Science.gov

Sample records for fugitive particulate emissions

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF MEASUREMENT METHODOLOGY FOR EVALUATING FUGITIVE PARTICULATE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A measurement methodology to evaluate fugitive particulate emissions was developed and demonstrated. The project focused on the application of the lidar (laser radar) technique under field conditions, but in circumstances that simplified and controlled the variables of the genera...

  2. METHOD FOR ESTIMATING FUGITIVE PARTICULATE EMISSIONS FROM HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Control techniques are reviewed for applicability to fugitive particulate emissions from hazardous waste sites. Techniques judged applicable include chemical stabilization (40 to 100 percent efficiency, $520/acre-yr to $2,720/acre-yr), wet suppression (25 to 90 percent efficiency...

  3. IDENTIFICATION, ASSESSMENT, AND CONTROL OF FUGITIVE PARTICULATE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The technical manual, designed to assist national, state, and local control agency personnel and industry personnel in evaluating fugitive emission control plans and in developing cost-effective control strategies, describes the identification, assessment, and control of fugitive...

  4. PARTICULATE CONTROL FOR FUGITIVE DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of particulate control for fugitive dust. Study results indicate that many Air Quality Control Regions (AQCRs) do not meet ambient air standards for particulates. In a majority of these ACQRs, the emissions from fugitive dust sources are higher...

  5. SETTING PRIORITIES FOR CONTROL OF FUGITIVE PARTICULATE EMISSIONS FROM OPEN SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes setting priorities for controlling fugitive particulate emissions. Emission rate estimates of suspended particulates from open sources in the U.S. were obtained from emission factors and source extents in the literature. Major open sources, with their estimat...

  6. 40 CFR 49.126 - Rule for limiting fugitive particulate matter emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rule for limiting fugitive particulate matter emissions. 49.126 Section 49.126 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE INDIAN COUNTRY: AIR QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT General Federal Implementation Plan Provisions General Rules...

  7. HIGHLIGHTS FROM TECHNICAL MANUAL ON HOOD SYSTEM CAPTURE OF PROCESS FUGITIVE PARTICULATE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses a technical manual whose emphasis is on the design and evaluation of actual hood systems used to control various fugitive particulate emission sources. Engineering analyses of the most important hood types are presented to provide a conceptual understanding of...

  8. Characterization of the fugitive particulate emissions from construction mud/dirt carryout.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, John S; Linna, Kara J; Squier, William C; Muleski, Gregory E; Cowherd, Chatten

    2004-11-01

    Although the fugitive dust associated with construction mud/dirt carryout can represent a substantial portion of the particulate matter (PM) emissions inventory in nonattainment areas, it has not been well characterized by direct sampling methods. In this paper, a research program is described that directly determined both PM10 and PM2.5 (particles < or =10 and 2.5 microm in classical aerodynamic diameter, respectively) emission factors for mud/dirt carryout from a major construction project located in metropolitan Kansas City, MO. The program also assessed the contribution of automotive emissions to the total PM2.5 burden and determined the baseline emissions from the test road. As part of the study, both time-integrated and continuous exposure-profiling methods were used to assess the PM emissions, including particle size and elemental composition. This research resulted in overall PM10 and PM2.5 emission factors of 6 and 0.2 g/vehicle, respectively. Although PM10 is within the range of prior U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance, the PM2.5 emission factor is far lower than previous estimates published by EPA. In addition, based on both the particle size and chemical data obtained in the study, a major portion of the PM2.5 emissions appears to be attributable to automotive exhaust from light-duty, gasoline-powered vehicles and not to the fugitive dust associated with reentrained mud/dirt carryout. PMID:15587553

  9. 40 CFR 49.126 - Rule for limiting fugitive particulate matter emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... section limits the amount of fugitive particulate matter that may be emitted from certain air pollution... does not apply to open burning, agricultural activities, forestry and silvicultural activities, sweat... subject to this section must: (i) Annually survey the air pollution source(s) during typical...

  10. 40 CFR 49.126 - Rule for limiting fugitive particulate matter emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... section limits the amount of fugitive particulate matter that may be emitted from certain air pollution... does not apply to open burning, agricultural activities, forestry and silvicultural activities, sweat... subject to this section must: (i) Annually survey the air pollution source(s) during typical...

  11. 40 CFR 49.126 - Rule for limiting fugitive particulate matter emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... amount of fugitive particulate matter that may be emitted from certain air pollution sources operating... burning, agricultural activities, forestry and silvicultural activities, sweat houses or lodges, non... subject to this section must: (i) Annually survey the air pollution source(s) during typical...

  12. 40 CFR 49.126 - Rule for limiting fugitive particulate matter emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... section limits the amount of fugitive particulate matter that may be emitted from certain air pollution... does not apply to open burning, agricultural activities, forestry and silvicultural activities, sweat... subject to this section must: (i) Annually survey the air pollution source(s) during typical...

  13. Assessing the Anthropogenic Fugitive Dust Emission Inventory and Temporal Allocation Using an Updated Speciation of Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Crustal materials are mainly emitted by anthropogenic and windblown fugitive dust, but also may potentially include some fly ash and industrial process emissions which are chemically similar to crustal emissions. Source apportionment studies have shown that anthropogenic fugitive...

  14. Flux estimation of fugitive particulate matter emissions from loose Calcisols at construction sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Hala A.; Kumar, Prashant; Kakosimos, Konstantinos E.

    2016-09-01

    A major source of airborne pollution in arid and semi-arid environments (i.e. North Africa, Middle East, Central Asia, and Australia) is the fugitive particulate matter (fPM), which is a frequent product of wind erosion. However, accurate determination of fPM is an ongoing scientific challenge. The objective of this study is to examine fPM emissions from the loose Calcisols (i.e. soils with a substantial accumulation of secondary carbonates), owing to construction activities that can be frequently seen nowadays in arid urbanizing regions such as the Middle East. A two months field campaign was conducted at a construction site, at rest, within the city of Doha (Qatar) to measure number concentrations of PM over a size range of 0.25-32 μm using light scattering based monitoring stations. The fPM emission fluxes were calculated using the Fugitive Dust Model (FDM) in an iterative manner and were fitted to a power function, which expresses the wind velocity dependence. The power factors were estimated as 1.87, 1.65, 2.70 and 2.06 for the four different size classes of particles ≤2.5, 2.5-6, 6-10 and ≤10 μm, respectively. Fitted power function was considered acceptable given that adjusted R2 values varied from 0.13 for the smaller particles and up to 0.69 for the larger ones. These power factors are in the same range of those reported in the literature for similar sources. The outcome of this study is expected to contribute to the improvement of PM emission inventories by focusing on an overlooked but significant pollution source, especially in dry and arid regions, and often located very close to residential areas and sensitive population groups. Further campaigns are recommended to reduce the uncertainty and include more fPM sources (e.g. earthworks) and other types of soil.

  15. Fugitive emissions monitoring trends

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.H.

    1997-02-01

    New Clean Air Act requirements are pushing facilities to reevaluate their monitoring programs. A description of the fugitive emission guidelines is included in this article, along with ideas about monitoring.

  16. FUGITIVE PARTICLE EMISSIONS FROM CONSTRUCTION SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    FUGITIVE PARTICLE EMISSIONS FROM CONSTRUCTION SITES The fugitive dust generated by construction activities is a major source of fine particulate matter (PM) which adversely impacts the air quality in certain areas of the country, especially the western U.S. To address this probl...

  17. Method for estimating fugitive particulate emissions from hazardous-waste sites. Final report, April-September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.H.; Branscome, M.R.; Chessin, R.L.; Damle, A.S.; Kameth, R.V.

    1987-08-01

    Control techniques are reviewed for applicability to fugitive particulate emissions from hazardous-waste sites. Techniques judged applicable include chemical stabilization (40 to 100% efficiency, $520/acre-yr to $2,720/acre-yr), wet suppression (25 to 90% efficiency, $365/acre-yr to $1,270/acre-yr), physical covering (30 to 100% efficiency, $0.01/sq.m to $65/sq.m), vegetative covering (50 to 80% efficiency, $0.11 /sq.m to $3.96/sq.m), and windscreens (30 to 80% efficiency, $18.01/sq.m to $26.90/sq.m of screen). Reducing vehicle speed on unpaved roads can reduce emissions by 25 to 80% depending on initial conditions. Supporting reviews are included for soil characteristics, emission factors, and dispersion processes that generate and distribute fugitive particulate matter. A method is described to estimate degree of contamination (DOC) of soil particles based on the contaminating chemical's water solubility and the soil's organic carbon content. A first-order decay process is included. Five example sites are described and estimates made of uncontrolled and controlled downwind concentrations of hazardous constituents. Annual averages are in the attogram to nanogram per cubic meter range. Ranges for control and efficiency costs for each site are included.

  18. Fugitive dust emission source profiles and assessment of selected control strategies for particulate matter at gravel processing sites in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chang-Tang; Chang, Yu-Min; Lin, Wen-Yinn; Wu, Ming-Ching

    2010-10-01

    Particles emitted from gravel processing sites are one contributor to worsening air quality in Taiwan. Major pollution sources at gravel processing sites include gravel and sand piles, unpaved roads, material crushers, and bare ground. This study analyzed fugitive dust emission characteristics at each pollution source using several types of particle samplers, including total suspended particulates (TSP), suspended particulate (PM10), fine suspended particulate (PM2.5), particulate sizer, and dust-fall collectors. Furthermore, silt content and moisture in the gravel were measured to develop particulate emission factors. The results showed that TSP (< 100 microm) concentrations at the boundary of gravel sites ranged from 280 to 1290 microg/m3, which clearly exceeds the Taiwan hourly air quality standard of 500 microg/m3. Moreover, PM10 concentrations, ranging from 135 to 550 microg/m3, were also above the daily air quality standard of 125 microg/m3 and approximately 1.2 and 1.5 times the PM2.5 concentrations, ranging from 105 to 470 microg/m3. The size distribution analysis reveals that mass mean diameter and geometric standard deviation ranged from 3.2 to 5.7 microm and from 2.82 to 5.51, respectively. In this study, spraying surfactant was the most effective control strategy to abate windblown dust from unpaved roads, having a control efficiency of approximately 93%, which is significantly higher than using paved road strategies with a control efficiency of approximately 45%. For paved roads, wet suppression provided the best dust control efficiencies ranging from 50 to 83%. Re-vegetation of disturbed ground had dust control efficiencies ranging from 48 to 64%. PMID:21090554

  19. Fugitive particulate air emissions from off-road vehicle maneuvers at military training lands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Military training lands used for off-road vehicle maneuvers may be subject to severe soil loss and air quality degradation as a result of severe wind erosion. The objective of this study was to measure suspended particulate matter resulting from various different vehicle training scenarios. Soil s...

  20. Optical remote sensing to quantify fugitive particulate mass emissions from stationary short-term and mobile continuous sources: part II. Field applications.

    PubMed

    Du, Ke; Yuen, Wangki; Wang, Wei; Rood, Mark J; Varma, Ravi M; Hashmonay, Ram A; Kim, Byung J; Kemme, Michael R

    2011-01-15

    Quantification of emissions of fugitive particulate matter (PM) into the atmosphere from military training operations is of interest by the United States Department of Defense. A new range-resolved optical remote sensing (ORS) method was developed to quantify fugitive PM emissions from puff sources (i.e., artillery back blasts), ground-level mobile sources (i.e., movement of tracked vehicles), and elevated mobile sources (i.e., airborne helicopters) in desert areas that are prone to generating fugitive dust plumes. Real-time, in situ mass concentration profiles for PM mass with particle diameters <10 μm (PM(10)) and <2.5 μm (PM(2.5)) were obtained across the dust plumes that were generated by these activities with this new method. Back blasts caused during artillery firing were characterized as a stationary short-term puff source whose plumes typically dispersed to <10 m above the ground with durations of 10-30 s. Fugitive PM emissions caused by artillery back blasts were related to the zone charge and ranged from 51 to 463 g PM/firing for PM(10) and 9 to 176 g PM/firing for PM(2.5). Movement of tracked vehicles and flying helicopters was characterized as mobile continuous sources whose plumes typically dispersed 30-50 m above the ground with durations of 100-200 s. Fugitive PM emissions caused by moving tracked vehicles ranged from 8.3 to 72.5 kg PM/km for PM(10) and 1.1 to 17.2 kg PM/km for PM(2.5), and there was no obvious correlation between PM emission and vehicle speed. The emission factor for the helicopter flying at 3 m above the ground ranged from 14.5 to 114.1 kg PM/km for PM(10) and 5.0 to 39.5 kg PM/km for PM(2.5), depending on the velocity of the helicopter and type of soil it flies over. Fugitive PM emissions by an airborne helicopter were correlated with helicopter speed for a particular soil type. The results from this range-resolved ORS method were also compared with the data obtained with another path-integrated ORS method and a Flux Tower

  1. PARTICULATE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FROM CONTROLLED CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarized the results of field testing of the effectiveness of control measures for sources of fugitive particulate emissions found at construction sites. The effectiveness of watering temporary, unpaved travel surfaces on emissions of particulate matter with aerodyna...

  2. EVALUATION OF FUGITIVE DUST EMISSIONS FROM MINING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation of fugitive dust air pollution from mining operations identifies and compiles currently available information on emission sources and rates, regulatory approaches, control techniques, measuring and monitoring techniques, health and welfare effects, and research pr...

  3. Valve packings conquer fugitive emissions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    In the early 1990s, when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA; Washington, D.C.) declared its intent to regulate fugitive emissions from valve-stem leakage, much of the chemical process industries (CPI) responded with fear and uncertainty. The biggest fear was that valve packing would not meet the required limits on leak rates and that expensive bellows seals may be required on many applications. The uncertainly was about how much it would cost. Today, for the most part, these concerns have been mitigated. It is estimated that about 80--90% of valves satisfy the emission requirements. The rest need some improvement in their packing systems to meet the regulations. Generally, these valves can be brought within compliance if the packing designers follow a few basic principles: Employ less-pliable outer rings and more-pliable inner rings; and don`t use excessive packing. While interest in valve packing remains high, mechanical seals continue to become more user-friendly. Many of those covered below are designed to run dry, and some can even tolerate high shaft-wobble without damage. Also look for improved flange gaskets and a host of seals to protect bearings. Twenty-one summaries are presented on new products and services.

  4. Fugitive Mercury Emissions From Nevada Gold Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. B.; Eckley, C. S.; Gustin, M.; Marsik, F.

    2008-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) can be released from point sources at gold mines (e.g. stacks associated with ore processing facilities) as well as from diffuse fugitive sources (e.g. waste rock dumps, heap leaches, etc). Fugitive Hg emissions have not been quantified for active gold mines and as such a large knowledge gap exists concerning the magnitude of total emissions from this source type. This study measured fugitive Hg emissions from two active gold mines in Northern Nevada. To contextualize the magnitude of the mine emissions with respect to those associated with natural surfaces, data were collected from undisturbed areas near the mines that are of similar geologic character. The initial results from this project have shown that there is a large range in surface Hg concentrations and associated emissions to the atmosphere from different surface types within a mine as well as between the two mines. At both mines, the lowest surface Hg concentrations and emissions were associated with the alluvium/overburden waste rock dumps. Surface Hg concentrations and emissions at nearby undisturbed sites were of similar magnitude. Surface concentrations and emissions were substantially higher from active heap leaches. In addition to the difference in fluxes for specific materials, measured emissions must be put within the context of material spatial extent and temporal variability. Here we compare Hg emission contributions from mining and undisturbed materials as a function of space and time (diel and seasonal), and illustrate the need for collection of these types of data in order to reduce uncertainties in understanding air-surface Hg exchange.

  5. SYMPOSIUM ON FUGITIVE EMISSIONS MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL HELD IN HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT ON MAY 17-19, 1976

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contents: Fugitive emissions problems in perspective; Regulatory aspect of fugitive emissions; A guideline for the measurement of air-borne fugitive emissions from industrial sources; Coke oven emission measurements during pushing; Problems in measuring fugitive emissions from wa...

  6. FUGITIVE EMISSIONS FROM INTEGRATED IRON AND STEEL PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an engineering investigation of fugitive (non-ducted) emissions in the iron and steel industry. Operations excluded from the study are coke ovens, basic oxygen furnace (BOF) charging, and blast furnace cast houses. Fugitive emission factors for iron an...

  7. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ooo - Fugitive Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fugitive Emission Limits 3 Table 3 to... Processing Plants Subpt. OOO, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart OOO—Fugitive Emission Limits Table 3 to Subpart OOO...; andPeriodic inspections of water sprays according to § 60.674(b) and § 60.676(b); and A...

  8. EVALUATION OF MAINTENANCE FOR FUGITIVE VOC EMISSIONS CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) has the responsibility for formulating regulations for the control of fugitive emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC). 'Fugitive emissions' generally refers to the diffuse release of vaporized hydrocarbon or...

  9. 40 CFR 60.36b - Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... combustor fugitive ash emissions. 60.36b Section 60.36b Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... September 20, 1994 § 60.36b Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions. For approval, a State plan shall include requirements for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions...

  10. Measurement of Fugitive Dust Emissions and Visible Emissions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Herbert C.

    The method of measuring fugitive dust emission utilized by the Texas Air Control Board is described in this presentation for the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971. The measuring procedure, precautions, expected results, and legal acceptance of the method are…

  11. Retrofit methods reduce valves' fugitive emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Gallupe, W. )

    1993-06-01

    Retrofitting in-service valves is a practical alternative that reduces plant fugitive emissions and meets the federal and state environmental provisions. Plant operators must find cost-effective technologies that control and restrain valve emissions. Unfortunately, valves are dynamic devices and must move to perform their functions. Surveying all options, total replacement is not viable due to cost and scale of magnitude. However, retrofit technologies are practical measures that concentrate on correcting the problem points on a valve--the stem, the valve body and piping connections. Retrofits examine if the proper valve type is being used. Retrofit methods can meet the emission standards and reduce capital costs for environmental compliance. Leaks from nearly all types of process equipment fall under the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments, but valves are the most serious challenge for the process industries, and consequently, the most costly to control. The paper discusses the following: valves as dynamic devices; compliance with environmental regulations; what makes valves leak; enhanced stem sealing; modular stem sealing devices; custom design solutions; special valves; and bellows seals.

  12. Bayesian estimation of airborne fugitive emissions using a Gaussian plume model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Bamdad; Stockie, John M.

    2016-09-01

    A new method is proposed for estimating the rate of fugitive emissions of particulate matter from multiple time-dependent sources via measurements of deposition and concentration. We cast this source inversion problem within the Bayesian framework, and use a forward model based on a Gaussian plume solution. We present three alternate models for constructing the prior distribution on the emission rates as functions of time. Next, we present an industrial case study in which our framework is applied to estimate the rate of fugitive emissions of lead particulates from a smelter in Trail, British Columbia, Canada. The Bayesian framework not only provides an approximate solution to the inverse problem, but also quantifies the uncertainty in the solution. Using this information we perform an uncertainty propagation study in order to assess the impact of the estimated sources on the area surrounding the industrial site.

  13. Windblown fugitive dust emissions from smelter slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, R. Steven; McKenna Neuman, Cheryl; Boulton, J. Wayne

    2014-06-01

    The waste products of mining and smelter operations contain fine particles that, when stored in stockpiles and tailings ponds, are subject to aerodynamic forces that may result in their suspension and transport within boundary layer air flows. The accuracy of atmospheric dispersion models such as AERMOD depends strongly upon suitable inputs for the emission rate that generally must be either measured or estimated from suitable analogues. Measurements of the emission rate of PM10 from smelter slag, based on wind tunnel experiments using the control volume method, are reported in this study and compared with vertical flux values obtained using a finite difference approximation. As compared to natural soils, the dust coatings on slag fragments are rapidly depleted during wind events so that the temporal aspect is important to capture in any consideration of the emission rate. At low wind speeds, vertical flux measurements underestimate the emission rate, but otherwise the agreement is excellent. Comparison with field measurements obtained at the smelter site reveals a degree of overlap with the laboratory data. As a general rule, PM10 emission from smelter slag by aerodynamic entrainment alone is several orders of magnitude lower than published fluxes of total suspended particulate (TSP) emitted from natural soil surfaces for which saltation bombardment is recognized to play a key role in the ejection of dust.

  14. FUGITIVE EMISSION TESTING AT THE KOSOVO COAL GASIFICATION PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes results of a test program to characterize fugitive emissions from the Kosovo coal gasification plant in Yugoslavia, a test program implemented by the EPA in response to a need for representative data on the potential environmental impacts of Lurgi coal gasif...

  15. VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND) FUGITIVE EMISSION PREDICTIVE MODEL - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses a mathematical model that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of various leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs on controlling volatile organic compound (VOC) fugitive emissions from chemical, petroleum, and other process units. The report also descr...

  16. SPRAY CHARGING AND TRAPPING SCRUBBER FOR FUGITIVE PARTICLE EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a theoretical and experimental evaluation of the control of fugitive particle emissions (FPE) with a Spray Charging and Trapping (SCAT) Scrubber that uses an air curtain and/or jets to contain, convey, and divert the FPE into a charged spray scrubber. ...

  17. ASSESSMENT OF THE USE OF FUGITIVE EMISSION CONTROL DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report compares the efficiencies and utility consumptions expected from three fugitive emission control techniques--building evacuation, charged fog sprays, and water sprays with additives--if they were applied in primary lead and copper smelters. Estimates are provided of th...

  18. MEASUREMENT OF FUGITIVE EMISSIONS AT A BIOREACTOR LANDFILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report focuses on three field campaigns performed in 2002 and 2003 to measure fugitive emissions at a bioreactor landfill in Louisville, KY, using an open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The study uses optical remote sensing-radial plume mapping. The horizontal...

  19. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ooo - Fugitive Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fugitive Emission Limits 3 Table 3 to Subpart OOO Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Nonmetallic Mineral Processing Plants Subpt. OOO, Table 3...

  20. Capturing fugitive methane emissions from natural gas compressor buildings.

    PubMed

    Litto, R; Hayes, R E; Liu, B

    2007-08-01

    Fugitive methane emissions account for about 50% of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the Canadian conventional oil and gas sector. Sources include leaks in natural gas transmission facilities such as pipelines and compressor stations. There are three sources of methane emissions in a compressor station. The first is emissions resulting from incomplete combustion in the engine; the second is leaks in valves, flanges and other equipment in the building; and the third results from instrument venting. Fugitive methane emissions may be in low concentration relative to air, and thus cannot be destroyed by conventional combustion (below flammability limits of about 5-16%). The present study investigates the feasibility of capturing methane emissions from a compressor station. Computer modelling of the flow patterns of lean methane emissions inside the building is used to show the influence of doors, vents and leak location. Simulations show that for a typical building most fugitive methane exits through the ridge vent provided that the main doors remain closed. When the extraction rate through the ridge vent is controlled, the methane concentration is at acceptable levels for destruction in a catalytic flow reverse reactor, that is, in the range of 0.1-1% by volume. PMID:16891053

  1. Diffuse and fugitive emission dose assessment on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.E.; Schmidt, J.W.; Gleckler, B.P.; Rhoads, K.

    1995-01-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Order requires RL to (1) evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which are subject to continuous emission measurement requirements in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, and (2) continuously measure radionuclide emissions in accordance with 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request requires RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. The RL Compliance Plan included as one of its milestones the requirement to develop a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA). An FFCA was negotiated between RL and the EPA, Region 10, and was entered into on February 7, 1994. One of the milestones was to provide EPA, Region 10, with a copy of the Federal Clean Air Act Title V operating air permit application and Air Emission Inventory (AEI) concurrent with its submission to the Washington State Department of Ecology. The AEI will include an assessment of the diffuse and fugitive emissions from the Hanford Site. This assessment does not identify any diffuse or fugitive emission source that would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr.

  2. 40 CFR 63.1445 - What work practice standards must I meet for my fugitive dust sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meet for my fugitive dust sources? 63.1445 Section 63.1445 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... meet for my fugitive dust sources? (a) You must control particulate matter emissions from fugitive dust sources at your primary copper smelter by operating according to a written fugitive dust control plan...

  3. Diffuse and fugitive radionuclide emissions assessment for the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.E.; Gleckler, B.P.; Schmidt, J.W.; Rhoads, K.

    1996-12-31

    On February 7, 1994 a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) was signed by the Department of Energy Richland Operations and the US Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, Region 10. The FFCA defines the actions needed to bring the Hanford Site into compliance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61 Subpart H. One of the milestones specified by the FFCA was that the Hanford Site is to provide EPA with a copy of the Federal Clean Air Act Title V operating air permit application and Air Emission Inventory (AEI) concurrent with its submission to the Washington State Department of Ecology. The AEI includes a dose assessment of the radionuclide emissions from diffuse and unmonitored sources at the Hanford Site. This paper describes how the dose assessment was performed using upwind and downwind radionuclide air concentration measurements. The paper also describes results from two diffuse and fugitive emissions studies. The studies were performed at several diffuse and fugitive emissions sites and utilized arrays of upwind and downwind low volume (2 cfm) air samplers. One study also utilized 4 high volume (40 cfm) PM{sub 10} air samplers to sample during high wind conditions.

  4. Measurements of fugitive hydrocarbon emissions with a tunable infrared DIAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, M. J. T.; Woods, P. T.; Jolliffe, B. W.; Swann, N. R. W.; Robinson, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    A tunable infrared differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been designed and developed at the National Physics Lab (NPL) which is capable of making measurements throughout the spectral region 3.0 to 4.2 micro-m. It is ideally suited to measuring a range of organic and inorganic species including methane, propane, and butane. The system also has an ultraviolet channel that is capable of making simultaneous measurements of aromatic hydrocarbons such as Toluene and benzene. This paper describes the source and detection system, together with some measurements of fugitive hydrocarbon emissions performed at various petrochemical plants.

  5. Vendors unveil one-step fugitive emissions monitoring, management

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.

    1995-04-01

    An alliance of manufacturers has developed a ``single-source solution`` for fugitive emissions monitoring. The LeakTracker{trademark} system combines barcode scans, and vapor detection and data collection capabilities to help companies comply with leak detection and repair requirements as mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency`s Method 21 guidelines. LeakTracker doubles productivity and helps eliminate human-error factors associated with fugitive emissions monitoring. Two-person teams, clipboard-and-pencil data entry, and manual data transcription are eliminated. By automating the process and integrating all components, a technician can monitor 500 points daily following Method 21 guidelines, compared to about 250 readings per day using other systems. LeakTracker includes a handheld workstation, sampling probe and laser-scan barcode reader that fit in a vest worn by a field technician. The technician points the workstation toward a barcode tag and pulls the trigger, which initiates a barcode read and automatically records the time, date and location. While the detachable probe ``sniffs`` for emissions, an analyzer interface module converts the gas detection signal from analog to digital format, allowing data to be recorded by the workstation. LeakTracker has an accuracy rate of 1 part per million.

  6. 40 CFR 57.504 - Continuing evaluation of fugitive emission control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuing evaluation of fugitive emission control measures. 57.504 Section 57.504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PRIMARY NONFERROUS SMELTER ORDERS Fugitive Emission Evaluation and Control § 57.504 Continuing evaluation...

  7. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ooo of... - Fugitive Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fugitive Emission Limits 3 Table 3 to... Mineral Processing Plants Subpt. OOO, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart OOO of Part 60—Fugitive Emission Limits... performance test according to § 60.11 of this part and § 60.675 of this subpart; andPeriodic inspections...

  8. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ooo of... - Fugitive Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fugitive Emission Limits 3 Table 3 to... Mineral Processing Plants Pt. 60, Subpt. OOO, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart OOO of Part 60—Fugitive Emission...; andPeriodic inspections of water sprays according to § 60.674(b) and § 60.676(b); and A...

  9. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ooo of... - Fugitive Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fugitive Emission Limits 3 Table 3 to... Mineral Processing Plants Pt. 60, Subpt. OOO, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart OOO of Part 60—Fugitive Emission...; andPeriodic inspections of water sprays according to § 60.674(b) and § 60.676(b); and A...

  10. Mapping Fugitive Gas Emission Sources and Severity Across Southeastern Saskatchewan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillie, J.; Risk, D. A.; Lavoie, M.; Williams, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Southeastern Saskatchewan, Canada contains a 10,000 km2 region heavily developed by oil and gas activity that has been struggling with air quality issues, arising from hundreds or thousands of oil and gas leak points. The region is also very diverse in terms of oilfield operators, who use extraction techniques including conventional, enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and fracking. As regulators and operators need more knowledge about emission patterns locally, we undertook comprehensive mapping and characterization of leak sources at the regional scale using vehicle-based data collection, together with computational techniques. We measured the presence and source of fugitive emissions from infrastructure and oilfield activities in eight 100 km2 survey domains. These included two controls with no oil and gas activity, and otherwise the domains were selected to capture the diversity of development; targeting primarily conventional and EOR activities in the Weyburn-Midale beds, and unconventional activities in the Bakken play. A total of 25 unique operators fell within the survey domains. Each domain was surveyed multiple times for CO2, CH4, and H2S, allowing us to identify persistent leaks and to screen out one-time events. The multiple gas targets also provided opportunities for discriminating one type of fugitive emission from another (i.e. flares from storage tanks) using ratios of excess (above ambient) concentrations, after correcting for natural background variability with a signal-processing routine. Fugitive emissions were commonly observed in all study domains. Most emissions were associated with oil and gas infrastructure, as opposed to drilling and other short-term activities. There were obvious emissions at many well pads, storage tanks, and flares. We also observed high geochemical variability around flares, with some being very effective in combusting toxic gases, and others less so. Almost all observed concentrations fell below regulatory limits, but have a

  11. Comparison of Contributions of Wind-blown and Anthropogenic Fugitive Dust Particles to Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Gong, S.

    2010-12-01

    A new wind-blown-dust emissions module was recently implemented into AURAMS, a Canadian regional air quality model (Park et al., 2009; Park et al., 2007), to investigate the relative impact of wind-blown dust vs. anthropogenic fugitive dust on air quality in North America. In order to apply the wind-blown dust emissions module to the entire North American continent, a soil-grain-size-distribution map was developed using the outputs of four monthly runs of AURAMS for 2002 and available PM2.5 dust-content observations. The simulation results using the new soil-grain-size-distribution map showed that inclusion of wind-blown dust emissions is essential to predict the impact of dust aerosols on air quality in North America, especially in the western U.S.. The wind-blown dust emissions varied widely by season, whereas the anthropogenic fugitive dust emissions did not change significantly. In the spring (April), the continental monthly average emissions rate of wind-blown dust was much higher than that of anthropogenic fugitive dust. The total amount of wind-blown dust emissions in North America predicted by the model for 2002 was comparable to that of anthropogenic fugitive dust emissions. Even with the inclusion of wind-blown dust emissions, however, the model still had difficulty simulating dust concentrations. Further improvements are needed, in terms of both limitations of the wind-blown-dust emission module and uncertainties in the anthropogenic fugitive dust emissions inventories, for improved dust modelling. References Park, S.H., S.L. Gong, W. Gong, P.A. Makar, M.D. Moran, C.A. Stroud, and J. Zhang, Sensitivity of surface characteristics on the simulation of wind-blown dust source in North America, Atmospheric Environment, 43 (19), 3122-3129, 2009. Park, S.H., S.L. Gong, T.L. Zhao, R.J. Vet, V.S. Bouchet, W. Gong, P.A. Makar, M.D. Moran, C. Stroud, and J. Zhang, Simulation of entrainment and transport of dust particles within North America in April 2001 ("Red

  12. Atmospheric monitoring for fugitive emissions from geological carbon storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Z. M.; Etheridge, D.; Luhar, A.; Leuning, R.; Jenkins, C.

    2013-12-01

    We present a multi-year record of continuous atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentration measurements, flask sampling (for CO2, CH4, N2O, δ13CO2 and SF6) and CO2 flux measurements at the CO2CRC Otway Project (http://www.co2crc.com.au/otway/), a demonstration site for geological storage of CO2 in south-western Victoria, Australia. The measurements are used to develop atmospheric methods for operational monitoring of large scale CO2 geological storage. Characterization of emission rates ideally requires concentration measurements upwind and downwind of the source, along with knowledge of the atmospheric turbulence field. Because only a single measurement location was available for much of the measurement period, we develop techniques to filter the record and to construct a ';pseudo-upwind' measurement from our dataset. Carbon dioxide and methane concentrations were filtered based on wind direction, downward shortwave radiation, atmospheric stability and hour-to-hour changes in CO2 flux. These criteria remove periods of naturally high concentration due to the combined effects of biogenic respiration, stable atmospheric conditions and pre-existing sources (both natural and anthropogenic), leaving a reduced data set, from which a fugitive leak from the storage reservoir, the ';(potential) source sector)', could more easily be detected. Histograms of the filtered data give a measure of the background variability in both CO2 and CH4. Comparison of the ';pseudo-upwind' dataset histogram with the ';(potential) source sector' histogram shows no statistical difference, placing limits on leakage to the atmosphere over the preceding two years. For five months in 2011, we ran a true pair of up and downwind CO2 and CH4 concentration measurements. During this period, known rates of gas were periodically released at the surface (near the original injection point). These emissions are clearly detected as elevated concentrations of CO2 and CH4 in the filtered data and in the measured

  13. IRON AND STEEL PLANT OPEN SOURCE FUGITIVE EMISSION CONTROL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of measurements of the control efficiency of various techniques used to mitigate emissions from open dust sources in the iron and steel industry. Of estimated emissions of 88,800 tons/year suspended particulate in 1978 (based on a 10-plant survey), 70, 13...

  14. Characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their gas/particle partitioning from fugitive emissions in coke plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Ling; Peng, Lin; Liu, Xiaofeng; Song, Chongfang; Bai, Huiling; Zhang, Jianqiang; Hu, Dongmei; He, Qiusheng; Li, Fan

    2014-02-01

    Coking is one of the most important emission sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in China. However, there is little information available on the emission characteristics of PAHs from fugitive emission during coking, especially on the specific processes dominating the gas-particle partitioning of PAHs. In this study, emission characteristics and gas-particle partitioning of PAHs from fugitive emission in four typical coke plants (CPs) with different scales and techniques were investigated. The average concentrations of total PAHs from fugitive emission at CP2, CP3 and CP4 (stamp charging) were 146.98, 31.82, and 35.20 μg m-3, which were 13.38-, 2.90- and 3.20-fold higher, respectively, than those at CP1 (top charging, 10.98 μg m-3). Low molecular weight PAHs with 2-3 rings made up 75.3% of the total PAHs on average, and the contributions of particulate PAH to the total BaP equivalent concentrations (BaPeq) in each plant were significantly higher than the corresponding contributions to the total PAH mass concentrations. The calculated total BaPeq concentrations varied from 0.19 to 10.86 μg m-3 with an average of 3.14 μg m-3, and more efficient measures to control fugitive emission in coke plants should be employed to prevent or reduce the health risk to workers. Absorption into organic matter dominated the gas-particle partitioning for most of the PAHs including PhA, FluA, Chr, BbF, BkF and BaP, while adsorption on elemental carbon appeared to play a dominant role for AcPy, AcP and Flu.

  15. MEASUREMENT OF FUGITIVE EMISSIONS AT A LANDFILL PRACTICING LEACHATE RECIRCULATION AND AIR INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently research has begun on operating bioreactor landfills. The bioreactor process involves the injection of liquid into the waste mass to accelerate waste degradation. Arcadis and EPA conducted a fugitive emissions characterization study at the Three Rivers Solid Waste Techno...

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES FOR FUGITIVE EMISSIONS FROM PROCESS AND EFFLUENT STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes work completed in this continuing program of evaluation, development, testing, and adaptation of existing and proposed measurement techniques for air and waterborne industrial process fugitive emissions. Results of five major research and development tasks a...

  17. Investigation of fugitive emissions from petrochemical transport barges using optical remote sensing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent airborne remote sensing survey data acquired with passive gas imaging equipment (PGIE), in this case infrared cameras, have shown potentially significant fugitive volatile organic carbon (VOC) emissions from petrochemical transport barges. The experiment found remote sens...

  18. USE OF PORTABLE INSTRUMENTATION FOR THE MONITORING OF FUGITIVE ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of evaluations and tests of currently available portable instrumentation used to monitor fugitive organic emissions generated by the transfer and storage of liquid wastes during the operation of hazardous waste incinerators. Relevant current methodologies...

  19. Improved emission calculations for PM{sub 10}, SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from coke oven battery fugitive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, A.; McCollum, H.R.

    1995-12-01

    National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) specify the allowable limit of particulate matter in ambient air. Particulate Matter, under 10 micron size (PM{sub 10}), is the inhalable part of total suspended particulate in air with direct adverse impact on human health and environment. To have a better understanding of fugitive emissions from coke oven doors, lids, offtakes, pushing, hot car travel and quenching, EPA has conducted studies and published factors for emissions from most of those sources. Unfortunately, many of those field tests were performed in the 70`s and 80`s, and the developed emission factors may no longer be valid for present day coke plant operation. To identify the sources of PM{sub 10}, H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} and to account for their loading in ambient air samplers, fugitive emission estimation from Clairton Works battery sources, such as decarbonization, soaking, guide machine leaks during pushing and hot car travel were included in the emissions inventory. With the idea of developing accurate emissions rates from those sources, Clairton personnel took a different approach. They went to the basics of coal carbonization. The authors of the paper gathered operating data regarding average flue temperature in batteries, tons of coal charged, coking time, decarbonization and soaking time in all the batteries of Clairton for a month and estimated the fugitive emissions from soaking, decarbonization, pushing, hot car travel and quenching. They used information from published literature to calculate these emissions. This paper includes all of the calculations and assumptions used in these estimates. The references are also included. This study is a demonstration of a pilot effort to consider a new approach for estimating fugitive emissions from coke battery sources. The authors acknowledge that further effort from agencies and industry is required to fine tune this approach.

  20. Contribution of Fugitive Emissions for PM10 Concentrations in an Industrial Area of Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marta Almeida, Susana; Viana Silva, Alexandra; Garcia, Silvia; Miranda, Ana Isabel

    2013-04-01

    Significant atmospheric dust arises from the mechanical disturbance of granular material exposed to the air. Dust generated from these open sources is termed "fugitive" because it is not discharged to the atmosphere in a confined flow stream. Common sources of fugitive dust include unpaved roads, agricultural tilling operations, aggregate storage piles, heavy construction and harbor operations. The objective of this work was to identify the likeliness and extend of the PM10 limit value exceedences due to fugitive emissions in a particularly zone where PM fugitive emissions are a core of environmental concerns - Mitrena, Portugal. Mitrena, is an industrial area that coexists with a high-density urban region (Setúbal) and areas with an important environmental concern (Sado Estuary and Arrábida which belongs to the protected area Natura 2000 Network). Due to the typology of industry sited in Mitrena (e.g. power plant, paper mill, cement, pesticides and fertilized productions), there are a large uncontrolled PM fugitive emissions, providing from heavy traffic and handling and storage of raw material on uncover stockyards in the harbor and industries. Dispersion modeling was performed with the software TAPM (The Air Pollution Model) and results were mapped over the study area, using GIS (Geographic Information Systems). Results showed that managing local particles concentrations can be a frustrating affair because the weight of fugitive sources is very high comparing with the local anthropogenic stationary sources. In order to ensure that the industry can continue to meet its commitments in protecting air quality, it is essential to warrant that the characteristics of releases from all fugitive sources are fully understood in order to target future investments in those areas where maximum benefit will be achieved.

  1. Sensitivity of detection of fugitive methane emissions from coal seam gas fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feitz, A. J.; Berko, H.; Wilson, P.; Jenkins, C.; Loh, Z. M.; Etheridge, D.

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing recognition that minimising methane emissions from the oil and gas sector is a key step in reducing global greenhouse gas emissions in the near term. Atmospheric monitoring techniques are likely to play an important future role in measuring the extent of existing emissions and verifying emission reductions. They can be very suitable for monitoring gas fields as they are continuous and integrate emissions from a number of potential point and diffuse sources that may vary in time. Geoscience Australia and CSIRO Marine & Atmospheric Research have collected three years of continuous methane and carbon dioxide measurements at their atmospheric composition monitoring station ('Arcturus') in the Bowen Basin, Australia. Methane signals in the Bowen Basin are likely to be influenced by cattle production, landfill, coal production, and conventional and coal seam gas (CSG) production. Australian CSG is typically 'dry' and is characterised by a mixed thermogenic-biogenic methane source with an absence of C3-C6+ alkanes. The range of δ13C isotopic signatures of the CSG is similar to methane from landfill gas and cattle emissions. The absence of standard in-situ tracers for CSG fugitive emissions suggests that having a comprehensive baseline will be critical for successful measurement of fugitive emissions using atmospheric techniques. In this paper we report on the sensitivity of atmospheric techniques for the detection of fugitive emissions from a simulated new CSG field against a three year baseline signal. Simulation of emissions was performed for a 1-year period using the coupled prognostic meteorological and air pollution model TAPM at different fugitive emission rates (i.e. estimates of <1% to up to 10% of production lost) and distances (i.e. 10 - 50 km) from the station. Emissions from the simulated CSG field are based on well density, production volumes, and field size typical of CSG fields in Australia. The distributions of the perturbed and

  2. Diesel particulate emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Abbass, M.K.; Andrews, G.E.; Williams, P.T.; Bartle, K.D.; Davies, I.L.; Tanui, L.K.

    1988-01-01

    The objective was to investigate combustion generated PAH in Diesel engine particulate emissions using a pure single component fuel, hexadecane, in a Perkins 4-236 engine in a single cylinder format. The results were compared with those using a conventional Diesel fuel and with the particulates collected by motoring the engine. To minimise any influence of contamination from the PAH in used lubricating oil, all the tests were carried out with fresh PAH free lubricating oil. The hexadecane particulates were found to contain 6-25% of the PAH and 5-9% of the n-alkanes for Diesel and the motoring tests were found to give 10% of the PAH and 50-200% of the n-alkane for hexadecane. It was concluded that there was an internal source of n-alkane and PAH in the engine and exhaust system, probably absorbed in engine deposits. It was therefore not possible to conclude that the PAH with hexadecane was pyrosynthesised.

  3. ASSESSMENT OF ROAD CARPET FOR CONTROL OF FUGITIVE EMISSIONS FROM UNPAVED ROADS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an assessment of the use of carpeting to control fugitive emissions from unpaved roads. Historically, emissions from unpaved roads have been controlled by watering, oiling, or chemical soil stabilization. An analysis of the forces which produce emissio...

  4. OPEN PATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR ACQUISITION OF FUGITIVE EMISSION FLUX DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollutant emission from unconfined sources is an increasingly important environmental issue. The U.S. EPA has developed a gorund-based optical remote sensing method that enables direct measurement of fugitive emission flux from large area sources. Open-path Fourier transfor...

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE FUGITIVE MERCURY EMISSIONS AT A CHLOR-ALKALI PLANT. OVERALL STUDY DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses a detailed emissions measurement campaign that was conducted over a 9-day period within a mercury (Hg) cell chlor-alkali plant in the southeastern United States (U.S.). The principal focus of this study was to measure fugitive (non-ducted) airborne Hg emission...

  6. Fugitive Emissions from Conventional and Hydraulically Fractured Natural Gas Developments in Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, E. E.; Risk, D. A.; Lavoie, M.; Marshall, A. D.; Baillie, J.; Williams, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Presently, fugitive emissions released into the atmosphere during the completion and production of oil and gas wells are poorly regulated within Canada. Some possible upstream sources of these emissions include flowback during well completions, liquid unloading, chemical injection pumps, and equipment leaks. The environmental benefits of combusting natural gas compared to oil or coal are negated if methane leakages surpass 3.2% of total production, so it is important to have a thorough understanding of these fugitive emissions. This study compares atmospheric leakage pathways of methane and other fugitive gases in both conventional and unconventional oil and gas developments in Western Canada to help fill this knowledge gap. Over 5000 kilometers of mobile survey campaigns were completed in carefully selected developments in the Montney shale play in British Columbia, and in conventional oil fields in Alberta. These sites are developed by more than 25 different operators. High precision laser and UV fluorescence gas analyzers were used to gather geolocated trace gas concentrations at a frequency of 1 Hz while driving. These data were processed with an adaptive technique to compensate for fluctuations in background concentrations for each gas. The residual excess concentrations were compositionally fingerprinted on the basis of the expected gas ratios for potential emission sites in order to definitively attribute anomalies to infrastructural leak sources. Preliminary results from the mobile surveys of both conventional and unconventional oil and gas sites are presented here. Pathways of methane and other fugitive gases are mapped to their respective sources, identifying common causes of emissions leaks across the oil and gas industry. This is the first bottom-up study of fugitive emissions from Canadian energy developments to produce publicly available data. These findings are significant to operators interested in lowering emissions for economic benefit, as well as

  7. FUGITIVE EMISSION SOURCES AND BATCH OPERATIONS IN SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICAL PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This survey report was developed for the EPA for use in assessing the potential magnitude of fugitive volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from agitator seals, cooling towers and batch operations in the production of 378 designated chemicals. The information presented in thi...

  8. SIMULATION OF ECOLOGICALLY CONSCIOUS CHEMICAL PROCESSES: FUGITIVE EMISSIONS VERSUS OPERATING CONDITIONS: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-CIN-1531A Mata, T.M., Smith*, R.L., Young*, D., and Costa, C.A.V. "Simulation of Ecologically Conscious Chemical Processes: Fugitive Emissions versus Operating Conditions." Paper published in: CHEMPOR' 2001, 8th International Chemical Engineering Conference, Aveiro, Portu...

  9. FIFTH SYMPOSIUM ON FUGITIVE EMISSIONS: MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL (MAY 3-5, 1982, CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations at the Fifth Symposium on Fugitive Emissions: Measurement and Control, May 3-5, 1982, in Charleston, SC. The Symposium was sponsored by the U.S. EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (known then as the Industrial Environmental...

  10. 40 CFR 60.55b - Standards for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions. 60.55b Section 60.55b Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Large Municipal...

  11. The Mobile Monitoring of fugitive methane emissions from natural gas consumer industries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural gas is used as a feedstock for major industrial processes, such as ammonia and fertilizer production. However, fugitive methane emissions from many major end-use sectors of the natural gas supply chain have not been quantified yet. This presentation introduces new tools ...

  12. Mobile monitoring of fugitive methane emissions from natural gas consumer industries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural gas is used as a feedstock for major industrial processes, such as ammonia and fertilizer production. However, fugitive methane emissions from many major end-use sectors of the natural gas supply chain have not yet been well quantified. This presentation introduces new m...

  13. 40 CFR 57.704 - Compliance with fugitive emission evaluation and control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance with fugitive emission evaluation and control requirements. 57.704 Section 57.704 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PRIMARY NONFERROUS SMELTER ORDERS Compliance Schedule Requirements § 57.704 Compliance with...

  14. EVALUATION OF FUGITIVE EMISSIONS USING GROUND-BASED OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed and evaluated a method for characterizing fugitive emissions from large area sources. The method, known as radial plume mapping (RPM) uses multiple-beam, scanning, optical remote sensing (ORS) instrumentation such as open-path Fourier transform infrared spectro...

  15. CONTROLLING EMISSIONS OF PARTICULATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives a semi-technical overview of the contribution of particulate matter to the overall U.S. air pollution problem. It also discusses contributions of the Particulate Technology Branch of EPA's Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory at Research Triangle Park, N....

  16. Open-path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy for acquisition of fugitive emission flux data.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Eben D; Shores, Richard C; Thompson, Edgar L; Harris, D Bruce; Thorneloe, Susan A; Varma, Ravi M; Hashmonay, Ram A; Modrak, Mark T; Natschke, David F; Gamble, Heather A

    2005-05-01

    Air pollutant emission from unconfined sources is an increasingly important environmental issue. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a ground-based optical remote-sensing method that enables direct measurement of fugitive emission flux from large area sources. Open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) has been the primary technique for acquisition of pollutant concentration data used in this emission measurement method. For a number of environmentally important compounds, such as ammonia and methane, open-path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (OP-TDLAS) is shown to be a viable alternative to Fourier transform spectroscopy for pollutant concentration measurements. Near-IR diode laser spectroscopy systems offer significant operational and cost advantages over Fourier transform instruments enabling more efficient implementation of the measurement strategy. This article reviews the EPA's fugitive emission measurement method and describes its multipath tunable diode laser instrument. Validation testing of the system is discussed. OP-TDLAS versus OP-FTIR correlation testing results for ammonia (R2 = 0.980) and methane (R2 = 0.991) are reported. Two example applications of tunable diode laser-based fugitive emission measurements are presented. PMID:15991674

  17. A monitoring strategy to assess the fugitive emission from a steel plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amodio, M.; Andriani, E.; Dambruoso, P. R.; de Gennaro, G.; Di Gilio, A.; Intini, M.; Palmisani, J.; Tutino, M.

    2013-11-01

    An assessment of the fugitive emission impact on ambient air PM, PAHs and metal concentrations was performed in a residential area near the biggest European steel plant. A careful experimental design was developed to characterize fugitive emissions produced by the integrated steel plant. A PM10 and PM2.5 monitoring campaign was conducted at three sampling sites around the steel plant, in order to perform a triangulation in the area surrounding the investigated site and evaluate its impact based on wind direction. Data analysis showed that the transport of air mass, from the steelworks to one of the receptor sites, resulted in ambient air concentrations of Fe, Mn, Zn and PAHs higher than those observed in the other two sites. Principal component analysis allowed the identification of four emission sources: coke ovens stack, mineral park, a crustal source and vanadium source. The first two sources were characterized by high concentrations of PAHs and metals and related to the steelworks, while the vanadium source was probably associated with maritime traffic in the port area. This preliminary monitoring approach proved effective in identifying the fugitive emission contribution of the steel plant to the surrounding air quality.

  18. Detection and characterization of chemical vapor fugitive emissions by nonlinear optimal estimation: theory and simulation.

    PubMed

    Gittins, Christopher M

    2009-08-10

    This paper addresses detection and characterization of chemical vapor fugitive emissions in a nonscattering atmosphere by processing of remotely-sensed long-wavelength infrared spectra. The analysis approach integrates a parameterized signal model based on the radiative transfer equation with a statistical model for the infrared background. The maximum likelihood model parameter values are defined as those that maximize a Bayesian posterior probability and are estimated using a Gauss-Newton algorithm. For algorithm performance evaluation we simulate observation of fugitive emissions by augmenting plume-free measured spectra with synthetic plume signatures. As plumes become optically thick, the Gauss-Newton algorithm yields significantly more accurate estimates of chemical vapor column density and significantly more favorable plume detection statistics than clutter-matched-filter-based and adaptive-subspace-detector-based plume characterization and detection. PMID:19668269

  19. Diesel particulate emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Abbass, M.K.; Andrews, G.E.; Bartle, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between diesel fuel composition and that of the solvent organic fraction of diesel particulates was investigated for an old DI Petter engine and a modern DI Perkins engine. Polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) were identified using high-resolution capillary column chromatography with a parallel triple detector system for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nitrogen-containing PAH, and sulphur-containing PAH. Identification of the PAC using retention indexes was confirmed using an ion trap detector, which was also used to quantify the low-concentration (<1 ppm) benzo(a)pyrene. It was conclusively shown for both engines that the bulk of the particulate solvent organic fraction, including the PAH fraction, was unburned fuel. However, there was some evidence that high molecular weight five-ring PAH may have an in-cylinder formation contribution, and it is postulated that this could be due to pyrolysis of lower molecular weight unburned fuel PAH. The contribution of lubricating oil to the particulate PAC is discussed, and evidence is presented that shows the unburned fuel PAC accumulates in the lubricating oil and thus contributes to the particulate PAC via the large lubricating oil component of the particulate PAC.

  20. PARTICULATE EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle or particulate matter is defined as any finely divided solid or liquid material, other than uncombined water, emitted to the ambient air as measured by applicable reference methods, or an equivalent or alternative method, or by a test method specified in 40CFR50.

  1. PAVED ROAD PARTICULATE EMISSIONS: SOURCE CATEGORY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of extensive field tests to develop emission factors for particulate emissions generated by traffic entrainment of paved road surface particulate matter. Using roadway surface silt loading as the basis, predictive emission factor equations for each partic...

  2. Emission Standards for Particulates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, George W.

    1974-01-01

    Promulgation of standards of performance under Section 111 and national emission standards for hazardous pollutants under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act is the responsibility of the Emission Standards and Engineering Division of the Environmental Protection Agency. The problems encountered and the bases used are examined. (Author/BT)

  3. QUANTIFICATION OF FUGITIVE REACTIVE ALKENE EMISSIONS FROM PETROCHEMICAL PLANTS WITH PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS.

    SciTech Connect

    SENUM,G.I.; DIETZ,R.N.

    2004-06-30

    Recent studies demonstrate the impact of fugitive emissions of reactive alkenes on the atmospheric chemistry of the Houston Texas metropolitan area (1). Petrochemical plants located in and around the Houston area emit atmospheric alkenes, such as ethene, propene and 1,3-butadiene. The magnitude of emissions is a major uncertainty in assessing their effects. Even though the petrochemical industry reports that fugitive emissions of alkenes have been reduced to less than 0.1% of daily production, recent measurement data, obtained during the TexAQS 2000 experiment indicates that emissions are perhaps a factor of ten larger than estimated values. Industry figures for fugitive emissions are based on adding up estimated emission factors for every component in the plant to give a total estimated emission from the entire facility. The dramatic difference between estimated and measured rates indicates either that calculating emission fluxes by summing estimates for individual components is seriously flawed, possibly due to individual components leaking well beyond their estimated tolerances, that not all sources of emissions for a facility are being considered in emissions estimates, or that there are known sources of emissions that are not being reported. This experiment was designed to confirm estimates of reactive alkene emissions derived from analysis of the TexAQS 2000 data by releasing perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) at a known flux from a petrochemical plant and sampling both the perfluorocarbon tracer and reactive alkenes downwind using the Piper-Aztec research aircraft operated by Baylor University. PFTs have been extensively used to determine leaks in pipelines, air infiltration in buildings, and to characterize the transport and dispersion of air parcels in the atmosphere. Over 20 years of development by the Tracer Technology Center (TTC) has produced a range of analysis instruments, field samplers and PFT release equipment that have been successfully deployed in a

  4. 40 CFR 63.7292 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with horizontal flues? 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with horizontal flues?...

  5. 40 CFR 63.7292 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with horizontal flues? 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with horizontal flues?...

  6. 40 CFR 63.7292 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with horizontal flues? 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with horizontal flues?...

  7. 40 CFR 63.7291 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues? 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues?...

  8. 40 CFR 63.7292 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with horizontal flues? 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with horizontal flues?...

  9. 40 CFR 63.7291 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues? 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues?...

  10. 40 CFR 63.7291 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues? 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues?...

  11. 40 CFR 63.7292 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with horizontal flues? 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with horizontal flues?...

  12. 40 CFR 63.7291 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues? 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues?...

  13. 40 CFR 63.7291 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues? 63...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a by-product coke oven battery with vertical flues?...

  14. MEASUREMENT OF FUGITIVE EMISSIONS AT REGION I LANDFILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report discusses a new measurement technology for characterizing emissions from large area sources. This work was funded by EPA's Monitoring and Measurement for the 21st Century Initiative, or 21M2. The site selected for demonstrating this technology is a superfund landfil...

  15. NONFERROUS INDUSTRY PARTICULATE EMISSIONS: SOURCE CATEGORY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the development of particulate emission factors based on cutoff size for inhalable particles for the nonferrous industry. After a review of available information characterizing particulate emissions from nonferrous plants, the data were summarized and ...

  16. EXTERNAL COMBUSTION PARTICULATE EMISSIONS: SOURCE CATEGORY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the development of particulate emission factors based on cutoff size for inhalable particles for external combustion sources. After a review of available information characterizing particulate emissions from external combustion sources, the data were s...

  17. Impact of fugitive emissions in ambient PM levels and composition: a case study in Southeast Spain.

    PubMed

    Santacatalina, M; Reche, C; Minguillón, M C; Escrig, A; Sanfelix, V; Carratalá, A; Nicolás, J F; Yubero, E; Crespo, J; Alastuey, A; Monfort, E; Miró, J V; Querol, X

    2010-10-01

    The results of this study show the high impact that anthropogenic fugitive emissions of mineral dust have on air quality (levels of PM(10), PM(2.5) and some metals) in a region in SE Spain named L'Alacantí. This could be extensive to other areas of Europe with similar characteristics. Fugitive emissions, such as those arising from large public construction works, cement and ceramic manufacturing, mining, heavy industries, handling and transport of powdered raw materials and road dust, are very often left out of emission monitoring and inspections in Europe. The comparative study of daily PM(10) series in the area shows how the increase of annual average PM(10) concentrations over 40 microg/m(3) is due to extreme episodes occurring in 2006 and 2007, at a regional scale, given the simultaneous recording of PM episodes at distant monitoring sites. The annual average values of the PM(10) concentrations were close to or slightly higher than 40 microg/m(3) (limit value of Directive 2008/50/CE) during 2006-2007 (Alicante-University 39-41, Agost 40-42, Sant Vicent 42-46, Alicante-El Plà 40-42 microg/m(3)). The main PM(10) sources in the zone were identified with the assistance of the PMF receptor model. Six common factors were determined, mineral as a main source (37% at Agost and 32% at Sant Vicent), road traffic, secondary sulfate, petroleum coke, sea spray and industry. Mineralogical studies, with XRD and SEM-EDX techniques, support the hypothesis that the highest PM episodes are associated to fugitive emissions of mineral matter. Despite the fact that L'Alacantí region is a heavily industrialized area with two cement plants and a significant number of ceramic manufacturing plants, the fugitive emissions may have accounted for the exceedances of the PM limit values during these two years, part of them caused by the construction of a highway. These results may contribute to the interpretation of prior studies on source apportionment carried out in Southern Europe

  18. A new approach to estimate fugitive methane emissions from coal mining in China.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yiwen; Sun, Yue; Sa, Zhanyou; Pan, Jienan; Wang, Jilin; Hou, Quanlin; Li, Qingguang; Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Developing a more accurate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory draws too much attention. Because of its resource endowment and technical status, China has made coal-related GHG emissions a big part of its inventory. Lacking a stoichiometric carbon conversion coefficient and influenced by geological conditions and mining technologies, previous efforts to estimate fugitive methane emissions from coal mining in China has led to disagreeing results. This paper proposes a new calculation methodology to determine fugitive methane emissions from coal mining based on the domestic analysis of gas geology, gas emission features, and the merits and demerits of existing estimation methods. This new approach involves four main parameters: in-situ original gas content, gas remaining post-desorption, raw coal production, and mining influence coefficient. The case studies in Huaibei-Huainan Coalfield and Jincheng Coalfield show that the new method obtains the smallest error, +9.59% and 7.01% respectively compared with other methods, Tier 1 and Tier 2 (with two samples) in this study, which resulted in +140.34%, +138.90%, and -18.67%, in Huaibei-Huainan Coalfield, while +64.36%, +47.07%, and -14.91% in Jincheng Coalfield. Compared with the predominantly used methods, this new one possesses the characteristics of not only being a comparably more simple process and lower uncertainty than the "emission factor method" (IPCC recommended Tier 1 and Tier 2), but also having easier data accessibility, similar uncertainty, and additional post-mining emissions compared to the "absolute gas emission method" (IPCC recommended Tier 3). Therefore, methane emissions dissipated from most of the producing coal mines worldwide could be more accurately and more easily estimated. PMID:26605831

  19. Natural gas fugitive emissions rates constrained by global atmospheric methane and ethane.

    PubMed

    Schwietzke, Stefan; Griffin, W Michael; Matthews, H Scott; Bruhwiler, Lori M P

    2014-07-15

    The amount of methane emissions released by the natural gas (NG) industry is a critical and uncertain value for various industry and policy decisions, such as for determining the climate implications of using NG over coal. Previous studies have estimated fugitive emissions rates (FER)--the fraction of produced NG (mainly methane and ethane) escaped to the atmosphere--between 1 and 9%. Most of these studies rely on few and outdated measurements, and some may represent only temporal/regional NG industry snapshots. This study estimates NG industry representative FER using global atmospheric methane and ethane measurements over three decades, and literature ranges of (i) tracer gas atmospheric lifetimes, (ii) non-NG source estimates, and (iii) fossil fuel fugitive gas hydrocarbon compositions. The modeling suggests an upper bound global average FER of 5% during 2006-2011, and a most likely FER of 2-4% since 2000, trending downward. These results do not account for highly uncertain natural hydrocarbon seepage, which could lower the FER. Further emissions reductions by the NG industry may be needed to ensure climate benefits over coal during the next few decades. PMID:24945600

  20. 40 CFR 63.1445 - What work practice standards must I meet for my fugitive dust sources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards must I meet for my fugitive dust sources? (a) You must control particulate matter emissions from... control plan that has been approved by the designated authority. For the purpose of complying with this paragraph (a) you may use an existing fugitive dust control plan provided that the plan complies with...

  1. Quantifying Fugitive Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Production with Mobile Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, T.; Rella, C.; Crosson, E.

    2013-12-01

    Quantification of fugitive methane (CH4) emissions to determine the environmental impact of natural gas production is challenging with current methods. We present a new mobile method known as the Plume Scanner that can quickly quantify CH4 emissions of point sources. The Plume Scanner is a direct measurement technique which utilizes a mobile Picarro cavity ring-down spectrometer and a gas sampling system based on AirCore technology [1]. As the Plume Scanner vehicle drives through the plume, the air is simultaneously sampled at four different heights, and therefore, the spatial CH4 distribution can be captured (Fig. 1). The flux of the plume is then determined by multiplying the spatial CH4 distribution data with the anemometer measurements. In this way, fugitive emission rates of highly localized sources such as natural gas production pads can be made quickly (~7 min). Verification with controlled CH4 releases demonstrate that under stable atmospheric conditions (Pasquill stability class is C or greater), the Plume Scanner measurements have an error of 2% and a repeatability of 15% [2]. Under unstable atmospheric conditions (Class A or B), the error is 6%, and the repeatability increases to 70% due to the variability of wind conditions. Over two weeks, 275 facilities in the Barnett Shale were surveyed from public roads by sampling the air for elevations in CH4 concentration, and 77% were found leaking. Emissions from 52 sites have been quantified with the Plume Scanner (Fig. 2), and the total emission is 4,900 liters per min (lpm) or 39,000 metric tons/yr CO2e. 1. Karion, A., C. Sweeney, P. Tans, and T. Newberger (2010), AirCore: An innovative atmospheric sampling system, J. Atmos. Oceanic Tech, 27, 1839-1853. 2. F. Pasquill (1961), The estimation of the dispersion of wind borne material, Meterol. Mag., 90(1063), 33-49 Figure 1. Plume Scanner Cartoon Figure 2. Distribution of methane fugitive emissions with error bars associated with the Pasquill stability classes

  2. A Mobile Sensing Approach for Regional Surveillance of Fugitive Methane Emissions in Oil and Gas Production.

    PubMed

    Albertson, John D; Harvey, Tierney; Foderaro, Greg; Zhu, Pingping; Zhou, Xiaochi; Ferrari, Silvia; Amin, M Shahrooz; Modrak, Mark; Brantley, Halley; Thoma, Eben D

    2016-03-01

    This paper addresses the need for surveillance of fugitive methane emissions over broad geographical regions. Most existing techniques suffer from being either extensive (but qualitative) or quantitative (but intensive with poor scalability). A total of two novel advancements are made here. First, a recursive Bayesian method is presented for probabilistically characterizing fugitive point-sources from mobile sensor data. This approach is made possible by a new cross-plume integrated dispersion formulation that overcomes much of the need for time-averaging concentration data. The method is tested here against a limited data set of controlled methane release and shown to perform well. We then present an information-theoretic approach to plan the paths of the sensor-equipped vehicle, where the path is chosen so as to maximize expected reduction in integrated target source rate uncertainty in the region, subject to given starting and ending positions and prevailing meteorological conditions. The information-driven sensor path planning algorithm is tested and shown to provide robust results across a wide range of conditions. An overall system concept is presented for optionally piggybacking of these techniques onto normal industry maintenance operations using sensor-equipped work trucks. PMID:26807713

  3. Fugitive greenhouse gas emissions from shale gas activities - a case study of Dish, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A.; Roscoe, B.; Lary, D.; Schaefer, D.; Tao, L.; Sun, K.; Brian, A.; DiGangi, J.; Miller, D. J.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    We evaluate new findings on aerial (horizontal and vertical) mapping of methane emissions in the atmospheric boundary layer region to help study fugitive methane emissions from extraction, transmission, and storage of natural gas and oil in Dish, Texas. Dish is located in the Barnett Shale which has seen explosive development of hydraulic fracking activities in recent years. The aerial measurements were performed with a new laser-based methane sensor developed specifically for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) methane sensor, with a mass of 2.5 kg and a precision of < 20 ppbv methane at 1 Hz, was flown on the UT-Dallas ARC Payload Master electronic aircraft at two sites in Texas: one representative of urban emissions of the Dallas-Fort Worth area in Richardson, Texas and another in Dish, Texas, closer to gas and oil activities. Methane mixing ratios at Dish were ubiquitously in the 3.5 - 4 ppmv range which was 1.5 - 2 ppmv higher than methane levels immediately downwind of Dallas. During the flight measurements at Dish, narrow methane plumes exceeding 20 ppmv were frequently observed at altitudes from the surface to 130 m above the ground. Based on the wind speed at the sampling location, the horizontal widths of large methane plumes were of the order of 100 m. The locations of the large methane plumes were variable in space and time over a ~ 1 km2 area sampled from the UAV. Spatial mapping over larger scales (10 km) by ground-based measurements showed similar methane levels as the UAV measurements. To corroborate our measurements, alkane and other hydrocarbon mixing ratios from an on-site TCEQ environmental monitoring station were analyzed and correlated with methane measurements to fingerprint the methane source. We show that fugitive methane emissions at Dish are a significant cause of the large and ubiquitous methane levels on the 1-10 km scale.

  4. FUGITIVE EMISSION REDUCTIONS DUE TO THE USE OF ENCLOSED DOCTOR BLADE SYSTEMS IN THE FLEXOGRAPHIC AND ROTOGRAVURE PRINTING INDUSTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a quantification of the level of fugitive emission reductions resulting from the use of enclosed doctor blade (EDB) systems in place of traditional ink feed systems at flexographic and rotogravure printing operations. An EDB system is an innovative ink...

  5. Bayesian Estimation of Fugitive Methane Point Source Emission Rates from a SingleDownwind High-Frequency Gas Sensor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bayesian Estimation of Fugitive Methane Point Source Emission Rates from a Single Downwind High-Frequency Gas Sensor With the tremendous advances in onshore oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) capability comes the realization that new tools are needed to support env...

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF FUGITIVE MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM THE CELL BUILDING AT A U.S. CHLOR-ALKALI PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses an extensive measurement campaign that was conducted of the fugitive (non-ducted) airborne elemental mercury [Hg(0)] emissions from the cell building of a chlor-alkali plant (CAP) located in the southeastern United States. The objectives of this study were to ...

  7. Characterizing Fugitive Methane Emissions in the Barnett Shale Area Using a Mobile Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xin; Talbot, Robert; Laine, Patrick; Torres, Azucena

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) was measured using a mobile laboratory to quantify fugitive CH4 emissions from Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) operations in the Barnett Shale area. During this Barnett Coordinated Campaign we sampled more than 152 facilities, including well pads, compressor stations, gas processing plants, and landfills. Emission rates from several ONG facilities and landfills were estimated using an Inverse Gaussian Dispersion Model and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Model AERMOD. Model results show that well pads emissions rates had a fat-tailed distribution, with the emissions linearly correlated with gas production. Using this correlation, we estimated a total well pad emission rate of 1.5 × 10(5) kg/h in the Barnett Shale area. It was found that CH4 emissions from compressor stations and gas processing plants were substantially higher, with some "super emitters" having emission rates up to 3447 kg/h, more then 36,000-fold higher than reported by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (GHGRP). Landfills are also a significant source of CH4 in the Barnett Shale area, and they should be accounted for in the regional budget of CH4. PMID:26148552

  8. Mobile monitoring of fugitive methane emissions from natural gas consumer industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Albertson, J. D.; Gaylord, A.; von Fischer, J.; Rudek, J.; Thoma, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gas is used as a feedstock for major industrial processes, such as ammonia and fertilizer production. However, fugitive methane emissions from many major end-use sectors of the natural gas supply chain have not been quantified yet. This presentation introduces new tools for estimating emission rates from mobile methane measurements, and examines results from recent field measurements conducted downwind of several industrial plants using a specialized vehicle equipped with fast response methane sensor. Using these data along with local meteorological data measured by a 3-D sonic anemometer, a Bayesian approach is applied to probabilistically infer methane emission rates based on a modified Gaussian dispersion model. Source rates are updated recursively with repeated traversals of the downwind methane plume when the vehicle was circling around the targeted facilities. Data from controlled tracer release experiments are presented and used to validate the approach. With access via public roads, this mobile monitoring method is able to quickly assess the emission strength of facilities along the sensor path. This work is developing the capacity for efficient regional coverage of potential methane emission rates in support of leak detection and mitigation efforts.

  9. Fugitive methane emissions from leak-prone natural gas distribution infrastructure in urban environments.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Margaret F; Ackley, Robert; Sanaie-Movahed, Bahare; Tang, Xiaojing; Phillips, Nathan G

    2016-06-01

    Fugitive emissions from natural gas systems are the largest anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in the U.S. and contribute to the risk of explosions in urban environments. Here, we report on a survey of CH4 emissions from 100 natural gas leaks in cast iron distribution mains in Metro Boston, MA. Direct measures of CH4 flux from individual leaks ranged from 4.0 - 2.3 × 10(4) g CH4•day(-1). The distribution of leak size is positively skewed, with 7% of leaks contributing 50% of total CH4 emissions measured. We identify parallels in the skewed distribution of leak size found in downstream systems with midstream and upstream stages of the gas process chain. Fixing 'superemitter' leaks will disproportionately stem greenhouse gas emissions. Fifteen percent of leaks surveyed qualified as potentially explosive (Grade 1), and we found no difference in CH4 flux between Grade 1 leaks and all remaining leaks surveyed (p = 0.24). All leaks must be addressed, as even small leaks cannot be disregarded as 'safely leaking.' Key methodological impediments to quantifying and addressing the impacts of leaking natural gas distribution infrastructure involve inconsistencies in the manner in which gas leaks are defined, detected, and classified. To address this need, we propose a two-part leak classification system that reflects both the safety and climatic impacts of natural gas leaks. PMID:27023280

  10. Quantification of Fugitive Methane Emissions with Spatially Correlated Measurements Collected with Novel Plume Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tracy; Rella, Chris; Crosson, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Quantification of fugitive methane emissions from unconventional natural gas (i.e. shale gas, tight sand gas, etc.) production, processing, and transport is essential for scientists, policy-makers, and the energy industry, because methane has a global warming potential of at least 21 times that of carbon dioxide over a span of 100 years [1]. Therefore, fugitive emissions reduce any environmental benefits to using natural gas instead of traditional fossil fuels [2]. Current measurement techniques involve first locating all the possible leaks and then measuring the emission of each leak. This technique is a painstaking and slow process that cannot be scaled up to the large size of the natural gas industry in which there are at least half a million natural gas wells in the United States alone [3]. An alternative method is to calculate the emission of a plume through dispersion modeling. This method is a scalable approach since all the individual leaks within a natural gas facility can be aggregated into a single plume measurement. However, plume dispersion modeling requires additional knowledge of the distance to the source, atmospheric turbulence, and local topography, and it is a mathematically intensive process. Therefore, there is a need for an instrument capable of simple, rapid, and accurate measurements of fugitive methane emissions on a per well head scale. We will present the "plume camera" instrument, which simultaneously measures methane at different spatial points or pixels. The spatial correlation between methane measurements provides spatial information of the plume, and in addition to the wind measurement collected with a sonic anemometer, the flux can be determined. Unlike the plume dispersion model, this approach does not require knowledge of the distance to the source and atmospheric conditions. Moreover, the instrument can fit inside a standard car such that emission measurements can be performed on a per well head basis. In a controlled experiment

  11. Fugitive methane emissions from natural, urban, agricultural, and energy-production landscapes of eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Bryce F. J.; Iverach, Charlotte P.; Lowry, Dave; Fisher, Rebecca E.; France, James L.; Nisbet, Euan G.

    2015-04-01

    Modern cavity ringdown spectroscopy systems (CRDS) enable the continuous measurement of methane concentration. This allows for improved quantification of greenhouse gas emissions associated with various natural and human landscapes. We present a subset of over 4000 km of continuous methane surveying along the east coast of Australia, made using a Picarro G2301 CRDS, deployed in a utility vehicle with an air inlet above the roof at 2.2 mAGL. Measurements were made every 5 seconds to a precision of <0.5 ppb for CH4. These surveys were undertaken during dry daytime hours and all measurements were moisture corrected. We compare the concentration of methane in the near surface atmosphere adjacent to open-cut coal mines, unconventional gas developments (coal seam gas; CSG), and leaks detected in cities and country towns. In areas of dryland crops the median methane concentration was 1.78 ppm, while in the irrigation districts located on vertisol soils the concentration was as low as 1.76 ppm, which may indicate that these soils are a sink for methane. In the Hunter Valley, New South Wales, open-cut coal mining district we mapped a continuous 50 km interval where the concentration of methane exceeded 1.80 ppm. The median concentration in this interval was 2.02 ppm. Peak readings were beyond the range of the reliable measurement (in excess of 3.00 ppm). This extended plume is an amalgamation of plumes from 17 major pits 1 to 10 km in length. Adjacent to CSG developments in the Surat Basin, southeast Queensland, only small anomalies were detected near the well-heads. Throughout the vast majority of the gas fields the concentration of methane was below 1.80 ppm. The largest source of fugitive methane associated with CSG was off-gassing methane from the co-produced water holding ponds. At one location the down wind plume had a cross section of approximately 1 km where the concentration of methane was above 1.80 ppm. The median concentration within this section was 1.82 ppm

  12. Fugitive emissions of methane from abandoned, decommissioned oil and gas wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, Fred; boothroyd, Ian; Almond, Sam; Davies, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to consider the potential legacy of increased onshore, unconventional gas production by examining the integrity of decommissioned, onshore, oil and gas wells in the UK. In the absence of a history of unconventional hydrocarbon exploitation in the UK, conventional onshore sites were considered and an examination of pollution incidents records had suggested that only a small fraction of onshore wells could show integrity failures. In this study the fugitive emissions of methane from former oil and gas production wells onshore in the UK were considered as a measure of well integrity. The survey considered 49 decommissioned (abandoned) wells from 4 different basins that were between 8 and 78 years old; all but one of these wells would be considered as having been decommissioned properly, i.e. wells cut, sealed and buried by soil cover to the extent that the well sites were being used for agriculture. For each well site the soil gas methane was analysed multiple times and assessed relative to a nearby control site of similar land-use and soil type. The results will be expressed in terms of the proportion and extent of well integrity failure, or success, over time since decommissioning and relative to local control sites. The probability of failure and the emissions factor for decommissioned wells will be presented.

  13. Fugitive emissions of methane from abandoned, decommissioned oil and gas wells.

    PubMed

    Boothroyd, I M; Almond, S; Qassim, S M; Worrall, F; Davies, R J

    2016-03-15

    This study considered the fugitive emissions of methane (CH4) from former oil and gas exploration and production wells drilled to exploit conventional hydrocarbon reservoirs onshore in the UK. This study selected from the 66% of all onshore wells in the UK which appeared to be properly decommissioned (abandoned) that came from 4 different basins and were between 8 and 79 years old. The soil gas above each well was analysed and assessed relative to a nearby control site of similar land use and soil type. The results showed that of the 102 wells considered 30% had soil gas CH4 at the soil surface that was significantly greater than their respective control. Conversely, 39% of well sites had significant lower surface soil gas CH4 concentrations than their respective control. We interpret elevated soil gas CH4 concentrations to be the result of well integrity failure, but do not know the source of the gas nor the route to the surface. Where elevated CH4 was detected it appears to have occurred within a decade of it being drilled. The flux of CH4 from wells was 364 ± 677 kg CO2eq/well/year with a 27% chance that the well would have a negative flux to the atmosphere independent of well age. This flux is low relative to the activity commonly used on decommissioned well sites (e.g. sheep grazing), however, fluxes from wells that have not been appropriately decommissioned would be expected to be higher. PMID:26822472

  14. Measurement of vehicle particulate emissions.

    PubMed Central

    Beltzer, M

    1975-01-01

    A constant volume sampler (CVS) compatible auto exhaust particulate sampling system has been built which samples exhaust isokinetically at constant temperature. This system yields internally consistent results and is capable of frequent and convenient operation. PMID:50931

  15. Remote sensing of fugitive methane emissions from oil and gas production in North American tight geologic formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneising, Oliver; Burrows, John P.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Buchwitz, Michael; Reuter, Maximilian; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2014-10-01

    In the past decade, there has been a massive growth in the horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing of shale gas and tight oil reservoirs to exploit formerly inaccessible or unprofitable energy resources in rock formations with low permeability. In North America, these unconventional domestic sources of natural gas and oil provide an opportunity to achieve energy self-sufficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions when displacing coal as a source of energy in power plants. However, fugitive methane emissions in the production process may counter the benefit over coal with respect to climate change and therefore need to be well quantified. Here we demonstrate that positive methane anomalies associated with the oil and gas industries can be detected from space and that corresponding regional emissions can be constrained using satellite observations. On the basis of a mass-balance approach, we estimate that methane emissions for two of the fastest growing production regions in the United States, the Bakken and Eagle Ford formations, have increased by 990 ± 650 ktCH4 yr-1 and 530 ± 330 ktCH4 yr-1 between the periods 2006-2008 and 2009-2011. Relative to the respective increases in oil and gas production, these emission estimates correspond to leakages of 10.1% ± 7.3% and 9.1% ± 6.2% in terms of energy content, calling immediate climate benefit into question and indicating that current inventories likely underestimate the fugitive emissions from Bakken and Eagle Ford.

  16. 40 CFR 63.7293 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery coke oven battery? 63.7293 Section 63.7293... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery Stacks Emission... pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery coke oven battery? (a) You must meet the requirements...

  17. 40 CFR 63.7293 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery coke oven battery? 63.7293 Section 63.7293... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery Stacks Emission... pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery coke oven battery? (a) You must meet the requirements...

  18. 40 CFR 63.7293 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery coke oven battery? 63.7293 Section 63.7293... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery Stacks Emission... pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery coke oven battery? (a) You must meet the requirements...

  19. 40 CFR 63.7293 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery coke oven battery? 63.7293 Section 63.7293... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery Stacks Emission... pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery coke oven battery? (a) You must meet the requirements...

  20. 40 CFR 63.7293 - What work practice standards must I meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meet for fugitive pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery coke oven battery? 63.7293 Section 63.7293... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Coke Ovens: Pushing, Quenching, and Battery Stacks Emission... pushing emissions if I have a non-recovery coke oven battery? (a) You must meet the requirements...

  1. FINE PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS FROM CANDLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives reulst of testing five types of candles, purchased from local stores, for fine particulate matter (PM) emissions under close-to-realistic conditions in a research house. The test method allows for determination of both the emission and deposition rates. Most tes...

  2. Quantifying the relative contribution of natural gas fugitive emissions to total methane emissions in Colorado and Utah using mobile stable isotope (13CH4) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, Chris; Jacobson, Gloria; Crosson, Eric; Karion, Anna; Petron, Gabrielle; Sweeney, Colm

    2013-04-01

    Fugitive emissions of methane into the atmosphere are a major concern facing the natural gas production industry. Because methane is more energy-rich than coal per kg of CO2 emitted into the atmosphere, it represents an attractive alternative to coal for electricity generation. However, given that the global warming potential of methane is many times greater than that of carbon dioxide (Solomon et al. 2007), the importance of quantifying the fugitive emissions of methane throughout the natural gas production and distribution process becomes clear (Howarth et al. 2011). A key step in the process of assessing the emissions arising from natural gas production activities is partitioning the observed methane emissions between natural gas fugitive emissions and other sources of methane, such as from landfills or agricultural activities. One effective method for assessing the contribution of these different sources is stable isotope analysis. In particular, the 13CH4 signature of natural gas (-35 to -40 permil) is significantly different that the signature of other significant sources of methane, such as landfills or ruminants (-45 to -70 permil). In this paper we present measurements of mobile field 13CH4 using a spectroscopic stable isotope analyzer based on cavity ringdown spectroscopy, in two intense natural gas producing regions of the United States: the Denver-Julesburg basin in Colorado, and the Uintah basin in Utah. Mobile isotope measurements in the nocturnal boundary layer have been made, over a total path of 100s of km throughout the regions, allowing spatially resolved measurements of the regional isotope signature. Secondly, this analyzer was used to quantify the isotopic signature of those individual sources (natural gas fugitive emissions, concentrated animal feeding operations, and landfills) that constitute the majority of methane emissions in these regions, by making measurements of the isotope ratio directly in the downwind plume from each source. These

  3. Feasibility of including fugitive PM-10 emissions estimates in the EPA emissions trends report

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, W.; Carlson, P.

    1990-09-01

    The report describes the results of Part 2 of a two part study. Part 2 was to evaluate the feasibility of developing regional emission trends for PM-10. Part 1 was to evaluate the feasibility of developing VOC emission trends, on a regional and temporal basis. These studies are part of the effort underway to improve the national emission trends. Part 1 is presented in a separate report. The categories evaluated for the feasibility of developing regional emissions estimates were: unpaved roads, paved roads, wind erosion, agricultural tilling, construction activities, feedlots, burning, landfills, mining and quarrying unpaved parking lots, unpaved airstrips and storage piles.

  4. 40 CFR 62.14106 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... minutes per 3-hour period), as determined by EPA Reference Method 22 observations as specified in 40 CFR... the atmosphere from that affected facility visible emissions of combustion ash from an ash conveying... paragraph (a) of this section does cover visible emissions discharged to the atmosphere from buildings...

  5. 40 CFR 62.14106 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... minutes per 3-hour period), as determined by EPA Reference Method 22 observations as specified in 40 CFR... the atmosphere from that affected facility visible emissions of combustion ash from an ash conveying... paragraph (a) of this section does cover visible emissions discharged to the atmosphere from buildings...

  6. Quantifying the relative contribution of natural gas fugitive emissions to total methane emissions in Colorado, Utah, and Texas using mobile isotopic methane analysis based on Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, Chris; Winkler, Renato; Sweeney, Colm; Karion, Anna; Petron, Gabrielle; Crosson, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Fugitive emissions of methane into the atmosphere are a major concern facing the natural gas production industry. Because methane is more energy-rich than coal per kg of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere, it represents an attractive alternative to coal for electricity generation, provided that the fugitive emissions of methane are kept under control. A key step in assessing these emissions in a given region is partitioning the observed methane emissions between natural gas fugitive emissions and other sources of methane, such as from landfills or agricultural activities. One effective method for assessing the contribution of these different sources is stable isotope analysis, using the isotopic carbon signature to distinguish between natural gas and landfills or ruminants. We present measurements of methane using a mobile spectroscopic stable isotope analyzer based on cavity ringdown spectroscopy, in three intense natural gas producing regions of the United States: the Denver-Julesburg basin in Colorado, the Uintah basin in Utah, and the Barnett Shale in Texas. Performance of the CRDS isotope analyzer is presented, including precision, calibration, stability, and the potential for measurement bias due to other atmospheric constituents. Mobile isotope measurements of individual sources and in the nocturnal boundary layer have been combined to establish the fraction of the observed methane emissions that can be attributed to natural gas activities. The fraction of total methane emissions in the Denver-Julesburg basin attributed to natural gas emissions is 78 +/- 13%. In the Uinta basin, which has no other significant sources of methane, the fraction is 96% +/- 15%. In addition, results from the Barnett shale are presented, which includes a major urban center (Dallas / Ft. Worth). Methane emissions in this region are spatially highly heterogeneous. Spatially-resolved isotope and concentration measurements are interpreted using a simple emissions model to

  7. 40 CFR 60.672 - Standard for particulate matter (PM).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for particulate matter (PM... Nonmetallic Mineral Processing Plants § 60.672 Standard for particulate matter (PM). (a) Affected facilities... particulate matter to a control device. (b) Affected facilities must meet the fugitive emission limits...

  8. 40 CFR 60.672 - Standard for particulate matter (PM).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for particulate matter (PM... Nonmetallic Mineral Processing Plants § 60.672 Standard for particulate matter (PM). (a) Affected facilities... particulate matter to a control device. (b) Affected facilities must meet the fugitive emission limits...

  9. 40 CFR 60.672 - Standard for particulate matter (PM).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for particulate matter (PM... Nonmetallic Mineral Processing Plants § 60.672 Standard for particulate matter (PM). (a) Affected facilities... particulate matter to a control device. (b) Affected facilities must meet the fugitive emission limits...

  10. 40 CFR 60.672 - Standard for particulate matter (PM).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for particulate matter (PM... Nonmetallic Mineral Processing Plants § 60.672 Standard for particulate matter (PM). (a) Affected facilities... particulate matter to a control device. (b) Affected facilities must meet the fugitive emission limits...

  11. 40 CFR 60.672 - Standard for particulate matter (PM).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for particulate matter (PM... Nonmetallic Mineral Processing Plants § 60.672 Standard for particulate matter (PM). (a) Affected facilities... particulate matter to a control device. (b) Affected facilities must meet the fugitive emission limits...

  12. Fugitive dust emissions from paved road travel in the Lake Tahoe basin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongzi; Kuhns, Hampden D; Brown, Scott; Gillies, John A; Etyemezian, Vicken; Gertler, Alan W

    2009-10-01

    The clarity of water in Lake Tahoe has declined substantially over the past 40 yr. Causes of the degradation include nitrogen and phosphorous fertilization of the lake waters and increasing amounts of inorganic fine sediment that can scatter light. Atmospheric deposition is a major source of fine sediment. A year-round monitoring study of road dust emissions around the lake was completed in 2007 using the Testing Re-entrained Aerosol Kinetic Emissions from Roads (TRAKER) system developed at the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Results of this study found that, compared with the summer season, road dust emissions increased by a factor of 5 in winter, on average, and about a factor of 10 when traction control material was applied to the roads after snow events. For winter and summer, road dust emission factors (grams coarse particulate matter [PM10] per vehicle kilometer traveled [g/vkt]) showed a decreasing trend with the travel speed of the road. The highest emission factors were observed on very low traffic volume roads on the west side of the lake. These roads were composed of either a 3/8-in. gravel material or had degraded asphalt. The principle factors influencing road dust emissions in the basin are season, vehicle speed (or road type), road condition, road grade, and proximity to other high-emitting roads. Combined with a traffic volume model, an analysis of the total emissions from the road sections surveyed indicated that urban areas (in particular South Lake Tahoe) had the highest emitting roads in the basin. PMID:19842329

  13. DEPOSITION AND REMOVAL OF FUGITIVE DUST IN THE ARID SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES: MEASUREMENTS AND MODEL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work was motivated by the need to better reconcile emission factors for fugitive dust with the amount of geologic material found on ambient filter samples. The deposition of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 µm (PM10), generated...

  14. 40 CFR 62.14106 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... minutes per 3-hour period), as determined by EPA Reference Method 22 observations as specified in 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission limits for municipal waste... DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Federal Plan Requirements for Large Municipal Waste...

  15. 40 CFR 62.14106 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... minutes per 3-hour period), as determined by EPA Reference Method 22 observations as specified in 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission limits for municipal waste... DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Federal Plan Requirements for Large Municipal Waste...

  16. METALLURGICAL COKE INDUSTRY PARTICULATE EMISSIONS: SOURCE CATEGORY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to develop particulate emission factors based on cutoff size for inhalable particles for the metallurgical coke industry. After a review of available information characterizing particulate emissions from metallurgical coke plants, the data were...

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF PARTICULATE EMISSIONS FROM NON-FERROUS SMELTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical composition and particle size data for particulate emissions for stationary sources are required for environmental health effect assessments, air chemistry studies, and air quality modelling Investigations such as source apportionment. n this study, particulate emissions...

  18. ASPHALTIC CONCRETE INDUSTRY PARTICULATE EMISSIONS: SOURCE CATEGORY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of particulate emission factors based on cutoff size for inhalable particles for the asphaltic concrete industry. After review of available information characterizing particulate emissions from asphalt concrete plants, the data were summarized...

  19. PARTICULATE EMISSIONS FROM CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although it has long been recognized that road and building construction activity constitutes an important source of PM emissions throughout the United States, until recently only limited research has been directed to its characterization. This paper presents the results of PM10...

  20. Continuous measurement of diesel particulate emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, S.; Black, F.; King, F.

    1988-01-01

    Evaluation of emerging diesel-particulate emissions control technology will require analytical procedures capable of continuous measurement of transient organic and elemental carbon emissions. Procedures based on the flame ionization properties of organic carbon and the opacity or light extinction properties of elemental carbon are described. The instrumentation provided adequate time resolution to observe the transient concentrations associated with typical automobile driving patterns. Accuracy and precision are evaluated by comparing integrated average results to measurements, using classical gravimetric filtration techniques. Emissions from two diesel passenger cars with substantially different chemical compositions are examined. Mass-specific extinction coefficients are developed using the Beer-Lambert Law and a simplified linear model that proved adequate for particulate concentrations typical of diluted passenger-car exhaust.

  1. Effects of Adding Corn Dried Distiller Grains with Solubles (DDGS) to the Dairy Cow Diet and Effects of Bedding in Dairy Cow Slurry on Fugitive Methane Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Massé, Daniel I.; Jarret, Guillaume; Benchaar, Chaouki; Hassanat, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary The objectives of this experiment were to investigate the effects of adding corn DDGS to the dairy cow diet as well as the bedding types (wood shavings, straw or peat moss) on manure fugitive CH4 emissions. The incorporation of DDGS in the diet has increased manure methane emission by 15% and the use of peat moss as bedding has increased manure methane emission by 27%. Abstract The specific objectives of this experiment were to investigate the effects of adding 10% or 30% corn dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) to the dairy cow diet and the effects of bedding type (wood shavings, straw or peat moss) in dairy slurry on fugitive CH4 emissions. The addition of DDGS10 to the dairy cow diet significantly increased (29%) the daily amount of fat excreted in slurry compared to the control diet. The inclusion of DDGS30 in the diet increased the daily amounts of excreted DM, volatile solids (VS), fat, neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF) and hemicellulose by 18%, 18%, 70%, 30%, 15% and 53%, respectively, compared to the control diet. During the storage experiment, daily fugitive CH4 emissions showed a significant increase of 15% (p < 0.05) for the slurry resulting from the corn DDGS30 diet. The addition of wood shavings and straw did not have a significant effect on daily fugitive CH4 emissions relative to the control diet, whereas the addition of peat moss caused a significant increase of 27% (p < 0.05) in fugitive CH4 emissions. PMID:26479012

  2. EVALUATION OF FUGITIVE EMISSIONS AT A FORMER LANDFILL SITE IN COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO, USING GROUND-BASED OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report details a measurement campaign conducted using the Radial Plume Mapping (RPM) method and optical remote sensing technologies to characterize fugitive emissions. This work was funded by EPAs Monitoring and Measurement for the 21st Century Initiative, or 21M2. The si...

  3. Effects of Adding Corn Dried Distiller Grains with Solubles (DDGS) to the Dairy Cow Diet and Effects of Bedding in Dairy Cow Slurry on Fugitive Methane Emissions.

    PubMed

    Massé, Daniel I; Jarret, Guillaume; Benchaar, Chaouki; Hassanat, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    The specific objectives of this experiment were to investigate the effects of adding 10% or 30% corn dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) to the dairy cow diet and the effects of bedding type (wood shavings, straw or peat moss) in dairy slurry on fugitive CH₄ emissions. The addition of DDGS10 to the dairy cow diet significantly increased (29%) the daily amount of fat excreted in slurry compared to the control diet. The inclusion of DDGS30 in the diet increased the daily amounts of excreted DM, volatile solids (VS), fat, neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF) and hemicellulose by 18%, 18%, 70%, 30%, 15% and 53%, respectively, compared to the control diet. During the storage experiment, daily fugitive CH₄ emissions showed a significant increase of 15% (p < 0.05) for the slurry resulting from the corn DDGS30 diet. The addition of wood shavings and straw did not have a significant effect on daily fugitive CH₄ emissions relative to the control diet, whereas the addition of peat moss caused a significant increase of 27% (p < 0.05) in fugitive CH₄ emissions. PMID:26479012

  4. Modeling of fugitive dust emission and control measures in stone crushing industry.

    PubMed

    Sivacoumar, R; Mohan Raj, S; Chinnadurai, S Jeremiah; Jayabalou, R

    2009-05-01

    Stone crushing in India is a small scale industry, where most of the operations are performed manually. A cluster of 72 stone crushing units located at Trisoolam in Chennai is a source of high levels of dust generation in the vicinity of the crushers and in the communities surrounding them. An ambient air quality monitoring network was designed and operated over 3 months (June-August, 2006) at 17 sites across the Trisoolam area. Wind speed and direction were monitored continuously every 1 hour to determine the upwind and downwind directions for the air quality monitoring program. The TSPM concentration at the source varied 1268-4108 microg/m(3) with a mean of 2759 microg/m(3), whereas in ambient air varied 65-417 microg/m(3) with a mean of 190 microg/m(3). The percentage of particulate fractions PM(2.5), PM(10), PM(15), and PM(30) was 14.3, 36.6, 45 and 73.5% of the total dust respectively. The settleable particulate matter was found to be 45% and the maximum percent of particles is in the range of 3-5 microm (8 %). Both ambient dust concentration and occupational exposure level exceeded Indian National Standards at most of the locations. Mathematical models viz., FDM, ISCST3 and AERMOD were employed for prediction of dust emission from stone crushers on the surrounding areas. The impact zone for measured concentration varied 211-1350 m with a mean of 784 m. The impact zone for predicted concentrations of FDM, ISCST3 and AERMOD varied 153-2650 m, 143-1056 m, 135-1225 m with a mean of 1335 m, 501 m and 679 m respectively. The control measures adopted at these stone crushing units are not sufficient enough to bring down the concentration within the stipulated limits. There is a scope for further improvement of control measures at these stone crushing units. PMID:19436856

  5. Estimation of point source fugitive emission rates from a single sensor time series: A conditionally-sampled Gaussian plume reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-Wittig, Tierney A.; Thoma, Eben D.; Albertson, John D.

    2015-08-01

    Emerging mobile fugitive emissions detection and measurement approaches require robust inverse source algorithms to be effective. Two Gaussian plume inverse approaches are described for estimating emission rates from ground-level point sources observed from remote vantage points. The techniques were tested using data from 41 controlled methane release experiments (14 studies) and further investigated using 7 field studies executed downwind of oil and gas well pads in Wyoming. Analyzed measurements were acquired from stationary observation locations 18-106 m downwind of the emission sources. From the fluctuating wind direction, the lateral plume geometry is reconstructed using a derived relationship between the wind direction and crosswind plume position. The crosswind plume spread is determined with both modeled and reconstructed Gaussian plume approaches and estimates of source emission rates are found through inversion. The source emission rates were compared to a simple point source Gaussian emission estimation approach that is part of Draft EPA Method OTM 33A. Compared to the known release rates, the modeled, reconstructed, and point source Gaussian controlled release results yield average percent errors of -5%, -2%, and 6% with standard deviations of 29%, 25%, and 37%, respectively. Compared to each other, the three methods agree within 30% for 78% of all 48 observations (41 CR and 7 Wyoming).

  6. Quantifying the relative contribution of natural gas fugitive emissions to total methane emissions in Colorado, Utah, and Texas using mobile δ13CH4 analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, C.; Crosson, E.; Petron, G.; Sweeney, C.; Karion, A.

    2013-12-01

    Fugitive emissions of methane into the atmosphere are a major concern facing the natural gas production industry. Because methane is more energy-rich than coal per kg of CO2 emitted into the atmosphere, it represents an attractive alternative to coal for electricity generation, provided that the fugitive emissions of methane are kept under control. A key step in assessing these emissions in a given region is partitioning the observed methane emissions between natural gas fugitive emissions and other sources of methane, such as from landfills or agricultural activities. One effective method for assessing the contribution of these different sources is stable isotope analysis, using the δ13CH4 signature to distinguish between natural gas and landfills or ruminants. We present measurements of mobile field δ13CH4 using a spectroscopic stable isotope analyzer based on cavity ringdown spectroscopy, in three intense natural gas producing regions of the United States: the Denver-Julesburg basin in Colorado, the Uintah basin in Utah, and the Barnett Shale in Texas. Mobile isotope measurements of individual sources and in the nocturnal boundary layer have been combined to establish the fraction of the observed methane emissions that can be attributed to natural gas activities. The fraction of total methane emissions in the Denver-Julesburg basin attributed to natural gas emissions is 78 +/- 13%. In the Uinta basin, which has no other significant sources of methane, the fraction is 96% +/- 15%. In addition, results from the Barnett shale are presented, which includes a major urban center (Dallas / Ft. Worth). Methane emissions in this region are spatially highly heterogeneous. Spatially-resolved isotope and concentration measurements are interpreted using a simple emissions model to arrive at an overall isotope ratio for the region. (left panel) Distribution of oil and gas well pads (yellow) and landfills (blue) in the Dallas / Ft. Worth area. Mobile nocturnal measurements

  7. Quantifying the relative contribution of natural gas fugitive emissions to total methane emissions in Weld County Colorado using δ13CH4 analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, C.; Jacobson, G. A.; Crosson, E.; Sweeney, C.; Karion, A.; Petron, G.

    2012-12-01

    Fugitive emissions of methane into the atmosphere are a major concern facing the natural gas production industry. Given that the global warming potential of methane is many times greater than that of carbon dioxide (Forster et al. 2007), the importance of quantifying methane emissions becomes clear. Companion presentations at this meeting describe efforts to quantify the overall methane emissions in two separate gas producing areas in Colorado and Utah during intensive field campaigns undertaken in 2012. A key step in the process of assessing the emissions arising from natural gas production activities is partitioning the observed methane emissions between natural gas fugitive emissions and other sources of methane, such as from landfills or agricultural activities. One method for assessing the contribution of these different sources is stable isotope analysis. In particular, the δ13CH4 signature of natural gas (-37 permil) is significantly different that the signature of other significant sources of methane, such as landfills or ruminants (-50 to -70 permil). In this paper we present measurements of δ13CH4 in Colorado in Weld County, a region of intense natural gas production, using a mobile δ13CH4¬ analyzer capable of high-precision measurements of the stable isotope ratio of methane at ambient levels. This analyzer was used to make stable isotope measurements at a fixed location near the center of the gas producing region, from which an overall isotope ratio for the regional emissions is determined. In addition, mobile measurements in the nocturnal boundary layer have been made, over a total distance of 150 km throughout Weld County, allowing spatially resolved measurements of this isotope signature. Finally, this analyzer was used to quantify the isotopic signature of those individual sources (natural gas fugitive emissions, concentrated animal feeding operations, and landfills) that constitute the majority of methane emissions in this region, by making

  8. Fugitive coke oven gas emission profile by continuous line averaged open-path Fourier transform infrared monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chitsan; Liou, Naiwei; Chang, Pao-Erh; Yang, Jen-Chin; Sun, Endy

    2007-04-01

    Although most coke oven research is focused on the emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, well-known carcinogens, little has been done on the emission of volatile organic compounds, some of which are also thought to be hazardous to workers and the environment. To profile coke oven gas (COG) emissions, we set up an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) system on top of a battery of coke ovens at a steel mill located in Southern Taiwan and monitored average emissions in a coke processing area for 16.5 hr. Nine COGs were identified, including ammonia, CO, methane, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, propylene, cyclohexane, and O-xylene. Time series plots indicated that the type of pollutants differed over time, suggesting that different emission sources (e.g., coke pushing, quench tower, etc.) were involved at different times over the study period. This observation was confirmed by the low cross-correlation coefficients of the COGs. It was also found that, with the help of meteorological analysis, the data collected by the OP-FTIR system could be analyzed effectively to characterize differences in the location of sources. Although the traditional single-point samplings of emissions involves sampling various sources in a coke processing area at several different times and is a credible profiling of emissions, our findings strongly suggest that they are not nearly as efficient or as cost-effective as the continuous line average method used in this study. This method would make it easier and cheaper for engineers and health risk assessors to identify and to control fugitive volatile organic compound emissions and to improve environmental health. PMID:17458466

  9. Particulate Emission Abatement for Krakow Boilerhouses

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-14

    Environmental clean-up and pollution control are considered the foremost national priorities in Poland. The target of this cleanup is the Polish coal industry, which supplies the fuel to generate over 78% of Poland`s primary energy production. This project addresses the problem of airborne dust and uncontrolled particulate emissions from boilerhouses, which represent a large fraction of the total in Poland. In Krakow alone, there are numerous uncontrolled boilers accounting for about half the total fuel use. the large number of low-capacity boilers poses both technical and economic challenges, since the cost of control equipment is a significant factor in the reduction of emissions. A new concept in dust collection, called a Core Separator, is proposed for this important application. The Core Separator is an advanced technology developed through research sponsored by the Department of Energy.

  10. Particulate Emission Abatement for Krakow Boiler Houses

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Environmental clean-up and pollution control are considered the foremost national priorities in Poland. The target of this cleanup is the Polish coal industry, which currently comprises over 78% of Poland`s primary energy production. This project addresses the problem of airborne dust and uncontrolled particulate emissions from boilerhouses, which represent a large fraction of the total in Poland. In Krakow alone, there are more than 2,000 uncontrolled boilers accounting for about half the total fuel use. The large number of low- capacity boilers poses both technical and economic challenges, since the cost of control equipment is a significant factor in the reduction of emissions. A new concept in dust collection, called a Core Separator, is proposed for this important application. The Core Separator is an advanced technology developed through research sponsored by the Department of Energy.

  11. Particulate emission abatement for Krakow boiler houses

    SciTech Connect

    Wysk, R.

    1995-12-31

    Among the many strategies for improving air quality in Krakow, one possible method is to adapt new and improved emission control technology. This project focuses on such a strategy. In order to reduce dust emissions from coal-fueled boilers, a new device called a Core Separator has been introduced in several boiler house applications. This advanced technology has been successfully demonstrated in Poland and several commercial units are now in operation. Particulate emissions from the Core Separator are typically 3 to 5 times lower than those from the best cyclone collectors. It can easily meet the new standard for dust emissions which will be in effect in Poland after 1997. The Core Separator is a completely inertial collector and is based on a unique recirculation method. It can effectively remove dust particles below 10 microns in diameter, the so-called PM-10 emissions. Its performance approaches that of fabric filters, but without the attendant cost and maintenance. It is well-suited to the industrial size boilers located in Krakow. Core Separators are now being marketed and sold by EcoInstal, one of the leading environmental firms in Poland, through a cooperative agreement with LSR Technologies.

  12. Quantification of Nitrous Oxide from Fugitive Emissions by Tracer Dilution Method using a Mobile Real-time Nitrous Oxide Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mønster, J.; Rella, C.; Jacobson, G. A.; He, Y.; Hoffnagle, J.; Scheutz, C.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrous oxide is a powerful greenhouse gas considered 298 times stronger than carbon dioxide on a hundred years term (Solomon et al. 2007). The increasing global concentration is of great concern and is receiving increasing attention in various scientific and industrial fields. Nitrous oxide is emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Inventories of source specific fugitive nitrous oxide emissions are often estimated on the basis of modeling and mass balance. While these methods are well-developed, actual measurements for quantification of the emissions can be a useful tool for verifying the existing estimation methods as well as providing validation for initiatives targeted at lowering unwanted nitrous oxide emissions. One approach to performing such measurements is the tracer dilution method (Galle et al. 2001), in which a tracer gas is released at the source location at a known flow. The ratio of downwind concentrations of both the tracer gas and nitrous oxide gives the ratios of the emissions rates. This tracer dilution method can be done with both stationary and mobile measurements; in either case, real-time measurements of both tracer and analyte gas is required, which places high demands on the analytical detection method. To perform the nitrous oxide measurements, a novel, robust instrument capable of real-time nitrous oxide measurements has been developed, based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy and operating in the near-infrared spectral region. We present the results of the laboratory and field tests of this instrument in both California and Denmark. Furthermore, results are presented from measurements using the mobile plume method with a tracer gas (acetylene) to quantify the nitrous oxide and methane emissions from known sources such as waste water treatment plants and composting facilities. Nitrous oxide (blue) and methane (yellow) plumes downwind from a waste water treatment facility.

  13. Fugitive dust emissions from agricultural land within the Columbia Plateau, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Windblown dust originating from agricultural land has contributed to poor air quality within the Columbia Plateau region of the Pacific Northwest United States. In fact, the US EPA national ambient air quality standard for PM10 (particulates 10 µm or smaller in diameter) is exceeded each year in ea...

  14. Method and means for diesel exhaust particulate emission control

    SciTech Connect

    Ludecke, O.A.

    1983-04-19

    A method and means for controlling diesel particulate emissions involves providing an exhaust trap filter to collect exhaust particulates at a point near the engine exhaust ports and providing means to periodically vent burning combustion chamber gases to the exhaust filter to initiate combustion and incineration of the collected particulates. Various means for conducting burning mixture to ignite the particulates in the filter are disclosed.

  15. Particulate Measurements and Emissions Characterization of Alternative Fuel Vehicle Exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, T. D.; Truex, T. J.; Norbeck, J. M.

    1998-11-19

    The objective of this project was to measure and characterize particulate emissions from light-duty alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and equivalent gasoline-fueled vehicles. The project included emission testing of a fleet of 129 gasoline-fueled vehicles and 19 diesel vehicles. Particulate measurements were obtained over Federal Test Procedure and US06 cycles. Chemical characterization of the exhaust particulate was also performed. Overall, the particulate emissions from modern technology compressed natural gas and methanol vehicles were low, but were still comparable to those of similar technology gasoline vehicles.

  16. Next Generation Emission Measurements for Fugitive, Area Source, and Fence Line Applications?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Next generation emissions measurements (NGEM) is an EPA term for the rapidly advancing field of air pollutant sensor technologies, data integration concepts, and associated geospatial modeling strategies for source emissions measurements. Ranging from low coat sensors to satelli...

  17. 40 CFR 60.55b - Standards for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operator of an affected facility shall cause to be discharged to the atmosphere visible emissions of... paragraph (a) of this section does cover visible emissions discharged to the atmosphere from buildings...

  18. 40 CFR 60.55b - Standards for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operator of an affected facility shall cause to be discharged to the atmosphere visible emissions of... paragraph (a) of this section does cover visible emissions discharged to the atmosphere from buildings...

  19. 40 CFR 60.55b - Standards for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operator of an affected facility shall cause to be discharged to the atmosphere visible emissions of... paragraph (a) of this section does cover visible emissions discharged to the atmosphere from buildings...

  20. 40 CFR 60.55b - Standards for municipal waste combustor fugitive ash emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operator of an affected facility shall cause to be discharged to the atmosphere visible emissions of... paragraph (a) of this section does cover visible emissions discharged to the atmosphere from buildings...

  1. Wind barriers suppress fugitive dust and soil-derived airborne particles in arid regions

    SciTech Connect

    Grantz, D.A.; Vaughn, D.L.; Farber, R.J.; Kim, B.; Ashbaugh, L.; Van Curen, T.; Campbell, R.

    1998-07-01

    Areas of abandoned agricultural land in the Antelope Valley, western Mojave (high) desert of California have proven in the previous studies to be recalcitrant to conventional tillage and revegetation strategies designed to suppress wind erosion of soil and transport of sediment and fugitive dust. These areas represented a continuing source of drifting sand and of coarse and respirable suspended particulate matter. The traditional techniques failed because furrows collapsed and the water holding capacity of the overburden was too low to support seed germination and transplant survival. In this study a variety of wind barriers were evaluated for suppression of sediment transport. Airborne particles were measured with an array of coarse particle samplers at heights of 0.2, 1.0, and 2.0 m above the soil surface. Discrete artificial wind barriers, consisting of widely spaced roughness elements were effective in suppressing fugitive emissions. Wind fences established along the leeward edge of an area of blowing sand, perpendicular to the prevailing wind, significantly decreased fugitive emissions. Control was greatest and precision of the measurements was highest under high wind conditions. These techniques provide rapid and effective suppression of fugitive emissions of soil-derived particles under conditions that resist conventional tillage and revegetation techniques. A simple, indirect procedure for determining local wind velocity erosion thresholds requiring only sampling of wind run and suspended particulate mass compared favorably with direct measurement of saltation as a function of wind velocity.

  2. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fugitive PM10 emissions from an integrated iron and steel plant.

    PubMed

    Khaparde, V V; Bhanarkar, A D; Majumdar, Deepanjan; Rao, C V Chalapati

    2016-08-15

    Fugitive emissions of PM10 (particles <10μm in diameter) and associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were monitored in the vicinity of coking unit, sintering unit, blast furnace and steel manufacturing unit in an integrated iron and steel plant situated in India. Concentrations of PM10, PM10-bound total PAHs, benzo (a) pyrene, carcinogenic PAHs and combustion PAHs were found to be highest around the sintering unit. Concentrations of 3-ring and 4-ring PAHs were recorded to be highest in the coking unit whereas 5-and 6-ring PAHs were found to be highest in other units. The following indicatory PAHs were identified: indeno (1,2,3-cd) pyrene, dibenzo (a,h) anthracene, benzo (k) fluoranthene in blast furnace unit; indeno (1,2,3-cd) pyrene, dibenzo (a,h) anthracene, chrysene in sintering unit; Anthracene, fluoranthene, chrysene in coking unit and acenaphthene, fluoranthene, fluorene in steel making unit. Total-BaP-TEQ (Total BaP toxic equivalent quotient) and BaP-MEQ (Total BaP mutagenic equivalent quotient) concentration levels ranged from 2.4 to 231.7ng/m(3) and 1.9 to 175.8ng/m(3), respectively. BaP and DbA (dibenzo (a,h) anthracene) contribution to total-BaP-TEQ was found to be the highest. PMID:27099996

  3. CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF DIESEL PARTICULATE EMISSIONS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of emerging diesel particulate emissions control technology will require analytical procedures capable of continuous measurement of transient organic and elemental carbon emissions. Procedures based on the flame ionization properties of organic carbon and the opacity o...

  4. IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY PARTICULATE EMISSIONS: SOURCE CATEGORY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to develop particulate emission factors based on cutoff size for inhalable particles for the iron and steel industry. After reviewing available information characterizing particulate emissions from iron and steel plants, the data were summarize...

  5. 40 CFR 86.1778-99 - Calculations; particulate emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculations; particulate emissions. 86.1778-99 Section 86.1778-99 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks § 86.1778-99 Calculations; particulate emissions. The provisions of §...

  6. 40 CFR 86.145-82 - Calculations; particulate emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculations; particulate emissions. 86.145-82 Section 86.145-82 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.145-82 Calculations; particulate emissions. (a)...

  7. Digital Optical Method to quantify the visual opacity of fugitive plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ke; Shi, Peng; Rood, Mark J.; Wang, Kai; Wang, Yang; Varma, Ravi M.

    2013-10-01

    Fugitive emissions of particulate matter (PM) raise public concerns due to their adverse impacts on human health and atmospheric visibility. Although the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has not developed a standard method for quantifying the opacities of fugitive plumes, select states have developed human vision-based opacity methods for such applications. A digital photographic method, Digital Optical Method for fugitive plumes (DOMfugitive), is described herein for quantifying the opacities of fugitive plume emissions. Field campaigns were completed to evaluate this method by driving vehicles on unpaved roads to generate dust plumes. DOMfugitive was validated by performing simultaneous measurements using a co-located laser transmissometer. For 84% of the measurements, the individual absolute opacity difference values between the two methods were ≤15%. The average absolute opacity difference for all the measurements was 8.5%. The paired t-test showed no significant difference between the two methods at 99% confidence level. Comparisons of wavelength dependent opacities with grayscale opacities indicated that DOMfugitive was not sensitive to the wavelength in the visible spectrum evaluated during these field campaigns. These results encourage the development of a USEPA standard method for quantifying the opacities of fugitive PM plumes using digital photography, as an alternative to human-vision based approaches.

  8. Continuous particulate monitoring for emission control

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, A.H. )

    1993-08-01

    An optical continuous particle monitoring system has been developed to overcome common problems associated with emissions monitoring equipment. Opacity monitors generally use a single- or double-pass system to analyze the presence of dust particles in the flue gas stream. The particles scatter and absorb light as it passes through the stack. As the particle content in the gas stream increases due to bag failure or some other problem, the amount of light that is blocked also increases. The opacity monitor compares the amount of lost light energy to the total energy of the light available and translates the signal to percentage of opacity. Opacity monitors are typically installed to meet the requirements set forth by pollution control agencies. Most opacity monitors are designed to meet all of the requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 40 CFR, Part 60, Appendix B, Performance Specification. The new continuous particle monitor (CPM) increases the accuracy of emission monitoring and overcomes typical problems found in conventional emission monitoring devices. The CPM is an optically based, calibratible, continuous dust monitor that uses a microprocessor, transmitter head, and receiver head. When calibrated with an isokinetic sample, a continuous readout of particulate concentration (in mg/m[sup 3]) in the exhaust gas is provided. The system can be used as a filter bag failure system or a long-term emission trend analyzer. Formal testing was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the optically based CPM. The monitor was calibrated using particles of a range of compositions, size distributions, and concentrations. The feasibility of using the instrument to measure particle concentration as low as 10 mg/m[sup 3] was examined.

  9. Particulate emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), including open beef cattle feedlots, swine facilities, and poultry facilities, can emit large amounts of particulate matter, including TSP (total suspended particulates), PM10 (particulate matter with equivalent aerodynamic diameter of 10 mm or less) a...

  10. IMPROVED EMISSION FACTORS FOR FUGITIVE DUST FROM WESTERN SURFACE COAL MINING SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary purpose of this study was to develop emission factors for significant surface coal mining operations that are applicable at Western surface coal mines and are based on state-of-the-art sampling and data analysis procedures. Primary objectives were (1) to develop emiss...

  11. Determination of direct and fugitive PM emissions in a Mediterranean harbour by means of classic and novel tracer methods.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Natalia; Viana, Mar; Pandolfi, Marco; Alastuey, Andrés; Querol, Xavier; Chinchón, Servando; Pinto, Juan Francisco; Torres, Federico; Díez, Juan Manuel; Saéz, José

    2009-10-01

    Remodelling works are frequent in harbour areas, given that they must adapt to rapidly changing market requirements. Depending on their nature (construction, demolition, etc.), these works may be carried out during long periods of time and thus exert a significant impact on the air quality at the harbours and their surroundings. The air quality at the Valencia harbour was studied during an enlargement project. Four sampling stations aimed to cover the major dust-emitting activities in the harbour. In addition, a sampling campaign was carried out to collect dust materials at their emission sources (e.g., loading and unloading of clinker and petroleum coke, as well as the enlargement works). Differences obtained between PM levels at the monitoring sites were correlated with the distance between sampling stations and enlargement works and/or harbour operations, as well as with the preferential wind direction. In all cases, the days with the highest PM_10 levels were linked to wind directions coinciding with the location of the enlargement works or the clinker and petroleum coke stocks. Classic source apportionment methodologies (PCA and CMB) were applied to the data, but their interpretation was complex due to the similar chemical signatures of PM originating from direct and fugitive emissions from stocked materials (e.g., clinker), and the enlargement works. To overcome this difficulty, a novel non-statistical approach was used to obtain quantitative estimations of the contributions from sources (petroleum coke and clinker), based on the correlation between specific PM components (e.g., carbonaceous species) and source tracers (e.g., V). Finally, a qualitative test using phenolphthalein was devised to identify the presence of clinker on the filters, which provided positive results. This novel tracer approach is thus recommended for harbour authorities. PMID:19716644

  12. THE MEASUREMENT OF HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS FROM FUGITIVE SOURCES IN PETROLEUM REFINERIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives preliminary results of measurements of hydrocarbon emissions from a number of petroleum refineries. Sampled sources included valves, flanges, pump and compressor seals, pressure relief devices, drains, and cooling towers. The paper discusses sampling techniques an...

  13. MEASUREMENT OF FUGITIVE ATMOSPHERIC EMISSIONS OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS FROM HAZARDOUS WASTE LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four landfills known to contain large quantities of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were monitored for atmospheric emissions: Three of these were uncontrolled and contained large numbers of electrical capacitors, many of which were scattered on the surface and leaking PCB askare...

  14. Particulate Emissions Hazards Associated with Fueling Heat Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2010-01-01

    All hydrocarbon- (HC-) fueled heat engine exhaust (tailpipe) emissions (<10 to 140 nm) contribute as health hazards, including emissions from transportation vehicles (e.g., aircraft) and other HC-fueled power systems. CO2 emissions are tracked, and when mapped, show outlines of major transportation routes and cities. Particulate pollution affects living tissue and is found to be detrimental to cardiovascular and respiratory systems where ultrafine particulates directly translocate to promote vascular system diseases potentially detectable as organic vapors. This paper discusses aviation emissions, fueling, and certification issues, including heat engine emissions hazards, detection at low levels and tracking of emissions, and alternate energy sources for general aviation.

  15. Assessing the fugitive emission of CH4 via migration along fault zones - comparing shale basins to non-shale basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothroyd, Ian; Almond, Sam; Worrall, Fred; Davies, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Fault zones and fracture networks have the potential to act as conduits for fluid flow and gas migration to groundwater aquifers and the surface, where fugitive emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere can take place. It is important to understand the extent to which fault zones enhance fluid flow from hydrocarbon basins to the surface when considering the possible impacts of hydraulic fracturing in shale gas basins on the environment. This study compares methane (CH4) concentrations across five fault systems in the UK using real-time mobile monitoring techniques. A Picarro Surveyor cavity-ring-down spectrometer was used to measure concentrations of CH4 and δ13C-CH4 to allow identification of thermogenic and biogenic CH4 sources. The study was conducted along faulted and non-faulted control routes in two shale gas basins, two coal basins and a non-hydrocarbon control basin. Analysis of variance indicated that fault routes had higher concentrations of CH4 than non-faulted control routes, while differences between basins explained the most variation in CH4 concentration. Binary logistic regression highlighted the impact of elevated concentrations of CH4 from landfill sites and agricultural areas, but was not sensitive enough to detect differences between fault and control routes. The average flux of faults over and above that expected from the background was 0.27 ± 0.14 kgCH4/km of fault/day or 0.1 ± 0.05 tonnes CH4/km of fault/yr), however, this flux is concentrated onto certain locations on certain faults and it is not known what length of faults across the UK we should consider.

  16. Retrieval of physical properties of particulate emission from animal feeding operations using three-wavelength elastic lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalov, Vladimir V.; Marchant, Christian; Bingham, Gail E.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Swasey, Jason; Rogers, Christopher; Ahlstrom, Douglas; Timothy, Paul

    2006-08-01

    Agricultural operations produce a variety of particulates and gases that influence ambient air quality. Lidar (LIght Detection And Ranging) technology provides a means to derive quantitative information of particulate spatial distribution and optical/physical properties over remote distances. A three-wavelength scanning lidar system built at the Space Dynamic Laboratory (SDL) is used to extract optical parameters of particulate matter and to convert these optical properties to physical parameters of particles. This particulate emission includes background aerosols, emissions from the agricultural feeding operations, and fugitive dust from the road. Aerosol optical parameters are retrieved using the widely accepted solution proposed by Klett. The inversion algorithm takes advantage of measurements taken simultaneously at three lidar wavelengths (355, 532, and 1064 nm) and allows us to estimate the particle size distribution. A bimodal lognormal particle size distribution is assumed and mode radius, width of the distribution, and total number density are estimated, minimizing the difference between calculated and measured extinction coefficients at the three lidar wavelengths. The results of these retrievals are then compared with simultaneous point measurements at the feeding operation site, taken with standard equipment including optical particle counters, portable PM 10 and PM 2.5 ambient air samplers, multistage impactors, and an aerosol mass spectrometer.

  17. Detection and quantification of fugitive emissions from Colorado oil and gas production operations using remote monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Western states contain vast amounts of oil and gas production. For example, Weld County Colorado contains approximately 25,000 active oil and gas well sites with associated production operations. There is little information on the air pollutant emission potential from this source...

  18. CHEMICAL STABILIZERS FOR THE CONTROL OF FUGITIVE ASBESTOS EMISSIONS FROM OPEN SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quarried serpentinite, recently found to contain asbestos, is used to aggregate for surfacing secondary roads. Emission concentrations of 0.6 x 10 to the 6th power to 8 x 10 to the 6th power fibers/cu m were collected 20 m downwind from a serpentinite surfaced roadway. These leve...

  19. PARTICULATE EMISSION ABATEMENT FOR KRAKOW BOILERHOUSES

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce H. Easom; Leo A, Smolensky; S. Ronald Wysk; Jan Surowka; Miroslaw Litke; Jacek Ginter

    1998-09-30

    A U.S./Polish Bilateral Steering Committee (BSC) and the Department of Energy (DOE) selected LSR Technologies, Inc. as a contractor to participate in the Krakow Clean Fuels and Energy Efficiency Program. The objective of this program was the formation of business ventures between U.S. and Polish firms to provide equipment and services to reduce air emissions in the city of Krakow. A cooperative agreement was entered into by DOE and LSR to begin work in April 1994 involving implementation of particulate control technology called a Core Separator{trademark} for coal-fueled boilerhouses in the city. The major work tasks included: (1) conducting a market analysis, (2) completion of a formal marketing plan, (3) obtaining patent protection within Poland, (4) selecting a manufacturing partner, and (5) completing a demonstration unit and commercial installations. In addition to work performed by LSR Technologies, key contributors to this project were (1) the Polish Foundation for Energy Efficiency (FEWE), a non-profit consulting organization specializing in energy and environmental-related technologies, and (2) EcoInstal, a privately held Polish company serving the air pollution control market. As the project concluded in late 1998, five (5) Core Separator{trademark} installations had been implemented in the city of Krakow, while about 40 others were completed in other regions of Poland.

  20. Fugitive emissions from the Bakken shale illustrate role of shale production in global ethane shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kort, E. A.; Smith, M. L.; Murray, L. T.; Gvakharia, A.; Brandt, A. R.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Sweeney, C.; Travis, K.

    2016-05-01

    Ethane is the second most abundant atmospheric hydrocarbon, exerts a strong influence on tropospheric ozone, and reduces the atmosphere's oxidative capacity. Global observations showed declining ethane abundances from 1984 to 2010, while a regional measurement indicated increasing levels since 2009, with the reason for this subject to speculation. The Bakken shale is an oil and gas-producing formation centered in North Dakota that experienced a rapid increase in production beginning in 2010. We use airborne data collected over the North Dakota portion of the Bakken shale in 2014 to calculate ethane emissions of 0.23 ± 0.07 (2σ) Tg/yr, equivalent to 1-3% of total global sources. Emissions of this magnitude impact air quality via concurrent increases in tropospheric ozone. This recently developed large ethane source from one location illustrates the key role of shale oil and gas production in rising global ethane levels.

  1. Fugitive Emissions from the Bakken Shale Illustrate Role of Shale Production in Global Ethane Shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kort, E. A.; Smith, M. L.; Murray, L. T.; Gvakharia, A.; Brandt, A. R.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Sweeney, C.; Travis, K.

    2016-01-01

    Ethane is the second most abundant atmospheric hydrocarbon, exerts a strong influence on tropospheric ozone, and reduces the atmosphere's oxidative capacity. Global observations showed declining ethane abundances from 1984 to 2010, while a regional measurement indicated increasing levels since 2009, with the reason for this subject to speculation. The Bakken shale is an oil and gas-producing formation centered in North Dakota that experienced a rapid increase in production beginning in 2010. We use airborne data collected over the North Dakota portion of the Bakken shale in 2014 to calculate ethane emissions of 0.23 +/- 0.07 (2 sigma) Tg/yr, equivalent to 1-3% of total global sources. Emissions of this magnitude impact air quality via concurrent increases in tropospheric ozone. This recently developed large ethane source from one location illustrates the key role of shale oil and gas production in rising global ethane levels.

  2. CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR PARTICULATE AND TAR EMISSIONS FROM COAL CONVERTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a characterization of solid and tar particulate emissions in raw product gases from several types of coal gasifiers, in terms of their total quantities, chemical composition, and size distribution. Fixed-bed gasifiers produce the smallest particulate l...

  3. Performance Evaluations and Quality Validation System for Optical Gas Imaging Cameras That Visualize Fugitive Hydrocarbon Gas Emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Optical gas imaging (OGI) cameras have the unique ability to exploit the electromagnetic properties of fugitive chemical vapors to make invisible gases visible. This ability is extremely useful for industrial facilities trying to mitigate product losses from escaping gas and fac...

  4. Fugitive coal mine methane emissions at five mining areas in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shi; Han, Jiaye; Wu, Jinyan; Li, Hongjun; Worrall, Rhys; Guo, Hua; Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenge

    2011-04-01

    Large quantities (about 28 billion m 3) of methane are released to the atmosphere every year from coal-mining activities around the world. This methane represents not only a significant greenhouse gas that is contributing to global temperature change, but is also a wasted energy resource. China, the largest coal producer in the world, is responsible for over 50% of the total global release of methane-containing ventilation air from coal mines. A mine site investigation methodology was developed for collecting reliable methane emission data from coal mines. Five main coal-mining areas in China were studied and specific data were collected from two mines in each of the five mining groups. Information such as coal and methane reserves, ventilation air released, methane concentration and methane release rates were collected. Future development plans were evaluated and used to estimate potential future emissions. It was determined that most of the methane generated in the five mining areas is currently released to the atmosphere.

  5. Analysis of field data to evaluate performance of optical remote sensing techniques to estimate fugitive emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, R.J.; Lew, F.; Zwicker, J.O.; Feldman, H.

    1999-07-01

    The American Petroleum Institute (API) has developed data sets for the evaluation of dispersion modeling and optical remote sensing (ORS) techniques. An initial field study featuring several tracer gas releases from simulated point, area, and volume sources was conducted in early 1995 at an open field site (Duke Forest, North Carolina). A second experiment (Project OPTEX) took place at an operational petrochemical facility in Texas and featured tracer releases at heights up to 41 meters from points located in an active process unit. This paper discusses the results of an analysis to evaluate the capability for remote sensing techniques to estimate the magnitude and location of emission sources in an industrial complex setting. Three major issues that the paper reports on are: (1) can ORS technology be used to determine emission rates when the source locations are known; (2) can ORS technology be used to locate sources in unknown locations, therefore promising to replace or at least streamline leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs at petrochemical facilities; and (3) what are the constraints for real-time operation, interpretation, and responsiveness involving ORS technology?

  6. Transcontinental methane measurements: Part 2. Mobile surface investigation of fossil fuel industrial fugitive emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifer, Ira; Culling, Daniel; Schneising, Oliver; Farrell, Paige; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John P.

    2013-08-01

    The potent greenhouse gas, methane, CH4, has a wide variety of anthropogenic and natural sources. Fall, continental-scale (Florida to California) surface CH4 data were collected to investigate the importance of fossil fuel industrial (FFI) emissions in the South US. A total of 6600 measurements along 7020-km of roadways were made by flame ion detection gas chromatography onboard a nearly continuously moving recreational vehicle in 2010. A second, winter survey in Southern California measured CH4 at 2 Hz with a cavity ring-down spectrometer in 2012. Data revealed strong and persistent FFI CH4 sources associated with refining, oil/gas production, a presumed major pipeline leak, and a coal loading plant. Nocturnal CH4 mixing ratios tended to be higher than daytime values for similar sources, sometimes significantly, which was attributed to day/night meteorological differences, primarily changes in the boundary layer height. The highest CH4 mixing ratio (39 ppm) was observed near the Kern River Oil Field, California, which uses steam reinjection. FFI CH4 plume signatures were distinguished as stronger than other sources on local scales. On large (4°) scales, the CH4 trend was better matched spatially with FFI activity than wetland spatial patterns. Qualitative comparison of surface data with SCIAMACHY and GOSAT satellite retrievals showed agreement of the large-scale CH4 spatial patterns. Comparison with inventory models and seasonal winds suggests for some seasons and some portions of the Gulf of Mexico a non-negligible underestimation of FFI emissions. For other seasons and locations, qualitative interpretation is not feasible. Unambiguous quantitative source attribution is more complex, requiring transport modeling.

  7. [Characteristic of Particulate Emissions from Concrete Batching in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Xue, Yi-feng; Zhou, Zhen; Zhong, Lian-hong; Yan, Jing; Qu, Song; Huang, Yu-hu; Tian, He- zhong; Pan, Tao

    2016-01-15

    With the economic development and population growth in Beijing, there is a strong need for construction and housing, which leads to the increase of the construction areas. Meanwhile, as a local provided material, the production of concrete has been raised. In the process of concrete production by concrete batching, there are numerous particulates emitted, which have large effect on the atmospheric environment, however, systematic study about the tempo-spatial characteristics of pollutant emission from concrete batching is still rare. In this study, we estimated the emission of particulates from concrete batching from 1991 to 2012 using emission factor method, analyzed the tempo-spatial characteristics of pollutant emission, established the uncertainty range by adopting Monte-Carlo method, and predicted the future emission in 2020 based on the relative environmental and economical policies. The results showed that: (1) the emissions of particulates from concrete batching showed a trend of "first increase and then decrease", reaching the maximum in 2005, and then decreased due to stricter emission standard and enhanced environmental management. (2) according to spatial distribution, the emission of particulates from concrete batch mainly concentrated in the urban area with more human activities, and the area between the fifth ring and the sixth ring contributed the most. (3) through scenarios analysis, for further reducing the emission from concrete batching in 2020, more stricter standard for green production as well as powerful supervision is needed. PMID:27078945

  8. A preliminary particulate matter emission factor from cotton harvesting.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Particulate matter (PM) sampling of cotton harvesting operations at three locations in Texas was conducted during the summer of 2006. PM emissions generated by a two-row (John Deere Model 9910) and six-row (John Deere Model 9996) cotton picker were measured at each sampling location. The PM emission...

  9. PARTICULATE EMISSION PROFILE OF A COTTON GIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) IS ONE OF SIX CRITERIA POLLUTANTS REGULATED BY THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) WITH NATIONAL AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS (NAAQS). IN GENERAL, PM IS THE ONLY AIR POLLUTANT OF CONCERN EMITTED FROM COTTON GINS. THE EPA HAS NAAQS FOR PM10 (PARTICLES WITH AN AERODYNA...

  10. Size distribution and chemical composition of particulate matter stack emissions in and around a copper smelter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Castanedo, Yolanda; Moreno, Teresa; Fernández-Camacho, Rocío; Sánchez de la Campa, Ana María; Alastuey, Andrés; Querol, Xavier; de la Rosa, Jesús

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports on results from a multi-sampling campaign (stack, fugitive emissions and ambient air measurements) to characterise the geochemical signature of metal and metalloid particles emitted from one of the largest Cu-smelters in the world (in Huelva, SW Spain). Exceptionally high concentrations of very fine particles (<0.33 μm) bearing As, Cd, Pb, Cu, Bi, Zn (∑>100 μg m-3) are emitted from the Flash Smelting Furnaces, but high levels are also emitted by the other main chimney stacks, namely Refining Furnaces, Sulphuric Plant, Converters Unit, and Crushing Plant. Enhanced concentrations of the same elements are also observed in ground measurements near the industrial complex. During the sampling campaign, the presence of plumes from the Cu-smelter over the nearby city of Huelva was identified based on increased concentrations of gaseous pollutants, particulate metals and ultrafine particle numbers (PN). The results demonstrate that the Cu-smelter is an important source of inhalable toxic elements carried by fine airborne particles. The pollution abatement systems applied so far appear to be relatively ineffective in preventing metalliferous air pollution events, potentially increasing health risks to local and regional populations.

  11. Monitoring fugitive dust emissions from off-highway vehicles traveling on unpaved roads and trails using passive samplers.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Pamela E; Meadows, Dexter; Eubanks, Ellen; Ryan, William E

    2008-09-01

    Vehicles traveling on dry, unpaved roads generate copious quantities fugitive dust that contributes to soil erosion, and potentially threatens human health and ecosystems. The purpose of this study was to develop a low-cost technique for monitoring road dust that would enable land managers to estimate soil loss. The "sticky-trap" collectors developed were evaluated at the Turkey Bay off-highway vehicle (OHV) riding area on the Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area, in western Kentucky. The results showed that the dust plume created by vehicle traffic was heterogeneous: larger particles were in the lower part of the plume and deposited closer to the source, smaller particles were carried higher in the plume and traveled at least 100 m away from the source. Collection of particles parallel to the source was also heterogeneous, suggesting that measurements taken at a single point may not be appropriate for estimating erosion losses. Measurements taken along two trails indicate that when large numbers of riders are present, dust concentrations may reach unhealthful conditions for riders, but that it is unlikely that fugitive dust is harming native vegetation, given frequent rainfall. The study demonstrated that OHV traffic contributes to substantial erosion of roadbeds because of aeolian transport. PMID:17902032

  12. Emission abatement system utilizing particulate traps

    DOEpatents

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander

    2004-04-13

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  13. Particulate emissions from diesel engines: correlation between engine technology and emissions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the last 30 years, diesel engines have made rapid progress to increased efficiency, environmental protection and comfort for both light- and heavy-duty applications. The technical developments include all issues from fuel to combustion process to exhaust gas aftertreatment. This paper provides a comprehensive summary of the available literature regarding technical developments and their impact on the reduction of pollutant emission. This includes emission legislation, fuel quality, diesel engine- and exhaust gas aftertreatment technologies, as well as particulate composition, with a focus on the mass-related particulate emission of on-road vehicle applications. Diesel engine technologies representative of real-world on-road applications will be highlighted. Internal engine modifications now make it possible to minimize particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions with nearly no reduction in power. Among these modifications are cooled exhaust gas recirculation, optimized injections systems, adapted charging systems and optimized combustion processes with high turbulence. With introduction and optimization of exhaust gas aftertreatment systems, such as the diesel oxidation catalyst and the diesel particulate trap, as well as NOx-reduction systems, pollutant emissions have been significantly decreased. Today, sulfur poisoning of diesel oxidation catalysts is no longer considered a problem due to the low-sulfur fuel used in Europe. In the future, there will be an increased use of bio-fuels, which generally have a positive impact on the particulate emissions and do not increase the particle number emissions. Since the introduction of the EU emissions legislation, all emission limits have been reduced by over 90%. Further steps can be expected in the future. Retrospectively, the particulate emissions of modern diesel engines with respect to quality and quantity cannot be compared with those of older engines. Internal engine modifications lead to a clear reduction of the

  14. Particulate emissions from diesel engines: correlation between engine technology and emissions.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Michael; Wiartalla, Andreas; Holderbaum, Bastian; Kiesow, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    In the last 30 years, diesel engines have made rapid progress to increased efficiency, environmental protection and comfort for both light- and heavy-duty applications. The technical developments include all issues from fuel to combustion process to exhaust gas aftertreatment. This paper provides a comprehensive summary of the available literature regarding technical developments and their impact on the reduction of pollutant emission. This includes emission legislation, fuel quality, diesel engine- and exhaust gas aftertreatment technologies, as well as particulate composition, with a focus on the mass-related particulate emission of on-road vehicle applications. Diesel engine technologies representative of real-world on-road applications will be highlighted.Internal engine modifications now make it possible to minimize particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions with nearly no reduction in power. Among these modifications are cooled exhaust gas recirculation, optimized injections systems, adapted charging systems and optimized combustion processes with high turbulence. With introduction and optimization of exhaust gas aftertreatment systems, such as the diesel oxidation catalyst and the diesel particulate trap, as well as NOx-reduction systems, pollutant emissions have been significantly decreased. Today, sulfur poisoning of diesel oxidation catalysts is no longer considered a problem due to the low-sulfur fuel used in Europe. In the future, there will be an increased use of bio-fuels, which generally have a positive impact on the particulate emissions and do not increase the particle number emissions.Since the introduction of the EU emissions legislation, all emission limits have been reduced by over 90%. Further steps can be expected in the future. Retrospectively, the particulate emissions of modern diesel engines with respect to quality and quantity cannot be compared with those of older engines. Internal engine modifications lead to a clear reduction of the

  15. CHARACTERIZAITON OF PARTICULATE EMISSIONS FROM MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER SLUDGE INCINERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate emissions from a group of municipal sludge incinerators with multiple-hearth furnaces, one with a fluidized-bed furnace were characterized. Three plants operated at or near autogenous burning conditions. Chemical element composition was determined for total and sized ...

  16. Mechanisms governing fine particulate emissions from coal flames

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.D.; Chen, S.L.; Kramlich, J.C.; Newton, G.H.; Seeker, W.R. ); Samuelsen, G.S. )

    1988-11-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to provide a basic understanding of the principal processes that govern fine particulate formation in pulverized coal flames, and develop procedures to predict the levels of emission of fine particles from pulverized coal combustors. (VC)

  17. Spectral emissions and dosimetry of metal tritide particulates.

    PubMed

    Strom, D J; Stewart, R D; McDonald, J C

    2002-01-01

    Inference of intakes and doses from inhalation of metal tritide particles has come under scrutiny because of decommissioning and decontamination of US Department of Energy facilities. Since self-absorption of radiation is very significant for larger particles, interpretation of counting results of metal tritide particles by liquid scintillation requires information about emission spectra. Similarly, inference of dose requires knowledge of charged particle and photon spectra. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code was used to compute spectral emissions and other dosimetric quantities for tritide particulates of Sc, Ti, Zr, Er, and Hf. Emission fractions, radial absorbed dose distributions, specific energy distributions and related frequency-mean specific energies and lineal energies, and the emitted spectra of electrons and bremsstrahlung photons are presented for selected particulates with diameters ranging from about 0.01 microm to 25 microm. Results characterising the effects of uncertainties associated with the composition and density of the tritides are also presented. Emission spectra are used to illustrate trends in the relationship between apparent and observed activity as a function of particle type and size. Emissions from metal tritide particles are weakly penetrating, and electron emission spectra tend to 'harden' as particle size increases. Microdosimetric considerations suggest that the radiation emitted by metal tritides can be classified as a low linear energy transfer radiation source. For cells less than about 7 microm away from the surface of a metal tritide, the primary dose component is due to electrons. However, bremsstrahlung radiation may deposit some energy tens, hundreds or even thousands of micrometres away from the surface of a tritide particle. The data and analyses presented in this report will help improve the accuracy of dose determinations for particulates of five metal tritides. Future work on the spectral

  18. Chemical tracers of particulate emissions from commercial shipping.

    PubMed

    Viana, Mar; Amato, Fulvio; Alastuey, Andrés; Querol, Xavier; Moreno, Teresa; Dos Santos, Saúl García; Herce, María Dolores; Fernández-Patier, Rosalía

    2009-10-01

    Despite the increase of commercial shipping around the world, data are yet relatively scarce on the contribution of these emissions to ambient air particulates. One of the reasons is the complexity in the detection and estimation of shipping contributions to ambient particulates in harbor and urban environments, given the similarity with tracers of other combustion sources. This study aimed to identify specific tracers of shipping emissions in a Mediterranean city with an important harbor (Melilla, Spain). Results showed that for 24 h PM10 and PM2.5 samples, valid tracers of commercial shipping emissions were ratios of V/Ni = 4-5 and V/EC < 2, whereas V/EC > 8 excluded the influence of shipping emissions. Other ratios (V/ S, La/Ce, Zn/Ni, Pb/Zn, OC/EC) and tracers (Pb, Zn) were also tested but did not correlate with this source. Due to the changing composition of diesel fuels, tracers in the Mediterranean Sea may not be representative in other regions of the world and vice versa. The contribution of shipping emissions to ambient particulate matter (PM) urban background levels was quantified by positive matrix factorization (PMF), resulting in 2% and 4% of mean annual PM10 levels (0.8 microg/m3 primary particles and 1.7 microg/m3 secondary particles, with 20% uncertainty) and 14% of mean annual PM2.5 levels (2.6 microg/m3). PMID:19848163

  19. Considerations for modeling small-particulate impacts from surface coal-mining operations based on wind-tunnel simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, S.G.; Petersen, W.B.; Thompson, R.S.

    1994-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 provide for a reexamination of the current Environmental Protection Agency`s (USEPA) methods for modeling fugitive particulate (PM10) from open-pit, surface coal mines. The Industrial Source Complex Model (ISCST2) is specifically named as the method that needs further study. Title II, Part B, Section 234 of the Amendments states that {open_quotes}...the Administrator shall analyze the accuracy of such model and emission factors and make revisions as may be necessary to eliminate any significant over-predictions of air quality effect of fugitive particulate emissions from such sources.{close_quotes}

  20. Atmospheric particulate emissions from dry abrasive blasting using coal slag

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskar Kura; Kalpalatha Kambham; Sivaramakrishnan Sangameswaran; Sandhya Potana

    2006-08-15

    Coal slag is one of the widely used abrasives in dry abrasive blasting. Atmospheric emissions from this process include particulate matter (PM) and heavy metals, such as chromium, lead, manganese, nickel. Quantities and characteristics of PM emissions depend on abrasive characteristics and process parameters. Emission factors are key inputs to estimate emissions. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of blast pressure, abrasive feed rate, and initial surface contamination on total PM (TPM) emission factors for coal slag. Rusted and painted mild steel surfaces were used as base plates. Blasting was carried out in an enclosed chamber, and PM was collected from an exhaust duct using U.S. Environment Protection Agency source sampling methods for stationary sources. Results showed that there is significant effect of blast pressure, feed rate, and surface contamination on TPM emissions. Mathematical equations were developed to estimate emission factors in terms of mass of emissions per unit mass of abrasive used, as well as mass of emissions per unit of surface area cleaned. These equations will help industries in estimating PM emissions based on blast pressure and abrasive feed rate. In addition, emissions can be reduced by choosing optimum operating conditions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Atmospheric particulate emissions from dry abrasive blasting using coal slag.

    PubMed

    Kura, Bhaskar; Kambham, Kalpalatha; Sangameswaran, Sivaramakrishnan; Potana, Sandhya

    2006-08-01

    Coal slag is one of the widely used abrasives in dry abrasive blasting. Atmospheric emissions from this process include particulate matter (PM) and heavy metals, such as chromium, lead, manganese, nickel. Quantities and characteristics of PM emissions depend on abrasive characteristics and process parameters. Emission factors are key inputs to estimate emissions. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of blast pressure, abrasive feed rate, and initial surface contamination on total PM (TPM) emission factors for coal slag. Rusted and painted mild steel surfaces were used as base plates. Blasting was carried out in an enclosed chamber, and PM was collected from an exhaust duct using U.S. Environment Protection Agency source sampling methods for stationary sources. Results showed that there is significant effect of blast pressure, feed rate, and surface contamination on TPM emissions. Mathematical equations were developed to estimate emission factors in terms of mass of emissions per unit mass of abrasive used, as well as mass of emissions per unit of surface area cleaned. These equations will help industries in estimating PM emissions based on blast pressure and abrasive feed rate. In addition, emissions can be reduced by choosing optimum operating conditions. PMID:16933653

  2. Trends in primary particulate matter emissions from Canadian agriculture.

    PubMed

    Pattey, Elizabeth; Qiu, Guowang

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter (PM) has long been recognized as an air pollutant due to its adverse health and environmental impacts. As emission of PM from agricultural operations is an emerging air quality issue, the Agricultural Particulate Matter Emissions Indicator (APMEI) has been developed to estimate the primary PM contribution to the atmosphere from agricultural operations on Census years and to assess the impact of practices adopted to mitigate these emissions at the soil landscape polygon scale as part of the agri-environmental indicator report series produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. In the APMEI, PM emissions from animal feeding operations, wind erosion, land preparation, crop harvest, fertilizer and chemical application, grain handling, and pollen were calculated and compared for the Census years of 1981-2006. In this study, we present the results for PM10 and PM2.5, which exclude chemical application and pollen sources as they only contribute to total suspended particles. In 2006, PM emissions from agricultural operations were estimated to be 652.6 kt for PM10 and 158.1 kt for PM2.5. PM emissions from wind erosion and land preparation account for most of PM emissions from agricultural operations in Canada, contributing 82% of PM10 and 76% of PM2.5 in 2006. Results from the APMEI show a strong reduction in PM emissions from agricultural operations between 1981 and 2006, with a decrease of 40% (442.8 kt) for PM10 and 47% (137.7 kt) for PM2.5. This emission reduction is mainly attributed to the adoption of conservation tillage and no-till practices and the reduction in the area of summer fallow land. PMID:22866575

  3. FUGITIVE DUST AT THE PARAHO OIL SHALE DEMONSTRATION RETORT AND MINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fugitive dust sampling program was conducted at Anvil Points, Colorado, site of the Paraho mining and oil shale retorting operations. High-volume samplers were used extensively for fugitive dust collection, and 175 total suspended particulate calculations are reported for measu...

  4. Organic marker compounds in surface soils of crop fields from the San Joaquin Valley fugitive dust characterization study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogge, Wolfgang F.; Medeiros, Patricia M.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    Fugitive dust from the erosion of arid and fallow land, after harvest and during agricultural activities, can at times be the dominant source of airborne particulate matter. In order to assess the source contributions to a given site, chemical mass balance (CMB) modeling is typically used together with source-specific profiles for organic and inorganic constituents. Yet, the mass balance closure can be achieved only if emission profiles for all major sources are considered. While a higher degree of mass balance closure has been achieved by adding individual organic marker compounds to elements, ions, EC, and organic carbon (OC), major source profiles for fugitive dust are not available. Consequently, neither the exposure of the population living near fugitive dust sources from farm land, nor its chemical composition is known. Surface soils from crop fields are enriched in plant detritus from both above and below ground plant parts; therefore, surface soil dust contains natural organic compounds from the crops and soil microbiota. Here, surface soils derived from fields growing cotton, safflower, tomato, almonds, and grapes have been analyzed for more than 180 organic compounds, including natural lipids, saccharides, pesticides, herbicides, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). The major result of this study is that selective biogenically derived organic compounds are suitable markers of fugitive dust from major agricultural crop fields in the San Joaquin Valley. Aliphatic homologs exhibit the typical biogenic signatures of epicuticular plant waxes and are therefore indicative of fugitive dust emissions and mechanical abrasion of wax protrusions from leaf surfaces. Saccharides, among which α- and β-glucose, sucrose, and mycose show the highest concentrations in surface soils, have been proposed to be generic markers for fugitive dust from cultivated land. Similarly, steroids are strongly indicative of fugitive dust. Yet, triterpenoids reveal the most

  5. INSTRUMENTATION FOR MONITORING THE OPACITY OF PARTICULATE EMISSIONS CONTAINING CONDENSED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-stack instrumentation and methodology were developed to monitor the opacity of particulate pollutants in stationary source emissions containing condensed water. The instrument continuously extracts and measures the opacity of representative samples of particulate effluent. It ...

  6. Gaseous and particulate emissions from a DC arc melter.

    PubMed

    Overcamp, Thomas J; Speer, Matthew P; Griner, Stewart J; Cash, Douglas M

    2003-01-01

    Tests treating soils contaminated with metal compounds and radionuclide surrogates were conducted in a DC arc melter. The soil melted, and glassy or ceramic waste forms with a separate metal phase were produced. Tests were run in the melter plenum with either air or N2 purge gases. In addition to nitrogen, the primary emissions of gases were CO2, CO, oxygen, methane, and oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)). Although the gas flow through the melter was low, the particulate concentrations ranged from 32 to 145 g/m3. Cerium, a nonradioactive surrogate for plutonium and uranium, was not enriched in the particulate matter (PM). The PM was enriched in cesium and highly enriched in lead. PMID:12568249

  7. Long-term Trends and Confidence in Global Natural Gas Fugitive Emissions Rates Based on δ13C-CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwietzke, S.; Sherwood, O.; Tans, P. P.; Michel, S. E.; Miller, J. B.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Griffin, W. M.; Bruhwiler, L.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous life cycle assessment (LCA) and field studies have estimated natural gas (NG) fugitive emissions rates (FER) - the fraction of produced NG, mostly CH4, emitted to the atmosphere, unintentionally or by design, during extraction, processing, transport, and distribution - at local, regional, and national scales. In a recent study, we estimated for the first time the global mean FER using long-term (three decades) atmospheric CH4, δ13C-CH4, and C2H6 measurements from global monitoring networks. As a further development, this work investigates the global mean FER uncertainty range (factor of 2) in more detail to increase confidence in the results. The objectives of this research are to (i) estimate probability distribution functions (PDF) of global mean FER, and (ii) identify long-term trends in global fossil fuel (FF) and other CH4 sources. In order to achieve these objectives, global atmospheric δ13C-CH4 measurements since the mid-1980s are analyzed using a box-model of the global CH4 sources and sinks. First, we derive PDFs of the key model parameters including literature isotopic source signatures, atmospheric lifetimes, natural and anthropogenic emissions, and FF hydrocarbon gas composition. Second, a Monte Carlo simulation of the box-model is performed to quantify FER confidence intervals. While our model attributes the majority of increased CH4 levels over the past three decades to microbial sources, FF sources have also increased slightly. However, FER - an indicator of NG life cycle efficiency - has decreased over the same period given the large NG production increase worldwide. Results are most sensitive to global average microbial isotopic signatures (weighted by source strength) and bottom-up estimates of biomass burning emissions, which will be discussed in more detail.

  8. Fuel quality effects on particulate matter emissions from light- and heavy-duty diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Den Ouden, C.J.J.; Clark, R.H.; Cowley, L.T.; Stradling, R.J.; Lange, W.W.; Maillard, C.

    1994-10-01

    This paper gives an update of Shell`s ongoing research on correlations between diesel fuel quality and particulate emissions in both heavy and light duty applications. An exhaust oxidation catalyst selectively decreases the particulate hydrocarbon fraction, leaving the fixed carbon fraction unaffected. This overall particulates reduction mechanism explains why particulate emissions from catalyst vehicles are less sensitive towards changes in fuel quality. An attempt has been made to explain the differences observed between particulate emissions from heavy- and light-duty engines. It is tentatively concluded that differences originate mainly from intrinsic differences between the heavy- and light-duty test cycles. 27 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Diesel particulate emissions from used cooking oil biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Lapuerta, Magín; Rodríguez-Fernández, José; Agudelo, John R

    2008-03-01

    Two different biodiesel fuels, obtained from waste cooking oils with different previous uses, were tested in a DI diesel commercial engine either pure or in 30% and 70% v/v blends with a reference diesel fuel. Tests were performed under a set of engine operating conditions corresponding to typical road conditions. Although the engine efficiency was not significantly affected, an increase in fuel consumption with the biodiesel concentration was observed. This increase was proportional to the decrease in the heating value. The main objective of the work was to study the effect of biodiesel blends on particulate emissions, measured in terms of mass, optical effect (smoke opacity) and size distributions. A sharp decrease was observed in both smoke and particulate matter emissions as the biodiesel concentration was increased. The mean particle size was also reduced with the biodiesel concentration, but no significant increases were found in the range of the smallest particles. No important differences in emissions were found between the two tested biodiesel fuels. PMID:17368887

  10. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION OF MICROFACPM: A MICROSCALE MOTOR VEHICLE EMISSION FACTOR MODEL FOR PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A microscale emission factor model (MicroFacPM) for predicting real-time site-specific motor vehicle particulate matter emissions was presented in the companion paper entitled "Development of a Microscale Emission Factor Model for Particulate Matter (MicroFacPM) for Predicting Re...

  11. Particulate exhaust emissions from an experimental combustor. [gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Ingebo, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    The concentration of dry particulates (carbon) in the exhaust of an experimental gas turbine combustor was measured at simulated takeoff operating conditions and correlated with the standard smoke-number measurement. Carbon was determined quantitatively from a sample collected on a fiberglass filter by converting the carbon in the smoke sample to carbon dioxide and then measuring the volume of carbon dioxide formed by gas chromatography. At a smoke of 25 (threshold of visibility of the smoke plume for large turbojets) the carbon concentration was 2.8 mg carbon/cu m exhaust gas, which is equivalent to an emission index of 0.17 g carbon/kg fuel.

  12. Filtration of Carbon Particulate Emissions from a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Green, Robert; Vijayakumar, R.; Berger, Gordon; Greenwood, Zach; Abney, Morgan; Peterson, Elspeth

    2016-01-01

    NASA is investigating plasma pyrolysis as a candidate technology that will enable the recovery of hydrogen from the methane produced by the ISS Sabatier Reactor. The Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) is the current prototype of this technology which converts the methane product from the Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) to acetylene and hydrogen with 90% or greater conversion efficiency. A small amount of solid carbon particulates are generated as a side product and must be filtered before the acetylene is removed and the hydrogen-rich gas stream is recycled back to the CRA. We discuss developmental work on several options for filtering out the carbon particulate emissions from the PPA exit gas stream. The filtration technologies and concepts investigated range from fibrous media to monolithic ceramic and sintered metal media. This paper describes the different developed filter prototypes and characterizes their performance from integrated testing at the Environmental Chamber (E-Chamber) at MSFC. In addition, characterization data on the generated carbon particulates, that help to define filter requirements, are also presented.

  13. Particle size distributions of particulate emissions from the ferroalloy industry evaluated by electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI).

    PubMed

    Kero, Ida; Naess, Mari K; Tranell, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    The present article presents a comprehensive evaluation of the potential use of an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) in the ferroalloy industry with respect to indoor air quality and fugitive emission control. The ELPI was used to assess particulate emission properties, particularly of the fine particles (Dp ≤ 1 μm), which in turn may enable more satisfactory risk assessments for the indoor working conditions in the ferroalloy industry. An ELPI has been applied to characterize the fume in two different ferroalloy plants, one producing silicomanganese (SiMn) alloys and one producing ferrosilicon (FeSi) alloys. The impactor classifies the particles according to their aerodynamic diameter and gives real-time particle size distributions (PSD). The PSD based on both number and mass concentrations are shown and compared. Collected particles have also been analyzed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy. From the ELPI classification, particle size distributions in the range 7 nm - 10 μm have been established for industrial SiMn and FeSi fumes. Due to the extremely low masses of the ultrafine particles, the number and mass concentration PSD are significantly different. The average aerodynamic diameters for the FeSi and the SiMn fume particles were 0.17 and 0.10 μm, respectively. Based on this work, the ELPI is identified as a valuable tool for the evaluation of airborne particulate matter in the indoor air of metallurgical production sites. The method is well suited for real-time assessment of morphology (particle shape), particle size, and particle size distribution of aerosols. PMID:25380385

  14. Particle Size Distributions of Particulate Emissions from the Ferroalloy Industry Evaluated by Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI)

    PubMed Central

    Kero, Ida; Naess, Mari K.; Tranell, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    The present article presents a comprehensive evaluation of the potential use of an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) in the ferroalloy industry with respect to indoor air quality and fugitive emission control. The ELPI was used to assess particulate emission properties, particularly of the fine particles (Dp ≤ 1 μm), which in turn may enable more satisfactory risk assessments for the indoor working conditions in the ferroalloy industry. An ELPI has been applied to characterize the fume in two different ferroalloy plants, one producing silicomanganese (SiMn) alloys and one producing ferrosilicon (FeSi) alloys. The impactor classifies the particles according to their aerodynamic diameter and gives real-time particle size distributions (PSD). The PSD based on both number and mass concentrations are shown and compared. Collected particles have also been analyzed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy. From the ELPI classification, particle size distributions in the range 7 nm – 10 μm have been established for industrial SiMn and FeSi fumes. Due to the extremely low masses of the ultrafine particles, the number and mass concentration PSD are significantly different. The average aerodynamic diameters for the FeSi and the SiMn fume particles were 0.17 and 0.10 μm, respectively. Based on this work, the ELPI is identified as a valuable tool for the evaluation of airborne particulate matter in the indoor air of metallurgical production sites. The method is well suited for real-time assessment of morphology (particle shape), particle size, and particle size distribution of aerosols. PMID:25380385

  15. PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF THE AIR CURTAIN SYSTEM FOR FUGITIVE PARTICLE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the demonstration of the technical and economic feasibility of using an air curtain transport system to control buoyant fugitive particle emissions. (Fugitive emissions are the major source of uncontrolled emissions for many industrial plants. There ar...

  16. Emissions of particulate matter from animal houses in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkel, Albert; Mosquera, Julio; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W. G.; Ogink, Nico W. M.; Aarnink, André J. A.

    2015-06-01

    In the Netherlands, emissions from animal houses represent a major source of ambient particulate matter (PM). The objective of the present paper was to provide accurate and up to date concentrations and emission rates of PM10 and PM2.5 for commonly used animal housing systems, under representative inside and outside climate conditions and ventilation rates. We set up a national survey which covered 13 housing systems for poultry, pigs, and dairy cattle, and included 36 farms. In total, 202 24-h measurements were carried out, which included concentrations of inhalable PM, PM10, PM2.5, and CO2, ventilation rate, temperature, and relative humidity. On an animal basis, geometric mean emission rates of PM10 ranged from 2.2 to 12.0 mg h-1 in poultry and from 7.3 to 22.5 mg h-1 in pigs. The mean PM10 emission rate in dairy cattle was 8.5 mg h-1. Geometric mean emission rates of PM2.5 ranged from 0.11 to 2.41 mg h-1 in poultry and from 0.21 to 1.56 mg h-1 in pigs. The mean PM2.5 emission rate in dairy cattle was 1.65 mg h-1. Emissions are also reported per Livestock Unit and Heat Production Unit. PM emission rates increased exponentially with increasing age in broilers and turkeys and increased linearly with increasing age in weaners and fatteners. In laying hens, broiler breeders, sows, and dairy cattle, emission levels were variable throughout the year.

  17. Particulate Emissions from a Pre-Emissions Control Era Spark-Ignition Vehicle: A Historical Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    John M.E. Storey; C. Scott Sluder; Douglas A. Blom; Erin Higinbotham

    2000-06-19

    This study examined the particulate emissions from a pre-emissions control era vehicle operated on both leaded and unleaded fuels for the purpose of establishing a historical benchmark. A pre-control vehicle was located that had been rebuilt with factory original parts to approximate an as-new vehicle prior to 1968. The vehicle had less than 20,000 miles on the rebuilt engine and exhaust. The vehicle underwent repeated FTP-75 tests to determine its regulated emissions, including particulate mass. Additionally, measurements of the particulate size distribution were made, as well as particulate lead concentration. These tests were conducted first with UTG96 certification fuel, followed by UTG96 doped with tetraethyl lead to approximate 1968 levels. Results of these tests, including transmission electron micrographs of individual particles from both the leaded and unleaded case are presented. The FTP composite PM emissions from this vehicle averaged 40.5 mg/mile using unleaded fuel. The results from the leaded fuel tests showed that the FTP composite PM emissions increased to an average of 139.5 mg/mile. Analysis of the particulate size distribution for both cases demonstrated that the mass-based size distribution of particles for this vehicle is heavily skewed towards the nano-particle range. The leaded-fuel tests showed a significant increase in mass concentration at the <0.1 micron size compared with the unleaded-fuel test case. The leaded-fuel tests produced lead emissions of nearly 0.04 g/mi, more than a 4-order-of-magnitude difference compared with unleaded-fuel results. Analysis of the size-fractionated PM samples showed that the lead PM emissions tended to be distributed in the 0.25 micron and smaller size range.

  18. Gaseous and particulate emission profiles during controlled rice straw burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis, E.; Ferrer, M.; Calvet, S.; Coscollà, C.; Yusà, V.; Cambra-López, M.

    2014-12-01

    Burning of rice straw can emit considerable amounts of atmospheric pollutants. We evaluated the effect of rice straw moisture content (5%, 10%, and 20%) on the emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) and on the organic and inorganic constituents of released particulate matter (PM): dioxins, heavy metals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Four burning tests were conducted per moisture treatment using the open chamber method. Additionally, combustion characteristics, including burning stages, durations, temperature, and relative humidity, were recorded. Burning tests showed flaming and smoldering stages were significantly longer in 20% moisture treatment (P < 0.05) compared with the rest. The amount of burned straw and ashes decreased with increasing straw moisture content (P < 0.001). Carbon dioxide was the main product obtained during combustion with emission values ranging from 692 g CO2 kg dry straw-1 (10% moisture content) to 835 g CO2 kg dry straw-1 (20% moisture content). Emission factors for PM were the highest in 20% moisture treatment (P < 0.005). Fine PM (PM2.5) accounted for more than 60% of total PM mass. Emission factors for dioxins increased with straw moisture content, being the highest in 20% moisture treatment, although showing a wide variability among burning tests (P > 0.05). Emissions factors for heavy metals were low and similar among moisture treatments (P > 0.05). Emission factors for individual PAHs were generally higher in 20% moisture treatment. Overall, emission factors of atmospheric pollutants measured in our study were higher in the 20% moisture content. This difference could be attributed to the incomplete combustion at higher levels of rice straw moisture content. According to our results, rice straw burning should be done after straw drying and under minimal moisture conditions to lower pollutant emission levels.

  19. PARTICULATE EMISSIONS AND CONTROL IN FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION: MODELING AND PARAMETRIC PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses a model, developed to describe the physical characteristics of the particulates emitted from fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) systems and to evaluate data on FBC particulate control systems. The model, which describes the particulate emissions profile from FBC,...

  20. Estimation of point source fugitive emission rates from a single sensor time series: a conditionally-sampled Gaussian plume reconstruction

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a technique for determining the trace gas emission rate from a point source. The technique was tested using data from controlled methane release experiments and from measurement downwind of a natural gas production facility in Wyoming. Concentration measuremen...

  1. 1995 Study and evaluation of fugitive and diffuse emissions from the 200 East Area at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.W.; Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-01-03

    The objective of this study is to evaluate Hanford`s major diffuse emission sources in the 200 East Area and evaluate the effectiveness of monitoring these sources collectively. The results from this evaluation may also be utilized to demonstrate Westinghouse`s compliance status with the applicable air emissions regulations and determine if additional studies and/or evaluations are necessary. Air sampling will be conducted downwind of the 200 East Area. This site has been chosen as being representative of most large diffuse sources located on the Hanford waste sites. A review of the 1993 ambient air data indicated that {sup 137}C was detectable in this area. This study will take place during February to August of 1995. This time period will enable the collection of sufficient data to assess diffuse radionuclide emissions from the 200 East Area waste sites. This study will use existing ambient air monitoring stations supplemented with temporary air monitoring stations. Plots of the 1993 average concentrations of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr collected from the existing stations may be found in Appendix A. Upon completion of this evaluation a recommendation will be made to perform additional sampling studies, or to discontinue further data gathering based on the evaluation`s results.

  2. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) in Alberta: A New Remote Sensing Tool for Wide Area Measurement of Particulates, CO2, and CH4 Emissions from Energy Extraction and Production Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, M.; Lemon, R.; Crowther, B. G.; Valupadas, P.; Fu, L.; Yang, Z.; Huda, Q.; Leung, B.; Chambers, A.

    2014-12-01

    Alberta Environmental Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting Agency (AEMERA) in cooperation with the Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) of Utah State University, have developed a mobile DIAL sensor designed specifically for particle, CO2 and CH4 emissions measurement. Rapid expansion of the oil and gas industry in Alberta, including the oil sands, has challenged the Alberta Government to keep pace in its efforts to monitor and mitigate the environmental impacts of development. The limitations of current monitoring systems has pushed the provincial government to seek out advanced sensing technologies such as differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to help assess the impact of energy development and industrial operations. This instrument is housed inside a 36' trailer and can be quickly staged and used to characterize source emissions and to locate fugitive leaks. DIAL is capable of measuring concentrations for carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) at ranges of up to 3 km with a spatial resolution of 1.5 m. DIAL can map both CO2 and CH4, as well as particulate matter (PM) in a linear fashion; by scanning the laser beam in both azimuth and elevation, DIAL can create images of emissions concentrations and ultimately can be used to determine emission factors, locate fugitive leaks, assess plume dispersion and confirm air dispersion modeling. The DIAL system has been deployed at a landfill, a coal-fired power plant, and an oil sands production area. A system overview of the DIAL instrument and recent results will be discussed.

  3. TRANSIENT, REAL-TIME, PARTICULATE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS IN DIESEL ENGINES

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S; Shih, J; Hillman, G; sekar, R; Graze, R; Shimpi, S; Martin, W; Pier, D

    2003-08-24

    This paper reports our efforts to develop an instrument, TG-1, to measure particulate emissions from diesel engines in real-time. TG-1 while based on laser-induced incandescence allows measurements at 10 Hz on typical engine exhausts. Using such an instrument, measurements were performed in the exhaust of a 1.7L Mercedes Benz engine coupled to a low inertia dynamometer. Comparative measurements performed under engine steady state conditions showed the instrument to agree within {+-}12% of measurements performed with an SMPS. Moreover, the instrument had far better time response and time resolution than a TEOM{reg_sign} 1105. Also, TG-1 appears to surpass the shortcomings of the TEOM instrument, i.e., of yielding negative values under certain engine conditions and, being sensitive to external vibration.

  4. Particulate emissions from a mid-latitude prescribed chaparral fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, Wesley R., III; Levine, Joel S.; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Winstead, Edward L.; Riggin, Philip J.; Brass, James A.; Ambrosia, Vincent G.

    1988-01-01

    Particulate emission from a 400-acre prescribed chaparral fire in the San Dimas Experimental Forest was investigated by collecting smoke aerosol on Teflon and glass-fiber filters from a helicopter, and using SEM and EDAX to study the features of the particles. Aerosol particles ranged in size from about 0.1 to 100 microns, with carbon, oxygen, magnesium, aluminum, silicon, calcium, and iron as the primary elements. The results of ion chromatographic analysis of aerosol-particle extracts (in water-methanol) revealed the presence of significant levels of NO2(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), Cl(-), PO4(3-), C2O4(2-), Na(+), NH4(+), and K(+). The soluble ionic portion of the aerosol was estimated to be about 2 percent by weight.

  5. Evaluating the effectiveness of vegetative environmental buffers in mitigating particulate matter emissions from poultry houses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Particulate Matter (PM) emissions from animal operations have been identified as a major air pollutant source with health and environmental impacts. Nearly 600 million broilers are produced annually on the Delmarva Peninsula, making it a hot spot for particulate matter emissions from poultry houses....

  6. Simplified and low cost optical remote sensing technology for fenceline monitoring of fugitive releases

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reducing fugitive emissions of hazardous air pollutants from industrial facilities is an ongoing priority for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Unlike stack emissions, fugitive releases are difficult to detect due to their spatial extent and inherent temporal variab...

  7. Removal of Sulfur from Natural Gas to Reduce Particulate Matter Emission from a Turbine Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spang, Brent Loren

    The present work investigates the effect of natural gas fuel sulfur on particulate emissions from stationary gas turbine engines used for electricity generation. Fuel sulfur from standard line gas was scrubbed using a system of fluidized reactor beds containing a specially designed activated carbon purpose built for sulfur absorption. A sulfur injection system using sonic orifices was designed and constructed to inject methyl mercaptan into the scrubbed gas stream at varying concentrations. Using these systems, particulate emissions created by various fuel sulfur levels between 0 and 8.3 ppmv were investigated. Particulate samples were collected from a Capstone C65 microturbine generator system using a Horiba MDLT-1302TA micro dilution tunnel and analyzed using a Horiba MEXA-1370PM particulate analyzer. In addition, ambient air samples were collected to determine incoming particulate levels in the combustion air. The Capstone C65 engine air filter was also tested for particulate removal efficiency by sampling downstream of the filter. To further differentiate the particulate entering the engine in the combustion air from particulate being emitted from the exhaust stack, two high efficiency HEPA filters were installed to eliminate a large portion of incoming particulate. Variable fuel sulfur testing showed that there was a strong correlation between total particulate emission factor and fuel sulfur concentration. Using eleven variable sulfur tests, it was determined that an increase of 1 ppmv fuel sulfur will produce an increase of approximately 3.2 microg/m3 total particulate. Also, the correlation also predicted that, for this particular engine, the total particulate emission factor for zero fuel sulfur was approximately 19.1 microg/m3. With the EC and OC data removed, the correlation became 3.1 microg/m3 of sulfur particulate produced for each ppmv of fuel sulfur. The correlation also predicted that with no fuel sulfur present, 6.6 microg/m3 of particulate will

  8. On the source inversion of fugitive surface layer releases. Part I. Model formulation and application to simple sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfélix, V.; Escrig, A.; López-Lilao, A.; Celades, I.; Monfort, E.

    2015-05-01

    Source inversion by dispersion modelling of fugitive particulate matter (PM) emissions entails considerable difficulty. Fugitive PM sources are rarely steady or point sources. They occur near the ground, where there are high vertical gradients of wind velocity and potential temperature. To resolve the source from the background concentrations, measurements need to be conducted very close to the source. In this study, a dispersion model was developed that consists of numerically solving the pollutant transport equation, while incorporating the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. By using this numerical approach, in contrast to Gaussian dispersion models, wind shear effects and plume meandering were accounted for directly. A series of controlled experiments were conducted, in which the fugitive PM sources were parameterized as much as possible. The developed model was used to obtain operation-specific PM10 emission factors (EFs). This is the first of two articles describing the model and the field campaigns in which it was applied to determine the EFs. Part I describes the mathematical model and its application to two relatively simple sources.

  9. Application of a microscale emission factor model for particulate matter to calculate vehicle-generated contributions to fine particulate emissions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rakesh B; Desloges, Catherine; Sloan, James J

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the evaluation and application of a new generation of particulate matter (PM) emission factor model (MicroFacPM). MicroFacPM that was evaluated in Tuscarora Mountain Tunnel, Pennsylvania Turnpike, PA shows good agreement between measured and modeled emissions. MicroFacPM application is presented to the vehicle traffic on the main approach road to the Ambassador Bridge, which is one of the most important international border entry points in North America, connecting Detroit, MI, with Windsor, Ontario, Canada. An increase in border security has forced heavy-duty diesel vehicles to line up for several kilometers through the city of Windsor causing concern about elevated concentrations of ambient PM. MicroFacPM has been developed to model vehicle-generated PM (fine [PM2.5] and coarse < or = 10 microm [PM10]) from the on-road vehicle fleet, which in this case includes traffic at very low speeds (10 km/h). The Windsor case study gives vehicle generated PM2.5 sources and their breakdown by vehicle age and class. It shows that the primary sources of vehicle-generated PM2.5 emissions are the late-model heavy-duty diesel vehicles. We also applied CALINE4 and AERMOD in conjunction with MicroFacPM, using Canadian traffic and climate conditions, to describe the vehicle-generated PM2.5 dispersion near this roadway during the month of May in 2003. PMID:16499145

  10. Vehicular emissions of organic particulate matter in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, B. S.; Andrade, M. F.; Herckes, P.; Dusek, U.; Röckmann, T.; Holzinger, R.

    2015-12-01

    Vehicular emissions have a strong impact on air pollution in big cities. Many factors affect these emissions: type of vehicle, type of fuel, cruising velocity, and brake use. This study focused on emissions of organic compounds by Light (LDV) and Heavy (HDV) duty vehicle exhaust. The study was performed in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil, where vehicles run on different fuels: gasoline with 25 % ethanol (called gasohol), hydrated ethanol, and diesel (with 5 % of biodiesel). The vehicular emissions are an important source of pollutants and the principal contribution to fine particulate matter (smaller than 2.5 μm, PM2.5) in Sao Paulo. The experiments were performed in two tunnels: Janio Quadros (TJQ) where 99 % of the vehicles are LDV, and Rodoanel Mario Covas (TRA) where up to 30 % of the fleet was HDV. The PM2.5 samples were collected on quartz filters in May and July 2011 at TJQ and TRA, respectively, using two samplers operating in parallel. The samples were analyzed by Thermal-Desorption Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass-Spectrometry (TD-PTR-MS), and by Thermal-Optical Transmittance (TOT). The organic aerosol (OA) desorbed at TD-PTR-MS represented around 30 % of the OA estimated by the TOT method, mainly due to the different desorption temperatures, with a maximum of 870 and 350 °C for TOT and TD-PTR-MS, respectively. Average emission factors (EF) organic aerosol (OA) and organic carbon (OC) were calculated for HDV and LDV fleet. We found that HDV emitted more OA and OC than LDV, and that OC emissions represented 36 and 43 % of total PM2.5 emissions from LDV and HDV, respectively. More than 700 ions were identified by TD-PTR-MS and the EF profiles obtained from HDV and LDV exhibited distinct features. Nitrogen-containing compounds measured in the desorbed material up to 350 °C contributed around 20 % to the EF values for both types of vehicles, possibly associated with incomplete fuel burning. Additionally, 70 % of the organic compounds measured from the aerosol

  11. A computational study of particulate emissions from an open pit quarry under neutral atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvester, S. A.; Lowndes, I. S.; Hargreaves, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    The extraction of minerals from surface mines and quarries can produce significant fugitive dust emissions as a result of site activities such as blasting, road haulage, loading, crushing and stockpiling. If uncontrolled, these emissions can present serious environmental, health, safety and operational issues impacting both site personnel and the wider community. The dispersion of pollutant emissions within the atmosphere is principally determined by the background wind systems characterized by the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This paper presents an overview of the construction and solution of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to replicate the development of the internal ventilation regime within a surface quarry excavation due to the presence of a neutral ABL above this excavation. This model was then used to study the dispersion and deposition of fugitive mineral dust particles generated during rock blasting operations. The paths of the mineral particles were modelled using Lagrangian particle tracking. Particles of four size fractions were released from five blast locations for eight different wind directions. The study concluded that dependent on the location of the bench blast within the quarry and the direction of the wind, a mass fraction of between 0.3 and 0.6 of the emitted mineral particles was retained within the quarry. The retention was largest when the distance from the blast location to the downwind pit boundary was greatest.

  12. Final report for measurement of primary particulate matter emissions from light-duty motor vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Norbeck, J. M.; Durbin, T. D.; Truex, T. J.

    1998-12-31

    This report describes the results of a particulate emissions study conducted at the University of California, Riverside, College of Engineering-Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) from September of 1996 to August of 1997. The goal of this program was to expand the database of particulate emissions measurements from motor vehicles to include larger numbers of representative in-use vehicles. This work was co-sponsored by the Coordinating Research Council (CRC), the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and was part of a larger study of particulate emissions being conducted in several states under sponsorship by CRC. For this work, FTP particulate mass emission rates were determined for gasoline and diesel vehicles, along with the fractions of particulates below 2.5 and 10 microns aerodynamic diameter. A total of 129 gasoline-fueled vehicles and 19 diesel-fueled vehicles were tested as part of the program.

  13. Particulate emissions from different types of biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Obrist, Daniel; Zielinska, Barbara; Gertler, Alan

    2013-06-01

    Biomass burning is a significant emission source of PM2.5(i.e., particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm), but few studies addressed the chemical composition of PM2.5 emissions from various types of fires. Here, we present results from a sampling campaign to quantify PM2.5 emissions from various types of prescribed burning activities using analysis of carbon (elemental carbon: EC; organic carbon: OC; and total carbon: TC); polar organic compounds (12 different compounds and four functional classes); water-soluble potassium (K+); and particle-bound mercury (PHg). Emissions were characterized for a series of prescribed burns in the Lake Tahoe basin in the western United States, along with controlled biomass combustion in a wood stove. In the field, emissions were collected from: (i) landscape underburns, consisting of wooden tissues, foliage, branches, and surface duff; (ii) pile burns, consisting mainly of wooden tissues stacked up to piles; (iii) mixed underburn/pile burns which consisted of a mix of the above; in a wood stove, burns included different fuel types collected from the Lake Tahoe basin, specifically (iv) wooden logs mainly of pine; (v) green foliage and branches from two dominant shrubs (manzanita and bitterbrush); and (vi) surface duff, mostly consisting of pine needle litter.Our data showed higher ratios of organic to elemental carbon in green fuels (19.2 ± 4.2) compared to dry, wooden logs (7.3 ± 1.9) both in prescribed burns in the field and in controlled stove combustion, indicating that more moisture in green biomass resulted in more smoldering-phase combustion. Further, OC/EC ratios were lower in wood stove burns compared to prescribed burns in the field, which we attribute to higher combustion temperatures in wood stove burns. The suite of 12 select polar organic compounds showed that the most prevalent compounds emitted across all burns were levoglucosan, mannosan, and resin acids (dehydroabietic, pimaric, and

  14. Lidar Approach in Estimating Particulate Mass Emissions from a Poultry Production Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, P. A.; Eichinger, W. E.; Prueger, J. H.; Hatfield, J.

    2009-12-01

    The current conventional particulate and mass emission measurements from livestock facilities rely primarily on point indoor/outdoor measurements. These measurements combined with assumed outflow rates from a building lead to emission rates and emission factors from the building. This approach, well established in the literature, poses accuracy and representation issues. To overcome the limitations of point measurement emission estimates, a new remote sensing approach is proposed. A scanning elastic lidar was used to estimate the spatially resolved extinction coefficient associated with particulates originating from a poultry production building. Particulate size distribution and wind co-measurements were combined with the lidar extinction coefficient data to estimate particulate mass fluxes and the emission factor from the building. The particulate size distribution was measured continuously since the size distribution changes significantly during the day. Assumptions of constant size distributions may result in errors of a factor of two in derived quantities. The data analysis from the study showed that the average particulate mass emission value from the poultry production building was 0.13±0.04 g/s (460±150 g/h) and the respective emission factor was 3.0±1.0 g/h AU (per animal unit, 500 kg live weight). The lidar estimated values are lower than the values found in the literature from point measurement studies. The study demonstrates a new innovative method in measuring emissions using scanning lidar technique. As presented in the study, the method can successfully address the need for a better tool for emission measurements in agricultural applications. The outlined measurement approach can be also applied, with careful considerations, to any non-point particulate emissions measurement needs in industry or in urban environment. Lidar, particle sizer and wind anemometer data processing flowchart leading to the particulate mass emission estimates

  15. Global emission projections of particulate matter (PM): I. Exhaust emissions from on-road vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fang; Winijkul, Ekbordin; Jung, Soonkyu; Bond, Tami C.; Streets, David G.

    2011-09-01

    We present global emission projections of primary particulate matter (PM) from exhaust of on-road vehicles under four commonly-used global fuel use scenarios from 2010 to 2050. The projections are based on a dynamic model of vehicle population linked to emission characteristics, SPEW-Trend. Unlike previous models of global emissions, this model incorporates more details on the technology stock, including the vehicle type and age, and the number of emitters with very high emissions ("superemitters"). However, our estimates of vehicle growth are driven by changes in predicted fuel consumption from macroeconomic scenarios, ensuring that PM projections are consistent with these scenarios. Total emissions are then obtained by integrating emissions of heterogeneous vehicle groups of all ages and types. Changes in types of vehicles in use are governed by retirement rates, timing of emission standards and the rate at which superemitters develop from normal vehicles. Retirement rates are modeled as a function of vehicle age and income level with a relationship based on empirical data, capturing the fact that people with lower income tend to keep vehicles longer. Adoption dates of emission standards are either estimated from planned implementation or from income levels. We project that global PM emissions range from 1100 Gg to 1360 Gg in 2030, depending on the scenario. An emission decrease is estimated until 2035 because emission standards are implemented and older engines built to lower standards are phased out. From 2010 to 2050, fuel consumption increases in all regions except North America, Europe and Pacific, according to all scenarios. Global emission intensities decrease continuously under all scenarios for the first 30 years due to the introduction of more advanced and cleaner emission standards. This leads to decreasing emissions from most regions. Emissions are expected to increase significantly in only Africa (1.2-3.1% per year). Because we have tied emission

  16. 40 CFR 63.1544 - Standards for fugitive dust sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Primary Lead Smelting § 63.1544 Standards for fugitive dust sources. (a) Each owner or operator of a primary lead smelter shall prepare, and at all times...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1544 - Standards for fugitive dust sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Primary Lead Smelting § 63.1544 Standards for fugitive dust sources. (a) Each owner or operator of a primary lead smelter shall prepare, and at all times...

  18. Mote cyclone robber system particulate emission factors for cotton gins: Particle size distribution characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of total particulate stack sampling and particle size analyses. In 2013, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than...

  19. Mote cleaner system particulate emission factors for cotton gins: Particle size distribution characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of total particulate stack sampling and particle size analyses. In 2013, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or ...

  20. First stage lint cleaning system particulate emission factors for cotton gins: Particle size distribution characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of total particulate stack sampling and particle size analyses. In 2006, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal...

  1. Particle size distribution characteristics of cotton gin first stage mote system total particulate emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of total particulate stack sampling and particle size analyses. In 2013, EPA published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This created a...

  2. Mote trash system particulate emission factors for cotton gins: Particle size distribution characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of total particulate stack sampling and particle size analyses. In 2013, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than...

  3. Combined mote system particulate emission factors for cotton gins: Particle size distribution characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of total particulate stack sampling and particle size analyses. In 2013, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or e...

  4. Overflow system particulate emission factors for cotton gins: Particle size distribution characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of total particulate stack sampling and particle size analyses. In 2013, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than...

  5. Combined lint cleaning system particulate emission factors for cotton gins: Particle size distribution characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of total particulate stack sampling and particle size analyses. In 2013, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or e...

  6. Master trash system particulate emission factors for cotton gins: Particle size distribution characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of total particulate stack sampling and particle size analyses. In 2013, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or ...

  7. TEST METHODS TO CHARACTERIZE PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS AND DEPOSITION RATES IN A RESEARCH HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses test methods to characterize particulate matter (PM) emissions and deposition rates in a research house. In a room in the research house, specially configured for PM source testing, a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-filtered air supply system, used for...

  8. Particle size distribution characteristics of cotton gin unloading system total particulate emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of total particulate stack sampling and particle size analyses. In 2013, EPA published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This created a...

  9. Particle size distribution characteristics of cotton gin combined mote system total particulate emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of total particulate stack sampling and particle size analyses. In 2013, EPA published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This created a...

  10. Particle size distribution characteristics of cotton gin cyclone robber system total particulate emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report is part of a project to characterize cotton gin emissions from the standpoint of total particulate stack sampling and particle size analyses. In 2013, EPA published a more stringent standard for particulate matter with nominal diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5). This created a...