Science.gov

Sample records for fuels demonstration program

  1. Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii's Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

  2. Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, C.M.

    1990-12-31

    Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii`s Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

  3. Fuel consolidation demonstration program: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    EPRI, Northeast Utilities, Baltimore Gas and Electric, the US Department of Energy and Combustion Engineering are engaged in a program to develop a system for consolidating spent fuel and a method of storing the consolidated fuel in the spent fuel storage pool which is licensable by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Fuel consolidation offers a means of substantially increasing the capacity of spent fuel storage pools. This is a final report of the Fuel Consolidation Demonstration Program. It provides a review of the overall program, a summary of the results obtained, the lessons learned, and an assessment of the present status of the consolidation system developed in the program. 7 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Alternative-fueled truck demonstration natural gas program: Caterpillar G3406LE development and demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    In 1990, the California Energy Commission, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the Southern California Gas Company joined together to sponsor the development and demonstration of compressed natural gas engines for Class 8 heavy-duty line-haul trucking applications. This program became part of an overall Alternative-Fueled Truck Demonstration Program, with the goal of advancing the technological development of alternative-fueled engines. The demonstration showed natural gas to be a technically viable fuel for Class 8 truck engines.

  5. Spent nuclear fuel removal program at the West Valley Demonstration Project: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Connors, B. J.; Golden, M. P.; Valenti, P. J.; Winkel, J. J.

    1987-03-01

    The spent nuclear fuel removal program at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) consisted of removing the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies from the storage pool in the plant, loading them in shielded casks, and preparing the casks for transportation. So far, four fuel removal campaigns have been completed with the return of 625 spent nuclear fuel assemblies to their four utility owners. A fifth campaign, which is not yet completed, will transfer the remaining 125 fuel assemblies to a government site in Idaho. A spent fuel rod consolidation demonstration has been completed, and the storage canisters and their racks are being removed from the fuel receiving and storage pool to make way for installation of the size reduction equipment. A brief history of the West Valley reprocessing plant and the events leading to the storage and ownership of the spent nuclear fuel assemblies and their subsequent removal from West Valley are also recorded as background information. 3 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

  7. Extended Burnup Demonstration Reactor Fuels Program. Annual progress report, April 1983-March 1984. [BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, C.A.

    1985-06-20

    The US Department of Energy, Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, and General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation have participated since 1979 in a cooperative Extended Burnup Demonstration Program. Under the program, standard ENC-fabricated reload fuel in the Big Rock Point and Oyster Creek reactor cores has been irradiated to discharge burnups at or beyond 35,000 MWD/MTU, one to two cycles beyond its originally projected exposure life. The program provides for examination of the fuel at poolside before and after each extended burnup cycle as well as for limited destructive hot cell examination. The 1984 progress report covers work performed under the EBD program between April 1983 and March 1984. Major milestones reached during the period include completion of a hot cell examination on four high burnup rods from Big Rock Point and of a poolside on the Oyster Creek EBD fuel at discharge. The hot cell examination of four rods at burnups to 37.2 GWD/MTU confirmed poolside measurements on the same fuel, showing the urania and gadolinia-bearing fuel rods to be in excellent condition. No major cladding degradation, pellet restructuring, or pellet-clad interaction was found in any of the samples examined. The Oyster Creek fuel, examined at an assembly average exposure of 34.5 GWD/MTU, showed good performance with regard to both diametral creepdown and clad oxide accumulation.

  8. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program final report. Volume 1: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles in typical applications in New York State. During 3 years of collecting data, 7.3 million miles of driving were accumulated, 1,003 chassis-dynamometer emissions tests were performed, 862,000 gallons of conventional fuel were saved, and unique information was developed about garage safety recommendations, vehicle performance, and other topics. Findings are organized by vehicle and fuel type. For light-duty compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, technology has evolved rapidly and closed-loop, electronically-controlled fuel systems provide performance and emissions advantages over open-loop, mechanical systems. The best CNG technology produces consistently low tailpipe emissions versus gasoline, and can eliminate evaporative emissions. Reduced driving range remains the largest physical drawback. Fuel cost is low ($/Btu) but capital costs are high, indicating that economics are best with vehicles that are used intensively. Propane produces impacts similar to CNG and is less expensive to implement, but fuel cost is higher than gasoline and safety codes limit use in urban areas. Light-duty methanol/ethanol vehicles provide performance and emissions benefits over gasoline with little impact on capital costs, but fuel costs are high. Heavy-duty CNG engines are evolving rapidly and provide large reductions in emissions versus diesel. Capital costs are high for CNG buses and fuel efficiency is reduced, but the fuel is less expensive and overall operating costs are about equal to those of diesel buses. Methanol buses provide performance and emissions benefits versus diesel, but fuel costs are high. Other emerging technologies were also evaluated, including electric vehicles, hybrid-electric vehicles, and fuel cells.

  9. The Ontario Hydro dry irradiated fuel storage program and concrete integrated container demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, P.J.; Grande, L. )

    1990-05-01

    The practicality of loading irradiated fuel into a concrete cask underwater in an existing pool facility has been successfully demonstrated. The cask holds about 7.7 metric-tons-uranium. Special design features allow the cask to be used for dry storage, for transportation, and for disposal without re-handling the fuel. The cask, called the concrete integrated container, or CIC, has been developed. This paper describes the loading, monitoring, and IAEA-based transportation certification of testing of the CIC.

  10. Industrial fuel gas demonstration plant program. License agreements for proprietary processes. (Deliverable No. 30)

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    The proprietary processes included within the Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant are listed. Draft license agreements covering the use of these processes, with the exception of the Westfield Process (Conoco), have been included at the end of this document. Except for the Claus Process (Amoco) all draft license agreements will be executed directly between MLGW and the licensor. All the draft license agreements provided have been prepared by the licensors after preliminary discussions. Presently these agreements are being reviewed by MLGW for acceptability. As stated above, the Amoco Sulfur Recovery Process will be covered by an existing agreement between Standard Oil and FWEC. Suitable clauses have been provided under Tab V. These clauses will be incorporated into the MLGW/FWEC subcontract for the protection of MLGW, FWEC, and licensor. At this writing the Industrial Team has no secrecy agreement executed with Conoco Methanation Company (Westfield Methanation Process) nor has any draft license agreement been transmitted by Conoco.

  11. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Task III, Demonstration plant safety, industrial hygiene, and major disaster plan (Deliverable No. 35)

    SciTech Connect

    1980-03-01

    This Health and Safety Plan has been adopted by the IFG Demonstration Plant managed by Memphis Light, Gas and Water at Memphis, Tennessee. The plan encompasses the following areas of concern: Safety Plan Administration, Industrial Health, Industrial Safety, First Aid, Fire Protection (including fire prevention and control), and Control of Safety Related Losses. The primary objective of this plan is to achieve adequate control of all potentially hazardous activities to assure the health and safety of all employees and eliminate lost work time to both the employees and the company. The second objective is to achieve compliance with all Federal, state and local laws, regulations and codes. Some thirty specific safe practice instruction items are included.

  12. The VHITAL program to demonstrate the performance and lifetime of a bismuth-fueled very high isp hall thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrese-Reading, Colleen; Sengupta, Anita; Frisbee, Robert; Polk, Jay; Capelli, Mark; Boyd, Iain; Keidar, Michael; Tverdokhlebov, Sergey; Semenkin, Sasha; Markusic, Tom; Yalin, Azer; Knowles, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    In the Very High Isp Thruster with Anode Layer (VHITAL) Program the performance, plume and lifetime capability of the radiatively-cooled two stage, bismuth-fueled VHITAL-160 will be characterized in the US and Russia.

  13. Navy fuel cell demonstration project.

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Billy D.; Akhil, Abbas Ali

    2008-08-01

    This is the final report on a field evaluation by the Department of the Navy of twenty 5-kW PEM fuel cells carried out during 2004 and 2005 at five Navy sites located in New York, California, and Hawaii. The key objective of the effort was to obtain an engineering assessment of their military applications. Particular issues of interest were fuel cell cost, performance, reliability, and the readiness of commercial fuel cells for use as a standalone (grid-independent) power option. Two corollary objectives of the demonstration were to promote technological advances and to improve fuel performance and reliability. From a cost perspective, the capital cost of PEM fuel cells at this stage of their development is high compared to other power generation technologies. Sandia National Laboratories technical recommendation to the Navy is to remain involved in evaluating successive generations of this technology, particularly in locations with greater environmental extremes, and it encourages their increased use by the Navy.

  14. Fuel consolidation demonstration: Consolidation concept development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    EPRI, Northeast utilities Service Company (NUSCO), DOE, Baltimore Gas Electric Company, and Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) are engaged in a program to develop a system for consolidating spent fuel, in which the consolidated fuel will be licensable by NRC for storage in the spent-fuel storage pool. Fuel consolidation offers a means of substantially increasing the capacity of spent-fuel storage pools. Consolidation equipment design, development, construction, and testing are being performed by C-E in Windsor, Connecticut. Seismic and structural evaluation of the capability of the Millstone Unit 2 spent-fuel pool and building to accommodate the increased fuel capacity is being conducted by NUSCO. NUSCO plans to obtain a license to store consolidated fuel in the Millstone-2 spent-fuel storage pool. NUSCO also plans to perform a hot demonstration of the integrated consolidation system with spent fuel at Millstone-2. This report describes the consolidation system design that forms the basis for the detailed design of the equipment comprising the system, including information on the fabrication and testing of the equipment. Appendix B describes an evaluation of the ability of the system under development to consolidate LWR spent-fuel assemblies other than the 14 {times} 14 fuel of C-E design stored at Millstone-2. A comparison was made of fuel-assembly designs on the basis of information available in open literature. It was concluded that with appropriate dimensional modifications the spent-fuel consolidation system equipment design is applicable to almost all PWR fuel-assembly configurations. 8 refs., 20 figs.

  15. Demonstration of alcohol as an aviation fuel

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    A recently funded Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP) project with Baylor University will demonstrate the effectiveness of ethanols as an aviation fuel while providing several environmental and economic benefits. Part of this concern is caused by the petroleum industry. The basis for the petroleum industry to find an alternative aviation fuel will be dictated mainly by economic considerations. Three other facts compound the problem. First is the disposal of oil used in engines burning leaded fuel. This oil will contain too much lead to be burned in incinerators and will have to be treated as a toxic waste with relatively high disposal fees. Second, as a result of a greater demand for alkalites to be used in the automotive reformulated fuel, the costs of these components are likely to increase. Third, the Montreal Protocol will ban in 1998 the use of Ethyl-Di-Bromide, a lead scavenger used in leaded aviation fuel. Without a lead scavenger, leaded fuels cannot be used. The search for alternatives to leaded aviation fuels has been underway by different organizations for some time. As part of the search for alternatives, the Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, has received a grant from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to improve the efficiencies of ethanol powered aircraft engines and to test other non-petroleum alternatives to aviation fuel.

  16. Residential Fuel Cell Demonstration Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrero, E.; McClelland, R.

    2002-07-01

    This report is a guide for rural electric cooperatives engaged in field testing of equipment and in assessing related application and market issues. Dispersed generation and its companion fuel cell technology have attracted increased interest by rural electric cooperatives and their customers. In addition, fuel cells are a particularly interesting source because their power quality, efficiency, and environmental benefits have now been coupled with major manufacturer development efforts. The overall effort is structured to measure the performance, durability, reliability, and maintainability of these systems, to identify promising types of applications and modes of operation, and to assess the related prospect for future use. In addition, technical successes and shortcomings will be identified by demonstration participants and manufacturers using real-world experience garnered under typical operating environments.

  17. Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Mallinger

    2004-08-27

    Project Description: Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants The Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants was established to demonstrate the benefits of new propane equipment. The US Department of Energy, the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) and the Propane Vehicle Council (PVC) partnered in this program. The project impacted ten different states, 179 vehicles, and 15 new propane fueling facilities. Based on estimates provided, this project generated a minimum of 1,441,000 new gallons of propane sold for the vehicle market annually. Additionally, two new off-road engines were brought to the market. Projects originally funded under this project were the City of Portland, Colorado, Kansas City, Impco Technologies, Jasper Engines, Maricopa County, New Jersey State, Port of Houston, Salt Lake City Newspaper, Suburban Propane, Mutual Liquid Propane and Ted Johnson.

  18. USEPA Arsenic Demonstration Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides background information on the USEPA arsenic removal program. The summary includes information on the history of the program, sites and technology selected, and a summary of the data collected from two completed projects.

  19. Demonstration of catalytic combustion with residual fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to demonstrate catalytic combustion of a residual fuel oil. Three catalytic reactors, including a baseline configuration and two backup configurations based on baseline test results, were operated on No. 6 fuel oil. All reactors were multielement configurations consisting of ceramic honeycomb catalyzed with palladium on stabilized alumina. Stable operation on residual oil was demonstrated with the baseline configuration at a reactor inlet temperature of about 825 K (1025 F). At low inlet temperature, operation was precluded by apparent plugging of the catalytic reactor with residual oil. Reduced plugging tendency was demonstrated in the backup reactors by increasing the size of the catalyst channels at the reactor inlet, but plugging still occurred at inlet temperature below 725 K (845 F). Operation at the original design inlet temperature of 589 K (600 F) could not be demonstrated. Combustion efficiency above 99.5% was obtained with less than 5% reactor pressure drop. Thermally formed NO sub x levels were very low (less than 0.5 g NO2/kg fuel) but nearly 100% conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NO sub x was observed.

  20. Southern Nevada Alternative Fuels Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Dan; Fast, Matthew

    2009-12-31

    The Southern Nevada Alternative Fuels Program is designed to demonstrate, in a day-to-day bus operation, the reliability and efficiency of a hydrogen bus operation under extreme conditions. By using ICE technology and utilizing a virtually emission free fuel, benefits to be derived include air quality enhancement and vehicle performance improvements from domestically produced, renewable energy sources. The project objective is to help both Ford and the City demonstrate and evaluate the performance characteristics of the E-450 H2ICE shuttle buses developed by Ford, which use a 6.8-liter supercharged Triton V-10 engine with a hydrogen storage system equivalent to 29 gallons of gasoline. The technology used during the demonstration project in the Ford buses is a modified internal combustion engine that allows the vehicles to run on 100% hydrogen fuel. Hydrogen gives a more thorough fuel burn which results in more power and responsiveness and less pollution. The resultant emissions from the tailpipe are 2010 Phase II compliant with NO after treatment. The City will lease two of these E-450 H2ICE buses from Ford for two years. The buses are outfitted with additional equipment used to gather information needed for the evaluation. Performance, reliability, safety, efficiency, and rider comments data will be collected. The method of data collection will be both electronically and manually. Emissions readings were not obtained during the project. The City planned to measure the vehicle exhaust with an emissions analyzer machine but discovered the bus emission levels were below the capability of their machine. Passenger comments were solicited on the survey cards. The majority of comments were favorable. The controllable issues encountered during this demonstration project were mainly due to the size of the hydrogen fuel tanks at the site and the amount of fuel that could be dispensed during a specified period of time. The uncontrollable issues encountered during this

  1. Automotive Fuel Processor Development and Demonstration with Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nuvera Fuel Cells

    2005-04-15

    The potential for fuel cell systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions over conventional power systems has generated significant interest in fuel cell technologies. While fuel cells are being investigated for use in many applications such as stationary power generation and small portable devices, transportation applications present some unique challenges for fuel cell technology. Due to their lower operating temperature and non-brittle materials, most transportation work is focusing on fuel cells using proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology. Since PEM fuel cells are fueled by hydrogen, major obstacles to their widespread use are the lack of an available hydrogen fueling infrastructure and hydrogen's relatively low energy storage density, which leads to a much lower driving range than conventional vehicles. One potential solution to the hydrogen infrastructure and storage density issues is to convert a conventional fuel such as gasoline into hydrogen onboard the vehicle using a fuel processor. Figure 2 shows that gasoline stores roughly 7 times more energy per volume than pressurized hydrogen gas at 700 bar and 4 times more than liquid hydrogen. If integrated properly, the fuel processor/fuel cell system would also be more efficient than traditional engines and would give a fuel economy benefit while hydrogen storage and distribution issues are being investigated. Widespread implementation of fuel processor/fuel cell systems requires improvements in several aspects of the technology, including size, startup time, transient response time, and cost. In addition, the ability to operate on a number of hydrocarbon fuels that are available through the existing infrastructure is a key enabler for commercializing these systems. In this program, Nuvera Fuel Cells collaborated with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop efficient, low-emission, multi-fuel processors for transportation applications. Nuvera's focus was on (1) developing fuel processor

  2. Electric thermal storage demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

  3. Electric thermal storage demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

  4. Equipment designs for the spent LWR fuel dry storage demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, R.J.; Kurasch, D.H.; Hardin, R.T.; Schmitten, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    In conjunction with the Spent Fuel Handling and Packaging Program (SFHPP) equipment has been designed, fabricated and successfully utilized to demonstrate the packaging and interim dry storage of spent LWR fuel. Surface and near surface storage configurations containing PWR fuel assemblies are currently on test and generating baseline data. Specific areas of hardware design focused upon include storage cell components and the support related equipment associated with encapsulation, leak testing, lag storage, and emplacement operations.

  5. Hydrogen fueling station development and demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Daney, D.; Daugherty, M.; Hill, D.; Prenger, F.C.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop and demonstrate a hydrogen fueling station for vehicles. Such stations are an essential infrastructural element in the practical application of hydrogen as vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology that is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle.

  6. DOD fuel cell demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, F.H.; Binder, M.J.; Taylor, W.R.

    1996-12-31

    The supply of reliable, cost-effective electric power with minimal environmental impact is a constant concern of Department of Defense (DOD) installation energy personnel. Electricity purchased from the local utility is expensive and represents only about 30% of the original energy input at the generating station due to generation and distribution inefficiencies. Because of master metering and large air conditioning loads, the demand portion of the installation`s electric bill can be in excess of 50% of the total bill. While the electric utilities in the United States have a very good record of reliability, there is significant potential for improving the security of electrical power supplied by using on-site power generation. On-site, dispersed power generation can reduce power outages due to weather, terrorist activities, or lack of utility generating capacity. In addition, as increased emphasis is placed on global warming, acid rain, and air pollution in general, the development of clean, highly efficient power producing technologies is not only desirable, but mandatory. Since the majority of central heat plants on U.S. military installations are nearing the end of their useful life, there is an opportunity to replace outdated existing equipment with modem technologies.

  7. The Seasat commercial demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccandless, S. W.; Miller, B. P.; Montgomery, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    The background and development of the Seasat commercial demonstration program are reviewed and the Seasat spacecraft and its sensors (altimeter, wind field scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar, and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer) are described. The satellite data distribution system allows for selected sets of data, reformatted or tailored to specific needs and geographical regions, to be available to commercial users. Products include sea level and upper atmospheric pressure, sea surface temperature, marine winds, significant wave heights, primary wave direction and period, and spectral wave data. The results of a set of retrospective case studies performed for the commercial demonstration program are described. These are in areas of application such as marine weather and ocean condition forecasting, offshore resource exploration and development, commercial fishing, and marine transportation.

  8. Texas LPG fuel cell development and demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2004-07-26

    The State Energy Conservation Office has executed its first Fuel Cell Project which was awarded under a Department of Energy competitive grant process. The Texas LPG Fuel Processor Development and Fuel Cell Demonstration Program is a broad-based public/private partnership led by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office (SECO). Partners include the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division (AFRED) of the Railroad Commission of Texas; Plug Power, Inc., Latham, NY, UOP/HyRadix, Des Plaines, IL; Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), San Antonio, TX; the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), and the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). The team proposes to mount a development and demonstration program to field-test and evaluate markets for HyRadix's LPG fuel processor system integrated into Plug Power's residential-scale GenSys(TM) 5C (5 kW) PEM fuel cell system in a variety of building types and conditions of service. The program's primary goal is to develop, test, and install a prototype propane-fueled residential fuel cell power system supplied by Plug Power and HyRadix in Texas. The propane industry is currently funding development of an optimized propane fuel processor by project partner UOP/HyRadix through its national checkoff program, the Propane Education and Research Council (PERC). Following integration and independent verification of performance by Southwest Research Institute, Plug Power and HyRadix will produce a production-ready prototype unit for use in a field demonstration. The demonstration unit produced during this task will be delivered and installed at the Texas Department of Transportation's TransGuide headquarters in San Antonio, Texas. Simultaneously, the team will undertake a market study aimed at identifying and quantifying early-entry customers, technical and regulatory requirements, and other challenges and opportunities that need to be addressed in planning commercialization of the units. For further

  9. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR radioassay program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, F. T.; Back, H. O.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Chu, P.-H.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Dunmore, J. A.; Efremenko, Yu.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Finnerty, P.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gehman, V. M.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I. S.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Massarczyk, R.; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Miller, M. L.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Steele, D.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2016-08-01

    The MAJORANA collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR at the Sanford Underground Research Facility at the Homestake gold mine, in Lead, SD. The apparatus will use Ge detectors, enriched in isotope 76Ge, to demonstrate the feasibility of a large-scale Ge detector experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. The long half-life of this postulated process requires that the apparatus be extremely low in radioactive isotopes whose decays may produce backgrounds to the search. The radioassay program conducted by the collaboration to ensure that the materials comprising the apparatus are sufficiently pure is described. The resulting measurements from gamma-ray counting, neutron activation and mass spectroscopy of the radioactive-isotope contamination for the materials studied for use in the detector are reported. We interpret these numbers in the context of the expected background for the experiment.

  10. INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    FuelCell Energy

    2005-05-16

    With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery, water

  11. Demonstration of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Management Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian; Colozza, Anthony; Wynne, Robert; Miller, Michael; Meyer, Al; Smith, William

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA Exploration program. The passive thermal management system relies on heat conduction within highly thermally conductive cooling plates to move the heat from the central portion of the cell stack out to the edges of the fuel cell stack. Using the passive approach eliminates the need for a coolant pump and other cooling loop components within the fuel cell system which reduces mass and improves overall system reliability. Previous development demonstrated the performance of suitable highly thermally conductive cooling plates and integrated heat exchanger technology to collect the heat from the cooling plates (Ref. 1). The next step in the development of this passive thermal approach was the demonstration of the control of the heat removal process and the demonstration of the passive thermal control technology in actual fuel cell stacks. Tests were run with a simulated fuel cell stack passive thermal management system outfitted with passive cooling plates, an integrated heat exchanger and two types of cooling flow control valves. The tests were run to demonstrate the controllability of the passive thermal control approach. Finally, successful demonstrations of passive thermal control technology were conducted with fuel cell stacks from two fuel cell stack vendors.

  12. Fuel cell technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A program to advance the technology for a cost-effective hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell system for future manned spacecraft is discussed. The evaluation of base line design concepts and the development of product improvements in the areas of life, power, specific weight and volume, versatility of operation, field maintenance and thermal control were conducted from the material and component level through the fabrication and test of an engineering model of the fuel cell system. The program was to be accomplished in a 13 month period.

  13. Diesel fueled ship propulsion fuel cell demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Kumm, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    The paper describes the work underway to adapt a former US Navy diesel electric drive ship as a 2.4 Megawatt fuel cell powered, US Coast Guard operated, demonstrator. The Project will design the new configuration, and then remove the four 600 kW diesel electric generators and auxiliaries. It will design, build and install fourteen or more nominal 180 kW diesel fueled molten carbonate internal reforming direct fuel cells (DFCs). The USCG cutter VINDICATOR has been chosen. The adaptation will be carried out at the USCG shipyard at Curtis Bay, MD. A multi-agency (state and federal) cooperative project is now underway. The USCG prime contractor, AEL, is performing the work under a Phase III Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) award. This follows their successful completion of Phases I and II under contract to the US Naval Sea Systems (NAVSEA) from 1989 through 1993 which successfully demonstrated the feasibility of diesel fueled DFCs. The demonstrated marine propulsion of a USCG cutter will lead to commercial, naval ship and submarine applications as well as on-land applications such as diesel fueled locomotives.

  14. U-GAS demonstration plant program

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, J.G.; Loeding, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    A joint program to design, construct, and operate an industrial fuel-gas demonstration plant in Memphis, Tennessee, has been undertaken by Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division (MLGW) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The facility will use the Institute of Gas Technology's U-GAS process to produce fuel gas equivalent to 50 million cubic feet per day of natural gas. The plant will use as feed 3200 tons/day of western Kentucky coal. To date, main activities have been the design of the plant and, in support of the design, operation of the U-GAS pilot plant, the compilation of an environmental report, and estimation of plant cost. This constitutes the work done under Phase I; Phases II and III, which will conclude detailed plant design and construction in Phase II and plant operations in Phase III, have been the subject of recent successful negotiations between DOE and MLGW. The cost of Phases II and III will be shared between the two signatories. The goal of the demonstration plant program is to test the feasibility of a multiple-user coal gasification plant located in the southwest corner of Memphis, Tennessee.

  15. National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-07-01

    This report discusses key analysis results based on data from early 2005 through September 2011 from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project, also referred to as the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration. This report serves as one of many mechanisms to help transfer knowledge and lessons learned within various parts of DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program, as well as externally to other stakeholders. It is the fifth and final such report in a series, with previous reports being published in July 2007, November 2007, April 2008, and September 2010.

  16. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell demonstration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Veyo, S.E.

    1995-08-01

    The development of a viable fuel cell driven electrical power generation system involves not only the development of cell and stack technology, but also the development of the overall system concept, the strategy for control, and the ancillary subsystems. The design requirements used to guide system development must reflect a customer focus in order to evolve a commercial product. In order to obtain useful customer feedback, Westinghouse has practiced the deployment with customers of fully integrated, automatically controlled, packaged solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems. These field units have served to demonstrate to customers first hand the beneficial attributes of the SOFC, to expose deficiencies through experience in order to guide continued development, and to garner real world feedback and data concerning not only cell and stack parameters, but also transportation, installation, permitting and licensing, start-up and shutdown, system alarming, fault detection, fault response, and operator interaction.

  17. CHP Fuel Cell Durability Demonstration - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Petrecky, James; Ashley, Christopher J

    2014-07-21

    Plug Power has managed a demonstration project that has tested multiple units of its high-temperature, PEM fuel cell system in micro-combined heat and power (μ-CHP) applications in California. The specific objective of the demonstration project was to substantiate the durability of GenSys Blue, and, thereby, verify its technology and commercial readiness for the marketplace. In the demonstration project, Plug Power, in partnership with the National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and Sempra, will execute two major tasks: • Task 1: Internal durability/reliability fleet testing. Six GenSys Blue units will be built and will undergo an internal test regimen to estimate failure rates. This task was modified to include 3 GenSys Blue units installed in a lab at UCI. • Task 2: External customer testing. Combined heat and power units will be installed and tested in real-world residential and/or light commercial end user locations in California.

  18. Space telerobotics technology demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szirmay, S. Z.; Schenker, P. S.; Rodriguez, G.; French, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the ongoing development of a telerobot demonstrator. The demonstrator is implemented as a laboratory-based research testbed, and will show proof-of-concept for supervised automation of space assembly, servicing, and repair operations. The demonstrator system features a hierarchically layered intelligent control architecture which enables automated planning and run-time sequencing of complex tasks by a supervisory human operator. The demonstrator also provides a full bilateral force-reflecting hand control teleroperations capability. The operator may switch smoothly between the automated and teleroperated tasking modes in run-time, either on a preplanned or operator-designated basis.

  19. Electric thermal storage demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

  20. Electric thermal storage demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

  1. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program update 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (also referred to as the CCT Program) is a $6.9 billion cost-shared industry/government technology development effort. The program is to demonstrate a new generation of advanced coal-based technologies, with the most promising technologies being moved into the domestic and international marketplace. Technology has a vital role in ensuring that coal can continue to serve U.S. energy interests and enhance opportunities for economic growth and employment while meeting the national committment to a clean and healthy global environment. These technologies are being advanced through the CCT Program. The CCT Program supports three substantive national objectives: ensuring a sustainable environment through technology; enhancing energy efficiency and reliability; providing opportunities for economic growth and employment. The technologies being demonstrated under the CCT Program reduce the emissions of sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, greenhouse gases, hazardous air pollutants, solid and liquid wastes, and other emissions resulting from coal use or conversion to other fuel forms. These emissions reductions are achieved with efficiencies greater than or equal to currently available technologies.

  2. NAS Miramar Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell demonstration status

    SciTech Connect

    Scroppo, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Part of M-C Power`s Technology Development Program, this MCFC power plant is designed to supply 250 kW of electricity to Naval Air Station (NAS) Miramar. It also cogenerates steam for the district heating system. The power plant is a fully integrated unit incorporating an advanced design fuel cell based on years of laboratory tests and a prior field test. This demonstration incorporates many innovative features, one of which is the plate type reformer which processes the natural gas fuel for use in the fuel cell. M-C Power Corp. has completed the design, fabrication, and conditioning of a 250-cell fuel cell stack, which was shipped to the site where it will be installed, tested, and evaluated as a 250 kW Proof-of-Concept MCFC Power Plant. (Originally going to Kaiser Permanente`s Sand Diego Medical Center, it was relocated to Miramar.)

  3. Fuel cell technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The results of a solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell development program are summarized. A base line design was defined, and materials and components of the base line configuration were fabricated and tested. Concepts representing base line capability extensions in the areas of life, power, specific weight and volume, versatility of operation, field maintenance, and thermal control were identified and evaluated. Liaison and coordination with space shuttle contractors resulted in the exchange of engineering data.

  4. Fuel Cells Today: Early Market Applications and Learning Demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-09

    This MP3 provides an overview of early market fuel cell applications including today's commercially available fuel cells and "learning demonstrations" to validate fuel cell technology in real world conditions.

  5. Fuel cell technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A fuel cell technology program was established to advance the state-of-the-art of hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells using low temperature, potassium hydroxide electrolyte technology as the base. Program tasks are described consisting of baseline cell design and stack testing, hydrogen pump design and testing, and DM-2 powerplant testing and technology extension efforts. A baseline cell configuration capable of a minimum of 2000 hours of life was defined. A 6-cell prototype stack, incorporating most of the scheme cell features, was tested for a total of 10,497 hours. A 6-cell stack incorporating all of the design features was tested. The DM-2 powerplant with a 34 cell stack, an accessory section packaged in the basic configuration anticipated for the space shuttle powerplant and a powerplant control unit, was defined, assembled, and tested. Cells were used in the stack and a drag-type hydrogen pump was installed in the accessory section. A test program was established, in conjunction with NASA/JSC, based on space shuttle orbiter mission. A 2000-hour minimum endurance test and a 5000-hour goal were set and the test started on August 8, 1972. The 2000-hour milestone was completed on November 3, 1972. On 13 March 1973, at the end of the thirty-first simulated seven-day mission and 5072 load hours, the test was concluded, all goals having been met. At this time, the DM-2 was in excellent condition and capable of additional endurance.

  6. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Program update 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program) is a $7.14 billion cost-shared industry/government technology development effort. The program is to demonstrate a new generation of advanced coal-based technologies, with the most promising technologies being moved into the domestic and international marketplace. Clean coal technologies being demonstrated under the CCT program are creating the technology base that allows the nation to meet its energy and environmental goals efficiently and reliably. The fact that most of the demonstrations are being conducted at commercial scale, in actual user environments, and under conditions typical of commercial operations allows the potential of the technologies to be evaluated in their intended commercial applications. The technologies are categorized into four market sectors: advanced electric power generation systems; environmental control devices; coal processing equipment for clean fuels; and industrial technologies. Sections of this report describe the following: Role of the Program; Program implementation; Funding and costs; The road to commercial realization; Results from completed projects; Results and accomplishments from ongoing projects; and Project fact sheets. Projects include fluidized-bed combustion, integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants, advanced combustion and heat engines, nitrogen oxide control technologies, sulfur dioxide control technologies, combined SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} technologies, coal preparation techniques, mild gasification, and indirect liquefaction. Industrial applications include injection systems for blast furnaces, coke oven gas cleaning systems, power generation from coal/ore reduction, a cyclone combustor with S, N, and ash control, cement kiln flue gas scrubber, and pulse combustion for steam coal gasification.

  7. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstrom, Charles, M., Jr.

    2009-07-07

    This report is the final technical report for DOE Program DE-FC36-04GO14301 titled “Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications”. Due to the public nature of this report some of the content reported in confidential reports and meetings to the DOE is not covered in detail in this report and some of the content has been normalized to not show actual values. There is a comparison of the projects accomplishments with the objectives, an overview of some of the key subsystem work, and a review of the three levels of prototypes demonstrated during the program. There is also a description of the eventual commercial product and market this work is leading towards. The work completed under this program has significantly increased the understanding of how Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC) can be deployed successfully to power consumer electronic devices. The prototype testing has demonstrated the benefits a direct methanol fuel cell system has over batteries typically used for powering consumer electronic devices. Three generations of prototypes have been developed and tested for performance, robustness and life. The technologies researched and utilized in the fuel cell stack and related subsystems for these prototypes are leveraged from advances in other industries such as the hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell industry. The work under this program advanced the state of the art of direct methanol fuel cells. The system developed by MTI micro fuel cells aided by this program differs significantly from conventional DMFC designs and offers compelling advantages in the areas of performance, life, size, and simplicity. The program has progressed as planned resulting in the completion of the scope of work and available funding in December 2008. All 18 of the final P3 prototypes builds have been tested and the results showed significant improvements over P2 prototypes in build yield, initial performance, and durability. The systems have

  8. DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Jennifer Stefanik; Howard Glunt; Andre L. Boehman; Allen Homan; David Klinikowski

    2003-04-01

    The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethylether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. The bulk of the efforts over the past year were focused on the conversion of the campus shuttle bus. This process, started in August 2001, took until April 2002 to complete. The process culminated in an event to celebrate the launching of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel operation on April 19, 2002. The design of the system on the shuttle bus was patterned after the system developed in the engine laboratory, but also was subjected to a rigorous failure modes effects analysis with help from Dr. James Hansel of Air Products. The result of this FMEA was the addition of layers of redundancy and over-pressure protection to the system on the shuttle bus. The system became operation in February 2002. Preliminary emissions tests and basic operation of the shuttle bus took place at the Pennsylvania Transportation institute's test track facility near the University Park airport. After modification and optimization of the system on the bus, operation on the campus shuttle route began in early June 2002. However, the work

  9. Controlled Speed Accessory Drive demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehn, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    A Controlled Speed Accessory Drive System was examined in an effort to improve the fuel economy of passenger cars. Concept feasibility and the performance of a typical system during actual road driving conditions were demonstrated. The CSAD system is described as a mechanical device which limits engine accessory speeds, thereby reducing parasitic horsepower losses and improving overall vehicle fuel economy. Fuel consumption data were compiled for fleets of GSA vehicles. Various motor pool locations were selected, each representing different climatic conditions. On the basis of a total accumulated fleet usage of nearly three million miles, an overall fuel economy improvement of 6 percent to 7 percent was demonstrated. Coincident chassis dynamometer tests were accomplished on selected vehicles to establish the effect of different accessory drive systems on exhaust emissions, and to evaluate the magnitude of the mileage benefits which could be derived.

  10. Clean coal technologies: Research, development, and demonstration program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, has structured an integrated program for research, development, and demonstration of clean coal technologies that will enable the nation to use its plentiful domestic coal resources while meeting environmental quality requirements. The program provides the basis for making coal a low-cost, environmentally sound energy choice for electric power generation and fuels production. These programs are briefly described.

  11. Ansaldo programs on fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Marcenaro, B.G.; Federici, F.

    1996-12-31

    The growth in traffic and the importance of maintaining a stable ecology at the global scale, particularly with regard to atmospheric pollution, raises the necessity to realize a new generation of vehicles which are more efficient, more economical and compatible with the environment. At European level, the Car of Tomorrow task force has identified fuel cells as a promising alternative propulsion system. Ansaldo Ricerche has been involved in the development of fuel cell vehicles since the early nineties. Current ongoing programs relates to: (1) Fuel cell bus demonstrator (EQHEPP BUS) Test in 1996 (2) Fuel cell boat demonstrator (EQHHPP BOAT) Test in 1997 (3) Fuel cell passenger car prototype (FEVER) Test in 1997 (4) 2nd generation Fuel cell bus (FCBUS) 1996-1999 (5) 2nd generation Fuel cell passenger car (HYDRO-GEN) 1996-1999.

  12. EPRI fuel cladding integrity program

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the EPRI fuel program is to supplement the fuel vendor research to assure that utility economic and operational interests are met. To accomplish such objectives, EPRI has conducted research and development efforts to (1) reduce fuel failure rates and mitigate the impact of fuel failures on plant operation, (2) provide technology to extend burnup and reduce fuel cycle cost. The scope of R&D includes fuel and cladding. In this paper, only R&D related to cladding integrity will be covered. Specific areas aimed at improving fuel cladding integrity include: (1) Fuel Reliability Data Base; (2) Operational Guidance for Defective Fuel; (3) Impact of Water Chemistry on Cladding Integrity; (4) Cladding Corrosion Data and Model; (5) Cladding Mechanical Properties; and (6) Transient Fuel Cladding Response.

  13. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE III. DEMONSTRATION TESTS - PHASE IV. GUIDELINES AND DEMONSTRATIONS - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the results of a four-phase program to demonstrate that fuel cell energy recovery using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell is both environmentally sound and commercially feasible. Phase I, a conceptual design and evaluation study, addressed the technical...

  14. Clean coal technology demonstration program: Program update 1996-97

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (known as the CCT Program) reached a significant milestone in 1996 with the completion of 20 of the 39 active projects. The CCT Program is responding to a need to demonstrate and deploy a portfolio of technologies that will assure the U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 297 billion tons could continue to supply the nation`s energy needs economically and in a manner that meets the nation`s environmental objectives. This portfolio of technologies includes environmental control devices that contributed to meeting the accords on transboundary air pollution recommended by the Special Envoys on Acid Rain in 1986. Operational, technical, environmental, and economic performance information and data are now flowing from highly efficient, low-emission, advanced power generation technologies that will enable coal to retain its prominent role into the next millennium. Further, advanced technologies are emerging that will enhance the competitive use of coal in the industrial sector, such as in steelmaking. Coal processing technologies will enable the entire coal resource base to be used while complying with environmental requirements. These technologies are producing products used by utilities and industrial processes. The capability to coproduce products, such as liquid and solid fuels, electricity, and chemicals, is being demonstrated at a commercial scale by projects in the CCT Program. In summary, this portfolio of technologies is satisfying the national need to maintain a multifuel energy mix in which coal is a key component because of its low-cost, availability, and abundant supply within the nation`s borders.

  15. Critical Ingredients of Successful Demonstration Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Kay A.

    The findings from a series of case studies of nine successful demonstration programs are summarized. The programs, funded by the Appalachian Regional Commission, included child development, vocational education, technology, economic development, and housing. The primary purpose of the case studies was to discover what makes programs successful. A…

  16. Data Analysis for ARRA Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.

    2010-05-01

    Presentation about ARRA Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations, including an overview of the ARRE Fuel Cell Project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's data analysis objectives, deployment composite data products, and planned analyses.

  17. FUEL CELL BUS DEMONSTRATION IN MEXICO CITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the performance of a cull-size, zero-emission, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel-cell-powered transit bus in the atmospheric environment of Mexico City. To address the air quality problems caused by vehicle emissions in Mexico City, a seminar on clean vehic...

  18. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    1999-03-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  19. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2001-04-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  20. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2002-07-30

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results. Also includes Power Plant Improvement Initiative Projects.

  1. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2000-04-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  2. QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR THE SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has implemented a rigorous quality assurance (QA) program to ensure that the performance data generated during their Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Demonstration projects are of known and adequate quality to support deci...

  3. DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Jennifer Stefanik; Howard Glunt; Andre L. Boehman; Allen Homan; David Klinikowski

    2003-04-01

    The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Their strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. The bulk of the efforts over the past year were focused on the conversion of the campus shuttle bus. This process, started in August 2001, took until April 2002 to complete. The process culminated in an event to celebrate the launching of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel operation on April 19, 2002. The design of the system on the shuttle bus was patterned after the system developed in the engine laboratory, but also was subjected to a rigorous failure modes effects analysis (FMEA, referred to by Air Products as a ''HAZOP'' analysis) with help from Dr. James Hansel of Air Products. The result of this FMEA was the addition of layers of redundancy and over-pressure protection to the system on the shuttle bus. The system became operational in February 2002. Preliminary emissions tests and basic operation of the shuttle bus took place at the Pennsylvania Transportation Institute's test track facility near the University Park airport. After modification and optimization of the system on the bus, operation on the

  4. The Home Start Demonstration Program: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Following a discussion of the Home Start program and its evaluation plan, the 16 Office of Child Development-funded Home Start projects in the United States are described. Home start is a 3-year Head Start demonstration program, aimed at the 3-5 years of age range, which focuses on enhancing the quality of children's lives by building upon…

  5. Technical Education Demonstration Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milwaukee Area Technical Coll., WI.

    The Technical Education Demonstration Program helped students aged 16-25 traditionally excluded from technical careers because of lack of training to attain academic and technical skills. Eighty-one teachers attended four-credit summer courses; 500 teachers, counselors, and administrators attended seminars. A demonstration model interfacing…

  6. OVERVIEW OF USEPA'S ARSENIC TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides a summary on the Arsenic Treatment Technology Demonstration Program. The information includes the history and the current status of the demonstration projects on both round 1 and round 2 including some photos of the treatment systems. The presentation m...

  7. DEMONSTRATION OF A 200-KILOWATT BIOMASS FUELED POWER PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the demonstration of a 200-kW biomass-fueled electric power plant. he objective of the demonstration is to evaluate the operating and performance characteristics of the system using lumber wastes for fuel. t is scheduled to accumulate 8000 hours of operation o...

  8. Alternative-engine-fuels demonstration and materials test

    SciTech Connect

    Thimsen, D.

    1981-01-01

    A portable demonstration was constructed to measure peak power and specific fuel consumption of a gasoline engine burning gasoline and ethanol, and a diesel engine burning No. 2 diesel and sunflower oil. The demonstrations were given at farm field days. Several metals were subjected to wet ethanol fuels to measure corrosion.

  9. Thermionic Fuel Element Verification Program - Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohl, Richard J.; Dahlberg, Richard C.; Dutt, Dale S.; Wood, John T.

    The Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) Verification program was established in 1986 to resolve the technology concerns raised in Phase 1 of the SP-100 program, namely, the performance and lifetime of thermionic fuel elements in a fast spectrum reactor. The program builds directly on an extensive database developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA-sponsored program, when TFEs were developed and tested at design conditions for over 10,000 h. The current effort has reestablished that technology and is extending the lifetime up to 7 to 10 yr. A TFE lifetime of more than 2 yr has been demonstrated in the TRIGA reactor. Component lifetimes of more than 10 yr have been demonstrated in accelerated tests in the FFTF (Richland) and EBR-II (Idaho) test reactors. Program completion is scheduled for FY-95.

  10. Integrated propulsion technology demonstrator. Program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    NASA and Rockwell have embarked on a cooperative agreement to define, develop, fabricate, and operate an integrated propulsion technology demonstrator (IPTD) for the purpose of validating design, process, and technology improvements of launch vehicle propulsion systems. This program, a result of NRA8-11, Task Area 1 A, is jointly funded by both NASA and Rockwell and is sponsored by the Reusable Launch Vehicle office at NASA Marshall Space flight Center. This program plan provides to the joint NASA/Rockwell integrated propulsion technology demonstrator (IPTD) team a description of the activities within tasks / sub tasks and associated schedules required to successfully achieve program objectives. This document also defines the cost elements and manpower allocations for each sub task for purpose of program control. This plan is updated periodically by developing greater depth of direction for outyear tasks as the program matures. Updating is accomplished by adding revisions to existing pages or attaching page revisions to this plan. In either case, revisions will be identified by appropriate highlighting of the change, or specifying a revision page through the use of footnotes on the bottom right of each change page. Authorization for the change is provided by the principal investigators to maintain control of this program plan document and IPTD program activities.

  11. Intergovernmental Advanced Stationary PEM Fuel Cell System Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Chartrand

    2011-08-31

    A program to complete the design, construction and demonstration of a PEMFC system fuelled by Ethanol, LPG or NG for telecom applications was initiated in October 2007. Early in the program the economics for Ethanol were shown to be unfeasible and permission was given by DOE to focus on LPG only. The design and construction of a prototype unit was completed in Jun 2009 using commercially available PEM FC stack from Ballard Power Systems. During the course of testing, the high pressure drop of the stack was shown to be problematic in terms of control and stability of the reformer. Also, due to the power requirements for air compression the overall efficiency of the system was shown to be lower than a similar system using internally developed low pressure drop FC stack. In Q3 2009, the decision was made to change to the Plug power stack and a second prototype was built and tested. Overall net efficiency was shown to be 31.5% at 3 kW output. Total output of the system is 6 kW. Using the new stack hardware, material cost reduction of 63% was achieved over the previous Alpha design. During a November 2009 review meeting Plug Power proposed and was granted permission, to demonstrate the new, commercial version of Plug Power's telecom system at CERL. As this product was also being tested as part of a DOE Topic 7A program, this part of the program was transferred to the Topic 7A program. In Q32008, the scope of work of this program was expanded to include a National Grid demonstration project of a micro-CHP system using hightemperature PEM technology. The Gensys Blue system was cleared for unattended operation, grid connection, and power generation in Aug 2009 at Union College in NY state. The system continues to operate providing power and heat to Beuth House. The system is being continually evaluated and improvements to hardware and controls will be implemented as more is learned about the system's operation. The program is instrumental in improving the efficiency and

  12. EVALUATION OF ROOSEVELT SUMMER DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM, 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RICHARDSON, JOY B.

    THE FIRST PART OF THIS REPORT OF A SENATE BILL 28 DEMONSTRATION PROJECT DESCRIBES THE SUMMER JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM IN WHICH STUDENTS WERE OFFERED (1) LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION TO IMPROVE THEIR READING ACHIEVEMENT, (2) AN INNOVATIVE MATHEMATICS COURSE CONDUCTED BY THE "DISCOVERY METHOD," AND (3) SPANISH-ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSES TO ENABLE PUPILS OF…

  13. The Quantum Opportunity Program Demonstration: Final Impacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schirm, Allen; Stuart, Elizabeth; McKie, Allison

    2006-01-01

    From July 1995 through September 2001, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) and the Ford Foundation (Ford) operated a demonstration of the Quantum Opportunity Program (QOP). QOP offered intensive and comprehensive services to help at-risk youth graduate from high school and enroll in postsecondary education or training. QOP was mainly an…

  14. Use of alcohol fuel: engine-conversion demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    The use of ethanol as a fuel extender when mixed with gasoline, and the use of both hydrated and anhydrous ethanol as a fuel in gasoline and diesel engines are discussed. Required engine modifications for efficient use of ethanol are described, and include engine compression alterations, carburetor adjustments, and arrangement for fuel preheating. In 1981 and 1982 a demonstration of ethanol use in spark ignition engines was conducted at a major public park in South Carolina. The demonstration included a controlled road test with a pick-up truck and a demonstration of ethanol use in small, air cooled gasoline engines. One problem that was identified was that of contaminated fuel that clogged the fuel system after a few days' operation. (LEW)

  15. Thin-Layer Fuel Cell for Teaching and Classroom Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirkhanzadeh, M.

    2009-01-01

    A thin-layer fuel cell is described that is simple and easy to set up and is particularly useful for teaching and classroom demonstrations. The cell is both an electrolyzer and a fuel cell and operates using a thin layer of electrolyte with a thickness of approximately 127 micrometers and a volume of approximately 40 microliters. As an…

  16. Demonstration and implementation of ethanol as an aviation fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the viability of ethanol as an aviation fuel at appropriate locations and audiences in the participating Biomass Energy Program Regions, and to promote implementation projects in the area. Seven demonstrations were to be performed during the Summer 1995 through December 1996 period. To maximize the cost effectiveness of the program, additional corporate co-sponsorships were sought at each demonstration site and the travel schedule was arranged to take advantage of appropriate events taking place in the vicinity of the schedule events or enroute. This way, the original funded amount was stretched to cover another year of activities increasing the number of demonstrations from seven to thirty-nine. While the Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) contract focused on ethanol as an aviation fuel, RAFDC also promoted the broader use of ethanol as a transportation fuel. The paper summarizes locations and occasions, and gives a brief description of each demonstration/exhibit/presentation held during the term of the project. Most of the demonstrations took place at regularly scheduled air shows, such as the Oshkosh, Wisconsin Air Show. The paper also reviews current and future activities in the areas of certification, emission testing, the international Clean Airports Program, air pollution monitoring with instrumented aircraft powered by renewable fuels, training operation and pilot project on ethanol, turbine fuel research, and educational programs.

  17. Alcohol fuels program technical review

    SciTech Connect

    1981-07-01

    The last issue of the Alcohol Fuels Process R/D Newsletter contained a work breakdown structure (WBS) of the SERI Alcohol Fuels Program that stressed the subcontracted portion of the program and discussed the SERI biotechnology in-house program. This issue shows the WBS for the in-house programs and contains highlights for the remaining in-house tasks, that is, methanol production research, alcohol utilization research, and membrane research. The methanol production research activity consists of two elements: development of a pressurized oxygen gasifier and synthesis of catalytic materials to more efficiently convert synthesis gas to methanol and higher alcohols. A report is included (Finegold et al. 1981) that details the experimental apparatus and recent results obtained from the gasifier. The catalysis research is principally directed toward producing novel organometallic compounds for use as a homogeneous catalyst. The utilization research is directed toward the development of novel engine systems that use pure alcohol for fuel. Reforming methanol and ethanol catalytically to produce H/sub 2/ and CO gas for use as a fuel offers performance and efficiency advantages over burning alcohol directly as fuel in an engine. An application of this approach is also detailed at the end of this section. Another area of utilization is the use of fuel cells in transportation. In-house researchers investigating alternate electrolyte systems are exploring the direct and indirect use of alcohols in fuel cells. A workshop is being organized to explore potential applications of fuel cells in the transportation sector. The membrane research group is equipping to evaluate alcohol/water separation membranes and is also establishing cost estimation and energy utilization figures for use in alcohol plant design.

  18. Hawaii alternative fuels utilization program. Phase 3, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, C.M.; Staackmann, M.

    1996-08-01

    The Hawaii Alternative Fuels Utilization Program originated as a five-year grant awarded by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) to the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The overall program included research and demonstration efforts aimed at encouraging and sustaining the use of alternative (i.e., substitutes for gasoline and diesel) ground transportation fuels in Hawaii. Originally, research aimed at overcoming technical impediments to the widespread adoption of alternative fuels was an important facet of this program. Demonstration activities centered on the use of methanol-based fuels in alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). In the present phase, operations were expanded to include flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) which can operate on M85 or regular unleaded gasoline or any combination of these two fuels. Additional demonstration work was accomplished in attempting to involve other elements of Hawaii in the promotion and use of alcohol fuels for ground transportation in Hawaii.

  19. Long term fuel scheduling linear programming

    SciTech Connect

    Asgarpoor, S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Gul, N. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an application of linear programming (LP) revised simplex method in order to solve the fuel scheduling problem. A regression method is applied to determine the polynomial cost curves, and a separable programming technique is used to linearize the objective function and the constraints for LP application. Results based on sample data obtained from Omaha Public Power District (OPPD) are presented to demonstrate the LP application to this problem.

  20. Data Analysis of Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.

    2009-11-17

    Presentation about early fuel cell markets, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Hydrogen Secure Data Center and its role in data analysis and demonstrations, and composite data products, and results reported to multiple stakeholders.

  1. NASA Technology Demonstrations Missions Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10) budget introduced a new strategic plan that placed renewed emphasis on advanced missions beyond Earth orbit. This supports NASA s 2011 strategic goal to create innovative new space technologies for our exploration, science, and economic future. As a result of this focus on undertaking many and more complex missions, NASA placed its attention on a greater investment in technology development, and this shift resulted in the establishment of the Technology Demonstrations Missions (TDM) Program. The TDM Program, within the newly formed NASA Office of the Chief Technologist, supports NASA s grand challenges by providing a steady cadence of advanced space technology demonstrations (Figure 1), allowing the infusion of flexible path capabilities for future exploration. The TDM Program's goal is to mature crosscutting capabilities to flight readiness in support of multiple future space missions, including flight test projects where demonstration is needed before the capability can transition to direct mission The TDM Program has several unique criteria that set it apart from other NASA program offices. For instance, the TDM Office matures a small number of technologies that are of benefit to multiple customers to flight technology readiness level (TRL) 6 through relevant environment testing on a 3-year development schedule. These technologies must be crosscutting, which is defined as technology with potential to benefit multiple mission directorates, other government agencies, or the aerospace industry, and they must capture significant public interest and awareness. These projects will rely heavily on industry partner collaboration, and funding is capped for all elements of the flight test demonstration including planning, hardware development, software development, launch costs, ground operations, and post-test assessments. In order to inspire collaboration across government and industry

  2. Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    SciTech Connect

    Alice M. Gitchell

    2006-09-15

    A 200 kW, natural gas fired fuel cell was installed at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the financial and operational suitability of retrofit fuel cell technology at a medium sized college. Target audience was design professionals and the wider community, with emphasis on use in higher education. ''Waste'' heat from the fuel cell was utilized to supplement boiler operations and provide domestic hot water. Instrumentation was installed in order to measure the effectiveness of heat utilization. It was determined that 26% of the available heat was captured during the first year of operation. The economics of the fuel cell is highly dependent on the prices of electricity and natural gas. Considering only fuel consumed and energy produced (adjusted for boiler efficiency), the fuel cell saved $54,000 in its first year of operation. However, taking into account the price of maintenance and the cost of financing over the short five-year life span, the fuel cell operated at a loss, despite generous subsidies. As an educational tool and market stimulus, the fuel cell attracted considerable attention, both from design professionals and the general public.

  3. Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Mitlitsky; Sara Mulhauser; David Chien; Deepak Shukla; David Weingaertner

    2009-11-14

    The Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (PSOFC) project demonstrated the technical viability of pre-commercial PSOFC technology at the County 911 Communications headquarters, as well as the input fuel flexibility of the PSOFC. PSOFC operation was demonstrated on natural gas and denatured ethanol. The Santa Clara County Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (PSOFC) project goals were to acquire, site, and demonstrate the technical viability of a pre-commercial PSOFC technology at the County 911 Communications headquarters. Additional goals included educating local permit approval authorities, and other governmental entities about PSOFC technology, existing fuel cell standards and specific code requirements. The project demonstrated the Bloom Energy (BE) PSOFC technology in grid parallel mode, delivering a minimum 15 kW over 8760 operational hours. The PSOFC system demonstrated greater than 81% electricity availability and 41% electrical efficiency (LHV net AC), providing reliable, stable power to a critical, sensitive 911 communications system that serves geographical boundaries of the entire Santa Clara County. The project also demonstrated input fuel flexibility. BE developed and demonstrated the capability to run its prototype PSOFC system on ethanol. BE designed the hardware necessary to deliver ethanol into its existing PSOFC system. Operational parameters were determined for running the system on ethanol, natural gas (NG), and a combination of both. Required modeling was performed to determine viable operational regimes and regimes where coking could occur.

  4. Whole-core LEU fuel demonstration in the ORR

    SciTech Connect

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Bretscher, M.M.; Cornella, R.J.; Hobbs, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    A whole-core demonstration of LEU fuel in the ORR is expected to begin during November 1985. Fuel elements will contain U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ at 4.8 Mg U/m/sup 3/ and shim rod fuel followers will contain U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ at 3.5 Mg U/m/sup 3/. Fuel fabrication is underway at B and W, CERCA, and NUKEM, with shipments scheduled to commence in October. The primary objectives of the demonstration are to provide data for validation of LEU and mixed-core fuel cycle calculations and to provide a large-scale demonstration of the acceptable performance of production-line U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ fuel elements. It is planned to approach the full LEU core through a series of mixed cores. Measurements to be made include flux distribution, reactivity swing, control rod worths, cycle length, fuel discharge burnup, gamma heating rates, ..beta../sub eff/l, and isothermal temperature coefficient. Measurements will also be made on fresh LEU and fresh HEU critical configurations. Preliminary safety approval has been received and the final safety assessment is being reviewed.

  5. City of Chula Vista hydrogen fuel cell bus demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, B.; Bamberger, B.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen as an energy carrier and fuel has potential for various uses including electricity, commercial, residential, transportation, and industrial. It is an energy carrier that can be produced from a variety of primary sources and potentially can accomplish these various uses while significantly reducing pollution by substituting for or reducing the use of fossil fuels. One of the most immediate and potentially viable roles for hydrogen as an energy carrier will be its use as a transportation fuel, especially in densely populated urban areas where automotive emissions contribute significantly to air pollution. The Department of Energy`s commitment to research and development of hydrogen as an alternative fuel, and California`s Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) requirements, both provide the impetus and favorable circumstance for demonstrating hydrogen as a transportation fuel on an urban bus system. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of using solid polymer fuel cells in a hydrogen-powered electric drive system for an urban transit bus application. Fuel cell buses use hydrogen fuel and oxygen from the air to produce electrical power with the only byproduct being pure water. Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are proposed for this project. Current evidence suggests that fuel cells, which rely on hydrogen and a process known as proton exchange to generate their power, appear to have an infinite life span. All exhaust pollution is completely eliminated, resulting in a Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV). An urban bus system offers the potential for developing a market for the production of hydrogen propulsion technology due to extensive vehicular use in densely populated areas experiencing pollution from numerous sources, and because the central garaging facilities or the bus system facilitates fueling and maintenance functions.

  6. 76 FR 79193 - Medicare Program; Independence at Home Demonstration Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Independence at Home... incentive and service delivery system that utilizes physician and nurse practitioner directed home-based... establishing the Independence at Home (IAH) Demonstration. The IAH Demonstration will test a service...

  7. Detonation duct gas generator demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, Andrew; Brinlee, Gayl A.; Othmer, Peter; Whelan, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of the generation of detonation waves moving periodically across high speed channel flow is experimentally demonstrated. Such waves are essential to the concept of compressing requirements and increasing the engine pressure compressor with the objective of reducing conventional compressor requirements and increasing the engine thermodynamic efficiency through isochoric energy addition. By generating transient transverse waves, rather than standing waves, shock wave losses are reduced by an order of magnitude. The ultimate objective is to use such detonation ducts downstream of a low pressure gas turbine compressor to produce a high overall pressure ratio thermodynamic cycle. A 4 foot long, 1 inch x 12 inch cross-section, detonation duct was operated in a blow-down mode using compressed air reservoirs. Liquid or vapor propane was injected through injectors or solenoid valves located in the plenum or the duct itself. Detonation waves were generated when the mixture was ignited by a row of spark plugs in the duct wall. Problems with fuel injection and mixing limited the air speeds to about Mach 0.5, frequencies to below 10 Hz, and measured pressure ratios of about 5 to 6. The feasibility of the gas dynamic compression was demonstrated and the critical problem areas were identified.

  8. CLIMATE CHANGE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Walneuski

    2004-09-16

    ChevronTexaco has successfully operated a 200 kW PC25C phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant at the corporate data center in San Ramon, California for the past two years and seven months following installation in December 2001. This site was chosen based on the ability to utilize the combined heat (hot water) and power generation capability of this modular fuel cell power plant in an office park setting . In addition, this project also represents one of the first commercial applications of a stationary fuel cell for a mission critical data center to assess power reliability benefits. This fuel cell power plant system has demonstrated outstanding reliability and performance relative to other comparably sized cogeneration systems.

  9. FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen P. Bergin

    2003-04-23

    This project has two primary purposes: (1) Build a small-footprint (SFP) fuel production plant to prove the feasibility of this relatively transportable technology on an intermediate scale (i.e. between laboratory-bench and commercial capacity) and produce as much as 150,000 gallons of hydrogen-saturated Fischer-Tropsch (FT) diesel fuel; and (2) Use the virtually sulfur-free fuel produced to demonstrate (over a period of at least six months) that it can not only be used in existing diesel engines, but that it also can enable significantly increased effectiveness and life of the next-generation exhaust-after-treatment emission control systems that are currently under development and that will be required for future diesel engines. Furthermore, a well-to-wheels economic analysis will be performed to characterize the overall costs and benefits that would be associated with the actual commercial production, distribution and use of such FT diesel fuel made by the process under consideration, from the currently underutilized (or entirely un-used) energy resources targeted, primarily natural gas that is stranded, sub-quality, off-shore, etc. During the first year of the project, which is the subject of this report, there have been two significant areas of progress: (1) Most of the preparatory work required to build the SFP fuel-production plant has been completed, and (2) Relationships have been established, and necessary project coordination has been started, with the half dozen project-partner organizations that will have a role in the fuel demonstration and evaluation phase of the project. Additional project tasks directly related to the State of Alaska have also been added to the project. These include: A study of underutilized potential Alaska energy resources that could contribute to domestic diesel and distillate fuel production by providing input energy for future commercial-size SFP fuel production plants; Demonstration of the use of the product fuel in a heavy

  10. Solid Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Work is reported on phase 5 of the Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) Fuel Cell Technology Development program. The SPE fuel cell life and performance was established at temperatures, pressures, and current densities significantly higher than those previously demonstrated in sub-scale hardware. Operation of single-cell Buildup No. 1 to establish life capabilities of the full-scale hardware was continued. A multi-cell full-scale unit (Buildup No. 2) was designed, fabricated, and test evaluated laying the groundwork for the construction of a reactor stack. A reactor stack was then designed, fabricated, and successfully test-evaluated to demonstrate the readiness of SPE fuel cell technology for future space applications.

  11. 1986 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1986-10-01

    Ninety nine brief papers are arranged under the following session headings: gas industry's 40 kw program, solid oxide fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell technology, molten carbonate fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell systems, power plants technology, fuel cell power plant designs, unconventional fuels, fuel cell application and economic assessments, and plans for commerical development. The papers are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  12. Five Kilowatt Fuel Cell Demonstration for Remote Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Witmer; Tom Johnson; Jack Schmid

    2008-12-31

    While most areas of the US are serviced by inexpensive, dependable grid connected electrical power, many areas of Alaska are not. In these areas, electrical power is provided with Diesel Electric Generators (DEGs), at much higher cost than in grid connected areas. The reasons for the high cost of power are many, including the high relative cost of diesel fuel delivered to the villages, the high operational effort required to maintain DEGs, and the reverse benefits of scale for small utilities. Recent progress in fuel cell technologies have lead to the hope that the DEGs could be replaced with a more efficient, reliable, environmentally friendly source of power in the form of fuel cells. To this end, the University of Alaska Fairbanks has been engaged in testing early fuel cell systems since 1998. Early tests were conducted on PEM fuel cells, but since 2001, the focus has been on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. In this work, a 5 kW fuel cell was delivered to UAF from Fuel Cell Technologies of Kingston, Ontario. The cell stack is of a tubular design, and was built by Siemens Westinghouse Fuel Cell division. This stack achieved a run of more than 1 year while delivering grid quality electricity from natural gas with virtually no degradation and at an electrical efficiency of nearly 40%. The project was ended after two control system failures resulted in system damage. While this demonstration was successful, considerable additional product development is required before this technology is able to provide electrical energy in remote Alaska. The major issue is cost, and the largest component of system cost currently is the fuel cell stack cost, although the cost of the balance of plant is not insignificant. While several manufactures are working on schemes for significant cost reduction, these systems do not as yet provide the same level of performance and reliability as the larger scale Siemens systems, or levels that would justify commercial deployment.

  13. Demonstration of a PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Trocciola; Thomas N. Pompa; Linda S. Boyd

    2004-09-01

    This project involved the installation of a 200kW PC25C{trademark} phosphoric-acid fuel cell power plant at Orgenergogaz, a Gazprom industrial site in Russia. In April 1997, a PC25C{trademark} was sold by ONSI Corporation to Orgenergogaz, a subsidiary of the Russian company ''Gazprom''. Due to instabilities in the Russian financial markets, at that time, the unit was never installed and started by Orgenergogaz. In October of 2001 International Fuel Cells (IFC), now known as UTC Fuel Cells (UTCFC), received a financial assistance award from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entitled ''Demonstration of PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia''. Three major tasks were part of this award: the inspection of the proposed site and system, start-up assistance, and installation and operation of the powerplant.

  14. Near-Net Forging Technology Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, I. Keith

    1996-01-01

    Significant advantages in specific mechanical properties, when compared to conventional aluminum (Al) alloys, make aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys attractive candidate materials for use in cryogenic propellant tanks and dry bay structures. However, the cost of Al-Li alloys is typically five times that of 2219 aluminum. If conventional fabrication processes are employed to fabricate launch vehicle structure, the material costs will restrict their utilization. In order to fully exploit the potential cost and performance benefits of Al-Li alloys, it is necessary that near-net manufacturing methods be developed to off-set or reduce raw material costs. Near-net forging is an advanced manufacturing method that uses elevated temperature metal movement (forging) to fabricate a single piece, near-net shape, structure. This process is termed 'near-net' because only a minimal amount of post-forge machining is required. The near-net forging process was developed to reduce the material scrap rate (buy-to-fly ratio) and fabrication costs associated with conventional manufacturing methods. The goal for the near-net forging process, when mature, is to achieve an overall cost reduction of approximately 50 percent compared with conventional manufacturing options for producing structures fabricated from Al-Li alloys. This NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) sponsored program has been a part of a unique government / industry partnership, coordinated to develop and demonstrate near-net forging technology. The objective of this program was to demonstrate scale-up of the near-net forging process. This objective was successfully achieved by fabricating four integrally stiffened, 170- inch diameter by 20-inch tall, Al-Li alloy 2195, Y-ring adapters. Initially, two 2195 Al-Li ingots were converted and back extruded to produce four cylindrical blockers. Conventional ring rolling of the blockers was performed to produce ring preforms, which were then contour ring rolled to produce

  15. National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-07-01

    This report discusses key analysis results based on data from early 2005 through September 2011 from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project, also referred to as the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration. It is the fifth and final such report in a series, with previous reports being published in July 2007, November 2007, April 2008, and September 2010.

  16. Transuranic material recovery in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, R.W.; Goff, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept that is being developed by Argonne National Laboratory. It takes advantage of the properties of metallic fuel and liquid metal cooling to offer significant improvements in reactor safety, operation, fuel cycle economics, environmental protection, and safeguards. The plans for demonstrating the IFR fuel cycle, including its waste processing options, by processing irradiated fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II fuel in its associated Fuel Cycle Facility have been developed for the first refining series. This series has been designed to provide the data needed for the further development of the IFR program. An important piece of the data needed is the recovery of TRU material during the reprocessing and waste operations.

  17. Transuranic material recovery in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, R.W.; Goff, K.M.

    1993-03-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept that is being developed by Argonne National Laboratory. It takes advantage of the properties of metallic fuel and liquid metal cooling to offer significant improvements in reactor safety, operation, fuel cycle economics, environmental protection, and safeguards. The plans for demonstrating the IFR fuel cycle, including its waste processing options, by processing irradiated fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II fuel in its associated Fuel Cycle Facility have been developed for the first refining series. This series has been designed to provide the data needed for the further development of the IFR program. An important piece of the data needed is the recovery of TRU material during the reprocessing and waste operations.

  18. Thermionic fuel element Verification Program - Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohl, Richard J.; Dahlberg, Richard C.; Dutt, Dale S.; Wood, John T.

    The TFE Verification Program is in the sixth year of a program to demonstrate the performance and lifetime of thermionic fuel elements for high power space applications. Data from accelerated tests in FETF and EBR-II show component lifetimes longer than 7 yr. Alumina insulators have shown good performance at high fast fluence. Graphite-cesium reservoirs based on isotropic graphite also meet requirements. Three TFEs are currently operating in the TRIGA reactor, the oldest having accumulated 15,000 hr of irradiation as of 1 October 1990.

  19. Fuel Flexible Turbine System (FFTS) Program

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-31

    tested in a C65 engine operating on 100% hydrogen and with the redesigned combustion liner - Combustion Liner Design A - installed. The results were promising for the FFTS program as the system was able to burn 100% hydrogen fuel without flashback while maintaining good combustion performance. While initial results have been demonstrated the feasibility of this program, further research is needed to determine whether these results will be repeated with FFTS-4 injectors installed in all injector ports and over a wide range of operating conditions and fuel variations.

  20. Spent nuclear fuel storage -- Performance tests and demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, M.A.; DeLoach, V.A.

    1993-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of heat transfer and shielding performance tests and demonstrations conducted from 1983 through 1992 by or in cooperation with the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Commercial Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The performance tests consisted of 6 to 14 runs involving one or two loadings, usually three backfill environments (helium, nitrogen, and vacuum backfills), and one or two storage system orientations. A description of the test plan, spent fuel load patterns, results from temperature and dose rate measurements, and fuel integrity evaluations are contained within the report.

  1. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE III. DEMONSTRATION TESTS - PHASE IV. GUIDELINES AND RECOMMENDATIONS- VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the results of a four-phase program to demonstrate that fuel cell energy recovery using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell is both environmentally sound and commercially feasible. Phase I, a conceptual design and evaluation study, addressed the technical...

  2. Executive summary of the Cryofracture demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, G.; Osborne, D.; Ancho, M.

    1991-09-01

    This report provides an executive summary of the Cryofracture demonstration program performed at Nuclear Remedial Technologies Corporation under contract to EG G Idaho, Inc., for the Department of Energy (DOE). Cryofracture is a size-reducing process whereby objects are frozen whereby objects are frozen to liquid nitrogen temperatures and crushed in a large hydraulic press. Material at the cryogenic temperatures have low ductility and are easily size reduced by fracturing. The main application being investigated for the DOE is for retrieved buried and stored transuranic (TRU) waste. Six 55-gallon drums and six 2 ft {times} 2 ft {times} 8 ft boxes containing simulated waste with tracers were subjected to the Cryofracture process. Data was obtained on (a) cool-down time, (b) yield strength of the containers, (c) size distribution of the waste before and after the Cryofracture process, (d) volume reduction of the waste, and (e) sampling of air and surface dusts for spread of tracers to evaluate potential contamination spread. The Cryofracture process was compared to conventional shredders and detailed cost estimates were established for construction of a Cryofracture facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Although cost estimates for conventional shredding are higher for Cryofracture, the potential for fire and explosion during conventional shredding would incur additional costs to preclude these events. These additional costs are unknown and would require considerable research and development. 4 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Association of American Railroads Alternative Fuels Program

    SciTech Connect

    Furber, C.P.

    1985-01-01

    Alternative fuels can be used in locomotive diesel engines as a means to reduce fuel costs or as fuel extenders when sufficient quantities of suitable lower cost fuels are not available. Broadened fuel purchasing guidelines, based on engine fuel tolerance limitation tests, offer a potential for reducing fuel costs. Fuels such as alcohols, certain vegetable oils, shale oils, and heavy oil blends can be used to extend fuel supplies. Fuel tolerance limitations of existing engines can be increased through modifications such as staged injection or the use of ceramic coatings. This paper describes the methods used by the Association of American Railroads Alternative Fuels Research Program to determine engine fuel tolerance limitations and extend engine fuel tolerance limits.

  4. Demonstrating and evaluating heavy-duty alternative fuel operations

    SciTech Connect

    Peerenboom, W.

    1998-02-01

    The principal objectives of this project was to understand the effects of using an alternative fuel on a truck operating fleet through actual operation of trucks. Information to be gathered was expected to be anecdotal, as opposed to statistically viable, because the Trucking Research institute (TRI) recognized that projects could not attract enough trucks to produce statistically credible volumes of data. TRI was to collect operational data, and provide them to NREL, who would enter the data into the alternative fuels database being constructed for heavy-duty trucks at the time. NREL would also perform data analysis, with the understanding that the demonstrations were generally pre-production model engines and vehicles. Other objectives included providing information to the trucking industry on the availability of alternative fuels, developing the alternative fuels marketplace, and providing information on experience with alternative fuels. In addition to providing information to the trucking industry, an objective was for TRI to inform NREL and DOE about the industry, and give feedback on the response of the industry to developments in alternative fuels in trucking. At the outset, only small numbers of vehicles participated in most of the projects. Therefore, they had to be considered demonstrations of feasibility, rather than data gathering tests from which statistically significant conclusions might be drawn. Consequently, data gathered were expected to be useful for making estimates and obtaining valuable practical lessons. Project data and lessons learned are the subjects of separate project reports. This report concerns itself with the work of TRI in meeting the overall objectives of the TRI-NREL partnership.

  5. Montana Integrated Carbon to Liquids (ICTL) Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fiato, Rocco; Sharma, Ramesh; Allen, Mark; Peyton, Brent; Macur, Richard; Cameron, Jemima

    2013-09-30

    Integrated carbon-to-liquids technology (ICTL) incorporates three basic processes for the conversion of a wide range of feedstocks to distillate liquid fuels: (1) Direct Microcatalytic Coal Liquefaction (MCL) is coupled with biomass liquefaction via (2) Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation and Isomerization (CHI) of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) or trigylceride fatty acids (TGFA) to produce liquid fuels, with process derived (3) CO{sub 2} Capture and Utilization (CCU) via algae production and use in BioFertilizer for added terrestrial sequestration of CO{sub 2}, or as a feedstock for MCL and/or CHI. This novel approach enables synthetic fuels production while simultaneously meeting EISA 2007 Section 526 targets, minimizing land use and water consumption, and providing cost competitive fuels at current day petroleum prices. ICTL was demonstrated with Montana Crow sub-bituminous coal in MCL pilot scale operations at the Energy and Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota (EERC), with related pilot scale CHI studies conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Applied Research Center (PARC). Coal-Biomass to Liquid (CBTL) Fuel samples were evaluated at the US Air Force Research Labs (AFRL) in Dayton and greenhouse tests of algae based BioFertilizer conducted at Montana State University (MSU). Econometric modeling studies were also conducted on the use of algae based BioFertilizer in a wheat-camelina crop rotation cycle. We find that the combined operation is not only able to help boost crop yields, but also to provide added crop yields and associated profits from TGFA (from crop production) for use an ICTL plant feedstock. This program demonstrated the overall viability of ICTL in pilot scale operations. Related work on the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of a Montana project indicated that CCU could be employed very effectively to reduce the overall carbon footprint of the MCL/CHI process. Plans are currently being made to conduct larger-scale process

  6. Spent fuel data for waste storage programs

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, E M

    1980-09-01

    Data on LWR spent fuel were compiled for dissemination to participants in DOE-sponsored waste storage programs. Included are mechanical descriptions of the existing major types of LWR fuel assemblies, spent LWR fuel fission product inventories and decay heat data, and inventories of LWR spent fuel currently in storage, with projections of future quantities.

  7. National Bioterrorism Syndromic Surveillance Demonstration Program.

    PubMed

    Yih, W Katherine; Caldwell, B; Harmon, R; Kleinman, K; Lazarus, R; Nelson, A; Nordin, J; Rehm, B; Richter, B; Ritzwoller, D; Sherwood, E; Platt, R

    2004-09-24

    The National Bioterrorism Syndromic Surveillance Demonstration Program identifies new cases of illness from electronic ambulatory patient records. Its goals are to use data from health plans and practice groups to detect localized outbreaks and to facilitate rapid public health follow-up. Data are extracted nightly on patient encounters occurring during the previous 24 hours. Visits or calls with diagnostic codes corresponding to syndromes of interest are counted; repeat encounters are excluded. Daily counts of syndromes by zip code are sent to a central data repository, where they are statistically analyzed for unusual clustering by using a model-adjusted SaTScan approach. The results and raw data are displayed on a restricted website. Patient-level information stays at the originating health-care organization unless required by public health authorities. If a cluster surpasses a threshold of statistical aberration chosen by the corresponding public health department, an electronic alert can be sent to that department. The health department might then call a clinical responder, who has electronic access to records of cases contributing to clusters. The system is flexible, allowing for changes in participating organizations, syndrome definitions, and alert thresholds. It is transparent to clinicians and has been accepted by the health-care organizations that provide the data. The system's data are usable by local and national health agencies. Its software is compatible with commonly used systems and software and is mostly open-source. Ongoing activities include evaluating the system's ability to detect naturally occurring outbreaks and simulated terrorism events, automating and testing alerts and response capability, and evaluating alternative data sources. PMID:15714626

  8. Research development and demonstration of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmer, R.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the progress in the Georgetown University research, development and demonstration project of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system. The topics addressed in the report include demonstrations, vehicle design and application analysis, technology transfer activities, coordination and monitoring of system design and integration contractor, fuel cell bus test program, current problems, work planned, and manpower, cost and schedule reports.

  9. Hallam fuel decladding. Program summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, W.F.

    1980-04-01

    This report summarizes the program of decladding the 150 Hallam fuel assemblies, removal of the sodium, and the packaging and shipment of the recovered fuel to Savannah River for eventual reprocessing.

  10. Geothermal Energy Research Development and Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The Federal program's goal, strategy, plans, and achievements are summarized. In addition, geothermal development by state and local governments and, where available, by the private sector is described. (MHR)

  11. Fuel economy and emissions evaluation of BMW hydrogen 7 mono-fuel demonstration vehicles.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, T.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Gurski, S.; Duoba, M.; Thiel, W.; Martin, D.; Korn, T.; Energy Systems; BMW Group Munich Germany; BMW Group Oxnard USA

    2008-12-01

    This article summarizes the testing of two BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility (APRF). The BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles are derived from the BMW Hydrogen 7 bi-fuel vehicles and based on a BMW 760iL. The mono-fuel as well as the bi-fuel vehicle(s) is equipped with cryogenic hydrogen on-board storage and a gaseous hydrogen port fuel injection system. The BMW Hydrogen 7 Mono-Fuel demonstration vehicles were tested for fuel economy as well as emissions on the Federal Test Procedure FTP-75 cold-start test as well as the highway test. The results show that these vehicles achieve emissions levels that are only a fraction of the Super Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle (SULEV) standard for nitric oxide (NO{sub x}) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. For non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions the cycle-averaged emissions are actually 0 g/mile, which require the car to actively reduce emissions compared to the ambient concentration. The fuel economy numbers on the FTP-75 test were 3.7 kg of hydrogen per 100 km, which, on an energy basis, is equivalent to a gasoline fuel consumption of 17 miles per gallon (mpg). Fuel economy numbers for the highway cycle were determined to be 2.1 kg of hydrogen per 100 km or 30 miles per gallon of gasoline equivalent (GGE). In addition to cycle-averaged emissions and fuel economy numbers, time-resolved (modal) emissions as well as air/fuel ratio data is analyzed to further investigate the root causes of the remaining emissions traces. The BMW Hydrogen 7 vehicles employ a switching strategy with lean engine operation at low engine loads and stoichiometric operation at high engine loads that avoids the NO{sub x} emissions critical operating regime with relative air/fuel ratios between 1 < {lambda} < 2. The switching between these operating modes was found to be a major source of the remaining NO{sub x} emissions. The emissions results collected

  12. US Department of Energy fuel cell program for transportation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Pandit G.

    1992-01-01

    Fuel cells of offer promise as the best future replacement for internal combustion engines in transportation applications. Fuel cells operate more efficiently than internal combustion engines, and are capable of running on non-petroleum fuels such as methanol, ethanol, natural gas or hydrogen. Fuel cells can also have a major impact on improving air quality. They virtually eliminate particulates, NO(x) and sulfur oxide emissions, and significantly reduce hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. The U.S. Department of Energy program on fuel cells for transportation applications is structured to advance fuel cells technologies from the R&D phase, through engineering design and scale-tip, to demonstration in cars, trucks, buses and locomotives, in order to provide energy savings, fuel flexibility and air quality improvements. This paper describes the present status of the U.S. program.

  13. Fifth annual report to congress. Federal alternative motor fuels programs

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the status of the US Department of Energy`s alternative fuel vehicle demonstration and performance tracking programs being conducted in accordance with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. These programs comprise the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative transportation fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The report summarizes tests and results from the fifth year. Electric vehicles are not included in these programs, and the annual report does not include information on them. Since the inception of the programs, great strides have been made in developing commercially viable alternative fuel vehicle technologies. However, as is the case in the commercialization of all new technologies, some performance problems have been experienced on vehicles involved in early demonstration efforts. Substantial improvements have been recorded in vehicle practicality, safety, and performance in real-world demonstrations. An aspect of particular interest is emissions output. Results from light duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated superior inservice emissions performance. Heavy duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated dramatic reductions in particulate emissions. However, emissions results from vehicles converted to run on alternative fuel have not been as promising. Although the technologies available today are commercially viable in some markets, further improvements in infrastructure and economics will result in greater market expansion. Information is included in this report on light and heavy duty vehicles, transit buses, vehicle conversions, safety, infrastructure support, vehicle availability, and information dissemination.

  14. Low NO(x) heavy fuel combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lister, E.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.; Nichols, L.

    1979-01-01

    The 'low nitrogen oxides heavy fuel combustor' program is described. Main program objectives are to generate and demonstrate the technology required to develop durable gas turbine combustors for utility and industrial applications, which are capable of sustained, environmentally acceptable operation with minimally processed petroleum residual fuels. The program will focus on 'dry' reductions of oxides of nitrogen, improved combustor durability, and satisfactory combustion of minimally processed petroleum residual fuels. Other technology advancements sought include: fuel flexibility for operation with petroleum distillates, blends of petroleum distillates and residual fuels, and synfuels (fuel oils derived from coal or shale); acceptable exhaust emissions of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, sulfur oxides and smoke; and retrofit capability to existing engines.

  15. Low NO/x/ heavy fuel combustor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lister, E.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.; Nichols, L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with the 'Low NO/x/ Heavy Fuel Combustor Program'. Main program objectives are to generate and demonstrate the technology required to develop durable gas turbine combustors for utility and industrial applications, which are capable of sustained, environmentally acceptable operation with minimally processed petroleum residual fuels. The program will focus on 'dry' reductions of oxides of nitrogen (NO/x/), improved combustor durability and satisfactory combustion of minimally processed petroleum residual fuels. Other technology advancements sought include: fuel flexibility for operation with petroleum distillates, blends of petroleum distillates and residual fuels, and synfuels (fuel oils derived from coal or shale); acceptable exhaust emissions of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, sulfur oxides and smoke; and retrofit capability to existing engines.

  16. The High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) Program: Flight Demonstration Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Southwick, Robert D.; Gallops, George W.; Orme, John S.

    1998-01-01

    Future aircraft turbine engines, both commercial and military, must be able to accommodate expected increased levels of steady-state and dynamic engine-face distortion. The current approach of incorporating sufficient design stall margin to tolerate these increased levels of distortion would significantly reduce performance. The objective of the High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) program is to design, develop, and flight-demonstrate an advanced, integrated engine control system that uses measurement-based estimates of distortion to enhance engine stability. The resulting distortion tolerant control reduces the required design stall margin, with a corresponding increase in performance and decrease in fuel burn. The HISTEC concept has been developed and was successfully flight demonstrated on the F-15 ACTIVE aircraft during the summer of 1997. The flight demonstration was planned and carried out in two phases, the first to show distortion estimation, and the second to show distortion accommodation. Post-flight analysis shows that the HISTEC technologies are able to successfully estimate and accommodate distortion, transiently setting the stall margin requirement on-line and in real-time. This allows the design stall margin requirement to be reduced, which in turn can be traded for significantly increased performance and/or decreased weight. Flight demonstration of the HISTEC technologies has significantly reduced the risk of transitioning the technology to tactical and commercial engines.

  17. Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen P. Bergin

    2006-06-30

    The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer

  18. FUEL PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Thermal Conductivity of Sphere-Pac Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ades, M. J.

    1981-07-01

    Progress in understanding the thermal conductivity of sphere-pac fuel beds has been made both at Oregon State University and Exxon Nuclear Company supported by the Fuel Performance Improvement Program (FPIP). FPIP is sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy and is being performed by Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purpose of the program is to test and demonstrate improved li9ht water reactor fuel concepts that are more resistant to failure from pellet-cladding interaction during power increases than standard pellet fuel.

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF LONG-TERM STORAGE CAPABILITY FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN L BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.; Deible, R.

    2011-04-27

    conclusion is that the fuel can be stored in L Basin, meeting general safety functions for fuel storage, for an additional 50 years and possibly beyond contingent upon continuation of existing fuel management activities and several augmented program activities. It is concluded that the technical bases and well-founded technologies have been established to store spent nuclear fuel in the L Basin. Methodologies to evaluate the fuel condition and characteristics, and systems to prepare fuel, isolate damaged fuel, and maintain water quality storage conditions have been established. Basin structural analyses have been performed against present NPH criteria. The aluminum fuel storage experience to date, supported by the understanding of the effects of environmental variables on materials performance, demonstrates that storage systems that minimize degradation and provide full retrievability of the fuel up to and greater than 50 additional years will require maintaining the present management programs, and with the recommended augmented/additional activities in this report.

  20. Detonation duct gas generator demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, A.; Othmer, P.; Rostafinski, W.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental demonstration is presented for the generation of detonation waves that move periodically across high speed channel flow; these waves can compress the outflow from a low pressure compressor, and thereby both reduce the compressor requirements associated with conventional gas turbines and enhance thermodynamic efficiency through isochoric energy addition. By generating transient transverse waves, rather than standing waves, shock-wave losses are reduced by an order of magnitude; the result is a Humphrey cycle augmenting the basic Brayton-cycle gas turbine. Attention is presently given to results from an experimental detonation duct.

  1. General Motors automotive fuel cell program

    SciTech Connect

    Fronk, M.H.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of the second phase of the GM/DOE fuel cell program is to develop and test a 30 kW fuel cell powerplant. This powerplant will be based on a methanol fuel processor and a proton exchange membrane PM fuel cell stack. In addition, the 10 kW system developed during phase I will be used as a {open_quotes}mule{close_quotes} to test automotive components and other ancillaries, needed for transient operation.

  2. Biomass fuels update. TVAs biomass fuels program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-02-01

    Equipment was installed and tests were conducted on the ethanol from hardwood project. Location of hardwoods, to improve forest management, and to reduce the cost of harvesting woody biomass was assessed. Substantial underutilized cropland exists in the Valley, and a questionnaire survey was administered to supplement available cropland data. The potential liquid fuel yields and production management practices for alternative starch, sugar, and vegetable oil crops were determined to obtain benchmark data and to evaluate alcohol production from alternative agricultural feedstocks. Workshops were conducted to provide information on production of alcohol.

  3. Evaluation of a Demonstration Program for Postsecondary Hospitality Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Susan F.

    A three-phase program evaluation effort employing comparison groups and a pre-post test design indicate formative guidelines for programs revision and summative results indicative of the effectiveness of a demonstration associate degree program for hospitality education. Program effectiveness is defined in terms of the program's enrollment of…

  4. Fuel Cell Seminar, 1992: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This year`s theme, ``Fuel Cells: Realizing the Potential,`` focuses on progress being made toward commercial manufacture and use of fuel cell products. Fuel cell power plants are competing for market share in some applications and demonstrations of market entry power plants are proceeding for additional applications. Development activity on fuel cells for transportation is also increasing; fuel cell products have potential in energy and transportation industries, with very favorable environmental impacts. This Seminar has the purpose of fostering communication by providing a forum for the international community interested in development, application, and business opportunities related fuel cells. Over 190 technical papers are included, the majority being processed for the data base.

  5. Demonstration of optimum fuel-to-moderator ratio in a PWR unit fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Feltus, M.A.; Pozsgai, C. )

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear engineering students at The Pennsylvania State University develop scaled-down [[approx]350 MW(thermal)] pressurized water reactors (PWRs) using actual plants as references. The design criteria include maintaining the clad temperature below 2200[degree]F, fuel temperature below melting point, sufficient departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) margin, a beginning-of-life boron concentration that yields a negative moderator temperature coefficient, an adequate cycle power production (330 effective full-power days), and a batch loading scheme that is economical. The design project allows for many degrees of freedom (e.g., assembly number, pitch and height and batch enrichments) so that each student's result is unique. The iterative nature of the design process is stressed in the course. The LEOPARD code is used for the unit cell depletion, critical boron, and equilibrium xenon calculations. Radial two-group diffusion equations are solved with the TWIDDLE-DEE code. The steady-state ZEBRA thermal-hydraulics program is used for calculating DNBR. The unit fuel cell pin radius and pitch (fuel-to-moerator ratio) for the scaled-down design, however, was set equal to the already optimized ratio for the reference PWR. This paper describes an honors project that shows how the optimum fuel-to-moderator ratio is found for a unit fuel cell shown in terms of neutron economics. This exercise illustrates the impact of fuel-to-moderator variations on fuel utilization factor and the effect of assuming space and energy separability.

  6. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction: Phase 2. Third semiannual report, January-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1980-09-01

    Two fuel concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as barrier fuels) have special fuel cladding designed to avoid the harmful effects of localized stress and reactive fission products during reactor service. Within the work scope of this program one of these concepts is to be selected for demonstration in a commercial power reactor. It was decided to demonstrate Zr-liner in 132 bundles which have liners of either crystal-bar zirconium or of low-oxygen sponge zirconium in the reload for Quad Cities Unit 2, Cycle 6. Irradiation testing or barrier fuel was continued, and the superior PCI resistance of Zr-liner fuel was further substantiated in the current report period. Furthermore, an irradiation experiment in which Zr-liner fuel, having a deliberately fabricated cladding perforation, was operated at a linear heat generation rate of 35 kW/m to a burnup of approx. 3 MWd/kg U showed no unusual signs of degradation compared with a similarly defected reference fuel rod. Four lead test assemblies of barrier fuel (two of Zr-liner and two of Cu-barrier), presently under irradiation in Quad Cities Unit 1, have achieved a burnup of 11 MWd/kg U.

  7. 75 FR 71171 - Social Security Disability Program Demonstration Project: Benefit Offset National Demonstration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Social Security Disability Program Demonstration Project: Benefit Offset National Demonstration (BOND) AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: We are announcing the...

  8. NASA broadened-specification fuels combustion technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fear, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    The broadened-Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program's purpose is to evolve and demonstrate the technology required to enable current and next generation high-thrust, high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines to use fuels with broadened properties and to verify the evolved technology in full scale engine tests. The three phases of the program are combustor concept screening, combustor optimization testing, and engine verification testing. Constraints for designing combustion systems are outlined and problems to be expected in the use of broadened properties fuels are listed.

  9. Status of the US Fuel Cell Program

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.C.

    1996-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring major programs to develop high efficiency fuel cell technologies to produce electric power from natural gas and other hydrogen sources. Fuel cell systems offer attractive potential for future electric power generation and are expected to have worldwide markets. They offer ultra-high energy conversion efficiency and extremely low environmental emissions. As modular units for distributed power generation, fuel cells are expected to be particularly beneficial where their by-product, heat, can be effectively used in cogeneration applications. Advanced fuel cell power systems fueled with natural gas are expected to be commercially available after the turn of the century.

  10. 76 FR 18066 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Changes to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 80 Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Changes to Renewable Fuel Standard Program... producers and importers of renewable fuels for which RINs have been generated by the foreign...

  11. CLIMATE CHANGE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Steven A. Gabrielle

    2004-12-03

    This report discusses the first year of operation of a fuel cell power plant located at the Sheraton Edison Hotel, Edison, New Jersey. PPL EnergyPlus, LLC installed the plant under a contract with the Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. A DFC{reg_sign}300 fuel cell, manufactured by FuelCell Energy, Inc. of Danbury, CT was selected for the project. The fuel cell successfully operated from June 2003 to May 2004. This report discusses the performance of the plant during this period.

  12. Low NOx Heavy Fuel Combustor Concept Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novick, A. S.; Troth, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of the technology required to operate an industrial gas turbine combustion system on minimally processed, heavy petroleum or residual fuels having high levels of fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) while producing acceptable levels of exhaust emissions is discussed. Three combustor concepts were designed and fabricated. Three fuels were supplied for the combustor test demonstrations: a typical middle distillate fuel, a heavy residual fuel, and a synthetic coal-derived fuel. The primary concept was an air staged, variable-geometry combustor designed to produce low emissions from fuels having high levels of FBN. This combustor used a long residence time, fuel-rich primary combustion zone followed by a quick-quench air mixer to rapidly dilute the fuel rich products for the fuel-lean final burnout of the fuel. This combustor, called the rich quench lean (RQL) combustor, was extensively tested using each fuel over the entire power range of the model 570 K engine. Also, a series of parameteric tests was conducted to determine the combustor's sensitivity to rich-zone equivalence ratio, lean-zone equivalence ratio, rich-zone residence time, and overall system pressure drop. Minimum nitrogen oxide emissions were measured at 50 to 55 ppmv at maximum continuous power for all three fuels. Smoke was less than a 10 SAE smoke number.

  13. Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Belard

    2006-09-21

    Verizon is presently operating the largest Distributed Generation Fuel Cell project in the USA. Situated in Long Island, NY, the power plant is composed of seven (7) fuel cells operating in parallel with the Utility grid from the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA). Each fuel cell has an output of 200 kW, for a total of 1.4 mW generated from the on-site plant. The remaining power to meet the facility demand is purchased from LIPA. The fuel cell plant is utilized as a co-generation system. A by-product of the fuel cell electric generation process is high temperature water. The heat content of this water is recovered from the fuel cells and used to drive two absorption chillers in the summer and a steam generator in the winter. Cost savings from the operations of the fuel cells are forecasted to be in excess of $250,000 per year. Annual NOx emissions reductions are equivalent to removing 1020 motor vehicles from roadways. Further, approximately 5.45 million metric tons (5 millions tons) of CO2 per year will not be generated as a result of this clean power generation. The project was partially financed with grants from the New York State Energy R&D Authority (NYSERDA) and from Federal Government Departments of Defense and Energy.

  14. 2012 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  15. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, Neil

    2015-12-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  16. [Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    Objective is the development of a gas-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell for electric utility power plant application. Primary objectives are to: demonstrate performance endurance in 10-cell stacks at 70 psia, 190 C, and 267 mA/cm[sup 2]; improve cell degradation rate to less than 8 mV/1000 hours; develop cost effective criteria, processes, and design configurations for stack components; design multiple stack unit and a single 100 kW fuel cell stack; design a 375 kW fuel cell module and demonstrate average cell beginning-of-use performance; manufacture four 375-kW fuel cell modules and establish characteristics of 1.5 MW pilot power plant. The work is broken into program management, systems engineering, fuel cell development and test, facilities development.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM CASE STUDIES: DEMONSTRATING PROGRAM OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This bookle...

  18. Environmental Technology Verification Program - ETV - Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This cd con...

  19. Results of 200 KW fuel cell evaluation programs

    SciTech Connect

    Torrey, J.M.; Merten, G.P.; Binder, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) has installed six monitoring systems on ONSI Corporation 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cells. Three of the systems were installed for the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) which is coordinating the Department of Defense (DoD) fuel cell Demonstration Program and three were installed under a contract with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). Monitoring of the three NYSERDA sites has been completed. Monitoring systems for the DoD fuel cells were installed in August, 1996 and thus no operating data was available at the time of this writing, but will be presented at the Fuel Cell Seminar. This paper will present the monitoring configuration and research approach for each program. Additionally, summary performance data is presented for the completed NYSERDA program.

  20. Small Scale SOFC Demonstration Using Bio-Based and Fossil Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Petrik, Michael; Ruhl, Robert

    2012-05-01

    Technology Management, Inc. (TMI) of Cleveland, Ohio, has completed the project entitled Small Scale SOFC Demonstration using Bio-based and Fossil Fuels. Under this program, two 1-kW systems were engineered as technology demonstrators of an advanced technology that can operate on either traditional hydrocarbon fuels or renewable biofuels. The systems were demonstrated at Patterson's Fruit Farm of Chesterland, OH and were open to the public during the first quarter of 2012. As a result of the demonstration, TMI received quantitative feedback on operation of the systems as well as qualitative assessments from customers. Based on the test results, TMI believes that > 30% net electrical efficiency at 1 kW on both traditional and renewable fuels with a reasonable entry price is obtainable. The demonstration and analysis provide the confidence that a 1 kW entry-level system offers a viable value proposition, but additional modifications are warranted to reduce sound and increase reliability before full commercial acceptance.

  1. CSTAR support for the commercial Launch Voucher Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Carter H.

    1993-01-01

    Congress mandated a Launch Voucher Demonstration Program (LVDP) in the NASA FY 1993 Authorization Bill. This program was to have been put into place by October 1, 1993 and would end on September 30, 1995, with a report to Congress on January 31, 1996. CSTAR was asked to provide a participatory relationship to NASA concerning the Launch Voucher Demonstration Program, specifically due to CSTAR's COMET experience and knowledge of the CCDS payload and transportation planning, budgeting, and contract management process. This paper describes CSTAR's involvement in the development of the Launch Voucher Demonstration Program.

  2. Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology Program, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Jeroszko, R. A.; Kennedy, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of two advanced technology combustor concepts was conducted to evolve and assess their capability for operation on broadened properties fuels. The concepts were based on the results of Phase 1 of the Broad Specification Fuel Combustor Technology Program which indicated that combustors with variable geometry or staged combustion zones had a flexibility of operation that could facilitate operation on these fuels. Emphasis in defining these concepts included the use of single pipe as opposed to duplex or staged fuels systems to avoid the risk of coking associated with the reduction in thermal stability expected in broadened properties fuels. The first concept was a variable geometry combustor in which the airflow into the primary zone could be altered through valves on the front while the second was an outgrowth of the staged Vorbix combustor, evolved under the NASA/P&W ECCP and EEE programs incorporating simplified fuel and air introduction. The results of the investigation, which involved the use of Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel, indicated that in the form initially conceived, both of these combustor concepts were deficient in performance relative to many of the program goals for performance emissions. However, variations of both combustors were evaluated that incorporated features to simulate conceptual enhancement to demonstrate the long range potential of the combustor. In both cases, significant improvements relative to the program goals were observed.

  3. Caterpillar MorElectric DOE Idle Reduction Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    John Bernardi

    2007-09-30

    This project titled 'Demonstration of the New MorElectric{trademark} Technology as an Idle Reduction Solution' is one of four demonstration projects awarded by the US Department of Energy in 2002. The goal of these demonstration and evaluation projects was to gather objective in-use information on the performance of available idle reduction technologies by characterizing the cost; fuel, maintenance, and engine life savings; payback; and user impressions of various systems and techniques. In brief, the Caterpillar Inc. project involved applying electrically driven accessories for cab comfort during engine-off stops and for reducing fuel consumption during on-highway operation. Caterpillar had equipped and operated five new trucks with the technology in conjunction with International Truck and Engine Corporation and COX Transfer. The most significant result of the project was a demonstrated average idle reduction of 13.8% for the 5 truck MEI fleet over the control fleet. It should be noted that the control fleet trucks were also equipped with an idle reduction device that would start and stop the main engine automatically in order to maintain cab temperature. The control fleet idle usage would have been reduced by 3858 hours over the 2 year period with the MEI system installed, or approximately 2315 gallons of fuel less (calculations assume a fuel consumption of 0.6 gallons per hour for the 13 liter engine at idle). The fuel saved will be significantly larger for higher displacement engines without idle reduction equipment such as the engine auto start/stop device used by COX Transfer. It is common for engines to consume 1.0 gallons per hour which would increase the fuel savings to approximately 1260 gallons per truck per year of typical idling (1800 hours idle/yr).

  4. Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The overall objectives of the Phase IV Solid Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Technology Program were to: (1) establish fuel cell life and performance at temperatures, pressures and current densities significantly higher than those previously demonstrated; (2) provide the ground work for a space energy storage system based on the solid polymer electrolyte technology (i.e., regenerative H2/O2 fuel cell); (3) design, fabricate and test evaluate a full-scale single cell unit. During this phase, significant progress was made toward the accomplishment of these objectives.

  5. Chrysler Pentastar direct hydrogen fuel cell program

    SciTech Connect

    Kimble, M.; Deloney, D.

    1995-08-01

    The Chrysler Pentastar Electronics, Inc. Direct Hydrogen Fueled PEM Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle Program (DPHV) was initiated 1 July, 1994 with the following mission, {open_quotes}Design, fabricate, and test a Direct Hydrogen Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System including onboard hydrogen storage, an efficient lightweight fuel cell, a gas management system, peak power augmentation and a complete system controls that can be economically mass produced and comply with all safety environmental and consumer requirements for vehicle applications for the 21st century.{close_quotes} The Conceptual Design for the entire system based upon the selection of an applicable vehicle and performance requirements that are consistent with the PNGV goals will be discussed. A Hydrogen Storage system that has been selected, packaged, and partially tested in accordance with perceived Hydrogen Safety and Infrastructure requirements will be discussed in addition to our Fuel Cell approach along with design of the {open_quotes}real{close_quotes} module. The Gas Management System and the Load Leveling System have been designed and the software programs have been developed and will be discussed along with a complete fuel cell test station that has the capability to test up to a 60 kW fuel cell system.

  6. Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power Commercial Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe

    2014-09-02

    This is the annual report for the Market Transformation project as required by DOE EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office. We have been provided with a specific format. It describes the work that was done in developing evaluating the performance of 5 kW stationary combined heat and power fuel cell systems that have been deployed in Oregon and California. It also describes the business case that was developed to identify markets and address cost.

  7. A demonstration of pig lard as an industrial boiler fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Badger, M.; Larsen, J.; Clemens, T.; Moyer, D.; Wehr, T.

    1999-07-01

    Hatfield Quality Meats is a family owned regional meat processor and vendor and has multiple facilities in Pennsylvania. The main plant and corporate offices are located in Hatfield, Pennsylvania where they process 7,000 hogs per day. Two of Hatfield's by-products are lard and choice white grease (CWG), both of which are produced in large quantities. The lard, which is stored warm and liquid, is sold by tanker truck to veal producers, by 55-gallon drums to commercial bakeries, in 5-gallon pails to a variety of restaurants, and periodically in 1-pound tins to grocery stores. The CWG, which is a rendered product, is also sold to veal producers. A decrease in sales could leave the company with large excess of these products and difficult disposal problems. Hatfield Quality Meats, Lehigh University, and Penn State's the Energy Institute evaluated the liquid lard as an industrial boiler fuel and obtained the necessary handleability and combustion data to allow for its use as a supplemental fuel in Hatfield's process, were burned in Penn State's research boiler. The boiler, which has a nominal firing rate of two million Btu/h, is a 150 psig working pressure, A-frame watertube boiler. In addition to the lard samples, No.6 fuel oil was fired for baseline comparison. This paper discusses the comparison of lard and No.6 fuel oil as boiler fuels. Issues discussed include fuel characterization, material handling, combustion performance, flame character and stability, and emissions.

  8. Web Cast on Arsenic Demonstration Program: Lessons Learned

    EPA Science Inventory

    Web cast presentation covered 10 Lessons Learned items selected from the Arsenic Demonstration Program with supporting information. The major items discussed include system design and performance items and the cost of the technologies.

  9. Low NOx heavy fuel combustor concept program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutrone, M. B.

    1981-01-01

    Combustion tests were completed with seven concepts, including three rich/lean concepts, three lean/lean concepts, and one catalytic combustor concept. Testing was conducted with ERBS petroleum distillate, petroleum residual, and SRC-II coal-derived liquid fuels over a range of operating conditions for the 12:1 pressure ratio General Electric MS7001E heavy-duty turbine. Blends of ERBS and SRC-II fuels were used to vary fuel properties over a wide range. In addition, pyridine was added to the ERBS and residual fuels to vary nitrogen level while holding other fuel properties constant. Test results indicate that low levels of NOx and fuel-bound nitrogen conversion can be achieved with the rich/lean combustor concepts for fuels with nitrogen contents up to 1.0% by weight. Multinozzle rich/lean Concept 2 demonstrated dry low Nox emissions within 10-15% of the EPA New Source Performance Standards goals for SRC-II fuel, with yields of approximately 15%, while meeting program goals for combustion efficiency, pressure drop, and exhaust gas temperature profile. Similar, if not superior, potential was demonstrated by Concept 3, which is a promising rich/lean combustor design.

  10. Demonstration of Caterpillar C-10 dual-fuel engines in MCI 102DL3 commuter buses

    SciTech Connect

    2000-02-28

    The purpose of this program was to demonstrate the Caterpillar C-10 Dual-Fuel Natural Gas (DFNG) engine in an over-the-road bus application. Three new Motor Coach Industries (MCI) 102DL3 buses, equipped with Caterpillar C-10 DFNG engines, and one bus, equipped with a Caterpillar C-10 diesel engine, were operated side by side on similar fixed-route revenue service for a 12-month demonstration period (February 1998 to January 1999). The buses were used as part of the Clean Air Express Commuter Bus Program in Santa Barbara County, California. The performance and reliability of the DFNG engines were similar to that of the diesel engine, but the emissions results were mixed.

  11. Startup, testing, and operation of the Santa Clara 2MW direct carbonate fuel cell demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skok, A.J.; Leo, A.J.; O`Shea, T.P.

    1996-12-31

    The Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is a collaboration between several utility organizations, Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE), and the U.S. Dept. Of Energy aimed at the demonstration of Energy Research Corporation`s (ERC) direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology. ERC has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade, and this project is an integral part of the ERC commercialization effort. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project is to provide the first full, commercial scale demonstration of this technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere. An aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing interaction with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: the Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its production facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales/marketing, and client services. FCE is serving as the prime contractor for the design, construction, and testing of the SCDP Plant. FCMC has manufactured the multi-stack submodules used in the DC power section of the plant. Fluor Daniel Inc. (FDI) served as the architect-engineer subcontractor for the design and construction of the plant and provided support to the design of the multi-stack submodules. FDI is also assisting the ERC companies in commercial power plant design.

  12. Student Assistance Program Demonstration Project Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, John A.; Houle, Denise M.

    This document presents the final report on the evaluation of California's model student assistance program (SAP) demonstration projects implemented in five locations across the state from July 1989 through June 1992. The report provides an overall, integrated review of the evaluation of the SAP demonstration projects, summarizes important findings…

  13. 45 CFR 2532.10 - Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Military Installation Conversion Demonstration... Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs. (a) Purposes. The purposes of this section are to...) Fully utilize military installations affected by closures or realignments; (3) Encourage...

  14. 45 CFR 2532.10 - Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Military Installation Conversion Demonstration... Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs. (a) Purposes. The purposes of this section are to...) Fully utilize military installations affected by closures or realignments; (3) Encourage...

  15. 45 CFR 2532.10 - Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Military Installation Conversion Demonstration... Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs. (a) Purposes. The purposes of this section are to...) Fully utilize military installations affected by closures or realignments; (3) Encourage...

  16. 45 CFR 2532.10 - Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Military Installation Conversion Demonstration... Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs. (a) Purposes. The purposes of this section are to...) Fully utilize military installations affected by closures or realignments; (3) Encourage...

  17. 45 CFR 2532.10 - Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Military Installation Conversion Demonstration... Military Installation Conversion Demonstration programs. (a) Purposes. The purposes of this section are to...) Fully utilize military installations affected by closures or realignments; (3) Encourage...

  18. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan (September 2011)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-09-01

    The Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan outlines the strategy, activities, and plans of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, which includes hydrogen and fuel cell activities within the EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program and the DOE offices of Nuclear Energy, Fossil Energy, and Science.

  19. Westinghouse Accident Tolerant Fuel Program

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Peng

    2013-08-21

    The PowerPoint presentation includes a timeline for the program implementation, the technical approach taken, a summary of testing results, a status of task 2, what has been done to share the results so far, and a summary of upcoming work.

  20. SunLine Leads the Way in Demonstrating Hydrogen-Fueled Bus Technologies (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    This brochure describes SunLine Transit Agency's newest advanced technology fuel cell electric bus. SunLine is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This bus represents the sixth generation of hydrogen-fueled buses that the agency has operated since 2000.

  1. Demonstration of improved vehicle fuel efficiency through innovative tire design, materials, and weight reduction technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Donley, Tim

    2014-12-31

    Cooper completed an investigation into new tire technology using a novel approach to develop and demonstrate a new class of fuel efficient tires using innovative materials technology and tire design concepts. The objective of this work was to develop a new class of fuel efficient tires, focused on the “replacement market” that would improve overall passenger vehicle fuel efficiency by 3% while lowering the overall tire weight by 20%. A further goal of this project was to accomplish the objectives while maintaining the traction and wear performance of the control tire. This program was designed to build on what has already been accomplished in the tire industry for rolling resistance based on the knowledge and general principles developed over the past decades. Cooper’s CS4 (Figure #1) premium broadline tire was chosen as the control tire for this program. For Cooper to achieve the goals of this project, the development of multiple technologies was necessary. Six technologies were chosen that are not currently being used in the tire industry at any significant level, but that showed excellent prospects in preliminary research. This development was divided into two phases. Phase I investigated six different technologies as individual components. Phase II then took a holistic approach by combining all the technologies that showed positive results during phase one development.

  2. Federal Funds: Fuel Conservation Fellowship Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobowski, Rita Cipalla

    1977-01-01

    To train individuals who might design and implement plans for developing alternative sources of energy like solar or geothermal power, the Office of Education supports graduate fellowships in mining, mineral, and mineral fuel conservation. Describes three projects funded by the fellowship program during the 1976-77 academic year. (Author/RK)

  3. Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration: Spring 2008 Results; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Garbak, J.

    2008-04-01

    Conference paper presented at the 2008 National Hydrogen Association Meeting that describes the spring, 2008 results of the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project.

  4. Low-cost flywheel demonstration program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    The Applied Physics Laboratory/Department of Energy Low Cost Flywheel Demonstration Program was initiated on 1 October 1977 and was successfully concluded on 31 December 19'9. The total cost of this program was $355,190. All primary objectives were successfully achieved as follows: demonstration of a full-size, 1)kWh flywheel having an estimated cost in large-volume production of approximately $50/kWh; developmeNt of a ball-bearing system having losses comparable to the losses in a totally magnetic suspension system; successful and repeated demonstration of the low-cost flywheel in a complete flywheel energy-storage system based on the use of ordinary house voltage and frequency; and application of the experience gained in the hardware program to project the system design into a complete, full-scale, 30-kWh home-type flywheel energy-storage system.

  5. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS - PHASE I. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST, AND EVALUATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses Phase I (a conceptual design, preliminary cost, and evaluation study) of a program to demonstrate the recovery of energy from waste methane produced by anaerobic digestion of waste water treatment sludge. The fuel cell is being used for this application becau...

  6. Overview of the solar dynamic ground test demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1993-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program demonstrates the availability of SD technologies in a simulated space environment at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) vacuum facility. An aerospace industry/ government team is working together to design, fabricate, build, and test a complete SD system. This paper reviews the goals and status of the SD GTD program. A description of the SD system includes key design features of the system, subsystems, and components as reported at the Critical Design Review (CDR).

  7. Hybrid Propulsion Demonstration Program 250K Hybrid Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, George; Zoladz, Tom; Arves, Joe; Kearney, Darren; Abel, Terry; Park, O.

    2003-01-01

    The Hybrid Propulsion Demonstration Program (HPDP) program was formed to mature hybrid propulsion technology to a readiness level sufficient to enable commercialization for various space launch applications. The goal of the HPDP was to develop and test a 250,000 pound vacuum thrust hybrid booster in order to demonstrate hybrid propulsion technology and enable manufacturing of large hybrid boosters for current and future space launch vehicles. The HPDP has successfully conducted four tests of the 250,000 pound thrust hybrid rocket motor at NASA's Stennis Space Center. This paper documents the test series.

  8. Community ownership and program continuation following a health demonstration project.

    PubMed

    Bracht, N; Finnegan, J R; Rissel, C; Weisbrod, R; Gleason, J; Corbett, J; Veblen-Mortenson, S

    1994-06-01

    Community ownership and maintenance of heart health programs was a major study goal of the Minnesota Heart Health Program (MHHP), a community-based National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute (NIH)-funded demonstration project. A partnership between the University of Minnesota and three Upper Midwest intervention communities was initiated in 1981. Local citizen boards were instrumental in planning, implementing and incorporating programs. Through an 8 year process of community organization, training and volunteer involvement, MHHP educational program responsibility was transferred to existing community-based groups and organizations. In 1989, when federal funding was withdrawn, 70% of all heart health intervention programs initiated by MHHP were being continued by local sponsors and supported by local funds. By 1992, maintenance of programs had decreased to an average 60%. Differential results of program incorporation among the three intervention communities are presented including findings on community sectors that most frequently sponsored programs. Factors that facilitate or impede local ownership are discussed. Research on longer-term maintenance of heart health programs in the three communities continues. PMID:10150448

  9. Demonstration of the Environmental Data Corporation Spectral Fuel Conservation System. Quarterly report, October-December, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-18

    A program plan was prepared and submitted to the Department of Energy in November 1979. The criteria that must be satisfied by the host site for a successful demonstration of the Spectral Fuel Conservation System have been developed and are included in this report. The process of demonstration site selection is underway and is expected to be completed on schedule by March 31, 1980. Preliminary discussions with Union Carbide indicate that the coal-fired boilers at the company's specialty chemicals plant in Institute, West Virginia appear to satisfy all the major site criteria. Exchanges of drawings are now in progress for further evaluation prior to undertaking a site inspection visit. Finally, a literature search has been initiated to determine the distribution by size and type of coal-fired boilers in the industrial sector as background to the energy savings analysis required in Task 11.

  10. A decision analysis framework to support long-term planning for nuclear fuel cycle technology research, development, demonstration and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Sowder, A.G.; Machiels, A.J.; Dykes, A.A.; Johnson, D.H.

    2013-07-01

    To address challenges and gaps in nuclear fuel cycle option assessment and to support research, develop and demonstration programs oriented toward commercial deployment, EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) is seeking to develop and maintain an independent analysis and assessment capability by building a suite of assessment tools based on a platform of software, simplified relationships, and explicit decision-making and evaluation guidelines. As a demonstration of the decision-support framework, EPRI examines a relatively near-term fuel cycle option, i.e., use of reactor-grade mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) in U.S. light water reactors. The results appear as a list of significant concerns (like cooling of spent fuels, criticality risk...) that have to be taken into account for the final decision.

  11. Optimization and Demonstration of a Solid Oxide Regenerative Fuel Cell System

    SciTech Connect

    James F. McElroy; Darren B. Hickey; Fred Mitlitsky

    2006-09-30

    Single cell solid oxide regenerative fuel cells (SORFCs) have been demonstrated for over 1000 hours of operation at degradation rates as low as 0.5% per thousand hours for current densities as high as 300mA/cm{sup 2}. Efficiency levels (fuel cell power out vs. electrolysis power in) have been demonstrated in excess of 80% at 100mA/cm{sup 2}. All testing has been performed with metallic based interconnects and non-noble metal electrodes in order to limit fabrication costs for commercial considerations. The SORFC cell technology will be scaled up to a 1kW sized stack which will be demonstrated in Year 2 of the program. A self contained SORFC system requires efficient thermal management in order to maintain operating temperatures during exothermic and endothermic operational modes. The use of LiF as a phase change material (PCM) was selected as the optimum thermal storage medium by virtue of its superior thermal energy density by volume. Thermal storage experiments were performed using LiF and a simulated SORFC stack. The thermal storage concept was deemed to be technically viable for larger well insulated systems, although it would not enable a high efficiency thermally self-sufficient SORFC system at the 1 kW level.

  12. NP-MHTGR Fuel Development Program Results

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, John Thomas; Petti, David Andrew; Hobbins, Richard Redfield; McCardell, Richard K.; Shaber, Eric Lee; Southworth, Finis Hio

    2002-10-01

    In August 1988, the Secretary of Energy announced a strategy to acquire New Production Reactor capacity for producing tritium. The strategy involved construction of a New Production Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (NP-MHTGR) where the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) was selected as the Management and Operations contractor for the project. Immediately after the announcement in August 1988, tritium target particle development began with the INEEL selected as the lead laboratory. Fuel particle development was initially not considered to be on a critical path for the project, therefore, the fuel development program was to run concurrently with the design effort of the NP-MHTGR.

  13. The whole-core LEU silicide fuel demonstration in the JMTR

    SciTech Connect

    Aso, Tomokazu; Akashi, Kazutomo; Nagao, Yoshiharu

    1997-08-01

    The JMTR was fully converted to LEU silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) fuel with cadmium wires as burnable absorber in January, 1994. The reduced enrichment program for the JMTR was initiated in 1979, and the conversion to MEU (enrichment ; 45%) aluminide fuel was carried out in 1986 as the first step of the program. The final goal of the program was terminated by the present LEU conversion. This paper describes the results of core physics measurement through the conversion phase from MEU fuel core to LEU fuel core. Measured excess reactivities of the LEU fuel cores are mostly in good agreement with predicted values. Reactivity effect and burnup of cadmium wires, therefore, were proved to be well predicted. Control rod worth in the LEU fuel core is mostly less than that in the MEU fuel core. Shutdown margin was verified to be within the safety limit. There is no significant difference in temperature coefficient of reactivity between the MEU and LEU fuel cores. These results verified that the JMTR was successfully and safely converted to LEU fuel. Extension of the operating cycle period was achieved and reduction of spend fuel elements is expected by using the fuel with high uranium density.

  14. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM - UNDERGROUND MINE SOURCE CONTROL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents results of the Mine Waste Technology Program Activity III, Project 8, Underground Mine Source Control Demonstration Project implemented and funded by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U. S. Department of E...

  15. 78 FR 44575 - Sickle Cell Disease Treatment Demonstration Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Sickle Cell Disease Treatment Demonstration... Services (HHS). ACTION: Request for Class Deviation for Non-Competitive Extension: Sickle Cell Disease... nine programs that are funded through competitive grant awards under the Sickle Cell Disease...

  16. Puerto Rico Nursing Career Cooperative Demonstration Program. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico State Dept. of Education, Hato Rey.

    The Puerto Rico Nursing Career Cooperative Demonstration Project and Associate Nursing Program provided education and onsite occupational training laboratory to upgrade the education of 20 licensed practical nurses (LPNs) from 1989-90. The nurses were upgraded to associate nurses in an 18-month period at the Technological Institute of Puerto Rico.…

  17. HTGR Spent Fuel Treatment Program. HTGR Spent Fuel Treatment Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The spent fuel treatment (SFT) program plan addresses spent fuel volume reduction, packaging, storage, transportation, fuel recovery, and disposal to meet the needs of the HTGR Lead Plant and follow-on plants. In the near term, fuel refabrication will be addressed by following developments in fresh fuel fabrication and will be developed in the long term as decisions on the alternatives dictate. The formulation of this revised program plan considered the implications of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) which, for the first time, established a definitive national policy for management and disposal of nuclear wastes. Although the primary intent of the program is to address technical issues, the divergence between commercial and government interests, which arises as a result of certain provisions of the NWPA, must be addressed in the economic assessment of technically feasible alternative paths in the management of spent HTGR fuel and waste. This new SFT program plan also incorporates a significant cooperative research and development program between the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany. The major objective of this international program is to reduce costs by avoiding duplicate efforts.

  18. Final Technical Report: Residential Fuel Cell Demonstration by the Delaware County Electric Cooperative, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Hilson Schneider

    2007-06-06

    This demonstration project contributes to the knowledge base in the area of fuel cells in stationary applications, propane fuel cells, edge-of-grid applications for fuel cells, and energy storage in combination with fuel cells. The project demonstrated that it is technically feasible to meet the whole-house electrical energy needs of a typical upstate New York residence with a 5-kW fuel cell in combination with in-home energy storage without any major modifications to the residence or modifications to the consumption patterns of the residents of the home. The use of a fuel cell at constant output power through a 120-Volt inverter leads to system performance issues including: • relatively poor power quality as quantified by the IEEE-defined short term flicker parameter • relatively low overall system efficiency Each of these issues is discussed in detail in the text of this report. The fuel cell performed well over the 1-year demonstration period in terms of availability and efficiency of conversion from chemical energy (propane) to electrical energy at the fuel cell output terminals. Another strength of fuel cell performance in the demonstration was the low requirements for maintenance and repair on the fuel cell. The project uncovered a new and important installation consideration for propane fuel cells. Alcohol added to new propane storage tanks is preferentially absorbed on the surface of some fuel cell reformer desulfurization filters. The experience on this project indicates that special attention must be paid to the volume and composition of propane tank additives. Size, composition, and replacement schedules for the de-sulfurization filter bed should be adjusted to account for propane tank additives to avoid sulfur poisoning of fuel cell stacks. Despite good overall technical performance of the fuel cell and the whole energy system, the demonstration showed that such a system is not economically feasible as compared to other commercially available

  19. Energy efficient engine program contributions to aircraft fuel conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterton, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    Significant advances in high bypass turbofan technologies that enhance fuel efficiency have been demonstrated in the NASA Energy Efficient Engine Program. This highly successful second propulsion element of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program included major contract efforts with both General Electric and Pratt & Whitney. Major results of these efforts will be presented including highlights from the NASA/General Electric E3 research turbofan engine test. Direct application of all the E3 technologies could result in fuel savings of over 18% compared to the CF6-50 and JT9D-7. Application of the E3 technologies to new and derivative engines such as the CF6-80C and PW 2037, as well as others, will be discussed. Significant portions of the fuel savings benefit for these new products can be directly related to the E3 technology program. Finally, results of a study looking at far term advanced turbofan engines will be briefly described. The study shows that substantial additional fuel savings over E3 are possible with additional turbofan technology programs.

  20. Energy efficient engine program contributions to aircraft fuel conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Batterton, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    Significant advances in high bypass turbofan technologies that enhance fuel efficiency have been demonstrated in the NASA Energy Efficient Engine Program. This highly successful second propulsion element of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program included major contract efforts with both General Electric and Pratt Whitney. Major results of these efforts will be presented including highlights from the NASA/General Electric E3 research turbofan engine test. Direct application of all the E3 technologies could result in fuel savings of over 18% compared to the CF6-50 and JT9D-7. Application of the E3 technologies to new and derivative engines such as the CF6-80C and PW 2037, as well as others, will be discussed. Significant portions of the fuel savings benefit for these new products can be directly related to the E3 technology program. Finally, results of a study looking at far term advanced turbofan engines will be briefly described. The study shows that substantial additional fuel savings over E3 are possible with additional turbofan technology programs.

  1. Automotive fuel economy and emissions program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowdy, M. W.; Baisley, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental data were generated to support an assessment of the relationship between automobile fuel economy and emissions control systems. Tests were made at both the engine and vehicle levels. Detailed investigations were made on cold-start emissions devices, exhaust gas recirculation systems, and air injection reactor systems. Based on the results of engine tests, an alternative emission control system and modified control strategy were implemented and tested in the vehicle. With the same fuel economy and NOx emissions as the stock vehicle, the modified vehicle reduced HC and CO emissions by about 20 percent. By removing the NOx emissions constraint, the modified vehicle demonstrated about 12 percent better fuel economy than the stock vehicle.

  2. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results. Fourth Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, Leslie; Post, Matthew

    2015-07-02

    This report presents results of a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) leads the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration, which includes 12 advanced-design fuel cell buses and two hydrogen fueling stations. The FCEBs in service at AC Transit are 40-foot, low-floor buses built by Van Hool with a hybrid electric propulsion system that includes a US Hybrid fuel cell power system and EnerDel lithium-based energy storage system. The buses began revenue service in May 2010.

  3. Bluetooth wireless monitoring, diagnosis and calibration interface for control system of fuel cell bus in Olympic demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Jianfeng; Lin, Xinfan; Xu, Liangfei; Li, Jianqiu; Ouyang, Minggao

    With the worldwide deterioration of the natural environment and the fossil fuel crisis, the possible commercialization of fuel cell vehicles has become a hot topic. In July 2008, Beijing started a clean public transportation plan for the 29th Olympic games. Three fuel cell city buses and 497 other low-emission vehicles are now serving the Olympic core area and Beijing urban areas. The fuel cell buses will operate along a fixed bus line for 1 year as a public demonstration of green energy vehicles. Due to the specialized nature of fuel cell engines and electrified power-train systems, measurement, monitoring and calibration devices are indispensable. Based on the latest Bluetooth wireless technology, a novel Bluetooth universal data interface was developed for the control system of the fuel cell city bus. On this platform, a series of wireless portable control auxiliary systems have been implemented, including wireless calibration, a monitoring system and an in-system programming platform, all of which are ensuring normal operation of the fuel cell buses used in the demonstration.

  4. Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes, Volume III

    EPA Science Inventory

    This booklet, ETV Program Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes, Volume III contains two case studies, addressing verified environmental technologies for decentalized wastewater treatment and converting animal waste to energy. Each case study contains a brief description ...

  5. Demonstration program for Omega receiver prototype microcomputer data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    The JOLT (TM) commercial microcomputer, based on the MOS Technology 6502 processor chip, for use in Omega navigation system is evaluated. A computer program was prepared in hand-assembled code to demonstrate receiver operation. The processor provides binary processing with interrupts enabled, a carriage return is given to initialize the teleprinter, and a jump is performed to enter the program loop to wait for an interrupt. The program loop operates continuously testing the interrupt flag. The interrupt routine reads the receiver status word and determines whether the current time-slot is the A slot. If so, the interrupt flag, which is also the data index pointer, is reset to zero. The status word is stored in the status buffer. If the time-slot is not A, the interrupt flag/pointer is incremented by one to index the phase and status to the proper buffer words for later use by the print routine.

  6. Commercial cyclone incinerator demonstration program: October 1979-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, B.M.

    1980-05-21

    The commercial cyclone incinerator program was designed to study the effects of burning low-level waste contaminated with beta and gamma emitters in a cyclone system. The ultimate program goal is the demonstration of a cyclone incinerator at a nuclear power plant. During the past six months, progress was made toward achieving the second program objective, Complete Incinerator Feasibility Plan. Forty-one laboratory-scale experiments were completed, with five more experiments remaining to be performed. Sample analysis from completed experiments continues. A promising scrub liquor was identified and is now being used for improved absorption of iodide and chloride from incinerator offgas. Inconel 601 continues to perform well as the material of construction for the laboratory-scale burn chamber. 7 figures, 7 tables.

  7. Commercial cyclone incinerator demonstration program: October 1979-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, B.M.

    1980-05-21

    The commercial cyclone incinerator program was designed to study the effects of burning low-level waste contaminated with beta and gamma emitters in a cyclone system. The ultimate program goal is the demonstration of a cyclone incinerator at a nuclear power plant. During the past six months, progress was made toward achieving the second program objective, Complete Incinerator Feasibility Plan. Forty-one laboratory-scale experiments were completed, with five more experiments remaining to be performed. Sample analysis from completed experiments continues. A promising scrub liquor was identified and is now being used for improved absorption of iodide and chloride from incinerator offgas. Inconel 601 continues to perform well as the material of construction for the laboratory-scale burn chamber.

  8. 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration program data report

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, C.A.; Cromer, M.V.; Newman, G.C.; Beiso, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    The 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration program, hosted by Fernald Environmental Management Project, was established to investigate technologies that are applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. An important part of this effort was evaluating field-screening tools potentially capable of acquiring high-resolution information on uranium contamination distribution in surface soils. Further-more, the information needed to be obtained in a cost- and time-efficient manner. Seven advanced field-screening technologies were demonstrated at a uranium-contaminated site at Fernald, located 29 kilometers northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. The seven technologies tested were: (1) alpha-track detectors, (2) a high-energy beta scintillometer, (3) electret ionization chambers, (4) and (5) two variants of gamma-ray spectrometry, (6) laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, and (7) long-range alpha detection. The goals of this field demonstration were to evaluate the capabilities of the detectors and to demonstrate their utility within the US Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration Program. Identical field studies were conducted using four industry-standard characterization tools: (1) a sodium-iodide scintillometer, (2) a low-energy FIDLER scintillometer, (3) a field-portable x-ray fluorescence detector, and (4) standard soil sampling coupled with laboratory analysis. Another important aspect of this program was the application of a cost/risk decision model to guide characterization of the site. This document is a compilation of raw data submitted by the technologies and converted total uranium data from the 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration.

  9. Performance demonstration program plan for analysis of simulated headspace gases

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for analysis of headspace gases will consist of regular distribution and analyses of test standards to evaluate the capability for analyzing VOCs, hydrogen, and methane in the headspace of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles will provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for TRU waste characterization. Laboratory performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste drum headspace gases according to the criteria set within the text of this Program Plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAPP QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization gas samples. Analyses which are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories which have demonstrated acceptable performance in the PDP.

  10. ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Bergin

    2003-10-17

    The Syntroleum plant is mechanically complete and currently undergoing start-up. The fuel production and demonstration plan is near completion. The study on the impact of small footprint plant (SFP) fuel on engine performance is about half-completed. Cold start testing has been completed. Preparations have been completed for testing the fuel in diesel electric generators in Alaska. Preparations are in progress for testing the fuel in bus fleets at Denali National Park and the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority. The experiments and analyses conducted during this project show that Fischer-Tropsch (FT) gas-to-liquid diesel fuel can easily be used in a diesel engine with little to no modifications. Additionally, based on the results and discussion presented, further improvements in performance and emissions can be realized by configuring the engine to take advantage of FT diesel fuel's properties. The FT fuel also shows excellent cold start properties and enabled the engine tested to start at more the ten degrees than traditional fuels would allow. This plant produced through this project will produce large amounts of FT fuel. This will allow the fuel to be tested extensively, in current, prototype, and advanced diesel engines. The fuel may also contribute to the nation's energy security. The military has expressed interest in testing the fuel in aircraft and ground vehicles.

  11. Pecan Street Grid Demonstration Program. Final technology performance report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-02-10

    This document represents the final Regional Demonstration Project Technical Performance Report (TPR) for Pecan Street Inc.’s (Pecan Street) Smart Grid Demonstration Program, DE-OE-0000219. Pecan Street is a 501(c)(3) smart grid/clean energy research and development organization headquartered at The University of Texas at Austin (UT). Pecan Street worked in collaboration with Austin Energy, UT, Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), the City of Austin, the Austin Chamber of Commerce and selected consultants, contractors, and vendors to take a more detailed look at the energy load of residential and small commercial properties while the power industry is undergoing modernization. The Pecan Street Smart Grid Demonstration Program signed-up over 1,000 participants who are sharing their home or businesses’s electricity consumption data with the project via green button protocols, smart meters, and/or a home energy monitoring system (HEMS). Pecan Street completed the installation of HEMS in 750 homes and 25 commercial properties. The program provided incentives to increase the installed base of roof-top solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, plug-in electric vehicles with Level 2 charging, and smart appliances. Over 200 participants within a one square mile area took advantage of Austin Energy and Pecan Street’s joint PV incentive program and installed roof-top PV as part of this project. Of these homes, 69 purchased or leased an electric vehicle through Pecan Street’s PV rebate program and received a Level 2 charger from Pecan Street. Pecan Street studied the impacts of these technologies along with a variety of consumer behavior interventions, including pricing models, real-time feedback on energy use, incentive programs, and messaging, as well as the corresponding impacts on Austin Energy’s distribution assets.The primary demonstration site was the Mueller community in Austin, Texas. The Mueller development, located less than three miles from the Texas State Capitol

  12. Fuel performance improvement program. Semiannual progress report, April-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Crouthamel, C E; Freshley, M D

    1980-10-01

    Progress on the Fuel Performance Improvement Program's fuel test and demonstration irradiations is reported for the period April-September, 1980. Included are results of out-of-reactor experiments with zircaloy cladding on the iodine assisted stress corrosion cracking mechanism. Preliminary results from the first eight ramp tests performed in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor are reported. The status of demonstration fuel irradiations in the Big Rock Point Reactor is described.

  13. Non-Flow-Through Fuel Cell System Test Results and Demonstration on the SCARAB Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidegger, Brianne, T.; Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the demonstration of a non-flow-through PEM fuel cell as part of a power system on the SCARAB rover. A 16-cell non-flow-through fuel cell stack from Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen, Inc. was incorporated into a power system designed to act as a range extender by providing power to the rover s hotel loads. This work represents the first attempt at a ground demonstration of this new technology aboard a mobile test platform. Development and demonstration were supported by the Office of the Chief Technologist s Space Power Systems Project and the Advanced Exploration System Modular Power Systems Project.

  14. Milliken Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project. Project performance summary, Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-11-30

    The New York State Electric & Gas Corporation (NYSEG) demonstrated a combination of technologies at its Milliken Station in Lansing, New York, designed to: (1) achieve high sulfur dioxide (SO2) capture efficiency, (2) bring nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions into compliance with Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), (3) maintain high station efficiency, and (4) eliminate waste water discharge. This project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) established to address energy and environmental concerns related to coal use. DOE sought cost-shared partnerships with industry through five nationally competed solicitations to accelerate commercialization of the most promising advance coal-based power generation and pollution control technologies. The CCTDP, valued at over five billion dollars, has significantly leveraged federal funding by forging effective partnerships founded on sound principles. For every federal dollar invested, CCTDP participants have invested two dollars. These participants include utilities, technology developers, state governments, and research organizations. The project presented here was one of nine selected in January 1991 from 33 proposals submitted in response to the program’s fourth solicitation.

  15. DEMONSTRATION TEST OF REFUSE-DERIVED FUEL AS A SUPPLEMENTAL FUEL IN CEMENT KILNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluff refuse-derived fuel (RDF) from Baltimore County, Maryland, residential solid waste was successfully tested as a supplementary fuel with pulverized coal in a large rotary cement kiln. RDF was produced at the Baltimore County Resource Recovery Facility, a joint project of Bal...

  16. Broad specification fuels combustion technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design and development efforts to evolve promising aircraft gas turbine combustor configurations for burning broadened-properties fuels were discussed. Design and experimental evaluations of three different combustor concepts in sector combustor rig tests was conducted. The combustor concepts were a state of the art single-annular combustor, a staged double-annular combustor, and a short single-annular combustor with variable geometry to control primary zone stoichiometry. A total of 25 different configurations of the three combustor concepts were evaluated. Testing was conducted over the full range of CF6-80A engine combustor inlet conditions, using four fuels containing between 12% and 14% hydrogen by weight. Good progress was made toward meeting specific program emissions and performance goals with each of the three combustor concepts. The effects of reduced fuel hydrogen content, including increased flame radiation, liner metal temperature, smoke, and NOx emissions were documented. The most significant effect on the baseline combustor was a projected 33% life reduction, for a reduction from 14% to 13% fuel hydrogen content, due to increased liner temperatures.

  17. Non-Flow-Through Fuel Cell System Test Results and Demonstration on the SCARAB Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidegger, Brianne; Burke, Kenneth; Jakupca, Ian

    2012-01-01

    This presentation describes the results of the demonstration of a non-flow-through PEM fuel cell as part of a power system on the SCARAB rover at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A 16-cell non-flow-through fuel cell stack from Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen, Inc. was incorporated into a power system designed to act as a range extender by providing power to the SCARAB rover s hotel loads. The power system, including the non-flow-through fuel cell technology, successfully demonstrated its goal as a range extender by powering hotel loads on the SCARAB rover, making this demonstration the first to use the non-flow-through fuel cell technology on a mobile platform.

  18. Advanced technology lightweight fuel cell program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of the alkaline electrolyte fuel cell as the power source in a multi hundred kilowatt orbital energy storage system was studied. The total system weight of an electrolysis cell energy storage system was determined. The tests demonstrated: (1) the performance stability of a platinum on carbon anode catalyst configuration after 5000 hours of testing has no loss in performance; (2) capability of the alkaline fuel cell to operate to a cyclical load profile; (3) suitability of a lightweight graphite electrolyte reservoir plate for use in the alkaline fuel cell; (4) long life potential of a hybrid polysulfone cell edge frame construction; and (5) long term stability of a fiber reinforced potassium titanate matrix structure. The power section tested operates with passive water removal eliminating the requirement for a dynamic hydrogen pump water separator thereby allowing a powerplant design with reduced weight, lower parasite power, and a potential for high reliability and extended endurance. It is concluded that two perovskites are unsuitable for use as a catalyst or as a catalyst support at the cathode of an alkaline fuel cell.

  19. Vision for the development of an international nuclear fuel recycling program

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, Kenneth D.

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of the development of an international nuclear fuel recycle program is to: - Demonstrate advanced recycling by working to prove the technologies needed to close the fuel cycle, minimize waste, and obtain more energy benefit for each unit of fuel. - Build a global vision by enlisting partners to limit the spread of sensitive nuclear technologies in a way that enables nuclear power to meet global challenges. The program will begin with the establishment of a smaller scale secure fuel cycle facility that would serve as a model for international nuclear fuel reprocessing centers that would eventually be built in several countries world wide. The operating process plants will provide the secure and safe guarded environment for the recycle of spent fuel from nuclear power stations around the world. The demonstration site will provide for developing and testing processes that would lead to the more complete use of the energy available in nuclear fuels and the minimization of long lived nuclear waste. (author)

  20. 14 CFR 125.507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... based on fuel tank system Instructions for Continued Airworthiness (ICA) that have been developed in... alteration for which fuel tank ICA are developed under SFAR 88, or under § 25.1529 in effect on June 6, 2001... procedures for the fuel tank system based on those ICA. (f) The fuel tank system inspection program...

  1. 14 CFR 125.507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... based on fuel tank system Instructions for Continued Airworthiness (ICA) that have been developed in... alteration for which fuel tank ICA are developed under SFAR 88, or under § 25.1529 in effect on June 6, 2001... procedures for the fuel tank system based on those ICA. (f) The fuel tank system inspection program...

  2. Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

  3. License renewal demonstration program: NRC observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Prato, R.J.; Kuo, P.T.; Newberry, S.F.

    1996-12-01

    This report summarizes the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff`s observations and lessons learned from the five License Renewal Demonstration Program (LRDP) site visits performed by the staff from March 25, 1996, through August 16, 1996. The LRDP was a Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) program intended to assess the effectiveness of the guidance provided by NEI 95-10, Revision 0, {open_quotes}Industry Guideline for Implementing the Requirements of 10 CFR Part 54 - The License Renewal Rule,{close_quotes} to implement the requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 54 (10 CFR Part 54), {open_quotes}Requirements for Renewal of Operating Licenses for Nuclear Power Plants.{close_quotes} In general, NEI 95-10 appeared to contain the basic guidance needed for scoping, screening, identifying aging effects, developing aging management programs, and performing time-limited aging analyses. However, inconsistent implementation of this guidance in some areas was an indication that clarification of existing guidance and/or the inclusion-of some new guidance may be needed for applicants to develop a license renewal program that is consistent with the intent of the rule.

  4. Second-Generation Fuel Cell Stack Durability and Freeze Capability from National FCV Learning Demonstration (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Garbak, J.

    2009-11-18

    This presentation provides information about the objectives and partners of the National Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration, the status of vehicle and station deployment, and results of vehicle and infrastructure analysis.

  5. Demonstration of a fuel-saving system for paint-curing ovens

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, W P

    1980-12-01

    Two curing ovens at Roll Coater, Inc. (the Greenfield, Indiana plant) were retrofitted to save fuel and cost. Included in the fuel conserving retrofit was the design, fabrication, and installation of an afterburner for each of the two ovens, piping their combustion products to each of two commonly housed waste heat boilers before discharge from those units to the atmosphere at about 450 F. Depending on the product being run and the coating applied, natural gas requirements have been reduced by 45 to 65% with operation of the zone incinerators only and by as much as 65 to 85% including the effects of both the zone incineration and heat recovery by means of the afterburners and waste heat boilers. A demonstration program on conversion work at the No. 3 line at Greenfield and results are described in Section 2. Section 3 describes the retrofit design and the system construction. System performance (tests and measurements, qualitative performance, maintenance factors, and economic performance) is described in Section 4. Conclusions and recommendations are summarized.

  6. Origins and Overview of the Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlowski, Joseph W.; Graham, David H.; Boccadoro, Charles H.; Coen, Peter G.; Maglieri, Domenic J.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the DARPA Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration (SSBD) Program was to demonstrate for the first time in flight that sonic booms can be substantially reduced by incorporating specialized aircraft shaping techniques. Although mitigation of the sonic boom via specialized shaping techniques was theorized decades ago, until now, this theory had never been tested with a flight vehicle subjected to actual flight conditions in a real atmosphere. The demonstrative success, which occurred on 27 August 2003 with repeat flights in the supersonic corridor at Edwards Air Force Base, is a critical milestone in the development of next generation supersonic aircraft that could one day fly unrestricted over land and help usher in a new era of time-critical air transport. Pressure measurements obtained on the ground and in the air confirmed that the specific modifications made to a Northrop Grumman F-5E aircraft not only changed the shape of the shock wave signature emanating from the aircraft, but also produced a flat-top signature whose shape persisted, as predicted, as the pressure waves propagated through the atmosphere to the ground. This accomplishment represents a major advance towards reducing the startling and potentially damaging noise of a sonic boom. This paper describes the evolution of the SSBD program, including the rationale for test article selection, and provides an overview of the history making accomplishments achieved during the SSBD effort, as well as, the follow-on NASA Shaped Sonic Boom Experiment (SSBE) Program, whose goal was to further evaluate the characteristics and robustness of shaped boom signatures.

  7. Fourth annual report to Congress, Federal Alternative Motor Fuels Programs

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This annual report to Congress presents the current status of the alternative fuel vehicle programs being conducted across the country in accordance with the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. These programs, which represent the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative fuels, are beginning their fifth year. This report summarizes tests and results from the fourth year.

  8. Lessons Learned from NASA UAV Science Demonstration Program Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegener, Steven S.; Schoenung, Susan M.

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, two airborne missions were flown as part of a NASA Earth Science Enterprise program to demonstrate the use of uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs) to perform earth science. One mission, the Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES), successfully measured lightning storms in the vicinity of Key West, Florida, during storm season using a high-altitude Altus(TM) UAV. In the other, a solar-powered UAV, the Pathfinder Plus, flew a high-resolution imaging mission over coffee fields in Kauai, Hawaii, to help guide the harvest.

  9. Ultra-Clean Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Production and Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Bergin

    2005-10-14

    The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: Dynamometer Durability Testing, the Denali Bus Fleet Demonstration, Bus Fleet Demonstrations Emissions Analysis, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Emissions Analysis, Feasibility Study of SFPs for Rural Alaska, and Cold Weather Testing of Ultra Clean Fuel.

  10. Demonstration of the use of hydrogen fuel for food service. Final report, October 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Back, D.D.

    1999-03-01

    This Phase 1 effort demonstrated the use of hydrogen-gas fuel for use in food service applications. Energy efficiencies of 40--50 percent were achieved with Mainstream Engineering's hydrogen burner, with usable energy supply rates of 15,000 BTU/hr, fulfilling the requirements of the US Army. It was demonstrated that hydrogen-fuel could be used for food service using compressed cylinders of hydrogen or by using metal-hydride derived hydrogen.

  11. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell development program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) development activities and current program status. The Westinghouse goal is to develop a cost effective cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 hours. Progress toward this goal will be discussed and test results presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 56,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Results of development efforts to reduce cost and increase power output of tubular SOFCs are described.

  12. Demonstrate fuel disassembly/encapsulation. Technical progress report, April 1981-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1981-08-03

    Work on this project is focused on demonstrating disassembly and encapsulation of nuclear fuels as a means to increase spent fuel storage. The effort commenced on April 17, 1980, and is progressing satisfactorily. The Equipment/Procedure Preparation sub-task is essentially complete. The Equipment Demonstration sub-task and the Process Assessment Studies sub-task continue. The equipment design effort associated with the first sub-task, the component testing and checking associated with the second sub-task, and the technical studies and investigations associated with the latter sub-task continue to verify the feasibility of this concept to enhance the use of fuel storage resources.

  13. The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect

    David Petti; Hans Gougar; Gary Bell

    2005-05-01

    The Department of Energy has established the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program to address the following overall goals: Provide a baseline fuel qualification data set in support of the licensing and operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Gas-reactor fuel performance demonstration and qualification comprise the longest duration research and development (R&D) task for the NGNP feasibility. The baseline fuel form is to be demonstrated and qualified for a peak fuel centerline temperature of 1250°C. Support near-term deployment of an NGNP by reducing market entry risks posed by technical uncertainties associated with fuel production and qualification. Utilize international collaboration mechanisms to extend the value of DOE resources. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, postirradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process, key fuel properties, the irradiation performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. Fuel performance modeling and analysis of the fission product behavior in the primary circuit are important aspects of this work. The performance models are considered essential for several reasons, including guidance for the plant designer in establishing the core design and operating limits, and demonstration to the licensing authority that the applicant has a thorough understanding of the in-service behavior of the fuel system. The fission product behavior task will also provide primary source term data needed for licensing. An overview of the program and recent progress will be presented.

  14. Program test objectives milestone 3. [Integrated Propulsion Technology Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaynor, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    The following conclusions have been developed relative to propulsion system technology adequacy for efficient development and operation of recoverable and expendable launch vehicles (RLV and ELV) and the benefits which the integrated propulsion technology demonstrator will provide for enhancing technology: (1) Technology improvements relative to propulsion system design and operation can reduce program cost. Many features or improvement needs to enhance operability, reduce cost, and improve payload are identified. (2) The Integrated Propulsion Technology Demonstrator (IPTD) Program provides a means of resolving the majority of issues associated with improvement needs. (3) The IPTD will evaluate complex integration of vehicle and facility functions in fluid management and propulsion control systems, and provides an environment for validating improved mechanical and electrical components. (4) The IPTD provides a mechanism for investigating operational issues focusing on reducing manpower and time to perform various functions at the launch site. These efforts include model development, collection of data to validate subject models, and ultimate development of complex time line models. (5) The IPTD provides an engine test bed for tri/bi-propellant engine development firings which is representative of the actual vehicle environment. (6) The IPTD provides for only a limited multiengine configuration integration environment for RLV. Multiengine efforts may be simulated for a number of subsystems and a number of subsystems are relatively independent of the multiengine influences.

  15. Demonstration program for wood/coal cofiring in western Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.; Elder, W.W.

    1998-12-31

    National interest in the combustion of wood and wood/coal mixtures is growing rapidly in response to the world-wide concern for global warming, the US concern for SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions, and regional interest in expanding the utilization of forest products and byproducts. Throughout the forest product sector, combustion of wood and wood byproducts is widely practiced. Numerous small combustors for use by the homeowner to burn seasoned firewood are on the market. Lumber and paper mills produce large amounts of raw wood wastes, which many of them combust in industrial boilers to provide process heat and mechanical energy for their operations. In the case of both small and large combustors, the feed systems, burners, thermal recovery systems and flues have been specially designed for 100% wood use. Within the industrial and utility coal-fired boiler sector, furnaces are designed for 100% coal combustion and there is very little experience with wood/coal cofiring in these systems. Moreover, what experience is out there has not been documented in the open literature. Thus, it is proving very difficult for operators of coal-fired boilers to join quickly the national effort to increase wood firing. To provide assistance in this direction, the Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry Program of the US Department of Agriculture Forest Service has initiated a program with the University of Pittsburgh to demonstrate wood/coal cofiring into stoker and fluid-bed boilers in the western Pennsylvania region. The first project under this program was a demonstration at the traveling-grate stoker boiler of the Pittsburgh Brewing Company. The program staff at the University is currently working on several new projects: initiating commercial wood/coal cofiring at the brewery, organizing a demonstration at the underfed stoker boiler plant at a state-owned facility, conceptualizing projects for a spreader stoker boiler at a federally-owned facility and a fluid-bed boiler

  16. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2007-11-19

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility’s compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document

  17. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2007-11-13

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility’s compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document

  18. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2006-04-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes sample gases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for analysis. Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility’s compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement

  19. Performance in the WIPP nondestructive assay performance demonstration program

    SciTech Connect

    Marcinkiewicz, C.J.; Connolly, M.J.; Becker, G.K.

    1997-11-01

    Measurement facilities performing nondestructive assay (NDA) of wastes intended for disposal at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are required to demonstrate their ability to meet specific Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs). This demonstration is performed, in part, by participation in the NDA Performance Demonstration Program (PDP). The PDP is funded and managed by the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) of DOE and is conducted by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It tests the characteristics of precision, system bias and/or total uncertainty through the measurement of variable, blind combinations of simulated waste drums and certified radioactive standards. Each facility must successfully participate in the PDP using each different type of measurement system planned for use in waste characterization. The first cycle of the PDP using each different type of measurement system planned for use in waste characterization. The first cycle of the PDP was completed in July 1996 and the second is scheduled for completion by December 1996. Seven sites reported data in cycle 1 for 11 different measurement systems. This paper describes the design and operation of the PDP and provides the performance data from cycle 1. It also describes the preliminary results from cycle 2 and updates the status and future plans for the NDA PDP. 4 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  1. 75 FR 79964 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ...EPA is finalizing amendments to certain of the Renewable Fuel Standard program regulations that were published on March 26, 2010, and that took effect on July 1, 2010 (``the RFS2 regulations''). Following publication of the RFS2 regulations, promulgated in response to the requirements of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, EPA discovered some technical errors and areas within the......

  2. 75 FR 26049 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... Standard program regulations that were published on March 26, 2010, at 75 FR 14670 (the ``RFS2 regulations... the Renewable Fuel Standard regulations published on March 26, 2010, at 75 FR 14670 (the ``RFS2..., (58 FR 51735 (October 4, 1993)) the Agency must determine whether the regulatory action...

  3. Emergency fuels utilization guidebook. Alternative Fuels Utilization Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The basic concept of an emergency fuel is to safely and effectively use blends of specification fuels and hydrocarbon liquids which are free in the sense that they have been commandeered or volunteered from lower priority uses to provide critical transportation services for short-duration emergencies on the order of weeks, or perhaps months. A wide variety of liquid hydrocarbons not normally used as fuels for internal combustion engines have been categorized generically, including limited information on physical characteristics and chemical composition which might prove useful and instructive to fleet operators. Fuels covered are: gasoline and diesel fuel; alcohols; solvents; jet fuels; kerosene; heating oils; residual fuels; crude oils; vegetable oils; gaseous fuels.

  4. Demonstrations of safeguards process monitoring sensitivities. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ehinger, M.H.; Wachter, J.W.

    1986-09-01

    Can process-monitoring information be incorporated into safeguards tests. What level of sensitivity to removals of materials can be achieved with process monitoring tests. These questions are being answered by a series of tests in US facilities. These tests involve full-scale facilities that simulate operating reprocessing plant conditions with natural or depleted uranium solutions as surrogate feed materials. Safeguards systems are in place to detect loss or unauthorized removals of solutions. As part of the tests, actual removals of material from the operating facilities are made. Removals have ranged from several kilograms down to a few hundred grams of uranium. For purposes of the tests, uranium is considered to be plutonium and is the focus of safeguards concerns.

  5. The Canadian fuel cell R&D program

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, N.R.; Hammerli, M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper gives an overview of the Canadian Fuel Cell R&D Program (CFCP). The program includes both mobile and stationary applications. It is based on Canadian as well as other fuel cell technologies. The Canadian fuel cell technologies comprise the development of the Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) of Ballard Power Systems Inc., as well as the Alkaline Fuel Cell of Astris Inc. Materials development issues are an important element of the Program. An outstanding example is the creation of the new BAM3G membrane technology of Ballard Advanced Materials in support of the Canadian PEFC technology. Finally, some system successes will be highlighted.

  6. Fuel Cell Power Plant Initiative. Volume 1; Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Logistics Fuel Processor 27 kWe Power System Demonstration for ARPA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veyo, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the successful testing of a 27 kWe Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) generator fueled by natural gas and/or a fuel gas produced by a brassboard logistics fuel preprocessor (LFP). The test period began on May 24, 1995 and ended on February 26, 1996 with the successful completion of all program requirements and objectives. During this time period, this power system produced 118.2 MWh of electric power. No degradation of the generator's performance was measured after 5582 accumulated hours of operation on these fuels: local natural gas - 3261 hours, jet fuel reformate gas - 766 hours, and diesel fuel reformate gas - 1555 hours. This SOFC generator was thermally cycled from full operating temperature to room temperature and back to operating temperature six times, because of failures of support system components and the occasional loss of test site power, without measurable cell degradation. Numerous outages of the LFP did not interrupt the generator's operation because the fuel control system quickly switched to local natural gas when an alarm indicated that the LFP reformate fuel supply had been interrupted. The report presents the measured electrical performance of the generator on all three fuel types and notes the small differences due to fuel type. Operational difficulties due to component failures are well documented even though they did not affect the overall excellent performance of this SOFC power generator. The final two appendices describe in detail the LFP design and the operating history of the tested brassboard LFP.

  7. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Education Programs Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Reports from the session on Education Programs Demonstration include:Hands-On Activities for Exploring the Solar System in K-14; Formal Education and Informal Settings;Making Earth and Space Science and Exploration Accessible; New Thematic Solar System Exploration Products for Scientists and Educators Engaging Students of All Ages with Research-related Activities: Using the Levers of Museum Reach and Media Attention to Current Events; Astronomy Village: Use of Planetary Images in Educational Multimedia; ACUMEN: Astronomy Classes Unleashed: Meaningful Experiences for Neophytes; Unusual Guidebook to Terrestrial Field Work Studies: Microenvironmental Studies by Landers on Planetary Surfaces (New Atlas in the Series of the Solar System Notebooks on E tv s University, Hungary); and The NASA ADS: Searching, Linking and More.

  8. Recovery Act. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxilliary Power Unit Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, Gail E.

    2013-09-30

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Diesel Auxilliary Power Unit Demonstration Project. Summarizing development of Delphi’s next generation SOFC system as the core power plant to prove the viability of the market opportunity for a 3-5 kW diesel SOFC system. Report includes test and demonstration results from testing the diesel APU in a high visibility fleet customer vehicle application.

  9. Fuel Performance Improvement Program. Semiannual progress report, October 1979-March 1980. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    Progress on the Fuel Performance Improvement Program's fuel design tests and demonstration irradiations for October 1979 through March 1980 is reported. Included are the results of out-of-reactor experiments with Zircaloy cladding using a device that simulates the interaction between fuel and cladding. Also included are reports on the irradiation of the advanced LWR fuel designs in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor and in Consumers Power Company's Big Rock Point Reactor. The establishment of the technical bases and licensing requirements for the advanced fuel concepts are also described.

  10. ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Bergin

    2004-10-18

    The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: SFP Construction and Fuel Production, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Fleet Testing at WMATA and Denali National Park, Demonstration of Clean Diesel Fuels in Diesel Electric Generators in Alaska, and Economic Analysis. ICRC provided overall project organization and budget management for the project. ICRC held meetings with various project participants. ICRC presented at the Department of Energy's annual project review meeting. The plant began producing fuel in October 2004. The first delivery of finished fuel was made in March of 2004 after the initial start-up period.

  11. DoD Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Olsen

    2006-09-15

    This report discusses the first year of operation of a fuel cell power plant located at the Ocean County College, Toms River, New Jersey. PPL EnergyPlus, LLC installed the plant under a contract with Ocean County College. A DFC{reg_sign}300 fuel cell, manufactured by Fuel Cell Energy, Inc. of Danbury, CT was selected for the project. The fuel cell successfully operated from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004. This report discusses the performance of the plant during this period. Ocean County College's decision to contract for use of a fuel cell at the college reflects the institution's commitment to managing energy costs, exercising environmental leadership, and leveraging innovative technologies to accomplish its energy and environmental goals. Ocean County College's director of facilities was interested in finding new energy cost reduction opportunities that could build on the institution's growing reputation for commitment to energy efficiency and environmental quality while exploring new technologies. This combination of goals positioned Ocean County College to value the prospect of installing a fuel cell as a demonstration project that could deliver on its commitment. PPL EnergyPlus, LLC developed the project and Millennium Builders, a PPL company, was chosen as the general contractor for the project. PPL and Ocean County College worked very closely with Jersey Central Power and Light (JCP&L) and New Jersey Natural Gas (NJNG) Company to assure integration of the fuel cell with the local utilities. The 250 kW molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and its balance of plant is contained in an all-weather container located just outside the college's Instructional Building on a cement pad in a fenced-in 30 x 50 foot area in close proximity to the college's boiler and electrical rooms. Cables and piping bring power and hot water from the fuel cell into these interior control areas. The unit's electrical output is fed onto the college's main circuit while the hot water

  12. Health Care and ADA Language Education Programs. Cooperative Demonstration Program: High Technology. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion County Schools, Fairmont, WV.

    A project implemented cooperative training programs in the three occupational areas: ADA computer language use; respiratory therapy technician; and hospital pharmacy technician. The project's purpose was to demonstrate high technology training programs for adults as a cooperative effort among the West Virginia Department of Education, local…

  13. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Project fact sheets 2000, status as of June 30, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program), a model of government and industry cooperation, responds to the Department of Energy's (DOE) mission to foster a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable. The CCT Program represents an investment of over $5.2 billion in advanced coal-based technology, with industry and state governments providing an unprecedented 66 percent of the funding. With 26 of the 38 active projects having completed operations, the CCT Program has yielded clean coal technologies (CCTs) that are capable of meeting existing and emerging environmental regulations and competing in a deregulated electric power marketplace. The CCT Program is providing a portfolio of technologies that will assure that U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 274 billion tons can continue to supply the nation's energy needs economically and in an environmentally sound manner. As the nation embarks on a new millennium, many of the clean coal technologies have realized commercial application. Industry stands ready to respond to the energy and environmental demands of the 21st century, both domestically and internationally, For existing power plants, there are cost-effective environmental control devices to control sulfur dioxide (S02), nitrogen oxides (NO,), and particulate matter (PM). Also ready is a new generation of technologies that can produce electricity and other commodities, such as steam and synthetic gas, and provide efficiencies and environmental performance responsive to global climate change concerns. The CCT Program took a pollution prevention approach as well, demonstrating technologies that remove pollutants or their precursors from coal-based fuels before combustion. Finally, new technologies were introduced into the major coal-based industries, such as steel production, to enhance environmental performance. Thanks in part to the CCT Program, coal--abundant, secure, and economical--can continue in

  14. The Brazilian fuel-alcohol program

    SciTech Connect

    Monaco, L.C.; Macedo, I.C.; Goldemberg, J.

    1993-12-31

    The substitution of ethanol for gasoline in passenger cars and light vehicles in Brazil is one of the largest commercial biomass-to-energy programs in existence today. Engines that run strictly on gasoline are no longer available in the country, having been replaced by neat-ethanol engines and by gasohol engines that burn a mixture of 78 percent gasoline and 22 percent ethanol, by volume. Technological advances, including more efficient production and processing of sugarcane, are responsible for the availability and low price of ethanol. The transition to ethanol fuel has reduced Brazil`s dependence on foreign oil (thus lowering its import-export ratio), created significant employment opportunities, and greatly enhanced urban air quality. In addition, because sugarcane-derived ethanol is a renewable resource (the cane is replanted at the same rate it is harvested), the combustion of ethanol adds virtually no net carbon dioxide to the atmosphere and so helps reduce the threat of global warming.

  15. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transporation Program - State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets: Frequently Asked Questions

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    Factsheet answering frequently asked questions about the U.S. Department of Energy's Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (the Program) that implements provisions of Titles III–V of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct). Answers to questions that are frequently asked about the Program by managers of state government and alternative fuel provider fleets are provided in the factsheet.

  16. Environmental permitting overview: Prepared for the Memphis Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    This overview briefly describes the background of the Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Program (IFGDP), locates and describes the plant and its processes, and summarizes the existing site environment, the activities required for construction and the expected environmental impacts of the project. The IFGDP will convert 3158 tons per day of high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal into 171 million standard cubic feet (SCF) of industrial fuel gas (IFG) with a heating value of 300 +- 30 Btu per SCF. Most of this gas (approximately 90 percent) will be distributed directly to industrial customers within the Memphis area. The remaining gas will be upgraded to the approximate heating value of natural gas (950 Btu per SCF). This upgraded gas, called subsitute natural gas (SNG), will flow into the existing MLGW gas system. The IFGDP will be located on a peninsula of land near the confluence of the Mississippi River and Lake McKellar within the limits of the City of Memphis, Tennessee. Impacts from construction of the IFGDP will be limited to the displacement of wildlife from the site and pipeline routes, slight increases (less than 9 inches) in maximum flood heights along existing nearby flood protection structures on the south shore of Lake McKellar, temporary disturbances of aquatic species and water quality during dredging operations, removal of vegetation from the site (including wetland species), potential increases in air quality particulate concentrations due to fugitive emissions and an increase in local employment and income. Operational impacts from the IFGDP are expected to occur mainly in the areas of air quality, water quality, and socio-economics. (DMC)

  17. Support and power plant documentation for the gas turbine powered bus demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nigro, D. N.; Stewart, R. G.; Apple, S. A.

    1982-01-01

    The operational experience obtained for the GT404-4 gas turbine engines in the intercity and intracity Bus Demonstration Programs is described for the period January 1980 through September 1981. Support for the engines and automatic transmissions involved in this program provided engineering and field service, spare parts and tools, training, and factory overhauls. the Greyhound (intercity) coaches accumulated 183,054 mi (294,595 km) and 5154 hr of total operation. The Baltimore Transit (intracity) coaches accumulated 40,567 mi (65,285 km) and 1840 hr of total operation. In service, the turbine powered Greyhound and Transit coaches achieved approximately 25% and 40% lower fuel mileage, respectively, than did the production diesel powered coaches. The gas turbine engine will require the advanced ceramic development currently being sponsored by the DOE and NASA to achieve fuel economy equivalent not only to that of today's diesel engines but also to the projected fuel economy of the advanced diesel engines of the 1990s. Sufficient experience was not achieved with the coaches prior to the start of service to identify and eliminate many of the problems associated with the startup of new equipment. Because of these problems, the mean miles between incident were unacceptably low. The future gas turbine system should be developed sufficiently to establish satisfactory durability prior to evaluation in revenue service. Commercialization of the gas turbine bus engine remains a viable goal for the future.

  18. Alcohol Fuels Program technical review, Spring 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    The alcohol fuels program consists of in-house and subcontracted research for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel alcohols via thermoconversion and bioconversion technologies. In the thermoconversion area, the SERI gasifier has been operated on a one-ton per day scale and produces a clean, medium-Btu gas that can be used to manufacture methanol with a relatively small gas-water shift reaction requirement. Recent research has produced catalysts that make methanol and a mixture of higher alcohols from the biomass-derived synthetic gas. Three hydrolysis processes have emerged as candidates for more focused research. They are: a high-temperature, dilute-acid, plug-flow approach based on the Dartmouth reactor; steam explosion pretreatment followed by hydrolysis using the RUT-C30 fungal organism; and direct microbial conversion of the cellulose to ethanol using bacteria in a single or mixed culture. Modeling studies, including parametric and sensitivity analyses, have recently been completed. The results of these studies will lead to a better definition of the present state-of-the-art for these processes and provide a framework for establishing the research and process engineering issues that still need resolution. In addition to these modeling studies, economic feasibility studies are being carried out by commercial engineering firms. Their results will supplement and add commercial validity to the program results. The feasibility contractors will provide input at two levels: Technical and economic assessment of the current state-of-the-art in alcohol production from lignocellulosic biomass via thermoconversion to produce methanol and higher alcohol mixtures and bioconversion to produce ethanol; and identification of research areas having the potential to significantly reduce the cost of production of alcohols.

  19. Demonstrating a small utility approach to demand-side program implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The US DOE awarded a grant to the Burlington Electric Department (B.E.D.) to test a demand-side management (DSM) demonstration program designed to quickly save a significant amount of power with little disruption to the utility's customers or its normal operations. B.E.D. is a small municipal utility located in northern Vermont, with a lengthy history of successful DSM involvement. In our grant application, we proposed to develop a replicable program and approach to DSM that might be useful to other small utilities and to write a report to enable such replication. We believe that this DSM program and/or individual program components are replicable. This report is designed to allow other utilities interested in DSM to replicate this program or specific program design features to meet their DSM goals. We also wanted to use the opportunity of this grant to test the waters of residential heating fuel-switching. We hoped to test the application of one fuel-switching technology, and to benefit from the lessons learned in developing a full-scale DSM program for this end- use. To this end the pilot effort has been very successful. In the pilot pressure we installed direct-vent gas fired space heaters sized as supplemental heating units in 44 residences heated solely by electric resistance heat. We installed the gas space heating units at no cost to the owners or residents. We surveyed participating customers. The results of those surveys are included in this report and preliminary estimates of winter peak capacity load reductions are also noted in this report.

  20. 1990 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains author prepared short resumes of the presentations at the 1990 Fuel Cell Seminar held November 25-28, 1990 in Phoenix, Arizona. Contained herein are 134 short descriptions organized into topic areas entitled An Environmental Overview, Transportation Applications, Technology Advancements for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells, Technology Advancements for Solid Fuel Cells, Component Technologies and Systems Analysis, Stationary Power Applications, Marine and Space Applications, Technology Advancements for Acid Type Fuel Cells, and Technology Advancement for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

  1. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: Success Story (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    This success story highlights the EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program's series of workshops that bring fleets regulated under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) together with Clean Cities stakeholders and fuel providers to form and strengthen regional partnerships and initiate projects that will deploy more alternative fuel infrastructure.

  2. Fuel cell energy service Enron`s commerical program

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, M.W.

    1996-04-01

    Enron, the premier provider of clean fuels worldwide, has launched a unique energy service based on fuel cell technology. The goal of this program is to bring the benefits of fuel cell power to the broad commercial marketplace. Enron`s Energy Service is currently based on a 200 kilowatt phosphoric acid power plant manufactured by ONSI Corporation. This plant is fueled by natural gas or propane, and exhibits superior performance. Enron offers a `no hassle` package that provides customers with immediate benefits with no upfront capital or technical risks. This paper describes Enron`s fuel cell commercial program.

  3. Demonstration of fuel cells to recover energy from anaerobic digester gas. Phase 1. A conceptual design, preliminary cost, and evaluation study. Final report, February-August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Trocciola, J.C.; Healy, H.C.

    1995-03-01

    The report discusses Phase I (a conceptual design, preliminary cost, and evaluation study) of a program to demonstrate the recovery of energy from waste methane produced by anaerobic digestion of waste water treatment sludge. The fuel cell is being used for this application because it is potentially one of the cleanest energy technologies available. The program is focused on utilizing a commercial Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) power plant because of its inherently high fuel efficiency, low emissions characteristics, and high state of development. The environmental impact of widespread use of this concept would be a significant reduction in global warming and acid rain air emissions.

  4. FTFc52 - freight train fuel consumption computer program. Software

    SciTech Connect

    Koper, J.; Muhlenberg, J.D.

    1980-09-01

    This tape contains a copy of a computer program for the prediction of fuel consumption of a freight train operated over track with known characteristics. The program is written in FORTRAN for the IBM VM/370 computer.

  5. Assessment of the integrity of spent fuel assemblies used in dry storage demonstrations at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Dobbins, J.C.; Zaloudek, F.R.

    1987-07-01

    This report summarizes the histories of 17 Zircaloy-clad spent fuel assemblies used in dry storage tests and demonstrations at the Engine Maintenance and Disassembly (EMAD) and Climax facilities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 18th assembly was shipped to the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL) and remained there for extensive characterization and as a source of specimens for whole-rod and rod-segment dry storage tests. The report traces the history of the assemblies after discharge from the Turkey Point Unit 3 pressurized-water reactor (1975 and 1977) through shipment (first arrival at EMAD in December 1978), dry storage tests and demonstrations, and shipment by truck cask from EMAD to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in May/June 1986. The principal objectives of this report are to assess and document the integrity of the fuel during the extensive dry storage activities at NTS and BCL, and to briefly summarize the dry storage technologies and procedures demonstrated in this program. The dry storage tests and demonstrations involved the following concepts and facilities: (1) surface drywells (EMAD); (2) deep drywells (425 m underground in the Climax granite formation); (3) concrete silo (EMAD); (4) air-cooled vault (EMAD); (5) electrically-heated module for fuel assembly thermal calibration and testing (EMAD/FAITM). 20 refs., 43 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Spent Nuclear Fuel Dry Transfer System Cold Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Max R; McKinnon, M. A.

    1999-12-01

    The spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system (DTS) provides an interface between large and small casks and between storage-only and transportation casks. It permits decommissioning of reactor pools after shutdown and allows the use of large storage-only casks for temporary onsite storage of spent nuclear fuel irrespective of reactor or fuel handling limitations at a reactor site. A cold demonstration of the DTS prototype was initiated in August 1996 at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The major components demonstrated included the fuel assembly handling subsystem, the shield plug/lid handling subsystem, the cask interface subsystem, the demonstration control subsystem, a support frame, and a closed circuit television and lighting system. The demonstration included a complete series of DTS operations from source cask receipt and opening through fuel transfer and closure of the receiving cask. The demonstration included both normal operations and recovery from off-normal events. It was designed to challenge the system to determine whether there were any activities that could be made to jeopardize the activities of another function or its safety. All known interlocks were challenged. The equipment ran smoothly and functioned as designed. A few "bugs" were corrected. Prior to completion of the demonstration testing, a number of DTS prototype systems were modified to apply lessons learned to date. Additional testing was performed to validate the modifications. In general, all the equipment worked exceptionally well. The demonstration also helped confirm cost estimates that had been made at several points in the development of the system.

  7. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-12-23

    The 2015 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2015 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; and market transformation.

  8. Office of Alcohol Fuels Program plan, FY 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    The goal of the Office of Alcohol Fuels is to promote the production, distribution, and use of alcohol fuels. The program objectives are defined and the strategy for implementation is described. An organizational model of the operation is included. The roles of the 3 program offices and various field offices are described. (DMC)

  9. Strategy for Fuel Rod Receipt, Characterization, Sample Allocation for the Demonstration Sister Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Marschman, Steven C.; Warmann, Stephan A.; Rusch, Chris

    2014-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology, has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development activities related to storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The UFDC Storage and Transportation staffs are responsible for addressing issues regarding the extended or long-term storage of UNF and its subsequent transportation. The near-term objectives of the Storage and Transportation task are to use a science-based approach to develop the technical bases to support the continued safe and secure storage of UNF for extended periods, subsequent retrieval, and transportation. While low burnup fuel [that characterized as having a burnup of less than 45 gigawatt days per metric tonne uranium (GWD/MTU)] has been stored for nearly three decades, the storage of high burnup used fuels is more recent. The DOE has funded a demonstration project to confirm the behavior of used high burnup fuel under prototypic conditions. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is leading a project team to develop and implement the Test Plan to collect this data from a UNF dry storage system containing high burnup fuel. The Draft Test Plan for the demonstration outlines the data to be collected; the high burnup fuel to be included; the technical data gaps the data will address; and the storage system design, procedures, and licensing necessary to implement the Test Plan. To provide data that is most relevant to high burnup fuel in dry storage, the design of the test storage system must closely mimic real conditions high burnup SNF experiences during all stages of dry storage: loading, cask drying

  10. Subscale Beryllium Mirrors Demonstrator (SBMD) Program Summary and Ball Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendrick, Stephen; Brown, Robert; Stahl, Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The SBMD Program was to design, fabricate, and test a 0.5-m beryllium lightweighted mirror applicable to space deployable systems with demanding optical and areal density requirements. This presentation summarizes the program's objectives and the mirror's tested technical performance along with lessons learned. In addition, test results are compared to modeling predictions. The SBMD Program was funded by NASA MSFC.