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1

Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells were investigated and developed. The electrocatalysts are defined as the material with a higher activity for the oxygen electrode reaction than the support. Advanced development will require that the materials be prepared in high surface area forms, and may also entail integration of various candidate materials. Eight candidate support materials and seven electrocatalysts were investigated. Of the 8 support, 3 materials meet the preliminary requirements in terms of electrical conductivity and stability. Emphasis is now on preparing in high surface area form and testing under more severe corrosion stress conditions. Of the 7 electrocatalysts prepared and evaluated, at least 5 materials remain as potential candidates. The major emphasis remains on preparation, physical characterization and electrochemical performance testing.

Swette, Larry; Giner, Jose

1987-01-01

2

Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. II  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary objective of this program is the investigation and development of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Approximately six support materials and five catalyst materials have been identified to date for further development.

Swette, L.; Kackley, N.

1990-01-01

3

Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells-II  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary objective of this program is the investigation and development of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single-unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Approximately six support materials and five catalyst materials have been identified to date for further development.

Swette, L.; Kackley, N.

1989-01-01

4

Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells, 3  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The investigation and development of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells is described. Focus is on chemical and electrochemical stability and O2 reduction/evolution activity of the electrode in question.

Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

1991-01-01

5

Positive Energy From rechargeable batteries to fuel cells: electrochemical energy as one  

E-print Network

of the fascinating and green alternatives to combustion engines Yaakov Vilenchik1 , David Andelman2 and Emanuel such as rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, which in the future could replace the combustion engine. We equally with oxygen in the air), which in turn is used to heat water into steam. Steam under high pressure has large

Andelman, David

6

Theoretical performance of hydrogen-bromine rechargeable SPE fuel cell  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A mathematical model was formulated to describe the performance of a hydrogen-bromine fuel cell. Porous electrode theory was applied to the carbon felt flow-by electrode and was coupled to theory describing the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) system. Parametric studies using the numerical solution to this model were performed to determine the effect of kinetic, mass transfer, and design parameters on the performance of the fuel cell. The results indicate that the cell performance is most sensitive to the transport properties of the SPE membrane. The model was also shown to be a useful tool for scale-up studies.

Savinell, Robert F.; Fritts, S. D.

1987-01-01

7

Unitized regenerative fuel cells for solar rechargeable aircraft and zero emission vehicles  

SciTech Connect

A unitized regenerative fuel cell (URFC) produces power and electrolytically regenerates its reactants using a single stack of reversible cells. URFCs have been designed for high altitude long endurance (HALE) solar rechargeable aircraft (SRA), zero emission vehicles (ZEVs), hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems for long duration satellites, energy storage for remote (off-grid) power sources, and peak shaving for on-grid applications. URFCs have been considered using hydrogen/oxygen, hydrogen/air, or hydrogen/halogen chemistries. This discussion is limited to the lightweight URFC energy storage system designs for span-loaded HALE SRA using hydrogen/oxygen, and for ZEVs using hydrogen/air with oxygen supercharging. Overlapping and synergistic development and testing opportunities for these two technologies will be highlighted.

Mitlitsky, F.; Colella, N.J.; Myers, B.

1994-09-06

8

An overview—Functional nanomaterials for lithium rechargeable batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Nanomaterials play important role in lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage and fuel cells. - Highlights: • Nanomaterials play important role for lithium rechargeable batteries. • Nanostructured materials increase the capacitance of supercapacitors. • Nanostructure improves the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of hydrogen storage materials. • Nanomaterials enhance the electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts in fuel cells. - Abstract: There is tremendous worldwide interest in functional nanostructured materials, which are the advanced nanotechnology materials with internal or external dimensions on the order of nanometers. Their extremely small dimensions make these materials unique and promising for clean energy applications such as lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, fuel cells, and other applications. This paper will highlight the development of new approaches to study the relationships between the structure and the physical, chemical, and electrochemical properties of functional nanostructured materials. The Energy Materials Research Programme at the Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, the University of Wollongong, has been focused on the synthesis, characterization, and applications of functional nanomaterials, including nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanowires, nanoporous materials, and nanocomposites. The emphases are placed on advanced nanotechnology, design, and control of the composition, morphology, nanostructure, and functionality of the nanomaterials, and on the subsequent applications of these materials to areas including lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells.

Liu, Hua Kun, E-mail: hua@uow.edu.au

2013-12-15

9

Problems associated with estimating ground water discharge and recharge from stream-discharge records  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground water discharge and recharge frequently have been estimated with hydrograph-separation techniques, but the critical assumptions of the techniques have not been investigated. The critical assumptions are that the hydraulic characteristics of the contributing aquifer (recession index) can be estimated from stream-discharge records; that periods of exclusively ground water discharge can be reliably identified; and that stream-discharge peaks approximate the magnitude and tinting of recharge events. The first assumption was tested by estimating the recession index from st earn-discharge hydrographs, ground water hydrographs, and hydraulic diffusivity estimates from aquifer tests in basins throughout the eastern United States and Montana. The recession index frequently could not be estimated reliably from stream-discharge records alone because many of the estimates of the recession index were greater than 1000 days. The ratio of stream discharge during baseflow periods was two to 36 times greater than the maximum expected range of ground water discharge at 12 of the 13 field sites. The identification of the ground water component of stream-discharge records was ambiguous because drainage from bank-storage, wetlands, surface water bodies, soils, and snowpacks frequently exceeded ground water discharge and also decreased exponentially during recession periods. The timing and magnitude of recharge events could not be ascertained from stream-discharge records at any of the sites investigated because recharge events were not directly correlated with stream peaks. When used alone, the recession-curve-displacement method and other hydrograph-separation techniques are poor tools for estimating ground water discharge or recharge because the major assumptions of the methods are commonly and grossly violated. Multiple, alternative methods of estimating ground water discharge and recharge should be used because of the uncertainty associated with any one technique.

Halford, K.J.; Mayer, G.C.

2000-01-01

10

Theoretical performance of hydrogen-bromine rechargeable SPE fuel cell. [Solid Polymer Electrolyte  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A mathematical model was formulated to describe the performance of a hydrogen-bromine fuel cell. Porous electrode theory was applied to the carbon felt flow-by electrode and was coupled to theory describing the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) system. Parametric studies using the numerical solution to this model were performed to determine the effect of kinetic, mass transfer, and design parameters on the performance of the fuel cell. The results indicate that the cell performance is most sensitive to the transport properties of the SPE membrane. The model was also shown to be a useful tool for scale-up studies.

Savinell, R. F.; Fritts, S. D.

1988-01-01

11

Problems of minority fuel-oil dealers  

SciTech Connect

Claims that minority fuel oil dealers are hampered by severe impediments in the competition for contracts for oil, loan funds from banks, and assistance from the Federal government are explored. Possible remedial actions are recommended. The study focused on the metropolitan areas of Boston, Providence, and New York City. Following the introductory section, the evolving role of minority oil retailers in the Northeast market is reviewed in the second section. The third section examines the specific problems confronting minority dealers, including obtaining start-up capital and finding sources of supply. The fourth section addresses the problems associated with serving the inner-city markets. The fifth section introduces specific recommendations to meet the problems outlined.

Kalt, Joseph P.; Lee, Henry

1980-01-01

12

GROUNDWATER RECHARGE MODELING - AN OVERVIEW  

Microsoft Academic Search

Groundwater recharge must be well understood for the effective utilization of water resources. In this article some of the recent studies in groundwater recharge modeling are detailed and discussed. The topics covered include (1) Recharge modeling in deterministic framework, (2)Recharge modeling in stochastic framework, (3) Recharge modeling using electromagnetic surveys (4) Mountain front recharge (5) Natural recharge estimates for India.

D. Nagesh Kumar

13

Mechanical modeling of porous oxide fuel pellet A Test Problem  

SciTech Connect

A poro-elasto-plastic material model has been developed to capture the response of oxide fuels inside the nuclear reactors under operating conditions. Behavior of the oxide fuel and variation in void volume fraction under mechanical loading as predicted by the developed model has been reported in this article. The significant effect of void volume fraction on the overall stress distribution of the fuel pellet has also been described. An important oxide fuel issue that can have significant impact on the fuel performance is the mechanical response of oxide fuel pellet and clad system. Specifically, modeling the thermo-mechanical response of the fuel pellet in terms of its thermal expansion, mechanical deformation, swelling due to void formation and evolution, and the eventual contact of the fuel with the clad is of significant interest in understanding the fuel-clad mechanical interaction (FCMI). These phenomena are nonlinear and coupled since reduction in the fuel-clad gap affects thermal conductivity of the gap, which in turn affects temperature distribution within the fuel and the material properties of the fuel. Consequently, in order to accurately capture fuel-clad gap closure, we need to account for fuel swelling due to generation, retention, and evolution of fission gas in addition to the usual thermal expansion and mechanical deformation. Both fuel chemistry and microstructure also have a significant effect on the nucleation and growth of fission gas bubbles. Fuel-clad gap closure leading to eventual contact of the fuel with the clad introduces significant stresses in the clad, which makes thermo-mechanical response of the clad even more relevant. The overall aim of this test problem is to incorporate the above features in order to accurately capture fuel-clad mechanical interaction. Because of the complex nature of the problem, a series of test problems with increasing multi-physics coupling features, modeling accuracy, and complexity are defined with the objective of accurate simulation of fuel-clad mechanical interaction subjected to a wide-range of thermomechanical stimuli.

Nukala, Phani K [ORNL; Barai, Pallab [ORNL; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL

2009-10-01

14

A Method for Solving the Fuel Constrained Unit Commitment Problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

The unit commitment problem involves finding the hourly commitment schedule for the thermal units of an electrical system, and their associated generation, over a period of up to a week. For some utilities, contractual or other factors limit the amount of fuel available to certain of the units or plants. This paper describes a new method which solves the unit

Arthur I. Cohen; S. H. Wan

1987-01-01

15

Diesel Locomotive Fueling Problem (LFP) in Railroad Operations  

E-print Network

Chapter 2 Diesel Locomotive Fueling Problem (LFP) in Railroad Operations Bodhibrata Nag Katta G their operating costs low. About 75% of transport by railroads in the world is based on diesel locomotives by diesel locomotives. One of the major compo- nents in the operating cost of diesel powered rail transport

Murty, Katta G.

16

An ultrafast rechargeable aluminium-ion battery.  

PubMed

The development of new rechargeable battery systems could fuel various energy applications, from personal electronics to grid storage. Rechargeable aluminium-based batteries offer the possibilities of low cost and low flammability, together with three-electron-redox properties leading to high capacity. However, research efforts over the past 30 years have encountered numerous problems, such as cathode material disintegration, low cell discharge voltage (about 0.55 volts; ref. 5), capacitive behaviour without discharge voltage plateaus (1.1-0.2 volts or 1.8-0.8 volts) and insufficient cycle life (less than 100 cycles) with rapid capacity decay (by 26-85 per cent over 100 cycles). Here we present a rechargeable aluminium battery with high-rate capability that uses an aluminium metal anode and a three-dimensional graphitic-foam cathode. The battery operates through the electrochemical deposition and dissolution of aluminium at the anode, and intercalation/de-intercalation of chloroaluminate anions in the graphite, using a non-flammable ionic liquid electrolyte. The cell exhibits well-defined discharge voltage plateaus near 2 volts, a specific capacity of about 70 mA h g(-1) and a Coulombic efficiency of approximately 98 per cent. The cathode was found to enable fast anion diffusion and intercalation, affording charging times of around one minute with a current density of ~4,000 mA g(-1) (equivalent to ~3,000 W kg(-1)), and to withstand more than 7,500 cycles without capacity decay. PMID:25849777

Lin, Meng-Chang; Gong, Ming; Lu, Bingan; Wu, Yingpeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Guan, Mingyun; Angell, Michael; Chen, Changxin; Yang, Jiang; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

2015-04-16

17

Accounting for intracell flow in models with emphasis on water table recharge and stream-aquifer interaction. 1. Problems and concepts  

USGS Publications Warehouse

One method of modeling multiple sources and sinks is to determine the net recharge per cell. For example, for a model cell containing both a sink and recharge through the water table, the amount of recharge should be reduced by the ratio of the area of influence of the sink within the cell to the area of the cell. The reduction is the intercepted portion of the recharge. In a multilayer model this amount is further reduced by a proportion factor, which is a function of the depth of the flow lines from the water table boundary to the internal sink. A gaining section of a stream is a typical sink. The aquifer contribution to a gaining stream can be conceptualized as having two parts; the first part is the intercepted lateral flow from the water table and the second is the flow across the streambed due to differences in head between the water level in the stream and the aquifer below. The amount intercepted is a function of the geometry of the cell, but the amount due to difference in head across the stream bed is largely independent of cell geometry. -from Authors

Jorgensen, D.G.; Signor, D.C.; Imes, J.L.

1989-01-01

18

Research on rechargeable oxygen electrodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Studies were carried out on a number of factors which may influence the behavior of the platinum electrocatalyst of oxygen electrodes for use in rechargeable metal-oxygen batteries or hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells. The effects of pretreatments for various potentials and added ionic species, which could be present in such systems, were studied with reguard to: (1) the state of surface oxidation, (2) platinum dissolution, (3) the kinetics of oxygen evolution and reduction (including the role of hydrogen peroxide), and (4) changes in porous electrode structure. These studies were carried out on smooth platinum, platinized platinum, and Teflon-bonded platinum black electrodes in carefully purified electrolyte solutions. The main factors which appear to affect rechargeable oxygen electrode performance and life are: (1) the buildup of a refractory anodic layer on extended cycling, and (2) the dissolution of platinum.

Giner, J.; Malachesky, P. A.; Holleck, G.

1971-01-01

19

Closing nuclear fuel cycle with fast reactors: problems and prospects  

SciTech Connect

The closed nuclear fuel cycle (CNFC) with fast reactors (FR) is the most promising way of nuclear energetics development because it prevents spent nuclear fuel (SNF) accumulation and minimizes radwaste volume due to minor actinides (MA) transmutation. CNFC with FR requires the elaboration of safety, environmentally acceptable and economically effective methods of treatment of SNF with high burn-up and low cooling time. The up-to-date industrially implemented SNF reprocessing technologies based on hydrometallurgical methods are not suitable for the reprocessing of SNF with high burn-up and low cooling time. The alternative dry methods (such as electrorefining in molten salts or fluoride technologies) applicable for such SNF reprocessing have not found implementation at industrial scale. So the cost of SNF reprocessing by means of dry technologies can hardly be estimated. Another problem of dry technologies is the recovery of fissionable materials pure enough for dense fuel fabrication. A combination of technical solutions performed with hydrometallurgical and dry technologies (pyro-technology) is proposed and it appears to be a promising way for the elaboration of economically, ecologically and socially accepted technology of FR SNF management. This paper deals with discussion of main principle of dry and aqueous operations combination that probably would provide safety and economic efficiency of the FR SNF reprocessing. (authors)

Shadrin, A.; Dvoeglazov, K.; Ivanov, V. [Bochvar Institute - VNIINM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01

20

Estimating groundwater recharge  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Groundwater recharge is the entry of fresh water into the saturated portion of the subsurface part of the hydrologic cycle, the modifier "saturated" indicating that the pressure of the pore water is greater than atmospheric.

Stonestrom, David A.

2011-01-01

21

Artificial recharge of groundwater  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Task Committee on Guidelines for Artificial Recharge of Groundwater, of the American Society of Civil Engineers' (ASCE) Irrigation and Drainage Division, sponsored an International Symposium on Artificial Recharge of Groundwater at the Inn-at-the-Park Hotel in Anaheim, Calif., August 23-27, 1988. Cosponsors were the U.S. Geological Survey, California Department of Water Resources, University of California Water Resources Center, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, with cooperation from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, American Water Resources Association, U.S. Agency for International Development, World Bank, United Nations Department of Technical Cooperation for Development, and a number of local and state organizations.Because of the worldwide interest in artificial recharge and the need to develop efficient recharge facilities, the Anaheim symposium brought together an interdisciplinary group of engineers and scientists to provide a forum for many professional disciplines to exchange experiences and findings related to various types of artificial recharge; learn from both successful and unsuccessful case histories; promote technology transfer between the various disciplines; provide an education resource for communication with those who are not water scientists, such as planners, lawyers, regulators, and the public in general; and indicate directions by which cities or other entities can save funds by having reasonable technical guidelines for implementation of a recharge project.

22

Stability and error analysis of the polarization estimation inverse problem for solid oxide fuel cells.  

E-print Network

describe the performance of a solid oxide fuel cell requires the solution of an inverse problem. Two at the electrodeelectrolyte interfaces of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) is investigated physically using ElectrochemicalStability and error analysis of the polarization estimation inverse problem for solid oxide fuel

Renaut, Rosemary

23

Solar recharging system for hearing aid cells.  

PubMed

We present a solar recharging system for nickel-cadmium cells of interest in areas where batteries for hearing aids are difficult to obtain. The charger has sun cells at the top. Luminous energy is converted into electrical energy, during the day and also at night if there is moonlight. The cost of the charger and hearing aid is very low at 35 US$. The use of solar recharging for hearing aids would be useful in alleviating the problems of deafness in parts of developing countries where there is no electricity. PMID:7964140

Gòmez Estancona, N; Tena, A G; Torca, J; Urruticoechea, L; Muñiz, L; Aristimuño, D; Unanue, J M; Torca, J; Urruticoechea, A

1994-09-01

24

Artificial recharge of groundwater and its role in water management  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This paper summarizes and discusses the various aspects and methods of artificial recharge with particular emphasis on its uses and potential role in water management in the Arabian Gulf region. Artificial recharge occurs when man's activities cause more water to enter an aquifer, either under pumping or non-pumping conditions, than otherwise would enter the aquifer. Use of artificial recharge can be a practical means of dealing with problems of overdraft of groundwater. Methods of artificial recharge may be grouped under two broad types: (a) water spreading techniques, and (b) well-injection techniques. Successful use of artificial recharge requires a thorough knowledge of the physical and chemical characteristics of the aquifier system, and extensive onsite experimentation and tailoring of the artificial-recharge technique to fit the local or areal conditions. In general, water spreading techniques are less expensive than well injection and large quantities of water can be handled. Water spreading can also result in significant improvement in quality of recharge waters during infiltration and movement through the unsaturated zone and the receiving aquifer. In comparison, well-injection techniques are often used for emplacement of fresh recharge water into saline aquifer zones to form a manageable lens of fresher water, which may later be partially withdrawn for use or continue to be maintained as a barrier against salt-water encroachment. A major advantage in use of groundwater is its availability, on demand to wells, from a natural storage reservoir that is relatively safe from pollution and from damage by sabotage or other hostile action. However, fresh groundwater occurs only in limited quantities in most of the Arabian Gulf region; also, it is heavily overdrafted in many areas, and receives very little natural recharge. Good use could be made of artificial recharge by well injection in replenishing and managing aquifers in strategic locations if sources of freshwater could be made available for the artificial-recharge operations. ?? 1989.

Kimrey, J.O.

1989-01-01

25

The Exxon rechargeable cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The design and performance of ambient temperature secondary cells based on the titanium disulfide cathode are discussed. These limited performance products were developed for microelectronic applications such as solar rechargeable watches and clocks which require low drain rate and do not require many deep cycles.

Malachesky, P. A.

1980-04-01

26

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY RECHARGE CENTERS  

E-print Network

). The government monitors, by routine audits, the University's compliance with federal regulations regarding of federal grants and contracts, we must comply with applicable government requirements (i.e., A-21, A-133 purchases should not be included in billing rates. Recharge centers with less than $250,000 in annual

Subramanian, Venkat

27

Fuel Cell Application Problems: Study Guide for AP Chemistry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This study guide is intended for 10th-12th grade AP chemistry students studying fuel cell technology. Applicable National Science Education Standards are included in the document. The study guide includes a comparison of gasoline and hydrogen, a section on kinetic molecular theory, a section on electrochemistry and material on hydrogen fuel cells. This document may be downloaded in PDF file format.

Cox, Brian A.

28

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Problems 1) Explain why the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle is not as efficient as the reported "tank  

E-print Network

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Problems 1) Explain why the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle is not as efficient as the reported "tank to wheel" efficiencies would suggest. Hydrogen must be produced, stored, and transported. None of these processes are 100% efficient and will thus have energy losses. These losses are due

Bowen, James D.

29

Comparing groundwater recharge and storage variability from GRACE satellite observations with observed water levels and recharge model simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sustainable management of groundwater resources, particularly in water stressed regions, requires estimates of groundwater recharge. This study in southern Mali, Africa compares approaches for estimating groundwater recharge and understanding recharge processes using a variety of methods encompassing groundwater level-climate data analysis, GRACE satellite data analysis, and recharge modelling for current and future climate conditions. Time series data for GRACE (2002-2006) and observed groundwater level data (1982-2001) do not overlap. To overcome this problem, GRACE time series data were appended to the observed historical time series data, and the records compared. Terrestrial water storage anomalies from GRACE were corrected for soil moisture (SM) using the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) to obtain monthly groundwater storage anomalies (GRACE-SM), and monthly recharge estimates. Historical groundwater storage anomalies and recharge were determined using the water table fluctuation method using observation data from 15 wells. Historical annual recharge averaged 145.0 mm (or 15.9% of annual rainfall) and compared favourably with the GRACE-SM estimate of 149.7 mm (or 14.8% of annual rainfall). Both records show lows and peaks in May and September, respectively; however, the peak for the GRACE-SM data is shifted later in the year to November, suggesting that the GLDAS may poorly predict the timing of soil water storage in this region. Recharge simulation results show good agreement between the timing and magnitude of the mean monthly simulated recharge and the regional mean monthly storage anomaly hydrograph generated from all monitoring wells. Under future climate conditions, annual recharge is projected to decrease by 8% for areas with luvisols and by 11% for areas with nitosols. Given this potential reduction in groundwater recharge, there may be added stress placed on an already stressed resource.

Allen, D. M.; Henry, C.; Demon, H.; Kirste, D. M.; Huang, J.

2011-12-01

30

The problem of used nuclear fuel: lessons for interim solutions from a comparative cost analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An acceptable long-term solution for used (spent) fuel from nuclear power reactors has evaded all countries engaged in the civilian nuclear fuel cycle. Furthermore, many countries are trying to develop interim storage solutions that address the shortage of storage in the spent fuel cooling pools at reactors. The United States has a particularly acute problem due to its adherence to

Allison Macfarlane

2001-01-01

31

The problem of liquid fuels (for aircraft engines)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The crisis which troubles the world market for liquid fuel in general and for carburants in particular is doubtless one of the most serious ever experienced by modern industry. It is a national crisis of economic and political independence for countries like Italy and France. The solutions suggested for meeting the lack of liquid fuel may be summed up under two general headings: the economical use of the petroleum now available; creation of petroleum substitutes from natural sources within the country. The process of cracking is described at length.

Gallo, Gino

1924-01-01

32

Advanced Small Rechargeable Batteries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lithium-based units offer highest performance. Paper reviews status of advanced, small rechargeable batteries. Covers aqueous systems including lead/lead dioxide, cadmium/nickel oxide, hydrogen/nickel oxide, and zinc/nickel oxide, as well as nonaqueous systems. All based on lithium anodes, nonaqueous systems include solid-cathode cells (lithium/molybdenum disulfide, lithium/titanium disulfide, and lithium/vanadium oxide); liquid-cathode cells (lithium/sulfur dioxide cells); and new category, lithium/polymer cells.

Halpert, Gerald

1989-01-01

33

Rechargeable Magnesium Power Cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rechargeable power cells based on magnesium anodes developed as safer alternatives to high-energy-density cells like those based on lithium and sodium anodes. At cost of some reduction in energy density, magnesium-based cells safer because less susceptible to catastrophic meltdown followed by flames and venting of toxic fumes. Other advantages include ease of handling, machining, and disposal, and relatively low cost.

Koch, Victor R.; Nanjundiah, Chenniah; Orsini, Michael

1995-01-01

34

A rechargeable hydrogen battery based on Ru catalysis.  

PubMed

Apart from energy generation, the storage and liberation of energy are among the major problems in establishing a sustainable energy supply chain. Herein we report the development of a rechargeable H2 battery which is based on the principle of the Ru-catalyzed hydrogenation of CO2 to formic acid (charging process) and the Ru-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid to CO2 and H2 (discharging process). Both processes are driven by the same catalyst at elevated temperature either under pressure (charging process) or pressure-free conditions (discharging process). Up to five charging-discharging cycles were performed without decrease of storage capacity. The resulting CO2/H2 mixture is free of CO and can be employed directly in fuel-cell technology. PMID:24803414

Hsu, Shih-Fan; Rommel, Susanne; Eversfield, Philipp; Muller, Keven; Klemm, Elias; Thiel, Werner R; Plietker, Bernd

2014-07-01

35

The growing problem of stranded used nuclear fuel.  

PubMed

By 2050, almost all U.S. nuclear reactors will have reached their 60 year maximum expected life. Many will shut down sooner. With no assurance that the current approach for finding a geologic repository or interim storage sites will succeed, used nuclear fuel could be stranded indefinitely at more than 70 sites in 35 states. Societal discussions about the future of nuclear waste should be framed in terms of the relative risks of all alternatives. We review and compare onsite storage, interim storage, and a geologic repository, as well as how these alternatives are presented to the public. PMID:24437358

Alley, William M; Alley, Rosemarie

2014-02-18

36

An approach to identify urban groundwater recharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaluating the proportion in which waters from different origins are mixed in a given water sample is relevant for many hydrogeological problems, such as quantifying total recharge, assessing groundwater pollution risks, or managing water resources. Our work is motivated by urban hydrogeology, where waters with different chemical signature can be identified (losses from water supply and sewage networks, infiltration from surface runoff and other water bodies, lateral aquifers inflows, ...). The relative contribution of different sources to total recharge can be quantified by means of solute mass balances, but application is hindered by the large number of potential origins. Hence, the need to incorporate data from a large number of conservative species, the uncertainty in sources concentrations and measurement errors. We present a methodology to compute mixing ratios and end-members composition, which consists of (i) Identification of potential recharge sources, (ii) Selection of tracers, (iii) Characterization of the hydrochemical composition of potential recharge sources and mixed water samples, and (iv) Computation of mixing ratios and reevaluation of end-members. The analysis performed in a data set from samples of the Barcelona city aquifers suggests that the main contributors to total recharge are the water supply network losses (22%), the sewage network losses (30%), rainfall, concentrated in the non-urbanized areas (17%), from runoff infiltration (20%), and the Besòs River (11%). Regarding species, halogens (chloride, fluoride and bromide), sulfate, total nitrogen, and stable isotopes (18O2H, and 34S) behaved quite conservatively. Boron, residual alkalinity, EDTA and Zn did not. Yet, including these species in the computations did not affect significantly the proportion estimations.

Vázquez-Suñé, E.; Carrera, J.; Tubau, I.; Sánchez-Vila, X.; Soler, A.

2010-04-01

37

An approach to identify urban groundwater recharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaluating the proportion in which waters from different origins are mixed in a given water sample is relevant for many hydrogeological problems, such as quantifying total recharge, assessing groundwater pollution risks, or managing water resources. Our work is motivated by urban hydrogeology, where waters with different chemical signature can be identified (losses from water supply and sewage networks, infiltration from surface runoff and other water bodies, lateral aquifers inflows, ...). The relative contribution of different sources to total recharge can be quantified by means of solute mass balances, but application is hindered by the large number of potential origins. Hence, the need to incorporate data from a large number of conservative species, the uncertainty in sources concentrations and measurement errors. We present a methodology to compute mixing ratios and end-members composition, which consists of (i) Identification of potential recharge sources, (ii) Selection of tracers, (iii) Characterization of the hydrochemical composition of potential recharge sources and mixed water samples, and (iv) Computation of mixing ratios and reevaluation of end-members. The analysis performed in a data set from samples of the Barcelona city aquifers suggests that the main contributors to total recharge are the water supply network losses (22%), the sewage network losses (30%), rainfall, concentrated in the non-urbanized areas (17%), from runoff infiltration (20%), and the Besòs River (11%). Regarding species, halogens (chloride, fluoride and bromide), sulfate, total nitrogen, and stable isotopes (18O, 2H, and 34S) behaved quite conservatively. Boron, residual alkalinity, EDTA and Zn did not. Yet, including these species in the computations did not affect significantly the proportion estimations.

Vázquez-Suñé, E.; Carrera, J.; Tubau, I.; Sánchez-Vila, X.; Soler, A.

2010-10-01

38

Modeling of Gap Closure in Uranium-Zirconium Alloy Metal Fuel - A Test Problem  

SciTech Connect

Uranium based binary and ternary alloy fuel is a possible candidate for advanced fast spectrum reactors with long refueling intervals and reduced liner heat rating [1]. An important metal fuel issue that can impact the fuel performance is the fuel-cladding gap closure, and fuel axial growth. The dimensional change in the fuel during irradiation is due to a superposition of the thermal expansion of the fuel due to heating, volumetric changes due to possible phase transformations that occur during heating and the swelling due to fission gas retention. The volumetric changes due to phase transformation depend both on the thermodynamics of the alloy system and the kinetics of phase change reactions that occur at the operating temperature. The nucleation and growth of fission gas bubbles that contributes to fuel swelling is also influenced by the local fuel chemistry and the microstructure. Once the fuel expands and contacts the clad, expansion in the radial direction is constrained by the clad, and the overall deformation of the fuel clad assembly depends upon the dynamics of the contact problem. The neutronics portion of the problem is also inherently coupled with microstructural evolution in terms of constituent redistribution and phase transformation. Because of the complex nature of the problem, a series of test problems have been defined with increasing complexity with the objective of capturing the fuel-clad interaction in complex fuels subjected to a wide range of irradiation and temperature conditions. The abstract, if short, is inserted here before the introduction section. If the abstract is long, it should be inserted with the front material and page numbered as such, then this page would begin with the introduction section.

Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Nukala, Phani K [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam [ORNL; Turner, John A [ORNL

2009-10-01

39

Reliability of Rechargeable Batteries in a Photovoltaic Power Supply System  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the reliability If a rechargeable battery acting as the energy storage component in a photovoltaic power supply system. A model system was constructed for this that includes the solar resource, the photovoltaic power supp Iy system, the rechargeable battery and a load. The solar resource and the system load are modeled as SI ochastic processes. The photovoltaic system and the rechargeable battery are modeled deterministically, imd an artificial neural network is incorporated into the model of the rechargeable battery to simulate dartage that occurs during deep discharge cycles. The equations governing system behavior are solved simultaneously in the Monte Carlo framework and a fwst passage problem is solved to assess system reliability.

Barney, P.; Jungst, R.G., Ingersoll, D.; O'Gorman, C.; Paez, T.L.; Urbina, A.

1998-11-30

40

An Optimal Solution to a General Dynamic Jet Fuel Hedging Problem  

E-print Network

combine dynamic programming and Kalman filter estimation to obtain an optimal policy that minimizesAn Optimal Solution to a General Dynamic Jet Fuel Hedging Problem Juliana M. Nascimento Warren B #12;Abstract We propose a dynamic hedging strategy for jet fuel which strikes a balance between

Powell, Warren B.

41

Conclusions and recommendations. [for problems in energy situation, air transportation, and hydrogen fuel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Conclusions and recommendations are presented for an analysis of the total energy situation; the effect of the energy problem on air transportation; and hydrogen fuel for aircraft. Properties and production costs of fuels, future prediction for energy and transportation, and economic aspects of hydrogen production are appended.

1973-01-01

42

Case studies––Problem solving in fluidized bed waste fuel incineration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fluidized bed combustion technology has been widely used as the new, flexible, multi-fuel boiler for waste combustion and energy recovery from low grade fuels. However, problems such as low thermal efficiency, high emissions, bed agglomeration etc. are still encountered in the operation of fluidized beds. Valuable experiences were gained from two case studies recently conducted regarding wastes combustion in industrial

Rong Yan; David Tee Liang; Leslie Tsen

2005-01-01

43

FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged  

ScienceCinema

Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

Friesen, Cody

2014-04-02

44

FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged  

SciTech Connect

Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

Friesen, Cody

2014-03-07

45

Rechargeable battery legislative and regulatory issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rechargeable batteries and rechargeable consumer products are regulated under a complex system of state, federal and international laws. These laws are designed to promote safety and the environmentally sound recycling or proper disposal of rechargeable batteries and battery-powered products. These laws affect virtually every person involved with rechargeable products, including manufacturers, distributors, retailers, consumers, recyclers, transporters and waste management authorities.

N. England

1993-01-01

46

Groundwater recharge in natural dune systems and agricultural ecosystems in the Thar Desert region, Rajasthan, India  

E-print Network

Groundwater recharge in natural dune systems and agricultural ecosystems in the Thar Desert region be sustainable. Keywords India . Groundwater recharge/water budget . Nutrients . Land use . Sustainability). Groundwater availability problems are likely to be exacerbated in the future by climate change. Average

Scanlon, Bridget R.

47

Alternative Fuels and Hybrid Technology: A Classroom Activity Designed to Evaluate a Contemporary Problem  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As petroleum reserves are being depleted worldwide and energy costs are increasing, the use of alternative fuels is being more widely considered as a solution to the impending energy crisis. In this classroom activity students are presented with a real-world problem in which they must evaluate the properties and environmental impacts of a variety…

Roy MacArthur, Amy H.; Copper, Christine L.

2009-01-01

48

Minimum fuel control of the planar circular restricted three-body problem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The circular restricted three-body problem is considered to model the dynamics of an artificial body submitted to the attraction of two planets. Minimization of the fuel consumption of the spacecraft during the transfer, e.g. from the Earth to the Moon, is considered. In the light of the controllability results of Caillau and Daoud (SIAM J Control Optim, 2012), existence for this optimal control problem is discussed under simplifying assumptions. Thanks to Pontryagin maximum principle, the properties of fuel minimizing controls is detailed, revealing a bang-bang structure which is typical of L1-minimization problems. Because of the resulting non-smoothness of the Hamiltonian two-point boundary value problem, it is difficult to use shooting methods to compute numerical solutions (even with multiple shooting, as many switchings on the control occur when low thrusts are considered). To overcome these difficulties, two homotopies are introduced: One connects the investigated problem to the minimization of the L2-norm of the control, while the other introduces an interior penalization in the form of a logarithmic barrier. The combination of shooting with these continuation procedures allows to compute fuel optimal transfers for medium or low thrusts in the Earth-Moon system from a geostationary orbit, either towards the L 1 Lagrange point or towards a circular orbit around the Moon. To ensure local optimality of the computed trajectories, second order conditions are evaluated using conjugate point tests.

Caillau, J.-B.; Daoud, B.; Gergaud, J.

2012-10-01

49

Spacecraft fuel-optimal and balancing maneuvers for a class of formation reconfiguration problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents fuel optimal and balancing methodologies for reconfiguring multiple spacecraft in formation subject to a Newtonian gravity field. For a kind of continuous-thrust propulsion system, a fuel-optimal control problem is formulated to minimize the integral squared control subject to the linearized Hill or Clohessy-Wiltshire dynamics of relative motion with respect to a circular reference orbit. Palmer's analytical solution for general reconfiguration is adapted to maneuvers between projected circular orbits, resulting in the optimal fuel consumption index as a function of configuration parameters such as orbit radius, phase angle, and transfer time. Parametric analyses reveal unique characteristics of individual fuel optimality and gross fuel consumption: for an arbitrary selection of initial/terminal orbit radii, (i) there exist special transfer times such that individual fuel consumption is optimally uniform for all phase angles, and (ii) the total fuel expenditure for a group of three or more spacecraft is invariant for the relatively same configuration with respect to the departure phase. These results serve to effectively design fuel balancing strategies for formation reconfiguration of multiple spacecraft.

Yoo, Sung-Moon; Lee, Sangjin; Park, Chandeok; Park, Sang-Young

2013-10-01

50

The simplest ENSO recharge oscillator Gerrit Burgers  

E-print Network

The simplest ENSO recharge oscillator Gerrit Burgers Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute: Burgers, G., F.-F. Jin, and G. J. van Oldenborgh (2005), The simplest ENSO recharge oscillator, Geophys

Wang, Yuqing

51

Identifying Recharge Location Using Noble Gas Recharge Temperatures, Pajarito Plateau, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

The solubility of noble gases in water is temperature dependent. Noble gas concentrations in ground water can therefore be used to determine the temperature at the water table at the recharge location (recharge temperature). The Pajarito Plateau in Northern New Mexico is an example of a hydrogeologic setting where noble gas recharge temperatures provide valuable information about recharge location which

A. H. Manning; M. Dale

2008-01-01

52

Choosing appropriate techniques for quantifying groundwater recharge  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Various techniques are available to quantify recharge; however, choosing appropriate techniques is often difficult. Important considerations in choosing a technique include space/time scales, range, and reliability of recharge estimates based on different techniques; other factors may limit the application of particular techniques. The goal of the recharge study is important because it may dictate the required space/time scales of the recharge estimates. Typical study goals include water-resource evaluation, which requires information on recharge over large spatial scales and on decadal time scales; and evaluation of aquifer vulnerability to contamination, which requires detailed information on spatial variability and preferential flow. The range of recharge rates that can be estimated using different approaches should be matched to expected recharge rates at a site. The reliability of recharge estimates using different techniques is variable. Techniques based on surface-water and unsaturated-zone data provide estimates of potential recharge, whereas those based on groundwater data generally provide estimates of actual recharge. Uncertainties in each approach to estimating recharge underscore the need for application of multiple techniques to increase reliability of recharge estimates.

Scanlon, B.R.; Healy, R.W.; Cook, P.G.

2002-01-01

53

Management plans for artificial reservoir recharge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reservoir recharge is one of the artifical recharge methods that is used extensively to replenish groundwater, especially in arid regions. The efficiency of this method is greatly reduced if an appropriate management plan is not implemented. Selection of a management plan requires precursory site evaluations, surveys and careful consideration of the constraints affecting recharge water and the aquifer. This article

Uygur Sendil

1990-01-01

54

Manganese oxide cathodes for rechargeable batteries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Manganese oxides are considered as promising cathodes for rechargeable batteries due to their low cost and low toxicity as well as the abundant natural resources. In this dissertation, manganese oxides have been investigated as cathodes for both rechargeable lithium and alkaline batteries. Nanostructured lithium manganese oxides designed for rechargeable lithium cells have been synthesized by reducing lithium permanganate with methanol

Dongmin Im

2002-01-01

55

High Temperature Corrosion Problem of Boiler Components in presence of Sulfur and Alkali based Fuels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Material degradation and ageing is of particular concern for fossil fuel fired power plant components. New techniques/approaches have been explored in recent years for Residual Life assessment of aged components and material degradation due to different damage mechanism like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion etc. Apart from the creep, the high temperature corrosion problem in a fossil fuel fired boiler is a matter of great concern if the fuel contains sulfur, chlorine sodium, potassium and vanadium etc. This paper discusses the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion in different critical components of boiler like water wall, superheater and reheater tubes and also remedial measures to avoid the premature failure. This paper also high lights the Residual Life Assessment (RLA) methodology of the components based on high temperature fireside corrosion. of different critical components of boiler.

Ghosh, Debashis; Mitra, Swapan Kumar

2011-04-01

56

Revised 06-2011 Rechargeable  

E-print Network

Revised 06-2011 Rechargeable Battery And Cell Phone Recycling Program Guidelines University Waste Label (see separate instructions). Step 4: Bag It Insert a battery or cell phone in a provided bag of Missouri Environmental Health and Safety 573-882-3736 http://ehs.missouri.edu/ hazmat

Taylor, Jerry

57

Rechargeable nickel-zinc batteries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Device proves superiority in having two and one half to three times the energy content of popular lead-zinc or nickel-cadmium batteries. Application to electric utility vehicles improved acceleration rate and nearly doubled driving range between rechargings. Unit contributes substantially toward realization of practical urban electrical automobiles.

Soltis, D. G.

1977-01-01

58

Groundwater recharge from overbank floods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Overbank flood recharge is increasingly acknowledged as important for estimations of aquifer sustainable yield. The physics of this process in areas with shallow groundwater, however, is not well understood and typically is not included in river or groundwater models. Modeling of the overbank flood recharge process was undertaken using a fully coupled, surface-subsurface flow model to compare the volume of infiltration through a floodplain with varying surface sediment, aquifer, and flood parameters. The infiltration volume was found to increase with the conductance of the clogging layer (represented by a thin veneer of sediments across the floodplain and river bed), flood wave height, peak duration, and aquifer transmissivity and to decrease with increasing water table gradient (positive toward the river). The influence of the flood wave and aquifer hydraulic parameters was more pronounced in systems with sand or loam clogging layers. Irregularities in floodplain elevation had a large effect on infiltration volume. A dimensionless analysis of the flood recharge process identified the factors that limited flood infiltration for each of the modeled scenarios: the clogging layer conductance, unsaturated aquifer storage, or aquifer transmissivity. A dimensionless numberF* was used to predict the limiting factor in floodplain systems. An analytical equation was developed to estimate the infiltration volume for catchments where full numerical modeling is not warranted or applicable. Results from the analytical equation compared favorably with recharge modeled using a more complex numerical model.

Doble, Rebecca C.; Crosbie, Russell S.; Smerdon, Brian D.; Peeters, Luk; Cook, Freeman J.

2012-09-01

59

ARTIFICIAL RECHARGE METHODS OF KARIZ  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kariz is one of the Iranian traditional water harvesting systems. Unfortunately some experts believe that water loss during winter and out of the crop season is the main disadvantage of this method. One of the methods to increase the discharge of kariz, is to recharge the aquifer artificially, where the karez tunnels are dug in them. This can be done

Abdolkarim Behnia

60

The pronounced seasonality of global groundwater recharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater recharged by meteoric water supports human life by providing two billion people with drinking water and by supplying 40% of cropland irrigation. While annual groundwater recharge rates are reported in many studies, fewer studies have explicitly quantified intra-annual (i.e., seasonal) differences in groundwater recharge. Understanding seasonal differences in the fraction of precipitation that recharges aquifers is important for predicting annual recharge groundwater rates under changing seasonal precipitation and evapotranspiration regimes in a warming climate, for accurately interpreting isotopic proxies in paleoclimate records, and for understanding linkages between ecosystem productivity and groundwater recharge. Here we determine seasonal differences in the groundwater recharge ratio, defined here as the ratio of groundwater recharge to precipitation, at 54 globally distributed locations on the basis of 18O/16O and 2H/1H ratios in precipitation and groundwater. Our analysis shows that arid and temperate climates have wintertime groundwater recharge ratios that are consistently higher than summertime groundwater recharge ratios, while tropical groundwater recharge ratios are at a maximum during the wet season. The isotope-based recharge ratio seasonality is consistent with monthly outputs from a global hydrological model (PCR-GLOBWB) for most, but not all locations. The pronounced seasonality in groundwater recharge ratios shown in this study signifies that, from the point of view of predicting future groundwater recharge rates, a unit change in winter (temperate and arid regions) or wet season (tropics) precipitation will result in a greater change to the annual groundwater recharge rate than the same unit change to summer or dry season precipitation.

Jasechko, Scott; Birks, S. Jean; Gleeson, Tom; Wada, Yoshihide; Fawcett, Peter J.; Sharp, Zachary D.; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Welker, Jeffrey M.

2014-11-01

61

Application of wavelet scaling function expansion continuous-energy resonance calculation method to MOX fuel problem  

SciTech Connect

More and more MOX fuels are used in all over the world in the past several decades. Compared with UO{sub 2} fuel, it contains some new features. For example, the neutron spectrum is harder and more resonance interference effects within the resonance energy range are introduced because of more resonant nuclides contained in the MOX fuel. In this paper, the wavelets scaling function expansion method is applied to study the resonance behavior of plutonium isotopes within MOX fuel. Wavelets scaling function expansion continuous-energy self-shielding method is developed recently. It has been validated and verified by comparison to Monte Carlo calculations. In this method, the continuous-energy cross-sections are utilized within resonance energy, which means that it's capable to solve problems with serious resonance interference effects without iteration calculations. Therefore, this method adapts to treat the MOX fuel resonance calculation problem natively. Furthermore, plutonium isotopes have fierce oscillations of total cross-section within thermal energy range, especially for {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu. To take thermal resonance effect of plutonium isotopes into consideration the wavelet scaling function expansion continuous-energy resonance calculation code WAVERESON is enhanced by applying the free gas scattering kernel to obtain the continuous-energy scattering source within thermal energy range (2.1 eV to 4.0 eV) contrasting against the resonance energy range in which the elastic scattering kernel is utilized. Finally, all of the calculation results of WAVERESON are compared with MCNP calculation. (authors)

Yang, W. [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Inst., Hong Cao road 29, Shanghai (China); Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong Univ., Xian Ning west road 28, Xi'an, Shaanxi (China); Wu, H.; Cao, L. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong Univ., Xian Ning west road 28, Xi'an, Shaanxi (China)

2012-07-01

62

Fuzzy-decision-making problems of fuel ethanol production using a genetically engineered yeast  

SciTech Connect

A fuzzy-decision-making procedure is applied to find the optimal feed policy of a fed-batch fermentation process for fuel ethanol production using a genetically engineered Saccharomyces yeast 1400 (pLNH33). The policy consisted of feed flow rate, feed concentration, and fermentation time. The recombinant yeast 1400 (pLNH33) can utilize glucose and xylose simultaneously to produce ethanol. However, the parent yeast utilizes glucose only. A partially selective model is used to describe the kinetic behavior of the process. In this study, this partially selective fermentation process is formulated as a general multiple-objective optimal control problem. By using an assigned membership function for each of the objectives, the general multiple-objective optimization problem can be converted into a maximizing decision problem. In order to obtain a global solution, a hybrid method of differential evolution is introduced to solve the maximizing decision problem. A simple guideline is introduced in the interactive programming procedures to find a satisfactory solution to the general multiple-objective optimization problem.

Wang, F.S.; Jing, C.H. [National Chung Cheng Univ., Chia-Yi (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [National Chung Cheng Univ., Chia-Yi (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Tsao, G.T. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Lab. of Renewable Resource Engineering] [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Lab. of Renewable Resource Engineering

1998-08-01

63

Safeguards problems and possible solutions with deep underground disposal of used nuclear fuel and fuel recycle waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

The disposal of used, radioactive, nuclear fuel and nuclear fuel recycle waste, which is often more radioactive, has been one of the major undertakings of the nuclear industry in many countries. Technology must be developed and facilities must be built for safe long-term storage or disposal of this used fuel and fuel recycle waste. In Canada, the United States, Sweden,

R. M. Smith; D. W. Jung

1987-01-01

64

Electrically rechargeable REDOX flow cell  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A bulk energy storage system is designed with an electrically rechargeable reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cell divided into two compartments by a membrane, each compartment containing an electrode. An anode fluid is directed through the first compartment at the same time that a cathode fluid is directed through the second compartment. Means are provided for circulating the anode and cathode fluids, and the electrodes are connected to an intermittent or non-continuous electrical source, which when operating, supplies current to a load as well as to the cell to recharge it. Ancillary circuitry is provided for disconnecting the intermittent source from the cell at prescribed times and for circulating the anode and cathode fluids according to desired parameters and conditions.

Thaller, L. H. (inventor)

1976-01-01

65

Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Embodiments include an iron-air rechargeable battery having a composite electrode including an iron electrode and a hydrogen electrode integrated therewith. An air electrode is spaced from the iron electrode and an electrolyte is provided in contact with the air electrode and the iron electrodes. Various additives and catalysts are disclosed with respect to the iron electrode, air electrode, and electrolyte for increasing battery efficiency and cycle life.

Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor); Prakash, G.K. Surya (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

2014-01-01

66

Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

Perry, J. L.

1988-01-01

67

Groundwater recharge and agricultural contamination  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Agriculture has had direct and indirect effects on the rates and compositions of groundwater recharge and aquifer biogeochemistry. Direct effects include dissolution and transport of excess quantities of fertilizers and associated materials and hydrologic alterations related to irrigation and drainage. Some indirect effects include changes in water-rock reactions in soils and aquifers caused by increased concentrations of dissolved oxidants, protons, and major ions. Agrilcultural activities have directly or indirectly affected the concentrations of a large number of inorganic chemicals in groundwater, for example NO3-, N2, Cl, SO42-, H+, P, C, K, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra, and As, as well a wide variety of pesticides and other organic compounds. For reactive contaminants like NO3-, a combination of chemical, isotopic, and environmental-tracer analytical approaches might be required to resolve changing inputs from subsequent alterations as causes of concentration gradients in groundwater. Groundwater records derived from multi-component hydrostratigraphic data can be used to quantify recharge rates and residence times of water and dissolved contaminants, document past variations in recharging contaminant loads, and identify natural contaminant-remediation processes. These data indicate that many of the world's surficial aquifers contain transient records of changing agricultural contamination from the last half of the 20th century. The transient agricultural groundwater signal has important implications for long-term trends and spatial heterogeneity in discharge.

Böhlke, J.K.

2002-01-01

68

PuO/sub 2/ dissolution problem for LWR plutonium recycle and LMFBR fuels: fabrication and reprocessing problems and their resolution  

SciTech Connect

A survey was made of the information reported to date for laboratory-scale dissolution experiments on PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ fuels, of reprocessing plant problems that might be encountered with these fuels, and of the fabrication methods for producing these fuels. The possibility of producing fuels that will be highly soluble in pure nitric acid without resorting to the use of corrosive fluorides for complete dissolution is examined. The report concludes that production of highly soluble fuel is possible, that it is probably economically justifiable, and that fluorides are not necessary for dissolution. Highly soluble fuel would likely have minimal impact on reprocessing criticality and waste disposal problems. Reactor specifications for PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ fuels seemingly permit a greater degree of nonhomogeneity than is desirable for achieving high solubility. A fuel solubility criteria is therefore proposed that would limit the amount of insoluble PuO/sub 2/ in irradiated fuels to less than or equal to 0.01 percent of the total amount of plutonium present.

,

1977-07-01

69

Advanced materials for electrodes and electrolyte in rechargeable lithium batteries  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery possesses many outstanding advantages over the well known rechargeable battery systems, in particularly higher energy density and longer shelf life, as well as not suffering from the memory effect problems of Ni-MH batteries. Those advantages are making it the greatest energy source of choice for the portable electronic market. Graphite and LiCoO2 are commonly used in

Sau yen Chew

2009-01-01

70

Artificial recharge in arid zone- Example from the Arava Valley- Israel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In arid zones direct recharge from rainfall is negligible. The indirect recharge like recharging of flood water is the principal source of water of the alluvial aquifers in arid environment. Flooding of ephemeral streams occur as a consequence of the rain intensity and its pattern, the basin size and the geomorphic settings as slops, vegetation and soil properties. In the Arava Valley there are several reservoirs that act as diversion levees. They were constructed on few ravines for two reasons. (1) to store large volumes of floodwater for direct use in nearby agricultural fields. (2) to enhance the recharge to the local alluvial aquifers. Since flood duration is relatively short compared to the infiltration (percolation) rate, it was assumed that by storing the water in the reservoirs it will increase the recharge volume because of higher water head, longer resistance time and larger surface area available for infiltration. Unfortunately, accumulation of silts and clays in the reservoirs clogged them to direct infiltration. The accumulation of silt and clay in the reservoirs is typically to arid zones where lack of vegetation cover creates a very high erosion rate and transportation of large amounts of sediment at the duration of the water flowing on the stream channel bed. To bypass the problem of reduction in the direct recharge inside the reservoirs because of clogging, and to continue the artificial recharge into the aquifer, two kinds of artificial recharge system are operating in the Arava Valley. In one site we use a system that is similar to the conventional spreading ponds system. The big reservoir is using to store the flood water and as a settling pond. The clean water is diverted to three infiltration ponds. In the rest five reservoirs we construct a drainage pipeline close to the bottom of the levee that allow us to release the clean water (after settling of the fine particles) downstream in a slow rate that is much more efficiency for artificial recharge than in high velocity. Monitoring after the recharge water is very important and in some cases very problematic. In cases where the groundwater is shallow (10-20 m' depth) the response to the recharge is quickly and takes few days (rising in water level and or decreasing in the salinity). But in cases where the water level is very deep (about 60-110 m' in most of the area) the response to the recharge can takes few months. At this condition, it is impossible to distinguish whether the rising in the water level and or decreasing in the salinity is a result of the artificial recharge or it is a result of natural lateral flow in the aquifer itself.

Guttman, Joseph

2010-05-01

71

Identifying Recharge Location Using Noble Gas Recharge Temperatures, Pajarito Plateau, New Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The solubility of noble gases in water is temperature dependent. Noble gas concentrations in ground water can therefore be used to determine the temperature at the water table at the recharge location (recharge temperature). The Pajarito Plateau in Northern New Mexico is an example of a hydrogeologic setting where noble gas recharge temperatures provide valuable information about recharge location which could be utilized in numerical model calibration. Previous studies have identified two potentially significant components of recharge to the regional aquifer underlying the plateau: (1) infiltration of precipitation in the Jemez Mountains adjacent to the plateau (mountain-block recharge); and (2) infiltration of stream water in the bottoms of canyons that traverse the plateau (plateau recharge). However, results regarding the relative importance of these two components are conflicting and uncertain. Their relative magnitude is of particular concern because Los Alamos National Laboratory is located on the plateau, and the susceptibility of the regional aquifer to lab-generated wastes depends directly upon the amount of plateau recharge. The Pajarito Plateau is an ideal location for applying noble gas recharge thermometry; mountain-block recharge should have cool recharge temperatures (<12°C) due to the shallow water table in the mountains, whereas plateau recharge should have distinctly warmer recharge temperatures (18 to 21°C) due to water table depths of 200 to 300m on the plateau. Noble gas samples were collected from wells screened in the regional aquifer across the plateau. Those analyzed to date from wells screened in the upper 30m of the aquifer yield recharge temperatures of 18 to 23°C. Exceptions are two wells located within 2km of the mountain front, which have recharge temperatures of 12 and 13°C. The one sample analyzed to date from a well screened deeper in the aquifer (125m below the water table) yields a recharge temperature of 11°C. Preliminary results therefore suggest that plateau recharge comprises nearly all of the water in the upper 30m of the regional aquifer throughout much of the plateau. However, the cooler recharge temperatures closer to the mountains and at depth indicate that mountain-block recharge may still constitute most of the total recharge to the aquifer; plateau recharge may be limited to a thin layer along the top of the aquifer at distances >2km from the mountain front.

Manning, A. H.; Dale, M.

2008-12-01

72

Electrically rechargeable redox flow cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Considering the topographical and sizing requirements for a typical pumped water storage installation and the immergence of energy conversion schemes that are time dependent as to their generating capability, a closer look is being given to nonpumped water storage schemes for storing electricity. An electrochemical bulk power storage concept, which was named a rechargeable redox flow cell is described. This scheme, based on pumping a redox couple through a power conversion section, appears to offer high overall efficiency, no cycle life limitations for the electrodes, and deep discharger capability.

Thaller, L. H.

1974-01-01

73

Electrically rechargeable redox flow cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Considering the topographical and sizing requirements for a typical pumped water storage installation and the immergence of energy conversion schemes that are time-dependent as to their generating capability, a closer look is being given to nonpumped water storage schemes for storing electricity. An electrochemical bulk power storage concept, called a rechargeable redox flow cell, is described. This scheme, based on pumping a redox couple through a power conversion section, appears to offer high overall efficiency, no cycle life limitations for the electrodes, and deep discharge capability.

Thaller, L. H.

1974-01-01

74

Waste fuel handling system design: How to avoid or solve flow problems  

SciTech Connect

The number of power plants utilizing waste products as fuel has increased due to a number of factors. First, growing environmental concerns have provided a thrust for utilizing waste products, such as culm, gob, bio-mass, chopped tires, etc., rather than stockpiling them. At the same time, advances in combustion technology, i.e., high efficiencies and cleaner combustion have made energy extraction economically viable. A second driving economic factor has been incentives for co-generation plants provided by the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. In plants and processes involving solids handling, the proper operation of the solids handling systems is often one of the most crucial elements in preventing plant startup delays, reduced plant efficiency, and equipment downtime. The Rand Corporation conducted a six-year study of 40 solids processing plants in the U.S. and Canada. Their findings reveal that 80% of these plants experience solids handling problems. This study also found that these plants were slow in coming up-to-speed, with an average startup time for some types of plants approaching 18 months. Once startup begins, poor performance continues to plague these operations with performance between 40% and 50% of design. While the focus of this survey was not exclusively power plants, parallels can easily be drawn to waste-to-energy plants since the fuel is inherently variable and often difficult to handle. Problems with material handling systems can translate into big losses as heavy penalties may be imposed for startup delays and for not meeting on-line requirements.

Purutyan, H.; Pittenger, B.H. [Jenike & Johanson, Inc., Westford, MA (United States); Stuart-Dick, D. [Jenike & Johanson, San Luis Obispo, CA (United States)

1994-12-31

75

Transformer Recharging with Alpha Channeling in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

Transformer recharging with lower hybrid waves in tokamaks can give low average auxiliary power if the resistivity is kept high enough during the radio frequency (rf) recharging stage. At the same time, operation in the hot ion mode via alpha channeling increases the effective fusion reactivity. This paper will address the extent to which these two large cost saving steps are compatible. __________________________________________________

N.J. Fisch

2009-12-21

76

INTRODUCTION TO ARTIFICIAL GROUND-WATER RECHARGE  

EPA Science Inventory

Artificial ground-water recharge has been practiced for scores of years throughout the world. The purpose of artificial recharge is to increase the rate at which water infiltrates the land surface in order to supplement the quantity of ground water in storage. A variety of rechar...

77

NORTH CAROLINA GROUNDWATER RECHARGE RATES 1994  

EPA Science Inventory

North Carolina Groundwater Recharge Rates, from Heath, R.C., 1994, Ground-water recharge in North Carolina: North Carolina State University, as prepared for the NC Department of Environment, Health and Natural Resources (NC DEHNR) Division of Enviromental Management Groundwater S...

78

Recharge at the Hanford Site: Status report  

SciTech Connect

A variety of field programs designed to evaluate recharge and other water balance components including precipitation, infiltration, evaporation, and water storage changes, have been carried out at the Hanford Site since 1970. Data from these programs have indicated that a wide range of recharge rates can occur depending upon specific site conditions. Present evidence suggests that minimum recharge occurs where soils are fine-textured and surfaces are vegetated with deep-rooted plants. Maximum recharge occurs where coarse soils or gravels exist at the surface and soils are kept bare. Recharge can occur in areas where shallow-rooted plants dominate the surface, particularly where soils are coarse-textured. Recharge estimates have been made for the site using simulation models. A US Geological Survey model that attempts to account for climate variability, soil storage parameters, and plant factors has calculated recharge values ranging from near zero to an average of about 1 cm/yr for the Hanford Site. UNSAT-H, a deterministic model developed for the site, appears to be the best code available for estimating recharge on a site-specific basis. Appendix I contains precipitation data from January 1979 to June 1987. 42 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

Gee, G.W.

1987-11-01

79

Groundwater Recharge in the Southern High Plains  

E-print Network

i Draft Groundwater Recharge in the Southern High Plains Report ###, Appendix A By Robert C. Reedy P.O. Box 13231 Austin, TX 78711-3231 1(512) 936-0861 January, 2003 #12;ii Table of Contents Page................................................................................. 1 Recharge Estimation for Current Groundwater Availability Modeling Project

Scanlon, Bridget R.

80

High power rechargeable batteries Paul V. Braun  

E-print Network

High power rechargeable batteries Paul V. Braun , Jiung Cho, James H. Pikul, William P. King storage Secondary batteries High energy density High power density Lithium ion battery 3D battery of rechargeable (second- ary) batteries, as this is critical for most applications. As the penetration

Braun, Paul

81

Reflections on Dry-Zone Recharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantifying recharge in regions of low precipitation remains a challenging task. The design of permanent nuclear-waste isolation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the design of arid-site landfill covers and the pumping of groundwater in desert cities, like Las Vegas, are examples where accurate recharge estimates are needed because they affect billion-dollar decisions. Recharge cannot be measured directly and must rely on estimation methods of various kinds including chemical tracers, thermal profiling, lysimetry, and water-balance modeling. Chemical methods, like chloride-mass-balance can significantly underestimate actual recharge rates and water-balance models are generally limited by large uncertainties. Studies at the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State, USA illustrate how estimates of recharge rates have changed over time and how these estimates can affect waste management decisions. Lysimetry has provided reliable estimates of recharge for a wide range of surface condittions. Lysimetric observations of reduced recharge, resulting from advective drying of coarse rock piles, suggest a way to avoid costly recharge protection using titanium shields at Yucca Mountain. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is funded by the U. S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-76-RL01830.

Gee, G. W.

2005-05-01

82

MODELING HEAT TRANSFER IN SPENT FUEL TRANSFER CASK NEUTRON SHIELDS – A CHALLENGING PROBLEM IN NATURAL CONVECTION  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 10-15 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper proposes that there may be reliable CFD approaches to the transfer cask problem, specifically coupled steady-state solvers or unsteady simulations; however, both of these solutions take significant computational effort. Segregated (uncoupled) steady state solvers that were tested did not accurately capture the flow field and heat transfer distribution in this application. Mesh resolution, turbulence modeling, and the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions are addressed. Because of the critical nature of this application, the need for new experiments at representative scales is clearly demonstrated.

Fort, James A.; Cuta, Judith M.; Bajwa, C.; Baglietto, E.

2010-07-18

83

Lithium ion rechargeable systems studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lithium ion systems, although relatively new, have attracted much interest worldwide. Their high energy density, long cycle life and relative safety, compared with metallic lithium rechargeable systems, make them prime candidates for powering portable electronic equipment. Although lithium ion cells are presently used in a few consumer devices, e.g., portable phones, camcorders, and laptop computers, there is room for considerable improvement in their performance. Specific areas that need to be addressed include: (1) carbon anode-increase reversible capacity, and minimize passivation; (2) cathode-extend cycle life, improve rate capability, and increase capacity. There are several programs ongoing at Sandia National Laboratories which are investigating means of achieving the stated objectives in these specific areas. This paper will review these programs.

Levy, Samuel C.; Lasasse, Robert R.; Cygan, Randall T.; Voigt, James A.

84

Rechargeable lithium-ion cell  

DOEpatents

The invention relates to a rechargeable lithium-ion cell, a method for its manufacture, and its application. The cell is distinguished by the fact that it has a metallic housing (21) which is electrically insulated internally by two half shells (15), which cover electrode plates (8) and main output tabs (7) and are composed of a non-conductive material, where the metallic housing is electrically insulated externally by means of an insulation coating. The cell also has a bursting membrane (4) which, in its normal position, is located above the electrolyte level of the cell (1). In addition, the cell has a twisting protection (6) which extends over the entire surface of the cover (2) and provides centering and assembly functions for the electrode package, which comprises the electrode plates (8).

Bechtold, Dieter (Bad Vilbel, DE); Bartke, Dietrich (Kelkheim, DE); Kramer, Peter (Konigstein, DE); Kretzschmar, Reiner (Kelkheim, DE); Vollbert, Jurgen (Hattersheim, DE)

1999-01-01

85

Lithium ion rechargeable systems studies  

SciTech Connect

Lithium ion systems, although relatively new, have attracted much interest worldwide. Their high energy density, long cycle life and relative safety, compared with metallic lithium rechargeable systems, make them prime candidates for powering portable electronic equipment. Although lithium ion cells are presently used in a few consumer devices, e.g., portable phones, camcorders, and laptop computers, there is room for considerable improvement in their performance. Specific areas that need to be addressed include: (1) carbon anode--increase reversible capacity, and minimize passivation; (2) cathode--extend cycle life, improve rate capability, and increase capacity. There are several programs ongoing at Sandia National Laboratories which are investigating means of achieving the stated objectives in these specific areas. This paper will review these programs.

Levy, S.C.; Lasasse, R.R.; Cygan, R.T.; Voigt, J.A.

1995-02-01

86

Fuels  

SciTech Connect

An account is given of current thinking on the infrastructural development prospects and the economic viability of such advanced cryogenic fuels as liquid hydrogen and liquid methane, as well as exotic synthetic liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The family of endothermic fuels will turn supersonic aircraft into flying chemical reactors, as they absorb airframe aerothermodynamic heat to change in chemical composition while actively cooling the structure. The airport-infrastructural and aircraft configuration-related difficulties posed by cryogenic fuels are noted.

Taylor, W.F.

1988-01-01

87

Fuel cells provide a revenue-generating solution to power quality problems  

SciTech Connect

Electric power quality and reliability are becoming increasingly important as computers and microprocessors assume a larger role in commercial, health care and industrial buildings and processes. At the same time, constraints on transmission and distribution of power from central stations are making local areas vulnerable to low voltage, load addition limitations, power quality and power reliability problems. Many customers currently utilize some form of premium power in the form of standby generators and/or UPS systems. These include customers where continuous power is required because of health and safety or security reasons (hospitals, nursing homes, places of public assembly, air traffic control, military installations, telecommunications, etc.) These also include customers with industrial or commercial processes which can`t tolerance an interruption of power because of product loss or equipment damage. The paper discusses the use of the PC25 fuel cell power plant for backup and parallel power supplies for critical industrial applications. Several PC25 installations are described: the use of propane in a PC25; the use by rural cooperatives; and a demonstration of PC25 technology using landfill gas.

King, J.M. Jr.

1996-03-01

88

A Comparison of Trajectory Optimization Methods for the Impulsive Minimum Fuel Rendezvous Problem  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper we present, a comparison of trajectory optimization approaches for the minimum fuel rendezvous problem. Both indirect and direct methods are compared for a variety of test cases. The indirect approach is based on primer vector theory. The direct approaches are implemented numerically and include Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP). Quasi- Newton and Nelder-Meade Simplex. Several cost function parameterizations are considered for the direct approach. We choose one direct approach that appears to be the most flexible. Both the direct and indirect methods are applied to a variety of test cases which are chosen to demonstrate the performance of each method in different flight regimes. The first test case is a simple circular-to-circular coplanar rendezvous. The second test case is an elliptic-to-elliptic line of apsides rotation. The final test case is an orbit phasing maneuver sequence in a highly elliptic orbit. For each test case we present a comparison of the performance of all methods we consider in this paper.

Hughes, Steven P.; Mailhe, Laurie M.; Guzman, Jose J.

2003-01-01

89

GPU Based General-Purpose Parallel computing to Solve Nuclear Reactor In-Core fuel Management Design and Operation Problem  

SciTech Connect

In-core fuel management study is a crucial activity in nuclear power plant design and operation. Its common problem is to find an optimum arrangement of fuel assemblies inside the reactor core. Main objective for this activity is to reduce the cost of generating electricity, which can be done by altering several physical properties of the nuclear reactor without violating any of the constraints imposed by operational and safety considerations. This research try to address the problem of nuclear fuel arrangement problem, which is, leads to the multi-objective optimization problem. However, the calculation of the reactor core physical properties itself is a heavy computation, which became obstacle in solving the optimization problem by using genetic algorithm optimization.This research tends to address that problem by using the emerging General Purpose Computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) techniques implemented by C language for CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) parallel programming. By using this parallel programming technique, we develop parallelized nuclear reactor fitness calculation, which is involving numerical finite difference computation. This paper describes current prototype of the parallel algorithm code we have developed on CUDA, that performs one hundreds finite difference calculation for nuclear reactor fitness evaluation in parallel by using GPU G9 Hardware Series developed by NVIDIA.

Prayudhatama, D.; Waris, A.; Kurniasih, N.; Kurniadi, R. [Bosscha Laboratory, Department of Physics, Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

2010-06-22

90

Groundwater recharge estimation and regionalization: the Great Bend Prairie of central Kansas and its recharge statistics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sophocleous, M., 1992. Groundwater recharge estimation and regionalization: the Great Bend Prairie of central Kansas and its recharge statistics. J. Hydrol., 137: 113-140. The results of a 6 year recharge st,dy in the Great Bend Prairie of t:entral Kansas are statistically analyzed to regionalize the limited number of site-specific but year-round measurements. Emphasis is placed on easily measured parameters and

Marios Sophocleous

1992-01-01

91

Experimental studies in natural groundwater-recharge dynamics: The analysis of observed recharge events  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sophocleous, M. and Perry, C.A., 1985. Experimental studies in natural groundwater- recharge dynamics: The analysis of observed recharge events. J. Hydrol., 81 : 297--332. The amounts and time distribution of groundwater recharge from precipitation over an approximately 19-month period were investigated at two instrumented sites in south- central Kansas. Precipitation and evapotranspiration sequences, soil-moisture profiles and storage changes, water fluxes

MARIOS SOPHOCLEOUS; CHARLES A. PERRY

1985-01-01

92

Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium-sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 Wh/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 Wh/kg were realized in practical batteries. Other technological advantages include its chemical simplicity, absence of self-discharge, and long cycle life possibility. More recently, other high temperature sodium batteries have come into the spotlight. These systems can be described as follow: Na/Beta Double Prime-Al2O3/NaAlCl4/Metal Dichloride Sodium/metal dichloride systems are colloquially known as the zebra system and are currently being developed for traction and load leveling applications. The sodium-metal dichloride systems appear to offer many of the same advantages of the Na/S system, especially in terms of energy density and chemical simplicity. The metal dichloride systems offer increased safety and good resistance to overcharge and operate over a wide range of temperatures from 150 to 400 C with less corrosion problems.

Distefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

1989-01-01

93

Design of an AUV recharging system  

E-print Network

The Odyssey AUV Series uses a Lithium-ion Polymer battery which is able to supply the necessary power for a limited mission time. The current method of recharge includes surfacing the AUV, opening the vehicle, removing the ...

Miller, Bryan D. (Bryan David)

2005-01-01

94

REVISED NORTH CAROLINA GROUNDWATER RECHARGE RATES 1998  

EPA Science Inventory

Revised North Carolina Groundwater Recharge Rates, from Heath, R.C., 1994, unpublished map: North Carolina State University, as modified by the NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) Division of Water Quality (DWQ) Groundwater Section, (polygons)...

95

Design of an AUV recharging system  

E-print Network

The utility of present Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) is limited by their on-board energy storage capability. Research indicates that rechargeable batteries will continue to be the AUV power source of choice for at ...

Gish, Lynn Andrew

2004-01-01

96

Issues and challenges facing rechargeable lithium batteries.  

PubMed

Technological improvements in rechargeable solid-state batteries are being driven by an ever-increasing demand for portable electronic devices. Lithium-ion batteries are the systems of choice, offering high energy density, flexible and lightweight design, and longer lifespan than comparable battery technologies. We present a brief historical review of the development of lithium-based rechargeable batteries, highlight ongoing research strategies, and discuss the challenges that remain regarding the synthesis, characterization, electrochemical performance and safety of these systems. PMID:11713543

Tarascon, J M; Armand, M

2001-11-15

97

Issues and challenges facing rechargeable lithium batteries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technological improvements in rechargeable solid-state batteries are being driven by an ever-increasing demand for portable electronic devices. Lithium-ion batteries are the systems of choice, offering high energy density, flexible and lightweight design, and longer lifespan than comparable battery technologies. We present a brief historical review of the development of lithium-based rechargeable batteries, highlight ongoing research strategies, and discuss the challenges

J.-M. Tarascon; M. Armand

2001-01-01

98

Theory of the generalized chloride mass balance method for recharge estimation in groundwater basins characterised by point and diffuse recharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Application of the conventional chloride mass balance (CMB) method to point recharge dominant groundwater basins can substantially under-estimate long-term average annual recharge by not accounting for the effects of localized surface water inputs. This is because the conventional CMB method ignores the duality of infiltration and recharge found in karstic systems, where point recharge can be a contributing factor. When point recharge is present in groundwater basins, recharge estimation is unsuccessful using the conventional CMB method with, either unsaturated zone chloride or groundwater chloride. In this paper we describe a generalized CMB that can be applied to groundwater basins with point recharge. Results from this generalized CMB are shown to be comparable with long-term recharge estimates obtained using the watertable fluctuation method, groundwater flow modelling and Darcy flow calculations. The generalized CMB method provides an alternative, reliable long-term recharge estimation method for groundwater basins characterised by both point and diffuse recharge.

Somaratne, N.; Smettem, K. R. J.

2014-01-01

99

Proposed artificial recharge studies in northern Qatar  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The aquifer system in northern Qatar comprises a water-table aquifer in the Rus Formation which is separated by an aquitard from a partially confined aquifer in the top of the overlying Umm er Radhuma Formation. These two aquifers are composed of limestone and dolomite of Eocene and Paleocene age and contain a fragile lens of freshwater which is heavily exploited as a source of water for agricultural irrigation. Net withdrawals are greatly in excess of total recharge, and quality of ground water is declining. Use of desalinated seawater for artificial recharge has been proposed for the area. Artificial recharge, on a large scale, could stabilize the decline in ground-water quality while allowing increased withdrawals for irrigation. The proposal appears technically feasible. Recharge should be by injection to the Umm er Radhuma aquifer whose average transmissivity is about 2,000 meters squared per day (as compared to an average of about 200 meters squared per day for the Rus aquifer). Implementation of artificial recharge should be preceded by a hydrogeologic appraisal. These studies should include test drilling, conventional aquifer tests, and recharge-recovery tests at four sites in northern Qatar. (USGS)

Kimrey, J.O.

1985-01-01

100

Fuels  

Microsoft Academic Search

The symbiotic relationship between internal combustion engines (Otto and Diesel) and petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline and Diesel oil) has characterized the entire road traffic scene for more than 100 years. To date, the increasingly stringent demands on vehicles and engines could be complied with by harmonizing the further development of engines and fuels. According to the current state of the art,

Dušan Gruden

101

Fluidized bed combustion of alternative solid fuels; status, successes and problems of the technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fluidized bed combustion can be used for energy production or incineration for almost any material containing carbon, hydrogen and sulphur in a combustible form, whether it be in the form of a solid, liquid, slurry or gas. The technology's fuel flexibility arises from the fact that the fuel is present in the combustor at a low level and is burnt

E. J Anthony

1995-01-01

102

MODELING HEAT TRANSFER IN SPENT FUEL TRANSFER CASK NEUTRON SHIELDS A CHALLENGING PROBLEM IN NATURAL CONVECTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay

James A. Fort; Judith M. Cuta; C. Bajwa; E. Baglietto

2010-01-01

103

National Fuel Cell Research Center  

E-print Network

National Fuel Cell Research Center www.nfcrc.uci.edu CONTROLS RESIDENTIAL FUEL CELL PHOTOVOLTAIC and efficiency, (3) RFC produces hydrogen, a flexible fuel that may be used for electricity, vehicles, heating fuel cells (RFC), we gain access to a new energy storage device that is both analogous to rechargeable

Mease, Kenneth D.

104

A critical assessment of simple recharge models: application to the UK Chalk  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantification of the timing and magnitude of point-scale groundwater recharge is challenging, but possible at specific sites given sufficient high spatial and temporal resolution field observations, and a suitable physically based model. Such models are generally too computationally intensive and have too many unknown parameters to be practically applicable within distributed, larger-scale hydrological or groundwater models. This motivates the need for simpler recharge models, which are widely used within groundwater models. However, it is important that these models are able to capture adequately the unsaturated zone flow processes. We perform an inter-comparison of recharge simulated by a detailed physically based model and a simple recharge model, with both models applied to a field site in the fractured porous Chalk in the UK. Flow processes are simulated convincingly using a dual permeability, equivalent continuum, vertically heterogeneous, Richards' equation model, applied to a 2-D hillslope transect. A simple conventional recharge model was then calibrated to reproduce the water table response simulated by the physically based model. The performance in reproducing the water table was surprisingly good, given the known discrepancies between the actual processes and the model representation. However, comparisons of recharge fluxes simulated by each model highlighted problems with the process representations in the simple model. Specifically, bypass flow events during the summer were compensating for recharge that should have come from slow, continual drainage of the unsaturated zone. Such a model may still be useful for assessment of groundwater resources on a monthly basis, under non-extreme climatic conditions. However, under extreme wet or dry conditions, or under a changed climate the predictive capacity of such models is likely to be inadequate.

Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.

2013-06-01

105

Estimated recharge rates at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitors the distribution of contaminants in ground water at the Hanford Site for the U.S. Department of Energy. A subtask called {open_quotes}Water Budget at Hanford{close_quotes} was initiated in FY 1994. The objective of this subtask was to produce a defensible map of estimated recharge rates across the Hanford Site. Methods that have been used to estimate recharge rates at the Hanford Site include measurements (of drainage, water contents, and tracers) and computer modeling. For the simulations of 12 soil-vegetation combinations, the annual rates varied from 0.05 mm/yr for the Ephrata sandy loam with bunchgrass to 85.2 mm/yr for the same soil without vegetation. Water content data from the Grass Site in the 300 Area indicated that annual rates varied from 3.0 to 143.5 mm/yr during an 8-year period. The annual volume of estimated recharge was calculated to be 8.47 {times} 10{sup 9} L for the potential future Hanford Site (i.e., the portion of the current Site bounded by Highway 240 and the Columbia River). This total volume is similar to earlier estimates of natural recharge and is 2 to 10x higher than estimates of runoff and ground-water flow from higher elevations. Not only is the volume of natural recharge significant in comparison to other ground-water inputs, the distribution of estimated recharge is highly skewed to the disturbed sandy soils (i.e., the 200 Areas, where most contaminants originate). The lack of good estimates of the means and variances of the supporting data (i.e., the soil map, the vegetation/land use map, the model parameters) translates into large uncertainties in the recharge estimates. When combined, the significant quantity of estimated recharge, its high sensitivity to disturbance, and the unquantified uncertainty of the data and model parameters suggest that the defensibility of the recharge estimates should be improved.

Fayer, M.J.; Walters, T.B.

1995-02-01

106

Problems in developing bimodal space power and propulsion system fuel element  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses design of a space nuclear power and propulsion system fuel element (PPFE) developed on the basis of an enhanced single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) of the 'TOPAZ-2' thermionic converter-reactor (TCR), and presents the PPFE performance for propulsion and power modes of operation. The choice of UC-TaC fuel composition is substantiated. Data on hydrogen effect on the PPFE output voltage are presented, design solutions are considered that allow to restrict hydrogen supply to an interelectrode gap (IEG). Long-term geometric stability of an emitter assembly is supported by calculated data.

Nikolaev, Yu. V.; Gontar, A. S.; Zaznoba, V. A.; Parshin, N. Ya.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Usov, V. A. [Research Institute of SIA 'Lutch' Podolsk, Moscow Region, 142100 (Russian Federation); RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation)

1997-01-10

107

Fuel-Powered Artificial Muscles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Artificial muscles and electric motors found in autonomous robots and prosthetic limbs are typically battery-powered, which severely restricts the duration of their performance and can necessitate long inactivity during battery recharge. To help solve these problems, we demonstrated two types of artificial muscles that convert the chemical energy of high-energy-density fuels to mechanical energy. The first type stores electrical charge and uses changes in stored charge for mechanical actuation. In contrast with electrically powered electrochemical muscles, only half of the actuator cycle is electrochemical. The second type of fuel-powered muscle provides a demonstrated actuator stroke and power density comparable to those of natural skeletal muscle and generated stresses that are over a hundred times higher.

Ebron, Von Howard; Yang, Zhiwei; Seyer, Daniel J.; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Oh, Jiyoung; Xie, Hui; Razal, Joselito; Hall, Lee J.; Ferraris, John P.; MacDiarmid, Alan G.; Baughman, Ray H.

2006-03-01

108

Polyphase alloys as rechargeable electrodes in advanced battery systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rechargeability of electrochemical cells is often limited by negative electrode problems. These may include loss of capacity, increased impedance ( In principle, these problems can be reduced or eliminated by the use of alloys that undergo either displacement or insertion reactions at reactant spec The fundamental reasons for some of these problems with elemental electrodes, as well as the basic principles involved in the different behavior of all A considerable amount of information is now available concerning the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of a number of alloys of potential interest f In addition, recent results have extended these results down to ambient temperatures, indicating that some such materials may be of interest for use wi The all-solid, mixed-conductor matrix concept will also be reviewed briefly. In this approach, the thermodynamic behaviors of two different binary allo

Huggins, Robert A.

1988-04-01

109

Transient, spatially varied groundwater recharge modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this work is to integrate field data and modeling tools in producing temporally and spatially varying groundwater recharge in a pilot watershed in North Okanagan, Canada. The recharge modeling is undertaken by using the Richards equation based finite element code (HYDRUS-1D), ArcGIS™, ROSETTA, in situ observations of soil temperature and soil moisture, and a long-term gridded climate data. The public version of HYDUS-1D and another version with detailed freezing and thawing module are first used to simulate soil temperature, snow pack, and soil moisture over a one year experimental period. Statistical analysis of the results show both versions of HYDRUS-1D reproduce observed variables to the same degree. After evaluating model performance using field data and ROSETTA derived soil hydraulic parameters, the HYDRUS-1D code is coupled with ArcGIS™ to produce spatially and temporally varying recharge maps throughout the Deep Creek watershed. Temporal and spatial analysis of 25 years daily recharge results at various representative points across the study watershed reveal significant temporal and spatial variations; average recharge estimated at 77.8 ± 50.8 mm/year. Previous studies in the Okanagan Basin used Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance without any attempt of model performance evaluation, notwithstanding its inherent limitations. Thus, climate change impact results from this previous study and similar others, such as Jyrkama and Sykes (2007), need to be interpreted with caution.

Assefa, Kibreab Amare; Woodbury, Allan D.

2013-08-01

110

Arsenic release during managed aquifer recharge (MAR)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mobilization and addition of geogenic trace metals to groundwater is typically caused by anthropogenic perturbations of the physicochemical conditions in the aquifer. This can add dangerously high levels of toxins to groundwater, thus compromising its use as a source of drinking water. In several regions world-wide, aquifer storage and recovery (ASR), a form of managed aquifer recharge (MAR), faces the problem of arsenic release due to the injection of oxygenated storage water. To better understand this process we coupled geochemical reactive transport modeling to bench-scale leaching experiments to investigate and verify the mobilization of geogenic arsenic (As) under a range of redox conditions from an arsenic-rich pyrite bearing limestone aquifer in Central Florida. Modeling and experimental observations showed similar results and confirmed the following: (1) native groundwater and aquifer matrix, including pyrite, were in chemical equilibrium, thus preventing the release of As due to pyrite dissolution under ambient conditions; (2) mixing of oxygen-rich surface water with oxygen-depleted native groundwater changed the redox conditions and promoted the dissolution of pyrite, and (3) the behavior of As along a flow path was controlled by a complex series of interconnected reactions. This included the oxidative dissolution of pyrite and simultaneous sorption of As onto neo-formed hydrous ferric oxides (HFO), followed by the reductive dissolution of HFO and secondary release of adsorbed As under reducing conditions. Arsenic contamination of drinking water in these systems is thus controlled by the re-equilibration of the system to more reducing conditions rather than a purely oxidative process.

Pichler, T.; Lazareva, O.; Druschel, G.

2013-12-01

111

The flow-refueling location problem for alternative-fuel vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beginning with Hodgson (Geogr.Anal.22(1990) 270), several researchers have been developing a new kind of location-allocation model for “flow capturing.” Instead of locating central facilities to serve demand at fixed points in space, their models aim to serve demand consisting of origin-destination flows along their shortest paths. This paper extends flow-capturing models to optimal location of refueling facilities for alternative-fuel (alt-fuel)

Michael Kuby; Seow Lim

2005-01-01

112

Modelling of heat and mass transfer to solve the problem of particle ignition water–coal fuel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problem of particle ignition coal-water fuel (WCF) has been solved numerically, located at a high flow environment. Two different approaches to describe the physics of the process have been applied. According to the results of numerical simulation of the effect of the scale has been set about ambient temperature, the particle size on the inertia of the studied processes. A comparison of ignition delay times has been obtained using both methods of describing heat and mass transfer processes preceding fire.

Salomatov, V. V.; Syrodoy, S. V.; Gutareva, N. Y.

2014-10-01

113

Surface clogging process modeling of suspended solids during urban stormwater aquifer recharge.  

PubMed

Aquifer recharge, which uses urban stormwater, is an effective technique to control the negative effects of groundwater over-exploitation, while clogging problems in infiltration systems remain the key restricting factor in broadening its practice. Quantitative understanding of the clogging process is still very poor. A laboratory study was conducted to understand surface physical clogging processes, with the primary aim of developing a model for predicting suspended solid clogging processes before aquifer recharge projects start. The experiments investigated the clogging characteristics of different suspended solid sizes in recharge water by using a series of one-dimensional fine quartz sand columns. The results showed that the smaller the suspended particles in recharge water, the farther the distance of movement and the larger the scope of clogging in porous media. Clogging extents in fine sand were 1 cm, for suspended particle size ranging from 0.075 to 0.0385 mm, and 2 cm, for particles less than 0.0385 mm. In addition, clogging development occurred more rapidly for smaller suspended solid particles. It took 48, 42, and 36 hr respectively, for large-, medium-, and small-sized particles to reach pre-determined clogging standards. An empirical formula and iteration model for the surface clogging evolution process were derived. The verification results obtained from stormwater recharge into fine sand demonstrated that the model could reflect the real laws of the surface clogging process. PMID:23513683

Wang, Zijia; Du, Xinqiang; Yang, Yuesuo; Ye, Xueyan

2012-01-01

114

Characteristics of groundwater recharge on the North China Plain.  

PubMed

Groundwater recharge is an important component of the groundwater system. On the North China Plain (NCP), groundwater is the main water supply. Because of large-scale overexploitation, the water table has declined, which has produced severe adverse effects on the environment and ecosystem. In this article, tracer experiment and watershed model were used to calculate and analyze NCP groundwater recharge. In the tracer experiment, average recharge was 108 mm/year and recharge coefficient 0.16. With its improved irrigation, vegetation coverage and evapotranspiration modules, the INFIL3.0 model was used for calculation of groundwater recharge. Regional modeling results showed an average recharge of 102 mm/year and recharge coefficient 0.14, for 2001-2009. These values are very similar to those from the field tracer experiment. Influences in the two methods were analyzed. The results can provide an important reference for NCP groundwater recharge. PMID:24032445

Tan, Xiu-Cui; Wu, Jing-Wei; Cai, Shu-Ying; Yang, Jin-Zhong

2014-01-01

115

Groundwater Recharge in Texas Bridget R. Scanlon, Alan Dutton,  

E-print Network

................................................................................. 28 Ogallala Aquifer ............................................................................. 20 Recharge Rates for the Major Aquifers Based on Review of Existing Data .................... 21 Evaluation of Techniques Used to Quantify Recharge in the Major Aquifers ................. 22 Conceptual

Scanlon, Bridget R.

116

REFLEAK: NIST Leak/Recharge Simulation Program for Refrigerant Mixtures  

National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

SRD 73 NIST REFLEAK: NIST Leak/Recharge Simulation Program for Refrigerant Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   REFLEAK estimates composition changes of zeotropic mixtures in leak and recharge processes.

117

Behavior of TOC in a Deep Confined Aquifer During Groundwater Artificial Recharge Process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, environmental geological problems such as land subsidence, land collapse, land cracking and salt-water intrusion have become important factors limiting economic development in some cities due to severe overexploitation of groundwater. So, a number of cities have carried out artificial recharge projects, which have played a significant role in controlling these problems. However, with the increasing trend of organic pollution appeared in the surface water, organic contaminated problems should not be neglected during this process. Although the organic components were always following in a lower concentration level, whether it would make groundwater face the organic pollution crisis was unknown for its' higher toxicity and durability. Based on a typical artificial recharge test carried out in a deep confined aquifer in this study area (located in Eastern China, there are 10 monitoring wells and 1 recharge well) that decided to control the field land subsidence, Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was selected as the target components to reveal the organic elements' changing trend during groundwater artificial recharge process. The results (Fig. 1) showed that the concentration of TOC in each monitoring well was appeared in an increasing trend due to the mix influence of the recharge water (TOC was 1.88mg/L) and the origin groundwater (TOC was 0.58mg/L). But the maximum concentrations of TOC in J4, J5, J6 monitoring well (the distance from recharge well was 10m, 17m, 31m respectively) were lower than the recharge water 0.28, 0.49, 0.74 mg/L respectively, with non-linear growth. It indicated that except adsorption, microbial degradation might also occur in the aquifer during artificial recharge. With the groundwater environment from relatively anaerobic environment turn to aerobic environment, DO was able to characterize the relative strength of the TOC biodegradation. The average value of DO in recharge water was 4.33 mg/L, and the maximum value of DO in J4, J5, J6 monitoring well was about 2.54, 2.43, 2.22 mg/L, respectively. All of that showed the farther distance from the recharge well to monitoring wells, the smaller change in the value of DO. It suggested that biodegradation function was in a relative weakening trend away from the recharge position. Based on the complete control of geological, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical conditions of the test site, GMS (groundwater modelling system) was used to simulate and forecast the TOC changing trend in the deep confined aquifer. The numerical results indicated the radius of influence (over 1.6mg/L) was 170m, 220m and 270m respectively after continuous recharge during 1 year, 2 year and 5 year.

Zhang, W.; He, H.; Shi, X.

2013-12-01

118

Sources of uncertainty in climate change impacts on groundwater recharge  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper assesses the significance of the many sources of uncertainty in future groundwater recharge estimation, based on lessons learnt from an integrated approach to assessing the regional impacts of climate and socio-economic change on groundwater recharge in East Anglia, UK. Many factors affect simulations of future groundwater recharge including changed precipitation and temperature regimes, coastal flooding, urbanization, woodland establishment,

I. P. Holman

2007-01-01

119

Anode for rechargeable ambient temperature lithium cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An ambient room temperature, high density, rechargeable lithium battery includes a Li(x)Mg2Si negative anode which intercalates lithium to form a single crystalline phase when x is up to 1.0 and an amorphous phase when x is from 1 to 2.0. The electrode has good reversibility and mechanical strength after cycling.

Huang, Chen-Kuo (inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (inventor); Attia, Alan I. (inventor); Halpert, Gerald (inventor)

1994-01-01

120

Recharging "Hot-Melt" Adhesive Film  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technique for recharging surface with "hot-melt" film makes use of one sided, high-temperature, pressure-sensitive adhesive tape. Purpose of the one-sided tape is to hold hot-melt charge in place until fused to surface. After adhesive has fused to surface and cooled, tape is removed, leaving adhesive on surface.

Progar, D. J.

1983-01-01

121

Design considerations for rechargeable lithium batteries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs of a discussion of design considerations for rechargable lithium batteries. The objective is to determine the influence of cell design parameters on the performance of Li-TiS2 cells. Topics covered include cell baseline design and testing, cell design and testing, cell design parameters studies, and cell cycling performance.

Shen, D. H.; Huang, C.-K.; Davies, E.; Perrone, D.; Surampudi, S.; Halpert, Gerald

1993-01-01

122

Self-Recharging Virtual Currency David Irwin  

E-print Network

aydan@cs.duke.edu ABSTRACT Market-based control is attractive for networked computing utilities in which self-recharging virtual currency model as a com- mon medium of exchange in a computational market. The key idea is to recycle currency through the economy auto- matically while bounding the rate

Shenoy, Prashant

123

Alloys of clathrate allotropes for rechargeable batteries  

DOEpatents

The present disclosure is directed at an electrode for a battery wherein the electrode comprises clathrate alloys of silicon, germanium or tin. In method form, the present disclosure is directed at methods of forming clathrate alloys of silicon, germanium or tin which methods lead to the formation of empty cage structures suitable for use as electrodes in rechargeable type batteries.

Chan, Candace K; Miller, Michael A; Chan, Kwai S

2014-12-09

124

Groundwater Recharge Simulator M. Tech. Thesis  

E-print Network

Groundwater Recharge Simulator M. Tech. Thesis by Dharmvir Kumar Roll No: 07305902 Guide: Prof;Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Groundwater Theory.1.2 Unsaturated Flow and the Water Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.1.3 Some more Terminology

Sohoni, Milind

125

Results of the international standard problem No. 31 CORA-13 experiment on severe fuel damage  

SciTech Connect

The definition of an international standard problem (ISP) exercise is a comparative exercise in which predictions with different computer codes for a given physical problem are compared with each other and a carefully controlled experimental study. The main goal of the ISP is to increase confidence in the validity and accuracy of analytical tools that are used in assessing the safety of nuclear installations. Moreover, it enables the code user to gain experience and to improve competence. The related calculation can be performed with or without previous knowledge of the experimental results; therefore two approaches to performing a standard problem exercise can be defined, [open quotes]open[close quotes] or [open quotes]blind.[close quotes] Following a proposal by the Federal Republic of Germany, principal working group (PWG) No. 2 of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations offered the CORA-13 experiment as ISP No. 31 to its member countries. The ISP, which was sponsored by the German Minister of Research and Technology, was conducted as a [open quotes]blind[close quotes] standard problem; i.e., only the initial and boundary conditions of the experiment were given to the participants for performing their calculations.

Firnhaber, M.; Trambauer, K. (Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Cologne (Germany)); Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany))

1993-01-01

126

The used nuclear fuel problem - can reprocessing and consolidated storage be complementary?  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes our CISF (Consolidated Interim Storage Facilities) and Reprocessing Facility concepts and show how they can be combined with a geologic repository to provide a comprehensive system for dealing with spent fuels in the USA. The performance of the CISF was logistically analyzed under six operational scenarios. A 3-stage plan has been developed to establish the CISF. Stage 1: the construction at the CISF site of only a rail receipt interface and storage pad large enough for the number of casks that will be received. The construction of the CISF Canister Handling Facility, the Storage Cask Fabrication Facility, the Cask Maintenance Facility and supporting infrastructure are performed during stage 2. The construction and placement into operation of a water-filled pool repackaging facility is completed for Stage 3. By using this staged approach, the capital cost of the CISF is spread over a number of years. It also allows more time for a final decision on the geologic repository to be made. A recycling facility will be built, this facility will used the NUEX recycling process that is based on the aqueous-based PUREX solvent extraction process, using a solvent of tri-N-butyl phosphate in a kerosene diluent. It is capable of processing spent fuels at a rate of 5 MT per day, at burn-ups up to 50 GWD per ton of spent fuels and a minimum of 5 years out-of-reactor cooling.

Phillips, C.; Thomas, I. [EnergySolutions Federal EPC., 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01

127

Oil fuel delivery optimization for multi product and multi depot: the case of petrol station replenishment problem (PSRP)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the Oil and Gas Law No. 22 of 2001, national and foreign private enterprises can invest in all sectors of Oil and Gas in Indonesia. In anticipation of this free competition, Pertamina, as a state-owned enterprises, which previously had monopolized the oil and gas business activities in Indonesia, should be able to improve services as well as the efficiency in order to compete in the free market, especially in terms of cost efficiency of fuel distribution to gas station (SPBU). To optimize the distribution activity, it is necessary to design a scheduling system and its fuel delivery routes daily to every SPBU. The determination of routes and scheduling delivery of fuel to the SPBU can be modeled as a Petrol Station Replenishment Problem (PSRP) with the multi-depot, multi-product, time windows and split deliveries, which in this study will be completed by the Tabu Search algorithm (TS). This study was conducted in the area of Bandung, the capital of West Java province, which is a big city and the neighboring city of Jakarta, the capital city of Indonesia. By using the fuel delivery data for one day, the results showed a decrease of 16.38% of the distance of the route compared to the current conditions, which impacted on the reduction of distribution costs and decrease the number of total trips by 5.22% and 3.83%.

Surjandari, Isti; Rachman, Amar; Dianawati, Fauzia; Wibowo, R. Pramono

2011-10-01

128

Manganese oxide cathodes for rechargeable batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Manganese oxides are considered as promising cathodes for rechargeable batteries due to their low cost and low toxicity as well as the abundant natural resources. In this dissertation, manganese oxides have been investigated as cathodes for both rechargeable lithium and alkaline batteries. Nanostructured lithium manganese oxides designed for rechargeable lithium cells have been synthesized by reducing lithium permanganate with methanol or hydrogen in various solvents followed by firing at moderate temperatures. The samples have been characterized by wet-chemical analyses, thermal methods, spectroscopic methods, and electron microscopy. It has been found that chemical residues in the oxides such as carboxylates and hydroxyl groups, which could be controlled by varying the reaction medium, reducing agents, and additives, make a significant influence on the electrochemical properties. The Li/Mn ratio in the material has also been found to be a critical factor in determining the rechargeability of the cathodes. The optimized samples exhibit a high capacity of close to 300 mAh/g with good cyclability and charge efficiency. The high capacity with a lower discharge voltage may make these nanostructured oxides particularly attractive for lithium polymer batteries. The research on the manganese oxide cathodes for alkaline batteries is focused on an analysis of the reaction products generated during the charge/discharge processes or by some designed chemical reactions mimicking the electrochemical processes. The factors influencing the formation of Mn3O4 in the two-electron redox process of delta-MnO2 have been studied with linear sweep voltammetry combined with X-ray diffraction. The presence of bismuth, the discharge rate, and the microstructure of the electrodes are found to affect the formation of Mn3O4, which is known to be electrochemically inactive. A faster voltage sweep and a more intimate mixing of the manganese oxide and carbon in the cathode are found to suppress the formation of Mn3O4. Bismuth has also been found to be beneficial in the one-electron process of gamma-MnO 2 when incorporated into the cathode. The results of a series of chemical reactions reveal that bismuth is blocking some reaction paths leading to the unwanted birnessite or Mn3O4. Barium is also found to play a similar role, but it is less effective than bismuth for the same amount of additive. Optimization of the additives has the potential to make the rechargeable alkaline cells based on manganese oxides to successfully compete with other rechargeable systems due to their low cost, environmental friendliness, and excellent safety features.

Im, Dongmin

129

Solid polymer electrolytes for rechargeable batteries. Final report  

SciTech Connect

SRI International has synthesized and tested new, dimensionally stable polymer electrolytes for high energy density rechargeable lithium batteries. We have prepared semi-interpenetrating networks of sulfur-substituted polyethyleneoxide with tetmethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The in situ hydrolysis of TEOS produces a mechanically stable three-dimensional network that entangles the polymer electrolytes and makes the film dimensionally flexible and stable. With this approach, the best dimensionally stable polymer electrolyte of this type produced so far, has a room temperature lithium ion conductivity of 7.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} S cm{sup {minus}1}. Another type of solid polymer electrolytes, polydiacetylene-based single-ion conductors with high room temperature proton conductivity were also developed. The best conductivity of these polymers is two orders of magnitude higher than that of Nafion under comparable experimental conditions. With further appropriate chemical modification, the new polymers could be used in fuel cells.

Narang, S.C.; Ventura, S.C. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Chemistry Lab.

1992-02-01

130

Rechargeable Infection-responsive Antifungal Denture Materials  

PubMed Central

Candida-associated denture stomatitis (CADS) is a significant clinical concern. We developed rechargeable infection-responsive antifungal denture materials for potentially managing the disease. Polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) was covalently bound onto diurethane dimethacrylate denture resins in the curing step. The PMAA resins bound cationic antifungal drugs such as miconazole and chlorhexidine digluconate (CG) through ionic interactions. The anticandidal activities of the drug-containing PMAA-resin discs were sustained for a prolonged period of time (weeks and months). Drug release was much faster at acidic conditions (pH 5) than at pH 7. Drugs bound to the denture materials could be “washed out” by treatment with EDTA, and the drug-depleted resins could be recharged with the same or a different class of anticandidal drugs. These results suggest clinical potential of the newly developed antifungal denture materials in the management of CADS and other infectious conditions. PMID:20940361

Cao, Z.; Sun, X.; Yeh, C.-K.; Sun, Y.

2010-01-01

131

Nanocomposite polymer electrolyte for rechargeable magnesium batteries  

SciTech Connect

Nanocomposite polymer electrolytes present new opportunities for rechargeable magnesium batteries. However, few polymer electrolytes have demonstrated reversible Mg deposition/dissolution and those that have still contain volatile liquids such as tetrahydrofuran (THF). In this work, we report a nanocomposite polymer electrolyte based on poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), Mg(BH4)2 and MgO nanoparticles for rechargeable Mg batteries. Cells with this electrolyte have a high coulombic efficiency of 98% for Mg plating/stripping and a high cycling stability. Through combined experiment-modeling investigations, a correlation between improved solvation of the salt and solvent chain length, chelation and oxygen denticity is established. Following the same trend, the nanocomposite polymer electrolyte is inferred to enhance the dissociation of the salt Mg(BH4)2 and thus improve the electrochemical performance. The insights and design metrics thus obtained may be used in nanocomposite electrolytes for other multivalent systems.

Shao, Yuyan; Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Wei, Zhehao; Gu, Meng; Deng, Xuchu; Xu, Suochang; Han, Kee Sung; Wang, Jiulin; Nie, Zimin; Li, Guosheng; Zavadil, K.; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong M.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Yong; Mueller, Karl T.; Persson, Kristin A.; Liu, Jun

2014-12-28

132

Rechargeable battery-powered flashlight system  

SciTech Connect

A rechargeable battery-operated flashlight system includes a housing for the flashlight, batteries and associated circuitry. A two-pronged plug is rotatably mounted in the housing for movement between two positions, the prongs projecting outwardly through an opening in the housing so that in one position they project into a recess formed by a reentrant portion of the housing and in the other position they project away from the recess. Resilient contacts connect the prongs to the rest of the circuitry, and engage in detents on the prongs in their two positions to inhibit rotation thereof. A wall bracket defines a pocket for releasably accommodating a receptacle fixture for receiving the plug prongs in their one position and for supporting the housing during recharging. In their other position, the prongs can be plugged directly into an AC wall outlet.

Conforti, F.J.; Fenne, K.R.

1984-08-21

133

Inorganic rechargeable non-aqueous cell  

DOEpatents

A totally inorganic non-aqueous rechargeable cell having an alkali or alkaline earth metal anode such as of lithium, a sulfur dioxide containing electrolyte and a discharging metal halide cathode, such as of CuCl.sub.2, CuBr.sub.2 and the like with said metal halide being substantially totally insoluble in SO.sub.2 and admixed with a conductive carbon material.

Bowden, William L. (Nashua, NH); Dey, Arabinda N. (Needham, MA)

1985-05-07

134

A new rechargeable intelligent vehicle detection sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) is a valid approach to solve the increasing transportation issue in cities. Vehicle detection is one of the key technologies in ITS. The ITS collects and processes traffic data (vehicle flow, vehicular speed, vehicle density and occupancy ratios) from vehicle detection sensors buried under the road or installed along the road. Inductive loop detector as one type of the vehicle detector is applied extensively, with the characters of stability, high value to cost ratio and feasibility. On the other hand, most of the existing inductive loop vehicle detection sensors have some weak points such as friability of detective loop, huge engineering for setting and traffic interruption during installing the sensor. The design and reality of a new rechargeable intelligent vehicle detection sensor is presented in this paper against these weak points existing now. The sensor consists of the inductive loop detector, the rechargeable batteries, the MCU (microcontroller) and the transmitter. In order to reduce the installing project amount, make the loop durable and easily maintained, the volume of the detective loop is reduced as much as we can. Communication in RF (radio frequency) brings on the advantages of getting rid of the feeder cable completely and reducing the installing project amount enormously. For saving the cable installation, the sensor is supplied by the rechargeable batteries. The purpose of the intelligent management of the energy and transmitter by means of MCU is to minimize the power consumption and prolong the working period of the sensor. In a word, the new sensor is more feasible with smaller volume, wireless communication, rechargeable batteries, low power consumption, low cost, high detector precision and easy maintenance and installation.

Lin, L.; Han, X. B.; Ding, R.; Li, G.; C-Y Lu, Steven; Hong, Q.

2005-01-01

135

Ampere-Hour Meter For Rechargeable Battery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Low-power analog/digital electronic circuit meters discharge of storage battery in ampere-hours. By metering discharge, one obtains indication of state of charge of battery and avoids unnecessary recharging, maintaining capacity of battery and prolonging life. Because of its small size and low power consumption, useful in such applications as portable video cameras, communication equipment on boats, portable audio equipment, and portable medical equipment.

Tripp, John S.; Schott, Timothy D.; Tcheng, Ping

1993-01-01

136

New anions as supporting electrolytes for rechargeable lithium batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Each of the two most commonly used salts in ambient-temperature rechargeable lithium batteries has problems involving safety and long-term stability. For example, solutions of LiClO 4 in 1,3-dioxolane are shock sensitive while LiAsF 6/ether electrolytes degrade (both thermochemically and electrochemically) with time. Studies have been undertaken on the solubility, conductivity, and stability towards lithium of seven new lithium salts in both tetrahydrofuran (THF) and sulfolane. Of the seven salts, LiTaF 6, Li 2C 2F 4(SO 3) 2 and Li 2C 4F 8 (SO 3) 2 provide reasonable conductivities and good stability in sulfolane at 70 °C.

Koch, V. R.; Dominey, L. A.; Goldman, J. L.; Langmuir, M. E.

137

The Li-ion rechargeable battery: a perspective.  

PubMed

Each cell of a battery stores electrical energy as chemical energy in two electrodes, a reductant (anode) and an oxidant (cathode), separated by an electrolyte that transfers the ionic component of the chemical reaction inside the cell and forces the electronic component outside the battery. The output on discharge is an external electronic current I at a voltage V for a time ?t. The chemical reaction of a rechargeable battery must be reversible on the application of a charging I and V. Critical parameters of a rechargeable battery are safety, density of energy that can be stored at a specific power input and retrieved at a specific power output, cycle and shelf life, storage efficiency, and cost of fabrication. Conventional ambient-temperature rechargeable batteries have solid electrodes and a liquid electrolyte. The positive electrode (cathode) consists of a host framework into which the mobile (working) cation is inserted reversibly over a finite solid-solution range. The solid-solution range, which is reduced at higher current by the rate of transfer of the working ion across electrode/electrolyte interfaces and within a host, limits the amount of charge per electrode formula unit that can be transferred over the time ?t = ?t(I). Moreover, the difference between energies of the LUMO and the HOMO of the electrolyte, i.e., electrolyte window, determines the maximum voltage for a long shelf and cycle life. The maximum stable voltage with an aqueous electrolyte is 1.5 V; the Li-ion rechargeable battery uses an organic electrolyte with a larger window, which increase the density of stored energy for a given ?t. Anode or cathode electrochemical potentials outside the electrolyte window can increase V, but they require formation of a passivating surface layer that must be permeable to Li(+) and capable of adapting rapidly to the changing electrode surface area as the electrode changes volume during cycling. A passivating surface layer adds to the impedance of the Li(+) transfer across the electrode/electrolyte interface and lowers the cycle life of a battery cell. Moreover, formation of a passivation layer on the anode robs Li from the cathode irreversibly on an initial charge, further lowering the reversible ?t. These problems plus the cost of quality control of manufacturing plague development of Li-ion rechargeable batteries that can compete with the internal combustion engine for powering electric cars and that can provide the needed low-cost storage of electrical energy generated by renewable wind and/or solar energy. Chemists are contributing to incremental improvements of the conventional strategy by investigating and controlling electrode passivation layers, improving the rate of Li(+) transfer across electrode/electrolyte interfaces, identifying electrolytes with larger windows while retaining a Li(+) conductivity ?(Li) > 10(-3) S cm(-1), synthesizing electrode morphologies that reduce the size of the active particles while pinning them on current collectors of large surface area accessible by the electrolyte, lowering the cost of cell fabrication, designing displacement-reaction anodes of higher capacity that allow a safe, fast charge, and designing alternative cathode hosts. However, new strategies are needed for batteries that go beyond powering hand-held devices, such as using electrode hosts with two-electron redox centers; replacing the cathode hosts by materials that undergo displacement reactions (e.g. sulfur) by liquid cathodes that may contain flow-through redox molecules, or by catalysts for air cathodes; and developing a Li(+) solid electrolyte separator membrane that allows an organic and aqueous liquid electrolyte on the anode and cathode sides, respectively. Opportunities exist for the chemist to bring together oxide and polymer or graphene chemistry in imaginative morphologies. PMID:23294028

Goodenough, John B; Park, Kyu-Sung

2013-01-30

138

High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements  

PubMed Central

Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300?mAh·g?1 at a voltage of approximately 2.4?V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide–triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems. PMID:25011939

Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, Cédric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

2014-01-01

139

High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300 mAh.g-1 at a voltage of approximately 2.4 V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems.

Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, Cédric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

2014-07-01

140

High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements.  

PubMed

Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300 Ah · g(-1) at a voltage of approximately 2.4 V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems. PMID:25011939

Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, Cédric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

2014-01-01

141

A 2-D Test Problem for CFD Modeling Heat Transfer in Spent Fuel Transfer Cask Neutron Shields  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 5-10 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper presents results for a simple 2-D problem that is an effective numerical analog for the neutron shield application. Because it is 2-D, solutions can be obtained relatively quickly allowing a comparison and assessment of sensitivity to model parameter changes. Turbulence models are considered as well as the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions. Solutions are compared for two commercial CFD codes, FLUENT and STAR-CCM+. The results can be used to provide input to the CFD Best Practices for this application. Following study results for the 2-D test problem, a comparison of simulation results is provided for a high Rayleigh number experiment with large annular gap. Because the geometry of this validation is significantly different from the neutron shield, and due to the critical nature of this application, the argument is made for new experiments at representative scales

Zigh, Ghani; Solis, Jorge; Fort, James A.

2011-01-14

142

Probabilistic analysis of the effects of climate change on groundwater recharge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Groundwater recharge is likely to be affected by climate change. In semiarid regions where groundwater resources are often critical, annual recharge rates are typically small and most recharge occurs episodically. Such episodic recharge is uncertain and difficult to predict. This paper analyzes the impacts of different climate predictions on diffuse episodic recharge at a low-relief semiarid rain-fed agricultural area. The

Gene-Hua Crystal Ng; Dennis McLaughlin; Dara Entekhabi; Bridget R. Scanlon

2010-01-01

143

Compliance problems of small utility systems with the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978: volume II - appendices  

SciTech Connect

A study of the problems of compliance with the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 experienced by electric utility systems which have a total generating capacity of less than 2000 MW is presented. This volume presents the following appendices: (A) case studies (Farmington, New Mexico; Lamar, Colorado; Dover, Delaware; Wolverine Electric Cooperative, Michigan; Central Telephone and Utilities, Kansas; Sierra Pacific Power Company, Nevada; Vero Beach, Florida; Lubbock, Texas; Western Farmers Cooperative, Oklahoma; and West Texas Utilities Company, Texas); (B) contacts and responses to study; (C) joint action legislation chart; (D) Texas Municipal Power Agency case study; (E) existing generating units jointly owned with small utilities; (F) future generating units jointly owned with small utilities; (G) Federal Register Notice of April 17, 1980, and letter of inquiry to utilities; (H) small utility responses; and (I) Section 744, PIFUA. (WHK)

None

1981-01-01

144

A review of groundwater recharge under irrigated agriculture in Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantification of recharge under irrigated agriculture is one of the most important but difficult tasks. It is the least understood component in groundwater studies because of its large variability in space and time and the difficulty of direct measurement. Better management of groundwater resources is only possible if we can accurately determine all fluxes going into and out of a groundwater system. One of the major challenges facing irrigated agriculture in Australia, and the world, is to reduce uncertainty in estimating or measuring the recharge flux. Reducing uncertainty in groundwater recharge under irrigated agriculture is a pre-requisite for effective, efficient and sustainable groundwater resource management especially in dry areas where groundwater usage is often the key to economic development. An accurate quantification of groundwater recharge under irrigated systems is also crucial because of its potential impacts on soil profile salinity, groundwater levels and groundwater quality. This paper aims to identify the main recharge control parameters thorough a review of past field and modelling recharge studies in Australia. We find that the main recharge control parameters under irrigated agriculture are soil type, irrigation management, watertable depth, land cover or plant water uptake, soil surface conditions, and soil, irrigation water and groundwater chemistry. The most commonly used recharge estimation approaches include chloride mass balance, water budget equation, lysimeters, Darcy's law and numerical models. Main sources and magnitude of uncertainty in recharge estimates associated with these approaches are discussed.

Riasat, Ali; Mallants, Dirk; Walker, Glen; Silberstein, Richard

2014-05-01

145

Recycling of used Ni-MH rechargeable batteries  

SciTech Connect

The Ni-MH (nickel metal hydride) rechargeable battery was developed several years ago. Its higher electrochemical capacity and greater safety compared with the Ni-Cd rechargeable battery have resulted in very rapid increase in its production. The Ni-MH rechargeable battery consists of Ni, Co and rare earth metals, so that recycling is important to recover these valuable mineral resources. In this study, a basic recycling process for used Ni-MH rechargeable batteries has been developed, in which the Ni, Co and rare earth elements are recovered through a combination of mechanical processing and hydrometallurgical processing.

Yoshida, T.; Ono, H.; Shirai, R. [Mitsui Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd., Ageo, Saitama (Japan). Corporate R and D Center

1995-12-31

146

Making Li-air batteries rechargeable: material challenges  

SciTech Connect

A Li-air battery could potentially provide three to five times higher energy density/specific energy than conventional batteries, thus enable the driving range of an electric vehicle comparable to a gasoline vehicle. However, making Li-air batteries rechargeable presents significant challenges, mostly related with materials. Herein, we discuss the key factors that influence the rechargeability of Li-air batteries with a focus on nonaqueous system. The status and materials challenges for nonaqueous rechargeable Li-air batteries are reviewed. These include electrolytes, cathode (electocatalysts), lithium metal anodes, and oxygen-selective membranes (oxygen supply from air). The perspective of rechargeable Li-air batteries is provided.

Shao, Yuyan; Ding, Fei; Xiao, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Wu; Park, Seh Kyu; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun

2013-02-25

147

Polyphase alloys as rechargeable electrodes in advanced battery systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rechargeability of electrochemical cells is often limited by negative electrode problems. These may include loss of capacity, increased impedance, macroscopic shape change, dendrite growth, or a tendency for filamentary or whisker growth. In principle, these problems can be reduced or eliminated by the use of alloys that undergo either displacement or insertion reactions at reactant species activities less than unity, rather than pure elements. The fundamental reasons for some of these problems with elemental electrodes, as well as the basic principles involved in the different behavior of alloys, are briefly discussed. More information is now available concerning the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of a number of alloys of potential interest for use as electrodes in elevated temperature lithium battery systems. Recent results have extended these results down to ambient temperatures, indicating that some such materials may be of interest for use with new low temperature molten salt electrolytes, or with organic solvent electrolytes. The all solid mixed conductor matrix concept is also reviewed.

Huggins, Robert A.

1987-01-01

148

Polyphase alloys as rechargeable electrodes in advanced battery systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rechargeability of electrochemical cells is often limited by negative electrode problems. These may include loss of capacity, increased impedance, macroscopic shape change, dendrite growth, or a tendency for filamentary or whisker growth. In principle, these problems can be reduced or eliminated by the use of alloys that undergo either displacement or insertion reactions at reactant species activities less than unity, rather than pure elements. The fundamental reasons for some of these problems with elemental electrodes, as well as the basic principles involved in the different behavior of alloys, are briefly discussed. More information is now available concerning the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of a number of alloys of potential interest for use as electrodes in elevated temperature lithium battery systems. Recent results have extended these results down to ambient temperatures, indicating that some such materials may be of interest for use with new low temperature molten salt electrolytes, or with organic solvent electrolytes. The all solid mixed conductor matrix concept is also reviewed.

Huggins, Robert A.

1987-09-01

149

Evolution of strategies for modern rechargeable batteries.  

PubMed

This Account provides perspective on the evolution of the rechargeable battery and summarizes innovations in the development of these devices. Initially, I describe the components of a conventional rechargeable battery along with the engineering parameters that define the figures of merit for a single cell. In 1967, researchers discovered fast Na(+) conduction at 300 K in Na ?,?''-alumina. Since then battery technology has evolved from a strongly acidic or alkaline aqueous electrolyte with protons as the working ion to an organic liquid-carbonate electrolyte with Li(+) as the working ion in a Li-ion battery. The invention of the sodium-sulfur and Zebra batteries stimulated consideration of framework structures as crystalline hosts for mobile guest alkali ions, and the jump in oil prices in the early 1970s prompted researchers to consider alternative room-temperature batteries with aprotic liquid electrolytes. With the existence of Li primary cells and ongoing research on the chemistry of reversible Li intercalation into layered chalcogenides, industry invested in the production of a Li/TiS2 rechargeable cell. However, on repeated recharge, dendrites grew across the electrolyte from the anode to the cathode, leading to dangerous short-circuits in the cell in the presence of the flammable organic liquid electrolyte. Because lowering the voltage of the anode would prevent cells with layered-chalcogenide cathodes from competing with cells that had an aqueous electrolyte, researchers quickly abandoned this effort. However, once it was realized that an oxide cathode could offer a larger voltage versus lithium, researchers considered the extraction of Li from the layered LiMO2 oxides with M = Co or Ni. These oxide cathodes were fabricated in a discharged state, and battery manufacturers could not conceive of assembling a cell with a discharged cathode. Meanwhile, exploration of Li intercalation into graphite showed that reversible Li insertion into carbon occurred without dendrite formation. The SONY corporation used the LiCoO2/carbon battery to power their initial cellular telephone and launched the wireless revolution. As researchers developed 3D transition-metal hosts, manufacturers introduced spinel and olivine hosts in the Lix[Mn2]O4 and LiFe(PO4) cathodes. However, current Li-ion batteries fall short of the desired specifications for electric-powered automobiles and the storage of electrical energy generated by wind and solar power. These demands are stimulating new strategies for electrochemical cells that can safely and affordably meet those challenges. PMID:22746097

Goodenough, John B

2013-05-21

150

Challenges of Artificial Recharge at the Chain of Lakes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A series of gravel quarry lakes, A through I (i.e. Chain of Lakes) in Alameda County, California are planned to convert to off-channel spreading lakes for artificial groundwater recharge. An operational plan is needed for the near-term improvements that would allow safe and efficient operations of Lake H and Lake I recently acquired for artificial recharge operations. Water source for the groundwater recharge comes from State Water Project (SWP) water releases at the South Bay Aqueduct turnout. The released water flows approximately nine miles in Arroyo Mocho Creek to the planned diversion facility. The recharge system includes multiple water delivery components and recharge components. Reliability of SWP water delivery is a water supply constraint to the recharge system. Hydraulic capacities of each delivery component and recharge capacities of each recharge component are physical constraints to the development of the operational plan. Policy issues identified in the Mitigated Negative Declaration which contains mitigation measures addressing potential impacts of fisheries and erosion are regulatory constraints to the operational plan development. Our approach that addresses technical challenges and policy issues in the development of the operational plan includes i) determination of lake recharge under observed conditions using water budget method; ii) development and calibration of a ground water flow model using MODFLOW; iii) estimation of lake recharge capacity for a range of lake levels using the calibrated ground water flow model; iv) analysis of clogging layer effects on recharge capacity; and v) development and application of operations models for the stream delivery system and the lake system.

Zeng, X.

2004-12-01

151

Impacts on groundwater recharge areas of megacity pumping: analysis of potential contamination of Kolkata, India, water supply  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water supply to the world's megacities is a problem of quantity and quality that will be a priority in the coming decades. Heavy pumping of groundwater beneath these urban centres, particularly in regions with low natural topographic gradients, such as deltas and floodplains, can fundamentally alter the hydrological system. These changes affect recharge area locations, which may shift closer to the city centre than before development, thereby increasing the potential for contamination. Hydrogeological simulation analysis allows evaluation of the impact on past, present and future pumping for the region of Kolkata, India, on recharge area locations in an aquifer that supplies water to over 13 million people. Relocated recharge areas are compared with known surface contamination sources, with a focus on sustainable management of this urban groundwater resource. The study highlights the impacts of pumping on water sources for long-term development of stressed city aquifers and for future water supply in deltaic and floodplain regions of the world.

Sahu, Paulami; Michael, Holly A.; Voss, Clifford I.; Sikdar, Pradip K.

2013-01-01

152

Artificial groundwater recharge as integral part of a water resources system in a humid environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Graz, Austria, artificial groundwater recharge has been operated as an integral part of the drinking water supply system for more than thirty years. About 180 l/s of high quality water from pristine creeks (i.e. no pre-treatment necessary) are infiltrated via sand and lawn basins and infiltration trenches into two phreatic aquifers to sustain the extraction of approximately 400 l/s. The remaining third of drinking water for roughly 300.000 people is provided by a remote supply line from the East alpine karst region Hochschwab. By this threefold model the water supply system is less vulnerable to external conditions. In the early 1980's the infiltration devices were also designed as a hydraulic barrier against riverbank infiltration from the river Mur, which at that time showed seriously impaired water quality due to upstream paper mills. This resulted into high iron and manganese groundwater concentrations which lead to clogging of the pumping wells. These problems have been eliminated in the meantime due to the onsite purification of paper mill effluents and the construction of many waste water treatment plants. The recharge system has recently been thoroughly examined to optimize the operation of groundwater recharge and to provide a basis for further extension. The investigations included (i) field experiments and laboratory analyses to improve the trade off between infiltration rate and elimination capacities of the sand filter basins' top layer, (ii) numerical groundwater modelling to compute the recovery rate of the recharged water, the composition of the origin of the pumped water, emergency scenarios due to the failure of system parts, the transient capture zones of the withdrawal wells and the coordination of recharge and withdrawal and (iii) development of an online monitoring setup combined with a decision support system to guarantee reliable functioning of the entire structure. Additionally, the depreciation, maintenance and operation costs of the managed aquifer recharge system have been evaluated. Among numerous results it could be shown that replacing the lawn by sand basins and operating them constantly during winter holds the largest potential to increase the infiltration volume. However, this is only an option for new to build structures since the current basin positions would lead to large direct losses of recharged groundwater into the river Mur. Adjusting the timing of infiltration and withdrawal based on subsurface travel time yields an increase of the pumped amount of about 11% given about the same extension the wells' capture zones. The overall costs of artificial groundwater recharge amount to 0,15 €/m³ excluding pumping and distribution costs compared to a water price of about 1,5 €/m³ charged to consumers. Currently, the implications of building a hydro power plant adjacent to the recharge site are evaluated emphasizing the need for innovative solutions given only limited land resources. On the basis of the projected impacts of climate change on the availability of surface water and groundwater in the South-Eastern alpine regions, the aquifers can act as a buffer system to help overcome the timely shift between supply and demand. Thus, also in predominantly humid regions artificial groundwater recharge represents a viable and sustainable solution to safeguard the supply of drinking water in the long term.

Kupfersberger, Hans; Stadler, Hermann

2010-05-01

153

Availability of streamflow for recharge of the basal aquifer in the Pearl Harbor area, Hawaii  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Pearl Harbor area is underlain by an extensive basal aquifer that contains large supplies of fresh water. Because of the presence of a cap rock composed of sedimentary material that is less permeable than the basaltic lava of the basal aquifer, seaward movement of ground water is retarded. The cap rock causes the basal water to stand at a high level; thus, the lens of fresh water that floats on sea water is thick. Discharge from the basal ground-water body, which includes pumpage from wells and shafts, averaged 250 million gallons per day during 1931-65. Because the water level in the basal aquifer did not decline progressively, recharge to the ground-water body must have been approximately equal to discharge. Although pumping for agricultural use has decreased since 1931, net ground-water discharge has increased because of a large increase in pumping for urban use. Substitution of ground water for surface water in the irrigation of sugarcane has also contributed to a net increase in ground-water discharge. The development of Mililani Town will further increase discharge. The increase in ground-water discharge may cause an increase in chloride content of the water pumped from wells near the shore of Pearl Harbor unless the increased discharge is balanced by increased recharge to the local aquifer. The aquifer is recharged by direct infiltration and deep percolation of rain, principally in the high forested area, by infiltration and percolation of irrigation water applied in excess of plant requirements, by seepage of water through streambeds, and possibly by ground-water inflow from outside the area. Recharge is greatest in the uplands, where rainfall is heavy and where much infiltration takes place before rainwater collects in the middle and lower reaches of stream channels. Once water collects in and saturates the alluvium of stream channels, additional inflow to the streams will flow out to sea, only slightly decreased by seepage. Average annual direct runoff from the 90-square-mile Pearl Harbor area is 47.27 million gallons per day, or 11.1 inches; this is 13.3 percent of the average annual rainfall (83.3 in.) over the area. Average annual direct runoff in streams at the 800- and 400-foot altitudes is 29 and 38 million gallons per day, respectively. Kipapa Stream has the largest average annual direct runoff at those altitudes--6 and 9 million gallons per day, respectively. Because streams are flashy and have a wide range in discharge, only 60 percent of the average annual runoff can be economically diverted through ditches to recharge areas. The diversion may be increased slightly if reservoirs are used in conjunction with ditches to temporarily detain flows in excess of ditch capacity. The planned irrigation use of some of the perennial flow available in Waikele Stream near sea level will decrease pumping from and increase recharge to the basal aquifer. Suspended-sediment load is mainly silt and clay, and it increases rapidly with increased discharge. Thus, the use of streamflow for artificial recharge poses problems. High flows must be used if recharge is to be effective, but flows must not be so high as to cause clogging of recharge facilities with sediment or woodland debris. Practical tests are needed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of different types of recharge structures, such as a reservoir or basin, large-diameter deep shafts, deep wells, or combinations of all these structures.

Hirashima, George Tokusuke

1971-01-01

154

Problem of computing the fuel component of the cost of electric and thermal energy in slow reactor nuclear power plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method for computing the cost of the fuel component of nuclear power plants is discussed. It was found that the proposed method for calculating the fuel component cost of nuclear power plants by the number of spent fuel assemblies, permits changes to be made in the fuel cycle, taking into account the interests of both the power plant and

Shcherbinin

1983-01-01

155

Analysis of regenerative fuel cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The concept of a rechargeable fuel cell (RFC) system is considered. A newer type of rechargeable battery, the nickel hydrogen (Ni-H2) battery, is also evaluated. A review was made of past studies which showed large variations in weight, cost, and efficiency. Hydrogen-bromine and hydrogen-chlorine regenerable fuel cells were studied, and were found to have a potential for higher energy storage efficiency then the hydrogen-oxygen system. A reduction of up to 15 percent in solar array size may be possible as a result. These systems are not yet developed, but further study of them is recommended.

Gross, S.

1982-01-01

156

Lithium Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Rechargeable lithium metal batteries have much higher energy density than those of lithium ion batteries using graphite anode. Unfortunately, uncontrollable dendritic lithium growth inherent in these batteries (upon repeated charge/discharge cycling) and limited Coulombic efficiency during lithium deposition/striping has prevented their practical application over the past 40 years. With the emerging of post Li-ion batteries, safe and efficient operation of lithium metal anode has become an enabling technology which may determine the fate of several promising candidates for the next generation of energy storage systems, including rechargeable Li-air battery, Li-S battery, and Li metal battery which utilize lithium intercalation compounds as cathode. In this work, various factors which affect the morphology and Coulombic efficiency of lithium anode will be analyzed. Technologies used to characterize the morphology of lithium deposition and the results obtained by modeling of lithium dendrite growth will also be reviewed. At last, recent development in this filed and urgent need in this field will also be discussed.

Xu, Wu; Wang, Jiulin; Ding, Fei; Chen, Xilin; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Zhang, Yaohui; Zhang, Jiguang

2014-02-28

157

Melt-Formable Block Copolymer Electrolytes for Lithium Rechargeable Batteries  

E-print Network

Melt-Formable Block Copolymer Electrolytes for Lithium Rechargeable Batteries Anne-Vale´rie G conductivity in polymer electrolytes for solid-state rechargeable lithium batteries. However, due to the strong. Herein, we report the design of new block copolymer electrolytes based on poly methyl methacrylate , PMMA

Sadoway, Donald Robert

158

Investigation of Possible Extra ~Recharge During Pumping in Nottinghant .Aquifer  

E-print Network

Investigation of Possible Extra ~Recharge During Pumping in Nottinghant .Aquifer by Jiu J. Jiaoa Abstract Approaches to investigate possible recharge during a pumping test period are demonstrated by analyzing the pumping test data from the Nottingham aquifer, UK. The pumping lasted more than 200 days

Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

159

Estimation of groundwater recharge and discharge across northern Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Groundwater recharge is one of the more difficult components of the hydrological cycle to estimate but one that is becoming increasingly important as Australia turns to groundwater resources for future economic development. Also of concern is groundwater discharge. The extraction of groundwater by pumping inevitably reduces groundwater discharge to rivers where the two are connected. Knowledge of both groundwater recharge

Russell S. Crosbie; James L. McCallum; Glenn A. Harrington

2009-01-01

160

Autonomous Battery Recharging for Indoor Mobile Robots Seungjun Oh  

E-print Network

1 Autonomous Battery Recharging for Indoor Mobile Robots Seungjun Oh Australian National University the batteries on a mobile robot. The robot used in this project is the Nomadic Technologies? Nomad XR4000 mobile robot. The battery recharging system was implemented using the robot's built-in sensors to control

161

Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the recharge boundary condition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reliability analysis method is integrated with MODFLOW to study the impact of recharge on the groundwater flow system at a study area in New Jersey. The performance function is formulated in terms of head or flow rate at a pumping well, while the recharge sensitivity vector is computed efficiently by implementing the adjoint method in MODFLOW. The developed methodology

M. I. Jyrkama; J. F. Sykes

2006-01-01

162

Global synthesis of groundwater recharge in semiarid and arid regions  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Global synthesis of the findings from ???140 recharge study areas in semiarid and arid regions provides important information on recharge rates, controls, and processes, which are critical for sustainable water development. Water resource evaluation, dryland salinity assessment (Australia), and radioactive waste disposal (US) are among the primary goals of many of these recharge studies. The chloride mass balance (CMB) technique is widely used to estimate recharge. Average recharge rates estimated over large areas (40-374000 km2) range from 0.2 to 35 mm year-1, representing 0.1-5% of long-term average annual precipitation. Extreme local variability in recharge, with rates up to ???720 m year-1, results from focussed recharge beneath ephemeral streams and lakes and preferential flow mostly in fractured systems. System response to climate variability and land use/land cover (LU/LC) changes is archived in unsaturated zone tracer profiles and in groundwater level fluctuations. Inter-annual climate variability related to El Nin??o Southern Oscillation (ENSO) results in up to three times higher recharge in regions within the SW US during periods of frequent El Nin??os (1977-1998) relative to periods dominated by La Nin??as (1941-1957). Enhanced recharge related to ENSO is also documented in Argentina. Climate variability at decadal to century scales recorded in chloride profiles in Africa results in recharge rates of 30 mm year-1 during the Sahel drought (1970-1986) to 150 mm year-1 during non-drought periods. Variations in climate at millennial scales in the SW US changed systems from recharge during the Pleistocene glacial period (??? 10 000 years ago) to discharge during the Holocene semiarid period. LU/LC changes such as deforestation in Australia increased recharge up to about 2 orders of magnitude. Changes from natural grassland and shrublands to dryland (rain-fed) agriculture altered systems from discharge (evapotranspiration, ET) to recharge in the SW US. The impact of LU change was much greater than climate variability in Niger (Africa), where replacement of savanna by crops increased recharge by about an order of magnitude even during severe droughts. Sensitivity of recharge to LU/LC changes suggests that recharge may be controlled through management of LU. In irrigated areas, recharge varies from 10 to 485 mm year-1, representing 1-25% of irrigation plus precipitation. However, irrigation pumpage in groundwater-fed irrigated areas greatly exceeds recharge rates, resulting in groundwater mining. Increased recharge related to cultivation has mobilized salts that accumulated in the unsaturated zone over millennia, resulting in widespread groundwater and surface water contamination, particularly in Australia. The synthesis of recharge rates provided in this study contains valuable information for developing sustainable groundwater resource programmes within the context of climate variability and LU/LC change. Copyright ?? 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Scanlon, B.R.; Keese, K.E.; Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.; Gaye, C.B.; Edmunds, W.M.; Simmers, I.

2006-01-01

163

Global synthesis of groundwater recharge in semiarid and arid regions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global synthesis of the findings from 140 recharge study areas in semiarid and arid regions provides important information on recharge rates, controls, and processes, which are critical for sustainable water development. Water resource evaluation, dryland salinity assessment (Australia), and radioactive waste disposal (US) are among the primary goals of many of these recharge studies. The chloride mass balance (CMB) technique is widely used to estimate recharge. Average recharge rates estimated over large areas (40-374 000 km2) range from 0.2 to 35 mm year-1, representing 0.1-5% of long-term average annual precipitation. Extreme local variability in recharge, with rates up to 720 m year-1, results from focussed recharge beneath ephemeral streams and lakes and preferential flow mostly in fractured systems. System response to climate variability and land use/land cover (LU/LC) changes is archived in unsaturated zone tracer profiles and in groundwater level fluctuations. Inter-annual climate variability related to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) results in up to three times higher recharge in regions within the SW US during periods of frequent El Niños (1977-1998) relative to periods dominated by La Niñas (1941-1957). Enhanced recharge related to ENSO is also documented in Argentina. Climate variability at decadal to century scales recorded in chloride profiles in Africa results in recharge rates of 30 mm year-1 during the Sahel drought (1970-1986) to 150 mm year-1 during non-drought periods. Variations in climate at millennial scales in the SW US changed systems from recharge during the Pleistocene glacial period (10 000 years ago) to discharge during the Holocene semiarid period. LU/LC changes such as deforestation in Australia increased recharge up to about 2 orders of magnitude. Changes from natural grassland and shrublands to dryland (rain-fed) agriculture altered systems from discharge (evapotranspiration, ET) to recharge in the SW US. The impact of LU change was much greater than climate variability in Niger (Africa), where replacement of savanna by crops increased recharge by about an order of magnitude even during severe droughts. Sensitivity of recharge to LU/LC changes suggests that recharge may be controlled through management of LU. In irrigated areas, recharge varies from 10 to 485 mm year-1, representing 1-25% of irrigation plus precipitation. However, irrigation pumpage in groundwater-fed irrigated areas greatly exceeds recharge rates, resulting in groundwater mining. Increased recharge related to cultivation has mobilized salts that accumulated in the unsaturated zone over millennia, resulting in widespread groundwater and surface water contamination, particularly in Australia. The synthesis of recharge rates provided in this study contains valuable information for developing sustainable groundwater resource programmes within the context of climate variability and LU/LC change.

Scanlon, Bridget R.; Keese, Kelley E.; Flint, Alan L.; Flint, Lorraine E.; Gaye, Cheikh B.; Edmunds, W. Michael; Simmers, Ian

2006-10-01

164

Early Markets: Fuel Cells for Material  

E-print Network

, fuel cells can efficiently provide power while at the same time producing almost no harmful air% and require 75% less space as compared with battery recharging infrastructure.1 In addition, fuel cells be cost-competitive with batteries on a lifecycle basis. Additionally, fuel cells are currently eligible

165

Lithium electronic environments in rechargeable battery electrodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work investigates the electronic environments of lithium in the electrodes of rechargeable batteries. The use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a novel approach, which when coupled with conventional electrochemical experiments, yield a thorough picture of the electrode interior. Relatively few EELS experiments have been preformed on lithium compounds owing to their reactivity. Experimental techniques were established to minimize sample contamination and control electron beam damage to studied compounds. Lithium hydroxide was found to be the most common product of beam damaged lithium alloys. Under an intense electron beam, halogen atoms desorbed by radiolysis in lithium halides. EELS spectra from a number of standard lithium compounds were obtained in order to identify the variety of spectra encountered in lithium rechargeable battery electrodes. Lithium alloys all displayed characteristically broad Li K-edge spectra, consistent with transitions to continuum states. Transitions to bound states were observed in the Li K and oxygen K-edge spectra of lithium oxides. Lithium halides were distinguished by their systematic chemical shift proportional to the anion electronegativity. Good agreement was found with measured lithium halide spectra and electron structure calculations using a self-consistant multiscattering code. The specific electrode environments of LiC6, LiCoO2, and Li-SnO were investigated. Contrary to published XPS predictions, lithium in intercalated graphite was determined to be in more metallic than ionic. We present the first experimental evidence of charge compensation by oxygen ions in deintercalated LiCoO2. Mossbauer studies on cycled Li-SnO reveal severely defective structures on an atomic scale. Metal hydride systems are presented in the appendices of this thesis. The mechanical alloying of immiscible Fe and Mg powders resulted in single-phase bcc alloys of less than 20 at% Mg. Kinetic studies on LaNi5-xSn x alloys proved that the mass transfer of hydrogen through these alloys was not hindered with increasing Sn substitutions for Ni. Collaborations with Energizer(c) found LanNi4.7Sn0.3 alloys to possess limited utility in rechargeable nickel-metal-hydride sealed-cell batteries.

Hightower, Adrian

166

Artificial Recharge Coupled with Flood Mitigation in Jeju, Korea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The primary goal of this study is to develop and apply the artificial recharge system at Han Stream in Jeju Island, Korea, for not only securing sustainable groundwater resources, but also mitigating severe floods occurred due to the global climate changes. Jeju-friendly Aquifer Recharge Technology (J-ART) in this study has been developed by capturing ephemeral stream water with no interference in the environments such as natural recharge or eco-system, storing the flood water in the reservoirs, recharging it through designed borehole after appropriate water treatment, and then making it to be used at down-gradient production wells. For optimal design of J-ART, we conducted injection tests at the monitoring well (MW5) as well as at the planned recharge site during drilling the recharge wells and performed a modeling with the data obtained. Based on the modeling results, the artificial recharge wells were developed with a design of 10-meter spacing between the wells and 35-40 meter depths, which has a capacity of more than 2,500,000 m3 of groundwater resources in a year. Characterizing groundwater flow from recharge area to discharge area should be achieved to assess the efficiency of J-ART. The resistivity logging employed to predict water flow in unsaturated zone during artificial recharge based on the inverse modeling and resistivity change patterns. Stable isotope studies of deuterium and oxygen-18 of surface waters and groundwaters were carried out to interpret mixing and flow in groundwaters impacted by artificial recharge. Transient models were developed to predict the effects of artificial recharge using the hydraulic properties of aquifers, groundwater levels, and meteorological data. Time series changes of water balance after artificial recharge were analyzed, and residence time of the recharged water was also predicted with a certain degree of uncertainty. Keywords: J-ART, Hydrogeological methods, Geophysical survey, Stable isotopes, Groundwater modeling, Jeju Island. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by a grant (code 3-2-3) from the Sustainable Water Resources Research Center of 21st Century Frontier Research Program.

Kim, Y.; Koo, M.; Lee, K.; Moon, D.; Barry, J. M.; Park, W.

2010-12-01

167

Climate variability effects on urban recharge beneath low impact development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater resources in urban and coastal environments are highly vulnerable to human pressures and climate variability and change, and many communities face water shortages and need to find alternative water supplies. Therefore, understanding how low impact development (LID) site planning and integrated/best management practices (BMPs) affect recharge rates and volumes is important because of the increasing use of LID and BMP to reduce stormwater runoff and improve surface-water quality. Often considered a secondary management benefit, many BMPs may also enhance recharge to local aquifers; however these hypothesized benefits have not been thoroughly tested or quantified. In this study, we quantify stormwater capture and recharge enhancement beneath a BMP infiltration trench of the LID research network at San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California. Stormwater capture and retention was analyzed using the SCS TR-55 curve number method and in-situ infiltration rates to assess LID storage. Recharge was quantified using vadose zone monitoring equipment, a detailed water budget analysis, and a Hydrus-2D model. Additionally, the effects of historical and predicted future precipitation on recharge rates were examined using precipitation from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamic Laboratory (GFDL) A1F1 climate scenario. Observed recharge rates beneath the infiltration trench range from 1,600 to 3,700 mm/year and are an order of magnitude greater than recharge beneath an irrigated grass lawn and a natural setting. The Hydrus-2D model results indicate increased recharge under the GFDL A1F1 scenario compared with historical and GFDL modeled 20th century rates because of the higher frequency of large precipitation events that induce runoff into the infiltration trench. However, under a simulated A1F1 El Niño year, recharge calculated by a water budget does not increase compared with current El Niño recharge rates. In comparison, simulated recharge rates were considerably lower beneath the grass lawn for historical and future precipitation years. This work highlights the potential management strategy of using LID to capture excess runoff during El Niño years that can be recharged and stored as groundwater. An additional benefit of LID in coastal aquifer systems is the ability to capture and redirect precipitation from runoff to recharge that may help mitigate the negative effects from groundwater pumping and sea-water intrusion.

Newcomer, M. E.; Gurdak, J. J.

2012-12-01

168

Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 Wh/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 Wh/kg have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. Researchers at JPL are evaluating various new cathode materials for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. The approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far studies have focused on alternate metal chlorides such as CuCl2 and organic cathode materials such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE).

Distefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

1989-12-01

169

Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium-sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 W h kg -1 theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 W h kg -1 have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. We, at JPL, are evaluating various new cathode materials for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. Our approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far, our studies have focussed on alternative metal chlorides such as CuCl 2 and organic cathode materials such as TCNE.

Di Stefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

170

Polymer Energy Rechargeable System Battery Being Developed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Long description. Illustrations of discotic liquid crystals, rod-coil polymers, lithium-ion conducting channel dilithium phthalocyanine (Li2Pc) from top and side, novel star polyethylene oxide structures, composite polyethylene oxide materials (showing polyethylene oxide + lithium salt, carbon atoms and oxygen atoms), homopolyrotaxanes, and diblock copolymers In fiscal year 2000, NASA established a program to develop the next generation, lithium-based, polymer electrolyte batteries for aerospace applications. The goal of this program, known as Polymer Energy Rechargeable Systems (PERS), is to develop a space-qualified, advanced battery system embodying polymer electrolyte and lithium-based electrode technologies and to establish world-class domestic manufacturing capabilities for advanced batteries with improved performance characteristics that address NASA s future aerospace battery requirements.

Manzo, Michelle A.

2003-01-01

171

A model recharge system for the LCC  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a model recharge system for LCC. The model is based on the premise that the charges assessed should accurately reflect the actual cost to the LCC for the resources being used. The benefits of such a system include a sense of absolute fairness to all users, plus incentives to conserve scarce resources. In developing this model it has been necessary to make compromises between conflicting objectives - such as making the model complete and comprehensive while keeping it simple and manageable. When compromises have been made, a brief discussion of the rationale behind each compromise has been included. It is quite possible that additional compromises will have to be made as the model moves toward implementation.

Carlson, R.E.; Hogan, C.B.

1988-05-05

172

Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium-sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 W h/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 W h/kg have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. Various new cathode materials are presently being evaluated for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. The approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far, the studies have focussed on alternative metal chlorides such as CuCl2 and organic cathode materials such as TCNE.

Di Stefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

1990-01-01

173

Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 Wh/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 Wh/kg have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. Researchers at JPL are evaluating various new cathode materials for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. The approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far studies have focused on alternate metal chlorides such as CuCl2 and organic cathode materials such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE).

Distefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

1989-01-01

174

Polymer Energy Rechargeable System (PERS) Development Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) have recently established a collaborative effort to support the development of polymer-based, lithium-based cell chemistries and battery technologies to address the next generation of aerospace applications and mission needs. The overall objective of this development program, which is referred to as PERS, Polymer Energy Rechargeable System, is to establish a world-class technology capability and U.S. leadership in polymer-based battery technology for aerospace applications. Programmatically, the PERS initiative will exploit both interagency collaborations to address common technology and engineering issues and the active participation of academia and private industry. The initial program phases will focus on R&D activities to address the critical technical issues and challenges at the cell level.

Baldwin, Richard S.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Dalton, Penni J.; Marsh, Richard A.; Surampudi, Rao

2001-01-01

175

Case studies of unique problems and events encountered during design, construction, and operation of three large commercial-scale fuel ethanol plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper summarizes the unique problems and events encountered during the design, construction, start-up, and operation phases of three differently constructed alcohol fuel projects. These projects were awarded cost sharing contracts (Cooperative Agreements) as part of the Department of Energy's effort to expedite ethanol production on a commercial scale. The scope of the projects included final design, economic and financial

1984-01-01

176

Labile Organic Carbon in Recharge and its Impact on Groundwater Arsenic Concentrations in Bangladesh  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Researchers have puzzled over the origin of dissolved arsenic in the aquifers of the Ganges Delta since widespread arsenic poisoning from groundwater was publicized two decades ago. Previous work has concluded that biological oxidation of organic carbon drives geochemical transformations that mobilize arsenic from sediments; however, the source of the organic carbon that fuels these processes remains controversial. A combined hydrologic and biogeochemical analysis of a typical site in Bangladesh, where constructed ponds and groundwater-irrigated rice fields are the main sources of recharge, shows that only recharge through pond sediments provides the biologically degradable organic carbon that can drive arsenic mobilization. Numerical groundwater simulations as well as chemical and isotopic indicators suggest that contaminated groundwater originates from excavated ponds and that water originating from rice fields is low in arsenic. In fact, rice fields act as an arsenic sink. Irrigation moves arsenic-rich groundwater from the aquifers and deposits it on the rice fields. Most of the deposited arsenic does not return to the aquifers; it is sorbed by the field’s surface soil and bunds, and is swept away in the monsoon floods. The findings indicate that patterns of arsenic contamination in the shallow aquifer are due to recharge-source variation and complex three-dimensional flow.

Neumann, R. B.; Ashfaque, K. N.; Badruzzaman, A. M.; Ali, M.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Harvey, C. F.

2009-12-01

177

Quantifying potential recharge in mantled sinkholes using ERT.  

PubMed

Potential recharge through thick soils in mantled sinkholes was quantified using differential electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Conversion of time series two-dimensional (2D) ERT profiles into 2D volumetric water content profiles using a numerically optimized form of Archie's law allowed us to monitor temporal changes in water content in soil profiles up to 9 m in depth. Combining Penman-Monteith daily potential evapotranspiration (PET) and daily precipitation data with potential recharge calculations for three sinkhole transects indicates that potential recharge occurred only during brief intervals over the study period and ranged from 19% to 31% of cumulative precipitation. Spatial analysis of ERT-derived water content showed that infiltration occurred both on sinkhole flanks and in sinkhole bottoms. Results also demonstrate that mantled sinkholes can act as regions of both rapid and slow recharge. Rapid recharge is likely the result of flow through macropores (such as root casts and thin gravel layers), while slow recharge is the result of unsaturated flow through fine-grained sediments. In addition to developing a new method for quantifying potential recharge at the field scale in unsaturated conditions, we show that mantled sinkholes are an important component of storage in a karst system. PMID:18823398

Schwartz, Benjamin F; Schreiber, Madeline E

2009-01-01

178

[Effects of reclaimed water recharge on groundwater quality: a review].  

PubMed

Reclaimed water recharge to groundwater is an effective way to relieve water resource crisis. However, reclaimed water contains some pollutants such as nitrate, heavy metals, and new type contaminants, and thus, there exists definite environmental risk in the reclaimed water recharge to groundwater. To promote the development of reclaimed water recharge to groundwater and the safe use of reclaimed water in China, this paper analyzed the relevant literatures and practical experiences around the world, and summarized the effects of different reclaimed water recharge modes on the groundwater quality. Surface recharge makes the salt and nitrate contents in groundwater increased but the risk of heavy metals pollution be smaller, whereas well recharge can induce the arsenic release from sedimentary aquifers, which needs to be paid more attention to. New type contaminants are the hotspots in current researches, and their real risks are unknown. Pathogens have less pollution risks on groundwater, but some virus with strong activity can have the risks. Some suggestions were put forward to reduce the risks associated with the reclaimed water recharge to groundwater in China. PMID:24015541

Chen, Wei-Ping; Lü, Si-Dan; Wang, Mei-E; Jiao, Wen-Tao

2013-05-01

179

Echo Meadows Project Winter Artificial Recharge.  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the findings of the Echo Meadows Project (BPA Project 2001-015-00). The main purpose of this project is to artificially recharge an alluvial aquifer, WITH water from Umatilla River during the winter high flow period. In turn, this recharged aquifer will discharge an increased flow of cool groundwater back to the river, thereby improving Umatilla River water quality and temperature. A considerable side benefit is that the Umatilla River should improve as a habitat for migration, spanning, and rearing of anadromous and resident fish. The scope of this project is to provide critical baseline information about the Echo Meadows and the associated reach of the Umatilla River. Key elements of information that has been gathered include: (1) Annual and seasonal groundwater levels in the aquifer with an emphasis on the irrigation season, (2) Groundwater hydraulic properties, particularly hydraulic conductivity and specific yield, and (3) Groundwater and Umatilla River water quality including temperature, nutrients and other indicator parameters. One of the major purposes of this data gathering was to develop input to a groundwater model of the area. The purpose of the model is to estimate our ability to recharge this aquifer using water that is only available outside of the irrigation season (December through the end of February) and to estimate the timing of groundwater return flow back to the river. We have found through the data collection and modeling efforts that this reach of the river had historically returned as much as 45 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water to the Umatilla River during the summer and early fall. However, this return flow was reduced to as low as 10 cfs primarily due to reduced quantities of irrigation application, gain in irrigation efficiencies and increased groundwater pumping. Our modeling indicated that it is possible to restore these critical return flows using applied water outside of the irrigation season. We further found that this water can be timed to return to the river during the desired time of the year (summer to early fall). This is because the river stage, which remains relatively high until this time, drops during the irrigation season-thereby releasing the stored groundwater and increasing river flows. A significant side benefit is that these enhanced groundwater return flows will be clean and cold, particularly as compared to the Umatilla River. We also believe that this same type of application of water could be done and the resulting stream flows could be realized in other watersheds throughout the Pacific Northwest. This means that it is critical to compare the results from this baseline report to the full implementation of the project in the next phase. As previously stated, this report only discusses the results of data gathered during the baseline phase of this project. We have attempted to make the data that has been gathered accessible with the enclosed databases and spreadsheets. We provide computer links in this report to the databases so that interested parties can fully evaluate the data that has been gathered. However, we cannot emphasize too strongly that the real value of this project is to implement the phases to come, compare the results of these future phases to this baseline and develop the science and strategies to successfully implement this concept to other rivers in the Pacific Northwest. The results from our verified and calibrated groundwater model matches the observed groundwater data and trends collected during the baseline phase. The modeling results indicate that the return flows may increase to their historic values with the addition of 1 acre-ft/acre of recharge water to the groundwater system (about 9,600 acre-feet total). What this means is that through continued recharge project, you can double to quadruple the annual baseflow of the Umatilla River during the low summer and fall flow periods as compared to the present base-flow. The cool and high quality recharge water is a significant beneficial impact to the river system.

Ziari, Fred

2002-12-19

180

Effects of artificial recharge on the Ogallala aquifer, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Four recharge tests were conducted by injecting water from playa lakes through wells into the Ogallala Formation. Injection was by gravity flow and by pumping under pressure. At one site, 34-acre feet of water was injected by gravity and produced a significant increase in yield of the well. At a second site, gravity injection of only 0.58 acre-foot caused a significant decrease in permeability due to plugging by suspended sediment. At two other sites, injection by pumping 6 and 14 acre-feet respectively, resulted in discharge of water at the surface and in perching of water above the water table. Differences in success of recharge were largely due to aquifer lithology and, therefore, the type of permeability; the concentration of suspended solids in the recharge water; and the injection technique. The injection technique can be controlled and the concentration of suspended solids can be minimized by treatment, but the site for well recharge will accept water most rapidly if it is selected on the basis of a favorable geohydrologic environment. Geophysical logs were used to study the effect of aquifer lithology on recharge and to understand the movement of injected water. Temperature logs were particularly useful in tracing the movement of recharged water. Natural-gamma, gamma-gamma, and neutron logs provided important data on lithology and porosity in the aquifer and changes in porosity and water distribution resulting from recharge. Effective recharge of the Ogallala Formation, using water from playa lakes, is possible where geohydrologic conditions are favorable and the recharge system is properly constructed.

Brown, Richmond Flint; Keys, W.S.

1985-01-01

181

Ground-water recharge from streamflow data, NW Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Annual base flows of streams draining Okaloosa County and adjacent areas in northwest Florida were determined through hydrograph separation and correlation techniques for purposes of evaluating variations in ground-water recharge rates. Base flows were least in the northern part of the county and greatest in the southern part. Topographic and soils data were then superimposed on the distribution of base flow by subbasin to produce a map showing distribution of ground-water recharge throughout the county. The highest recharge rate occurs in the southern part of the county where relatively flat upland areas underlain by excessively drained sandy soils result in minimal storm runoff and evapotranspiration.

Vecchioli, John; Bridges, W.C.; Rumenik, R.P.; Grubbs, J.W.

1991-01-01

182

Recharge and discharge calculations to characterize the groundwater hydrologic balance  

SciTech Connect

Several methods are presented to quantify the ground water component of the hydrologic balance; including (1) hydrograph separation techniques, (2) water budget calculations, (3) spoil discharge techniques, and (4) underground mine inflow studies. Stream hydrograph analysis was used to calculate natural groundwater recharge and discharge rates. Yearly continuous discharge hydrographs were obtained for 16 watersheds in the Cumberland Plateau area of Tennessee. Baseflow was separated from storm runoff using computerized hydrograph analysis techniques developed by the USGS. The programs RECESS, RORA, and PART were used to develop master recession curves, calculate ground water recharge, and ground water discharge respectively. Station records ranged from 1 year of data to 60 years of data with areas of 0.67 to 402 square miles. Calculated recharge ranged from 7 to 28 inches of precipitation while ground water discharge ranged from 6 to 25 inches. Baseflow ranged from 36 to 69% of total flow. For sites with more than 4 years of data the median recharge was 20 inches/year and the 95% confidence interval for the median was 16.4 to 23.8 inches of recharge. Water budget calculations were also developed independently by a mining company in southern Tennessee. Results showed about 19 inches of recharge is available on a yearly basis. A third method used spoil water discharge measurements to calculate average recharge rate to the mine. Results showed 21.5 inches of recharge for this relatively flat area strip mine. In a further analysis it was shown that premining soil recharge rates of 19 inches consisted of about 17 inches of interflow and 2 inches of deep aquifer recharge while postmining recharge to the spoils had almost no interflow component. OSM also evaluated underground mine inflow data from northeast Tennessee and southeast Kentucky. This empirical data showed from 0.38 to 1.26 gallons per minute discharge per unit acreage of underground workings. This is the equivalent to 7 to 24 inches of recharge per year. The four methods provide a good comparative way to quantify the groundwater portion of the hydrologic balance.

Liddle, R.G. [Dept. of the Interior, Knoxville, TN (United States). Office of Surface Mining

1998-12-31

183

Geophysical expression of natural recharge in different geological terrains.  

PubMed

Behavior of the Dar-Zarrouk parameters--longitudinal unit conductance, transverse unit resistance, longitudinal resistivity, and transverse resistivity--has been compared with the behavior of the natural recharge in two geological terrains. Contour patterns of the geophysical parameters and those of natural recharge have been analyzed and a qualitative relation in their behavior was recognized. Graphical comparison of the geophysical and hydrogeological parameters clearly illustrates a qualitative relationship between the two parameters. Use of such qualitative relation in the field of ground water exploration and management studies is explained. A modest beginning is attempted to arrive at a quantitative relation between natural recharge and Dar-Zarrouk parameters. PMID:14649869

Hodlur, G K; Singh, U K; Das, R K; Rangarajan, R; Chand, Ramesh; Singh, S B

2003-01-01

184

Extracellular enzyme activities during slow sand filtration in a water recharge plant.  

PubMed

Activities of the extracellular enzymes beta-glucosidase and phosphatase and bacterial densities were investigated during the filtration process at several sites in a groundwater recharge plant at the Ruhr river (Hengsen recharge plant in Schwerte. Germany). Low numbers of microorganisms and low levels of activity in this type of habitat, compared to most surface waters, caused methodological problems when determining microbial activity. In this study, fluorigenic model substrates, which enable hydrolytic rates as low as 1 nmol (L x h)(-1) to be measured, were used to determine extracellular enzyme activities. Highest activities were determined in surface water (107 nmol (L x h)(-1) for beta-glucosidase and 252 nmol (L x h)(-1) for phosphatase). which decreased during the filtration process in the gravel prefilter and the main sand filter until the end of subsurface flow (1.6 nmol (L x h)(-1) and 6.8 nmol (L x h)(-1), respectively). Similarly, bacterial numbers decreased from 3.4 x 10(6) to 0.29 x 10(6) cells mL(-1). These data showed that microbial activity within the prefilter and the shallow layers of the sand filter had the greatest impact on water quality. In addition to its involvement in the continuous purification of surface water, the microbial community in the sand filter probably acts as a biological buffer against ephemeral increases in the loads of organic matter and nutrients in the recharge plant. PMID:11394783

Hendel, B; Marxsen, J; Fiebig, D; Preuss, G

2001-07-01

185

Groundwater storage variability and annual recharge using well-hydrograph and GRACE satellite data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most studies using GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) data for examining water storage anomalies have rich hydrogeological databases. Here, GRACE data are analyzed for southern Mali, Africa, a region with sparse hydrogeological data. GRACE data (2002-2008) did not overlap with observed groundwater-level data (1982-2002). Terrestrial water storage from GRACE was corrected for soil moisture using the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) model to obtain monthly groundwater storage anomalies and annual net recharge. Historical storage anomalies and net recharge were determined using the water-table fluctuation method for available observation wells. Average annual net recharge averaged 149.1 mm (or 16.4% of annual rainfall) and 149.7 mm (14.8%) from historical water level and GRACE data, respectively. Monthly storage anomaly lows and peaks were observed in May and September, respectively, but have a shift in peak to November using the corrected GRACE data, suggesting that the GLDAS model may poorly predict the timing of soil-water storage in this region. Notwithstanding problems with the GLDAS model, the soil moisture-corrected GRACE data accurately predict the relative timing and magnitude of groundwater-storage changes, suggesting that GRACE data are valuable for identifying long-term regional changes in groundwater storage in areas with sparse hydrogeological data.

Henry, Chris M.; Allen, Diana M.; Huang, Jianliang

2011-06-01

186

Delineating spring recharge areas in a fractured sandstone aquifer (Luxembourg) based on pesticide mass balance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple method to delineate the recharge areas of a series of springs draining a fractured aquifer is presented. Instead of solving the flow and transport equations, the delineation is reformulated as a mass balance problem assigning arable land in proportion to the pesticide mass discharged annually in a spring at minimum total transport cost. The approach was applied to the Luxembourg Sandstone, a fractured-rock aquifer supplying half of the drinking water for Luxembourg, using the herbicide atrazine. Predictions of the recharge areas were most robust in situations of strong competition by neighbouring springs while the catchment boundaries for isolated springs were extremely sensitive to the parameter controlling flow direction. Validation using a different pesticide showed the best agreement with the simplest model used, whereas using historical crop-rotation data and spatially distributed soil-leaching data did not improve predictions. The whole approach presents the advantage of integrating objectively information on land use and pesticide concentration in spring water into the delineation of groundwater recharge zones in a fractured-rock aquifer.

Farlin, J.; Drouet, L.; Gallé, T.; Pittois, D.; Bayerle, M.; Braun, C.; Maloszewski, P.; Vanderborght, J.; Elsner, M.; Kies, A.

2013-06-01

187

Prospects for and problems of using light-water supercritical-pressure coolant in nuclear reactors in order to increase the efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

Trends in the development of the power sector of the Russian and world power industries both at present time and in the near future are analyzed. Trends in the rise of prices for reserves of fossil and nuclear fuels used for electricity production are compared. An analysis of the competitiveness of electricity production at nuclear power plants as compared to the competitiveness of electricity produced at coal-fired and natural-gas-fired thermal power plants is performed. The efficiency of the open nuclear fuel cycle and various versions of the closed nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. The requirements on light-water reactors under the scenario of dynamic development of the nuclear power industry in Russia are determined. Results of analyzing the efficiency of fuel utilization for various versions of vessel-type light-water reactors with supercritical coolant are given. Advantages and problems of reactors with supercritical-pressure water are listed.

Alekseev, P. N.; Semchenkov, Yu. M.; Sedov, A. A., E-mail: sedov@dhtp.kial.ru; Subbotin, S. A.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15

188

Ionic liquid electrolytes as a platform for rechargeable metal-air batteries: a perspective.  

PubMed

Metal-air batteries are a well-established technology that can offer high energy densities, low cost and environmental responsibility. Despite these favourable characteristics and utilisation of oxygen as the cathode reactant, these devices have been limited to primary applications, due to a number of problems that occur when the cell is recharged, including electrolyte loss and poor efficiency. Overcoming these obstacles is essential to creating a rechargeable metal-air battery that can be utilised for efficiently capturing renewable energy. Despite the first metal-air battery being created over 100 years ago, the emergence of reactive metals such as lithium has reinvigorated interest in this field. However the reactivity of some of these metals has generated a number of different philosophies regarding the electrolyte of the metal-air battery. Whilst much is already known about the anode and cathode processes in aqueous and organic electrolytes, the shortcomings of these electrolytes (i.e. volatility, instability, flammability etc.) have led some of the metal-air battery community to study room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) as non-volatile, highly stable electrolytes that have the potential to support rechargeable metal-air battery processes. In this perspective, we discuss how some of these initial studies have demonstrated the capabilities of RTILs as metal-air battery electrolytes. We will also show that much of the long-held mechanistic knowledge of the oxygen electrode processes might not be applicable in RTIL based electrolytes, allowing for creative new solutions to the traditional irreversibility of the oxygen reduction reaction. Our understanding of key factors such as the effect of catalyst chemistry and surface structure, proton activity and interfacial reactions is still in its infancy in these novel electrolytes. In this perspective we highlight the key areas that need the attention of electrochemists and battery engineers, in order to progress the understanding of the physical and electrochemical processes in RTILs as electrolytes for the various forms of rechargeable metal-air batteries. PMID:25093926

Kar, Mega; Simons, Tristan J; Forsyth, Maria; MacFarlane, Douglas R

2014-09-21

189

Using natural distributions of short-lived radium isotopes to quantify groundwater discharge and recharge  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Radium activity in pore water of wetland sediments often differs from the amount expected from local production, decay, and exchange with solid phases. This disequilibrium results from vertical transport of radium with groundwater that flows between the underlying aquifer and surface water. In situations where groundwater recharge or discharge is significant, the rate of vertical water flow through wetland sediment can be determined from the radium disequilibrium by a combined model of transport, production, decay, and exchange with solid phases. We have developed and tested this technique at three sites in the freshwater portion of the Everglades by quantifying vertical advective velocities in areas with persistent groundwater recharge or discharge and estimating a coefficient of dispersion at a site that is subject to reversals between recharge and discharge. Groundwater velocities (v) were determined to be between 0 and -0.5 cm d-1 for a recharge site and 1.5 ?? 0.4 cm d-1 for a discharge site near Levee 39 in the Everglades. Strong gradients in 223Ra and 224Ra usually occurred at the base of the peat layer, which avoided the problems of other tracers (e.g., chloride) for which greatest sensitivity occurs near the peat surface - a zone readily disturbed by processes unrelated to groundwater flow. This technique should be easily applicable to any wetland system with different production rates of these isotopes in distinct sedimentary layers or surface water. The approach is most straightforward in systems where constant pore-water ionic strength can be assumed, simplifying the modeling of radium exchange.

Krest, J.M.; Harvey, J.W.

2003-01-01

190

Bipolar rechargeable lithium battery for high power applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs of a discussion on bipolar rechargeable lithium battery for high power applications are presented. Topics covered include cell chemistry, electrolytes, reaction mechanisms, cycling behavior, cycle life, and cell assembly.

Hossain, Sohrab; Kozlowski, G.; Goebel, F.

1993-01-01

191

GROUNDWATER RECHARGE/DISCHARGE, NEUSE RIVER WATERSHED, NC  

EPA Science Inventory

The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality and Groundwater Section, in cooperation with the NC Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, developed the Groundwater Recharge/Discharge digital data to enhance planning, siting ...

192

ENGINEERING ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF A PROGRAM FOR ARTIFICIAL GROUNDWATER RECHARGE.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study describes and demonstrates two alternate methods for evaluating the relative costs and benefits of artificial groundwater recharge using percolation ponds. The first analysis considers the benefits to be the reduction of pumping lifts and land subsidence; the second considers benefits as the alternative costs of a comparable surface delivery system. Example computations are carried out for an existing artificial recharge program in Santa Clara Valley in California. A computer groundwater model is used to estimate both the average long term and the drought period effects of artificial recharge in the study area. Results indicate that the costs of artificial recharge are considerably smaller than the alternative costs of an equivalent surface system. Refs.

Reichard, Eric G.; Bredehoeft, John D.

1984-01-01

193

Impact of Storm Water Recharge Practices on Boston Groundwater Elevations  

E-print Network

Impact of Storm Water Recharge Practices on Boston Groundwater Elevations Brian F. Thomas, S periodically experienced a decline in groundwater elevations and the associated deterioration of untreated wood piles, which support building foundations. To combat declining water tables, Boston enacted

Vogel, Richard M.

194

Soil Water Balance and Recharge Monitoring at the Hanford Site – FY 2010 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the recharge data collected in FY 2010 at five locations on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Average monthly precipitation and temperature conditions in FY 2010 were near normal and did not present an opportunity for increased recharge. The recharge monitoring data confirmed those conditions, showing normal behavior in water content, matric head, and recharge rates. Also provided in this report is a strategy for recharge estimation for the next 5 years.

Fayer, Michael J.; Saunders, Danielle L.; Herrington, Ricky S.; Felmy, Diana

2010-10-27

195

Cryogenic Transport of High-Pressure-System Recharge Gas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method of relatively safe, compact, efficient recharging of a high-pressure room-temperature gas supply has been proposed. In this method, the gas would be liquefied at the source for transport as a cryogenic fluid at or slightly above atmospheric pressure. Upon reaching the destination, a simple heating/expansion process would be used to (1) convert the transported cryogenic fluid to the room-temperature, high-pressure gaseous form in which it is intended to be utilized and (2) transfer the resulting gas to the storage tank of the system to be recharged. In conventional practice for recharging high-pressure-gas systems, gases are transported at room temperature in high-pressure tanks. For recharging a given system to a specified pressure, a transport tank must contain the recharge gas at a much higher pressure. At the destination, the transport tank is connected to the system storage tank to be recharged, and the pressures in the transport tank and the system storage tank are allowed to equalize. One major disadvantage of the conventional approach is that the high transport pressure poses a hazard. Another disadvantage is the waste of a significant amount of recharge gas. Because the transport tank is disconnected from the system storage tank when it is at the specified system recharge pressure, the transport tank still contains a significant amount of recharge gas (typically on the order of half of the amount transported) that cannot be used. In the proposed method, the cryogenic fluid would be transported in a suitably thermally insulated tank that would be capable of withstanding the recharge pressure of the destination tank. The tank would be equipped with quick-disconnect fluid-transfer fittings and with a low-power electric heater (which would not be used during transport). In preparation for transport, a relief valve would be attached via one of the quick-disconnect fittings (see figure). During transport, the interior of the tank would be kept at a near-ambient pressure far below the recharge pressure. As leakage of heat into the tank caused vaporization of the cryogenic fluid, the resulting gas would be vented through the relief valve, which would be set to maintain the pressure in the tank at the transport value. Inasmuch as the density of a cryogenic fluid at atmospheric pressure greatly exceeds that of the corresponding gas in a practical high-pressure tank at room temperature, a tank for transporting a given mass of gas according to the proposed method could be smaller (and, hence, less massive) than is a tank needed for transporting the same mass of gas according to the conventional method.

Ungar, Eugene K,; Ruemmele, Warren P.; Bohannon, Carl

2010-01-01

196

Hydrogeological Methods for Assessing Feasibility of Artificial Recharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study presents the hydrogeological methods to assess the feasibility of artificial recharge in Jeju Island, Korea for securing both sustainable groundwater resources and severe floods. Jeju-friendly Aquifer Recharge Technology (J-ART) in this study is developing by capturing ephemeral stream water with no interference in the environments such as natural recharge or eco-system, storing the flood water in the reservoirs, recharging it through designed borehole after appropriate water treatment, and then making it to be used at down-gradient production wells. Many hydrogeological methods, including physico-chemical surface water and groundwater monitoring, geophysical survey, stable isotope analysis, and groundwater modeling have been employed to predict and assess the artificially recharged surface waters flow and circulation between recharge area and discharge area. In the study of physico-chemical water monitoring survey, the analyses of surface water level and velocity, of water qualities including turbidity, and of suspended soil settling velocity were performed. For understanding subsurface hydrogeologic characteristics the injection test was executed and the results are 118-336 m2/day of transmissivity and 4,367-11,032 m3/day of the maximum intake water capacity. Characterizing groundwater flow from recharge area to discharge area should be achieved to assess the efficiency of J-ART. The resistivity logging was carried out to predict water flow in unsaturated zone during artificial recharge based on the inverse modeling and resistivity change patterns. Stable isotopes of deuterium and oxygen-18 of surface waters and groundwaters have been determined to interpret mixing and flow in groundwaters impacted by artificial recharge. A numerical model simulating groundwater flow and heat transport to assess feasibility of artificial recharge has been developed using the hydraulic properties of aquifers, groundwater levels, borehole temperatures, and meteorological data. Also, groundwater modeling was performed to aid in artificial recharge system design, such as optimizing number and spacing of injection wells, building up and maintaining a water column inside each operating injection well, and optimizing time. Acknowledgements This research was supported by a grant (code 3-2-3) from the Sustainable Water Resources Research Center of 21st Century Frontier Research Program and the Basic Research Program (09-3414) of KIGAM.

Kim, Y.; Koo, M.; Lee, K.; Moon, D.; Barry, J. M.

2009-12-01

197

Thermal and Electrical Recharging of Sodium/Sulfur Cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Efficiency as high as 60 percent achieved. Proposed thermal and electrical recharging scheme expected to increase overall energy efficiency of battery of sodium/sulfur cells (beta cells). Takes advantage of peculiarity in chemical kinetics of recharge portion of operating cycle to give thermal assist to electrically driven chemical reactions. Future application include portable power supplies and energy storage in commercial power systems during offpeak periods.

Richter, Robert

1987-01-01

198

Future prospects of artifical groundwater recharge. [Disposal wells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Storing water underground has the advantages of minimizing evapotranspiration losses, equalizing water temperatures, providing natural filtration, and insuring a protected local water supply during times of emergency. More than 400 cities in the U.S. now use their treated effluent for agricultural irrigation or ground-water recharge. Water reclamation systems may be classified into infiltration basins, ridge-and-furrow, spray-irrigation, spray-runoff, and recharge wells.

1971-01-01

199

Ground water recharge and flow characterization using multiple isotopes.  

PubMed

Stable isotopes of delta(18)O, delta(2)H, and (13)C, radiogenic isotopes of (14)C and (3)H, and ground water chemical compositions were used to distinguish ground water, recharge areas, and possible recharge processes in an arid zone, fault-bounded alluvial aquifer. Recharge mainly occurs through exposed stream channel beds as opposed to subsurface inflow along mountain fronts. This recharge distribution pattern may also occur in other fault-bounded aquifers, with important implications for conceptualization of ground water flow systems, development of ground water models, and ground water resource management. Ground water along the mountain front near the basin margins contains low delta(18)O, (14)C (percent modern carbon [pmC]), and (3)H (tritium units [TU]), suggesting older recharge. In addition, water levels lie at greater depths, and basin-bounding faults that locally act as a flow barrier may further reduce subsurface inflow into the aquifer along the mountain front. Chemical differences in ground water composition, attributed to varying aquifer mineralogy and recharge processes, further discriminate the basin-margin and the basin-center water. Direct recharge through the indurated sandstones and mudstones in the basin center is minimal. Modern recharge in the aquifer is mainly through the broad, exposed stream channel beds containing coarse sand and gravel where ground water contains higher delta(18)O, (14)C (pmC), and (3)H (TU). Spatial differences in delta(18)O, (14)C (pmC), and (3)H (TU) and occurrences of extensive mudstones in the basin center suggest sluggish ground water movement, including local compartmentalization of the flow system. PMID:18384592

Chowdhury, Ali H; Uliana, Matthew; Wade, Shirley

2008-01-01

200

Seasonal variation in natural recharge of coastal aquifers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many coastal zones around the world have irregular precipitation throughout the year. This results in discontinuous natural recharge of coastal aquifers, which affects the size of freshwater lenses present in sandy deposits. Temperature data for the period 1960-1990 from LocClim (local climate estimator) and those obtained from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) SRES A1b scenario for 2070-2100, have been used to calculate the potential evapotranspiration with the Thornthwaite method. Potential recharge (difference between precipitation and potential evapotranspiration) was defined at 12 locations: Ameland (The Netherlands), Auckland and Wellington (New Zealand); Hong Kong (China); Ravenna (Italy), Mekong (Vietnam), Mumbai (India), New Jersey (USA), Nile Delta (Egypt), Kobe and Tokyo (Japan), and Singapore. The influence of variable/discontinuous recharge on the size of freshwater lenses was simulated with the SEAWAT model. The discrepancy between models with continuous and with discontinuous recharge is relatively small in areas where the total annual recharge is low (258-616 mm/year); but in places with Monsoon-dominated climate (e.g. Mumbai, with recharge up to 1,686 mm/year), the difference in freshwater-lens thickness between the discontinuous and the continuous model is larger (up to 5 m) and thus important to consider in numerical models that estimate freshwater availability.

Mollema, Pauline N.; Antonellini, Marco

2013-06-01

201

The Policy of "Pumping the Recharge" Is Out of Control  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrogeologists have spent several scientific generations in understanding the source of water to well fields and the effects of wells on the interrelated surface water system. The benchmark is by Theis [1940], who emphasized that some groundwater is initially mined during aquifer development and, after sufficient time, well discharge will be made up by diminution of both rejected recharge and natural discharge. Rejected recharge is water that would reside in the aquifer, except for a lack of space available. Theis advised that a perennial safe yield is equivalent to the amount of rejected recharge and natural discharge that is "feasible to utilize." His term "feasible" may have anticipated many current issues about aquifer sustainability. Papers published this year on the Ogallala aquifer in the central United States and on the global groundwater "footprint" [Scanlon et al., 2012; Gleeson et al., 2012] focus on recharge as an index of sustainability and have been featured in the popular press. However, I argue in this Forum that natural recharge rates alone cannot serve to address the core policy question regarding sustainable aquifer conditions in response to well field stresses. For the sake of users of hydrologic guidance, advisors on this topic may wish to reconsider the safe nature of "pumping the recharge."

Balleau, W. Peter

2013-01-01

202

Recharge signal identification based on groundwater level observations.  

PubMed

This study applied a method of the rotated empirical orthogonal functions to directly decompose the space-time groundwater level variations and determine the potential recharge zones by investigating the correlation between the identified groundwater signals and the observed local rainfall records. The approach is used to analyze the spatiotemporal process of piezometric heads estimated by Bayesian maximum entropy method from monthly observations of 45 wells in 1999-2007 located in the Pingtung Plain of Taiwan. From the results, the primary potential recharge area is located at the proximal fan areas where the recharge process accounts for 88% of the spatiotemporal variations of piezometric heads in the study area. The decomposition of groundwater levels associated with rainfall can provide information on the recharge process since rainfall is an important contributor to groundwater recharge in semi-arid regions. Correlation analysis shows that the identified recharge closely associates with the temporal variation of the local precipitation with a delay of 1-2 months in the study area. PMID:22016042

Yu, Hwa-Lung; Chu, Hone-Jay

2012-10-01

203

Estimating aquifer channel recharge using optical data interpretation.  

PubMed

Recharge through intermittent and ephemeral stream channels is believed to be a primary aquifer recharge process in arid and semiarid environments. The intermittent nature of precipitation and flow events in these channels, and their often remote locations, makes direct flow and loss measurements difficult and expensive. Airborne and satellite optical images were interpreted to evaluate aquifer recharge due to stream losses on the Frio River in south-central Texas. Losses in the Frio River are believed to be a major contributor of recharge to the Edwards Aquifer. The results of this work indicate that interpretation of readily available remote sensing optical images can offer important insights into the spatial distribution of aquifer recharge from losing streams. In cases where upstream gauging data are available, simple visual analysis of the length of the flowing reach downstream from the gauging station can be used to estimate channel losses. In the case of the Frio River, the rate of channel loss estimated from the length of the flowing reach at low flows was about half of the loss rate calculated from in-stream gain-loss measurements. Analysis based on water-surface width and channel slope indicated that losses were mainly in a reach downstream of the mapped recharge zone. The analysis based on water-surface width, however, did not indicate that this method could yield accurate estimates of actual flow in pool and riffle streams, such as the Frio River and similar rivers draining the Edwards Plateau. PMID:21434908

Walter, Gary R; Necsoiu, Marius; McGinnis, Ronald

2012-01-01

204

Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries: Low-Cost Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries with High Energy Density  

SciTech Connect

BEEST Project: Pellion Technologies is developing rechargeable magnesium batteries that would enable an EV to travel 3 times farther than it could using Li-ion batteries. Prototype magnesium batteries demonstrate excellent electrochemical behavior; delivering thousands of charge cycles with very little fade. Nevertheless, these prototypes have always stored too little energy to be commercially viable. Pellion Technologies is working to overcome this challenge by rapidly screening potential storage materials using proprietary, high-throughput computer models. To date, 12,000 materials have been identified and analyzed. The resulting best materials have been electrochemically tested, yielding several very promising candidates.

None

2010-10-01

205

Catholytes: a highly concentrated catholyte based on a solvate ionic liquid for rechargeable flow batteries (adv. Mater. 15/2015).  

PubMed

"Energy in a bottle" expresses the concept of a reusable electrochemical fuel which is easy to transport, use, and store. On page 2501, K. Takechi and co-workers demonstrate that supercooled materials based on 'solvate ionic liquids' result in high-energy-density catholytes for flow batteries which maintain their liquid nature even under freezing conditions. This technology enables a rechargeable system with an energy density reaching 200 Wh/L. PMID:25867290

Takechi, Kensuke; Kato, Yuichi; Hase, Yoko

2015-04-01

206

Feasibility of artificial recharge to the 800-foot sand of the Kirkwood Formation in the coastal plain near Atlantic City, New Jersey  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Renewed development of the Atlantic City area since the mid-1970 's has increased the demand for water. Increased pumpage from the 800-foot sand of the Kirkwood Formation has reversed an antecedent water-level recovery in this aquifer, thus reducing water in storage and increasing the potential for saltwater intrusion. Practicable approaches to providing a dependable water supply while properly managing withdrawals from the 800-foot sand include development of surface- and ground-water supplies but artificial recharging the 800-foot sand is the principal alternative discussed. Investigation of its feasibility locally included a review of methods of artificial recharge and attendant operational problems, investigation of local hydrogeologic conditions, and collection and interpretation of water-quality data. System design and quality of injected water are important for successful artificial recharge. Mixtures of water from the 800-foot sand and from a representative local public-supply system may become supersaturated with oxygen. Significant temperature differences between two such waters would likely exacerbate that condition. Limited chemical analyses suggest that suspended solids concentration of water from local public supplies may at times be high enough to cause clogging of recharge-well screens. These problems are soluable by appropriate conditioning of recharge water. (USGS)

May, J.E.

1985-01-01

207

Fossil Fuels.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fossil fuels. Some topics covered are historic facts, development of fuels, history of oil production, current and future trends of the oil industry, refining fossil fuels, and environmental problems. Material in each unit may…

Crank, Ron

208

Quantifying Recharge in Semi-Arid Basins: Translating Impact of Climate Variability and Change on Groundwater Resources  

E-print Network

temperature (Barnett et al., 2008). Groundwater recharge is thus likely to be altered due to climate change and variability impacting groundwater resources. Our current knowledge of recharge rates is poor because recharge and change on recharge rates in the future (IPCC, 2007). In arid and semi-arid environments recharge

Fay, Noah

209

Alternative fuels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Potential problems related to the use of alternative aviation turbine fuels are discussed and both ongoing and required research into these fuels is described. This discussion is limited to aviation turbine fuels composed of liquid hydrocarbons. The advantages and disadvantages of the various solutions to the problems are summarized. The first solution is to continue to develop the necessary technology at the refinery to produce specification jet fuels regardless of the crude source. The second solution is to minimize energy consumption at the refinery and keep fuel costs down by relaxing specifications.

Grobman, J. S.; Butze, H. F.; Friedman, R.; Antoine, A. C.; Reynolds, T. W.

1977-01-01

210

Coupling Stormwater Capture and Managed Aquifer Recharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are quantifying the performance of a system that couples stormwater capture and managed aquifer recharge (MAR). Our field site is a working ranch in the Pajaro Valley, central coastal California, where runoff from ~125 acres of farmed and grazed land is directed into a 2.5-acre infiltration basin. Stormwater captured for MAR at this site would otherwise be routed off the property and eventually into the ocean. We instrumented the site prior to the start of the 2013 water year (1 October 2012) to measure local precipitation, total inflow to the basin, and point-specific infiltration rates across the bottom of the basin using heat as a tracer. We also deployed sediment measurement and collection instruments to quantify the amount, texture, and biochemical nature of sediment accumulating in the basin, and to evaluate associated maintenance requirements for the system. The 2013 water year was relatively dry, with total precipitation less than 50% of the long-term average for this region; most of this precipitation occurred in December 2012. Water level and flow records indicate 17 distinct rain events that generated runoff, most early in the water year. The total inflow to the infiltration basin was 4.1 x 104 m3, equivalent to ~33 ac-ft. During a water year with average precipitation, it appears that this system could collect 80-100 ac-ft of runoff. There was up to 10 cm of sediment accumulation in some parts of the infiltration basin by the end of the rainy season. Sediment samples collected at the end of the season are being processed for analysis of sediment distribution and character. Thermal data are being analyzed to calculate spatial and temporal variations in infiltration rates across the basin. These data will be combined to assess the efficacy of coupling stormwater capture and MAR, and can guide future projects in this region of high groundwater demand and limited resources.

Beganskas, S.; Hill, C. L.; Fisher, A. T.; Los Huertos, M.

2013-12-01

211

Design and simulation of lithium rechargeable batteries  

SciTech Connect

Lithium -based rechargeable batteries that utilize insertion electrodes are being considered for electric-vehicle applications because of their high energy density and inherent reversibility. General mathematical models are developed that apply to a wide range of lithium-based systems, including the recently commercialized lithium-ion cell. The modeling approach is macroscopic, using porous electrode theory to treat the composite insertion electrodes and concentrated solution theory to describe the transport processes in the solution phase. The insertion process itself is treated with a charge-transfer process at the surface obeying Butler-Volmer kinetics, followed by diffusion of the lithium ion into the host structure. These models are used to explore the phenomena that occur inside of lithium cells under conditions of discharge, charge, and during periods of relaxation. Also, in order to understand the phenomena that limit the high-rate discharge of these systems, we focus on the modeling of a particular system with well-characterized material properties and system parameters. The system chosen is a lithium-ion cell produced by Bellcore in Red Bank, NJ, consisting of a lithium-carbon negative electrode, a plasticized polymer electrolyte, and a lithium-manganese-oxide spinel positive electrode. This battery is being marketed for consumer electronic applications. The system is characterized experimentally in terms of its transport and thermodynamic properties, followed by detailed comparisons of simulation results with experimental discharge curves. Next, the optimization of this system for particular applications is explored based on Ragone plots of the specific energy versus average specific power provided by various designs.

Doyle, C.M.

1995-08-01

212

Comparison study of SPEA2+, SPEA2, and NSGA-II in diesel engine emissions and fuel economy problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, the technology that can control NOx and Soot values of diesel engines by changing the elec- tronically controllable parameters has been developed. However, there is a trade-off relationship between fuel economy and NOx values. Therefore, the diesel engines that can change their characteristics with along to the driving environment should be emerged in the future. For designing these kinds

Tomoyuki Hiroyasu; Seiichi Nakayama; Mitsunori Miki

2005-01-01

213

Factors affecting areas contributing recharge to wells in shallow aquifers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The source of water to wells is ultimately the location where the water flowing to a well enters the boundary surface of the ground-water system. In ground-water systems that receive most of their water from areal recharge, the location of the water entering the ground-water system is at the water table. The area contributing recharge to a discharging well is the surface area that defines the location of the water entering the ground-water system at the water table that flows to the well and is eventually discharged from the well. The calculation of areas contributing recharge to wells is complex because flow paths in ground-water systems change in response to development, and the aquifer material in ground-water systems is heterogeneous and is hidden from direct observation . Hypothetical experiments were undertaken to show the complexities in the delineation of areas contributing recharge to wells. Four different 'cases' are examined to demonstrate the effect of different conceptualized aquifer frameworks on deterministically calculated areas contributing recharge. The main conclusion drawn from the experiments is that, in order to understand the cause and effect relations that affect the quality of water derived from wells, the importance and nature of the variability in the ground-waterflow system must be considered and accounted for in any efforts to 'protect' the water supply.

Reilly, Thomas E.; Pollock, David W.

1993-01-01

214

Groundwater recharge from Long Lake, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore  

SciTech Connect

Long Lake, located between Lake Michigan and the Dune-complexes of Indiana Dunes, was formed during Pleistocene and Holocene epochs. The lake is currently being studied to understand the detailed hydrology. One of the objective of the study is to understand the hydrologic relationship between the lake and a water treatment holding pond to the northeast. Understanding the water movement between the two bodies of water, if any, would be very important in the management and protection of nature preserves in the area. Seepage measurement and minipiezometric tests indicate groundwater recharge from Long Lake. The groundwater recharge rate is approximately 1.40 to 22.28 x 10[sup [minus]4] m/day. An estimate of the amount of recharge of 7.0 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3]/y may be significant in terms of groundwater recharge of the upper aquifer system of the Dunes area. The water chemistry of the two bodies of water appears to be similar, however, the pH of the holding pond is slightly alkaline (8.5) while that of Long Lake is less alkaline (7.7). There appears to be no direct contact between the two bodies of water (separated by approximately six meters of clay rich sediment). The geology of the area indicates a surficial aquifer underlying Long Lake. The lake should be regarded as a recharge area and should be protected from pollutants as the degradation of the lake would contaminate the underlying aquifer.

Isiorho, S.A.; Beeching, F.M. (Indiana Univ., Fort Wayne, IN (United States). Geosciences Dept.); Whitman, R.L.; Stewart, P.M. (National Park Services, Porter, IN (United States). Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore); Gentleman, M.A.

1992-01-01

215

Fate of human viruses in groundwater recharge systems  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this research program was to determine the ability of a well-managed tertiary effluent-recharge system to return virologically acceptable water to the groundwater aquifer. The study assessed the quality of waters renovated by indigenous recharge operations and investigated a number of virus-soil interrelationships. The elucidation of the interactions led to the establishment of basin operating criteria for optimizing virus removal. Raw influents, chlorinated tertiary effluents, and renovated wastewater from the aquifer directly beneath a uniquely designed recharge test basin were assayed on a weekly basis for the presence of human enteroviruses and coliform bacteria. High concentrations of viruses were routinely isolated from influents but were isolated only on four occasions from tertiary-treated sewage effluents. In spite of the high quality effluent being recharged, viruses were isolated from the groundwater observation well, indicating their ability to penetrate the unsaturated zone. Results of poliovirus seeding experiments carried out in the test basin clearly indicated the need to operate recharge basins at low (e.g. 1 cm/h) infiltration rates in areas having soil types similar to those found at the study site. The method selected for reducing the test basin infiltration rate involved clogging the basin surface with settled organic material from highly turbid effluent. Alternative methods for slowing infiltration rates are discussed in the text.

Vaughn, J.M.; Landry, E.F.

1980-03-01

216

Estimation of recharge through selected drainage wells and potential effects from well closure, Orange County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Drainage wells have been used in Orange County, Florida, and surrounding areas to alleviate flooding and to control lake levels since 1904. Over 400 drainage wells have been drilled in the county, but many are now redundant because of surface drainage systems that have been installed within the last two or three decades. Most of the drainage wells emplace water into the Upper Floridan aquifer, a zone of high transmissivity within the Floridan aquifer system. In 1992, the Orange County Stormwater Management Department identified 23 wells that were considered noncritical or redundant for current drainage control. These wells were targeted for closure to eliminate maintenance and possible contamination problems. A 3-year study (1992 through 1994) encompassed several drainage basins in the county. Inflow to 18 of the 23 drainage wells on the noncritical list and the effects of closure of these noncritical wells on the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer were estimated. Three sites were chosen for intensive study and were used for further extrapolation to other noncritical sites. The total average annual recharge rate through the 18 selected wells was estimated to be 9 cubic feet per second, or about 6 million gallons per day. The highest rate of long-term recharge, 4.6 cubic feet per second, was to well H-35. Several wells on the noncritical list were already plugged or had blocked intakes. Yields, or the sum of surface-water outflows and drainage-well recharge, from the drainage basins ranged from 20 to 33 inches per year. In some of the basins, all the yield from the basin was recharge through a drainage well. In other basins, most of the yield was surface outflow through canals rather than to drainage wells. The removal of the recharge from closure of the wells was simulated by superposition in a three-dimensional ground-water flow model. As a second step in the model, water was also applied to two sites in western Orange County that could receive redirected surface water. One of the sites is CONSERV II, a distribution system used to apply reclaimed water to the surficial aquifer system through rapid infiltration basins and grove irrigation. The second site, Lake Sherwood, has an extremely high downward recharge rate estimated to be at least 54 inches per year. The results from the simulations showed a decline of 1 foot or less in the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer with removal of the recharge and a mound of about 1 foot in the vicinity of the two sites in western Orange County. The Lake Sherwood site seems to reduce the declines caused by closure of the wells to a greater degree than the CONSERV II site, partly because the Lake Sherwood site is closer to the drainage-well basins.

Bradner, L.A.

1996-01-01

217

The Effects of Recharge, Agricultural Pumping and Municipal Pumping on Springflow and Pumping Lifts Within the Edwards Aquifer  

E-print Network

The Effects of Recharge, Agricultural Pumping and Municipal Pumping on Springflow and Pumping Lifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 The Effects of Recharge and Pumping Over Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 The Effects of Agricultural Pumping, Municipal Pumping and Recharge on Comal Springflow

McCarl, Bruce A.

218

Comet whole-core solution to a stylized 3-dimensional pressurized water reactor benchmark problem with UO{sub 2}and MOX fuel  

SciTech Connect

A stylized pressurized water reactor (PWR) benchmark problem with UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel was used to test the accuracy and efficiency of the coarse mesh radiation transport (COMET) code. The benchmark problem contains 125 fuel assemblies and 44,000 fuel pins. The COMET code was used to compute the core eigenvalue and assembly and pin power distributions for three core configurations. In these calculations, a set of tensor products of orthogonal polynomials were used to expand the neutron angular phase space distribution on the interfaces between coarse meshes. The COMET calculations were compared with the Monte Carlo code MCNP reference solutions using a recently published an 8-group material cross section library. The comparison showed both the core eigenvalues and assembly and pin power distributions predicated by COMET agree very well with the MCNP reference solution if the orders of the angular flux expansion in the two spatial variables and the polar and azimuth angles on the mesh boundaries are 4, 4, 2 and 2. The mean and maximum differences in the pin fission density distribution ranged from 0.28%-0.44% and 3.0%-5.5%, all within 3-sigma uncertainty of the MCNP solution. These comparisons indicate that COMET can achieve accuracy comparable to Monte Carlo. It was also found that COMET's computational speed is 450 times faster than MCNP. (authors)

Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, 770 State Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0745 (United States)

2012-07-01

219

The timing of EV recharging and its effect on utilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The impact of electric vehicles (EVs) on electric utilities will in part depend on when the vehicles are recharged. If electricity pricing practices were guided by time of day, recharging of EVs would occur at late night hours, when demand for electricity for other purposes is low. The peak demand by the year 2000 would then increase by only 400 MW, by comparison with 5700 MW for the case of electricity that is uniformly priced throughout the day. It is further established by the present projections that the oil- and gas-burning component of electrical generation would rise by only 27 percent for the late night-charging case, by contrast to 39 percent for the alternative, late afternoon and early evening recharging.

Collins, M. M.; Mader, G. H.

1983-02-01

220

Sulfone-based electrolytes for aluminium rechargeable batteries.  

PubMed

Electrolyte is a key material for success in the research and development of next-generation rechargeable batteries. Aluminium rechargeable batteries that use aluminium (Al) metals as anode materials are attractive candidates for next-generation batteries, though they have not been developed yet due to the lack of practically useful electrolytes. Here we present, for the first time, non-corrosive reversible Al electrolytes working at room temperature. The electrolytes are composed of aluminium chlorides, dialkylsulfones, and dilutants, which are realized by the identification of electrochemically active Al species, the study of sulfone dependences, the effects of aluminium chloride concentrations, dilutions and their optimizations. The characteristic feature of these materials is the lower chloride concentrations in the solutions than those in the conventional Al electrolytes, which allows us to use the Al metal anodes without corrosions. We anticipate that the sulfone-based electrolytes will open the doors for the research and development of Al rechargeable batteries. PMID:25627398

Nakayama, Yuri; Senda, Yui; Kawasaki, Hideki; Koshitani, Naoki; Hosoi, Shizuka; Kudo, Yoshihiro; Morioka, Hiroyuki; Nagamine, Masayuki

2015-02-10

221

Hydrogeological evaluation of an over-exploited aquifer in Dhaka, Bangladesh towards the implementation of groundwater artificial recharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The population of Dhaka City is presently about 12 million and according to present trends in population growth, that number will most likely increase to 17.2 million by the year 2025. A serious water crisis is expected due to the extremely limited quality and quantity of water resources in the region. Previous studies have shown that the current trend in groundwater resource development is non-sustainable due to over-exploitation of the regional aquifer system, resulting in rapidly decreasing groundwater levels of about 2 to 3 meters per year. Today, annual groundwater extraction clearly exceeds natural groundwater recharge. New water management strategies are needed to guarantee future generations of Dhaka City a secured and sustained water supply as well as sustainable development of the city. The implementation of groundwater artificial recharge (AR) is one potential measure. As the first step towards a new water management strategy for Dhaka City, the authors report on the hydrogeological conditions of the greater Dhaka region and from this are able to present the location of potential recharge sites and identify appropriate recharge technologies for AR implementation. The aquifers of greater Dhaka can be grouped in three major categories: Holocene Deposit, Pleistocene Deposit and Plio-Pleistocene Deposit. The aquifers are generally thick and multilayered with relatively high transmissivity and storage coefficients. AR is considered feasible due to the fact these aquifers are alluvium deposit aquifers which characteristically have moderate to high hydraulic conductivity. Low costs for recovery of recharged water and large recharge volume capacity are generally associated with aquifers of unconsolidated sediments. Spatial analysis of the region has shown that Karaniganj, Kotoali, Savar, Dhamrai, Singair upazila, which are situated in greater Dhaka region and close to Dhaka City, could serve as recharge sites to the subsurface by pond infiltration technique. A study involving the use of a 3-D mathematical model shows that the abstraction or recharge in the area within and around Dhaka City does not affect the groundwater level below the city. Therefore, in order to improve the groundwater level, artificial groundwater recharge directly at the city area would be mostly appropriate. As the thickness of the surface impermeable layer varies from 5 m to 45 m, the combination of infiltration and injection technology would be a proper choice. Detailed studies are required using the most appropriate state of the art spatial analysis to support the final selection and ranking of suitable locations for the AR facilities, according to flood risk, urbanization, underground characteristics, water sources, AR technology and later use of the recovered water. Groundwater quality data reveal that the upper aquifer below Dhaka City contains relatively high concentrations of dissolved ions, quite variable in space. The ground water is predominantly of Ca-Mg-HCO3 type. Cation exchange and oxidation may enhance the biogeochemical processes in the aquifer under the existing prevailing conditions. Many reports conclude that that the groundwater chemistry of the upper aquifer has been influenced by various anthropogenic processes, showing wide variations of groundwater quality depending on the area, which would complicate the implementation of AR projects. The preliminary evaluation of the potential for AR implementation, considering environmental and social impacts, as well as the available water sources for infiltration and injection (conventional or non-conventional), AR may be considered a viable response measure with regards to the problems Dhaka City is facing. Without the implementation of groundwater artificial recharge or similar measures, groundwater availability and groundwater quality will further decrease and serious water crisis are to be expected. Measures to avoid groundwater contamination must also be taken to complement the benefits provided by AR implementation.

Azizur Rahman, M.; Rusteberg, Bernd; Sauter, Martin

2010-05-01

222

Within-Day Recharge of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Energy Impact of Public Charging Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the role of public charging infrastructure in increasing the share of driving on electricity that plug-in hybrid electric vehicles might exhibit, thus reducing their gasoline consumption. Vehicle activity data obtained from a global positioning system tracked household travel survey in Austin, Texas, is used to estimate gasoline and electricity consumptions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Drivers within-day recharging behavior, constrained by travel activities and public charger availability, is modeled. It is found that public charging offers greater fuel savings for hybrid electric vehicles s equipped with smaller batteries, by encouraging within-day recharge, and providing an extensive public charging service is expected to reduce plug-in hybrid electric vehicles gasoline consumption by more than 30% and energy cost by 10%, compared to the scenario of home charging only.

Dong, Jing [ORNL; Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL

2012-01-01

223

Evaluation of artificial groundwater recharge effects with MIKE-SHE: a case study.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In many areas where the technical and financial resources are limited, the treatment and disposal of wastewater comprise a problem. With increasing frequency, the wastewater reuse is considered as another alternative for water management alternative. In this way, the wastewater is converted into an added value resource. Treated wastewater infiltration into the soil could be a viable tertiary treatment, especially for small communities where the availability of land is not a problem and the wastewater has not industrial waste contribution and is highly biodegradable. The Experimental Plant of Carrión de los Céspedes (Seville, Spain) develops non-conventional wastewater treatments for small villages. Currently, a project regarding wastewater reutilization for aquifer recharge through a horizontal permeable reactive barrier and a subsequent soil infiltration is being carried out. One of the aspects to be evaluated within this context is the impact on aquifer. Consequently, the main goal of the present study is to assess the effects on the water flow derived from the future recharge activities by using the MIKE-SHE hydrological code. The unsaturated and saturated zones have been integrated in the model, which requires geological, land use, topography, piezometric head, soil and climate data to build up the model. The obtained results from the model show that with the annual recharge volume contributed by the experimental plant (3 m3 or 0.19 L/s) there is no effect in the groundwater flow. A volume of 400 m3/year (25 L/s) would be required to yield a variation in the piezometric head and therefore, in the groundwater flow i.e. a volume about 100 times larger than the estimated is necessary. To calibrate the model, simulated piezometric head values have been compared to the measured field data at a number of locations. In the calibration, the percent error had to be lower than 15 % at each location. Future works concerning groundwater quality and reactive transport modelling should be undertaken in order to get a more accurate impact evaluation of the recharge activities.

Leal, M.; Martínez-García, I.; Carreño, F.; de Bustamante, I.; Lillo, J.

2012-04-01

224

Crab Burrows are Important Conduits for Groundwater Recharge in Bangladesh  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent research suggests that recharge from man-made ponds may stimulate arsenic mobilization within Bangladeshi aquifers. Man-made ponds are widespread throughout Bangladesh and are generally underlain by low permeability clays that could potentially limit flow to the sandy aquifer below if they are not compromised by preferential flow paths. Animal borrows are one common type of preferential flow path through surface clays. Across the Ganges Delta, terrestrial crabs dig borrows, sometimes as long as 10 meters. In our study pond in Munshiganj, Bangladesh we found crab burrows extending through the surficial clays and down into the shallow aquifer spaced approximately every meter. We use these field observations along with a novel, coupled isotope and water balance model to quantify the fluxes into and out of the pond. We show that nearly all of the aquifer recharge from the pond is through crab burrows which have enhanced the hydraulic conductivity of the surficial sediments by several orders of magnitude. In addition we show that the recharging pond water is shifting the solute composition of water beneath the pond. We suggest that, as a result of crab burrows, young ponds may contribute large fluxes of recharge water whereas older ponds may contribute little recharge to the aquifer. All terrestrial crabs have gills that must remain moist to allow for respiration. So, to ensure an uninterrupted water source, their borrows must reach the maximum depth that the water table drops to seasonally after irrigation ceases and before the onset of the monsoon. Once a pond is installed crabs living within the sediments that now make up the new pond bottom would no longer need to construct burrows to ensure a constant supply of water. Over time, burrows that existed prior to pond construction can clog. Water balance data for an old pond at our study site indicates that this pond contributes less recharge than our newly constructed pond.

Stahl, M.; Tarek, M. H.; Yeo, D. C.; Badruzzaman, A.; Harvey, C. F.

2013-12-01

225

Estimating ground water recharge from topography, hydrogeology, and land cover.  

PubMed

Proper management of ground water resources requires knowledge of the rates and spatial distribution of recharge to aquifers. This information is needed at scales ranging from that of individual communities to regional. This paper presents a methodology to calculate recharge from readily available ground surface information without long-term monitoring. The method is viewed as providing a reasonable, but conservative, first approximation of recharge, which can then be fine-tuned with other methods as time permits. Stream baseflow was measured as a surrogate for recharge in small watersheds in southeastern Wisconsin. It is equated to recharge (R) and then normalized to observed annual precipitation (P). Regression analysis was constrained by requiring that the independent and dependent variables be dimensionally consistent. It shows that R/P is controlled by three dimensionless ratios: (1) infiltrating to overland water flux, (2) vertical to lateral distance water must travel, and (3) percentage of land cover in the natural state. The individual watershed properties that comprise these ratios are now commonly available in GIS data bases. The empirical relationship for predicting R/P developed for the study watersheds is shown to be statistically viable and is then tested outside the study area and against other methods of calculating recharge. The method produces values that agree with baseflow separation from streamflow hydrographs (to within 15% to 20%), ground water budget analysis (4%), well hydrograph analysis (12%), and a distributed-parameter watershed model calibrated to total streamflow (18%). It has also reproduced the temporal variation over 5 yr observed at a well site with an average error < 12%. PMID:15726928

Cherkauer, Douglas S; Ansari, Sajjad A

2005-01-01

226

Isotopic assessment of the recharge of a coastal aquifer in N. Albania  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The River Mati coastal plain aquifers serve as a groundwater source for about 250 000 people. A major concern is the rate of recharge from an alluvial fan at the entry of River Mati into the coastal plain. The investigation revealed brackish groundwater close to the Adriatic coast. However, the groundwater was artesian indicating the sea water intrusion is not currently a threat. As per ^18O analysis this water was not a mix of old sea water but had the signature of the river water. The salinity is likely to be derived by diffusion from intercalated clay layers. 14C dating of the water showed ages of the most brackish water up to 7 000 years. Upstream there are a large number of active and abandoned copper mines and about 10 M ton of waste rock from these mines. The ^34S in the river water was close to the value for sulphides in this waste rock. Also the groundwater showed values close to that of the river. Only the brackish groundwater close to the sea shore had a sea water signature, probably derived from sulphate diffusion from the above mentioned clay layers. Thus currently the groundwater extracted in a large well-field for the Durres town is more or less completely fed by recharge from the river. Large scale sand and gravel extraction in the alluvial cone is a threat to this recharge, lowering the head for flow and also presenting a risk for pollution by oil and fuel from the vehicles used for the sand and gravel extraction. It is recommended that a number of the artesian wells close to the Adriatic coast are monitored regarding the head above ground level.

Jacks, Gunnar; Kumanova, Xhume; Marku, Sonila

2013-04-01

227

Inorganic electrolyte Li/CuCl2 rechargeable cell  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A rechargeable lithium battery using a cathode of copper(II) chloride and an electrolyte consisting of LiAlCl4.3SO2 has been developed. The efficiency of lithium plating was evaluated in lithium-limited prototype cells. Cathode rechargeability was evaluated in cathode-limited prototypes, and system energy density was demonstrated by use of a wound D cell. The use of an electrolyte system which reacts reversibly with metallic lithium allowed the use of systematic overcharge to eliminate irreversible loss of lithium from the system and to provide for cell balancing. Lithium cycling figures of merit as high as 190 were attained by use of the overcharging.

Dey, A. N.; Bowden, W. L.; Kuo, H. C.; Gopikanth, M. L.; Schlaikjer, C.

1989-06-01

228

Thin Rechargeable Batteries for CMOS SRAM Memory Protection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New rechargeable battery technology is described and compared with classical primary battery back-up of SRAM PC cards. Thin solid polymer electrolyte cells with the thickness of TSOP memory components (1 mm nominal, 1.1 mm max) and capacities of 14 mAh/sq cm can replace coin cells. The SRAM PC cards with permanently installed rechargeable cells and optional electrochromic low battery voltage indicators will free the periodic PC card user from having to 'feed' their PC cards with coin cells and will allow a quick visual check of stored cards for their battery voltage status.

Crouse, Dennis N.

1993-01-01

229

Modelling of recharge and pollutant fluxes to urban groundwaters.  

PubMed

Urban groundwater resources are of considerable importance to the long-term viability of many cities world-wide, yet prediction of the quantity and quality of recharge is only rarely attempted at anything other than a very basic level. This paper describes the development of UGIf, a simple model written within a GIS, designed to provide estimates of spatially distributed recharge and recharge water quality in unconfined but covered aquifers. The following processes (with their calculation method indicated) are included: runoff and interception (curve number method); evapotranspiration (Penman-Grindley); interflow (empirical index approach); volatilization (Henry's law); sorption (distribution coefficient); and degradation (first order decay). The input data required are: meteorological data, landuse/cover map with event mean concentration attributes, geological maps with hydraulic and geochemical attributes, and topographic and water table elevation data in grid form. Standard outputs include distributions of: surface runoff, infiltration, potential recharge, ground level slope, interflow, actual recharge, pollutant fluxes in surface runoff, travel times of each pollutant through the unsaturated zone, and the pollutant fluxes and concentrations at the water table. The process of validation has commenced with a study of the Triassic Sandstone aquifer underlying Birmingham, UK. UGIf predicts a similar average recharge rate for the aquifer as previous groundwater flow modelling studies, but with significantly more spatial detail: in particular the results indicate that recharge through paved areas may be more important than previously thought. The results also highlight the need for more knowledge/data on the following: runoff estimation; interflow (including the effects of lateral flow and channelling on flow times and therefore chemistry); evapotranspiration in paved areas; the nature of unsaturated zone flow below paved areas; and the role of the pipe network. Although considerably more verification is needed, UGIf shows promise for use: in providing input for regional groundwater solute transport models; in identifying gaps in knowledge and data; in determining which processes are the most important influences on urban groundwater quantity and quality; in evaluating existing recharge models; in planning, for example in investigation of the effects of landuse or climate change; and in assessing groundwater vulnerability. PMID:16325236

Thomas, Abraham; Tellam, John

2006-05-01

230

Rechargeable room-temperature CF(x)-sodium battery.  

PubMed

Here we demonstrate for the first time that CFx cathodes show rechargeable capability in sodium ion batteries with an initial discharge capacity of 1061 mAh g(-1) and a reversible discharge capacity of 786 mAh g(-1). The highly reversible electrochemical reactivity of CFx with Na at room temperature indicates that the decomposition of NaF could be driven by carbon formed during the first discharge. The high reversible capacity made it become a promising cathode material for future rechargeable sodium batteries. PMID:24494989

Liu, Wen; Li, Hong; Xie, Jing-Ying; Fu, Zheng-Wen

2014-02-26

231

Focused Ground-Water Recharge in the Amargosa Desert Basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Amargosa River is an approximately 300-kilometer long regional drainage connecting the northern highlands on the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nev., to the floor of Death Valley in Inyo County, Calif. Streamflow analysis indicates that the Amargosa Desert portion of the river is dry more than 98 percent of the time. Infiltration losses during ephemeral flows of the Amargosa River and Fortymile Wash provide the main sources of ground-water recharge on the desert-basin floor. The primary use of ground water is for irrigated agriculture. The current study examined ground-water recharge from ephemeral flows in the Amargosa River by using streamflow data and environmental tracers. The USGS streamflow-gaging station at Beatty, Nev., provided high-frequency data on base flow and storm runoff entering the basin during water years 1998?2001. Discharge into the basin during the four-year period totaled 3.03 million cubic meters, three quarters of which was base flow. Streambed temperature anomalies indicated the distribution of ephemeral flows and infiltration losses within the basin. Major storms that produced regional flow during the four-year period occurred in February 1998, during a strong El Ni?o that more than doubled annual precipitation, and in July 1999. The study also quantified recharge beneath undisturbed native vegetation and irrigation return flow beneath irrigated fields. Vertical profiles of water potential and environmental tracers in the unsaturated zone provided estimates of recharge beneath the river channel (0.04?0.09 meter per year) and irrigated fields (0.1?0.5 meter per year). Chloride mass-balance estimates indicate that 12?15 percent of channel infiltration becomes ground-water recharge, together with 9?22 percent of infiltrated irrigation. Profiles of potential and chloride beneath the dominant desert-shrub vegetation suggest that ground-water recharge has been negligible throughout most of the basin since at least the early Holocene. Surface-based electrical-resistivity imaging provided areal extension of borehole information from sampled profiles. These images indicate narrowly focused recharge beneath the Amargosa River channel, flanked by large tracts of recharge-free basin floor.

Stonestrom, David A.; Prudic, David E.; Walvoord, Michelle A.; Abraham, Jared D.; Stewart-Deaker, Amy E.; Glancy, Patrick A.; Constantz, Jim; Laczniak, Randell J.; Andraski, Brian J.

2007-01-01

232

Estimation of Recharge to the Middle Trinity Aquifer of Central Texas Using Water-Level Fluctuations  

E-print Network

in the study area, comprising about 4500 square miles. The results of the investigation yielded a method of recharge calculation different from the stream baseflow method now in use. The recharge values obtained by this study were substantially less than...

Jennings, Marshall; Chad, Thomas; Burch, John; Creutzburg, Brian; Lambert, Lance

233

Diffuse groundwater recharge in semiarid environments: interactions between climate and soil texture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research, primarily based on environmental tracer techniques, has demonstrated that diffuse recharge in semiarid environments varies greatly through space and time. Typically, there is no diffuse recharge at low-elevation sites in semiarid regions, whereas diffuse recharge often occurs at higher elevations. While there has been no diffuse recharge at low-elevation sites over the past ˜ 10^4 yr, it is

E. Small

2003-01-01

234

The problems of mass transfer and formation of deposits of corrosion products on fuel assemblies of a VVER-1200 reactor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On the basis of examination of materials published both in Russia and abroad, as well as their own investigations, the authors explain the reasons for the occurrence of such effects as AOA (Axial Offset Anomalies) and an increase in the coolant pressure difference in the core of nuclear reactors of the VVER type. To detect the occurrence of the AOA effect, the authors suggest using the specific activity of 58Co in the coolant. In the VVER-1200 design the thermohydraulic regime for fuel assemblies in the first year of their service life involves slight boiling of the coolant in the upper part of the core, which may induce the occurrence of the AOA effect, intensification of corrosion of fuel claddings, and abnormal increase in deposition of corrosion products. Radiolysis of the water coolant in the boiling section (boiling in pores of deposits) may intensify not only general corrosion but also a localized (nodular) one. As a result of intensification of the corrosion processes and growth of deposits, deterioration of the radiation situation in the rooms of the primary circuit of a VVER-1200 reactor as compared to that at nuclear power plants equipped with reactors of the VVER-1000 type is possible. Recommendations for preventing the AOA effect at nuclear power plants with VVER-1200 reactors on the matter of the direction of further investigations are made.

Rodionov, Yu. A.; Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Gavrilov, A. V.

2014-03-01

235

Derived Operating Rules for Allocating Recharges and Withdrawals among Unconnected Aquifers  

E-print Network

the future availability of water for extraction influence recharge and withdrawal decisions. DOI: 10Derived Operating Rules for Allocating Recharges and Withdrawals among Unconnected Aquifers David E and recharge of water in multiple, unconnected aquifers. Management objectives are: 1 minimizing costs; 2

Pasternack, Gregory B.

236

Climate change impacts on groundwater recharge uncertainty, shortcomings, and the way forward?  

Microsoft Academic Search

An integrated approach to assessing the regional impacts of climate and socio-economic change on groundwater recharge is described from East Anglia, UK. Many factors affect future groundwater recharge including changed precipitation and temperature regimes, coastal flooding, urbanization, woodland establishment, and changes in cropping and rotations. Important sources of uncertainty and shortcomings in recharge estimation are discussed in the light of

I. P. Holman

2006-01-01

237

Impact of deep plowing on groundwater recharge in a semiarid region  

E-print Network

Impact of deep plowing on groundwater recharge in a semiarid region: Case study, High Plains, Texas September 2008; accepted 17 September 2008; published 20 December 2008. [1] Groundwater recharge is critical in rainfed (nonirrigated) agriculture in a semiarid region on groundwater recharge, which had not been

Scanlon, Bridget R.

238

THE SENSITIVITY OF NORTHERN GROUNDWATER RECHARGE TO CLIMATE CHANGE: A CASE STUDY IN NORTHWEST ALASKA1  

E-print Network

THE SENSITIVITY OF NORTHERN GROUNDWATER RECHARGE TO CLIMATE CHANGE: A CASE STUDY IN NORTHWEST WSE and snow depth compared well with PWBM-simulated groundwater recharge and snow storage. Using to sustain sufficient groundwater recharge. (KEY TERMS: climate variability/change; arctic /antarctic

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

239

The impact of climate change on spatially varying groundwater recharge in the grand river watershed (Ontario)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the process of groundwater recharge is fundamental to the management of groundwater resources. Quantifying the future evolution of recharge over time requires not only the reliable forecasting of changes in key climatic variables, but also modelling their impact on the spatially varying recharge process. This paper presents a physically based methodology that can be used to characterize both the

Mikko I. Jyrkama; Jon F. Sykes

2007-01-01

240

Climate change impacts on groundwater recharge uncertainty, shortcomings, and the way forward?  

Microsoft Academic Search

An integrated approach to assessing the regional impacts of climate and socio-economic change on groundwater recharge is described from East Anglia, UK. Many factors affect future groundwater recharge including changed precipitation and temperature regimes, coastal flooding, urbanization, woodland establishment, and changes in cropping and rotations.Important sources of uncertainty and shortcomings in recharge estimation are discussed in the light of the

I. P. Holman

2006-01-01

241

Recharge in Karst Shrublands of Central Texas: Monitoring Drip Rates in Shallow Caves  

Microsoft Academic Search

The exceedingly complex subsurface hydrology of karst landscapes presents formidable challenges to understanding recharge rates and the relationships between rainfall and recharge. In this study, we have established a network of drip collectors and monitoring stations in shallow caves in the Edwards Plateau to better understand the dynamics of recharge and eventually for determining the effect of woody plants on

R. A. Bazan; B. P. Wilcox; C. L. Munster; K. Owens; B. Shade

2007-01-01

242

USGS Professional Paper 1703--Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States--  

E-print Network

USGS Professional Paper 1703--Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States-- Appendix--1 Thermal Methods for Investigating Ground-Water Recharge By Kyle W. Blasch, Jim is defined as the downward flux of water across the regional water table. The introduction of recharging

243

Spatial Variability of Ground-Water Recharge Estimates in the Glassboro Area, New Jersey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spatial variability of ground-water recharge estimates in the Glassboro area, NJ, was evaluated using geostatistical methods as a preliminarily assessment of aquifer vulnerability. Recharge was estimated using Darcy's law, based on parameters obtained from pedotransfer functions applied to measured soil texture values. The recharge estimates correspond to sediments overlying the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer, which comprises highly permeable unconsolidated sands and

B. T. Nolan; A. L. Baehr

2001-01-01

244

WASTEWATER CONTAMINATE REMOVAL FOR GROUNDWATER RECHARGE AT WATER FACTORY 21  

EPA Science Inventory

This is the second report in a series which describes the performance of Water Factory 21, a 0.66 cu m/s advanced wastewater treatment plant designed to reclaim secondary effluent from a municipal wastewater treatment plant so that it can be used for injection and recharge of a g...

245

LOCALIZED RECHARGE INFLUENCES ON MTBE TRANSPORT AND WELL PLACEMENT CONSIDERATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Vertical characterization of a gasoline release site at East Patchogue, New York showed that methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and aromatic plumes "dived" as they passed beneath a sand pit. That this behavior was caused by aquifer recharge was shown by two pieces of evidence. Fir...

246

College of Chemistry Recharge Rates Computer Graphics Laboratory  

E-print Network

College of Chemistry Recharge Rates Computer Graphics Laboratory Computational Services (effective at cost Linux/Pitzer Center support (effective July 1, 2014) Pitzer Center support $67.00/hour Chemistry & Store Room (effective July 1, 2014) Store Room Cost + 25.60% Compressed Gases Cost + 25% Demurrage $13

Doudna, Jennifer A.

247

PRIORITY POLLUTANTS IN THE CEDAR CREEK WASTEWATER RECLAMATION - RECHARGE FACILITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

The Cedar Creek Wastewater Reclamation Plant (CCWRP) located in Nassau County, NY is a 0.24 cu m/s (5.5 mgd) advanced wastewater treatment (AWT) plant designed to produce a high quality effluent suitable for groundwater recharge. The CCWRP was constructed as a demonstration proje...

248

Wave energy systems for recharging AUV energy supplies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes ocean wave energy resources and characterizes their global distribution and temporal variability. It presents an overview of wave energy conversion devices that have progressed beyond the laboratory wave tank and have been proven at sea, and which lend themselves to miniaturization and packaging in a configuration suitable for recharging AUV power supplies from a docking station base.

George Hagerman

2002-01-01

249

Modelling the groundwater recharge of an urban area in Germany  

Microsoft Academic Search

Groundwater recharge is an important part of the natural water cycle. This cycle is disturbed particularly in urban areas. Sealing negatively influences the hydrological and mechanical soil properties. The continued sealing of soils, mainly caused by urbanisation, will continue to reduce the infiltration of water to groundwater and increase the surface run-off. Furthermore, recent and future climate changes strongly affect

Sabine Tesch; Volkmar Dunger; Jörg Matschullat

2010-01-01

250

Climate change effects on vegetation characteristics and groundwater recharge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Climate change is among the most pressing issues of our time. Increase in temperature, a decrease in summer precipitation and increase in reference evapotranspiration might affect the water balance, freshwater availability and the spatial distribution and type of vegetation. Precipitation and evapotranspiration (ET) largely determine groundwater recharge. Therefore, climate change likely affects both the spatial and temporal freshwater availability for

2010-01-01

251

On the Fate of Artificial Recharge in a Coastal Aquifer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increased use of reclaimed water for artificial groundwater recharge purposes has led to concerns about future groundwater quality, particularly as it relates to the introduction of new organic and inorganic contaminants into the subsurface. Here we review the integrated application of isotopic characterization and numerical modeling techniques for assessing the migration of reclaimed water that is used for artificial

A. Tompson; M. Davisson; R. Maxwell; G. Hudson; C. Welty; S. Carle; N. Rosenberg

252

Interdisciplinary Institute for Innovation Optimal Recharging Strategy for  

E-print Network

while the Spanish government has committed to having 1 million electric or hybrid cars on Spanish roads price differentials in electricity tariffs are designed to dissuade car owners from recharging for Electric Vehicles in France Margaret Armstrong Charles El Hajj Moussa Jérôme Adnot Alain Galli Philippe

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

253

Groundwater drainage and recharge by networks of irregular channels  

Microsoft Academic Search

A linear complementarity theory is proposed for the coupled treatment of groundwater seepage and surface runoff along a sloping plane ground perturbed by irregular channels. Steady downslope routing is applied to the two-dimensional overland flow, while Green functions are used to relate the three-dimensional groundwater motion to the surface drainage and recharge distribution. The coupling between the surface and subsurface

Wei-Jay Ni; Hervé Capart

2006-01-01

254

Net Recharge Targets to meet Regional Environmental Goals  

E-print Network

. Building on the previous hydrogeology studies in the CIA, further work was carried out to quantify vertical. This project is aimed at investigating the following groundwater management issues in the CIA: · Characterise and discharge zones in the CIA. Currently the overall recharge area is around 30 percent of the region

Khan, Shahbaz

255

Encouraging Revegetation in Australia with a Groundwater Recharge Credit Scheme  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a comprehensive method to design, test and then implement a Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) framework to combat the environmental consequences of extensive native vegetation clearance in Australia. Clearing of vegetation, primarily due to the expansion of farming areas, has often resulted in regional dryland and irrigation salinity. The market based approach adopted ? a groundwater recharge

Wendy Proctor; Jeffery D. Connor; John Ward; Darla Hatton MacDonald

2007-01-01

256

HOW TO PURCHASE CREDITS OR RECHARGE THE CARD: Preliminaryremarks  

E-print Network

to purchase credits or recharge the bike sharing card is a service provided and managed by velopass sarl. The USI has nothing to do with the management and organization of the bike sharing service for the velopass online shop, you need to do it (it's free) by selecting on the left the button "Registrati

Krause, Rolf

257

Methods Note/ Net Recharge vs. Depth to Groundwater  

E-print Network

soils with a shallow groundwater table. The transition depth (dt) between negative and positive valuesMethods Note/ Net Recharge vs. Depth to Groundwater Relationship in the Platte River Valley rates were correlated with depth to groundwater (d) values in the wide alluvial valley of the Platte

Szilagyi, Jozsef

258

Estimating High Plains Aquifer Recharge Using Temperature Probes  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The magnitude of recharge through playa wetlands in the High Plains Region of the United States has been debated, but rarely quantified. The ephemeral nature of water in playas makes it difficult and expensive to observe filling and drying/draining cycles. Inexpensive tools are needed to quantify ...

259

DELINEATING KARST RECHARGE AREAS AT ONONDAGA CAVE STATE PARK  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Onondaga Cave State Park is located in the north central portion of the Ozarks near Leasburg, Missouri. The park is known for two extensive cave systems, Onondaga Cave and Cathedral Cave. Both of these cave systems have active streams (1-2 cfs at baseflow) which have unknown recharge areas. As a man...

260

THE ROLE OF UNSATURATED FLOW IN ARTIFICAL RECHARGE PROJECTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hydrogeology of the unsaturated zone plays a critical role in determining the suitability of a site for artificial recharge. Optimally, a suitable site has highly permeable soils, capacity for horizontal flow at the aquifer boundary, lack of impeding layers, and a thick unsaturated zone. The suitability of a site is often determined by field and laboratory measurements of soil

Alan L. Flint

261

A polymer electrolyte-based rechargeable lithium\\/oxygen battery  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel rechargeable Li\\/Oâ battery is reported. It comprises a Li{sup +} conductive organic polymer electrolyte membrane sandwiched by a thin Li metal foil anode, and a thin carbon composite electrode on which oxygen, the electroactive cathode material, accessed from the environment, is reduced during discharge to generate electric power. It features an all solid state design in which electrode

K. M. Abraham; Z. Jiang

1996-01-01

262

Using stable isotopes of water to re-evaluate the recharge/discharge functions of North American bogs and fens  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In North American mires hydrologists commonly find raised bog crests and low-lying fen water tracks to be focal points for groundwater recharge and discharge, respectively. To further test these observations we synoptically surveyed vertical profiles of peat pore water ?18O/?2H and major mineral solutes from a range of bog and fen landforms across the Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands (GLAP) of northern Minnesota. We also sampled a detailed transect through a 150 km2 bog-fen complex in the Red Lake II peatland watershed of the GLAP. The molar ratios of Ca/Mg in the pore water beneath the Red Lake II bog crest are depleted in Mg with respect to the atmospheric average of 3.6, indicative of preferential flushing of Mg from the peat by meteoric recharge. Higher solute concentrations in the middle of the peat profile at an adjacent fen show focused groundwater discharge with Ca/Mg ratios of ~1.4, similar to that of water from local wells tapping underlying glacial till. However, contrary to expectations, we find evidence that modern recharge has penetrated throughout the peat column beneath both bog and fen landforms throughout the GLAP. Landform surface features control the isotopic recharge value. These landform-specific isotope signatures propagate through vertical pore water profiles. Pore waters deeper than 0.5 m partition into discrete ranges of ?18O according to three a priori landform classifications: 1) -11.9 ± 0.4 o for bog crests, 2) -10.6 ± 0.1 o for Sphagnum lawns, and 3) -8.8 ± 1.0 o for fen water tracks. The fen water tracks have standing water at their surface that is seasonally enriched by isotope fractionating evaporation and therefore fingerprints recharge to depths ?3 m. Incongruities between isotope and solute mixing trends may be related to the dual porosity nature of peat and matrix diffusion, which could supply solutes to active pore spaces following flushing by meteoric recharge. This buffering of base solutes in the deep peat may influence methanogenic bacteria that are sensitive to pH. Our results support the hypothesis that the downward transport of labile carbon substrates from the surface of northern peat basins fuels methane production in deeper peat strata.

Levy, Zeno; Siegel, Donald; Glaser, Paul; Dasgupta, Soumitri

2014-05-01

263

Ecohydrologic process modeling of mountain block groundwater recharge.  

PubMed

Regional mountain block recharge (MBR) is a key component of alluvial basin aquifer systems typical of the western United States. Yet neither water scientists nor resource managers have a commonly available and reasonably invoked quantitative method to constrain MBR rates. Recent advances in landscape-scale ecohydrologic process modeling offer the possibility that meteorological data and land surface physical and vegetative conditions can be used to generate estimates of MBR. A water balance was generated for a temperate 24,600-ha mountain watershed, elevation 1565 to 3207 m, using the ecosystem process model Biome-BGC (BioGeochemical Cycles) (Running and Hunt 1993). Input data included remotely sensed landscape information and climate data generated with the Mountain Climate Simulator (MT-CLIM) (Running et al. 1987). Estimated mean annual MBR flux into the crystalline bedrock terrain is 99,000 m(3) /d, or approximately 19% of annual precipitation for the 2003 water year. Controls on MBR predictions include evapotranspiration (radiation limited in wet years and moisture limited in dry years), soil properties, vegetative ecotones (significant at lower elevations), and snowmelt (dominant recharge process). The ecohydrologic model is also used to investigate how climatic and vegetative controls influence recharge dynamics within three elevation zones. The ecohydrologic model proves useful for investigating controls on recharge to mountain blocks as a function of climate and vegetation. Future efforts will need to investigate the uncertainty in the modeled water balance by incorporating an advanced understanding of mountain recharge processes, an ability to simulate those processes at varying scales, and independent approaches to calibrating MBR estimates. PMID:19702780

Magruder, Ian A; Woessner, William W; Running, Steve W

2009-01-01

264

Groundwater suitability recharge zones modelling - A GIS application  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater quality in Gujarat state is highly variable and due to multiplicity of factors viz. influenced by direct sea water encroachment, inherent sediment salinity, water logging, overexploitation leading to overall deterioration in ground water quality, coupled with domestic and industrial pollution etc. The groundwater scenario in the state is not very encouraging due to imbalance between recharge and groundwater exploitation. Further, the demand for water has increased manifold owing to agricultural, industrial and domestic requirement and this has led to water scarcity in many parts of the state, which is likely to become more severe in coming future due to both natural and manmade factors. Therefore, sustainable development of groundwater resource requires precise quantitative assessment based on reasonably valid scientific principles. Hence, delineation of groundwater potential zones (GWPZ), has acquired great significance. The present study focuses on the integrated Geospatial and Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) techniques to determine the most important contributing factors that affect the groundwater resources and also to delineate the potential zones for groundwater recharge. The multiple thematic layers of influencing parameters viz. geology, geomorphology, soil, slope, drainage density and land use, weightages were assigned to the each factor according to their relative importance as per subject experts opinion owing to the natural setup of the region. The Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) was applied to these factors and potential recharge zones were identified. The study area for the assessment of groundwater recharge potential zones is Mahi-Narmada inter-stream region of Gujarat state. The study shows that around 28 % region has the excellent suitability of the ground water recharge.

Dabral, S.; Bhatt, B.; Joshi, J. P.; Sharma, N.

2014-11-01

265

Defining Flood Recharge Processes: Lower Bill Williams River, Western Arizona  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

River networks provide hydrologic connections between upland and headwater catchments and downstream reaches. In arid and semi-arid regions, full connectivity of a river system is rare and moments of connection may only occur during large flood events. Here we investigate the Bill Williams River, among the most arid river basins in the United States. The aridity of this system-and the associated lack of complicating hillslope processes adjacent to the river-provides a unique opportunity to study flood recharge processes in relative isolation. During all but the highest flows, the river infiltrates completely at the east end of Planet Valley and reemerges at the west end where it enters the Bill Williams River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). Determining the source of baseflow in the lower Bill Williams/NWR, and the residence time of this water in the Planet Valley aquifer, will provide insight into the dependence of streamflow on earlier recharge-inducing floods. Defining this dependence more clearly is the next step toward a detailed knowledge of the long-term, basin-scale impacts of floods on water quality and quantity. To determine the impact of floods and the recharge they induce, surface and groundwater samples were collected during high and low flows throughout the basin from April 2007 through the present. Isotopic (?18OH2O, ?2HH2O) and chemical differences (most notably SO4) in streamflow and groundwater along the system indicate the importance of older groundwater in NWR baseflow-either in the form of prior flood recharge or influxes from local springs. Sulfate isotope analysis (?34SSO4, ?18OSO4) is pending for samples throughout the lower basin and this information should allow streamflow sources to be defined and quantified. This study provides a better characterization of the hydrologic and hydrochemical behavior of a Basin and Range river, and allows the effects of flood recharge processes to be more clearly defined at the basin scale.

Simpson, S. C.; Meixner, T.; Hogan, J.

2008-12-01

266

Transient heat and mass transfer modeling aspects of rechargeable lithium/polymer electrolyte batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rechargeable lithium/polymer electrolyte batteries have the potential for higher energy density than existing lithium-ion type batteries. However, lithium/polymer batteries have limited cycle life. Discharge capacity is extremely sensitive to temperature and discharge rate, and potential safety problems exist and are related to battery temperature distribution. This dissertation addresses several of these battery performance limiting issues by modeling fundamental heat and mass transfer processes that occur during lithium/polymer battery operation. A transient, three dimensional heat transfer and generation model was developed and applied to a single lithium/poly(ethylene oxide)/titanium disulfide cell. This model can be used to predict the cell temperatures for a new type of thermal battery, namely, a lithium/polymer thermal battery. Fundamental processes that occur at the lithium/polymer electrolyte interface were determined and a diffusion-limited reaction model was proposed to explain the interfacial resistance growth with time. The addition of alumina to the poly(ethylene oxide) polymer electrolyte reduces the magnitude and growth rate of the interfacial resistance mainly by serving as a diluent. The cell voltage and discharge capacity as a function of discharge rate for a room temperature rechargeable lithium/polymer electrolyte/lithium manganese oxide cell were accurately simulated by a simple diffusion-limited reaction model and by a transient, two-dimensional mass transfer and generation model. The importance of using the intrinsic lithium chemical diffusion coefficient in modeling lithium insertion cathode materials is addressed.

Fellner, Joseph Phillip

267

New High Capacity Cathode Materials for Rechargeable Li-ion Batteries: Vanadate-Borate Glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

V2O5 based materials are attractive cathode alternatives due to the many oxidation state switches of vanadium bringing about a high theoretical specific capacity. However, significant capacity losses are eminent for crystalline V2O5 phases related to the irreversible phase transformations and/or vanadium dissolution starting from the first discharge cycle. These problems can be circumvented if amorphous or glassy vanadium oxide phases are employed. Here, we demonstrate vanadate-borate glasses as high capacity cathode materials for rechargeable Li-ion batteries for the first time. The composite electrodes of V2O5 - LiBO2 glass with reduced graphite oxide (RGO) deliver specific energies around 1000 Wh/kg and retain high specific capacities in the range of ~ 300 mAh/g for the first 100 cycles. V2O5 - LiBO2 glasses are considered as promising cathode materials for rechargeable Li-ion batteries fabricated through rather simple and cost-efficient methods.

Afyon, Semih; Krumeich, Frank; Mensing, Christian; Borgschulte, Andreas; Nesper, Reinhard

2014-11-01

268

The simulation of the recharging method of active medical implant based on Monte Carlo method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recharging of Active Medical Implant (AMI) is an important issue for its future application. In this paper, a method for recharging active medical implant using wearable incoherent light source has been proposed. Firstly, the models of the recharging method are developed. Secondly, the recharging processes of the proposed method have been simulated by using Monte Carlo (MC) method. Finally, some important conclusions have been reached. The results indicate that the proposed method will help to result in a convenient, safe and low-cost recharging method of AMI, which will promote the application of this kind of implantable device.

Kong, Xianyue; Song, Yong; Hao, Qun; Cao, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Dai, Pantao; Li, Wansong

2014-11-01

269

Classification of ground-water recharge potential in three parts of Santa Cruz County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water recharge potential was classified in the Santa Cruz coastal area, North-central area, and Soquel-Aptos area in Santa Cruz County, Calif., for three data elements that affect recharge; slope, soils, and geology. Separate numerical maps for each element were composited into a single numerical map using a classification system that ranked the numbers into areas of good , fair, and poor recharge potential. Most of the Santa Cruz coastal area and the Norht-central area have a poor recharge potential, and much of the Soquel-Aptos area has a good to fair recharge potential. (Kosco-USGS)

Muir, K.S.; Johnson, Michael J.

1979-01-01

270

Comparison of surface and groundwater balance approaches in the evaluation of managed aquifer recharge structures: Case of a percolation tank in a crystalline aquifer in India  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To face the problem of groundwater depletion, the Indian Government relies on large projects of Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR). Numerous recharge structures such as percolation tanks exist but the impact of these structures on groundwater resources remains poorly understood. Although the evaporation/infiltration ratio of percolation tanks was determined in several studies in semi-arid contexts using surface water balance methods, few studies evaluated the impact on the aquifer recharge. However, knowledge on recharge dynamics over time and space is essential for (1) the quantitative evaluation of stored water volumes, (2) the identification of beneficiaries (farmers) and (3) the estimation of percolation tanks recharge zone to the extent that is required to define proper management regulations at basin scale. These three points are of prime importance in the case of semi-arid regions where a limited number of rain events determine the water stored over the entire year. Assessment of the stored groundwater is even more difficult in crystalline aquifers due to the heterogeneous structure of flow paths. To date no methodological guidelines exist for local assessment of percolation tanks in crystalline aquifers. In this paper, we develop a method for calculating a local groundwater budget and we compare it with a computed surface balance. The method is applied to a case study in semi-arid crystalline context. From the groundwater balance we draw conclusions on (1) the limited amount of stored water in the aquifer, (2) the delayed recharge of the aquifer highlighting temporary storage/slow groundwater movement in the unsaturated zone and (3) the limited number of beneficiaries in years of medium monsoon rainfall. These results complement the understanding of the hydrodynamic functioning of percolation tanks, and their impact on the local groundwater balance.

Boisson, A.; Baïsset, M.; Alazard, M.; Perrin, J.; Villesseche, D.; Dewandel, B.; Kloppmann, W.; Chandra, S.; Picot-Colbeaux, G.; Sarah, S.; Ahmed, S.; Maréchal, J. C.

2014-11-01

271

Current state, problems, and prospects of development of the fuel and power industry of the Russian Federation  

SciTech Connect

Despite the political and territorial changes that have occurred in the former USSR, the Russian Federation as before remains the core of the entire energy supply system of countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), the three Baltic States, as well as an exporter of oil and gas to European countries. Demonstrated gas reserves in Russia amount to 47 trillion cubic meters and coal reserves more than 200 billion tons. With the dissolution of the USSR, the infrastructure of the entire region was affected. The main production of pipes remained in Ukraine and 80% of the production of oil equipment remained in Azerbaijan. The majority of underground gas storage facilities, refineries, and electric-power installations constructed during the past 20 years remained in Belarus, Baltic Countries, and Ukraine. To solve some of the problems, laws were passed that aimed at the formation of market relations in the economy and power industry. The transition to a market economy in the oil and gas industry should take 5-7 years and has a large effect on the overall markets reforms taking place. The article also outlines the history and present state of petroleum reserves and development in Russia.

Shatalov, A.T.

1994-09-01

272

Monitoring induced denitrification in an artificial aquifer recharge system.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As demands on groundwater increase, artificial recharge is becoming a common method for enhancing groundwater supply. The Llobregat River is a strategic water supply resource to the Barcelona metropolitan area (Catalonia, NE Spain). Aquifer overexploitation has leaded to both a decrease of groundwater level and seawater intrusion, with the consequent deterioration of water quality. In the middle section of the aquifer, in Sant Vicenç del Horts, decantation and infiltration ponds recharged by water from the Llobregat River (highly affected from wastewater treatment plant effluents), were installed in 2007, in the framework of the ENSAT Life+ project. At the bottom of the infiltration pond, a vegetal compost layer was installed to promote the growth of bacteria, to induce denitrification and to create favourable conditions for contaminant biodegradation. This layer consists on a mixture of compost, aquifer material, clay and iron oxide. Understanding the fate of contaminants, such as nitrate, during artificial aquifer recharge is required to evaluate the impact of artificial recharge in groundwater quality. In order to distinguish the source of nitrate and to evaluate the capability of the organic reactive layer to induce denitrification, a multi-isotopic approach coupled with hydrogeochemical data was performed. Groundwater samples, as well as river samples, were sampled during artificial and natural recharge periods. The isotopic analysis included: ?15N and ?18O of dissolved nitrate, ?34S and ?18O of dissolved sulphate, ?13C of dissolved inorganic carbon, and ?2H and ?18O of water. Dissolved nitrate isotopic composition (?15NNO3 from +9 to +21 o and ?18ONO3 from +3 to +16 ) demonstrated that heterotrophic denitrification induced by the reactive layer was taking place during the artificial recharge periods. An approximation to the extent of nitrate attenuation was calculated, showing a range between 95 and 99% or between 35 and 45%, by using the extreme literature ?N values of -4o and -22o respectively (Aravena and Robertson, 1998; Pauwels et al., 2000). Ongoing denitrification batch experiments will allow us to determine the specific nitrogen and oxygen isotopic fractionation induced by the organic reactive layer, in order to estimate more precisely the extent of denitrification during artificial aquifer recharge. These results confirmed that the reactive layer induces denitrification in the recharge ponds area, proving the usefulness of an isotopic approach to characterize water quality improvement occurring during artificial aquifer recharge. References 1. Aravena, R., Robertson, W.D., 1998. Use of multiple isotope tracers to evaluate denitrification in ground water: Study of nitrate from a large-flux septic system plume. Ground Water, 36(6): 975-982. 2. Pauwels, H., J.C., Kloppmann, W., 2000. Denitrification and mixing in a schist aquifer: Influence on water chemistry and isotopes. Chemical Geology, 168(3-4): 307-324. Acknowledgment This study was supported by the projects CGL2011-29975-C04-01 from the Spanish Government, 2009SGR-00103 from the Catalan Government and ENPI/2011/280-008 from the European Commission. Please fill in your abstract text.

Grau-Martinez, Alba; Torrentó, Clara; Folch, Albert; Domènech, Cristina; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert

2014-05-01

273

Transient, spatially-varied recharge for groundwater modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study is aimed at producing spatially and temporally varying groundwater recharge for transient groundwater modeling in a pilot watershed in the North Okanagan, Canada. The recharge modeling is undertaken by using a Richard's equation based finite element code (HYDRUS-1D) [Simunek et al., 2002], ArcGISTM [ESRI, 2011], ROSETTA [Schaap et al., 2001], in situ observations of soil temperature and soil moisture and a long term gridded climate data [Nielsen et al., 2010]. The public version of HYDUS-1D [Simunek et al., 2002] and another beta version with a detailed freezing and thawing module [Hansson et al., 2004] are first used to simulate soil temperature, snow pack and soil moisture over a one year experimental period. Statistical analysis of the results show both versions of HYDRUS-1D reproduce observed variables to the same degree. Correlation coefficients for soil temperature simulation were estimated at 0.9 and 0.8, at depths of 10 cm and 50 cm respectively; and for soil moisture, 0.8 and 0.6 at 10 cm and 50 cm respectively. This and other standard measures of model performance (root mean square error and average error) showed a promising performance of the HYDRUS-1D code in our pilot watershed. After evaluating model performance using field data and ROSETTA derived soil hydraulic parameters, the HYDRUS-1D code is coupled with ArcGISTM to produce spatially and temporally varying recharge maps throughout the Deep Creek watershed. Temporal and spatial analysis of 25 years daily recharge results at various representative points across the study watershed reveal significant temporal and spatial variations; average recharge estimated at 77.8 ± 50.8mm /year. This significant variation over the years, caused by antecedent soil moisture condition and climatic condition, illustrates the common flaw of assigning a constant percentage of precipitation throughout the simulation period. Groundwater recharge modeling has previously been attempted in the Okanagan Basin and other parts of Canada by using the HELP code. However, HELP has known limitations related with boundary conditions as well as spatial and temporal discretization options, and thus cannot simulate highly variable fluxes near boundaries. The limitations are even more pronounced in semi-arid areas like the Okanagan Basin where upward fluxes can be high, because HELP assumes that water below evaporative zone simply drains to the base of a soil column without accounting for upward fluxes. In addition to these limitations, previous studies that used HELP for recharge estimation, [Towes and Allen, 2009; Jyrkama and Sykes, 2007], did not attempt to verify model performance in their study area. The study here presents an integrated procedure that can help address some of these often neglected modelling challenges. The significance of the method in transient groundwater modeling is demonstrated by applying the spatially and temporally varying recharge boundary condition to a saturated zone groundwater model, MIKESHE [DHI, 2009a]. The water table simulated using this method is found to be within 0.6 m of the observed values, whereas the water levels estimated using uniform recharge boundary condition can fluctuate by as much as 1.6 m. Root mean square errors were estimated at 0.3 and 0.94 respectively.

Assefa, K.; Woodbury, A. D.

2012-12-01

274

Transient,spatially-varied recharge for groundwater modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study is aimed at producing spatially and temporally varying groundwater recharge for transient groundwater modeling in a pilot watershed in the North Okanagan, Canada. The recharge modeling is undertaken by using a Richard's equation based finite element code (HYDRUS-1D) [Simunek et al., 2002], ArcGISTM [ESRI, 2011], ROSETTA [Schaap et al., 2001], in situ observations of soil temperature and soil moisture and a long term gridded climate data [Nielsen et al., 2010]. The public version of HYDUS-1D [Simunek et al., 2002] and another beta version with a detailed freezing and thawing module [Hansson et al., 2004] are first used to simulate soil temperature, snow pack and soil moisture over a one year experimental period. Statistical analysis of the results show both versions of HYDRUS-1D reproduce observed variables to the same degree. Correlation coefficients for soil temperature simulation were estimated at 0.9 and 0.8, at depths of 10 cm and 50 cm respectively; and for soil moisture, 0.8 and 0.6 at 10 cm and 50 cm respectively. This and other standard measures of model performance (root mean square error and average error) showed a promising performance of the HYDRUS-1D code in our pilot watershed. After evaluating model performance using field data and ROSETTA derived soil hydraulic parameters, the HYDRUS-1D code is coupled with ArcGISTM to produce spatially and temporally varying recharge maps throughout the Deep Creek watershed. Temporal and spatial analysis of 25 years daily recharge results at various representative points across the study watershed reveal significant temporal and spatial variations; average recharge estimated at 77.8 ± 50.8mm /year. This significant variation over the years, caused by antecedent soil moisture condition and climatic condition, illustrates the common flaw of assigning a constant percentage of precipitation throughout the simulation period. Groundwater recharge modeling has previously been attempted in the Okanagan Basin and other parts of Canada by using the HELP code. However, HELP has known limitations related with boundary conditions as well as spatial and temporal discretization options, and thus cannot simulate highly variable fluxes near boundaries. The limitations are even more pronounced in semi-arid areas like the Okanagan Basin where upward fluxes can be high, because HELP assumes that water below evaporative zone simply drains to the base of a soil column without accounting for upward fluxes. In addition to these limitations, previous studies that used HELP for recharge estimation, [Towes and Allen, 2009; Jyrkama and Sykes, 2007], did not attempt to verify model performance in their study area. The study here presents an integrated procedure that can help address some of these often neglected modelling challenges. The significance of the method in transient groundwater modeling is demonstrated by applying the spatially and temporally varying recharge boundary condition to a saturated zone groundwater model, MIKESHE [DHI, 2009a]. The water table simulated using this method is found to be within 0.6 m of the observed values, whereas the water levels estimated using uniform recharge boundary condition can fluctuate by as much as 1.6 m. Root mean square errors were estimated at 0.3 and 0.94 respectively.

Assefa, Kibreab; Woodbury, Allan

2013-04-01

275

Hydrometeorological daily recharge assessment model (DREAM) for the Western Mountain Aquifer, Israel: Model application and effects of temporal patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recharge is a critical issue for water management. Recharge assessment and the factors affecting recharge are of scientific and practical importance. The purpose of this study was to develop a daily recharge assessment model (DREAM) on the basis of a water balance principle with input from conventional and generally available precipitation and evaporation data and demonstrate the application of this

N. A. Sheffer; E. Dafny; H. Gvirtzman; S. Navon; A. Frumkin; E. Morin

2010-01-01

276

Combined estimation of specific yield and natural recharge in a semi-arid groundwater basin with irrigated agriculture  

Microsoft Academic Search

A water budget approach is developed to jointly estimate specific yield and natural recharge in an unconfined aquifer with significant seasonal water table fluctuations. Water table fluctuations are due to distinct seasonality in groundwater recharge. The separation of the hydrologic year into two (or more) extended seasons of recharge (wet season) and no-recharge (dry season) with accompanying changes in water

J. C. Maréchal; B. Dewandel; S. Ahmed; L. Galeazzi; F. K. Zaidi

2006-01-01

277

SOLUTION OF A GROUNDWATER CONTROL PROBLEM WITH IMPLICIT FILTERING \\Lambda  

E-print Network

to a control problem from hydrology. We seek to control the temperature at a group of drinking water wells to control the temperature in a set of drinking water wells. The site shown in Figure 2.1 is in the recharge on a groundwater temperature control problem. This problem has some of the impor­ tant difficulties

278

SOLUTION OF A GROUNDWATER CONTROL PROBLEM WITH IMPLICIT A. BATTERMANN  

E-print Network

to a control problem from hydrology. We seek to control the temperature at a group of drinking water wells to control the temperature in a set of drinking water wells. The site shown in Figure 2.1 is in the recharge on a groundwater temperature control problem. This problem has some of the impor- tant difficulties

279

Geophysical Methods for Improved Understanding of Managed Aquifer Recharge (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Managed aquifer recharge is increasingly being used as a means of augmenting groundwater supplies. With the increased use, questions arise regarding the suitability of sites for such operations, as well as the operational efficiency of these systems. In this work we specifically look at MAR using an artificial recharge pond. There are two operational challenges commonly faced in artificial recharge ponds: 1) A decrease in infiltration rate of water into the subsurface during operating; this limits the amount of stored water. 2) Low recovery rates of the stored water. Addressing both of these challenges requires sufficient information about the spatial and temporal variation in governing hydrologic properties and processes. Geophysical methods provide a novel way of obtaining such information from the region beneath a recharge pond. A study of the Harkins Slough Recharge Pond, near Watsonville California, presented a unique opportunity to develop and test geophysical methods, specifically for improved understanding off MAR. At this site we deployed a series of geophysical sensors aimed at addressing the two operational challenges at the site. We first addressed the question: What is controlling the decrease in filtration rate? The development and installation of electrical conductivity probes beneath the pond allowed us to monitor changes in the top ~1 m over a 4-month period. This dataset revealed that clogging in the top ~10 cm was responsible for the decreased infiltration rate. These 1D data were augmented by a time-lapse 2D ERT dataset that shows significant lateral variability in infiltration at the site. The second question we addressed was: Why is the recovery rate so low? Using a combination of cone-penetrometer testing and seismic reflection data, we developed a subsurface model that suggested there was a thin clay layer that may be impeding the flow of water to the recovery wells. To further understand this, we developed electrical conductivity probes, containing pore pressure transducers, to monitor changes in electrical conductivity and fluid pressure to a depth of 30 m. The data acquired with these probes clearly showed that the subsurface clay layer was impeding flow to the screened zone of the recovery wells. The findings at the site demonstrate the value of geophysics obtaining information regarding the siting and operation of artificial recharge ponds.

Pidlisecky, A.; Nenna, V.; Knight, R. J.

2013-12-01

280

An aqueous rechargeable formate-based hydrogen battery driven by heterogeneous Pd catalysis.  

PubMed

The formate-based rechargeable hydrogen battery (RHB) promises high reversible capacity to meet the need for safe, reliable, and sustainable H2 storage used in fuel cell applications. Described herein is an additive-free RHB which is based on repetitive cycles operated between aqueous formate dehydrogenation (discharging) and bicarbonate hydrogenation (charging). Key to this truly efficient and durable H2 handling system is the use of highly strained Pd nanoparticles anchored on graphite oxide nanosheets as a robust and efficient solid catalyst, which can facilitate both the discharging and charging processes in a reversible and highly facile manner. Up to six repeated discharging/charging cycles can be performed without noticeable degradation in the storage capacity. PMID:25382034

Bi, Qing-Yuan; Lin, Jian-Dong; Liu, Yong-Mei; Du, Xian-Long; Wang, Jian-Qiang; He, He-Yong; Cao, Yong

2014-12-01

281

Case studies of unique problems and events encountered during design, construction, and operation of three large commercial-scale fuel ethanol plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the unique problems and events encountered during the design, construction, start-up, and operation phases of three differently constructed alcohol fuel projects. These projects were awarded cost sharing contracts (Cooperative Agreements) as part of the Department of Energy's effort to expedite ethanol production on a commercial scale. The scope of the projects included final design, economic and financial analysis, market analysis, environmental analysis, facility construction, and plant start-up operation. The three ethanol plants are a 20-million gallon per year (MMGPY) new-construction or grass roots facility; a 60-MMGPY plant constructed using refurbished equipment at a decommissioned ammonia fertilizer facility; and a 10-MMGPY retrofitted brewery. A comparison of the case histories of these projects clearly points out the advantages and disadvantages of each type of design and construction.

Jones, K.W.

1984-01-01

282

Recharging behavior of nitrogen-centers in ZnO  

SciTech Connect

Electron Paramagnetic Resonance was used to study N{sub 2}-centers in ZnO, which show a 5-line spectrum described by the hyperfine interaction of two nitrogen nuclei (nuclear spin I?=?1, 99.6% abundance). The recharging of this center exhibits two steps, a weak onset at about 1.4?eV and a strongly increasing signal for photon energies above 1.9?eV. The latter energy coincides with the recharging energy of N{sub O} centers (substitutional nitrogen atoms on oxygen sites). The results indicate that the N{sub 2}-centers are deep level defects and therefore not suitable to cause significant hole-conductivity at room temperature.

Philipps, Jan M., E-mail: jan.m.philipps@physik.uni-giessen.de; Meyer, Bruno K.; Hofmann, Detlev M. [I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Stehr, Jan E.; Buyanova, Irina [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University, 58183 Linkoeping (Sweden); Tarun, Marianne C.; McCluskey, Matthew D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Materials Science Program, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2814 (United States)

2014-08-14

283

Novel electrolyte chemistries for Mg-Ni rechargeable batteries.  

SciTech Connect

Commercial hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) and battery electric vehicles (BEV) serve as means to reduce the nation's dependence on oil. Current electric vehicles use relatively heavy nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) rechargeable batteries. Li-ion rechargeable batteries have been developed extensively as the replacement; however, the high cost and safety concerns are still issues to be resolved before large-scale production. In this study, we propose a new highly conductive solid polymer electrolyte for Mg-Ni high electrochemical capacity batteries. The traditional corrosive alkaline aqueous electrolyte (KOH) is replaced with a dry polymer with conductivity on the order of 10{sup -2} S/cm, as measured by impedance spectroscopy. Several potential novel polymer and polymer composite candidates are presented with the best-performing electrolyte results for full cell testing and cycling.

Garcia-Diaz, Brenda (Savannah River National Laboratory); Kane, Marie; Au, Ming (Savannah River National Laboratory)

2010-10-01

284

Evaluating storm-scale groundwater recharge dynamics with coupled weather radar data and unsaturated zone modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater recharge rates through the unsaturated zone emerge from complex interactions within the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system that derive from nonlinear relationships amongst atmospheric boundary conditions, plant water use and soil hydraulic properties. While it is widely recognized that hydrologic models must capture soil water dynamics in order to provide reliable recharge estimates, information on episodic recharge generation remains uncommon, and links between storm-scale weather patterns and their influence on recharge is largely unexplored. In this study, the water balance of a heterogeneous one-dimensional soil domain (3 m deep) beneath a typical rainfed corn agro-ecosystem in eastern Nebraska was numerically simulated in HYDRUS-1D for 12 years (2001-2012) on hourly time steps in order to assess the relationships between weather events and episodic recharge generation. WSR-88D weather radar reflectivity data provided both rainfall forcing data (after estimating rain rates using the z/r ratio method) and a means of storm classification on a scale from convective to stratiform using storm boundary characteristics. Individual storm event importance to cumulative recharge generation was assessed through iterative scenario modeling (773 total simulations). Annual cumulative recharge had a mean value of 9.19 cm/yr (about 12 % of cumulative rainfall) with coefficient of variation of 73%. Simulated recharge generation events occurred only in late winter and spring, with a peak in May (about 35% of total annual recharge). Recharge generation is observed primarily in late spring and early summer because of the combination of high residual soil moisture following a winter replenishment period, heavy convective storms, and low to moderate potential evapotranspiration rates. During the growing season, high rates of root water uptake cause rapid soil water depletion, and the concurrent high potential evapotranspiration and low soil moisture prevented recharge generation until late winter, even when intense convective storms took place. For this reason, about 86% of all precipitation events produce insignificant recharge contributions. Recharge responses to individual storms were nonlinear and did not cluster well with either storm amount or storm classification type. For example, ~7% of rainfall events fall near the 1:1 rainfall/recharge line and these events represent about 37% of cumulative recharge, and individual storms accounted for up to 4% of their annual totals. However, recharge events in late winter are mainly triggered by stratiform precipitation whereas in spring they are generally generated by convective storms. This novel approach to assessing storm-scale recharge may be relevant to several current challenges in the characterization of groundwater recharge processes, including the evaluation of their spatiotemporal distributions and the impacts of climate change on groundwater.

Nasta, P.; Gates, J. B.; Lock, N.; Houston, A. L.

2013-12-01

285

Recharging the Silicon Crucible in a Hot Furnace  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

"Melt recharger" adds raw silicon to crucible in crystal-growing furnace without disturbing inert-gas atmosphere or significantly lowering temperature of melt. Crucible-refill hopper is lowered into hot zone of crystal-pulling chamber through an isolation valve. Cable that supports hopper is fastened to cone-shaped stopper in bottom of hopper. Stopper moves out of opening in hopper, allowing part of polysilicon charge to drop into crucible.

Lane, R. L.

1982-01-01

286

Scale effects of hydrostratigraphy and recharge zonation on base flow.  

PubMed

Uncertainty regarding spatial variations of model parameters often results in the simplifying assumption that parameters are spatially uniform. However, spatial variability may be important in resource assessment and model calibration. In this paper, a methodology is presented for estimating a critical basin size, above which base flows appear to be relatively less sensitive to the spatial distribution of recharge and hydraulic conductivity, and below which base flows are relatively more sensitive to this spatial variability. Application of the method is illustrated for a watershed that exhibits distinct infiltration patterns and hydrostratigraphic layering. A ground water flow model (MODFLOW) and a parameter estimation code (UCODE) were used to evaluate the influence of recharge zonation and hydrostratigraphic layering on base flow distribution. Optimization after removing spatial recharge variability from the calibrated model altered base flow simulations up to 53% in watersheds smaller than 40 km(2). Merging six hydrostratigraphic units into one unit with average properties increased base flow residuals up to 83% in basins smaller than 50 km(2). Base flow residuals changed <5% in watersheds larger than 40 and 50 km(2) when recharge and hydrostratigraphy were simplified, respectively; thus, the critical basin size for the example area is approximately 40 to 50 km(2). Once identified for an area, a critical basin size could be used to guide the scale of future investigations. By ensuring that parameter discretization needed to capture base flow distribution is commensurate with the scope of the investigation, uncertainty caused by overextending uniform parameterization or by estimating extra parameter values is reduced. PMID:16681517

Juckem, Paul F; Hunt, Randall J; Anderson, Mary P

2006-01-01

287

Spatial and temporal infiltration dynamics during managed aquifer recharge.  

PubMed

Natural groundwater recharge is inherently difficult to quantify and predict, largely because it comprises a series of processes that are spatially distributed and temporally variable. Infiltration ponds used for managed aquifer recharge (MAR) provide an opportunity to quantify recharge processes across multiple scales under semi-controlled conditions. We instrumented a 3-ha MAR infiltration pond to measure and compare infiltration patterns determined using whole-pond and point-specific methods. Whole-pond infiltration was determined by closing a transient water budget (accounting for inputs, outputs, and changes in storage), whereas point-specific infiltration rates were determined using heat as a tracer and time series analysis at eight locations in the base of the pond. Whole-pond infiltration, normalized for wetted area, rose rapidly to more than 1.0 m/d at the start of MAR operations (increasing as pond stage rose), was sustained at high rates for the next 40 d, and then decreased to less than 0.1 m/d by the end of the recharge season. Point-specific infiltration rates indicated high spatial and temporal variability, with the mean of measured values generally being lower than rates indicated by whole-pond calculations. Colocated measurements of head gradients within saturated soils below the pond were combined with infiltration rates to calculate soil hydraulic conductivity. Observations indicate a brief period of increasing saturated hydraulic conductivity, followed by a decrease of one to two orders of magnitude during the next 50 to 75 d. Locations indicating the most rapid infiltration shifted laterally during MAR operation, and we suggest that infiltration may function as a "variable source area" processes, conceptually similar to catchment runoff. PMID:22050208

Racz, Andrew J; Fisher, Andrew T; Schmidt, Calla M; Lockwood, Brian S; Los Huertos, Marc

2012-01-01

288

Managed aquifer recharge: rediscovering nature as a leading edge technology.  

PubMed

Use of Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) has rapidly increased in Australia, USA, and Europe in recent years as an efficient means of recycling stormwater or treated sewage effluent for non-potable and indirect potable reuse in urban and rural areas. Yet aquifers have been relied on knowingly for water storage and unwittingly for water treatment for millennia. Hence if 'leading edge' is defined as 'the foremost part of a trend; a vanguard', it would be misleading to claim managed aquifer recharge as a leading edge technology. However it has taken a significant investment in scientific research in recent years to demonstrate the effectiveness of aquifers as sustainable treatment systems to enable managed aquifer recharge to be recognised along side engineered treatment systems in water recycling. It is a 'cross-over' technology that is applicable to water and wastewater treatment and makes use of passive low energy processes to spectacularly reduce the energy requirements for water supply. It is robust within limits, has low cost, is suitable from village to city scale supplies, and offers as yet almost untapped opportunities for producing safe drinking water supplies where they do not yet exist. It will have an increasingly valued role in securing water supplies to sustain cities affected by climate change and population growth. However it is not a universal panacea and relies on the presence of suitable aquifers and sources of water together with effective governance to ensure human health and environment protection and water resources planning and management. This paper describes managed aquifer recharge, illustrates its use in Australia, outlining economics, guidelines and policies, and presents some of the knowledge about aquifer treatment processes that are revealing the latent value of aquifers as urban water infrastructure and provide a driver to improving our understanding of urban hydrogeology. PMID:21076220

Dillon, P; Toze, S; Page, D; Vanderzalm, J; Bekele, E; Sidhu, J; Rinck-Pfeiffer, S

2010-01-01

289

Changes in vegetation diversity caused by artificial recharge  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Efforst to increase the rate of artificial recharge through basins often necessitates scrapping and ditching before and during operations. Such operations can result in more or less drastic changes in vegetation (depending on what was there before), characterized by diminisched numbers of species and lowered diversity. Two examples, one from Texas and one from the Netherlands are presented showing how similar treatments cause similar changes in two completely difference plant communities. ?? 1979 Dr. W. Junk b.v. - Publishers.

Van Hylckama, T. E. A.

1979-01-01

290

Electrochemically Stable Cathode Current Collectors for Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Rechargeable Mg batteries are attractive energy storage systems and could bring cost-effective energy solutions. Currently, however, no practical cathode current collectors that can withstand high voltages in Mg2+ electrolytes has been identified and therefore cathode research is greatly hindered. Here we identified that two metals, Mo and W, are electrochemically stable through formation of surface passive layers. The presented results could have significant impacts on the developments of high voltage Mg batteries.

Cheng, Yingwen; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Shao, Yuyan; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Jun; Li, Guosheng

2014-01-01

291

The MOLICEL(R) rechargeable lithium system: Multicell battery aspects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

MOLICEL rechargeable lithium cells were cycled in batteries using series, parallel, and series/parallel connections. The individual cell voltages and branch currents were measured to understand the cell interactions. The observations were interpreted in terms of the inherent characteristics of the Li/MoS2 system and in terms of a singular cell failure mode. The results confirm that correctly configured multicell batteries using MOLICELs have performance characteristics comparable to those of single cells.

Fouchard, D.; Taylor, J. B.

1987-01-01

292

Estimating areas contributing recharge to wells, lessons from previous studies  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Factors relating to the estimation of areas contributing recharge to wells, such as complexity of the ground-water flow system, effects of changing hydrologic conditions, and effects of well-screen locations and pumping rates, are reviewed. The point of view that simulation is the best means to obtain physically based estimates of contributing areas is emphasized. An extensive list of USGS reports that include estimation of contributing areas is provided.

Franke, O. Lehn; Reilly, T.E.; Pollock, D.W.; LaBaugh, J.W.

1998-01-01

293

Estimating recharge at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A case study  

SciTech Connect

Obtaining values of net infiltration, groundwater travel time, and recharge is necessary at the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada, USA, in order to evaluate the expected performance of a potential repository as a containment system for high-level radioactive waste. However, the geologic complexities of this site, its low precipitation and net infiltration, with numerous mechanisms operating simultaneously to move water through the system, provide many challenges for the estimation of the spatial distribution of recharge. A variety of methods appropriate for arid environments has been applied, including water-balance techniques, calculations using Darcy's law in the unsaturated zone, a soil-physics method applied to neutron-hole water-content data, inverse modeling of thermal profiles in boreholes extending through the thick unsaturated zone, chloride mass balance, atmospheric radionuclides, and empirical approaches. These methods indicate that near-surface infiltration rates at Yucca Mountain are highly variable in time and space, with local (point) values ranging from zero to several hundred millimeters per year. Spatially distributed net-infiltration values average 5 mm/year, with the highest values approaching 20 mm/year near Yucca Crest. Site-scale recharge estimates range from less than 1 to about 12 mm/year. These results have been incorporated into a site-scale model that has been calibrated using these data sets that reflect infiltration processes acting on highly variable temporal and spatial scales. The modeling study predicts highly non-uniform recharge at the water table, distributed significantly differently from the non-uniform infiltration pattern at the surface.

Flint, A.; Flint, L.; Kwicklis, E.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2001-05-13

294

Estimating recharge at yucca mountain, nevada, usa: comparison of methods  

SciTech Connect

Obtaining values of net infiltration, groundwater travel time, and recharge is necessary at the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada, USA, in order to evaluate the expected performance of a potential repository as a containment system for high-level radioactive waste. However, the geologic complexities of this site, its low precipitation and net infiltration, with numerous mechanisms operating simultaneously to move water through the system, provide many challenges for the estimation of the spatial distribution of recharge. A variety of methods appropriate for and environments has been applied, including water-balance techniques, calculations using Darcy's law in the unsaturated zone, a soil-physics method applied to neutron-hole water-content data, inverse modeling of thermal profiles in boreholes extending through the thick unsaturated zone, chloride mass balance, atmospheric radionuclides, and empirical approaches. These methods indicate that near-surface infiltration rates at Yucca Mountain are highly variable in time and space, with local (point) values ranging from zero to several hundred millimeters per year. Spatially distributed net-infiltration values average 5 mm/year, with the highest values approaching 20 nun/year near Yucca Crest. Site-scale recharge estimates range from less than I to about 12 mm/year. These results have been incorporated into a site-scale model that has been calibrated using these data sets that reflect infiltration processes acting on highly variable temporal and spatial scales. The modeling study predicts highly non-uniform recharge at the water table, distributed significantly differently from the non-uniform infiltration pattern at the surface. [References: 57

Flint, A. L.; Flint, L. E.; Kwicklis, E. M.; Fabryka-Martin, J. T.; Bodvarsson, G. S.

2001-11-01

295

Polymer Considerations in Rechargeable Lithium Ion Plastic Batteries  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of polymers have been investigated in order to determine their suitability as ionically conductive binders of the active electrode materials and as hybrid electrolyte matrices in plastic lithium ion rechargeable batteries. Hybrid electrolyte films used in this study have been prepared by solvent casting using a 1:1 w\\/w mixture of the matrix polymer with 1 M LiPF6 in

Antoni S. Gozdz; Jean-Marie Tarascon; Caroline N. Schmutz; Paul Warren; O. S. Gebizlioglu; F. Shokoohi

1995-01-01

296

NiF2 Cathodes For Rechargeable Na Batteries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Use of NiF2 cathodes in medium-to-high-temperature rechargeable sodium batteries increases energy and power densities by 25 to 30 percent without detracting from potential advantage of safety this type of sodium battery offers over sodium batteries having sulfur cathodes. High-energy-density sodium batteries with metal fluoride cathodes used in electric vehicles and for leveling loads on powerlines.

Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Distefano, Salvador; Halpert, Gerald

1992-01-01

297

Evaluation of Recharge Potential at Crater U5a (WISHBONE)  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclides are present both below and above the water table at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), as the result of underground nuclear testing. Mobilization and transport of radionuclides from the vadose zone is a complex process that is influenced by the solubility and sorption characteristics of the individual radionuclides, as well as the soil water flux. On the NTS, subsidence craters resulting from testing underground nuclear weapons are numerous, and many intercept surface water flows. Because craters collect surface water above the sub-surface point of device detonation, these craters may provide a mechanism for surface water to recharge the groundwater aquifer system underlying the NTS. Given this situation, there is a potential for the captured water to introduce contaminants into the groundwater system. Crater U5a (WISHBONE), located in Frenchman Flat, was selected for study because of its potentially large drainage area, and significant erosional features, which suggested that it has captured more runoff than other craters in the Frenchman Flat area. Recharge conditions were studied in subsidence crater U5a by first drilling boreholes and analyzing the collected soil cores to determine the soil properties and moisture conditions. This information, coupled with a 32-year precipitation record, was used to conduct surface and vaodse zone modeling. Surface water modeling predicted that approximately 13 ponding events had occurred during the life of the crater. Vadose zone modeling indicated that since the crater's formation approximately 5,900 m3 of water were captured by the crater. Of this total, approximately 5,200 m3 of potential recahrge may have occurred, and the best estimates of annual average potential recharge rates lie between 36 and 188 cm of water per year. The term potential is used here to indicate that the water is not technically recharged because it has not yet reached the water table.

Richard H. French; Samuel L. Hokett

1998-11-01

298

Estimating recharge at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA: Comparison of methods  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Obtaining values of net infiltration, groundwater travel time, and recharge is necessary at the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada, USA, in order to evaluate the expected performance of a potential repository as a containment system for high-level radioactive waste. However, the geologic complexities of this site, its low precipitation and net infiltration, with numerous mechanisms operating simultaneously to move water through the system, provide many challenges for the estimation of the spatial distribution of recharge. A variety of methods appropriate for arid environments has been applied, including water-balance techniques, calculations using Darcy's law in the unsaturated zone, a soil-physics method applied to neutron-hole water-content data, inverse modeling of thermal profiles in boreholes extending through the thick unsaturated zone, chloride mass balance, atmospheric radionuclides, and empirical approaches. These methods indicate that near-surface infiltration rates at Yucca Mountain are highly variable in time and space, with local (point) values ranging from zero to several hundred millimeters per year. Spatially distributed net-infiltration values average 5 mm/year, with the highest values approaching 20 mm/year near Yucca Crest. Site-scale recharge estimates range from less than 1 to about 12 mm/year. These results have been incorporated into a site-scale model that has been calibrated using these data sets that reflect infiltration processes acting on highly variable temporal and spatial scales. The modeling study predicts highly non-uniform recharge at the water table, distributed significantly differently from the non-uniform infiltration pattern at the surface.

Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.; Kwicklis, E.M.; Fabryka-Martin, J. T.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2002-01-01

299

Estimating recharge at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA: comparison of methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Obtaining values of net infiltration, groundwater travel time, and recharge is necessary at the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada,\\u000a USA, in order to evaluate the expected performance of a potential repository as a containment system for high-level radioactive\\u000a waste. However, the geologic complexities of this site, its low precipitation and net infiltration, with numerous mechanisms\\u000a operating simultaneously to move water

Alan L. Flint; Lorraine E. Flint; Edward M. Kwicklis; June T. Fabryka-Martin; Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson

2002-01-01

300

Molten Air -- A new, highest energy class of rechargeable batteries  

E-print Network

This study introduces the principles of a new class of batteries, rechargeable molten air batteries, and several battery chemistry examples are demonstrated. The new battery class uses a molten electrolyte, are quasi reversible, and have amongst the highest intrinsic battery electric energy storage capacities. Three examples of the new batteries are demonstrated. These are the iron, carbon and VB2 molten air batteries with respective intrinsic volumetric energy capacities of 10,000, 19,000 and 27,000 Wh per liter.

Licht, Stuart

2013-01-01

301

A polyaniline and Nafion ® composite film as a rechargeable battery  

Microsoft Academic Search

The charge-discharge characteristics of polyaniline (PAn)-Nafion®-PAn composite films used as rechargeable batteries were investigated. The batteries were formed chemically by sandwiching Nafion® between two thin layers of PAn-Nafion® composite in equilibrium with various electrolytes. It was found that cells with LiClO4 in propylene carbonate as electrolyte showed the highest capacity. The charge and discharge performance of the battery was almost

N. Li; J. Y. Lee; L. H. Ong

1992-01-01

302

Development efforts in rechargeable batteries for underwater vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

For over two decades the White Oak Laboratory of the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) has been collaborating with the battery industry to develop advanced rechargeable batteries for underwater vehicles. Many underwater vehicles use zinc\\/silver oxide (Zn\\/AgO) batteries to supply the required propulsion power. Although Zn\\/AgO offers the highest energy density (55 watt hours per pound, Wh\\/lb) of any commercial

Patricia H. Smith; Stanley D. James; Peter B. Keller

1996-01-01

303

Estimation of groundwater recharge parameters by time series analysis.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A model is proposed that relates water level fluctuations in a Dupuit aquifer to effective precipitation at the top of the unsaturated zone. Effective precipitation, defined herein as that portion of precipitation which becomes recharge, is related to precipitation measured in a nearby gage by a two-parameter function. A second-order stationary assumption is used to connect the spectra of effective precipitation and water level fluctuations.-from Authors

Naff, R.L.; Gutjahr, A.L.

1983-01-01

304

Natural recharge and localization of fresh ground water in Kuwait  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fresh ground water (200 parts per million total dissolved solids and upwards) occurs in portions of Pleistocene sandstone aquifers beneath basins and wadis in north Kuwait where the mean rainfall is about five inches per year. The fresh water is surrounded and underlain by brackish water (> 4000 ppm TDS). Drilling and testing show that fresh water saturation is restricted to wadis and basin areas; in Rawdatain basin it attains a maximum thickness of about 110 feet and a lateral extent of about seven miles. The fresh ground water represents recharge localized, during infrequent, torrential rain storms, in areas of concentrated runoff where sediments in the vadose zone are moderately permeable and depth to the water table is generally less than a hundred feet. Concentration of runoff appears to be the primary control in the localization of recharge. The fresh water percolates downward to the ground-water reservoir following rare storms, then flows in the direction of hydraulic gradient and gradually becomes brackish. Theoretical delineation of the recharge area and ground-water flow pattern in Rawdatain was confirmed by tritium and C14 dating of the water. Brackish ground-water conditions prevail from water table downward in areas where rainfall infiltrates essentially where it falls, permeability of sediments in the vadose zone is low, or the water table is several hundred feet below land surface. In these areas, rainfall is retained and lost within the soil zone or becomes mineralized during deep percolation. ?? 1964.

Bergstrom, R.E.; Aten, R.E.

1965-01-01

305

A new analytical method for groundwater recharge and discharge estimation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SummaryA new analytical method was proposed for groundwater recharge and discharge estimation in an unconfined aquifer. The method is based on an analytical solution to the Boussinesq equation linearized in terms of h2, where h is the water table elevation, with a time-dependent source term. The solution derived was validated with numerical simulation and was shown to be a better approximation than an existing solution to the Boussinesq equation linearized in terms of h. By calibrating against the observed water levels in a monitoring well during a period of 100 days, we shown that the method proposed in this study can be used to estimate daily recharge (R) and evapotranspiration (ET) as well as the lateral drainage. It was shown that the total R was reasonably estimated with a water-table fluctuation (WTF) method if the water table measurements away from a fixed-head boundary were used, but the total ET was overestimated and the total net recharge was underestimated because of the lack of consideration of lateral drainage and aquifer storage in the WTF method.

Liang, Xiuyu; Zhang, You-Kuan

2012-07-01

306

Preferential eruption of andesitic magmas through recharge filtering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Andesitic volcanic rocks are common in subduction zones and are argued to play an important role in the formation and evolution of the continental crust at convergent margins. Andesite formation is dominated by mixing between iron- and magnesium-rich (mafic) magmas and silica-rich (felsic) magmas. The abundance of andesites in many subduction zones suggests they erupt in preference to the magmas that mix to produce them; however, the reasons for this remain unclear. Here we use textural and geochemical analyses of andesites from Mount Hood, Oregon, to show that eruptions are closely linked with episodes of mafic recharge-the intrusion of mafic magma into a shallow felsic magma reservoir. The felsic and mafic magmas involved rarely erupt by themselves, probably because the former are too viscous and the latter too dense. Mafic recharge overcomes these barriers to eruption, and, as it also promotes efficient mixing, results in preferential eruption of mixed andesitic magmas. The abundance of andesites therefore relates to local crustal conditions and the ability of magmas to erupt. We suggest that volcanoes, such as Mount Hood, that erupt homogeneous andesitic compositions through time are those that are the most reliant on mafic recharge to initiate eruptions.

Kent, Adam J. R.; Darr, Cristina; Koleszar, Alison M.; Salisbury, Morgan J.; Cooper, Kari M.

2010-09-01

307

Aquifer recharge with reclaimed water in the Llobregat Delta. Laboratory batch experiments and field test site.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Summary Spain, as most other Mediterranean countries, faces near future water shortages, generalized pollution and loss of water dependent ecosystems. Aquifer recharge represents a promising option to become a source for indirect potable reuse purposes but presence of pathogens as well as organic and inorganic pollutants should be avoided. To this end, understanding the processes of biogeochemical degradation occurring within the aquifer during infiltration is capital. A set of laboratory batch experiments has been assembled in order to assess the behaviour of selected pesticides, drugs, estrogens, surfactant degradation products, biocides and phthalates under different redox conditions. Data collected during laboratory experiments and monitoring activities at the Sant Vicenç dels Horts test site will be used to build and calibrate a numerical model (i) of the physical-chemical-biochemical processes occurring in the batches and (ii) of multicomponent reactive transport in the unsaturated/saturated zone at the test site. Keywords Aquifer recharge, batch experiments, emerging micropollutants, infiltration, numerical model, reclaimed water, redox conditions, Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT). 1. Introduction In Spain, the Llobregat River and aquifers, which supply water to Barcelona, have been overexploited for years and therefore, suffer from serious damages: the river dries up on summer, riparian vegetation has disappeared and seawater has intruded the aquifer. In a global context, solutions to water stress problems are urgently needed yet must be sustainable, economical and safe. Recent developments of analytical techniques detect the presence of the so-called "emerging" organic micropollutants in water and soils. Such compounds may affect living organisms when occurring in the environment at very low concentrations (microg/l or ng/l). In wastewater and drinking water treatment plants, a remarkable removal of these chemicals from water can be obtained only using advanced and costly treatments. Nevertheless, a number of studies are demonstrating that physical, chemical and biochemical processes associated with water movement within the subsoil represent a natural alternative way to reduce the presence of these contaminants. This processes are called Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT). Aquifer recharge will become a source for indirect potable reuse purposes as long as the presence of pathogens and organic and inorganic pollutants is avoided. To this end, understanding the biogeochemical degradation processes occurring within the aquifer during infiltration is capital. 2. Laboratory batch experiments A set of laboratory batch experiments has been assembled to assess the behaviour of selected pesticides, drugs, estrogens, surfactant degradation products, biocides and phthalates under different redox conditions. The setup of the experiments consists of glass bottles containing 120 g of soil and 240 ml of synthetic water spiked with the mix of micropollutants. A source of easily degradable organic carbon and, depending on the type of test, electron acceptors are added in order to yield aerobic respiration and nitrate/iron/manganese/sulphate reduction conditions. The evolution of the processes is monitored by sacrificing duplicate bottles according to a defined schedule and analysing water for major and minor components as well as for micropollutants. Results from biotic tests are compared with abiotic ones in order to discern biodegradation from other chemical processes. The soil, the synthetic water and the micropollutants selected for the experiments are representative of a test site in the nearby of Barcelona (Spain) where artificial recharge of groundwater through ponds is going to be performed using river water or tertiary effluent from a waste water treatment plant. The results of the experiments improve the knowledge on the behaviour of the selected micropollutants under different redox conditions and provide with useful information on the conditions to develop at the test site during artificial recharge. The data coll

Tobella, J.

2010-05-01

308

Fuel additive for diesel fuels  

SciTech Connect

An anti-wear compression ignition fuel for use in diesel engines comprising (1) a monohydroxy alkanol having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms, and (2) a wear inhibiting amount of a c12 to c30 hydrocarbyl succinic acid or anhydride, E.G. Tetrapropenyl succinic acid. Optionally, said fuel composition may also contain an ignition accelerator such as an organic nitrate. It has recently been disclosed in brazilian patent application no. P17700392 that alcohols, such as methanol and ethanol, can be substituted for conventional petroleum derived diesel fuels for burning in diesel engines, when used in combination with an ignition accelerator, such as ethyl nitrate or nitrite. Reportedly, the addition of alkyl nitrate or nitrite accelerators to the alcohol achieves a level of auto-ignition sufficient to operate in diesel engines. Unfortunately, these fuel compositions , devoid of any petroleum derived products, are notably deficient in lubricity or lubricating properties with the result that engine wear from the use of these fuels in internal combustion reciprocating diesel engines is a serious problem. Of particular concern are wear problems associated with the fuel injector mechanism used in such engines. Wear problems have also been encountered in diesel engines operating on light diesel fuel oils as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,002,437.

Malec, R. E.

1980-12-30

309

Ponds and Rice Fields: The Hydrology and Chemistry of Aquifer Recharge in Bangladesh  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The shallow aquifer in Bangladesh, which provides drinking water for millions and irrigation water for innumerable rice fields, is severely contaminated with naturally occurring arsenic. Water balance calculations show that surface ponds and irrigated rice fields are the primary sources of recharge to this contaminated aquifer. Recharge from an individual rice field is both temporally and spatially heterogeneous, whereas flow from a pond is more constant and uniform through the pond sediments. Rice field recharge is focused through bunds (the berms surrounding the field), and depends on irrigation intervals. Field flow patterns are controlled by cracks and the development of an unsaturated zone. The water chemistry of these two recharge sources is distinctly different. Compared to the rice fields, ponds contribute recharge with a higher organic carbon load and increased concentrations of solutes associated with anoxic microbial respiration. The differences in the recharge behavior and solute loads of these two sources may explain the spatial patterns of groundwater chemistry that control arsenic concentrations.

Neumann, R. B.; Harvey, C. F.

2007-12-01

310

Ground-water recharge through active sand dunes in northwestern Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Most water-resource investigations in semiarid basins of the Great Basin in western North America conclude that ground-water recharge from direct precipitation on the valley floor is negligible. However, many of these basins contain large areas covered by unvegetated, active sand dunes that may act as conduits for ground-water recharge. The potential for this previously undocumented recharge was investigated in an area covered by sand dunes in Desert Valley, northwestern Nevada, using a deep percolation model. The model uses daily measurements of precipitation and temperature to determine energy and moisture balance, from which estimates of long-term mean annual recharge are made. For the study area, the model calculated a mean annual recharge rate of as much as 1.3 inches per year, or 17 percent of the long-term mean precipitation. Model simulations also indicate that recharge would be virtually zero if the study area were covered by vegetation rather than dunes.

Berger, D.L.

1992-01-01

311

Characterizing Field Biodegradation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in Groundwater with Active Reclaimed Water Recharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is an emerging contaminant in groundwater, because of its aqueous miscibility, exceptional animal toxicity, and human carcinogenicity. NDMA detections in groundwater have been tracked to either decomposition of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) used in rocket fuel facilities or chlorine disinfection in wastewater reclamation plants. Laboratory experiments on both unsaturated and saturated soil samples have demonstrated that NDMA can be biodegraded by microbial activity, under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. However, very limited direct evidence for its biodegradation has been found from the field in saturated groundwater. Our research aimed to evaluate photolysis and biodegradation of NDMA occurring along the full travel path - from wastewater reclamation plant effluent, through rivers and spreading grounds, to groundwater. For this evaluation, we established an extensive monitoring network to characterize NDMA concentrations at effluent discharge points, surface water stations, and groundwater monitoring and production wells, during the operation of the Montebello Forebay Groundwater Recharge facilities in Los Angeles County, California. Field monitoring for NDMA has been conducted for more than six years, including 32 months of relatively lower NDMA concentrations in effluent, 43 months of elevated NDMA effluent concentrations, and 7 months with significantly reduced NDMA effluent concentrations. The NDMA effluent concentration increase and significant concentration decrease were caused by changes in treatment processes. The NDMA sampling data imply that significant biodegradation occurred in groundwater, accounting for a 90% mass reduction of NDMA over the six-year monitoring period. In addition, the occurrence of a discrete well monitored effluent release during the study period allowed critical analysis of the fate of NDMA in a well- characterized, localized groundwater flow subsystem. The data indicate that 80% of the recharged NDMA mass was biodegraded in groundwater with the remaining mass pumped out by extraction wells. To reproduce the observation data, a groundwater flow and transport model was developed and calibrated against groundwater elevation and NDMA concentration data. The calibrated half-life of NDMA in groundwater is 69 days, which is consistent with the values obtained through laboratory incubation using soil samples from the Montebello Forebay Spreading Grounds. Given the photolysis of NDMA in surface water and biodegradation in groundwater observed during this study, reclaimed wastewater with limited NDMA concentrations can be safely used for groundwater recharge under the study area conditions.

McCraven, S.; Zhou, Q.; Garcia, J.; Gasca, M.; Johnson, T.

2007-12-01

312

Effects of Microtopographically Concentrated Recharge on Nitrate Variability in a Confined Aquifer: Model Simulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Simulated recharge to a shallow confined aquifer indicates that locally concentrated recharge through microtopographically determined recharge areas (having elevation differences of less than 2 cm) can have a substantial effect on the spatial variability of nitrate-N concentrations [N-NO3] in the upper meter of an aquifer. For an aquifer that is confined and near pressure equilibrium with the watertable, hydraulic mounds

W. M. Schuh; D. L. Klinkebiel

2003-01-01

313

Shallow groundwater recharge mechanism and apparent age in the Ndop plain, northwest Cameroon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Knowledge of groundwater recharge and apparent age constitutes a valuable tool for its sustainable management. Accordingly, shallow groundwater (n = 72) in the Ndop plain has been investigated using the stable isotopes of oxygen (18O) and hydrogen (2H or D) and tritium (3H) to determine the recharge process, timing and rate of recharge, and residence time. The shallow groundwater showed low variability in ?18O values (-2.7 to -4.1 ‰) and 3H content (2.4-3.1 TU). The low variability suggests a similar origin, homogenous aquifer, good water mixing and storage capacity of the groundwater reservoir. Like surface water, a cluster of groundwater along the Ndop Meteoric Water Line (NMWL) and Global Meteoric Water Line indicates meteoric origin/recharge. The rainfall recharge occurs under low relative humidity conditions and negligible evaporation effect. About 80 % of the recharge is from direct heterogeneous/diffuse local precipitation at low altitude (<1,260 m) within the Ndop plain. Approximately 20 % is from high altitude precipitation (localised recharge) or is recharged by the numerous inflowing streams and rivers from high elevations. A homogenous cluster of ?-values in groundwater (and surface water) between May and June monsoon rains on the NMWL suggests dominant recharge during these months. The recharge represents at least 16 % (>251 mm) of the annual rainfall (1,540 mm) indicating high annual recharge; high enough for development of the groundwater resource for agriculture. The 3H content (>2.4 TU) in groundwater indicates post-1952 recharged water with an estimated residence time <30 years, suggesting short subsurface circulation, and subsequently a renewable aquifer.

Wirmvem, Mengnjo Jude; Mimba, Mumbfu Ernestine; Kamtchueng, Brice Tchakam; Wotany, Engome Regina; Bafon, Tasin Godlove; Asaah, Asobo Nkengmatia Elvis; Fantong, Wilson Yetoh; Ayonghe, Samuel Ndonwi; Ohba, Takeshi

2015-02-01

314

Multi-component transport and transformation in deep confined aquifer during groundwater artificial recharge.  

PubMed

Taking an artificial groundwater recharge site in Shanghai, China as an example, this study employed a combination of laboratory experiment and numerical modeling to investigate the transport and transformation of major solutes, as well as the mechanism of associated water-rock interactions in groundwater during artificial groundwater recharge. The results revealed that: (1) Major ions in groundwater were mainly affected by mixing, ion exchanging (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+)), as well as dissolution of Calcite, Dolomite. Dissolution of carbonate minerals was not entirely dependent on the pattern of groundwater recharge, the reactivity of the source water itself as indicated by the sub-saturation with respect to the carbonate minerals is the primary factor. (2) Elemental dissolution of As, Cr and Fe occurred in aquifer was due to the transformation of subsurface environment from anaerobic to aerobic systems. Different to bank filtration recharge or pond recharge, the concentration of Fe near the recharge point was mainly controlled by oxidation dissolution of Siderite, which was followed by a release of As, Cr into groundwater. (3) Field modeling results revealed that the hydro chemical type of groundwater gradually changed from the initial Cl-HCO3-Na type to the Cl-HCO3-Na-Ca type during the recharge process, and its impact radius would reach roughly 800 m in one year. It indicated that the recharge pressure (approx. 0.45 Mpa) would enlarge the impact radius under deep well recharge conditions. According to different recharge modes, longer groundwater resident time will associate with minerals' fully reactions. Although the concentrations of major ions were changing during the artificial recharge process, it did not pose a negative impact on the environmental quality of groundwater. The result of trace elements indicated that controlling the environment factors (especially Eh, DO, flow rate) during the recharge was effective to reduce the potential threats to groundwater quality. PMID:25617875

Zhang, Wenjing; Huan, Ying; Yu, Xipeng; Liu, Dan; Zhou, Jingjing

2015-04-01

315

Using CRD method for quantification of groundwater recharge in the Gaza Strip, Palestine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rainfall is the main source of groundwater recharge in the Gaza Strip area in Palestine. The area is located in the semi-arid\\u000a zone and there is no source of recharge other than rainfall. Estimation of groundwater recharge from rainfall is not an easy\\u000a task since it depends on many uncertain parameters. The cumulative rainfall departure (CRD) method, which depends on

Husam Baalousha

2005-01-01

316

Soil Water Balance and Recharge Monitoring at the Hanford Site - FY09 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Recharge provides the primary driving force for transporting contaminants from the vadose zone to underlying aquifer systems. Quantification of recharge rates is important for assessing contaminant transport and fate and for evaluating remediation alternatives. This report describes the status of soil water balance and recharge monitoring performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at the Hanford Site for Fiscal Year 2009. Previously reported data for Fiscal Years 2004 - 2008 are updated with data collected in Fiscal Year 2009 and summarized.

Rockhold, Mark L.; Saunders, Danielle L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Waichler, Scott R.; Clayton, Ray E.

2009-09-28

317

Estimation of groundwater recharge from water storage structures in a semi-arid climate of India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Groundwater recharge from water storage structures under semi-arid conditions of western India has been estimated by employing water table fluctuation (WTF) and chloride mass balance (CMB) methods. Groundwater recharge was estimated as 7.3% and 9.7% of the annual rainfall by WTF method for the years 2003 and 2004, respectively while the two years average recharge was estimated as 7.5% using

V. N. Sharda; R. S. Kurothe; D. R. Sena; V. C. Pande; S. P. Tiwari

2006-01-01

318

Impacts of climate change on groundwater in Australia: a sensitivity analysis of recharge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Groundwater recharge is a complex process reflecting many interactions between climate, vegetation and soils. Climate change\\u000a will impact upon groundwater recharge but it is not clear which climate variables have the greatest influence over recharge.\\u000a This study used a sensitivity analysis of climate variables using a modified version of WAVES, a soil-vegetation-atmosphere-transfer\\u000a model (unsaturated zone), to determine the importance of

J. L. McCallum; R. S. Crosbie; G. R. Walker; W. R. Dawes

2010-01-01

319

Climatic controls on diffuse groundwater recharge in semiarid environments of the southwestern United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although there is no diffuse groundwater recharge at many semiarid sites, evidence for diffuse recharge exists at some locations where mean annual precipitation $\\\\overline{P}$ is much less than mean annual potential evapotranspiration $\\\\overline{PET}$, particularly where soils are coarse and rainfall variable is substantial. We investigate the climatic controls on diffuse recharge using a one-dimensional, variably saturated flow model. The model

Eric E. Small

2005-01-01

320

Groundwater recharge at five representative sites in the Hebei Plain, China.  

PubMed

Accurate estimates of groundwater recharge are essential for effective management of groundwater, especially when supplies are limited such as in many arid and semiarid areas. In the Hebei Plain, China, water shortage is increasingly restricting socioeconomic development, especially for agriculture, which heavily relies on groundwater. Human activities have greatly changed groundwater recharge there during the past several decades. To obtain better estimates of recharge in the plain, five representative sites were selected to investigate the effects of irrigation and water table depth on groundwater recharge. At each site, a one-dimensional unsaturated flow model (Hydrus-1D) was calibrated using field data of climate, soil moisture, and groundwater levels. A sensitivity analysis of evapotranspirative fluxes and various soil hydraulic parameters confirmed that fine-textured surface soils generally generate less recharge. Model calculations showed that recharge on average is about 175 mm/year in the piedmont plain to the west, and 133 mm/year in both the central alluvial and lacustrine plains and the coastal plain to the east. Temporal and spatial variations in the recharge processes were significant in response to rainfall and irrigation. Peak time-lags between infiltration (rainfall plus irrigation) and recharge were 18 to 35 days in the piedmont plain and 3 to 5 days in the central alluvial and lacustrine plains, but only 1 or 2 days in the coastal plain. This implies that different time-lags corresponding to different water table depths must be considered when estimating or modeling groundwater recharge. PMID:20100294

Lu, Xiaohui; Jin, Menggui; van Genuchten, Martinus Th; Wang, Bingguo

2011-01-01

321

Hydrological functions of sinkholes and characteristics of point recharge in groundwater basins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Karstic limestone aquifers are hydrologically and hydrochemically extremely heterogeneous and point source recharge via sinkholes and fissures is a common feature. We studied three groundwater systems in karstic settings dominated by point source recharge in order to assess the relative contributions to total recharge from point sources using chloride and ?18O relations. Preferential groundwater flows were observed through an inter-connected network of highly conductive zones with groundwater mixing along flow paths. Measurements of salinity and chloride indicated that fresh water pockets exist at point recharge locations. A measurable fresh water plume develops only when a large quantity of surface water enters the aquifer as a point recharge source. The difference in chloride concentrations in diffuse and point recharge zones decreases as aquifer saturated thickness increases and the plumes become diluted through mixing. The chloride concentration in point recharge fluxes crossing the watertable plane can remain at or near surface runoff chloride concentrations, rather than in equilibrium with groundwater chloride. In such circumstances the conventional chloride mass balance method that assumes equilibrium of recharge water chloride with groundwater requires modification to include both point and diffuse recharge mechanisms.

Somaratne, N.; Smettem, K.; Lawson, J.; Nguyen, K.; Frizenschaf, J.

2013-09-01

322

Estimation of groundwater recharge from water storage structures in a semi-arid climate of India  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SummaryGroundwater recharge from water storage structures under semi-arid conditions of western India has been estimated by employing water table fluctuation (WTF) and chloride mass balance (CMB) methods. Groundwater recharge was estimated as 7.3% and 9.7% of the annual rainfall by WTF method for the years 2003 and 2004, respectively while the two years average recharge was estimated as 7.5% using CMB method. A Recharge function depicting the relationship between potential recharge from storage structures and successive day averaged storage depths was better exhibited by a power function. A diagnostic relationship correlating the rainfall to the potential recharge from water storage structures has been developed to explain the characteristics of the storage structures for a given geographical location. The study has revealed that a minimum of 104.3 mm cumulative rainfall is required to generate 1 mm of recharge from the water storage structures. It was also inferred that the storage structures have limited capacity to induce maximum recharge irrespective of the amount of rainfall and maximum recharge to rainfall ratio is achieved at a lower rainfall than the average annual rainfall of the area. An empirical linear relationship was found to reasonably correlate the changes in chloride concentration with water table rise or fall in the study area.

Sharda, V. N.; Kurothe, R. S.; Sena, D. R.; Pande, V. C.; Tiwari, S. P.

2006-09-01

323

A numerical analysis on the applicability of the water level fluctuation method for quantifying groundwater recharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The water table fluctuation(WTF) method is a conventional method for quantifying groundwater recharge by multiplying the specific yield to the water level rise. Based on the van Genuchten model, an analytical relationship between groundwater recharge and the water level rise is derived. The equation is used to analyze the effects of the depth to water level and the soil properties on the recharge estimate using the WTF method. The results show that the WTF method is reliable when applied to the aquifers of the fluvial sand provided the water table is below 1m depth. However, if it is applied to the silt loam having the water table depth ranging 4~10m, the recharge is overestimated by 30~80%, and the error increases drastically as the water table is getting shallower. A 2-D unconfined flow model with a time series of the recharge rate is developed. It is used for elucidating the errors of the WTF method, which is implicitly based on the tank model where the horizontal flow in the saturated zone is ignored. Simulations show that the recharge estimated by the WTF method is underestimated for the observation well near the discharge boundary. This is due to the fact that the hydraulic stress resulting from the recharge is rapidly dissipating by the horizontal flow near the discharge boundary. Simulations also reveal that the recharge is significantly underestimated with increase in the hydraulic conductivity and the recharge duration, and decrease in the specific yield.

Koo, M.; Lee, D.

2002-12-01

324

Modeling spatiotemporal impacts of hydroclimatic extremes on groundwater recharge at a Mediterranean karst aquifer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Karst aquifers provide large parts of the water supply for Mediterranean countries, though climate change is expected to have a significant negative impact on water availability. Recharge is therefore a key variable that has to be known for sustainable groundwater use. In this study, we present a new approach that combines two independent methods for karst recharge estimation. The first method derives spatially distributed information of mean annual recharge patterns through GIS analysis. The second is a process-based karst model that provides spatially lumped but temporally distributed information about recharge. By combining both methods, we add a spatial reference to the lumped simulations of the process-based model. In this way, we are able to provide spatiotemporal information of recharge and subsurface flow dynamics also during varying hydroclimatic conditions. We find that there is a nonlinear relationship between precipitation and recharge rates resulting in strong decreases of recharge following even moderate decreases of precipitation. This is primarily due to almost constant actual evapotranspiration amounts despite varying hydroclimatic conditions. During the driest year in the record, almost the entire precipitation was consumed as actual evapotranspiration and only little diffuse recharge took place at the high altitudes of our study site. During wettest year, recharge constituted a much larger fraction of precipitation and occurred at the entire study site. Our new method and our findings are significant for decision makers in similar regions that want to prepare for possible changes of hydroclimatic conditions in the future.

Hartmann, Andreas; Mudarra, Matías; Andreo, Bartolomé; Marín, Ana; Wagener, Thorsten; Lange, Jens

2014-08-01

325

A generalized estimate of ground-water-recharge rates in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water recharge rates were estimated by analysis of streamflow, precipitation, and basin-characteristics data. Streamflow data were partitioned into ground-water-discharge and surface-water-runoff components. Regression equations relate ground-water discharge to precipitation at each basin. Basin-characteristics and long-term precipitation data were used to aid in the interpolation of recharge characteristics within gaged and ungaged areas. A multiple regression equation was developed to estimate spatial variation of recharge. The generalized estimate provides a consistent method for approximating recharge rates in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan.

Holtschlag, David J.

1997-01-01

326

Use of soil moisture probes to estimate ground water recharge at an oil spill site  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Soil moisture data collected using an automated data logging system were used to estimate ground water recharge at a crude oil spill research site near Bemidji, Minnesota. Three different soil moisture probes were tested in the laboratory as well as the field conditions of limited power supply and extreme weather typical of northern Minnesota: a self-contained reflectometer probe, and two time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes, 30 and 50 cm long. Recharge was estimated using an unsaturated zone water balance method. Recharge estimates for 1999 using the laboratory calibrations were 13 to 30 percent greater than estimates based on the factory calibrations. Recharge indicated by the self-contained probes was 170 percent to 210 percent greater than the estimates for the TDR probes regardless of calibration method. Results indicate that the anomalously large recharge estimates for the self-contained probes are not the result of inaccurate measurements of volumetric moisture content, but result from the presence of crude oil, or bore-hole leakage. Of the probes tested, the 50 cm long TDR probe yielded recharge estimates that compared most favorably to estimates based on a method utilizing water table fluctuations. Recharge rates for this probe represented 24 to 27 percent of 1999 precipitation. Recharge based on the 30 cm long horizontal TDR probes was 29 to 37 percent of 1999 precipitation. By comparison, recharge based on the water table fluctuation method represented about 29 percent of precipitation. (JAWRA) (Copyright ?? 2005).

Delin, G.N.; Herkelrath, W.N.

2005-01-01

327

Use of Soil Moisture Probes to Estimate Ground Water Recharge At an Oil Spill Site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil moisture data collected using an automated data logging system were used to estimate ground water recharge at a crude oil spill research site near Bemidji, Minnesota. Three different soil moisture probes were tested in the laboratory as well as the field conditions of limited power supply and extreme weather typical of northern Minnesota: a self-contained reflectometer probe, and two time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes, 30 and 50 cm long. Recharge was estimated using an unsaturated zone water balance method. Recharge estimates for 1999 using the laboratory calibrations were 13 to 30 percent greater than estimates based on the factory calibrations. Recharge indicated by the self-contained probes was 170 percent to 210 percent greater than the estimates for the TDR probes regardless of calibration method. Results indicate that the anomalously large recharge estimates for the self-contained probes are not the result of inaccurate measurements of volumetric moisture content, but result from the presence of crude oil, or borehole leakage. Of the probes tested, the 50 cm long TDR probe yielded recharge estimates that compared most favorably to estimates based on a method utilizing water table fluctuations. Recharge rates for this probe represented 24 to 27 percent of 1999 precipitation. Recharge based on the 30 cm long horizontal TDR probes was 29 to 37 percent of 1999 precipitation. By comparison, recharge based on the water table fluctuation method represented about 29 percent of precipitation.

Delin, Geoffrey N.; Herkelrath, William N.

2005-12-01

328

Estimated ground-water recharge from streamflow in Fortymile Wash near Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The two purposes of this report are to qualitatively document ground-water recharge from stream-flow in Fortymile Wash during the period 1969--95 from previously unpublished ground-water levels in boreholes in Fortymile Canyon during 1982--91 and 1995, and to quantitatively estimate the long-term ground-water recharge rate from streamflow in Fortymile Wash for four reaches of Fortymile Wash (Fortymile Canyon, upper Jackass Flats, lower Jackass Flats, and Amargosa Desert). The long-term groundwater recharge rate was estimated from estimates of the volume of water available for infiltration, the volume of infiltration losses from streamflow, the ground-water recharge volume from infiltration losses, and an analysis of the different periods of data availability. The volume of water available for infiltration and ground-water recharge in the four reaches was estimated from known streamflow in ephemeral Fortymile Wash, which was measured at several gaging station locations. The volume of infiltration losses from streamflow for the four reaches was estimated from a streamflow volume loss factor applied to the estimated streamflows. the ground-water recharge volume was estimated from a linear relation between infiltration loss volume and ground-water recharge volume for each of the four reaches. Ground-water recharge rates were estimated for three different periods of data availability (1969--95, 1983--95, and 1992--95) and a long-term ground-water recharge rate estimated for each of the four reaches.

Savard, C.S.

1998-10-01

329

Preliminary results of column experiments simulating nutrients transport in artificial recharge by treated wastewater  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nutrients (phosphates, nitrates, nitrites and ammonium) are very often present in treated wastewater as consequence of the inefficient removal capability during wastewater treatments. Such compounds represent an environmental concern since they are responsible for contamination and/or eutrophication problems when reaching the water bodies (groundwater, river, streams…). Therefore, when wastewater reclamation activities such as artificial recharge are planned, special attention should be paid to these compounds to avoid groundwater deterioration. In this context, we proposed the installation of a Horizontal Permeable Reactive Barrier (H-PRB) made of different reactive materials, among them zeolite and palygorskite, to remove nutrients or at least to decrease their concentrations. The overall aim of this research is to evaluate if the application of a H-PRB could represent a feasible solution for the attenuation of nutrients when unconventional water resources (i.e. treated wastewater) are used for recharge activities. Specifically, this study is intended to identify the transport processes affecting nitrates, nitrites, ammonium and phosphates when treated wastewater is infiltrated through the reactive materials of the H-PRB. Column experiments are generally suitable to examine the interactions between reactive materials and treated wastewater that affect the transport behavior of nutrients. For example, processes such as adsorption can be identified and quantified. Thus, laboratory column experiments were carried out using zeolite or palygorskite as column infilling material and synthetic treated wastewater as column influent. The experiments are closely connected to an experimental field study in Carrión de los Céspedes (Seville-Spain) where a pilot H-PRB is currently under evaluation. The columns were operated under saturated conditions applying a constant flow rate of 1.2 mL/min equivalent to the infiltration rate estimated through infiltration experiments at the field site. Wastewater synthesized in the laboratory simulates the secondary effluent used for recharge activities in the Experimental Plant of Carrión de los Céspedes, Experimental results showed that ammonium and phosphates are clearly retarded when infiltrating through both materials (zeolite and palygorskite) as consequence of cation exchange and surface complexation processes. Indeed, after about 14 days from the beginning of the experiments the two compounds do not appear at the column effluent exhibiting a very strong retardation. Concerning nitrites and nitrates, no retardation is observed. Preliminary interpretation of the experimental results by means of the geochemical modeling code PHREEQ-C confirmed and quantified the importance of specific reactive processes affecting transport of nutrients through the applied reactive materials.

Leal, María; Meffe, Raffaella; Lillo, Javier

2013-04-01

330

Representative recharge rates in a complex unsaturated hydrogeology  

SciTech Connect

This study summarizes analyses used for the determination of representative recharge rates in a semi-arid terrain of complex topography for the purpose of modeling the performance assessment of a mesa top disposal facility. Four recharge rates are identified based on different terrains. The terrain is first broadly grouped into canyon bottoms and mesa tops, with each covering about half the topography. The canyon bottoms are considered wet or dry depending on the local infiltration conditions and the influence of mans` activities. The mesa tops are separated into locations which are undisturbed and disturbed by laboratory operations. Disturbed locations at the disposal facility include the disposal pits utilized for shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste, covering approximately half the mesa top area. Several sources of data and analyses have been synthesized to estimate the resulting recharge rates. Data and analyses include: (1) detailed surface water balance calculations with site-specific parameter values as input; (2) chloride ion profiles and analysis of implied flux at several borehole locations; (3) analyses of liquid and vapor phase vertical flux from moisture profiles with stratigraphic unit averaged unsaturated hydrologic properties; (4) comparison of moisture content field data with values implied from Darcy flux calculations for assumed unit gradient conditions and for stratigraphic unit averaged unsaturated hydrologic properties; (5) liquid flux calculated under self-consistent gradients from field observed moisture profiles and analytic determinations of in-situ moisture potential and conductivity at limited locations; (6) distributions in near surface soil moisture contents expressed as an equivalent vertical flux under unit gradient assumptions; and (7) limited comparisons to tracers available from past disposal operations.

Vold, E.; Newman, B.; Birdsell, K. [and others

1997-02-01

331

Artificial recharge through a thick, heterogeneous unsaturated zone  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Thick, heterogeneous unsaturated zones away from large streams in desert areas have not previously been considered suitable for artificial recharge from ponds. To test the potential for recharge in these settings, 1.3 ?? 10 6 m3 of water was infiltrated through a 0.36-ha pond along Oro Grande Wash near Victorville, California, between October 2002 and January 2006. The pond overlies a regional pumping depression 117 m below land surface and is located where thickness and permeability of unsaturated deposits allowed infiltration and saturated alluvial deposits were sufficiently permeable to allow recovery of water. Because large changes in water levels caused by nearby pumping would obscure arrival of water at the water table, downward movement of water was measured using sensors in the unsaturated zone. The downward rate of water movement was initially as high as 6 m/d and decreased with depth to 0.07 m/d; the initial time to reach the water table was 3 years. After the unsaturated zone was wetted, water reached the water table in 1 year. Soluble salts and nitrate moved readily with the infiltrated water, whereas arsenic and chromium were less mobile. Numerical simulations done using the computer program TOUGH2 duplicated the downward rate of water movement, accumulation of water on perched zones, and its arrival at the water table. Assuming 10 ?? 10 6 m3 of recharge annually for 20 years, a regional ground water flow model predicted water level rises of 30 m beneath the ponds, and rises exceeding 3 m in most wells serving the nearby urban area.

Izbicki, J.A.; Flint, A.L.; Stamos, C.L.

2008-01-01

332

Rechargeable battery which combats shape change of the zinc anode  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A rechargeable cell or battery is provided in which shape change of the zinc anode is combatted by profiling the ionic conductivity of the paths between the electrodes. The ion flow is greatest at the edges of the electrodes and least at the centers, thereby reducing migration of the zinc ions from edges to the center of the anode. A number of embodiments are disclosed in which the strength and/or amount of electrolyte, and/or the number and/or size of the paths provided by the separator between the electrodes, are varied to provide the desired ionic conductivity profile.

Cohn, E. M. (inventor)

1976-01-01

333

High pressure water electrolysis for space station EMU recharge  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A high pressure oxygen recharge system (HPORS), is being developed for application on board the Space Station. This electrolytic system can provide oxygen at up to 6000 psia without a mechanical compressor. The Hamilton standard HPORS based on a solid polymer electrolyte system is an extension of the much larger and succesful 3000 psia system of the U.S. Navy. Cell modules have been successfully tested under conditions beyond which spacecraft may encounter during launch. The control system with double redundancy and mechanical backups for all electronically controlled components is designed to ensure a safe shutdown.

Lance, Nick; Puskar, Michael; Moulthrop, Lawrence; Zagaja, John

1988-01-01

334

Downstream of downtown: urban wastewater as groundwater recharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wastewater infiltration is often a major component of overall recharge to aquifers around urban areas, especially in more arid climates. Despite this, such recharge still represents only an incidental (or even accidental) byproduct of various current practices of sewage effluent handling and wastewater reuse. This topic is reviewed through reference to certain areas of detailed field research, with pragmatic approaches being identified to reduce the groundwater pollution hazard of these practices whilst attempting to retain their groundwater resource benefit. Since urban sewage effluent is probably the only `natural resource' whose global availability is steadily increasing, the socioeconomic importance of this topic for rapidly developing urban centres in the more arid parts of Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East will be apparent. L'infiltration des eaux usées est souvent la composante essentielle de toute la recharge des aquifères des zones urbaines, particulièrement sous les climats les plus arides. Malgré cela, une telle recharge ne constitue encore qu'un sous-produit incident, ou même accidentel, de pratiques courantes variées du traitement de rejets d'égouts et de réutilisation d'eaux usées. Ce sujet est passé en revue en se référant à certaines régions étudiées en détail, par des approches pragmatiques reconnues pour permettre de réduire les risques de pollution des nappes dues à ces pratiques tout en permettant d'en tirer profit pour leur ressource en eau souterraine. Puisque les effluents d'égouts urbains sont probablement la seule « ressource naturelle » dont la disponibilité globale va croissant constamment, l'importance socio-économique de ce sujet est évidente pour les centres urbains à développement rapide de l'Asie, de l'Afrique, de l'Amérique latine et du Moyen-Orient. La infiltración de aguas residuales es a menudo un componente principal de la recarga total en acuíferos ubicados en torno a zonas urbanas, especialmente en los climas más áridos. A pesar de ello, dicho componente todavía es una consecuencia secundaria (o incluso accidental) de diversas prácticas asociadas con la manipulación de las aguas residuales y con la reutilitzación de aguas depuradas. Este tema se revisa mediante referencias a ciertas áreas en las que existen investigación detallada de campo, identificando enfoques pragmáticos con el fin de reducir el riesgo de contaminación de las aguas subterráneas por tales prácticas, a la vez tratando de conservar los beneficios para los recursos del acuífero. Dado que los efluentes de aguas residuales urbanas son probablemente la única `fuente natural' cuya disponibilidad global se halla en del aumento, la importancia socioeconómica de este tema será evidente para los centros urbanos de rápido desarrollo en Asia, Latinoamérica y Oriente Medio.

Foster, S. S. D.; Chilton, P. J.

335

RISING beamline (BL28XU) for rechargeable battery analysis  

PubMed Central

The newly installed BL28XU beamline at SPring-8 is dedicated to in situ structural and electronic analysis of rechargeable batteries. It supports the time range (1?ms to 100?s) and spatial range (1?µm to 1?mm) needed for battery analysis. Electrochemical apparatus for battery charging and discharging are available in experimental hutches and in a preparation room. Battery analysis can be carried out efficiently and effectively using X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine-structure analysis and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Here, the design and performance of the beamline are described, and preliminary results are presented. PMID:24365948

Tanida, H.; Fukuda, K.; Murayama, H.; Orikasa, Y.; Arai, H.; Uchimoto, Y.; Matsubara, E.; Uruga, T.; Takeshita, K.; Takahashi, S.; Sano, M.; Aoyagi, H.; Watanabe, A.; Nariyama, N.; Ohashi, H.; Yumoto, H.; Koyama, T.; Senba, Y.; Takeuchi, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Ohata, T.; Matsushita, T.; Ishizawa, Y.; Kudo, T.; Kimura, H.; Yamazaki, H.; Tanaka, T.; Bizen, T.; Seike, T.; Goto, S.; Ohno, H.; Takata, M.; Kitamura, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Ohta, T.; Ogumi, Z.

2014-01-01

336

Rechargeable thin film battery and method for making the same  

DOEpatents

A rechargeable, stackable, thin film, solid-state lithium electrochemical cell, thin film lithium battery and method for making the same is disclosed. The cell and battery provide for a variety configurations, voltage and current capacities. An innovative low temperature ion beam assisted deposition method for fabricating thin film, solid-state anodes, cathodes and electrolytes is disclosed wherein a source of energetic ions and evaporants combine to form thin film cell components having preferred crystallinity, structure and orientation. The disclosed batteries are particularly useful as power sources for portable electronic devices and electric vehicle applications where high energy density, high reversible charge capacity, high discharge current and long battery lifetimes are required.

Goldner, Ronald B.; Liu, Te-Yang; Goldner, Mark A.; Gerouki, Alexandra; Haas, Terry E.

2006-01-03

337

A 65 Ah rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide battery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A rechargeable lithium molybdenum disulfide battery which has a number of superior performance characteristics which includes a high energy density, a high power density, and a long charge retention time was developed. The first cell sizes developed included a C size cell and an AA size cell. Over the last two years, a project to demonstrate the feasibility of the scale up to this technology to a BC size cell with 65 Ah capacity was undertaken. The objective was to develop, build, and test a .6 kWh storage battery consisting of 6 BC cells in series.

Brandt, K.

1986-01-01

338

Cost and energy consumption estimates for the aluminum-air battery anode fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

At the request of DOE's Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a study to generate estimates of the energy use and costs associated with the aluminum anode fuel cycle of the aluminum-air (Al-air) battery. The results of this analysis indicate that the cost and energy consumption characteristics of the mechanically rechargeable Al-air battery system are not as attractive as some other electrically rechargeable electric vehicle battery systems being developed by OESD. However, there are distinct advantages to mechanically rechargeable batteries, which may make the Al-air battery (or other mechanically rechargeable batteries) attractive for other uses, such as stand-alone applications. Fuel cells, such as the proton exchange membrane (PEM), and advanced secondary batteries may be better suited to electric vehicle applications. 26 refs., 3 figs., 25 tabs.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01

339

Using Tracer Tests to Estimate Vertical Recharge and Evaluate Influencing Factors for Irrigated Agricultural Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate estimation of vertical groundwater recharge is critical for (semi) arid regions, especially in places such as the North China Plain where vertical recharge comprises the largest portion of recharge. Tracer tests were used to estimate vertical recharge beneath agricultural systems irrigated by groundwater, and to help delineate factors that influence recharge. Bromide solution was applied to trace infiltration in the vadose zone beneath irrigated agricultural fields (rotated winter wheat and summer maize, orchards, and cotton) and non-irrigated woodlands at both piedmont plain (Shijiazhaung) and alluvial and lacustrine plains (Hengshui) in the North China Plain. The tracer tests lasted for more than two years, and were conducted at a total of 37 sites. Tracer solution was injected into the subsurface at a depth of 1.2 m before the rainy season. Soil samples were then collected periodically to observe bromide transport and estimate recharge rates at the point-scale. For these experiments, the only irrigation the fields received was that applied by the landowners. In addition to these tests, a controlled irrigation experiment was conducted at a single wheat and maize site. The results showed that recharge rates were lower for the alluvial and lacustrine plains sites, which comprise finer-textured soils than those present in the piedmont plain. Specifically, the recharge rate ranged between 56-466 mm/a beneath wheat-maize, 110-564 mm/a beneath orchard, and 0-21 mm/a beneath woodlands with an average recharge coefficient of 0.17 for the piedmont plain sites, while the recharge rate ranged between 26-165 mm/a beneath wheat-maize, 6-40 mm/a beneath orchard, 87-319 mm/a beneath cotton, and 0-32 mm/a beneath woodlands with an average recharge coefficient of 0.10 for the alluvial and lacustrine plain sites. Irrigation provided the primary contribution to recharge, with precipitation providing a minor contribution. The results of both the uncontrolled and controlled irrigation experiments showed that recharge increased as irrigation quantity increased. Overall, recharge was lower for the fields with the rotation cultivation of winter wheat and summer maize compared to the aged apple orchard. In general, the irrigation quantity applied was larger than the requirement of the crops. Thus, managing the irrigation regime to insure that irrigation matches crop requirements would be helpful to better preserve groundwater resources and prevent water-table decline. The recharge rates obtained in this study will be used as input in a mathematical modeling effort designed to simulate the regional groundwater system in the North China Plain.

Lin, D.; Jin, M.; Brusseau, M.; Ma, B.; Liu, Y.

2013-12-01

340

Predicting Groundwater Recharge for the Okanagan Basin: A Little HELP From the Locals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Estimates of groundwater recharge are an essential component in flow models; however, recharge is highly uncertain and difficult to quantify for dry regions. Since flow models are often used in water management planning, acquiring spatially variable recharge estimates at a comparable scale can be challenging. Regional scale recharge estimates must reflect trends of local scale processes to be effective in planning. This study examined how results from a regional recharge model compared to recharge estimated in separate, local scale models from opposing ends of the Okanagan basin, in British Columbia, Canada. At nearly 8000~km2, the north-south trending basin has a climatic gradient with a warmer, wetter climate in the north and hotter, drier conditions in the south. The region has become a popular area for tourism, residence, and agriculture, particularly orchards and vineyards. With surface water sources close to fully allocated, the region is turning to groundwater as a means to support increasing socioeconomic growth. Basin wide (regional) recharge estimates in the valley bottom are a critical step in managing groundwater resources. Regional estimates of recharge were determined with the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) code by establishing common areas of soil texture, water table depth and three other hydrologic parameters. Results from the regional scale were compared with two independently derived, local scale estimates of groundwater recharge. For the south Okanagan, regional estimates were compared with results from a high-resolution integrated HELP and MODFLOW analysis; and in the north Okanagan, regional estimates were compared to results from a study utilizing the Richards equation based MIKE-SHE code. Comparison with these two models, calculated in areas at each end of the climatic gradient, provide confidence in developing a map of regional groundwater recharge. Preliminary results illustrate the applicability of HELP for predicting basin-wide recharge for areas with shallow slope (limited runoff), accurate depth to water table (from a water well database), and detailed descriptions of vadose zone lithology.

Liggett, J. E.; Toews, M. W.; Smerdon, B. D.; Allen, D. M.

2007-12-01

341

Numerical assessment of ASR recharge using small-diameter wells and surface basins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) methods are increasingly used to overcome the temporal imbalance between water demand and availability. Common ASR recharge methods utilize large-diameter injection wells or surface infiltration basins and trenches, and can be costly to implement. A new low-cost ASR recharge method is currently being developed. This approach is based on recharge via gravity in small-diameter wells installed with direct-push (DP) technology. Numerical modeling is used here to assess the potential of this new approach under conditions commonly faced in field settings. The primary objective is to investigate if a battery of small-diameter DP wells can serve as a viable alternative to a surface basin under typical field conditions, while the secondary objective is to assess which subsurface parameters have the greatest control on DP well performance. Simulation results indicate that gravity recharge via small-diameter wells appears to have a distinct advantage over recharge via surface infiltration basins. For example, two 0.05-m shallow vadose-zone wells with 9-m screens can recharge water at a greater rate than a 60 m2 basin. Also, results reveal that, contrary to an infiltration basin, the recharge rate in a DP well has a much stronger dependence on the horizontal component of hydraulic conductivity than on the vertical component. Moreover, near-surface layers of low hydraulic conductivity, which can significantly reduce the recharge capacity of a surface basin, have a relatively small impact on the recharge capacity of a well as long as a significant portion of the well screen is installed below those layers. Given that installation and operation costs can be low in comparison to common ASR recharge methods, this new approach appears to have great potential for recharging good quality water in shallow unconsolidated aquifers. A field investigation has recently been initiated to follow up the findings of this simulation assessment.

Händel, Falk; Liu, Gaisheng; Dietrich, Peter; Liedl, Rudolf; Butler, James J.

2014-09-01

342

Ground truthing groundwater-recharge estimates derived from remotely sensed evapotranspiration: a case in South Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using a water balance to estimate groundwater recharge through the use of remotely sensed evapotranspiration offers a spatial and temporal density of data that other techniques cannot match. However, the estimates are uncertain and therefore ground truthing of the recharge estimates is necessary. This study, conducted in the south-east of South Australia, demonstrated that the raw water-balance estimates of recharge had a negative bias of 45 mm/yr when compared to 190 recharge estimates using the water-table fluctuation method over a 10-year period (2001-2010). As this bias was not related to the magnitude of the recharge estimated using the water-table fluctuation method, a simple offset was used to bias-correct the water-balance recharge estimates. The bias-corrected recharge estimates had a mean residual that was not significantly different from an independent set of 99 historical recharge estimates but did have a large mean absolute residual indicating a lack of precision. The value in this technique is the density of the data (250-m grid over 29,000 km2). The relationship between the water-table depth and net recharge under different vegetation types was investigated. Under pastures, there was no relationship with water-table depth, as the shallow roots do not intercept groundwater. However, under plantation forestry, there was a relationship between net recharge and water-table depth. Net recharge under plantation forestry growing on sandy soils was independent of the water table at around 6 m depth but, under heavier textured soils, the trees were using groundwater from depths of more than 20 m.

Crosbie, Russell S.; Davies, Phil; Harrington, Nikki; Lamontagne, Sebastien

2015-03-01

343

Using 14C and 3H to understand groundwater flow and recharge in an aquifer window  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Knowledge of groundwater residence times and recharge locations are vital to the sustainable management of groundwater resources. Here we investigate groundwater residence times and patterns of recharge in the Gellibrand Valley, southeast Australia, where outcropping aquifer sediments of the Eastern View Formation form an "aquifer window" that may receive diffuse recharge and recharge from the Gellibrand River. To determine recharge patterns and groundwater flowpaths, environmental isotopes (3H, 14C, ?13C, ?18O, ?2H) are used in conjunction with groundwater geochemistry and continuous monitoring of groundwater elevation and electrical conductivity. Despite the water table fluctuating by 0.9-3.7 m annually producing estimated recharge rates of 90 and 372 mm yr-1, residence times of shallow (11-29 m) groundwater determined by 14C ages are between 100 and 10 000 years. 3H activities are negligible in most of the groundwater and groundwater electrical conductivity in individual areas remains constant over the period of study. Although diffuse local recharge is evident, the depth to which it penetrates is limited to the upper 10 m of the aquifer. Rather, groundwater in the Gellibrand Valley predominantly originates from the regional recharge zone, the Barongarook High, and acts as a regional discharge zone where upward head gradients are maintained annually, limiting local recharge. Additionally, the Gellibrand River does not recharge the surrounding groundwater and has limited bank storage. 14C ages and Cl concentrations are well correlated and Cl concentrations may be used to provide a first-order estimate of groundwater residence times. Progressively lower chloride concentrations from 10 000 years BP to the present day are interpreted to indicate an increase in recharge rates on the Barongarook High.

Atkinson, A. P.; Cartwright, I.; Gilfedder, B. S.; Cendón, D. I.; Unland, N. P.; Hofmann, H.

2014-06-01

344

Using 14C and 3H to understand groundwater flow and recharge in an aquifer window  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Knowledge of groundwater residence times and recharge locations is vital to the sustainable management of groundwater resources. Here we investigate groundwater residence times and patterns of recharge in the Gellibrand Valley, southeast Australia, where outcropping aquifer sediments of the Eastern View Formation form an "aquifer window" that may receive diffuse recharge from rainfall and recharge from the Gellibrand River. To determine recharge patterns and groundwater flow paths, environmental isotopes (3H, 14C, ?13C, ?18O, ?2H) are used in conjunction with groundwater geochemistry and continuous monitoring of groundwater elevation and electrical conductivity. The water table fluctuates by 0.9 to 3.7 m annually, implying recharge rates of 90 and 372 mm yr-1. However, residence times of shallow (11 to 29 m) groundwater determined by 14C are between 100 and 10 000 years, 3H activities are negligible in most of the groundwater, and groundwater electrical conductivity remains constant over the period of study. Deeper groundwater with older 14C ages has lower ?18O values than younger, shallower groundwater, which is consistent with it being derived from greater altitudes. The combined geochemistry data indicate that local recharge from precipitation within the valley occurs through the aquifer window, however much of the groundwater in the Gellibrand Valley predominantly originates from the regional recharge zone, the Barongarook High. The Gellibrand Valley is a regional discharge zone with upward head gradients that limits local recharge to the upper 10 m of the aquifer. Additionally, the groundwater head gradients adjacent to the Gellibrand River are generally upwards, implying that it does not recharge the surrounding groundwater and has limited bank storage. 14C ages and Cl concentrations are well correlated and Cl concentrations may be used to provide a first-order estimate of groundwater residence times. Progressively lower chloride concentrations from 10 000 years BP to the present day are interpreted to indicate an increase in recharge rates on the Barongarook High.

Atkinson, A. P.; Cartwright, I.; Gilfedder, B. S.; Cendón, D. I.; Unland, N. P.; Hofmann, H.

2014-12-01

345

Reconnaissance Estimates of Recharge Based on an Elevation-dependent Chloride Mass-balance Approach  

SciTech Connect

Significant uncertainty is associated with efforts to quantity recharge in arid regions such as southern Nevada. However, accurate estimates of groundwater recharge are necessary to understanding the long-term sustainability of groundwater resources and predictions of groundwater flow rates and directions. Currently, the most widely accepted method for estimating recharge in southern Nevada is the Maxey and Eakin method. This method has been applied to most basins within Nevada and has been independently verified as a reconnaissance-level estimate of recharge through several studies. Recharge estimates derived from the Maxey and Eakin and other recharge methodologies ultimately based upon measures or estimates of groundwater discharge (outflow methods) should be augmented by a tracer-based aquifer-response method. The objective of this study was to improve an existing aquifer-response method that was based on the chloride mass-balance approach. Improvements were designed to incorporate spatial variability within recharge areas (rather than recharge as a lumped parameter), develop a more defendable lower limit of recharge, and differentiate local recharge from recharge emanating as interbasin flux. Seventeen springs, located in the Sheep Range, Spring Mountains, and on the Nevada Test Site were sampled during the course of this study and their discharge was measured. The chloride and bromide concentrations of the springs were determined. Discharge and chloride concentrations from these springs were compared to estimates provided by previously published reports. A literature search yielded previously published estimates of chloride flux to the land surface. {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios and discharge rates of the three largest springs in the Amargosa Springs discharge area were compiled from various sources. This information was utilized to determine an effective chloride concentration for recharging precipitation and its associated uncertainty via Monte Carlo simulations. Previously developed isohyetal maps were utilized to determine the mean and standard deviation of precipitation within the area. A digital elevation model was obtained to provide elevation information. A geologic model was obtained to provide the spatial distribution of alluvial formations. Both were used to define the lower limit of recharge. In addition, 40 boreholes located in alluvial sediments were drilled and sampled in an attempt to support the argument that the areal distribution of alluvial sediments can be used to define a zone of negligible recharge. The data were compiled in a geographic information system and used in a Monte Carlo analysis to determine recharge occurring within the study area. Results of the analysis yielded estimates of the mean and standard deviation of recharge occurring within the study area (28.168 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} yr{sup -1} and 7.008 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} yr{sup -1}, and 26.838 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} yr{sup -1} and 6.928 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} yr{sup -1}) for two sets of simulations using alternate definitions of the lower limit of recharge. A sensitivity analysis determined the recharge estimates were most sensitive to uncertainty associated with the chloride concentration of the spring discharge. The second most sensitive parameter was the uncertainty associated with the mean precipitation within the recharge areas. Comparison of the analysis to previously published estimates of recharge revealed mixed results with the recharge estimates derived during the course of this project generally greater relative to previously published estimates.

Charles E. Russell; Tim Minor

2002-08-31

346

Contributing recharge areas, groundwater travel time, and groundwater water quality of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer near the City of Independence, Missouri, well field, 1997-2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The City of Independence, Missouri, operates a well field in the Missouri River alluvial aquifer. Contributing recharge areas (CRA) were last determined for the well field in 1996. Since that time, eight supply wells have been installed in the area north of the Missouri River and well pumpage has changed for the older supply wells. The change in pumping has altered groundwater flow and substantially changed the character of the CRA and groundwater travel times to the supply wells. The U.S Geological Survey, in a cooperative study with the City of Independence, Missouri, simulated steady-state groundwater flow for 2007 well pumpage, average annual river stage, and average annual recharge. Particle-tracking analysis was used to determine the CRA for supply wells and monitoring wells, and the travel time from recharge areas to supply wells, recharge areas to monitoring wells, and monitoring wells to supply wells. The simulated CRA for the well field is elongated in the upstream direction and extends to both sides of the Missouri River. Groundwater flow paths and recharge areas estimated for monitoring wells indicate the origin of water to each monitoring well, the travel time of that water from the recharge area, the flow path from the vicinity of each monitoring well to a supply well, and the travel time from the monitoring well to the supply well. Monitoring wells 14a and 14b have the shortest groundwater travel time from their contributing recharge area of 0.30 years and monitoring well 29a has the longest maximum groundwater travel time from its contributing recharge area of 1,701 years. Monitoring well 22a has the shortest groundwater travel time of 0.5 day to supply well 44 and monitoring well 3b has the longest maximum travel time of 31.91 years to supply well 10. Water-quality samples from the Independence groundwater monitoring well network were collected from 1997 to 2008 by USGS personnel during ongoing annual sampling within the 10-year contributing recharge area (CRA) of the Independence well field. Statistical summaries and the spatial and temporal variability of water quality in the Missouri River alluvial aquifer near the Independence well field were characterized from analyses of 598 water samples. Water-quality constituent groups include dissolved oxygen and physical properties, nutrients, major ions and trace elements, wastewater indicator compounds, fuel compounds, and total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX), alachlor, and atrazine. The Missouri Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) for iron was exceeded in almost all monitoring wells. The Missouri Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for arsenic was exceeded 32 times in samples from monitoring wells. The MCL for barium was exceeded five times in samples from one monitoring well. The SMCL for manganese was exceeded 160 times in samples from all monitoring wells and the combined well-field sample. The most frequently detected wastewater indicator compounds were N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), phenol, caffeine, and metolachlor. The most frequently detected fuel compounds were toluene and benzene. Alachlor was detected in 22 samples and atrazine was detected in 37 samples and the combined well-field sample. The MCL for atrazine was exceeded in one sample from one monitoring well. Samples from monitoring wells with median concentrations of total inorganic nitrogen larger than 1 milligram per liter (mg/L) are located near agricultural land and may indicate that agricultural land practices are the source of nitrogen to groundwater. Largest median values of specific conductance; total inorganic nitrogen; dissolved calcium, magnesium, sodium, iron, arsenic, manganese, bicarbonate, and sulfate and detections of wastewater indicator compounds generally were in water samples from monitoring wells with CRAs that intersect the south bank of the Missouri River. Zones of higher specific conductance were located just upstream from the Independen

Kelly, Brian P.

2011-01-01

347

An assessment of recharge possibility to North-Western Sahara Aquifer System (NWSAS) using environmental isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SummaryA comprehensive understanding of the groundwater dynamics of a transboundary aquifer system is highly needed for any successful transboundary cooperation policy. Moreover, an analysis of the NWSAS can be of particular interest for policy makers and researchers. This paper aims to reveals and to assess the renewability of North-Western Sahara Aquifer System (NWSAS) as one of the major transboundary multi-layered aquifer system, in North Africa, shared by Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya and is often referred to as the Système Aquifère du Sahara Septentrional (SASS). The paper is primarily intended for exploring whether it receives a considerable fraction of modern water as recharge or it is at risk of being depleted and excessively pumped, where the main challenge for NWSAS, is that it should be abstracted rationally for equitable use. Environmental isotopes data of ? 18O, ? 2H, 3H, 14C as well as characteristics of d-excess are used to illustrate whether NSWAS is renewable or non-renewable resource. Geochemical, hydrological and statistical evidences supporting the renewability of NWSAS are provided through pairs of cross-plots. The study has clearly indicated that NWSAS is receiving a considerable fraction of modern water as recharge to the aquifer because of the following reasons: Firstly, the moderately depleted delta values of ? 18O and ? 2H of water from Sahara Atlas in Algeria and the Dahar and the Dj. Nefoussa in Tunisia and Libya with ? 18O content (-6.0‰ to -5.0‰) compared with that of palaeowater (-7.0‰ to -9.0‰) indicate an appreciable fraction of modern water recharging NWSAS. This appreciable fraction of modern water should be attributed to originate from the present-day precipitation (-6.5‰). Secondly, the presence of significant amount of 14C > 2% and 3H > 5 TU, frequently found in data should be attributed to a mixing with shallow and modern water, where old water practically contains no 14C. The foregoing facts are in good agreement with the results of conventional hydrologic approach. This would contradict the assumption that the NWSAS is non-renewable water resource. In this context, the NWSAS is being located in one of the driest regions on the planet; these huge resources have been recognized to be of great importance to the socio-economic development of its riparian countries. So the present paper addresses the necessity of identifying specific cooperation problems which evolve out of these hydro geological attributes and prevalent use patterns. Accordingly, the description of NWSAS as non-renewable, devoid of any meaningful recharge, a rather stagnant water body, disconnected from any surface water body in addition to its classification as "non-renewable" would therefore be misleading and represents one of the most obvious inaccuracy as well.

Al-Gamal, Samir Anwar

2011-02-01

348

Recharge Mechanism to North-Western Sahara Aquifer System (NWSAS) Using Environmental Isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A comprehensive understanding is highly needed for any successful transboundary cooperation policy. Moreover, an analysis of the NWSAS can be of particular interest for policy makers and researchers. This paper aims to reveals and to assess the renewability of North Western Sahara Aquifer System(NWSAS) as one of the major transboundary multi-layered aquifer system, in North Africa, shared by Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya and is often referred to as the Système Aquifère du Sahara Septentrional (SASS).The paper is primarily intended for exploring whether it receives a considerable fraction of modern water as recharge or it is at risk of being depleted and excessively pumped, where the main challenge for NWSAS ,is that it should be abstracted rationally for equitable use. Environmental isotopes data of ?18O, ?2H, 3H ,14C as well as characteristics of d-excess are used to illustrate whether NSWAS is renewable or non-renewable resource.Geochemical, hydrological and statistical evidences supporting the renewability of NWSAS are provided through pairs of cross-plots . The study has clearly indicated that NWSAS is receiving a considerable fraction of modern water as recharge to the aquifer because of the following reasons; Firstly, the moderately depleted delta values of O-18 and H-2 of water from Sahara Atlas in Algeria and the Dahar and the Dj. Nefoussa in Tunisia and Libya with ?18O content (- 6.0‰ to -5.0‰) compared with that of palaeowater (-7.0 to -9.0 ‰) indicate a considerable fraction of modern water recharging NWSAS.This considerable fraction of modern water should be attributed to originate from the present-day precipitation (-6.5‰).Secondly, the presence of significant amount of 14C >2 % and 3H > 5TU., frequently found in data should be attributed to a mixing with shallow and modern water, where old water practically contains no 14C. The foregoing facts are in good agreement with the results of conventional hydrologic approach. This would contradicts the assumption that the NWSAS is non-renewable water resource. In this context, the NWSAS is being located in one of the driest regions on the planet, these huge resources have been recognized to be of great importance to the socio-economic development of its riparian countries. So the present paper addresses the necessity of identifying specific cooperation problems which evolve out of these hydrogeological attributes and prevalent use patterns. Accordingly, the description of NWSAS as non renewable, devoid of any meaningful recharge , a rather stagnant water body, disconnected from any surface water body in addition to its classification as "non-renewable" would therefore be misleading and represents one of the most obvious inaccuracy as well. Keywords stable isotopes of 18O and 2H, unstable isotopes of 14C and 3H.renewal , socio-economic development, Riparian,

Al-Gamal, Samir

2010-05-01

349

Feasibility of groundwater recharge dam projects in arid environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new method for determining feasibility and prioritizing investments for agricultural and domestic recharge dams in arid regions is developed and presented. The method is based on identifying the factors affecting the decision making process and evaluating these factors, followed by determining the indices in a GIS-aided environment. Evaluated parameters include results from field surveys and site visits, land cover and soils data, precipitation data, runoff data and modeling, number of beneficiaries, domestic irrigation demand, reservoir objectives, demography, reservoirs yield and reliability, dam structures, construction costs, and operation and maintenance costs. Results of a case study on more than eighty proposed dams indicate that assessment of reliability, annualized cost/demand satisfied and yield is crucial prior to investment decision making in arid areas. Irrigation demand is the major influencing parameter on yield and reliability of recharge dams, even when only 3 months of the demand were included. Reliability of the proposed reservoirs as related to their standardized size and net inflow was found to increase with increasing yield. High priority dams were less than 4% of the total, and less priority dams amounted to 23%, with the remaining found to be not feasible. The results of this methodology and its application has proved effective in guiding stakeholders for defining most favorable sites for preliminary and detailed design studies and commissioning.

Jaafar, H. H.

2014-05-01

350

Natural water purification and water management by artificial groundwater recharge  

PubMed Central

Worldwide, several regions suffer from water scarcity and contamination. The infiltration and subsurface storage of rain and river water can reduce water stress. Artificial groundwater recharge, possibly combined with bank filtration, plant purification and/or the use of subsurface dams and artificial aquifers, is especially advantageous in areas where layers of gravel and sand exist below the earth’s surface. Artificial infiltration of surface water into the uppermost aquifer has qualitative and quantitative advantages. The contamination of infiltrated river water will be reduced by natural attenuation. Clay minerals, iron hydroxide and humic matter as well as microorganisms located in the subsurface have high decontamination capacities. By this, a final water treatment, if necessary, becomes much easier and cheaper. The quantitative effect concerns the seasonally changing river discharge that influences the possibility of water extraction for drinking water purposes. Such changes can be equalised by seasonally adapted infiltration/extraction of water in/out of the aquifer according to the river discharge and the water need. This method enables a continuous water supply over the whole year. Generally, artificially recharged groundwater is better protected against pollution than surface water, and the delimitation of water protection zones makes it even more save. PMID:18357624

Balke, Klaus-Dieter; Zhu, Yan

2008-01-01

351

Natural water purification and water management by artificial groundwater recharge.  

PubMed

Worldwide, several regions suffer from water scarcity and contamination. The infiltration and subsurface storage of rain and river water can reduce water stress. Artificial groundwater recharge, possibly combined with bank filtration, plant purification and/or the use of subsurface dams and artificial aquifers, is especially advantageous in areas where layers of gravel and sand exist below the earth's surface. Artificial infiltration of surface water into the uppermost aquifer has qualitative and quantitative advantages. The contamination of infiltrated river water will be reduced by natural attenuation. Clay minerals, iron hydroxide and humic matter as well as microorganisms located in the subsurface have high decontamination capacities. By this, a final water treatment, if necessary, becomes much easier and cheaper. The quantitative effect concerns the seasonally changing river discharge that influences the possibility of water extraction for drinking water purposes. Such changes can be equalised by seasonally adapted infiltration/extraction of water in/out of the aquifer according to the river discharge and the water need. This method enables a continuous water supply over the whole year. Generally, artificially recharged groundwater is better protected against pollution than surface water, and the delimitation of water protection zones makes it even more save. PMID:18357624

Balke, Klaus-Dieter; Zhu, Yan

2008-03-01

352

Rechargeable Li/Li(1+x)V308 cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Murphy et al. (1981) and Abraham et al. (1981) have investigated the possibility of a use of transition metal oxides as substitutes of TiS2 in cathodes for rechargeable Li cells, giving particular attention to the V compounds of formula V6O(13+y) with y less than 0.2. The considered materials have greater energy densities than TiS2. However, an important drawback is reported for both V6O13.16 (nonstoichiometric). At 1.6 V a reduction process occurs which inhibits further rechargeability. This phenomenon is probably related to irreversible structure reorganizations connected with the high Li(+) content. In connection with the present investigation, it has been attempted to overcome the considered drawback by using a material, which while retaining the basic electrochemical features of V6O(13+y), would be able to undergo overdischarges without strucural damage. The use of Li(1+x)V308 has been investigated in this connection.

Panero, S.; Pasquali, M.; Pistoia, G.

1983-05-01

353

The Guarani Aquifer System: estimation of recharge along the Uruguay-Brazil border  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cities of Rivera and Santana do Livramento are located on the outcropping area of the sandstone Guarani Aquifer on the Brazil-Uruguay border, where the aquifer is being increasingly exploited. Therefore, recharge estimates are needed to address sustainability. First, a conceptual model of the area was developed. A multilayer, heterogeneous and anisotropic groundwater-flow model was built to validate the conceptual model and to estimate recharge. A field campaign was conducted to collect water samples and monitor water levels used for model calibration. Field data revealed that there exists vertical gradients between confining basalts and underlying sandstones, suggesting basalts could indirectly recharge sandstone in fractured areas. Simulated downward flow between them was a small amount within the global water budget. Calibrated recharge rates over basalts and over outcropping sandstones were 1.3 and 8.1% of mean annual precipitation, respectively. A big portion of sandstone recharge would be drained by streams. The application of a water balance yielded a recharge of 8.5% of average annual precipitation. The numerical model and the water balance yielded similar recharge values consistent with determinations from previous authors in the area and other regions of the aquifer, providing an upper bound for recharge in this transboundary aquifer.

Gómez, Andrea A.; Rodríguez, Leticia B.; Vives, Luis S.

2010-11-01

354

Estimation of groundwater recharge to chalk and sandstone aquifers using simple soil models  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the assumption that the water draining below the root zone is potentially available for groundwater recharge, two current UK methods for estimating annual groundwater recharge have been compared with a new soil model using data from four sites under permanent grass in the UK: two sites representative of the Chalk aquifer at Bridgest Farm (Hampshire) and Fleam Dyke (Cambridgeshire),

R. Ragab; J. Finch; R. Harding

1997-01-01

355

Influence of model conceptualisation on one-dimensional recharge quantification: Uley South, South Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Model conceptualisation is a key source of uncertainty in one-dimensional recharge modelling. The effects of different conceptualisations on transient recharge predictions for the semi-arid Uley South Basin, South Australia, were investigated. One-dimensional unsaturated zone modelling was used to quantify the effect of variations of (1) lithological complexity of the unsaturated zone, and (2) representation of preferential flow pathways. The simulations considered ranges of water-table depths, vegetation characteristics, and top soil thicknesses representative for the study area. Complex lithological profiles were more sensitive to the selected vegetation characteristics and water-table depth. Scenarios considering runoff infiltration into, and preferential flow through sinkholes resulted in higher and faster recharge rates. A comparison of modelled and field-based recharge estimates indicated that: (1) the model simulated plausible recharge rates, (2) only the models with preferential flow correctly reproduced the timing of recharge, and (3) preferential flow is probably redistributed in the unsaturated zone rather than passing to the water table directly. Because different but equally plausible conceptual models produce widely varying recharge rates, field-based recharge estimates are essential to constrain the modelling results.

Ordens, Carlos M.; Post, Vincent E. A.; Werner, Adrian D.; Hutson, John L.

2014-06-01

356

Recharge into Southern High Plains aquifer—possible mechanisms, unresolved questions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The High Plains aquifer in the Southern High Plains (Texas and New Mexico), consisting of Tertiary, Cretaceous, and Triassic formations, has traditionally been considered to be recharged by its uppermost water-bearing unit, the Tertiary Ogallala aquifer. This article provides hydrologic, chemical, and isotopic evidence that in the Southern High Plains: (1) Cretaceous rocks actually contain independent recharge sources; (2) Triassic rocks cannot currently be recharged by the Ogallala aquifer in significant quantities; and (3) in places, both Cretaceous and Triassic aquifers recharge the overlying Ogallala aquifer. On the basis of chemical and isotopic data, playa lakes seem to act as the predominant recharge source of the Ogallala aquifer, suggesting recharge rates greater than 30 mm/yr, as opposed to the much lower rates reported by others. The Cretaceous aquifers are being recharged by cross-formational flow from the Ogallala aquifer but also from overlying Quaternary sands and the underlying Triassic aquifer in eastern New Mexico. Current recharge into the Triassic aquifer may be insignificant.

Nativ, Ronit

1992-01-01

357

EVALUATING UNCERTAINTIES IN GROUND-WATER RECHARGE ESTIMATES THROUGH ADVANCED MONITORING  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Risk, as estimated by many multimedia environmental models, is highly sensitive to infiltration and ground-water recharge. This field study used high-frequency monitoring of vadose-zone water content and piezometric levels to build confidence in modeling of infiltration and ground-water recharge. ...

358

Groundwater-recharge estimation in the Ordos Plateau, China: comparison of methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater recharge is a key factor in water-balance studies, especially in (semi-)arid areas. In this study, multiple methods were used to estimate groundwater recharge in the Ordos Plateau (China), including reference to water-table fluctuation, Darcy's law and the water budget. The mean annual recharge rates found were: water-table-fluctuation method (46-109 mm/yr); saturated-zone Darcian method (17-54 mm/yr); and water-budget method (21-109 mm/yr). Generally, groundwater-recharge rates are higher in the eastern part of the plateau where the land surface is covered by permeable sand that is favorable for infiltration. Along with results from previous studies using the empirical method, the chloride-mass-balance method, the unsaturated-zone Darcian method and the hydrograph-separation method, groundwater recharge rates were compared. There is no one method that would consistently produce the largest or smallest estimate of annual recharge for all groundwater systems. The largest recharge estimates were usually determined using the unsaturated-zone Darcian method and the smallest estimates were usually determined using the chloride-mass-balance method. Comparison of multiple methods is found to be valuable for determining the range of plausible recharge rates and for highlighting the uncertainty of the estimates.

Yin, Lihe; Hu, Guangcheng; Huang, Jinting; Wen, Dongguang; Dong, Jiaqiu; Wang, Xiaoyong; Li, Hongbo

2011-12-01

359

Estimate of recharge from radiocarbon dating of groundwater and numerical flow and transport modeling  

E-print Network

Estimate of recharge from radiocarbon dating of groundwater and numerical flow and transport, Pennsylvania Abstract. This paper combines radiocarbon age and hydraulic data to estimate recharge. In this paper, we use 14 C dating of groundwater from the saturated zone and a linked numerical flow

Polly, David

360

A numerical analysis on the applicability of the water level fluctuation method for quantifying groundwater recharge  

Microsoft Academic Search

The water table fluctuation(WTF) method is a conventional method for quantifying groundwater recharge by multiplying the specific yield to the water level rise. Based on the van Genuchten model, an analytical relationship between groundwater recharge and the water level rise is derived. The equation is used to analyze the effects of the depth to water level and the soil properties

M. Koo; D. Lee

2002-01-01

361

A method of estimating spatio-temporally distributed groundwater recharge using integrated surface-subsurface modelling  

Microsoft Academic Search

In general, there have been various methods of estimating groundwater recharge such as baseflow separation approaches, water budget analyses based on lumped conceptual models, and the water table fluctuation method (WTF) by using data from groundwater monitoring wells. However, groundwater recharge rates show spatial-temporal variability due to climatic conditions, land use, and hydrogeological heterogeneity, so these methods have various limitations

Il Moon Chung; Nam Won Kim; Jeongwoo Lee; Marios Sophocleous

2010-01-01

362

Statistical analysis of hydrographs and water-table fluctuation to estimate groundwater recharge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using water-table monitoring data from the National Groundwater Monitoring Network in Korea, groundwater hydrographs were classified into five typical groups. Then, to estimate groundwater recharge, a modified water-table fluctuation (WTF) method was developed from the relation between the cumulative WTF and corresponding precipitation records. Applying this method to different types of hydrographs, the spatial variability of recharge in river basins

Sang-Ki Moon; Nam C Woo; Kwang S Lee

2004-01-01

363

Climate Change Impact on Groundwater Recharge: A Case Study in Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Climate change may result in variety of climate and streamflow characteristics. These will further induce influences of groundwater recharge. Therefore, this study assessed the impact of climate change on groundwater recharge through evaluating the change of streamflow under different scenarios. Projection of precipitation or temperature impacted by climate change is of great uncertainty, thus three Global Circulation Models (GCMs), i.e.

K. Ke; C. Tung; C. Tan; P. Yu

2008-01-01

364

USING REMOTE SENSING DATA TO MODEL GROUNDWATER RECHARGE POTENTIAL IN KANYE REGION, BOTSWANA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study focuses on the groundwater recharge potential in the upper Limpopo catchment starting from Kanye region in South Botswana. Existing high resolution remote sensing data were used to estimate the spatial distribution of potential recharge and discharge of aquifers in this semi-arid region. 29 NOAA AVHRR images available for Southern and Central Botswana between 1996 and 2000 were analyzed

Haijing Wang; Lesego Kgotlhang; Wolfgang Kinzelbach

365

Optimal Operation of Artificial Groundwater Recharge Systems Considering Water Quality Transformations  

Microsoft Academic Search

In water limited areas as water demand increases alternative sustainable water sources must be identified. One supply augmentation practice, that is already being applied in the arid southwest U.S., is artificial groundwater recharge usingwastewater effluent. The objective of a recharge facility is to supplement the available groundwater resources by storing water for the future. The resulting reclaimed water is used

Muzaffar M. Eusuff; Kevin E. Lansey

2004-01-01

366

Data-Conditioned Distributions of Groundwater Recharge Under Climate Change Scenarios  

Microsoft Academic Search

Groundwater recharge is likely to be impacted by climate change, with changes in precipitation amounts altering moisture availability and changes in temperature affecting evaporative demand. This could have major implications for sustainable aquifer pumping rates and contaminant transport into groundwater reservoirs in the future, thus making predictions of recharge under climate change very important. Unfortunately, in dry environments where groundwater

D. McLaughlin; G. C. Ng; D. Entekhabi; B. Scanlon

2008-01-01

367

Groundwater Recharge Modeling in Azraq Basin (Jordan) Considering the Unsaturated Flow Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water resources in Azraq basin at the northeastern part of Jordan are at critical juncture, due to the continual and excessive abstraction of groundwater accompanied with small amounts of groundwater recharge by precipitation, and high rates of evaporation losses over the entire basin. Groundwater recharge from precipitation over the basin was estimated using soil water balance. It was found that

M. Al Sharif; T. Al Jazzar

2009-01-01

368

Rapid Recharge to Perched-Intermediate Groundwater Zones, Pajarito Plateau, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Los Alamos National Laboratory continuously monitors groundwater levels and surface-water discharge at over 150 locations on the Pajarito Plateau. The resulting data sets were analyzed to help identify locations where surface water and shallow alluvial groundwater (generally <30 ft) recharge deeper perched- intermediate groundwater (approximately 200 to 700 ft bgs) zones. Runoff from snowmelt and summer rainstorms recharges the

K. D. Reid; R. J. Koch; D. Katzman; K. H. Birdsell; D. E. Broxton; V. V. Vesselinov

2008-01-01

369

PROSPECTS FOR ENHANCED GROUNDWATER RECHARGE VIA INFILTRATION OF URBAN STORMWATER RUNOFF: A CASE STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

The rain garden is an urban storm water best management practice that is used to infiltrate runoff close to its source, thereby disconnecting impervious area while providing an avenue for groundwater recharge. Groundwater recharge may provide additional benefits to aquatic ecosys...

370

Estimating recharge through Playa Lakes to the Southern High Plains Aquifer  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In the Southern High Plains of Texas, it is accepted that focused recharge to the High Plains Aquifer (locally known as the Ogallala) occurs through over 20,000 playa lakes, which are local depressions that collect storm runoff. The amount and rate of recharge is not precisely known, and the impact ...

371

A ROOT ZONE MODELLING APPROACH TO ESTIMATING GROUNDWATER RECHARGE FROM IRRIGATED AREAS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In irrigated semi-arid and arid regions, accurate knowledge of groundwater recharge is important for the sustainable management of scarce water resources. The Campo de Cartagena area of southeast Spain is a semi-arid region where irrigation return flow accounts for a substantial portion of recharge....

372

Silicon nanowires as a rechargeable template for hydride transfer in redox biocatalysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a new possible application of hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowires (H-SiNWs) as a rechargeable template for hydride transfer in redox biocatalysis. H-SiNWs transfer hydride efficiently to regenerate NADH by oxidizing Si-Hx bonds. The oxidized H-SiNWs were readily recharged for the continuous regeneration of NADH and enzymatic reactions.

Lee, Hwa Young; Kim, Jae Hong; Son, Eun Jin; Park, Chan Beum

2012-11-01

373

Mode changing stability of wind turbine in an integrated wind turbine and rechargeable battery system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Power generated by wind turbines changes due to variation in wind speed that is independent of the load power. Rechargeable batteries could be used as a reserve power source to alleviate unbalance between the load power and power generated by wind turbines. A supervisory controller is proposed for an integrated wind turbine-battery system (wind turbine electrically connected to a rechargeable

Christine A. Mecklenborg; Dushyant Palejiya; John F. Hall; Dongmei Chen

2011-01-01

374

Ground-water recharge near Santa Fe, north-central New Mexico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recharge to the basin-fill aquifer near Santa Fe, New Mexico, was investigated using chloride mass-balance methods. Chloride concentrations in water in the unsaturated zone indicate no recharge in areas where runoff and flooding do not occur. The mass of chloride stored in the upper part of the unsaturated zone in these areas would take about 6,000 to 8,000 years to accumulate, assuming the present (1989) chloride fluxes. Chloride concen- trations in water in the unsaturated zone beneath arroyo channels indicate that recharge does occur in these areas; chloride concentrations in this recharge water at two sites ranged from 40 to 60 milligrams per liter. Estimates of mountain-front recharge using a chloride balance in drainage basins are about 2,320 acre-feet per year in the Santa Fe River drainage, 690 acre-feet per year in the Rio Tesuque drainage, and 830 acre-feet per year in the Anoyo Hondo drainage. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen indicate that little summer precipitation recharges the ground-water system and that winter precipitation results in most of the recharge water. Most hydrogen and oxygen isotope data for ground water in the area coincide with the local meteoric water line on a graph showing the relation between oxygen and hydrogen in ground water. This indicates that, on the basis of the hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of ground water and precipi- tation, evaporation of recharge water or ground water does not occur.

Anderholm, S.K.

1994-01-01

375

Recharge to the interdune lakes and Holocene climatic changes in the Badain Jaran Desert, western China  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present new estimates on evaporation and groundwater recharge in the Badain Jaran Desert, western Inner Mongolia of northwestern China, based on a modified Penman Equation suitable for lakes in China. Geochemical data and water balance calculations suggest that local rainfall makes a significant contribution to groundwater recharge and that past lake-level variations in this desert environment should reflect palaeoclimatic

Xiaoping Yang; Nina Ma; Jufeng Dong; Bingqi Zhu; Bing Xu; Zhibang Ma; Jiaqi Liu

2010-01-01

376

Fullerenes: non-transition metal clusters as rechargeable magnesium battery cathodes.  

PubMed

We discovered that non-transition metal clusters have great potential as rechargeable Mg battery cathodes. Fullerene (C60), one of the prototype materials, was discharged and recharged with a remarkable rate capability. This unique rate performance is attributed to its capability to delocalize electrons on the entire cluster rather than to individual atoms. PMID:25461490

Zhang, Ruigang; Mizuno, Fuminori; Ling, Chen

2015-01-21

377

DISTRIBUTION OF AREAL RECHARGE TO A DISCRETE FRACTURE NETWORK (FRACNET) MODEL USING THE ANALYTIC ELEMENT METHOD  

EPA Science Inventory

Rain water filtering down through the soil will provide recharge of the saturated fractured rock aquifer. he computer model FRACNET has been designed to distribute areal recharge into linear fracture zones in order to complete the regional water balance. n this presentation, a te...

378

Chemical modifications of groundwater contaminated by recharge of treated sewage effluent  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-term monitoring of the chemical composition of recharge sewage effluent and associated contaminated groundwater from the Dan Region Sewage Reclamation Project shows, after 16 years of recharge operation, the presence of a distinct saline plume (up to 400 mg\\/l Cl), extending 1600 m downgradient in the Coastal Plain aquifer of Israel. The recorded electrolyte composition of groundwater in the vicinity

Avner Vengosh; Rami Keren

1996-01-01

379

Importance of unsaturated zone flow for simulating recharge in a humid climate  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Transient recharge to the water table is often not well understood or quantified. Two approaches for simulating transient recharge in a ground water flow model were investigated using the Trout Lake watershed in north-central Wisconsin: (1) a traditional approach of adding recharge directly to the water table and (2) routing the same volume of water through an unsaturated zone column to the water table. Areas with thin (less than 1 m) unsaturated zones showed little difference in timing of recharge between the two approaches; when water was routed through the unsaturated zone, however, less recharge was delivered to the water table and more discharge occurred to the surface because recharge direction and magnitude changed when the water table rose to the land surface. Areas with a thick (15 to 26 m) unsaturated zone were characterized by multimonth lags between infiltration and recharge, and, in some cases, wetting fronts from precipitation events during the fall overtook and mixed with infiltration from the previous spring snowmelt. Thus, in thicker unsaturated zones, the volume of water infiltrated was properly simulated using the traditional approach, but the timing was different from simulations that included unsaturated zone flow. Routing of rejected recharge and ground water discharge at land surface to surface water features also provided a better simulation of the observed flow regime in a stream at the basin outlet. These results demonstrate that consideration of flow through the unsaturated zone may be important when simulating transient ground water flow in humid climates with shallow water tables.

Hunt, R.J.; Prudic, D.E.; Walker, J.F.; Anderson, M.P.

2008-01-01

380

HYDRUS-1D Modeling of an Irrigated Agricultural Plot with Application to Aquifer Recharge Estimation  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A variety of methods are available for estimating aquifer recharge in semi-arid regions, each with advantages and disadvantages. We are investigating a procedure for estimating recharge in an irrigated basin. The method involves computing irrigation return flows based on HYDRUS-1D modeling of root z...

381

Discrete-storm water-table fluctuation method to estimate episodic recharge.  

PubMed

We have developed a method to identify and quantify recharge episodes, along with their associated infiltration-related inputs, by a consistent, systematic procedure. Our algorithm partitions a time series of water levels into discrete recharge episodes and intervals of no episodic recharge. It correlates each recharge episode with a specific interval of rainfall, so storm characteristics such as intensity and duration can be associated with the amount of recharge that results. To be useful in humid climates, the algorithm evaluates the separability of events, so that those whose recharge cannot be associated with a single storm can be appropriately lumped together. Elements of this method that are subject to subjectivity in the application of hydrologic judgment are values of lag time, fluctuation tolerance, and master recession parameters. Because these are determined once for a given site, they do not contribute subjective influences affecting episode-to-episode comparisons. By centralizing the elements requiring scientific judgment, our method facilitates such comparisons by keeping the most subjective elements openly apparent, making it easy to maintain consistency. If applied to a period of data long enough to include recharge episodes with broadly diverse characteristics, the method has value for predicting how climatic alterations in the distribution of storm intensities and seasonal duration may affect recharge. PMID:24588378

Nimmo, John R; Horowitz, Charles; Mitchell, Lara

2015-03-01

382

USGS Professional Paper 1703--Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States--  

E-print Network

USGS Professional Paper 1703--Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United, streamflow, and water-table eleva- tions, for example--for calibration and performance testing. Calibration provides initial estimates of the rates and distribu- tion of ground-water recharge, and the calibrated

Binley, Andrew

383

Streamflow, Infiltration, and Ground-Water Recharge at Abo Arroyo, New Mexico  

E-print Network

Streamflow, Infiltration, and Ground-Water Recharge at Abo Arroyo, New Mexico USGS Professional Paper 1703--Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States-- Chapter D By Amy-fill sediments and separated from the regional water table by an unsaturated zone that reaches 120 meters thick

384

www.VadoseZoneJournal.org | 6622011, Vol. 10 Groundwater Recharge through  

E-print Network

www.VadoseZoneJournal.org | 6622011, Vol. 10 Groundwater Recharge through Vertisols: Irrigated groundwater recharge, including water quantity and quality. Soil core samples (0­11-m depth) from six similar to recent local groundwater Cl- and significantly lower than pore-water Cl- in deep vadose zones

Scanlon, Bridget R.

385

Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States --  

E-print Network

Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States -- Climatic and Geologic Framework By David A. Stonestrom and James R. Harrill Abstract Ground-water recharge in the arid focused in time and space. Widespread water-table declines accompanied agricultural development during

386

Historical Groundwater Fluctuation in Suffolk, Virginia Simulated Using Effective Monthly Recharge (Wem) Model  

E-print Network

Historical Groundwater Fluctuation in Suffolk, Virginia Simulated Using Effective Monthly Recharge. The Effective Monthly Recharge (Wem) model generates a synthetic hydrograph of water table elevations (Wem) model. We wanted to calibrate the model using a short portion of a long record of groundwater

Darby, Dennis

387

COMPARATIVE LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF ALCALINE CELLS AND NI-MH RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES  

E-print Network

Page 1 COMPARATIVE LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF ALCALINE CELLS AND NI-MH RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES Jean by applying the LCA methodology to evaluate the environmental footprint of alkaline cells and Ni-MH batteries phase. Besides, the emphasis on rechargeable batteries is only justified from an environmental point

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

388

Discrete-storm water-table fluctuation method to estimate episodic recharge.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We have developed a method to identify and quantify recharge episodes, along with their associated infiltration-related inputs, by a consistent, systematic procedure. Our algorithm partitions a time series of water levels into discrete recharge episodes and intervals of no episodic recharge. It correlates each recharge episode with a specific interval of rainfall, so storm characteristics such as intensity and duration can be associated with the amount of recharge that results. To be useful in humid climates, the algorithm evaluates the separability of events, so that those whose recharge cannot be associated with a single storm can be appropriately lumped together. Elements of this method that are subject to subjectivity in the application of hydrologic judgment are values of lag time, fluctuation tolerance, and master recession parameters. Because these are determined once for a given site, they do not contribute subjective influences affecting episode-to-episode comparisons. By centralizing the elements requiring scientific judgment, our method facilitates such comparisons by keeping the most subjective elements openly apparent, making it easy to maintain consistency. If applied to a period of data long enough to include recharge episodes with broadly diverse characteristics, the method has value for predicting how climatic alterations in the distribution of storm intensities and seasonal duration may affect recharge.

Nimmo, John R.; Horowittz, Charles; Mitchell, Lara

2015-01-01

389

Estimation of recharge from irrigation flows; Analysis of field and laboratory data and modeling.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This work is aimed at quantifying aquifer recharge due to irrigation in the Campo de Cartagena (SE Spain). A study of recharge was conducted on an experiment plot cropped in lettuce and irrigated with a drip system. The physico-chemical and hydraulic properties of the vadose zone were characterized ...

390

A root zone modelling approach to estimating groundwater recharge from irrigated areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

summary In irrigated semi-arid and arid regions, accurate knowledge of groundwater recharge is important for the sustainable management of scarce water resources. The Campo de Cartagena area of southeast Spain is a semi-arid region where irrigation return flow accounts for a substantial portion of recharge. In this study we estimated irrigation return flow using a root zone modelling approach in

Jacinto M. Jiménez-Martínez; Todd H. Skaggs

2009-01-01

391

MODIS-Aided Statewide Net Groundwater-Recharge Estimation in Nebraska  

E-print Network

MODIS-Aided Statewide Net Groundwater-Recharge Estimation in Nebraska by Jozsef Szilagyi1-function-transformed groundwater vulnerability DRASTIC-code values. Statewide mean annual net recharge became about 29 mm (i.e., 5 by declining groundwater levels due to large-scale irrigation are found in the south-western region

Szilagyi, Jozsef

392

Hydropedologic Analysis of Ground-Water Recharge at the Field Scale  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Estimating ground-water recharge is an important element in water resources characterization, vulnerability assessment, and utilization. Contaminant sources often occur in the unsaturated zone where ground-water recharge may mobilize it to migrate into a water table aquifer. Cumulative soil water...

393

Climate Impact on Groundwater Recharge in Southeastern Louisiana and Southwestern Mississippi  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Increases of concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases have a significant effect on global climate, precipitation and hydrology, which in turn influences recharge to aquifers. Groundwater recharge study is imperative to the sole source aquifer, for example the Southern Hills aquifer system in southeastern Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi, which provides more than 50 percent of the drinking water consumed in the area overlying the aquifer and has no substitute drinking water source(s). To trace the climate impact and its consequent groundwater availability, this study developed a GIS-based integrated framework to connect climate models to a high-resolution hydrologic model to quantify long-term groundwater recharge. We employed the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP3) model as our hydrologic model to estimate spatial-temporal distribution of potential recharge for a regional scale. HELP3 model was especially suitable for our recharge study due to Louisiana humid climate and the use of a regional-scale water budget approach. Detailed surficial soil property and land cover were obtained from the NRCS and the USGS to derive maps of curve number for the HELP3 model. Wireline well logs and drillers logs were analyzed to determine stratigraphic lithology and the first major sand encountered beneath the soil layer. For a regional scale, we used global circulation model (GCM) downscaled daily precipitation and temperature obtained from USGS CASCaDE Project Climate Data as the forcing input to the HELP3 model. The emission scenarios considered in this study were A2, B1 and A1FI from Parallel Climate Model 1 (PCM) and from the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab's GFDL CM2.1 model. We used the computed runoff from USGS WaterWatch along with the HELP3 model to calculate the recharge index (RI) and delineate the recharge index map for individual hydrologic units in terms of Hydrologic Unit Codes (HUCs). The recharge index was defined as the percentage of precipitation that recharges aquifers. High-resolution recharge index maps were obtained to quantify the spatial impact of climate change on long-term groundwater availability. The framework was applied to the recharge study on the Southern Hills aquifer system overlain by twenty HUCs. The RI map for the Southern Hill aquifer system was obtained based on the computed runoff data from 1951 to 2000 in WaterWatch. Then the HELP3 model was applied to recharge estimation from 2000 to 2050. The results showed the differences in recharge estimation given different climate scenarios. Moreover, the results showed spatial-temporal variation of recharge in the aquifer system due to variations in land use, soil characteristics and predicted meteorological variables.

Beigi, E.; Tsai, F. T.

2012-12-01

394

3/5/2014 Micro-Windmill Technology: Future Uses Include Recharging Your Smartphone | Philippine Latest News http://philsense.com/2014/01/11/micro-windmill-technology-future-uses-include-recharging-your-smartphone/ 1/6  

E-print Network

3/5/2014 Micro-Windmill Technology: Future Uses Include Recharging Your Smartphone | Philippine Latest News http://philsense.com/2014/01/11/micro-windmill-technology-future-uses-include-recharging-your-smartphone Micro-Windmill Technology: Future Uses Include Recharging Your Smartphone Your ads w ill be inserted

Chiao, Jung-Chih

395

3/4/2014 Technologyuses micro-windmills to recharge cell phones http://www.innovationtoronto.com/2014/01/technology-microwindmills-recharge-cell-phones/ 1/4  

E-print Network

3/4/2014 » Technologyuses micro-windmills to recharge cell phones http://www.innovationtoronto.com/2014/01/technology-microwindmills-recharge-cell-phones/ 1/4 INNOVATION & INNOVATION NEEDED: THINGS Inside Your Car Technology uses micro-windmills to recharge cell phones Flat panels with thousand

Chiao, Jung-Chih

396

Groundwater recharge to the Gulf Coast aquifer system in Montgomery and Adjacent Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Simply stated, groundwater recharge is the addition of water to the groundwater system. Most of the water that is potentially available for recharging the groundwater system in Montgomery and adjacent counties in southeast Texas moves relatively rapidly from land surface to surface-water bodies and sustains streamflow, lake levels, and wetlands. Recharge in southeast Texas is generally balanced by evapotranspiration, discharge to surface waters, and the downward movement of water into deeper parts of the groundwater system; however, this balance can be altered locally by groundwater withdrawals, impervious surfaces, land use, precipitation variability, or climate, resulting in increased or decreased rates of recharge. Recharge rates were compared to the 1971–2000 normal annual precipitation measured Cooperative Weather Station 411956, Conroe, Tex.

Oden, Timothy D.; Delin, Geoffrey N.

2013-01-01

397

3H and 14C as tracers of ground-water recharge  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Surface spreading of water from the Santa Clara River is used to recharge aquifers underlying the Oxnard Plain. These aquifers are divided into an upper system about 400 feet thick, and a lower system more than 1,000 feet thick. In previous studies, it has been reported that surface spreading recharged aquifers in both the upper and lower systems. Water from most wells perforated in the upper system has tritium levels consistent with decay-corrected concentrations found in water recharged after 1952 when tritium levels increased as a result of atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons. Water from most wells in the lower system does not contain measurable tritium and must have been recharged prior to 1952. Carbon-14 ages estimated for water from wells in the lower system range from recent to about 25,000 years before present. These data show that the lower system is not effectively recharged by surface spreading.

Izbicki, John A.; Michel, Robert L.; Martin, Peter

1992-01-01

398

Modeling Integrated Cave Drip Recharge Data using DReAM (Daily Recharge Assessment Model) in a Dry Eastern Mediterranean Area, Sif Cave - Israel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding recharge mechanisms and controls in karst regions is extremely important for managing water resources because of the dynamic nature of the system. To better understand this mechanism, a cave in the recharge area of the karstic Western Mountain Aquifer (WMA) of Israel was equipped to measure precipitation infiltration (2006-2008) by collecting integrated water drips from three areas in the cave (14, 46, and 52 m2 areas). Barrels equipped with pressure transducers record drip rate and volume for each of the three areas and enable estimation of recharge. A water budget model - DReAM (Daily Recharge Assessment Model) was used to quantify and predict infiltration behavior at the cave. DReAM includes calculations of all water cycle components - precipitation, evapotranspiration, runoff and recharge. The model was calibrated and validated using two independent sets of values, providing good agreement between calculated and observed data. Modeling results agree with previous studies that show: 1) three distinct flow paths (slow, intermediate, and fast flows) of water infiltrating at the cave; 2) a threshold of ~100 mm rain at the beginning of the rainy season for infiltration to begin; and 3) a decrease in lag time between rain events and infiltration response throughout the rainy season. This modeling tool and analysis approach can translate precipitation to groundwater recharge which will be very important for projecting future water resources in response to climate variability.

Anker, Y.; Sheffer, N. A.; Scanlon, B. R.; Gimburg, A.; Morin, E.

2010-12-01

399

Water-storage change measured with high-precision gravimetry at a groundwater recharge facility in Tucson, USA.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater depletion is a serious problem in many regions around the world. Artificial groundwater recharge is used for the short- and long-term storage of water in subsurface and can be an effective tool to prevent aquifer over-draft. Effective design and management of recharge facilities benefits from knowledge of the subsurface conditions and water-storage properties. In this study we combine different types of gravimeters and coupled hydrogeophysical inverse techniques to monitor subsurface water storage and to estimate subsurface hydraulic properties at the field scale. Water storage dynamics are continuously monitored with two iGrav™ superconducting gravimeters and three gPhones at three infiltration basins of the Tucson Water Southern Avra Valley Storage and Recovery Project facility. These continuous gravity observations are supported by time-lapse monitoring with absolute and spring gravimeters to map spatial gravity variations. Water level is monitored at 16 wells in the vicinity. The results of the first 6-month drying-wetting-drying cycle of the infiltration basins, during which 4,240,500 cubic meters (3,440 acre-feet) infiltrated over 53 days, are presented in this study. Gravity variations up to 170 ?Gal were observed. Collocated measurements show an overall good agreement of the different gravimeters. Distinct spatial variations of gravity change indicate variable water storage dynamics caused by subsurface heterogeneity at the field scale. Multiple gravimeter types combined with coupled inversion allows accurate tracking of subsurface water storage, which can improve the predictions of subsurface conditions and the water resources management of artificial recharge facilities.

Creutzfeldt, B.; Kennedy, J.; Ferre, P. A.

2012-12-01

400

Fuel cells feasibility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technical and economic status of fuel cells is assessed with emphasis on their potential benefits to the Deep Space Network. The fuel cell, what it is, how it operates, and what its outputs are, is reviewed. Major technical problems of the fuel cell and its components are highlighted. Due to these problems and economic considerations it is concluded that fuel cells will not become commercially viable until the early 1990s.

Schonfeld, D.; Charng, T.

1981-01-01

401

Groundwater recharge of carbonate aquifers of the Silesian-Cracow Triassic (southern Poland) under human impact  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Triassic carbonate unit has been intensively drained by zinc and lead ore mines and numerous borehole fields since the nineteenth century. Its groundwater recharge has increased due to: pumping of water from boreholes, mining activity, and urbanization. An approach to determine the amounts of the recharge at a variety of spatial scales is presented in the paper. Different methods were used to identify and quantify recharge components on a regional and local scale: mathematical modelling was performed for four aquifers included in an aquifer system, an analytical estimation based on the assumption that an average recharge is equal to the average discharge of the hydrogeological system—for six man-made drainage centres, and the method of water level fluctuation (WLF) was applied in one observation borehole. Results of modelling have been supplemented by observation of environmental tracers (?18O, ?2H, 3H), noble gases temperatures, and 4Heexc in groundwater. The regional aquifer’s current recharge according to estimations performed by means of modelling varies from 39 to 101 mm/year on average. Depending on the aquifer site the average precipitation ranges from 779 to 864 mm/year. In the confined part of the aquifer average recharge ranges from 26 to 61 mm/year. Within outcrops average recharge varies from 96 to 370 mm/year. Current recharge estimated by the analytical method for man-made drainage centres varies from 158 up to 440 mm/year. High values are caused by different recharge sources like precipitation, induced leakage from shallow aquifers, and water losses from streams, water mains and sewer systems. Pumping of water, mining and municipal activities constitute additional factors accounting for the intensified recharge.

Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Witkowski, Andrzej J.

2008-07-01

402

Temporal and spatial variability of groundwater recharge on Jeju Island, Korea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Estimates of groundwater recharge spatial and temporal variability are essential inputs to groundwater flow models that are used to test groundwater availability under different management and climate conditions. In this study, a soil water balance analysis was conducted to estimate groundwater recharge on the island of Jeju, Korea, for baseline, drought, and climate-land use change scenarios. The Soil Water Balance (SWB) computer code was used to compute groundwater recharge and other water balance components at a daily time step using a 100 m grid cell size for an 18-year baseline scenario (1992-2009). A 10-year drought scenario was selected from historical precipitation trends (1961-2009), while the climate-land use change scenario was developed using late 21st century climate projections and a change in urban land use. Mean annual recharge under the baseline, drought, and climate-land use scenarios was estimated at 884, 591, and 788 mm, respectively. Under the baseline scenario, mean annual recharge was within the range of previous estimates (825-959 mm) and only slightly lower than the mean of 902 mm. As a fraction of mean annual rainfall, mean annual recharge was computed as only 42% and less than previous estimates of 44-48%. The maximum historical reported annual pumping rate of 241 × 106 m3 equates to 15% of baseline recharge, which is within the range of 14-16% computed from earlier studies. The model does not include a mechanism to account for additional sources of groundwater recharge, such as fog drip, irrigation, and artificial recharge, and may also overestimate evapotranspiration losses. Consequently, the results presented in this study represent a conservative estimate of total recharge.

Mair, Alan; Hagedorn, Benjamin; Tillery, Suzanne; El-Kadi, Aly I.; Westenbroek, Stephen; Ha, Kyoochul; Koh, Gi-Won

2013-09-01

403

Quantification of groundwater recharge in a hard rock terrain of Orissa: a case study.  

PubMed

A study was carried out to select the best method to estimate groundwater recharge in a hard rock terrain. Various standard empirical methods, soil-moisture balance method, water table fluctuation (WTF) method and commonly adopted norms set by Groundwater Estimation Committee (GEC), Govt of India were used to estimate recharge for the Munijhara watershed in the Nayagarh block of Orissa (India). The empirical formulae gave recharge rates ranging from 13 cm to 32 cm/year with average of 22.4 cm and standard deviation of 5.34, independent of other influencing factors like soil, topography and geology. The soil-moisture balance study indicated that recharge is more dependent on the continuous heavy rainfall total annual volume of rainfall. Recharge was limited at up to 10 mm per day, possibly due to presence of hard rock below the soil surface. The rise in water table depth was 3.45 m to 5.35 m with a mean rise of 4.5 m during the year 2006-2007. Annual groundwater recharge based on the WTF approach varied from 10.3 to 16.85 cm with a mean of 13.5 cm, standard deviation of 1.57 cm and coefficient of variation 11.57%. This recharge accounted for 8 to 14% of rainfall received. With a water budget approach based on GEC norms, recharge was calculated as 17 cm per year. The study showed that the magnitudes of annual groundwater recharge as estimated by the WST method and GEC norms are in conformity with other recent findings in India under the same climate conditions. Based on the results recharge structures could be planned in suitable locations to reduce fallow areas under the watershed. PMID:19717920

Sethi, Ranu Rani; Kumar, A; Sharma, S P

2009-01-01

404

Comparison of local- to regional-scale estimates of ground-water recharge in Minnesota, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SummaryRegional ground-water recharge estimates for Minnesota were compared to estimates made on the basis of four local- and basin-scale methods. Three local-scale methods (unsaturated-zone water balance, water-table fluctuations (WTF) using three approaches, and age dating of ground water) yielded point estimates of recharge that represent spatial scales from about 1 to about 1000 m 2. A fourth method (RORA, a basin-scale analysis of streamflow records using a recession-curve-displacement technique) yielded recharge estimates at a scale of 10-1000s of km 2. The RORA basin-scale recharge estimates were regionalized to estimate recharge for the entire State of Minnesota on the basis of a regional regression recharge (RRR) model that also incorporated soil and climate data. Recharge rates estimated by the RRR model compared favorably to the local and basin-scale recharge estimates. RRR estimates at study locations were about 41% less on average than the unsaturated-zone water-balance estimates, ranged from 44% greater to 12% less than estimates that were based on the three WTF approaches, were about 4% less than the age dating of ground-water estimates, and were about 5% greater than the RORA estimates. Of the methods used in this study, the WTF method is the simplest and easiest to apply. Recharge estimates made on the basis of the UZWB method were inconsistent with the results from the other methods. Recharge estimates using the RRR model could be a good source of input for regional ground-water flow models; RRR model results currently are being applied for this purpose in USGS studies elsewhere.

Delin, Geoffrey N.; Healy, Richard W.; Lorenz, David L.; Nimmo, John R.

2007-02-01

405

Variations in climate and ephemeral channel recharge in southeastern Arizona, United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

[1] Significant variations in interannual and decadal recharge rates are likely in alluvial basins of the semiarid southwestern United States on the basis of decadal variations in climate and precipitation and correlation of El Nin??o with high rates of winter precipitation and streamflow. A better understanding of the magnitude of recharge variations in semiarid and arid regions would reduce water budget uncertainty. Variability of ephemeral channel recharge with climate in southeastern Arizona was investigated through analysis of hydrologic monitoring near three ephemeral streams in southeastern Arizona during the middle to late 1990s and by relating the results to long-term hydrologic and climatic trends. The analysis used precipitation, streamflow, water levels in wells, estimates of groundwater storage change from repeat gravity surveys, and two climatic indicators of El Nin??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Southern Oscillation index, and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Results indicate that variations in winter recharge are related to ENSO. El Nin??o conditions correspond with a greater probability of high rates of winter precipitation, streamflow, and recharge. La Nin??a conditions are almost exclusively associated with below-average recharge. Rates of recharge along Rillito Creek near Tucson during 1977-1998, a period of frequent El Nin??o conditions and positive PDO values, were 3 times recharge rates during 1941-1957, a period dominated by La Nin??a conditions and low PDO values. Quantification of recharge variability with decadal climate cycles should improve estimates of rates of aquifer drainage and replenishment in the region. Similar methods are applicable to other regions where thick unsaturated zones can accept significant periodic recharge.

Pool, D.R.

2005-01-01

406

Temporal and spatial variability of groundwater recharge on Jeju Island, Korea  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Estimates of groundwater recharge spatial and temporal variability are essential inputs to groundwater flow models that are used to test groundwater availability under different management and climate conditions. In this study, a soil water balance analysis was conducted to estimate groundwater recharge on the island of Jeju, Korea, for baseline, drought, and climate-land use change scenarios. The Soil Water Balance (SWB) computer code was used to compute groundwater recharge and other water balance components at a daily time step using a 100 m grid cell size for an 18-year baseline scenario (1992–2009). A 10-year drought scenario was selected from historical precipitation trends (1961–2009), while the climate-land use change scenario was developed using late 21st century climate projections and a change in urban land use. Mean annual recharge under the baseline, drought, and climate-land use scenarios was estimated at 884, 591, and 788 mm, respectively. Under the baseline scenario, mean annual recharge was within the range of previous estimates (825–959 mm) and only slightly lower than the mean of 902 mm. As a fraction of mean annual rainfall, mean annual recharge was computed as only 42% and less than previous estimates of 44–48%. The maximum historical reported annual pumping rate of 241 × 106 m3 equates to 15% of baseline recharge, which is within the range of 14–16% computed from earlier studies. The model does not include a mechanism to account for additional sources of groundwater recharge, such as fog drip, irrigation, and artificial recharge, and may also overestimate evapotranspiration losses. Consequently, the results presented in this study represent a conservative estimate of total recharge.

Mair, Alan; Hagedorn, Benjamin; Tillery, Suzanne; El-Kadi, Aly I.; Westenbroek, Stephen; Ha, Kyoochul; Koh, Gi-Won

2013-01-01

407

Measurement of groundwater recharge on eastern Long Island, New York, U.S.A.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two methods were tested for their suitability to provide improved estimates of recharge in the region of eastern Long Island. The two methods tested consist, first, of measuring recharge with a direct application of Darcy's law in the vadose zone and, second, of calculating recharge by closure of the hydrologic budget equation with evaporation computed from micrometeorologic data. The recharge figure, now in general use, of 50% of the annual precipitation is a long-term average at best. Our measurements of recharge, which were performed during a three-year period, showed that the vertical flux past the 1 m depth was strongly dependent on both the time of the year and the precipitation amount. In late fall, winter and early spring a high percentage of the precipitation became recharge. During the summer months there was a small net upward movement of water past the 1 m depth. Precipitation during these months did not contribute to the annual recharge. It may be concluded from our measurements that in order to estimate recharge, special attention should be given to precipitation during the winter months. A better estimate for annual recharge than the current 50% of annual precipitation might be to take approximately 75-90% of the precipitation from October 15 until May 15. The two methods used for estimating recharge were labour intensive and required experienced technicians. Currently, one method cannot be recommended above the other. Both methods give a good estimate during the year except for the winter. The closure method using micrometeorological data gives a slightly higher estimate than the direct measurement method based on Darcy's law.

Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Jackson, Craig D.; Kung, Samuel K. J.; Brutsaert, Wilfried

1985-07-01

408

Chloride-mass-balance for predicting increased recharge after land-use change  

SciTech Connect

The chloride-mass-balance (CMB) method has been used extensively to estimate recharge in arid and semi-arid environments. Required data include estimates of annual precipitation, total chloride input (from dry fallout and precipitation), and pore-water chloride concentrations. Typically, CMB has been used to estimate ancient recharge but recharge from recent land-use change has also been documented. Recharge rates below a few mm/yr are reliably detected with CMB; however, estimates above a few mm/yr appear to be less reliable. We tested the CMB method against 26 years of drainage from a 7.6-m-deep lysimeter at a simulated waste-burial ground, located on the Department of Energy s Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA where land-use change has increased recharge rates. Measured drainage from the lysimeter for the past 26 years averaged 62 mm/yr. Precipitation averaged 190 mm/yr with an estimated chloride input of 0.225 mg/L. Initial pore-water chloride concentration was 88 mg/L and decreased to about 6 mg/L after 26 years, while the drainage water decreased to less than 1 mg/L. A recharge estimate made using chloride concentrations in drain water was within 20 percent of the measured drainage rate. In contrast, recharge estimates using 1:1 (water: soil) extracts were lower than actual by factors ranging from 2 to 8 or more. The results suggest that when recharge is above a few mm/yr, soil water extracts can lead to unreliable estimates of recharge. For conditions of elevated recharge, direct sampling of pore water is the preferred method, because chloride concentrations are often 20 to 50 times higher in directly-sampled pore water than in pore-water extracts.

Gee, G.W.; Zhang, Z.F.; Tyler, S.W.; Albright, W.H.; Singleton, M.J.

2004-02-23

409

Sensitivity assessment of simulated evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge across a shallow water region for diverse land cover and soil properties  

Microsoft Academic Search

Climate and land cover changes impact groundwater resources primarily through changes in net surface recharge. Actual evapotranspiration (ET) and the partitioning between runoff and groundwater infiltration govern the change in drainage to the aquifer (recharge supply). We discuss a comprehensive program of in-situ and model based measurement to quantify current and projected changes in recharge within the Oak Ridges Moraine

Anita Simic; Richard Fernandes; Shusen Wang

2004-01-01

410

Temporal and spatial scaling of hydraulic response to recharge in fractured aquifers: Insights from a frequency domain analysis  

E-print Network

Temporal and spatial scaling of hydraulic response to recharge in fractured aquifers: Insights from investigate the hydraulic response to recharge of a fractured aquifer, using a frequency domain approach scaling of hydraulic response to recharge in fractured aquifers: Insights from a frequency domain analysis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

411

Lithologic influences on groundwater recharge through incised glacial till from profile to regional scales: Evidence from glaciated Eastern Nebraska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Variability in sediment hydraulic properties associated with landscape depositional and erosional features can influence groundwater recharge processes by affecting soil-water storage and transmission. This study considers recharge to aquifers underlying river-incised glaciated terrain where the distribution of clay-rich till is largely intact in upland locations but has been removed by alluvial erosion in stream valleys. In a stream-dissected glacial region in eastern Nebraska (Great Plains region of the United States), recharge estimates were developed for nested profile, aquifer, and regional scales using unsaturated zone profile measurements (matric potentials, Cl- and 3H), groundwater tracers (CFC-12 and SF6), and a remote sensing-assisted water balance model. Results show a consistent influence of till lithology on recharge rates across nested spatial scales despite substantial uncertainty in all recharge estimation methods, suggesting that minimal diffuse recharge occurs through upland glacial till lithology whereas diffuse recharge occurs in river valleys where till is locally absent. Diffuse recharge is estimated to account for a maximum of 61% of total recharge based on comparison of diffuse recharge estimated from the unsaturated zone (0-43 mm yr-1) and total recharge estimated from groundwater tracers (median 58 mm yr-1) and water balance modeling (median 56 mm yr-1). The results underscore the importance of lithologic controls on the distributions of both recharge rates and mechanisms.

Gates, John B.; Steele, Gregory V.; Nasta, Paolo; Szilagyi, Jozsef

2014-01-01

412

Use of Constructed Wetlands for Polishing Recharge Wastewater  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of constructed wetlands for waste water treatment is becoming increasingly popular as more focus is being shifted to natural means of waste treatment. These wetlands employ processes that occur naturally and effectively remove pollutants and can greatly minimize costs when compared to full scale treatment plants. Currently, wetland design is based on basic “rules-of-thumb,” meaning engineers have a general understanding but not necessarily a thorough knowledge of the intricate physical, biological, and chemical processes involved in these systems. Furthermore, there is very little consideration given to use the wetland as a recharge pond to allow the treated water to percolate and recharge the local groundwater aquifers. The City of Foley, located in Alabama, and the Utilities Board of the City of Foley partnered with Wolf Bay Watershed Watch to evaluate alternative wastewater effluent disposal schemes. Rather than discharging the treated water into a local stream, a pilot program has been developed to allow water from the treatment process to flow into a constructed wetlands area where, after natural treatment, the treated water will then be allowed to percolate into a local unconfined aquifer. The goal of this study is to evaluate how constructed wetlands can be used for “polishing” effluent as well as how this treated water might be reused. Research has shown that constructed wetlands, with proper design and construction elements, are effective in the treatment of BOD, TSS, nitrogen, phosphorous, pathogens, metals, sulfates, organics, and other substances commonly found in wastewater. Mesocosms will be used to model the wetland, at a much smaller scale, in order to test and collect data about the wetland treatment capabilities. Specific objectives include: 1. Determine optimum flow rates for surface flow wetlands where water treatment is optimized. 2. Evaluate the capabilities of constructed wetlands to remove/reduce common over the counter pharmaceuticals such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen. 3. Evaluate the use of different wetland plants and their treatment characteristics. 4. Evaluate the effectiveness of the wetlands to allow treated to water to recharge local into a local groundwater aquifer.

Cardwell, W.

2009-12-01

413

Zeolite in horizontal permeable reactive barriers for artificial groundwater recharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Spanish Water Reuse Royal Decree 1620/2007 considers groundwater recharge as a feasible use of reclaimed water. To achieve the water quality established in the above-mentioned legislation, a tertiary wastewater treatment is required. In this context, the infiltration of effluents generated by secondary wastewater treatments through a Horizontal Permeable Reactive Barrier (HPRB) may represent a suitable regeneration technology. Some nutrients (phosphate and ammonium) and some Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) are not fully removed in conventional wastewater treatment plants. To avoid groundwater contamination when effluents of wastewater treatments plants are used in artificial recharge activities, these contaminants have to be removed. Due to its sorption capacities, zeolite is among the most used reactive materials in Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB). Therefore, the main goal of this study is to evaluate the zeolite retention effectiveness of nutrients and PPCPs occurring in treated wastewater. Batch sorption experiments using synthetic wastewater (SWW) and zeolite were performed. A 1:4 zeolite/SWW ratio was selected due to the high sorption capacity of the reactive material.The assays were carried out by triplicate. All the bottles containing the SWW-zeolite mixture were placed on a mechanical shaker during 24 hours at 140 rpm and 25 °C. Ammonium and phosphate, as main nutrients, and a group of PPCPs were selected as compounds to be tested during the experiments. Nutrients were analyzed by ion chromatography. For PPCPs determination, Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) was applied before their analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry time of flight (LC-MS/ TOF). The experimental data were fitted to linearized Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations to obtain sorption parameters. In general, Freundlich model shows a greater capability of reproducing experimental data. To our knowledge, sorption of the investigated compounds on zeolite has rarely been addressed and this holds true especially for PPCPs. Therefore, the obtained results will be useful for the design and characterization of those HPRBs in which zeolite will be employed to regenerate treated wastewater for artificial recharge activities.

Leal, María; Martínez-Hernández, Virtudes; Lillo, Javier; Meffe, Raffaella; de Bustamante, Irene

2013-04-01

414

Spatial Variability of Ground-Water Recharge Estimates in the Glassboro Area, New Jersey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spatial variability of ground-water recharge estimates in the Glassboro area, NJ, was evaluated using geostatistical methods as a preliminarily assessment of aquifer vulnerability. Recharge was estimated using Darcy's law, based on parameters obtained from pedotransfer functions applied to measured soil texture values. The recharge estimates correspond to sediments overlying the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer, which comprises highly permeable unconsolidated sands and gravels. Knowing which areas receive greater recharge would indicate areas of greater vulnerability, depending on overlying land use. Recharge varied from -7.3 to 722 in/yr in the study area and the median was 12.1 in/yr. Experimental variograms of untransformed recharge data were erratic and related kriged maps were dominated by extreme values (250-722 in/yr) in the data set. An indicator transform stabilized the variograms. Indicator kriging (IK) reduced the influence of extreme values in the data set and yielded maps showing the probability of exceeding threshold values of recharge in the study area. The probability of exceeding the median recharge rate of 12.1 in/yr was 0.9 in the southern portion of the study area and might represent an area of focused recharge. As a check of model fit, probabilities predicted with IK were compared with the original recharge estimates and found to be strongly related. IK predictions corresponding to quintiles of recharge were used to estimate cumulative distribution functions (cdfs) for specific locations in the study area. The cdfs indicate the probability of exceeding any recharge rate at a particular location, and are shaped differently depending on location in the study area. The IK technique estimates cdfs with a single sampling realization (i.e., without a mean and variance at a given location). Additional variables were analyzed with regression to add a deterministic aspect to the analysis and to improve predictions. These variables included land slope, elevation, and a "wetness index" (the relation between land slope and overland flow contributing to point on the landscape). Regression residuals from a log-linear model were analyzed geostatistically to facilitate kriged predictions that incorporate trend. An overlay of land use with a map showing areas of high recharge indicates areas potentially vulnerable to contamination from chemicals applied to the land surface. However, analysis of chemical data at the water table is necessary to verify the resulting map.

Nolan, B. T.; Baehr, A. L.

2001-12-01

415

Comparing the Energy Content of Batteries, Fuels, and Materials  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A methodology for calculating the theoretical and practical specific energies of rechargeable batteries, fuels, and materials is presented. The methodology enables comparison of the energy content of diverse systems such as the lithium-ion battery, hydrocarbons, and ammonia. The methodology is relevant for evaluating the possibility of using…

Balsara, Nitash P.; Newman, John

2013-01-01

416

Using HDR (Hot Dry Rock) technology to recharge The Geysers  

SciTech Connect

The main reason for the productivity decline at The Geysers geothermal field is obvious: more fluid is being withdrawn from the reservoir than is being returned by reinjection and natural recharge. However, there is another factor that may be contributing to this decline --- the method of reinjection. By reinjecting cold condensate directly into the steam dome as is the current practice, the very large pressure difference between the injected condensate and the underpressured reservoir guarantees that the reinjected fluid will fall rapidly to the bottom of the reservoir, with very little residence time for heat transfer. This point is very important since the vast majority of the heat contained in The Geysers geothermal field is stored in the hot rock comprising the reservoir. 10 refs., 4 figs.

Brown, D.W.; Robinson, B.A.

1990-01-01

417

Layered cathode materials for lithium ion rechargeable batteries  

DOEpatents

A number of materials with the composition Li.sub.1+xNi.sub..alpha.Mn.sub..beta.Co.sub..gamma.M'.sub..delta.O.sub.2-- zF.sub.z (M'=Mg,Zn,Al,Ga,B,Zr,Ti) for use with rechargeable batteries, wherein x is between about 0 and 0.3, .alpha. is between about 0.2 and 0.6, .beta. is between about 0.2 and 0.6, .gamma. is between about 0 and 0.3, .delta. is between about 0 and 0.15, and z is between about 0 and 0.2. Adding the above metal and fluorine dopants affects capacity, impedance, and stability of the layered oxide structure during electrochemical cycling.

Kang, Sun-Ho (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL)

2007-04-17

418

Status of the development of rechargeable lithium cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The progress in the development of the ambient temperature lithium - titanium disulfide rechargeable cell under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is described in this paper. Originally aimed at achieving a specific energy of 100 Wh/kg, 'AA' cells have demonstrated 125 Wh/kg at the C/3 discharge rate. The results of evaluating cell design parameters are discussed and cycling test data are also included in the paper. Safety tests results at various over-charge and over discharge conditions and rates proved to be uneventful. The test results of cell with built-in overcharge mechanism proved the concept was feasible. Replacing the lithium foil electrode with a Li(x)C resulted in a capacity at 1mA/cm(exp 2) of 200 mAh/gm and 235 mAh/gm at 0.167 mA.

Halpert, G.; Surampudi, S.; Shen, D.; Huang, C-K.; Narayanan, S.; Vamos, E.; Perrone, D.

1993-01-01

419

Identifying Recharge from Tropical Cyclonic Storms, Baja California Sur, Mexico.  

PubMed

Groundwater in the Todos Santos watershed in southern Baja California, and throughout the peninsula south of latitude 28°N, has values of (?(18) O‰, ?D‰) ranging between (-8.3, -57) and (-10.9, -78). Such negative values are uncharacteristic of the site latitude near the sea level. Altitude effects do not explain the isotope data. Tropical depressions originating along the Pacific coast of North America yield rain with isotopic depletion; rain from these weather systems in southern Arizona commonly has ?(18) O values?recharge in southern Baja California, where named tropical depressions bring large rains (>50?mm) at least once every 2 to 3 years, and along the Pacific coast between Jalisco and Oaxaca. PMID:24635484

Eastoe, Christopher J; Hess, Greg; Mahieux, Susana

2014-03-17

420

Biologically inspired pteridine redox centres for rechargeable batteries.  

PubMed

The use of biologically occurring redox centres holds a great potential in designing sustainable energy storage systems. Yet, to become practically feasible, it is critical to explore optimization strategies of biological redox compounds, along with in-depth studies regarding their underlying energy storage mechanisms. Here we report a molecular simplification strategy to tailor the redox unit of pteridine derivatives, which are essential components of ubiquitous electron transfer proteins in nature. We first apply pteridine systems of alloxazinic structure in lithium/sodium rechargeable batteries and unveil their reversible tautomerism during energy storage. Through the molecular tailoring, the pteridine electrodes can show outstanding performance, delivering 533?Wh?kg(-1) within 1?h and 348?Wh?kg(-1) within 1?min, as well as high cyclability retaining 96% of the initial capacity after 500 cycles at 10?A?g(-1). Our strategy combined with experimental and theoretical studies suggests guidance for the rational design of organic redox centres. PMID:25359101

Hong, Jihyun; Lee, Minah; Lee, Byungju; Seo, Dong-Hwa; Park, Chan Beum; Kang, Kisuk

2014-01-01

421

Physico-chemical analysis of rechargeable aerospace cells  

SciTech Connect

Rechargeable aerospace batteries such as nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) and nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H{sub 2}) are subjected to a detailed physical and chemical analysis to confirm the suitability of their design, determine whether the manufacturing process is under control, and explain anomalous performance features. The results of a number of cell analyses are presented, including the variation of cadmium precharge, overcharge protection, cadmium migration, swelling, porosity, and active material utilization. The results point to a decrease in positive plate utilization with storage and decrease in negative plate utilization, and overcharge protection, and increase in cadmium migration with cycling for Ni-Cd cells. In the case of Ni-H{sub 2} cells, the positive plate active material utilization tends to be high when the plaque porosity is 75.6 to 78.8%.

Rao, G.M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Vaidyanathan, H.; Robbins, K.M. [COMSAT Labs., Clarksburg, MD (United States)

1996-11-01

422

Biologically inspired pteridine redox centres for rechargeable batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of biologically occurring redox centres holds a great potential in designing sustainable energy storage systems. Yet, to become practically feasible, it is critical to explore optimization strategies of biological redox compounds, along with in-depth studies regarding their underlying energy storage mechanisms. Here we report a molecular simplification strategy to tailor the redox unit of pteridine derivatives, which are essential components of ubiquitous electron transfer proteins in nature. We first apply pteridine systems of alloxazinic structure in lithium/sodium rechargeable batteries and unveil their reversible tautomerism during energy storage. Through the molecular tailoring, the pteridine electrodes can show outstanding performance, delivering 533?Wh?kg?1 within 1?h and 348?Wh?kg?1 within 1?min, as well as high cyclability retaining 96% of the initial capacity after 500 cycles at 10?A?g?1. Our strategy combined with experimental and theoretical studies suggests guidance for the rational design of organic redox centres.

Hong, Jihyun; Lee, Minah; Lee, Byungju; Seo, Dong-Hwa; Park, Chan Beum; Kang, Kisuk

2014-10-01

423

Resilient design of recharging station networks for electric transportation vehicles  

SciTech Connect

As societies shift to 'greener' means of transportation using electricity-driven vehicles one critical challenge we face is the creation of a robust and resilient infrastructure of recharging stations. A particular issue here is the optimal location of service stations. In this work, we consider the placement of battery replacing service station in a city network for which the normal traffic flow is known. For such known traffic flow, the service stations are placed such that the expected performance is maximized without changing the traffic flow. This is done for different scenarios in which roads, road junctions and service stations can fail with a given probability. To account for such failure probabilities, the previously developed facility interception model is extended. Results show that service station failures have a minimal impact on the performance following robust placement while road and road junction failures have larger impacts which are not mitigated easily by robust placement.

Kris Villez; Akshya Gupta; Venkat Venkatasubramanian

2011-08-01

424

Using isotopes for design and monitoring of artificial recharge systems  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Over the past years, the IAEA has provided support to a number of Member States engaged in the implementation of hydrological projects dealing with the design and monitoring of artificial recharge ( A R ) systems, primarily situated in arid and semiarid regions. AR is defined as any engineered system designed to introduce water to, and store water in, underlying aquifers. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is a specific type of AR used with the purpose of increasing groundwater resources. Different water management strategies have been tested under various geographical, hydrological and climatic regimes. However, the success of such schemes cannot easily be predicted, since many variables need to be taken into account in the early stages of every AR project.

Contributors: Hendriksson, N.; Kulongoski, J.T.; Massmann, G.; Newman, B.

2013-01-01

425

Energy-constrained open-system magmatic processes IV: Geochemical, thermal and mass consequences of energy-constrained recharge, assimilation and fractional crystallization (EC-RAFC)  

SciTech Connect

A wealth of geochemical and petrological data provide evidence that the processes of fractional crystallization, assimilation, and magma recharge (replenishment) dominate the chemical signatures of many terrestrial igneous rocks. Previous work [ Spera and Bohrson, 2001 ; Bohrson and Spera, 2001 ] has es