration of electronic waste and plastic waste containing chlorine are all factors influencing the formation of PCDD/Fs in boilers. The impact of chlorine and catalysing metals (such as copper and iron) in the fuel on PCDD/F formation was studied in a 12 MW{sub th} circulating fluidised bed (CFB) boiler. The PCDD/F concentrations in the raw gas after the convection pass of the boiler and in the fly ashes were compared. The fuel types were a so-called clean biomass with low content of chlorine, biomass with enhanced content of chlorine from supply of PVC, and solid recovered fuel (SRF) which is a waste fuel containing higher concentrations of both chlorine, and catalysing metals. The PCDD/F formation increased for the biomass with enhanced chlorine content and it was significantly reduced in the raw gas as well as in the fly ashes by injection of ammonium sulphate. A link, the alkali chloride track, is demonstrated between the level of alkali chlorides in the gas phase, the chlorine content in the deposits in the convection pass and finally the PCDD/F formation. The formation of PCDD/Fs was also significantly reduced during co-combustion of SRF with municipal sewage sludge (MSS) compared to when SRF was fired without MSS

  18. A model of particulate and species formation applied to laminar, nonpremixed flames for three aliphatic-hydrocarbon fuels

    SciTech Connect

    D'Anna, A.; Kent, J.H.

    2008-03-15

    A detailed kinetic mechanism is developed that includes aromatic growth and particulate formation. The model includes reaction pathways leading to the formation of nanosized particles and their coagulation and growth to larger soot particles using a sectional approach for the particle phase. It is tested against literature data of species concentrations and particulate measurements in nonpremixed laminar flames of methane, ethylene, and butene. Reasonably good predictions of gas and particle-phase concentrations and particle sizes are obtained without any change to the kinetic scheme for the different fuels. The model predicts the low concentration of particulates in the methane flame (about 0.5 ppm) and the higher concentration of soot in the ethylene and butene flames (near 10 ppm). Model predictions show that in the methane flame small precursor particles dominate the particulate loading, whereas soot is the major component in ethylene and butene flames, in accordance with the experimental data. The driving factors in the model responsible for the quite different soot predictions in the ethylene and butene flames compared with the methane flame are benzene and acetylene concentrations, which are higher in the ethylene and butene flames. Soot loadings in the ethylene flame are sensitive to the acetylene soot growth reaction, whereas particle inception rates are linked to benzene in the model. A coagulation model is used to obtain collision efficiencies for some of the particle reactions, and tests show that the modeled results are not particularly sensitive to coagulation at the rates used in our model. Soot oxidation rates are not high enough to correctly predict burnout, and this aspect of the model needs further attention. (author)

  19. Elucidating the mechanism of Cr(VI) formation upon the interaction with metal oxides during coal oxy-fuel combustion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Jiao, Facun; Zhang, Lian; Yao, Hong; Ninomiya, Yoshihiko

    2013-10-15

    The thermodynamics underpinning the interaction of Cr-bearing species with basic metal oxides, i.e. K2O, Fe2O3, MgO and CaO, during the air and oxy-fuel combustion of coal have been examined. The synchrotron-based X-ray adsorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) was used for Cr speciation. For the oxides tested, Cr(VI) formation is dominated by the reduction potential of the metals. The oxides of Ca(2+) with high reduction potential favored the oxidation of Cr(III), same for K(+). The other two basic metals, Fe2O3 and MgO with lower reduction potentials reacted with Cr(III) to form the corresponding chromites at the temperatures above 600°C. Coal combustion experiments in drop-tube furnace have confirmed the rapid capture of Cr vapors, either trivalent or hexavalent, by CaO into solid ash. The existence of HCl in flue gas favored the vaporization of Cr as CrO2Cl2, which was in turn captured by CaO into chromate. Both Fe2O3 and MgO exhibited less capability on scavenging the Cr(VI) vapor. Particularly, MgO alone exhibited a low capability for capturing the vaporized Cr(III) vapors. However, its co-existence with CaO in the furnace inhibited the Cr(VI) formation. This is beneficial for minimizing the toxicity of Cr in the coal combustion-derived fly ash. PMID:23969010

  20. Thermal Decomposition of Ethyl Formate behind the Reflected Shock Waves in the Temperature Range of 909-1258K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaganesh, M.; Sudhakar, G.; Rajakumar, B.

    Ethyl formate is the simplest model of ethyl esters which are considered as biodiesel. Systematic tests on properties and reactivity of biodiesel have been reported[1, 2]. Methyl and ethyl ester mix can offer improved physical properties. Generally, ethyl esters are slightly more reactive than the methyl esters[3]. Also ethyl formate is an interstellar molecule. It was first detected in interstellar space by Belloche et al.[4]. So studies of this molecule are required to understand the fuel properties and interstellar chemistry.

  1. The formation of Ca-Cl-rich groundwaters in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica: Field measurements and modeling of reactive transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, Jonathan D.; Sletten, Ronald S.

    2013-06-01

    Ca-Cl-rich brines have been found in shallow subsurface flows, groundwater systems, lakes, and ponds throughout the Dry Valleys of Antarctica. The apparent abundance of Ca-Cl-rich waters near the surface is unusual compared to global surface water compositions and a number of theories have been proposed to explain the genesis of these brines. We show that an ice-cemented soil developing on fluvial sediment in Taylor Valley also contains Ca-Cl-rich brine. The distribution of soluble ions, exchangeable cations, and stable isotopes down to 2.1 m depth in the soil suggests that CaCl2 was formed by cation exchange reactions during downward reactive transport of Na-Cl-rich brine from the soil surface. To explore the implications of exchange reactions for the formation of Ca-Cl-rich brine, Ca-Na and Ca-Mg exchange properties were measured in 1 mM, 0.1 M, and 4.75 M solutions. Low-temperature reactions and brine transport were modeled in PHREEQC by incorporating FREZCHEM Pitzer parameters and solubility products into PHREEQC. Modeling shows that by freezing soils in equilibrium with Dry Valley surface waters, a strong Ca-Mg enrichment of the soil solution is caused by the exchange of aqueous Na+ with exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+. Ca-Mg enrichment also occurs as Na-Cl-rich brine from the soil surface advects into ice-cemented soil. By modeling this process in the borehole soil, trends in ion distributions with depth can be predicted. Brine compositions from cation exchange reactions are consistent with Ca-Cl-rich brine compositions in the Dry Valleys, although additional water-rock interaction is proposed to account for the low Mg2+ concentrations in Don Juan Pond. Furthermore, the amount of CaCl2 that can be produced by exchange reactions is consistent with estimated amounts of CaCl2 in groundwaters beneath Don Juan Pond. This suggests that cation exchange reactions can explain the Ca-Cl-rich composition of the enigmatic Don Juan Pond and other brines in the Dry Valleys.

  2. Reactive arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive arthritis is a group of conditions that may involve the joints, eyes, and urinary and genital systems. ... The exact cause of reactive arthritis is unknown. It occurs most often in men younger than age 40. It may follow an infection in the urethra ...

  3. NOx formation from the combustion of monodisperse n-heptane sprays doped with fuel-nitrogen additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarv, Hamid; Cernansky, Nicholas P.

    1989-01-01

    A series of experiments with simulated synthetic fuels were conducted in order to investigate the effect of droplet size on the conversion of fuel-nitrogen to NOx. Pyridine and pyrrole were added to n-heptane as nitrogen-containing additives and burned as monodisperse fuel droplets under various operating conditions in a spray combustion facility. The experimental results indicate that under stoichiometric and fuel-rich conditions, reducing the droplet size increases the efficiency of fuel-N conversion to NOx. This observation is associated with improved oxidation of the pyrolysis fragments of the additive by better oxygen penetration through the droplet flame zone. The dominant reactions by which fuel-N is transformed to NOx were also considered analytically by a premixed laminar flame code. The calculations are compared to the small droplet size results.

  4. Formation and High Reactivity of the anti-Dioxo Form of High-Spin μ-Oxodioxodiiron(IV) as the Active Species That Cleaves Strong C-H Bonds.

    PubMed

    Kodera, Masahito; Ishiga, Shin; Tsuji, Tomokazu; Sakurai, Katsutoshi; Hitomi, Yutaka; Shiota, Yoshihito; Sajith, P K; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Mieda, Kaoru; Ogura, Takashi

    2016-04-18

    Recently, it was shown that μ-oxo-μ-peroxodiiron(III) is converted to high-spin μ-oxodioxodiiron(IV) through O-O bond scission. Herein, the formation and high reactivity of the anti-dioxo form of high-spin μ-oxodioxodiiron(IV) as the active oxidant are demonstrated on the basis of resonance Raman and electronic-absorption spectral changes, detailed kinetic studies, DFT calculations, activation parameters, kinetic isotope effects (KIE), and catalytic oxidation of alkanes. Decay of μ-oxodioxodiiron(IV) was greatly accelerated on addition of substrate. The reactivity order of substrates is toluenereactive in the C-H bond cleavage of ethylbenzene than the most reactive diiron system reported so far. The KIE for the reaction with toluene/[D8 ]toluene is 95 at -30 °C, which the largest in diiron systems reported so far. The present diiron complex efficiently catalyzes the oxidation of various alkanes with H2 O2 . PMID:26970337

  5. The N.A.C.A. Apparatus for Studying the Formation and Combustion of Fuel Sprays and the Results from Preliminary Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M

    1931-01-01

    Described here is an apparatus for studying the formation and combustion of fuel sprays under conditions closely simulating those in a high speed compression-ignition engine. The apparatus consists of a single-cylinder modified test engine, a fuel injection system so designed that a single charge of fuel can be injected into the combustion chamber, an electric driving motor, and a high-speed photographic apparatus. The cylinder head of the engine has a vertical disk form of combustion chamber whose sides are glass windows. When the fuel is injected into the combustion chamber, motion pictures at the rate of 2000 per second are taken of the spray formation by means of spark discharges. When combustion takes place, the light of combustion is recorded on the same photographic film as the spray photographs. Included here are the results of some tests to determine the effect of air temperature, air flow, and nozzle design on the spray formation. The results show that the compression temperature has little effect on the penetration of the fuel spray, but does not affect the dispersion, that air velocities of about 300 feet per second are necessary to destroy the core of the spray, and that the effect of air flow on the spray is controlled to a certain extent by the design of the injection nozzle. The results on the combustion of the spray show that when ignition does not take place until after spray cut-off, the ignition may start almost simultaneously throughout the combustion chamber or at different points throughout the chamber. When ignition takes place before spray cut-off, the combustion starts around the edge of the spray and then spreads throughout the chamber.

  6. CO J = 2-1 LINE EMISSION IN CLUSTER GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1: FUELING STAR FORMATION IN DENSE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wagg, Jeff; Pope, Alexandra; Alberts, Stacey; Armus, Lee; Desai, Vandana; Brodwin, Mark; Bussmann, Robert S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Melbourne, Jason; Stern, Daniel

    2012-06-20

    We present observations of CO J = 2-1 line emission in infrared-luminous cluster galaxies at z {approx} 1 using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our two primary targets are optically faint, dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) found to lie within 2 Mpc of the centers of two massive (>10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) galaxy clusters. CO line emission is not detected in either DOG. We calculate 3{sigma} upper limits to the CO J = 2-1 line luminosities, L'{sub CO} < 6.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} and <6.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}. Assuming a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor derived for ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the local universe, this translates to limits on the cold molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}}< 4.86 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} and M{sub H{sub 2}}< 5.30 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. Both DOGs exhibit mid-infrared continuum emission that follows a power law, suggesting that an active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributes to the dust heating. As such, estimates of the star formation efficiencies in these DOGs are uncertain. A third cluster member with an infrared luminosity, L{sub IR} < 7.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }, is serendipitously detected in CO J = 2-1 line emission in the field of one of the DOGs located roughly two virial radii away from the cluster center. The optical spectrum of this object suggests that it is likely an obscured AGN, and the measured CO line luminosity is L'{sub CO} = (1.94 {+-} 0.35) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}, which leads to an estimated cold molecular gas mass M{sub H{sub 2}}= (1.55{+-}0.28) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. A significant reservoir of molecular gas in a z {approx} 1 galaxy located away from the cluster center demonstrates that the fuel can exist to drive an increase in star formation and AGN activity at the outskirts of high-redshift clusters.

  7. PROBING REACTIVITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION USING XAD-8 RESIN ADSORPTION AND ULTRAFILTRATION FRACTIONATION. (R828045)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection by-product (DBP) reactivity (yield and speciation upon reaction with chlorine) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from two surface waters was investigated. The source waters, each having significantly different specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA

  8. Reactive Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with treatment and may cause joint damage. What Research Is Being Conducted on Reactive Arthritis? Researchers continue ... such as methotrexate and sulfasalazine. More information on research is available from the following websites: National Institutes ...

  9. Steric and Electronic Control over the Reactivity of a Thiolate-Ligated Fe(II) Complex with Dioxygen and Superoxide: Reversible μ-Oxo Dimer Formation

    PubMed Central

    Theisen, Roslyn M.; Shearer, Jason; Kaminsky, Werner; Kovacs, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    The reactivity between a thiolate-ligated five-coordinate complex [FeII(SMe2N4(tren))]+ (1) and dioxygen is examined in order to determine if O2 activation, resembling that of the metalloenzyme cytochrome P450, can be promoted even when O2 binds cis, as opposed to trans, to a thiolate. Previous work in our group showed that [FeII(SMe2N4-(tren))]+ (1) reacts readily with superoxide (O2−) in the presence of a proton source to afford H2O2 via an FeIII–OOH intermediate, thus providing a biomimetic model for the metalloenzyme superoxide reductase (SOR). Addition of O2 to 1 affords binuclear μ-oxo-bridged [FeIII(SMe2N4(tren))]2(μ2-O)(PF6)2•3MeCN (3). At low temperatures, in protic solvents, an intermediate is detected, the details of which will be the subject of a separate paper. Although the thiolate ligand does not appear to perturb the metrical parameters of the unsupported μ-oxo bridge (Fe–O=1.807(8) Å, and Fe–O–Fe= 155.3(5)° fall in the usual range), it decreases the magnetic coupling between the irons (J = −28 cm−1) and creates a rather basic oxo site. Protonation of this oxo using strong (HBF4, HCl) or weak (HOAc, NH4PF6, LutNHCl) acids results in bridge cleavage to cleanly afford the corresponding monomeric anion-ligated (OAc− (6), or Cl− (7)) or solvent-ligated (MeCN (4)) derivatives. Addition of OH− converts [FeIII(SMe2N4-(tren))(MeCN)]2+ (4) back to μ-oxo 3. Thus, μ-oxo bridge cleavage is reversible. The protonated μ-hydroxo-bridged intermediate is not observed. In an attempt to prevent μ-oxo dimer formation, and facilitate the observation of O2-bound intermediates, a bulkier tertiary amine ligand, tren-Et4= N-(2-amino-ethyl)-N-(2-diethylamino-ethyl)-N′,N′-diethyl-ethane-1,2-diamine, and the corresponding [FeII(SMe2N4(tren-Et4))]+ (5) complex was synthesized and structurally characterized. Steric repulsive interactions create unusually long FeII-N(3,4) amine bonds in 5 (mean distance = 2.219(1) Å). The [(tren-Et4)N4SMe2]1

  10. Reactivity and Chemoselectivity of Allenes in Rh(I)-Catalyzed Intermolecular (5 + 2) Cycloadditions with Vinylcyclopropanes: Allene-Mediated Rhodacycle Formation Can Poison Rh(I)-Catalyzed Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Allenes are important 2π building blocks in organic synthesis and engage as 2-carbon components in many metal-catalyzed reactions. Wender and co-workers discovered that methyl substituents on the terminal allene double bond counterintuitively change the reactivities of allenes in [Rh(CO)2Cl]2-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with vinylcyclopropanes (VCPs). More sterically encumbered allenes afford higher cycloadduct yields, and such effects are also observed in other Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular cycloadditions. Through density functional theory calculations (B3LYP and M06) and experiment, we explored this enigmatic reactivity and selectivity of allenes in [Rh(CO)2Cl]2-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with VCPs. The apparent low reactivity of terminally unsubstituted allenes is associated with a competing allene dimerization that irreversibly sequesters rhodium. With terminally substituted allenes, steric repulsion between the terminal substituents significantly increases the barrier of allene dimerization while the barrier of the (5 + 2) cycloaddition is not affected, and thus the cycloaddition prevails. Computation has also revealed the origin of chemoselectivity in (5 + 2) cycloadditions with allene-ynes. Although simple allene and acetylene have similar reaction barriers, intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions of allene-ynes occur exclusively at the terminal allene double bond. The terminal double bond is more reactive due to the enhanced d−π* backdonation. At the same time, insertion of the internal double bond of an allene-yne has a higher barrier as it would break π conjugation. Substituted alkynes are more difficult to insert compared with acetylene, because of the steric repulsion from the additional substituents. This leads to the greater reactivity of the allene double bond relative to the alkynyl group in allene-ynes. PMID:25379606

  11. N-Methoxy-N-methylcyanoformamide, a Highly Reactive Reagent for the Formation of β-Keto Weinreb Amides and Unsymmetrical Ketones.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Jeremy; Schwartz, Brett D

    2016-08-01

    A rapid and straightforward synthesis of the new and highly reactive reagent N-methoxy-N-methylcyanoformamide from trimethylsilyl cyanide and N-methoxy-N-methylcarbamoylimidazole, is reported. This reagent enables the one-pot preparation of β-carbonyl Weinreb amides from lithium enolates, one-carbon homologated Weinreb amides, and unsymmetrical ketones in one-pot procedures from various organometallic species. PMID:27433740

  12. Standard format and content for the safety analysis report for an independent spent fuel storage installation or monitored retrievable storage installation (dry storage): Revision 1, Task CE 406-4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    Part 72, ''Licensing Requirements for the Independent Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste,'' of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations specifies the information to be supplied in applications for licenses to store spent fuel in an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) or to store spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) installation. However, Part 72 does not specify the format for presentation of the safety analysis report (SAR). Guidance on the content of the SAR will vary, depending on the type of installation that is planned. This guide represents a Standard Format that is acceptable to the NRC staff for the SAR required for the license application. Conformance with this Standard Format, however, is not mandatory. License applications with differing SAF formats will be acceptable to the staff if they provide an adequate basis for the findings required for the issuance of a license.

  13. 13C Pathway Analysis for the Role of Formate in Electricity Generation by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Using Lactate in Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuai; Guo, Weihua; H. Nealson, Kenneth; Feng, Xueyang; He, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising technology for direct electricity generation from organics by microorganisms. The type of electron donors fed into MFCs affects the electrical performance, and mechanistic understanding of such effects is important to optimize the MFC performance. In this study, we used a model organism in MFCs, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and 13C pathway analysis to investigate the role of formate in electricity generation and the related microbial metabolism. Our results indicated a synergistic effect of formate and lactate on electricity generation, and extra formate addition on the original lactate resulted in more electrical output than using formate or lactate as a sole electron donor. Based on the 13C tracer analysis, we discovered decoupled cell growth and electricity generation in S. oneidensis MR-1 during co-utilization of lactate and formate (i.e., while the lactate was mainly metabolized to support the cell growth, the formate was oxidized to release electrons for higher electricity generation). To our best knowledge, this is the first time that 13C tracer analysis was applied to study microbial metabolism in MFCs and it was demonstrated to be a valuable tool to understand the metabolic pathways affected by electron donors in the selected electrochemically-active microorganisms. PMID:26868848

  14. (13)C Pathway Analysis for the Role of Formate in Electricity Generation by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Using Lactate in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shuai; Guo, Weihua; H Nealson, Kenneth; Feng, Xueyang; He, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising technology for direct electricity generation from organics by microorganisms. The type of electron donors fed into MFCs affects the electrical performance, and mechanistic understanding of such effects is important to optimize the MFC performance. In this study, we used a model organism in MFCs, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and (13)C pathway analysis to investigate the role of formate in electricity generation and the related microbial metabolism. Our results indicated a synergistic effect of formate and lactate on electricity generation, and extra formate addition on the original lactate resulted in more electrical output than using formate or lactate as a sole electron donor. Based on the (13)C tracer analysis, we discovered decoupled cell growth and electricity generation in S. oneidensis MR-1 during co-utilization of lactate and formate (i.e., while the lactate was mainly metabolized to support the cell growth, the formate was oxidized to release electrons for higher electricity generation). To our best knowledge, this is the first time that (13)C tracer analysis was applied to study microbial metabolism in MFCs and it was demonstrated to be a valuable tool to understand the metabolic pathways affected by electron donors in the selected electrochemically-active microorganisms. PMID:26868848

  15. Effect of hydrocarbon fuel type on fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, E. L.; Bittker, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    A modified jet fuel thermal oxidation tester (JFTOT) procedure was used to evaluate deposit and sediment formation for four pure hydrocarbon fuels over the temperature range 150 to 450 C in 316-stainless-steel heater tubes. Fuel types were a normal alkane, an alkene, a naphthene, and an aromatic. Each fuel exhibited certain distinctive deposit and sediment formation characteristics. The effect of aluminum and 316-stainless-steel heater tube surfaces on deposit formation for the fuel n-decane over the same temperature range was investigated. Results showed that an aluminum surface had lower deposit formation rates at all temperatures investigated. By using a modified JFTOT procedure the thermal stability of four pure hydrocarbon fuels and two practical fuels (Jet A and home heating oil no. 2) was rated on the basis of their breakpoint temperatures. Results indicate that this method could be used to rate thermal stability for a series of fuels.

  16. Shock tube study of the fuel structure effects on the chemical kinetic mechanisms responsible for soot formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.

    1983-01-01

    Soot formation in toluene-, benzene-, and acetylene-oxygen-argon mixtures was investigated to study soot formation in a combustion environment. High concentrations of oxygen completely suppress soot formation. The addition of oxygen at relatively low concentrations uniformly suppresses soot formation at high pressures, while at relatively lower pressures it suppresses soot formation at higher temperatures while promoting soot production at lower temperatures. The observed behavior indicates that oxidation reactions compete with ring fragmentation. The main conclusion to be drawn from the results is that the soot formation mechanism is probably the same for the pyrolysis and oxidation of hydrocarbons. That is, the addition of oxygen does not alter the soot route but rather promotes or inhibits this route by means of competitive reactions. An approach to empirical modeling of soot formation during pyrolysis of aromatic hydrocarbons is also presented.

  17. Reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is one of the spondyloarthropathy family of clinical syndromes. The clinical features are those shared by other members of the spondyloarthritis family, though it is distinguished by a clear relationship with a precipitating infection. Susceptibility to reactive arthritis is closely linked with the class 1 HLA allele B27; it is likely that all sub-types pre-dispose to this condition. The link between HLA B27 and infection is mirrored by the development of arthritis in HLA B27-transgenic rats. In this model, arthritis does not develop in animals maintained in a germ-free environment. Infections of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory tract appear to provoke reactive arthritis and a wide range of pathogens has now been implicated. Although mechanistic parallels may exist, reactive arthritis is distinguished from Lyme disease, rheumatic fever and Whipple's disease by virtue of the distinct clinical features and the link with HLA B27. As in these conditions both antigens and DNA of several micro-organisms have been detected in joint material from patients with reactive arthritis. The role of such disseminated microbial elements in the provocation or maintenance of arthritis remains unclear. HLA B27-restricted T-cell responses to microbial antigens have been demonstrated and these may be important in disease pathogenesis. The importance of dissemination of bacteria from sites of mucosal infection and their deposition in joints has yet to be fully understood. The role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of reactive arthritis is being explored; in some circumstances, both the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of certain antibiotics appear to be valuable. The term reactive arthritis should be seen as a transitory one, reflecting a concept which may itself be on the verge of replacement, as our understanding of the condition develops. Nevertheless it appropriately describes arthritis that is associated with demonstrable

  18. Cationic Intermixing and Reactivity at the La2 Mo2 O9 /La0.8 Sr0.2 MnO3-δ Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrolyte-Cathode Interface.

    PubMed

    Ravella, Uday K; Liu, Jingjing; Corbel, Gwenaël; Skinner, Stephen J; Lacorre, Philippe

    2016-08-23

    Among standard high-temperature cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells, La0.8 Sr0.2 MnO3-δ (LSM) displays the least reactivity with the oxide-ion conductor La2 Mo2 O9 (LMO), yet a reaction is observed at high processing temperatures, identified by using XRD and focused ion beam secondary-ion mass spectrometry (FIB-SIMS) after annealing at 1050 and 1150 °C. Additionally, Sr and Mn solutions were deposited and annealed on LMO pellets, as well as a Mo solution on a LSM pellet. From these studies several reaction products were identified by using XRD and located by using FIB-SIMS on the surface of pelletised samples. We used depth profiling to show that the reactivity extended up to ∼10 μm from the surface region. If Sr was present, a SrMoO4 -type scheelite phase was always observed as a reaction product, and if Mn was present, LaMnO3+δ single crystals were observed on the surface of the LMO pellets. Additional phases such as La2 MoO6 and La6 MoO12 were also detected depending on the configuration and annealing temperature. Reaction mechanisms and detailed reaction formulae are proposed to explain these observations. The strongest driving force for cationic diffusion appears to originate from Mo(6+) and Mn(3+) cations, rather than from Sr(2+) . PMID:27478975

  19. Jet fuel instability mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanisms of the formation of fuel-insoluble deposits were studied in several real fuels and in a model fuel consisting of tetralin in dodecane solution. The influence of addition to the fuels of small concentrations of various compounds on the quantities of deposits formed and on the formation and disappearance of oxygenated species in solution was assessed. The effect of temperature on deposit formation was also investigated over the range of 308-453 K.

  20. Analysis of the effect of transverse power distribution in an involute fuel plate with and without oxide film formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. S.

    1998-10-27

    Existing thermal hydraulics computer codes can account for variations in power and temperature in the axial and thickness directions but variations across the width of the plate cannot be accounted for. In the case of fuel plates in an annular core this can lead to significant errors which are accentuated by the presence of an oxide layer that builds up on the aluminum cladding with burnup. This paper uses a three dimensional SINDA model to account for the transverse variations in power. The effect of oxide thickness on these differences is studied in detail. Power distribution and fuel conductivity are also considered. The lower temperatures predicted with the SINDA model result in a greater margin to clad and fuel damage.

  1. Investigation on the reactivity of α-azidochalcones with carboxylic acids: Formation of α-amido-1,3-diketones and highly substituted 2-(trifluoromethyl)oxazoles.

    PubMed

    Rajaguru, Kandasamy; Mariappan, Arumugam; Suresh, Rajendran; Manivannan, Periasamy; Muthusubramanian, Shanmugam

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of α-azidochalcones with carboxylic acids has been investigated resulting in the formation of α-amido-1,3-diketones under microwave irradiation via in situ formation of 2H-azirine intermediates. An interesting reaction is described wherein, with trifluoroacetic acid at lower temperature, it affords highly substituted 2-(trifluoromethyl)oxazoles. These flexible transformations proceed under solvent free conditions in good to excellent yields without any catalyst. PMID:26664623

  2. Investigation on the reactivity of α-azidochalcones with carboxylic acids: Formation of α-amido-1,3-diketones and highly substituted 2-(trifluoromethyl)oxazoles

    PubMed Central

    Rajaguru, Kandasamy; Mariappan, Arumugam; Suresh, Rajendran; Manivannan, Periasamy

    2015-01-01

    Summary The reaction of α-azidochalcones with carboxylic acids has been investigated resulting in the formation of α-amido-1,3-diketones under microwave irradiation via in situ formation of 2H-azirine intermediates. An interesting reaction is described wherein, with trifluoroacetic acid at lower temperature, it affords highly substituted 2-(trifluoromethyl)oxazoles. These flexible transformations proceed under solvent free conditions in good to excellent yields without any catalyst. PMID:26664623

  3. Flash pyrolysis of biomass with reactive and non-reactive gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P. T.; Sundaram, M. S.

    1983-03-01

    The process chemistry of the flash pyrolysis of biomass (wood) with the reactive gases, H2 and CH4 and with the nonreactive gas He was determined in a 1 in. downflow tubular reactor. It is found that with hydrogen, flash hydropyrolysis leads to high yields of methane and CO which can be used for SNG and methanol production. With methane, flash methanolysis of wood, leads to high yields of ethylene, benzene and CO which can be used for the production of valuable feedstocks and methanol fuel. At reactor conditions of 50 psi and 10,000 C and approximately 1 sec residence time, the ethylene yield based on wood carbon converted is 22%, benzene 12% and the CO yield is 48%. The yield of ethylene is 2.2 times higher with methane than with helium, which indicates a free radical reaction between CH4 and the pyrolyzed wood. A preliminary process analysis indicates an economically competitive process for the production of ethylene, benzene and ethanol based on the methanolysis of wood. The development of the data base for the flash pyrolysis of wood and other biomass materials with methane and other reactive gases and the determination of the role of the hemicellulose and lignin in the formation of these valuable fuels and feedstocks are recommended.

  4. A particle assembly/constrained expansion (PACE) model for the formation and structure of porous metal oxide deposits on nuclear fuel rods in pressurized light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Donald W.; Lu, Shijing; O'Brien, Christopher J.; Bucholz, Eric W.; Rak, Zsolt

    2015-02-01

    A new model is proposed for the structure and properties of porous metal oxide scales (aka Chalk River Unidentified Deposits (CRUD)) observed on the nuclear fuel rod cladding in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The model is based on the thermodynamically-driven expansion of agglomerated octahedral nickel ferrite particles in response to pH and temperature changes in the CRUD. The model predicts that porous nickel ferrite with internal {1 1 1} surfaces is a thermodynamically stable structure under PWR conditions even when the free energy of formation of bulk nickel ferrite is positive. This explains the pervasive presence of nickel ferrite in CRUD, observed CRUD microstructures, why CRUD maintains its porosity, and variations in porosity within the CRUD observed experimentally. This model is a stark departure from decades of conventional wisdom and detailed theoretical analysis of CRUD chemistry, and defines new research directions for model validation, and for understanding and ultimately controlling CRUD formation.

  5. Fuel-rich catalytic combustion of Jet-A fuel-equivalence ratios 5.0 to 8.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.; Gracia-Salcedo, Carmen M.

    1989-01-01

    Fuel-rich catalytic combustion (E.R. greater than 5.0) is a unique technique for preheating a hydrocarbon fuel to temperatures much higher than those obtained by conventional heat exchangers. In addition to producing very reactive molecules, the process upgrades the structure of the fuel by the formation of hydrogen and smaller hydrocarbons and produces a cleaner burning fuel by removing some of the fuel carbon from the soot formation chain. With fuel-rich catalytic combustion as the first stage of a two stage combustion system, enhanced fuel properties can be utilized by both high speed engines, where time for ignition and complete combustion is limited, and engines where emission of thermal NO sub x is critical. Two-stage combustion (rich-lean) has been shown to be effective for NO sub x reduction in stationary burners where residence times are long enough to burn-up the soot formed in the first stage. Such residence times are not available in aircraft engines. Thus, the soot-free nature of the present process is critical for high speed engines. The successful application of fuel-rich catalytic combustion to Jet-A, a multicomponent fuel used in gas turbine combustors, is discusssed.

  6. Effects of Molecular Structure of the Oxidation Products of Reactive Atmospheric Hydrocarbons on the Formation of Secondary Organic Particular Matter, Including the Effects of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niakan, Negar

    Organic aerosols have significant effects on human health, air quality and climate. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are produced by the oxidation of primary-volatile organic compounds (VOC). For example, α-pinene reacts with oxidants such as hydroxyl radical (OH), ozone (O3), and nitrate radical (NO3), accounting for a significant portion of total organic aerosol in the atmosphere. Experimental studies have shown that the oxidation process between α-pinene and ozone has the most significant impact in the formation of SOA (Hoffmann et al., 1997). Most of the models used to predict SOA formation, however, are limited in that they neglect the role of water due to uncertainty about the structure and nature of organic compounds, in addition to uncertainty about the effect of varying relative humidity (RH) on atmospheric organic particulate matter (OPM) (Kanakidou et al., 2005). For this study, structures of organic compounds involved in the formation of SOA are estimated, and the role of water uptake is incorporated in the process. The Combinatorial Aerosol Formation Model (CAFM) is a deterministic model used to determine the amount of organic mass (M o µg m-3) formation based on the predicted structures. Results show that the amount of SOA that is formed is almost negligible when the amount of parent hydrocarbon involved in the reaction is low ( i.e. around 5 µg m-3), especially at lower RH. Observing compounds with a greater number of polar groups (alcohol and carboxylic acid) indicates that structure has a significant effect on organic mass formation. This observation is in agreement with the fact that the more hydrophilic the compound is, the higher RH, leading to more condensation into the PM phase.

  7. Effects of UV-C irradiation on phosphoinositide turnover in plant cells: similarities with those occurring via the formation of reactive oxygen intermediates in animal cells.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, M P; Ricci, D; Fraternale, D; Piatti, E; Manunta, A; Accorsi, A

    1999-03-01

    With the aim of examining the response of plant cells to UV-C irradiation, we investigated the behaviour of the phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PtdIns 4,5-P2) molecule (the precursor of the phosphoinositide signal transduction cascade) by exposing callus cells from Peucedanum verticillare to UV-C (130 J m-2) and by examining the level and the fatty acid composition of PtdIns 4,5-P2 at different times after irradiation. We show that a pathway for the UV-C response includes transient PtdIns 4,5-P2 breakdown. The effect of ultraviolet rays is mimicked by H2O2 suggesting that in this plant it may be brought about by reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI), as already underlined in experimental animal models. PMID:10374257

  8. Unravelling the mechanisms of reactive oxygen species formation in nanohybrid systems of porphyrins and enriched (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes for photosensitization.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Camila S; Ferreira, Daniele C; Sáfar, Gustavo A M; Gontijo, Rafael N; Fantini, Cristiano; Martins, Dayse C S; Idemori, Ynara M; Pinheiro, Maurício V B; Krambrock, Klaus

    2016-07-27

    Nanohybrids of enriched (6,5) single-walled semiconducting carbon nanotubes (E-SWCNTs) and porphyrin can be used synergistically as photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents. The efficiency of different porphyrins within the nanohybrids was investigated and compared with results obtained from porphyrins in previous studies. Reactive oxygen species singlet oxygen (1)O2 and for the first time hydroxyl radical ˙OH generation by the nanohybrids under illumination were detected by electron paramagnetic resonance using spin trapping molecules TEMP and PBN. Based on the analysis, we improve the modelling of charge transport within the nanohybrids, which is also detected by Raman scattering. It is shown that the 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-trimethylammoniumphenyl)porphyrin [H2TTMAPP(OTs)4] and E-SWCNT form very efficient nanohybrids for PDT applications in the visible spectral range. PMID:27402463

  9. Chicken Fetal Liver DNA Damage and Adduct Formation by Activation-Dependent DNA-Reactive Carcinogens and Related Compounds of Several Structural Classes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gary M.; Duan, Jian-Dong; Brunnemann, Klaus D.; Iatropoulos, Michael J.; Vock, Esther; Deschl, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    The chicken egg genotoxicity assay (CEGA), which utilizes the liver of an intact and aseptic embryo-fetal test organism, was evaluated using four activation-dependent DNA-reactive carcinogens and four structurally related less potent carcinogens or non-carcinogens. In the assay, three daily doses of test substances were administered to eggs containing 9–11-day-old fetuses and the fetal livers were assessed for two endpoints, DNA breaks using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay and DNA adducts using the 32P-nucleotide postlabeling (NPL) assay. The effects of four carcinogens of different structures requiring distinct pathways of bioactivation, i.e., 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), were compared with structurally related non-carcinogens fluorene (FLU) and benzo[e]pyrene (B[e]P) or weak carcinogens, aflatoxin B2 (AFB2) and N-nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA). The four carcinogens all produced DNA breaks at microgram or low milligram total doses, whereas less potent carcinogens and non-carcinogens yielded borderline or negative results, respectively, at higher doses. AAF and B[a]P produced DNA adducts, whereas none was found with the related comparators FLU or B[e]P, consistent with comet results. DEN and NDELA were also negative for adducts, as expected in the case of DEN for an alkylating agent in the standard NPL assay. Also, AFB1 and AFB2 were negative in NPL, as expected, due to the nature of ring opened aflatoxin adducts, which are resistant to enzymatic digestion. Thus, the CEGA, using comet and NPL, is capable of detection of the genotoxicity of diverse DNA-reactive carcinogens, while not yielding false positives for non-carcinogens. PMID:24973097

  10. 08FFL-0020Influence of High Fuel Rail Pressure and Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction on PM Formation in an Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, Michael D; Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John Morse; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The influence of fuel rail pressure (FRP) and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on particulate matter (PM) formation is investigated in this paper along with notes regarding the NOx and other emissions. Increasing FRP was shown to reduce the overall soot and total PM mass for four operating conditions. These conditions included two high speed conditions (2400 rpm at 540 and 270 Nm of torque) and two moderated speed conditions (1400 rpm at 488 and 325 Nm). The concentrations of CO2 and NOx increased with fuel rail pressure and this is attributed to improved fuel-air mixing. Interestingly, the level of unburned hydrocarbons remained constant (or increased slightly) with increased FRP. PM concentration was measured using an AVL smoke meter and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS); and total PM was collected using standard gravimetric techniques. These results showed that the smoke number and particulate concentrations decrease with increasing FRP. However the decrease becomes more gradual as very high rail pressures. Additionally, the total PM decreased with increasing FRP; however, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) reaches a maximum after which it declines with higher rail pressure. The total PM was collected for the two 1400 rpm conditions downstream of the engine, diesel oxidation catalyst, and a urea-SCR catalyst. The results show that significant PM reduction occurs in the SCR catalyst even during high rates of urea dosage. Analysis of the PM indicates that residual SOF is burned up in the SCR catalyst.

  11. A role of hydrocarbon reaction for NO{sub x} formation and reduction in fuel-rich pulverized coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Kamikawa, Yuki; Okazaki, Teruyuki; Yamamoto, Kenji; Orita, Hisayuki

    2010-08-15

    We have investigated an index for modeling a NO{sub x} reaction mechanism of pulverized coal combustion. The reaction mechanism of coal nitrogen was examined by drop-tube furnace experiments under various burning conditions. We proposed the gas phase stoichiometric ratio (SRgas) as a key index to evaluate NO{sub x} concentration in fuel-rich flames. The SRgas was defined as: SRgas {identical_to} amount of fuel required for stoichiometry combustion/amount of gasified fuel where, the amount of gasified fuel was defined as the amount of fuel which had been released to the gas phase by pyrolysis, oxidation and gasification reactions. When SRgas < 1.0, NO{sub x} concentration was strongly influenced by the value of SRgas. In this condition, the NO{sub x} concentration was hardly influenced by coal type, particle diameter, or reaction time. We developed a model to analyze NO{sub x} and XN(HCN, NH{sub 3}) concentrations for pulverized coal/air combustion and coal/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} combustion, based on the index. NO{sub x} and XN concentrations did not reproduce the experimental results without considering reactions between hydrocarbons and NO{sub x}. The hydrocarbon reaction was important for both NO{sub x} and XN, especially for air combustion. In the present model, an empirical formula was used to estimate the total concentration of hydrocarbons in coal flame. The reaction of heavy hydrocarbons which had plural aromatic rings was very important to analyze the reaction mechanism of hydrocarbons for coal combustion in detail. When burning temperature and SRgas were the same, total hydrocarbon concentration in a coal flame was larger than that of a light gaseous hydrocarbon flame. Total hydrocarbon concentration in oxy-fuel combustion was lower than that in air combustion. We verified the proposed model by experimental results obtained for a drop-tube furnace and a laboratory-scale furnace that had an installed low-NO{sub x} burner. (author)

  12. Effect of metal-ion-to-fuel ratio on the phase formation of bioceramic phosphates synthesized by self-propagating combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Swamiappan; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2008-07-01

    Synthetic calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca10 (PO4)6 (OH)2) is a well-known bioceramic material used in orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent biocompatibility and bone-bonding ability due to its structural and compositional similarity to human bone. Here we report, for the first time, the synthesis of HAP by combustion employing tartaric acid as a fuel. Calcium nitrate is used as the source of calcium and diammonium hydrogen phosphate serves as the source of phosphate ions. Reaction processing parameters such as the pH, fuel-oxidant ratio and autoignition temperature are controlled and monitored. The products were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, which revealed the formation of a hexagonal hydroxyapatite phase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra showed that the substitution of a carbonate ion occurs at the phosphate site. The morphology of the particles was imaged by scanning electron microscopy, which also revealed that the particles are of submicron size. Thermal analysis showed that the phase formation takes place at the time of combustion. Surface area and porosity analysis showed that the surface area is high and that the pores are of nanometer size. The mean grain size of the HAP powder, determined by the Debye-Scherrer formula, is in the range 20-30 nm. Chemical analyses to determine the Ca : P atomic ratio in synthesized ceramics were performed, and it was found to be 1 : 1.66.

  13. Synthesis and analysis of reactive nanocomposites prepared arrested reactive milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbrajkar, Swati M.

    Different types of reactive nanocomposites have been synthesized by Arrested Reactive Milling (ARM). The technical approach was to increase the interface area available for heterogeneous reaction between solid fuel and oxidizer components. Using aluminum as the main fuel and different metal oxides as oxidizers, highly energetic reactive nanocomposites with different degrees of structural refinement were synthesized. Specifically, stoichiometric Al-MoO 3, Al-CuO, and Al-NaNO3 material systems were studied in detail. The correlation of heterogeneous exothermic reactions occurring in the nanocomposite powders upon their heating at low rates and ignition events observed for the same powders heated rapidly was of interest. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and heated filament ignition experiments were used to quantify the ignition kinetics and related reaction mechanisms. Fuel rich Al-MoO3 nanocomposites were also synthesized using ARM. Optimum composition and milling parameters were identified for fuel-rich compositions. Analysis of exothermic reactions in Al-MoO3 system showed that kinetics of such reactions could not be determined by isoconversion processing and respective activation energies could not be meaningfully found as functions of reaction progress. Instead, detailed DSC measurements at different heating rates are required to enable one in developing a multi-step kinetic model to describe such reactions adequately.

  14. Multi-functional reactively-sputtered copper oxide electrodes for supercapacitor and electro-catalyst in direct methanol fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Sambhaji M.; Kim, Jongmin; Inamdar, Akbar I.; Woo, Hyeonseok; Jo, Yongcheol; Pawar, Bharati S.; Cho, Sangeun; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik

    2016-02-01

    This work reports on the concurrent electrochemical energy storage and conversion characteristics of granular copper oxide electrode films prepared using reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at room temperature under different oxygen environments. The obtained films are characterized in terms of their structural, morphological, and compositional properties. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope studies reveal that granular, single-phase Cu2O and CuO can be obtained by controlling the oxygen flow rate. The electrochemical energy storage properties of the films are investigated by carrying out cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. The electrochemical analysis reveals that the Cu2O and CuO electrodes have high specific capacitances of 215 and 272 F/g in 6 M KOH solution with a capacity retention of about 80% and 85% after 3000 cycles, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry are used to study the electrochemical energy conversion properties of the films via methanol electro-oxidation. The results show that the Cu2O and CuO electrodes are electro-catalytically active and highly stable.

  15. Multi-functional reactively-sputtered copper oxide electrodes for supercapacitor and electro-catalyst in direct methanol fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Sambhaji M; Kim, Jongmin; Inamdar, Akbar I; Woo, Hyeonseok; Jo, Yongcheol; Pawar, Bharati S; Cho, Sangeun; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on the concurrent electrochemical energy storage and conversion characteristics of granular copper oxide electrode films prepared using reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at room temperature under different oxygen environments. The obtained films are characterized in terms of their structural, morphological, and compositional properties. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope studies reveal that granular, single-phase Cu2O and CuO can be obtained by controlling the oxygen flow rate. The electrochemical energy storage properties of the films are investigated by carrying out cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. The electrochemical analysis reveals that the Cu2O and CuO electrodes have high specific capacitances of 215 and 272 F/g in 6 M KOH solution with a capacity retention of about 80% and 85% after 3000 cycles, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry are used to study the electrochemical energy conversion properties of the films via methanol electro-oxidation. The results show that the Cu2O and CuO electrodes are electro-catalytically active and highly stable. PMID:26888077

  16. Multi-functional reactively-sputtered copper oxide electrodes for supercapacitor and electro-catalyst in direct methanol fuel cell applications

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Sambhaji M.; Kim, Jongmin; Inamdar, Akbar I.; Woo, Hyeonseok; Jo, Yongcheol; Pawar, Bharati S.; Cho, Sangeun; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on the concurrent electrochemical energy storage and conversion characteristics of granular copper oxide electrode films prepared using reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at room temperature under different oxygen environments. The obtained films are characterized in terms of their structural, morphological, and compositional properties. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope studies reveal that granular, single-phase Cu2O and CuO can be obtained by controlling the oxygen flow rate. The electrochemical energy storage properties of the films are investigated by carrying out cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests. The electrochemical analysis reveals that the Cu2O and CuO electrodes have high specific capacitances of 215 and 272 F/g in 6 M KOH solution with a capacity retention of about 80% and 85% after 3000 cycles, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry are used to study the electrochemical energy conversion properties of the films via methanol electro-oxidation. The results show that the Cu2O and CuO electrodes are electro-catalytically active and highly stable. PMID:26888077

  17. High-performance Fuel Cell with Stretched Catalyst-Coated Membrane: One-step Formation of Cracked Electrode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Moon; Ahn, Chi-Yeong; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kim, Sungjun; Hwang, Wonchan; Jang, Segeun; Shin, Sungsoo; Lee, Gunhee; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-01-01

    We have achieved performance enhancement of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) though crack generation on its electrodes. It is the first attempt to enhance the performance of PEMFC by using cracks which are generally considered as defects. The pre-defined, cracked electrode was generated by stretching a catalyst-coated Nafion membrane. With the strain-stress property of the membrane that is unique in the aspect of plastic deformation, membrane electrolyte assembly (MEA) was successfully incorporated into the fuel cell. Cracked electrodes with the variation of strain were investigated and electrochemically evaluated. Remarkably, mechanical stretching of catalyst-coated Nafion membrane led to a decrease in membrane resistance and an improvement in mass transport, which resulted in enhanced device performance. PMID:27210793

  18. High-performance Fuel Cell with Stretched Catalyst-Coated Membrane: One-step Formation of Cracked Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Moon; Ahn, Chi-Yeong; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kim, Sungjun; Hwang, Wonchan; Jang, Segeun; Shin, Sungsoo; Lee, Gunhee; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-05-01

    We have achieved performance enhancement of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) though crack generation on its electrodes. It is the first attempt to enhance the performance of PEMFC by using cracks which are generally considered as defects. The pre-defined, cracked electrode was generated by stretching a catalyst-coated Nafion membrane. With the strain-stress property of the membrane that is unique in the aspect of plastic deformation, membrane electrolyte assembly (MEA) was successfully incorporated into the fuel cell. Cracked electrodes with the variation of strain were investigated and electrochemically evaluated. Remarkably, mechanical stretching of catalyst-coated Nafion membrane led to a decrease in membrane resistance and an improvement in mass transport, which resulted in enhanced device performance.

  19. High-performance Fuel Cell with Stretched Catalyst-Coated Membrane: One-step Formation of Cracked Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Moon; Ahn, Chi-Yeong; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kim, Sungjun; Hwang, Wonchan; Jang, Segeun; Shin, Sungsoo; Lee, Gunhee; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-01-01

    We have achieved performance enhancement of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) though crack generation on its electrodes. It is the first attempt to enhance the performance of PEMFC by using cracks which are generally considered as defects. The pre-defined, cracked electrode was generated by stretching a catalyst-coated Nafion membrane. With the strain-stress property of the membrane that is unique in the aspect of plastic deformation, membrane electrolyte assembly (MEA) was successfully incorporated into the fuel cell. Cracked electrodes with the variation of strain were investigated and electrochemically evaluated. Remarkably, mechanical stretching of catalyst-coated Nafion membrane led to a decrease in membrane resistance and an improvement in mass transport, which resulted in enhanced device performance. PMID:27210793

  20. Study of scale formation on AISI 316L in simulated solid oxide fuel cell bi-polar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Singh , P.; Windisch, C.F., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Significant progress made towards reducing the operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) from {approx}1000 C to {approx}600 C is expected to permit the use of metallic materials with substantial cost reduction. One of the components in a SOFC stack to be made of metallic materials is a bipolar separator, also called an interconnect. It provides electrical connection between individual cells and serves as a gas separator to prevent mixing of the fuel and air. At operating temperature, the material selected for interconnects should possess good chemical and mechanical stability in complex fuel and oxidant gaseous environments, good electrical conductivity, and a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) that matches that of the cathode, anode, and electrolyte components. Cr2O3 scale-forming alloys appear to be the most promising candidates. There appears to be a mechanism whereby the environment on the fuel side of a stainless steel interconnect changes the corrosion behavior of the metal on the air side. The corrosion behavior of 316L stainless steel simultaneously exposed to air on one side and H2+3%H2O on the other at 907 K was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The electrical property of the investigated material was determined in terms of area-specific resistance (ASR). The chemical and electrical properties of 316L exposed to a dual environment of air/ (H2+H2O) were compared to those of 316L exposed to a single environment of air/air.

  1. Effect of Nozzle Design on Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a High-Speed Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    Fuel was injected from different type of injection nozzles into the combustion chamber of the NACA combustion apparatus, operated as a compression-ignition engine. High speed motion pictures were taken of the fuel sprays and combustion. Single-orifice nozzles of 0.008, 0.020, and 0.040 inch diameter, and multiorifice nozzles having 2, 6, and 16 orifices were tested. Nozzles having impinging jets and slit orifices were also included. The photographs indicate that the rate of vapor diffusion from the spray is comparatively slow and that this slow rate of diffusion for combustion chambers with little or no air flow prevents the compression-ignition engine from giving the high performance inherent in the high compression ratios. The sprays from the multiorifice nozzles destroyed the air movement to a greater extent than did those from single orifice nozzles. It is concluded that high performance cannot be realized until the methods of distributing the fuel are improved by means of the injection-nozzle design, air flow, or both.

  2. Theoretical study of 1,6-anhydrosugar formation from phenyl D-glucosides under basic condition: reasons for higher reactivity of β-anomer.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Takashi; Nakao, Yoshihide; Sato, Hirofumi; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2010-12-17

    Degradation of anomeric phenyl d-glucosides to levoglucosan under basic condition is theoretically studied. MP4(SDQ)//DFT(B3LYP)-computational results indicate that the degradation of phenyl α-glucoside (R(α)) occurs via the S(N)icB mechanism. In this mechanism, the oxyanion at the C6, which is formed through deprotonation of the OH group, directly attacks the anomeric carbon. On the other hand, the degradation of phenyl β-glucoside (R(β)) occurs via the S(N)icB(2) mechanism. In this mechanism, the oxyanion at the C2 attacks the anomeric carbon in a nucleophilic manner to afford 1,2-anhydride intermediate and then the oxyanion at the C6 attacks the anomeric carbon to afford levoglucosan. The activation barrier is much lower in the reaction of R(β) (ΔG(0++) = 25.6 kcal/mol and E(a) = 26.5 kcal/mol) than in the reaction of R(α) (ΔG(0++) = 38.1 kcal/mol and E(a) = 37.2 kcal/mol), which is consistent with the experimental observation that β-glucoside is generally much more reactive than the corresponding α-glucoside. The lower activation barrier of the reaction of R(β) arises from the stereoelectronic effect, which is induced by the charge transfer from the ring oxygen to the anomeric carbon, and the staggered conformation around the C1-C2 bond. When the stereoelectronic effect is absent, the degradation needs larger activation energy; for instance, the degradation of phenyl 5a-carba-β-d-glucoside (R(Cβ)) occurs with large ΔG(0++) and E(a) values like those of α-glucosides, because the methylene group of R(Cβ) does not contribute to the stereoelectronic effect. Also, the conformation around the C1-C2 bond is staggered in the transition state of the R(β) reaction but eclipsed in that of the R(α) reaction, which also leads to the larger reactivity of R(β). PMID:21082769

  3. Double-stranded DNA-templated cleavage of oligonucleotides containing a P3'->N5' linkage triggered by triplex formation: the effects of chemical modifications and remarkable enhancement in reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kosuke Ramon; Kodama, Tetsuya; Tomizu, Masaharu; Negoro, Yoshinori; Orita, Ayako; Osaki, Tomohisa; Hosoki, Noritsugu; Tanaka, Takaya; Imanishi, Takeshi; Obika, Satoshi

    2010-11-01

    We recently reported double-stranded DNA-templated cleavage of oligonucleotides as a sequence-specific DNA-detecting method. In this method, triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) modified with 5'-amino-2',4'-BNA were used as a DNA-detecting probe. This modification introduced a P3'→N5' linkage (P-N linkage) in the backbone of the TFO, which was quickly cleaved under acidic conditions when it formed a triplex. The prompt fission of the P-N linkage was assumed to be driven by a conformational strain placed on the linkage upon triplex formation. Therefore, chemical modifications around the P-N linkage should change the reactivity by altering the microenvironment. We synthesized 5'-aminomethyl type nucleic acids, and incorporated them into TFOs instead of 5'-amino-2',4'-BNA to investigate the effect of 5'-elongation. In addition, 2',4'-BNA/LNA or 2',5'-linked DNA were introduced at the 3'- and/or 5'-neighboring residues of 5'-amino-2',4'-BNA to reveal neighboring residual effects. We evaluated the triplex stability and reaction properties of these TFOs, and found out that chemical modifications around the P-N linkage greatly affected their reaction properties. Notably, 2',5'-linked DNA at the 3' position flanking 5'-amino-2',4'-BNA brought significantly higher reactivity, and we succeeded in indicating that a TFO with this modification is promising as a DNA analysis tool. PMID:20615902

  4. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  5. Formation of broadband antireflective and superhydrophilic subwavelength structures on fused silica using one-step self-masking reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xin; Jiang, Xiaodong; Huang, Jin; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Zu, Xiaotao; Wu, Weidong; Zheng, Wanguo

    2015-08-01

    Fused silica subwavelength structures (SWSs) with an average period of ~100 nm were fabricated using an efficient approach based on one-step self-masking reactive ion etching. The subwavelength structures exhibited excellent broadband antireflection properties from the ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelength range. These properties are attributable to the graded refractive index for the transition from air to the fused silica substrate that is produced by the ideal nanocone subwavelength structures. The transmittance in the 400-700 nm range increased from approximately 93% for the polished fused silica to greater than 99% for the subwavelength structure layer on fused silica. Achieving broadband antireflection in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range by appropriate matching of the SWS heights on the front and back sides of the fused silica is a novel strategy. The measured antireflection properties are consistent with the results of theoretical analysis using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. This method is also applicable to diffraction grating fabrication. Moreover, the surface of the subwavelength structures exhibits significant superhydrophilic properties.

  6. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2) attenuates reactive oxygen species formation and inhibits cell death: implications for otoprotective therapy

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Deron R.; Reolo, Marie J. Y.; Peh, Yee Xin; Wang, Wei; Lee, Chang-Wook; Rivera, Rich; Paterson, Ian C.; Chun, Jerold

    2016-01-01

    Ototoxic drugs, such as platinum-based chemotherapeutics, often lead to permanent hearing loss through apoptosis of neuroepithelial hair cells and afferent neurons of the cochlea. There is no approved therapy for preventing or reversing this process. Our previous studies identified a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), S1P2, as a potential mediator of otoprotection. We therefore sought to identify a pharmacological approach to prevent cochlear degeneration via activation of S1P2. The cochleae of S1pr2−/− knockout mice were evaluated for accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. This showed that loss of S1P2 results in accumulation of ROS that precedes progressive cochlear degeneration as previously reported. These findings were supported by in vitro cell-based assays to evaluate cell viability, induction of apoptosis, and accumulation of ROS following activation of S1P2 in the presence of cisplatin. We show for the first time, that activation of S1P2 with a selective receptor agonist increases cell viability and reduces cisplatin-mediated cell death by reducing ROS. Cumulatively, these results suggest that S1P2 may serve as a therapeutic target for attenuating cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity. PMID:27080739

  7. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2) attenuates reactive oxygen species formation and inhibits cell death: implications for otoprotective therapy.

    PubMed

    Herr, Deron R; Reolo, Marie J Y; Peh, Yee Xin; Wang, Wei; Lee, Chang-Wook; Rivera, Rich; Paterson, Ian C; Chun, Jerold

    2016-01-01

    Ototoxic drugs, such as platinum-based chemotherapeutics, often lead to permanent hearing loss through apoptosis of neuroepithelial hair cells and afferent neurons of the cochlea. There is no approved therapy for preventing or reversing this process. Our previous studies identified a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), S1P2, as a potential mediator of otoprotection. We therefore sought to identify a pharmacological approach to prevent cochlear degeneration via activation of S1P2. The cochleae of S1pr2(-/-) knockout mice were evaluated for accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. This showed that loss of S1P2 results in accumulation of ROS that precedes progressive cochlear degeneration as previously reported. These findings were supported by in vitro cell-based assays to evaluate cell viability, induction of apoptosis, and accumulation of ROS following activation of S1P2 in the presence of cisplatin. We show for the first time, that activation of S1P2 with a selective receptor agonist increases cell viability and reduces cisplatin-mediated cell death by reducing ROS. Cumulatively, these results suggest that S1P2 may serve as a therapeutic target for attenuating cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity. PMID:27080739

  8. Formation of Pd nanocrystals in titanium-oxide film by rapid thermal annealing of reactively cosputtered TiPdO films

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Wanyi; Ding Shijin; Chen Hongbing; Sun Qingqing; Zhang, David Wei

    2011-03-15

    In this article, the authors report a novel method for preparation of Pd nanocrystals embedded in TiO{sub 2} film; i.e., the TiPdO films are first deposited by reactively cosputtering Ti and Pd targets in a plasma mixture of O{sub 2} and Ar, followed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The experimental results indicate that the TiPdO film with a high content of Pd is inclined to produce big nanocrystals. Furthermore, the higher the RTA temperature, the bigger the Pd nanocrystals become. In addition, our analyses of the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra reveal that PdO, PdO{sub 2}, Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and TiO{sub 2} coexist in the as-deposited film, and the RTA at 600 deg. C leads to decomposition of the entire PdO{sub 2} and partial PdO, together with the growth of Pd nanocrystals. At the same time, the released oxygen oxidizes fully Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} into TiO{sub 2} during the decomposition. As the RTA temperature is increased up to 900 deg. C, more and more PdO is decomposed and the Pd nanocrystals become bigger and bigger.

  9. Formation of broadband antireflective and superhydrophilic subwavelength structures on fused silica using one-step self-masking reactive ion etching

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Jiang, Xiaodong; Huang, Jin; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Zu, Xiaotao; Wu, Weidong; Zheng, Wanguo

    2015-01-01

    Fused silica subwavelength structures (SWSs) with an average period of ~100 nm were fabricated using an efficient approach based on one-step self-masking reactive ion etching. The subwavelength structures exhibited excellent broadband antireflection properties from the ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelength range. These properties are attributable to the graded refractive index for the transition from air to the fused silica substrate that is produced by the ideal nanocone subwavelength structures. The transmittance in the 400–700 nm range increased from approximately 93% for the polished fused silica to greater than 99% for the subwavelength structure layer on fused silica. Achieving broadband antireflection in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range by appropriate matching of the SWS heights on the front and back sides of the fused silica is a novel strategy. The measured antireflection properties are consistent with the results of theoretical analysis using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. This method is also applicable to diffraction grating fabrication. Moreover, the surface of the subwavelength structures exhibits significant superhydrophilic properties. PMID:26268896

  10. Studies on phase formation, microstructure development and elastic properties of reduced NiO-8YSZ anode supported bi-layer half-cell structures of solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nithyanantham, T.; Biswas, S.; Thangavel, S.N.; Bandopadhyay, S.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed study on the development of microstructure and phase in NiO-8YSZ anodes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed study on elastic properties at high temperatures in air/reducing atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of initial porosity, composition and other issues are evaluated in detail. -- Abstract: Half-cell structures of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with a thin and dense electrolyte layer of 8YSZ supported by a thick and porous NiO-8YSZ anode precursor structure were reduced in a gas mixture of 5% H{sub 2}-95% Ar at 800 Degree-Sign C for selected time periods in order to fabricate cermets with desired microstructure and composition, and to study their effects on the elastic properties at ambient and reactive atmospheres. It appears that 2 h of exposure to the reducing conditions is enough to reduce {approx}80% of NiO with an enhanced porosity value of 35%. The Ni-8YSZ cermet phase formation in the anode was analyzed with X-ray diffraction (XRD) in correlation with its microstructure. The elastic properties were determined after the reduction, at room and elevated temperatures using the impulse excitation technique. At room temperature the decrease in the Young's modulus was about 44% (after 8 h of reduction) and can be attributed mainly to the changes in the microstructure, particularly the increase in porosity from {approx}12% to 37%. Young's moduli of the as-received precursor and reduced anodes were evaluated as a function of temperature in air and reducing atmosphere. The results were explained in correlation to the initial porosity, composition and oxidation of Ni at the elevated temperatures.

  11. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J; Li, Fangxing; Tufon, Christopher; Isemonger, Alan

    2008-07-01

    system losses, increase circuit capacity, increase reliability, and improve efficiency. Reactive power is theoretically available from any inverter-based equipment such as photovoltaic (PV) systems, fuel cells, microturbines, and adjustable-speed drives. However, the installation is usually only economical if reactive power supply is considered during the design and construction phase. In this report, we find that if the inverters of PV systems or the generators of combined heat and power (CHP) systems were designed with capability to supply dynamic reactive power, they could do this quite economically. In fact, on an annualized basis, these inverters and generators may be able to supply dynamic reactive power for about $5 or $6 per kVAR. The savings from the local supply of dynamic reactive power would be in reduced losses, increased capacity, and decreased transmission congestion. The net savings are estimated to be about $7 per kVAR on an annualized basis for a hypothetical circuit. Thus the distribution company could economically purchase a dynamic reactive power service from customers for perhaps $6/kVAR. This practice would provide for better voltage regulation in the distribution system and would provide an alternate revenue source to help amortize the cost of PV and CHP installations. As distribution and transmission systems are operated under rising levels of stress, the value of local dynamic reactive supply is expected to grow. Also, large power inverters, in the range of 500 kW to 1 MW, are expected to decrease in cost as they become mass produced. This report provides one data point which shows that the local supply of dynamic reactive power is marginally profitable at present for a hypothetical circuit. We expect that the trends of growing power flow on the existing system and mass production of inverters for distributed energy devices will make the dynamic supply of reactive power from customers an integral component of economical and reliable system

  12. The influence of radiation-induced vacancy on the formation of thin-film of compound layer during a reactive diffusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akintunde, S. O.; Selyshchev, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical approach is developed that describes the formation of a thin-film of AB-compound layer under the influence of radiation-induced vacancy. The AB-compound layer is formed as a result of a chemical reaction between the atomic species of A and B immiscible layers. The two layers are irradiated with a beam of energetic particles and this process leads to several vacant lattice sites creation in both layers due to the displacement of lattice atoms by irradiating particles. A- and B-atoms diffuse via these lattice sites by means of a vacancy mechanism in considerable amount to reaction interfaces A/AB and AB/B. The reaction interfaces increase in thickness as a result of chemical transformation between the diffusing species and surface atoms (near both layers). The compound layer formation occurs in two stages. The first stage begins as an interfacial reaction controlled process, and the second as a diffusion controlled process. The critical thickness and time are determined at a transition point between the two stages. The influence of radiation-induced vacancy on layer thickness, speed of growth, and reaction rate is investigated under irradiation within the framework of the model presented here. The result obtained shows that the layer thickness, speed of growth, and reaction rate increase strongly as the defect generation rate rises in the irradiated layers. It also shows the feasibility of producing a compound layer (especially in near-noble metal silicide considered in this study) at a temperature below their normal formation temperature under the influence of radiation.

  13. The environmental carcinogen 3-nitrobenzanthrone and its main metabolite 3-aminobenzanthrone enhance formation of reactive oxygen intermediates in human A549 lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Tanja . E-mail: tanja.hansen@item.fraunhofer.de; Seidel, Albrecht; Borlak, Juergen

    2007-06-01

    The environmental contaminant 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is highly mutagenic and a suspected human carcinogen. We aimed to evaluate whether 3-NBA is able to deregulate critical steps in cell cycle control and apoptosis in human lung epithelial A549 cells. Increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+} and caspase activities were detected upon 3-NBA exposure. As shown by cell cycle analysis, an increased number of S-phase cells was observed after 24 h of treatment with 3-NBA. Furthermore, 3-NBA was shown to inhibit cell proliferation when added to subconfluent cell cultures. The main metabolite of 3-NBA, 3-ABA, induced statistically significant increases in tail moment as judged by alkaline comet assay. The potential of 3-NBA and 3-ABA to enhance the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was demonstrated by flow cytometry using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). The enzyme inhibitors allopurinol, dicumarol, resveratrol and SKF525A were used to assess the impact of metabolic conversion on 3-NBA-mediated ROS production. Resveratrol decreased dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence by 50%, suggesting a role for CYP1A1 in 3-NBA-mediated ROS production. Mitochondrial ROS production was significantly attenuated (20% reduction) by addition of rotenone (complex I inhibition) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA, complex II inhibition). Taken together, the results of the present study provide evidence for a genotoxic potential of 3-ABA in human epithelial lung cells. Moreover, both compounds lead to increased intracellular ROS and create an environment favorable to DNA damage and the promotion of cancer.

  14. The problems of mass transfer and formation of deposits of corrosion products on fuel assemblies of a VVER-1200 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, Yu. A.; Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Gavrilov, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    On the basis of examination of materials published both in Russia and abroad, as well as their own investigations, the authors explain the reasons for the occurrence of such effects as AOA (Axial Offset Anomalies) and an increase in the coolant pressure difference in the core of nuclear reactors of the VVER type. To detect the occurrence of the AOA effect, the authors suggest using the specific activity of 58Co in the coolant. In the VVER-1200 design the thermohydraulic regime for fuel assemblies in the first year of their service life involves slight boiling of the coolant in the upper part of the core, which may induce the occurrence of the AOA effect, intensification of corrosion of fuel claddings, and abnormal increase in deposition of corrosion products. Radiolysis of the water coolant in the boiling section (boiling in pores of deposits) may intensify not only general corrosion but also a localized (nodular) one. As a result of intensification of the corrosion processes and growth of deposits, deterioration of the radiation situation in the rooms of the primary circuit of a VVER-1200 reactor as compared to that at nuclear power plants equipped with reactors of the VVER-1000 type is possible. Recommendations for preventing the AOA effect at nuclear power plants with VVER-1200 reactors on the matter of the direction of further investigations are made.

  15. Effects of alkylate fuel on exhaust emissions and secondary aerosol formation of a 2-stroke and a 4-stroke scooter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardini, Alessandro A.; Platt, Stephen M.; Clairotte, Michael; El Haddad, Imad; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Ježek, Irena; Drinovec, Luka; Močnik, Griša; Slowik, Jay G.; Manfredi, Urbano; Prévôt, André S. H.; Baltensperger, Urs; Astorga, Covadonga

    2014-09-01

    Regulated and unregulated emissions from a 2-stroke and a 4-stroke scooter were characterized during a legislative driving cycle in a certified laboratory. Scooter exhaust was analyzed at the tailpipe, in a dilution tunnel, and partly collected in a mobile smog chamber for photochemical ageing. We present evidence that the photochemically aged exhaust from a 2-stroke and a 4-stroke scooter produces considerable amounts of secondary organic aerosol: from 1.5 to 22.0 mg/km, and from 5.5 to 6.6 mg/km, respectively. Tests were repeated after replacing the standard petrol and synthetic lube oil with an alkylate fuel (with low content of aromatic compounds) and ultra-clean lube oil (low ash forming potential). We observed emission reduction (with some exceptions) for several gaseous and particulate phase species, in particular for carbon monoxide (from 8% up to 38% and from 31% to 50%, for the 2-stroke and the 4-stroke scooters, respectively), particulate mass (from 32% up to 75% for the 2-stroke scooter), aromatic compounds (89% and 97% for the 2-stroke and the 4-stroke scooter, respectively), and secondary organic aerosol (from 87% to 100% and 99% for the 2-stroke and the 4-stroke scooters, respectively). We attribute the organic aerosol reduction to the low content of aromatics in the alkylate fuel.

  16. Reactive transport modeling of carbon dioxide sequestration via bicarbonate brine injection in the Rose Run sandstone formation: A comparison with traditional CCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, P.; Kendall, T.; Seeker, R.; Constantz, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    One by-product of the Calera process to make building materials from CO2 is a bicarbonate solution that contains a variable fraction of the CO2 captured from flue gas. Injection of this fluid into the subsurface has advantages over CO2 injection in terms of technical risks, environmental issues, cost, safety, and public acceptance. With bicarbonate injection, there is no need of a cap-rock, as the solution is non-volatile, and will not be buoyant because it is of comparable density to the host fluids. Although a bicarbonate fluid has less CO2 mass per unit volume than supercritical CO2 (in our example, 34 times less), a large injection zone footprint is not a strong disadvantage because detailed site characterization, in particular of cap-rock integrity, is less critical. Moreover, the amount of CO2 that needs trapping is reduced by an amount equal to the carbon in the mineralized cement by-product. Bicarbonate injection can be carried out in relatively shallow aquifers, which reduces the pumping energy needed for emplacement. In terms of desirable long-term CO2 trapping mechanisms, bicarbonate injection greatly accelerates solubility and mineral trapping into hours and days as compared to decades or more for liquid CO2 injection. Thus, bicarbonate injection is a practical demonstration of fluid mixing at field scale. To assess the potential for geological storage of CO2 in American Electric Power’s (AEP) Mountaineer site, 1D reactive transport models have been constructed to compare bicarbonate with CO2 injection and upscale the mixing problem from batch experiments to the field. For CO2 injection, CO2 forms a completely dried-out zone near the borehole, which may result in halite efflorescence and may be a concern for well-bore injectivity. Simulations predict that after 10,000 years, the CO2 partial pressure remains above 200 bars, and the solution pH remains below 5 within a one kilometer radius of the wellbore. Consequently, the dissolved CO2 is about 1

  17. Understanding the Mechanism of the Divergent Reactivity of Non-Heteroatom-Stabilized Chromium Carbene Complexes with Furfural Imines: Formation of Benzofurans and Azetines.

    PubMed

    Funes-Ardoiz, Ignacio; González, Jairo; Santamaría, Javier; Sampedro, Diego

    2016-02-19

    The mechanisms of the reaction between non-heteroatom-stabilized alkynyl chromium carbene complexes prepared in situ and furfural imines to yield benzofurans and/or azetines have been explored by means of density functional theory method calculations. The reaction proceeds through a complex cascade of steps triggered by a nucleophilic addition of the imine nitrogen atom. The formation of two benzofuran regioisomers has been explained in terms of competitive nucleophilic attacks to different positions of the carbene complex. Each of these regioisomers can be obtained as the major product depending on the starting materials. The overall sequence could be controlled to yield benzofurans or azetines by adjusting the substituents present in the initial carbene complex. This mechanistic information allowed for the preparation of new benzofurans and azetinylcarbenes in good yields. PMID:26799934

  18. Soot formation during pyrolysis of aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Clary, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    A study combining experimental, empirical modeling, and detailed modeling techniques has been conducted to develop a better understanding of the chemical reactions involved in soot formation during the high-temperature pyrolysis of aromatic and other unsaturated hydrocarbons. The experiments were performed behind reflected shock waves in a conventional shock-tube with soot formation monitored via attenuation of a laser beam at 633 nm. Soot-formation measurements were conducted with toluene-argon and benzene-argon mixtures. Detailed kinetic models of soot formation were developed for pyrolyzing acetylene, butadiene, ethylene and benzene. The computational results indicate the importance of compact, fused polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as soot intermediates and the importance of the reactivation of these intermediates by hydrogen atoms to form aromatic radicals. The overshoot by hydrogen atoms of their equilibrium concentration provides a driving kinetic force for soot formation. The results with ethylene and butadiene indicate that acetylene is an important growth species for soot formation for these fuels. The benzene model suggests that reactions between aromatic species may be important for soot formation from aromatic fuels.

  19. Formation and physical properties of uranium hydride under conditions relevant to metallic fuel and nuclear waste storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Robin; Godfrey, Hugh; Broan, Chris; Goddard, Dave; Woodhouse, Guy; Durham, Peter; Diggle, Andrew; Bradshaw, John

    2016-08-01

    The formation of uranium hydride is recognised as a hazard during the storage of uranium metal owing to its potentially pyrophoric properties. This study has assessed the influence of water vapour on the potential for uranium hydride to form at low temperatures and shows that it increases the duration of the induction period but does not necessarily prevent uranium hydride formation and also does not significantly change the reaction rate with hydrogen. It is further shown that the α-UH3 fraction in the uranium hydride gradually increases at decreasing temperatures and is likely to be the dominant phase formed under typical storage conditions. Particle morphology and specific surface area of uranium hydride prepared between 30 °C and 200 °C have also been characterised but show only modest variation compared with the phase composition.

  20. Pollutant formation in fuel lean recirculating flows. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report; [in an Opposed Reacting Jet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schefer, R. W.; Sawyer, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    An opposed reacting jet combustor (ORJ) was tested at a pressure of 1 atmosphere. A premixed propane/air stream was stabilized by a counterflowing jet of the same reactants. The resulting intensely mixed zone of partially reacted combustion products produced stable combustion at equivalence ratios as low as 0.45. Measurements are presented for main stream velocities of 7.74 and 13.6 m/sec with an opposed jet velocity of 96 m/sec, inlet air temperatures from 300 to 600 K, and equivalence ratios from 0.45 to 0.625. Fuel lean premixed combustion was an effective method of achieving low NOx emissions and high combustion efficiencies simultaneously. Under conditions promoting lower flame temperature, NO2 constituted up to 100 percent of the total NOx. At higher temperatures this percentage decreased to a minimum of 50 percent.

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Mediate p300-dependent STAT1 Protein Interaction with Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor (PPAR)-γ in CD36 Protein Expression and Foam Cell Formation.

    PubMed

    Kotla, Sivareddy; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2015-12-18

    Previously, we have demonstrated that 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid (15(S)-HETE) induces CD36 expression involving STAT1. Many studies have shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ mediates CD36 expression. Therefore, we asked the question whether these transcriptional factors interact with each other in the regulation of CD36 expression by 15(S)-HETE. Here, we show that STAT1 interacts with PPARγ in the induction of CD36 expression and foam cell formation by 15(S)-HETE. In addition, using molecular biological approaches such as EMSA, supershift EMSA, ChIP, re-ChIP, and promoter-reporter gene assays, we demonstrate that the STAT1 and PPARγ complex binds to the STAT-binding site at -107 nucleotides in the CD36 promoter and enhances its activity. Furthermore, the interaction of STAT1 with PPARγ depends on STAT1 acetylation, which is mediated by p300. In addition, our findings show that reactive oxygen species-dependent Syk and Pyk2 stimulation is required for p300 tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Together, these results demonstrate that an interaction between STAT1, p300, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ is required for 15(S)-HETE-induced CD36 expression, oxidized low density lipoprotein uptake, and foam cell formation, critical events underlying the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:26504087

  2. DETERMINATION OF SPECIFIC NEUTRONIC REACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Dessauer, G.

    1960-05-10

    A method is given for production-line determination of the specific neutronic reactivity of such objects as individual nuclear fuel or neutron absorber elements and is notable for rapidity and apparatus simplicity. The object is incorporated in a slightly sub-critical chain fission reactive assembly having a discrete neutron source, thereby establishing a K/sub eff/ within the crucial range of 0.95 to 0.995. The range was found to afford, uniquely, flux- transient damped response in a niatter of seconds simultaneously with acceptable analytical sensitivity. The resulting neutron flux measured at a situs spaced from both object and source within the assembly serves as a calibrable indication of said reactivity.

  3. On the reactivity of methylbenzenes

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Gabriel da; Bozzelli, Joseph W.

    2010-11-15

    Alkylated aromatic hydrocarbons, including the methylbenzenes, are a major and growing component of liquid transportation fuels. Reactivity (or lack thereof) for the methylbenzenes in combustion systems, measured by octane rating, ignition delay, and laminar flame speed, varies widely with the number and position of methyl substituents. At present this behaviour is not fully understood. This study demonstrates how the low temperature and ignition reactivity of methylbenzenes is controlled by the presence of isolated methyl groups and adjacent methyl pairs (the ortho effect); this allows for the development of octane number correlations. Introduction of an isolated methyl group, adjacent only to CH ring sites, consistently increases the research octane number (RON) by around 26. This phenomenon is explained by the formation of relatively unreactive benzyl free radicals. When an adjacent pair of methyl substituents is present the RON consistently decreases by between 8 and 26, compared to the case when these methyl groups are isolated from each other (this effect generally diminishes with increasing degree of substitution). Research octane numbers for all aromatics with zero to three methyl substituents are accurately described by the empirical relationship RON = 98 + 24.2n{sub m} - 25.8n{sub p}, where n{sub m} is the total number of methyl groups and n{sub p} is the number of contiguous adjacent methyl pairs. The ortho effect is attributed to the unique oxidation chemistry of o-methylbenzyl, o-methylbenzoxyl, and o-methylphenyl type radicals here we provide a preliminary exploration of this chemistry and highlight areas requiring further research. It is shown that the o-methylbenzyl radical can react with two oxygen molecules to form 1,2-diformylbenzene + 2OH + H, a highly chain-branching process. This chemistry is expected to largely explain the two-stage ignition and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior witnessed for polymethylbenzenes with adjacent

  4. Fuel quality combustion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naegeli, D. W.; Moses, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    A high pressure research combustor operating over a wide range of burner inlet conditions was used to determine the effects of fuel molecular structure on soot formation. Six test fuels with equal hydrogen content (12.8%) were blended to stress different molecular components and final boiling points. The fuels containing high concentrations (20%) of polycyclic aromatics and partially saturated polycyclic structures such as tetralin, produced more soot than would be expected from a hydrogen content correlation for typical petroleum based fuels. Fuels containing naphthenes such as decalin agreed with the hydrogen content correlation. The contribution of polycyclic aromatics to soot formation was equivalent to a reduction in fuel hydrogen content of about one percent. The fuel sensitivity to soot formation due to the polycyclic aromatic contribution decreased as burner inlet pressure and fuel/air ratio increased.

  5. Geochemical reactivity in the mixing zone of a coastal salt lake and its effect on microbialite formation, Lake Clifton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warden, J. G.; Breecker, D.; Bennett, P.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrochemistry of Lake Clifton, Western Australia was investigated to evaluate the effects of mixing on geochemical reactions occurring at or near the groundwater-surface water interface. Lake Clifton is a coastal salt lake located along Australia's southwest coast known for both its value as a wetland habitat and for containing modern microbialite structures. The microbialites occur near zones of groundwater input along the eastern and northeastern lakeshore. Composed of aragonite and predominantly thrombolytic in texture, the microbialites form isolated conical structures nearly 1 m in height and a seasonally submerged reef that is 5 km long and up to 30 m wide. Microbialite structures in Lake Clifton have been subjected to an approximately 3-fold increase in salinity from hyposaline lake water in the early 1990s to hypersaline at present. Recent measurements of total dissolved solids at the Lake Clifton boardwalk varied between 56132 ppm in August, 2012 and 73707 ppm in June, 2011. The mixing of carbonate waters can cause nonlinear effects that might result in either mineral dissolution or precipitation. PHREEQC was used to model geochemical reactivity in the Lake Clifton mixing zone in order to better understand the current geochemical impact of the salinity increase. The mixing model suggests that if mixing is the only process influencing water chemistry, mixtures of supersaturated, hypersaline lake water and saturated, fresh groundwater will be supersaturated above (and undersaturated below) 14-22% lake water, with respect to aragonite. The transition between waters saturated and undersaturated with respect to aragonite depended on fluctuations in the chemistry of the lake water end member. The minimum saturation index occurred at 4% lake water and indicated weakly undersaturated (SI = -0.12) waters. Data from seepage meters, pore-waters (7-50 mm depth), and piezometers (41.6-80.5 cm depth) were compared to the mixing model based on chloride

  6. Mapping gas-phase organic reactivity and concomitant secondary organic aerosol formation: chemometric dimension reduction techniques for the deconvolution of complex atmospheric datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Rickard, A. R.; McFiggans, G. B.; Jenkin, M. E.; Bloss, W. J.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Highly non-linear dynamical systems, such as those found in atmospheric chemistry, necessitate hierarchical approaches to both experiment and modeling in order, ultimately, to identify and achieve fundamental process-understanding in the full open system. Atmospheric simulation chambers comprise an intermediate in complexity, between a classical laboratory experiment and the full, ambient system. As such, they can generate large volumes of difficult-to-interpret data. Here we describe and implement a chemometric dimension reduction methodology for the deconvolution and interpretation of complex gas- and particle-phase composition spectra. The methodology comprises principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and positive least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). These methods are, for the first time, applied to simultaneous gas- and particle-phase composition data obtained from a comprehensive series of environmental simulation chamber experiments focused on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) photooxidation and associated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We primarily investigated the biogenic SOA precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, myrcene, linalool and β-caryophyllene. The chemometric analysis is used to classify the oxidation systems and resultant SOA according to the controlling chemistry and the products formed. Furthermore, a holistic view of results across both the gas- and particle-phases shows the different SOA formation chemistry, initiating in the gas-phase, proceeding to govern the differences between the various BVOC SOA compositions. The results obtained are used to describe the particle composition in the context of the oxidized gas-phase matrix. An extension of the technique, which incorporates into the statistical models data from anthropogenic (i.e. toluene) oxidation and "more realistic" plant mesocosm systems, demonstrates that such an ensemble of chemometric mapping has the potential to be

  7. Mapping gas-phase organic reactivity and concomitant secondary organic aerosol formation: chemometric dimension reduction techniques for the deconvolution of complex atmospheric data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Rickard, A. R.; McFiggans, G. B.; Jenkin, M. E.; Bloss, W. J.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-07-01

    Highly non-linear dynamical systems, such as those found in atmospheric chemistry, necessitate hierarchical approaches to both experiment and modelling in order to ultimately identify and achieve fundamental process-understanding in the full open system. Atmospheric simulation chambers comprise an intermediate in complexity, between a classical laboratory experiment and the full, ambient system. As such, they can generate large volumes of difficult-to-interpret data. Here we describe and implement a chemometric dimension reduction methodology for the deconvolution and interpretation of complex gas- and particle-phase composition spectra. The methodology comprises principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and positive least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). These methods are, for the first time, applied to simultaneous gas- and particle-phase composition data obtained from a comprehensive series of environmental simulation chamber experiments focused on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) photooxidation and associated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We primarily investigated the biogenic SOA precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, myrcene, linalool and β-caryophyllene. The chemometric analysis is used to classify the oxidation systems and resultant SOA according to the controlling chemistry and the products formed. Results show that "model" biogenic oxidative systems can be successfully separated and classified according to their oxidation products. Furthermore, a holistic view of results obtained across both the gas- and particle-phases shows the different SOA formation chemistry, initiating in the gas-phase, proceeding to govern the differences between the various BVOC SOA compositions. The results obtained are used to describe the particle composition in the context of the oxidised gas-phase matrix. An extension of the technique, which incorporates into the statistical models data from anthropogenic (i

  8. Chemistry of a binuclear cadmium(II) hydroxide complex: formation from water, CO(2) reactivity, and comparison to a zinc analog.

    PubMed

    Allred, Russell A; McAlexander, Lenore H; Arif, Atta M; Berreau, Lisa M

    2002-12-16

    Treatment of the bmnpa (N,N-bis-2-(methylthio)ethyl-N-((6-neopentylamino-2-pyridyl)methyl)amine) ligand with equimolar amounts of Cd(ClO(4))(2).5H(2)O and Me(4)NOH.5H(2)O in CH(3)CN yielded the binuclear cadmium hydroxide complex [((bmnpa)Cd)(2)(mu-OH)(2)](ClO(4))(2).CH(3)CN (1). Complex 1 may also be prepared (a) by treatment of a CH(3)CN solution of (bmnpa)Cd(ClO(4))(2) (2) with 1 equiv of n-BuLi, followed by treatment with water or (b) from 2 in the presence of 1 equiv each of water and NEt(3). The hydroxide derivative 1 is not produced from 2 and water in the absence of an added base. Complex 1 possesses a binuclear structure in the solid state with hydrogen-bonding and CH/pi interactions involving the bmnpa ligand. The overall structural features of 1 differ from the halide derivative [((bmnpa)Cd)(2)(mu-Cl)(2)](ClO(4))(2) (3), particularly in that the Cd(2)(mu-OH)(2) core of 1 is symmetric whereas the Cd(2)(mu-Cl)(2) core of 3 is asymmetric. In acetonitrile solution, 1 behaves as a 1:2 electrolyte and retains a binuclear structure and secondary hydrogen-bonding and CH/pi interactions, whereas 3 is a 1:1 electrolyte, indicating formation of a mononuclear [(bmnpa)CdCl]ClO(4) species in solution. Treatment of 1 with CO(2) in anhydrous CH(3)CN yields the bridging carbonate complex [((bmnpa)Cd)(2)(mu-CO(3))](ClO(4))(2).CH(3)CN (4). Treatment of a chemically similar zinc hydroxide complex, [((benpa)Zn)(2)(mu-OH)(2)](ClO(4))(2) (benpa = N,N-bis-2-(ethylthio)ethyl-N-((6-neopentylamino-2-pyridyl)methyl)amine, with CO(2) also results in the formation of a carbonate derivative, [((benpa)Zn)(2)(mu-CO(3))](ClO(4))(2) (5), albeit the coordination mode of the bridging carbonate moiety is different. Treatment of 4 with added water results in no reaction, whereas 5 under identical conditions will undergo reaction to yield the zinc hydroxide complex [((benpa)Zn)(2)(mu-OH)(2)](ClO(4))(2). PMID:12470076

  9. Reactivity of vinyl phosphonate containing diazoesters: formation, reactivity, and utility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Rainier, Jon D

    2015-01-16

    Treatment of diazo vinyl phosphonate with alcohols, amines, and thiols in the presence of Rh(II) results in the chemo- and stereoselective generation of enol ethers, enamines and vinyl sulfides via an X-H insertion process. The utility of the products from t