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Sample records for fuel transition core

  1. Transition Core Properties during Conversion of the NBSR from HEU to LEU Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

    2013-10-31

    The transition of the NBSR from HEU to LEU fuel is challenging due to reactivity constraints and the need to maintain an uninterrupted science program, the mission of the NBSR. The transition cannot occur with a full change of HEU to LEU fuel elements since the excess reactivity would be large enough that the NBSR would violate the technical specification for shutdown margin. Manufacturing LEU fuel elements to represent irradiated fuel elements would be cost prohibitive since 26 one-of-a-kind fuel elements would need to be manufactured. For this report a gradual transition from the present HEU fuel to the proposed LEU fuel was studied. The gradual change approach would follow the present fuel management scheme and replace four HEU fuel elements with four LEU fuel elements each cycle. This manuscript reports the results of a series of calculations to predict the neutronic characteristics and how the neutronics will change during the transition from HEU to LEU in the NBSR.

  2. Alternative fuel transit buses

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.

    1996-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory; this project was funded by DOE. One of NREL`s missions is to objectively evaluate the performance, emissions, and operating costs of alternative fuel vehicles so fleet managers can make informed decisions when purchasing them. Alternative fuels have made greater inroads into the transit bus market than into any other. Each year, the American Public Transit Association (APTA) surveys its members on their inventory and buying plans. The latest APTA data show that about 4% of the 50,000 transit buses in its survey run on an alternative fuel. Furthermore, 1 in 5 of the new transit buses that members have on order are alternative fuel buses. This program was designed to comprehensively and objectively evaluate the alternative fuels in use in the industry.

  3. IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT: PWR Core Calculations Using MCRAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PetroviĆ, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT CALCULATIONS * In-Core Fuel Management * Methodological Problems of In-Core Fuel Management * In-Core Fuel Management Analytical Tools * PENN STATE FUEL MANAGEMENT PACKAGE * Penn State Fuel Management Package (PFMP) * Assembly Data Description (ADD) * Linking PSU-LEOPARD and MCRAC: An Example * MULTICYCLE REACTOR ANALYSIS CODE (MCRAC) * Main Features and Options of MCRAC code * Core geometry * Diffusion equations * 1.5-group model * Multicycle neutronic analysis * Multicycle cost analysis * Criticality search * Power-dependent xenon feedback calculations * Control rod and burnable absorber simulation * Search for LP with flat BOC power distribution * Artificial ADD option * Variable dimensioning technique * RBI version of MCRAC code * Programming changes in PC version * Fuel interchange option * MCRAC Input/Output * General input description * Sample input * Sample output * EXPERIENCE WITH MCRAC CODE * CONCLUSIONS * REFERENCES

  4. Mixed core conversion study with HEU and LEU fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mixed core study are presented for gradual replacement of HEU fuel with LEU fuel using the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor as an example. The key parameters show that the transition can be accomplished safely and economically.

  5. Nuclear core and fuel assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Downs, Robert E.

    1981-01-01

    A fast flux nuclear core of a plurality of rodded, open-lattice assemblies having a rod pattern rotated relative to a rod support structure pattern. Elongated fuel rods are oriented on a triangular array and laterally supported by grid structures positioned along the length of the assembly. Initial inter-assembly contact is through strongbacks at the corners of the support pattern and peripheral fuel rods between adjacent assemblies are nested so as to maintain a triangular pitch across a clearance gap between the other portions of adjacent assemblies. The rod pattern is rotated relative to the strongback support pattern by an angle .alpha. equal to sin .sup.-1 (p/2c), where p is the intra-assembly rod pitch and c is the center-to-center spacing among adjacent assemblies.

  6. Transition phase of the whole-core demonstration at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, R.W.; Bretscher, M.M.; Cornella, R.J.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The transition from operation of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor with high-enrichment uranium (HEU) fuel to operation with low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel is nearing completion. The systematics of the replacement of the HEU fuel with the LEU fuel are discussed. The results of the core physics measurements that have been conducted during the transition phase are described.

  7. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOEpatents

    Kantrowitz, M.L.; Rosenstein, R.G.

    1998-10-13

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly. 38 figs.

  8. Mox fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOEpatents

    Kantrowitz, Mark L.; Rosenstein, Richard G.

    2001-05-15

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion. characteristics of the assembly.

  9. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOEpatents

    Kantrowitz, Mark L.; Rosenstein, Richard G.

    1998-01-01

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

  10. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOEpatents

    Kantrowitz, Mark L.; Rosenstein, Richard G.

    2001-07-17

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

  11. Fuels and materials for LMFBR core components

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, C M; Jackson, R J; Straalsund, J L

    1984-04-01

    This paper reviews development of fuels and materials for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor. Included are the status of fuels and materials technology for LMFBR core components. The fuel assembly for the Fast Flux Test Facility, or FFTF, in operation near Richland, Washington, is described. The outer part of the 12-ft long assembly is called a flow channel or duct. Inside are 217 fuel pins, each containing mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel pellets. The comparable schematic for control rod or absorber assembly is also shown. The FFTF absorber assembly contains 61 control rods containing boron carbide pellets. Because FFTF is a test reactor, it does not contain blanket assemblies; however, the Clinch River Breeder Reactor blanket assemblies look very similar to the FFTF fuel assembly, except that they each contain 61 UO/sub 2/ rods. Sizes of various LMFBR fuel assemblies are compared. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor fuel assembly is nearly identical to that of FFTF, except for an increased length to accommodate UO/sub 2/ axial blankets within the fuel pins. The DP-1 design is for a large breeder reactor and uses larger ducts and more fuel pins per assembly. By comparison, the fuel assemblies for EBR-II are much smaller, as is the EBR-II core.

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT AND CORE SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Moore, W.T.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors and in particular to an improved fuel element and a novel reactor core system for facilitating removal of contaminating fission products, as they are fermed, from association with the flssionable fuel, so as to mitigate the interferent effects of such fission products during reactor operation. The fuel elements are comprised of tubular members impervious to fluid and contatning on their interior surfaces a thin layer of fissionable material providing a central void. The core structure is comprised of a plurality of the tubular fuel elements arranged in parallel and a closed manifold connected to their ends. In the reactor the core structure is dispersed in a water moderator and coolant within a pressure vessel, and a means connected to said manifuld is provided for withdrawing and disposing of mobile fission product contamination from the interior of the feel tubes and manifold.

  13. Leading Change: Transitioning to the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Brian

    2012-01-01

    For many school districts in the United States, making the transition to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) is proving to be a challenge at a time when they are already facing many obstacles, not the least of which is dwindling financial resources. A change of this magnitude cannot be made haphazardly; to be successful in its goal of helping…

  14. Alternative fuel transit buses: The Pierce Transit Success Story

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The Pierce transit program for operating mass transit buses on compressed natural gas (CNG) is described. Cost, reliability, fuel efficiency, emission of combustion products, and future trends are discussed.

  15. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, J.P.; Young, J.E.

    1983-10-12

    A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

  16. Solid oxide fuel cell with monolithic core

    DOEpatents

    McPheeters, Charles C.; Mrazek, Franklin C.

    1988-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell in which fuel and oxidant gases undergo an electrochemical reaction to produce an electrical output includes a monolithic core comprised of a corrugated conductive sheet disposed between upper and lower generally flat sheets. The corrugated sheet includes a plurality of spaced, parallel, elongated slots which form a series of closed, linear, first upper and second lower gas flow channels with the upper and lower sheets within which a fuel gas and an oxidant gas respectively flow. Facing ends of the fuel cell are generally V-shaped and provide for fuel and oxidant gas inlet and outlet flow, respectively, and include inlet and outlet gas flow channels which are continuous with the aforementioned upper fuel gas and lower oxidant gas flow channels. The upper and lower flat sheets and the intermediate corrugated sheet are preferably comprised of ceramic materials and are securely coupled together such as by assembly in the green state and sintering together during firing at high temperatures. A potential difference across the fuel cell, or across a stacked array of similar fuel cells, is generated when an oxidant gas such as air and a fuel such as hydrogen gas is directed through the fuel cell at high temperatures, e.g., between 700.degree. C. and 1100.degree. C.

  17. Solid oxide fuel cell with monolithic core

    DOEpatents

    McPheeters, C.C.; Mrazek, F.C.

    1988-08-02

    A solid oxide fuel cell in which fuel and oxidant gases undergo an electrochemical reaction to produce an electrical output includes a monolithic core comprised of a corrugated conductive sheet disposed between upper and lower generally flat sheets. The corrugated sheet includes a plurality of spaced, parallel, elongated slots which form a series of closed, linear, first upper and second lower gas flow channels with the upper and lower sheets within which a fuel gas and an oxidant gas respectively flow. Facing ends of the fuel cell are generally V-shaped and provide for fuel and oxidant gas inlet and outlet flow, respectively, and include inlet and outlet gas flow channels which are continuous with the aforementioned upper fuel gas and lower oxidant gas flow channels. The upper and lower flat sheets and the intermediate corrugated sheet are preferably comprised of ceramic materials and are securely coupled together such as by assembly in the green state and sintering together during firing at high temperatures. A potential difference across the fuel cell, or across a stacked array of similar fuel cells, is generated when an oxidant gas such as air and a fuel such as hydrogen gas is directed through the fuel cell at high temperatures, e.g., between 700 C and 1,100 C. 8 figs.

  18. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, John P.; Young, John E.

    1984-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween, and each interconnect wall consists of thin layers of the cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of interconnect material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002-0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002-0.05 cm thick.

  19. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2008-10-01

    This report provides preliminary results from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluation of a protoptye fuel cell transit bus operating at Connecticut Transit in Hartford. Included are descriptions of the planned fuel cell bus demonstration and equipment; early results and agency experience are also provided.

  20. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2007-03-01

    This report provides an evaluation of three prototype fuel cell-powered transit buses operating at AC Transit in Oakland, California, and six baseline diesel buses similar in design to the fuel cell buses.

  1. Checklist for transition to new highway fuel(s).

    SciTech Connect

    Risch, C.; Santini, D.J.

    2011-12-15

    Transportation is vital to the U.S. economy and society. As such, U.S. Presidents have repeatedly stated that the nation needs to reduce dependence on petroleum, especially for the highway transportation sector. Throughout history, highway transportation fuel transitions have been completed successfully both in United States and abroad. Other attempts have failed, as described in Appendix A: Historical Highway Fuel Transitions. Planning for a transition is critical because the changes can affect our nation's ability to compete in the world market. A transition will take many years to complete. While it is tempting to make quick decisions about the new fuel(s) of choice, it is preferable and necessary to analyze all the pertinent criteria to ensure that correct decisions are made. Doing so will reduce the number of changes in highway fuel(s). Obviously, changes may become necessary because of occurrences such as significant technology breakthroughs or major world events. With any and all of the possible transitions to new fuel(s), the total replacement of gasoline and diesel fuels is not expected. These conventional fuels are envisioned to coexist with the new fuel(s) for decades, while the revised fuel and vehicle infrastructures are implemented. The transition process must analyze the needs of the primary 'players,' which consist of the customers, the government, the fuel industry, and the automotive industry. To maximize the probability of future successes, the prime considerations of these groups must be addressed. Section 2 presents a succinct outline of the Checklist. Section 3 provides a brief discussion about the groupings on the Checklist.

  2. Fuel Breeding and Core Behavior Analyses on In Core Fuel Management of Water Cooled Thorium Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Sidik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Waris, Abdul; Subhki, Muhamad Nurul; Ismail,

    2010-12-23

    Thorium fuel cycle with recycled U-233 has been widely recognized having some contributions to improve the water-cooled breeder reactor program which has been shown by a feasible area of breeding and negative void reactivity which confirms that fissile of 233U contributes to better fuel breeding and effective for obtaining negative void reactivity coefficient as the main fissile material. The present study has the objective to estimate the effect of whole core configuration as well as burnup effects to the reactor core profile by adopting two dimensional model of fuel core management. About more than 40 months of cycle period has been employed for one cycle fuel irradiation of three batches fuel system for large water cooled thorium reactors. All position of fuel arrangement contributes to the total core conversion ratio which gives conversion ratio less than unity of at the BOC and it contributes to higher than unity (1.01) at the EOC after some irradiation process. Inner part and central part give the important part of breeding contribution with increasing burnup process, while criticality is reduced with increasing the irradiation time. Feasibility of breeding capability of water-cooled thorium reactors for whole core fuel arrangement has confirmed from the obtained conversion ratio which shows higher than unity. Whole core analysis on evaluating reactivity change which is caused by the change of voided condition has been employed for conservative assumption that 100% coolant and moderator are voided. It obtained always a negative void reactivity coefficient during reactor operation which shows relatively more negative void coefficient at BOC (fresh fuel composition), and it becomes less negative void coefficient with increasing the operation time. Negative value of void reactivity coefficient shows the reactor has good safety properties in relation to the reactivity profile which is the main parameter in term of criticality safety analysis. Therefore, this

  3. Attosecond photoionization dynamics with stimulated core-valence transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jhih-An; Rohringer, Nina; Dahlström, Jan Marcus

    2016-03-01

    We investigate ionization of neon atoms by an isolated attosecond pump pulse in the presence of two coherent extreme ultraviolet or x-ray probe fields. The probe fields are tuned to a core-valence transition in the residual ion and induce spectral shearing of the photoelectron distributions. We show that the photoelectron-ion coincidence signal contains an interference pattern that depends on the temporal structure of the attosecond pump pulse and the stimulated core-valence transition. Many-body perturbation theory is used to compute "atomic response times" for the processes and we find strikingly different behavior for stimulation to the outer-core hole (2 p ↔2 s ) and stimulation to the inner-core hole (2 p ↔1 s ). The response time of the inner-core transition is found to be comparable to that of state-of-the-art laser-based characterization techniques for attosecond pulses.

  4. State Accountability in the Transition to Common Core. Updated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core is at a critical juncture. While many surveys show that support for the standards themselves remains strong, implementation has not been without major challenges. "State Accountability in the Transition to Common Core," a new policy brief from the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, provides cautionary advice about what key…

  5. Dynamic Analysis of Fuel Cycle Transitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Dixon; Steve Piet; David Shropshire; Gretchen Matthern

    2009-09-01

    This paper examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle to a closed fuel cycle. The once-through system involves only Light Water Reactors (LWRs) operating on uranium oxide fuel UOX), while the closed cycle includes both LWRs and fast spectrum reactors (FRs) in either a single-tier system or two-tier fuel system. The single-tier system includes full transuranic recycle in FRs while the two-tier system adds one pass of mixed oxide uranium-plutonium (MOX U-Pu) fuel in the LWR. While the analysis primarily focuses on burner fast reactors, transuranic conversion ratios up to 1.0 are assessed and many of the findings apply to any fuel cycle transitioning from a thermal once-through system to a synergistic thermal-fast recycle system. These findings include uranium requirements for a range of nuclear electricity growth rates, the importance of back end fuel cycle facility timing and magnitude, the impact of employing a range of fast reactor conversion ratios, system sensitivity to used fuel cooling time prior to recycle, impacts on a range of waste management indicators, and projected electricity cost ranges for once-through, single-tier and two-tier systems. The study confirmed that significant waste management benefits can be realized as soon as recycling is initiated, but natural uranium savings are minimal in this century. The use of MOX in LWRs decouples the development of recycle facilities from fast reactor fielding, but also significantly delays and limits fast reactor deployment. In all cases, fast reactor deployment was significantly below than predicted by static equilibrium analyses.

  6. Alignment and alignment transition of bent core nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elamain, Omaima; Hegde, Gurumurthy; Komitov, Lachezar

    2013-07-01

    We report on the alignment of nematics consisting of bimesogen bent core molecules of chlorine substituent of benzene derivative and their binary mixture with rod like nematics. It was found that the alignment layer made from polyimide material, which is usually used for promoting vertical (homeotropic) alignment of rod like nematics, promotes instead a planar alignment of the bent core nematic and its nematic mixtures. At higher concentration of the rod like nematic component in these mixtures, a temperature driven transition from vertical to planar alignment was found near the transition to isotropic phase.

  7. Thermal barrier and support for nuclear reactor fuel core

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Jr., William S.; Pickering, J. Larry; Black, William E.

    1987-01-01

    A thermal barrier/core support for the fuel core of a nuclear reactor having a metallic cylinder secured to the reactor vessel liner and surrounded by fibrous insulation material. A top cap is secured to the upper end of the metallic cylinder that locates and orients a cover block and post seat. Under normal operating conditions, the metallic cylinder supports the entire load exerted by its associated fuel core post. Disposed within the metallic cylinder is a column of ceramic material, the height of which is less than that of the metallic cylinder, and thus is not normally load bearing. In the event of a temperature excursion beyond the design limits of the metallic cylinder and resulting in deformation of the cylinder, the ceramic column will abut the top cap to support the fuel core post.

  8. Serially connected solid oxide fuel cells having monolithic cores

    DOEpatents

    Herceg, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of cell segments electrically serially connected in the flow direction, each segment consisting of electrolyte walls and interconnect that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageways; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte composite materials is of the order of 0.002-0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002-0.05 cm thick. Between 2 and 50 cell segments may be connected in series.

  9. The OCD phase transition and supernova core collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, N.A.; Mathews, G.J.; Wilson, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    We examine the implications for stellar core collapse of a phase transition occurring at densities of a few times nuclear matter density. We use an equation of state that describes a phase transition between bulk nuclear matter and a phase consisting of unbound quarks and gluons. We analyze the effect on the prompt shock, the production of strange matter, and the effect on the neutrino signal and the delayed mechanism.

  10. Whole-core LEU fuel demonstration in the ORR

    SciTech Connect

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Bretscher, M.M.; Cornella, R.J.; Hobbs, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    A whole-core demonstration of LEU fuel in the ORR is expected to begin during November 1985. Fuel elements will contain U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ at 4.8 Mg U/m/sup 3/ and shim rod fuel followers will contain U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ at 3.5 Mg U/m/sup 3/. Fuel fabrication is underway at B and W, CERCA, and NUKEM, with shipments scheduled to commence in October. The primary objectives of the demonstration are to provide data for validation of LEU and mixed-core fuel cycle calculations and to provide a large-scale demonstration of the acceptable performance of production-line U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ fuel elements. It is planned to approach the full LEU core through a series of mixed cores. Measurements to be made include flux distribution, reactivity swing, control rod worths, cycle length, fuel discharge burnup, gamma heating rates, ..beta../sub eff/l, and isothermal temperature coefficient. Measurements will also be made on fresh LEU and fresh HEU critical configurations. Preliminary safety approval has been received and the final safety assessment is being reviewed.

  11. A smooth transition to hydrogen transportation fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, G.D.; Smith, J.R.; Schock, R.N.

    1995-04-14

    The goal of this work is to examine viable near-term infrastructure options for a transition to hydrogen fueled vehicles and to suggest profitable directions for technology development. The authors have focused in particular on the contrasting options of decentralized production using the existing energy distribution network, and centralized production of hydrogen with a large-scale infrastructure. Delivered costs have been estimated using best available industry cost and deliberately conservative economic assumptions. The sensitivities of these costs have then been examined for three small-scale scenarios: (1) electrolysis at the home for one car, and production at the small station scale (300 cars/day), (2) conventional alkaline electrolysis and (3) steam reforming of natural gas. All scenarios assume fueling a 300 mile range vehicle with 3.75 kg. They conclude that a transition appears plausible, using existing energy distribution systems, with home electrolysis providing fuel costing 7.5 to 10.5{cents}/mile, station electrolysis 4.7 to 7.1{cents}/mile, and steam reforming 3.7 to 4.7{cents}/mile. The average car today costs about 6{cents}/mile to fuel. Furthermore, analysis of liquid hydrogen delivered locally by truck from central processing plants can also be competitive at costs as low as 4{cents}/mile. These delivered costs are equal to $30 to $70 per GJ, LHV. Preliminary analysis indicates that electricity transmission costs favor this method of distributing energy, until very large (10 GW) hydrogen pipelines are installed. This indicates that significant hydrogen pipeline distribution will be established only when significant markets have developed.

  12. Simulation on reactor TRIGA Puspati core kinetics fueled with thorium (Th) based fuel element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Abdul Aziz; Pauzi, Anas Muhamad; Rahman, Shaik Mohmmed Haikhal Abdul; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Muhammad; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Idris, Faridah Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    In confronting global energy requirement and the search for better technologies, there is a real case for widening the range of potential variations in the design of nuclear power plants. Smaller and simpler reactors are attractive, provided they can meet safety and security standards and non-proliferation issues. On fuel cycle aspect, thorium fuel cycles produce much less plutonium and other radioactive transuranic elements than uranium fuel cycles. Although not fissile itself, Th-232 will absorb slow neutrons to produce uranium-233 (233U), which is fissile. By introducing Thorium, the numbers of highly enriched uranium fuel element can be reduced while maintaining the core neutronic performance. This paper describes the core kinetic of a small research reactor core like TRIGA fueled with a Th filled fuel element matrix using a general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code.

  13. Serially connected solid oxide fuel cells having monolithic cores

    DOEpatents

    Herceg, J.E.

    1985-05-20

    Disclosed is a solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output. The cell core has an array of cell segments electrically serially connected in the flow direction, each segment consisting of electrolyte walls and interconnect that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageways; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte composite materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick. Between 2 and 50 cell segments may be connected in series.

  14. Fuel cell transit bus development & commercialization programs at Gerogetown University

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmer, R.; Larkins, J.; Romano, S.

    1996-12-31

    Fourteen years ago, Georgetown University (GU) perceived the need for a clean, efficient power systems for transportation that could operate on non-petroleum based fuels. The transit bus application was selected to begin system development. GU recognized the range and recharge constraints of a pure battery powered transit bus. A Fuel Cell power system would circumvent these limitations and, with an on board reformer, accommodate liquid fuel for rapid refueling. Feasibility studies for Fuel Cell power systems for transit buses were conducted with the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1983. Successful results of this investigation resulted in the DOT/DOE Fuel Cell transit bus development program. The first task was to prove that small Fuel Cell power plants were possible. This was achieved with the Phase I development of two 25 kW Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) brassboard systems. A liquid cooled version was selected for the Phase II activity in which three 30-foot Fuel Cell powered Test Bed Buses (TBBs) were fabricated. The first of these TBBs was delivered in the spring of 1994. All three of these development vehicles are now in Phase III of the program to conduct testing and evaluation, is conducting operational testing of the buses. The test will involve two fuel cell-operated buses; one with a proton exchange fuel cell and the other with a phosphoric acid fuel cell.

  15. Laser cutting apparatus for nuclear core fuel subassembly

    DOEpatents

    Walch, Allan P.; Caruolo, Antonio B.

    1982-02-23

    The object of the invention is to provide a system and apparatus which employs laser cutting to disassemble a nuclear core fuel subassembly. The apparatus includes a gantry frame (C) which straddles the core fuel subassembly (14), an x-carriage (22) travelling longitudinally above the frame which carries a focus head assembly (D) having a vertically moving carriage (46) and a laterally moving carriage (52), a system of laser beam transferring and focusing mirrors carried by the x-carriage and focusing head assembly, and a shroud follower (F) and longitudinal follower (G) for following the shape of shroud (14) to maintain a beam focal point (44) fixed upon the shroud surface for accurate cutting.

  16. Core conversion of the Portuguese research reactor to LEU fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, J.G.; Ramos, A.R.; Kocher, A.

    2008-07-15

    Core conversion of the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) to LEU fuel is being performed within IAEA's Technical Cooperation project POR/4/016, with financial support from the US and Portugal. CERCA was selected as manufacturer of the LEU assemblies by the IAEA after an international call for bids. CERCA provided a comprehensive package to the RPI which included the mechanical verification of the design of the assemblies, their manufacture and arrangements for a joint inspection of the finished assemblies. The LEU fuel assemblies were manufactured within 8 months upon final approval of the design. The safety analyses for the core conversion to LEU fuel were made with the assistance of the RERTR program and were submitted for review by the IAEA and by Portuguese authorities in January 2007. Revised documents were submitted in June 2007 addressing the issues raised during review. Regulatory approval was received in early August and core conversion was done in early September. All measured safety parameters are within the defined acceptance limits. Operation at full power is expected by the end of October. (author)

  17. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project: Evaluation Results Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-02-01

    This report evaluates a fuel cell electric bus demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. This evaluation report covers two years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2013.

  18. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

    2009-10-01

    This report documents progress in meeting the technological challenges of fuel cell propulsion for transportation based on current fuel cell transit bus demonstrations and plans for more fuel cell transit buses and hydrogen infrastructure.

  19. National Fuel Cell Bus Program: Accelerated Testing Evaluation Report and Appendices, Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit)

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-01-01

    This is an evaluation of hydrogen fuel cell transit buses operating at AC Transit in revenue service since March 20, 2006 compared to similar diesel buses operating from the same depot. This evaluation report includes results from November 2007 through October 2008. Evaluation results include implementation experience, fueling station operation, fuel cell bus operations at Golden Gate Transit, and evaluation results at AC Transit (bus usage, availability, fuel economy, maintenance costs, and roadcalls).

  20. Fuel and core testing plan for a target fueled isotope production reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Coats, Richard Lee; Dahl, James J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

    2010-12-01

    In recent years there has been an unstable supply of the critical diagnostic medical isotope 99Tc. Several concepts and designs have been proposed to produce 99Mo the parent nuclide of 99Tc, at a commercial scale sufficient to stabilize the world supply. This work lays out a testing and experiment plan for a proposed 2 MW open pool reactor fueled by Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) 99Mo targets. The experiments and tests necessary to support licensing of the reactor design are described and how these experiments and tests will help establish the safe operating envelop for a medical isotope production reactor is discussed. The experiments and tests will facilitate a focused and efficient licensing process in order to bring on line a needed production reactor dedicated to supplying medical isotopes. The Target Fuel Isotope Reactor (TFIR) design calls for an active core region that is approximately 40 cm in diameter and 40 cm in fuel height. It contains up to 150 cylindrical, 1-cm diameter, LEU oxide fuel pins clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy), in an annular hexagonal array on a {approx}2.0 cm pitch surrounded, radially, by a graphite or a Be reflector. The reactor is similar to U.S. university reactors in power, hardware, and safety/control systems. Fuel/target pin fabrication is based on existing light water reactor fuel fabrication processes. However, as part of licensing process, experiments must be conducted to confirm analytical predictions of steady-state power and accident conditions. The experiment and test plan will be conducted in phases and will utilize existing facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories. The first phase is to validate the predicted reactor core neutronics at delayed critical, zero power and very low power. This will be accomplished by using the Sandia Critical Experiment (CX) platform. A full scale TFIR core will be built in the CX and delayed critical measurements will be taken. For low power experiments

  1. Analysis of fuel options for the breakeven core configuration of the Advanced Recycling Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Stauff, N.E.; Klim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A.; Fiorina, C.; Franceschini, F.

    2013-07-01

    A trade-off study is performed to determine the impacts of various fuel forms on the core design and core physics characteristics of the sodium-cooled Toshiba- Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR). The fuel forms include oxide, nitride, and metallic forms of U and Th. The ARR core configuration is redesigned with driver and blanket regions in order to achieve breakeven fissile breeding performance with the various fuel types. State-of-the-art core physics tools are used for the analyses. In addition, a quasi-static reactivity balance approach is used for a preliminary comparison of the inherent safety performances of the various fuel options. Thorium-fueled cores exhibit lower breeding ratios and require larger blankets compared to the U-fueled cores, which is detrimental to core compactness and increases reprocessing and manufacturing requirements. The Th cores also exhibit higher reactivity swings through each cycle, which penalizes reactivity control and increases the number of control rods required. On the other hand, using Th leads to drastic reductions in void and coolant expansion coefficients of reactivity, with the potential for enhancing inherent core safety. Among the U-fueled ARR cores, metallic and nitride fuels result in higher breeding ratios due to their higher heavy metal densities. On the other hand, oxide fuels provide a softer spectrum, which increases the Doppler effect and reduces the positive sodium void worth. A lower fuel temperature is obtained with the metallic and nitride fuels due to their higher thermal conductivities and compatibility with sodium bonds. This is especially beneficial from an inherent safety point of view since it facilitates the reactor cool-down during loss of power removal transients. The advantages in terms of inherent safety of nitride and metallic fuels are maintained when using Th fuel. However, there is a lower relative increase in heavy metal density and in breeding ratio going from oxide to metallic

  2. High-burnup core design using minor actinide-containing metal fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Hirokazu; Ogata, Takanari; Obara, T.

    2013-07-01

    A neutronic design study of metal fuel fast reactor (FR) cores is conducted on the basis of an innovative fuel design concept to achieve an extremely high burnup and realize an efficient fuel cycle system. Since it is expected that the burnup reactivity swing will become extremely large in an unprecedented high burnup core, minor actinides (MAs) from light water reactors (LWRs) are added to fresh fuel to improve the core internal conversion. Core neutronic analysis revealed that high burnups of about 200 MWd/kg for a small-scale core and about 300 MWd/kg for a large-scale core can be attained while suppressing the burnup reactivity swing to almost the same level as that of conventional cores with normal burnup. An actinide burnup analysis has shown that the MA consumption ratio is improved to about 60% and that the accumulated MAs originating from LWRs can be efficiently consumed by the high-burnup metal fuel FR. (authors)

  3. Update from the NREL Alternative Fuel Transit Bus Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Norton, P.; Clark, N.

    1999-05-01

    The object of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty urban transit buses operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Final reports from this project were produced in 1996 from data collection and evaluation of 11 transit buses from eight transit sites. With the publication of these final reports, three issues were raised that needed further investigation: (1) the natural gas engines studied were older, open-loop control engines; (2) propane was not included in the original study; and (3) liquefied natural gas (LNG) was found to be in the early stages of deployment in transit applications. In response to these three issues, the project has continued by emissions testing newer natural gas engines and adding two new data collection sites to study the newer natural gas technology and specifically to measure new technology LNG buses.

  4. The whole-core LEU silicide fuel demonstration in the JMTR

    SciTech Connect

    Aso, Tomokazu; Akashi, Kazutomo; Nagao, Yoshiharu

    1997-08-01

    The JMTR was fully converted to LEU silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) fuel with cadmium wires as burnable absorber in January, 1994. The reduced enrichment program for the JMTR was initiated in 1979, and the conversion to MEU (enrichment ; 45%) aluminide fuel was carried out in 1986 as the first step of the program. The final goal of the program was terminated by the present LEU conversion. This paper describes the results of core physics measurement through the conversion phase from MEU fuel core to LEU fuel core. Measured excess reactivities of the LEU fuel cores are mostly in good agreement with predicted values. Reactivity effect and burnup of cadmium wires, therefore, were proved to be well predicted. Control rod worth in the LEU fuel core is mostly less than that in the MEU fuel core. Shutdown margin was verified to be within the safety limit. There is no significant difference in temperature coefficient of reactivity between the MEU and LEU fuel cores. These results verified that the JMTR was successfully and safely converted to LEU fuel. Extension of the operating cycle period was achieved and reduction of spend fuel elements is expected by using the fuel with high uranium density.

  5. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The prototype fuel cell bus was manufactured by Van Hool and ISE Corp. and features an electric hybrid drive system with a UTC Power PureMotion 120 Fuel Cell Power System and ZEBRA batteries for energy storage. The fuel cell bus started operation in April 2007, and evaluation results through October 2009 are provided in this report.

  6. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project Evaluation Results: Second Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-09-01

    Second report evaluating a fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL published its first report on the demonstration in February 2014. This report is an update to the previous report; it covers 3 full years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2014 and focuses on the final experiences and lessons learned.

  7. Speeding the transition: Designing a fuel-cell hypercar

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, B.D.; Moore, T.C.; Lovins, A.B.

    1997-12-31

    A rapid transformation now underway in automotive technology could accelerate the transition to transportation powered by fuel cells. Ultralight, advanced-composite, low-drag, hybrid-electric hypercars--using combustion engines--could be three- to fourfold more efficient and one or two orders of magnitude cleaner than today`s cars, yet equally safe, sporty, desirable, and (probably) affordable. Further, important manufacturing advantages--including low tooling and equipment costs, greater mechanical simplicity, autobody parts consolidation, shorter product cycles, and reduced assembly effort and space--permit a free-market commercialization strategy. This paper discusses a conceptual hypercar powered by a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). It outlines the implications of platform physics and component selection for the vehicle`s mass budget and performance. The high fuel-to-traction conversion efficiency of the hypercar platform could help automakers overcome the Achilles` heel of hydrogen-powered vehicles: onboard storage. Moreover, because hypercars would require significantly less tractive power, and even less fuel-cell power, they could adopt fuel cells earlier, before fuel cells` specific cost, mass, and volume have fully matured. In the meantime, commercialization in buildings can help prepare fuel cells for hypercars. The promising performance of hydrogen-fueled PEMFC hypercars suggests important opportunities in infrastructure development for direct-hydrogen vehicles.

  8. Transitioning to a Hydrogen Future: Learning from the Alternative Fuels Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, M.

    2006-02-01

    This paper assesses relevant knowledge within the alternative fuels community and recommends transitional strategies and tactics that will further the hydrogen transition in the transportation sector.

  9. On the flexibility of high temperature reactor cores for high-and low-enriched fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bzandes, S.; Lonhert, G.

    1982-07-01

    The operational flexibility of a high temperature reactor (HTR) is not restricted to either a low- or a high-enriched fuel cycle. Both fuel cycles are possible for the same core design. The fuel cycle cost is, however, penalized for low-enriched fuel; in addition, higher uranium consumption is required. Hence, an HTR is most economical to operate in the high-enriched thorium-uranium fuel cycle.

  10. Core transitions in the breakup of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, N. C.; Nunes, F. M.; Thompson, I. J.

    2006-03-01

    An interesting physical process has been unveiled: Dynamical core excitation during a breakup reaction of loosely bound core+N systems. These reactions are typically used to extract spectroscopic information and/or astrophysical information. A new method, the eXtended Continuum Discretized Coupled Channel (XCDCC) method, was developed to incorporate, in a consistent way and to all orders, core excitation in the bound and scattering states of the projectile, as well as dynamical excitation of the core as it interacts with the target. The model predicts cross sections to specific states of the core. It is applied to the breakup of Be11 on Be9 at 60 MeV/nucleon, and the calculated cross sections are in improved agreement with the data. The distribution of the cross section amongst the various core states is shown to depend on the reaction model used, and not simply on the ground state spectroscopic factors.

  11. Preliminary neutronics calculations for conversion of the Tehran research reactor core from HEU to LEU fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Nejat, S.M.R. . Dept. of Engineering Physics.)

    1993-08-01

    The 5-MW highly enriched uranium (HEU)-fueled Tehran Research Reactor is considered for conversion to high-density, low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. A preliminary neutronics calculation is performed as part of the conversion goal. In this study, two cores are considered: the HEU reference core and a proposed LEU core similar to the reference core, and a proposed LEU core similar to the reference core, using standardized U[sub 3]Si[sub 2] plates with the option of different [sup 235]U loadings. Various possibilities are investigated for the conversion of HEU to LEU fuel elements with 20% enriched [sup 235]U loadings of 207 to 297 g [sup 235]U/element. For the same equilibrium cycle length, the fuels are compared for flux, power distribution, burnup, and reactivity.

  12. Conversion and evaluation of the THOR reactor core to TRIGA fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.-H.; Shiau, L.-C.

    1990-07-01

    The THOR reactor is a pool type 1 MW research reactor and has been operated since 1961. The original MTR fuel elements have been gradually replaced by TRIGA fuel elements since 1977 and the conversion completed in 1987. The calculations were performed for various core configurations by using computer codes, WIMS/CITATION. The computing results have been evaluated and compared with the core measurements after the fuel conversion. The analysis results are in good correspondence with the measurements. (author)

  13. Radial stability and configuration transition of carbon nanotubes regulated by enclosed cores

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yonggang; He, Haitang; Ye, Hongfei

    2015-05-15

    The radial stability and configuration transition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with enclosed cores have been studied in this paper by using atomistic simulations. We found that an abnormal transition of CNTs from open to collapse can be regulated by enclosing deformable and rigid cores. The energy barrier for the configuration transition can be reduced by nearly one order of magnitude due to the presence of these cores, i.e., from ∼0.3 eV/Å to ∼0.03 eV/Å. These findings may provide guidance for the design of controllable CNT-based carrier systems for the delivery of drug, gene and fluid.

  14. National Fuel Cell Bus Program: Accelerated Testing Evaluation Report #2, Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) and Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2010-06-01

    This is an evaluation of hydrogen fuel cell transit buses operating at AC Transit in revenue service since March 20, 2006, comparing similar diesel buses operating from the same depot. It covers November 2007 through February 2010. Results include implementation experience, fueling station operation, evaluation results at AC Transit (bus usage, availability, fuel economy, maintenance costs, and road calls), and a summary of achievements and challenges encountered during the demonstration.

  15. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-05-01

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The evaluation period in this report (January 2008 through February 2009) has been chosen to coincide with a UTC Power propulsion system changeout that occurred on January 15, 2008.

  16. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fourth Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five new compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fourth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from April 2008 through October 2008. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous three evaluation reports.

  17. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fifth Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2009-08-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fifth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from October 2008 through June 2009. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous four evaluation reports.

  18. Combustion characteristics in the transition region of liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cernansky, N. P.; Namer, I.; Tidona, R. J.; Sarv, H.

    1984-01-01

    A monodisperse aerosol generator was modified to study ignition requirements, flammability limits, and flame speeds in the transition region. An ignition system was developed and tested. The fabrication of an optical drop sizing system is nearly complete. Preliminary measurements of droplet size effects on the minimum ignition energy for n-heptane sprays performed. Parameteric studies of droplet size effects on minimum ignition energies of various fuels including alcohols are in progress.

  19. Nuclear Physics the core of matter, the fuel of stars.

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J. P.; Physics

    1999-01-01

    Dramatic progress has been made in all branches of physics since the National Research Council's 1986 decadal survey of the field. The Physics in a New Era series explores these advances and looks ahead to future goals. The series includes assessments of the major subfields and reports on several smaller subfields, and preparation has begun on an overview volume on the unity of physics, its relationships to other fields, and its contributions to national needs. Nuclear Physics is the latest volume of the series. The book describes current activity in understanding nuclear structure and symmetries, the behavior of matter at extreme densities, the role of nuclear physics in astrophysics and cosmology, and the instrumentation and facilities used by the field. It makes recommendations on the resources needed for experimental and theoretical advances in the coming decade. Nuclear physics addresses the nature of matter making up 99.9 percent of the mass of our everyday world. It explores the nuclear reactions that fuel the stars, including our Sun, which provides the energy for all life on Earth. The field of nuclear physics encompasses some 3,000 experimental and theoretical researchers who work at universities and national laboratories across the United States, as well as the experimental facilities and infrastructure that allow these researchers to address the outstanding scientific questions facing us. This report provides an overview of the frontiers of nuclear physics as we enter the next millennium, with special attention to the state of the science in the United States.The current frontiers of nuclear physics involve fundamental and rapidly evolving issues. One is understanding the structure and behavior of strongly interacting matter in terms of its basic constituents, quarks and gluons, over a wide range of conditions - from normal nuclear matter to the dense cores of neutron stars, and to the Big Bang that was the birth of the universe. Another is to describe

  20. The Transition to a Many-core World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, T. G.

    2012-12-01

    The need to increase performance within a fixed energy budget has pushed the computer industry to many core processors. This is grounded in the physics of computing and is not a trend that will just go away. It is hard to overestimate the profound impact of many-core processors on software developers. Virtually every facet of the software development process will need to change to adapt to these new processors. In this talk, we will look at many-core hardware and consider its evolution from a perspective grounded in the CPU. We will show that the number of cores will inevitably increase, but in addition, a quest to maximize performance per watt will push these cores to be heterogeneous. We will show that the inevitable result of these changes is a computing landscape where the distinction between the CPU and the GPU is blurred. We will then consider the much more pressing problem of software in a many core world. Writing software for heterogeneous many core processors is well beyond the ability of current programmers. One solution is to support a software development process where programmer teams are split into two distinct groups: a large group of domain-expert productivity programmers and much smaller team of computer-scientist efficiency programmers. The productivity programmers work in terms of high level frameworks to express the concurrency in their problems while avoiding any details for how that concurrency is exploited. The second group, the efficiency programmers, map applications expressed in terms of these frameworks onto the target many-core system. In other words, we can solve the many-core software problem by creating a software infrastructure that only requires a small subset of programmers to become master parallel programmers. This is different from the discredited dream of automatic parallelism. Note that productivity programmers still need to define the architecture of their software in a way that exposes the concurrency inherent in their

  1. Massive Quiescent Cores in Orion. VI. The Internal Structures and a Candidate of Transiting Core in NGC 2024 Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhiyuan; Li, Di

    2016-06-01

    We present a multiwavelength observational study of the NGC 2024 filament using infrared to submillimeter continuum and the {{NH}}3 (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions centered on FIR-3, the most massive core therein. FIR-3 is found to have no significant infrared point sources in the Spitzer/IRAC bands. But the {{NH}}3 kinetic temperature map shows a peak value at the core center with {T}{{k}}=25 K, which is significantly higher than the surrounding level ({T}{{k}}\\quad = 15–19 K). Such internal heating signature without an infrared source suggests an ongoing core collapse possibly at a transition stage from first hydrostatic core (FHSC) to protostar. The eight dense cores in the filament have dust temperatures between 17.5 and 22 K. They are much cooler than the hot ridge ({T}{{d}}∼ 55 K) around the central heating star IRS-2b. Comparison with a dust heating model suggests that the filament should have a distance of 3–5 pc from IRS-2b. This value is much larger than the spatial extent of the hot ridge, suggesting that the filament is spatially separated from the hot region along the line of sight.

  2. Use of Solid Hydride Fuel for Improved long-Life LWR Core Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E

    2006-04-30

    The primary objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of improving the performance of PWR and BWR cores by using solid hydride fuels instead of the commonly used oxide fuel. The primary measure of performance considered is the bus-bar cost of electricity (COE). Additional performance measures considered are safety, fuel bundle design simplicity – in particular for BWR’s, and plutonium incineration capability. It was found that hydride fuel can safely operate in PWR’s and BWR’s without restricting the linear heat generation rate of these reactors relative to that attainable with oxide fuel. A couple of promising applications of hydride fuel in PWR’s and BWR’s were identified: (1) Eliminating dedicated water moderator volumes in BWR cores thus enabling to significantly increase the cooled fuel rods surface area as well as the coolant flow cross section area in a given volume fuel bundle while significantly reducing the heterogeneity of BWR fuel bundles thus achieving flatter pin-by-pin power distribution. The net result is a possibility to significantly increase the core power density – on the order of 30% and, possibly, more, while greatly simplifying the fuel bundle design. Implementation of the above modifications is, though, not straightforward; it requires a design of completely different control system that could probably be implemented only in newly designed plants. It also requires increasing the coolant pressure drop across the core. (2) Recycling plutonium in PWR’s more effectively than is possible with oxide fuel by virtue of a couple of unique features of hydride fuel – reduced inventory of U-238 and increased inventory of hydrogen. As a result, the hydride fuelled core achieves nearly double the average discharge burnup and the fraction of the loaded Pu it incinerates in one pass is double that of the MOX fuel. The fissile fraction of the Pu in the discharged hydride fuel is only ~2/3 that of the MOX fuel and the

  3. Safety evaluation of a hydrogen fueled transit bus

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.; Thomas, J.K.; Hovis, G.L.; Wu, T.T.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen fueled vehicle demonstration projects must satisfy management and regulator safety expectations. This is often accomplished using hazard and safety analyses. Such an analysis has been completed to evaluate the safety of the H2Fuel bus to be operated in Augusta, Georgia. The evaluation methods and criteria used reflect the Department of Energy`s graded approach for qualifying and documenting nuclear and chemical facility safety. The work focused on the storage and distribution of hydrogen as the bus motor fuel with emphases on the technical and operational aspects of using metal hydride beds to store hydrogen. The safety evaluation demonstrated that the operation of the H2Fuel bus represents a moderate risk. This is the same risk level determined for operation of conventionally powered transit buses in the United States. By the same criteria, private passenger automobile travel in the United States is considered a high risk. The evaluation also identified several design and operational modifications that resulted in improved safety, operability, and reliability. The hazard assessment methodology used in this project has widespread applicability to other innovative operations and systems, and the techniques can serve as a template for other similar projects.

  4. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

    2011-11-01

    This status report, fifth in a series of annual status reports from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), discusses the achievements and challenges of fuel cell propulsion for transit and summarizes the introduction of fuel cell transit buses in the United States. Progress this year includes an increase in the number of fuel cell electric buses (FCEBs), from 15 to 25, operating at eight transit agencies, as well as increased diversity of the fuel cell design options for transit buses. The report also provides an analysis of the combined results from fuel cell transit bus demonstrations evaluated by NREL with a focus on the most recent data through July 2011 including fuel cell power system reliability and durability; fuel economy; roadcall; and hydrogen fueling results. These evaluations cover 22 of the 25 FCEBs currently operating.

  5. Entropy of vortex cores near the superconductor-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capan, Cigdem; Behnia, Kamran; Hinderer, J.; Jansen, A. G. M.; Lang, W.; Raffy, H.; Marcenat, C.; Marin, C.; Flouquet, J.

    2002-03-01

    We investigated Nernst effect in underdoped cuprates at high magnetic fields, following the discovery by N.P.Ong's group of a substantial Nernst signal far above Tc in these systems. We made the peculiar observation that at magnetic fields high enough to induce non-metallic resistivity a large Nernst peak persists, pointing at the presence of vortices near the superconductor-insulator transition. However, it is no longer correlated with resistivity, in contrast to the low field regime. Results on LSCO single crystals and Bi-2201 thin films will be discussed in the framework of a simple phenomenology of vortex motion in a thermal gradient which allows to extract the vortex transport entropy combining Nernst data and resistivity, near this field induced superconductor-insulator transition.

  6. Modeling and design of a reload PWR core for a 48-month fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, M.V.; Driscoll, M.J.; Todreas, N.E.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this research was to use state-of-the-art nuclear and fuel performance packages to evaluate the feasibility and costs of a 48 calendar month core in existing pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs, considering the full range of practical design and economic considerations. The driving force behind this research is the desire to make nuclear power more economically competitive with fossil fuel options by expanding the scope for achievement of higher capacity factors. Using CASMO/SIMULATE, a core design with fuel enriched to 7{sup w}/{sub o} U{sup 235} for a single batch loaded, 48-month fuel cycle has been developed. This core achieves an ultra-long cycle length without exceeding current fuel burnup limits. The design uses two different types of burnable poisons. Gadolinium in the form of gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) mixed with the UO{sub 2} of selected pins is sued to hold down initial reactivity and to control flux peaking throughout the life of the core. A zirconium di-boride (ZrB{sub 2}) integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) coating on the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-UO{sub 2} fuel pellets is added to reduce the critical soluble boron concentration in the reactor coolant to within acceptable limits. Fuel performance issues of concern to this design are also outlined and areas which will require further research are highlighted.

  7. PWR core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for thorium-uranium breeding recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, G.; Liu, C.; Si, S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper was focused on core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle in current PWRs, without any major change to the fuel lattice and the core internals, but substituting the UOX pellet with Thorium-based pellet. The fuel cycle analysis indicates that Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle is technically feasible in current PWRs. A 4-loop, 193-assembly PWR core utilizing 17 x 17 fuel assemblies (FAs) was taken as the model core. Two mixed cores were investigated respectively loaded with mixed reactor grade Plutonium-Thorium (PuThOX) FAs and mixed reactor grade {sup 233}U-Thorium (U{sub 3}ThOX) FAs on the basis of reference full Uranium oxide (UOX) equilibrium-cycle core. The UOX/PuThOX mixed core consists of 121 UOX FAs and 72 PuThOX FAs. The reactor grade {sup 233}U extracted from burnt PuThOX fuel was used to fabrication of U{sub 3}ThOX for starting Thorium-. Uranium breeding recycle. In UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core, the well designed U{sub 3}ThOX FAs with 1.94 w/o fissile uranium (mainly {sup 233}U) were located on the periphery of core as a blanket region. U{sub 3}ThOX FAs remained in-core for 6 cycles with the discharged burnup achieving 28 GWD/tHM. Compared with initially loading, the fissile material inventory in U{sub 3}ThOX fuel has increased by 7% via 1-year cooling after discharge. 157 UOX fuel assemblies were located in the inner of UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core refueling with 64 FAs at each cycle. The designed UOX/PuThOX and UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core satisfied related nuclear design criteria. The full core performance analyses have shown that mixed core with PuThOX loading has similar impacts as MOX on several neutronic characteristic parameters, such as reduced differential boron worth, higher critical boron concentration, more negative moderator temperature coefficient, reduced control rod worth, reduced shutdown margin, etc.; while mixed core with U{sub 3}ThOX loading on the periphery of core has no

  8. Variant 22: Spatially-Dependent: Transient Processes in MOX Fueled Core

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-09-28

    This work is a part of Joint U.S./Russian Project with Weapons-Grade Plutonium Disposition in VVER Reactors and presents the results of spatial kinetics calculational benchmarks. The examinations were carried out with the following purposes: to verify one of spatial neutronic kinetics model elaborated in KI, to understand sensibility of the model to neutronics difference of UOX and MOX cores, and to compare in future point and spatial kinetics models (on the base of a set of selected accidents) in view of eventual creation of RELAP option with 3D kinetics. The document contains input data and results of model operation of three emergency dynamic processes in the VVER-1000 core: (1) Central control rod ejection by pressure drop caused by destroying of the moving mechanism cover. (2) Overcooling of the reactor core caused by steam line rupture and non-closure of steam generator stop valve. (3) The boron dilution of coolant in part of the VVER-1000 core caused by penetration of the distillate slug into the core at start up of non-working loop. These accidents have been applied to: (1) Uranium reference core that is the so-called Advanced VVER-1000 core with Zirconium fuel pins claddings and guide tubes. A number of assemblies contained 18 boron BPRs while first year operating. (2) MOX core with about 30% MOX fuel. At a solving it was supposed that MOX-fuel thermophysical characteristics are identical to uranium fuel ones. The calculations were carried out with the help of the program NOSTRA/1/, simulating VVER dynamics that is briefly described in Chapter 1. Chapter 3 contains the description of reference Uranium and MOX cores that are used in calculations. The neutronics calculations of MOX core with about 30% MOX fuel are named ''Variant 2 1''. Chapters 4-6 contain the calculational results of three above mentioned benchmark accidents that compose in a whole the ''Variant 22''.

  9. Low-Enriched Fuel Design Concept for the Prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, James W

    2007-05-01

    A new non-TRISO fuel and clad design concept is proposed for the prismatic, heliumcooled Very High Temperature Reactor core. The new concept could substantially reduce the current 10-20 wt% TRISO uranium enrichments down to 4-6 wt% for both initial and reload cores. The proposed fuel form would be a high-temperature, high-density uranium ceramic, for example UO2, configured into very small diameter cylindrical rods. The small diameter fuel rods significantly increase core reactivity through improved neutron moderation and fuel lumping. Although a high-temperature clad system for the concept remains to be developed, recent success in tube fabrication and preliminary irradiation testing of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding for light water reactor applications offers good potential for this application, and for future development of other carbide clad designs. A high-temperature ceramic fuel, together with a high-temperature clad material, could also lead to higher thermal safety margins during both normal and transient reactor conditions relative to TRISO fuel. The calculated neutronic results show that the lowenrichment, small diameter fuel rods and low thermal neutron absorbing clad retain the strong negative Doppler fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity that ensures inherent safe operation of the VHTR, and depletion studies demonstrate that an 18-month power cycle can be achieved with the lower enrichment fuel.

  10. Reducing transit bus emissions: Alternative fuels or traffic operations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Ahsan; Hatzopoulou, Marianne

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we simulated the operations and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of transit buses along a busy corridor and quantified the effects of two different fuels (conventional diesel and compressed natural gas) as well as a set of driving conditions on emissions. Results indicate that compressed natural gas (CNG) reduces GHG emissions by 8-12% compared to conventional diesel, this reduction could increase to 16% with high levels of traffic congestion. However, the benefits of switching from conventional diesel to CNG are less apparent when the road network is uncongested. We also investigated the effects of bus operations on emissions by applying several strategies such as transit signal priority (TSP), queue jumper lanes, and relocation of bus stops. Results show that in congested conditions, TSP alone can reduce GHG emissions by 14% and when combined with improved technology; a reduction of 23% is achieved. The reduction benefits are even more apparent when other transit operational improvements are combined with TSP. Finally a sensitivity analysis was performed to investigate the effect of operational improvements on emissions under varying levels of network congestion. We observe that under “extreme congestion”, the benefits of TSP decrease.

  11. Analysis on fuel breeding capability of FBR core region based on minor actinide recycling doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik; Novitrian, Waris, Abdul; Ismail, Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fuel breeding based on the capability of fuel conversion capability can be achieved by convertion rasio of some fertile materials into fissile materials during nuclear reaction processes such as main fissile materials of U-233, U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 and for fertile materials of Th-232, U-238, and Pu-240 as well as Pu-238. Minor actinide (MA) loading option which consists of neptunium, americium and curium will gives some additional contribution from converted MA into plutonium such as conversion Np-237 into Pu-238 and it's produced Pu-238 converts to Pu-239 via neutron capture. Increasing composition of Pu-238 can be used to produce fissile material of Pu-239 as additional contribution. Trans-uranium (TRU) fuel (Mixed fuel loading of MOX (U-Pu) and MA composition) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel compositions are analyzed for comparative analysis in order to show the effect of MA to the plutonium productions in core in term of reactor criticality condition and fuel breeding capability. In the present study, neptunium (Np) nuclide is used as a representative of MAin trans-uranium (TRU) fuel composition as Np-MOX fuel type. It was loaded into the core region gives significant contribution to reduce the excess reactivity in comparing to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and in the same time it contributes to increase nuclear fuel breeding capability of the reactor. Neptunium fuel loding scheme in FBR core region gives significant production of Pu-238 as fertile material to absorp neutrons for reducing excess reactivity and additional contribution for fuel breeding.

  12. Analysis on fuel breeding capability of FBR core region based on minor actinide recycling doping

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Sidik; Novitrian,; Waris, Abdul; Ismail; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2014-09-30

    Nuclear fuel breeding based on the capability of fuel conversion capability can be achieved by conversion ratio of some fertile materials into fissile materials during nuclear reaction processes such as main fissile materials of U-233, U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 and for fertile materials of Th-232, U-238, and Pu-240 as well as Pu-238. Minor actinide (MA) loading option which consists of neptunium, americium and curium will gives some additional contribution from converted MA into plutonium such as conversion Np-237 into Pu-238 and it's produced Pu-238 converts to Pu-239 via neutron capture. Increasing composition of Pu-238 can be used to produce fissile material of Pu-239 as additional contribution. Trans-uranium (TRU) fuel (Mixed fuel loading of MOX (U-Pu) and MA composition) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel compositions are analyzed for comparative analysis in order to show the effect of MA to the plutonium productions in core in term of reactor criticality condition and fuel breeding capability. In the present study, neptunium (Np) nuclide is used as a representative of MAin trans-uranium (TRU) fuel composition as Np-MOX fuel type. It was loaded into the core region gives significant contribution to reduce the excess reactivity in comparing to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and in the same time it contributes to increase nuclear fuel breeding capability of the reactor. Neptunium fuel loading scheme in FBR core region gives significant production of Pu-238 as fertile material to absorp neutrons for reducing excess reactivity and additional contribution for fuel breeding.

  13. Non-Proliferative, Thorium-Based, Core and Fuel Cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Todosow M.; Todosow M.; Raitses, G. Galperin, A.

    2009-07-12

    Two of the major barriers to the expansion of worldwide adoption of nuclear power are related to proliferation potential of the nuclear fuel cycle and issues associated with the final disposal of spent fuel. The Radkowsky Thorium Fuel (RTF) concept proposed by Professor A. Radkowsky offers a partial solution to these problems. The main idea of the concept is the utilization of the seed-blanket unit (SBU) fuel assembly geometry which is a direct replacement for a 'conventional' assembly in either a Russian pressurized water reactor (VVER-1000) or a Western pressurized water reactor (PWR). The seed-blanket fuel assembly consists of a fissile (U) zone, known as seed, and a fertile (Th) zone known as blanket. The separation of fissile and fertile allows separate fuel management schemes for the thorium part of the fuel (a subcritical 'blanket') and the 'driving' part of the core (a supercritical 'seed'). The design objective for the blanket is an efficient generation and in-situ fissioning of the U233 isotope, while the design objective for the seed is to supply neutrons to the blanket in a most economic way, i.e. with minimal investment of natural uranium. The introduction of thorium as a fertile component in the nuclear fuel cycle significantly reduces the quantity of plutonium production and modifies its isotopic composition, reducing the overall proliferation potential of the fuel cycle. Thorium based spent fuel also contains fewer higher actinides, hence reducing the long-term radioactivity of the spent fuel. The analyses show that the RTF core can satisfy the requirements of fuel cycle length, and the safety margins of conventional pressurized water reactors. The coefficients of reactivity are comparable to currently operating VVER's/PWR's. The major feature of the RTF cycle is related to the total amount of spent fuel discharged for each cycle from the reactor core. The fuel management scheme adopted for RTF core designs allows a significant decrease in the

  14. Integral manifolding structure for fuel cell core having parallel gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Herceg, J.E.

    1983-10-12

    Disclosed herein are manifolding means for directing the fuel and oxidant gases to parallel flow passageways in a fuel cell core. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte and interconnect wall consists respectively of anode and cathode materials layered on the opposite sides of electrolyte material, or on the opposite sides of interconnect material. A core wall projects beyond the open ends of the defined core passageways and is disposed approximately midway between and parallel to the adjacent overlaying and underlying interconnect walls to define manifold chambers therebetween on opposite sides of the wall. Each electrolyte wall defining the flow passageways is shaped to blend into and be connected to this wall in order to redirect the corresponding fuel and oxidant passageways to the respective manifold chambers either above or below this intermediate wall. Inlet and outlet connections are made to these separate manifold chambers respectively, for carrying the fuel and oxidant gases to the core, and for carrying their reaction products away from the core.

  15. Integral manifolding structure for fuel cell core having parallel gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Herceg, Joseph E.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed herein are manifolding means for directing the fuel and oxidant gases to parallel flow passageways in a fuel cell core. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte and interconnect wall consists respectively of anode and cathode materials layered on the opposite sides of electrolyte material, or on the opposite sides of interconnect material. A core wall projects beyond the open ends of the defined core passageways and is disposed approximately midway between and parallel to the adjacent overlaying and underlying interconnect walls to define manifold chambers therebetween on opposite sides of the wall. Each electrolyte wall defining the flow passageways is shaped to blend into and be connected to this wall in order to redirect the corresponding fuel and oxidant passageways to the respective manifold chambers either above or below this intermediate wall. Inlet and outlet connections are made to these separate manifold chambers respectively, for carrying the fuel and oxidant gases to the core, and for carrying their reaction products away from the core.

  16. Checkerboard seed-blanket thorium fuel core concepts for heavy water moderated reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, B.P.; Hyland, B.

    2013-07-01

    New reactor concepts to implement thorium-based fuel cycles have been explored to achieve maximum resource utilization. Pressure tube heavy water reactors (PT-HWR) are highly advantageous for implementing the use of thorium-based fuels because of their high neutron economy and on-line re-fuelling capability. The use of heterogeneous seed-blanket core concepts in a PT-HWR where higher-fissile-content seed fuel bundles are physically separate from lower-fissile-content blanket bundles allows more flexibility and control in fuel management to maximize the fissile utilization and conversion of fertile fuel. The lattice concept chosen was a 35-element bundle made with a homogeneous mixture of reactor grade Pu (about 67 wt% fissile) and Th, and with a central zirconia rod to help reduce coolant void reactivity. Several checkerboard heterogeneous seed-blanket core concepts with plutonium-thorium-based fuels in a 700-MWe-class PT-HWR were analyzed, using a once-through thorium (OTT) cycle. Different combinations of seed and blanket fuel were tested to determine the impact on core-average burnup, fissile utilization, power distributions, and other performance parameters. It was found that various checkerboard core concepts can achieve a fissile utilization that is up to 26% higher than that achieved in a PT-HWR using more conventional natural uranium fuel bundles. Up to 60% of the Pu is consumed; up to 43% of the energy is produced from thorium, and up to 303 kg/year of Pa-233/U-233/U-235 are produced. Checkerboard cores with about 50% of low-power blanket bundles may require power de-rating (65% to 74%) to avoid exceeding maximum limits for channel and bundle powers and linear element ratings. (authors)

  17. Annular seed-blanket thorium fuel core concepts for heavy water moderated reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, B.P.; Hyland, B.

    2013-07-01

    New reactor concepts to implement thorium-based fuel cycles have been explored to achieve maximum resource utilization. Pressure tube heavy water reactors (PT-HWR) are highly advantageous for implementing the use of thorium-based fuels because of their high neutron economy and on-line re-fuelling capability. The use of heterogeneous seed-blanket core concepts in a PT-HWR where higher-fissile-content seed fuel bundles are physically separate from lower-fissile-content blanket bundles allows more flexibility and control in fuel management to maximize the fissile utilization and conversion of fertile fuel. The lattice concept chosen is a 35-element bundle made with a homogeneous mixture of reactor grade Pu and Th, and with a central zirconia rod to help reduce coolant void reactivity. Several annular heterogeneous seed-blanket core concepts with plutonium-thorium-based fuels in a 700-MWe-class PT-HWR were analyzed, using a once-through thorium (OTT) cycle. Different combinations of seed and blanket fuel were tested to determine the impact on core-average burnup, fissile utilization, power distributions, and other performance parameters. It was found that the various core concepts can achieve a fissile utilization that is up to 30% higher than is currently achieved in a PT-HWR using conventional natural uranium fuel bundles. Up to 67% of the Pu is consumed; up to 43% of the energy is produced from thorium, and up to 363 kg/year of U-233 is produced. Seed-blanket cores with ∼50% content of low-power blanket bundles may require power de-rating (∼58% to 65%) to avoid exceeding maximum limits for peak channel power, bundle power and linear element ratings. (authors)

  18. Performance of the MTR core with MOX fuel using the MCNP4C2 code.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Ismail; Albarhoum, Mohamad

    2016-08-01

    The MCNP4C2 code was used to simulate the MTR-22 MW research reactor and perform the neutronic analysis for a new fuel namely: a MOX (U3O8&PuO2) fuel dispersed in an Al matrix for One Neutronic Trap (ONT) and Three Neutronic Traps (TNTs) in its core. Its new characteristics were compared to its original characteristics based on the U3O8-Al fuel. Experimental data for the neutronic parameters including criticality relative to the MTR-22 MW reactor for the original U3O8-Al fuel at nominal power were used to validate the calculated values and were found acceptable. The achieved results seem to confirm that the use of MOX fuel in the MTR-22 MW will not degrade the safe operational conditions of the reactor. In addition, the use of MOX fuel in the MTR-22 MW core leads to reduce the uranium fuel enrichment with (235)U and the amount of loaded (235)U in the core by about 34.84% and 15.21% for the ONT and TNTs cases, respectively. PMID:27213809

  19. Modeling Shallow Core-Level Transitions in the Reflectance Spectra of Gallium-Containing Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoute, Nicholas; Aspnes, David

    2012-02-01

    The electronic structure of covalent materials is typically approached by band theory. However, shallow core level transitions may be better modeled by an atomic-scale approach. We investigate shallow d-core level reflectance spectra in terms of a local atomic-multiplet theory, a novel application of a theory typically used for higher-energy transitions on more ionic type material systems. We examine specifically structure in reflectance spectra of GaP, GaAs, GaSb, GaSe, and GaAs1-xPx due to transitions that originate from Ga3d core levels and occur in the 20 to 25 eV range. We model these spectra as a Ga^+3 closed-shell ion whose transitions are influenced by perturbations on 3d hole-4p electron final states. These are specifically spin-orbit effects on the hole and electron, and a crystal-field effect on the hole, attributed to surrounding bond charges and positive ligand anions. Empirical radial-strength parameters were obtained by least-squares fitting. General trends with respect to anion electronegativity are consistent with expectations. In addition to the spin-orbit interaction, crystal-field effects play a significant role in breaking the degeneracy of the d levels, and consequently are necessary to understand shallow 3d core level spectra.

  20. Discontinuous phase transition in a core contact process on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Huiseung; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Yup

    2015-02-01

    To understand the effect of generalized infection processes, we suggest and study the core contact process (CCP) on complex networks. In CCP an uninfected node is infected when at least k different infected neighbors of the node select the node for the infection. The healing process is the same as that of the normal CP. It is analytically and numerically shown that discontinuous transitions occur in CCP on random networks and scale-free networks depending on infection rate and initial density of infected nodes. The discontinuous transitions include hybrid transitions with β = 1/2 and β = 1. The asymptotic behavior of the phase boundary related to the initial density is found analytically and numerically. The mapping between CCP with k and static (k+1)-core percolation is supposed from the (k+1)-core structure in the active phase and the hybrid transition with β = 1/2. From these properties of CCP one can see that CCP is one of the dynamical processes for the k-core structure on real networks.

  1. California's Transition to the Common Core State Standards: The State's Role in Local Capacity Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Paul; Murphy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and the Local Control Funding Formula are introducing major changes to California's K-12 system. Implementation of new curricula and instruction is under way at the district level, but California started its transition relatively late and it has taken a more decentralized approach than most other states.…

  2. Evaluation of storing Shippingport Core II spent blanket fuel assemblies in the T Plant PWR Core II fuel pool without active cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.R.; Lanning, D.D.; Dana, C.M.; Hedengren, D.C.

    1994-10-01

    PWR Core II fuel pool chiller-off test was conducted because it appeared possible that acceptable pool-water temperatures could be maintained without operating the chillers, thus saving hundreds of thousands of dollars in maintenance and replacement costs. Test results showed that the water-cooling capability is no longer needed to maintain pool temperature below 38{degrees}C (100{degrees}F).

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic cross flow core and manifolding

    DOEpatents

    Poeppel, Roger B.; Dusek, Joseph T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention discloses a monolithic core construction having the flow passageways for the fuel and for the oxidant gases extended transverse to one another, whereby full face core manifolding can be achieved for these gases and their reaction products. The core construction provides that only anode material surround each fuel passageway and only cathode material surround each oxidant passageway, each anode and each cathode further sandwiching at spaced opposing sides electrolyte and interconnect materials to define electrolyte and interconnect walls. Webs of the cathode and anode material hold the electrolyte and interconnect walls spaced apart to define the flow passages. The composite anode and cathode wall structures are further alternately stacked on one another (with the separating electrolyte or interconnect material typically being a single common layer) whereby the fuel passageway and the oxidant passageways are disposed transverse to one another.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic cross flow core and manifolding

    DOEpatents

    Poeppel, R.B.; Dusek, J.T.

    1983-10-12

    This invention discloses a monolithic core construction having the flow passageways for the fuel and for the oxidant gases extended transverse to one another, whereby full face core manifolding can be achieved for these gases and their reaction products. The core construction provides that only anode material surround each fuel passageway and only cathode material surround each oxidant passageway, each anode and each cathode further sandwiching at spaced opposing sides electrolyte and interconnect materials to define electrolyte and interconnect walls. Webs of the cathode and anode material hold the electrolyte and interconnect walls spaced apart to define the flow passages. The composite anode and cathode wall structures are further alternately stacked on one another (with the separating electrolyte or interconnect material typically being a single common layer) whereby the fuel passageways and the oxidant passageways are disposed transverse to one another.

  5. Fuels for urban transit buses: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joshua T; Hammitt, James K; Levy, Jonathan I

    2003-04-15

    Public transit agencies have begun to adopt alternative propulsion technologies to reduce urban transit bus emissions associated with conventional diesel (CD) engines. Among the most popular alternatives are emission controlled diesel buses (ECD), defined here to be buses with continuously regenerating diesel particle filters burning low-sulfur diesel fuel, and buses burning compressed natural gas (CNG). This study uses a series of simplifying assumptions to arrive at first-order estimates for the incremental cost-effectiveness (CE) of ECD and CNG relative to CD. The CE ratio numerator reflects acquisition and operating costs. The denominator reflects health losses (mortality and morbidity) due to primary particulate matter (PM), secondary PM, and ozone exposure, measured as quality adjusted life years (QALYs). We find that CNG provides larger health benefits than does ECD (nine vs six QALYs annually per 1000 buses) but that ECD is more cost-effective than CNG (dollar 270 000 per QALY for ECD vs dollar 1.7 million to dollar 2.4 million for CNG). These estimates are subject to much uncertainty. We identify assumptions that contribute most to this uncertainty and propose potential research directions to refine our estimates. PMID:12731827

  6. Annular core liquid-salt cooled reactor with multiple fuel and blanket zones

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Per F.

    2013-05-14

    A liquid fluoride salt cooled, high temperature reactor having a reactor vessel with a pebble-bed reactor core. The reactor core comprises a pebble injection inlet located at a bottom end of the reactor core and a pebble defueling outlet located at a top end of the reactor core, an inner reflector, outer reflector, and an annular pebble-bed region disposed in between the inner reflector and outer reflector. The annular pebble-bed region comprises an annular channel configured for receiving pebble fuel at the pebble injection inlet, the pebble fuel comprising a combination of seed and blanket pebbles having a density lower than the coolant such that the pebbles have positive buoyancy and migrate upward in said annular pebble-bed region toward the defueling outlet. The annular pebble-bed region comprises alternating radial layers of seed pebbles and blanket pebbles.

  7. Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, J.; Hamilton, H.; Hyland, B.

    2013-07-01

    A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

  8. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Gikakis, C.

    2013-12-01

    This report is the seventh in an annual series of reports that summarize the progress of fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) development in the United States and discuss the achievements and challenges of introducing fuel cell propulsion in transit. The report also provides a snapshot of current FCEB performance results from August 2012 through July 2013 for five FCEB demonstrations at four transit agencies.

  9. Excitation energy transfer in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii deficient in the PSI core or the PSII core under conditions mimicking state transitions.

    PubMed

    Wlodarczyk, Lucyna M; Dinc, Emine; Croce, Roberta; Dekker, Jan P

    2016-06-01

    The efficient use of excitation energy in photosynthetic membranes is achieved by a dense network of pigment-protein complexes. These complexes fulfill specific functions and interact dynamically with each other in response to rapidly changing environmental conditions. Here, we studied how in the intact cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C.r.) the lack of the photosystem I (PSI) core or the photosystem II (PSII) core affects these interactions. To that end the mutants F15 and M18 (both PSI-deficient) and FUD7 (PSII-deficient) were incubated under conditions known to promote state transitions in wild-type. The intact cells were then instantly frozen to 77K and the full-spectrum time-resolved fluorescence emission of the cells was measured by means of streak camera. In the PSI-deficient mutants excitation energy transfer (EET) towards light-harvesting complexes of PSI (Lhca) occurs in less than 0.5 ns, and fluorescence from Lhca decays in 3.1 ns. Decreased trapping by PSII and increased fluorescence of Lhca upon state 1 (S1)→state 2 (S2) transition appears in the F15 and less in the M18 mutant. In the PSII-deficient mutant FUD7, quenched (0.5 ns) and unquenched (2 ns) light-harvesting complexes of PSII (LHCII) are present in both states, with the quenched form more abundant in S2 than in S1. Moreover, EET of 0.4 ns from the remaining LHCII to PSI increases upon S1→S2 transition. We relate the excitation energy kinetics observed in F15, M18 and FUD7 to the remodeling of the photosynthetic apparatus in these mutants under S1 and S2 conditions. PMID:26946087

  10. Performance Spec. for Fuel Drying and Canister Inerting System for PWR Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assemblies Stored within Shipping Port Spent Fuel Canisters

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-03-14

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and basic design requirements imposed on the fuel drying and canister inerting system for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies (BFAs) stored within Shippingport spent fuel (SSFCs) canisters (fuel drying and canister inerting system). This fuel drying and canister inerting system is a component of the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Spent Nuclear Fuels Project at the Hanford Site. The fuel drying and canister inerting system provides for removing water and establishing an inert environment for Shippingport PWR Core 2 BFAs stored within SSFCs. A policy established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) states that new SNF facilities (this is interpreted to include structures, systems and components) shall achieve nuclear safety equivalence to comparable U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed facilities. This will be accomplished in part by applying appropriate NRC requirements for comparable NRC-licensed facilities to the fuel drying and canister inerting system, in addition to applicable DOE regulations and orders.

  11. Fuel performance models for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core design

    SciTech Connect

    Stansfield, O.M.; Simon, W.A.; Baxter, A.M.

    1983-09-01

    Mechanistic fuel performance models are used in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core design and licensing to predict failure and fission product release. Fuel particles manufactured with defective or missing SiC, IPyC, or fuel dispersion in the buffer fail at a level of less than 5 x 10/sup -4/ fraction. These failed particles primarily release metallic fission products because the OPyC remains intact on 90% of the particles and retains gaseous isotopes. The predicted failure of particles using performance models appears to be conservative relative to operating reactor experience.

  12. Core design study of a supercritical light water reactor with double row fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y.; Yang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-07-01

    An equilibrium core for supercritical light water reactor has been designed. A novel type of fuel assembly with dual rows of fuel rods between water rods is chosen and optimized to get more uniform assembly power distributions. Stainless steel is used for fuel rod cladding and structural material. Honeycomb structure filled with thermal isolation is introduced to reduce the usage of stainless steel and to keep moderator temperature below the pseudo critical temperature. Water flow scheme with ascending coolant flow in inner regions is carried out to achieve high outlet temperature. In order to enhance coolant outlet temperature, the radial power distributions needs to be as flat as possible through operation cycle. Fuel loading pattern and control rod pattern are optimized to flatten power distribution at inner regions. Axial fuel enrichment is divided into three parts to control axial power peak, which affects maximum cladding surface temperature. (authors)

  13. Whole-core neutron transport calculations without fuel-coolant homogenization

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. A.; Tsoulfanidis, N.; Lewis, E. E.; Palmiotti, G.; Taiwo, T. A.

    2000-02-10

    The variational nodal method implemented in the VARIANT code is generalized to perform full core transport calculations without spatial homogenization of cross sections at either the fuel-pin cell or fuel assembly level. The node size is chosen to correspond to one fuel-pin cell in the radial plane. Each node is divided into triangular finite subelements, with the interior spatial flux distribution represented by piecewise linear trial functions. The step change in the cross sections at the fuel-coolant interface can thus be represented explicitly in global calculations while retaining the fill spherical harmonics capability of VARIANT. The resulting method is applied to a two-dimensional seven-group representation of a LWR containing MOX fuel assemblies. Comparisons are made of the accuracy of various space-angle approximations and of the corresponding CPU times.

  14. Oyster Creek fuel thermal margin during core thermal-hydraulic oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Dougher, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Oyster Creek nuclear facility, a boiling water reactor (BWR)-2 plant type, has never experienced core thermal-hydraulic instability. Power oscillations, however, have been observed in other BWR cores both domestically and internationally. Two modes of oscillations have been observed, core wide and regional half-core. During core wide oscillations, the neutron flux in the core oscillates in the radial fundamental mode. During regional half-core oscillations, higher order harmonics in the radial plane result in out-of-phase oscillations with the neutron flux in one half of the core oscillating 180 deg out-of-phase with the neutron flux in the other half of the core. General Design Criteria 12 requires either prevention or detection and suppression of power oscillations which could result in violations of fuel design limits. Analyses performed by General Electric have demonstrated that for large-magnitude oscillations the potential exists for violation of the safety limit minimum critical power ratio (MCPR). However, for plants with a flow-biased neutron flux scram automatic mitigation of oscillations may be provided at an oscillation magnitude below that at which the safety limit is challenged. Plant-specific analysis for Oyster Creek demonstrates that the existing average power range monitor (APRM) system will sense and suppress power oscillations prior to violation of any safety limits.

  15. Core-Protected Platinum Monolayer Shell High-Stability Electrocatalysts for Fuel-Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    K Sasaki; H Naohara; Y Cai; Y Choi; P Liu; M Vukmirovic; J Wang; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    Platinum monolayers can act as shells for palladium nanoparticles to lead to electrocatalysts with high activities and an ultralow platinum content, but high platinum utilization. The stability derives from the core protecting the shell from dissolution. In fuel-cell tests, no loss of platinum was observed in 200,000 potential cycles, whereas loss of palladium was significant.

  16. Core-Protected Platinum Monolayer Shell High-Stability Electrocatalysts for Fuel-Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Adzic, R.R.; Sasaki, K.; Naohara, H.; Cai, Y.; Choi, Y.M.; Liu, P.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Wang, J.X.

    2010-11-08

    More than skin deep: Platinum monolayers can act as shells for palladium nanoparticles to lead to electrocatalysts with high activities and an ultralow platinum content, but high platinum utilization. The stability derives from the core protecting the shell from dissolution. In fuel-cell tests, no loss of platinum was observed in 200?000 potential cycles, whereas loss of palladium was significant.

  17. Transition Analysis of Promising U.S. Future Fuel Cycles Using ORION

    SciTech Connect

    Sunny, Eva E.; Worrall, Andrew; Peterson, Joshua L.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Gehin, Jess C.; Gregg, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies performed an evaluation and screening (E&S) study of nuclear fuel cycle options to help prioritize future research and development decisions. Previous work for this E&S study focused on establishing equilibrium conditions for analysis examples of 40 nuclear fuel cycle evaluation groups (EGs) and evaluating their performance according to a set of 22 standardized metrics. Following the E&S study, additional studies are being conducted to assess transitioning from the current US fuel cycle to future fuel cycle options identified by the E&S study as being most promising. These studies help inform decisions on how to effectively achieve full transition, estimate the length of time needed to undergo transition from the current fuel cycle, and evaluate performance of nuclear systems and facilities in place during the transition. These studies also help identify any barriers to achieve transition. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fuel Cycle Options Campaign team used ORION to analyze the transition pathway from the existing US nuclear fuel cycle—the once-through use of low-enriched-uranium (LEU) fuel in thermal-spectrum light water reactors (LWRs) —to a new fuel cycle with continuous recycling of plutonium and uranium in sodium fast reactors (SFRs). This paper discusses the analysis of the transition from an LWR to an SFR fleet using ORION, highlights the role of lifetime extensions of existing LWRs to aid transition, and discusses how a slight delay in SFR deployment can actually reduce the time to achieve an equilibrium fuel cycle.

  18. Benchmark Evaluation of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor Upgraded LEU-Fueled Core

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2001-09-01

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate the cold-critical start-up measurements performed during the fresh core reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The final upgraded core configuration with 64 fuel elements has been completed. Evaluated benchmark measurement data include criticality, control-rod worth measurements, shutdown margin, and excess reactivity. Dominant uncertainties in keff include the manganese content and impurities contained within the stainless steel cladding of the fuel and the 236U and erbium poison content in the fuel matrix. Calculations with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data are approximately 1.4% greater than the benchmark model eigenvalue, supporting contemporary research regarding errors in the cross section data necessary to simulate TRIGA-type reactors. Uncertainties in reactivity effects measurements are estimated to be ~10% with calculations in agreement with benchmark experiment values within 2s. The completed benchmark evaluation de-tails are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Evaluation of the NRAD LEU cores containing 56, 60, and 62 fuel elements have also been completed, including analysis of their respective reactivity effects measurements; they are also available in the IRPhEP Handbook but will not be included in this summary paper.

  19. Detailed OEDGE modeling of core-pedestal fueling in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J. D.; Leonard, A. W.; Stangeby, P. C.; Boedo, J.A.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Reiter, D.; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Watkins, J. G.; Lisgo, S.

    2013-01-01

    The OEDGE code is used to model core fueling for attached L-mode plasmas and between edge localized modes (ELMs) for attached H-mode plasmas in DIII-D. Empirical plasma reconstruction has been used to determine the plasma conditions in these discharges. EIRENE is used to model the hydrogen recycling. Divertor recycling accounts for 65 100% of the core fueling. The fraction of the total divertor target flux ionized inside the separatrix ranges from 5% to 20%. The fraction of total wall flux ionized inside the separatrix ranges from 20% to 50%. Neutrals originating from wall regions closer to the separatrix are more likely to ionize in the confined plasma. Ionization in the confined plasma is concentrated below the midplane with peaks in the poloidal profiles just above the X-point. Radial core ionization in high density H-mode is peaked strongly near the separatrix.

  20. tRNA Core Hypothesis for the Transition from the RNA World to the Ribonucleoprotein World

    PubMed Central

    de Farias, Savio T.; Rêgo, Thais G.; José, Marco V.

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present the tRNA core hypothesis, which emphasizes the central role of tRNAs molecules in the origin and evolution of fundamental biological processes. tRNAs gave origin to the first genes (mRNA) and the peptidyl transferase center (rRNA), proto-tRNAs were at the core of a proto-translation system, and the anticodon and operational codes then arose in tRNAs molecules. Metabolic pathways emerged from evolutionary pressures of the decoding systems. The transitions from the RNA world to the ribonucleoprotein world to modern biological systems were driven by three kinds of tRNAs transitions, to wit, tRNAs leading to both mRNA and rRNA. PMID:27023615

  1. tRNA Core Hypothesis for the Transition from the RNA World to the Ribonucleoprotein World.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Savio T; Rêgo, Thais G; José, Marco V

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present the tRNA core hypothesis, which emphasizes the central role of tRNAs molecules in the origin and evolution of fundamental biological processes. tRNAs gave origin to the first genes (mRNA) and the peptidyl transferase center (rRNA), proto-tRNAs were at the core of a proto-translation system, and the anticodon and operational codes then arose in tRNAs molecules. Metabolic pathways emerged from evolutionary pressures of the decoding systems. The transitions from the RNA world to the ribonucleoprotein world to modern biological systems were driven by three kinds of tRNAs transitions, to wit, tRNAs leading to both mRNA and rRNA. PMID:27023615

  2. In-Core Fuel Management with Biased Multiobjective Function Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Shatilla, Youssef A.; Little, David C.; Penkrot, Jack A.; Holland, Richard Andrew

    2000-06-15

    The capability of biased multiobjective function optimization has been added to the Westinghouse Electric Company's (Westinghouse's) Advanced Loading Pattern Search code (ALPS). The search process, given a user-defined set of design constraints, proceeds to minimize a global parameter called the total value associated with constraints compliance (VACC), an importance-weighted measure of the deviation from limit and/or margin target. The search process takes into consideration two equally important user-defined factors while minimizing the VACC, namely, the relative importance of each constraint with respect to the others and the optimization of each constraint according to its own objective function. Hence, trading off margin-to-design limits from where it is abundantly available to where it is badly needed can now be accomplished. Two practical methods are provided to the user for input of constraints and associated objective functions. One consists of establishing design limits based on traditional core design parameters such as assembly/pin burnup, power, or reactivity. The second method allows the user to write a program, or script, to define a logic not possible through ordinary means. This method of script writing was made possible through the application resident compiler feature of the technical user language integration processor (tulip), developed at Westinghouse. For the optimization problems studied, ALPS not only produced candidate loading patterns (LPs) that met all of the conflicting design constraints, but in cases where the design appeared to be over constrained gave a wide range of LPs that came very close to meeting all the constraints based on the associated objective functions.

  3. Phase transitions in core-collapse supernova matter at sub-saturation densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Helena; Newton, William G.; Stone, Jirina R.

    2014-12-01

    Phase transitions in hot, dense matter in the collapsing cores of massive stars have an important impact on the core-collapse supernova mechanism as they absorb heat, disrupt homology, and so weaken the developing shock. We perform a three-dimensional, finite temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) study of inhomogeneous nuclear matter to determine the critical density and temperature for the phase transition between the pasta phase and homogeneous matter and its properties. We employ four different parametrizations of the Skyrme nuclear energy-density functional, SkM*, SLy4, NRAPR, and SQMC700, which span a range of saturation-density symmetry energy behaviors constrained by a variety of nuclear experimental probes. For each of these interactions we calculate free energy, pressure, entropy, and chemical potentials in the range of particle number densities where the nuclear pasta phases are expected to exist, 0.02-0.12 fm-3, temperatures 2-8 MeV, and a proton fraction of 0.3. We find unambiguous evidence for a first-order phase transition to uniform matter, unsoftened by the presence of the pasta phases. No conclusive signs of a first-order phase transition between the pasta phases is observed, and it is argued that the thermodynamic quantities vary continuously right up to the first-order phase transition to uniform matter. We compare our results with thermodynamic spinodals calculated using the same Skyrme parametrizations, finding that the effect of short-range Coulomb correlations and quantum shell effects included in our model leads to the pasta phases existing at densities up to 0.01 fm-3 above the spinodal boundaries, thus increasing the transition density to uniform matter by the same amount. The transition density is otherwise shown to be insensitive to the symmetry energy at saturation density within the range constrained by the concordance of a variety of experimental constraints, and can be taken to be a well determined quantity.

  4. On axisymmetric/diamond-like mode transitions in axially compressed core-shell cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fan; Potier-Ferry, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Recent interests in curvature- and stress-induced pattern formation and pattern selection motivate the present study. Surface morphological wrinkling of a cylindrical shell supported by a soft core subjected to axial compression is investigated based on a nonlinear 3D finite element model. The post-buckling behavior of core-shell cylinders beyond the first bifurcation often leads to complicated responses with surface mode transitions. The proposed finite element framework allows predicting and tracing these bifurcation portraits from a quantitative standpoint. The occurrence and evolution of 3D instability modes including sinusoidally deformed axisymmetric patterns and non-axisymmetric diamond-like modes will be highlighted according to critical dimensionless parameters. Besides, the phase diagram obtained from dimensional analyses and numerical results could be used to guide the design of core-shell cylindrical systems to achieve the desired instability patterns.

  5. Quantifying the landscape and kinetic paths for epithelial-mesenchymal transition from a core circuit.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhe; Hong, Tian; Nie, Qing

    2016-07-21

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), as a crucial process in embryonic development and cancer metastasis, has been investigated extensively. However, how to quantify the global stability and transition dynamics for EMT under fluctuations remains to be elucidated. Starting from a core EMT genetic circuit composed of three key proteins or microRNAs (microRNA-200, ZEB and SNAIL), we uncovered the potential landscape for the EMT process. Three attractors emerge from the landscape, which correspond to epithelial, mesenchymal and partial EMT states respectively. Based on the landscape, we analyzed two important quantities of the EMT system: the barrier heights between different basins of attraction that describe the degree of difficulty for EMT or backward transition, and the mean first passage time (MFPT) that characterizes the kinetic transition rate. These quantities can be harnessed as measurements for the stability of cell types and the degree of difficulty of transitions between different cell types. We also calculated the minimum action paths (MAPs) by path integral approaches. The MAP delineates the transition processes between different cell types quantitatively. We propose two different EMT processes: a direct EMT from E to P, and a step-wise EMT going through an intermediate state, depending on different extracellular environments. The landscape and kinetic paths we acquired offer a new physical and quantitative way for understanding the mechanisms of EMT processes, and indicate the possible roles for the intermediate states. PMID:27328302

  6. Advanced core design and fuel management for pebble-bed reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gougar, Hans David

    A method for designing and optimizing recirculating pebble-bed reactor cores is presented. At the heart of the method is a new reactor physics computer code, PEBBED, which accurately and efficiently computes the neutronic and material properties of the asymptotic (equilibrium) fuel cycle. This core state is shown to be unique for a given core geometry, power level, discharge burnup, and fuel circulation policy. Fuel circulation in the pebble-bed can be described in terms of a few well-defined parameters and expressed as a recirculation matrix. The implementation of a few heat-transfer relations suitable for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors allows for the rapid estimation of thermal properties critical for safe operation. Thus, modeling and design optimization of a given pebble-bed core can be performed quickly and efficiently via the manipulation of a limited number key parameters. Automation of the optimization process is achieved by manipulation of these parameters using a genetic algorithm. The end result is an economical, passively safe, proliferation-resistant nuclear power plant.

  7. Advanced Core Design And Fuel Management For Pebble-Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; William K. Terry

    2004-10-01

    A method for designing and optimizing recirculating pebble-bed reactor cores is presented. At the heart of the method is a new reactor physics computer code, PEBBED, which accurately and efficiently computes the neutronic and material properties of the asymptotic (equilibrium) fuel cycle. This core state is shown to be unique for a given core geometry, power level, discharge burnup, and fuel circulation policy. Fuel circulation in the pebble-bed can be described in terms of a few well?defined parameters and expressed as a recirculation matrix. The implementation of a few heat?transfer relations suitable for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors allows for the rapid estimation of thermal properties critical for safe operation. Thus, modeling and design optimization of a given pebble-bed core can be performed quickly and efficiently via the manipulation of a limited number key parameters. Automation of the optimization process is achieved by manipulation of these parameters using a genetic algorithm. The end result is an economical, passively safe, proliferation-resistant nuclear power plant.

  8. Density Affects the Nature of the Hexatic-Liquid Transition in Two-Dimensional Melting of Soft-Core Systems.

    PubMed

    Zu, Mengjie; Liu, Jun; Tong, Hua; Xu, Ning

    2016-08-19

    We find that both continuous and discontinuous hexatic-liquid transitions can happen in the melting of two-dimensional solids of soft-core disks. For three typical model systems, Hertzian, harmonic, and Gaussian-core models, we observe the same scenarios. These systems exhibit reentrant crystallization (melting) with a maximum melting temperature T_{m} happening at a crossover density ρ_{m}. The hexatic-liquid transition at a density smaller than ρ_{m} is discontinuous. Liquid and hexatic phases coexist in a density interval, which becomes narrower with increasing temperature and tends to vanish approximately at T_{m}. Above ρ_{m}, the transition is continuous, in agreement with the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young theory. For these soft-core systems, the nature of the hexatic-liquid transition depends on density (pressure), with the melting at ρ_{m} being a plausible transition point from discontinuous to continuous hexatic-liquid transition. PMID:27588868

  9. Density Affects the Nature of the Hexatic-Liquid Transition in Two-Dimensional Melting of Soft-Core Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Mengjie; Liu, Jun; Tong, Hua; Xu, Ning

    2016-08-01

    We find that both continuous and discontinuous hexatic-liquid transitions can happen in the melting of two-dimensional solids of soft-core disks. For three typical model systems, Hertzian, harmonic, and Gaussian-core models, we observe the same scenarios. These systems exhibit reentrant crystallization (melting) with a maximum melting temperature Tm happening at a crossover density ρm. The hexatic-liquid transition at a density smaller than ρm is discontinuous. Liquid and hexatic phases coexist in a density interval, which becomes narrower with increasing temperature and tends to vanish approximately at Tm. Above ρm, the transition is continuous, in agreement with the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young theory. For these soft-core systems, the nature of the hexatic-liquid transition depends on density (pressure), with the melting at ρm being a plausible transition point from discontinuous to continuous hexatic-liquid transition.

  10. Transition from HEU to LEU fuel in Romania's 14-MW TRIGA reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    The 14-MW TRIGA steady state reactor (SSR) located in Pitesti, Romania, first went critical in the fall of 1979. Initially, the core configuration for full power operation used 29 fuel clusters each containing a 5 {times} 5 square array of HEU (10 wt%) -- ZrH -- Er (2.8 wt%) fuel-moderator rods (1.295 cm o.d.) clad in Incology. With a total inventory of 35 HEU fuel clusters, burnup considerations required a gradual expansion of the core from 29 to 32 and finally to 35 clusters before the reactor was shut down because of insufficient excess reactivity. At this time each of the original 29 fuel clusters had an overage {sup 235}U burnup in the range from 50 to 62%. Because of the US policy regarding the export of highly enriched uranium, fresh HEU TRIGA replacement fuel is not available. After a number of safety-related measurements, the SSR is expected to resume full power operation in the near future using a mixed core containing five LEU TRIGA clusters of the same geometry as the original fuel but with fuel-moderator rods containing 45 wt% U (19.7% {sup 235}U enrichment) and 1.1 wt% Er. Rods for 14 additional LEU fuel clusters will be fabricated by General Atomics. In support of the SSR mixed core operation numerous neutronic calculations have been performed. This paper presents some of the results of those calculations.

  11. Transition from HEU to LEU fuel in Romania`s 14-MW TRIGA reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1991-12-31

    The 14-MW TRIGA steady state reactor (SSR) located in Pitesti, Romania, first went critical in the fall of 1979. Initially, the core configuration for full power operation used 29 fuel clusters each containing a 5 {times} 5 square array of HEU (10 wt%) -- ZrH -- Er (2.8 wt%) fuel-moderator rods (1.295 cm o.d.) clad in Incology. With a total inventory of 35 HEU fuel clusters, burnup considerations required a gradual expansion of the core from 29 to 32 and finally to 35 clusters before the reactor was shut down because of insufficient excess reactivity. At this time each of the original 29 fuel clusters had an overage {sup 235}U burnup in the range from 50 to 62%. Because of the US policy regarding the export of highly enriched uranium, fresh HEU TRIGA replacement fuel is not available. After a number of safety-related measurements, the SSR is expected to resume full power operation in the near future using a mixed core containing five LEU TRIGA clusters of the same geometry as the original fuel but with fuel-moderator rods containing 45 wt% U (19.7% {sup 235}U enrichment) and 1.1 wt% Er. Rods for 14 additional LEU fuel clusters will be fabricated by General Atomics. In support of the SSR mixed core operation numerous neutronic calculations have been performed. This paper presents some of the results of those calculations.

  12. Method of fabricating a monolithic core for a solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Zwick, Stanley A.; Ackerman, John P.

    1985-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a core for use in a solid oxide fuel cell that electrochemically combines fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output. The core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support consisting instead only of the active anode, cathode, electrolyte and interconnect materials. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching electrolyte material therebetween, and each interconnect wall consists of the cathode and anode materials sandwiching interconnect material therebetween. The electrolyte and interconnect walls define a plurality of substantially parallel core passageways alternately having respectively the inside faces thereof with only the anode material or with only the cathode material exposed. In the wall structure, the electrolyte and interconnect materials are only 0.002-0.01 cm thick; and the cathode and anode materials are only 0.002-0.05 cm thick. The method consists of building up the electrolyte and interconnect walls by depositing each material on individually and endwise of the wall itself, where each material deposit is sequentially applied for one cycle; and where the depositing cycle is repeated many times until the material buildup is sufficient to formulate the core. The core is heat cured to become dimensionally and structurally stable.

  13. Start-up fuel and power flattening of sodium-cooled candle core

    SciTech Connect

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Sagawa, Yu; Umino, Akitake; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    The hard neutron spectrum and unique power shape of CANDLE enable its distinctive performances such as achieving high burnup more than 30% and exempting necessity of both enrichment and reprocessing. On the other hand, they also cause several challenging problems. One is how the initial fuel can be prepared to start up the first CANDLE reactor because the equilibrium fuel composition that enables stable CANDLE burning is complex both in axial and radial directions. Another prominent problem is high radial power peaking factor that worsens averaged burnup, namely resource utilization factor in once-through mode and shorten the life time of structure materials. The purposes of this study are to solve these two problems. Several ideas for core configurations and startup fuel using single enrichment uranium and iron as a substitute of fission products are studied. As a result, it is found that low enriched uranium is applicable to ignite the core but all concepts examined here exceeded heat limits. Adjustment in enrichment and height of active and burnt zone is opened for future work. Sodium duct assemblies and thorium fuel assemblies loaded in the center region are studied as measures to reduce radial power peaking factor. Replacing 37 fuels by thorium fuel assemblies in the zeroth to third row provides well-balanced performance with flattened radial power distribution. The CANDLE core loaded with natural uranium in the outer and thorium in the center region achieved 35.6% of averaged burnup and 7.0 years of cladding life time owing to mitigated local fast neutron irradiation at the center. Using thorium with natural or depleted uranium in CANDLE reactor is also beneficial to diversifying fission resource and extending available term of fission energy without expansion of needs for enrichment and reprocessing.

  14. Status of core conversion with LEU silicide fuel in JRR-4

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Teruo; Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Shirai, Eiji

    1997-08-01

    Japan Research Reactor No.4 (JRR-4) is a light water moderated and cooled, 93% enriched uranium ETR-type fuel used and swimming pool type reactor with thermal output of 3.5MW. Since the first criticality was achieved on January 28, 1965, JRR-4 has been used for shielding experiments, radioisotope production, neutron activation analyses, training for reactor engineers and so on for about 30 years. Within the framework of the RERTR Program, the works for conversion to LEU fuel are now under way, and neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations emphasizing on safety and performance aspects are being carried out. The design and evaluation for the core conversion are based on the Guides for Safety Design and Evaluation of research and testing reactor facilities in Japan. These results show that the JRR-4 will be able to convert to use LEU fuel without any major design change of core and size of fuel element. LEU silicide fuel (19.75%) will be used and maximum neutron flux in irradiation hole would be slightly decreased from present neutron flux value of 7x10{sup 13}(n/cm{sup 2}/s). The conversion works are scheduled to complete in 1998, including with upgrade of the reactor building and utilization facilities.

  15. Coupling the core analysis program DeCART to the fuel performance application BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Gleicher, F. N.; Spencer, B.; Novascone, S.; Williamson, R.; Martineau, R. C.; Rose, M.; Downar, T. J.; Collins, B.

    2013-07-01

    The 3D neutron transport and core analysis program DeCART was coupled to the fuels performance application BISON to provide a higher fidelity tool for fuel performance simulation. This project is motivated by the desire to couple a high fidelity core analysis program (based on the method of characteristics) to a high fidelity fuel performance program, both of which can simulate 3D problems. DeCART provides sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux, with resonance treatment, during burnup or a fast transient. BISON implicitly solves coupled thermomechanical equations for the fuel on a sub-millimeter level finite element mesh. A method was developed for mapping the fission rate density and fast neutron flux from DeCART to BISON. Multiple depletion cases were run with one-way data transfer from DeCART to BISON. The one-way data transfer of fission rate density is shown to agree with the fission rate density obtained from an internal Lassman-style model in BISON. One-way data transfer was also demonstrated in a 3D case in which azimuthal asymmetry was induced in the fission rate density profile of a fuel rod modeled in DeCART. Two-way data transfer was established by mapping the temperature distribution from BISON to DeCART. A Picard iterative algorithm was developed for the loose coupling with two-way data transfer. (authors)

  16. Analysis of Advanced Fuel Assemblies and Core Designs for the Current and Next Generations of LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Ragusa, Jean; Vierow, Karen

    2011-09-01

    The objective of the project is to design and analyze advanced fuel assemblies for use in current and future light water reactors and to assess their ability to reduce the inventory of transuranic elements, while preserving operational safety. The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel can delay or avoid the need for a second geological repository in the US. Current light water reactor fuel assembly designs under investigation could reduce the plutonium inventory of reprocessed fuel. Nevertheless, these designs are not effective in stabilizing or reducing the inventory of minor actinides. In the course of this project, we developed and analyzed advanced fuel assembly designs with improved thermal transmutation capability regarding transuranic elements and especially minor actinides. These designs will be intended for use in thermal spectrum (e.g., current and future fleet of light water reactors in the US). We investigated various fuel types, namely high burn-up advanced mixed oxides and inert matrix fuels, in various geometrical designs that are compliant with the core internals of current and future light water reactors. Neutronic/thermal hydraulic effects were included. Transmutation efficiency and safety parameters were used to rank and down-select the various designs.

  17. Nuclear Engineering Computer Models for In-Core Fuel Management Analysis.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-06-12

    Version 00 VPI-NECM is a nuclear engineering computer system of modules for in-core fuel management analysis. The system consists of 6 independent programs designed to calculate: (1) FARCON - neutron slowing down and epithermal group constants, (2) SLOCON - thermal neutron spectrum and group constants, (3) DISFAC - slow neutron disadvantage factors, (4) ODOG - solution of a one group neutron diffusion equation, (5) ODMUG - three group criticality problem, (6) FUELBURN - fuel burnupmore » in slow neutron fission reactors.« less

  18. An analytical study of volatile metallic fission product release from very high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel and core

    SciTech Connect

    Mitake, S.; Okamoto, F.

    1988-04-01

    Release characteristics of volatile metallic fission products from the coated fuel particle and the reactor core for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor during its power operation has been studied using numerical analysis. A computer code FORNAX, based on Fick's diffusion law and the evaporation mass transfer relation, has been developed, which considers, in particular, distribution and time histories of power density, fuel temperature, and failed and degraded fuel particle fractions in the core. Applicability of the code to evaluate the core design has been shown and the following have been indicated on the release of cesium from the reactor: 1. The release from the intact fuel particles by diffusion through their intact coatings shows larger contribution in the total core release at higher temperature. 2. The diffusion release from the intact particle is governed not only by the diffusion in the silicon carbide layer but also by that in the fuel kernel.

  19. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, Leslie; Post, Matthew; Gikakis, Christina

    2015-12-11

    This report, published annually, summarizes the progress of fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) development in the United States and discusses the achievements and challenges of introducing fuel cell propulsion in transit. Various stakeholders, including FCEB developers, transit agencies, and system integrators, have expressed the value of this annual status report, which provides a summary of results from evaluations performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The annual status report tracks the progress of the FCEB industry toward meeting technical targets, documents the lessons learned, and discusses the path forward for commercial viability of fuel cell technology for transit buses. The 2015 summary results primarily focus on the most recent year for each demonstration, from August 2014 through July 2015. The results for these buses account for more than 1,045,000 miles traveled and 83,000 hours of fuel cell power system operation. The primary results presented in the report are from two demonstrations of fuel-cell-dominant bus designs: the Zero Emission Bay Area Demonstration Group led by Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) in California and the American Fuel Cell Bus Project at SunLine Transit Agency in California.

  20. Bay Area Transit Agencies Propel Fuel Cell Buses Toward Commercialization (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration of the next generation of fuel cells buses. Several transit agencies in the San Francisco Bay Area are participating in demonstrating the largest single fleet of fuel cell buses in the United States.

  1. 78 FR 50313 - Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... safety. On May 20, 2013 (78 FR 29520), the NRC published the final rule for 10 CFR 73.37, ``Physical... 3150-AI64 Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Greater than 100 Grams,'' dated October 10, 2002, and subsequent...

  2. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, Leslie; Chandler, Kevin; Gikakis, Christina

    2012-11-01

    This report is the sixth in an annual series of reports that summarize the progress of fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) development in the United States and discuss the achievements and challenges of introducing fuel cell propulsion in transit. The report also provides a snapshot of current FCEB performance results over the last year.

  3. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Simpson, Michael

    2013-04-19

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  4. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Simpson, Michael; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  5. Enhancement of the inherent self-protection of the fast sodium reactor cores with oxide fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Eliseev, V.A.; Malisheva, I.V.; Matveev, V.I.; Egorov, A.V.; Maslov, P.A.

    2013-07-01

    With the development and research into the generation IV fast sodium reactors, great attention is paid to the enhancement of the core inherent self-protection characteristics. One of the problems dealt here is connected with the reduction of the reactivity margin so that the control rods running should not result in the core overheating and melting. In this paper we consider the possibilities of improving the core of BN-1200 with oxide fuel by a known method of introducing an axial fertile layer into the core. But unlike earlier studies this paper looks at the possibility of using such a layer not only for improving breeding, but also for reducing sodium void reactivity effect (SVRE). This proposed improvement of the BN-1200 core does not solve the problem of strong interference in control and protection system (CPS) rods of BN-1200, but they reduce significantly the reactivity margin for burn-up compensation. This helps compensate all the reactivity balances in the improved core configurations without violating constraints on SVRE value.

  6. Fuel rod and core materials investigations related to LWR extended burnup operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstad, Erik; Vitanza, Carlo

    1992-06-01

    The paper deals with tests and recent measurements related to extended burnup fuel performance and describes test facilities and results in the areas of waterside cladding corrosion and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Fuel temperature data suggest a gradual degradation of UO 2 thermal conductivity with exposure in the range 6-8% per 10 MWd/kgUO 2 at temperatures below 700°C. The effect on the fuel microstructure of interlinkage and resintering phenomena is shown by measuring the surface-to-volume ( S/ V) ratio of the fuel. Changes in S/V with burnup are correlated to power rating and fuel operating temperature. No evidence was found of enhanced fission gas release during load-follow operation in the burnup range 25-45 MWd/kgUO 2. The effect of high lithium concentration (high pH) on the corrosion behaviour of pre-irradiated high burnup Zircaloy-4 fuel rods subjected either to nucleate boiling or to one-phase cooling conditions was studied. The oxide thickness growth rates measured at an average burnup up to 40 MWd/kgUO 2 are consistent with literature data and show no evidence of corrosion enhancement due to the high lithium content and little effect of cooling regime. A test facility for exploring the effects of environmental variables on IASCC behaviour of in-core structural materials is described.

  7. Core/shell structural transformation and brittle-to-ductile transition in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zaoshi; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Nakano, Aiichiro

    2012-04-01

    Nanowires (NWs) exhibit thermo-mechanical properties that are distinct from their bulk properties, and their understanding is critical for the reliability, manufacturability, and optimization of a wide range of devices consisting of NWs. Here, molecular-dynamics simulation reveals a rich size-temperature "phase diagram" for the mechanical response of a zinc-oxide NW under tension. For smaller diameters and higher temperatures, transitions are found from brittle cleavage to structural transformation-mediated brittle cleavage to ductile failure. Atomistic mechanisms of the unique nano-thermo-mechanical behavior are elucidated as a consequence of surface-structural relaxation, which in particular predicts spontaneous formation of a core/shell structure under tension. The nano-thermo-mechanical phase diagram resolves controversies between previous experiments and theory, and the predicted "intrinsic" core/shell structure may find device applications.

  8. Core Fueling and Edge Particle Flux Analysis in Ohmically and Auxiliary Heated NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    V.A. Soukhanovskii; R. Maingi; R. Raman; H.W. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; L. Roquemore; C.H. Skinner; NSTX Research Team

    2002-06-12

    The Boundary Physics program of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is focusing on optimization of the edge power and particle flows in b * 25% L- and H-mode plasmas of t {approx} 0.8 s duration heated by up to 6 MW of high harmonic fast wave and up to 5 MW of neutral beam injection. Particle balance and core fueling efficiencies of low and high field side gas fueling of L-mode homic and NBI heated plasmas have been compared using an analytical zero dimensional particle balance model and measured ion and neutral fluxes. Gas fueling efficiencies are in the range of 0.05-0.20 and do not depend on discharge magnetic configuration, density or poloidal location of the injector. The particle balance modeling indicates that the addition of HFS fueling results in a reversal of the wall loading rate and higher wall inventories. Initial particle source estimates obtained from neutral pressure and spectroscopic measurements indicate that ion flux into the divertor greatly exceeds midplane ion flux from the main plasma, suggesting that the scrape-off cross-field transport plays a minor role in diverted plasmas. Present analysis provides the basis for detailed fluid modeling of core and edge particle flows and particle confinement properties of NSTX plasmas. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contracts No. DE-AC02-76CH03073, DE-AC05-00OR22725, and W-7405-ENG-36.

  9. Nondestructive examination of 51 fuel and reflector elements from Fort St. Vrain Core Segment 1

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.M.; Saurwein, J.J.

    1980-12-01

    Fifty-one fuel and reflector elements irradiated in core segment 1 of the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) were inspected dimensionally and visually in the Hot Service Facility at Fort St. Vrain in July 1979. Time- and volume-averaged graphite temperatures for the examined fuel elements ranged from approx. 400/sup 0/ to 750/sup 0/C. Fast neutron fluences varied from approx. 0.3 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ to 1.0 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/. Nearly all of the examined elements shrank in both axial and radial dimensions. The measured data were compared with strain and bow predictions obtained from SURVEY/STRESS, a computer code that employs viscoelastic beam theory to calculate stresses and deformations in HTGR fuel elements.

  10. Exciton-trion transitions in single CdSe-CdS core-shell nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Daniel E; van Embden, Joel; Mulvaney, Paul; Fernée, Mark J; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2009-08-25

    We report on the observation of an intermediate state in the blinking of single CdSe/CdS core-shell nanocrystals. This state has a low quantum yield and connects the "on" and "off" states commonly observed in the photoluminescence blinking of individual nanocrystals. We find that the transitions between these two emitting states follow nearly single-exponential statistics. The transitions from the "on" state to this intermediate state result from changes in the surface passivation of the nanocrystal. The data are consistent with photoinduced, adsorption/desorption events that take place at the surface of the nanocrystals. The trion state leads to a reduction in photoluminescence in nanocrystals. PMID:19655720

  11. Mean-field dynamic criticality and geometric transition in the Gaussian core model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coslovich, Daniele; Ikeda, Atsushi; Miyazaki, Kunimasa

    2016-04-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate dynamic heterogeneities and the potential energy landscape of the Gaussian core model (GCM). Despite the nearly Gaussian statistics of particles' displacements, the GCM exhibits giant dynamic heterogeneities close to the dynamic transition temperature. The divergence of the four-point susceptibility is quantitatively well described by the inhomogeneous version of the mode-coupling theory. Furthermore, the potential energy landscape of the GCM is characterized by large energy barriers, as expected from the lack of activated, hopping dynamics, and display features compatible with a geometric transition. These observations demonstrate that all major features of mean-field dynamic criticality can be observed in a physically sound, three-dimensional model.

  12. Mean-field dynamic criticality and geometric transition in the Gaussian core model.

    PubMed

    Coslovich, Daniele; Ikeda, Atsushi; Miyazaki, Kunimasa

    2016-04-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate dynamic heterogeneities and the potential energy landscape of the Gaussian core model (GCM). Despite the nearly Gaussian statistics of particles' displacements, the GCM exhibits giant dynamic heterogeneities close to the dynamic transition temperature. The divergence of the four-point susceptibility is quantitatively well described by the inhomogeneous version of the mode-coupling theory. Furthermore, the potential energy landscape of the GCM is characterized by large energy barriers, as expected from the lack of activated, hopping dynamics, and display features compatible with a geometric transition. These observations demonstrate that all major features of mean-field dynamic criticality can be observed in a physically sound, three-dimensional model. PMID:27176347

  13. Multiple phase transitions in extended hard-core lattice gas models in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Nath, Trisha; Rajesh, R

    2014-07-01

    We study the k-NN hard-core lattice gas model in which the first k next-nearest-neighbor sites of a particle are excluded from occupation by other particles on a two-dimensional square lattice. This model is the lattice version of the hard-disk system with increasing k corresponding to decreasing lattice spacing. While the hard-disk system is known to undergo a two-step freezing process with increasing density, the lattice model has been known to show only one transition. Here, based on Monte Carlo simulations and high-density expansions of the free energy and density, we argue that for k = 4,10,11,14,⋯, the lattice model undergoes multiple transitions with increasing density. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm the same for k = 4,...,11. This, in turn, resolves an existing puzzle as to why the 4-NN model has a continuous transition against the expectation of a first-order transition. PMID:25122264

  14. 10 CFR 73.35 - Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel (100 grams or less) in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... fuel (100 grams or less) in transit. 73.35 Section 73.35 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... Transit § 73.35 Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel (100 grams or less) in... quantity of irradiated reactor fuel weighing 100 grams (0.22 pounds) or less in net weight of...

  15. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2013-01-01

    SunLine Transit Agency, which provides public transit services to the Coachella Valley area of California, has demonstrated hydrogen and fuel cell bus technologies for more than 10 years. In May 2010, SunLine began demonstrating the advanced technology (AT) fuel cell bus with a hybrid electric propulsion system, fuel cell power system, and lithium-based hybrid batteries. This report describes operations at SunLine for the AT fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas buses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with SunLine to evaluate the bus in real-world service to document the results and help determine the progress toward technology readiness. NREL has previously published three reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from February 2012 through November 2012.

  16. Core-Shell Model of Folding-Unfolding Transitions (UFT) in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aroutiounian, Svetlana

    2008-03-01

    There are ˜10^N conformations for a protein of length N to sort out randomly in search of lowest free energy state. Can protein folding be simple and fast? Core-shell model introduces principles, proposes mechanisms and scores residues of fast, reversible UFT in protein. According to it, during UFT the realm of intra-residual interactions leads the residue motion. The scaffold of hydrophilic residues forms external shell of unstructured, tube-like protein in unfolded state, just as the hydrophobic residues form internal scaffold -- core, of the protein in folded state. As UFT proceeds, residue slides into lowest-score position permitted by its structure. Model accounts for experimentally observed features of UFT. It is based on three principles: 1) During UFT protein is virtual - its features or structure are inferred only statistically and with limited precision; 2) Mechanism of UFT memory is not longitudinal, but transverse; 3) Native design overrides specific features of residues - the alphabet of amino acids assumes an intrinsic score-function. Per-residue mechanism of UFT is proposed and score-function is described. Difference graphs of transitional score-function and average genome-wide abundance index show that our score-function is the order parameter of UFT in protein and by virtue of being it, reveals transitional key residues. It echoes the multiple-tier and funnel concepts of FEL perspective. Monte Carlo simulations of UFT in myoglobin illustrate the idea.

  17. NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS TRIGGERED BY A QUARK-HADRON PHASE TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Nobuya; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Hempel, Matthias; Kaeppeli, Roger; Rauscher, Thomas; Winteler, Christian; Fischer, Tobias; Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel; Froehlich, Carla; Sagert, Irina

    2012-10-10

    We explore heavy-element nucleosynthesis in the explosion of massive stars that are triggered by a quark-hadron phase transition during the early post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. The present study is based on general-relativistic radiation hydrodynamics simulations with three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport in spherical symmetry, which utilize a quark-hadron hybrid equation of state based on the MIT bag model for strange quark matter. The quark-hadron phase transition inside the stellar core forms a shock wave propagating toward the surface of the proto-neutron star. This shock wave results in an explosion and ejects neutron-rich matter from the outer accreted layers of the proto-neutron star. Later, during the cooling phase, the proto-neutron star develops a proton-rich neutrino-driven wind. We present a detailed analysis of the nucleosynthesis outcome in both neutron-rich and proton-rich ejecta and compare our integrated nucleosynthesis with observations of the solar system and metal-poor stars. For our standard scenario, we find that a 'weak' r-process occurs and elements up to the second peak (A {approx} 130) are successfully synthesized. Furthermore, uncertainties in the explosion dynamics could barely allow us to obtain the strong r-process which produces heavier isotopes, including the third peak (A {approx} 195) and actinide elements.

  18. PWR core and spent fuel pool analysis using scale and nestle

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J. E.; Maldonado, G. I.; St Clair, R.; Orr, D.

    2012-07-01

    The SCALE nuclear analysis code system [SCALE, 2011], developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is widely recognized as high quality software for analyzing nuclear systems. The SCALE code system is composed of several validated computer codes and methods with standard control sequences, such as the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics sequence, which supplies dependable and accurate analyses for industry, regulators, and academia. Although TRITON generates energy-collapsed and space-homogenized few group cross sections, SCALE does not include a full-core nodal neutron diffusion simulation module within. However, in the past few years, the open-source NESTLE core simulator [NESTLE, 2003], originally developed at North Carolina State Univ. (NCSU), has been updated and upgraded via collaboration between ORNL and the Univ. of Tennessee (UT), so it now has a growingly seamless coupling to the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics [Galloway, 2010]. This study presents the methodology used to couple lattice physics data between TRITON and NESTLE in order to perform a three-dimensional full-core analysis employing a 'real-life' Duke Energy PWR as the test bed. The focus for this step was to compare the key parameters of core reactivity and radial power distribution versus plant data. Following the core analysis, following a three cycle burn, a spent fuel pool analysis was done using information generated from NESTLE for the discharged bundles and was compared to Duke Energy spent fuel pool models. The KENO control module from SCALE was employed for this latter stage of the project. (authors)

  19. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: First Results Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2011-03-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This report provides the early data results and implementation experience of the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service.

  20. Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Transitions: Optimization, Modeling Choices, and Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsen, Robert W.

    Many nuclear fuel cycle simulators have evolved over time to help understan the nuclear industry/ecosystem at a macroscopic level. Cyclus is one of th first fuel cycle simulators to accommodate larger-scale analysis with it liberal open-source licensing and first-class Linux support. Cyclus also ha features that uniquely enable investigating the effects of modeling choices o fuel cycle simulators and scenarios. This work is divided into thre experiments focusing on optimization, effects of modeling choices, and fue cycle uncertainty. Effective optimization techniques are developed for automatically determinin desirable facility deployment schedules with Cyclus. A novel method fo mapping optimization variables to deployment schedules is developed. Thi allows relationships between reactor types and scenario constraints to b represented implicitly in the variable definitions enabling the usage o optimizers lacking constraint support. It also prevents wasting computationa resources evaluating infeasible deployment schedules. Deployed power capacit over time and deployment of non-reactor facilities are also included a optimization variables There are many fuel cycle simulators built with different combinations o modeling choices. Comparing results between them is often difficult. Cyclus flexibility allows comparing effects of many such modeling choices. Reacto refueling cycle synchronization and inter-facility competition among othe effects are compared in four cases each using combinations of fleet of individually modeled reactors with 1-month or 3-month time steps. There are noticeable differences in results for the different cases. The larges differences occur during periods of constrained reactor fuel availability This and similar work can help improve the quality of fuel cycle analysi generally There is significant uncertainty associated deploying new nuclear technologie such as time-frames for technology availability and the cost of buildin advanced reactors

  1. Nanomagnetism of Core-Shell Magnetic Nanoparticles and Application in Spent Nuclear Fuel Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarsem Singh, Maninder Kaur

    This dissertation presents the study on novel core-shell magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with unique magnetic properties. Understanding the fundamental physics of antiferromagnetic - ferromagnetic interactions is essential to apply in different applications. Chromium (Cr) doped and undoped core-shell iron/iron-oxide NPs have been synthesized using cluster deposition system and studied with respect to their nanostructures, morphologies, sizes, chemical composition and magnetic properties. The room-temperature magnetic properties of Fe based NPs shows the strong dependence of intra/inter-particle interaction on NP size. The Cr-doped Fe NP shows the origin of sigma-FeCr phase at very low Cr concentration (2 at.%) unlike others reported at high Cr content and interaction reversal from dipolar to exchange interaction. A theoretical model of watermelon is constructed based on the experimental results and core-shell NP system in order to explain the physics of exchange interaction in Cr-doped Fe particles. The magnetic nanoparticle---chelator separation nanotechnology is investigated for spent nuclear fuel recycling and is reported 97% and 80% of extraction for Am(III) and Pu(IV) actinides respectively. If the long-term heat generating actinides such as Am(III) can be efficiently removed from the used fuel raffinates, the volume of material that can be placed in a given amount of repository space can be significantly increased. As it is a simple, versatile, compact, and cost efficient process that minimizes secondary waste and improves storage performance.

  2. Heuristic rules embedded genetic algorithm for in-core fuel management optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Fatih

    The objective of this study was to develop a unique methodology and a practical tool for designing loading pattern (LP) and burnable poison (BP) pattern for a given Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core. Because of the large number of possible combinations for the fuel assembly (FA) loading in the core, the design of the core configuration is a complex optimization problem. It requires finding an optimal FA arrangement and BP placement in order to achieve maximum cycle length while satisfying the safety constraints. Genetic Algorithms (GA) have been already used to solve this problem for LP optimization for both PWR and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). The GA, which is a stochastic method works with a group of solutions and uses random variables to make decisions. Based on the theories of evaluation, the GA involves natural selection and reproduction of the individuals in the population for the next generation. The GA works by creating an initial population, evaluating it, and then improving the population by using the evaluation operators. To solve this optimization problem, a LP optimization package, GARCO (Genetic Algorithm Reactor Code Optimization) code is developed in the framework of this thesis. This code is applicable for all types of PWR cores having different geometries and structures with an unlimited number of FA types in the inventory. To reach this goal, an innovative GA is developed by modifying the classical representation of the genotype. To obtain the best result in a shorter time, not only the representation is changed but also the algorithm is changed to use in-core fuel management heuristics rules. The improved GA code was tested to demonstrate and verify the advantages of the new enhancements. The developed methodology is explained in this thesis and preliminary results are shown for the VVER-1000 reactor hexagonal geometry core and the TMI-1 PWR. The improved GA code was tested to verify the advantages of new enhancements. The core physics code

  3. Evaluation of accuracy of calculations of VVER-1000 core states with incomplete covering of fuel by the absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirov, A. V.; Ponomarenko, G. L.

    2012-07-01

    An additional verification of bundled software (BS) SAPFIR-95 and amp;RC [1] and code KORSAR/GP [2] was performed. Both software products were developed in A.P. Alexandrov NITI and certified by ROSTEKHNADZOR of RF for numeric simulation of stationary, transitional and emergency conditions of VVER reactors. A benchmark model for neutronics calculations was created within the limits of this work. The cold subcritical state of VVER - 1000 reactor stationary fuelling was simulated on the basis of FA with an increased height of the fuel column (TVS-2M) considering detailed presentation of radial and front neutron reflectors. A case of passing of pure condensate slug through the core in initially deep subcritical state during start of the first RCP set after refueling was considered as an examined condition of reactor operation. A relatively small size of the slug, its spatial position near the reflectors (lower and lateral), as well as failure of the inserted control rods of the control and protection system (CPS CR) to reach the lower limit of the fuel column stipulate for methodical complexity of a correct calculation of the neutron multiplication constant (K{sub eff}) using engineering codes. Code RC was used as a test program in the process of reactor calculated 3-D modeling. Code MCNP5 [3] was used as the precision program, which solves the equation of neutrons transfer by Monte-Carlo method and which was developed in the US (Los-Alamos). As a result of comparative calculations dependency of K{sub eff} on two parameters was evaluated - boron acid concentration (Cb) and CPS CR position. Reactivity effect was evaluated, which is implemented as a result of failure of all CPS control rods to reach the lower fuel limit calculated using the engineering codes mentioned above. (authors)

  4. Core loading pattern optimization of thorium fueled heavy water breeder reactor using genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Soewono, C. N.; Takaki, N.

    2012-07-01

    In this work genetic algorithm was proposed to solve fuel loading pattern optimization problem in thorium fueled heavy water reactor. The objective function of optimization was to maximize the conversion ratio and minimize power peaking factor. Those objectives were simultaneously optimized using non-dominated Pareto-based population ranking optimal method. Members of non-dominated population were assigned selection probabilities based on their rankings in a manner similar to Baker's single criterion ranking selection procedure. A selected non-dominated member was bred through simple mutation or one-point crossover process to produce a new member. The genetic algorithm program was developed in FORTRAN 90 while neutronic calculation and analysis was done by COREBN code, a module of core burn-up calculation for SRAC. (authors)

  5. Core materials development for the fuel cycle R&D program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, S. A.; Toloczko, M.; Cole, J.; Byun, T. S.

    2011-08-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of burning minor actinides in a transmutation fuel. One of the challenges of achieving this goal is to develop fuels capable of reaching extreme burnup levels (e.g. 40%). To achieve such high burnup levels' fast reactor core materials (cladding and duct) must be able to withstand very high doses (>300 dpa design goal) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. Thus, these materials must withstand radiation effects that promote low temperature embrittlement, radiation induced segregation, high temperature helium embrittlement, swelling, accelerated creep, corrosion with the coolant, and chemical interaction with the fuel (FCCI). To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Test specimens of ferritic/martensitic alloys (T91/HT-9) previously irradiated in the FFTF reactor up to 210 dpa at a temperature range of 350-750 °C are presently being tested. This includes analysis of a duct made of HT-9 after irradiation to a total dose of 155 dpa at temperatures from 370 to 510 °C. Compact tension, charpy and tensile specimens have been machined from this duct and mechanical testing as well as SANS and Mossbauer spectroscopy are currently being performed. Initial results from compression testing and Charpy testing reveal a strong increase in yield stress (˜400 MPa) and a large increase in DBTT (up to 230 °C) for specimens irradiated at 383 °C to a dose of 28 dpa. Less hardening and a smaller increase in DBTT was observed for specimens irradiated at higher temperatures up to 500 °C. Advanced radiation tolerant materials are also being developed to enable the desired extreme fuel burnup levels. Specifically, coatings are being developed to minimize FCCI, and research is underway to fabricate large heats of radiation tolerant oxide dispersion steels with homogeneous oxide

  6. Core Materials Development for the Fuel Cycle R&D Program

    SciTech Connect

    S. A. Maloy; M. Toloczko; J. Cole; T. S. Byun

    2011-08-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of burning minor actinides in a transmutation fuel. One of the challenges of achieving this goal is to develop fuels capable of reaching extreme burnup levels (e.g. 40%). To achieve such high burnup levels fast reactor core materials (cladding and duct) must be able to withstand very high doses (greater than 300 dpa design goal) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. Thus, these materials must withstand radiation effects that promote low temperature embrittlement, radiation induced segregation, high temperature helium embrittlement, swelling, accelerated creep, corrosion with the coolant, and chemical interaction with the fuel (FCCI). To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Test specimens of ferritic/martensitic alloys (T91/HT-9) previously irradiated in the FFTF reactor up to 210 dpa at a temperature range of 350-750 C are presently being tested. This includes analysis of a duct made of HT-9 after irradiation to a total dose of 155 dpa at temperatures from 370 to 510 C. Compact tension, charpy and tensile specimens have been machined from this duct and mechanical testing as well as SANS and Mossbauer spectroscopy are currently being performed. Initial results from compression testing and Charpy testing reveal a strong increase in yield stress ({approx}400 MPa) and a large increase in DBTT (up to 230 C) for specimens irradiated at 383 C to a dose of 28 dpa. Less hardening and a smaller increase in DBTT was observed for specimens irradiated at higher temperatures up to 500 C. Advanced radiation tolerant materials are also being developed to enable the desired extreme fuel burnup levels. Specifically, coatings are being developed to minimize FCCI, and research is underway to fabricate large heats of radiation tolerant oxide dispersion steels with homogeneous

  7. Core materials development for the fuel cycle R&D program

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M; Maloy, S; Cole, James I.; Byun, Thak Sang

    2011-01-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of burning minor actinides in a transmutation fuel. One of the challenges of achieving this goal is to develop fuels capable of reaching extreme burnup levels (e.g. 40%). To achieve such high burnup levels fast reactor core materials (cladding and duct) must be able to withstand very high doses (>300 dpa design goal) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. Thus, these materials must withstand radiation effects that promote low temperature embrittlement, radiation induced segregation, high temperature helium embrittlement, swelling, accelerated creep, corrosion with the coolant, and chemical interaction with the fuel (FCCI). To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Test specimens of ferritic/martensitic alloys (T91/HT-9) previously irradiated in the FFTF reactor up to 210 dpa at a temperature range of 350 750 C are presently being tested. This includes analysis of a duct made of HT-9 after irradiation to a total dose of 155 dpa at temperatures from 370 to 510 C. Compact tension, charpy and tensile specimens have been machined from this duct and mechanical testing as well as SANS and Mossbauer spectroscopy are currently being performed. Initial results from compression testing and Charpy testing reveal a strong increase in yield stress (400 MPa) and a large increase in DBTT (up to 230 C) for specimens irradiated at 383 C to a dose of 28 dpa. Less hardening and a smaller increase in DBTT was observed for specimens irradiated at higher temperatures up to 500 C. Advanced radiation tolerant materials are also being developed to enable the desired extreme fuel burnup levels. Specifically, coatings are being developed to minimize FCCI, and research is underway to fabricate large heats of radiation tolerant oxide dispersion steels with homogeneous oxide dispersions.

  8. Core materials development for the fuel cycle R&D program

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, S. A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Cole, J. I.; Byun, Thak Sang

    2011-12-31

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of burning minor actinides in a transmutation fuel. One of the challenges of achieving this goal is to develop fuels capable of reaching extreme burnup levels (e.g. 40%). To achieve such high burnup levels’ fast reactor core materials (cladding and duct) must be able to withstand very high doses (>300 dpa design goal) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. Thus, these materials must withstand radiation effects that promote low temperature embrittlement, radiation induced segregation, high temperature helium embrittlement, swelling, accelerated creep, corrosion with the coolant, and chemical interaction with the fuel (FCCI). To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Test specimens of ferritic/martensitic alloys (T91/HT-9) previously irradiated in the FFTF reactor up to 210 dpa at a temperature range of 350– 750 °C are presently being tested. This includes analysis of a duct made of HT-9 after irradiation to a total dose of 155 dpa at temperatures from 370 to 510 °C. Compact tension, charpy and tensile specimens have been machined from this duct and mechanical testing as well as SANS and Mossbauer spectroscopy are currently being performed. Initial results from compression testing and Charpy testing reveal a strong increase in yield stress (~400 MPa) and a large increase in DBTT (up to 230 °C) for specimens irradiated at 383 °C to a dose of 28 dpa. Less hardening and a smaller increase in DBTT was observed for specimens irradiated at higher temperatures up to 500 °C. Advanced radiation tolerant materials are also being developed to enable the desired extreme fuel burnup levels. Specifically, coatings are being developed to minimize FCCI, and research is underway to fabricate large heats of radiation tolerant oxide dispersion steels with homogeneous

  9. Combustion characteristics in the transition region of liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cernansky, N. P.; Namer, I.; Tidona, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A number of important effects were observed in the droplet size transition region in spray combustion systems. In this region, where the mechanism of flame propagation is transformed from diffusive to premixed dominated combustion, the following effects have been observed: (1) maxima in burning velocity; (2) extension of flammability limits; (3) minima in ignition energy; and (4) minima in NO(x) formation. Unfortunately, because of differences in experimental facilities and limitations in the ranges of experimental data, a unified description of these transition region effects is not available at this time. Consequently, a fundamental experimental investigation was initiated to study the effect of droplet size, size distribution, and operating parameters on these transition region phenomena in a single well controlled spray combustion facility.

  10. Fuel Cell Transit Bus Evaluations: Joint Evaluation Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy and the Federal Transit Administration (Report and Appendix)

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2010-11-01

    This document describes the fuel cell transit bus evaluations performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration (FTA). This document provides a description of the demonstration sites, funding sources, and data collection activities for fuel cell transit bus evaluations currently planned from FY10 through FY12.

  11. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gigakis, C.

    2010-11-01

    This status report, fourth in a series of annual status reports from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, summarizes progress and accomplishments from demonstrations of fuel cell transit buses in the United States. This year's assessment report provides the results from the fifth year of operation of five Van Hool, ISE, and UTC Power fuel cell buses operating at AC Transit, SunLine, and CTTRANSIT. The achievements and challenges of this bus design, implementation, and operating are presented, with a focus on the next steps for implementing larger numbers and new and different designs of fuel cell buses. The major positive result from nearly five years of operation is the dramatic increase in reliability experienced for the fuel cell power system.

  12. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chander, K.; Gikakis, C.

    2012-11-01

    This report is the sixth in an annual series of reports that summarize the progress of fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) development in the United States and discuss the achievements and challenges of introducing fuel cell propulsion in transit. The report also provides a snapshot of current FCEB performance results over the last year. There are 25 active FCEBs in demonstrations this year at eight locations.

  13. Creation of a Full-Core HTR Benchmark with the Fort St. Vrain Initial Core and Assessment of Uncertainties in the FSV Fuel Composition and Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, William R.; Lee, John C.; baxter, Alan; Wemple, Chuck

    2012-03-31

    Information and measured data from the intial Fort St. Vrain (FSV) high temperature gas reactor core is used to develop a benchmark configuration to validate computational methods for analysis of a full-core, commercial HTR configuration. Large uncertainties in the geometry and composition data for the FSV fuel and core are identified, including: (1) the relative numbers of fuel particles for the four particle types, (2) the distribution of fuel kernel diameters for the four particle types, (3) the Th:U ratio in the initial FSV core, (4) and the buffer thickness for the fissile and fertile particles. Sensitivity studies were performed to assess each of these uncertainties. A number of methods were developed to assist in these studies, including: (1) the automation of MCNP5 input files for FSV using Python scripts, (2) a simple method to verify isotopic loadings in MCNP5 input files, (3) an automated procedure to conduct a coupled MCNP5-RELAP5 analysis for a full-core FSV configuration with thermal-hydraulic feedback, and (4) a methodology for sampling kernel diameters from arbitrary power law and Gaussian PDFs that preserved fuel loading and packing factor constraints. A reference FSV fuel configuration was developed based on having a single diameter kernel for each of the four particle types, preserving known uranium and thorium loadings and packing factor (58%). Three fuel models were developed, based on representing the fuel as a mixture of kernels with two diameters, four diameters, or a continuous range of diameters. The fuel particles were put into a fuel compact using either a lattice-bsed approach or a stochastic packing methodology from RPI, and simulated with MCNP5. The results of the sensitivity studies indicated that the uncertainties in the relative numbers and sizes of fissile and fertile kernels were not important nor were the distributions of kernel diameters within their diameter ranges. The uncertainty in the Th:U ratio in the intial FSV core was

  14. Identification of fuel cycle simulator functionalities for analysis of transition to a new fuel cycle

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Carlsen, Brett W.; Dixon, Brent W.; Feng, Bo; Greenberg, Harris R.; Hays, Ross D.; Passerini, Stefano; Todosow, Michael; Worrall, Andrew

    2016-06-09

    Dynamic fuel cycle simulation tools are intended to model holistic transient nuclear fuel cycle scenarios. As with all simulation tools, fuel cycle simulators require verification through unit tests, benchmark cases, and integral tests. Model validation is a vital aspect as well. Although compara-tive studies have been performed, there is no comprehensive unit test and benchmark library for fuel cycle simulator tools. The objective of this paper is to identify the must test functionalities of a fuel cycle simulator tool within the context of specific problems of interest to the Fuel Cycle Options Campaign within the U.S. Department of Energy smore » Office of Nuclear Energy. The approach in this paper identifies the features needed to cover the range of promising fuel cycle options identified in the DOE-NE Fuel Cycle Evaluation and Screening (E&S) and categorizes these features to facilitate prioritization. Features were categorized as essential functions, integrating features, and exemplary capabilities. One objective of this paper is to propose a library of unit tests applicable to each of the essential functions. Another underlying motivation for this paper is to encourage an international dialog on the functionalities and standard test methods for fuel cycle simulator tools.« less

  15. Stability of β-equilibrated dense matter and core-crust transition in neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atta, Debasis; Basu, D. N.

    2014-09-01

    The stability of the β-equilibrated dense nuclear matter is analyzed with respect to the thermodynamic stability conditions. Based on the density dependent M3Y effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, the effects of the nuclear incompressibility on the proton fraction in neutron stars and the location of the inner edge of their crusts and core-crust transition density and pressure are investigated. The high-density behavior of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter satisfies the constraints from the observed flow data of heavy-ion collisions. The neutron star properties studied using β-equilibrated neutron star matter obtained from this effective interaction for a pure hadronic model agree with the recent observations of the massive compact stars. The density, pressure, and proton fraction at the inner edge separating the liquid core from the solid crust of neutron stars are determined to be ρt=0.0938 fm-3, Pt=0.5006 MeV fm-3, and xp (t)=0.0308, respectively.

  16. America's Next Great Ship: Space Launch System Core Stage Transitioning from Design to Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birkenstock, Benjamin; Kauer, Roy

    2014-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Program is essential to achieving the Nation's and NASA's goal of human exploration and scientific investigation of the solar system. As a multi-element program with emphasis on safety, affordability, and sustainability, SLS is becoming America's next great ship of exploration. The SLS Core Stage includes avionics, main propulsion system, pressure vessels, thrust vector control, and structures. Boeing manufactures and assembles the SLS core stage at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans, LA, a historical production center for Saturn V and Space Shuttle programs. As the transition from design to manufacturing progresses, the importance of a well-executed manufacturing, assembly, and operation (MA&O) plan is crucial to meeting performance objectives. Boeing employs classic techniques such as critical path analysis and facility requirements definition as well as innovative approaches such as Constraint Based Scheduling (CBS) and Cirtical Chain Project Management (CCPM) theory to provide a comprehensive suite of project management tools to manage the health of the baseline plan on both a macro (overall project) and micro level (factory areas). These tools coordinate data from multiple business systems and provide a robust network to support Material & Capacity Requirements Planning (MRP/CRP) and priorities. Coupled with these tools and a highly skilled workforce, Boeing is orchestrating the parallel buildup of five major sub assemblies throughout the factory. Boeing and NASA are transforming MAF to host state of the art processes, equipment and tooling, the most prominent of which is the Vertical Assembly Center (VAC), the largest weld tool in the world. In concert, a global supply chain is delivering a range of structural elements and component parts necessary to enable an on-time delivery of the integrated Core Stage. SLS is on plan to launch humanity into the next phase of space exploration.

  17. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2011-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has not been evaluated as it is very similar to the evaluated core configuration. The benchmark eigenvalue is 1.0012 ± 0.0029. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  18. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has not been evaluated as it is very similar to the evaluated core configuration. The benchmark eigenvalue is 1.0012 ± 0.0029. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  19. Westinghouse Fuel Assemblies Performance after Operation in South-Ukraine NPP Mixed Core

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullayev, A. M.; Kulish, G. V.; Slyeptsov, O.; Slyeptsov, S.; Aleshin, Y.; Sparrow, S.; Lashevych, P.; Sokolov, D.; Latorre, Richard

    2013-09-14

    The evaluation of WWER-1000 Westinghouse fuel performance was done using the results of post–irradiation examinations of six LTAs and the WFA reload batches that have operated normally in mixed cores at South-Ukraine NPP, Unit-3 and Unit-2. The data on WFA/LTA elongation, FR growth and bow, WFA bow and twist, RCCA drag force and drag work, RCCA drop time, FR cladding integrity as well as the visual observation of fuel assemblies obtained during the 2006-2012 outages was utilized. The analysis of the measured data showed that assembly growth, FR bow, irradiation growth, and Zr-1%Nb grid and ZIRLO cladding corrosion lies within the design limits. The RCCA drop time measured for the LTA/WFA is about 1.9 s at BOC and practically does not change at EOC. The measured WFA bow and twist, and data of drag work on RCCA insertion showed that the WFA deformation in the mixed core is mostly controlled by the distortion of Russian FAs (TVSA) having the higher lateral stiffness. The visual inspection of WFAs carried out during the 2012 outages revealed some damage to the Zr-1%Nb grid outer strap for some WFAs during the loading sequence. The performed fundamental investigations allowed identifying the root cause of grid outer strap deformation and proposing the WFA design modifications for preventing damage to SG at a 225 kg handling trip limit.

  20. Scoping studies of the alternative options for defueling, packaging, shipping, and disposing of the TMI-2 spent fuel core

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert T.

    1980-09-01

    A portion of this fuel will be shipped to nuclear facilities to perform detailed physical examinations. Removal of this fuel from the TMI-2 core is also a significant step in the eventual cleanup of this facility. The report presents a scoping study of the technical operations required for defueling and canning. The TMI fuel when canned could be stored in the spent fuel storage pool. After a period of on-site storage, it is expected that the bulk of the fuel will be shipped off-site for either storage or reprocessing. Evaluation is made of the technical, economic, and institutional factors associated with alternate approaches to disposition of this fuel. Recommendations are presented concerning future generic development tasks needed for the defueling, packaging, on-site shipping of this fuel.

  1. Supported Core@Shell Electrocatalysts for Fuel Cells: Close Encounter with Reality

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seung Jun; Yoo, Sung Jong; Shin, Jungho; Cho, Yong-Hun; Jang, Jong Hyun; Cho, Eunae; Sung, Yung-Eun; Nam, Suk Woo; Lim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Kim, Soo-Kil

    2013-01-01

    Core@shell electrocatalysts for fuel cells have the advantages of a high utilization of Pt and the modification of its electronic structures toward enhancement of the activities. In this study, we suggest both a theoretical background for the design of highly active and stable core@shell/C and a novel facile synthetic strategy for their preparation. Using density functional theory calculations guided by the oxygen adsorption energy and vacancy formation energy, Pd3Cu1@Pt/C was selected as the most suitable candidate for the oxygen reduction reaction in terms of its activity and stability. These predictions were experimentally verified by the surfactant-free synthesis of Pd3Cu1/C cores and the selective Pt shell formation using a Hantzsch ester as a reducing agent. In a similar fashion, Pd@Pd4Ir6/C catalyst was also designed and synthesized for the hydrogen oxidation reaction. The developed catalysts exhibited high activity, high selectivity, and 4,000 h of long-term durability at the single-cell level. PMID:23419683

  2. Deflagration to detonation transition fueled by dust layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.-C.; Harbaugh, A. S.; Alexander, C. G.; Kauffman, C. W.; Sichel, M.

    1995-12-01

    The roles which dust layers play in severe dust explosions were investigated in a 70 m long and 30 cm inside diameter horizontal Flame Acceleration Tube (FAT) with one end closed and the other end open to the atmosphere. A variety of dusts such as corn dust, cornstarch, Mira Gel starch, wheat dust, and wood flour were layered on the bottom half of the FAT. To initiate the combustion process, a detonation tube filled with a stoichiometric H2/O2 mixture at room temperature and 1 atm pressure was used to ignite a short presuspended dust cloud with a dust concentration of 500 600 g/m3. Combustion waves generated by this dust cloud travel toward the open end of the FAT and are continuously fueled by the dust/air mixtures. Flame propagation processes in the FAT were closely monitored by a variety of measuring instruments at different locations. The study demonstrates that stable quasi-detonation were reached in some runs, but self-sustained Chapman-Jouguet detonations were not observed possibly due to the limitation of the tube length. Attempts were made to determine the structure of dust detonations fueled by a dust layer. Preliminary evidence indicates that for Mira Gel starch the leading shock is essentially a triple shock configuration which involves a Mach stem and for wheat and wood dusts there possibly exists a multi-headed spin structure.

  3. Computation of intersubband transition energy in normal and inverted core-shell quantum dots using finite difference technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyasi, Arpan; Bhattacharyya, S.; Das, N. R.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, intersubband transition energy is computed for core-shell (normal and inverted) quantum dots (CSQD) of cubic and spherical geometries by solving time-independent Schrödinger equation using finite-difference technique. Sparse, structured Hamiltonian matrices of order N3 × N3 for cubic and N × N for spherical dots are produced considering N discrete points in spatial direction. The matrices are diagonalized to obtain eigenstates for electrons. Computed results for the lowest three eigenstates and intersubband transitions are shown for different structural parameters taking GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs based CSQD as example. Transition energy decreases with increase in core thickness. When compared, spherical CSQDs show higher transition energy between two subbands than cubic CSQDs of similar size and same material composition. Also, in inverted configuration, transition energy decreases for a cubic dot while increases for a spherical dot as core size is increased. Wide tuning range for intersubband transition by tailoring dot dimensions indicates important applications for optical emitters/detectors.

  4. 10 CFR 73.37 - Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the Department of Transportation in 49 CFR § 172.202 and § 172.203(d). (iii) A listing of the routes... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit. 73.37 Section 73.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED)...

  5. 10 CFR 73.37 - Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the Department of Transportation in 49 CFR § 172.202 and § 172.203(d). (iii) A listing of the routes... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit. 73.37 Section 73.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED)...

  6. 10 CFR 73.37 - Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the Department of Transportation in 49 CFR § 172.202 and § 172.203(d). (iii) A listing of the routes... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit. 73.37 Section 73.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED)...

  7. 10 CFR 73.37 - Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... in 49 CFR 172.202 and 172.203(d). (iii) A listing of the routes to be used within the State or Tribal... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit. 73.37 Section 73.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED)...

  8. Safe operating procedures for alternative fuel buses: A synthesis of transit practice

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The synthesis will be of interest to transit agency managers, maintenance managers, and other personnel concerned with the operation of bus fleets using alternative fuels to meet national and local requirements related to air quality and energy diversification. Information on the use of methanol, ethanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), liquified petroleum gas (LPG), liquified natural gas (LNG), and other alternatives is included.

  9. Distinct element method analyses of fuel spheres in the PBMR core using PFC{sup 3D}

    SciTech Connect

    Polson, Alexander G.

    2004-07-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor, or PBMR, is a High Temperature Gas Reactor that contains a large number of graphite fuel spheres that circulate in its core. The dynamics of these spheres, combined with thermal contraction and expansion, causes various loading cases on the reactor structures. A Distinct Element Method, or DEM, as implemented in the Particle Flow Code in 3D, or PFC{sup 3D}, is used at PBMR (Pty) Ltd to model the fuel sphere dynamics in the reactor core. This paper presents a few exploratory studies where PFC{sup 3D} was used to investigate the interaction between fuel spheres and structural components in the PBMR, as well as the packing efficiency of the spheres in the core. (author)

  10. Design of a boiling water reactor equilibrium core using thorium-uranium fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, J-L.; Nunez-Carrera, A.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

    2004-10-06

    In this paper the design of a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) equilibrium core using thorium is presented; a heterogeneous blanket-seed core arrangement concept was adopted. The design was developed in three steps: in the first step two different assemblies were designed based on the integrated blanket-seed concept, they are the blanket-dummy assembly and the blanket-seed assembly. The integrated blanketseed concept comes from the fact that the blanket and the seed rods are located in the same assembly, and are burned-out in a once-through cycle. In the second step, a core design was developed to achieve an equilibrium cycle of 365 effective full power days in a standard BWR with a reload of 104 fuel assemblies designed with an average 235U enrichment of 7.5 w/o in the seed sub-lattice. The main operating parameters, like power, linear heat generation rate and void distributions were obtained as well as the shutdown margin. It was observed that the analyzed parameters behave like those obtained in a standard BWR. The shutdown margin design criterion was fulfilled by addition of a burnable poison region in the assembly. In the third step an in-house code was developed to evaluate the thorium equilibrium core under transient conditions. A stability analysis was also performed. Regarding the stability analysis, five operational states were analyzed; four of them define the traditional instability region corner of the power-flow map and the fifth one is the operational state for the full power condition. The frequency and the boiling length were calculated for each operational state. The frequency of the analyzed operational states was similar to that reported for BWRs; these are close to the unstable region that occurs due to the density wave oscillation phenomena in some nuclear power plants. Four transient analyses were also performed: manual SCRAM, recirculation pumps trip, main steam isolation valves closure and loss of feed water. The results of these transients are

  11. The Core Competencies and MFT Education: Practical Aspects of Transitioning to a Learning-Centered, Outcome-Based Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehart, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The MFT core competencies and latest COAMFTE accreditation standards usher in a new paradigm for MFT education. This transition necessitates not only measuring student mastery of competencies but also, more importantly, adopting a contemporary pedagogical model. This article provides an overview of the changes, a review of parallel trends in other…

  12. Getting College and Career Ready during State Transition toward the Common Core State Standards. Working Paper 127

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Zeyu; Cepa, Kennan

    2015-01-01

    This study provides a first look at how student college- and career-readiness have progressed in the early years of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) implementation. It is motivated by concern that changes triggered by the standards transition might be disruptive to student learning in the short run, even when those changes may become…

  13. Topological defects in liquid crystalline matter: Strain transitions, simulations, and visualization of core structure and fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callan-Jones, Andrew

    Topological defects play several roles in the physics of liquid crystalline matter. Their presence is felt over many length scales, necessitating modeling strategies ranging from continuum level finite element analysis of cholesteric elastomers to molecular dynamics simulation of liquid nematics. We have first studied the effect of a strain applied to a cholesteric elastomer, focusing on the transition from the twisted phase to the nematic phase, and extended work by others by including the Frank penalty for director distortions. This leads to metastability of the twisted state above the transition, prompting us to consider nucleation of topological defects as way to remove the twist walls. We explored the consequences of this idea and obtained analytical and numerical agreement, concluding that inhomogeneities in the strain field due to the coexisting phases are small, making the nucleation problem very similar to earlier studies on cholesteric liquids unwound by a magnetic field. Molecular dynamics simulations of a temperature quench of a fluid of rod-like molecules based on the Gay-Berne potential provide a way to study multiscale phenomena associated with defects, such as the structure of the core and the interaction between defect motion and the underlying orientational degrees of freedom. Locating and then studying defects in a fluid, as opposed to in a lattice simulation, however, are inherently challenging problems because of the mobility of the molecules. We have collaborated with researchers in scientific visualization to develop methods that overcome limitations of an earlier discrete finding method. In particular, new measures for describing nematic ordering are introduced, making observation of features such as the defect type and the nature of the core readily done. The dramatic improvement in spatial and temporal resolution of defect behavior afforded by the visualization opens up a number of possible routes to follow in studying static and dynamic

  14. Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building

    SciTech Connect

    Lata

    1996-09-26

    This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

  15. Spontaneous transition of core radial electric field driven by magnetic islands in the H-1NF heliac

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. T. A.; Blackwell, B. D.; Howard, J.; Harris, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental observation of spontaneous transition of the core radial electric field to a large positive value (E(r) similar to 5 kV m(-1)), with a strong electric-field shear (similar to 700 kV m(-2)) in a low temperature (T(e) similar to 10 eV) radio frequency generated argon plasma in the H-1NF heliac stellarator. The transition, which seems to be driven by a spontaneous excitation of m = 2 magnetic islands near the core, is associated with a localized increase in the plasma density and excitation of coherent low frequency (similar to 3 kHz) oscillations possibly due to unstable E(r) shear driven modes. Evidence suggests development of the core electron-root scenario, which previously has been observed only at high temperature electron cyclotron heated plasmas.

  16. An In-Core Power Deposition and Fuel Thermal Environmental Monitor for Long-Lived Reactor Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Don W. Miller

    2004-09-28

    The primary objective of this program is to develop the Constant Temperature Power Sensor (CTPS) as in-core instrumentation that will provide a detailed map of local nuclear power deposition and coolant thermal-hydraulic conditions during the entire life of the core.

  17. Measurement of gamma field parameters in core with LEU fuel IRT-4M using TL detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bily, T.

    2008-07-15

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters represent very useful tool for gamma fields parameters measurements at nuclear research reactors, especially at zero power ones. {sup 7}LiF:Mg,Ti and {sup 7}LiF:Mg,Cu,P type TL dosimeters enable determination of only gamma component in mixed neutron - gamma field. At VR-1 reactor operated within the Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering at the Czech Technical University in Prague the integral characteristics of gamma rays field were investigated, especially its spatial distribution and time behaviour, i.e. the non-saturated delayed gamma ray emission influence. Measured spatial distributions were compared with monte carlo code MCNP5 calculations. Although MCNP cannot generate delayed gamma rays from fission, the relative gamma dose rate distribution is within {+-} 15% with measured values. The experiments were carried out with core configuration C1 consisting of LEU fuel IRT-4M (19.7 %). (author)

  18. Fuel/propellant mixing in an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xu; Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.

    1997-01-01

    A numerical investigation of the mixing of gaseous uranium and hydrogen inside an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket engine (spherical geometry) is presented. The gaseous uranium fuel is injected near the centerline of the spherical engine cavity at a constant mass flow rate, and the hydrogen propellant is injected around the periphery of the engine at a five degree angle to the wall, at a constant mass flow rate. The main objective is to seek ways to minimize the mixing of uranium and hydrogen by choosing a suitable injector geometry for the mixing of light and heavy gas streams. Three different uranium inlet areas are presented, and also three different turbulent models (k-ɛ model, RNG k-V model, and RSM model) are investigated. The commercial CFD code, FLUENT, is used to model the flow field. Uranium mole fraction, axial mass flux, and radial mass flux contours are obtained.

  19. Fuel/propellant mixing in an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket engine

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, X.; Wehrmeyer, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A numerical investigation of the mixing of gaseous uranium and hydrogen inside an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket engine (spherical geometry) is presented. The gaseous uranium fuel is injected near the centerline of the spherical engine cavity at a constant mass flow rate, and the hydrogen propellant is injected around the periphery of the engine at a five degree angle to the wall, at a constant mass flow rate. The main objective is to seek ways to minimize the mixing of uranium and hydrogen by choosing a suitable injector geometry for the mixing of light and heavy gas streams. Three different uranium inlet areas are presented, and also three different turbulent models (k-{var_epsilon} model, RNG k-{var_epsilon} model, and RSM model) are investigated. The commercial CFD code, FLUENT, is used to model the flow field. Uranium mole fraction, axial mass flux, and radial mass flux contours are obtained. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-13

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization. PMID:26948023

  1. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Second Results Report and Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This is the second results report for the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service, and it focuses on the newest data analysis and lessons learned since the previous report. The appendices, referenced in the main report, provide the full background for the evaluation. They will be updated as new information is collected but will contain the original background material from the first report.

  2. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Third Results Reports

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2012-05-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. NREL has previously published two reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from July 2011 through January 2012.

  3. CNG transit fueling station handbook. Final report, October 1993-June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.R.; Pennington, M.D.

    1997-02-01

    This manual has been complied for use by a Transit Authority Engineer or an Engineering Company who is involved in the design of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fueling facilities. It is intended to provide a convenient and comprehensive reference document, to supplement but not replace codes and other reference documents. It is also intended to be used as a basis for the design of a broad range of CNG fueling facilities. The scope is limited to straight CNG and hence Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) or LNG vaporization to CNG has not been addressed. Similarly, this document does not deal with the facility modifications which may be required to park, service, or fuel CNG buses indoors. Additional information on actual gas fueling is available from the Gas Research Institute.

  4. High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Francesco Venneri; Chang-Keun Jo; Jae-Man Noh; Yonghee Kim; Claudio Filippone; Jonghwa Chang; Chris Hamilton; Young-Min Kim; Ji-Su Jun; Moon-Sung Cho; Hong-Sik Lim; MIchael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Vincent Descotes; Brian Boer

    2010-09-01

    The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450

  5. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge

  6. A core microRNA signature associated with inducers of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Martín, Juan; Díaz-López, Antonio; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Castilla, M Ángeles; Rosa-Rosa, Juan M; Cano, Amparo; Palacios, José

    2014-02-01

    Although it is becoming clear that certain miRNAs fulfil a fundamental role in the regulation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a comprehensive study of the miRNAs associated with this process has yet to be performed. Here, we profiled the signature of miRNA expression in an in vitro model of EMT, ectopically expressing in MDCK cells one of seven EMT transcription factors (SNAI1, SNAI2, ZEB1, ZEB2, TWIST1, TWIST2 or E47) or the EMT inducer LOXL2. In this way, we identified a core subset of deregulated miRNAs that were further validated in vivo, studying endometrial carcinosarcoma (ECS), a tumour entity that represents an extreme example of phenotypic plasticity. Moreover, epigenetic silencing through DNA methylation of miRNA genes of the miR-200 family and miR-205 that are down-regulated during EMT was evident in both the in vitro (MDCK transfectants) and in vivo (ECS) models of EMT. The strong correlation between expression and DNA methylation suggests a major role for this epigenetic mark in the regulation of the miR-141-200c locus. PMID:24122292

  7. Effect of buoyancy on fuel containment in an open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putre, H. A.

    1971-01-01

    Analysis aimed at determining the scaling laws for the buoyancy effect on fuel containment in an open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine, so conducted that experimental conditions can be related to engine conditions. The fuel volume fraction in a short coaxial flow cavity is calculated with a programmed numerical solution of the steady Navier-Stokes equations for isothermal, variable density fluid mixing. A dimensionless parameter B, called the Buoyancy number, was found to correlate the fuel volume fraction for large accelerations and various density ratios. This parameter has the value B = 0 for zero acceleration, and B = 350 for typical engine conditions.

  8. The influence of transition metal solutes on dislocation core structure and values of Peierls stress and barrier in tungsten.

    SciTech Connect

    Samolyuk, German D; Stoller, Roger E; Osetskiy, Yury N

    2013-01-01

    Several transition metals were examined to evaluate their potential for improving the ductility of tungsten. We investigate the dislocation core structure, Peierls stress and barrier of $1/2\\langle111\\rangle$ screw dislocations in binary tungsten-transition metal alloys (W$_{1-x}$TM$_{x}$) based on first principles electronic structure calculations. The periodic quadrupole approach was applied to model the structure of $1/2\\langle111\\rangle$ dislocation. The alloying with transition metals was modeled using the virtual crystal approximation. In order to verify the applicability of this approach, the equilibrium lattice parameter and elastic constants were calculated for tungsten alloyed with the set of transition metals. Reasonable agreement was obtained between results using the virtual crystal approximation and those using both a conventional super-cell approach and existing experimental data. Increasing the concentration of a transition metal from the VIIIA group leads to reduction of the $C^\\prime$ elastic constant and increase of elastic anisotropy A=$C_{44}/C^\\prime$. It was demonstrated that alloying W with a group VIIIA transition metal changes the structure of the dislocation core from symmetric to asymmetric, similar to results obtained for W$_{1-x}$Re$_{x}$ alloys in the earlier work of Romaner {\\it et al} (Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 195503 (2010)). Following the core symmetry change, the values of the Peierls stress and barrier are reduced. This combination of two effects could lead to increased ductility in a tungsten-based alloy\\comments. Our results demonstrate that similar effects could be achieved with any of the transition metals from the VIIIA group.

  9. Timing is everything : along the fossil fuel transition pathway.

    SciTech Connect

    Kobos, Peter Holmes; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2013-10-01

    People save for retirement throughout their career because it is virtually impossible to save all you'll need in retirement the year before you retire. Similarly, without installing incremental amounts of clean fossil, renewable or transformative energy technologies throughout the coming decades, a radical and immediate change will be near impossible the year before a policy goal is set to be in place. Therefore, our research question is,To meet our desired technical and policy goals, what are the factors that affect the rate we must install technology to achieve these goals in the coming decades?' Existing models do not include full regulatory constraints due to their often complex, and inflexible approaches to solve foroptimal' engineering instead ofrobust' and multidisciplinary solutions. This project outlines the theory and then develops an applied software tool to model the laboratory-to-market transition using the traditional technology readiness level (TRL) framework, but develops subsequent and a novel regulatory readiness level (RRL) and market readiness level (MRL). This tool uses the ideally-suited system dynamics framework to incorporate feedbacks and time delays. Future energy-economic-environment models, regardless of their programming platform, may adapt this software model component framework ormodule' to further vet the likelihood of new or innovative technology moving through the laboratory, regulatory and market space. The prototype analytical framework and tool, called the Technology, Regulatory and Market Readiness Level simulation model (TRMsim) illustrates the interaction between technology research, application, policy and market dynamics as they relate to a new or innovative technology moving from the theoretical stage to full market deployment. The initial results that illustrate the model's capabilities indicate for a hypothetical technology, that increasing the key driver behind each of the TRL, RRL and

  10. Analysis of Accidents at the Pakistan Research Reactor-1 Using Proposed Mixed-Fuel (HEU and LEU) Core

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhari, Ishtiaq H.

    2004-12-15

    The Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) was converted from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in 1991. The reactor is running successfully, with an upgraded power level of 10 MW. To save money on the purchase of costly fresh LEU fuel elements, the use of less burnt HEU spent fuel elements along with the present LEU fuel elements is being considered. The proposal calls for the HEU fuel elements to be placed near the thermal column to gain the required excess reactivity. In the present study the safety analysis of a proposed mixed-fuel core has been carried out at a calculated steady-state power level of 9.8 MW. Standard computer codes and correlations were employed to compute various parameters. Initiating events in reactivity-induced accidents involve various modes of reactivity insertion, namely, start-up accident, accidental drop of a fuel element on the core, flooding of a beam tube with water, and removal of an in-pile experiment during reactor operation. For each of these transients, time histories of reactor power, energy released, temperature, and reactivity were determined.

  11. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2013-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  12. The effect of fuel thermal conductivity on the behavior of LWR cores during loss-of-coolant accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Wang, Dean; Ott, Larry J.; Montgomery, Robert O.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of variation in thermal conductivity of light water reactor fuel elements on core response during loss-of-coolant accident scenarios is examined. Initially, a simplified numerical analysis is utilized to determine the time scales associated with dissipation of stored energy from the fuel into the coolant once the fission reaction is stopped. The analysis is then followed by full reactor system thermal-hydraulics analysis of a typical boiling and pressurized water reactor subjected to a large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario using the TRACE code. Accordingly, sensitivity analyses to examine the effect of an increase in fuel thermal conductivity, up to 500%, on fuel temperature evolution during these transients are performed. Given the major differences in thermal-hydraulics design aspects of boiling and pressurized water reactors, different fuel and temperature responses during the simulated loss-of-coolant transients are observed.

  13. Structural study of a bent-core liquid crystal showing the B{sub 1}-B{sub 2} transition

    SciTech Connect

    Folcia, Cesar Luis; Etxebarria, J.; Ortega, J.; Ros, M. B.

    2006-09-15

    An experimental study of the B{sub 1}-B{sub 2} transition is carried out in a bent-core liquid crystal. The study is essentially based on x-ray measurements as a function of temperature. The B{sub 1}-B{sub 2} transition is extremely unusual and implies a deep structural change from a columnar phase to a lamellar phase. We have found that the B{sub 1} phase in our compound is similar to the so-called B{sub 1} reversed phase, with an additional splay of the polarization in the columns. On approaching the B{sub 2} phase the width of the cross section of the columns increases. The transition is clearly first order, with a large hysteresis though the enthalpy content is very small. A possible mechanism for the transition is briefly sketched.

  14. Fuel cell performance of palladium-platinum core-shell electrocatalysts synthesized in gram-scale batches

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khateeb, Siddique; Su, Dong; Guerreo, Sandra; Darling, Robert M.; Protsailo, Lesia V.; Shao, Minhua

    2016-05-03

    This article presents the performance of palladium-platinum core-shell catalysts (Pt/Pd/C) for oxygen reduction synthesized in gram-scale batches in both liquid cells and polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Core-shell catalyst synthesis and characterization, ink fabrication, and cell assembly details are discussed. The Pt mass activity of the Pt/Pd core-shell catalyst was 0.95 A mg–1 at 0.9 V measured in liquid cells (0.1 M HClO4), which was 4.8 times higher than a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The performances of Pt/Pd/C and Pt/C in large single cells (315 cm2) were assessed under various operating conditions. The core-shell catalyst showed consistently higher performance than commercial Pt/Cmore » in fuel cell testing. A 20–60 mV improvement across the whole current density range was observed on air. Sensitivities to temperature, humidity, and gas composition were also investigated and the core-shell catalyst showed a consistent benefit over Pt under all conditions. However, the 4.8 times activity enhancement predicated by liquid cell measurements was not fully realized in fuel cells.« less

  15. Analyzing the Potential for Stationary Fuel Cells to Augment Hydrogen Availability in the Transition to Hydrogen Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changzheng; Lin, Zhenhong; Greene, David L; Leiby, Paul Newsome; Bowman, David Charles

    2010-01-01

    The lack of refueling stations is one of the biggest barriers to the transition to hydrogen-powered transportation. Stationary fuel cells, when deployed and operated to co-generate heat, hydrogen and power, could serve as distributed sources of hydrogen for motor vehicles. This study uses a hydrogen transition market simulation model to analyze the potential for stationary fuel cells to augment hydrogen availability during the early stage of a hydrogen transition. The analysis contributes to understanding potential synergies between stationary and mobile hydrogen fuel cell applications.

  16. KUGEL: a thermal, hydraulic, fuel performance, and gaseous fission product release code for pebble bed reactor core analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shamasundar, B.I.; Fehrenbach, M.E.

    1981-05-01

    The KUGEL computer code is designed to perform thermal/hydraulic analysis and coated-fuel particle performance calculations for axisymmetric pebble bed reactor (PBR) cores. This computer code was developed as part of a Department of Energy (DOE)-funded study designed to verify the published core performance data on PBRs. The KUGEL code is designed to interface directly with the 2DB code, a two-dimensional neutron diffusion code, to obtain distributions of thermal power, fission rate, fuel burnup, and fast neutron fluence, which are needed for thermal/hydraulic and fuel performance calculations. The code is variably dimensioned so that problem size can be easily varied. An interpolation routine allows variable mesh size to be used between the 2DB output and the two-dimensional thermal/hydraulic calculations.

  17. EVALUATION OF CORE PHYSICS ANALYSIS METHODS FOR CONVERSION OF THE INL ADVANCED TEST REACTOR TO LOW-ENRICHMENT FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Mark DeHart; Gray S. Chang

    2012-04-01

    Computational neutronics studies to support the possible conversion of the ATR to LEU are underway. Simultaneously, INL is engaged in a physics methods upgrade project to put into place modern computational neutronics tools for future support of ATR fuel cycle and experiment analysis. A number of experimental measurements have been performed in the ATRC in support of the methods upgrade project, and are being used to validate the new core physics methods. The current computational neutronics work is focused on performance of scoping calculations for the ATR core loaded with a candidate LEU fuel design. This will serve as independent confirmation of analyses that have been performed previously, and will evaluate some of the new computational methods for analysis of a candidate LEU fuel for ATR.

  18. Simulations of the Fuel Economy and Emissions of Hybrid Transit Buses over Planned Local Routes

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; LaClair, Tim J; Daw, C Stuart; Smith, David E; Franzese, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    We present simulated fuel economy and emissions city transit buses powered by conventional diesel engines and diesel-hybrid electric powertrains of varying size. Six representative city drive cycles were included in the study. In addition, we included previously published aftertreatment device models for control of CO, HC, NOx, and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Our results reveal that bus hybridization can significantly enhance fuel economy by reducing engine idling time, reducing demands for accessory loads, exploiting regenerative braking, and shifting engine operation to speeds and loads with higher fuel efficiency. Increased hybridization also tends to monotonically reduce engine-out emissions, but trends in the tailpipe (post-aftertreatment) emissions involve more complex interactions that significantly depend on motor size and drive cycle details.

  19. Vlasov formalism for extended relativistic mean field models: The crust-core transition and the stellar matter equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Helena; Providência, Constança

    2016-07-01

    The Vlasov formalism is extended to relativistic mean field hadron models with nonlinear terms up to fourth order and applied to the calculation of the crust-core transition density. The effect of the nonlinear ω ρ and σ ρ coupling terms on the crust-core transition density and pressure and on the macroscopic properties of some families of hadronic stars is investigated. For that purpose, six families of relativistic mean field models are considered. Within each family, the members differ in the symmetry energy behavior. For all the models, the dynamical spinodals are calculated, and the crust-core transition density and pressure and the neutron star mass-radius relations are obtained. The effect on the star radius of the inclusion of a pasta calculation in the inner crust is discussed. The set of six models that best satisfy terrestrial and observational constraints predicts a radius of 13.6 ±0.3 km and a crust thickness of 1.36 ±0.06 km for a 1.4 M⊙ star.

  20. High performance of SDC and GDC core shell type composite electrolytes using methane as a fuel for low temperature SOFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, Muneeb; Siraj, Khurram; Raza, Rizwan; Javed, Fayyaz; Ahsan, Muhammad; Shakir, Imran; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid

    2016-02-01

    Nanocomposites Samarium doped Ceria (SDC), Gadolinium doped Ceria (GDC), core shell SDC amorphous Na2CO3 (SDCC) and GDC amorphous Na2CO3 (GDCC) were synthesized using co-precipitation method and then compared to obtain better solid oxide electrolytes materials for low temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFCs). The comparison is done in terms of structure, crystallanity, thermal stability, conductivity and cell performance. In present work, XRD analysis confirmed proper doping of Sm and Gd in both single phase (SDC, GDC) and dual phase core shell (SDCC, GDCC) electrolyte materials. EDX analysis validated the presence of Sm and Gd in both single and dual phase electrolyte materials; also confirming the presence of amorphous Na2CO3 in SDCC and GDCC. From TGA analysis a steep weight loss is observed in case of SDCC and GDCC when temperature rises above 725 °C while SDC and GDC do not show any loss. The ionic conductivity and cell performance of single phase SDC and GDC nanocomposite were compared with core shell GDC/amorphous Na2CO3 and SDC/ amorphous Na2CO3 nanocomposites using methane fuel. It is observed that dual phase core shell electrolytes materials (SDCC, GDCC) show better performance in low temperature range than their corresponding single phase electrolyte materials (SDC, GDC) with methane fuel.

  1. Lattice-Strain Control of Exceptional Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Peter

    2011-08-19

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical approach to demonstrate how lattice strain can be used to continuously tune the catalytic activity of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on bimetallic nanoparticles that have been dealloyed. The sluggish kinetics of the ORR is a key barrier to the adaptation of fuel cells and currently limits their widespread use. Dealloyed Pt-Cu bimetallic nanoparticles, however, have been shown to exhibit uniquely high reactivity for this reaction. We first present evidence for the formation of a core-shell structure during dealloying, which involves removal of Cu from the surface and subsurface of the precursor nanoparticles. We then show that the resulting Pt-rich surface shell exhibits compressive strain that depends on the composition of the precursor alloy. We next demonstrate the existence of a downward shift of the Pt d-band, resulting in weakening of the bond strength of intermediate oxygenated species due to strain. Finally, we combine synthesis, strain, and catalytic reactivity in an experimental/theoretical reactivity-strain relationship which provides guidelines for the rational design of strained oxygen reduction electrocatalysts. The stoichiometry of the precursor, together with the dealloying conditions, provides experimental control over the resulting surface strain and thereby allows continuous tuning of the surface electrocatalytic reactivity - a concept that can be generalized to other catalytic reactions.

  2. Transition from the adiabatic to the sudden limit in core-electron photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, Lars; Michiels, John; Inglesfield, John

    1998-12-01

    Experimental results for core-electron photoemission Jk(ω) are often compared with the one-electron spectral function Ac(ɛk-ω), where ω is the photon energy, ɛk is the photoelectron energy, and the optical transition matrix elements are taken as constant. Since Jk(ω) is nonzero only for ɛk>0, we must actually compare it with Ac(ɛk-ω)θ(ɛk). For metals Ac(ω) is known to have a quasiparticle (QP) peak with an asymmetric power-law [theories of Mahan, Nozières, de Dominicis, Langreth, and others (MND)] singularity due to low-energy particle-hole excitations. The QP peak starts at the core-electron energy ɛc, and is followed by an extended satellite (shakeup) structure at smaller ω. For photon energies ω just above threshold, ωth=-ɛc, Ac(ɛk-ω)θ(ɛk) as a function of ɛk (ω constant) is cut just behind the quasiparticle peak, and neither the tail of the MND line nor the plasmon satellites are present. The sudden (high-energy) limit is given by a convolution of Ac(ω) and a loss function, i.e., by the Berglund-Spicer two-step expression. Thus Ac(ω) alone does not give the correct photoelectron spectrum, neither at low nor at high energies. We present an extension of the quantum-mechanical (QM) models developed earlier by Inglesfield, and by Bardyszewski and Hedin to calculate Jk(ω). It includes recoil and damping, as well as shakeup effects and extrinsic losses, is exact in the high-energy limit, and allows calculations of Jk(ω) including the MND line and multiple plasmon losses. The model, which involves electrons coupled to quasibosons, is motivated by detailed arguments. As an illustration we have made quantitative calculations for a semi-infinite jellium with the density of aluminum metal and an embedded atom. The coupling functions (fluctuation potentials) between the electron and the quasibosons are related to the random-phase-approximation dielectric function, and different levels of approximations are evaluated numerically. The differences

  3. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 73 - Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule Pursuant to the provision of § 73.37 of 10 CFR part 73, each licensee who transports or delivers to a carrier for transport irradiated... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in...

  4. Analysis, operation and maintenance of a fuel cell/battery series-hybrid bus for urban transit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubna, Piyush; Brunner, Doug; Gangloff, John J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    The fuel cell hybrid bus (FCHB) program was initiated at the University of Delaware in 2005 to demonstrate the viability of fuel cell vehicles for transit applications and to conduct research and development to facilitate the path towards their eventual commercialization. Unlike other fuel cell bus programs, the University of Delaware's FCHB design features a battery-heavy hybrid which offers multiple advantages in terms of cost, performance and durability. The current fuel cell hybrid bus is driven on a regular transit route at the University of Delaware. The paper describes the baseline specifications of the bus with a focus on the fuel cell and the balance of plant. The fuel cell/battery series-hybrid design is well suited for urban transit routes and provides key operational advantages such as hydrogen fuel economy, efficient use of the fuel cell for battery recharging, and regenerative braking. The bus is equipped with a variety of sensors including a custom-designed cell voltage monitoring system which provide a good understanding of bus performance under normal operation. Real-time data collection and analysis have yielded key insights for fuel cell bus design optimization. Results presented here illustrate the complex flow of energy within the various subsystems of the fuel cell hybrid bus. A description of maintenance events has been included to highlight the issues that arise during general operation. The paper also describes several modifications that will facilitate design improvements in future versions of the bus. Overall, the fuel cell hybrid bus demonstrates the viability of fuel cells for urban transit applications in real world conditions.

  5. Solid oxide fuel cell with transitioned cross-section for improved anode gas management at the open end

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, Paolo R.; Draper, Robert

    2012-01-17

    A solid oxide fuel cell (400) is made having a tubular, elongated, hollow, active section (445) which has a cross-section containing an air electrode (452) a fuel electrode (454) and solid oxide electrolyte (456) between them, where the fuel cell transitions into at least one inactive section (460) with a flattened parallel sided cross-section (462, 468) each cross-section having channels (472, 474, 476) in them which smoothly communicate with each other at an interface section (458).

  6. A Technique to Determine Billet Core Charge Weight for P/M Fuel Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H.B.

    2001-07-02

    The core length in an extruded tube depends on the weight of powder in the billet core. In the past, the amount of aluminum powder needed to give a specified core length was determined empirically. This report gives a technique for calculating the weight of aluminum powder for the P/M core. An equation has been derived which can be used to determine the amount of aluminum needed for P/M billet core charge weights. Good agreement was obtained when compared to Mark 22 tube extrusion data. From the calculated charge weight, the elastomeric bag can be designed and made to compact the U3O8-Al core.

  7. Star-Forming Brightest Cluster Galaxies at 0.25 < z < 1.25: A Transitioning Fuel Supply

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McDonald, M.; Stalder, B.; Bayliss, M.; Allen, S. W.; Applegate, D. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; et al

    2016-01-22

    In this paper, we present a multiwavelength study of the 90 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect by the South Pole Telescope, utilizing data from various ground- and space-based facilities. We infer the star-formation rate (SFR) for the BCG in each cluster—based on the UV and IR continuum luminosity, as well as the [O ii]λλ3726,3729 emission line luminosity in cases where spectroscopy is available—and find seven systems with SFR > 100 M⊙ yr-1. We find that the BCG SFR exceeds 10 M⊙ yr-1 in 31 of 90 (34%) cases at 0.25 < z < 1.25, compared to ~1%–5% at z ~ 0 from the literature. At z ≳ 1, this fraction increases tomore » $${92}_{-31}^{+6}$$%, implying a steady decrease in the BCG SFR over the past ~9 Gyr. At low-z, we find that the specific SFR in BCGs is declining more slowly with time than for field or cluster galaxies, which is most likely due to the replenishing fuel from the cooling ICM in relaxed, cool core clusters. At z ≳ 0.6, the correlation between the cluster central entropy and BCG star formation—which is well established at z ~ 0—is not present. Instead, we find that the most star-forming BCGs at high-z are found in the cores of dynamically unrelaxed clusters. We use data from the Hubble Space Telescope to investigate the rest-frame near-UV morphology of a subsample of the most star-forming BCGs, and find complex, highly asymmetric UV morphologies on scales as large as ~50–60 kpc. Finally, the high fraction of star-forming BCGs hosted in unrelaxed, non-cool core clusters at early times suggests that the dominant mode of fueling star formation in BCGs may have recently transitioned from galaxy–galaxy interactions to ICM cooling.« less

  8. Star-forming Brightest Cluster Galaxies at 0.25 > z > 1.25: A Transitioning Fuel Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Stalder, B.; Bayliss, M.; Allen, S. W.; Applegate, D. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chiu, I.; Desai, S.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Marrone, D. P.; Miller, E. D.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Stanford, S. A.; Stark, A. A.; Vieira, J. D.; Zenteno, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 90 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev Zel’dovich effect by the South Pole Telescope, utilizing data from various ground- and space-based facilities. We infer the star-formation rate (SFR) for the BCG in each cluster—based on the UV and IR continuum luminosity, as well as the [O ii]λλ3726,3729 emission line luminosity in cases where spectroscopy is available—and find seven systems with SFR > 100 M⊙ yr-1. We find that the BCG SFR exceeds 10 M⊙ yr-1 in 31 of 90 (34%) cases at 0.25 < z < 1.25, compared to ˜1%-5% at z ˜ 0 from the literature. At z ≳ 1, this fraction increases to {92}-31+6%, implying a steady decrease in the BCG SFR over the past ˜9 Gyr. At low-z, we find that the specific SFR in BCGs is declining more slowly with time than for field or cluster galaxies, which is most likely due to the replenishing fuel from the cooling ICM in relaxed, cool core clusters. At z ≳ 0.6, the correlation between the cluster central entropy and BCG star formation—which is well established at z ˜ 0—is not present. Instead, we find that the most star-forming BCGs at high-z are found in the cores of dynamically unrelaxed clusters. We use data from the Hubble Space Telescope to investigate the rest-frame near-UV morphology of a subsample of the most star-forming BCGs, and find complex, highly asymmetric UV morphologies on scales as large as ˜50-60 kpc. The high fraction of star-forming BCGs hosted in unrelaxed, non-cool core clusters at early times suggests that the dominant mode of fueling star formation in BCGs may have recently transitioned from galaxy-galaxy interactions to ICM cooling.

  9. Generalized Thermohydraulics Module GENFLO for Combining With the PWR Core Melting Model, BWR Recriticality Neutronics Model and Fuel Performance Model

    SciTech Connect

    Miettinen, Jaakko; Hamalainen, Anitta; Pekkarinen, Esko

    2002-07-01

    Thermal hydraulic simulation capability for accident conditions is needed at present in VTT in several programs. Traditional thermal hydraulic models are too heavy for simulation in the analysis tasks, where the main emphasis is the rapid neutron dynamics or the core melting. The GENFLO thermal hydraulic model has been developed at VTT for special applications in the combined codes. The basic field equations in GENFLO are for the phase mass, the mixture momentum and phase energy conservation equations. The phase separation is solved with the drift flux model. The basic variables to be solved are the pressure, void fraction, mixture velocity, gas enthalpy, liquid enthalpy, and concentration of non-condensable gas fractions. The validation of the thermohydraulic solution alone includes large break LOCA reflooding experiments and in specific for the severe accident conditions QUENCH tests. In the recriticality analysis the core neutronics is simulated with a two-dimensional transient neutronics code TWODIM. The recriticality with one rapid prompt peak is expected during a severe accident scenario, where the control rods have been melted and ECCS reflooding is started after the depressurization. The GENFLO module simulates the BWR thermohydraulics in this application. The core melting module has been developed for the real time operator training by using the APROS engineering simulators. The core heatup, oxidation, metal and fuel pellet relocation and corium pool formation into the lower plenum are calculated. In this application the GENFLO model simulates the PWR vessel thermohydraulics. In the fuel performance analysis the fuel rod transient behavior is simulated with the FRAPTRAN code. GENFLO simulates the subchannel around a single fuel rod and delivers the heat transfer on the cladding surface for the FRAPTRAN. The transient boundary conditions for the subchannel are transmitted from the system code for operational transient, loss of coolant accidents and

  10. Modeling transit bus fuel consumption on the basis of cycle properties.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Oscar F; Clark, Nigel N; Thompson, Gregory J

    2011-04-01

    A method exists to predict heavy-duty vehicle fuel economy and emissions over an "unseen" cycle or during unseen on-road activity on the basis of fuel consumption and emissions data from measured chassis dynamometer test cycles and properties (statistical parameters) of those cycles. No regression is required for the method, which relies solely on the linear association of vehicle performance with cycle properties. This method has been advanced and examined using previously published heavy-duty truck data gathered using the West Virginia University heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with the trucks exercised over limited test cycles. In this study, data were available from a Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority emission testing program conducted in 2006. Chassis dynamometer data from two conventional diesel buses, two compressed natural gas buses, and one hybrid diesel bus were evaluated using an expanded driving cycle set of 16 or 17 different driving cycles. Cycle properties and vehicle fuel consumption measurements from three baseline cycles were selected to generate a linear model and then to predict unseen fuel consumption over the remaining 13 or 14 cycles. Average velocity, average positive acceleration, and number of stops per distance were found to be the desired cycle properties for use in the model. The methodology allowed for the prediction of fuel consumption with an average error of 8.5% from vehicles operating on a diverse set of chassis dynamometer cycles on the basis of relatively few experimental measurements. It was found that the data used for prediction should be acquired from a set that must include an idle cycle along with a relatively slow transient cycle and a relatively high speed cycle. The method was also applied to oxides of nitrogen prediction and was found to have less predictive capability than for fuel consumption with an average error of 20.4%. PMID:21516939

  11. Accidental degeneracy in photonic bands and topological phase transitions in two-dimensional core-shell dielectric photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Wang, Hai-Xiao; Xu, Ya-Dong; Chen, Huan-Yang; Jiang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A simple core-shell two-dimensional photonic crystal is studied where the triangular lattice symmetry and the C6 point group symmetry give rich physics in accidental touching points of photonic bands. We systematically evaluate different types of accidental nodal points at the Brillouin zone center for transverse-magnetic harmonic modes when the geometry and permittivity of the core-shell material are continuously tuned. The accidental nodal points can have different dispersions and topological properties (i.e., Berry phases). These accidental nodal points can be the critical states lying between a topological phase and a normal phase of the photonic crystal. They are thus very important for the study of topological photonic states. We show that, without breaking time-reversal symmetry, by tuning the geometry of the core-shell material, a phase transition into the photonic quantum spin Hall insulator can be achieved. Here the "spin" is defined as the orbital angular momentum of a photon. We study the topological phase transition as well as the properties of the edge and bulk states and their application potentials in optics. PMID:27505772

  12. Systematic technology evaluation program for SiC/SiC composite-based accident-tolerant LWR fuel cladding and core structures: Revision 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-08-01

    Fuels and core structures in current light water reactors (LWR’s) are vulnerable to catastrophic failure in severe accidents as unfortunately evidenced by the March 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident. This vulnerability is attributed primarily to the rapid oxidation kinetics of zirconium alloys in a water vapor environment at very high temperatures. Zr alloys are the primary material in LWR cores except for the fuel itself. Therefore, alternative materials with reduced oxidation kinetics as compared to zirconium alloys are sought to enable enhanced accident-tolerant fuels and cores.

  13. Solar Electricity and Solar Fuels: Status and Perspectives in the Context of the Energy Transition.

    PubMed

    Armaroli, Nicola; Balzani, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The energy transition from fossil fuels to renewables is already ongoing, but it will be a long and difficult process because the energy system is a gigantic and complex machine. Key renewable energy production data show the remarkable growth of solar electricity technologies and indicate that crystalline silicon photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines are the workhorses of the first wave of renewable energy deployment on the TW scale around the globe. The other PV alternatives (e.g., copper/indium/gallium/selenide (CIGS) or CdTe), along with other less mature options, are critically analyzed. As far as fuels are concerned, the situation is significantly more complex because making chemicals with sunshine is far more complicated than generating electric current. The prime solar artificial fuel is molecular hydrogen, which is characterized by an excellent combination of chemical and physical properties. The routes to make it from solar energy (photoelectrochemical cells (PEC), dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells (DSPEC), PV electrolyzers) and then synthetic liquid fuels are presented, with discussion on economic aspects. The interconversion between electricity and hydrogen, two energy carriers directly produced by sunlight, will be a key tool to distribute renewable energies with the highest flexibility. The discussion takes into account two concepts that are often overlooked: the energy return on investment (EROI) and the limited availability of natural resources-particularly minerals-which are needed to manufacture energy converters and storage devices on a multi-TW scale. PMID:26584653

  14. GPU Based General-Purpose Parallel computing to Solve Nuclear Reactor In-Core fuel Management Design and Operation Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Prayudhatama, D.; Waris, A.; Kurniasih, N.; Kurniadi, R.

    2010-06-22

    In-core fuel management study is a crucial activity in nuclear power plant design and operation. Its common problem is to find an optimum arrangement of fuel assemblies inside the reactor core. Main objective for this activity is to reduce the cost of generating electricity, which can be done by altering several physical properties of the nuclear reactor without violating any of the constraints imposed by operational and safety considerations. This research try to address the problem of nuclear fuel arrangement problem, which is, leads to the multi-objective optimization problem. However, the calculation of the reactor core physical properties itself is a heavy computation, which became obstacle in solving the optimization problem by using genetic algorithm optimization.This research tends to address that problem by using the emerging General Purpose Computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) techniques implemented by C language for CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) parallel programming. By using this parallel programming technique, we develop parallelized nuclear reactor fitness calculation, which is involving numerical finite difference computation. This paper describes current prototype of the parallel algorithm code we have developed on CUDA, that performs one hundreds finite difference calculation for nuclear reactor fitness evaluation in parallel by using GPU G9 Hardware Series developed by NVIDIA.

  15. Global optimization and oxygen dissociation on polyicosahedral Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster for alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N.; Chen, F. Y.; Wu, X. Q.

    2015-07-01

    The structure of 38 atoms Ag-Cu cluster is studied by using a combination of a genetic algorithm global optimization technique and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is demonstrated that the truncated octahedral (TO) Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster is less stable than the polyicosahedral (pIh) Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster from the atomistic models and the DFT calculation shows an agreeable result, so the newfound pIh Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster is further investigated for potential application for O2 dissociation in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The activation energy barrier for the O2 dissociation on pIh Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster is 0.715 eV, where the d-band center is -3.395 eV and the density of states at the Fermi energy level is maximal for the favorable absorption site, indicating that the catalytic activity is attributed to a maximal charge transfer between an oxygen molecule and the pIh Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster. This work revises the earlier idea that Ag32Cu6 core-shell nanoparticles are not suitable as ORR catalysts and confirms that Ag-Cu nanoalloy is a potential candidate to substitute noble Pt-based catalyst in alkaline fuel cells.

  16. Global optimization and oxygen dissociation on polyicosahedral Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster for alkaline fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, N.; Chen, F. Y.; Wu, X.Q.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of 38 atoms Ag-Cu cluster is studied by using a combination of a genetic algorithm global optimization technique and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is demonstrated that the truncated octahedral (TO) Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster is less stable than the polyicosahedral (pIh) Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster from the atomistic models and the DFT calculation shows an agreeable result, so the newfound pIh Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster is further investigated for potential application for O2 dissociation in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The activation energy barrier for the O2 dissociation on pIh Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster is 0.715 eV, where the d-band center is −3.395 eV and the density of states at the Fermi energy level is maximal for the favorable absorption site, indicating that the catalytic activity is attributed to a maximal charge transfer between an oxygen molecule and the pIh Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster. This work revises the earlier idea that Ag32Cu6 core-shell nanoparticles are not suitable as ORR catalysts and confirms that Ag-Cu nanoalloy is a potential candidate to substitute noble Pt-based catalyst in alkaline fuel cells. PMID:26148904

  17. Well-defined oxide core-polymer shell nanoparticles: interfacial interactions, peculiar dynamics, and transitions in polymer nanolayers.

    PubMed

    Bershtein, V A; Gun'ko, V M; Egorova, L M; Guzenko, N V; Pakhlov, E M; Ryzhov, V A; Zarko, V I

    2010-07-01

    Interfacial interactions, chain dynamics, and glass and melting transitions were studied in well-defined core-shell nanoparticles with amorphous silica or crystalline alumina cores and noncrystallizable poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) or crystallizable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) shells. Varying particle composition caused regular changes in the shell thickness from 1 to 2 nm (monomolecular layer) up to 90 nm. Far- and mid-IR spectroscopy allowed us to register hydrogen bonding and, tentatively, Lewis/Brønsted (LB) interfacial interactions as well as changes in the dynamics and conformational state of the polymer chains as a function of the nanoshell thickness. Their most pronounced peculiarities were found for the monomolecular polymer layers. The LB interactions were stronger with the alumina substrate than silica. DSC analysis was performed, and the data obtained were in agreement with the spectroscopic data. Unlike the bulk polymer, the PVP monolayer was characterized with an extraordinarily large dynamic heterogeneity within the glass transition while broadening the transition range and varying the activation energy by an order of magnitude. The PEG monolayer adsorbed on silica was totally amorphous, whereas a highly crystalline one with the anomalously thin lamellae, down to 3 nm thick, was adsorbed on an alumina surface, presumably as a result of the quasi-heteroepitaxial crystallization process. PMID:20415443

  18. Simulated Verification of Fuel Element Inventory in a Small Reactor Core Using the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, Brandon R; Mihalczo, John T

    2009-01-01

    The International Panel on Climate Change projects that by 2050 the world energy demand may double. Although the primary focus for new nuclear power plants in industrialized nations is on large plants in the 1000-1600 MWe range, there is an increasing demand for small and medium reactors (SMRs). About half of the innovative SMR concepts are for small (<300 MWe) reactors with a 5-30 year life without on-site refueling. This type of reactor is also known as a battery-type reactor. These reactors are particularly attractive to countries with small power grids and for non-electrical purposes such as heating, hydrogen production, and seawater desalination. Traditionally, this type of reactor has been used in a nautical propulsion role. This type of reactor is designed as a permanently sealed unit to prevent the diversion of the uranium in the core by the user. However, after initial fabrication it will be necessary to verify that the newly fabricated reactor core contains the quantity of uranium that initially entered the fuel fabrication plant. In most instances, traditional inspection techniques can be used to perform this verification, but in certain situations the core design will be considered sensitive. Non-intrusive verification techniques must be utilized in these situations. The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) with imaging uses active interrogation and a fast time correlation processor to characterize fissile material. The MCNP-PoliMi computer code was used to simulate NMIS measurements of a small, sealed reactor core. Because most battery-type reactor designs are still in the early design phase, a more traditional design based on a Russian icebreaker core was used in the simulations. These simulations show how the radiography capabilities of the NMIS could be used to detect the diversion of fissile material by detecting void areas in the assembled core where fuel elements have been removed.

  19. Ab initio study of 3s core-level x-ray photoemission spectra in transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Manabu; Igarashi, Jun-Ichi

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the 3s - and 4s -core-level x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) spectra in the ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic transition metals by developing an ab initio method. We obtain the spectra exhibiting the characteristic shapes as a function of binding energy in good agreement with experimental observations. The spectral shapes are strikingly different between the majority spin channel and the minority spin channel for ferromagnetic metals Ni, Co, and Fe, that is, large intensities appear in the higher binding-energy side of the main peak (satellite) in the majority spin channel. Such satellite or shoulder intensities are also obtained for nonmagnetic metals V and Ru. These behaviors are elucidated in terms of the change of the one-electron states induced by the core-hole potential.

  20. RIT Stability through the Transition to Common Core-Aligned MAP® Tests. How Using MAP to Measure Student Learning Growth is Reliable Now and in 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2013

    2013-01-01

    While many educators expect the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) to be more rigorous than previous state standards, some wonder if the transition to CCSS and to a Common Core aligned MAP test will have an impact on their students' RIT scores or the NWEA norms. MAP assessments use a proprietary scale known as the RIT (Rasch unit) scale to measure…

  1. Strangeness driven phase transitions in compressed baryonic matter and their relevance for neutron stars and core collapsing supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Raduta, Ad. R.; Gulminelli, F.; Oertel, M.

    2015-02-24

    We discuss the thermodynamics of compressed baryonic matter with strangeness within non-relativistic mean-field models with effective interactions. The phase diagram of the full baryonic octet under strangeness equilibrium is built and discussed in connection with its relevance for core-collapse supernovae and neutron stars. A simplified framework corresponding to (n, p, Λ)(+e)-mixtures is employed in order to test the sensitivity of the existence of a phase transition on the (poorely constrained) interaction coupling constants and the compatibility between important hyperonic abundances and 2M{sub ⊙} neutron stars.

  2. A neutral branched platinum-acetylide complex possessing a tetraphenylethylene core: preparation of a luminescent organometallic gelator and its unexpected spectroscopic behaviour during sol-to-gel transition.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Nai-Wei; Huang, Junhai; Xu, Zheng; Sun, Dan-Dan; Wang, Cui-Hong; Xu, Lin

    2015-10-21

    A neutral branched platinum-acetylide complex TPA possessing a tetraphenylethylene core was successfully prepared, which was found to form luminescent organometallic gels in ethyl acetate. Stimulated by temperature or F(-), the reversible gel-sol transition was realized. More interestingly, TPA exhibited an unexpected blue shift of the emission during the sol-to-gel transition. PMID:26323961

  3. Designing, Leading and Managing the Transition to the Common Core: A Strategy Guidebook for Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brentt; Vargo, Merrill

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core provides districts an opportunity to renew their focus on teaching and learning. But it also poses a number of design and implementation challenges for school districts. The "Leadership and Design Cycles" described in this guidebook offers an evidenced-based and structured process for leaders to design and implement…

  4. The Translational Genomics Core at Partners Personalized Medicine: Facilitating the Transition of Research towards Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Blau, Ashley; Brown, Alison; Mahanta, Lisa; Amr, Sami S

    2016-01-01

    The Translational Genomics Core (TGC) at Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM) serves as a fee-for-service core laboratory for Partners Healthcare researchers, providing access to technology platforms and analysis pipelines for genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic research projects. The interaction of the TGC with various components of PPM provides it with a unique infrastructure that allows for greater IT and bioinformatics opportunities, such as sample tracking and data analysis. The following article describes some of the unique opportunities available to an academic research core operating within PPM, such the ability to develop analysis pipelines with a dedicated bioinformatics team and maintain a flexible Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) with the support of an internal IT team, as well as the operational challenges encountered to respond to emerging technologies, diverse investigator needs, and high staff turnover. In addition, the implementation and operational role of the TGC in the Partners Biobank genotyping project of over 25,000 samples is presented as an example of core activities working with other components of PPM. PMID:26927185

  5. The Translational Genomics Core at Partners Personalized Medicine: Facilitating the Transition of Research towards Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Ashley; Brown, Alison; Mahanta, Lisa; Amr, Sami S.

    2016-01-01

    The Translational Genomics Core (TGC) at Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM) serves as a fee-for-service core laboratory for Partners Healthcare researchers, providing access to technology platforms and analysis pipelines for genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic research projects. The interaction of the TGC with various components of PPM provides it with a unique infrastructure that allows for greater IT and bioinformatics opportunities, such as sample tracking and data analysis. The following article describes some of the unique opportunities available to an academic research core operating within PPM, such the ability to develop analysis pipelines with a dedicated bioinformatics team and maintain a flexible Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) with the support of an internal IT team, as well as the operational challenges encountered to respond to emerging technologies, diverse investigator needs, and high staff turnover. In addition, the implementation and operational role of the TGC in the Partners Biobank genotyping project of over 25,000 samples is presented as an example of core activities working with other components of PPM. PMID:26927185

  6. Roadmap for a Successful Transition to the Common Core in States and Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Carmel; Marchitello, Max; Lazarín, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards present the greatest opportunity in decades to improve the quality of education afforded to all students. Uniformly raising standards across the majority of states and increasing the rigor of assessments sets an ambitious bar of college and career readiness for all students. Furthermore, assessing students against…

  7. Quantum phases and phase transitions of frustrated hard-core bosons on a triangular ladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Tapan; Pai, Ramesh V.; Mukerjee, Subroto; Paramekanti, Arun

    2013-05-01

    Kinetically frustrated bosons at half filling in the presence of a competing nearest-neighbor repulsion support a wide supersolid regime on the two-dimensional triangular lattice. We study this model on a two-leg ladder using the finite-size density-matrix renormalization-group method, obtaining a phase diagram which contains three phases: a uniform superfluid (SF), an insulating charge density wave (CDW) crystal, and a bond ordered insulator (BO). We show that the transitions from SF to CDW and SF to BO are continuous in nature, with critical exponents varying continuously along the phase boundaries, while the transition from CDW to BO is found to be first order. The phase diagram is also found to contain an exactly solvable Majumdar Ghosh point, and reentrant SF to CDW phase transitions.

  8. Forced-to-natural convection transition tests in parallel simulated liquid metal reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, A.E. ); Montgomery, B.H. )

    1990-01-01

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Out of Reactor Safety (THORS) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had as its objective the testing of simulated, electrically heated liquid metal reactor (LMR) fuel assemblies in an engineering-scale, sodium loop. Between 1971 and 1985, the THORS Program operated 11 simulated fuel bundles in conditions covering a wide range of normal and off-normal conditions. The last test series in the Program, THORS-SHRS Assembly 1, employed two parallel, 19-pin, full-length, simulated fuel assemblies of a design consistent with the large LMR (Large Scale Prototype Breeder -- LSPB) under development at that time. These bundles were installed in the THORS Facility, allowing single- and parallel-bundle testing in thermal-hydraulic conditions up to and including sodium boiling and dryout. As the name SHRS (Shutdown Heat Removal System) implies, a major objective of the program was testing under conditions expected during low-power reactor operation, including low-flow forced convection, natural convection, and forced-to-natural convection transition at various powers. The THORS-SHRS Assembly 1 experimental program was divided up into four phases. Phase 1 included preliminary and shakedown tests, including the collection of baseline steady-state thermal-hydraulic data. Phase 2 comprised natural convection testing. Forced convection testing was conducted in Phase 3. The final phase of testing included forced-to-natural convection transition tests. Phases 1, 2, and 3 have been discussed in previous papers. The fourth phase is described in this paper. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Transition from ignition to flame spread over thick fuels in a simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuangfeng; Lu, Zhanbin

    Ignition of solid fuels and subsequent transition to flame spread is of fundamental interest and practical importance for spacecraft fire safety. Most previous reseach on microgravity flame spread has involved purely opposed or purely concurrent flow, i.e. ignition occurs at one end of the fuel sample. In this study, a narrow channel apparatus is employed to investigate the phenomenon of flame spread over a thermally thick PMMA sheet in narrow gaps that essentially suppress buoyancy and produce a low-gravity flame spread environment. The ignition is initiated in the middle of the sample, and the focus is to determine the effects of atmosphere oxygen concentration and flow velocity on flame spread behavior in microgravity. Experimental results show that a single flame propagates upstream when oxygen concentration and flow velocity are relatively low. As oxygen and flow velocity are increased to levels high enough, however, the flame may propagate upstream and also downstream. Based on oxygen side diffusion, oxygen shadowing, and fuel depletion effect, the various observed flame behaviors are explained.

  10. Fuel containment and stability in the gas core nuclear rocket. Final report, April 15, 1993--April 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kammash, T.

    1996-02-01

    One of the most promising approaches to advanced propulsion that could meet the objectives of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) is the open cycle gas core nuclear rocket (GCR). The energy in this device is generated by a fissioning uranium plasma which heats, through radiation, a propellant that flows around the core and exits through a nozzle, thereby converting thermal energy into thrust. Although such a scheme can produce very attractive propulsion parameters in the form of high specific impulse and high thrust, it does suffer from serious physics and engineering problems that must be addressed if it is to become a viable propulsion system. Among the major problems that must be solved are the confinement of the uranium plasma, potential instabilities and control problems associated with the dynamics of the uranium core, and the question of startup and fueling of such a reactor. In this paper, the authors focus their attention on the problems of equilibria and stability of the uranium care, and examine the potential use of an externally applied magnetic field for these purposes. They find that steady state operation of the reactor is possible only for certain care profiles that may not be compatible with the radiative aspect of the system. The authors also find that the system is susceptible to hydrodynamic and acoustic instabilities that could deplete the uranium fuel in a short time if not properly suppressed.

  11. Verification study of thorium cross section in MVP calculation of thorium based fuel core using experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, V. T.; Fujii, T.; Wada, K.; Kitada, T.; Takaki, N.; Yamaguchi, A.; Watanabe, H.; Unesaki, H.

    2012-07-01

    Considering the importance of thorium data and concerning about the accuracy of Th-232 cross section library, a series of experiments of thorium critical core carried out at KUCA facility of Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Inst. have been analyzed. The core was composed of pure thorium plates and 93% enriched uranium plates, solid polyethylene moderator with hydro to U-235 ratio of 140 and Th-232 to U-235 ratio of 15.2. Calculations of the effective multiplication factor, control rod worth, reactivity worth of Th plates have been conducted by MVP code using JENDL-4.0 library [1]. At the experiment site, after achieving the critical state with 51 fuel rods inserted inside the reactor, the measurements of the reactivity worth of control rod and thorium sample are carried out. By comparing with the experimental data, the calculation overestimates the effective multiplication factor about 0.90%. Reactivity worth of the control rods evaluation using MVP is acceptable with the maximum discrepancy about the statistical error of the measured data. The calculated results agree to the measurement ones within the difference range of 3.1% for the reactivity worth of one Th plate. From this investigation, further experiments and research on Th-232 cross section library need to be conducted to provide more reliable data for thorium based fuel core design and safety calculation. (authors)

  12. Fuel Summary for Peach Bottom Unit 1 High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cores 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Karel I. Kingrey

    2003-04-01

    This fuel summary report contains background and summary information for the Peach Bottom Unit 1, High-Temperature, Gas-Cooled Reactor Cores 1 and 2. This report contains detailed information about the fuel in the two cores, the Peach Bottom Unit 1 operating history, nuclear parameters, physical and chemical characteristics, and shipping and storage canister related data. The data in this document have been compiled from a large number of sources and are not qualified beyond the qualification of the source documents. This report is intended to provide an overview of the existing data pertaining to spent fuel management and point to pertinent reference source documents. For design applications, the original source documentation must be used. While all referenced sources are available as records or controlled documents at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), some of the sources were marked as informal or draft reports. This is noted where applicable. In some instances, source documents are not consistent. Where they are known, this document identifies those instances and provides clarification where possible. However, as stated above, this document has not been independently qualified and such clarifications are only included for information purposes. Some of the information in this summary is available in multiple source documents. An effort has been made to clearly identify at least one record document as the source for the information included in this report.

  13. Crystal Phase Transitions in the Shell of PbS/CdS Core/Shell Nanocrystals Influences Photoluminescence Intensity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We reveal the existence of two different crystalline phases, i.e., the metastable rock salt and the equilibrium zinc blende phase within the CdS-shell of PbS/CdS core/shell nanocrystals formed by cationic exchange. The chemical composition profile of the core/shell nanocrystals with different dimensions is determined by means of anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering with subnanometer resolution and is compared to X-ray diffraction analysis. We demonstrate that the photoluminescence emission of PbS nanocrystals can be drastically enhanced by the formation of a CdS shell. Especially, the ratio of the two crystalline phases in the shell significantly influences the photoluminescence enhancement. The highest emission was achieved for chemically pure CdS shells below 1 nm thickness with a dominant metastable rock salt phase fraction matching the crystal structure of the PbS core. The metastable phase fraction decreases with increasing shell thickness and increasing exchange times. The photoluminescence intensity depicts a constant decrease with decreasing metastable rock salt phase fraction but shows an abrupt drop for shells above 1.3 nm thickness. We relate this effect to two different transition mechanisms for changing from the metastable rock salt phase to the equilibrium zinc blende phase depending on the shell thickness. PMID:25673918

  14. Monitoring the Slow State Transitions in the Atoll 4u 1705-440 (core Program)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Of all persistent neutron star LMXBs, the atoll source 4U 1705-440 shows the largest dynamic range in count rate (~70) and the most extreme spectral changes. The long timescales and regularity with which 4U 1705-440 traverses its full spectral range allow us to study spectral state transitions in a very detailed manner. Here we propose to monitor, for the first time, two or more full state transition cycles of 4U 1705-440. We propose 168 observations at 3-day intervals to study the importance of the recent accretion history on the evolution of spectral, variability, and burst properties. In addition, our program allows us to test a new spectral model for neutron star LMXBs over a range that is unprecedented for persistent sources.

  15. Domain walls and anchoring transitions mimicking nematic biaxiality in the oxadiazole bent-core liquid crystal C7.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ki; Cukrov, Greta; Xiang, Jie; Shin, Sung-Tae; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-05-28

    We investigate the origin of "secondary disclinations" that were recently described as new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. Using an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in a uniaxial nematic phase during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bounding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a moderate electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignment caused by ionic impurities forming electric double layers. The model is supported by the fact that the temperature of the tangentially tilted anchoring transition decreases as the cell thickness increases and as the concentration of ionic species (added salt) increases. We also demonstrate that the surface alignment is strongly affected by thermal degradation of the samples. This study shows that C7 exhibits only a uniaxial nematic phase and demonstrates yet another mechanism (formation of "secondary disclinations") by which a uniaxial nematic phase can mimic a biaxial nematic behaviour. PMID:25820380

  16. Changes in core electron temperature fluctuations across the ohmic energy confinement transition in Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Oi, C. Y.; Rice, J. E.; Gao, C.; Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Parra, F.; Mikkelsen, D.; Ernst, D.; Walk, J.; Hughes, J. W.; Irby, J.; Kasten, C.; Hubbard, A. E.; Greenwald, M. J.; the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of long wavelength (kyρs < 0.3) electron temperature fluctuations in Alcator C-Mod made with a new correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic support a long-standing hypothesis regarding the confinement transition from linear ohmic confinement (LOC) to saturated ohmic confinement (SOC). Electron temperature fluctuations decrease significantly (∼40%) crossing from LOC to SOC, consistent with a change from trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence domination to ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence as the density is increased. Linear stability analysis performed with the GYRO code (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) shows that TEMs are dominant for long wavelength turbulence in the LOC regime and ITG modes are dominant in the SOC regime at the radial location (ρ ∼ 0.8) where the changes in electron temperature fluctuations are measured. In contrast, deeper in the core (ρ < 0.8), linear stability analysis indicates that ITG modes remain dominant across the LOC/SOC transition. This radial variation suggests that the robust global changes in confinement of energy and momentum occurring across the LOC/SOC transition are correlated to local changes in the dominant turbulent mode near the edge.

  17. Crystallization of ion clouds in octupole traps: Structural transitions, core melting, and scaling laws

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, F.; Champenois, C.; Yurtsever, E.

    2009-12-15

    The stable structures and melting properties of ion clouds in isotropic octupole traps are investigated using a combination of semianalytical and numerical models, with a particular emphasis at finite-size scaling effects. Small-size clouds are found to be hollow and arranged in shells corresponding approximately to the solutions of the Thomson problem. The shell structure is lost in clusters containing more than a few thousands of ions, the inner parts of the cloud becoming soft and amorphous. While melting is triggered in the core shells, the melting temperature follows the rule expected for three-dimensional dense particles, with a depression scaling linearly with the inverse radius.

  18. Fission product retention in TRISCO coated UO sub 2 particle fuels subjected to HTR simulated core heating tests

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, C.A.; Kania, M.J.

    1990-11-01

    Results of the examination and analysis of 25,730 individual microspheres from spherical fuel elements HFR-K3/1 and HFR-K3/3 are reported. The parent spheres were irradiated in excess of end-of-life exposure and subsequently subjected to simulated core heating tests in a special high-temperature furnace at Forschungszentrum, Juelich, GmbH (KFA). Following the heating tests, the spheres were electrolytically deconsolidated to obtain unbonded fuel particles for Irradiated Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA) analysis. For sphere HFR-K3/1, which was heated for 500 h at 1600{degree}C, only four particles were identified as having released fission products. The remaining particles from the sphere showed no statistical evidence of fission product release. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examination showed that three of the defect particles had large sections of the TRISO coating missing, while the fourth appeared normal. For sphere HFR-K3/3, which was heated for 100 h at 1800{degree}C, the IMGA data revealed that fission product release (cesium) from individual particles was significant and that there was large particle-to-particle variation in retention capabilities. Individual particle release (cesium) averaged ten times the KFA-measured integral spherical fuel element release value. In addition, the bimodal distribution of the individual particle data indicated that two distinct modes of failure at fuel temperatures of 1800{degree}C and above may exist. 6 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Technical Approach and Plan for Transitioning Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities to the Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-10-06

    This document describes the approach and process in which the 100-K Area Facilities are to be deactivated and transitioned over to the Environmental Restoration Program after spent nuclear fuel has been removed from the K Basins. It describes the Transition Project's scope and objectives, work breakdown structure, activity planning, estimated cost, and schedule. This report will be utilized as a planning document for project management and control and to communicate details of project content and integration.

  20. The performance of 3500 MWth homogeneous and heterogeneous metal fueled core designs

    SciTech Connect

    Turski, R.; Yang, Shi-tien

    1987-11-01

    Performance parameters are calculated for a representative 3500 MWth homogeneous and a heterogeneous metal fueled reactor design. The equilibrium cycle neutronic characteristics, safety coefficients, control system requirements, and control rod worths are evaluated. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics for both configurations are also compared. The heavy metal fuel loading requirements and neutronic performance characteristics are also evaluated for the uranium startup option. 14 refs., 14 figs., 20 tabs.

  1. A New Innovative Spherical Cermet Nuclear Fuel Element to Achieve an Ultra-Long Core Life for use in Grid-Appropriate LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Senor, David J.; Painter, Chad L.; Geelhood, Ken J.; Wootan, David W.; Meriwether, George H.; Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.; Matson, Dean W.; Abrego, Celestino P.

    2007-12-01

    Spherical cermet fuel elements are proposed for use in the Atoms For Peace Reactor (AFPR-100) concept. AFPR-100 is a small-scale, inherently safe, proliferation-resistant reactor that would be ideal for deployment to nations with emerging economies that decide to select nuclear power for the generation of carbon-free electricity. The basic concept of the AFPR core is a water-cooled fixed particle bed, randomly packed with spherical fuel elements. The flow of coolant within the particle bed is at such a low rate that the bed does not fluidize. This report summarizes an approach to fuel fabrication, results associated with fuel performance modeling, core neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses demonstrating a ~20 year core life, and a conclusion that the proliferation resistance of the AFPR reactor concept is high.

  2. Magnetic transition and sound velocities of Fe 3S at high pressure: implications for Earth and planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Fei, Yingwei; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Zhao, Jiyong; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2004-09-01

    Magnetic, elastic, thermodynamic, and vibrational properties of the most iron-rich sulfide, Fe3S, known to date have been studied with synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS) and nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) up to 57 GPa at room temperature. The magnetic hyperfine fields derived from the time spectra of the synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy show that the low-pressure magnetic phase displays two magnetic hyperfine field sites and that a magnetic collapse occurs at 21 GPa. The magnetic to non-magnetic transition significantly affects the elastic, thermodynamic, and vibrational properties of Fe3S. The magnetic collapse of Fe3S may also affect the phase relations in the iron-sulfur system, changing the solubility of sulfur in iron under higher pressures. Determination of the physical properties of the non-magnetic Fe3S phase is important for the interpretation of the amount and properties of sulfur present in the planetary cores. Sound velocities of Fe3S obtained from the measured partial phonon density of states (PDOS) for 57Fe incorporated in the alloy show that Fe3S has higher compressional and shear wave velocity than those of hcp-Fe and hcp-Fe0.92Ni0.08 alloy under high pressures, making sulfur a potential light element in the Earth's core based on geophysical arguments. The VP and VS of the non-magnetic Fe3S follow a Birch's law trend whereas the slopes decrease in the magnetic phase, indicating that the decrease of the magnetic moment significantly affects the sound velocities. If the Martian core is in the solid state containing 14.2 wt.% sulfur, it is likely that the non-magnetic Fe3S phase is a dominant component and that our measured sound velocities of Fe3S can be used to construct the corresponding velocity profile of the Martian core. It is also conceivable that Fe3P and Fe3C undergo similar magnetic phase transitions under high pressures.

  3. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on transitions for individuals with disabilities contains nine papers discussing transition programs and issues. "Transition Issues for the 1990s," by Michael J. Ward and William D. Halloran, discusses self-determination, school responsibility for transition, continued educational engagement of at-risk students, and service…

  4. Methodology of Fuel Burn Up Fitting in VVER-1000 Reactor Core by Using New Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry and In-Core Measurements and its Application for Routine Reactor Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, Pavel; Borodkin, Gennady; Khrennikov, Nikolay

    2016-02-01

    Paper describes the new approach of fitting axial fuel burn-up patterns in peripheral fuel assemblies of VVER-1000 type reactors, on the base of ex-core neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations and in-core SPND measured data. The developed approach uses results of new ex-vessel measurements on different power units through different reactor cycles and their uncertainties to clear the influence of a fitted fuel burn-up profile to the RPV neutron fluence calculations. The new methodology may be recommended to be included in the routine fluence calculations used in RPV lifetime management and may be taken into account during VVER-1000 core burn-up pattern correction.

  5. Equilibrium reconstruction based on core magnetic measurement and its applications on equilibrium transition in Joint-TEXT tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Zhuang, G. Jian, X.; Li, Q.; Liu, Y.; Gao, L.; Wang, Z. J.

    2014-10-15

    Evaluation and reconstruction of plasma equilibrium, especially to resolve the safety factor profile, is imperative for advanced tokamak operation and physics study. Based on core magnetic measurement by the high resolution laser polarimeter-interferometer system (POLARIS), the equilibrium of Joint-TEXT (J-TEXT) plasma is reconstructed and profiles of safety factor, current density, and electron density are, therefore, obtained with high accuracy and temporal resolution. The equilibrium reconstruction procedure determines the equilibrium flux surfaces essentially from the data of POLARIS. Refraction of laser probe beam, a major error source of the reconstruction, has been considered and corrected, which leads to improvement of accuracy more than 10%. The error of reconstruction has been systematically assessed with consideration of realistic diagnostic performance and scrape-off layer region of plasma, and its accuracy has been verified. Fast equilibrium transitions both within a single sawtooth cycle and during the penetration of resonant magnetic perturbation have been investigated.

  6. Magnetic moments, E3 transitions and the structure of high-spin core excited states in 211Rn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, A. R.; Dracoulis, G. D.; Byrne, A. P.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Poletti, S. J.; Gerl, J.; Lewis, P. M.

    1985-05-01

    The results of g-factor measurements of high-spin states in 211Rn are: Ex = 8856 + Δ' keV (Jπ = 63/2-), g = 0.626(7); 6101 + Δ' KeV (49/2+), 0.766(8); 5347 + Δ' KeV (43/2-), 0.74(2); 3927 + Δ KeV (35/2+), 1.017(12); 1578 + Δ KeV (17/2-), 0.912(9). These results together with measured E3 transition strengths and shell model calculations are used to assign configurations to the core excited states in 211Rn. Mixed configurations are required to explain the g-factors and enhanced E3 strengths simultaneously.

  7. Shear flows at the tokamak edge and their role in core rotation and the L-H transition.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, A Y

    2007-06-01

    Pfirsch-Schlüter fluxes in tokamaks are shown to drive strong poloidal and toroidal shear flows that are localized to the edge and scrape-off layer in the presence of temperature gradients and finite bootstrap current in the pedestal. Within a magnetohydrodynamic model, the effect of these flows on core rotation and their role in the magnetic configuration dependence of the power threshold for the low- (L-) to high- (H-)mode transition are discussed. Theoretical predictions based on symmetries of the underlying equations, coupled with computational results, are found to be in general agreement with observations in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [Phys. Plasmas 12, 056111 (2005)10.1063/1.1876294]. PMID:17677853

  8. Accidental degeneracy in photonic bands and topological phase transitions in two-dimensional core-shell dielectric photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lin; Wang, Hai-Xiao; Xu, Ya-Dong; Chen, Huan-Yang; Jiang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A simple core-shell two-dimensional photonic crystal is studied where the triangle lattice symmetry and $C_{6v}$ rotation symmetry leads to rich physics in the study of accidental degeneracy's in photonic bands. We systematically evaluate different types of accidental nodal points, depending on the dispersions around them and their topological properties, when the geometry and permittivity are continuously changed. These accidental nodal points can be the critical states lying between a topological phase and a normal phase and are thus important for the study of topological photonic states. In time-reversal systems, this leads to the photonic quantum spin Hall insulator where the spin is defined upon the orbital angular momentum for transverse-magnetic polarization. We study the topological phase transition as well as the properties of the edge and bulk states and their application potentials in optics.

  9. Fuel efficient hydrodynamic containment for gas core fission reactor rocket propulsion. Final report, September 30, 1992--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Sforza, P.M.; Cresci, R.J.

    1997-05-31

    Gas core reactors can form the basis for advanced nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems capable of providing specific impulse levels of more than 2,000 sec., but containment of the hot uranium plasma is a major problem. The initial phase of an experimental study of hydrodynamic confinement of the fuel cloud in a gas core fission reactor by means of an innovative application of a base injection stabilized recirculation bubble is presented. The development of the experimental facility, a simulated thrust chamber approximately 0.4 m in diameter and 1 m long, is described. The flow rate of propellant simulant (air) can be varied up to about 2 kg/sec and that of fuel simulant (air, air-sulfur hexafluoride) up to about 0.2 kg/sec. This scale leads to chamber Reynolds numbers on the same order of magnitude as those anticipated in a full-scale nuclear rocket engine. The experimental program introduced here is focused on determining the size, geometry, and stability of the recirculation region as a function of the bleed ratio, i.e. the ratio of the injected mass flux to the free stream mass flux. A concurrent CFD study is being carried out to aid in demonstrating that the proposed technique is practical.

  10. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2012-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.