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Sample records for full-length enriched cdna

  1. cDNA Library Enrichment of Full Length Transcripts for SMRT Long Read Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Benjamin; Reinhardt, Richard; Schneeberger, Korbinian

    2016-01-01

    The utility of genome assemblies does not only rely on the quality of the assembled genome sequence, but also on the quality of the gene annotations. The Pacific Biosciences Iso-Seq technology is a powerful support for accurate eukaryotic gene model annotation as it allows for direct readout of full-length cDNA sequences without the need for noisy short read-based transcript assembly. We propose the implementation of the TeloPrime Full Length cDNA Amplification kit to the Pacific Biosciences Iso-Seq technology in order to enrich for genuine full-length transcripts in the cDNA libraries. We provide evidence that TeloPrime outperforms the commonly used SMARTer PCR cDNA Synthesis Kit in identifying transcription start and end sites in Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, we show that TeloPrime-based Pacific Biosciences Iso-Seq can be successfully applied to the polyploid genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) not only to efficiently annotate gene models, but also to identify novel transcription sites, gene homeologs, splicing isoforms and previously unidentified gene loci. PMID:27327613

  2. Characterization of expressed sequence tags from a full-length enriched cDNA library of Cryptomeria japonica male strobili

    PubMed Central

    Futamura, Norihiro; Totoki, Yasushi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Igasaki, Tomohiro; Nanjo, Tokihiko; Seki, Motoaki; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Mari, Adriano; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Shinohara, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    Background Cryptomeria japonica D. Don is one of the most commercially important conifers in Japan. However, the allergic disease caused by its pollen is a severe public health problem in Japan. Since large-scale analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the male strobili of C. japonica should help us to clarify the overall expression of genes during the process of pollen development, we constructed a full-length enriched cDNA library that was derived from male strobili at various developmental stages. Results We obtained 36,011 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from either one or both ends of 19,437 clones derived from the cDNA library of C. japonica male strobili at various developmental stages. The 19,437 cDNA clones corresponded to 10,463 transcripts. Approximately 80% of the transcripts resembled ESTs from Pinus and Picea, while approximately 75% had homologs in Arabidopsis. An analysis of homologies between ESTs from C. japonica male strobili and known pollen allergens in the Allergome Database revealed that products of 180 transcripts exhibited significant homology. Approximately 2% of the transcripts appeared to encode transcription factors. We identified twelve genes for MADS-box proteins among these transcription factors. The twelve MADS-box genes were classified as DEF/GLO/GGM13-, AG-, AGL6-, TM3- and TM8-like MIKCC genes and type I MADS-box genes. Conclusion Our full-length enriched cDNA library derived from C. japonica male strobili provides information on expression of genes during the development of male reproductive organs. We provided potential allergens in C. japonica. We also provided new information about transcription factors including MADS-box genes expressed in male strobili of C. japonica. Large-scale gene discovery using full-length cDNAs is a valuable tool for studies of gymnosperm species. PMID:18691438

  3. Full-Length Enriched cDNA Libraries and ORFeome Analysis of Sugarcane Hybrid and Ancestor Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Scott; Pörtner-Taliana, Antje; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane is a major crop used for food and bioenergy production. Modern cultivars are hybrids derived from crosses between Saccharum officinarum and Saccharum spontaneum. Hybrid cultivars combine favorable characteristics from ancestral species and contain a genome that is highly polyploid and aneuploid, containing 100–130 chromosomes. These complex genomes represent a huge challenge for molecular studies and for the development of biotechnological tools that can facilitate sugarcane improvement. Here, we describe full-length enriched cDNA libraries for Saccharum officinarum, Saccharum spontaneum, and one hybrid genotype (SP803280) and analyze the set of open reading frames (ORFs) in their genomes (i.e., their ORFeomes). We found 38,195 (19%) sugarcane-specific transcripts that did not match transcripts from other databases. Less than 1.6% of all transcripts were ancestor-specific (i.e., not expressed in SP803280). We also found 78,008 putative new sugarcane transcripts that were absent in the largest sugarcane expressed sequence tag database (SUCEST). Functional annotation showed a high frequency of protein kinases and stress-related proteins. We also detected natural antisense transcript expression, which mapped to 94% of all plant KEGG pathways; however, each genotype showed different pathways enriched in antisense transcripts. Our data appeared to cover 53.2% (17,563 genes) and 46.8% (937 transcription factors) of all sugarcane full-length genes and transcription factors, respectively. This work represents a significant advancement in defining the sugarcane ORFeome and will be useful for protein characterization, single nucleotide polymorphism and splicing variant identification, evolutionary and comparative studies, and sugarcane genome assembly and annotation. PMID:25222706

  4. Large-scale sequencing based on full-length-enriched cDNA libraries in pigs: contribution to annotation of the pig genome draft sequence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Along with the draft sequencing of the pig genome, which has been completed by an international consortium, collection of the nucleotide sequences of genes expressed in various tissues and determination of entire cDNA sequences are necessary for investigations of gene function. The sequences of expressed genes are also useful for genome annotation, which is important for isolating the genes responsible for particular traits. Results We performed a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis in pigs by using 32 full-length-enriched cDNA libraries derived from 28 kinds of tissues and cells, including seven tissues (brain, cerebellum, colon, hypothalamus, inguinal lymph node, ovary, and spleen) derived from pigs that were cloned from a sow subjected to genome sequencing. We obtained more than 330,000 EST reads from the 5′-ends of the cDNA clones. Comparison with human and bovine gene catalogs revealed that the ESTs corresponded to at least 15,000 genes. cDNA clones representing contigs and singlets generated by assembly of the EST reads were subjected to full-length determination of inserts. We have finished sequencing 31,079 cDNA clones corresponding to more than 12,000 genes. Mapping of the sequences of these cDNA clones on the draft sequence of the pig genome has indicated that the clones are derived from about 15,000 independent loci on the pig genome. Conclusions ESTs and cDNA sequences derived from full-length-enriched libraries are valuable for annotation of the draft sequence of the pig genome. This information will also contribute to the exploration of promoter sequences on the genome and to molecular biology-based analyses in pigs. PMID:23150988

  5. Construction of a full-length enriched cDNA library and preliminary analysis of expressed sequence tags from Bengal Tiger Panthera tigris tigris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changqing; Liu, Dan; Guo, Yu; Lu, Taofeng; Li, Xiangchen; Zhang, Minghai; Ma, Jianzhang; Ma, Yuehui; Guan, Weijun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Bengal tiger, Panthera tigris tigris, the most well-known wild Animal. Total RNA was extracted from cultured Bengal tiger fibroblasts in vitro. The titers of primary and amplified libraries were 1.28 × 106 pfu/mL and 1.56 × 109 pfu/mL respectively. The percentage of recombinants from unamplified library was 90.2% and average length of exogenous inserts was 0.98 kb. A total of 212 individual ESTs with sizes ranging from 356 to 1108 bps were then analyzed. The BLASTX score revealed that 48.1% of the sequences were classified as a strong match, 45.3% as nominal and 6.6% as a weak match. Among the ESTs with known putative function, 26.4% ESTs were found to be related to all kinds of metabolisms, 19.3% ESTs to information storage and processing, 11.3% ESTs to posttranslational modification, protein turnover, chaperones, 11.3% ESTs to transport, 9.9% ESTs to signal transducer/cell communication, 9.0% ESTs to structure protein, 3.8% ESTs to cell cycle, and only 6.6% ESTs classified as novel genes. By EST sequencing, a full-length gene coding ferritin was identified and characterized. The recombinant plasmid pET32a-TAT-Ferritin was constructed, coded for the TAT-Ferritin fusion protein with two 6× His-tags in N and C-terminal. After BCA assay, the concentration of soluble Trx-TAT-Ferritin recombinant protein was 2.32 ± 0.12 mg/mL. These results demonstrated that the reliability and representativeness of the cDNA library attained to the requirements of a standard cDNA library. This library provided a useful platform for the functional genome and transcriptome research of Bengal tigers. PMID:23708105

  6. Construction of a Full-Length Enriched cDNA Library and Preliminary Analysis of Expressed Sequence Tags from Bengal Tiger Panthera tigris tigris

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changqing; Liu, Dan; Guo, Yu; Lu, Taofeng; Li, Xiangchen; Zhang, Minghai; Ma, Jianzhang; Ma, Yuehui; Guan, Weijun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Bengal tiger, Panthera tigris tigris, the most well-known wild Animal. Total RNA was extracted from cultured Bengal tiger fibroblasts in vitro. The titers of primary and amplified libraries were 1.28 × 106 pfu/mL and 1.56 × 109 pfu/mL respectively. The percentage of recombinants from unamplified library was 90.2% and average length of exogenous inserts was 0.98 kb. A total of 212 individual ESTs with sizes ranging from 356 to 1108 bps were then analyzed. The BLASTX score revealed that 48.1% of the sequences were classified as a strong match, 45.3% as nominal and 6.6% as a weak match. Among the ESTs with known putative function, 26.4% ESTs were found to be related to all kinds of metabolisms, 19.3% ESTs to information storage and processing, 11.3% ESTs to posttranslational modification, protein turnover, chaperones, 11.3% ESTs to transport, 9.9% ESTs to signal transducer/cell communication, 9.0% ESTs to structure protein, 3.8% ESTs to cell cycle, and only 6.6% ESTs classified as novel genes. By EST sequencing, a full-length gene coding ferritin was identified and characterized. The recombinant plasmid pET32a-TAT-Ferritin was constructed, coded for the TAT-Ferritin fusion protein with two 6× His-tags in N and C-terminal. After BCA assay, the concentration of soluble Trx-TAT-Ferritin recombinant protein was 2.32 ± 0.12 mg/mL. These results demonstrated that the reliability and representativeness of the cDNA library attained to the requirements of a standard cDNA library. This library provided a useful platform for the functional genome and transcriptome research of Bengal tigers. PMID:23708105

  7. Analysis of expression sequence tags from a full-length-enriched cDNA library of developing sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sesame (Sesamum indicum) is one of the most important oilseed crops with high oil contents and rich nutrient value. However, genetic improvement efforts in sesame could not get benefit from molecular biology technology due to poor DNA and RNA sequence resources. In this study, we carried out a large scale of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequencing from developing sesame seeds and further conducted analysis on seed storage products-related genes. Results A normalized and full-length enriched cDNA library from 5 ~ 30 days old immature seeds was constructed and randomly sequenced, leading to generation of 41,248 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) which then formed 4,713 contigs and 27,708 singletons with 44.9% uniESTs being putative full-length open reading frames. Approximately 26,091 of all these uniESTs have significant matches to the counterparts in Nr database of GenBank, and 21,628 of them were assigned to one or more Gene ontology (GO) terms. Homologous genes involved in oil biosynthesis were identified including some conservative transcription factors regulating oil biosynthesis such as LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1), PICKLE (PKL), WRINKLED1 (WRI1) and majority of them were found for the first time in sesame seeds. One hundred and 17 ESTs were identified possibly involved in biosynthesis of sesame lignans, sesamin and sesamolin. In total, 9,347 putative functional genes from developing seeds were identified, which accounts for one third of total genes in the sesame genome. Further analysis of the uniESTs identified 1,949 non-redundant simple sequence repeats (SSRs). Conclusions This study has provided an overview of genes expressed during sesame seed development. This collection of sesame full-length cDNAs covered a wide variety of genes in seeds, in particular, candidate genes involved in biosynthesis of sesame oils and lignans. These EST sequences enriched with full length will contribute to comparative genomic studies on sesame and other oilseed plants

  8. Generation and analysis of a large-scale expressed sequence tags from a full-length enriched cDNA library of Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu; Liu, Changqing; Lu, Taofeng; Liu, Dan; Bai, Chunyu; Li, Xiangchen; Ma, Yuehui; Guan, Weijun

    2014-05-15

    In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Siberian tiger, the world's most endangered species. The titers of primary and amplified libraries were 1.28×10(6)pfu/mL and 1.59×10(10)pfu/mL respectively. The proportion of recombinants from unamplified library was 91.3% and the average length of exogenous inserts was 1.06kb. A total of 279 individual ESTs with sizes ranging from 316 to 1258bps were then analyzed. Furthermore, 204 unigenes were successfully annotated and involved in 49 functions of the GO classification, cell (175, 85.5%), cellular process (165, 80.9%), and binding (152, 74.5%) are the dominant terms. 198 unigenes were assigned to 156 KEGG pathways, and the pathways with the most representation are metabolic pathways (18, 9.1%). The proportion pattern of each COG subcategory was similar among Panthera tigris altaica, P. tigris tigris and Homo sapiens, and general function prediction only cluster (44, 15.8%) represents the largest group, followed by translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis (33, 11.8%), replication, recombination and repair (24, 8.6%), and only 7.2% ESTs classified as novel genes. Moreover, the recombinant plasmid pET32a-TAT-COL6A2 was constructed, coded for the Trx-TAT-COL6A2 fusion protein with two 6× His-tags in N and C-terminal. After BCA assay, the concentration of soluble Trx-TAT-COL6A2 recombinant protein was 2.64±0.18mg/mL. This library will provide a useful platform for the functional genome and transcriptome research of for the P. tigris and other felid animals in the future. PMID:24630959

  9. A drosophila full-length cDNA resource

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, Mark; Carlson, Joseph; Brokstein, Peter; Yu, Charles; Champe, Mark; George, Reed; Guarin, Hannibal; Kronmiller, Brent; Pacleb, Joanne; Park, Soo; Rubin, Gerald M.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2003-05-09

    Background: A collection of sequenced full-length cDNAs is an important resource both for functional genomics studies and for the determination of the intron-exon structure of genes. Providing this resource to the Drosophila melanogaster research community has been a long-term goal of the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project. We have previously described the Drosophila Gene Collection (DGC), a set of putative full-length cDNAs that was produced by generating and analyzing over 250,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from a variety of tissues and developmental stages. Results: We have generated high-quality full-insert sequence for 8,921 clones in the DGC. We compared the sequence of these clones to the annotated Release 3 genomic sequence, and identified more than 5,300 cDNAs that contain a complete and accurate protein-coding sequence. This corresponds to at least one splice form for 40 percent of the predicted D. melanogaster genes. We also identified potential new cases of RNA editing. Conclusions: We show that comparison of cDNA sequences to a high-quality annotated genomic sequence is an effective approach to identifying and eliminating defective clones from a cDNA collection and ensure its utility for experimentation. Clones were eliminated either because they carry single nucleotide discrepancies, which most probably result from reverse transcriptase errors, or because they are truncated and contain only part of the protein-coding sequence.

  10. [Comparison of methods to construct a full-length cDNA library].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xin-Guo; Jing, Rui-Lian; Kong, Xiu-Ying; Zhao, Guang-Yao; Jia, Ji-Zeng

    2006-07-01

    The use of full-length cDNA libraries is an effective tool to obtain complete gene information in a high-efficiency, high-throughput manner, especially in organisms with huge genomes that are not amenable to whole genome sequencing. In this review, we outlined several methods of full-length cDNA library construction and compared their advantages and disadvantages based on their respective principles. Drawing on our own experience, we described the Cap-trapper method in detail, with an emphasis on its application in wheat full-length cDNA library construction as well as the determination of the ratio of full-length cDNA in a library. PMID:16825176

  11. Generation and Analysis of a Large-Scale Expressed Sequence Tag Database from a Full-Length Enriched cDNA Library of Developing Leaves of Gossypium hirsutum L

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chaoyou; Fan, Shuli; Song, Meizhen; Yu, Shuxun

    2013-01-01

    Background Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is one of the world’s most economically-important crops. However, its entire genome has not been sequenced, and limited resources are available in GenBank for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying leaf development and senescence. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, 9,874 high-quality ESTs were generated from a normalized, full-length cDNA library derived from pooled RNA isolated from throughout leaf development during the plant blooming stage. After clustering and assembly of these ESTs, 5,191 unique sequences, representative 1,652 contigs and 3,539 singletons, were obtained. The average unique sequence length was 682 bp. Annotation of these unique sequences revealed that 84.4% showed significant homology to sequences in the NCBI non-redundant protein database, and 57.3% had significant hits to known proteins in the Swiss-Prot database. Comparative analysis indicated that our library added 2,400 ESTs and 991 unique sequences to those known for cotton. The unigenes were functionally characterized by gene ontology annotation. We identified 1,339 and 200 unigenes as potential leaf senescence-related genes and transcription factors, respectively. Moreover, nine genes related to leaf senescence and eleven MYB transcription factors were randomly selected for quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), which revealed that these genes were regulated differentially during senescence. The qRT-PCR for three GhYLSs revealed that these genes express express preferentially in senescent leaves. Conclusions/Significance These EST resources will provide valuable sequence information for gene expression profiling analyses and functional genomics studies to elucidate their roles, as well as for studying the mechanisms of leaf development and senescence in cotton and discovering candidate genes related to important agronomic traits of cotton. These data will also facilitate future whole-genome sequence assembly and annotation

  12. [Construction and sequencing of full-length cDNA of peste des petits ruminants virus].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jun-Jun; Dou, Yong-Xi; Zhang, Hai-Rui; Mao, Li; Meng, Xue-Lian; Luo, Xuo-Nong; Cai, Xue-Peng

    2010-07-01

    To develop a reverse genetics system of Peste des petits ruminants virus(PPRV), five pairs of oligonucleotide primers were designed on the basis of the full-length genomic sequence of PPRV Nigeria 75/ 1 strain. Using RT-PCR technique, five over-lapping cDNA fragments, designated as JF1, JF2, JF3, JF4 and JF5, respectively, were amplified, followed by cloning into pcDNA3.1(+)vector. An AscI restriction enzyme site and a T7 promoter sequence were introduced immediately upstream of 5'-end, while a PacI restriction enzyme site was engineered downstream of 3'-end. Using pok12 as a plasmid vector, the full-length cDNA clone pok12-PPRV of Nigeria 75/1 was assembled by connecting the five cDNA fragments via the unique restriction endonuclease site of PPRV genome. The resultant nucleotide sequence of the PPRV Nigeria 75/1 strain in the study was compared with other members of genus morbillivirus, and phylogenetic analysis was used to examine the evolutionary relationships. The results showed that PPRV Nigeria 75/ 1 was antigenically closely related to Rinderpest virus and Measles virus. Successful construction of full-length cDNA clone of PPRV Nigeria 75/1 strain lays the basis rescuing PPRV effectively and enables further research of PPRV at molecular level. PMID:20836386

  13. [Rapid construction of full-length MnSOD cDNA of chickens by one-step 3'RACE].

    PubMed

    Bu, You-Quan; Luo, Xu-Gang; Liu, Bin; Li, Su-Fen

    2004-07-01

    RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) is a popular technique to rapidly obtain the full-length cDNA. After obtaining the 3' cDNA and 5' cDNA fragments with a overlapped region by 3' RACE and 5' RACE, the full-length cDNA could be generated by end-to-end PCR or subcloning. In this study, 3' RACE combined with touch-down PCR was successfully used for the rapid construction of full-length MnSOD cDNA of chickens. Compared with the conventional end-to-end PCR or subcloning, this method, called one-step 3' RACE, is fast, economical and highly specific. It especially fits the rapid construction of full-length cDNA by RACE method. PMID:15640053

  14. Generation of Arabidopsis mutants by heterologous expression of a full length cDNA library from tomato fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterologous expression of cDNA libraries in Arabidopsis and other plants has been used for gene identifications. To identify functions of tomato genes, we expressed a tomato full-length cDNA library in Arabidopsis thaliana and generated over 7,000 mutants. We constructed a tomato cDNA library with ...

  15. Full-length cDNA cloning and structural characterization of preproinsulin in Alligator sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R; Zhang, S Z; Li, E; Wang, C; Wang, C L; Wu, X B

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is an important endocrine hormone that plays a critical physiological role in regulating metabolism and glucostasis in vertebrates. In this study, the complete cDNA of Alligator sinensis preproinsulin gene was cloned for the first time by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and rapid amplification of cDNA ends methods; the amino acid sequence encoded and protein structure were analyzed. The full-length of preproinsulin cDNA sequence consists of 528 base pairs (bp), comprising a 34-bp 5'-untranslated region, a 170-bp 3'-untranslated region and an open reading frame that is 324 bp in length. The open reading frame encodes a 107-amino acid preproinsulin with a molecular weight of approximately 12,153.8 Da, theoretical isoelectric point of 5.68, aliphatic index of 92.06, and grand average of hydropathicity of -0.157, from which a signal peptide, a B-chain, a C-peptide, and an A-chain are derived. Online analysis suggested that the deduced preproinsulin amino acid sequence contains a transmembrane region, and that it has a signal peptide whose cleavage site occurs between alanine 24 and alanine 25. Comparative analysis of preproinsulin amino acid sequences indicated that the A-chain and B-chain sequences of preproinsulins are highly conserved between reptiles and birds, and that the preproinsulin amino acid sequence of Alligator sinensis shares 89% similarity to that of Chelonia mydas, but low similarity of 48-63% to those of mammals and fishes. The phylogenetic tree constructed using the neighbor-joining method revealed that preproinsulin of Alligator sinensis had high homology with reptiles and birds, such as Chelonia mydas, Gallus gallus, and Columba livia. PMID:25366775

  16. Construction, characterization and expression of full length cDNA clone of sheep YAP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Li, Da; Su, Rui; Musa, Hassan H; Chen, Ling; Zhou, Hong

    2014-02-01

    RT-PCR, 5'RACE, 3'RACE were used to clone sheep full length cDNA sequence of YAP1 (Yes-associated protein 1), eukaryotic expression plasmid and a mutant that cannot be phosphorylated at Ser42 was successfully constructed. The amino acid sequence analysis revealed that sheep YAP1 gene encoded water-soluble protein and its relative molecular weight and isoelectric point was 44,079.0 Da and 4.91, respectively. Sub-cellular localization of YAP1 was in the nucleus, it is hydrophilic non-transmembrane and non-secreted protein. YAP1 protein contained 33 phosphorylation sites, seven glycosylation sites and two WW domains. The secondary structure of YAP1 was mainly composed of random coil, while the tertiary structure of domain area showed a forniciform helix structure. YAP1 gene was expressed in different tissues, the highest expression was in kidney and the lowest was in hypothalamus. The CDS of sheep YAP1was amplified by RT-PCR from healthy sheep longissimus dorsi muscle, cloned into pMD19-T simple vector by T/A ligation. YAP1 coding region was further sub-cloned into pEGFP-C1 vector by T4 Ligase to construct a eukaryotic expression plasmid and then make the eukaryotic expression vector as the template to construct the phosphorylation site mutant. PCR, restriction enzyme and sequencing were used to confirm the recombinant plasmid. The sheep full-length YAP1 cDNA sequence is 1712 in length encoding 403 amino acids. It was confirmed that the sheep YAP1 CDS was correctly inserted into eukaryotic expression vector and serine had been mutated to alanine by PCR, restriction digestion and sequencing. The result showed that the recombinant plasmid pEGFP-C1-YAP1 and pEGFP-C1-YAP1 S42A was constructed correctly, this will help for further studies on the YAP1 protein expression and its biological activities. PMID:24381103

  17. Isolation, characterization and functional analysis of full length p53 cDNA from Bubalus bubalis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Minu; Aggarwal, Suruchi; Mohanty, Ashok K; Mukhopadhyay, Tapas

    2015-09-01

    p53 plays a pivotal role in maintaining the genomic integrity of the cell and has an important role in cellular transformation. We isolated and cloned a full length p53 cDNA (Bp53) from water buffalo in expression vectors designed to generate tagged proteins with FLAG or GFP. Bp53 was found to be 1161 nucleotide long and codes for 386 amino acid residues with 79% homology with human p53 containing 393 amino acids. Although Bp53 has some inherent differences in amino acid composition in different functional domains as compared to human p53 but the total electrostatic charge of amino acids has been maintained. Bp53 cDNA was transiently transfected in a p53 null human NSCLC cell line and as expected, it was predominantly localized in the nucleus. Besides, Bp53 effectively transactivates a number of target genes similar to human p53 and exerts most of its anti-tumorigenic potential in culture as observed in clonogenic and cell viability assays. Like human p53 mutants, core domain mutant version of Bp53 was found to be mis-localized to cytoplasm with diminished tumor suppressor activity. However, Bp53 appeared to be more sensitive to mdm2 mediated degradation and as a result, this protein was less stable as compared to human p53. For the first time we have characterized a functionally efficient wild-type p53 from buffalo having lower stability than human p53 and thus, buffalo p53 could be used as a model system for further insight to the molecular basis of wild-type p53 instability. PMID:26003295

  18. Construction and characterization of a full-length cDNA library for the wheat stripe rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A full-length cDNA library with complete genomic coverage is a powerful tool for functional genomic studies. We have constructed a full-length cDNA library from urediniospores of race PST-78 of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, the fungal pathogen causing wheat stripe rust. The full-length cDNA l...

  19. Infectious RNA transcripts from full-length dengue virus type 2 cDNA clones made in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Polo, S; Ketner, G; Levis, R; Falgout, B

    1997-01-01

    The dengue virus type 2 genomic RNA was amplified by reverse transcription-PCR and cloned as four cDNA fragments. We could not assemble these four fragments into full-length cDNA in Escherichia coli. The full-length dengue virus cDNA was constructed by homologous recombination in yeast, either as part of a yeast artificial chromosome or in a yeast-E. coli shuttle vector. Full-length cDNA clones were propagated once in E. coli to prepare useful quantities of DNA. In vitro transcription of these clones produced full-length RNA transcripts. Introduction of these transcripts into LLC-MK2 cells produced typical dengue infection, as judged by cytopathic effects and indirect immunofluorescence. Infectivity was sensitive to RNase digestion and was dependent on the presence of cap analog in the transcription reaction mixture. Virus in the medium was passaged on C6-36 cells to produce stocks, and these stocks had titers and plaque morphologies similar to those of the parental dengue virus type 2. Intracellular dengue virus RNA from cells infected with transcript-derived virus contained an introduced BstEII site, proving that infectivity was derived from RNA transcripts and not from contamination with parental dengue virus. Transcript-derived virus was comparable to dengue virus type 2 for growth and protein expression in tissue culture cells. Sequence analysis of the dengue virus cDNA in one full-length clone revealed only one unexpected silent mutation. By using yeast technology, it will be easy to introduce specific mutations into the dengue virus cDNA, allowing analysis of the virus phenotype in cells transfected with mutant transcripts. PMID:9188607

  20. Giardia canis: ultrastructural analysis of G. canis trophozoites transfected with full length G. canis virus cDNA transcripts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Giardia canis virus (GCV) is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus of the family Totiviridae. In this study, the full-length cDNA of the G. canis virus was constructed in pPoly2/sfinot vector and RNA was transcribed in vitro. Virus-free G. canis trophozoites were transfected with in vitro transcribed ...

  1. Integrating de novo transcriptome assembly and cloning to obtain chicken Ovocleidin-17 full-length cDNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Liu, Long; Zhu, Feng; Ning, ZhongHua; Hincke, Maxwell T; Yang, Ning; Hou, ZhuoCheng

    2014-01-01

    Efficiently obtaining full-length cDNA for a target gene is the key step for functional studies and probing genetic variations. However, almost all sequenced domestic animal genomes are not 'finished'. Many functionally important genes are located in these gapped regions. It can be difficult to obtain full-length cDNA for which only partial amino acid/EST sequences exist. In this study we report a general pipeline to obtain full-length cDNA, and illustrate this approach for one important gene (Ovocleidin-17, OC-17) that is associated with chicken eggshell biomineralization. Chicken OC-17 is one of the best candidates to control and regulate the deposition of calcium carbonate in the calcified eggshell layer. OC-17 protein has been purified, sequenced, and has had its three-dimensional structure solved. However, researchers still cannot conduct OC-17 mRNA related studies because the mRNA sequence is unknown and the gene is absent from the current chicken genome. We used RNA-Seq to obtain the entire transcriptome of the adult hen uterus, and then conducted de novo transcriptome assembling with bioinformatics analysis to obtain candidate OC-17 transcripts. Based on this sequence, we used RACE and PCR cloning methods to successfully obtain the full-length OC-17 cDNA. Temporal and spatial OC-17 mRNA expression analyses were also performed to demonstrate that OC-17 is predominantly expressed in the adult hen uterus during the laying cycle and barely at immature developmental stages. Differential uterine expression of OC-17 was observed in hens laying eggs with weak versus strong eggshell, confirming its important role in the regulation of eggshell mineralization and providing a new tool for genetic selection for eggshell quality parameters. This study is the first one to report the full-length OC-17 cDNA sequence, and builds a foundation for OC-17 mRNA related studies. We provide a general method for biologists experiencing difficulty in obtaining candidate gene full-length

  2. An efficient full-length cDNA amplification strategy based on bioinformatics technology and multiplexed PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan; Wang, Wei-Min; Wang, Huan-Ling

    2016-01-01

    A novel strategy for amplification full-length cDNA and promoter sequences has been developed using bioinformatics technology and multiplexed PCR methods in this study. The amplification of 3' ends of cDNA is performed according to the modified classic 3' RACE techniques, therein the more efficient and effective oligo(dT)-anchor primer with hairpin structure is specially designed. For the amplification of 5' ends of cDNA, two or three-round TAIL-PCR or touch-down PCR using arbitrary degenerate (AD) and sequence-specific reverse (SPR) primers is performed until the 5' sequence of multi-assembled fragment reaches the exon1 region identified by aligning this fragment to reference genome database. Then another TAIL-PCR or touch-down PCR using genomic DNA as template is conducted to obtain the remaining 5' and promoter sequences. The 5' end sites of cDNA are predicted by aligning finally assembled fragment to homologous reference genes of other species, and screening the relative locations of common characteristic cis-elements in silico on promoter. The putative 5' ends are further validated by primers corresponding to these predicted sites in cDNAs. This method is suitable for researchers to isolate limited full-length cDNA sequences due to its operability, inexpensiveness, efficiency and speediness. PMID:26758040

  3. An efficient full-length cDNA amplification strategy based on bioinformatics technology and multiplexed PCR methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nan; Wang, Wei-Min; Wang, Huan-Ling

    2016-01-01

    A novel strategy for amplification full-length cDNA and promoter sequences has been developed using bioinformatics technology and multiplexed PCR methods in this study. The amplification of 3′ ends of cDNA is performed according to the modified classic 3′ RACE techniques, therein the more efficient and effective oligo(dT)-anchor primer with hairpin structure is specially designed. For the amplification of 5′ ends of cDNA, two or three-round TAIL-PCR or touch-down PCR using arbitrary degenerate (AD) and sequence-specific reverse (SPR) primers is performed until the 5′ sequence of multi-assembled fragment reaches the exon1 region identified by aligning this fragment to reference genome database. Then another TAIL-PCR or touch-down PCR using genomic DNA as template is conducted to obtain the remaining 5′ and promoter sequences. The 5′ end sites of cDNA are predicted by aligning finally assembled fragment to homologous reference genes of other species, and screening the relative locations of common characteristic cis-elements in silico on promoter. The putative 5′ ends are further validated by primers corresponding to these predicted sites in cDNAs. This method is suitable for researchers to isolate limited full-length cDNA sequences due to its operability, inexpensiveness, efficiency and speediness. PMID:26758040

  4. Hibiscus latent Fort Pierce virus in Brazil and synthesis of its biologically active full-length cDNA clone.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruimin; Niu, Shengniao; Dai, Weifang; Kitajima, Elliot; Wong, Sek-Man

    2016-10-01

    A Brazilian isolate of Hibiscus latent Fort Pierce virus (HLFPV-BR) was firstly found in a hibiscus plant in Limeira, SP, Brazil. RACE PCR was carried out to obtain the full-length sequences of HLFPV-BR which is 6453 nucleotides and has more than 99.15 % of complete genomic RNA nucleotide sequence identity with that of HLFPV Japanese isolate. The genomic structure of HLFPV-BR is similar to other tobamoviruses. It includes a 5' untranslated region (UTR), followed by open reading frames encoding for a 128-kDa protein and a 188-kDa readthrough protein, a 38-kDa movement protein, 18-kDa coat protein, and a 3' UTR. Interestingly, the unique feature of poly(A) tract is also found within its 3'-UTR. Furthermore, from the total RNA extracted from the local lesions of HLFPV-BR-infected Chenopodium quinoa leaves, a biologically active, full-length cDNA clone encompassing the genome of HLFPV-BR was amplified and placed adjacent to a T7 RNA polymerase promoter. The capped in vitro transcripts from the cloned cDNA were infectious when mechanically inoculated into C. quinoa and Nicotiana benthamiana plants. This is the first report of the presence of an isolate of HLFPV in Brazil and the successful synthesis of a biologically active HLFPV-BR full-length cDNA clone. PMID:27139727

  5. [Full-length cDNA cloning of flavonol synthase genes of Carthamus tinctorius and construction plant expression vector].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-ting; Liu, Xiu-ming; Wan, Qiu; Yao, Na; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Xue-meng; Jiao, Zhong-da; Li, Hai-yan; Li, Xiao-kun

    2015-02-01

    Flavonol synthase (FLS) is one of the key enzymes in flavonoids metabolic pathways. In this study, middle sequence was obtained from Carthamus tinctorius transcriptome sequencing results. Full-length cDNAs of FLS was cloned from petals of C. tinctorius to FLS by using RT-PCR and RACE technology. Its full-length cDNA was 1,201 bp, with an open reading frame of 1,101 bp and 336 encoded amino acids. The phylogenetic analysis showed that, FLS gene encoded amino acids in C. tinctorius were highly homologous with amino acids in congeneric Compositae species, especially Rudbeckia laciniata. The pBASTA-FLS plant expression vector was successfully built by the molecular biology method, which lays a foundation for further studying biology functions of the gene and biosynthesis mechanism of flavonoids. PMID:26137682

  6. A new set of ESTs and cDNA clones from full-length and normalized libraries for gene discovery and functional characterization in citrus

    PubMed Central

    Marques, M Carmen; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Forment, Javier; Arribas, Raquel; Alamar, Santiago; Conejero, Vicente; Perez-Amador, Miguel A

    2009-01-01

    Background Interpretation of ever-increasing raw sequence information generated by modern genome sequencing technologies faces multiple challenges, such as gene function analysis and genome annotation. Indeed, nearly 40% of genes in plants encode proteins of unknown function. Functional characterization of these genes is one of the main challenges in modern biology. In this regard, the availability of full-length cDNA clones may fill in the gap created between sequence information and biological knowledge. Full-length cDNA clones facilitate functional analysis of the corresponding genes enabling manipulation of their expression in heterologous systems and the generation of a variety of tagged versions of the native protein. In addition, the development of full-length cDNA sequences has the power to improve the quality of genome annotation. Results We developed an integrated method to generate a new normalized EST collection enriched in full-length and rare transcripts of different citrus species from multiple tissues and developmental stages. We constructed a total of 15 cDNA libraries, from which we isolated 10,898 high-quality ESTs representing 6142 different genes. Percentages of redundancy and proportion of full-length clones range from 8 to 33, and 67 to 85, respectively, indicating good efficiency of the approach employed. The new EST collection adds 2113 new citrus ESTs, representing 1831 unigenes, to the collection of citrus genes available in the public databases. To facilitate functional analysis, cDNAs were introduced in a Gateway-based cloning vector for high-throughput functional analysis of genes in planta. Herein, we describe the technical methods used in the library construction, sequence analysis of clones and the overexpression of CitrSEP, a citrus homolog to the Arabidopsis SEP3 gene, in Arabidopsis as an example of a practical application of the engineered Gateway vector for functional analysis. Conclusion The new EST collection denotes an

  7. Penalized likelihood for sparse contingency tables with an application to full-length cDNA libraries

    PubMed Central

    Dahinden, Corinne; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Emerick, Mark C; Bühlmann, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background The joint analysis of several categorical variables is a common task in many areas of biology, and is becoming central to systems biology investigations whose goal is to identify potentially complex interaction among variables belonging to a network. Interactions of arbitrary complexity are traditionally modeled in statistics by log-linear models. It is challenging to extend these to the high dimensional and potentially sparse data arising in computational biology. An important example, which provides the motivation for this article, is the analysis of so-called full-length cDNA libraries of alternatively spliced genes, where we investigate relationships among the presence of various exons in transcript species. Results We develop methods to perform model selection and parameter estimation in log-linear models for the analysis of sparse contingency tables, to study the interaction of two or more factors. Maximum Likelihood estimation of log-linear model coefficients might not be appropriate because of the presence of zeros in the table's cells, and new methods are required. We propose a computationally efficient ℓ1-penalization approach extending the Lasso algorithm to this context, and compare it to other procedures in a simulation study. We then illustrate these algorithms on contingency tables arising from full-length cDNA libraries. Conclusion We propose regularization methods that can be used successfully to detect complex interaction patterns among categorical variables in a broad range of biological problems involving categorical variables. PMID:18072965

  8. Full-Length cDNA, Prokaryotic Expression, and Antimicrobial Activity of UuHb-F-I from Urechis unicinctus

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Rongli; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin, which widely exists in all vertebrates and in some invertebrates, is possibly a precursor of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). However, AMPs in the hemoglobin of invertebrates have been rarely investigated. This study is the first to report the full-length cDNA, prokaryotic expression, and antimicrobial activity of UuHb-F-I from Urechis unicinctus. The full-length cDNA sequence of UuHb-F-I was 780 bp with an open-reading frame of 429 bp encoding 142 amino acids. MALDI-TOF-MS suggested that the recombinant protein of UuHb-F-I (rUuHb-F-I) yielded a molecular weight of 15,168.01 Da, and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was MGLTGAQIDAIK. rUuHb-F-I exhibited different antimicrobial activities against microorganisms. The lowest minimum inhibitory concentration against Micrococcus luteus was 2.78–4.63 μM. Our results may help elucidate the immune defense mechanism of U. unicinctus and may provide insights into new AMPs in drug discovery. PMID:27471730

  9. Full-Length cDNA, Prokaryotic Expression, and Antimicrobial Activity of UuHb-F-I from Urechis unicinctus.

    PubMed

    Niu, Rongli; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin, which widely exists in all vertebrates and in some invertebrates, is possibly a precursor of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). However, AMPs in the hemoglobin of invertebrates have been rarely investigated. This study is the first to report the full-length cDNA, prokaryotic expression, and antimicrobial activity of UuHb-F-I from Urechis unicinctus. The full-length cDNA sequence of UuHb-F-I was 780 bp with an open-reading frame of 429 bp encoding 142 amino acids. MALDI-TOF-MS suggested that the recombinant protein of UuHb-F-I (rUuHb-F-I) yielded a molecular weight of 15,168.01 Da, and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was MGLTGAQIDAIK. rUuHb-F-I exhibited different antimicrobial activities against microorganisms. The lowest minimum inhibitory concentration against Micrococcus luteus was 2.78-4.63 μM. Our results may help elucidate the immune defense mechanism of U. unicinctus and may provide insights into new AMPs in drug discovery. PMID:27471730

  10. Full-length cDNA cloning, molecular characterization and differential expression analysis of peroxiredoxin 6 from Ovis aries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan-Nan; Liu, Zeng-Shan; Lu, Shi-Ying; Hu, Pan; Li, Yan-Song; Feng, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Shou-Yin; Wang, Nan; Meng, Qing-Feng; Yang, Yong-Jie; Tang, Feng; Xu, Yun-Ming; Zhang, Wen-Hui; Guo, Xing; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Hong-Lin

    2015-04-15

    Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6), an important antioxidant enzyme that can eliminate reactive oxygen species (ROS) to maintain homeostasis, is a bifunctional protein that possesses the activities of both glutathione peroxidase and phospholipase A2. In this study, a novel full-length Prdx6 cDNA (OaPrdx6) was cloned from Sheep (Ovis aries) using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of OaPrdx6 was 1753bp containing a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 93bp, a 3'-UTR of 985bp with a poly(A) tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 675bp encoding a protein of 224 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 25.07kDa. The recombinant protein OaPrdx6 was expressed and purified, and its DNA protection activity was identified. In order to analyze the Prdx6 protein expression in tissues from O. aries, monoclonal antibodies against OaPrdx6 were prepared. Western blotting results indicated that OaPrdx6 protein could be detected in heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, stomach, intestine, muscle, lymph node and white blood cells, and the highest expression was found in lung while the lowest expression in muscle. Compared to the normal sheep group, the mRNA transcription level of Prdx6 in buffy coat was up-regulated in the group infected with a virulent field strain of Brucella melitensis, and down-regulated in the group inoculated with a vaccine strain S2 of brucellosis. The results indicated that Prdx6 was likely to be involved in the host immune responses against Brucella infection, and probably regarded as a molecular biomarker for distinguishing between animals infected with virulent Brucella infection and those inoculated with vaccine against brucellosis. PMID:25712755

  11. Isolation and characterization of a full length cDNA for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Oyake, M.; Onodera, O.; Ikeuchi, T.

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant spinocerebellar degeneration characterized by anticipation and variable combination of symptoms including myoclonus, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, choleoathetosis, and dementia. Recently, we discovered that DRPLA is caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat of a B37 gene on chromosome 12. To characterize functions of the DRPLA gene product, we isolated several cDNA clones for the DRPLA gene from human adult and fetus brain cDNA libraries, using an oligonucleotide flanking the CAG repeat. The cDNA spans 4247 bp in length and there is only an open reading frame coding for 986 amino acids. The CAG repeat, which is expanded in DRPLA, is located 291 bp downstream from the initiation methionine and encodes a polyglutamine tract. The deduced amino acid sequence from amino acids residues 582 to 707 has a high homology to published human hippocampus derived expressed sequence (M78755) located at chromosome 1p (63.8% identity), and 3{prime}-untranslated region of the DRPLA cDNA revealed homology to the mouse small nuclear RNA U7 gene (X54165). Northern blot analysis revealed a 4.7 knt transcript which is widely expressed in various tissues including heart, lung, kidney, placenta, skeletal muscle, and brain. In human adult brain, the transcript was broadly expressed including amygdala, caudate nucleus, corpus callosum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus and thalamus, and was not specific to the dentatorubral-pallidoluysian system. The availability of a full length cDNA will be highly useful for analyzing the pathogenesis of this unique neurodegenerative disease as well as for analyzing other CAG repeat related neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Infectious foot-and-mouth disease virus derived from a cloned full-length cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zibert, A; Maass, G; Strebel, K; Falk, M M; Beck, E

    1990-01-01

    A full-length cDNA plasmid of foot-and-mouth disease virus has been constructed. RNA synthesized in vitro by means of a bacteriophage SP6 promoter inserted in front of the cDNA led to the production of infectious particles upon transfection of BHK-21 cells. These particles were also found to be highly infectious for primary bovine kidney cells as well as for baby mice. The difficulty in cloning the foot-and-mouth disease virus cytidyl tract in Escherichia coli was circumvented by joining two separate cloned parts, representing the S and L fragments of the genome, and, in a second step, inserting a dC-dG homopolymer. Homopolymeric sequences of up to 25 cytidyl residues did not lead to the production of virus. Replicons containing poly(C) tracts long enough to permit virus replication were first established in yeast cells. One of these constructs could also be maintained in E. coli and was used to produce infectious RNA in vitro. The length of the poly(C) sequence in this cDNA plasmid was 32 nucleotides. However, the poly(C) tracts of two recombinant viruses found in transfected BHK-21 cells were 60 and 80 nucleotides long, respectively. Possible mechanisms leading to the enlargement of the poly(C) tract during virus replication are discussed. Images PMID:2159523

  13. Full-Length cDNA Cloning, Molecular Characterization and Differential Expression Analysis of Lysophospholipase I from Ovis aries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan-Nan; Liu, Zeng-Shan; Hu, Pan; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Shi-Ying; Li, Yan-Song; Yang, Yong-Jie; Zhang, Dong-Song; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Hong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Lysophospholipase I (LYPLA1) is an important protein with multiple functions. In this study, the full-length cDNA of the LYPLA1 gene from Ovis aries (OaLypla1) was cloned using primers and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technology. The full-length OaLypla1 was 2457 bp with a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 24 bp, a 3'-UTR of 1740 bp with a poly (A) tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 693 bp encoding a protein of 230 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 24,625.78 Da. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the OaLypla1 protein shared a high amino acid identity with LYPLA1 of Bos taurus. The recombinant OaLypla1 protein was expressed and purified, and its phospholipase activity was identified. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against OaLypla1 that bound native OaLypla1 were generated. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that OaLypla1 was constitutively expressed in the liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and white blood cells of sheep, with the highest level in the kidney. Additionally, the mRNA levels of OaLypla1 in the buffy coats of sheep challenged with virulent or avirulent Brucella strains were down-regulated compared to untreated sheep. The results suggest that OaLypla1 may have an important physiological role in the host response to bacteria. The function of OaLypla1 in the host response to bacterial infection requires further study in the future. PMID:27483239

  14. Full-Length cDNA Cloning, Molecular Characterization and Differential Expression Analysis of Lysophospholipase I from Ovis aries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan-Nan; Liu, Zeng-Shan; Hu, Pan; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Shi-Ying; Li, Yan-Song; Yang, Yong-Jie; Zhang, Dong-Song; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Hong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Lysophospholipase I (LYPLA1) is an important protein with multiple functions. In this study, the full-length cDNA of the LYPLA1 gene from Ovis aries (OaLypla1) was cloned using primers and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technology. The full-length OaLypla1 was 2457 bp with a 5′-untranslated region (UTR) of 24 bp, a 3′-UTR of 1740 bp with a poly (A) tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 693 bp encoding a protein of 230 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 24,625.78 Da. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the OaLypla1 protein shared a high amino acid identity with LYPLA1 of Bos taurus. The recombinant OaLypla1 protein was expressed and purified, and its phospholipase activity was identified. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against OaLypla1 that bound native OaLypla1 were generated. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that OaLypla1 was constitutively expressed in the liver, spleen, lung, kidney, and white blood cells of sheep, with the highest level in the kidney. Additionally, the mRNA levels of OaLypla1 in the buffy coats of sheep challenged with virulent or avirulent Brucella strains were down-regulated compared to untreated sheep. The results suggest that OaLypla1 may have an important physiological role in the host response to bacteria. The function of OaLypla1 in the host response to bacterial infection requires further study in the future. PMID:27483239

  15. Integrative Annotation of 21,037 Human Genes Validated by Full-Length cDNA Clones

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Tadashi; Itoh, Takeshi; Suzuki, Yutaka; O'Donovan, Claire; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Koyanagi, Kanako O.; Barrero, Roberto A.; Tamura, Takuro; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Tanino, Motohiko; Yura, Kei; Miyazaki, Satoru; Ikeo, Kazuho; Homma, Keiichi; Kasprzyk, Arek; Nishikawa, Tetsuo; Hirakawa, Mika; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Ashurst, Jennifer; Jia, Libin; Nakao, Mitsuteru; Thomas, Michael A.; Mulder, Nicola; Karavidopoulou, Youla; Jin, Lihua; Kim, Sangsoo; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Lenhard, Boris; Eveno, Eric; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Yamasaki, Chisato; Takeda, Jun-ichi; Gough, Craig; Hilton, Phillip; Fujii, Yasuyuki; Sakai, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Susumu; Amid, Clara; Bellgard, Matthew; de Fatima Bonaldo, Maria; Bono Hidemasa; Bromberg, Susan K.; Brookes, Anthony J.; Bruford, Elspeth; Carninci Piero; Chelala, Claude; Couillault, Christine; de Souza, Sandro J.; Debily, Marie-Anne; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Dubchak, Inna; Endo, Toshinori; Estreicher, Anne; Eyras, Eduardo; Fukami-Kobayashi, Kaoru; Gopinath, Gopal R.; Graudens, Esther; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Han, Michael; Han, Ze-Guang; Hanada, Kousuke; Hanaoka, Hideki; Harada, Erimi; Hashimoto, Katsuyuki; Hinz, Ursula; Hirai, Momoki; Hishiki, Teruyoshi; Hopkinson, Ian; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Kanapin, Alexander; Kaneko, Yayoi; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kelso, Janet; Kersey, Paul; Kikuno Reiko; Kimura, Kouichi; Korn, Bernhard; Kuryshev, Vladimir; Makalowska, Izabela; Makino Takashi; Mano, Shuhei; Mariage-Samson, Regine; Mashima, Jun; Matsuda, Hideo; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Minoshima, Shinsei; Nagai, Keiichi; Nagasaki, Hideki; Nagata, Naoki; Nigam, Rajni; Ogasawara, Osamu; Ohara, Osamu; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Okada, Norihiro; Okido, Toshihisa; Oota, Satoshi; Ota, Motonori; Ota, Toshio; Otsuki, Tetsuji; Piatier-Tonneau, Dominique; Poustka, Annemarie; Ren, Shuang-Xi; Saitou, Naruya; Sakai, Katsunaga; Sakamoto, Shigetaka; Sakate, Ryuichi; Schupp, Ingo; Servant, Florence; Sherry, Stephen; Shiba Rie; et al.

    2004-01-15

    The human genome sequence defines our inherent biological potential; the realization of the biology encoded therein requires knowledge of the function of each gene. Currently, our knowledge in this area is still limited. Several lines of investigation have been used to elucidate the structure and function of the genes in the human genome. Even so, gene prediction remains a difficult task, as the varieties of transcripts of a gene may vary to a great extent. We thus performed an exhaustive integrative characterization of 41,118 full-length cDNAs that capture the gene transcripts as complete functional cassettes, providing an unequivocal report of structural and functional diversity at the gene level. Our international collaboration has validated 21,037 human gene candidates by analysis of high-quality full-length cDNA clones through curation using unified criteria. This led to the identification of 5,155 new gene candidates. It also manifested the most reliable way to control the quality of the cDNA clones. We have developed a human gene database, called the H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; http://www.h-invitational.jp/). It provides the following: integrative annotation of human genes, description of gene structures, details of novel alternative splicing isoforms, non-protein-coding RNAs, functional domains, subcellular localizations, metabolic pathways, predictions of protein three-dimensional structure, mapping of known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identification of polymorphic microsatellite repeats within human genes, and comparative results with mouse full-length cDNAs. The H-InvDB analysis has shown that up to 4 percent of the human genome sequence (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 34 assembly) may contain misassembled or missing regions. We found that 6.5 percent of the human gene candidates (1,377 loci) did not have a good protein-coding open reading frame, of which 296 loci are strong candidates for nonprotein-coding RNA

  16. Transcriptome and full-length cDNA resources for the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, a major insect pest of pine forests.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Christopher I; Henderson, Hannah; Li, Maria; Yuen, Mack; Clark, Erin L; Fraser, Jordie D; Huber, Dezene P W; Liao, Nancy Y; Docking, T Roderick; Birol, Inanc; Chan, Simon K; Taylor, Greg A; Palmquist, Diana; Jones, Steven J M; Bohlmann, Joerg

    2012-08-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) are major insect pests of many woody plants around the world. The mountain pine beetle (MPB), Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a significant historical pest of western North American pine forests. It is currently devastating pine forests in western North America--particularly in British Columbia, Canada--and is beginning to expand its host range eastward into the Canadian boreal forest, which extends to the Atlantic coast of North America. Limited genomic resources are available for this and other bark beetle pests, restricting the use of genomics-based information to help monitor, predict, and manage the spread of these insects. To overcome these limitations, we generated comprehensive transcriptome resources from fourteen full-length enriched cDNA libraries through paired-end Sanger sequencing of 100,000 cDNA clones, and single-end Roche 454 pyrosequencing of three of these cDNA libraries. Hybrid de novo assembly of the 3.4 million sequences resulted in 20,571 isotigs in 14,410 isogroups and 246,848 singletons. In addition, over 2300 non-redundant full-length cDNA clones putatively containing complete open reading frames, including 47 cytochrome P450s, were sequenced fully to high quality. This first large-scale genomics resource for bark beetles provides the relevant sequence information for gene discovery; functional and population genomics; comparative analyses; and for future efforts to annotate the MPB genome. These resources permit the study of this beetle at the molecular level and will inform research in other Dendroctonus spp. and more generally in the Curculionidae and other Coleoptera. PMID:22516182

  17. Sequencing analysis of 20,000 full-length cDNA clones from cassava reveals lineage specific expansions in gene families related to stress response

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Tetsuya; Plata, Germán; Rodríguez-Zapata, Fausto; Seki, Motoaki; Salcedo, Andrés; Toyoda, Atsushi; Ishiwata, Atsushi; Tohme, Joe; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Ishitani, Manabu

    2007-01-01

    Background Cassava, an allotetraploid known for its remarkable tolerance to abiotic stresses is an important source of energy for humans and animals and a raw material for many industrial processes. A full-length cDNA library of cassava plants under normal, heat, drought, aluminum and post harvest physiological deterioration conditions was built; 19968 clones were sequence-characterized using expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Results The ESTs were assembled into 6355 contigs and 9026 singletons that were further grouped into 10577 scaffolds; we found 4621 new cassava sequences and 1521 sequences with no significant similarity to plant protein databases. Transcripts of 7796 distinct genes were captured and we were able to assign a functional classification to 78% of them while finding more than half of the enzymes annotated in metabolic pathways in Arabidopsis. The annotation of sequences that were not paired to transcripts of other species included many stress-related functional categories showing that our library is enriched with stress-induced genes. Finally, we detected 230 putative gene duplications that include key enzymes in reactive oxygen species signaling pathways and could play a role in cassava stress response features. Conclusion The cassava full-length cDNA library here presented contains transcripts of genes involved in stress response as well as genes important for different areas of cassava research. This library will be an important resource for gene discovery, characterization and cloning; in the near future it will aid the annotation of the cassava genome. PMID:18096061

  18. Large scale full-length cDNA sequencing reveals a unique genomic landscape in a lepidopteran model insect, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Futahashi, Ryo; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Sasanuma, Shun-ichi; Narukawa, Junko; Ajimura, Masahiro; Jouraku, Akiya; Namiki, Nobukazu; Shimomura, Michihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Suzuki, Masataka G; Daimon, Takaaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kawaoka, Shinpei; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Noda, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Masahiro; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Goldsmith, Marian R; Feng, Qili; Xia, Qingyou; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei

    2013-09-01

    The establishment of a complete genomic sequence of silkworm, the model species of Lepidoptera, laid a foundation for its functional genomics. A more complete annotation of the genome will benefit functional and comparative studies and accelerate extensive industrial applications for this insect. To realize these goals, we embarked upon a large-scale full-length cDNA collection from 21 full-length cDNA libraries derived from 14 tissues of the domesticated silkworm and performed full sequencing by primer walking for 11,104 full-length cDNAs. The large average intron size was 1904 bp, resulting from a high accumulation of transposons. Using gene models predicted by GLEAN and published mRNAs, we identified 16,823 gene loci on the silkworm genome assembly. Orthology analysis of 153 species, including 11 insects, revealed that among three Lepidoptera including Monarch and Heliconius butterflies, the 403 largest silkworm-specific genes were composed mainly of protective immunity, hormone-related, and characteristic structural proteins. Analysis of testis-/ovary-specific genes revealed distinctive features of sexual dimorphism, including depletion of ovary-specific genes on the Z chromosome in contrast to an enrichment of testis-specific genes. More than 40% of genes expressed in specific tissues mapped in tissue-specific chromosomal clusters. The newly obtained FL-cDNA sequences enabled us to annotate the genome of this lepidopteran model insect more accurately, enhancing genomic and functional studies of Lepidoptera and comparative analyses with other insect orders, and yielding new insights into the evolution and organization of lepidopteran-specific genes. PMID:23821615

  19. Large Scale Full-Length cDNA Sequencing Reveals a Unique Genomic Landscape in a Lepidopteran Model Insect, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Futahashi, Ryo; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Sasanuma, Shun-ichi; Narukawa, Junko; Ajimura, Masahiro; Jouraku, Akiya; Namiki, Nobukazu; Shimomura, Michihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Suzuki, Masataka G; Daimon, Takaaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kawaoka, Shinpei; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Noda, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Masahiro; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Arunkumar, Kallare P.; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Goldsmith, Marian R.; Feng, Qili; Xia, Qingyou; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of a complete genomic sequence of silkworm, the model species of Lepidoptera, laid a foundation for its functional genomics. A more complete annotation of the genome will benefit functional and comparative studies and accelerate extensive industrial applications for this insect. To realize these goals, we embarked upon a large-scale full-length cDNA collection from 21 full-length cDNA libraries derived from 14 tissues of the domesticated silkworm and performed full sequencing by primer walking for 11,104 full-length cDNAs. The large average intron size was 1904 bp, resulting from a high accumulation of transposons. Using gene models predicted by GLEAN and published mRNAs, we identified 16,823 gene loci on the silkworm genome assembly. Orthology analysis of 153 species, including 11 insects, revealed that among three Lepidoptera including Monarch and Heliconius butterflies, the 403 largest silkworm-specific genes were composed mainly of protective immunity, hormone-related, and characteristic structural proteins. Analysis of testis-/ovary-specific genes revealed distinctive features of sexual dimorphism, including depletion of ovary-specific genes on the Z chromosome in contrast to an enrichment of testis-specific genes. More than 40% of genes expressed in specific tissues mapped in tissue-specific chromosomal clusters. The newly obtained FL-cDNA sequences enabled us to annotate the genome of this lepidopteran model insect more accurately, enhancing genomic and functional studies of Lepidoptera and comparative analyses with other insect orders, and yielding new insights into the evolution and organization of lepidopteran-specific genes. PMID:23821615

  20. Sequencing and analysis of 10967 full-length cDNA clones from Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, R D; Chang, E; Petrescu, A; Liao, N; Kirkpatrick, R; Griffith, M; Butterfield, Y; Stott, J; Barber, S; Babakaiff, R; Matsuo, C; Wong, D; Yang, G; Smailus, D; Brown-John, M; Mayo, M; Beland, J; Gibson, S; Olson, T; Tsai, M; Featherstone, R; Chand, S; Siddiqui, A; Jang, W; Lee, E; Klein, S; Prange, C; Myers, R M; Green, E D; Wagner, L; Gerhard, D; Marra, M; Jones, S M; Holt, R

    2005-10-31

    Sequencing of full-insert clones from full-length cDNA libraries from both Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis has been ongoing as part of the Xenopus Gene Collection initiative. Here we present an analysis of 10967 clones (8049 from X. laevis and 2918 from X. tropicalis). The clone set contains 2013 orthologs between X. laevis and X. tropicalis as well as 1795 paralog pairs within X. laevis. 1199 are in-paralogs, believed to have resulted from an allotetraploidization event approximately 30 million years ago, and the remaining 546 are likely out-paralogs that have resulted from more ancient gene duplications, prior to the divergence between the two species. We do not detect any evidence for positive selection by the Yang and Nielsen maximum likelihood method of approximating d{sub N}/d{sub S}. However, d{sub N}/d{sub S} for X. laevis in-paralogs is elevated relative to X. tropicalis orthologs. This difference is highly significant, and indicates an overall relaxation of selective pressures on duplicated gene pairs. Within both groups of paralogs, we found evidence of subfunctionalization, manifested as differential expression of paralogous genes among tissues, as measured by EST information from public resources. We have observed, as expected, a higher instance of subfunctionalization in out-paralogs relative to in-paralogs.

  1. Computer-Based Methods for the Mouse Full-Length cDNA Encyclopedia: Real-Time Sequence Clustering for Construction of a Nonredundant cDNA Library

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Hideaki; Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Shibata, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Masayoshi; Carninci, Piero; Sugahara, Yuichi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2001-01-01

    We developed computer-based methods for constructing a nonredundant mouse full-length cDNA library. Our cDNA library construction process comprises assessment of library quality, sequencing the 3′ ends of inserts and clustering, and completing a re-array to generate a nonredundant library from a redundant one. After the cDNA libraries are generated, we sequence the 5′ ends of the inserts to check the quality of the library; then we determine the sequencing priority of each library. Selected libraries undergo large-scale sequencing of the 3′ ends of the inserts and clustering of the tag sequences. After clustering, the nonredundant library is constructed from the original libraries, which have redundant clones. All libraries, plates, clones, sequences, and clusters are uniquely identified, and all information is saved in the database according to this identifier. At press time, our system has been in place for the past two years; we have clustered 939,725 3′ end sequences into 127,385 groups from 227 cDNA libraries/sublibraries (see http://genome.gse.riken.go.jp/). [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the DDBJ data library under accession nos. AV00011–AV175734, AV204013–AV382295, and BB561685–BB609425.] PMID:11157791

  2. Identification and expression analysis of a full-length cDNA encoding a Kandelia candel tonoplast intrinsic protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Fang, Xiao-Dong; Lin, Qi-Fen; Li, Guan-Yi; Zhao, Wen-Ming

    2003-03-01

    corresponding to the 5' end of this gene was obtained using the GSP2 primer. Two primers that flank the putative open reading frame (ORF) were designed to obtain the cDNA containing the complete ORF by RACE PCR reaction. The full-length cDNA of KCTIP1, containing a 756 bp open reading frame (ORF), was approximately 1.1 kb; the start codon was located at the nucleotides of 99-101 and stop codon at the nucleotides of 855-857 followed by a poly (A) tail. The KCTIP1 cDNA sequence in this research was released in GenBank with accession number AF521135. Using ExPASy Proteomics tools provided by EMBL, the isoelectric point and MWt of KCTIP1 are estimated as 5.77 and 26.3 kD respectively. Transmembrane prediction analysis revealed the deduced KCTIP1 protein sequence contains six transmembrane regions at amino acid residues of 20 - 42, 57 - 79, 86 - 108, 113 - 135, 142 - 164 and 217 - 239. Two highly conserved asparagine-proline-alanine (NPA) motifs were located at 85 - 87 and 199 - 201 amino acid residues respectively. KCTIP1 is also predicted to contain the Cys residue (Cys 118) that are shown to confer Hg-sensitivity in Arabidopsis gamma-TIP and delta-TIP. Similarity analysis showed that KCTIP1 shared 77% - 79% amino acid sequence identity with the TIPs from Vitis berlandieri, Brassica oleracea and Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression analyses indicated that KCTIP1 had different expression among species of Mangroves. Expressions of KCTIP1 in Kandelia candel, Rhizophora apoculata and Ceriops tagal were suppressed by salt, and were insensitive to salt stress in unknown species of Mangroves. Previous studied showed that salt conditions might result in large and rapid changes in extracellular water potential and serious disturbance to the cytoplasm. In order to compensate for this imbalance, the relative contribution of water channels to flow across the root could thus vary. K. candel is a species that is native to intertial zone of tropical and subtropical coast and is well-adapted to salt

  3. Sequencing and comparative genomics analysis in Senecio scandens Buch.-Ham. Ex D. Don, based on full-length cDNA library

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Gang; Ping, Junjiao; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Delin

    2014-01-01

    Senecio scandens Buch.-Ham. ex D. Don, an important antibacterial source of Chinese traditional medicine, has a widespread distribution in a few ecological habitats of China. We generated a full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) library from a sample of elite individuals with superior antibacterial properties, with satisfactory parameters such as library storage (4.30 × 106 CFU), efficiency of titre (1.30 × 106 CFU/mL), transformation efficiency (96.35%), full-length ratio (64.00%) and redundancy ratio (3.28%). The BLASTN search revealed the facile formation of counterparts between the experimental sample and Arabidopsis thaliana in view of high-homology cDNA sequence (90.79%) with e-values <1e – 50. Sequence similarities to known proteins indicate that the entire sequences of the full-length cDNA clones consist of the major of functional genes identified by a large set of microarray data from the present experimental material. For other Compositae species, a large set of full-length cDNA clones reported in the present article will serve as a useful resource to facilitate further research on the transferability of expressed sequence tag-derived simple sequence repeats (EST-SSR) development, comparative genomics and novel transcript profiles. PMID:26740776

  4. Cost-Effective Sequencing of Full-Length cDNA Clones Powered by a De Novo-Reference Hybrid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Sugano, Sumio; Morishita, Shinichi; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequencing full-length cDNA clones is important to determine gene structures including alternative splice forms, and provides valuable resources for experimental analyses to reveal the biological functions of coded proteins. However, previous approaches for sequencing cDNA clones were expensive or time-consuming, and therefore, a fast and efficient sequencing approach was demanded. Methodology We developed a program, MuSICA 2, that assembles millions of short (36-nucleotide) reads collected from a single flow cell lane of Illumina Genome Analyzer to shotgun-sequence ∼800 human full-length cDNA clones. MuSICA 2 performs a hybrid assembly in which an external de novo assembler is run first and the result is then improved by reference alignment of shotgun reads. We compared the MuSICA 2 assembly with 200 pooled full-length cDNA clones finished independently by the conventional primer-walking using Sanger sequencers. The exon-intron structure of the coding sequence was correct for more than 95% of the clones with coding sequence annotation when we excluded cDNA clones insufficiently represented in the shotgun library due to PCR failure (42 out of 200 clones excluded), and the nucleotide-level accuracy of coding sequences of those correct clones was over 99.99%. We also applied MuSICA 2 to full-length cDNA clones from Toxoplasma gondii, to confirm that its ability was competent even for non-human species. Conclusions The entire sequencing and shotgun assembly takes less than 1 week and the consumables cost only ∼US$3 per clone, demonstrating a significant advantage over previous approaches. PMID:20479877

  5. Identification of genes expressed in human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells by expressed sequence tags and efficient full-length cDNA cloning

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Fu, Gang; Wu, Ji-Sheng; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Zhou, Jun; Kan, Li-Xin; Huang, Qiu-Hua; He, Kai-Li; Gu, Bai-Wei; Han, Ze-Guang; Shen, Yu; Gu, Jian; Yu, Ya-Ping; Xu, Shu-Hua; Wang, Ya-Xin; Chen, Sai-Juan; Chen, Zhu

    1998-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) possess the potentials of self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation toward different lineages of blood cells. These cells not only play a primordial role in hematopoietic development but also have important clinical application. Characterization of the gene expression profile in CD34+ HSPCs may lead to a better understanding of the regulation of normal and pathological hematopoiesis. In the present work, genes expressed in human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells were catalogued by partially sequencing a large amount of cDNA clones [or expressed sequence tags (ESTs)] and analyzing these sequences with the tools of bioinformatics. Among 9,866 ESTs thus obtained, 4,697 (47.6%) showed identity to known genes in the GenBank database, 2,603 (26.4%) matched to the ESTs previously deposited in a public domain database, 1,415 (14.3%) were previously undescribed ESTs, and the remaining 1,151 (11.7%) were mitochondrial DNA, ribosomal RNA, or repetitive (Alu or L1) sequences. Integration of ESTs of known genes generated a profile including 855 genes that could be divided into different categories according to their functions. Some (8.2%) of the genes in this profile were considered related to early hematopoiesis. The possible function of ESTs corresponding to so far unknown genes were approached by means of homology and functional motif searches. Moreover, attempts were made to generate libraries enriched for full-length cDNAs, to better explore the genes in HSPCs. Nearly 60% of the cDNA clones of mRNA under 2 kb in our libraries had 5′ ends upstream of the first ATG codon of the ORF. With this satisfactory result, we have developed an efficient working system that allowed fast sequencing of 32 full-length cDNAs, 16 of them being mapped to the chromosomes with radiation hybrid panels. This work may lay a basis for the further research on the molecular network of hematopoietic regulation. PMID:9653160

  6. Construction of a full-length cDNA library of Solen grandis dunker and identification of defense- and immune-related genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guohua; Liu, Xiangquan; Ren, Lihua; Yang, Jianmin; Wei, Xiumei; Yang, Jialong

    2013-11-01

    The basic genetic characteristics, important functional genes, and entire transcriptome of Solen grandis Dunker were investigated by constructing a full-length cDNA library with the `switching mechanism at the 5'-end of the RNA transcript' (SMART) technique. Total RNA was isolated from the immune-relevant tissues, gills and hemocytes, using the Trizol reagent, and cDNA fragments were digested with Sfi I before being ligated to the pBluescript II SK* vector. The cDNA library had a titer of 1048 cfu μL-1 and a storage capacity of 1.05×106 cfu. Approximately 98% of the clones in the library were recombinants, and the fragment lengths of insert cDNA ranged from 0.8 kb to 3.0 kb. A total of 2038 expressed sequence tags were successfully sequenced and clustered into 965 unigenes. BLASTN analysis showed that 240 sequences were highly similar to the known genes (E-value < 1e -5; percent identity >80%), accounting for 25% of the total unigenes. According to the Gene Ontology, these unigenes were related to several biological processes, including cell structure, signal transport, protein synthesis, transcription, energy metabolism, and immunity. Fifteen of the identified sequences were related to defense and immunity. The full-length cDNA sequence of HSC70 was obtained. The cDNA library of S. grandis provided a useful resource for future researches of functional genomics related to stress tolerance, immunity, and other physiological activities.

  7. Identification and isolation of full-length cDNA sequences by sequencing and analysis of expressed sequence tags from guarana (Paullinia cupana).

    PubMed

    Figueirêdo, L C; Faria-Campos, A C; Astolfi-Filho, S; Azevedo, J L

    2011-01-01

    The current intense production of biological data, generated by sequencing techniques, has created an ever-growing volume of unanalyzed data. We reevaluated data produced by the guarana (Paullinia cupana) transcriptome sequencing project to identify cDNA clones with complete coding sequences (full-length clones) and complete sequences of genes of biotechnological interest, contributing to the knowledge of biological characteristics of this organism. We analyzed 15,490 ESTs of guarana in search of clones with complete coding regions. A total of 12,402 sequences were analyzed using BLAST, and 4697 full-length clones were identified, responsible for the production of 2297 different proteins. Eighty-four clones were identified as full-length for N-methyltransferase and 18 were sequenced in both directions to obtain the complete genome sequence, and confirm the search made in silico for full-length clones. Phylogenetic analyses were made with the complete genome sequences of three clones, which showed only 0.017% dissimilarity; these are phylogenetically close to the caffeine synthase of Theobroma cacao. The search for full-length clones allowed the identification of numerous clones that had the complete coding region, demonstrating this to be an efficient and useful tool in the process of biological data mining. The sequencing of the complete coding region of identified full-length clones corroborated the data from the in silico search, strengthening its efficiency and utility. PMID:21732283

  8. Development of an agroinoculation system for full-length and GFP-tagged cDNA clones of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongying; Xiao, Caili; Han, Kelei; Peng, Jiejun; Lin, Lin; Lu, Yuwen; Xie, Li; Wu, Xiaohua; Xu, Pei; Li, Guojing; Chen, Jianping; Yan, Fei

    2015-11-01

    The complete 6243-nucleotide sequence of a cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolate from bottle gourd in Zhejiang province, China, was determined. A full-length cDNA clone of this isolate was constructed by inserting the cDNA between the 35S promoter and the ribozyme in the binary plasmid pCB301-CH. A suspension of an Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105 clone carrying this construct was highly infectious in Nicotiana benthamiana and bottle gourd. Another infectious clone containing the green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter gene was also successfully constructed. This study is the first report of the efficient use of agroinoculation for generating CGMMV infections. PMID:26323263

  9. Rapid Construction of Stable Infectious Full-Length cDNA Clone of Papaya Leaf Distortion Mosaic Virus Using In-Fusion Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) is becoming a threat to papaya and transgenic papaya resistant to the related pathogen, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). The generation of infectious viral clones is an essential step for reverse-genetics studies of viral gene function and cross-protection. In this study, a sequence- and ligation-independent cloning system, the In-Fusion® Cloning Kit (Clontech, Mountain View, CA, USA), was used to construct intron-less or intron-containing full-length cDNA clones of the isolate PLDMV-DF, with the simultaneous scarless assembly of multiple viral and intron fragments into a plasmid vector in a single reaction. The intron-containing full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV-DF was stably propagated in Escherichia coli. In vitro intron-containing transcripts were processed and spliced into biologically active intron-less transcripts following mechanical inoculation and then initiated systemic infections in Carica papaya L. seedlings, which developed similar symptoms to those caused by the wild-type virus. However, no infectivity was detected when the plants were inoculated with RNA transcripts from the intron-less construct because the instability of the viral cDNA clone in bacterial cells caused a non-sense or deletion mutation of the genomic sequence of PLDMV-DF. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the construction of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV and the splicing of intron-containing transcripts following mechanical inoculation. In-Fusion cloning shortens the construction time from months to days. Therefore, it is a faster, more flexible, and more efficient method than the traditional multistep restriction enzyme-mediated subcloning procedure. PMID:26633465

  10. Rapid Construction of Stable Infectious Full-Length cDNA Clone of Papaya Leaf Distortion Mosaic Virus Using In-Fusion Cloning.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Decai; Shen, Wentao; Yan, Pu; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) is becoming a threat to papaya and transgenic papaya resistant to the related pathogen, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). The generation of infectious viral clones is an essential step for reverse-genetics studies of viral gene function and cross-protection. In this study, a sequence- and ligation-independent cloning system, the In-Fusion(®) Cloning Kit (Clontech, Mountain View, CA, USA), was used to construct intron-less or intron-containing full-length cDNA clones of the isolate PLDMV-DF, with the simultaneous scarless assembly of multiple viral and intron fragments into a plasmid vector in a single reaction. The intron-containing full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV-DF was stably propagated in Escherichia coli. In vitro intron-containing transcripts were processed and spliced into biologically active intron-less transcripts following mechanical inoculation and then initiated systemic infections in Carica papaya L. seedlings, which developed similar symptoms to those caused by the wild-type virus. However, no infectivity was detected when the plants were inoculated with RNA transcripts from the intron-less construct because the instability of the viral cDNA clone in bacterial cells caused a non-sense or deletion mutation of the genomic sequence of PLDMV-DF. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the construction of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of PLDMV and the splicing of intron-containing transcripts following mechanical inoculation. In-Fusion cloning shortens the construction time from months to days. Therefore, it is a faster, more flexible, and more efficient method than the traditional multistep restriction enzyme-mediated subcloning procedure. PMID:26633465

  11. Characterisation of a new infectious full-length cDNA clone of BVDV genotype 2 and generation of virus mutants.

    PubMed

    Mischkale, Katrin; Reimann, Ilona; Zemke, J; König, P; Beer, Martin

    2010-04-21

    Based on their genomic sequences, two genotypes of Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) can be differentiated, BVDV type 1 (BVDV-1) and BVDV type 2 (BVDV-2). The complete genomic sequence of the highly virulent BVDV-2 strain 890 was cloned as cDNA to establish the infectious cDNA clone p890FL. In vitro-synthesised full-length RNA of p890FL was transfected into bovine cells and infectious virus could be recovered (v890FL). In vitro, recombinant v890FL showed similar growth characteristics as wild type virus v890WT. However, infection experiments in calves revealed an attenuation of recombinant v890FL in comparison to the parental isolate. Both leukocytopenia and fever were less pronounced in v890FL-infected calves. Nevertheless, viremia and virus shedding were comparable between recombinant and parental BVDV 890. Furthermore, mutants with partial deletions of the genomic region encoding for the autoprotease N(pro) (p890DeltaN(pro)) or the capsid protein (p890DeltaC) were constructed and characterised. In order to generate pseudovirions, replicon p890DeltaC was efficiently trans-complemented on a helper cell line. In summary, the newly developed construct p890FL represents the first infectious full-length cDNA clone for the BVDV-2 strain 890 and offers a useful tool for further studies on the pathogenesis of BVDV-2 and the development of novel recombinant BVDV-2 specific vaccine candidates. PMID:19875251

  12. Development of three full-length infectious cDNA clones of distinct brassica yellows virus genotypes for agrobacterium-mediated inoculation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Dong, Shu-Wei; Xiang, Hai-Ying; Chen, Xiang-Ru; Li, Da-Wei; Yu, Jia-Lin; Han, Cheng-Gui

    2015-02-01

    Brassica yellows virus is a newly identified species in the genus of Polerovirus within the family Luteoviridae. Brassica yellows virus (BrYV) is prevalently distributed throughout Mainland China and South Korea, is an important virus infecting cruciferous crops. Based on six BrYV genomic sequences of isolates from oilseed rape, rutabaga, radish, and cabbage, three genotypes, BrYV-A, BrYV-B, and BrYV-C, exist, which mainly differ in the 5' terminal half of the genome. BrYV is an aphid-transmitted and phloem-limited virus. The use of infectious cDNA clones is an alternative means of infecting plants that allows reverse genetic studies to be performed. In this study, full-length cDNA clones of BrYV-A, recombinant BrYV5B3A, and BrYV-C were constructed under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. An agrobacterium-mediated inoculation system of Nicotiana benthamiana was developed using these cDNA clones. Three days after infiltration with full-length BrYV cDNA clones, necrotic symptoms were observed in the inoculated leaves of N. benthamiana; however, no obvious symptoms appeared in the upper leaves. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot detection of samples from the upper leaves showed that the maximum infection efficiency of BrYVs could reach 100%. The infectivity of the BrYV-A, BrYV-5B3A, and BrYV-C cDNA clones was further confirmed by northern hybridization. The system developed here will be useful for further studies of BrYV, such as host range, pathogenicity, viral gene functions, and plant-virus-vector interactions, and especially for discerning the differences among the three genotypes. PMID:25499296

  13. Construction and analysis of infectious transcripts synthesized from full-length cDNA clones of both genomic RNAs of pea early browning virus.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, S A; Wallis, C V; Taylor, S C; Goulden, M G; Wood, K R; Davies, J W

    1991-05-01

    Full-length cDNA clones of both RNAs of pea early browning virus have been constructed. Synthetic transcripts derived in vitro from these clones are infectious when inoculated onto plants. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of virions in transcript-inoculated plants, and both purified RNA and virions isolated from such plants could be used to infect other plants. Transcripts of RNA1 alone were able to replicate and spread systemically which is a characteristic of members of the tobravirus group of plant viruses. PMID:2024460

  14. Molecular and biological characterization of highly infectious transcripts from full-length cDNA clones of broad bean wilt virus 1.

    PubMed

    Ferriol, Inmaculada; Ambrós, Silvia; da Silva, Dorivaldo M; Falk, Bryce W; Rubio, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Broad bean wilt virus 1 (BBWV-1), genus Fabavirus, has a genome composed of two single-stranded positive-sense RNAs of ∼5.8 (RNA1) and 3.4kb (RNA2). Full-length cDNA clones of both genomic RNAs (pBenR1 and pBenR2) from BBWV-1 isolate Ben were constructed under the control of the T7 promoter. In vitro derived capped transcripts were infectious in Nicotiana benthamiana, Chenopodium quinoa and Vicia faba plants. The biological activity of viral transcripts was not affected by extra bases at the 5'-terminus introduced during in vitro transcription. Virions derived from the infectious cDNA clones displayed similar viral infectivity and accumulation, as well as symptom induction as the wild-type BBWV-1 isolate. PMID:26951858

  15. Characterization of a full-length infectious cDNA clone and a GFP reporter derivative of the oncolytic picornavirus SVV-001.

    PubMed

    Poirier, John T; Reddy, P Seshidhar; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Li, Shawn S; Stump, Kristine L; Burroughs, Kevin D; Hallenbeck, Paul L; Rudin, Charles M

    2012-12-01

    Seneca Valley virus (SVV-001) is an oncolytic picornavirus with selective tropism for a subset of human cancers with neuroendocrine differentiation. To characterize further the specificity of SVV-001 and its patterns and kinetics of intratumoral spread, bacterial plasmids encoding a cDNA clone of the full-length wild-type virus and a derivative virus expressing GFP were generated. The full-length cDNA of the SVV-001 RNA genome was cloned into a bacterial plasmid under the control of the T7 core promoter sequence to create an infectious cDNA clone, pNTX-09. A GFP reporter virus cDNA clone, pNTX-11, was then generated by cloning a fusion protein of GFP and the 2A protein from foot-and-mouth disease virus immediately following the native SVV-001 2A sequence. Recombinant GFP-expressing reporter virus, SVV-GFP, was rescued from cells transfected with in vitro RNA transcripts from pNTX-11 and propagated in cell culture. The proliferation kinetics of SVV-001 and SVV-GFP were indistinguishable. The SVV-GFP reporter virus was used to determine that a subpopulation of permissive cells is present in small-cell lung cancer cell lines previously thought to lack permissivity to SVV-001. Finally, it was shown that SVV-GFP administered to tumour-bearing animals homes in to and infects tumours whilst having no detectable tropism for normal mouse tissues at 1×10(11) viral particles kg(-1), a dose equivalent to that administered in ongoing clinical trials. These infectious clones will be of substantial value in further characterizing the biology of this virus and as a backbone for the generation of additional oncolytic derivatives. PMID:22971818

  16. Completion of Kunjin virus RNA sequence and recovery of an infectious RNA transcribed from stably cloned full-length cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Khromykh, A A; Westaway, E G

    1994-01-01

    Completion of the Kunjin virus (KUN) RNA sequence showed that it is the longest flavivirus sequence reported (11,022 bases), commencing with a 5' noncoding region of 96 bases. The 3' noncoding sequence of 624 nucleotides included a unique insertion sequence of 46 bases adjacent to the stop codon, but otherwise it had properties similar to those of RNAs of closely related flaviviruses. A full-length KUN cDNA clone which could be stably propagated in Escherichia coli DH5 alpha was constructed; SP6 polymerase RNA transcripts from amplified cDNA were infectious when transfected into BHK-21 cells. A mutational change abolishing the BamHI restriction site at position 4049, leading to a conservative amino acid change of Arg-175 to Lys in the NS2A protein, was introduced into the cDNA during construction and was retained in the recovered virus. Extra terminal nucleotides introduced during cloning of the cDNA were shown to be present in the in vitro RNA transcripts but absent in the RNA of recovered virus. Although recovered virus differed from the parental KUN by a smaller plaque phenotype and delayed growth rate in BHK-21 cells and mice, it was very similar as assessed by several other criteria, such as peak titer during growth in cells, infectivity titer in cells and in mice, rate of adsorption and penetration in cells, replication at 39 degrees C, and neurovirulence after intraperitoneal injection in mice. The KUN stably cloned cDNA will provide a useful basis for future studies in defining and characterizing functional roles of all the gene products. Images PMID:8207832

  17. Expression of a full-length cDNA for the human MDR1 gene confers resistance to colchicine, doxorubicin, and vinblastine

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, K.; Cardarelli, C.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I.

    1987-05-01

    Intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) is an important problem in cancer therapy. MDR in human KB carcinoma cells selected for resistance to colchicine, vinblastine, or doxorubicin (former generic name adriamycin) is associated with overexpression of the MDR1 gene, which encodes P-glycoprotein. The authors previously have isolated an overlapping set of cDNA clones for the human MDR1 gene from multidrug-resistant KB cells. Here they report the construction of a full-length cDNA for the human MDR1 gene and show that this reconstructed cDNA, when inserted into a retroviral expression vector containing the long terminal repeats of Moloney leukemia virus or Harvey sarcoma virus, functions in mouse NIH 3T3 and human KB cells to confer the complete multidrug-resistance phenotype. These results suggest that the human MDR1 gene may be used as a positive selectable marker to introduce genes into human cells and to transform human cells to multidrug resistance without introducing nonhuman antigens.

  18. Insights from computational analysis of full-length β-ketoacyl-[ACP] synthase-II cDNA isolated from American and African oil palms

    PubMed Central

    Bhore, Subhash J.; Cha, Thye S.; Amelia, Kassim; Shah, Farida H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Palm oil derived from fruits (mesocarp) of African oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. Tenera) and American oil palm (E. oleifera) is important for food industry. Due to high yield, Elaeis guineensis (Tenera) is cultivated on commercial scale, though its oil contains high (~54%) level of saturated fatty acids. The rate-limiting activity of beta-ketoacyl-[ACP] synthase-II (KAS-II) is considered mainly responsible for the high (44%) level of palmitic acid (C16:0) in the oil obtained from E. guineensis. Objective: The objective of this study was to annotate KAS-II cDNA isolated from American and African oil palms. Materials and Methods: The full-length E. oleifera KAS-II (EoKAS-II) cDNA clone was isolated using random method of gene isolation. Whereas, the E. guineensis KAS-II (EgTKAS-II) cDNA was isolated using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique; and missing ends were obtained by employing 5’and 3’ RACE technique. Results: The results show that EoKAS-II and EgTKAS-II open reading frames (ORFs) are of 1689 and 1721 bp in length, respectively. Further analysis of the both EoKAS-II and EgTKAS-II predicted protein illustrates that they contains conserved domains for ‘KAS-I and II’, ‘elongating’ condensing enzymes, ‘condensing enzymes super-family’, and ‘3-oxoacyl-[ACP] synthase II’. The predicted protein sequences shows 95% similarity with each other. Consecutively, the three active sites (Cys, His, and His) were identified in both proteins. However, difference in positions of two active Histidine (His) residues was noticed. Conclusion: These insights may serve as the foundation in understanding the variable activity of KAS-II in American and African oil palms; and cDNA clones could be useful in the genetic engineering of oil palms. PMID:24678202

  19. Expressed Sequence Tags Analysis and Design of Simple Sequence Repeats Markers from a Full-Length cDNA Library in Perilla frutescens (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Eun Soo; Yoo, Ji Hye; Choi, Jae Hoo; Kim, Chang Heum; Jeon, Mi Ran; Kang, Byeong Ju; Lee, Jae Geun; Choi, Seon Kang; Ghimire, Bimal Kumar; Yu, Chang Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Perilla frutescens is valuable as a medicinal plant as well as a natural medicine and functional food. However, comparative genomics analyses of P. frutescens are limited due to a lack of gene annotations and characterization. A full-length cDNA library from P. frutescens leaves was constructed to identify functional gene clusters and probable EST-SSR markers via analysis of 1,056 expressed sequence tags. Unigene assembly was performed using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) homology searches and annotated Gene Ontology (GO). A total of 18 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were designed as primer pairs. This study is the first to report comparative genomics and EST-SSR markers from P. frutescens will help gene discovery and provide an important source for functional genomics and molecular genetic research in this interesting medicinal plant. PMID:26664999

  20. Agroinoculation of a full-length cDNA clone of cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV) results in systemic infection in cotton and the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Delfosse, Verónica C; Casse, María F; Agrofoglio, Yamila C; Kresic, Iván Bonacic; Hopp, Horacio E; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Distéfano, Ana J

    2013-07-01

    Cotton blue disease is the most important viral disease of cotton in the southern part of South America. Its etiological agent, cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV), is specifically transmitted to host plants by the aphid vector (Aphis gossypii) and any attempt to perform mechanical inoculations of this virus into its host has failed. This limitation has held back the study of this virus and the disease it causes. In this study, a full-length cDNA of CLRDV was constructed and expressed in vivo under the control of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. An agrobacterium-mediated inoculation system for the cloned cDNA construct of CLRDV was developed. Northern and immunoblot analyses showed that after several weeks the replicon of CLRDV delivered by Agrobacterium tumefaciens in Gossypium hirsutum plants gave rise to a systemic infection and typical blue disease symptoms correlated to the presence of viral RNA and P3 capsid protein. We also demonstrated that the virus that accumulated in the agroinfected plants was transmissible by the vector A. gossypii. This result confirms the production of biologically active transmissible virions. In addition, the clone was infectious in Nicotiana benthamiana plants which developed interveinal chlorosis three weeks postinoculation and CLRDV was detected both in the inoculated and systemic leaves. Attempts to agroinfect Arabidopsis thaliana plants were irregularly successful. Although no symptoms were observed, the P3 capsid protein as well as the genomic and subgenomic RNAs were irregularly detected in systemic leaves of some agroinfiltrated plants. The inefficient infection rate infers that A. thaliana is a poor host for CLRDV. This is the first report on the construction of a biologically-active infectious full-length clone of a cotton RNA virus showing successful agroinfection of host and non-host plants. The system herein developed will be useful to study CLRDV viral functions and plant-virus interactions using a reverse

  1. [Rescue of bovine Asia 1 serotype foot-and-mouth disease virus from a full-length cDNA clone].

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Zhang, Runxiang; Song, Ge; Gao, Mingchun; Liu, Xiangtao; Wang, Junwei

    2009-11-01

    After sequencing the Asia 1 foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) (As01 strain), we amplified the two fragments covering the whole genome by overlapping PCR and long PCR. The 5' fragment was 1.8 kb in length including 15Cs, and the 3' fragment was 6.7 kb in length. The two fragments were cloned into the pBluescript SK vector to construct recombinant plasmid pBSAs carrying the full-length cDNA of FMDV As01 strain. The RNA transcript was synthesized in vitro using T7 polymerase and transfected into BHK-21 cells. We observed the typical CPE caused by rescued FMDV. The harvested virus was confirmed to be Asia 1 FMDV by RT-PCR, indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and electron microscope observation. The rescued virus showed a similar pathogenicity in suckling mouse (LD50) compared to its wild-type virus. The infectious cDNA clone of the FMDV As01 strain laid a new ground for further investigation of FMDV virulence determinants and development of novel vaccines against FMD. PMID:20222458

  2. Full-Length Venom Protein cDNA Sequences from Venom-Derived mRNA: Exploring Compositional Variation and Adaptive Multigene Evolution.

    PubMed

    Modahl, Cassandra M; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2016-06-01

    Envenomation of humans by snakes is a complex and continuously evolving medical emergency, and treatment is made that much more difficult by the diverse biochemical composition of many venoms. Venomous snakes and their venoms also provide models for the study of molecular evolutionary processes leading to adaptation and genotype-phenotype relationships. To compare venom complexity and protein sequences, venom gland transcriptomes are assembled, which usually requires the sacrifice of snakes for tissue. However, toxin transcripts are also present in venoms, offering the possibility of obtaining cDNA sequences directly from venom. This study provides evidence that unknown full-length venom protein transcripts can be obtained from the venoms of multiple species from all major venomous snake families. These unknown venom protein cDNAs are obtained by the use of primers designed from conserved signal peptide sequences within each venom protein superfamily. This technique was used to assemble a partial venom gland transcriptome for the Middle American Rattlesnake (Crotalus simus tzabcan) by amplifying sequences for phospholipases A2, serine proteases, C-lectins, and metalloproteinases from within venom. Phospholipase A2 sequences were also recovered from the venoms of several rattlesnakes and an elapid snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus), and three-finger toxin sequences were recovered from multiple rear-fanged snake species, demonstrating that the three major clades of advanced snakes (Elapidae, Viperidae, Colubridae) have stable mRNA present in their venoms. These cDNA sequences from venom were then used to explore potential activities derived from protein sequence similarities and evolutionary histories within these large multigene superfamilies. Venom-derived sequences can also be used to aid in characterizing venoms that lack proteomic profiles and identify sequence characteristics indicating specific envenomation profiles. This approach, requiring only venom, provides

  3. Cloning and sequence analysis of a full-length cDNA of SmPP1cb encoding turbot protein phosphatase 1 beta catalytic subunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Fei; Guo, Huarong; Wang, Jian

    2008-02-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by protein kinases and phosphatases, is an important and versatile mechanism by which eukaryotic cells regulate almost all the signaling processes. Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is the first and well-characterized member of the protein serine/threonine phosphatase family. In the present study, a full-length cDNA encoding the beta isoform of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1(PP1cb), was for the first time isolated and sequenced from the skin tissue of flatfish turbot Scophthalmus maximus, designated SmPP1cb, by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. The cDNA sequence of SmPP1cb we obtained contains a 984 bp open reading frame (ORF), flanked by a complete 39 bp 5' untranslated region and 462 bp 3' untranslated region. The ORF encodes a putative 327 amino acid protein, and the N-terminal section of this protein is highly acidic, Met-Ala-Glu-Gly-Glu-Leu-Asp-Val-Asp, a common feature for PP1 catalytic subunit but absent in protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B). And its calculated molecular mass is 37 193 Da and pI 5.8. Sequence analysis indicated that, SmPP1cb is extremely conserved in both amino acid and nucleotide acid levels compared with the PP1cb of other vertebrates and invertebrates, and its Kozak motif contained in the 5'UTR around ATG start codon is GXXAXXGXX ATGG, which is different from mammalian in two positions A-6 and G-3, indicating the possibility of different initiation of translation in turbot, and also the 3'UTR of SmPP1cb is highly diverse in the sequence similarity and length compared with other animals, especially zebrafish. The cloning and sequencing of SmPP1cb gene lays a good foundation for the future work on the biological functions of PP1 in the flatfish turbot.

  4. Full-Length Venom Protein cDNA Sequences from Venom-Derived mRNA: Exploring Compositional Variation and Adaptive Multigene Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Modahl, Cassandra M.; Mackessy, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Envenomation of humans by snakes is a complex and continuously evolving medical emergency, and treatment is made that much more difficult by the diverse biochemical composition of many venoms. Venomous snakes and their venoms also provide models for the study of molecular evolutionary processes leading to adaptation and genotype-phenotype relationships. To compare venom complexity and protein sequences, venom gland transcriptomes are assembled, which usually requires the sacrifice of snakes for tissue. However, toxin transcripts are also present in venoms, offering the possibility of obtaining cDNA sequences directly from venom. This study provides evidence that unknown full-length venom protein transcripts can be obtained from the venoms of multiple species from all major venomous snake families. These unknown venom protein cDNAs are obtained by the use of primers designed from conserved signal peptide sequences within each venom protein superfamily. This technique was used to assemble a partial venom gland transcriptome for the Middle American Rattlesnake (Crotalus simus tzabcan) by amplifying sequences for phospholipases A2, serine proteases, C-lectins, and metalloproteinases from within venom. Phospholipase A2 sequences were also recovered from the venoms of several rattlesnakes and an elapid snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus), and three-finger toxin sequences were recovered from multiple rear-fanged snake species, demonstrating that the three major clades of advanced snakes (Elapidae, Viperidae, Colubridae) have stable mRNA present in their venoms. These cDNA sequences from venom were then used to explore potential activities derived from protein sequence similarities and evolutionary histories within these large multigene superfamilies. Venom-derived sequences can also be used to aid in characterizing venoms that lack proteomic profiles and identify sequence characteristics indicating specific envenomation profiles. This approach, requiring only venom, provides

  5. Cloning, expression and protective immunity evaluation of the full-length cDNA encoding succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Yu, JunLong; Wang, ShiPing; Li, WenKai; Dai, Gan; Xu, ShaoRui; He, Zhuo; Peng, XianChu; Zhou, SongHua; Liu, XueQin

    2007-04-01

    1071-bp fragment was obtained from the Schistosoma japonicum (Chinese strain) adult cDNA library after the 3' and 5' ends of the incomplete expression sequence tag (EST) of succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein of Schistosoma japonicum (SjSDISP) were amplified by the anchored PCR with 2 pairs of primers designed according to the EST of SjSDISP and the sequence of multiclone sites of the library vector. Sequence analysis indicated that the fragment was a full-length cDNA with a complete open reading frame (ORF), encoding 278 amino acid residues. The fragment was cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pQE30, and subsequently sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. SDS-PAGE and Western-blot analyses showed that the recombinant protein was about 32 kD and could be recognized by the polyclonal antisera from rabbits immunized with Schistosoma japonicum adult worm antigen. Compared with the FCA controls, mice vaccinated with rSjSDISP (test) or rSjGST (positive control) all revealed high levels of specific antibody and significant reduction in worm burden, liver eggs per gram (LEPG), fecal eggs per gram (FEPG) and intrauterine eggs. These results suggest that SjSDISP may be a novel and partially protective vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis. In contrast to the worm burden reduction rate, the higher degree of egg reduction rate in the test group also suggested that SjSDISP vaccine may primarily play a role in anti-embryonation or anti-fecundity immunity. PMID:17447029

  6. Complete genome sequence and construction of infectious full-length cDNA clones of tobacco ringspot Nepovirus, a viral pathogen causing bud blight in soybean.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fumei; Hwang, Un Sun; Lim, Seungmo; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Lee, Su-Heon; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Moon, Jae Sun

    2015-08-01

    Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV, genus Nepovirus), causes severe diseases in soybean and tobacco plants. TRSV-induced bud blight disease significantly reduced both the yield and quality of soybeans. The function of the encoded viral gene product involved in TRSV infection was unclear due to the limitation of reverse genetics studies on the viral genome. Here, we represent the successful construction of infectious full-length cDNA clones of TRSV genome (RNA1 and RNA2). The cDNAs of TRSV RNA1 and RNA2 were cloned into the binary vector pPZP211 immediately downstream of a double cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and upstream of the nopaline synthase terminator. Seven days after agrobacterium-mediated co-inoculation of these two constructs, Nicotiana benthamiana plants developed a systemic infection with necrotic ringspot symptoms and weak stunting of the leaves, similar to that induced by natural TRSV. The systemic infection was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and Western blot analysis. Simultaneously, soybean, tomato, and Arabidopsis ecotype Estland were mechanically inoculated with sap prepared from TRSV-agroinfiltrated N. benthamiana leaves, showing typical symptoms of bud blight, necrotic spots, and lethal systemic necrosis, respectively. The system developed herein will be an appealing way to determine TRSV viral gene functions and study host-TRSV interactions. PMID:26159876

  7. Efficient and simpler method to construct normalized cDNA libraries with improved representations of full-length cDNAs

    DOEpatents

    Soares, M.B.; Fatima Bonaldo, M. de

    1998-12-08

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library comprising: (a) constructing a directionally cloned library containing cDNA inserts wherein the insert is capable of being amplified by polymerase chain reaction; (b) converting a double-stranded cDNA library into single-stranded DNA circles; (c) generating single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) by polymerase chain reaction with appropriate primers; (d) hybridizing the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) with the complementary single-stranded nucleic acid molecules generated in step (c) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; and (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded DNA circles from the hybridized DNA circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides a method to normalize a cDNA library wherein the generating of single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) is by excising cDNA inserts from the double-stranded cDNA library; purifying the cDNA inserts from cloning vectors; and digesting the cDNA inserts with an exonuclease. This invention further provides a method to construct a subtractive cDNA library following the steps described above. This invention further provides normalized and/or subtractive cDNA libraries generated by the above methods. 25 figs.

  8. Efficient and simpler method to construct normalized cDNA libraries with improved representations of full-length cDNAs

    DOEpatents

    Soares, Marcelo Bento; Bonaldo, Maria de Fatima

    1998-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library comprising: (a) constructing a directionally cloned library containing cDNA inserts wherein the insert is capable of being amplified by polymerase chain reaction; (b) converting a double-stranded cDNA library into single-stranded DNA circles; (c) generating single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) by polymerase chain reaction with appropriate primers; (d) hybridizing the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) with the complementary single-stranded nucleic acid molecules generated in step (c) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; and (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded DNA circles from the hybridized DNA circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides a method to normalize a cDNA library wherein the generating of single-stranded nucleic acid molecules complementary to the single-stranded DNA circles converted in step (b) is by excising cDNA inserts from the double-stranded cDNA library; purifying the cDNA inserts from cloning vectors; and digesting the cDNA inserts with an exonuclease. This invention further provides a method to construct a subtractive cDNA library following the steps described above. This invention further provides normalized and/or subtractive cDNA libraries generated by the above methods.

  9. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Habets, W.J.; Sillekens, P.T.G.; Hoet, M.H.; Schalken, J.A.; Roebroek, A.J.M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Van de Ven, W.J.M.; Van Venrooij, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone lambdaHB''-1 from a phage lambdagt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone lambdaHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone lambdaHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the lambdaHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone lambdaHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens.

  10. Expression of active iron regulatory factor from a full-length human cDNA by in vitro transcription/translation.

    PubMed Central

    Hirling, H; Emery-Goodman, A; Thompson, N; Neupert, B; Seiser, C; Kühn, L C

    1992-01-01

    Iron regulatory factor (IRF), also called iron responsive element-binding protein (IRE-BP), is a cytoplasmic RNA-binding protein which regulates post-transcriptionally transferrin receptor mRNA stability and ferritin mRNA translation. By using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the sequence published by Rouault et al. (1990) a probe was derived which permitted the isolation of three human IRF cDNA clones. Hybridization to genomic DNA and mRNA, as well as sequencing data indicated a single copy gene of about 40 kb specifying a 4.0 kb mRNA that translates into a protein of 98,400 dalton. By in vitro transcription of a assembled IRF cDNA coupled to in vitro translation in a wheat germ extract, we obtained full sized IRF that bound specifically to a human ferritin IRE. In vitro translated IRF retained sensitivity to sulfhydryl oxidation by diamide and could be reactivated by beta-mercaptoethanol in the same way as native placental IRF. An IRF deletion mutant shortened by 132 amino acids at the COOH-terminus was no longer able to bind to an IRE, indicating that this region of the protein plays a role in RNA recognition. Placental IRF has previously been shown to migrate as a doublet on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. After V8 protease digestion the heterogeneity was located in a 65/70 kDa NH2-terminal doublet. The liberated 31 kDa COOH-terminal polypeptide was found to be homogeneous by amino acid sequencing supporting the conclusion of a single IRF gene. Images PMID:1738601

  11. Molecular cloning of a full-length cDNA for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and regional expressions of the expanded alleles in the CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, Osamu; Oyake, Mutsuo; Takano, Hiroki

    1995-11-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by genetic anticipation and variable combinations of symptoms including myoclonus, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia. Recently, we discovered that DRPLA is caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat of a gene on the short arm of chromosome 12. We determined the consensus DRPLA cDNA sequence containing the complete coding region for 1,185 amino acids. The CAG repeat, which is expanded in DRPLA, is located 1,462 bp downstream from the putative methionine initiation codon and encodes a poly-glutamine tract. Although poly-serine and proline tracts exist near the CAG repeats, these poly-serine or proline tracts did not show any polymorphisms, which is in strong contrast to the high heterogeneity in the length of the CAG repeat. Northern blot analysis revealed a 4.7-kb transcript that is widely expressed in various tissues including heart, lung, kidney, placenta, skeletal muscle, and brain. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the expanded alleles are transcribed to levels comparable to those of normal alleles. These results indicate that there is no difference in transcriptional efficiency between expanded and normal alleles. Furthermore, mRNA from cerebellar hemispheres of DRPLA patients showed smaller sizes of CAG repeats compared with other regions of the brain, which reflects somatic mosaicism of the expanded alleles of the DRPLA gene. 49 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Construction of full-length cDNA library and development of EST-derived simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers in Senecio scandens.

    PubMed

    Qian, Gang; Ping, Junjiao; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Lei; Xu, Delin

    2014-12-01

    Senecio scandens Buch.-Ham. ex D. Don (Compositae) is a crucial source of Chinese traditional medicine with antibacterial properties. We constructed a cDNA library and obtained expressed sequence tags (ESTs) to show the distribution of gene ontology annotations for mRNAs, using an individual plant with superior antibacterial characteristics. Analysis of comparative genomics indicates that the putative uncharacterized proteins (21.07%) might be derived from "molecular function unknown" clones or rare transcripts. Furthermore, the Compositae had high cross-species transferability of EST-derived simple sequence repeats (EST-SSR), based on valid amplifications of 206 primer pairs developed from the newly assembled expressed sequence tag sequences in Artemisia annua L. Among those EST-SSR markers, 52 primers showed polymorphic amplifications between individuals with contrasting diverse antibacterial traits. Our sequence data and molecular markers will be cost-effective tools for further studies such as genome annotation, molecular breeding, and novel transcript profiles within Compositae species. PMID:25007751

  13. Express Sequence Tag Analysis - Identification of Anseriformes Trypsin Genes from Full-Length cDNA Library of the Duck (Anas platyrhynchos) and Characterization of Their Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haining; Cai, Shasha; Gao, Jiuxiang; Wang, Chen; Qiao, Xue; Wang, Hui; Feng, Lan; Wang, Yipeng

    2016-02-01

    Trypsins are key proteins important in animal protein digestion by breaking down the peptide bonds on the carboxyl side of lysine and arginine residues, hence it has been used widely in various biotechnological processes. In the current study, a full-length cDNA library with capacity of 5·10(5) CFU/ml from the duck (Anas platyrhynchos) was constructed. Using express sequence tag (EST) sequencing, genes coding two trypsins were identified and two full-length trypsin cDNAs were then obtained by rapid-amplification of cDNA end (RACE)-PCR. Using Blast, they were classified into the trypsin I and II subfamilies, but both encoded a signal peptide, an activation peptide, and a 223-a.a. mature protein located in the C-terminus. The two deduced mature proteins were designated as trypsin-IAP and trypsin-IIAP, and their theoretical isoelectric points (pI) and molecular weights (MW) were 7.99/23466.4 Da and 4.65/24066.0 Da, respectively. Molecular characterizations of genes were further performed by detailed bioinformatics analysis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that trypsin-IIAP has an evolution pattern distinct from trypsin-IAP, suggesting its evolutionary advantage. Then the duck trypsin-IIAP was expressed in an Escherichia coli system, and its kinetic parameters were measured. The three dimensional structures of trypsin-IAP and trypsin-IIAP were predicted by homology modeling, and the conserved residues required for functionality were identified. Two loops controlling the specificity of the trypsin and the substrate-binding pocket represented in the model are almost identical in primary sequences and backbone tertiary structures of the trypsin families. PMID:27260395

  14. Construction and characterization of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of foot-and-mouth disease virus strain O/JPN/2010 isolated in Japan in 2010.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Tatsuya; Onozato, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Seiichi; Fukai, Katsuhiko; Yamada, Manabu; Morioka, Kazuki; Kanno, Toru

    2016-06-01

    A full-length infectious cDNA clone of the genome of a foot-and-mouth disease virus isolated from the 2010 epidemic in Japan was constructed and designated pSVL-f02. Transfection of Cos-7 or IBRS-2 cells with this clone allowed the recovery of infectious virus. The recovered virus had the same in vitro characterization as the parental virus with regard to antigenicity in neutralization and indirect immunofluorescence tests, plaque size and one-step growth. Pigs were experimentally infected with the parental virus or the recombinant virus recovered from pSVL-f02 transfected cells. There were no significant differences in clinical signs or antibody responses between the two groups, and virus isolation and viral RNA detection from clinical samples were similar. Virus recovered from transfected cells therefore retained the in vitro characteristics and the in vivo pathogenicity of their parental strain. This cDNA clone should be a valuable tool to analyze determinants of pathogenicity and mechanisms of virus replication, and to develop genetically engineered vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease virus. PMID:27234555

  15. Specific Polysome Immunoadsorption to Purify an Ammonium-Inducible Glutamate Dehydrogenase mRNA from Chlorella sorokiniana and Synthesis of Full Length Double-Stranded cDNA from the Purified mRNA.

    PubMed

    Bascomb, N F; Turner, K J; Schmidt, R R

    1986-06-01

    A specific polysome immunoadsorption procedure, employing soluble rabbit anti-NADP-GDH IgG and sheep anti-rabbit IgG covalently-linked to an insoluble cellulose matrix, was used to immunoselect polysomes translating mRNA for a chloroplastic ammonium-inducible NADP-GDH in fully induced cells of Chlorella sorokiniana. The immunoselected polysomes were dissociated, and the NADP-GDH mRNA was recovered by oligo (dT)cellulose chromatography. The translatable NADP-GDH mRNA was estimated to be 0.07 and 90% of the total polysomal poly(A)(+)RNA before and after immunoselection of the polysomes, respectively. The immunoadsorption procedure resulted in an 83% recovery and 1,291-fold purification of translatable NADP-GDH mRNA. In vitro translation of the immunoselected poly(A)(+)RNA yielded a single radioactive protein (on sodium dodecyl sufate polyacrylamide gels) with a molecular weight of 58,500, i.e. size of the putative precursor-protein of the NADP-GDH subunit in the holoenzyme in fully induced cells. The purified NADP-GDH mRNA was used for synthesis of a high proportion of nearly full-length single-stranded cDNA and double-stranded cDNA molecules. PMID:16664850

  16. RiceFOX: A Database of Arabidopsis Mutant Lines Overexpressing Rice Full-Length cDNA that Contains a Wide Range of Trait Information to Facilitate Analysis of Gene Function

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Tetsuya; Kondou, Youichi; Akiyama, Kenji; Kurotani, Atsushi; Higuchi, Mieko; Ichikawa, Takanari; Kuroda, Hirofumi; Kusano, Miyako; Mori, Masaki; Saitou, Tsutomu; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Sugano, Shoji; Suzuki, Makoto; Takahashi, Hideki; Takahashi, Shinya; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Yokotani, Naoki; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Saito, Kazuki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Oda, Kenji; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Matsui, Minami

    2011-01-01

    Identification of gene function is important not only for basic research but also for applied science, especially with regard to improvements in crop production. For rapid and efficient elucidation of useful traits, we developed a system named FOX hunting (Full-length cDNA Over-eXpressor gene hunting) using full-length cDNAs (fl-cDNAs). A heterologous expression approach provides a solution for the high-throughput characterization of gene functions in agricultural plant species. Since fl-cDNAs contain all the information of functional mRNAs and proteins, we introduced rice fl-cDNAs into Arabidopsis plants for systematic gain-of-function mutation. We generated >30,000 independent Arabidopsis transgenic lines expressing rice fl-cDNAs (rice FOX Arabidopsis mutant lines). These rice FOX Arabidopsis lines were screened systematically for various criteria such as morphology, photosynthesis, UV resistance, element composition, plant hormone profile, metabolite profile/fingerprinting, bacterial resistance, and heat and salt tolerance. The information obtained from these screenings was compiled into a database named ‘RiceFOX’. This database contains around 18,000 records of rice FOX Arabidopsis lines and allows users to search against all the observed results, ranging from morphological to invisible traits. The number of searchable items is approximately 100; moreover, the rice FOX Arabidopsis lines can be searched by rice and Arabidopsis gene/protein identifiers, sequence similarity to the introduced rice fl-cDNA and traits. The RiceFOX database is available at http://ricefox.psc.riken.jp/. PMID:21186176

  17. Technology development for gene discovery and full-length sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelo Bento Soares

    2004-07-19

    In previous years, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, we developed methods for construction of normalized and subtracted cDNA libraries, and constructed hundreds of high-quality libraries for production of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). Our clones were made widely available to the scientific community through the IMAGE Consortium, and millions of ESTs were produced from our libraries either by collaborators or by our own sequencing laboratory at the University of Iowa. During this grant period, we focused on (1) the development of a method for preferential cloning of tissue-specific and/or rare transcripts, (2) its utilization to expedite EST-based gene discovery for the NIH Mouse Brain Molecular Anatomy Project, (3) further development and optimization of a method for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries, and (4) modification of a plasmid vector to maximize efficiency of full-length cDNA sequencing by the transposon-mediated approach. It is noteworthy that the technology developed for preferential cloning of rare mRNAs enabled identification of over 2,000 mouse transcripts differentially expressed in the hippocampus. In addition, the method that we optimized for construction of full-length-enriched cDNA libraries was successfully utilized for the production of approximately fifty libraries from the developing mouse nervous system, from which over 2,500 full-ORF-containing cDNAs have been identified and accurately sequenced in their entirety either by our group or by the NIH-Mammalian Gene Collection Program Sequencing Team.

  18. A full-length cDNA infectious clone of North American type 1 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: expression of green fluorescent protein in the Nsp2 region.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ying; Rowland, Raymond R R; Roof, Michael; Lunney, Joan K; Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Nelson, Eric A

    2006-12-01

    The recent emergence of a unique group of North American type 1 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in the United States presents new disease control problems for a swine industry that has already been impacted seriously by North American type 2 PRRSV. In this study, a full-length cDNA infectious clone was generated from a low-virulence North American type 1 PRRSV isolate, SD01-08. In vitro studies demonstrated that the cloned virus maintained growth properties similar to those of the parental virus. Virological, pathological, and immunological observations from animals challenged with cloned viruses were similar to those from animals challenged with the parental virus and a modified live virus vaccine. To further explore the potential use as a viral backbone for expressing foreign genes, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was inserted into a unique deletion site located at amino acid positions 348 and 349 of the predicted Nsp2 region in the virus, and expression of the Nsp2-GFP fusion protein was visualized by fluorescent microscopy. The availability of this North American type 1 infectious clone provides an important research tool for further study of the basic viral biology and pathogenic mechanisms of this group of type 1 PRRSV in the United States. PMID:16971421

  19. Identification of Habitat-Specific Biomes of Aquatic Fungal Communities Using a Comprehensive Nearly Full-Length 18S rRNA Dataset Enriched with Contextual Data.

    PubMed

    Panzer, Katrin; Yilmaz, Pelin; Weiß, Michael; Reich, Lothar; Richter, Michael; Wiese, Jutta; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Labes, Antje; Imhoff, Johannes F; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Reich, Marlis

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diversity surveys have demonstrated that aquatic fungi are highly diverse, and that they play fundamental ecological roles in aquatic systems. Unfortunately, comparative studies of aquatic fungal communities are few and far between, due to the scarcity of adequate datasets. We combined all publicly available fungal 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences with new sequence data from a marine fungi culture collection. We further enriched this dataset by adding validated contextual data. Specifically, we included data on the habitat type of the samples assigning fungal taxa to ten different habitat categories. This dataset has been created with the intention to serve as a valuable reference dataset for aquatic fungi including a phylogenetic reference tree. The combined data enabled us to infer fungal community patterns in aquatic systems. Pairwise habitat comparisons showed significant phylogenetic differences, indicating that habitat strongly affects fungal community structure. Fungal taxonomic composition differed considerably even on phylum and class level. Freshwater fungal assemblage was most different from all other habitat types and was dominated by basal fungal lineages. For most communities, phylogenetic signals indicated clustering of sequences suggesting that environmental factors were the main drivers of fungal community structure, rather than species competition. Thus, the diversification process of aquatic fungi must be highly clade specific in some cases.The combined data enabled us to infer fungal community patterns in aquatic systems. Pairwise habitat comparisons showed significant phylogenetic differences, indicating that habitat strongly affects fungal community structure. Fungal taxonomic composition differed considerably even on phylum and class level. Freshwater fungal assemblage was most different from all other habitat types and was dominated by basal fungal lineages. For most communities, phylogenetic signals indicated clustering of

  20. Identification of Habitat-Specific Biomes of Aquatic Fungal Communities Using a Comprehensive Nearly Full-Length 18S rRNA Dataset Enriched with Contextual Data

    PubMed Central

    Panzer, Katrin; Yilmaz, Pelin; Weiß, Michael; Reich, Lothar; Richter, Michael; Wiese, Jutta; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Labes, Antje; Imhoff, Johannes F.; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Reich, Marlis

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diversity surveys have demonstrated that aquatic fungi are highly diverse, and that they play fundamental ecological roles in aquatic systems. Unfortunately, comparative studies of aquatic fungal communities are few and far between, due to the scarcity of adequate datasets. We combined all publicly available fungal 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences with new sequence data from a marine fungi culture collection. We further enriched this dataset by adding validated contextual data. Specifically, we included data on the habitat type of the samples assigning fungal taxa to ten different habitat categories. This dataset has been created with the intention to serve as a valuable reference dataset for aquatic fungi including a phylogenetic reference tree. The combined data enabled us to infer fungal community patterns in aquatic systems. Pairwise habitat comparisons showed significant phylogenetic differences, indicating that habitat strongly affects fungal community structure. Fungal taxonomic composition differed considerably even on phylum and class level. Freshwater fungal assemblage was most different from all other habitat types and was dominated by basal fungal lineages. For most communities, phylogenetic signals indicated clustering of sequences suggesting that environmental factors were the main drivers of fungal community structure, rather than species competition. Thus, the diversification process of aquatic fungi must be highly clade specific in some cases.The combined data enabled us to infer fungal community patterns in aquatic systems. Pairwise habitat comparisons showed significant phylogenetic differences, indicating that habitat strongly affects fungal community structure. Fungal taxonomic composition differed considerably even on phylum and class level. Freshwater fungal assemblage was most different from all other habitat types and was dominated by basal fungal lineages. For most communities, phylogenetic signals indicated clustering of

  1. Analysis of 4,664 high-quality sequence-finished poplar full-length cDNA clones and their utility for the discovery of genes responding to insect feeding

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Steven G; Chun, Hye Jung E; Cooper, Dawn; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Kolosova, Natalia; Gunter, Lee; Tuskan, Gerald A; Douglas, Carl J; Holt, Robert A; Jones, Steven JM; Marra, Marco A; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    Background The genus Populus includes poplars, aspens and cottonwoods, which will be collectively referred to as poplars hereafter unless otherwise specified. Poplars are the dominant tree species in many forest ecosystems in the Northern Hemisphere and are of substantial economic value in plantation forestry. Poplar has been established as a model system for genomics studies of growth, development, and adaptation of woody perennial plants including secondary xylem formation, dormancy, adaptation to local environments, and biotic interactions. Results As part of the poplar genome sequencing project and the development of genomic resources for poplar, we have generated a full-length (FL)-cDNA collection using the biotinylated CAP trapper method. We constructed four FLcDNA libraries using RNA from xylem, phloem and cambium, and green shoot tips and leaves from the P. trichocarpa Nisqually-1 genotype, as well as insect-attacked leaves of the P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides hybrid. Following careful selection of candidate cDNA clones, we used a combined strategy of paired end reads and primer walking to generate a set of 4,664 high-accuracy, sequence-verified FLcDNAs, which clustered into 3,990 putative unique genes. Mapping FLcDNAs to the poplar genome sequence combined with BLAST comparisons to previously predicted protein coding sequences in the poplar genome identified 39 FLcDNAs that likely localize to gaps in the current genome sequence assembly. Another 173 FLcDNAs mapped to the genome sequence but were not included among the previously predicted genes in the poplar genome. Comparative sequence analysis against Arabidopsis thaliana and other species in the non-redundant database of GenBank revealed that 11.5% of the poplar FLcDNAs display no significant sequence similarity to other plant proteins. By mapping the poplar FLcDNAs against transcriptome data previously obtained with a 15.5 K cDNA microarray, we identified 153 FLcDNA clones for genes that were

  2. A Full-length cDNA Infectious Clone of North American Type 1 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus: Expression of Green Fluorescent Protein in the Nsp2 Region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent emergence of a unique group of North American Type 1 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in the U.S. presents new disease control problems for a swine industry that has already been seriously impacted by North American Type 2 PRRSV. In this study, a full-length cDN...

  3. A Full-Length Infectious cDNA Clone of Zika Virus from the 2015 Epidemic in Brazil as a Genetic Platform for Studies of Virus-Host Interactions and Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Tsetsarkin, Konstantin A.; Kenney, Heather; Chen, Rubing; Liu, Guangping; Manukyan, Hasmik; Whitehead, Stephen S.; Laassri, Majid

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An arthropod-borne virus, Zika virus (ZIKV), has recently emerged as a major human pathogen. Associated with complications during perinatal development and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults, ZIKV raises new challenges for understanding the molecular determinants of flavivirus pathogenesis. This underscores the necessity for the development of a reverse genetic system based on an epidemic ZIKV strain. Here, we describe the generation and characterization in cell cultures of an infectious cDNA clone of ZIKV isolated from the 2015 epidemic in Brazil. The cDNA-derived ZIKV replicated efficiently in a variety of cell lines, including those of both neuronal and placental origin. We observed that the growth of cDNA-derived virus was attenuated compared to the growth of the parental isolate in most cell lines, which correlates with substantial differences in sequence heterogeneity between these viruses that were determined by deep-sequencing analysis. Our findings support the role of genetic diversity in maintaining the replicative fitness of viral populations under changing conditions. Moreover, these results indicate that caution should be exercised when interpreting the results of reverse-genetics experiments in attempts to accurately predict the biology of natural viruses. Finally, a Vero cell-adapted cDNA clone of ZIKV was generated that can be used as a convenient platform for studies aimed at the development of ZIKV vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:27555311

  4. Infectious full-length clones of Calibrachoa Mottle Virus (CbMV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Full-length cDNA clones derived from genomic RNA (gRNA) and subgenomic RNAs (sgRNAs) of Calibrachoa mottle virus (CbMV) were constructed under the control of the T7 RNA promoter and ligated into plasmid pUC-18. The capped and uncapped in vitro transcripts, synthesized from full length genomic cDNA...

  5. Isolation of full-length RNA from a thermophilic cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Luo, X Z; Stevens, S E

    1997-11-01

    Isolation of full-length mRNA without degradation is critical in the study of in vivo gene regulation and transcription, cDNA synthesis and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. It is particularly difficult to isolate full-length mRNA from thermophiles, which have higher turnover rates of mRNA degradation. Mastigocladus laminosus is a thermophilic heterocystous cyanobacterium. The assay of M. laminosus cell lysates showed that RNase activity was high and was resistant to the conventional guanidine thiocyanate and 2-mercaptoethanol denaturation methods. The mRNA isolated by several conventional methods was completely degraded. A method was developed to purify full-length mRNA by a combination of fast cooling, vanadyl-ribonucleoside-complex inhibition, phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol extraction, lithium chloride precipitation and the lysing of cells with the French Press. This method produced high-quality, full-length mRNA in high yield. Purified mRNA was suitable for Northern blotting, cDNA synthesis and RT-PCR. This method could be applicable to other thermophiles in which the RNase activity is high and/or is resistant to guanidine thiocyanate. PMID:9383558

  6. Full-length minor ampullate spidroin gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gefei; Liu, Xiangqin; Zhang, Yunlong; Lin, Senzhu; Yang, Zijiang; Johansson, Jan; Rising, Anna; Meng, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Spider silk includes seven protein based fibers and glue-like substances produced by glands in the spider's abdomen. Minor ampullate silk is used to make the auxiliary spiral of the orb-web and also for wrapping prey, has a high tensile strength and does not supercontract in water. So far, only partial cDNA sequences have been obtained for minor ampullate spidroins (MiSps). Here we describe the first MiSp full-length gene sequence from the spider species Araneus ventricosus, using a multidimensional PCR approach. Comparative analysis of the sequence reveals regulatory elements, as well as unique spidroin gene and protein architecture including the presence of an unusually large intron. The spliced full-length transcript of MiSp gene is 5440 bp in size and encodes 1766 amino acid residues organized into conserved nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains and a central predominantly repetitive region composed of four units that are iterated in a non regular manner. The repeats are more conserved within A. ventricosus MiSp than compared to repeats from homologous proteins, and are interrupted by two nonrepetitive spacer regions, which have 100% identity even at the nucleotide level. PMID:23251707

  7. Full-Length Minor Ampullate Spidroin Gene Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gefei; Liu, Xiangqin; Zhang, Yunlong; Lin, Senzhu; Yang, Zijiang; Johansson, Jan; Rising, Anna; Meng, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Spider silk includes seven protein based fibers and glue-like substances produced by glands in the spider's abdomen. Minor ampullate silk is used to make the auxiliary spiral of the orb-web and also for wrapping prey, has a high tensile strength and does not supercontract in water. So far, only partial cDNA sequences have been obtained for minor ampullate spidroins (MiSps). Here we describe the first MiSp full-length gene sequence from the spider species Araneus ventricosus, using a multidimensional PCR approach. Comparative analysis of the sequence reveals regulatory elements, as well as unique spidroin gene and protein architecture including the presence of an unusually large intron. The spliced full-length transcript of MiSp gene is 5440 bp in size and encodes 1766 amino acid residues organized into conserved nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains and a central predominantly repetitive region composed of four units that are iterated in a non regular manner. The repeats are more conserved within A. ventricosus MiSp than compared to repeats from homologous proteins, and are interrupted by two nonrepetitive spacer regions, which have 100% identity even at the nucleotide level. PMID:23251707

  8. Full-length transcriptome analysis of human retina-derived cell lines ARPE-19 and Y79 using the vector-capping method.

    PubMed

    Oshikawa, Mio; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Ikegami, Tomoko; Fuchida, Yuki; Matsubara, Maki; Toyama, Shigeru; Usami, Ron; Ohtoko, Kuniyo; Kato, Seishi

    2011-08-01

    PURPOSE. To collect an entire set of full-length cDNA clones derived from human retina-derived cell lines and to identify full-length transcripts for retinal preferentially expressed genes. METHODS. The full-length cDNA libraries were constructed from a retinoblastoma cell line, Y79, and a retinal pigment epithelium cell line, ARPE-19, using the vector-capping method, which generates a genuine full-length cDNA. By single-pass sequencing of the 5'-end of cDNA clones and subsequent mapping to the human genome, the authors determined their transcriptional start sites and annotated the cDNA clones. RESULTS. Of the 23,616 clones isolated from Y79-derived cDNA libraries, 19,229 full-length cDNA clones were identified and classified into 4808 genes, including genes of >10 kbp. Of the 7067 genes obtained from the Y79 and ARPE-19 libraries, the authors selected 72 genes that were preferentially expressed in the eye, of which 131 clones corresponding to 57 genes were fully sequenced. As a result, we discovered many variants that were produced by different transcriptional start sites, alternative splicing, and alternative polyadenylation. CONCLUSIONS. The bias-free, full-length cDNA libraries constructed using the vector-capping method were shown to be useful for collecting an entire set of full-length cDNA clones for these retinal cell lines. Full-length transcriptome analysis of these cDNA libraries revealed that there were, unexpectedly, many transcript variants for each gene, indicating that obtaining the full-length cDNA for each variant is indispensable for analyzing its function. The full-length cDNA clones (approximately 80,000 clones each for ARPE-19 and Y79) will be useful as a resource for investigating the human retina. PMID:21697133

  9. Full-length infectious clone of a low passage dengue virus serotype 2 from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Jefferson José da Silva; Magalhães, Tereza; Silva, José Valter Joaquim; da Silva, Andréa Nazaré Monteiro Rangel; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; Gil, Laura Helena Vega Gonzales

    2015-01-01

    Full-length dengue virus (DENV) cDNA clones are an invaluable tool for many studies, including those on the development of attenuated or chimeric vaccines and on host-virus interactions. Furthermore, the importance of low passage DENV infectious clones should be highlighted, as these may harbour critical and unique strain-specific viral components from field-circulating isolates. The successful construction of a functional Brazilian low passage DENV serotype 2 full-length clone through homologous recombination reported here supports the use of a strategy that has been shown to be highly useful by our group for the development of flavivirus infectious clones and replicons. PMID:26200712

  10. Management of full-length complete ureteral avulsion

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kaifa; Sun, Fa; Tian, Yuan; Zhao, Yili

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Complete ureteral avulsion is one of the most serious complications of ureteroscopy. The aim of this report was to look for a good solution to full-length complete ureteral avulsion. Case presentation A 40-year-old man underwent ureteroscopic management. Full-length complete avulsion of ureter occurred during ureteroscopy. Pyeloureterostomy plus greater omentum investment outside the avulsed ureter and ureterovesical anastomosis were performed 6 hours after ureteral avulsion. The patient was followed-up during 34 months. Double-J tube was removed at 3 months after operation. Twenty three months after the first operation, the patient developed hydronephrosis because of a new ureter upside stone, then rigid ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy were used successfully. Conclusion Pyeloureterostomy plus greater omentum investment outside the avulsed ureter and ureterovesical anastomosis may be a good choice for full-length complete ureteral avulsion. PMID:27136483

  11. Full-length fuel rod behavior under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, N J; Lanning, D D; Panisko, F E

    1992-12-01

    This document presents an assessment of the severe accident phenomena observed from four Full-Length High-Temperature (FLHT) tests that were performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. These tests were conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as part of the Severe Accident Research Program. The objectives of the test were to simulate conditions and provide information on the behavior of full-length fuel rods during hypothetical, small-break, loss-of-coolant severe accidents, in commercial light water reactors.

  12. Sequencing and Analysis of Full-Length cDNAs, 5′-ESTs and 3′-ESTs from a Cartilaginous Fish, the Elephant Shark (Callorhinchus milii)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yue Ying; Kodzius, Rimantas; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tay, Alice; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2012-01-01

    Cartilaginous fishes are the most ancient group of living jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and are, therefore, an important reference group for understanding the evolution of vertebrates. The elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii), a holocephalan cartilaginous fish, has been identified as a model cartilaginous fish genome because of its compact genome (∼910 Mb) and a genome project has been initiated to obtain its whole genome sequence. In this study, we have generated and sequenced full-length enriched cDNA libraries of the elephant shark using the ‘oligo-capping’ method and Sanger sequencing. A total of 6,778 full-length protein-coding cDNA and 10,701 full-length noncoding cDNA were sequenced from six tissues (gills, intestine, kidney, liver, spleen, and testis) of the elephant shark. Analysis of their polyadenylation signals showed that polyadenylation usage in elephant shark is similar to that in mammals. Furthermore, both coding and noncoding transcripts of the elephant shark use the same proportion of canonical polyadenylation sites. Besides BLASTX searches, protein-coding transcripts were annotated by Gene Ontology, InterPro domain, and KEGG pathway analyses. By comparing elephant shark genes to bony vertebrate genes, we identified several ancient genes present in elephant shark but differentially lost in tetrapods or teleosts. Only ∼6% of elephant shark noncoding cDNA showed similarity to known noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). The rest are either highly divergent ncRNAs or novel ncRNAs. In addition to full-length transcripts, 30,375 5′-ESTs and 41,317 3′-ESTs were sequenced and annotated. The clones and transcripts generated in this study are valuable resources for annotating transcription start sites, exon-intron boundaries, and UTRs of genes in the elephant shark genome, and for the functional characterization of protein sequences. These resources will also be useful for annotating genes in other cartilaginous fishes whose genomes have been targeted for

  13. Recovering full-length viral genomes from metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Saskia L.; Bodewes, Rogier; Ruiz-González, Aritz; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Koopmans, Marion P.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Schürch, Anita C.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious disease metagenomics is driven by the question: “what is causing the disease?” in contrast to classical metagenome studies which are guided by “what is out there?” In case of a novel virus, a first step to eventually establishing etiology can be to recover a full-length viral genome from a metagenomic sample. However, retrieval of a full-length genome of a divergent virus is technically challenging and can be time-consuming and costly. Here we discuss different assembly and fragment linkage strategies such as iterative assembly, motif searches, k-mer frequency profiling, coverage profile binning, and other strategies used to recover genomes of potential viral pathogens in a timely and cost-effective manner. PMID:26483782

  14. The Human Transcript Database: A Catalogue of Full Length cDNA Inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Bouckk John; Michael McLeod; Kim Worley; Richard Gibbs

    1999-09-10

    The BCM Search Launcher provided improved access to web-based sequence analysis services during the granting period and beyond. The Search Launcher web site grouped analysis procedures by function and provided default parameters that provided reasonable search results for most applications. For instance, most queries were automatically masked for repeat sequences prior to sequence database searches to avoid spurious matches. In addition to the web-based access and arrangements that were made using the functions easier, the BCM Search Launcher provided unique value-added applications like the BEAUTY sequence database search tool that combined information about protein domains and sequence database search results to give an enhanced, more complete picture of the reliability and relative value of the information reported. This enhanced search tool made evaluating search results more straight-forward and consistent. Some of the favorite features of the web site are the sequence utilities and the batch client functionality that allows processing of multiple samples from the command line interface. One measure of the success of the BCM Search Launcher is the number of sites that have adopted the models first developed on the site. The graphic display on the BLAST search from the NCBI web site is one such outgrowth, as is the display of protein domain search results within BLAST search results, and the design of the Biology Workbench application. The logs of usage and comments from users confirm the great utility of this resource.

  15. Renal Agenesis with Full Length Ipsilateral Refluxing Ureter.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dilip Kumar; Chandra, Vipin; Banerjee, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral renal agenesis with vesicoureteral reflux in the ipsilateral full length ureter is a rare phenomenon. Herein we report a case of 10-year old boy who presented with recurrent urinary tract infections. No renal tissue was identified on left side in various imaging studies. Micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG) showed left sided refluxing and blind ending ureter. Left ureterectomy was done because of recurrent UTI in the refluxing system. PMID:27170916

  16. Renal Agenesis with Full Length Ipsilateral Refluxing Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Vipin; Banerjee, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral renal agenesis with vesicoureteral reflux in the ipsilateral full length ureter is a rare phenomenon. Herein we report a case of 10-year old boy who presented with recurrent urinary tract infections. No renal tissue was identified on left side in various imaging studies. Micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG) showed left sided refluxing and blind ending ureter. Left ureterectomy was done because of recurrent UTI in the refluxing system. PMID:27170916

  17. Conformational states of the full-length glucagon receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Linlin; Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Wang, Chong; Siu, Fai Y.; Song, Gaojie; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Pascal, Bruce D.; Wu, Beili; Potter, Clinton S.; Zhou, Hu; Griffin, Patrick R.; Carragher, Bridget; Yang, Huaiyu; Wang, Ming-Wei; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-07-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors are composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) and a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain, and their signalling is regulated by peptide hormones. Using a hybrid structural biology approach together with the ECD and 7TM domain crystal structures of the glucagon receptor (GCGR), we examine the relationship between full-length receptor conformation and peptide ligand binding. Molecular dynamics (MD) and disulfide crosslinking studies suggest that apo-GCGR can adopt both an open and closed conformation associated with extensive contacts between the ECD and 7TM domain. The electron microscopy (EM) map of the full-length GCGR shows how a monoclonal antibody stabilizes the ECD and 7TM domain in an elongated conformation. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) studies and MD simulations indicate that an open conformation is also stabilized by peptide ligand binding. The combined studies reveal the open/closed states of GCGR and suggest that glucagon binds to GCGR by a conformational selection mechanism.

  18. Structural photoactivation of a full-length bacterial phytochrome

    PubMed Central

    Björling, Alexander; Berntsson, Oskar; Lehtivuori, Heli; Takala, Heikki; Hughes, Ashley J.; Panman, Matthijs; Hoernke, Maria; Niebling, Stephan; Henry, Léocadie; Henning, Robert; Kosheleva, Irina; Chukharev, Vladimir; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Menzel, Andreas; Newby, Gemma; Khakhulin, Dmitry; Wulff, Michael; Ihalainen, Janne A.; Westenhoff, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Phytochromes are light sensor proteins found in plants, bacteria, and fungi. They function by converting a photon absorption event into a conformational signal that propagates from the chromophore through the entire protein. However, the structure of the photoactivated state and the conformational changes that lead to it are not known. We report time-resolved x-ray scattering of the full-length phytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans on micro- and millisecond time scales. We identify a twist of the histidine kinase output domains with respect to the chromophore-binding domains as the dominant change between the photoactivated and resting states. The time-resolved data further show that the structural changes up to the microsecond time scales are small and localized in the chromophore-binding domains. The global structural change occurs within a few milliseconds, coinciding with the formation of the spectroscopic meta-Rc state. Our findings establish key elements of the signaling mechanism of full-length bacterial phytochromes. PMID:27536728

  19. Conformational states of the full-length glucagon receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Wang, Chong; Siu, Fai Y.; Song, Gaojie; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Pascal, Bruce D.; Wu, Beili; Potter, Clinton S.; Zhou, Hu; Griffin, Patrick R.; Carragher, Bridget; Yang, Huaiyu; Wang, Ming-Wei; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-01-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors are composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) and a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain, and their signalling is regulated by peptide hormones. Using a hybrid structural biology approach together with the ECD and 7TM domain crystal structures of the glucagon receptor (GCGR), we examine the relationship between full-length receptor conformation and peptide ligand binding. Molecular dynamics (MD) and disulfide crosslinking studies suggest that apo-GCGR can adopt both an open and closed conformation associated with extensive contacts between the ECD and 7TM domain. The electron microscopy (EM) map of the full-length GCGR shows how a monoclonal antibody stabilizes the ECD and 7TM domain in an elongated conformation. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) studies and MD simulations indicate that an open conformation is also stabilized by peptide ligand binding. The combined studies reveal the open/closed states of GCGR and suggest that glucagon binds to GCGR by a conformational selection mechanism. PMID:26227798

  20. Development of a full-length human protein production pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Justin; Petritis, Brianne; Sau, Sujay; Rauf, Femina; Gaskin, Michael; Ober-Reynolds, Benjamin; Mineyev, Irina; Magee, Mitch; Chaput, John; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    There are many proteomic applications that require large collections of purified protein, but parallel production of large numbers of different proteins remains a very challenging task. To help meet the needs of the scientific community, we have developed a human protein production pipeline. Using high-throughput (HT) methods, we transferred the genes of 31 full-length proteins into three expression vectors, and expressed the collection as N-terminal HaloTag fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and two commercial cell-free (CF) systems, wheat germ extract (WGE) and HeLa cell extract (HCE). Expression was assessed by labeling the fusion proteins specifically and covalently with a fluorescent HaloTag ligand and detecting its fluorescence on a LabChip® GX microfluidic capillary gel electrophoresis instrument. This automated, HT assay provided both qualitative and quantitative assessment of recombinant protein. E. coli was only capable of expressing 20% of the test collection in the supernatant fraction with ≥20 μg yields, whereas CF systems had ≥83% success rates. We purified expressed proteins using an automated HaloTag purification method. We purified 20, 33, and 42% of the test collection from E. coli, WGE, and HCE, respectively, with yields ≥1 μg and ≥90% purity. Based on these observations, we have developed a triage strategy for producing full-length human proteins in these three expression systems. PMID:24806540

  1. Simulations of The Dalles Dam Proposed Full Length Spillwall

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2008-02-25

    This report presents results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study to evaluatethe impacts of a full-length spillwall at The Dalles Dam. The full-length spillwall is being designed and evaluated as a structural means to improve tailrace egress and thus survival of juvenile fish passing through the spillway. During the course of this study, a full-length spillwall at Bays 6/7 and 8/9 were considered. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed extending the spillwall constructed in the stilling basin between spillway Bays 6 and 7 about 590 ft farther downstream. It is believed that the extension of the spillwall will improve egress conditions for downstream juvenile salmonids by moving them more rapidly into the thalweg of the river hence reducing their exposure to predators. A numerical model was created, validated, and applied the The Dalles Dam tailrace. The models were designed to assess impacts to flow, tailrace egress, navigation, and adult salmon passage of a proposed spill wall extension. The more extensive model validation undertaken in this study greatly improved our confidence in the numerical model to represent the flow conditions in The Dalles tailrace. This study used these validated CFD models to simulate the potential impacts of a spillwall extension for The Dalles Dam tailrace for two locations. We determined the following: (1)The construction of an extended wall (between Bays 6/7) will not adversely impact entering or exiting the navigation lock. Impact should be less if a wall were constructed between Bays 8/9. (2)The construction of a wall between Bays 6/7 will increase the water surface elevation between the wall and the Washington shore. Although the increased water surface elevation would be beneficial to adult upstream migrants in that it decreases velocities on the approach to the adult ladder, the increased flow depth would enhance dissolved gas production, impacting potential operations of the project because of

  2. Isolation and characterization of full-length putative alcohol dehydrogenase genes from polygonum minus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Nur Athirah Abd; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2013-11-01

    Polygonum minus, locally named as Kesum is an aromatic herb which is high in secondary metabolite content. Alcohol dehydrogenase is an important enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidation of alcohol and aldehyde with the presence of NAD(P)(H) as co-factor. The main focus of this research is to identify the gene of ADH. The total RNA was extracted from leaves of P. minus which was treated with 150 μM Jasmonic acid. Full-length cDNA sequence of ADH was isolated via rapid amplification cDNA end (RACE). Subsequently, in silico analysis was conducted on the full-length cDNA sequence and PCR was done on genomic DNA to determine the exon and intron organization. Two sequences of ADH, designated as PmADH1 and PmADH2 were successfully isolated. Both sequences have ORF of 801 bp which encode 266 aa residues. Nucleotide sequence comparison of PmADH1 and PmADH2 indicated that both sequences are highly similar at the ORF region but divergent in the 3' untranslated regions (UTR). The amino acid is differ at the 107 residue; PmADH1 contains Gly (G) residue while PmADH2 contains Cys (C) residue. The intron-exon organization pattern of both sequences are also same, with 3 introns and 4 exons. Based on in silico analysis, both sequences contain "classical" short chain alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases ((c) SDRs) conserved domain. The results suggest that both sequences are the members of short chain alcohol dehydrogenase family.

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of the full-length Hsp90 gene from Matricaria recutita.

    PubMed

    Ling, S P; Su, S S; Zhang, H M; Zhang, X S; Liu, X Y; Pan, G F; Yuan, Y

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is one of the most abundant and conserved chaperone proteins and plays important roles in plant growth and responses to environmental stimuli. However, little is known regarding the sequence and function of Hsp90s in Matricaria recutita. In the present study, we cloned the full-length cDNA sequence of the hsp90 gene from this species. Using rapid amplification of cDNA ends technologies with 2 degenerate primers that were designed based on the hsp90 gene sequence from other members of Asteraceae, we isolated and characterized an Hsp90 homolog gene from M. recutita (Mr-Hsp90). The full-length Mr-hsp90 cDNA sequence, containing 2097 base pairs, encodes a protein of 698 amino acids. Based on amino acid sequence identity, Mr-Hsp90 showed high similarity to other cloned Hsp90 proteins. The Mr-Hsp90 protein was closely clustered with the Lactuca sativa in a phylogenetic tree. These results indicate that the cloned sequence of Mr-Hsp90 is a member of the Hsp90 family, which is reported for the first time in M. recutita. Next, we conducted a salt stress experiment to determine the protein's function under salt stress conditions. Survival of chamomile seedlings subjected to heat-shock pretreatment was significantly increased compared with groups that had not undergone heat-shock pretreatment in a salt stress environment. This indicates that Mr-Hsp90 plays an important role in the salt resistance of chamomile seedlings. PMID:25526220

  4. Analysis and Optimization of "Full-Length" Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19

    A method of analyzing the axial variation of the heat generation rate, temperature, voltage, current density and emitter heat flux in a thermionic converter is described. The method is particularly useful for the case of "long" diodes, each extending over the full length of the reactor core. For a given diode geometry and fuel distribution, the analysis combines a nuclear solution of the axial fission density profile with the iterative solution of four differential equations representing the thermal, electrical, and thermionic interactions within the diode. The digital computer program developed to solve these equations can also perform a design optimization with respect to lead resistance, load voltage, and emitter thickness, for a specified maximum emitter temperature. Typical results are presented, and the use of this analysis for predicting the diode operating characteristics is illustrated.

  5. Quantifying elongation rhythm during full-length protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Gabriel; Chen, Chunlai; Kaur, Jaskiran; Cui, Xiaonan; Zhang, Haibo; Asahara, Haruichi; Chong, Shaorong; Smilansky, Zeev; Goldman, Yale E; Cooperman, Barry S

    2013-07-31

    Pauses regulate the rhythm of ribosomal protein synthesis. Mutations disrupting even minor pauses can give rise to improperly formed proteins and human disease. Such minor pauses are difficult to characterize by ensemble methods, but can be readily examined by single-molecule (sm) approaches. Here we use smFRET to carry out real-time monitoring of the expression of a full-length protein, the green fluorescent protein variant Emerald GFP. We demonstrate significant correlations between measured elongation rates and codon and isoacceptor tRNA usage, and provide a quantitative estimate of the effect on elongation rate of replacing a codon recognizing an abundant tRNA with a synonymous codon cognate to a rarer tRNA. Our results suggest that tRNA selection plays an important general role in modulating the rates and rhythms of protein synthesis, potentially influencing simultaneous co-translational processes such as folding and chemical modification. PMID:23822614

  6. Full length talin stimulates integrin activation and axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chin Lik; Kwok, Jessica C.F.; Heller, Janosch P.D.; Zhao, Rongrong; Eva, Richard; Fawcett, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Integrin function is regulated by activation involving conformational changes that modulate ligand-binding affinity and downstream signaling. Activation is regulated through inside-out signaling which is controlled by many signaling pathways via a final common pathway through kindlin and talin, which bind to the intracellular tail of beta integrins. Previous studies have shown that the axon growth inhibitory molecules NogoA and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) inactivate integrins. Overexpressing kindlin-1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons activates integrins, enabling their axons to overcome inhibitory molecules in the environment, and promoting regeneration in vivo following dorsal root crush. Other studies have indicated that expression of the talin head alone or with kindlin can enhance integrin activation. Here, using adult rat DRG neurons, we investigate the effects of overexpressing various forms of talin on axon growth and integrin signaling. We found that overexpression of the talin head activated axonal integrins but inhibited downstream signaling via FAK, and did not promote axon growth. Similarly, co-expression of the talin head and kindlin-1 prevented the growth-promoting effect of kindlin-1, suggesting that the talin head acts as a form of dominant negative for integrin function. Using full-length talin constructs in PC12 cells we observed that neurite growth was enhanced by the expression of wild-type talin and more so by two ‘activated’ forms of talin produced by point mutation (on laminin and aggrecan–laminin substrates). Nevertheless, co-expression of full-length talin with kindlin did not promote neurite growth more than either molecule alone. In vivo, we find that talin is present in PNS axons (sciatic nerve), and also in CNS axons of the corticospinal tract. PMID:25771432

  7. Crystal Structure of a Full-Length [beta]-Catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yi; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Liu, Jing; Berndt, Jason D.; Zheng, Jie J.; Moon, Randall T.; Xu, Wenqing

    2008-08-19

    {beta}-catenin plays essential roles in cell adhesion and Wnt signaling, while deregulation of {beta}-catenin is associated with multiple diseases including cancers. Here, we report the crystal structures of full-length zebrafish {beta}-catenin and a human {beta}-catenin fragment that contains both the armadillo repeat and the C-terminal domains. Our structures reveal that the N-terminal region of the C-terminal domain, a key component of the C-terminal transactivation domain, forms a long {alpha} helix that packs on the C-terminal end of the armadillo repeat domain, and thus forms part of the {beta}-catenin superhelical core. The existence of this helix redefines our view of interactions of {beta}-catenin with some of its critical partners, including ICAT and Chibby, which may form extensive interactions with this C-terminal domain {alpha} helix. Our crystallographic and NMR studies also suggest that the unstructured N-terminal and C-terminal tails interact with the ordered armadillo repeat domain in a dynamic and variable manner.

  8. Massive Collection of Full-Length Complementary DNA Clones and Microarray Analyses:. Keys to Rice Transcriptome Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2009-02-01

    Completion of the high-precision genome sequence analysis of rice led to the collection of about 35,000 full-length cDNA clones and the determination of their complete sequences. Mapping of these full-length cDNA sequences has given us information on (1) the number of genes expressed in the rice genome; (2) the start and end positions and exon-intron structures of rice genes; (3) alternative transcripts; (4) possible encoded proteins; (5) non-protein-coding (np) RNAs; (6) the density of gene localization on the chromosome; (7) setting the parameters of gene prediction programs; and (8) the construction of a microarray system that monitors global gene expression. Manual curation for rice gene annotation by using mapping information on full-length cDNA and EST assemblies has revealed about 32,000 expressed genes in the rice genome. Analysis of major gene families, such as those encoding membrane transport proteins (pumps, ion channels, and secondary transporters), along with the evolution from bacteria to higher animals and plants, reveals how gene numbers have increased through adaptation to circumstances. Family-based gene annotation also gives us a new way of comparing organisms. Massive amounts of data on gene expression under many kinds of physiological conditions are being accumulated in rice oligoarrays (22K and 44K) based on full-length cDNA sequences. Cluster analyses of genes that have the same promoter cis-elements, that have similar expression profiles, or that encode enzymes in the same metabolic pathways or signal transduction cascades give us clues to understanding the networks of gene expression in rice. As a tool for that purpose, we recently developed "RiCES", a tool for searching for cis-elements in the promoter regions of clustered genes.

  9. Crystal Structure of a Full-Length Autotransporter

    SciTech Connect

    van den Berg, B.

    2010-01-01

    The autotransporter (AT) secretion mechanism is the most common mechanism for the secretion of virulence factors across the outer membrane (OM) from pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, ATs have attracted biotechnological and biomedical interest for protein display on bacterial cell surfaces. Despite their importance, the mechanism by which passenger domains of ATs pass the OM is still unclear. The classical view is that the {beta}-barrel domain provides the conduit through which the unfolded passenger moves, with the energy provided by vectorial folding of the {beta}-strand-rich passenger on the extracellular side of the OM. We present here the first structure of a full-length AT, the esterase EstA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, at a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom}. EstA has a relatively narrow, 12-stranded {beta}-barrel that is covalently attached to the passenger domain via a long, curved helix that occupies the lumen of the {beta}-barrel. The passenger has a structure that is dramatically different from that of other known passengers, with a globular fold that is dominated by {alpha}-helices and loops. The arrangement of secondary-structure elements suggests that the passenger can fold sequentially, providing the driving force for passenger translocation. The esterase active-site residues are located at the apical surface of the passenger, at the entrance of a large hydrophobic pocket that contains a bound detergent molecule that likely mimics substrate. The EstA structure provides insight into AT mechanism and will facilitate the design of fusion proteins for cell surface display.

  10. Full-length Dysferlin Transfer by the Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase Restores Dysferlin-deficient Muscle.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Helena; Schöwel, Verena; Spuler, Simone; Marg, Andreas; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    Dysferlin-deficient muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease characterized by muscle weakness and wasting for which there is no treatment. It is caused by mutations in DYSF, a large, multiexonic gene that forms a coding sequence of 6.2 kb. Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is a nonviral gene transfer vector, already used in clinical trials. The hyperactive SB system consists of a transposon DNA sequence and a transposase protein, SB100X, that can integrate DNA over 10 kb into the target genome. We constructed an SB transposon-based vector to deliver full-length human DYSF cDNA into dysferlin-deficient H2K A/J myoblasts. We demonstrate proper dysferlin expression as well as highly efficient engraftment (>1,100 donor-derived fibers) of the engineered myoblasts in the skeletal muscle of dysferlin- and immunodeficient B6.Cg-Dysf(prmd) Prkdc(scid)/J (Scid/BLA/J) mice. Nonviral gene delivery of full-length human dysferlin into muscle cells, along with a successful and efficient transplantation into skeletal muscle are important advances towards successful gene therapy of dysferlin-deficient muscular dystrophy. PMID:26784637

  11. Two methods for full-length RNA sequencing for low quantities of cells and single cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xinghua; Durrett, Russell E.; Zhu, Haiying; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Li, Yumei; Zi, Xiaoyuan; Marjani, Sadie L.; Euskirchen, Ghia; Ma, Chao; LaMotte, Robert H.; Park, In-Hyun; Snyder, Michael P.; Mason, Christopher E.; Weissman, Sherman M.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to determine the gene expression pattern in low quantities of cells or single cells is important for resolving a variety of problems in many biological disciplines. A robust description of the expression signature of a single cell requires determination of the full-length sequence of the expressed mRNAs in the cell, yet existing methods have either 3′ biased or variable transcript representation. Here, we report our protocols for the amplification and high-throughput sequencing of very small amounts of RNA for sequencing using procedures of either semirandom primed PCR or phi29 DNA polymerase-based DNA amplification, for the cDNA generated with oligo-dT and/or random oligonucleotide primers. Unlike existing methods, these protocols produce relatively uniformly distributed sequences covering the full length of almost all transcripts independent of their sizes, from 1,000 to 10 cells, and even with single cells. Both protocols produced satisfactory detection/coverage of the abundant mRNAs from a single K562 erythroleukemic cell or a single dorsal root ganglion neuron. The phi29-based method produces long products with less noise, uses an isothermal reaction, and is simple to practice. The semirandom primed PCR procedure is more sensitive and reproducible at low transcript levels or with low quantities of cells. These methods provide tools for mRNA sequencing or RNA sequencing when only low quantities of cells, a single cell, or even degraded RNA are available for profiling. PMID:23267071

  12. [Isolation, identification and full-length genome sequence analysis of encephalomyocarditis virus from local aardvarks].

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong-Tao; Liu, Hui-Min; He, Xiu-Yuan; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Lu; Wang, Xin-Wei; Yang, Xia; Yao, Hui-Xia; Wang, Chuan-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is a natural epidemic zoonotic pathogen. However, no reports have been published regarding the isolation, identification and full-length genome of EMCV from a local aardvark population. In present study, an EMCV isolate HNXX13 was isolated from aardvarks named Huainan-pig in Henan Province. The systematic identification, full-length genome sequencing and molecular characteristic analysis of the isolate HNXX13 were conducted. The result showed that the isolate was spherical with a diameter of 24-30 nm, neither heat- nor acid-resistant, sensitive to trypsin, insensitive to chloroform, not protected by bivalent cationic, and the specific fluorescence was observed in the cytoplasm of BHK-21 cells infected with the isolate by using indirect fluorescence assay. The full-length genome of EMCV HNXX13 generated a 7 725bp sequence (GenBank: F771002), with 81.0%-99.9% nucleotide identity to reference strains from different animals, and 99.5% with a Chinese reference strain isolated earlier from a commercial pig herd. The phylogenetic tree based on the full-length genome and ORF sequences identified that all EMCV strains were divided into three groups G1, G2 and G3, and strain HNXX13 belonging to the G1 group with other Chinese reference strains. The result also identified that this EMCV infection could cause severe clinical signs in a local aardvark population, and enriches the molecular epidemiological data of EMCV in China. Regional differences exist in EMCV genome and transmission is limited within a certain area. However, the cross-infection and transmission of EMCV between aardvark and mice appears most likely. Mutations have occurred in some amino acids of EMCV strain HNXX13 during the transmission in local aardvark herd and these mutations might make the virus easier to infect the aardvark. PMID:25272589

  13. Molecular cloning and properties of a full-length putative thyroid hormone receptor coactivator.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, A; Yen, P M; Misiti, S; Cardona, G R; Liu, Y; Chin, W W

    1996-08-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors that regulate target gene transcription. The conserved carboxy-terminal region of the ligand-binding domain (AF-2) has been thought to play a critical role in mediating ligand-dependent transactivation by the interaction with coactivator(s). Using bacterially-expressed TR as a probe, far-Western-based expression cDNA library screening identified cDNAs that encode, in part, the recently reported partial steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) sequence. Additional work, including 5' RACE, has characterized a full-length cDNA that encodes a approximately 160 kD protein as a putative thyroid hormone receptor coactivator (F-SRC-1). In vitro binding studies show that F-SRC-1 binds to a variety of nuclear hormone receptors in a ligand-dependent manner, along with TBP and TFIIB, suggesting that F-SRC-1 may play a role as a bridging molecule between nuclear hormone receptors and general transcription factors. Interestingly, AF-2 mutants also retain ligand-dependent interaction with F-SRC-1. Although F-SRC-1 recognizes the ligand-induced conformational changes of nuclear hormone receptors, our observations suggest that F-SRC-1 may bind directly with subregion(s) in nuclear hormone receptors other than the AF-2 region. PMID:8754792

  14. Biological characterization of liver fatty acid binding gene from miniature pig liver cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y H; Wang, K F; Zhang, S; Fan, Y N; Guan, W J; Ma, Y H

    2015-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP) are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind to long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Wuzhishan miniature pig, and then the L-FABP gene was cloned from this cDNA library and an expression vector (pEGFP-N3-L-FABP) was constructed in vitro. This vector was transfected into hepatocytes to test its function. The results of western blotting analysis demonstrated that the L-FABP gene from our full-length enriched cDNA library regulated downstream genes, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family in hepatocytes. This study provides a theoretical basis and experimental evidence for the application of L-FABP for the treatment of liver injury. PMID:26345909

  15. The Drosophila gene collection: Identification of putative full-length cDNAs for 70 percent of D. melanogaster genes

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, Mark; Liao, Guochun; Brokstein, Peter; Hong, Ling; Carninci, Piero; Shiraki, Toshiyuki; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Champe, Mark; Pacleb, Joanne; Wan, Ken; Yu, Charles; Carlson, Joe; George, Reed; Celniker, Susan; Rubin, Gerald M.

    2002-08-12

    Collections of full-length nonredundant cDNA clones are critical reagents for functional genomics. The first step toward these resources is the generation and single-pass sequencing of cDNA libraries that contain a high proportion of full-length clones. The first release of the Drosophila Gene Collection Release 1 (DGCr1) was produced from six libraries representing various tissues, developmental stages, and the cultured S2 cell line. Nearly 80,000 random 5prime expressed sequence tags (EST) from these libraries were collapsed into a nonredundant set of 5849 cDNAs, corresponding to {approx}40 percent of the 13,474 predicted genes in Drosophila. To obtain cDNA clones representing the remaining genes, we have generated an additional 157,835 5prime ESTs from two previously existing and three new libraries. One new library is derived from adult testis, a tissue we previously did not exploit for gene discovery; two new cap-trapped normalized libraries are derived from 0-22hr embryos and adult heads. Taking advantage of the annotated D. melanogaster genome sequence, we clustered the ESTs by aligning them to the genome. Clusters that overlap genes not already represented by cDNA clones in the DGCr1 were analyzed further, and putative full-length clones were selected for inclusion in the new DGC. This second release of the DGC (DGCr2) contains 5061 additional clones, extending the collection to 10,910 cDNAs representing >70 percent of the predicted genes in Drosophila.

  16. Full-Length GB Virus C (Hepatitis G Virus) RNA Transcripts Are Infectious in Primary CD4-Positive T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jinhua; Wünschmann, Sabina; Schmidt, Warren; Shao, Jianqiang; Stapleton, Jack T.

    2000-01-01

    GB virus C (GBV-C or hepatitis G virus) is a recently described flavivirus which frequently leads to chronic viremia in humans. Although GBV-C is associated with acute posttransfusion hepatitis, it is not clear if the virus is pathogenic for humans. We constructed a full-length cDNA from the plasma of a person with chronic GBV-C viremia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) transfected with full-length RNA transcripts from this GBV-C clone resulted in viral replication. This was demonstrated by serial passage of virus from cell culture supernatants, detection of increasing concentrations of positive- and negative-sense GBV-C RNA over time, and the detection of the GBV-C E2 antigen by confocal microscopy. In addition, two types of GBV-C particles were identified in cell lysates; these particles had buoyant densities of 1.06 and 1.12 to 1.17 g/ml in sucrose gradients. PBMCs sorted for expression of CD4 contained 100-fold-more GBV-C RNA than CD4-negative cells. Taken together, these data demonstrate that RNA transcripts from GBV-C full-length cDNA are infectious in primary CD4-positive T cells. In contrast, RNA transcripts from an infectious hepatitis C virus clone did not replicate in the same cell culture system. Infectious RNA transcripts from GBV-C cDNA should prove useful for studying viral replication and may allow identification of differences between GBV-C and hepatitis C virus cultivation in vitro. PMID:10982359

  17. High-quality full-length immunoglobulin profiling with unique molecular barcoding.

    PubMed

    Turchaninova, M A; Davydov, A; Britanova, O V; Shugay, M; Bikos, V; Egorov, E S; Kirgizova, V I; Merzlyak, E M; Staroverov, D B; Bolotin, D A; Mamedov, I Z; Izraelson, M; Logacheva, M D; Kladova, O; Plevova, K; Pospisilova, S; Chudakov, D M

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput sequencing analysis of hypermutating immunoglobulin (IG) repertoires remains a challenging task. Here we present a robust protocol for the full-length profiling of human and mouse IG repertoires. This protocol uses unique molecular identifiers (UMIs) introduced in the course of cDNA synthesis to control bottlenecks and to eliminate PCR and sequencing errors. Using asymmetric 400+100-nt paired-end Illumina sequencing and UMI-based assembly with the new version of the MIGEC software, the protocol allows up to 750-nt lengths to be sequenced in an almost error-free manner. This sequencing approach should also be applicable to various tasks beyond immune repertoire studies. In IG profiling, the achieved length of high-quality sequence covers the variable region of even the longest chains, along with the fragment of a constant region carrying information on the antibody isotype. The whole protocol, including preparation of cells and libraries, sequencing and data analysis, takes 5 to 6 d. PMID:27490633

  18. Functional and expression analyses of transcripts based on full-length cDNAs of Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Setsuko; Makita, Yuko; Kuriyama-Kondou, Tomoko; Kawashima, Mika; Mochizuki, Yoshiki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Sato, Shusei; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Matsui, Minami

    2015-01-01

    Sorghum bicolor is one of the most important crops for food and bioethanol production. Its small diploid genome and resistance to environmental stress make sorghum an attractive model for studying the functional genomics of the Saccharinae and other C4 grasses. We analyzed the domain-based functional annotation of the cDNAs using the gene ontology (GO) categories for molecular function to characterize all the genes cloned in the full-length cDNA library of sorghum. The sorghum cDNA library successfully captured a wide range of cDNA-encoded proteins with various functions. To characterize the protein function of newly identified cDNAs, a search of their deduced domains and comparative analyses in the Oryza sativa and Zea mays genomes were carried out. Furthermore, genes on the sense strand corresponding to antisense transcripts were classified based on the GO of molecular function. To add more information about these genes, we have analyzed the expression profiles using RNA-Seq of three tissues (spikelet, seed and stem) during the starch-filling phase. We performed functional analysis of tissue-specific genes and expression analysis of genes of starch biosynthesis enzymes. This functional analysis of sorghum full-length cDNAs and the transcriptome information will facilitate further analysis of the Saccharinae and grass families. PMID:26546227

  19. Functional and expression analyses of transcripts based on full-length cDNAs of Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Setsuko; Makita, Yuko; Kuriyama-Kondou, Tomoko; Kawashima, Mika; Mochizuki, Yoshiki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Sato, Shusei; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Matsui, Minami

    2015-12-01

    Sorghum bicolor is one of the most important crops for food and bioethanol production. Its small diploid genome and resistance to environmental stress make sorghum an attractive model for studying the functional genomics of the Saccharinae and other C4 grasses. We analyzed the domain-based functional annotation of the cDNAs using the gene ontology (GO) categories for molecular function to characterize all the genes cloned in the full-length cDNA library of sorghum. The sorghum cDNA library successfully captured a wide range of cDNA-encoded proteins with various functions. To characterize the protein function of newly identified cDNAs, a search of their deduced domains and comparative analyses in the Oryza sativa and Zea mays genomes were carried out. Furthermore, genes on the sense strand corresponding to antisense transcripts were classified based on the GO of molecular function. To add more information about these genes, we have analyzed the expression profiles using RNA-Seq of three tissues (spikelet, seed and stem) during the starch-filling phase. We performed functional analysis of tissue-specific genes and expression analysis of genes of starch biosynthesis enzymes. This functional analysis of sorghum full-length cDNAs and the transcriptome information will facilitate further analysis of the Saccharinae and grass families. PMID:26546227

  20. Identification and Functional Analyses of 11 769 Full-length Human cDNAs Focused on Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Wakamatsu, Ai; Kimura, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Jun-ichi; Nishikawa, Tetsuo; Nomura, Nobuo; Sugano, Sumio; Isogai, Takao

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed diversity of mRNA produced as a result of alternative splicing in order to evaluate gene function. First, we predicted the number of human genes transcribed into protein-coding mRNAs by using the sequence information of full-length cDNAs and 5′-ESTs and obtained 23 241 of such human genes. Next, using these genes, we analyzed the mRNA diversity and consequently sequenced and identified 11 769 human full-length cDNAs whose predicted open reading frames were different from other known full-length cDNAs. Especially, 30% of the cDNAs we identified contained variation in the transcription start site (TSS). Our analysis, which particularly focused on multiple variable first exons (FEVs) formed due to the alternative utilization of TSSs, led to the identification of 261 FEVs expressed in the tissue-specific manner. Quantification of the expression profiles of 13 genes by real-time PCR analysis further confirmed the tissue-specific expression of FEVs, e.g. OXR1 had specific TSS in brain and tumor tissues, and so on. Finally, based on the results of our mRNA diversity analysis, we have created the FLJ Human cDNA Database. From our result, it has been understood mechanisms that one gene produces suitable protein-coding transcripts responding to the situation and the environment. PMID:19880432

  1. Differential representation of sunflower ESTs in enriched organ-specific cDNA libraries in a small scale sequencing project

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Paula; Paniego, Norma; Lew, Sergio; Hopp, H Esteban; Heinz, Ruth A

    2003-01-01

    Background Subtractive hybridization methods are valuable tools for identifying differentially regulated genes in a given tissue avoiding redundant sequencing of clones representing the same expressed genes, maximizing detection of low abundant transcripts and thus, affecting the efficiency and cost effectiveness of small scale cDNA sequencing projects aimed to the specific identification of useful genes for breeding purposes. The objective of this work is to evaluate alternative strategies to high-throughput sequencing projects for the identification of novel genes differentially expressed in sunflower as a source of organ-specific genetic markers that can be functionally associated to important traits. Results Differential organ-specific ESTs were generated from leaf, stem, root and flower bud at two developmental stages (R1 and R4). The use of different sources of RNA as tester and driver cDNA for the construction of differential libraries was evaluated as a tool for detection of rare or low abundant transcripts. Organ-specificity ranged from 75 to 100% of non-redundant sequences in the different cDNA libraries. Sequence redundancy varied according to the target and driver cDNA used in each case. The R4 flower cDNA library was the less redundant library with 62% of unique sequences. Out of a total of 919 sequences that were edited and annotated, 318 were non-redundant sequences. Comparison against sequences in public databases showed that 60% of non-redundant sequences showed significant similarity to known sequences. The number of predicted novel genes varied among the different cDNA libraries, ranging from 56% in the R4 flower to 16 % in the R1 flower bud library. Comparison with sunflower ESTs on public databases showed that 197 of non-redundant sequences (60%) did not exhibit significant similarity to previously reported sunflower ESTs. This approach helped to successfully isolate a significant number of new reported sequences putatively related to responses

  2. Analysis of 4,664 high-quality sequence-finished poplar full-length

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, S.; Gunter, Lee E; Tuskan, Gerald A; Douglas, Carl; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven; Marra, Marco; Bohlmann, J.

    2008-01-01

    The genus Populus includes poplars, aspens and cottonwoods, which will be collectively referred to as poplars hereafter unless otherwise specified. Poplars are the dominant tree species in many forest ecosystems in the Northern Hemisphere and are of substantial economic value in plantation forestry. Poplar has been established as a model system for genomics studies of growth, development, and adaptation of woody perennial plants including secondary xylem formation, dormancy, adaptation to local environments, and biotic interactions. As part of the poplar genome sequencing project and the development of genomic resources for poplar, we have generated a full-length (FL)-cDNA collection using the biotinylated CAP trapper method. We constructed four FLcDNA libraries using RNA from xylem, phloem and cambium, and green shoot tips and leaves from the P. trichocarpa Nisqually-1 genotype, as well as insect-attacked leaves of the P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides hybrid. Following careful selection of candidate cDNA clones, we used a combined strategy of paired end reads and primer walking to generate a set of 4,664 high-accuracy, sequence-verified FLcDNAs, which clustered into 3,990 putative unique genes. Mapping FLcDNAs to the poplar genome sequence combined with BLAST comparisons to previously predicted protein coding sequences in the poplar genome identified 39 FLcDNAs that likely localize to gaps in the current genome sequence assembly. Another 173 FLcDNAs mapped to the genome sequence but were not included among the previously predicted genes in the poplar genome. Comparative sequence analysis against Arabidopsis thaliana and other species in the non-redundant database of GenBank revealed that 11.5% of the poplar FLcDNAs display no significant sequence similarity to other plant proteins. By mapping the poplar FLcDNAs against transcriptome data previously obtained with a 15.5 K cDNA microarray, we identified 153 FLcDNA clones for genes that were differentially expressed in

  3. Responses of Nontransformed Human Hepatocytes to Conditional Expression of Full-Length Hepatitis C Virus Open Reading Frame

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weiliang; Lázaro, Catherine A.; Campbell, Jean S.; Parks, W. Tony; Katze, Michael G.; Fausto, Nelson

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic hepatitis that can lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. To study the effects of HCV protein expression on host cells, we established conditional expression of the full-length open reading frame (ORF) of an infectious cDNA clone of HCV (genotype 1a, H77 strain) in the nontransformed human hepatocyte line cell HH4 using the ecdysone receptor regulatory system. Treatment with the ecdysone analog ponasterone-A induced tightly regulated and dose-dependent full-length HCV ORF expression and properly processed HCV proteins. HCV Core, NS3, and NS5A colocalized in perinuclear regions and associated with the early endosomal protein EEA1. HCV ORF expression caused marked growth inhibition, increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, up-regulation of glutamate-l-cysteine ligase activity, increased glutathione level, and activation of nuclear factor κB. Although it was not directly cytotoxic, HCV ORF expression sensitized HH4 cells to Fas at certain concentrations but not to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. HCV ORF expression in HH4 cells up-regulated genes involved in innate immune response/inflammation and oxidative stress responses and down-regulated cell growth-related genes. Expression of HCV ORF in host cells may contribute to HCV pathogenesis by producing oxidative stress and increasing the expression of genes related to the innate immune response and inflammation. PMID:17991716

  4. Retrotransposon mdg3 of Drosophila: General structure and functional domains of the full-length copy

    SciTech Connect

    Avedisov, S.N.; Ilyin, Yu.V.

    1995-09-01

    A full-length copy of the transposable element mdg3 from the plasmid clone Dm38 of Drosophila melanogaster was obtained by screening the DNA library of the cell culture 67J25D. Previous work demonstrated that only full-length copies of mdg3 (5.5 kb) are amplified in this culture, whereas the number of deleted copies probably has not changed since the cell line was established. We sequenced the full-length copy of mdg3 from cDm38 by the method described by Sanger. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Sequencing and comparative genomic analysis of 1227 Felis catus cDNA sequences enriched for developmental, clinical and nutritional phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The feline genome is valuable to the veterinary and model organism genomics communities because the cat is an obligate carnivore and a model for endangered felids. The initial public release of the Felis catus genome assembly provided a framework for investigating the genomic basis of feline biology. However, the entire set of protein coding genes has not been elucidated. Results We identified and characterized 1227 protein coding feline sequences, of which 913 map to public sequences and 314 are novel. These sequences have been deposited into NCBI's genbank database and complement public genomic resources by providing additional protein coding sequences that fill in some of the gaps in the feline genome assembly. Through functional and comparative genomic analyses, we gained an understanding of the role of these sequences in feline development, nutrition and health. Specifically, we identified 104 orthologs of human genes associated with Mendelian disorders. We detected negative selection within sequences with gene ontology annotations associated with intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton and muscle functions. We detected relatively less negative selection on protein sequences encoding extracellular networks, apoptotic pathways and mitochondrial gene ontology annotations. Additionally, we characterized feline cDNA sequences that have mouse orthologs associated with clinical, nutritional and developmental phenotypes. Together, this analysis provides an overview of the value of our cDNA sequences and enhances our understanding of how the feline genome is similar to, and different from other mammalian genomes. Conclusions The cDNA sequences reported here expand existing feline genomic resources by providing high-quality sequences annotated with comparative genomic information providing functional, clinical, nutritional and orthologous gene information. PMID:22257742

  6. Fabrication and Testing of Full-Length Single-Cell Externally Fueled Converters for Thermionic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1995-08-01

    Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes the fabrication and testing of full-length prototypcial converters, both unfueled and fueled, and presents parametric results of electrically heated tests.

  7. [Cloning of full-length coding sequence of tree shrew CD4 and prediction of its molecular characteristics].

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei-Wei; Gao, Yue-Dong; Guo, Yan; Huang, Jing-Fei; Xiao, Chang; Li, Zuo-Sheng; Zhang, Hua-Tang

    2012-02-01

    The tree shrews, as an ideal animal model receiving extensive attentions to human disease research, demands essential research tools, in particular cellular markers and monoclonal antibodies for immunological studies. In this paper, a 1 365 bp of the full-length CD4 cDNA encoding sequence was cloned from total RNA in peripheral blood of tree shrews, the sequence completes two unknown fragment gaps of tree shrews predicted CD4 cDNA in the GenBank database, and its molecular characteristics were analyzed compared with other mammals by using biology software such as Clustal W2.0 and so forth. The results showed that the extracellular and intracellular domains of tree shrews CD4 amino acid sequence are conserved. The tree shrews CD4 amino acid sequence showed a close genetic relationship with Homo sapiens and Macaca mulatta. Most regions of the tree shrews CD4 molecule surface showed positive charges as humans. However, compared with CD4 extracellular domain D1 of human, CD4 D1 surface of tree shrews showed more negative charges, and more two N-glycosylation sites, which may affect antibody binding. This study provides a theoretical basis for the preparation and functional studies of CD4 monoclonal antibody. PMID:22345010

  8. In vitro translation of the full-length RNA transcript of figwort mosaic virus (Caulimovirus).

    PubMed

    Ranu, R S; Gowda, S; Scholthof, H; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1996-01-01

    The circular DNA genome of FMV consists of seven tandemly arranged genes placed successively on a full-length RNA transcript that spans the entire circular viral genome. This transcript is a tentative mRNA for at least five of the six major conserved genes of this virus (genes I-V) that are positioned on this transcript. The sixth major gene (gene VI) is expressed as a separate monocistronic transcript. A long 5'-nontranslated leader (598 nucleotides), a small nonconserved gene (VII), and a short intergenic region (57 nucleotides) precede the five major conserved genes (I through V) on the full-length transcript. A reporter gene (CAT), as a separate cistron or fused in-frame, to viral cistrons in various downstream positions in cloned versions of the viral genome was used in a transcription vector to generate artificial full-length transcripts of FMV. When these mRNAs were translated in vitro (rabbit reticulocyte lysate system), the reporter gene was translated efficiently in all positions. Translation of internal native viral gene positioned on the full-length transcript of FMV was also determined (the gene VI product). These observations suggest that the full-length FMV transcript functions as a polycistronic mRNA in plants. Results are best explained on the basis of translational coupling/relay race model. PMID:8882638

  9. Chinese hamster ovary cells contain transcriptionally active full-length type C proviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Y S; Penuel, E M; Low, M A; Nguyen, T P; Mangahas, J O; Anderson, K P; Petropoulos, C J

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated a genomic locus from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that contains a full-length provirus. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicates that it is a defective member of the rodent type C retrovirus family with an env region that is similar to those of mouse amphotropic retrovirus and subgroup B feline leukemia virus. We were able to demonstrate that this provirus is a member of a closely related family of full-length proviruses in CHO cells and Chinese hamster liver. Hybridization probes generated from this genomic clone were used to characterize type C retrovirus RNA expression in CHO cells. Full-length genomic RNA and subgenomic envelope mRNA were detected in CHO cell lines but not in the human-derived 293 cell line. Interestingly, we discovered that the site of retrovirus integration lies within a G repeat sequence belonging to the short interspersed element family of retroposons. Images PMID:7966574

  10. Chinese hamster ovary cells contain transcriptionally active full-length type C proviruses.

    PubMed

    Lie, Y S; Penuel, E M; Low, M A; Nguyen, T P; Mangahas, J O; Anderson, K P; Petropoulos, C J

    1994-12-01

    We have isolated a genomic locus from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that contains a full-length provirus. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicates that it is a defective member of the rodent type C retrovirus family with an env region that is similar to those of mouse amphotropic retrovirus and subgroup B feline leukemia virus. We were able to demonstrate that this provirus is a member of a closely related family of full-length proviruses in CHO cells and Chinese hamster liver. Hybridization probes generated from this genomic clone were used to characterize type C retrovirus RNA expression in CHO cells. Full-length genomic RNA and subgenomic envelope mRNA were detected in CHO cell lines but not in the human-derived 293 cell line. Interestingly, we discovered that the site of retrovirus integration lies within a G repeat sequence belonging to the short interspersed element family of retroposons. PMID:7966574

  11. Nanoscale insights into full-length prion protein aggregation on model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yangang; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Yanan; Wang, Hongda; Xu, Bingqian

    2016-06-30

    The aggregates of the full-length human recombinant prion protein (PrP) (23-231) on model membranes were investigated by combining the atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements and theoretical calculations at pH 5.0, showing the great effect of PrP concentration on its supramolecular assemblies on the lipid bilayer. PMID:27284592

  12. piggyBac transposons expressing full-length human dystrophin enable genetic correction of dystrophic mesoangioblasts

    PubMed Central

    Loperfido, Mariana; Jarmin, Susan; Dastidar, Sumitava; Di Matteo, Mario; Perini, Ilaria; Moore, Marc; Nair, Nisha; Samara-Kuko, Ermira; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Dickson, George; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic neuromuscular disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin. We developed a novel gene therapy approach based on the use of the piggyBac (PB) transposon system to deliver the coding DNA sequence (CDS) of either full-length human dystrophin (DYS: 11.1 kb) or truncated microdystrophins (MD1: 3.6 kb; MD2: 4 kb). PB transposons encoding microdystrophins were transfected in C2C12 myoblasts, yielding 65±2% MD1 and 66±2% MD2 expression in differentiated multinucleated myotubes. A hyperactive PB (hyPB) transposase was then deployed to enable transposition of the large-size PB transposon (17 kb) encoding the full-length DYS and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Stable GFP expression attaining 78±3% could be achieved in the C2C12 myoblasts that had undergone transposition. Western blot analysis demonstrated expression of the full-length human DYS protein in myotubes. Subsequently, dystrophic mesoangioblasts from a Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dog were transfected with the large-size PB transposon resulting in 50±5% GFP-expressing cells after stable transposition. This was consistent with correction of the differentiated dystrophic mesoangioblasts following expression of full-length human DYS. These results pave the way toward a novel non-viral gene therapy approach for DMD using PB transposons underscoring their potential to deliver large therapeutic genes. PMID:26682797

  13. piggyBac transposons expressing full-length human dystrophin enable genetic correction of dystrophic mesoangioblasts.

    PubMed

    Loperfido, Mariana; Jarmin, Susan; Dastidar, Sumitava; Di Matteo, Mario; Perini, Ilaria; Moore, Marc; Nair, Nisha; Samara-Kuko, Ermira; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Dickson, George; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K

    2016-01-29

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic neuromuscular disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin. We developed a novel gene therapy approach based on the use of the piggyBac (PB) transposon system to deliver the coding DNA sequence (CDS) of either full-length human dystrophin (DYS: 11.1 kb) or truncated microdystrophins (MD1: 3.6 kb; MD2: 4 kb). PB transposons encoding microdystrophins were transfected in C2C12 myoblasts, yielding 65±2% MD1 and 66±2% MD2 expression in differentiated multinucleated myotubes. A hyperactive PB (hyPB) transposase was then deployed to enable transposition of the large-size PB transposon (17 kb) encoding the full-length DYS and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Stable GFP expression attaining 78±3% could be achieved in the C2C12 myoblasts that had undergone transposition. Western blot analysis demonstrated expression of the full-length human DYS protein in myotubes. Subsequently, dystrophic mesoangioblasts from a Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dog were transfected with the large-size PB transposon resulting in 50±5% GFP-expressing cells after stable transposition. This was consistent with correction of the differentiated dystrophic mesoangioblasts following expression of full-length human DYS. These results pave the way toward a novel non-viral gene therapy approach for DMD using PB transposons underscoring their potential to deliver large therapeutic genes. PMID:26682797

  14. The structure of full-length LysR-type transcriptional regulators. Modeling of the full-length OxyR transcription factor dimer

    PubMed Central

    Zaim, Jolanta; Kierzek, Andrzej M.

    2003-01-01

    The LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs) comprise the largest family of prokaryotic transcription factors. These proteins are composed of an N-terminal DNA binding domain (DBD) and a C-terminal cofactor binding domain. To date, no structure of the DBD has been solved. According to the SUPERFAMILY and MODBASE databases, a reliable homology model of LTTR DBDs may be built using the structure of the Escherichia coli ModE transcription factor, containing a winged helix– turn–helix (HTH) motif, as a template. The remote, but statistically significant, sequence similarity between ModE and LTTR DBDs and an alignment generated using SUPERFAMILY and MODBASE methods was independently confirmed by alignment of sequence profiles representing ModE and LTTR family DBDs. Using the crystal structure of the E.coli OxyR C-terminal domain and the DBD alignments we constructed a structural model of the full-length dimer of this LTTR family member and used it to investigate the mode of protein–DNA interaction. We also applied the model to interpret, in a structural context, the results of numerous biochemical studies of mutated LTTRs. A comparison of the LTTR DBD model with the structures of other HTH proteins also provides insights into the interaction of LTTRs with the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase α subunit. PMID:12595552

  15. Development of a full-length cDNA-derived enterovirus A71 vaccine candidate using reverse genetics technology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Ting; Chow, Yen-Hung; Hsiao, Kuang-Nan; Hu, Kai-Chieh; Chiang, Jen-Ron; Wu, Suh-Chin; Chong, Pele; Liu, Chia-Chyi

    2016-08-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) is responsible for epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in young children. To circumvent difficulties in obtaining clinical enterovirus isolates that might be contaminated with other viruses, a platform technology was developed to quickly generate vaccine virus strains based on the published enterovirus genomic sequences. A recombinant plasmid containing the full-length infectious cDNA clone of EV-A71 vaccine strain E59 was directly generated after transfecting the recombinant plasmid into Vero, RD or HEK293A cells, and phenotypic characteristics similar to the parental strain were observed. The cDNA-derived infectious EV-A71 virus grown in Vero cells produced relatively stable virus titers in both T-flasks and microcarrier culture systems. To evaluate the genetic stability of the cDNA-derived EV-A71 viruses, the immunodominant structural proteins, VP1 and VP2, of the recombinant EV-A71 viruses were sequenced and analyzed. The cDNA-derived EV-A71 virus showed weak pathogenicity in a human SCARB2 mouse model. These results show the successful generation of a recombinant virus derived from a published viral genomic sequence that demonstrated good genetic stability and viral yields, which could represent an efficient and safe vaccine strain for cGMP-grade manufacturing. PMID:27387826

  16. Loss of GATA-1 full length as a cause of Diamond-Blackfan anemia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Parrella, Sara; Aspesi, Anna; Quarello, Paola; Garelli, Emanuela; Pavesi, Elisa; Carando, Adriana; Nardi, Margherita; Ellis, Steven R; Ramenghi, Ugo; Dianzani, Irma

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-1 alter the proliferation/differentiation of hemopoietic progenitors. Mutations in exon 2 interfere with the synthesis of the full-length isoform of GATA-1 and lead to the production of a shortened isoform, GATA-1s. These mutations have been found in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a congenital erythroid aplasia typically caused by mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins. We sequenced GATA-1 in 23 patients that were negative for mutations in the most frequently mutated DBA genes. One patient showed a c.2T > C mutation in the initiation codon leading to the loss of the full-length GATA-1 isoform. PMID:24453067

  17. Structure of the full-length TRPV2 channel by cryo-EM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Kevin W.; Cohen, Matthew R.; Jiang, Jiansen; Samanta, Amrita; Lodowski, David T.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y.

    2016-03-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins form a superfamily Ca2+-permeable cation channels regulated by a range of chemical and physical stimuli. Structural analysis of a `minimal' TRP vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) elucidated a mechanism of channel activation by agonists through changes in its outer pore region. Though homologous to TRPV1, other TRPV channels (TRPV2-6) are insensitive to TRPV1 activators including heat and vanilloids. To further understand the structural basis of TRPV channel function, we determined the structure of full-length TRPV2 at ~5 Å resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. Like TRPV1, TRPV2 contains two constrictions, one each in the pore-forming upper and lower gates. The agonist-free full-length TRPV2 has wider upper and lower gates compared with closed and agonist-activated TRPV1. We propose these newly revealed TRPV2 structural features contribute to diversity of TRPV channels.

  18. Synaptonemal complex extension from clustered telomeres mediates full-length chromosome pairing in Schmidtea mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Youbin; Miller, Danny E.; Ross, Eric J.; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro; Hawley, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    In the 1920s, József Gelei proposed that chromosome pairing in flatworms resulted from the formation of a telomere bouquet followed by the extension of synapsis from telomeres at the base of the bouquet, thus facilitating homolog pairing in a processive manner. A modern interpretation of Gelei’s model postulates that the synaptonemal complex (SC) is nucleated close to the telomeres and then extends progressively along the full length of chromosome arms. We used the easily visible meiotic chromosomes, a well-characterized genome, and RNAi in the sexual biotype of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea to test that hypothesis. By identifying and characterizing S. mediterranea homologs of genes encoding synaptonemal complex protein 1 (SYCP1), the topoisomerase-like protein SPO11, and RAD51, a key player in homologous recombination, we confirmed that SC formation begins near the telomeres and progresses along chromosome arms during zygotene. Although distal regions pair at the time of bouquet formation, pairing of a unique interstitial locus is not observed until the formation of full-length SC at pachytene. Moreover, neither full extension of the SC nor homologous pairing is dependent on the formation of double-strand breaks. These findings validate Gelei’s speculation that full-length pairing of homologous chromosomes is mediated by the extension of the SC formed near the telomeres. S. mediterranea thus becomes the first organism described (to our knowledge) that forms a canonical telomere bouquet but does not require double-strand breaks for synapsis between homologous chromosomes. However, the initiation of SC formation at the base of the telomere bouquet, which then is followed by full-length homologous pairing in planarian spermatocytes, is not observed in other species and may not be conserved. PMID:25404302

  19. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 2. Final safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hesson, G.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Pilger, J.P.; Rausch, W.N.; King, L.L.; Hurley, D.E.; Parchen, L.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    Hazardous conditions associated with performing the Full-Length High- Temperature (FLHT). Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 2 experiment have been analyzed. Major hazards that could cause harm or damage are (1) radioactive fission products, (2) radiation fields, (3) reactivity changes, (4) hydrogen generation, (5) materials at high temperature, (6) steam explosion, and (7) steam pressure pulse. As a result of this analysis, it is concluded that with proper precautions the FLHT- 2 test can be safely conducted.

  20. Detection and Full-Length Genome Characterization of Novel Canine Vesiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Pierfrancesco; Lorusso, Eleonora; Di Martino, Barbara; Wang, Qiuhong; Larocca, Vittorio; Cavalli, Alessandra; Camero, Michele; Decaro, Nicola; Bányai, Krisztián; Saif, Linda J.; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2015-01-01

    Vesiviruses have been detected in several animal species and as accidental contaminants of cells. We detected vesiviruses in asymptomatic kennel dogs (64.8%) and symptomatic (1.1%) and asymptomatic (3.5%) household dogs in Italy. The full-length genome of 1 strain, Bari/212/07/ITA, shared 89%–90% nt identity with vesiviruses previously detected in contaminated cells. PMID:26196075

  1. Crystallization and X-ray structure of full-length recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Ngamelue, Michelle N.; Homma, Kohei; Lockridge, Oksana; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2007-09-01

    The first crystals and the 2.8 Å X-ray structure of full-length recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase are reported. Human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) has been shown to function as an endogenous scavenger of diverse poisons. BChE is a 340 kDa tetrameric glycoprotein that is present in human serum at a concentration of 5 mg l{sup −1}. The well documented therapeutic effects of BChE on cocaine toxicity and organophosphorus agent poisoning has increased the need for effective methods of producing recombinant therapeutic BChE. In order to be therapeutically useful, BChE must have a long circulatory residence time or associate as tetramers. Full-length recombinant BChE produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells or human embryonic kidney cells has been shown to associate as monomers, with a shorter circulatory residence time than the naturally occurring tetrameric serum protein. Based on the preceding observation as well as the need to develop novel methodologies to facilitate the mass production of therapeutic recombinant BChE, studies have been initiated to determine the structural basis of tetramer formation. Towards these ends, full-length monomeric recombinant BChE has been crystallized for the first time. A 2.8 Å X-ray structure was solved in space group P42{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 156, c = 146 Å.

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis of Near Full-Length HIV Type 1 Genomic Sequences from 21 Korean Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Eun; Foley, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Korean subclade of subtype B (KSB) is the most prevalent HIV-1 strain found in Korea. To date, only two near full-length HIV-1 sequences from Korean patients have been reported. Here, we analyzed a total of 24 near full-length genomes of HIV-1 strains that were isolated from 17 antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive patients and four ART-exposed patients. Proviral DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was PCR amplified and directly sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses were used to classify viruses from 19 patients as KSB, from one patient as subtype B, from one patient as subtype D, and three viruses from one patient as CRF02_AG. All KSB viruses demonstrated TAAAA instead of TATAA at the TATA box in the LTR. Of the 19 KSB patients, their sequence identities at the nucleotide level ranged from 89.8% to 97.1% from the lowest env gene to the highest pol gene. Other than the CRF02_AG viruses, no recombination events were noted in any of the 19 KSB patients, which is consistent with our previous studies on the pol, vif, and nef genes. Except for one strain, all of the strains were classified as non-syncytium-inducing strains. This is the first report to describe near full-length KSB. PMID:23199052

  3. Full-length genomic characterizations of two canine parvoviruses prevalent in Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Han, Shi-Chong; Guo, Hui-Chen; Sun, Shi-Qi; Shu, Long; Wei, Yan-Quan; Sun, De-Hui; Cao, Sui-Zhong; Peng, Guang-Neng; Liu, Xiang-Tao

    2015-05-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) can cause acute hemorrhagic diarrhea and fatal myocarditis in young dogs. Currently, most studies have focused on the evolution of the VP2 gene, whereas the full-length genome of CPV has been rarely reported. In this study, the whole genomes of CPV-LZ1 and CPV-LZ2 strains prevalent in Northwest China were determined and analyzed in comparison with those of the reference CPVs. The genome sequences of both LZ strains consisted of 5053 nucleotides. CPV-LZ1 and CPV-LZ2 strains were designated as new CPV-2a and CPV-2b, respectively. Sequence alignment analysis results revealed that these two new strains underwent specific unique variations during the process of local adaption. The left non-translated regions of these strains formed a Y-shaped hairpin structure, whereas the right non-translated regions lacked the reiteration of DNA sequence. A phylogenetic tree constructed from 33 whole coding regions of CPVs showed a strong spatial clustering, and these two strains belonged to the Chinese strain cluster lineage. This study provides a method to obtain the full-length genome of CPV. The isolation and characterization of these viruses adds incrementally to the knowledge of the full-length genome of CPV. The results from this study also provide insight into the molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of the CPV field isolates from Northwest China and can be useful in preventing and controlling CPV infection in this region. PMID:25690604

  4. Cognitive flexibility deficits in a mouse model for the absence of full-length dystrophin.

    PubMed

    Remmelink, E; Aartsma-Rus, A; Smit, A B; Verhage, M; Loos, M; van Putten, M

    2016-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle-wasting disorder, caused by mutations in the DMD gene and the resulting lack of dystrophin. The DMD gene has seven promoters, giving rise to multiple full-length and shorter isoforms. Besides the expression of dystrophin in muscles, the majority of dystrophin isoforms is expressed in brain and dystrophinopathy can lead to cognitive deficits, including intellectual impairments and deficits in executive function. In contrast to the muscle pathology, the impact of the lack of dystrophin on the brain is not very well studied. Here, we study the behavioral consequences of a lack of full-length dystrophin isoforms in mdx mice, particularly with regard to domains of executive functions and anxiety. We observed a deficit in cognitive flexibility in mdx mice in the absence of motor dysfunction or general learning impairments using two independent behavioral tests. In addition, increased anxiety was observed, but its expression depended on the context. Overall, these results suggest that the absence of full-length dystrophin in mice has specific behavioral effects that compare well to deficits observed in DMD patients. PMID:27220066

  5. GST-His purification: a two-step affinity purification protocol yielding full-length purified proteins.

    PubMed

    Maity, Ranjan; Pauty, Joris; Krietsch, Jana; Buisson, Rémi; Genois, Marie-Michelle; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Key assays in enzymology for the biochemical characterization of proteins in vitro necessitate high concentrations of the purified protein of interest. Protein purification protocols should combine efficiency, simplicity and cost effectiveness. Here, we describe the GST-His method as a new small-scale affinity purification system for recombinant proteins, based on a N-terminal Glutathione Sepharose Tag (GST) and a C-terminal 10xHis tag, which are both fused to the protein of interest. The latter construct is used to generate baculoviruses, for infection of Sf9 infected cells for protein expression. GST is a rather long tag (29 kDa) which serves to ensure purification efficiency. However, it might influence physiological properties of the protein. Hence, it is subsequently cleaved off the protein using the PreScission enzyme. In order to ensure maximum purity and to remove the cleaved GST, we added a second affinity purification step based on the comparatively small His-Tag. Importantly, our technique is based on two different tags flanking the two ends of the protein, which is an efficient tool to remove degraded proteins and, therefore, enriches full-length proteins. The method presented here does not require an expensive instrumental setup, such as FPLC. Additionally, we incorporated MgCl2 and ATP washes to remove heat shock protein impurities and nuclease treatment to abolish contaminating nucleic acids. In summary, the combination of two different tags flanking the N- and the C-terminal and the capability to cleave off one of the tags, guaranties the recovery of a highly purified and full-length protein of interest. PMID:24193370

  6. The full-length form of the Drosophila amyloid precursor protein is involved in memory formation.

    PubMed

    Bourdet, Isabelle; Preat, Thomas; Goguel, Valérie

    2015-01-21

    The APP plays a central role in AD, a pathology that first manifests as a memory decline. Understanding the role of APP in normal cognition is fundamental in understanding the progression of AD, and mammalian studies have pointed to a role of secreted APPα in memory. In Drosophila, we recently showed that APPL, the fly APP ortholog, is required for associative memory. In the present study, we aimed to characterize which form of APPL is involved in this process. We show that expression of a secreted-APPL form in the mushroom bodies, the center for olfactory memory, is able to rescue the memory deficit caused by APPL partial loss of function. We next assessed the impact on memory of the Drosophila α-secretase kuzbanian (KUZ), the enzyme initiating the nonamyloidogenic pathway that produces secreted APPLα. Strikingly, KUZ overexpression not only failed to rescue the memory deficit caused by APPL loss of function, it exacerbated this deficit. We further show that in addition to an increase in secreted-APPL forms, KUZ overexpression caused a decrease of membrane-bound full-length species that could explain the memory deficit. Indeed, we observed that transient expression of a constitutive membrane-bound mutant APPL form is sufficient to rescue the memory deficit caused by APPL reduction, revealing for the first time a role of full-length APPL in memory formation. Our data demonstrate that, in addition to secreted APPL, the noncleaved form is involved in memory, raising the possibility that secreted and full-length APPL act together in memory processes. PMID:25609621

  7. Performance of initial full-length RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, P.; Cottingham, J.; Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.; Goodzeit, C.; Greene, A.; Herrera, J.; Kahn, S.; Kelly, E.; Morgan, G.

    1987-01-01

    The first four full-length (9.7 m) R and D dipoles for the proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have been successfully tested. The magnets reached a quench plateau of approximately 4.5 T with very reasonable training - a field level comfortably above the design field of 3.45 T required for operation with beams of 100 GeV/amu gold nuclei. Measured field multipoles are considered to be quite acceptable for this series of R and D magnets.

  8. Effects of Full-Length Kisspeptin Administration on Follicular Development in Japanese Black Beef Cows

    PubMed Central

    NANIWA, Yousuke; NAKATSUKASA, Keisuke; SETSUDA, Shohei; OISHI, Shinya; FUJII, Nobutaka; MATSUDA, Fuko; UENOYAMA, Yoshihisa; TSUKAMURA, Hiroko; MAEDA, Kei-ichiro; OHKURA, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Kisspeptin is a key molecule that stimulates gonadotropin secretion via release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the present study, our aim was to investigate whether kisspeptin has stimulatory effects on follicular development via GnRH/gonadotropin secretion in cows. Japanese Black beef cows were intravenously injected with full-length bovine kisspeptin [Kp-53 (0.2 or 2 nmol/kg)] or vehicle 5 days after they exhibited standing estrus (Day 0). In cows injected with Kp-53 at 2 nmol/kg, the follicular sizes of the first dominant follicles increased on Day 6 and thereafter. Ovulation of the first dominant follicle occurred in 1 out of 4 cows treated with Kp-53 at 2 nmol/kg. Injection of Kp-53 at 2 nmol/kg increased the concentration of plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) but not follicle-stimulating hormone, over a 4-h period following injection in all cows. The present study suggests that administration of full-length kisspeptin causes LH secretion, which is sustained for a few hours, and it is capable of stimulating follicular development and/or ovulation. PMID:24107742

  9. Design, fabrication, and testing of an external fuel (UO2), full-length thermionic converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, A.; Raab, B.

    1971-01-01

    The development of a full-length external-fuel thermionic converter for in-pile testing is described. The development program includes out-of-pile performance testing of the fully fueled-converter, using RF-induction heating, before its installation in the in-pile test capsule. The external-fuel converter is cylindrical in shape, and consists of an inner, centrally cooled collector, and an outer emitter surrounded by nuclear fuel. The term full-length denotes that the converter is long enough to extend over the full height of the reactor core. Thus, the converter is not a scaled-down test device, but a full-scale fuel element of the thermionic reactor. The external-fuel converter concept permits a number of different design options, particularly with respect to the fuel composition and shape, and the collector cooling arrangement. The converter described was developed for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and is based on their concept for a thermionic reactor with uninsulated collector cooling as previously described. The converter is double-ended, with through-flow cooling, and with ceramic seals and emitter and collector power take-offs at both ends. The design uses a revolver-shaped tungsten emitter body, with the central emitter hole surrounded by six peripheral fuel holes loaded with cylindrical UO2 pellets.

  10. Structure of the full-length TRPV2 channel by cryo-EM

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Kevin W.; Cohen, Matthew R.; Jiang, Jiansen; Samanta, Amrita; Lodowski, David T.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y.

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins form a superfamily Ca2+-permeable cation channels regulated by a range of chemical and physical stimuli. Structural analysis of a ‘minimal' TRP vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) elucidated a mechanism of channel activation by agonists through changes in its outer pore region. Though homologous to TRPV1, other TRPV channels (TRPV2–6) are insensitive to TRPV1 activators including heat and vanilloids. To further understand the structural basis of TRPV channel function, we determined the structure of full-length TRPV2 at ∼5 Å resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. Like TRPV1, TRPV2 contains two constrictions, one each in the pore-forming upper and lower gates. The agonist-free full-length TRPV2 has wider upper and lower gates compared with closed and agonist-activated TRPV1. We propose these newly revealed TRPV2 structural features contribute to diversity of TRPV channels. PMID:27021073

  11. Full-length soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor down-modulates nephrin expression in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Massimo; Cinque, Paola; Giusti, Guido; Proietti, Silvia; Nebuloni, Manuela; Danese, Silvio; D'Alessio, Silvia; Genua, Marco; Portale, Federica; Lo Porto, Manuela; Singhal, Pravin C; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Saleem, Moin A; Mavilio, Domenico; Mikulak, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Increased plasma level of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) was associated recently with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In addition, different clinical studies observed increased concentration of suPAR in various glomerular diseases and in other human pathologies with nephrotic syndromes such as HIV and Hantavirus infection, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Here, we show that suPAR induces nephrin down-modulation in human podocytes. This phenomenon is mediated only by full-length suPAR, is time-and dose-dependent and is associated with the suppression of Wilms' tumor 1 (WT-1) transcription factor expression. Moreover, an antagonist of αvβ3 integrin RGDfv blocked suPAR-induced suppression of nephrin. These in vitro data were confirmed in an in vivo uPAR knock out Plaur(-/-) mice model by demonstrating that the infusion of suPAR inhibits expression of nephrin and WT-1 in podocytes and induces proteinuria. This study unveiled that interaction of full-length suPAR with αvβ3 integrin expressed on podocytes results in down-modulation of nephrin that may affect kidney functionality in different human pathologies characterized by increased concentration of suPAR. PMID:26380915

  12. Structural Organization of a Full-Length Gp130/LIF-R Cytokine Receptor Transmembrane Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Skiniotis, G.; Lupardus, P.J.; Martick, M.; Walz, T.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-26

    gp130 is a shared receptor for at least nine cytokines, and can signal either as a homodimer, or as a heterodimer with Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor (LIF-R). Here we biophysically and structurally characterize the full-length, transmembrane form of a quaternary cytokine receptor complex consisting of gp130, LIF-R, the cytokine Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), and its alpha receptor (CNTF-R{alpha}). Thermodynamic analysis indicates that, unlike the cooperative assembly of the symmetric gp130/Interleukin-6/IL-6R{alpha} hexameric complex, CNTF/CNTF-R{alpha} heterodimerizes gp130 and LIF-R via non-cooperative energetics to form an asymmetric 1:1:1:1 complex. Single particle electron microscopic (EM) analysis of the full-length gp130/LIF-R/CNTF-R{alpha}/CNTF quaternary complex elucidates an asymmetric structural arrangement, in which the receptor extracellular and transmembrane segments join as a continuous, rigid unit, poised to sensitively transduce ligand engagement to the membrane-proximal intracellular signaling regions. These studies also enumerate the organizing principles for assembly of the 'tall' class of gp130-family cytokine receptor complexes including LIF, IL-27, IL-12, and others.

  13. Full-length dysferlin expression driven by engineered human dystrophic blood derived CD133+ stem cells.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, Mirella; Navarro, Claire; Sitzia, Clementina; Farini, Andrea; Montani, Erica; Wein, Nicolas; Razini, Paola; Beley, Cyriaque; Cassinelli, Letizia; Parolini, Daniele; Belicchi, Marzia; Parazzoli, Dario; Garcia, Luis; Torrente, Yvan

    2013-12-01

    The protein dysferlin is abundantly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles, where its main function is membrane repair. Mutations in the dysferlin gene are involved in two autosomal recessive muscular dystrophies: Miyoshi myopathy and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B. Development of effective therapies remains a great challenge. Strategies to repair the dysferlin gene by skipping mutated exons, using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs), may be suitable only for a subset of mutations, while cell and gene therapy can be extended to all mutations. AON-treated blood-derived CD133+ stem cells isolated from patients with Miyoshi myopathy led to partial dysferlin reconstitution in vitro but failed to express dysferlin after intramuscular transplantation into scid/blAJ dysferlin null mice. We thus extended these experiments producing the full-length dysferlin mediated by a lentiviral vector in blood-derived CD133+ stem cells isolated from the same patients. Transplantation of engineered blood-derived CD133+ stem cells into scid/blAJ mice resulted in sufficient dysferlin expression to correct functional deficits in skeletal muscle membrane repair. Our data suggest for the first time that lentivirus-mediated delivery of full-length dysferlin in stem cells isolated from Miyoshi myopathy patients could represent an alternative therapeutic approach for treatment of dysferlinopathies. PMID:24028392

  14. Full-length genomic characterization and molecular evolution of canine parvovirus in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ling; Tang, Qinghai; Shi, Lijun; Kong, Miaomiao; Liang, Lin; Mao, Qianqian; Bu, Bin; Yao, Lunguang; Zhao, Kai; Cui, Shangjin; Leal, Élcio

    2016-06-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) can cause acute haemorrhagic enteritis in dogs and myocarditis in puppies. This disease has become one of the most serious infectious diseases of dogs. During 2014 in China, there were many cases of acute infectious diarrhoea in dogs. Some faecal samples were negative for the CPV-2 antigen based on a colloidal gold test strip but were positive based on PCR, and a viral strain was isolated from one such sample. The cytopathic effect on susceptible cells and the results of the immunoperoxidase monolayer assay, PCR, and sequencing indicated that the pathogen was CPV-2. The strain was named CPV-NY-14, and the full-length genome was sequenced and analysed. A maximum likelihood tree was constructed using the full-length genome and all available CPV-2 genomes. New strains have replaced the original strain in Taiwan and Italy, although the CPV-2a strain is still predominant there. However, CPV-2a still causes many cases of acute infectious diarrhoea in dogs in China. PMID:27038801

  15. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Lanning, D.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Hensley, W.K.; Fitzsimmons, D.E.; Panisko, F.E.; Hartwell, J.K.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes and presents data from a severe fuel damage test that was conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), Ontario, Canada. The test, designated FLHT-5, was the fourth in a series of full-length high-temperature (FLHT) tests on light-water reactor fuel. The tests were designed and performed by staff from the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. The test operation and test results are described in this report. The fuel bundle in the FLHT-5 experiment included 10 unirradiated full-length pressurized-water reactor (PWR) rods, 1 irradiated PWR rod and 1 dummy gamma thermometer. The fuel rods were subjected to a very low coolant flow while operating at low fission power. This caused coolant boilaway, rod dryout and overheating to temperatures above 2600 K, severe fuel rod damage, hydrogen generation, and fission product release. The test assembly and its effluent path were extensively instrumented to record temperatures, pressures, flow rates, hydrogen evolution, and fission product release during the boilaway/heatup transient. Post-test gamma scanning of the upper plenum indicated significant iodine and cesium release and deposition. Both stack gas activity and on-line gamma spectrometer data indicated significant ({approximately}50%) release of noble fission gases. Post-test visual examination of one side of the fuel bundle revealed no massive relocation and flow blockage; however, rundown of molten cladding was evident.

  16. Efficient expression of full-length antibodies in the cytoplasm of engineered bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Michael-Paul; Ke, Na; Lobstein, Julie; Peterson, Cristen; Szkodny, Alana; Mansell, Thomas J.; Tuckey, Corinna; Riggs, Paul D.; Colussi, Paul A.; Noren, Christopher J.; Taron, Christopher H.; DeLisa, Matthew P.; Berkmen, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Current methods for producing immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies in engineered cells often require refolding steps or secretion across one or more biological membranes. Here, we describe a robust expression platform for biosynthesis of full-length IgG antibodies in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm. Synthetic heavy and light chains, both lacking canonical export signals, are expressed in specially engineered E. coli strains that permit formation of stable disulfide bonds within the cytoplasm. IgGs with clinically relevant antigen- and effector-binding activities are readily produced in the E. coli cytoplasm by grafting antigen-specific variable heavy and light domains into a cytoplasmically stable framework and remodelling the fragment crystallizable domain with amino-acid substitutions that promote binding to Fcγ receptors. The resulting cytoplasmic IgGs—named ‘cyclonals'—effectively bypass the potentially rate-limiting steps of membrane translocation and glycosylation. PMID:26311203

  17. Cocrystallization studies of full-length recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) with cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin Ajibola; Asojo, Oluyomi Adebola; Ngamelue, Michelle N.; Homma, Kohei; Lockridge, Oksana

    2011-09-16

    Human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE; EC 3.1.1.8) is a 340 kDa tetrameric glycoprotein that is present in human serum at about 5 mg l{sup -1} and has well documented therapeutic effects on cocaine toxicity. BChE holds promise as a therapeutic that reduces and finally eliminates the rewarding effects of cocaine, thus weaning an addict from the drug. There have been extensive computational studies of cocaine hydrolysis by BChE. Since there are no reported structures of BChE with cocaine or any of the hydrolysis products, full-length monomeric recombinant wild-type BChE was cocrystallized with cocaine. The refined 3 {angstrom} resolution structure appears to retain the hydrolysis product benzoic acid in sufficient proximity to form a hydrogen bond to the active-site Ser198.

  18. Full-length apolipoprotein E protects against the neurotoxicity of an apoE-related peptide

    PubMed Central

    Crutcher, K.A.; Lilley, H.N.; Anthony, S. R.; Zhou, W.; Narayanaswami, V.

    2009-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E was found to protect against the neurotoxic effects of a dimeric peptide derived from the receptor-binding region of this protein (residues 141–149). Both apoE3 and apoE4 conferred protection but the major N-terminal fragment of each isoform did not. Nor was significant protection provided by bovine serum albumin or apoA-I. Full-length apoE3 and apoE4 also inhibited the uptake of a fluorescent-labeled derivative of the peptide, suggesting that the mechanism of inhibition might involve competition for cell surface receptors/proteoglycans that mediate endocytosis and/or signaling pathways. These results might bear on the question of the role of apoE in neuronal degeneration, such as occurs in Alzheimer’s disease where apoE4 confers a significantly greater risk of pathology. PMID:19836363

  19. On the Minimum Weight of Simple Full-Length Array LDPC Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Kenji; Kaji, Yuichi

    We investigate the minimum weights of simple full-length array LDPC codes (SFA-LDPC codes). The SFA-LDPC codes are a subclass of LDPC codes, and constructed algebraically according to two integer parameters p and j. Mittelholzer and Yang et al. have studied the minimum weights of SFA-LDPC codes, but the exact minimum weights of the codes are not known except for some small p and j. In this paper, we show that the minimum weights of the SFA-LDPC codes with j=4 and j=5 are upper-bounded by 10 and 12, respectively, independent from the prime number p. By combining the results with Yang's lower-bound limits, we can conclude that the minimum weights of the SFA-LDPC codes with j=4 and p>7 are exactly 10 and those of the SFA-LDPC codes with j=5 are 10 or 12.

  20. The first detection and full-length genome sequence of porcine deltacoronavirus isolated in Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Lorsirigool, Athip; Saeng-Chuto, Kepalee; Temeeyasen, Gun; Madapong, Adthakorn; Tripipat, Thitima; Wegner, Matthew; Tuntituvanont, Angkana; Intrakamhaeng, Manakant; Nilubol, Dachrit

    2016-10-01

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) has been reported in many countries, including Hong Kong, the United States, South Korea, China and Thailand. In January 2016, clinical diarrhea similar to that of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) with a lower mortality rate was reported on a swine farm in Lao PDR. Intestine samples were collected from 3-day-old pigs with clinical diarrhea and assayed for the presence of swine enteric coronaviruses. The PCR results were positive for PDCoV but negative for PEDV and TGEV. A phylogenetic tree demonstrated that PDCoV from Lao PDR was grouped separately from PDCoV isolates from China and the USA, but was more closely related to the Chinese isolates than to the US isolates. The full-length genome sequence of the novel PDCoV isolate P1_16_BTL_0116 was determined. PMID:27424024

  1. Mechanism of activation gating in the full-length KcsA K[superscript +] channel

    SciTech Connect

    Uysal, Serdar; Cuello, Luis G.; Cortes, D. Marien; Koide, Shohei; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Perozo, Eduardo

    2012-10-25

    Using a constitutively active channel mutant, we solved the structure of full-length KcsA in the open conformation at 3.9 {angstrom}. The structure reveals that the activation gate expands about 20 {angstrom}, exerting a strain on the bulge helices in the C-terminal domain and generating side windows large enough to accommodate hydrated K{sup +} ions. Functional and spectroscopic analysis of the gating transition provides direct insight into the allosteric coupling between the activation gate and the selectivity filter. We show that the movement of the inner gate helix is transmitted to the C-terminus as a straightforward expansion, leading to an upward movement and the insertion of the top third of the bulge helix into the membrane. We suggest that by limiting the extent to which the inner gate can open, the cytoplasmic domain also modulates the level of inactivation occurring at the selectivity filter.

  2. Generation of a Mouse Full-length Balancer with Versatile Cassette-shuttling Selection Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhisheng; Sun, Lei; Li, Rongbo; Han, Min; Zhuang, Yuan; Wu, Xiaohui; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Balancer chromosomes are important tools for a variety of genetic manipulations in lower model organisms, owing to their ability to suppress recombination. In mouse, however, such effort has not been accomplished, mostly due to the size of the chromosomes and the complexity of multiple step chromosomal engineering. We developed an effective and versatile cassette-shuttling selection (CASS) strategy involving only two selection markers to achieve the sequential production of multiple large inversions along the chromosome. Using this strategy, we successfully generated the first full-length balancer in mice and showed that Balancer 17M-GFP can efficiently suppress recombination. Our study has not only generated a useful genetic resource, but also provided a strategy for constructing mammalian balancer chromosomes. PMID:27489495

  3. Quasispecies Analyses of the HIV-1 Near-full-length Genome With Illumina MiSeq.

    PubMed

    Ode, Hirotaka; Matsuda, Masakazu; Matsuoka, Kazuhiro; Hachiya, Atsuko; Hattori, Junko; Kito, Yumiko; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Sugiura, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) exhibits high between-host genetic diversity and within-host heterogeneity, recognized as quasispecies. Because HIV-1 quasispecies fluctuate in terms of multiple factors, such as antiretroviral exposure and host immunity, analyzing the HIV-1 genome is critical for selecting effective antiretroviral therapy and understanding within-host viral coevolution mechanisms. Here, to obtain HIV-1 genome sequence information that includes minority variants, we sought to develop a method for evaluating quasispecies throughout the HIV-1 near-full-length genome using the Illumina MiSeq benchtop deep sequencer. To ensure the reliability of minority mutation detection, we applied an analysis method of sequence read mapping onto a consensus sequence derived from de novo assembly followed by iterative mapping and subsequent unique error correction. Deep sequencing analyses of aHIV-1 clone showed that the analysis method reduced erroneous base prevalence below 1% in each sequence position and discarded only < 1% of all collected nucleotides, maximizing the usage of the collected genome sequences. Further, we designed primer sets to amplify the HIV-1 near-full-length genome from clinical plasma samples. Deep sequencing of 92 samples in combination with the primer sets and our analysis method provided sufficient coverage to identify >1%-frequency sequences throughout the genome. When we evaluated sequences of pol genes from 18 treatment-naïve patients' samples, the deep sequencing results were in agreement with Sanger sequencing and identified numerous additional minority mutations. The results suggest that our deep sequencing method would be suitable for identifying within-host viral population dynamics throughout the genome. PMID:26617593

  4. Quasispecies Analyses of the HIV-1 Near-full-length Genome With Illumina MiSeq

    PubMed Central

    Ode, Hirotaka; Matsuda, Masakazu; Matsuoka, Kazuhiro; Hachiya, Atsuko; Hattori, Junko; Kito, Yumiko; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Sugiura, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) exhibits high between-host genetic diversity and within-host heterogeneity, recognized as quasispecies. Because HIV-1 quasispecies fluctuate in terms of multiple factors, such as antiretroviral exposure and host immunity, analyzing the HIV-1 genome is critical for selecting effective antiretroviral therapy and understanding within-host viral coevolution mechanisms. Here, to obtain HIV-1 genome sequence information that includes minority variants, we sought to develop a method for evaluating quasispecies throughout the HIV-1 near-full-length genome using the Illumina MiSeq benchtop deep sequencer. To ensure the reliability of minority mutation detection, we applied an analysis method of sequence read mapping onto a consensus sequence derived from de novo assembly followed by iterative mapping and subsequent unique error correction. Deep sequencing analyses of aHIV-1 clone showed that the analysis method reduced erroneous base prevalence below 1% in each sequence position and discarded only < 1% of all collected nucleotides, maximizing the usage of the collected genome sequences. Further, we designed primer sets to amplify the HIV-1 near-full-length genome from clinical plasma samples. Deep sequencing of 92 samples in combination with the primer sets and our analysis method provided sufficient coverage to identify >1%-frequency sequences throughout the genome. When we evaluated sequences of pol genes from 18 treatment-naïve patients' samples, the deep sequencing results were in agreement with Sanger sequencing and identified numerous additional minority mutations. The results suggest that our deep sequencing method would be suitable for identifying within-host viral population dynamics throughout the genome. PMID:26617593

  5. Production, purification and characterization of recombinant, full-length human claudin-1.

    PubMed

    Bonander, Nicklas; Jamshad, Mohammed; Oberthür, Dominik; Clare, Michelle; Barwell, James; Hu, Ke; Farquhar, Michelle J; Stamataki, Zania; Harris, Helen J; Dierks, Karsten; Dafforn, Timothy R; Betzel, Christian; McKeating, Jane A; Bill, Roslyn M

    2013-01-01

    The transmembrane domain proteins of the claudin superfamily are the major structural components of cellular tight junctions. One family member, claudin-1, also associates with tetraspanin CD81 as part of a receptor complex that is essential for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection of the liver. To understand the molecular basis of claudin-1/CD81 association we previously produced and purified milligram quantities of functional, full-length CD81, which binds a soluble form of HCV E2 glycoprotein (sE2). Here we report the production, purification and characterization of claudin-1. Both yeast membrane-bound and detergent-extracted, purified claudin-1 were antigenic and recognized by specific antibodies. Analytical ultracentrifugation demonstrated that extraction with n-octyl-β-d-glucopyranoside yielded monodispersed, dimeric pools of claudin-1 while extraction with profoldin-8 or n-decylphosphocholine yielded a dynamic mixture of claudin-1 oligomers. Neither form bound sE2 in line with literature expectations, while further functional analysis was hampered by the finding that incorporation of claudin-1 into proteoliposomes rendered them intractable to study. Dynamic light scattering demonstrated that claudin-1 oligomers associate with CD81 in vitro in a defined molar ratio of 1∶2 and that complex formation was enhanced by the presence of cholesteryl hemisuccinate. Attempts to assay the complex biologically were limited by our finding that claudin-1 affects the properties of proteoliposomes. We conclude that recombinant, correctly-folded, full-length claudin-1 can be produced in yeast membranes, that it can be extracted in different oligomeric forms that do not bind sE2 and that a dynamic preparation can form a specific complex with CD81 in vitro in the absence of any other cellular components. These findings pave the way for the structural characterization of claudin-1 alone and in complex with CD81. PMID:23704991

  6. Methionine oxidation induces amyloid fibril formation by full-length apolipoprotein A-I

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yuan Qi; Binger, Katrina J.; Howlett, Geoffrey J.; Griffin, Michael D. W.

    2010-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is the major protein component of HDL, where it plays an important role in cholesterol transport. The deposition of apoA-I derived amyloid is associated with various hereditary systemic amyloidoses and atherosclerosis; however, very little is known about the mechanism of apoA-I amyloid formation. Methionine residues in apoA-I are oxidized via several mechanisms in vivo to form methionine sulfoxide (MetO), and significant levels of methionine oxidized apoA-I (MetO-apoA-I) are present in normal human serum. We investigated the effect of methionine oxidation on the structure, stability, and aggregation of full-length, lipid-free apoA-I. Circular dichrosim spectroscopy showed that oxidation of all three methionine residues in apoA-I caused partial unfolding of the protein and decreased its thermal stability, reducing the melting temperature (Tm) from 58.7 °C for native apoA-I to 48.2 °C for MetO-apoA-I. Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed that methionine oxidation inhibited the native self association of apoA-I to form dimers and tetramers. Incubation of MetO-apoA-I for extended periods resulted in aggregation of the protein, and these aggregates bound Thioflavin T and Congo Red. Inspection of the aggregates by electron microscopy revealed fibrillar structures with a ribbon-like morphology, widths of approximately 11 nm, and lengths of up to several microns. X-ray fibre diffraction studies of the fibrils revealed a diffraction pattern with orthogonal peaks at spacings of 4.64 Å and 9.92 Å, indicating a cross-β amyloid structure. This systematic study of fibril formation by full-length apoA-I represents the first demonstration that methionine oxidation can induce amyloid fibril formation. PMID:20133843

  7. Characterization of full-length recombinant human Proteoglycan 4 as an ocular surface boundary lubricant.

    PubMed

    Samsom, Michael L; Morrison, Sheila; Masala, Nemanja; Sullivan, Benjamin D; Sullivan, David A; Sheardown, Heather; Schmidt, Tannin A

    2014-10-01

    Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4, or lubricin) is a lubricating mucin-like glycoprotein recently discovered at the ocular surface, where it functions as a boundary lubricant and appears to play a protective role. Recent technological advances have enabled abundant expression of full-length recombinant human PRG4 (rhPRG4). The objectives of this study were to 1) biochemically characterize the gross structure and glycosylations of full-length rhPRG4, and 2) assess the ocular surface boundary lubricating ability of rhPRG4 at both human cornea-eyelid and human cornea-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) biointerfaces. rhPRG4 expressed by a Chinese hamster ovary cell line was characterized and compared to native bovine PRG4 by SDS-PAGE western blotting, and protein identity was assessed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Human corneas were articulated against PDMS or human eyelids, at effective sliding velocities of 0.3-30 mm/s under physiological loads of ∼15 kPa, to assess and compare the ocular lubricating ability of rhPRG4 to PRG4. Samples were tested serially in PRG4, rhPRG4 (both 300 μg/ml), then saline. Western blotting indicated that rhPRG4 had immunoreactivity at the appropriate apparent molecular weight, and possessed O-linked glycosylation consistent with that of PRG4. rhPRG4 protein identity was confirmed by MS/MS. Both PRG4 and rhPRG4 significantly, and similarly, reduced friction compared to saline at both human cornea - PDMS and human cornea-eyelid biointerfaces. In conclusion, the rhPRG4 studied here demonstrated appropriate higher order structure, O-linked glycosylations, and ocular surface boundary lubricating. Purified rhPRG4 may have clinical utility as a topical treatment of dry eye disease or contact lens biomaterial coating to promote more comfortable wear. PMID:24997456

  8. First structure of full-length mammalian phenylalanine hydroxylase reveals the architecture of an autoinhibited tetramer.

    PubMed

    Arturo, Emilia C; Gupta, Kushol; Héroux, Annie; Stith, Linda; Cross, Penelope J; Parker, Emily J; Loll, Patrick J; Jaffe, Eileen K

    2016-03-01

    Improved understanding of the relationship among structure, dynamics, and function for the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) can lead to needed new therapies for phenylketonuria, the most common inborn error of amino acid metabolism. PAH is a multidomain homo-multimeric protein whose conformation and multimerization properties respond to allosteric activation by the substrate phenylalanine (Phe); the allosteric regulation is necessary to maintain Phe below neurotoxic levels. A recently introduced model for allosteric regulation of PAH involves major domain motions and architecturally distinct PAH tetramers [Jaffe EK, Stith L, Lawrence SH, Andrake M, Dunbrack RL, Jr (2013) Arch Biochem Biophys 530(2):73-82]. Herein, we present, to our knowledge, the first X-ray crystal structure for a full-length mammalian (rat) PAH in an autoinhibited conformation. Chromatographic isolation of a monodisperse tetrameric PAH, in the absence of Phe, facilitated determination of the 2.9 Å crystal structure. The structure of full-length PAH supersedes a composite homology model that had been used extensively to rationalize phenylketonuria genotype-phenotype relationships. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) confirms that this tetramer, which dominates in the absence of Phe, is different from a Phe-stabilized allosterically activated PAH tetramer. The lack of structural detail for activated PAH remains a barrier to complete understanding of phenylketonuria genotype-phenotype relationships. Nevertheless, the use of SAXS and X-ray crystallography together to inspect PAH structure provides, to our knowledge, the first complete view of the enzyme in a tetrameric form that was not possible with prior partial crystal structures, and facilitates interpretation of a wealth of biochemical and structural data that was hitherto impossible to evaluate. PMID:26884182

  9. Fabrication and Testing of Full-Length Single-Cell Externally Fueled Converters for Thermionic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-06-01

    The preceding paper described designs and analyses of thermionic reactors employing full-core-length single-cell converters with their heated emitters located on the outside of their internally cooled collectors, and it presented results of detailed parametric analyses which illustrate the benefits of this unconventional design. The present paper describes the fabrication and testing of full-length prototypical converters, both unfueled and fueled, and presents parametric results of electrically heated tests. The unfueled converter tests demonstrated the practicality of operating such long converters without shorting across a 0.3-mm interelectrode gap. They produced a measured peak output of 751 watts(e) from a single diode and a peak efficiency of 15.4%. The fueled converter tests measured the parametric performance of prototypic UO(subscript 2)-fueled converters designed for subsequent in-pile testing. They employed revolver-shaped tungsten elements with a central emitter hole surrounded by six fuel chambers. The full-length converters were heated by a water-cooled RF-induction coil inside an ion-pumped vacuum chamber. This required development of high-vacuum coaxial RF feedthroughs. In-pile test rules required multiple containment of the UO (subscript 2)-fuel, which complicated the fabrication of the test article and required successful development of techniques for welding tungsten and other refractory components. The test measured a peak power output of 530 watts(e) or 7.1 watts/cm (superscript 2) at an efficiency of 11.5%. There are three copies in the file. Cross-Reference a copy FSC-ESD-217-94-529 in the ESD files with a CID #8574.

  10. A Glutamine/Asparagine-Rich Fragment of Gln3, but not the Full-Length Protein, Aggregates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Antonets, K S; Sargsyan, H M; Nizhnikov, A A

    2016-04-01

    The amino acid sequence of protein Gln3 in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a region enriched with Gln (Q) and Asn (N) residues. In this study, we analyzed the effects of overexpression of Gln3 and its Q/N-rich fragment fused with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Being overexpressed, full-length Gln3-YFP does not form aggregates, inhibits vegetative growth, and demonstrates nuclear localization, while the Q/N-rich fragment (Gln3QN) fused with YFP forms aggregates that do not colocalize with the nucleus and do not affect growth of the cells. Although detergent-resistant aggregates of Gln3QN are formed in the absence of yeast prions, the aggregation of Gln3QN significantly increases in the presence of [PIN(+)] prion, while in the presence of two prions, [PSI(+)] and [PIN(+)], the percentage of cells with Gln3QN aggregates is significantly lower than in the strain bearing only [PIN(+)]. Data on colocalization demonstrate that this effect is mediated by interaction between Gln3QN aggregates and [PSI(+)] and [PIN(+)] prions. PMID:27293098

  11. Construction of phosphorylation interaction networks by text mining of full-length articles using the eFIP system

    PubMed Central

    Tudor, Catalina O.; Ross, Karen E.; Li, Gang; Vijay-Shanker, K.; Wu, Cathy H.; Arighi, Cecilia N.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a reversible post-translational modification where a protein kinase adds a phosphate group to a protein, potentially regulating its function, localization and/or activity. Phosphorylation can affect protein–protein interactions (PPIs), abolishing interaction with previous binding partners or enabling new interactions. Extracting phosphorylation information coupled with PPI information from the scientific literature will facilitate the creation of phosphorylation interaction networks of kinases, substrates and interacting partners, toward knowledge discovery of functional outcomes of protein phosphorylation. Increasingly, PPI databases are interested in capturing the phosphorylation state of interacting partners. We have previously developed the eFIP (Extracting Functional Impact of Phosphorylation) text mining system, which identifies phosphorylated proteins and phosphorylation-dependent PPIs. In this work, we present several enhancements for the eFIP system: (i) text mining for full-length articles from the PubMed Central open-access collection; (ii) the integration of the RLIMS-P 2.0 system for the extraction of phosphorylation events with kinase, substrate and site information; (iii) the extension of the PPI module with new trigger words/phrases describing interactions and (iv) the addition of the iSimp tool for sentence simplification to aid in the matching of syntactic patterns. We enhance the website functionality to: (i) support searches based on protein roles (kinases, substrates, interacting partners) or using keywords; (ii) link protein entities to their corresponding UniProt identifiers if mapped and (iii) support visual exploration of phosphorylation interaction networks using Cytoscape. The evaluation of eFIP on full-length articles achieved 92.4% precision, 76.5% recall and 83.7% F-measure on 100 article sections. To demonstrate eFIP for knowledge extraction and discovery, we constructed phosphorylation

  12. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) transcription during latency in human ganglia: detection of transcripts mapping to genes 21, 29, 62, and 63 in a cDNA library enriched for VZV RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Cohrs, R J; Barbour, M; Gilden, D H

    1996-01-01

    Information on the extent of virus DNA transcription and translation in infected tissue is crucial to an understanding of herpesvirus latency. To detect low-abundance latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) transcripts, poly(A)+ RNA extracted from latently infected human trigeminal ganglia was enriched for VZV transcripts by hybridization to biotinylated VZV DNA. After hybridization, the RNA-DNA hybrid was isolated by binding to avidin-coated beads and extensively washed, and the RNA was released by heat denaturation. A lambda-based cDNA library was then constructed from the enriched RNA. PCR and DNA sequencing of DNA extracted from the cDNA library revealed the presence of VZV genes 21, 29, 62, and 63, but not VZV genes 4, 10, 40, 51, and 61, in the enriched cDNA library. These findings confirm the detection of VZV gene 29 and 62 transcripts on Northern (RNA) blots prepared from latently infected human ganglia (J.L. Meier, R.P. Holman, K.D. Croen, J.E. Smialek, and S.E. Straus, Virology 193:193-200, 1993) and the presence of VZV gene 21 transcripts in a cDNA library from mRNA of latently infected ganglia (R.J. Cohrs, K. Srock, M.B. Barbour, G. Owens, R. Mahalingam, M.E. Devlin, M. Wellish and D.H. Gilden, J. Virol. 68:7900-7908,1994) and also reveal, for the first time, the presence of VZV gene 63 RNA in latently infected human ganglia. PMID:8627753

  13. Factors Influencing the Production of MFSV Full-Length Clone: Maize Fine Streak Virus Proteins in Drosophila S2 Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize fine streak virus (MFSV) is negative-sense RNA virus member of the genus Nucleorhabdovirus. Our goal is to determine whether Drosophila S2 cells can support the production of a full-length clone of MFSV. We have previously demonstrated that the full-length MFSV nucleoprotein (N) and phosphopro...

  14. How to obtain a non-digital Full-length lower limb Radiographs using regular X-ray plates

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Mangal; Singh, Tarandeep; Shah, Lalitkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full-length hip-to-ankle radiographs are an important part of planning and execution of any realignment procedure of the lower limb. This technical note describes a simple and inexpensive technique to obtain plain, standing, full-length hip-to-ankle radiograph using regular x-ray plates.

  15. Effect of systemically increasing human full-length Klotho on glucose metabolism in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, E A; Olauson, H; Larsson, T; Catrina, S B

    2016-03-01

    The metabolic effects of antiaging Klotho were previously investigated in vivo by genetic manipulation. We have here studied the metabolic effect of physiologic levels of circulating full length Klotho in db/db mice. Increasing the full-length human Klotho levels has a positive effect on blood glucose through increasing insulin secretion. PMID:26806457

  16. Structure and Dynamics of Full Length HIV-1 Capsid Protein in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Lalit; Schwieters, Charles D.; Grishaev, Alexander; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Baber, James L.; Clore, G. Marius

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 capsid protein plays a crucial role in viral infectivity, assembling into a cone that encloses the viral RNA. In the mature virion, the N-terminal domain of the capsid protein forms hexameric and pentameric rings, while C-terminal domain homodimers connect adjacent N-terminal domain rings to one another. Structures of disulfide-linked hexamer and pentamer assemblies, as well as structures of the isolated domains have been solved previously. The dimer configuration in C-terminal domain constructs differs in solution (residues 144–231) and crystal (residues 146–231) structures by ~30°, and it has been postulated that the former connects the hexamers while the latter links pentamers to hexamers. Here we study the structure and dynamics of full-length capsid protein in solution, comprising a mixture of monomeric and dimeric forms in dynamic equilibrium, using ensemble simulated annealing driven by experimental NMR residual dipolar couplings and X-ray scattering data. The complexity of the system necessitated the development of a novel computational framework that should be generally applicable to many other challenging systems that currently escape structural characterization by standard application of mainstream techniques of structural biology. We show that the orientation of the C-terminal domains in dimeric full-length capsid and isolated C-terminal domain constructs is the same in solution, and obtain a quantitative description of the conformational space sampled by the N-terminal domain relative to the C-terminal domain on the nano- to millisecond time-scale. The positional distribution of the N-terminal domain relative to the C-terminal domain is large and modulated by the oligomerization state of the C-terminal domain. We also show that a model of the hexamer/pentamer assembly can be readily generated with a single configuration of the C-terminal domain dimer, and that capsid assembly likely proceeds via conformational selection of sparsely

  17. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain.

    PubMed

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S; Seemann, Stefan E; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-12-01

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus. PMID:26476446

  18. Recombinant production and film properties of full-length hornet silk proteins.

    PubMed

    Kambe, Yusuke; Sutherland, Tara D; Kameda, Tsunenori

    2014-08-01

    Full-length versions of the four main components of silk cocoons of Vespa simillima hornets, Vssilk1-4, were produced as recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. In shake flasks, the recombinant Vssilk proteins yielded 160-330mg recombinant proteinl(-1). Films generated from solutions of single Vssilk proteins had a secondary structure similar to that of films generated from native hornet silk. The films made from individual recombinant hornet silk proteins had similar or enhanced mechanical performance compared with films generated from native hornet silk, possibly reflecting the homogeneity of the recombinant proteins. The pH-dependent changes in zeta (ζ) potential of each Vssilk film were measured, and isoelectric points (pI) of Vssilk1-4 were determined as 8.9, 9.1, 5.0 and 4.2, respectively. The pI of native hornet silk, a combination of the four Vssilk proteins, was 4.7, a value similar to that of Bombyx mori silkworm silk. Films generated from Vssilk1 and 2 had net positive charge under physiological conditions and showed significantly higher cell adhesion activity. It is proposed that recombinant hornet silk is a valuable new material with potential for cell culture applications. PMID:24862540

  19. Improving the diffraction of full-length human selenomethionyl metavinculin crystals by streak-seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Izard, Tina

    2012-06-28

    Metavinculin is an alternatively spliced isoform of vinculin that has a 68-residue insert in its tail domain (1134 total residues) and is exclusively expressed in cardiac and smooth muscle tissue, where it plays important roles in myocyte adhesion complexes. Mutations in the metavinculin-specific insert are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in man. Crystals of a DCM-associated mutant of full-length selenomethionine-labeled metavinculin grown by hanging-drop vapor diffusion diffracted poorly and were highly sensitive to radiation, preventing the collection of a complete X-ray diffraction data set at the highest possible resolution. Streak-seeding markedly improved the stability, crystal-growth rate and diffraction quality of DCM-associated mutant metavinculin crystals, allowing complete data collection to 3.9 {angstrom} resolution. These crystals belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with two molecules in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = b = 170, c = 211 {angstrom}, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90{sup o}.

  20. Stable preparations of tyrosine hydroxylase provide the solution structure of the full-length enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Bezem, Maria T.; Baumann, Anne; Skjærven, Lars; Meyer, Romain; Kursula, Petri; Martinez, Aurora; Flydal, Marte I.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters. TH is a highly complex enzyme at mechanistic, structural, and regulatory levels, and the preparation of kinetically and conformationally stable enzyme for structural characterization has been challenging. Here, we report on improved protocols for purification of recombinant human TH isoform 1 (TH1), which provide large amounts of pure, stable, active TH1 with an intact N-terminus. TH1 purified through fusion with a His-tagged maltose-binding protein on amylose resin was representative of the iron-bound functional enzyme, showing high activity and stabilization by the natural feedback inhibitor dopamine. TH1 purified through fusion with a His-tagged ZZ domain on TALON is remarkably stable, as it was partially inhibited by resin-derived cobalt. This more stable enzyme preparation provided high-quality small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data and reliable structural models of full-length tetrameric TH1. The SAXS-derived model reveals an elongated conformation (Dmax = 20 nm) for TH1, different arrangement of the catalytic domains compared with the crystal structure of truncated forms, and an N-terminal region with an unstructured tail that hosts the phosphorylation sites and a separated Ala-rich helical motif that may have a role in regulation of TH by interacting with binding partners. PMID:27462005

  1. Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    PubMed

    Ota, Toshio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Nishikawa, Tetsuo; Otsuki, Tetsuji; Sugiyama, Tomoyasu; Irie, Ryotaro; Wakamatsu, Ai; Hayashi, Koji; Sato, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Keiichi; Kimura, Kouichi; Makita, Hiroshi; Sekine, Mitsuo; Obayashi, Masaya; Nishi, Tatsunari; Shibahara, Toshikazu; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Ishii, Shizuko; Yamamoto, Jun-ichi; Saito, Kaoru; Kawai, Yuri; Isono, Yuko; Nakamura, Yoshitaka; Nagahari, Kenji; Murakami, Katsuhiko; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Iwayanagi, Takao; Wagatsuma, Masako; Shiratori, Akiko; Sudo, Hiroaki; Hosoiri, Takehiko; Kaku, Yoshiko; Kodaira, Hiroyo; Kondo, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Masanori; Takahashi, Makiko; Kanda, Katsuhiro; Yokoi, Takahide; Furuya, Takako; Kikkawa, Emiko; Omura, Yuhi; Abe, Kumi; Kamihara, Kumiko; Katsuta, Naoko; Sato, Kazuomi; Tanikawa, Machiko; Yamazaki, Makoto; Ninomiya, Ken; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Yamashita, Hiromichi; Murakawa, Katsuji; Fujimori, Kiyoshi; Tanai, Hiroyuki; Kimata, Manabu; Watanabe, Motoji; Hiraoka, Susumu; Chiba, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Shinichi; Ono, Yukio; Takiguchi, Sumiyo; Watanabe, Susumu; Yosida, Makoto; Hotuta, Tomoko; Kusano, Junko; Kanehori, Keiichi; Takahashi-Fujii, Asako; Hara, Hiroto; Tanase, Tomo-o; Nomura, Yoshiko; Togiya, Sakae; Komai, Fukuyo; Hara, Reiko; Takeuchi, Kazuha; Arita, Miho; Imose, Nobuyuki; Musashino, Kaoru; Yuuki, Hisatsugu; Oshima, Atsushi; Sasaki, Naokazu; Aotsuka, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Matsunawa, Hiroshi; Ichihara, Tatsuo; Shiohata, Namiko; Sano, Sanae; Moriya, Shogo; Momiyama, Hiroko; Satoh, Noriko; Takami, Sachiko; Terashima, Yuko; Suzuki, Osamu; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Senoh, Akihiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Goto, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Fumio; Wakebe, Hirokazu; Hishigaki, Haretsugu; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Akio; Takemoto, Makoto; Kawakami, Bunsei; Yamazaki, Masaaki; Watanabe, Koji; Kumagai, Ayako; Itakura, Shoko; Fukuzumi, Yasuhito; Fujimori, Yoshifumi; Komiyama, Megumi; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Tanigami, Akira; Fujiwara, Tsutomu; Ono, Toshihide; Yamada, Katsue; Fujii, Yuka; Ozaki, Kouichi; Hirao, Maasa; Ohmori, Yoshihiro; Kawabata, Ayako; Hikiji, Takeshi; Kobatake, Naoko; Inagaki, Hiromi; Ikema, Yasuko; Okamoto, Sachiko; Okitani, Rie; Kawakami, Takuma; Noguchi, Saori; Itoh, Tomoko; Shigeta, Keiko; Senba, Tadashi; Matsumura, Kyoka; Nakajima, Yoshie; Mizuno, Takae; Morinaga, Misato; Sasaki, Masahide; Togashi, Takushi; Oyama, Masaaki; Hata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Manabu; Komatsu, Takami; Mizushima-Sugano, Junko; Satoh, Tadashi; Shirai, Yuko; Takahashi, Yukiko; Nakagawa, Kiyomi; Okumura, Koji; Nagase, Takahiro; Nomura, Nobuo; Kikuchi, Hisashi; Masuho, Yasuhiko; Yamashita, Riu; Nakai, Kenta; Yada, Tetsushi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Ohara, Osamu; Isogai, Takao; Sugano, Sumio

    2004-01-01

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs. PMID:14702039

  2. The full-length transcripts and promoter analysis of intergenic microRNAs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jinjun; Zhang, Zan; Liang, Jingdong; Ge, Qiongqiong; Duan, Xuchu; Ma, Fei; Li, Fei

    2011-05-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) transcription is still not well understood until now. To increase the miRNA abundance, we stimulated miRNA transcription with CuSO(4) and knocked down Drosha enzyme using dsRNA in Drosophila S2 cells. The full length transcripts of bantam, miR-276a and miR-277, the 5'-end of miR-8, the 3'-end of miR-2b and miR-10 were obtained. We also conducted a series of miRNA promoter analysis to prove the reliability of RACE results. Luciferase-reporter assays proved that both bantam and miR-276a promoters successfully drove the expressions of downstream luciferase genes. The promoter activities were impaired by introducing one or multiple mutations at predicted transcription factor binding sites. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that hypophosphorylated RNA polymerase II and transcription factor c-Myc physically bind at miRNA promoter. RNA interference of transcription factors Mad and Prd led to down-expression of bantam, miR-277 and miR-2b but not miR-276a, whereas RNAi of Dorsal had the opposite effect. PMID:21333734

  3. Stable preparations of tyrosine hydroxylase provide the solution structure of the full-length enzyme.

    PubMed

    Bezem, Maria T; Baumann, Anne; Skjærven, Lars; Meyer, Romain; Kursula, Petri; Martinez, Aurora; Flydal, Marte I

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters. TH is a highly complex enzyme at mechanistic, structural, and regulatory levels, and the preparation of kinetically and conformationally stable enzyme for structural characterization has been challenging. Here, we report on improved protocols for purification of recombinant human TH isoform 1 (TH1), which provide large amounts of pure, stable, active TH1 with an intact N-terminus. TH1 purified through fusion with a His-tagged maltose-binding protein on amylose resin was representative of the iron-bound functional enzyme, showing high activity and stabilization by the natural feedback inhibitor dopamine. TH1 purified through fusion with a His-tagged ZZ domain on TALON is remarkably stable, as it was partially inhibited by resin-derived cobalt. This more stable enzyme preparation provided high-quality small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data and reliable structural models of full-length tetrameric TH1. The SAXS-derived model reveals an elongated conformation (Dmax = 20 nm) for TH1, different arrangement of the catalytic domains compared with the crystal structure of truncated forms, and an N-terminal region with an unstructured tail that hosts the phosphorylation sites and a separated Ala-rich helical motif that may have a role in regulation of TH by interacting with binding partners. PMID:27462005

  4. Comprehensive Analysis of the Green-to-Blue Photoconversion of Full-Length Cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Samantha J.O.; Hauck, Anna F.E.; Clark, Ian P.; Heyes, Derren J.; Scrutton, Nigel S.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes are members of the phytochrome superfamily of photoreceptors and are of central importance in biological light-activated signaling mechanisms. These photoreceptors are known to reversibly convert between two states in a photoinitiated process that involves a basic E/Z isomerization of the bilin chromophore and, in certain cases, the breakage of a thioether linkage to a conserved cysteine residue in the bulk protein structure. The exact details and timescales of the reactions involved in these photoconversions have not been conclusively shown. The cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 contains phycocyanobilin and phycoviolobilin chromophores, both of which photoconvert between two species: blue-absorbing and green-absorbing, and blue-absorbing and red-absorbing, respectively. Here, we followed the complete green-to-blue photoconversion process of the phycoviolobilin chromophore in the full-length form of Tlr0924 over timescales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds. Using a combination of time-resolved visible and mid-infrared transient absorption spectroscopy and cryotrapping techniques, we showed that after photoisomerization, which occurs with a lifetime of 3.6 ps, the phycoviolobilin twists or distorts slightly with a lifetime of 5.3 μs. The final step, the formation of the thioether linkage with the protein, occurs with a lifetime of 23.6 ms. PMID:25418104

  5. Single-Molecule Studies of Unlabeled Full-Length p53 Protein Binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Philippa; Lee, Kidan; Ciccarella, Pietro; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Kim, Ki-Bum; Albrecht, Tim

    2016-03-10

    p53 is an antitumor protein that plays an important role in apoptosis, preserving genomic stability and preventing angiogenesis, and it has been implicated in a large number of human cancers. For this reason it is an interesting target for both fundamental studies, such as the mechanism of interaction with DNA, and applications in biosensing. Here, we report a comprehensive study of label-free, full length p53 (flp53) and its interaction with engineered double-stranded DNA in vitro, at the single-molecule level, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and solid-state nanopore sensing. AFM data show that dimeric and tetrameric p53 bind to the DNA in a sequence-specific manner, confirming previously reported relative binding affinities. The statistical significance is tested using both the Grubbs test and stochastic simulations. For the first time, ultralow noise solid-state nanopore sensors are employed for the successful differentiation between bare DNA and p53/DNA complexes. Furthermore, translocation statistics reflect the binding affinities of different DNA sequences, in accordance with AFM data. Our results thus highlight the potential of solid-state nanopore sensors for single-molecule biosensing, especially when labeling is either not possible or at least not a viable option. PMID:26855037

  6. Blueprint for a High-Performance Biomaterial: Full-Length Spider Dragline Silk Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Nadia A.; Garb, Jessica E.; Tinghitella, Robin M.; Collin, Matthew A.; Hayashi, Cheryl Y.

    2007-01-01

    Spider dragline (major ampullate) silk outperforms virtually all other natural and manmade materials in terms of tensile strength and toughness. For this reason, the mass-production of artificial spider silks through transgenic technologies has been a major goal of biomimetics research. Although all known arthropod silk proteins are extremely large (>200 kiloDaltons), recombinant spider silks have been designed from short and incomplete cDNAs, the only available sequences. Here we describe the first full-length spider silk gene sequences and their flanking regions. These genes encode the MaSp1 and MaSp2 proteins that compose the black widow's high-performance dragline silk. Each gene includes a single enormous exon (>9000 base pairs) that translates into a highly repetitive polypeptide. Patterns of variation among sequence repeats at the amino acid and nucleotide levels indicate that the interaction of selection, intergenic recombination, and intragenic recombination governs the evolution of these highly unusual, modular proteins. Phylogenetic footprinting revealed putative regulatory elements in non-coding flanking sequences. Conservation of both upstream and downstream flanking sequences was especially striking between the two paralogous black widow major ampullate silk genes. Because these genes are co-expressed within the same silk gland, there may have been selection for similarity in regulatory regions. Our new data provide complete templates for synthesis of recombinant silk proteins that significantly improve the degree to which artificial silks mimic natural spider dragline fibers. PMID:17565367

  7. Correlation of the level of full-length CFTR transcript with pulmonary phenotype in patients carrying R117H and 1342-1,-2delAG mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamosh, A.; Cutting, G.R.; Oates, R.; Amos, J.

    1994-09-01

    The R117H mutation occurs on two chromosome backgrounds, one associated with a 7 thymidine tract (7T-R11H) in the splice-acceptor site of intron 8, the other with a 5 thymidine tract (5T-R117H). We examined exon 9 splicing efficiency in 5 patients of genotype R117H/{delta}F508 and one carrying 1342-1,-2delAG{delta}F508, an obligate exon 9 slice site mutation. Four patients carried R117H on a 7T background -- three adult men with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens and one adolescent female with pancreatitis and borderline sweat chloride concentration. The patient with R117H on a 5T background had pancreatic sufficient CF (PS-CF). The 1342-1,-2delAG patient has classic pancreatic insufficient CF (PI-CF). cDNA was synthesized from total RNA extracted from nasal epithlial cells and analyzed for CFTR splicing by 35 cycle PCR using primers in exon 7 and 11. The quantity of full length transcript derived from the R117H or {delta}F508 alleles was assessed by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization. While 91.4% of transcript from the 5T-R117H allele was full-length, only 42.2% of CFTR transcript from the 5T-R117H allele was full length. Since CBAVD patients have no lung disease and PS-CF patients do, this indicates that the threshold of developing CF lung disease is crossed when the amount of CFTR transcript bearing R117H is reduced by half. Interestingly, 17.1% of transcript derived from the 1342-1,-2delAG allele (or 8.6% of total CFTR transcript) was normal and full length. This suggests that up to 9% of full length wild-type CFTR transcript may be inadequate to escape the lung disease of CF and that a 9 thymidine tract followed by AAC (the result of the AG deletion) can be used as a splice donor with 2-9% efficiency.

  8. Functional Characterization of a Full Length Pregnane X Receptor, Expression in vivo, and Identification of PXR Alleles in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Bainy, Afonso C. D.; Kubota, Akira; Goldstone, Jared V.; Lille-Langøy, Roger; Karchner, Sibel I.; Celander, Malin C.; Hahn, Mark E.; Goksøyr, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) (nuclear receptor NR1I2) is a ligand activated transcription factor, mediating responses to diverse xenobiotic and endogenous chemicals. The properties of PXR in fish are not fully understood. Here we report on cloning and characterization of full-length PXR of zebrafish, Danio rerio, and pxr expression in vivo. Initial efforts gave a cDNA encoding a 430 amino acid protein identified as zebrafish pxr by phylogenetic and synteny analysis. The sequence of the cloned Pxr DNA binding domain was highly conserved, with 74% identity to human PXR, while the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the cloned sequence was only 44% identical to human PXR-LBD. Sequence variation among clones in the initial effort prompted sequencing of multiple clones from a single fish. There were two prominent variants, one sequence with S183, Y218 and H383 and the other with I183, C218 and N383, which we designate as alleles pxr*1 (nr1i2*1) and pxr*2 (nr1i2*2), respectively. In COS-7 cells co-transfected with a PXR-responsive reporter gene, the full-length Pxr*1 (the more common variant) was activated by known PXR agonists clotrimazole and pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile but to a lesser extent than the full-length human PXR. Activation of full-length Pxr*1 was only 10% of that with the Pxr*1 LBD. Quantitative real time PCR analysis showed prominent expression of pxr in liver and eye, as well as brain and intestine of adult zebrafish. The pxr was expressed in heart and kidney at levels similar to that in intestine. The expression of pxr in liver was weakly induced by ligands for mammalian PXR or CAR (NR1I3). The results establish a foundation for PXR studies in this vertebrate model. PXR allelic variation and the differences between the full-length PXR and the LBD in reporter assays have implications for assessing the action of PXR ligands in zebrafish. PMID:24121122

  9. Full-Length Semaphorin-3C Is an Inhibitor of Tumor Lymphangiogenesis and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mumblat, Yelena; Kessler, Ofra; Ilan, Neta; Neufeld, Gera

    2015-06-01

    Semaphorins play important regulatory roles in diverse processes such as axon guidance, angiogenesis, and immune responses. We find that semaphorin-3C (sema3C) induces the collapse of the cytoskeleton of lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) in a neuropilin-2-, plexin-D1-, and plexin-A1-dependent manner, while most other semaphorins, including antiangiogenic semaphorins such as sema3A do not. Sema3C is cleaved, like other class-3 semaphorins, by furin-like pro-protein convertases (FPPC). Cleaved sema3C (p65-Sema3C) was unable to induce the collapse of the cytoskeleton of LEC. FPPC are strongly upregulated in tumor cells. In order to examine the effects of full-length sema3C on tumor progression, we therefore generated an active point mutated furin cleavage-resistant sema3C (FR-sema3C). FR-sema3C inhibited potently proliferation of LEC and to a lesser extent proliferation of human umbilical vein-derived endothelial cells. FR-sema3C also inhibited VEGF-C-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR-3, ERK1/2, and AKT. Expression of recombinant FR-sema3C in metastatic, triple-negative LM2-4 breast cancer cells did not affect their migration or proliferation in vitro. However, tumors derived from FR-sema3C-expressing LM2-4 cells implanted in mammary fat pads developed at a slower rate, contained a lower concentration of blood vessels and lymph vessels, and metastasized much less effectively to lymph nodes. Interestingly, p65-Sema3C, but not FR-sema3C, rendered A549 lung cancer cells resistant to serum deprivation, suggesting that previously reported protumorigenic activities of sema3C may be due to p65-Sema3C produced by tumor cells. Our observations suggest that FR-sema3C may be further developed into a novel antitumorigenic drug. PMID:25808871

  10. Modelling the structure of full-length Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mushtaq; Gatherer, Derek; Wilson, Joanna B

    2014-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus is a clinically important human virus associated with several cancers and is the etiologic agent of infectious mononucleosis. The viral nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) is central to the replication and propagation of the viral genome and likely contributes to tumourigenesis. We have compared EBNA1 homologues from other primate lymphocryptoviruses and found that the central glycine/alanine repeat (GAr) domain as well as predicted cellular protein (USP7 and CK2) binding sites are present in homologues in the Old World primates, but not the marmoset, suggesting that these motifs may have co-evolved. Using the resolved structure of the C-terminal one-third of EBNA1 (homodimerization and DNA binding domain), we have gone on to develop monomeric and dimeric models in silico of the full-length protein. The C-terminal domain is predicted to be structurally highly similar between homologues, indicating conserved function. Zinc could be stably incorporated into the model, bonding with two N-terminal cysteines predicted to facilitate multimerisation. The GAr contains secondary structural elements in the models, while the protein binding regions are unstructured, irrespective of the prediction approach used and sequence origin. These intrinsically disordered regions may facilitate the diversity observed in partner interactions. We hypothesize that the structured GAr could mask the disordered regions, thereby protecting the protein from default degradation. In the dimer conformation, the C-terminal tails of each monomer wrap around a proline-rich protruding loop of the partner monomer, providing dimer stability, a feature which could be exploited in therapeutic design. PMID:25011696

  11. Cognitive defects are reversible in inducible mice expressing pro-aggregant full-length human Tau

    PubMed Central

    Sydow, Astrid; Hofmann, Anne; Wu, Dan; Messing, Lars; Balschun, Detlef; D'Hooge, Rudi; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary lesions of abnormal Tau are hallmarks of Alzheimer´s disease and frontotemporal dementias. Our regulatable (Tet-OFF) mouse models of tauopathy express variants of human full-length Tau in the forebrain (CaMKIIα promoter) either with mutation ΔK280 (pro-aggregant) or ΔK280/I277P/I308P (anti-aggregant). Co-expression of luciferase enables in vivo quantification of gene expression by bioluminescence imaging. Pro-aggregant mice develop synapse loss and Tau pathology including missorting, phosphorylation and early pretangle formation, whereas anti-aggregant mice do not. We correlated hippocampal Tau pathology with learning/memory performance and synaptic plasticity. Pro-aggregant mice at 16 months of gene expression exhibited severe cognitive deficits in Morris water-maze and in passive-avoidance paradigms, whereas anti-aggregant mice were comparable to controls. Cognitive impairment of pro-aggregant mice was accompanied by loss of hippocampal LTP in CA1 and CA3 areas and by a reduction of synaptic proteins and dendritic spines, although no neuronal loss was observed. Remarkably, memory and LTP recovered when pro-aggregant Tau was switched-OFF for ∼4 months, Tau phosphorylation and missorting were reversed, and synapses recovered. Moreover soluble and insoluble pro-aggregant hTau40 disappeared while insoluble mouse Tau was still present. This study links early Tau pathology without neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal death to cognitive decline and synaptic dysfunction. It demonstrates that Tau-induced impairments are reversible after switching-OFF pro-aggregant Tau. Therefore our mouse model may mimic an early phase of AD when the hippocampus does not yet suffer from irreversible cell death but cognitive deficits are already striking. It offers potential to evaluate drugs with regard to learning and memory performance. PMID:22532069

  12. Structural Influences: Cholesterol, Drug, and Proton Binding to Full-Length Influenza A M2 Protein.

    PubMed

    Ekanayake, E Vindana; Fu, Riqiang; Cross, Timothy A

    2016-03-29

    The structure and functions of the M2 protein from Influenza A are sensitive to pH, cholesterol, and the antiinfluenza drug Amantadine. This is a tetrameric membrane protein of 97 amino-acid residues that has multiple functions, among them as a proton-selective channel and facilitator of viral budding, replacing the need for the ESCRT proteins that other viruses utilize. Here, various amino-acid-specific-labeled samples of the full-length protein were prepared and mixed, so that only interresidue (13)C-(13)C cross peaks between two differently labeled proteins representing interhelical interactions are observed. This channel is activated at slightly acidic pH values in the endosome when the His(37) residues in the middle of the transmembrane domain take on a +2 or +3 charged state. Changes observed here in interhelical distances in the N-terminus can be accounted for by modest structural changes, and no significant changes in structure were detected in the C-terminal portion of the channel upon activation of the channel. Amantadine, which blocks proton conductance by binding in the aqueous pore near the N-terminus, however, significantly modifies the tetrameric structure on the opposite side of the membrane. The interactions between the juxtamembrane amphipathic helix of one monomer and its neighboring monomer observed in the absence of drug are disrupted in its presence. However, the addition of cholesterol prevents this structural disruption. In fact, strong interactions are observed between cholesterol and residues in the amphipathic helix, accounting for cholesterol binding adjacent to a native palmitoylation site and near to an interhelix crevice that is typical of cholesterol binding sites. The resultant stabilization of the amphipathic helix deep in the bilayer interface facilitates the bilayer curvature that is essential for viral budding. PMID:27028648

  13. Identification and quantification of full-length BK channel variants in the developing mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yoshihisa; Harvey, Margaret; Sokolowski, Bernd

    2011-11-01

    Maxi-K(+) (BK) channel diversity is attributed to alternative splicing in the kcnma1 gene. The resultant variants manifest themselves in different cell types, tissues, and functions, such as excitation, metabolism, and signaling. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed immunogold particle labeling of BK in apical and basal regions of inner and outer hair cells, respectively. Additional labeling occurs in Deiters' cells and the inner mitochondrial membrane. Identification of full-length sequences reveals 27 BK variants from embryonic and postnatal mouse inner ear, per classification by tail motif, VYR, DEC, and ERL, and by exon usage. Three predicted start codons are found encoding MAN, MSS, and MDA, of which MDA shows the greatest expression through all stages in development, whereas MAN is undetectable. Complex splice sites occur between exons 9 and 10 and between 21 and 23. Spliced-in/out exons between 8 and 10 reveal a short fragment composed of exons 8 + 10, detectable on postnatal day (PD) 14 and PD30, and a longer fragment composed of exons 8 + 9 + 10 that is upregulated on embryonic day (ED) 14. Spliced-in exons 22 or 23 are expressed on ED14 but decrease over time; however, exon 22 increases again on PD34. Using tail-specific primers, qRT-PCR from ED14, PD4, -14, and -30 shows that BK-VYR and -ERL dominate expression on ED14, whereas DEC dominates after birth in all cochlear regions. The localization of BK and the changes in expression of its exons and tail types, by alternative splicing during development, may contribute to cochlear organization, acquisition of hearing, and intracellular signaling. PMID:21800349

  14. Purification and Activity Testing of the Full-Length YycFGHI Proteins of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Türck, Michael; Bierbaum, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Background The YycFG two-component regulatory system (TCS) of Staphylococcus aureus represents the only essential TCS that is almost ubiquitously distributed in Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C-content. YycG (WalK/VicK) is a sensor histidine-kinase and YycF (WalR/VicR) is the cognate response regulator. Both proteins play an important role in the biosynthesis of the cell envelope and mutations in these proteins have been involved in development of vancomycin and daptomycin resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we present high yield expression and purification of the full-length YycG and YycF proteins as well as of the auxiliary proteins YycH and YycI of Staphylococcus aureus. Activity tests of the YycG kinase and a mutated version, that harbours an Y306N exchange in its cytoplasmic PAS domain, in a detergent-micelle-model and a phosholipid-liposome-model showed kinase activity (autophosphorylation and phosphoryl group transfer to YycF) only in the presence of elevated concentrations of alkali salts. A direct comparison of the activity of the kinases in the liposome-model indicated a higher activity of the mutated YycG kinase. Further experiments indicated that YycG responds to fluidity changes in its microenvironment. Conclusions/Significance The combination of high yield expression, purification and activity testing of membrane and membrane-associated proteins provides an excellent experimental basis for further protein-protein interaction studies and for identification of all signals received by the YycFGHI system. PMID:22276191

  15. Crystal structure of the full-length bacterial selenocysteine-specific elongation factor SelB

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec), the 21st amino acid in translation, uses its specific tRNA (tRNASec) to recognize the UGA codon. The Sec-specific elongation factor SelB brings the selenocysteinyl-tRNASec (Sec-tRNASec) to the ribosome, dependent on both an in-frame UGA and a Sec-insertion sequence (SECIS) in the mRNA. The bacterial SelB binds mRNA through its C-terminal region, for which crystal structures have been reported. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of the full-length SelB from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus, in complex with a GTP analog, at 3.2-Å resolution. SelB consists of three EF-Tu-like domains (D1–3), followed by four winged-helix domains (WHD1–4). The spacer region, connecting the N- and C-terminal halves, fixes the position of WHD1 relative to D3. The binding site for the Sec moiety of Sec-tRNASec is located on the interface between D1 and D2, where a cysteine molecule from the crystallization solution is coordinated by Arg residues, which may mimic Sec binding. The Sec-binding site is smaller and more exposed than the corresponding site of EF-Tu. Complex models of Sec-tRNASec, SECIS RNA, and the 70S ribosome suggest that the unique secondary structure of tRNASec allows SelB to specifically recognize tRNASec and characteristically place it at the ribosomal A-site. PMID:26304550

  16. Crystal structure of the full-length bacterial selenocysteine-specific elongation factor SelB.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Sekine, Shun-Ichi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-10-15

    Selenocysteine (Sec), the 21(st) amino acid in translation, uses its specific tRNA (tRNA(Sec)) to recognize the UGA codon. The Sec-specific elongation factor SelB brings the selenocysteinyl-tRNA(Sec) (Sec-tRNA(Sec)) to the ribosome, dependent on both an in-frame UGA and a Sec-insertion sequence (SECIS) in the mRNA. The bacterial SelB binds mRNA through its C-terminal region, for which crystal structures have been reported. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of the full-length SelB from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus, in complex with a GTP analog, at 3.2-Å resolution. SelB consists of three EF-Tu-like domains (D1-3), followed by four winged-helix domains (WHD1-4). The spacer region, connecting the N- and C-terminal halves, fixes the position of WHD1 relative to D3. The binding site for the Sec moiety of Sec-tRNA(Sec) is located on the interface between D1 and D2, where a cysteine molecule from the crystallization solution is coordinated by Arg residues, which may mimic Sec binding. The Sec-binding site is smaller and more exposed than the corresponding site of EF-Tu. Complex models of Sec-tRNA(Sec), SECIS RNA, and the 70S ribosome suggest that the unique secondary structure of tRNA(Sec) allows SelB to specifically recognize tRNA(Sec) and characteristically place it at the ribosomal A-site. PMID:26304550

  17. Sequence Variability, Gene Structure, and Expression of Full-Length Human Endogenous Retrovirus H

    PubMed Central

    Jern, Patric; Sperber, Göran O.; Ahlsén, Göran; Blomberg, Jonas

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we identified and classified 926 human endogenous retrovirus H (HERV-H)-like proviruses in the human genome. In this paper, we used the information to, in silico, reconstruct a putative ancestral HERV-H. A calculated consensus sequence was nearly open in all genes. A few manual adjustments resulted in a putative 9-kb HERV-H provirus with open reading frames (ORFs) in gag, pro, pol, and env. Long terminal repeats (LTRs) differed by 1.1%, indicating proximity to an integration event. The gag ORF was extended upstream of the normal myristylation start site. There was a long leader (including a “pre-gag” ORF) region positioned like the N terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) “glyco-Gag,” potentially encoding a proline- and serine-rich domain remotely similar to MLV pp12. Another ORF, starting inside the 5′ LTR, had no obvious similarity to known protein domains. Unlike other hitherto described gammaretroviruses, the reconstructed Gag had two zinc finger motifs. Alternative splicing of sequences related to the HERV-H consensus was confirmed using dbEST data. env transcripts were most prevalent in colon tumors, but also in normal testis. We found no evidence for full length env transcripts in the dbEST. HERV-H had a markedly skewed nucleotide composition, disfavoring guanine and favoring cytidine. We conclude that the HERV-H consensus shared a gene arrangement common to gammaretroviruses with gag separated by stop codon from pro-pol in the same reading frame, while env resides in another reading frame. There was also alternative splicing. HERV-H consensus yielded new insights in gammaretroviral evolution and will be useful as a model in studies on expression and function. PMID:15858016

  18. Mapping Full-Length Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses in a Large White Pig

    PubMed Central

    Herring, C.; Quinn, G.; Bower, R.; Parsons, N.; Logan, N. A.; Brawley, A.; Elsome, K.; Whittam, A.; Fernandez-Suarez, X. M.; Cunningham, D.; Onions, D.; Langford, G.; Scobie, L.

    2001-01-01

    Xenotransplantation may bridge the widening gap between the shortage of donor organs and the increasing number of patients waiting for transplantation. However, a major safety issue is the potential cross-species transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV). This problem could be resolved if it is possible to produce pigs that do not contain replication-competent copies of this virus. In order to determine the feasibility of this, we have determined the number of potentially replication-competent full-length PERV proviruses and obtained data on their integration sites within the porcine genome. We have screened genomic DNA libraries from a Large White pig for potentially intact proviruses. We identified six unique PERV B proviruses that were apparently intact in all three genes, while the majority of isolated proviruses were defective in one or more genes. No intact PERV A proviruses were found in this pig, despite the identification of multiple defective A proviruses. Genotyping of 30 unrelated pigs for these unique proviruses showed a heterogeneous distribution. Two proviruses were uncommon, present in 7 of 30 and 3 of 30 pigs, while three were each present in 24 of 30 pigs, and one was present in 30 of 30 animals examined. Our data indicate that few PERV proviruses in Large White pigs are capable of productive infection and suggest that many could be removed by selective breeding. Further studies are required to determine if all potentially functional proviruses could be removed by breeding or whether gene knockout techniques will be required to remove the residuum. PMID:11711616

  19. Expression, Purification, and Identification of Associated Proteins of the Full-length hCDK12/CyclinK Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Bartkowiak, Bartlomiej; Greenleaf, Arno L.

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of transcription and associated processes has been shown to be dependent on the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) and the phosphorylation of the heptad repeats of which it is composed (consensus sequence Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7). Two primary S2 position CTD kinases have been identified in higher eukaryotes: P-TEFb and CDK12/CyclinK. The more recently discovered CDK12 appears to act at the 3′-end of the transcription unit and has been identified as a tumor suppressor for ovarian cancer; however much is still unknown about the in vivo roles of CDK12/CyclinK. In an effort to further characterize these roles we have purified to near homogeneity and characterized, full-length, active, human CDK12/CyclinK, and identified hCDK12-associated proteins via mass spectrometry. We find that employing a “2A” peptide-linked multicistronic construct containing CDK12 and CyclinK results in the efficient production of active, recombinant enzyme in the baculovirus/Sf9 expression system. Using GST-CTD fusion protein substrates we find that CDK12/CyclinK prefers a substrate with unmodified repeats or one that mimics prephosphorylation at the S7 position of the CTD; also the enzyme is sensitive to the inhibitor flavopiridol at higher concentrations. Identification of CDK12-associating proteins reveals a strong enrichment for RNA-processing factors suggesting that CDK12 affects RNA processing events in two distinct ways: Indirectly through generating factor-binding phospho-epitopes on the CTD of elongating RNAPII and directly through binding to specific factors. PMID:25429106

  20. A novel copper(II) coordination at His186 in full-length murine prion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yasuko; Hiraoka, Wakako; Igarashi, Manabu; Ito, Kimihito; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Horiuchi, Motohiro; Yamamori, Tohru; Yasui, Hironobu; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Inanami, Osamu

    2010-04-09

    To explore Cu(II) ion coordination by His{sup 186} in the C-terminal domain of full-length prion protein (moPrP), we utilized the magnetic dipolar interaction between a paramagnetic metal, Cu(II) ion, and a spin probe introduced in the neighborhood of the postulated binding site by the spin labeling technique (SDSL technique). Six moPrP mutants, moPrP(D143C), moPrP(Y148C), moPrP(E151C), moPrP(Y156C), moPrP(T189C), and moPrP(Y156C,H186A), were reacted with a methane thiosulfonate spin probe and a nitroxide residue (R1) was created in the binding site of each one. Line broadening of the ESR spectra was induced in the presence of Cu(II) ions in moPrP(Y148R1), moPrP(Y151R1), moPrP(Y156R1), and moPrP(T189R1) but not moPrP(D143R1). This line broadening indicated the presence of electron-electron dipolar interaction between Cu(II) and the nitroxide spin probe, suggesting that each interspin distance was within 20 A. The interspin distance ranges between Cu(II) and the spin probes of moPrP(Y148R1), moPrP(Y151R1), moPrP(Y156R1), and moPrP(T189R1) were estimated to be 12.1 A, 18.1 A, 10.7 A, and 8.4 A, respectively. In moPrP(Y156R1,H186A), line broadening between Cu(II) and the spin probe was not observed. These results suggest that a novel Cu(II) binding site is involved in His186 in the Helix2 region of the C-terminal domain of moPrP{sup C}.

  1. Soluble expression, purification and characterization of the full length IS2 Transposase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The two-step transposition pathway of insertion sequences of the IS3 family, and several other families, involves first the formation of a branched figure-of-eight (F-8) structure by an asymmetric single strand cleavage at one optional donor end and joining to the flanking host DNA near the target end. Its conversion to a double stranded minicircle precedes the second insertional step, where both ends function as donors. In IS2, the left end which lacks donor function in Step I acquires it in Step II. The assembly of two intrinsically different protein-DNA complexes in these F-8 generating elements has been intuitively proposed, but a barrier to testing this hypothesis has been the difficulty of isolating a full length, soluble and active transposase that creates fully formed synaptic complexes in vitro with protein bound to both binding and catalytic domains of the ends. We address here a solution to expressing, purifying and structurally analyzing such a protein. Results A soluble and active IS2 transposase derivative with GFP fused to its C-terminus functions as efficiently as the native protein in in vivo transposition assays. In vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assay data show that the partially purified protein prepared under native conditions binds very efficiently to cognate DNA, utilizing both N- and C-terminal residues. As a precursor to biophysical analyses of these complexes, a fluorescence-based random mutagenesis protocol was developed that enabled a structure-function analysis of the protein with good resolution at the secondary structure level. The results extend previous structure-function work on IS3 family transposases, identifying the binding domain as a three helix H + HTH bundle and explaining the function of an atypical leucine zipper-like motif in IS2. In addition gain- and loss-of-function mutations in the catalytic active site define its role in regional and global binding and identify functional signatures that are common

  2. High avidity antibodies to full-length VAR2CSA correlate with absence of placental malaria.

    PubMed

    Tutterrow, Yeung Lo; Salanti, Ali; Avril, Marion; Smith, Joseph D; Pagano, Ian S; Ako, Simon; Fogako, Josephine; Leke, Rose G F; Taylor, Diane Wallace

    2012-01-01

    VAR2CSA mediates sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in the placenta, increasing the risk of poor pregnancy outcomes. Naturally acquired antibodies (Ab) to placental parasites at delivery have been associated with improved pregnancy outcomes, but Ab levels and how early in pregnancy Ab must be present in order to eliminate placental parasites before delivery remains unknown. Antibodies to individual Duffy-binding like domains of VAR2CSA have been studied, but the domains lack many of the conformational epitopes present in full-length VAR2CSA (FV2). Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe the acquisition of Ab to FV2 in women residing in high and low transmission areas and determine how Ab levels during pregnancy correlate with clearance of placental parasites. Plasma samples collected monthly throughout pregnancy from pregnant women living in high and low transmission areas in Cameroon were evaluated for Ab to FV2 and the proportion of high avidity Ab (i.e., Ab that remain bound in the presence of 3M NH(4)SCN) was assessed. Ab levels and proportion of high avidity Ab were compared between women with placental malaria (PM(+)) and those without (PM(-)) at delivery. Results showed that PM(-) women had significantly higher Ab levels (p = 0.0047) and proportion of high avidity Ab (p = 0.0009) than PM(+) women throughout pregnancy. Specifically, women with moderate to high Ab levels (>5,000 MFI) and those with ≥ 35% high avidity Ab at 5-6 months were found to have 2.3 (95% CI, 1.0-4.9) and 7.6-fold (p = 0.0013, 95% CI: 1.2-50.0) reduced risk of placental malaria, respectively. These data show that high levels of Ab to FV2, particularly those with high avidity for FV2, produced by mid-pregnancy are important in clearing parasites from the placenta. Both high Ab levels and proportion of high avidity Ab to FV2 may serve as correlates of protection for assessing immunity against placental malaria. PMID:22761948

  3. Identification of cDNAs encoding viper venom hyaluronidases: cross-generic sequence conservation of full-length and unusually short variant transcripts.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Robert A; Ibison, Frances; Wilbraham, Davina; Wagstaff, Simon C

    2007-05-01

    The immobilisation of prey by snakes is most efficiently achieved by the rapid dissemination of venom from its site of injection into the blood stream. Hyaluronidase is a common component of snake venoms and has been termed the "venom spreading factor". In the absence of nucleotide or protein sequence data to confirm the functional identity of this venom component, we interrogated a venom gland EST database for the saw-scaled viper, Echis ocellatus (Nigeria), using the gene ontology (GO) term "carbohydrate metabolism". A single hyalurononglucosaminadase-activity matching sequence (EOC00242) was found and used to design PCR primers to acquire the full-length cDNA sequence. Although very different from the bee venom and mammalian hyaluronidase sequences, the E. ocellatus sequence retained all the catalytic, positional and structural residues that characterise this class of carbohydrate metabolising hydrolases. An extraordinarily high level of sequence identity (>95%) was observed in analogous venom gland cDNA sequences isolated (by PCR) from another saw-scaled viper species, E. pyramidum leakeyi (Kenya), and from the sahara horned viper, Cerastes cerastes cerastes (Egypt) and the puff adder, Bitis arietans (Nigeria). Smaller amplicons, lacking hyaluronidase catalytic residues because of 768 bp or 855 bp central deletions, appear to encode either truncated peptides without hyaluronidase activity, or are non-translated transcripts because they lack consensus translation initiating motifs. PMID:17210232

  4. Effects of irradiating adult mdx mice before full-length dystrophin cDNA transfer on host anti-dystrophin immunity.

    PubMed

    Eghtesad, S; Zheng, H; Nakai, H; Epperly, M W; Clemens, P R

    2010-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal, genetic disorder in which dystrophin-deficient muscle progressively degenerates, for which dystrophin gene transfer could provide effective treatment. The host immune response to dystrophin, however, is an obstacle to therapeutic gene expression. Understanding the dystrophin-induced host immune response will facilitate the discovery of strategies to prolong expression of recombinant dystrophin in dystrophic muscle. Using whole-body irradiation of the dystrophic mdx mouse before gene transfer, we temporally removed the immune system; a 600 rad dose removed peripheral immune cells, which were restored by self-reconstitution, and a 900 rad dose removed central and peripheral immune cells, which were restored by adoptive transfer of bone marrow from a syngeneic, dystrophin-normal donor. The anti-dystrophin humoral response was delayed and dystrophin expression was partially preserved in irradiated, vector-treated mice. Nonirradiated, vector-treated control mice lost muscle dystrophin expression completely, had an earlier anti-dystrophin humoral response and demonstrated muscle fibers focally surrounded with T cells. We conclude that dystrophin gene transfer induced anti-dystrophin humoral immunity and cell-mediated responses that were significantly diminished and delayed by temporal removal of the host central or peripheral immune cells. Furthermore, manipulation of central immunity altered the pattern of regulatory T cells in muscle. PMID:20827278

  5. Characterization of a Pathogenic Full-Length cDNA Clone and Transmission Model for Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strain PC22A

    PubMed Central

    Beall, Anne; Yount, Boyd; Lin, Chun-Ming; Hou, Yixuan; Wang, Qiuhong; Saif, Linda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a highly pathogenic alphacoronavirus. In the United States, highly virulent PEDV strains cause between 80 and 100% mortality in suckling piglets and are rapidly transmitted between animals and farms. To study the genetic factors that regulate pathogenesis and transmission, we developed a molecular clone of PEDV strain PC22A. The infectious-clone-derived PEDV (icPEDV) replicated as efficiently as the parental virus in cell culture and in pigs, resulting in lethal disease in vivo. Importantly, recombinant PEDV was rapidly transmitted to uninoculated pigs via indirect contact, demonstrating virulence and efficient transmission while replicating phenotypes seen in the wild-type virus. Using reverse genetics, we removed open reading frame 3 (ORF3) and replaced this region with a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene to generate icPEDV-ΔORF3-RFP. icPEDV-ΔORF3-RFP replicated efficiently in vitro and in vivo, was efficiently transmitted among pigs, and produced lethal disease outcomes. However, the diarrheic scores in icPEDV-ΔORF3-RFP-infected pigs were lower than those in wild-type-virus- or icPEDV-infected pigs, and the virus formed smaller plaques than those of PC22A. Together, these data describe the development of a robust reverse-genetics platform for identifying genetic factors that regulate pathogenic outcomes and transmission efficiency in vivo, providing key infrastructural developments for developing and evaluating the efficacy of live attenuated vaccines and therapeutics in a clinical setting. PMID:26733065

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of full-length and proteolytically activated pyruvate oxidase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, Annett; Neumann, Piotr; Wille, Georg; Stubbs, Milton T.; Tittmann, Kai

    2008-03-01

    The peripheral membrane flavoprotein pyruvate oxidase from E. coli has been crystallized in the full-length form and as a proteolytically activated truncation variant lacking the last 23 amino acids at the C-terminus. The thiamine diphosphate- and flavin-dependent peripheral membrane enzyme pyruvate oxidase from Escherichia coli (EcPOX) has been crystallized in the full-length form and as a proteolytically activated C-terminal truncation variant which lacks the last 23 amino acids (Δ23 EcPOX). Crystals were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using either protamine sulfate (full-length EcPOX) or 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (Δ23 EcPOX) as precipitants. Native data sets were collected at a X-ray home source to a resolution of 2.9 Å. The two forms of EcPOX crystallize in different space groups. Whereas full-length EcPOX crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 with two monomers per asymmetric unit, the crystals of Δ23 EcPOX belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and contain 12 monomers per asymmetric unit.

  7. 78 FR 13071 - Guidance for Industry: Implementation of an Acceptable Full-Length and Abbreviated Donor History...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... (76 FR 44013), FDA announced the availability of the draft guidance of the same title dated July 2011...- Length and Abbreviated Donor History Questionnaires and Accompanying Materials for Use in Screening... ``Guidance for Industry: Implementation of an Acceptable Full-Length and Abbreviated Donor...

  8. Large-scale analysis of full-length cDNAs from the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cultivar Micro-Tom, a reference system for the Solanaceae genomics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    and aid in tomato functional genomics and molecular breeding. Full-length cDNA sequences and their annotations are provided in the database KaFTom http://www.pgb.kazusa.or.jp/kaftom/ via the website of the National Bioresource Project Tomato http://tomato.nbrp.jp. PMID:20350329

  9. Reversal of a full-length mutant huntingtin neuronal cell phenotype by chemical inhibitors of polyglutamine-mediated aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Gines, Silvia; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F

    2005-01-01

    Background Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder triggered by an expanded polyglutamine tract in huntingtin that is thought to confer a new conformational property on this large protein. The propensity of small amino-terminal fragments with mutant, but not wild-type, glutamine tracts to self-aggregate is consistent with an altered conformation but such fragments occur relatively late in the disease process in human patients and mouse models expressing full-length mutant protein. This suggests that the altered conformational property may act within the full-length mutant huntingtin to initially trigger pathogenesis. Indeed, genotype-phenotype studies in HD have defined genetic criteria for the disease initiating mechanism, and these are all fulfilled by phenotypes associated with expression of full-length mutant huntingtin, but not amino-terminal fragment, in mouse models. As the in vitro aggregation of amino-terminal mutant huntingtin fragment offers a ready assay to identify small compounds that interfere with the conformation of the polyglutamine tract, we have identified a number of aggregation inhibitors, and tested whether these are also capable of reversing a phenotype caused by endogenous expression of mutant huntingtin in a striatal cell line from the HdhQ111/Q111 knock-in mouse. Results We screened the NINDS Custom Collection of 1,040 FDA approved drugs and bioactive compounds for their ability to prevent in vitro aggregation of Q58-htn 1–171 amino terminal fragment. Ten compounds were identified that inhibited aggregation with IC50 < 15 μM, including gossypol, gambogic acid, juglone, celastrol, sanguinarine and anthralin. Of these, both juglone and celastrol were effective in reversing the abnormal cellular localization of full-length mutant huntingtin observed in mutant HdhQ111/Q111 striatal cells. Conclusions At least some compounds identified as aggregation inhibitors also prevent a neuronal cellular phenotype caused

  10. Strategies to facilitate the development of uncloned or cloned infectious full-length viral cDNAs: Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus as a case study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Approaches to simplify and streamline the construction of full-length infectious cDNA clones (FL-cDNAs) are needed. Among desirable improvements are the ability to use total nucleic acids (TNA) extracts from infected hosts (to bypass viral purification limitations) for the direct one-step amplification of large FL-cDNAs, the possibility to inoculate plants with uncloned FL-cDNAs and the simplified cloning of these large molecules. Results Using the 7.55 kb genome of Apple chlorotic leaf spot trichovirus (ACLSV) approaches allowing the rapid generation from TNA extracts of FL-cDNAs under the control of the T7 promoter and the successful inoculation of plants using in vitro transcripts obtained from these uncloned amplification products have been developed. We also show that the yeast homologous recombination system permits efficient cloning of FL-cDNAs and the simultaneous one-step tailoring of a ternary Yeast-Escherichia coli-Agrobacterium tumefaciens shuttle vector allowing efficient inoculation of both herbaceous and woody host plants by agroinfiltration. Conclusions The fast and efficient strategies described here should have broad applications, in particular for the study of "difficult" plant viruses, such as those infecting woody hosts, and potentially for other, non plant-infecting viral agents. PMID:22040379

  11. Caspase 3 inactivates biologically active full length interleukin-33 as a classical cytokine but does not prohibit nuclear translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Shafaqat; Nguyen, Dang Quan; Falk, Werner; Martin, Michael Uwe

    2010-01-15

    IL-33 is a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines with dual function which either activates cells via the IL-33 receptor in a paracrine fashion or translocates to the nucleus to regulate gene transcription in an intracrine manner. We show that full length murine IL-33 is active as a cytokine and that it is not processed by caspase 1 to mature IL-33 but instead cleaved by caspase 3 at aa175 to yield two products which are both unable to bind to the IL-33 receptor. Full length IL-33 and its N-terminal caspase 3 breakdown product, however, translocate to the nucleus. Finally, bioactive IL-33 is not released by cells constitutively or after activation. This suggests that IL-33 is not a classical cytokine but exerts its function in the nucleus of intact cells and only activates others cells via its receptor as an alarm mediator after destruction of the producing cell.

  12. Increased proteolytic processing of full-length Gli2 transcription factor reduces the Hedgehog pathway activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Wang, Chengbing; Pan, Yong; Bai, Zengliang; Wang, Baolin

    2011-01-01

    The proteolytic processing of Gli2 and Gli3 full-length transcription factors into repressors is a key step of the regulation in Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. The differential Gli2 and Gli3 processing is controlled by the processing determinant domain or PDD, but its significance is not clear. We generated a Gli2 mutant allele, Gli23PDD, in which the Gli3PDD substitutes for the Gli2PDD. As expected, Gli23PDD is processed more efficiently and at the different position as compared to Gli2, indicating that PDD also determines the extent and site of Gli2 and Gli3 processing in vivo. The increase in levels of the Gli2 repressor in Gli23PDD mutant reduces the Hh pathway activity. Gli23PDD processing is still regulated by Hh signaling. These results indicate that the proper balance between the Gli2 full-length activator and repressor is essential for Hh signaling. PMID:21337666

  13. RT-PCR and sequence analysis of the full-length fusion protein of Canine Distemper Virus from domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Romanutti, Carina; Gallo Calderón, Marina; Keller, Leticia; Mattion, Nora; La Torre, José

    2016-02-01

    During 2007-2014, 84 out of 236 (35.6%) samples from domestic dogs submitted to our laboratory for diagnostic purposes were positive for Canine Distemper Virus (CDV), as analyzed by RT-PCR amplification of a fragment of the nucleoprotein gene. Fifty-nine of them (70.2%) were from dogs that had been vaccinated against CDV. The full-length gene encoding the Fusion (F) protein of fifteen isolates was sequenced and compared with that of those of other CDVs, including wild-type and vaccine strains. Phylogenetic analysis using the F gene full-length sequences grouped all the Argentinean CDV strains in the SA2 clade. Sequence identity with the Onderstepoort vaccine strain was 89.0-90.6%, and the highest divergence was found in the 135 amino acids corresponding to the F protein signal-peptide, Fsp (64.4-66.7% identity). In contrast, this region was highly conserved among the local strains (94.1-100% identity). One extra putative N-glycosylation site was identified in the F gene of CDV Argentinean strains with respect to the vaccine strain. The present report is the first to analyze full-length F protein sequences of CDV strains circulating in Argentina, and contributes to the knowledge of molecular epidemiology of CDV, which may help in understanding future disease outbreaks. PMID:26611227

  14. Kinetics of Hedgehog-Dependent Full-Length Gli3 Accumulation in Primary Cilia and Subsequent Degradation ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaohui; Lai, Cary K.; Evangelista, Marie; Hongo, Jo-Anne; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Scales, Suzie J.

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in vertebrates depends on intraflagellar transport (IFT) within primary cilia. The Hh receptor Patched is found in cilia in the absence of Hh and is replaced by the signal transducer Smoothened within an hour of Hh stimulation. By generating antibodies capable of detecting endogenous pathway transcription factors Gli2 and Gli3, we monitored their kinetics of accumulation in cilia upon Hh stimulation. Localization occurs within minutes of Hh addition, making it the fastest reported readout of pathway activity, which permits more precise temporal and spatial localization of Hh signaling events. We show that the species of Gli3 that accumulates at cilium tips is full-length and likely not protein kinase A phosphorylated. We also confirmed that phosphorylation and βTrCP/Cul1 are required for endogenous Gli3 processing and that this is inhibited by Hh. Surprisingly, however, Hh-dependent inhibition of processing does not lead to accumulation of full-length Gli3, but instead renders it labile, leading to its proteasomal degradation via the SPOP/Cul3 complex. In fact, full-length Gli3 disappears with faster kinetics than the Gli3 repressor, the latter not requiring SPOP/Cul3 or βTrCP/Cul1. This may contribute to the increased Gli3 activator/repressor ratios found in IFT mutants. PMID:20154143

  15. Species-Specific Expression of Full-Length and Alternatively Spliced Variant Forms of CDK5RAP2.

    PubMed

    Park, John S Y; Lee, Marie-Katrina; Kang, SungMyung; Jin, Yan; Fu, Songbin; Rosales, Jesusa L; Lee, Ki-Young

    2015-01-01

    CDK5RAP2 is one of the primary microcephaly genes that are associated with reduced brain size and mental retardation. We have previously shown that human CDK5RAP2 exists as a full-length form (hCDK5RAP2) or an alternatively spliced variant form (hCDK5RAP2-V1) that is lacking exon 32. The equivalent of hCDK5RAP2-V1 has been reported in rat and mouse but the presence of full-length equivalent hCDK5RAP2 in rat and mouse has not been examined. Here, we demonstrate that rat expresses both a full length and an alternatively spliced variant form of CDK5RAP2 that are equivalent to our previously reported hCDK5RAP2 and hCDK5RAP2-V1, repectively. However, mouse expresses only one form of CDK5RAP2 that is equivalent to the human and rat alternatively spliced variant forms. Knowledge of this expression of different forms of CDK5RAP2 in human, rat and mouse is essential in selecting the appropriate model for studies of CDK5RAP2 and primary microcephaly but our findings further indicate the evolutionary divergence of mouse from the human and rat species. PMID:26550838

  16. Species-Specific Expression of Full-Length and Alternatively Spliced Variant Forms of CDK5RAP2

    PubMed Central

    Park, John S. Y.; Lee, Marie-Katrina; Kang, SungMyung; Jin, Yan; Fu, Songbin; Rosales, Jesusa L.; Lee, Ki-Young

    2015-01-01

    CDK5RAP2 is one of the primary microcephaly genes that are associated with reduced brain size and mental retardation. We have previously shown that human CDK5RAP2 exists as a full-length form (hCDK5RAP2) or an alternatively spliced variant form (hCDK5RAP2-V1) that is lacking exon 32. The equivalent of hCDK5RAP2-V1 has been reported in rat and mouse but the presence of full-length equivalent hCDK5RAP2 in rat and mouse has not been examined. Here, we demonstrate that rat expresses both a full length and an alternatively spliced variant form of CDK5RAP2 that are equivalent to our previously reported hCDK5RAP2 and hCDK5RAP2-V1, repectively. However, mouse expresses only one form of CDK5RAP2 that is equivalent to the human and rat alternatively spliced variant forms. Knowledge of this expression of different forms of CDK5RAP2 in human, rat and mouse is essential in selecting the appropriate model for studies of CDK5RAP2 and primary microcephaly but our findings further indicate the evolutionary divergence of mouse from the human and rat species. PMID:26550838

  17. A systematic approach for testing expression of human full-length proteins in cell-free expression systems

    PubMed Central

    Langlais, Claudia; Guilleaume, Birgit; Wermke, Nadja; Scheuermann, Tina; Ebert, Lars; LaBaer, Joshua; Korn, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    Background The growing field of proteomics and systems biology is resulting in an ever increasing demand for purified recombinant proteins for structural and functional studies. Here, we show a systematic approach to successfully express a full-length protein of interest by using cell-free and cell-based expression systems. Results In a pre-screen, we evaluated the expression of 960 human full-length open reading frames in Escherichia coli (in vivo and in vitro). After analysing the protein expression rate and solubility, we chose a subset of 87 plasmids yielding no protein product in E. coli in vivo. These targets were subjected to a more detailed analysis comparing a prokaryotic cell-free E. coli system with an eukaryotic wheat germ system. In addition, we determined the expression rate, yield and solubility of those proteins. After sequence optimisation for the E. coli in vitro system and generating linear templates for wheat germ expression, the success rate of cell-free protein expression reached 93%. Conclusion We have demonstrated that protein expression in cell-free systems is an appropriate technology for the successful expression of soluble full-length proteins. In our study, wheat germ expression using a two compartment system is the method of choice as it shows high solubility and high protein yield. PMID:17915018

  18. The Juxtamembrane Linker of Full-length Synaptotagmin 1 Controls Oligomerization and Calcium-dependent Membrane Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K.; Cafiso, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1) is the calcium sensor for synchronous neurotransmitter release. The two C2 domains of Syt1, which may mediate fusion by bridging the vesicle and plasma membranes, are connected to the vesicle membrane by a 60-residue linker. Here, we use site-directed spin labeling and a novel total internal reflection fluorescence vesicle binding assay to characterize the juxtamembrane linker and to test the ability of reconstituted full-length Syt1 to interact with opposing membrane surfaces. EPR spectroscopy demonstrates that the majority of the linker interacts with the membrane interface, thereby limiting the extension of the C2A and C2B domains into the cytoplasm. Pulse dipolar EPR spectroscopy provides evidence that purified full-length Syt1 is oligomerized in the membrane, and mutagenesis indicates that a glycine zipper/GXXXG motif within the linker helps mediate oligomerization. The total internal reflection fluorescence-based vesicle binding assay demonstrates that full-length Syt1 that is reconstituted into supported lipid bilayers will capture vesicles containing negatively charged lipid in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Moreover, the rate of vesicle capture increases with Syt1 density, and mutations in the GXXXG motif that inhibit oligomerization of Syt1 reduce the rate of vesicle capture. This work demonstrates that modifications within the 60-residue linker modulate both the oligomerization of Syt1 and its ability to interact with opposing bilayers. In addition to controlling its activity, the oligomerization of Syt1 may play a role in organizing proteins within the active zone of membrane fusion. PMID:24973220

  19. Identification of 48 full-length MHC-DAB functional alleles in miiuy croaker and evidence for positive selection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Sun, Yueyan; Xu, Tianjun

    2016-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a vital role in the immune response and are a highly polymorphic gene superfamily in vertebrates. As the molecular marker associated with polymorphism and disease susceptibility/resistance, the polymorphism of MHC genes has been investigated in many tetrapods and teleosts. Most studies were focused on the polymorphism of the second exon, which encodes the peptide-binding region (PBR) in the α1- or β1-domain, but few studies have examined the full-length coding region. To comprehensive investigate the polymorphism of MHC gene, we identified 48 full-length miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) MHC class IIB (Mimi-DAB) functional alleles from 26 miiuy croaker individuals. All of the alleles encode 34 amino acid sequences, and a high level of polymorphism was detected in Mimi-DAB alleles. The rate of non-synonymous substitutions (dN) occurred at a significantly higher frequency than that of synonymous substitutions (dS) in the PBR, and this result suggests that balancing selection maintains polymorphisms at the Mimi-DAB locus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the full-length and exon 2 sequences of Mimi-DAB alleles both showed that the Mimi-DAB alleles were clustered into two major groups. A total of 19 positive selected sites were identified on the Mimi-DAB alleles after testing for positive selection, and 14 sites were predicted to be associated with antigen-binding sites, which suggests that most of selected sites are significant for disease resistance. The polymorphism of Mimi-DAB alleles provides an important resource for analyzing the association between the polymorphism of MHC gene and disease susceptibility/resistance, and for researching the molecular selective breeding of miiuy croaker with enhanced disease resistance. PMID:27164216

  20. Binding of Full-Length HIV-1 gp120 to CD4 Induces Structural Reorientation around the gp120 Core

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish,F.; Garg, R.; Anguita, J.; Krueger, J.

    2006-01-01

    Small-angle x-ray scattering data on the unliganded full-length fully glycosylated HIV-1 gp120, the soluble CD4 (domains 1-2) receptor and their complex in solution are presented. Ab initio structure restorations using these data provides the first look at the envelope shape for the unliganded and the complexed gp120 molecule. Fitting known crystal structures of the unliganded SIV and the complexed HIV gp120 core regions within our resultant shape constraints reveals movement of the V3 loop upon binding.

  1. High-Throughput Plasmid cDNA Library Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Kenneth H.; Yu, Charles; George, Reed A.; Carlson, JosephW.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Svirskas, Robert; Stapleton, Mark; Celniker, SusanE.

    2006-05-24

    Libraries of cDNA clones are valuable resources foranalysing the expression, structure, and regulation of genes, as well asfor studying protein functions and interactions. Full-length cDNA clonesprovide information about intron and exon structures, splice junctionsand 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs). Open reading frames (ORFs)derived from cDNA clones can be used to generate constructs allowingexpression of native proteins and N- or C-terminally tagged proteins.Thus, obtaining full-length cDNA clones and sequences for most or allgenes in an organism is critical for understanding genome functions.Expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing samples cDNA libraries at random,which is most useful at the beginning of large-scale screening projects.However, as projects progress towards completion, the probability ofidentifying unique cDNAs via EST sequencing diminishes, resulting in poorrecovery of rare transcripts. We describe an adapted, high-throughputprotocol intended for recovery of specific, full-length clones fromplasmid cDNA libraries in five days.

  2. [Rapid site-directed mutagenesis on full-length plasmid DNA by using designed restriction enzyme assisted mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baozhong; Ran, Duoliang; Zhang, Xin; An, Xiaoping; Shan, Yunzhu; Zhou, Yusen; Tong, Yigang

    2009-02-01

    To use the designed restriction enzyme assisted mutagenesis technique to perform rapid site-directed mutagenesis on double-stranded plasmid DNA. The target amino acid sequence was reversely translated into DNA sequences with degenerate codons, resulting in large amount of silently mutated sequences containing various restriction endonucleases (REs). Certain mutated sequence with an appropriate RE was selected as the target DNA sequence for designing mutation primers. The full-length plasmid DNA was amplified with high-fidelity Phusion DNA polymerase and the amplified product was 5' phosphorylated by T4 polynucleotide kinase and then self-ligated. After transformation into an E. coli host the transformants were rapidly screened by cutting with the designed RE. With this strategy we successfully performed the site-directed mutagenesis on an 8 kb plasmid pcDNA3.1-pIgR and recovered the wild-type amino acid sequence of human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). A novel site-directed mutagenesis strategy based on DREAM was developed which exploited RE as a rapid screening measure. The highly efficient, high-fidelity Phusion DNA polymerase was applied to ensure the efficient and faithful amplification of the full-length sequence of a plasmid of up to 8 kb. This rapid mutagenesis strategy avoids using any commercial site-directed mutagenesis kits, special host strains or isotopes. PMID:19459340

  3. Predicting the strength of UP-elements and full-length E. coli σE promoters

    PubMed Central

    Rhodius, Virgil A.; Mutalik, Vivek K.; Gross, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the location and strength of promoters from genomic sequence requires accurate sequenced-based promoter models. We present the first model of a full-length bacterial promoter, encompassing both upstream sequences (UP-elements) and core promoter modules, based on a set of 60 promoters dependent on σE, an alternative ECF-type σ factor. UP-element contribution, best described by the length and frequency of A- and T-tracts, in combination with a PWM-based core promoter model, accurately predicted promoter strength both in vivo and in vitro. This model also distinguished active from weak/inactive promoters. Systematic examination of promoter strength as a function of RNA polymerase (RNAP) concentration revealed that UP-element contribution varied with RNAP availability and that the σE regulon is comprised of two promoter types, one of which is active only at high concentrations of RNAP. Distinct promoter types may be a general mechanism for increasing the regulatory capacity of the ECF group of alternative σ's. Our findings provide important insights into the sequence requirements for the strength and function of full-length promoters and establish guidelines for promoter prediction and for forward engineering promoters of specific strengths. PMID:22156164

  4. Functional Recombinant Extra Membrane Loop of Human CD20, an Alternative of the Full Length CD20 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Anbouhi, Mahdi Habibi; Baraz, Aida Feiz; Bouzari, Saeid; Abolhassani, Mohsen; Khanahmad, Hossein; Golkar, Majid; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Behdani, Mahdi; Najafabadi, Ali Jahanian; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2012-01-01

    Background: Targeting of CD20 antigen with monoclonal antibodies has become the mainstay in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and immunotherapeutic depletion of malignant B cells. Accessibility of antigen is one of the crucial factors in development of monoclonal antibodies against this antigen. One major problem in expression of full length CD20 is aggregation and misfolding. Therefore, production of an alternative polypeptide is easer and favorable comparing to that of a full length transmembrane protein CD20. Methods: In this study, we expressed the extra membrane loop of hCD20 (exCD20) consisting of a non-glycosylated 47-amino acids region. The exCD20 coding sequence was amplified by PCR and cloned in pET32a(+) expression vector. The desired protein was expressed in fusion with thioredoxin and 6× His tag in E. coli Origami strain. ELISA and Western-blotting data were performed to indicate the functionality of this protein. Results: We have obtained the exCD20 recombinant protein which can be detected in ELISA and Western-blot experiments. This recombinant fusion protein was soluble and stable without aggregation and misfolding problems. Conclusion: The recombinant extra membrane loop of human CD20 protein in fusion with thioredoxin (exCD20) can be used in function assays and some applications such as ELISA, immuneblotting, affinity purification, immunization, screening, and development of anti-CD20 antibodies. PMID:23023212

  5. Global Identification of the Full-Length Transcripts and Alternative Splicing Related to Phenolic Acid Biosynthetic Genes in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhichao; Luo, Hongmei; Ji, Aijia; Zhang, Xin; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolic acids are among the main bioactive components in Salvia miltiorrhiza, and their biosynthesis has attracted widespread interest. However, previous studies on the biosynthesis of phenolic acids using next-generation sequencing platforms are limited with regard to the assembly of full-length transcripts. Based on hybrid-seq (next-generation and single molecular real-time sequencing) of the S. miltiorrhiza root transcriptome, we experimentally identified 15 full-length transcripts and four alternative splicing events of enzyme-coding genes involved in the biosynthesis of rosmarinic acid. Moreover, we herein demonstrate that lithospermic acid B accumulates in the phloem and xylem of roots, in agreement with the expression patterns of the identified key genes related to rosmarinic acid biosynthesis. According to co-expression patterns, we predicted that six candidate cytochrome P450s and five candidate laccases participate in the salvianolic acid pathway. Our results provide a valuable resource for further investigation into the synthetic biology of phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:26904067

  6. Predicting the strength of UP-elements and full-length E. coli σE promoters.

    PubMed

    Rhodius, Virgil A; Mutalik, Vivek K; Gross, Carol A

    2012-04-01

    Predicting the location and strength of promoters from genomic sequence requires accurate sequenced-based promoter models. We present the first model of a full-length bacterial promoter, encompassing both upstream sequences (UP-elements) and core promoter modules, based on a set of 60 promoters dependent on σ(E), an alternative ECF-type σ factor. UP-element contribution, best described by the length and frequency of A- and T-tracts, in combination with a PWM-based core promoter model, accurately predicted promoter strength both in vivo and in vitro. This model also distinguished active from weak/inactive promoters. Systematic examination of promoter strength as a function of RNA polymerase (RNAP) concentration revealed that UP-element contribution varied with RNAP availability and that the σ(E) regulon is comprised of two promoter types, one of which is active only at high concentrations of RNAP. Distinct promoter types may be a general mechanism for increasing the regulatory capacity of the ECF group of alternative σ's. Our findings provide important insights into the sequence requirements for the strength and function of full-length promoters and establish guidelines for promoter prediction and for forward engineering promoters of specific strengths. PMID:22156164

  7. Near full-length genomic characterization of a HIV type 1 BC recombinant strain from Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Roni; Sarkar, Kamalesh; Singh, N Brajachand; Singh, Y Manihar; Chakrabarti, Sekhar

    2012-10-01

    Genetic complexity of HIV-1 is brought about by recombination between HIV-1 subtypes which leads to the development of epidemiologically significant founder strains. In the present study, the near full-length genome sequence of an HIV-1 isolate from an injecting drug user of Manipur (India) was determined, which evidenced the presence of a novel HIV-1 BC recombinant strain. Near full-length genome was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using primer walking approach. The recombination break points were detected using bootscan and simplot analyses. This isolate exhibited a mosaic structure consisting of subtype C backbone with subtype B insertions at the upstream of pol gene (3026-3259) and the downstream of env gene which spanned till the nef gene (8183-8961). Phylogenetic relationships determined with neighbor-joining trees, revealed that the subtype C sequences clustered with sequences from Indian subtype C HIV-1 strains, and the subtype B sequences clustered with HIV-1 subtype B strains from Thailand. This finding may create a complex scenario of HIV-1 epidemic among the injecting drug users of Manipur in near future. PMID:22710995

  8. Full-length sequence analysis of chloroquine resistance transporter gene in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Sabah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lii Lian; Lau, Tiek Ying; Timothy, William; Prabakaran, Dhanaraj

    2014-01-01

    Chloroquine resistance (CQR) in falciparum malaria was identified to be associated with several mutations in the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) that encodes the transmembrane transporter in digestive vacuole membrane of the parasite. This study aimed to investigate the point mutations across the full-length pfcrt in Plasmodium falciparum isolates in Sabah, Malaysia. A total of 31 P. falciparum positive samples collected from Keningau, Kota Kinabalu, and Kudat, Sabah, were analyzed. pfcrt was PCR amplified and cloned prior to sequence analysis. This study showed that all the previously described 10 point mutations associated with CQR at codons 72, 74, 75, 76, 97, 220, 271, 326, 356, and 371 were found with different prevalence. Besides, two novel point mutations, I166V and H273N, were identified with 22.5% and 19.3%, respectively. Three haplotypes, namely, CVMNK (29%), CVIET (3.2%), and SVMNT (67.7%), were identified. High prevalence of SVMNT among P. falciparum isolates from Sabah showed that these isolates are closer to the P. falciparum isolates from Papua New Guinea rather than to the more proximal Southeast Asian CVIET haplotype. Full-length analysis of pfcrt showed that chloroquine resistant P. falciparum in Sabah is still prevalent despite the withdrawal of chloroquine usage since 1979. PMID:25574497

  9. Characterization of 40 full-length MHC class IIA functional alleles in miiuy croaker: Polymorphism and positive selection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tianjun; Liu, Jiang; Sun, Yueyan; Zhu, Zhihuang; Liu, Tianxing

    2016-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex is a highly polymorphic gene superfamily in vertebrates that plays an important role in adaptive immune response. In the present study, we identified 40 full-length miiuy croaker MHC class IIA (Mimi-DAA) functional alleles from 26 miiuy croaker individuals and found that the alleles encode 30 amino acid sequences. A high level of polymorphism in Mimi-DAA was detected in miiuy croaker. The rate of non-synonymous substitutions (d(N)) occurred at a significantly higher frequency than that of synonymous substitutions (d(S)) in the peptide-binding region (PBR) and non-PBR. This result suggests that balancing selection maintains polymorphisms at the Mimi-DAA locus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the full-length sequences showed that the Mimi-DAA alleles clustered into three groups. However, the phylogenetic tree constructed using the exon 2 sequences indicated that the Mimi-DAA alleles clustered into two groups. A total of 22 positively selected sites were identified on the Mimi-DAA alleles after testing for positive selection, and five sites were predicted to be associated with the binding of peptide antigen, suggesting that a few selected residues may play a significant role in immune function. PMID:26598111

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the full-length cystathionine β-synthase from Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Oyenarte, Iker; Majtan, Tomas; Ereño, June; Corral-Rodríguez, María Angeles; Klaudiny, Jaroslav; Majtan, Juraj; Kraus, Jan P.; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is a pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the first step of the transsulfuration pathway, namely the condensation of serine with homocysteine to form cystathionine. Mutations in the CBS gene are the single most common cause of hereditary homocystinuria, a multisystemic disease affecting to various extents the vasculature, connective tissues and central nervous system. At present, the crystal structure of CBS from Drosophila melanogaster is the only available structure of the full-length enzyme. Here we describe a cloning, overexpression, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a full-length CBS from Apis mellifera (AmCBS) which maintains 51 and 46% sequence identity with its Drosophila and human homologs, respectively. The AmCBS yielded crystals belonging to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 85.90, b = 95.87, c = 180.33 Å. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 3.0 Å. The crystal structure contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit which presumably correspond to the dimeric species observed in solution. PMID:23143241

  11. Analysis of the mouse gut microbiome using full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jongoh; Lee, Sooin; Go, Min-Jeong; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Chul-Ho; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Demands for faster and more accurate methods to analyze microbial communities from natural and clinical samples have been increasing in the medical and healthcare industry. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have facilitated the elucidation of the microbial community composition with higher accuracy and greater throughput than was previously achievable; however, the short sequencing reads often limit the microbial composition analysis at the species level due to the high similarity of 16S rRNA amplicon sequences. To overcome this limitation, we used the nanopore sequencing platform to sequence full-length 16S rRNA amplicon libraries prepared from the mouse gut microbiota. A comparison of the nanopore and short-read sequencing data showed that there were no significant differences in major taxonomic units (89%) except one phylotype and three taxonomic units. Moreover, both sequencing data were highly similar at all taxonomic resolutions except the species level. At the species level, nanopore sequencing allowed identification of more species than short-read sequencing, facilitating the accurate classification of the bacterial community composition. Therefore, this method of full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing will be useful for rapid, accurate and efficient detection of microbial diversity in various biological and clinical samples. PMID:27411898

  12. Analysis of the mouse gut microbiome using full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jongoh; Lee, Sooin; Go, Min-Jeong; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Chul-Ho; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Demands for faster and more accurate methods to analyze microbial communities from natural and clinical samples have been increasing in the medical and healthcare industry. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have facilitated the elucidation of the microbial community composition with higher accuracy and greater throughput than was previously achievable; however, the short sequencing reads often limit the microbial composition analysis at the species level due to the high similarity of 16S rRNA amplicon sequences. To overcome this limitation, we used the nanopore sequencing platform to sequence full-length 16S rRNA amplicon libraries prepared from the mouse gut microbiota. A comparison of the nanopore and short-read sequencing data showed that there were no significant differences in major taxonomic units (89%) except one phylotype and three taxonomic units. Moreover, both sequencing data were highly similar at all taxonomic resolutions except the species level. At the species level, nanopore sequencing allowed identification of more species than short-read sequencing, facilitating the accurate classification of the bacterial community composition. Therefore, this method of full-length 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing will be useful for rapid, accurate and efficient detection of microbial diversity in various biological and clinical samples. PMID:27411898

  13. Full-Length Fibronectin Drives Fibroblast Accumulation at the Surface of Collagen Microtissues during Cell-Induced Tissue Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Foolen, Jasper; Shiu, Jau-Ye; Mitsi, Maria; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Christopher S.; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Generating and maintaining gradients of cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a prerequisite for the development of functionality of healthy tissue. Therefore, gaining insights into the drivers of spatial organization of cells and the role of ECM during tissue morphogenesis is vital. In a 3D model system of tissue morphogenesis, a fibronectin-FRET sensor recently revealed the existence of two separate fibronectin populations with different conformations in microtissues, i.e. ‘compact and adsorbed to collagen’ versus ‘extended and fibrillar’ fibronectin that does not colocalize with the collagen scaffold. Here we asked how the presence of fibronectin might drive this cell-induced tissue morphogenesis, more specifically the formation of gradients in cell density and ECM composition. Microtissues were engineered in a high-throughput model system containing rectangular microarrays of 12 posts, which constrained fibroblast-populated collagen gels, remodeled by the contractile cells into trampoline-shaped microtissues. Fibronectin’s contribution during the tissue maturation process was assessed using fibronectin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (Fn-/- MEFs) and floxed equivalents (Fnf/f MEFs), in fibronectin-depleted growth medium with and without exogenously added plasma fibronectin (full-length, or various fragments). In the absence of full-length fibronectin, Fn-/- MEFs remained homogenously distributed throughout the cell-contracted collagen gels. In contrast, in the presence of full-length fibronectin, both cell types produced shell-like tissues with a predominantly cell-free compacted collagen core and a peripheral surface layer rich in cells. Single cell assays then revealed that Fn-/- MEFs applied lower total strain energy on nanopillar arrays coated with either fibronectin or vitronectin when compared to Fnf/f MEFs, but that the presence of exogenously added plasma fibronectin rescued their contractility. While collagen

  14. Full-Length Fibronectin Drives Fibroblast Accumulation at the Surface of Collagen Microtissues during Cell-Induced Tissue Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Foolen, Jasper; Shiu, Jau-Ye; Mitsi, Maria; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Christopher S; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Generating and maintaining gradients of cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a prerequisite for the development of functionality of healthy tissue. Therefore, gaining insights into the drivers of spatial organization of cells and the role of ECM during tissue morphogenesis is vital. In a 3D model system of tissue morphogenesis, a fibronectin-FRET sensor recently revealed the existence of two separate fibronectin populations with different conformations in microtissues, i.e. 'compact and adsorbed to collagen' versus 'extended and fibrillar' fibronectin that does not colocalize with the collagen scaffold. Here we asked how the presence of fibronectin might drive this cell-induced tissue morphogenesis, more specifically the formation of gradients in cell density and ECM composition. Microtissues were engineered in a high-throughput model system containing rectangular microarrays of 12 posts, which constrained fibroblast-populated collagen gels, remodeled by the contractile cells into trampoline-shaped microtissues. Fibronectin's contribution during the tissue maturation process was assessed using fibronectin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (Fn-/- MEFs) and floxed equivalents (Fnf/f MEFs), in fibronectin-depleted growth medium with and without exogenously added plasma fibronectin (full-length, or various fragments). In the absence of full-length fibronectin, Fn-/- MEFs remained homogenously distributed throughout the cell-contracted collagen gels. In contrast, in the presence of full-length fibronectin, both cell types produced shell-like tissues with a predominantly cell-free compacted collagen core and a peripheral surface layer rich in cells. Single cell assays then revealed that Fn-/- MEFs applied lower total strain energy on nanopillar arrays coated with either fibronectin or vitronectin when compared to Fnf/f MEFs, but that the presence of exogenously added plasma fibronectin rescued their contractility. While collagen decoration of

  15. Structure of full-length human anti-PD1 therapeutic IgG4 antibody pembrolizumab.

    PubMed

    Scapin, Giovanna; Yang, Xiaoyu; Prosise, Winifred W; McCoy, Mark; Reichert, Paul; Johnston, Jennifer M; Kashi, Ramesh S; Strickland, Corey

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 antibodies exhibit unusual properties with important biological consequences. We report the structure of the human full-length IgG4 S228P anti-PD1 antibody pembrolizumab, solved to 2.3-Å resolution. Pembrolizumab is a compact molecule, consistent with the presence of a short hinge region. The Fc domain is glycosylated at the CH2 domain on both chains, but one CH2 domain is rotated 120° with respect to the conformation observed in all reported structures to date, and its glycan chain faces the solvent. We speculate that this new conformation is driven by the shorter hinge. The structure suggests a role for the S228P mutation in preventing the IgG4 arm exchange. In addition, this unusual Fc conformation suggests possible structural diversity between IgG subclasses and shows that use of isolated antibody fragments could mask potentially important interactions, owing to molecular flexibility. PMID:26595420

  16. Modular structure of the full-length DNA gyrase B subunit revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Costenaro, Lionel; Grossmann, J Günter; Ebel, Christine; Maxwell, Anthony

    2007-03-01

    DNA gyrase, the only topoisomerase able to introduce negative supercoils into DNA, is essential for bacterial transcription and replication; absent from humans, it is a successful target for antibacterials. From biophysical experiments in solution, we report a structural model at approximately 12-15 A resolution of the full-length B subunit (GyrB). Analytical ultracentrifugation shows that GyrB is mainly a nonglobular monomer. Ab initio modeling of small-angle X-ray scattering data for GyrB consistently yields a "tadpole"-like envelope. It allows us to propose an organization of GyrB into three domains-ATPase, Toprim, and Tail-based on their crystallographic and modeled structures. Our study reveals the modular organization of GyrB and points out its potential flexibility, needed during the gyrase catalytic cycle. It provides important insights into the supercoiling mechanism by gyrase and suggests new lines of research. PMID:17355868

  17. Molecular characterization of full-length MLV-related endogenous retrovirus ChiRV1 from the chicken, Gallus gallus.

    PubMed

    Borysenko, Leonid; Stepanets, Volodymir; Rynditch, Alla V

    2008-06-20

    We report the first full-length sequence of an endogenous retrovirus from the genome of domestic chicken, that is not related to the Avian leukemia viruses (ALV). This retrovirus, designated ChiRV1, clusters with Murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related retroviruses and hence is the first complete gammaretrovirus from the genome of a bird. Nevertheless it is not related to exogenous MLV-related retroviruses infecting chicken. The provirus is 9133 bp long and contains 90%-identical LTRs as well as reading frames for the gag, pol and env genes, interrupted by in-frame stop codons. Expression analysis showed that ChiRV1 is a transcribed provirus. Screening of the chicken genome database revealed 100 ChiRV1-related sequences that are grouped into three classes based upon LTR alignment and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. PMID:18440041

  18. Internalization of the Extracellular Full-Length Tau Inside Neuro2A and Cortical Cells Is Enhanced by Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wauters, Mathilde; Wattiez, Ruddy; Ris, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Tau protein is mainly intracellular. However, several studies have demonstrated that full-length Tau can be released into the interstitial fluid of the brain. The physiological or pathological function of this extracellular Tau remains unknown. Moreover, as evidence suggests, extracellular Tau aggregates can be internalized by neurons, seeding Tau aggregation. However, much less is known about small species of Tau. In this study, we hypothesized that the status of phosphorylation could alter the internalization of recombinant Tau in Neuro2A and cortical cells. Our preliminary results revealed that the highly phosphorylated form of Tau entered the cells ten times more easily than a low phosphorylated one. This suggests that hyperphosphorylated Tau protein could spread between neurons in pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27548242

  19. Characterization of full-length HIV-1 CRF17_BF genomes and comparison to the prototype CRF12_BF strains.

    PubMed

    Aulicino, Paula C; Gómez-Carrillo, Manuel; Bello, Gonzalo; Rocco, Carlos; Mangano, Andrea; Carr, Jean; Sen, Luisa; Foley, Brian

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the full-length intersubtype recombinant structure of the HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form CRF17_BF. A single genome of CRF17_BF was originally described in 2001 as being largely similar to CRF12_BF. Since then, more genomes of CRF17_BF have been sequenced but not adequately described in publications. Here we describe CRF17_BF as a genuine CRF, and analyze its recombination pattern based on bootscan analyses, subtype signature patterns, and phylogenetic reconstruction of subtype-delimited segments. We show that CRF17_BF can be distinguished from CRF12_BF in several regions of the genome, including vpu, pol, env and nef. A complete and accurate characterization and description of recombination breakpoints in CRFs is required for a proper surveillance of HIV-1 genotypes, and important for epidemiological purposes. PMID:22266022

  20. A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Anson; Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti; Yoo, Si-Eun; Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. {yields} HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1{sup +/0}) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1{sup +/0} mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1{sup +/0} cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1{sup +/0} cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

  1. Short-Read Assembly of Full-Length 16S Amplicons Reveals Bacterial Diversity in Subsurface Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christopher S.; Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Frischkorn, Kyle R.; Thomas, Brian C.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    In microbial ecology, a fundamental question relates to how community diversity and composition change in response to perturbation. Most studies have had limited ability to deeply sample community structure (e.g. Sanger-sequenced 16S rRNA libraries), or have had limited taxonomic resolution (e.g. studies based on 16S rRNA hypervariable region sequencing). Here, we combine the higher taxonomic resolution of near-full-length 16S rRNA gene amplicons with the economics and sensitivity of short-read sequencing to assay the abundance and identity of organisms that represent as little as 0.01% of sediment bacterial communities. We used a new version of EMIRGE optimized for large data size to reconstruct near-full-length 16S rRNA genes from amplicons sheared and sequenced with Illumina technology. The approach allowed us to differentiate the community composition among samples acquired before perturbation, after acetate amendment shifted the predominant metabolism to iron reduction, and once sulfate reduction began. Results were highly reproducible across technical replicates, and identified specific taxa that responded to the perturbation. All samples contain very high alpha diversity and abundant organisms from phyla without cultivated representatives. Surprisingly, at the time points measured, there was no strong loss of evenness, despite the selective pressure of acetate amendment and change in the terminal electron accepting process. However, community membership was altered significantly. The method allows for sensitive, accurate profiling of the “long tail” of low abundance organisms that exist in many microbial communities, and can resolve population dynamics in response to environmental change. PMID:23405248

  2. Characterization of Full-Length Genomes of Hepatitis B Virus Quasispecies in Sera of Patients at Different Phases of Infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Tao; Huang, Su-Yuan; Chen, Li; Liu, Feng; Cai, Xiao-Hui; Guo, Yang-Fan; Wang, Ming-Jie; Han, Yue; Yu, De-Min; Jiang, Jie-Hong; Zhang, Dong-Hua; Gong, Qi-Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zang, Guo-Qing; Lu, Zhong-Hua; Huang, Li-Hua; Zhang, Xin-Xin

    2015-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection results in different clinical presentation due to different levels of immune response. Our study aimed to characterize HBV full-length genome quasispecies (QS) in patients with different phases of infection to better understand its pathogenesis. Forty treatment-naive HBV-infected patients were enrolled, including 10 cases of acute hepatitis B (AHB), 9 cases of immunotolerant (IT) HBV carriers, 11 cases of chronic hepatitis B (CHB), and 10 cases of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The present study was conducted by clone-based sequencing. QS heterogeneity within each open reading frame was calculated. The mutation frequency index (MFI) and amino acid variations within the large HBsAg, HBcAg, and HBxAg regions were analyzed based on the different infection phases. In total, 606 HBV full-length sequences were obtained. HBV QS had higher heterogeneity in ACLF and CHB than that in IT among chronically infected individuals. AHB patients had the lower QS heterogeneity at onset than those with chronic infection. ACLF patients had the highest frequency of mutations in the core promoter and precore region. A triple mutation (A1762T/G1764A/G1896A) was observed more frequently in genotype C than in genotype B. The MFI indicated that specific peptides of the studied regions had more frequent mutations in ACLF. Furthermore, several amino acid variations, known as T- and B-cell epitopes, were potentially associated with the immunoactive phase of infection. More HBV genome mutations and deletions were observed in patients with more severe diseases, particularly in specific regions of the core and preS regions, the clinical significance and mechanism of which need to be further investigated. PMID:25926495

  3. Conditional expression of full-length humanized anti-prion protein antibodies in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Daniel A; Heinig, Lars; Ramljak, Sanja; Krueger, Astrid; Schulte, Reiner; Wrede, Arne; Stuke, Andreas W

    2010-12-01

    Because of their high antigen specificity and metabolic stability, genetically engineered human monoclonal antibodies are on the way to becoming one of the most promising medical diagnostics and therapeutics. In order to establish an in vitro system capable of producing such biosimilar antibodies, we used human constant chain sequences to design the novel human antibody expressing vector cassette pMAB-ABX. A bidirectional tetracycline (tet)-controllable promotor was used for harmonized expression of immunoglobulin type G (IgG) heavy and light chains. As an example we used anti-prion protein (anti-PrP) IgGs. Therefore, the variable heavy (V(H)) and light chain (V(L)) sequences of anti-PrP antibodies, previously generated in our laboratory by DNA immunization of prion protein knock-out mice, were isolated from murine hybridoma cell lines and inserted into pMAB-ABX vector. After transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, a number of stable antibody producing cell clones were selected. One cell line (pMAB-ABX-13F10/3B5) stably expressing the recombinant humanized antibody (rechuAb) 13F10/3B5 was selected for detailed characterization by Western blot, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometric analyses. The full-length recombinant humanized IgG antibody showed a high level of expression in the cytoplasm. In conclusion, the new cell system described here is a suitable tool to produce functional intact full-length humanized IgG antibodies. PMID:21087094

  4. The feline oral microbiome: a provisional 16S rRNA gene based taxonomy with full-length reference sequences.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Floyd E; Klein, Erin A; Bennett, Marie-Louise; Croft, Julie M; Harris, Stephen J; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V

    2015-02-25

    The human oral microbiome is known to play a significant role in human health and disease. While less well studied, the feline oral microbiome is thought to play a similarly important role. To determine roles oral bacteria play in health and disease, one first has to be able to accurately identify bacterial species present. 16S rRNA gene sequence information is widely used for molecular identification of bacteria and is also useful for establishing the taxonomy of novel species. The objective of this research was to obtain full 16S rRNA gene reference sequences for feline oral bacteria, place the sequences in species-level phylotypes, and create a curated 16S rRNA based taxonomy for common feline oral bacteria. Clone libraries were produced using "universal" and phylum-selective PCR primers and DNA from pooled subgingival plaque from healthy and periodontally diseased cats. Bacteria in subgingival samples were also cultivated to obtain isolates. Full-length 16S rDNA sequences were determined for clones and isolates that represent 171 feline oral taxa. A provisional curated taxonomy was developed based on the position of each taxon in 16S rRNA phylogenetic trees. The feline oral microbiome curated taxonomy and 16S rRNA gene reference set will allow investigators to refer to precisely defined bacterial taxa. A provisional name such as "Propionibacterium sp. feline oral taxon FOT-327" is an anchor to which clone, strain or GenBank names or accession numbers can point. Future next-generation-sequencing studies of feline oral bacteria will be able to map reads to taxonomically curated full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences. PMID:25523504

  5. Near-Full-Length Genome Sequences of a Novel HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form, CRF01_AE/B'/C (CRF78_cpx), in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Yindi; Feng, Yue; Miao, Zhijiang; Wang, Binghui; Yang, Ming; Zhang, A-Mei; Liu, Li; Xia, Xueshan

    2016-06-01

    We report a novel HIV circulating recombinant form (CRF78_cpx) composed mainly of CRF01_AE with inserts from subtypes B and C identified from three epidemiologically unlinked individuals in Yunnan province, China. Two of the subjects are heterosexual men and one is a male intravenous drug user. Sequencing and analyzing the near-full-length genome of these three isolates (YNTC88, YNTC19, and YNTC35) revealed identical recombination breakpoints in all three viruses, but considerable genetic diversity between them, across the genomes, indicating that this is not a newly created CRF, only newly detected. CRF78_cpx differs from previously documented CRF01-AE/B'/C forms in its distinct backbone, inserted fragment size, and breakpoints, and is not related to other described recombinants in the region such as CRF07_BC or CRF65_cpx (also composed of CRF01_AE, B', and C). Our present findings further enrich the diversity of the prevalent HIV-1 CRFs in Yunnan, which is considered as an epicenter of HIV-1 infections in China. PMID:26885715

  6. A full-length Plasmodium falciparum recombinant circumsporozoite protein expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens platform as a malaria vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Noe, Amy R; Espinosa, Diego; Li, Xiangming; Coelho-Dos-Reis, Jordana G A; Funakoshi, Ryota; Giardina, Steve; Jin, Hongfan; Retallack, Diane M; Haverstock, Ryan; Allen, Jeffrey R; Vedvick, Thomas S; Fox, Christopher B; Reed, Steven G; Ayala, Ramses; Roberts, Brian; Winram, Scott B; Sacci, John; Tsuji, Moriya; Zavala, Fidel; Gutierrez, Gabriel M

    2014-01-01

    The circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum is a major surface protein, which forms a dense coat on the sporozoite's surface. Preclinical research on CSP and clinical evaluation of a CSP fragment-based RTS, S/AS01 vaccine have demonstrated a modest degree of protection against P. falciparum, mediated in part by humoral immunity and in part by cell-mediated immunity. Given the partial protective efficacy of the RTS, S/AS01 vaccine in a recent Phase 3 trial, further improvement of CSP-based vaccines is crucial. In this report, we describe the preclinical development of a full-length, recombinant CSP (rCSP)-based vaccine candidate against P. falciparum malaria suitable for current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) production. Utilizing a novel high-throughput Pseudomonas fluorescens expression platform, we demonstrated greater efficacy of full-length rCSP as compared to N-terminally truncated versions, rapidly down-selected a promising lead vaccine candidate, and developed a high-yield purification process to express immunologically active, intact antigen for clinical trial material production. The rCSP, when formulated with various adjuvants, induced antigen-specific antibody responses as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence assay (IFA), as well as CD4+ T-cell responses as determined by ELISpot. The adjuvanted rCSP vaccine conferred protection in mice when challenged with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites containing the P. falciparum repeat region of CSP. Furthermore, heterologous prime/boost regimens with adjuvanted rCSP and an adenovirus type 35-vectored CSP (Ad35CS) showed modest improvements in eliciting CSP-specific T-cell responses and anti-malarial protection, depending on the order of vaccine delivery. Collectively, these data support the importance of further clinical development of adjuvanted rCSP, either as a stand-alone product or as one of the components in a heterologous prime/boost strategy

  7. Aminoglycosides Restore Full-length Type VII Collagen by Overcoming Premature Termination Codons: Therapeutic Implications for Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Cogan, Jon; Weinstein, Jacqueline; Wang, Xinyi; Hou, Yingping; Martin, Sabrina; South, Andrew P; Woodley, David T; Chen, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) have severe, incurable skin fragility, blistering, and multiple skin wounds due to mutations in the gene encoding type VII collagen (C7), the major component of anchoring fibrils mediating epidermal-dermal adherence. Nearly 10–25% of RDEB patients carry nonsense mutations leading to premature stop codons (PTCs) that result in truncated C7. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using aminoglycosides to suppress PTCs and induce C7 expression in two RDEB keratinocyte cell lines (Q251X/Q251X and R578X/R906) and two primary RDEB fibroblasts (R578X/R578X and R163X/R1683X). Incubation of these cells with aminoglycosides (geneticin, gentamicin, and paromomycin) resulted in the synthesis and secretion of a full-length C7 in a dose-dependent and sustained manner. Importantly, aminoglycoside-induced C7 reversed the abnormal RDEB cell phenotype and incorporated into the dermal-epidermal junction of skin equivalents. We further demonstrated the general utility of aminoglycoside-mediated readthrough in 293 cells transiently transfected with expression vectors encoding 22 different RDEB nonsense mutations. This is the first study demonstrating that aminoglycosides can induce PTC readthrough and restore functional C7 in RDEB caused by nonsense mutations. Therefore, aminoglycosides may have therapeutic potential for RDEB patients and other inherited skin diseases caused by nonsense mutations. PMID:25155989

  8. THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SPATIOTEMPORAL COLLAGEN GENE EXPRESSION, HISTOLOGY, AND BIOMECHANICS FOLLOWING FULL-LENGTH INJURY IN THE MURINE PATELLAR TENDON

    PubMed Central

    Dyment, Nathaniel A; Kazemi, Namdar; Aschbacher-Smith, Lindsey E; Barthelery, Nicolas J.; Kenter, Keith; Gooch, Cynthia; Shearn, Jason T; Wylie, Christopher; Butler, David L

    2011-01-01

    Tendon injuries are major orthopaedic problems that worsen as the population ages. Type-I (Col1) and type-II (Col2) collagens play important roles in tendon midsubstance and tendon-to-bone insertion healing, respectively. Using double transgenic mice, this study aims to spatiotemporally monitor Col1 and Col2 gene expression, histology and biomechanics up to 8 weeks following a full-length patellar tendon injury. Gene expression and histology were analyzed weekly for up to 5 weeks while mechanical properties were measured at 1, 2, 5, and 8 weeks. At week 1, the healing region displayed loose granulation tissue with little Col1 expression. Col1 expression peaked at 2 weeks, but the ECM was highly disorganized and hypercellular. By 3 weeks, Col1 expression had reduced and by 5 weeks, the ECM was generally aligned along the tendon axis. Col2 expression was not seen in the healing midsubstance or insertion at any time point. The biomechanics of the healing tissue was inadequate at all time points, achieving ultimate loads and stiffnesses of 48% and 63% of normal values by 8 weeks. Future studies will further characterize the cells within the healing midsubstance and insertion using tenogenic markers and compare these results to those of tendon cells during normal development. PMID:21698662

  9. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  10. REAL-Select: Full-Length Antibody Display and Library Screening by Surface Capture on Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Ralf; Becker, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald; Hock, Björn

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel approach named REAL-Select for the non-covalent display of IgG-molecules on the surface of yeast cells for the purpose of antibody engineering and selection. It relies on the capture of secreted native full-length antibodies on the cell surface via binding to an externally immobilized ZZ domain, which tightly binds antibody Fc. It is beneficial for high-throughput screening of yeast-displayed IgG-libraries during antibody discovery and development. In a model experiment, antibody-displaying yeast cells were isolated from a 1∶1,000,000 mixture with control cells confirming the maintenance of genotype-phenotype linkage. Antibodies with improved binding characteristics were obtained by affinity maturation using REAL-Select, demonstrating the ability of this system to display antibodies in their native form and to detect subtle changes in affinity by flow cytometry. The biotinylation of the cell surface followed by functionalization with a streptavidin-ZZ fusion protein is an approach that is independent of the genetic background of the antibody-producing host and therefore can be expected to be compatible with other eukaryotic expression hosts such as P. pastoris or mammalian cells. PMID:25501029

  11. Improved Structures of Full-Length P97, An AAA ATPase: Implications for Mechanisms of Nucleotide-Dependent Conformational Change

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, J.M.; Brunger, A.T.; Weis, W.I.

    2009-05-14

    The ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA) protein p97 has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and homotypic membrane fusion. p97 belongs to a subgroup of AAA proteins that contains two nucleotide binding domains, D1 and D2. We determined the crystal structure of D2 at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution. This model enabled rerefinement of full-length p97 in different nucleotide states against previously reported low-resolution diffraction data to significantly improved R values and Ramachandran statistics. Although the overall fold remained similar, there are significant improvements, especially around the D2 nucleotide binding site. The rerefinement illustrates the importance of knowledge of high-resolution structures of fragments covering most of the whole molecule. The structures suggest that nucleotide hydrolysis is transformed into larger conformational changes by pushing of one D2 domain by its neighbor in the hexamer, and transmission of nucleotide-state information through the D1-D2 linker to displace the N-terminal, effector binding domain.

  12. Improved yields of full-length functional human FGF1 can be achieved using the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, Adele; Bill, Roslyn M; Gustafsson, Lena; Hedfalk, Kristina

    2007-03-01

    We have produced human fibroblast growth factor 1 (hFGF1) in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris in order to obtain the large amounts of active protein required for subsequent functional and structural characterization. Four constructs were made to examine both intracellular and secreted expression, with variations in the location of the His6 tag at either end of the peptide. hFGF1 could be produced from all four constructs in shake flasks, but production was optimized by growing only the highest-yielding of these strains, which produced hFGF1 intracellularly, under tightly controlled conditions in a 3 L fermentor. One hundred and eight milligrams of pure protein was achieved per liter culture (corresponding to 0.68 mg of protein per gram of wet cells), the function of which was verified using NIH 3T3 cell cultures. This is a 30-fold improvement over previously reported yields of full-length hFGF1. PMID:17134911

  13. Computational Analysis of Full-length cDNAs Reveals Frequent Coupling Between Transcriptional and Splicing Programs

    PubMed Central

    Chern, Tzu-Ming; Paul, Nicodeme; van Nimwegen, Erik; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing studies revealed that the majority of human and mouse multi-exon genes have multiple splice forms. High-density oligonucleotide array-based measurements have further established that many exons are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. The mechanisms underlying the tissue-dependent expression of most alternative exons remain, however, to be understood. In this study, we focus on one possible mechanism, namely the coupling of (tissue specific) transcription regulation with alternative splicing. We analyzed the FANTOM3 and H-Invitational datasets of full-length mouse and human cDNAs, respectively, and found that in transcription units with multiple start sites, the inclusion of at least 15% and possibly up to 30% of the ‘cassette’ exons correlates with the use of specific transcription start sites (TSS). The vast majority of TSS-associated exons are conserved between human and mouse, yet the conservation is weaker when compared with TSS-independent exons. Additionally, the currently available data only support a weak correlation between the probabilities of TSS association of orthologous exons. Our analysis thus suggests frequent coupling of transcriptional and splicing programs, and provides a large dataset of exons on which the molecular basis of this coupling can be further studied. PMID:18276623

  14. Virus recovery and full-length sequence analysis of atypical bovine pestivirus Th/04_KhonKaen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lihong; Kampa, Jaruwan; Belák, Sándor; Baule, Claudia

    2009-07-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of recently identified "atypical" bovine pestiviruses, performed based on different gene regions, has revealed unclear relationships with other established species, therefore, their phylogenetic position could not be determined so far. In this study, the atypical pestivirus Th/04_KhonKaen was recovered from serum of a naturally infected calf and the complete genome sequence was determined and analysed, as means to define its position. The viral genome is 12,337 nucleotides (nt) long, and comprises a 5'-UTR of 383 nt, a 3'-UTR of 254 nt and an open reading frame of 11,700 nt, without duplication of viral sequences or insertions of cellular sequences. The phylogenetic analyses of the full-length sequence, performed by Neighbor-joining, Maximum likelihood, and the Bayesian approach, unanimously placed Th/04_KhonKaen in a single lineage, distinct from the established pestivirus species, and close to bovine viral diarrhea virus types 1 and 2. Furthermore, Th/04_KhonKaen and two previously reported atypical pestiviruses D32/00_'HoBi' and CH-KaHo/cont formed a well-supported monophyletic clade in trees based on the complete N(pro) and E2 gene regions. The finding provides conclusive classification of the Th/04_KhonKaen virus and confirms the standing of the "atypical" bovine pestiviruses as a novel pestivirus species. PMID:19349128

  15. Computational insights into the inhibition and destabilization of morin on the oligomer of full-length human islet amyloid polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianqian; Zhou, Shuangyan; Wei, Wei; Yao, Xiaojun; Liu, Huanxiang; Hu, Zhide

    2015-11-21

    The aggregation of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is closely related with the occurrence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Natural flavonoid morin was confirmed to not only inhibit the amyloid formation of hIAPP, but disaggregate its preformed amyloid fibrils. In this study, with the goal of elucidating the molecular mechanism of inhibition and destabilization of morin on the full-length hIAPP(1-37) oligomer, molecular dynamics simulations were performed for hIAPP(1-37) pentamer in the presence and absence of morin. The obtained results show that during the protein-inhibitor interaction, morin can notably alter the structural properties of hIAPP(1-37) pentamer, such as morphology, solvent accessible surface area and secondary structure. Moreover, we identified three possible binding sites of morin on hIAPP, all of which located near the amyloidogenic region of this protein. From the binding free energy calculations, we found that Site II was the most possible one. Further conformational analysis together with energy decomposition showed that the residues His18, Phe23 and Ile26 play a key role in the binding with morin by hydrogen bond, π-π and hydrophobic interactions. The proposal of the theoretical mechanism of morin against hIAPP aggregation will provide valuable information for the development of new drugs to inhibit hIAPP aggregation. PMID:26460729

  16. The full-length cell-cell fusogen EFF-1 is monomeric and upright on the membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Vasishtan, Daven; Siebert, C. Alistair; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-05-01

    Fusogens are membrane proteins that remodel lipid bilayers to facilitate membrane merging. Although several fusogen ectodomain structures have been solved, structural information on full-length, natively membrane-anchored fusogens is scarce. Here we present the electron cryo microscopy three-dimensional reconstruction of the Caenorhabditis elegans epithelial fusion failure 1 (EFF-1) protein natively anchored in cell-derived membrane vesicles. This reveals a membrane protruding, asymmetric, elongated monomer. Flexible fitting of a protomer of the EFF-1 crystal structure, which is homologous to viral class-II fusion proteins, shows that EFF-1 has a hairpin monomeric conformation before fusion. These structural insights, when combined with our observations of membrane-merging intermediates between vesicles, enable us to propose a model for EFF-1 mediated fusion. This process, involving identical proteins on both membranes to be fused, follows a mechanism that shares features of SNARE-mediated fusion while using the structural building blocks of the unilaterally acting class-II viral fusion proteins.

  17. Accumulation of human full-length tau induces degradation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4 via activating calpain-2

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yaling; Wang, Yali; Gao, Di; Ye, Jinwang; Wang, Xin; Fang, Lin; Wu, Dongqin; Pi, Guilin; Lu, Chengbiao; Zhou, Xin-Wen; Yang, Ying; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Cholinergic impairments and tau accumulation are hallmark pathologies in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD), however, the intrinsic link between tau accumulation and cholinergic deficits is missing. Here, we found that overexpression of human wild-type full-length tau (termed hTau) induced a significant reduction of α4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with an increased cleavage of the receptor producing a ~55kDa fragment in primary hippocampal neurons and in the rat brains, meanwhile, the α4 nAChR currents decreased. Further studies demonstrated that calpains, including calpain-1 and calpain-2, were remarkably activated with no change of caspase-3, while simultaneous suppression of calpain-2 by selective calpain-2 inhibitor but not calpain-1 attenuated the hTau-induced degradation of α4 nAChR. Finally, we demonstrated that hTau accumulation increased the basal intracellular calcium level in primary hippocampal neurons. We conclude that the hTau accumulation inhibits nAChRs α4 by activating calpain-2. To our best knowledge, this is the first evidence showing that the intracellular accumulation of tau causes cholinergic impairments. PMID:27277673

  18. Human wild-type full-length tau accumulation disrupts mitochondrial dynamics and the functions via increasing mitofusins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia-Chun; Hu, Yu; Wang, Zhi-hao; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Feng, Qiong; Wang, Qun; Ye, Keqiang; Liu, Gong-Ping; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of tau protein is hallmark of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD), however, the cellular mechanism whereby tau accumulation causes neurodegeneration is poorly understood. Here we report that overexpression of human wild-type full-length tau (termed htau) disrupted mitochondrial dynamics by enhancing fusion and induced their perinuclear accumulation in HEK293 cells and rat primary hippocampal neurons. The htau accumulation at later stage inhibited mitochondrial functions shown by the decreased ATP level, the ratio of ATP/ADP and complex I activity. Simultaneously, the cell viability was decreased with retraction of the cellular/neuronal processes. Further studies demonstrated that htau accumulation increased fusion proteins, including OPA1 and mitofusins (Mfn1, Mfn2) and reduced the ubiquitination of Mfn2. Downregulation of the mitofusins by shRNA to ~45% or ~52% of the control levels attenuated the htau-enhanced mitochondrial fusion and restored the functions, while downregulation of OPA1 to ~50% of the control level did not show rescue effects. Finally, abnormal mitochondrial accumulation and dysfunction were also observed in the brains of htau transgenic mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate that htau accumulation decreases cell viability and causes degeneration via enhancing mitofusin-associated mitochondrial fusion, which provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying tauopathies. PMID:27099072

  19. X-Ray Crystal Structure of the Full Length Human Chitotriosidase (CHIT1) Reveals Features of Its Chitin Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Fadel, Firas; Zhao, Yuguang; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Ruiz, Francesc X.; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Chitinases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of chitin. Human chitotriosidase (CHIT1) is one of the two active human chitinases, involved in the innate immune response and highly expressed in a variety of diseases. CHIT1 is composed of a catalytic domain linked by a hinge to its chitin binding domain (ChBD). This latter domain belongs to the carbohydrate-binding module family 14 (CBM14 family) and facilitates binding to chitin. So far, the available crystal structures of the human chitinase CHIT1 and the Acidic Mammalian Chitinase (AMCase) comprise only their catalytic domain. Here, we report a crystallization strategy combining cross-seeding and micro-seeding cycles which allowed us to obtain the first crystal structure of the full length CHIT1 (CHIT1-FL) at 1.95 Å resolution. The CHIT1 chitin binding domain (ChBDCHIT1) structure shows a distorted β-sandwich 3D fold, typical of CBM14 family members. Accordingly, ChBDCHIT1 presents six conserved cysteine residues forming three disulfide bridges and several exposed aromatic residues that probably are involved in chitin binding, including the highly conserved Trp465 in a surface- exposed conformation. Furthermore, ChBDCHIT1 presents a positively charged surface which may be involved in electrostatic interactions. Our data highlight the strong structural conservation of CBM14 family members and uncover the structural similarity between the human ChBDCHIT1, tachycitin and house mite dust allergens. Overall, our new CHIT1-FL structure, determined with an adapted crystallization approach, is one of the few complete bi-modular chitinase structures available and reveals the structural features of a human CBM14 domain. PMID:27111557

  20. Comparison of Newly Assembled Full Length HIV-1 Integrase With Prototype Foamy Virus Integrase: Structure-Function Prospective

    PubMed Central

    Dayer, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug design against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase through its mechanistic study is of great interest in the area in biological research. The main obstacle in this area is the absence of the full-length crystal structure for HIV-1 integrase to be used as a model. A complete structure, similar to HIV-1 of a prototype foamy virus integrase in complex with DNA, including all conservative residues, is available and has been extensively used in recent investigations. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine whether the above model is precisely representative of HIV-1 integrase. This would critically determine the success of any designed drug using the model in deactivation of integrase and AIDS treatment. Materials and Methods Primarily, a new structure for HIV-1 was constructed, using a crystal structure of prototype foamy virus as the starting structure. The constructed structure of HIV-1 integrase was simultaneously simulated with a prototype foamy virus integrase on a separate occasion. Results Our results indicate that the HIV-1 system behaves differently from the prototype foamy virus in terms of folding, hydration, hydrophobicity of binding site and stability. Conclusions Based on our findings, we can conclude that HIV-1 integrase is vastly different from the prototype foamy virus integrase and does not resemble it, and the modeling output of the prototype foamy virus simulations could not be simply generalized to HIV-1 integrase. Therefore, our HIV-1 model seems to be more representative and more useful for future research. PMID:27540450

  1. Modeling Signal Propagation Mechanisms and Ligand-Based Conformational Dynamics of the Hsp90 Molecular Chaperone Full-Length Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Morra, Giulia; Verkhivker, Gennady; Colombo, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone essential for protein folding and activation in normal homeostasis and stress response. ATP binding and hydrolysis facilitate Hsp90 conformational changes required for client activation. Hsp90 plays an important role in disease states, particularly in cancer, where chaperoning of the mutated and overexpressed oncoproteins is important for function. Recent studies have illuminated mechanisms related to the chaperone function. However, an atomic resolution view of Hsp90 conformational dynamics, determined by the presence of different binding partners, is critical to define communication pathways between remote residues in different domains intimately affecting the chaperone cycle. Here, we present a computational analysis of signal propagation and long-range communication pathways in Hsp90. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the full-length Hsp90 dimer, combined with essential dynamics, correlation analysis, and a signal propagation model. All-atom MD simulations with timescales of 70 ns have been performed for complexes with the natural substrates ATP and ADP and for the unliganded dimer. We elucidate the mechanisms of signal propagation and determine “hot spots” involved in interdomain communication pathways from the nucleotide-binding site to the C-terminal domain interface. A comprehensive computational analysis of the Hsp90 communication pathways and dynamics at atomic resolution has revealed the role of the nucleotide in effecting conformational changes, elucidating the mechanisms of signal propagation. Functionally important residues and secondary structure elements emerge as effective mediators of communication between the nucleotide-binding site and the C-terminal interface. Furthermore, we show that specific interdomain signal propagation pathways may be activated as a function of the ligand. Our results support a “conformational selection model” of the Hsp90 mechanism, whereby the protein may exist in a

  2. Construction and characterization of a full-length infectious simian T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 molecular clone.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Sébastien Alain; Walic, Marine; Calattini, Sara; Mallet, Adeline; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Gessain, Antoine; Mahieux, Renaud

    2007-06-01

    Together with their simian T-cell lymphotropic virus (STLV) equivalent, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), HTLV-2, and HTLV-3 form the primate T-cell lymphotropic virus (PTLV) group. Over the years, understanding the biology and pathogenesis of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 has been widely improved by the creation of molecular clones. In contrast, so far, PTLV-3 experimental studies have been restricted to the overexpression of the tax gene using reporter assays. We have therefore decided to construct an STLV-3 molecular clone. We generated a full-length STLV-3 proviral clone (8,891 bp) by PCR amplification of overlapping fragments. This STLV-3 molecular clone was then transfected into 293T cells. Reverse transcriptase PCR experiments followed by sequence analysis of the amplified products allowed us to establish that both gag and tax/rex mRNAs were transcribed. Western blotting further demonstrated the presence of the STLV-3 p24gag protein in the cell culture supernatant from transfected cells. Transient transfection of 293T cells and of 293T-long terminal repeat-green fluorescent protein cells with the STLV-3 clone promoted syncytium formation, a hallmark of PTLV Env expression, as well as the appearance of fluorescent cells, also demonstrating that the Tax3 protein was expressed. Virus particles were visible by electron microscopy. These particles are infectious, as demonstrated by our cell-free-infection experiments with purified virions. All together, our data demonstrate that the STLV-3 molecular clone is functional and infectious. This clone will give us a unique opportunity to study in vitro the different pX transcripts and the putative presence of antisense transcripts and to evaluate the PTLV-3 pathogenicity in vivo. PMID:17428869

  3. Evolution and Phylogenetic Analysis of Full-Length VP3 Genes of Eastern Mediterranean Bluetongue Virus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Nomikou, Kyriaki; Dovas, Chrysostomos Ι.; Maan, Sushila; Anthony, Simon J.; Samuel, Alan R.; Papanastassopoulou, Maria; Maan, Narender S.; Mangana, Olga; Mertens, Peter P. C.

    2009-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the ‘type’ species of the genus Orbivirus within the family Reoviridae. The BTV genome is composed of ten linear segments of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), each of which codes for one of ten distinct viral proteins. Previous phylogenetic comparisons have evaluated variations in genome segment 3 (Seg-3) nucleotide sequence as way to identify the geographical origin (different topotypes) of BTV isolates. The full-length nucleotide sequence of genome Seg-3 was determined for thirty BTV isolates recovered in the eastern Mediterranean region, the Balkans and other geographic areas (Spain, India, Malaysia and Africa). These data were compared, based on molecular variability, positive-selection-analysis and maximum-likelihood phylogenetic reconstructions (using appropriate substitution models) to 24 previously published sequences, revealing their evolutionary relationships. These analyses indicate that negative selection is a major force in the evolution of BTV, restricting nucleotide variability, reducing the evolutionary rate of Seg-3 and potentially of other regions of the BTV genome. Phylogenetic analysis of the BTV-4 strains isolated over a relatively long time interval (1979–2000), in a single geographic area (Greece), showed a low level of nucleotide diversity, indicating that the virus can circulate almost unchanged for many years. These analyses also show that the recent incursions into south-eastern Europe were caused by BTV strains belonging to two different major-lineages: representing an ‘eastern’ (BTV-9, -16 and -1) and a ‘western’ (BTV-4) group/topotype. Epidemiological and phylogenetic analyses indicate that these viruses originated from a geographic area to the east and southeast of Greece (including Cyprus and the Middle East), which appears to represent an important ecological niche for the virus that is likely to represent a continuing source of future BTV incursions into Europe. PMID:19649272

  4. Three-Dimensional Structures of Full-Length, Membrane-Embedded Human α(IIb)β(3) Integrin Complexes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Ping; Kim, Eldar; Swift, Mark; Smith, Jeffrey W; Volkmann, Niels; Hanein, Dorit

    2016-02-23

    Integrins are bidirectional, allosteric transmembrane receptors that play a central role in hemostasis and arterial thrombosis. Using cryo-electron microscopy, multireference single-particle reconstruction methods, and statistics-based computational fitting approaches, we determined three-dimensional structures of human integrin αIIbβ3 embedded in a lipid bilayer (nanodiscs) while bound to domains of the cytosolic regulator talin and to extracellular ligands. We also determined the conformations of integrin in solution by itself to localize the membrane and the talin-binding site. To our knowledge, our data provide unprecedented three-dimensional information about the conformational states of intact, full-length integrin within membrane bilayers under near-physiological conditions and in the presence of cytosolic activators and extracellular ligands. We show that αIIbβ3 integrins exist in a conformational equilibrium clustered around four main states. These conformations range from a compact bent nodule to two partially extended intermediate conformers and finally to a fully upright state. In the presence of nanodiscs and the two ligands, the equilibrium is significantly shifted toward the upright conformation. In this conformation, the receptor extends ∼20 nm upward from the membrane. There are no observable contacts between the two subunits other than those in the headpiece near the ligand-binding pocket, and the α- and β-subunits are well separated with their cytoplasmic tails ∼8 nm apart. Our results indicate that extension of the ectodomain is possible without separating the legs or extending the hybrid domain, and that the ligand-binding pocket is not occluded by the membrane in any conformations of the equilibrium. Further, they suggest that integrin activation may be influenced by equilibrium shifts. PMID:26910421

  5. Fate of prions in soil: trapped conformation of full-length ovine prion protein induced by adsorption on clays.

    PubMed

    Revault, M; Quiquampoix, H; Baron, M H; Noinville, S

    2005-08-01

    Studying the mechanism of retention of ovine prion protein in soils will tackle the environmental aspect of potential dissemination of scrapie infectious agent. We consider the surface-induced conformational changes that the recombinant ovine prion protein (ovPrP) may undergo under different pH conditions when interacting with soil minerals of highly adsorptive capacities such as montmorillonite. The conformational states of the full-length ovine prion protein adsorbed on the electronegative clay surface are compared to its solvated state in deuterated buffer in the pD range 3.5-9, using FTIR spectroscopy. The in vitro pH-induced conversion of the alpha-helical monomer of ovPrP into oligomers of beta-like structure prone to self-aggregation does not occur when the protein is adsorbed on the clay surface. The conformation of the trapped ovPrP molecules on montmorillonite is pH-independent and looks like that of the ovPrP solvated state at pD higher than 7, suggesting the major role of Arg and Lys residues in the electrostatic origin of adsorption. The uneven distribution of positively and negatively charged residues of the ovPrP protein would promote a favored orientation of the protein towards the clay, so that not only the basic residues embedded in the N-terminal flexible part but also external basic residues in the globular part of the protein might participate to the attractive interaction. From these results, it appears unlikely that the interaction of normal prions (PrP(C)) with soil clay surfaces could induce a change of conformation leading to the pathogenic form of prions (PrP(Sc)). PMID:15950385

  6. Full-length spleen tyrosine kinase inhibits the invasion and metastasis of human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhihai; Cai, Zhiyi; Tao, Baohong; Jin, Qiaozhi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate correlation between full-length spleen tyrosine kinase [SYK (L)] expression and clinical characteristics of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC), and explore effects of SYK (L) on invasion and metastasis of LSCC. Methods: The human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells with low SYK (L) expression were transfected with pIRES2-EGFP-SYK (L) vector and empty vector pIRES2-EGFP to generate Hep-2-SYK (L) cells and Hep-2-neo cells. The cell invasion and migration abilities were determined. Results: The SYK (L) positive expression rate in LSCC tissues was significantly lower than in vocal cord dysplasia tissues and normal laryngeal tissues (P < 0.05). There was a significant correlation between SYK (L) expression and LSCC T stage, histopathological grade and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05). mRNA expression of SYK (L) in Hep-2-SYK (L) cells was significantly higher than in Hep-2-neo cells and Hep-2 cells (P < 0.01). The protein expression of SYK (L) in Hep-2-SYK (L) cells was markedly higher than in Hep-2-neo cells and Hep-2 cells (P < 0.01). The number of invasive cells was significantly lower in Hep-2-SYK (L) group than in Hep-2-neo group and Hep-2 group (P < 0.01). The average number of migrating cells in Hep-2-SYK (L) group also markedly reduced as compared to Hep-2-neo group and Hep-2 group (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The SYK (L) expression was down-regulated in LSCC, which was closely correlated with cancer growth and lymph node metastasis. SYK (L) up-regulation was able to inhibit the invasion and metastasis of LSCC, therefore suppressing tumor development. Thus, SYK (L) may be a potential target for the LSCC treatment. PMID:26884848

  7. Computational Study on Full-length Human Ku70 with Double Stranded DNA: Dynamics, Interactions and Functional Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    The Ku70/80 heterodimer is the first repair protein in the initial binding of double-strand break (DSB) ends following DNA damage, and is a component of nonhomologous end joining repair, the primary pathway for DSB repair in mammalian cells. In this study we constructed a full-length human Ku70 structure based on its crystal structure, and performed 20 ns conventional molecular dynamic (CMD) simulations on this protein and several other complexes with short DNA duplexes of different sequences. The trajectories of these simulations indicated that, without the topological support of Ku80, the residues in the bridge and C-terminal arm of Ku70 are more flexible than other experimentally identified domains. We studied the two missing loops in the crystal structure and predicted that they are also very flexible. Simulations revealed that they make an important contribution to the Ku70 interaction with DNA. Dislocation of the previously studied SAP domain was observed in several systems, implying its role in DNA binding. Targeted molecular dynamic (TMD) simulation was also performed for one system with a far-away 14bp DNA duplex. The TMD trajectory and energetic analysis disclosed detailed interactions of the DNA-binding residues during the DNA dislocation, and revealed a possible conformational transition for a DSB end when encountering Ku70 in solution. Compared to experimentally based analysis, this study identified more detailed interactions between DNA and Ku70. Free energy analysis indicated Ku70 alone is able to bind DNA with relatively high affinity, with consistent contributions from various domains of Ku70 in different systems. The functional implications of these domains in the processes of Ku heterodimerization and DNA damage recognition and repair can be characterized in detail based upon this analysis.

  8. Prognostic significance of full-length estrogen receptor beta expression in stage I-III triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shanle, Erin K; Onitilo, Adedayo A; Huang, Wei; Kim, KyungMann; Zang, Chong; Engel, Jessica M; Xu, Wei; Wisinski, Kari B

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive breast cancer subtype for which there is a need to identify new therapeutic targets. Full-length estrogen receptor beta (ERβ1) may be a possible target given its antiproliferative effects on breast cancer cells. The prognostic significance of ERβ in breast cancer subtypes has remained elusive, and disparate results observed across previously published reports might be due to the detection of multiple ERβ isoforms, the lack of specific antibodies and the use of different cutoffs to define ERβpositivity. The objective of this retrospective study was to determine the association between ERβ1 expression and disease-free and overall survival, as well as Ki67 expression, in non-metastatic TNBC. Immunohistochemical protocols were optimized using xenograft tissues obtained from a breast cancer cell line with inducible ERβ1 expression. ERβ1 localization and expression were assessed in two cohorts of TNBC using the VECTRATM platform. There was a close relationship between nuclear and cytoplasmic ERβ1 expression. ERβ1 was expressed in a subset of TNBCs, but its expression was significantly associated with Ki67 in only one of the cohorts. There was no significant association between ERβ1 expression and disease-free and overall survival in either cohort. Although these results suggest that ERβ1 expression alone may not be informative in TNBCs, this study provides a new strategy for optimizing and objectively measuring ERβ1 expression in tissues, which may provide a standard for ERβ1 immunohistochemistry in future large-scale clinical studies aimed at better understanding the role of ERβ1 in breast cancer. PMID:26328009

  9. Potency of Full- Length MGF to Induce Maximal Activation of the IGF-I R Is Similar to Recombinant Human IGF-I at High Equimolar Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Joseph A. M. J. L.; Hofland, Leo J.; Strasburger, Christian J.; van den Dungen, Elisabeth S. R.; Thevis, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Aims To compare full-length mechano growth factor (full-length MGF) with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and human recombinant insulin (HI) in their ability to activate the human IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), the human insulin receptor (IR-A) and the human insulin receptor-B (IR-B), respectively. In addition, we tested the stimulatory activity of human MGF and its stabilized analog Goldspink-MGF on the IGF-IR. Methods The effects of full-length MGF, IGF-I, human mechano growth factor (MGF), Goldspink-MGF and HI were compared using kinase specific receptor activation (KIRA) bioassays specific for IGF-I, IR-A or IR-B, respectively. These assays quantify activity by measuring auto-phosphorylation of the receptor upon ligand binding. Results IGF-IR: At high equimolar concentrations maximal IGF-IR stimulating effects generated by full-length MGF were similar to that of IGF-I (89-fold vs. 77-fold, respectively). However, EC50 values of IGF-I and full-length MGF for the IGF-I receptor were 0.86 nmol/L (95% CI 0.69–1.07) and 7.83 nmol/L (95% CI: 4.87–12.58), respectively. No IGF-IR activation was observed by human MGF and Goldspink-MGF, respectively. IR-A/IR-B: At high equimolar concentrations similar maximal IR-A stimulating effects were observed for full -length MGF and HI, but maximal IR-B stimulation achieved by full -length MGF was stronger than that by HI (292-fold vs. 98-fold). EC50 values of HI and full-length MGF for the IR-A were 1.13 nmol/L (95% CI 0.69–1.84) and 73.11 nmol/L (42.87–124.69), respectively; for IR-B these values were 1.28 nmol/L (95% CI 0.64–2.57) and 35.10 nmol/L (95% 17.52–70.33), respectively. Conclusions Full-length MGF directly stimulates the IGF-IR. Despite a higher EC50 concentration, at high equimolar concentrations full-length MGF showed a similar maximal potency to activate the IGF-IR as compared to IGF-I. Further research is needed to understand the actions of full-length MGF in vivo and to define the

  10. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Deymier, Martin J.; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Ende, Zachary; Ratner, Hannah K.; Kilembe, William; Hunter, Eric

    2014-11-15

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual's diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that can be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens. - Highlights: • Our novel methodology demonstrates accurate amplification and cloning of full-length HIV-1 genomes. • A majority of plasma derived HIV variants from a chronically infected individual are infectious. • The transmitted/founder was more infectious than the majority of the variants from the chronically infected donor.

  11. Full-length coding sequence for 12 bovine viral diarrhea virus isolates from persistently infected cattle in a feedyard in Kansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report here the full-length coding sequence of 12 bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolates from persistently infected cattle from a feedyard in southwest Kansas, USA. These 12 genomes represent the three major genotypes (BVDV 1a, 1b, and 2a) of BVDV currently circulating in the United States....

  12. Solution behavior of the intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain of the Retinoid X Receptor alpha in the context of full-length protein

    PubMed Central

    Peluso-Iltis, Carole; Kieffer, Bruno; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Rochel, Natacha

    2016-01-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are transcription factors with important functions in embryonic development, metabolic processes, differentiation and apoptosis. A particular feature of RXRs is their ability to act as obligatory heterodimerisation partners of class II nuclear receptors. At the same time, these receptors are also able to form homodimers that bind to direct repeat (DR1) hormone response elements. Since the discovery of RXRs, most of the studies focused on its ligand binding and DNA-binding domains, while its N-terminal domain (NTD) harboring a ligand-independent activation function remained poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the solution properties of the NTD domain of RXRα alone and in the context of the full-length receptor using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We report the solution structure of the full-length homodimeric RXRα on DNA and show that the NTD remains highly flexible within this complex. PMID:26937780

  13. Solution Behavior of the Intrinsically Disordered N-Terminal Domain of Retinoid X Receptor α in the Context of the Full-Length Protein.

    PubMed

    Belorusova, Anna Y; Osz, Judit; Petoukhov, Maxim V; Peluso-Iltis, Carole; Kieffer, Bruno; Svergun, Dmitri I; Rochel, Natacha

    2016-03-29

    Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are transcription factors with important functions in embryonic development, metabolic processes, differentiation, and apoptosis. A particular feature of RXRs is their ability to act as obligatory heterodimerization partners of class II nuclear receptors. At the same time, these receptors are also able to form homodimers that bind to direct repeat separated by one nucleotide hormone response elements. Since the discovery of RXRs, most of the studies focused on its ligand binding and DNA binding domains, while its N-terminal domain (NTD) harboring a ligand-independent activation function remained poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the solution properties of the NTD of RXRα alone and in the context of the full-length receptor using small-angle X-ray scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We report the solution structure of the full-length homodimeric RXRα on DNA and show that the NTD remains highly flexible within this complex. PMID:26937780

  14. Do additional full-length radiographs of the humerus and forearm improve the decision making in children with supracondylar humerus fractures?

    PubMed

    Bloom, Tamir; Seigerman, Daniel A; Zhao, Caixia; Sabharwal, Sanjeev

    2016-09-01

    We sought to determine the diagnostic utility of additional full-length radiographs of the forearm and humerus for pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures. A pediatric orthopedic surgeon and a senior orthopedic resident individually reviewed the initial humerus, forearm, and elbow radiographs of 55 children with a supracondylar humerus fracture and recommended definitive treatment (operative vs. nonoperative) on the basis of the modified Gartland classification. Interobserver agreements for classification and the recommended treatment were highest for the elbow radiographs (weighted κ=0.92). All disagreements in the recommended treatment were in fractures classified as Gartland type I versus II fractures. Although two children (4%) had an ipsilateral distal forearm fracture, selective versus routine use of additional full-length radiographs in children with a supracondylar humerus fracture needs to be evaluated further. PMID:27258360

  15. A polymerase chain reaction method for the amplification of full-length envelope genes of HIV-1 from DNA samples containing single molecules of HIV-1 provirus.

    PubMed

    McClure, P; Curran, R; Boneham, S; Ball, J K

    2000-07-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of full-length envelope genes from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) directly from uncultured clinical samples is difficult. This paper describes a comparative assessment of the performance of three thermostable polymerases in an HIV-1 full-length envelope gene PCR. The PCR method utilising Expand HiFi polymerase was successful when using DNA samples extracted from a variety of sources including blood, semen and various tissues. This method generated high and specific yields of product from samples containing as little as one copy of HIV-1 proviral DNA. The resulting PCR products were suitable for a variety of downstream analytical methods including DNA sequence analysis. PMID:10921844

  16. Structural characterization of the full-length response regulator spr1814 in complex with a phosphate analogue reveals a novel conformational plasticity of the linker region.

    PubMed

    Park, Ae Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hye; Chi, Young Min; Park, Hyun

    2016-04-29

    Spr1814 of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a response regulator (RR) that belongs to the NarL/FixJ subfamily and has a four-helix helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of the full-length spr1814 in complex with a phosphate analogue beryllium fluoride (BeF3(-)) was determined at 2.0 Å. This allows for a structural comparison with the previously reported full-length unphosphorylated spr1814. The phosphorylation of conserved aspartic acid residue of N-terminal receiver domain triggers a structural perturbation at the α4-β5-α5 interface, leading to the domain reorganization of spr1814, and this is achieved by a rotational change in the C-terminal DNA-binding domain. PMID:27038544

  17. ADAMTS13 and 15 are not regulated by the full length and N-terminal domain forms of TIMP-1, -2, -3 and -4

    PubMed Central

    GUO, CENQI; TSIGKOU, ANASTASIA; LEE, MENG HUEE

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) 13 and 15 are secreted zinc proteinases involved in the turnover of von Willebrand factor and cancer suppression. In the present study, ADAMTS13 and 15 were subjected to inhibition studies with the full-length and N-terminal domain forms of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs)-1 to −4. TIMPs have no ability to inhibit the ADAMTS proteinases in the full-length or N-terminal domain form. While ADAMTS13 is also not sensitive to the hydroxamate inhibitors, batimastat and ilomastat, ADAMTS15 can be effectively inhibited by batimastat (Kiapp 299 nM). In conclusion, the present results indicate that TIMPs are not the regulators of these two ADAMTS proteinases. PMID:26870338

  18. Investigating microbial eukaryotic diversity from a global census: insights from a comparison of pyrotag and full-length sequences of 18S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Lie, Alle A Y; Liu, Zhenfeng; Hu, Sarah K; Jones, Adriane C; Kim, Diane Y; Countway, Peter D; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Cary, S Craig; Sherr, Evelyn B; Sherr, Barry F; Gast, Rebecca J; Caron, David A

    2014-07-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) approaches are rapidly surpassing Sanger sequencing for characterizing the diversity of natural microbial communities. Despite this rapid transition, few comparisons exist between Sanger sequences and the generally much shorter reads of NGS. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) derived from full-length (Sanger sequencing) and pyrotag (454 sequencing of the V9 hypervariable region) sequences of 18S rRNA genes from 10 global samples were analyzed in order to compare the resulting protistan community structures and species richness. Pyrotag OTUs called at 98% sequence similarity yielded numbers of OTUs that were similar overall to those for full-length sequences when the latter were called at 97% similarity. Singleton OTUs strongly influenced estimates of species richness but not the higher-level taxonomic composition of the community. The pyrotag and full-length sequence data sets had slightly different taxonomic compositions of rhizarians, stramenopiles, cryptophytes, and haptophytes, but the two data sets had similarly high compositions of alveolates. Pyrotag-based OTUs were often derived from sequences that mapped to multiple full-length OTUs at 100% similarity. Thus, pyrotags sequenced from a single hypervariable region might not be appropriate for establishing protistan species-level OTUs. However, nonmetric multidimensional scaling plots constructed with the two data sets yielded similar clusters, indicating that beta diversity analysis results were similar for the Sanger and NGS sequences. Short pyrotag sequences can provide holistic assessments of protistan communities, although care must be taken in interpreting the results. The longer reads (>500 bp) that are now becoming available through NGS should provide powerful tools for assessing the diversity of microbial eukaryotic assemblages. PMID:24814788

  19. PCR-based isolation and identification of full-length low-molecular-weight glutenin subunit genes in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Liu, Dongcheng; Jiang, Wei; Guo, Xiaoli; Yang, Wenlong; Sun, Jiazhu; Ling, Hongqing; Zhang, Aimin

    2011-12-01

    Low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GSs) are encoded by a multi-gene family and are essential for determining the quality of wheat flour products, such as bread and noodles. However, the exact role or contribution of individual LMW-GS genes to wheat quality remains unclear. This is, at least in part, due to the difficulty in characterizing complete sequences of all LMW-GS gene family members in bread wheat. To identify full-length LMW-GS genes, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method was established, consisting of newly designed conserved primers and the previously developed LMW-GS gene molecular marker system. Using the PCR-based method, 17 LMW-GS genes were identified and characterized in Xiaoyan 54, of which 12 contained full-length sequences. Sequence alignments showed that 13 LMW-GS genes were identical to those found in Xiaoyan 54 using the genomic DNA library screening, and the other four full-length LMW-GS genes were first isolated from Xiaoyan 54. In Chinese Spring, 16 unique LMW-GS genes were isolated, and 13 of them contained full-length coding sequences. Additionally, 16 and 17 LMW-GS genes in Dongnong 101 and Lvhan 328 (chosen from the micro-core collections of Chinese germplasm), respectively, were also identified. Sequence alignments revealed that at least 15 LMW-GS genes were common in the four wheat varieties, and allelic variants of each gene shared high sequence identities (>95%) but exhibited length polymorphism in repetitive regions. This study provides a PCR-based method for efficiently identifying LMW-GS genes in bread wheat, which will improve the characterization of complex members of the LMW-GS gene family and facilitate the understanding of their contributions to wheat quality. PMID:21830110

  20. Structure of the full-length insecticidal protein Cry1Ac reveals intriguing details of toxin packaging into in vivo formed crystals

    PubMed Central

    Evdokimov, Artem G; Moshiri, Farhad; Sturman, Eric J; Rydel, Timothy J; Zheng, Meiying; Seale, Jeffrey W; Franklin, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    For almost half a century, the structure of the full-length Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal protein Cry1Ac has eluded researchers, since Bt-derived crystals were first characterized in 1965. Having finally solved this structure we report intriguing details of the lattice-based interactions between the toxic core of the protein and the protoxin domains. The structure provides concrete evidence for the function of the protoxin as an enhancer of native crystal packing and stability. PMID:25139047

  1. EFFECTS OF PHOSPHORYLATION ON THE SELF-ASSEMBLY OF NATIVE FULL-LENGTH PORCINE AMELOGENIN AND ITS REGULATION OF CALCIUM PHOSPHATE FORMATION IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Wiedemann-Bidlack, Felicitas B.; Kwak, Seo-Young; Beniash, Elia; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Simmer, James P.; Margolis, Henry C.

    2010-01-01

    The self-assembly of the predominant extracellular enamel matrix protein amelogenin plays an essential role in regulating the growth and organization of enamel mineral during early stages of dental enamel formation. The present study describes the effect of the phosphorylation of a single site on the full-length native porcine amelogenin P173 on self-assembly and on the regulation of spontaneous calcium phosphate formation in vitro. Studies were also conducted using recombinant non-phosphorylated (rP172) porcine amelogenin, along with the most abundant amelogenin cleavage product (P148) and its recombinant form (rP147). Amelogenin self-assembly was assessed using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Using these approaches, we have shown that self-assembly of each amelogenin is very sensitive to pH and appears to be affected by both hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions. Furthermore, our results suggest that the phosphorylation of the full-length porcine amelogenin P173 has a small but potentially important effect on its higher-order self-assembly into chain-like structures under physiological conditions of pH, temperature, and ionic strength. Although phosphorylation has a subtle effect on the higher-order assembly of full-length amelogenin, native phosphorylated P173 was found to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate for extended periods of time, in sharp contrast to previous findings using non-phosphorylated rP172. The biological relevance of these findings is discussed. PMID:21074619

  2. Identification of HBsAg-specific antibodies from a mammalian cell displayed full-length human antibody library of healthy immunized donor.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-Zheng; Liang, Zhong-Kun; Chen, Zhen-Rui; Lou, Hai-Bo; Zhou, Ye; Zhang, Zhe-Huan; Yu, Fei; Liu, Shuwen; Zhou, Yuanping; Wu, Shuguang; Zheng, Wenling; Tan, Wanlong; Jiang, Shibo; Zhou, Chen

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) is important in the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Aiming to develop recombinant monoclonal antibodies as an alternative to HBIG, we report the successful identification of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-specific antibodies from a full-length human antibody library displayed on mammalian cell surface. Using total RNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a natively immunized donor as template, the antibody repertoire was amplified. Combining four-way ligation and the Flp recombinase-mediated integration (Flp-In) system, we constructed a mammalian cell-based, fully human, full-length antibody display library in which each cell displayed only one kind of antibody molecule. By screening the cell library using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), eight cell clones that displayed HBsAg-specific antibodies on cell surfaces were identified. DNA sequence analysis of the antibody genes revealed three unique antibodies. FACS data indicated that fluorescent strength of expression (FSE), fluorescent strength of binding (FSB) and relative binding ability (RBA) were all different among them. These results demonstrated that by using our antibody mammalian display and screening platform, we can successfully identify antigen-specific antibodies from an immunized full-length antibody library. Therefore, this platform is very useful for the development of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:22179672

  3. Structural snapshots of full-length Jak1, a transmembrane gp130/IL-6/IL-6Rα cytokine receptor complex, and the receptor-Jak1 holocomplex

    PubMed Central

    Lupardus, Patrick J.; Skiniotis, Georgios; Rice, Amanda J.; Thomas, Christoph; Fischer, Suzanne; Walz, Thomas; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Summary The shared cytokine receptor gp130 signals as a homodimer or heterodimer through activation of Janus kinases (Jaks) associated with the receptor intracellular domains. Here we reconstitute, in parts and whole, the full-length gp130 homodimer in complex with the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), its alpha receptor (IL-6Rα) and Jak1, for electron microscopy imaging. We find that the full-length gp130 homodimer complex has intimate interactions between the trans- and juxtamembrane segments of the two receptors, appearing to rigidify the connection between the extra- and intracellular regions. 2D averages and 3D reconstructions of full-length Jak1 reveal a three-lobed structure comprised of FERM-SH2, pseudokinase and kinase modules possessing extensive inter-segmental flexibility that likely facilitates allosteric activation. Single-particle imaging of the gp130/IL-6/IL-6Rα/Jak1 holocomplex shows Jak1 associated with the membrane proximal intracellular regions of gp130, abutting the would-be inner leaflet of the cell membrane. Jak1 association with gp130 is enhanced by the presence of a membrane environment. PMID:21220115

  4. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning

    PubMed Central

    Deymier, Martin J.; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Ende, Zachary; Ratner, Hannah K.; Kilembe, William; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual's diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that could be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens. PMID:25243334

  5. The full-length E1-circumflexE4 protein of human papillomavirus type 18 modulates differentiation-dependent viral DNA amplification and late gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Regina; Ryan, Gordon B.; Knight, Gillian L.; Laimins, Laimonis A.; Roberts, Sally . E-mail: s.roberts@bham.ac.uk

    2007-06-05

    Activation of the productive phase of the human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle in differentiated keratinocytes is coincident with high-level expression of E1-circumflexE4 protein. To determine the role of E1-circumflexE4 in the HPV replication cycle, we constructed HPV18 mutant genomes in which expression of the full-length E1-circumflexE4 protein was abrogated. Undifferentiated keratinocytes containing mutant genomes showed enhanced proliferation when compared to cells containing wildtype genomes, but there were no differences in maintenance of viral episomes. Following differentiation, cells with mutant genomes exhibited reduced levels of viral DNA amplification and late gene expression, compared to wildtype genome-containing cells. This indicates that HPV18 E1-circumflexE4 plays an important role in regulating HPV late functions, and it may also function in the early phase of the replication cycle. Our finding that full-length HPV18 E1-circumflexE4 protein plays a significant role in promoting viral genome amplification concurs with a similar report with HPV31, but is in contrast to an HPV11 study where viral DNA amplification was not dependent on full-length E1-circumflexE4 expression, and to HPV16 where only C-terminal truncations in E1-circumflexE4 abrogated vegetative genome replication. This suggests that type-specific differences exist between various E1-circumflexE4 proteins.

  6. Construction of infectious cDNA clone derived from a classical swine fever virus field isolate in BAC vector using in vitro overlap extension PCR and recombination.

    PubMed

    Kamboj, Aman; Saini, Mohini; Rajan, Lekshmi S; Patel, Chhabi Lal; Chaturvedi, V K; Gupta, Praveen K

    2015-12-15

    To develop reverse genetics system of RNA viruses, cloning of full-length viral genome is required which is often challenging due to many steps involved. In this study, we report cloning of full-length cDNA from an Indian field isolate (CSFV/IVRI/VB-131) of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) using in vitro overlap extension PCR and recombination which drastically reduced the number of cloning steps. The genome of CSFV was amplified in six overlapping cDNA fragments, linked by overlap extension PCR and cloned in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector using in vitro recombination method to generate full-length cDNA clone. The full-length CSFV cDNA clone was found stable in E. coli Stellar and DH10B cells. The full-length RNA was transcribed in vitro using T7 RNA polymerase and transfected in PK15 cells using Neon-tip electroporator to rescue infectious CSFV. The progeny CSFV was propagated in PK15 cells and found indistinguishable from the parent virus. The expression of CSFV proteins were detected in cytoplasm of PK15 cells infected with progeny CSFV at 72 h post-infection. We concluded that the in vitro overlap extension PCR and recombination method is useful to construct stable full-length cDNA clone of RNA virus in BAC vector. PMID:26478540

  7. Qualitative De Novo Analysis of Full Length cDNA and Quantitative Analysis of Gene Expression for Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) Transcriptomes Using Parallel Long-Read Technology and Short-Read Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Inoue, Takashi; Murayama, Norie; Onodera, Jun; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a non-human primate that could prove useful as human pharmacokinetic and biomedical research models. The cytochromes P450 (P450s) are a superfamily of enzymes that have critical roles in drug metabolism and disposition via monooxygenation of a broad range of xenobiotics; however, information on some marmoset P450s is currently limited. Therefore, identification and quantitative analysis of tissue-specific mRNA transcripts, including those of P450s and flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMO, another monooxygenase family), need to be carried out in detail before the marmoset can be used as an animal model in drug development. De novo assembly and expression analysis of marmoset transcripts were conducted with pooled liver, intestine, kidney, and brain samples from three male and three female marmosets. After unique sequences were automatically aligned by assembling software, the mean contig length was 718 bp (with a standard deviation of 457 bp) among a total of 47,883 transcripts. Approximately 30% of the total transcripts were matched to known marmoset sequences. Gene expression in 18 marmoset P450- and 4 FMO-like genes displayed some tissue-specific patterns. Of these, the three most highly expressed in marmoset liver were P450 2D-, 2E-, and 3A-like genes. In extrahepatic tissues, including brain, gene expressions of these monooxygenases were lower than those in liver, although P450 3A4 (previously P450 3A21) in intestine and P450 4A11- and FMO1-like genes in kidney were relatively highly expressed. By means of massive parallel long-read sequencing and short-read technology applied to marmoset liver, intestine, kidney, and brain, the combined next-generation sequencing analyses reported here were able to identify novel marmoset drug-metabolizing P450 transcripts that have until now been little reported. These results provide a foundation for mechanistic studies and pave the way for the use of marmosets as model animals for drug development in the future. PMID:24977701

  8. New Primers Targeting Full-Length Ciliate 18S rRNA Genes and Evaluation of Dietary Effect on Rumen Ciliate Diversity in Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Shengguo; Zhang, Yangdong; Sun, Peng; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the full-length 18S rRNA gene sequences of rumen ciliates is more reliable for taxonomical classification and diversity assessment than the analysis of partial hypervariable regions only. The objective of this study was to develop new oligonucleotide primers targeting the full-length 18S rRNA genes of rumen ciliates, and to evaluate the effect of different sources of dietary fiber (corn stover or a mixture of alfalfa hay and corn silage) and protein (mixed rapeseed, cottonseed, and/or soybean meals) on rumen ciliate diversity in dairy cows. Primers were designed based on a total of 137 previously reported ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequences. The 3'-terminal sequences of the newly designed primers, P.1747r_2, P.324f, and P.1651r, demonstrated >99% base coverage. Primer pair D (P.324f and P.1747r_2) was selected for the cloning and sequencing of ciliate 18S rRNA genes because it produced a 1423-bp amplicon, and did not amply the sequences of other eukaryotic species, such as yeast. The optimal species-level cutoff value for distinguishing between the operational taxonomic units of different ciliate species was 0.015. The phylogenetic analysis of full-length ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequences showed that distinct ciliate profiles were induced by the different sources of dietary fiber and protein. Dasytricha and Entodinium were the predominant genera in the ruminal fluid of dairy cattle, and Dasytricha was significantly more abundant in cows fed with corn stover than in cows fed with alfalfa hay and corn silage. PMID:26319789

  9. Gene VI of figwort mosaic virus (caulimovirus group) functions in posttranscriptional expression of genes on the full-length RNA transcript.

    PubMed

    Gowda, S; Wu, F C; Scholthof, H B; Shepherd, R J

    1989-12-01

    Experimental evidence for a molecular function for gene VI of the caulimoviruses is presented. Based on experiments with the figwort mosaic virus (FMV), it appears that gene VI has a role in the posttranscriptional expression of the closely packed genes (VII and I-V), which appear on the larger, full-length RNA transcript of this virus. Gene VI with its flanking 5'/3' expression signals included as a separate plasmid during electroporation of DNA into protoplasts of Nicotiana edwardsonii shows an unusual type of transactivation of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene fused at its 5' end to a small open reading frame (gene VII) of the long 5' leader of the full-length RNA transcript of the FMV genome. The level of activity of the CAT gene is increased up to 20-fold over the activity of control plasmids when gene VI is included in the electroporation mixture. Mutagenesis of the coding portions of gene VI of pGS1 RVI, a transactivating plasmid used in the electroporation experiments, demonstrated that it was probably the polypeptide product of gene VI that was responsible for the transactivating effect. Experiments with various portions of the 5' leader of the large, full-length RNA of FMV showed that the coding region of gene VII is necessary for the transactivation event. Clones of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) or FMV with intact gene VI were found to reciprocally transactivate gene VII-CAT fusions (FMV) or gene I-CAT fusions (CaMV) located downstream of the 5' leader sequences of either viral genome. PMID:2594762

  10. The C-Terminal Region Mesd Peptide Mimics Full-Length Mesd and Acts as an Inhibitor of Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cuihong; Lu, Wenyan; Zhang, Wei; Londoño-Joshi, Angelina I.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Bu, Guojun; Li, Yonghe

    2013-01-01

    While Mesd was discovered as a specialized molecular endoplasmic reticulum chaperone for the Wnt co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6, recombinant Mesd protein is able to bind to mature LRP5 and LRP6 on the cell surface and acts as a universal antagonist of LRP5/6 modulators. In our previous study, we found that the C-terminal region of Mesd, which is absent in sequences from invertebrates, is necessary and sufficient for binding to mature LRP6 on the cell surface. In the present studies, we further characterized the interaction between the C-terminal region Mesd peptide and LRP5/6. We found that Mesd C-terminal region-derived peptides block Mesd binding to LRP5 at the cell surface too. We also showed that there are two LRP5/6 binding sites within Mesd C-terminal region which contain several positively charged residues. Moreover, we demonstrated that the Mesd C-terminal region peptide, like the full-length Mesd protein, blocked Wnt 3A- and Rspodin1-induced Wnt/β-catenin signaling in LRP5- and LRP6- expressing cells, suppressed Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human breast HS578T cells and prostate cancer PC-3 cells, and inhibited cancer cell proliferation, although the full-length Mesd protein is more potent than its peptide. Finally, we found that treatment of the full-length Mesd protein and its C-terminal region peptide significantly increased chemotherapy agent Adriamycin-induced cytotoxicity in HS578T and PC-3 cells. Together, our results suggest that Mesd C-terminal region constitutes the major LRP5/6-binding domain, and that Mesd protein and its C-terminal region peptide have a potential therapeutic value in cancer. PMID:23469146

  11. Analysis of the full-length genome sequence of papaya lethal yellowing virus (PLYV), determined by deep sequencing, confirms its classification in the genus Sobemovirus.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Alvaro J; Alfenas-Zerbini, Poliane; Cascardo, Renan S; Andrade, Eduardo C; Murilo Zerbini, F

    2012-10-01

    Papaya lethal yellowing virus (PLYV) causes an economically important disease in papayas in northeastern Brazil. Based on biological and molecular properties, PLYV has been tentatively assigned to the genus Sobemovirus. We report the sequence of the full-length genome of a PLYV isolate from Brazil, determined by deep sequencing. The PLYV genome is 4,145 nt long and contains four ORFs, with an arrangement identical to that of sobemoviruses. The polyprotein and CP display significant sequence identity with the corresponding proteins of other sobemoviruses. Pairwise comparisons and phylogenetic analysis based on complete nucleotide sequences confirm the classification of PLYV in the genus Sobemovirus. PMID:22743825

  12. Recombinant production of functional full-length and truncated human TRAM/TICAM-2 adaptor protein involved in Toll-like receptor and interferon signaling.

    PubMed

    Ullah, M Obayed; Valkov, Eugene; Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon; Mas, Caroline; Mansell, Ashley; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-02-01

    TRAM/TICAM-2 is used by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) as a bridging adaptor during the mammalian innate immune response. It recruits TRIF, another TIR domain-containing adaptor protein, to TLR4 via TIR domain interactions, which leads to the activation of transcription factors responsible for the production of type-1 interferon and cytokines. The molecular mechanisms of these dual interactions mediated by the TRAM TIR domain are not clear. To understand the molecular basis of TIR:TIR domain interactions, structural and biochemical studies of TRAM TIR domain are necessary, and require a functional soluble protein. In this paper, we report a successful purification and characterization of full-length TRAM. Because full-length TRAM likely contains unstructured regions that may be disadvantageous for structural studies, we also carried out a systematic construct design to determine the boundaries of the TRAM TIR domain. The truncated TRAM constructs were designed based on secondary structure predictions and screened by small-scale expression. Selected constructs were subjected to biophysical analyses. We show that the expressed TRAM TIR domain is functional using in vitro GST pull-down assays that demonstrate a physical interaction with the TLR4 TIR domain. We further show, by site-directed mutagenesis, that the "BB loop" regions of both the TRAM TIR domain and the TLR4 TIR domain are crucial for this physical interaction. PMID:25306876

  13. Production of full-length soluble Plasmodium falciparum RH5 protein vaccine using a Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 stable cell line system.

    PubMed

    Hjerrild, Kathryn A; Jin, Jing; Wright, Katherine E; Brown, Rebecca E; Marshall, Jennifer M; Labbé, Geneviève M; Silk, Sarah E; Cherry, Catherine J; Clemmensen, Stine B; Jørgensen, Thomas; Illingworth, Joseph J; Alanine, Daniel G W; Milne, Kathryn H; Ashfield, Rebecca; de Jongh, Willem A; Douglas, Alexander D; Higgins, Matthew K; Draper, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 (PfRH5) has recently emerged as a leading candidate antigen against the blood-stage human malaria parasite. However it has proved challenging to identify a heterologous expression platform that can produce a soluble protein-based vaccine in a manner compliant with current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). Here we report the production of full-length PfRH5 protein using a cGMP-compliant platform called ExpreS(2), based on a Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) stable cell line system. Five sequence variants of PfRH5 were expressed that differed in terms of mutagenesis strategies to remove potential N-linked glycans. All variants bound the PfRH5 receptor basigin and were recognized by a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Analysis following immunization of rabbits identified quantitative and qualitative differences in terms of the functional IgG antibody response against the P. falciparum parasite. The antibodies induced by one protein variant were shown to be qualitatively similar to responses induced by other vaccine platforms. This work identifies Drosophila S2 cells as a clinically-relevant platform suited for the production of 'difficult-to-make' proteins from Plasmodium parasites, and identifies a PfRH5 sequence variant that can be used for clinical production of a non-glycosylated, soluble full-length protein vaccine immunogen. PMID:27457156

  14. First full-length genomic sequence of a hepatitis A virus isolated in Argentina shows recombination between subgenotypes IA and IB.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Sebastian; Malirat, Viviana; Scodeller, Eduardo; Mattion, Nora

    2011-01-01

    A hepatitis A virus (HAV) recovered in Argentina from a stool sample of a sick child in the year 2006 (HAV-Arg/06) was entirely sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis included the HAV-Arg/06 sequence in subgenotype IA, either considering the usual VP1-2A variable junction fragment or the full length nucleotide sequence. Interestingly, a recombination event with subgenotype IB, involving a portion of the 2C-3A nonstructural proteins coding region (nucleotides 4961-5140) was detected using specific software. Only subgenotype IA strains have been detected in Argentina or Uruguay, whereas subgenotype IA and IB strains have been reported to circulate in Brazil. Although recombination has been given an important role in the evolution of picornaviruses, there have been only a few reports of its involvement in the evolution of HAV, probably due to the limited number of complete HAV sequences available. This study constitutes the first report of a full-length HAV sequence in Argentina and the third in South America, after the sequence of the IA isolate HAV5 from Uruguay and the IB isolate HAF-203 from Brazil. The availability of new sequence data covering the complete HAV genome will help establish a more consistent genetic relatedness among HAV isolates and the role of recombination in its evolution. PMID:21056065

  15. Assessing the genetic diversity of Cu resistance in mine tailings through high-throughput recovery of full-length copA genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofang; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Shaban, Babak; Bruxner, Timothy J. C.; Bond, Philip L.; Huang, Longbin

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the genetic diversity of microbial copper (Cu) resistance at the community level remains challenging, mainly due to the polymorphism of the core functional gene copA. In this study, a local BLASTN method using a copA database built in this study was developed to recover full-length putative copA sequences from an assembled tailings metagenome; these sequences were then screened for potentially functioning CopA using conserved metal-binding motifs, inferred by evolutionary trace analysis of CopA sequences from known Cu resistant microorganisms. In total, 99 putative copA sequences were recovered from the tailings metagenome, out of which 70 were found with high potential to be functioning in Cu resistance. Phylogenetic analysis of selected copA sequences detected in the tailings metagenome showed that topology of the copA phylogeny is largely congruent with that of the 16S-based phylogeny of the tailings microbial community obtained in our previous study, indicating that the development of copA diversity in the tailings might be mainly through vertical descent with few lateral gene transfer events. The method established here can be used to explore copA (and potentially other metal resistance genes) diversity in any metagenome and has the potential to exhaust the full-length gene sequences for downstream analyses. PMID:26286020

  16. Architecture of a Full-length Retroviral Integrase Monomer and Dimer, Revealed by Small Angle X-ray Scattering and Chemical Cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    Bojja, Ravi S.; Andrake, Mark D.; Weigand, Steven; Merkel, George; Yarychkivska, Olya; Henderson, Adam; Kummerling, Marissa; Skalka, Anna Marie

    2012-02-07

    We determined the size and shape of full-length avian sarcoma virus (ASV) integrase (IN) monomers and dimers in solution using small angle x-ray scattering. The low resolution data obtained establish constraints for the relative arrangements of the three component domains in both forms. Domain organization within the small angle x-ray envelopes was determined by combining available atomic resolution data for individual domains with results from cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry. The full-length dimer architecture so revealed is unequivocally different from that proposed from x-ray crystallographic analyses of two-domain fragments, in which interactions between the catalytic core domains play a prominent role. Core-core interactions are detected only in cross-linked IN tetramers and are required for concerted integration. The solution dimer is stabilized by C-terminal domain (CTD-CTD) interactions and by interactions of the N-terminal domain in one subunit with the core and CTD in the second subunit. These results suggest a pathway for formation of functional IN-DNA complexes that has not previously been considered and possible strategies for preventing such assembly.

  17. Production of full-length soluble Plasmodium falciparum RH5 protein vaccine using a Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 stable cell line system

    PubMed Central

    Hjerrild, Kathryn A.; Jin, Jing; Wright, Katherine E.; Brown, Rebecca E.; Marshall, Jennifer M.; Labbé, Geneviève M.; Silk, Sarah E.; Cherry, Catherine J.; Clemmensen, Stine B.; Jørgensen, Thomas; Illingworth, Joseph J.; Alanine, Daniel G. W.; Milne, Kathryn H.; Ashfield, Rebecca; de Jongh, Willem A.; Douglas, Alexander D.; Higgins, Matthew K.; Draper, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 (PfRH5) has recently emerged as a leading candidate antigen against the blood-stage human malaria parasite. However it has proved challenging to identify a heterologous expression platform that can produce a soluble protein-based vaccine in a manner compliant with current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). Here we report the production of full-length PfRH5 protein using a cGMP-compliant platform called ExpreS2, based on a Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) stable cell line system. Five sequence variants of PfRH5 were expressed that differed in terms of mutagenesis strategies to remove potential N-linked glycans. All variants bound the PfRH5 receptor basigin and were recognized by a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Analysis following immunization of rabbits identified quantitative and qualitative differences in terms of the functional IgG antibody response against the P. falciparum parasite. The antibodies induced by one protein variant were shown to be qualitatively similar to responses induced by other vaccine platforms. This work identifies Drosophila S2 cells as a clinically-relevant platform suited for the production of ‘difficult-to-make’ proteins from Plasmodium parasites, and identifies a PfRH5 sequence variant that can be used for clinical production of a non-glycosylated, soluble full-length protein vaccine immunogen. PMID:27457156

  18. Calculation of Evolutionary Correlation between Individual Genes and Full-Length Genome: A Method Useful for Choosing Phylogenetic Markers for Molecular Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuai; Luo, Xuenong; Wei, Wei; Zheng, Yadong; Dou, Yongxi; Cai, Xuepeng

    2013-01-01

    Individual genes or regions are still commonly used to estimate the phylogenetic relationships among viral isolates. The genomic regions that can faithfully provide assessments consistent with those predicted with full-length genome sequences would be preferable to serve as good candidates of the phylogenetic markers for molecular epidemiological studies of many viruses. Here we employed a statistical method to evaluate the evolutionary relationships between individual viral genes and full-length genomes without tree construction as a way to determine which gene can match the genome well in phylogenetic analyses. This method was performed by calculation of linear correlations between the genetic distance matrices of aligned individual gene sequences and aligned genome sequences. We applied this method to the phylogenetic analyses of porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2), measles virus (MV), hepatitis E virus (HEV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Phylogenetic trees were constructed for comparisons and the possible factors affecting the method accuracy were also discussed in the calculations. The results revealed that this method could produce results consistent with those of previous studies about the proper consensus sequences that could be successfully used as phylogenetic markers. And our results also suggested that these evolutionary correlations could provide useful information for identifying genes that could be used effectively to infer the genetic relationships. PMID:24312527

  19. An ancestral host defence peptide within human β-defensin 3 recapitulates the antibacterial and antiviral activity of the full-length molecule

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Ersilia; Colavita, Irene; Sarnataro, Daniela; Scudiero, Olga; Zambrano, Gerardo; Granata, Vincenzo; Daniele, Aurora; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Galdiero, Stefania; Folliero, Veronica; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Urbanowicz, Richard A.; Ball, Jonathan K.; Salvatore, Francesco; Pessi, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are critical components of innate immunity. Despite their diversity, they share common features including a structural signature, designated “γ-core motif”. We reasoned that for each HDPs evolved from an ancestral γ-core, the latter should be the evolutionary starting point of the molecule, i.e. it should represent a structural scaffold for the modular construction of the full-length molecule, and possess biological properties. We explored the γ-core of human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) and found that it: (a) is the folding nucleus of HBD3; (b) folds rapidly and is stable in human serum; (c) displays antibacterial activity; (d) binds to CD98, which mediates HBD3 internalization in eukaryotic cells; (e) exerts antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus and herpes simplex virus; and (f) is not toxic to human cells. These results demonstrate that the γ-core within HBD3 is the ancestral core of the full-length molecule and is a viable HDP per se, since it is endowed with the most important biological features of HBD3. Notably, the small, stable scaffold of the HBD3 γ-core can be exploited to design disease-specific antimicrobial agents. PMID:26688341

  20. The full-length transcript of a caulimovirus is a polycistronic mRNA whose genes are trans activated by the product of gene VI.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, H B; Gowda, S; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1992-05-01

    Gene expression of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, was investigated by electroporation of Nicotiana edwardsonii cell suspension protoplasts with cloned viral constructs in which a reporter gene was inserted at various positions on the genome. The results showed that the genome of FMV contains two promoters; one is used for the production of a full-length RNA and another initiates synthesis of a separate monocistronic RNA for gene VI. Evidence is provided that the full-length transcript, the probable template for reverse transcription, can serve as a polycistronic mRNA for translation of genes I through V and perhaps also gene VI. Expression of all the genes on the polycistronic mRNA is trans activated by the gene VI protein. Reporter gene expression appears most efficient when its start codon is in close proximity to the stop codon of the preceding gene, as for the native genes of caulimoviruses. We propose that the gene VI product enables expression of the polycistronic mRNA by promoting reinitiation of ribosomes to give translational coupling of individual genes. PMID:1560539

  1. Different conformational dynamics of PDZ1 and PDZ2 in full-length EBP50 analyzed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Young; Duc, Nguyen Minh; Kim, Dong Kyun; Lee, Su Youn; Li, Sheng; Seo, Min-Duk; Woods, Virgil L; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-08-01

    Ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding protein 50 (EBP50) is a scaffolding protein expressed in polarized epithelial cells in various organs, including the liver, kidney, and small intestine, in which it regulates the trafficking and targeting cellular proteins. EBP50 contains two postsynaptic density-95/disk-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) domains (e.g., PDZ1 and PDZ2) and an ezrin/radixin/moesin-binding (EB) domain. PDZ domains are one of the major scaffolding domains regulating protein-protein interactions with critical biological roles in cell polarity, migration, proliferation, recognition, and cell-cell interaction. PDZ1 and PDZ2 in EBP50 have different ligand selectivity, although several high-resolution structural studies of isolated PDZ1 and PDZ2 showed similar structures. We studied the conformations of full-length EBP50 and isolated PDZ1 and PDZ2 using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). The deuterium uptake profiles of isolated PDZ1 and PDZ2 were similar to those of full-length EBP50. Interestingly, PDZ1 was more dynamic than PDZ2, and these PDZ domains underwent different conformational changes upon ligand binding. These results might explain the differences in ligand-selectivity between PDZ1 and PDZ2. PMID:25789870

  2. Directed Evolution of a Secretory Leader for the Improved Expression of Heterologous Proteins and Full-Length Antibodies in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rakestraw, J. Andy; Sazinsky, Stephen L.; Piatesi, Andrea; Antipov, Eugene; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2010-01-01

    Because of its eukaryotic nature, simple fermentation requirements, and pliable genetics, there have been many attempts at improving recombinant protein production in S. cerevisiae. These strategies typically involve altering the expression of a native protein thought to be involved in heterologous protein trafficking. Usually, these approaches yield three to ten-fold improvements over wild-type strains and are almost always specific to one type of protein. In this study, a library of mutant alpha mating factor 1 leader peptides (MFα1pp) is screened for the enhanced secretion of a single-chain antibody. One of the isolated mutants is shown to enhance the secretion of the scFv up to sixteen-fold over wild-type. These leaders also confer a secretory improvement to two other scFvs as well as two additional, structurally unrelated proteins. Moreover, the improved leader sequences, combined with strain engineering, allow for a one-hundred eighty fold improvement over previous reports in the secretion of full length, functional, glycosylated human IgG1. The production of full-length IgG1 at milligram per liter titers in a simple, laboratory-scale system will significantly expedite drug discovery and reagent synthesis while reducing antibody cloning, production, and characterization costs. PMID:19459139

  3. Differing Efficacies of Lead Group A Streptococcal Vaccine Candidates and Full-Length M Protein in Cutaneous and Invasive Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Hernandez, Tania; Pandey, Manisha; Henningham, Anna; Cole, Jason; Choudhury, Biswa; Cork, Amanda J.; Gillen, Christine M.; Ghaffar, Khairunnisa Abdul; West, Nicholas P.; Silvestri, Guido; Good, Michael F.; Moyle, Peter M.; Toth, Istvan; Nizet, Victor; Batzloff, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen responsible for both superficial infections and invasive diseases. Autoimmune sequelae may occur upon repeated infection. For this reason, development of a vaccine against GAS represents a major challenge, since certain GAS components may trigger autoimmunity. We formulated three combination vaccines containing the following: (i) streptolysin O (SLO), interleukin 8 (IL-8) protease (Streptococcus pyogenes cell envelope proteinase [SpyCEP]), group A streptococcal C5a peptidase (SCPA), arginine deiminase (ADI), and trigger factor (TF); (ii) the conserved M-protein-derived J8 peptide conjugated to ADI; and (iii) group A carbohydrate lacking the N-acetylglucosamine side chain conjugated to ADI. We compared these combination vaccines to a “gold standard” for immunogenicity, full-length M1 protein. Vaccines were adjuvanted with alum, and mice were immunized on days 0, 21, and 28. On day 42, mice were challenged via cutaneous or subcutaneous routes. High-titer antigen-specific antibody responses with bactericidal activity were detected in mouse serum samples for all vaccine candidates. In comparison with sham-immunized mice, all vaccines afforded protection against cutaneous challenge. However, only full-length M1 protein provided protection in the subcutaneous invasive disease model. PMID:27302756

  4. Assessing the genetic diversity of Cu resistance in mine tailings through high-throughput recovery of full-length copA genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofang; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Shaban, Babak; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Bond, Philip L; Huang, Longbin

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the genetic diversity of microbial copper (Cu) resistance at the community level remains challenging, mainly due to the polymorphism of the core functional gene copA. In this study, a local BLASTN method using a copA database built in this study was developed to recover full-length putative copA sequences from an assembled tailings metagenome; these sequences were then screened for potentially functioning CopA using conserved metal-binding motifs, inferred by evolutionary trace analysis of CopA sequences from known Cu resistant microorganisms. In total, 99 putative copA sequences were recovered from the tailings metagenome, out of which 70 were found with high potential to be functioning in Cu resistance. Phylogenetic analysis of selected copA sequences detected in the tailings metagenome showed that topology of the copA phylogeny is largely congruent with that of the 16S-based phylogeny of the tailings microbial community obtained in our previous study, indicating that the development of copA diversity in the tailings might be mainly through vertical descent with few lateral gene transfer events. The method established here can be used to explore copA (and potentially other metal resistance genes) diversity in any metagenome and has the potential to exhaust the full-length gene sequences for downstream analyses. PMID:26286020

  5. Rational Design of High-Number dsDNA Fragments Based on Thermodynamics for the Construction of Full-Length Genes in a Single Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Birla, Bhagyashree S.; Chou, Hui-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Gene synthesis is frequently used in modern molecular biology research either to create novel genes or to obtain natural genes when the synthesis approach is more flexible and reliable than cloning. DNA chemical synthesis has limits on both its length and yield, thus full-length genes have to be hierarchically constructed from synthesized DNA fragments. Gibson Assembly and its derivatives are the simplest methods to assemble multiple double-stranded DNA fragments. Currently, up to 12 dsDNA fragments can be assembled at once with Gibson Assembly according to its vendor. In practice, the number of dsDNA fragments that can be assembled in a single reaction are much lower. We have developed a rational design method for gene construction that allows high-number dsDNA fragments to be assembled into full-length genes in a single reaction. Using this new design method and a modified version of the Gibson Assembly protocol, we have assembled 3 different genes from up to 45 dsDNA fragments at once. Our design method uses the thermodynamic analysis software Picky that identifies all unique junctions in a gene where consecutive DNA fragments are specifically made to connect to each other. Our novel method is generally applicable to most gene sequences, and can improve both the efficiency and cost of gene assembly. PMID:26716828

  6. The recombinant C-terminus of the human MUC2 mucin forms dimers in Chinese-hamster ovary cells and heterodimers with full-length MUC2 in LS 174T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lidell, Martin E; Johansson, Malin E V; Mörgelin, Matthias; Asker, Noomi; Gum, James R; Kim, Young S; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2003-01-01

    The entire cDNA corresponding to the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain of the human MUC2 apomucin, after the serine- and threonine-rich tandem repeat, was expressed in Chinese-hamster ovary-K1 cells and in the human colon carcinoma cell line, LS 174T. The C-terminus was expressed as a fusion protein with the green fluorescent protein and mycTag sequences and the murine immunoglobulin kappa-chain signal sequence to direct the protein to the secretory pathway. Pulse-chase studies showed a rapid conversion of the C-terminal monomer into a dimer in both Chinese-hamster ovary-K1 and LS 174T cells. Disulphide-bond-stabilized dimers secreted into the media of both cell lines had a higher apparent molecular mass compared with the intracellular forms. The MUC2 C-terminus was purified from the spent culture medium and visualized by molecular electron microscopy. The dimer nature of the molecule was visible clearly and revealed that each monomer was attached to the other by a large globular domain. Gold-labelled antibodies against the mycTag or green fluorescent protein revealed that these were localized to the ends opposite to the parts responsible for the dimerization. The C-terminus expressed in LS 174T cells formed heterodimers with the full-length wild-type MUC2, but not with the MUC5AC mucin, normally expressed in LS 174T cells. The homodimers of the MUC2 C-termini were secreted continuously from the LS 174T cells, but no wild-type MUC2 secretion has been observed from these cells. This suggests that the information for sorting the MUC2 mucin into the regulated secretory pathway in cells having this ability is present in parts other than the C-terminus of MUC2. PMID:12597771

  7. Identification of the full-length KIAA0591 gene encoding a novel kinesin-related protein which is mapped to the neuroblastoma suppressor gene locus at 1p36.2.

    PubMed

    Nagai, M; Ichimiya, S; Ozaki, T; Seki, N; Mihara, M; Furuta, S; Ohira, M; Tomioka, N; Nomura, N; Sakiyama, S; Kubo, O; Takakura, K; Hori, T; Nakagawara, A

    2000-05-01

    The distal region of a short arm of chromosome 1p is frequently deleted in many human cancers including neuroblastoma (NBL), in which it has been narrowed down to the smallest region of overlap between D1S244 and D1S214 (approximately 7 cM). During the search for the candidate tumor suppressor genes mapped within the region, we found the KIAA0591 gene which encoded a new human kinesin-related protein with a homology to human axonal transporter of synaptic vesicles (ATSV). The kinesin is an intracellular motor protein and often associated with neuronal differentiation and survival. Here we identified a complete open reading frame of the KIAA0591 gene by screening a cDNA library derived from human substantia nigra. The KIAA0591 protein contains a possible pleckstrin homology (PH) domain at its carboxy-terminus. However, it did not possess a force-generating motor domain which is well conserved among kinesin superfamily members (KIFs). Northern blot analysis demonstrated that KIAA0591 mRNA was preferentially expressed in both adult and fetal brains, kidney, skeletal muscle and pancreas. KIAA0591 was expressed in favorable NBLs at higher levels than in unfavorable NBLs, although RT-PCR SSCP analysis showed no mutation within the coding region of the KIAA0591 gene, when 8 neuroblastoma tissues and 15 neuroblastoma-derived cell lines were examined. Thus, the full-length KIAA0591 gene may be a novel member of human KIF superfamily which lacks motor domain and might function as a tumor suppressor in an epigenetic but not a classic Knudson's manner. PMID:10762626

  8. Generation of an infectious Negev virus cDNA clone

    PubMed Central

    Gorchakov, Rodion V.; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Negevirus consists of insect-only viruses isolated from mosquitoes and sandflies. Here, we report the successful construction of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of Negev virus (NEGV) strain M30957. Viral RNA was transcribed in vitro and virus was readily rescued with or without the use of a cap analogue. These results strongly suggest that NEGV, and likely other members within the genus, is a non-segmented, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus. PMID:24878640

  9. Directional RNA-seq reveals highly complex condition-dependent transcriptomes in E. coli K12 through accurate full-length transcripts assembling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although prokaryotic gene transcription has been studied over decades, many aspects of the process remain poorly understood. Particularly, recent studies have revealed that transcriptomes in many prokaryotes are far more complex than previously thought. Genes in an operon are often alternatively and dynamically transcribed under different conditions, and a large portion of genes and intergenic regions have antisense RNA (asRNA) and non-coding RNA (ncRNA) transcripts, respectively. Ironically, similar studies have not been conducted in the model bacterium E coli K12, thus it is unknown whether or not the bacterium possesses similar complex transcriptomes. Furthermore, although RNA-seq becomes the major method for analyzing the complexity of prokaryotic transcriptome, it is still a challenging task to accurately assemble full length transcripts using short RNA-seq reads. Results To fill these gaps, we have profiled the transcriptomes of E. coli K12 under different culture conditions and growth phases using a highly specific directional RNA-seq technique that can capture various types of transcripts in the bacterial cells, combined with a highly accurate and robust algorithm and tool TruHMM (http://bioinfolab.uncc.edu/TruHmm_package/) for assembling full length transcripts. We found that 46.9 ~ 63.4% of expressed operons were utilized in their putative alternative forms, 72.23 ~ 89.54% genes had putative asRNA transcripts and 51.37 ~ 72.74% intergenic regions had putative ncRNA transcripts under different culture conditions and growth phases. Conclusions As has been demonstrated in many other prokaryotes, E. coli K12 also has a highly complex and dynamic transcriptomes under different culture conditions and growth phases. Such complex and dynamic transcriptomes might play important roles in the physiology of the bacterium. TruHMM is a highly accurate and robust algorithm for assembling full-length transcripts in prokaryotes using directional RNA

  10. Full-Length Recombinant Plasmodium falciparum VAR2CSA Binds Specifically to CSPG and Induces Potent Parasite Adhesion-Blocking Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Khunrae, Pongsak; Dahlbäck, Madeleine; Nielsen, Morten A.; Andersen, Gorm; Ditlev, Sisse B.; Resende, Mafalda; Pinto, Vera V.; Theander, Thor G.; Higgins, Matthew K.; Salanti, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains one of the world's leading causes of human suffering and poverty. Each year, the disease takes 1–3 million lives, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa. The adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to vascular endothelium or placenta is the key event in the pathogenesis of severe P. falciparum infection. In pregnant women, the parasites express a single and unique member of the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family named VAR2CSA, which is associated with the ability of the IEs to adhere specifically to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) in the placenta. Several Duffy-binding-like domains from VAR2CSA molecules have been shown in vitro to bind to CSA, but it has also been demonstrated that Duffy-binding-like domains from PfEMP1 proteins other than VAR2CSA can bind CSA. In addition, the specificity of the binding of VAR2CSA domains to glycosaminoglycans does not match that of VAR2CSA-expressing IEs. This has led to speculation that the domains of native VAR2CSA need to come together to form a specific binding site or that VAR2CSA might bind to CSA through a bridging molecule. Here, we describe the expression and purification of the complete extracellular region of VAR2CSA secreted at high yields from insect cells. Using surface plasmon resonance, we demonstrate that VAR2CSA alone binds with nanomolar affinity to human chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan and with significantly weaker affinity to other glycosaminoglycans, showing a specificity similar to that observed for IEs. Antibodies raised against full-length VAR2CSA completely inhibit recombinant VAR2CSA binding, as well as parasite binding to chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan. This is the first study to describe the successful production and functionality of a full-length PfEMP1. The specificity of the binding and anti-adhesion potency of induced IgG, together with high-yield production, encourages the use of full-length PfEMP1 in vaccine development strategies. PMID

  11. Thermodynamic and fibril formation studies of full length immunoglobulin light chain AL-09 and its germline protein using scan rate dependent thermal unfolding.

    PubMed

    Blancas-Mejía, Luis M; Horn, Timothy J; Marin-Argany, Marta; Auton, Matthew; Tischer, Alexander; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina

    2015-12-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a fatal disease where monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains deposit as insoluble amyloid fibrils. For many years it has been considered that AL amyloid deposits are formed primarily by the variable domain, while its constant domain has been considered not to be amyloidogenic. However recent studies identify full length (FL) light chains as part of the amyloid deposits. In this report, we compare the stabilities and amyloidogenic properties of two light chains, an amyloid-associated protein AL-09 FL, and its germline protein κ I O18/O8 FL (IGKV 1-33). We demonstrate that the thermal unfolding for both proteins is irreversible and scan rate dependent, with similar stability parameters compared to their VL counterparts. In addition, the constant domain seems to modulate their amyloidogenic properties and affect the morphology of the amyloid fibrils. These results allow us to understand the role of the kappa constant domain in AL amyloidosis. PMID:26263488

  12. The full-length genome sequences of nine HCV genotype 4 variants representing a new subtype 4s and eight unclassified lineages.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling; Xu, Yan; Yuan, Jie; Li, Chunhua; Murphy, Donald G

    2015-08-01

    We characterized the full-length genomes for nine novel variants of HCV genotype 4 (HCV-4), representing a new subtype 4s and eight unclassified lineages. They were obtained from patients who resided in Canada but all had origins in Africa. An extended maximum clade credibility (MCC) tree was reconstructed after the inclusion of 30 reference sequences. It differentiated 18 assigned subtypes and 10 unclassified lineages within HCV-4. Similar analysis of 102 partial NS5B sequences resulted in another MCC tree that revealed 22 assigned subtypes (4a-4t, 4w, and 4v) and 30 unclassified lineages at the subtype level. Our study shows that HCV-4 is taxonomically complex and it displays high genetic diversity to support an African origin. PMID:25854865

  13. From selective full-length genes isolation by TAR cloning in yeast to their expression from HAC vectors in human cells.

    PubMed

    Kouprina, Natalay; Lee, Nicholas C O; Kononenko, Artem V; Samoshkin, Alexander; Larionov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning allows selective isolation of full-length genes and genomic loci as large circular Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YACs) in yeast. The method has a broad application for structural and functional genomics, long-range haplotyping, characterization of chromosomal rearrangements, and evolutionary studies. In this paper, we describe a basic protocol for gene isolation by TAR as well as a method to convert TAR isolates into Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs) using a retrofitting vector. The retrofitting vector contains a 3' HPRT-loxP cassette to allow subsequent gene loading into a unique loxP site of the HAC-based (Human Artificial Chromosome) gene delivery vector. The benefit of combining the TAR gene cloning technology with the HAC gene delivery system for gene expression studies is discussed. PMID:25239739

  14. The full-length genome sequences of nine HCV genotype 4 variants representing a new subtype 4s and eight unclassified lineages

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ling; Xu, Yan; Yuan, Jie; Li, Chunhua; Murphy, Donald G.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized the full-length genomes for nine novel variants of HCV genotype 4 (HCV-4), representing a new subtype 4s and eight unclassified lineages. They were obtained from patients who resided in Canada but all had origins in Africa. An extended maximum clade credibility (MCC) tree was reconstructed after the inclusion of 30 reference sequences. It differentiated 18 assigned subtypes and 10 unclassified lineages within HCV-4. Similar analysis of 102 partial NS5B sequences resulted in another MCC tree that revealed 22 assigned subtypes (4a–4t, 4w, and 4v) and 30 unclassified lineages at the subtype level. Our study shows that HCV-4 is taxonomically complex and it displays high genetic diversity to support an African origin. PMID:25854865

  15. Promoter/leader deletion analysis and plant expression vectors with the figwort mosaic virus (FMV) full length transcript (FLt) promoter containing single or double enhancer domains.

    PubMed

    Maiti, I B; Gowda, S; Kiernan, J; Ghosh, S K; Shepherd, R J

    1997-03-01

    The boundaries required for maximal expression from the promoter/leader region of the full length transcript of figwort mosaic virus (FLt promoter) coupled to reporter genes were defined by 5' and 3' deletion analyses. In transient expression assays using protoplasts of Nicotiana edwardsonii, a 314 bp FLt promoter fragment sequence (-249 to +65 from the transcription start site) was sufficient for strong expression activity. Plant expression vectors developed with modified FLt promoters were tested with GUS or CAT as reporter genes in transgenic plants. The FLt promoter is a strong constitutive promoter, with strength comparable to or greater than that of the CaMV 35S promoter. The FLt promoter with its double enhancer domain linked to GUS or CAT reporter genes provides an average 4-fold greater activity than the FLt promoter with a single enhancer domain (-55 to -249 bp upstream fragment) in tests with transgenic plants and in protoplast transient expression assays. PMID:9090062

  16. Isolation and expression analysis of peanut chlorotic streak caulimovirus (PClSV) full-length transcript (FLt) promoter in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Maiti, I B; Shepherd, R J

    1998-03-17

    A promoter fragment from peanut chlorotic streak caulimovirus (PClSV) full-length transcript (FLt) was identified and later modified to have duplicated enhancer domain. The FLt promoter with its single or double enhancer domains, fused with the GUS reporter gene to form chimeric gene constructs, showed a high level of expression of these genes in cells and transgenic plants. The FLt promoter with its double enhancer domain gives an average threefold greater expression of genes compared to the FLt promoter with its single enhancer domain in transgenic plants. In young seedlings the expression was in the order root > leaf > stem. The histochemical GUS assay in young seedlings showed more activity in root tips and leaf midribs, veins, and other vascular tissues. The expression from the PClSV FLt promoter was compared with that from the figwort mosaic virus promoter in transgenic plants. These constitutive promoters were comparable in respect to GUS expression level. PMID:9514942

  17. Full-length Gα(q)-phospholipase C-β3 structure reveals interfaces of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Angeline M; Dutta, Somnath; Boguth, Cassandra A; Skiniotis, Georgios; Tesmer, John J G

    2013-03-01

    Phospholipase C-β (PLCβ) is directly activated by Gαq, but the molecular basis for how its distal C-terminal domain (CTD) contributes to maximal activity is poorly understood. Herein we present both the crystal structure and cryo-EM three-dimensional reconstructions of human full-length PLCβ3 in complex with mouse Gαq. The distal CTD forms an extended monomeric helical bundle consisting of three antiparallel segments with structural similarity to membrane-binding bin-amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domains. Sequence conservation of the distal CTD suggests putative membrane and protein interaction sites, the latter of which bind the N-terminal helix of Gαq in both the crystal structure and cryo-EM reconstructions. Functional analysis suggests that the distal CTD has roles in membrane targeting and in optimizing the orientation of the catalytic core at the membrane for maximal rates of lipid hydrolysis. PMID:23377541

  18. Full-lengthq-phospholipase C-β3 structure reveals interfaces of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Angeline M.; Dutta, Somnath; Boguth, Cassandra A.; Skiniotis, Georgios; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2014-08-21

    Phospholipase C-β (PLCβ) is directly activated by Gαq, but the molecular basis for how its distal C-terminal domain (CTD) contributes to maximal activity is poorly understood. Herein we present both the crystal structure and cryo-EM three-dimensional reconstructions of human full-length PLCβ3 in complex with mouse Gαq. The distal CTD forms an extended monomeric helical bundle consisting of three antiparallel segments with structural similarity to membrane-binding bin-amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domains. Sequence conservation of the distal CTD suggests putative membrane and protein interaction sites, the latter of which bind the N-terminal helix of Gαq in both the crystal structure and cryo-EM reconstructions. Functional analysis suggests that the distal CTD has roles in membrane targeting and in optimizing the orientation of the catalytic core at the membrane for maximal rates of lipid hydrolysis.

  19. Near Full-Length Genome Identification of a Novel HIV-1 Recombinant Form (CRF01_AE/CRF07_BC) in Zhejiang, China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaorong; Li-Jun, Xu; Xie, Tiansheng; Liu, Fumin; Wu, Nanping

    2016-09-01

    CRF01_AE and CRF07_BC are the two major circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) in China. Furthermore, many kinds of unique recombinant forms (URFs) between CRF01_AE and CRF07_BC were recently identified in China. Here we detected a novel recombinant of CRF07_BC/CRF01_AE, whose genome structure is distinctly different from other URFs reported before. The phylogenetic analysis of the near full-length sequence of 15zj032 reveals that three regions of CRF01_AE insert into the CRF07_BC backbone. Recently, the continued emergence of novel URFs implies that super infections of different subtypes of HIV-1 are common in China and should be given enough importance. PMID:27353182

  20. Rescue of Newcastle disease virus from cloned cDNA using an RNA polymerase II promoter.

    PubMed

    Li, Bao-Yu; Li, Xue-Rui; Lan, Xi; Yin, Xiang-Pin; Li, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Bin; Liu, Ji-Xing

    2011-06-01

    A new system was developed to improve the efficiency and simplify the procedure of recovery of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from cloned cDNA. A full-length cDNA clone of mesogenic NDV vaccine strain Mukteswar was assembled from five subgenomic cDNA fragments and cloned into a plasmid allowing transcription driven by cellular RNA polymerase II. The full-length viral cDNA was flanked by hammerhead ribozyme (HamRz) and hepatitis delta virus ribozyme (HdvRz) sequences, resulted in the synthesis of antigenomic RNA with exact termini. Without supplying T7 RNA polymerase, infectious NDV could be generated efficiently in some eukaryotic cell lines by simultaneous transcription of antigenomic RNA from the full-length plasmid and expression of NP, P and L proteins from helper plasmids introduced by cotransfection. The efficiency of recovery with the conventional T7 promoter system based on BRS-T7 cells and the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter system was compared, and the results demonstrate that the new system facilitates the generation of recombinant NDV and more efficient than the T7 rescue system using BRS-T7. PMID:21327786

  1. Study of canine parvovirus evolution: comparative analysis of full-length VP2 gene sequences from Argentina and international field strains.

    PubMed

    Gallo Calderón, Marina; Wilda, Maximiliano; Boado, Lorena; Keller, Leticia; Malirat, Viviana; Iglesias, Marcela; Mattion, Nora; La Torre, Jose

    2012-02-01

    The continuous emergence of new strains of canine parvovirus (CPV), poorly protected by current vaccination, is a concern among breeders, veterinarians, and dog owners around the world. Therefore, the understanding of the genetic variation in emerging CPV strains is crucial for the design of disease control strategies, including vaccines. In this paper, we obtained the sequences of the full-length gene encoding for the main capsid protein (VP2) of 11 canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) Argentine representative field strains, selected from a total of 75 positive samples studied in our laboratory in the last 9 years. A comparative sequence analysis was performed on 9 CPV-2c, one CPV-2a, and one CPV-2b Argentine strains with respect to international strains reported in the GenBank database. In agreement with previous reports, a high degree of identity was found among CPV-2c Argentine strains (99.6-100% and 99.7-100% at nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively). However, the appearance of a new substitution in the 440 position (T440A) in four CPV-2c Argentine strains obtained after the year 2009 gives support to the variability observed for this position located within the VP2, three-fold spike. This is the first report on the genetic characterization of the full-length VP2 gene of emerging CPV strains in South America and shows that all the Argentine CPV-2c isolates cluster together with European and North American CPV-2c strains. PMID:21858463

  2. Structure of the Full-Length Bacteriophytochrome from the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas campestris Provides Clues to its Long-Range Signaling Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Otero, Lisandro Horacio; Klinke, Sebastián; Rinaldi, Jimena; Velázquez-Escobar, Francisco; Mroginski, María Andrea; Fernández López, María; Malamud, Florencia; Vojnov, Adrián Alberto; Hildebrandt, Peter; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; Bonomi, Hernán Ruy

    2016-09-25

    Phytochromes constitute a major superfamily of light-sensing proteins that are reversibly photoconverted between a red-absorbing (Pr) and a far-red-absorbing (Pfr) state. Bacteriophytochromes (BphPs) are found among photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic bacteria, including pathogens. To date, several BphPs have been biophysically characterized. However, it is still not fully understood how structural changes are propagated from the photosensory module to the output module during the signal transduction event. Most phytochromes share a common architecture consisting of an N-terminal photosensor that includes the PAS2-GAF-PHY domain triad and a C-terminal variable output module. Here we present the crystal structure of the full-length BphP from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (XccBphP) bearing its photosensor and its complete output module, a PAS9 domain. In the crystals, the protein was found to be in the Pr state, whereas diffraction data together with resonance Raman spectroscopic and theoretical results indicate a ZZZssa and a ZZEssa chromophore configuration corresponding to a mixture of Pr and Meta-R state, the precursor of Pfr. The XccBphP quaternary assembly reveals a head-to-head dimer in which the output module contributes to the helical dimer interface. The photosensor, which is shown to be a bathy-like BphP, is influenced in its dark reactions by the output module. Our structural analyses suggest that the photoconversion between the Pr and Pfr states in the full-length XccBphP may involve changes in the relative positioning of the output module. This work contributes to understand the light-induced structural changes propagated from the photosensor to the output modules in phytochrome signaling. PMID:27107635

  3. Crystal Structure of DNA Cytidine Deaminase ABOBEC3G Catalytic Deamination Domain Suggests a Binding Mode of Full-length Enzyme to Single-stranded DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiuxiu; Zhang, Tianlong; Xu, Zeng; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Bin; Lan, Wenxian; Wang, Chunxi; Ding, Jianping; Cao, Chunyang

    2015-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a DNA cytidine deaminase (CD) that demonstrates antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and other pathogenic virus. It has an inactive N-terminal CD1 virus infectivity factor (Vif) protein binding domain (A3G-CD1) and an actively catalytic C-terminal CD2 deamination domain (A3G-CD2). Although many studies on the structure of A3G-CD2 and enzymatic properties of full-length A3G have been reported, the mechanism of how A3G interacts with HIV-1 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is still not well characterized. Here, we reported a crystal structure of a novel A3G-CD2 head-to-tail dimer (in which the N terminus of the monomer H (head) interacts with the C terminus of monomer T (tail)), where a continuous DNA binding groove was observed. By constructing the A3G-CD1 structural model, we found that its overall fold was almost identical to that of A3G-CD2. We mutated the residues located in or along the groove in monomer H and the residues in A3G-CD1 that correspond to those seated in or along the groove in monomer T. Then, by performing enzymatic assays, we confirmed the reported key elements and the residues in A3G necessary to the catalytic deamination. Moreover, we identified more than 10 residues in A3G essential to DNA binding and deamination reaction. Therefore, this dimer structure may represent a structural model of full-length A3G, which indicates a possible binding mode of A3G to HIV-1 ssDNA. PMID:25542899

  4. Crystal structure of DNA cytidine deaminase ABOBEC3G catalytic deamination domain suggests a binding mode of full-length enzyme to single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiuxiu; Zhang, Tianlong; Xu, Zeng; Liu, Shanshan; Zhao, Bin; Lan, Wenxian; Wang, Chunxi; Ding, Jianping; Cao, Chunyang

    2015-02-13

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a DNA cytidine deaminase (CD) that demonstrates antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and other pathogenic virus. It has an inactive N-terminal CD1 virus infectivity factor (Vif) protein binding domain (A3G-CD1) and an actively catalytic C-terminal CD2 deamination domain (A3G-CD2). Although many studies on the structure of A3G-CD2 and enzymatic properties of full-length A3G have been reported, the mechanism of how A3G interacts with HIV-1 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is still not well characterized. Here, we reported a crystal structure of a novel A3G-CD2 head-to-tail dimer (in which the N terminus of the monomer H (head) interacts with the C terminus of monomer T (tail)), where a continuous DNA binding groove was observed. By constructing the A3G-CD1 structural model, we found that its overall fold was almost identical to that of A3G-CD2. We mutated the residues located in or along the groove in monomer H and the residues in A3G-CD1 that correspond to those seated in or along the groove in monomer T. Then, by performing enzymatic assays, we confirmed the reported key elements and the residues in A3G necessary to the catalytic deamination. Moreover, we identified more than 10 residues in A3G essential to DNA binding and deamination reaction. Therefore, this dimer structure may represent a structural model of full-length A3G, which indicates a possible binding mode of A3G to HIV-1 ssDNA. PMID:25542899

  5. Evidence supporting a critical contribution of intrinsically disordered regions to the biochemical behavior of full-length human HP1γ.

    PubMed

    Velez, Gabriel; Lin, Marisa; Christensen, Trace; Faubion, William A; Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul

    2016-01-01

    HP1γ, a non-histone chromatin protein, has elicited significant attention because of its role in gene silencing, elongation, splicing, DNA repair, cell growth, differentiation, and many other cancer-associated processes, including therapy resistance. These characteristics make it an ideal target for developing small drugs for both mechanistic experimentation and potential therapies. While high-resolution structures of the two globular regions of HP1γ, the chromo- and chromoshadow domains, have been solved, little is currently known about the conformational behavior of the full-length protein. Consequently, in the current study, we use threading, homology-based molecular modeling, molecular mechanics calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations to develop models that allow us to infer properties of full-length HP1γ at an atomic resolution level. HP1γ appears as an elongated molecule in which three Intrinsically Disordered Regions (IDRs, 1, 2, and 3) endow this protein with dynamic flexibility, intermolecular recognition properties, and the ability to integrate signals from various intracellular pathways. Our modeling also suggests that the dynamic flexibility imparted to HP1γ by the three IDRs is important for linking nucleosomes with PXVXL motif-containing proteins, in a chromatin environment. The importance of the IDRs in intermolecular recognition is illustrated by the building and study of both IDR2 HP1γ-importin-α and IDR1 and IDR2 HP1γ-DNA complexes. The ability of the three IDRs for integrating cell signals is demonstrated by combined linear motif analyses and molecular dynamics simulations showing that posttranslational modifications can generate a histone mimetic sequence within the IDR2 of HP1γ, which when bound by the chromodomain can lead to an autoinhibited state. Combined, these data underscore the importance of IDRs 1, 2, and 3 in defining the structural and dynamic properties of HP1γ, discoveries that have both mechanistic and

  6. Copper and Zinc Interactions with Cellular Prion Proteins Change Solubility of Full-Length Glycosylated Isoforms and Induce the Occurrence of Heterogeneous Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Brim, Svetlana; Groschup, Martin H.; Kuczius, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized biochemically by protein aggregation of infectious prion isoforms (PrPSc), which result from the conformational conversion of physiological prion proteins (PrPC). PrPC are variable post-translationally modified glycoproteins, which exist as full length and as aminoterminally truncated glycosylated proteins and which exhibit differential detergent solubility. This implicates the presence of heterogeneous phenotypes, which overlap as protein complexes at the same molecular masses. Although the biological function of PrPC is still enigmatic, evidence reveals that PrPC exhibits metal-binding properties, which result in structural changes and decreased solubility. In this study, we analyzed the yield of PrPC metal binding affiliated with low solubility and changes in protein banding patterns. By implementing a high-speed centrifugation step, the interaction of zinc ions with PrPC was shown to generate large quantities of proteins with low solubility, consisting mainly of full-length glycosylated PrPC; whereas unglycosylated PrPC remained in the supernatants as well as truncated glycosylated proteins which lack of octarepeat sequence necessary for metal binding. This effect was considerably lower when PrPC interacted with copper ions; the presence of other metals tested exhibited no effect under these conditions. The binding of zinc and copper to PrPC demonstrated differentially soluble protein yields within distinct PrPC subtypes. PrPC–Zn2+-interaction may provide a means to differentiate glycosylated and unglycosylated subtypes and offers detailed analysis of metal-bound and metal-free protein conversion assays. PMID:27093554

  7. Mini- and full-length dystrophin gene transfer induces the recovery of nitric oxide synthase at the sarcolemma of mdx4cv skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Decrouy, A; Renaud, J M; Lunde, J A; Dickson, G; Jasmin, B J

    1998-01-01

    In normal skeletal muscle fibers, dystrophin accumulates at the cytoplasmic face of the sarcolemma where it associates with dystrophin-associated proteins (DAPs). Several studies have recently shown that the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is also located at the sarcolemma, and that this membrane localization is mediated through interactions of nNOS with one of the DAPs, namely alpha 1-syntrophin. Since the lack of dystrophin in muscle fibers from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and mdx mice is accompanied by an absence of sarcolemmal nNOS, we examined in the present study, whether dystrophin gene replacement would lead to the restoration of nNOS at its appropriate subcellular location. To this end, tibialis anterior muscles from mdx4cv mice were directly injected with plasmid DNA encoding either full-length (pRSV-dys) or mini-(pRSV-dyB; lacking exons 17-48) dystrophin. For these experiments, we chose to study 10-week-old mdx4cv mice since at this developmental stage, muscles from these mice have already undergone several cycles of degeneration-regeneration. Immunofluorescence experiments performed on serial cross-sections revealed that approximately 50% of the dystrophin-positive fibers also exhibited significant levels of nNOS at their sarcolemma 2 weeks following gene transfer with pRSV-dys. Similar results were obtained with pRSV-dyB indicating that exons 17-48 of the dystrophin gene are not essential for the correct localization of nNOS in skeletal muscle fibers. Taken together with the recent demonstration that dystrophin gene transfer leads to significant physiological benefits our results suggest that dystrophin gene therapy using full-length or truncated dystrophin, also induces a rapid recovery of biochemical functions. PMID:9536265

  8. Novel insights into structure–function mechanism and tissue-specific expression profiling of full-length dxr gene from Cymbopogon winterianus

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Kamalakshi; Dehury, Budheswar; Phukon, Munmi; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Sen, Priyabrata

    2015-01-01

    The 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR; EC1.1.1.267), an NADPH-dependent reductase, plays a pivotal role in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway (MEP), in the conversion of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) into MEP. The sheath and leaf of citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus) accumulates large amount of terpenes and sesquiterpenes with proven medicinal value and economic uses. Thus, sequencing of full length dxr gene and its characterization seems to be a valuable resource in metabolic engineering to alter the flux of isoprenoid active ingredients in plants. In this study, full length DXR from citronella was characterized through in silico and tissue-specific expression studies to explain its structure–function mechanism, mode of cofactor recognition and differential expression. The modelled DXR has a three-domain architecture and its active site comprised of a cofactor (NADPH) binding pocket and the substrate-binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulation studies indicated that DXR model retained most of its secondary structure during 10 ns simulation in aqueous solution. The modelled DXR superimposes well with its closest structural homolog but subtle variations in the charge distribution over the cofactor recognition site were noticed. Molecular docking study revealed critical residues aiding tight anchoring NADPH within the active pocket of DXR. Tissue-specific differential expression analysis using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and qRT-PCR in various tissues of citronella plant revealed distinct differential expression of DXR. To our knowledge, this is the first ever report on DXR from the important medicinal plant citronella and further characterization of this gene will open up better avenues for metabolic engineering of secondary metabolite pathway genes from medicinal plants in the near future. PMID:25941629

  9. Preservation of Muscle Force in Mdx3cv Mice Correlates with Low-Level Expression of a Near Full-Length Dystrophin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dejia; Yue, Yongping; Duan, Dongsheng

    2008-01-01

    The complete absence of dystrophin causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Its restoration by greater than 20% is needed to reduce muscle pathology and improve muscle force. Dystrophin levels lower than 20% are considered therapeutically irrelevant but are associated with a less severe phenotype in certain Becker muscular dystrophy patients. To understand the role of low-level dystrophin expression, we compared muscle force and pathology in mdx3cv and mdx4cv mice. Dystrophin was eliminated in mdx4cv mouse muscle but was expressed in mdx3cv mice as a near full-length protein at ∼5% of normal levels. Consistent with previous reports, we found dystrophic muscle pathology in both mouse strains. Surprisingly, mdx3cv extensor digitorium longus muscle showed significantly higher tetanic force and was also more resistant to eccentric contraction-induced injury than mdx4cv extensor digitorium longus muscle. Furthermore, mdx3cv mice had stronger forelimb grip strength than mdx4cv mice. Immunostaining revealed utrophin up-regulation in both mouse strains. The dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex was also restored in the sarcolemma in both strains although at levels lower than those in normal mice. Our results suggest that subtherapeutic expression levels of near full-length, membrane-bound dystrophin, possibly in conjunction with up-regulated utrophin levels, may help maintain minimal muscle force but not arrest muscle degeneration or necrosis. Our findings provide valuable insight toward understanding delayed clinical onset and/or slow disease progression in certain Becker muscular dystrophy patients. PMID:18385524

  10. COP1D, an alternatively spliced constitutive photomorphogenic-1 (COP1) product, stabilizes UV stress-induced c-Jun through inhibition of full-length COP1.

    PubMed

    Savio, M G; Rotondo, G; Maglie, S; Rossetti, G; Bender, J R; Pardi, R

    2008-04-10

    COP1 is an evolutionarily conserved RING-finger ubiquitin ligase acting within a Cullin-RING ligase (CRL) complex that promotes polyubiquitination of c-Jun and p53. Stability of the above substrates is affected by post-translational changes priming the proteins for polyubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation. However, degradation of both substrates is controlled indirectly by signaling pathways affecting the E3 ligases involved in their polyubiquitination. Here, we report the identification of COP1D, a ubiquitously expressed splice variant of COP1 lacking a portion of a coiled-coil region involved in intermolecular associations. While being unable to associate with other components of the CRL complex, COP1D exerts a dominant-negative function over the full-length protein, due to its ability to heterodimerize with COP1 and sequester it from the enzymatically active complex. Ectopic expression of COP1D antagonizes the function of COP1, while its selective downregulation by RNA interference promotes more efficient degradation of c-Jun and p53 by the full-length protein. The COP1/COP1D mRNA ratio is modulated by UV stress and a decreased COP1/COP1D ratio correlates with elevated c-Jun, but not p53 protein levels in invasive ductal breast cancer. Thus, dynamic changes of the COP1/COP1D ratio provide an additional level of regulation of the half-life of the substrates of this E3 ligase under homeostatic or pathological conditions. PMID:17968316

  11. Site-specific cleavage/packaging of herpes simplex virus DNA and the selective maturation of nucleocapsids containing full-length viral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Vlazny, Donald A.; Kwong, Ann; Frenkel, Niza

    1982-01-01

    Defective genomes present in serially passaged herpes simplex virus (HSV) stocks have been shown to consist of tandemly arranged repeat units containing limited sets of the standard virus DNA sequences. Invariably, the HSV defective genomes terminate with the right (S component) terminus of HSV DNA. Because the oligomeric forms can arise from a single repeat unit, it has been concluded that the defective genomes arise by a rolling circle mechanism of replication. We now report on our studies of defective genomes packaged in viral capsids accumulating in the nuclei and in mature virions (enveloped capsids) translocated into the cytoplasm of cells infected with serially passaged virus. These studies have revealed that, upon electrophoresis in agarose gels, the defective genomes prepared from cytoplasmic virions comigrated with nondefective standard virus DNA (Mr 100 × 106). In contrast, DNA prepared from capsids accumulating in nuclei consisted of both full-length defective virus DNA molecules and smaller DNA molecules of discrete sizes, ranging in Mr from 5.5 to 100 × 106. These smaller DNA species were shown to consist of different integral numbers (from 1 to approximately 18) of defective genome repeat units and to terminate with sequences corresponding to the right terminal sequences of HSV DNA. We conclude on the basis of these studies that (i) sequences from the right end of standard virus DNA contain a recognition signal for the cleavage and packaging of concatemeric viral DNA, (ii) the sequence-specific cleavage is either a prerequisite for or occurs during the entry of viral DNA into capsid structures, and (iii) DNA molecules significantly shorter than full-length standard viral DNA can become encapsidated within nuclear capsids provided they contain the cleavage/packaging signal. However, capsids containing DNA molecules significantly shorter than standard virus DNA are not translocated into the cytoplasm. Images PMID:6280181

  12. COMPLETE CDNA CLONING AND POLYMORPHISMS AT PORCINE BPI: ASSOCIATIONS WITH BACTERIAL LOAD AND IMMUNE RESPONSE TRAITS IN PIGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bactericidal permeability-increasing (BPI) gene encodes a neutrophil protein with inhibitory/killing functions against gram-negative bacteria. We investigated BPI as a candidate gene for resistance to Salmonella cholerasuis (SC) in pigs. We cloned and sequenced a full-length BPI cDNA and iden...

  13. Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1A (KDM1A/LSD1): Product Recognition and Kinetic Analysis of Full-Length Histones.

    PubMed

    Burg, Jonathan M; Gonzalez, Julie J; Maksimchuk, Kenneth R; McCafferty, Dewey G

    2016-03-22

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1A (KDM1A/LSD1) is a FAD-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative demethylation of histone H3K4me1/2 and H3K9me1/2 repressing and activating transcription, respectively. Although the active site is expanded compared to that of members of the greater amine oxidase superfamily, it is too sterically restricted to encompass the minimal 21-mer peptide substrate footprint. The remainder of the substrate/product is therefore expected to extend along the surface of KDM1A. We show that full-length histone H3, which lacks any posttranslational modifications, is a tight-binding, competitive inhibitor of KDM1A demethylation activity with a Ki of 18.9 ± 1.2 nM, a value that is approximately 100-fold higher than that of the 21-mer peptide product. The relative H3 affinity is independent of preincubation time, suggesting that H3 rapidly reaches equilibrium with KDM1A. Jump dilution experiments confirmed the increased binding affinity of full-length H3 was at least partially due to a slow off rate (koff) of 1.2 × 10(-3) s(-1), corresponding to a half-life (t1/2) of 9.63 min, and a residence time (τ) of 13.9 min. Independent affinity capture surface plasmon resonance experiments confirmed the tight-binding nature of the H3/KDM1A interaction, revealing a Kd of 9.02 ± 2.3 nM, a kon of (9.3 ± 1.5) × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), and a koff of (8.4 ± 0.3) × 10(-4) s(-1). Additionally, no other core histones exhibited inhibition of KDM1A demethylation activity, which is consistent with H3 being the preferred histone substrate of KDM1A versus H2A, H2B, and H4. Together, these data suggest that KDM1A likely contains a histone H3 secondary specificity element on the enzyme surface that contributes significantly to its recognition of substrates and products. PMID:26673564

  14. In vivo Dopamine Efflux is Decreased in Striatum of both Fragment (R6/2) and Full-Length (YAC128) Transgenic Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Joshua W.; Abercrombie, Elizabeth D.

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is characterized by numerous alterations within the corticostriatal circuitry. The striatum is innervated by a dense array of dopaminergic (DA) terminals and these DA synapses are critical to the proper execution of motor functions. As motor disturbances are prevalent in HD we examined DA neurotransmission in the striatum in transgenic (tg) murine models of HD. We used in vivo microdialysis to compare extracellular concentrations of striatal DA in both a fragment (R6/2) model, which displays a rapid and severe phenotype, and a full-length (YAC128) model that expresses a more progressive phenotype. Extracellular striatal DA concentrations were significantly reduced in R6/2 mice and decreased concomitantly with age-dependent increasing motor impairments on the rotarod task (7, 9, and 11 weeks). In a sample of 11-week-old R6/2 mice, we also measured tissue concentrations of striatal DA and found that total levels of DA were significantly depleted. However, the loss of total DA content (<50%) was insufficient to account for the full extent of DA depletion in the extracellular fluid (ECF; ∼75%). We also observed a significant reduction in extracellular DA concentrations in the striatum of 7-month-old YAC128 mice. In a separate set of experiments, we applied d-amphetamine (AMPH; 10 μm) locally into the striatum to stimulate the release of intracellular DA into the ECF. The AMPH-induced increase in extracellular DA levels was significantly blunted in 9-week-old R6/2 mice. There also was a decrease in AMPH-stimulated DA efflux in 7-month-old YAC128 mice in comparison to WT controls, although the effect was milder. In the same cohort of 7-month-old YAC128 mice we observed a significant reduction in the total locomotor activity in response to systemic AMPH (2 mg/kg). Our data demonstrate that extracellular DA release is attenuated in both a fragment and full-length tg mouse model of HD and support the concept of DA involvement in aspects of

  15. Quantitative measurement of full-length and C-terminal proteolyzed RBP4 in serum of normal and insulin-resistant humans using a novel mass spectrometry immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Eskurza, Iratxe; Kiernan, Urban A; Phillips, David A; Blüher, Matthias; Graham, Timothy E; Kahn, Barbara B

    2012-03-01

    Serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels are increased in insulin-resistant humans and correlate with severity of insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome. Quantitative Western blotting (qWestern) has been the most accurate method for serum RBP4 measurements, but qWestern is technically complex and labor intensive. The lack of a reliable, high-throughput method for RBP4 measurements has resulted in variability in findings in insulin-resistant humans. Many commonly used ELISAs have limited dynamic range. Neither the current ELISAs nor qWestern distinguish among full-length and carboxyl terminus proteolyzed forms of circulating RBP4 that are altered in different medical conditions. Here, we report the development of a novel quantitative mass spectrometry immunoaffinity assay (qMSIA) to measure full-length and proteolyzed forms of RBP4. qMSIA and qWestern of RBP4 were performed in identical serum aliquots from insulin-sensitive/normoglycemic or insulin-resistant humans with impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes. Total RBP4 qMSIA measurements were highly similar to qWestern and correlated equally well with clinical severity of insulin resistance (assessed by clamp glucose disposal rate, r = -0.74), hemoglobin A1c (r = 0.63), triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein (r = 0.55), waist/hip (r = 0.61), and systolic blood pressure (r = 0.53, all P < 0.001). Proteolyzed forms of RBP4 accounted for up to 50% of total RBP4 in insulin-resistant subjects, and des(Leu)-RBP4 (cleavage of last leucine) correlated highly with insulin resistance (assessed by glucose disposal rate, r = -0.69). In multiple regression analysis, insulin resistance but not glomerular filtration rate was the strongest, independent predictor of serum RBP4 levels. Thus, qMSIA provides a novel tool for accurately measuring serum RBP4 levels as a biomarker for severity of insulin resistance and risk for type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. PMID:22253430

  16. Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1A (KDM1A/LSD1): Product Recognition and Kinetic Analysis of Full-Length Histones

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Jonathan M.; Gonzalez, Julie J.; Maksimchuk, Kenneth R.; McCafferty, Dewey G.

    2016-01-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1A (KDM1A/LSD1) is a FAD-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative demethylation of histone H3K4me1/2 and H3K9me1/2 repressing and activating transcription, respectively. Although the active site is expanded compared to that of members of the greater amine oxidase superfamily, it is too sterically restricted to encompass the minimal 21-mer peptide substrate footprint. The remainder of the substrate/product is therefore expected to extend along the surface of KDM1A. We show that full-length histone H3, which lacks any posttranslational modifications, is a tight-binding, competitive inhibitor of KDM1A demethylation activity with a Ki of 18.9 ± 1.2 nM, a value that is approximately 100-fold higher than that of the 21-mer peptide product. The relative H3 affinity is independent of preincubation time, suggesting that H3 rapidly reaches equilibrium with KDM1A. Jump dilution experiments confirmed the increased binding affinity of full-length H3 was at least partially due to a slow off rate (koff) of 1.2 × 10−3 s−1, corresponding to a half-life (t1/2) of 9.63 min, and a residence time (τ) of 13.9 min. Independent affinity capture surface plasmon resonance experiments confirmed the tight-binding nature of the H3/KDM1A interaction, revealing a Kd of 9.02 ± 2.3 nM, a kon of (9.3 ± 1.5) × 104 M−1 s−1, and a koff of (8.4 ± 0.3) × 10−4 s−1. Additionally, no other core histones exhibited inhibition of KDM1A demethylation activity, which is consistent with H3 being the preferred histone substrate of KDM1A versus H2A, H2B, and H4. Together, these data suggest that KDM1A likely contains a histone H3 secondary specificity element on the enzyme surface that contributes significantly to its recognition of substrates and products. PMID:26673564

  17. The CEA/CD3-Bispecific Antibody MEDI-565 (MT111) Binds a Nonlinear Epitope in the Full-Length but Not a Short Splice Variant of CEA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaqi; Brohawn, Philip; Morehouse, Chris; Lekstrom, Kristen; Baeuerle, Patrick A.; Wu, Herren; Yao, Yihong; Coats, Steven R.; Dall’Acqua, William; Damschroder, Melissa; Hammond, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    MEDI-565 (also known as MT111) is a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody in development for the treatment of patients with cancers expressing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). MEDI-565 binds CEA on cancer cells and CD3 on T cells to induce T-cell mediated killing of cancer cells. To understand the molecular basis of human CEA recognition by MEDI-565 and how polymorphisms and spliced forms of CEA may affect MEDI-565 activity, we mapped the epitope of MEDI-565 on CEA using mutagenesis and homology modeling approaches. We found that MEDI-565 recognized a conformational epitope in the A2 domain comprised of amino acids 326–349 and 388–410, with critical residues F326, T328, N333, V388, G389, P390, E392, I408, and N410. Two non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs10407503, rs7249230) were identified in the epitope region, but they are found at low homozygosity rates. Searching the National Center for Biotechnology Information GenBank® database, we further identified a single, previously uncharacterized mRNA splice variant of CEA that lacks a portion of the N-terminal domain, the A1 and B1 domains, and a large portion of the A2 domain. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of multiple cancers showed widespread expression of full-length CEA in these tumors, with less frequent but concordant expression of the CEA splice variant. Because the epitope was largely absent from the CEA splice variant, MEDI-565 did not bind or mediate T-cell killing of cells solely expressing this form of CEA. In addition, the splice variant did not interfere with MEDI-565 binding or activity when co-expressed with full-length CEA. Thus MEDI-565 may broadly target CEA-positive tumors without regard for expression of the short splice variant of CEA. Together our data suggest that MEDI-565 activity will neither be impacted by SNPs nor by a splice variant of CEA. PMID:22574157

  18. Cloning and expression of full-length human insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) in the Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Khodadadi, Emad; Panjepour, Mojtaba; Abbasian, Mahdi; Broujeni, Zahra Khalili; Mofid, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The effect of the growth hormone on target cells is mediated by the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). IGF-1 binds to the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) in blood and biological fluids. Considering the important application of IGBP3 as a drug component, in this research we cloned and expressed the full-length IGFBP3 in the pET-11a vector and BL21 (DE3) expression host. Materials and Methods: First the sequence encoding of IGFBP3 was designed based on the amino acid sequence of the protein and then by codon optimization, in order to ensure the maximum expression in Escherichia coli. In the next step, the synthetic DNA encoding IGFBP3 was inserted into the pUC57 vector, at the appropriate restriction sites and then subcloned in the pET-11a expression vector in the same restriction sites. The constructed vector was transformed to E. coli BL21 as an expression host and induced in the presence of IPTG for expression of the IGFBP3 protein. Protein expression was evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Results: Double digestion of the new plasmid (pET-11a -IGBP3) with NdeI and BamHI showed two bands in 873 bp and 5700 bp. To study the accurate cloning procedure, the plasmid was sequenced and its authenticity was confirmed. Also the expected protein band (31.6 kDa) was observed in SDS-PAGE analysis. Conclusion: DNA fragment encoding the full-length IGFBP3 protein was accurately cloned in the pET-11a expression vector and the recombinant plasmid transformed to E. coli BL21 (DE3) expression host. Results of the SDS-PAGE analysis verified that recombinant IGFBP3 (31.6 kDa) are successfully expressed under the control of T7 promoter. As we shown pET-11a can be successfully used for expression of the IGFBP3 protein. PMID:25878991

  19. Cloning and functional expression of a human pancreatic islet glucose-transporter cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Permutt, M.A.; Koranyi, L.; Keller, K.; Lacy, P.E.; Scharp, D.W.; Mueckler, M. )

    1989-11-01

    Previous studies have suggested that pancreatic islet glucose transport is mediated by a high-K{sub m}, low-affinity facilitated transporter similar to that expressed in liver. To determine the relationship between islet and liver glucose transporters, liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clones were isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clone hybridized to mRNA transcripts of the same size in human liver and pancreatic islet RNA. A cDNA library was prepared from purified human pancreatic islet tissue and screened with human liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA. The authors isolated two overlapping cDNA clones encompassing 2600 base pairs, which encode a pancreatic islet protein identical in sequence to that of the putative liver-type glucose-transporter protein. Xenopus oocytes injected with synthetic mRNA transcribed from a full-length cDNA construct exhibited increased uptake of 2-deoxyglucose, confirming the functional identity of the clone. These cDNA clones can now be used to study regulation of expression of the gene and to assess the role of inherited defects in this gene as a candidate for inherited susceptibility to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  20. Construction of infectious cDNA clones for RNA viruses: Turnip crinkle virus.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, Eugene V

    2008-01-01

    Reverse genetic approach is widely used in virology as it makes possible direct identification of viral gene function and uses RNA genomes as vectors. Production of infectious cDNA clones is an essential step in developing a reverse genetic system for an RNA virus. Here, we present rapid method for generation of infectious cDNA clone for Turnip crinkle virus (TCV). The infectious cDNA clone could be used for production of in vitro transcripts with the T7 RNA polymerase which could be used for infection of plants or plant cell protoplasts. The procedure described here includes purification of TCV, viral RNA extraction, reverse transcription, PCR amplification of the full-length cDNA copy of TCV linked to a T7 RNA polymerase promoter, cloning into a plasmid vector, in vitro transcription, and selection of infectious clones. PMID:18370276

  1. Benchmark analysis of algorithms for determining and quantifying full-length mRNA splice forms from RNA-seq data

    PubMed Central

    Hayer, Katharina E.; Pizarro, Angel; Lahens, Nicholas F.; Hogenesch, John B.; Grant, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Because of the advantages of RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) over microarrays, it is gaining widespread popularity for highly parallel gene expression analysis. For example, RNA-Seq is expected to be able to provide accurate identification and quantification of full-length splice forms. A number of informatics packages have been developed for this purpose, but short reads make it a difficult problem in principle. Sequencing error and polymorphisms add further complications. It has become necessary to perform studies to determine which algorithms perform best and which if any algorithms perform adequately. However, there is a dearth of independent and unbiased benchmarking studies. Here we take an approach using both simulated and experimental benchmark data to evaluate their accuracy. Results: We conclude that most methods are inaccurate even using idealized data, and that no method is highly accurate once multiple splice forms, polymorphisms, intron signal, sequencing errors, alignment errors, annotation errors and other complicating factors are present. These results point to the pressing need for further algorithm development. Availability and implementation: Simulated datasets and other supporting information can be found at http://bioinf.itmat.upenn.edu/BEERS/bp2 Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: hayer@upenn.edu PMID:26338770

  2. Short Communication: Phylogenetic and Molecular Characterization of Six Full-Length HIV-1 Genomes from India Reveals a Monophyletic Lineage of Indian Sub-Subtype A1.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sudhanshu Shekhar; Cherian, Sarah; Thakar, Madhuri; Paranjape, Ramesh S

    2016-05-01

    Although HIV-1 epidemic in India is mainly driven by subtype C, subtype A has been reported for over two decades. This is the first comprehensive analysis of sequences of HIV-1 subtype A from India, based on the near full-length genome sequences of six different HIV-1 subtype A Indian isolates along with available partial gene sequences from India and global sequences. The phylogenetic analyses revealed the convergence of all Indian whole-genome sequences and majority of the partial gene sequences to a single node with the sequences most closely related to African sub-subtype A1. The presence of the signature motifs consistent with those observed in subtype A and CTL epitopes characterized specifically for subtype A1 were observed among the study sequences. Deletion of LY amino acid of LYPXnL motif of p6gag and one amino acid in V3 loop have been observed among the study isolates, which have also been observed in a few sequences from East Africa. Overall, the results are indicative of a monophyletic lineage or founder effect of the Indian epidemic due to sub-subtype A1 and supportive of a possible migration of subtype A1 into India from East Africa. PMID:26756665

  3. Otoferlin Deficiency in Zebrafish Results in Defects in Balance and Hearing: Rescue of the Balance and Hearing Phenotype with Full-Length and Truncated Forms of Mouse Otoferlin

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Paroma; Padmanarayana, Murugesh; Abdullah, Nazish; Holman, Chelsea L.; LaDu, Jane; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory hair cells convert mechanical motion into chemical signals. Otoferlin, a six-C2 domain transmembrane protein linked to deafness in humans, is hypothesized to play a role in exocytosis at hair cell ribbon synapses. To date, however, otoferlin has been studied almost exclusively in mouse models, and no rescue experiments have been reported. Here we describe the phenotype associated with morpholino-induced otoferlin knockdown in zebrafish and report the results of rescue experiments conducted with full-length and truncated forms of otoferlin. We found that expression of otoferlin occurs early in development and is restricted to hair cells and the midbrain. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed localization to both apical and basolateral regions of hair cells. Knockdown of otoferlin resulted in hearing and balance defects, as well as locomotion deficiencies. Further, otoferlin morphants had uninflated swim bladders. Rescue experiments conducted with mouse otoferlin restored hearing, balance, and inflation of the swim bladder. Remarkably, truncated forms of otoferlin retaining the C-terminal C2F domain also rescued the otoferlin knockdown phenotype, while the individual N-terminal C2A domain did not. We conclude that otoferlin plays an evolutionarily conserved role in vertebrate hearing and that truncated forms of otoferlin can rescue hearing and balance. PMID:25582200

  4. Improvement of genome assembly completeness and identification of novel full-length protein-coding genes by RNA-seq in the giant panda genome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meili; Hu, Yibo; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Chenglin; Yu, Jun; Xiao, Jingfa; Wei, Fuwen; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    High-quality and complete gene models are the basis of whole genome analyses. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) genome was the first genome sequenced on the basis of solely short reads, but the genome annotation had lacked the support of transcriptomic evidence. In this study, we applied RNA-seq to globally improve the genome assembly completeness and to detect novel expressed transcripts in 12 tissues from giant pandas, by using a transcriptome reconstruction strategy that combined reference-based and de novo methods. Several aspects of genome assembly completeness in the transcribed regions were effectively improved by the de novo assembled transcripts, including genome scaffolding, the detection of small-size assembly errors, the extension of scaffold/contig boundaries, and gap closure. Through expression and homology validation, we detected three groups of novel full-length protein-coding genes. A total of 12.62% of the novel protein-coding genes were validated by proteomic data. GO annotation analysis showed that some of the novel protein-coding genes were involved in pigmentation, anatomical structure formation and reproduction, which might be related to the development and evolution of the black-white pelage, pseudo-thumb and delayed embryonic implantation of giant pandas. The updated genome annotation will help further giant panda studies from both structural and functional perspectives. PMID:26658305

  5. Improvement of genome assembly completeness and identification of novel full-length protein-coding genes by RNA-seq in the giant panda genome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meili; Hu, Yibo; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Chenglin; Yu, Jun; Xiao, Jingfa; Wei, Fuwen; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    High-quality and complete gene models are the basis of whole genome analyses. The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) genome was the first genome sequenced on the basis of solely short reads, but the genome annotation had lacked the support of transcriptomic evidence. In this study, we applied RNA-seq to globally improve the genome assembly completeness and to detect novel expressed transcripts in 12 tissues from giant pandas, by using a transcriptome reconstruction strategy that combined reference-based and de novo methods. Several aspects of genome assembly completeness in the transcribed regions were effectively improved by the de novo assembled transcripts, including genome scaffolding, the detection of small-size assembly errors, the extension of scaffold/contig boundaries, and gap closure. Through expression and homology validation, we detected three groups of novel full-length protein-coding genes. A total of 12.62% of the novel protein-coding genes were validated by proteomic data. GO annotation analysis showed that some of the novel protein-coding genes were involved in pigmentation, anatomical structure formation and reproduction, which might be related to the development and evolution of the black-white pelage, pseudo-thumb and delayed embryonic implantation of giant pandas. The updated genome annotation will help further giant panda studies from both structural and functional perspectives. PMID:26658305

  6. Characterization of full-length and polymerase chain reaction-derived partial-length Gottfried and OSU gene 4 probes for serotypic differentiation of porcine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Rosen, B I; Parwani, A V; Gorziglia, M; Larralde, G; Saif, L J

    1992-10-01

    To determine the VP4 (P type) specificity of porcine rotaviruses, full- and partial-length gene 4 probes were produced from cloned Gottfried and OSU porcine rotavirus genomic segment 4 cDNAs. The gene 4 segments from the prototype Gottfried (VP7 serotype 4) and OSU (VP7 serotype 5) porcine rotavirus strains were selected for study because of their distinct P types and the occurrence of rotaviruses with similar serotypes among swine. Partial-length gene 4 cDNAs were produced and amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and encompassed portions of the variable region (nucleotides 211 to 612) of VP8 encoded by genomic segment 4. The hybridization stringency conditions necessary for optimal probe specificity and sensitivity were determined by dot or Northern (RNA) blot hybridizations against a diverse group of human and animal rotaviruses of heterologous group A serotypes and against representative group B and C porcine rotaviruses. The PCR-derived gene 4 probes were more specific than the full-length gene 4 probes but demonstrated equivalent sensitivity. The Gottfried PCR-derived probe hybridized with Gottfried, SB2, SB3, and SB5 G serotype 4 porcine rotaviruses. The OSU PCR-derived probe hybridized with OSU, EE, A580, and SB-1A porcine rotaviruses and equine H1 rotavirus. Results of the hybridization reactions of the PCR-derived gene 4 probes with selected porcine rotavirus strains agreed with previous serological or genetic analyses, indicating their suitability as diagnostic reagents. PMID:1328281

  7. A truncated fragment of Ov-ASP-1 consisting of the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain maintains adjuvanticity as the full-length protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Yang, Yi; Xiao, Wenjun; Sun, Weilai; Yu, Hong; Du, Lanying; Lustigman, Sara; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-04-15

    The Onchocerca volvulus activation-associated secreted protein-1 (Ov-ASP-1) has good adjuvanticity for a variety of antigens and vaccines, probably due to its ability activate antigen-processing cells (APCs). However, the functional domain of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant is not clearly defined. Based on the structural prediction of this protein family, we constructed a 16-kDa recombinant protein of Ov-ASP-1 that contains only the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain (residues 10-153), designated ASPPR. We found that ASPPR exhibits adjuvanticity similar to that of the full-length Ov-ASP-1 (residues 10-220) for various antigens, including ovalbumin (OVA), HBsAg protein antigen, and the HIV peptide 5 (Pep5) antigen, but it is more suitable for vaccine design in ASPPR-antigen fusion proteins, and more stable in PBS than Ov-ASP-1 stored at -70 °C. These results suggest that ASPPR might be the functional region of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant, and therefore could be developed as an adjuvant for human use. PMID:25736195

  8. Characterization of the cloned full-length and a truncated human target of rapamycin: Activity, specificity, and enzyme inhibition as studied by a high capacity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Zhang Weiguo; Lamison, Craig; LaRocque, James; Gibbons, James; Yu, Ker . E-mail: yuk@wyeth.com

    2005-06-24

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR/TOR) is implicated in cancer and other human disorders and thus an important target for therapeutic intervention. To study human TOR in vitro, we have produced in large scale both the full-length TOR (289 kDa) and a truncated TOR (132 kDa) from HEK293 cells. Both enzymes demonstrated a robust and specific catalytic activity towards the physiological substrate proteins, p70 S6 ribosomal protein kinase 1 (p70S6K1) and eIF4E binding protein 1 (4EBP1), as measured by phosphor-specific antibodies in Western blotting. We developed a high capacity dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) for analysis of kinetic parameters. The Michaelis constant (K {sub m}) values of TOR for ATP and the His6-S6K substrate were shown to be 50 and 0.8 {mu}M, respectively. Dose-response and inhibition mechanisms of several known inhibitors, the rapamycin-FKBP12 complex, wortmannin and LY294002, were also studied in DELFIA. Our data indicate that TOR exhibits kinetic features of those shared by traditional serine/threonine kinases and demonstrate the feasibility for TOR enzyme screen in searching for new inhibitors.

  9. Characterization of the role of full-length CRMP3 and its calpain-cleaved product in inhibiting microtubule polymerization and neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Aylsworth, Amy; Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario ; Jiang, Susan X.; Desbois, Angele; Hou, Sheng T.

    2009-10-01

    Collapsin response mediator proteins (CRMPs) are key modulators of cytoskeletons during neurite outgrowth in response to chemorepulsive guidance molecules. However, their roles in adult injured neurons are not well understood. We previously demonstrated that CRMP3 underwent calcium-dependent N-terminal protein cleavage during excitotoxicity-induced neurite retraction and neuronal death. Here, we report findings that the full-length CRMP3 inhibits tubulin polymerization and neurite outgrowth in cultured mature cerebellar granule neurons, while the N-terminal truncated CRMP3 underwent nuclear translocation and caused a significant nuclear condensation. The N-terminal truncated CRMP3 underwent nuclear translocation through nuclear pores. Nuclear protein pull-down assay and mass spectrometry analysis showed that the N-terminal truncated CRMP3 was associated with nuclear vimentin. In fact, nuclear-localized CRMP3 co-localized with vimentin during glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. However, the association between the truncated CRMP3 and vimentin was not critical for nuclear condensation and neurite outgrowth since over-expression of truncated CRMP3 in vimentin null neurons did not alleviate nuclear condensation and neurite outgrowth inhibition. Together, these studies showed CRMP3's role in attenuating neurite outgrowth possibility through inhibiting microtubule polymerization, and also revealed its novel association with vimentin during nuclear condensation prior to neuronal death.

  10. Expression, purification, refolding and in vitro recovery of active full length recombinant human gelatinase MMP-9 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Sara; Moghadam, Tahereh Tohidi; Dabirmanesh, Bahareh; Khajeh, Khosro

    2016-10-01

    Human gelatinase (MMP-9) is a member of matrix metalloproteinases family (MMPs), which has been associated with malignant tumor progression and metastasis by matrix degradation. Herein, active full length recombinant human MMP-9 (amino acid residues 107-707) has been expressed in the form of inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli BL21, using pET21a vector. Solubilization of inclusion bodies was carried out in Tris-HCl buffer with 6 M urea, and refolding was performed using dilution and urea gradient methods. Tris-HCl buffer with 5 mM CaCl2 and 1 μM ZnCl2 at pH 7.8 was used as a refolding buffer. Analysis of the structure by fluorescence and far-UV circular dichroism showed a well-formed structure by urea gradient method. Kinetic parameters in refolding conditions of rhMMP-9 were also analyzed, depicting increase in the enzyme's activity without any aggregation. PMID:27164034

  11. A Novel Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form CRF76_01B Identified by Near Full-Length Genome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Satoko; Hachiya, Atsuko; Hosaka, Masumi; Matsuda, Masakazu; Ode, Hirotaka; Shigemi, Urara; Okazaki, Reiko; Sadamasu, Kenji; Nagashima, Mami; Toyokawa, Takao; Tateyama, Masao; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Sugiura, Wataru; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Iwatani, Yasumasa

    2016-03-01

    HIV-1 CRF01_AE and subtype B (B) have dominated and their different circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) have emerged in East and Southeast Asian countries. Here, we report a novel drug-resistant HIV-1 CRF. Five independent recombinant specimens exhibiting discordant subtype results for the gag, pol, and env sequences were isolated. These recombinants had the CRF01_AE (gag p17)/B (pol PR-RT and IN)/CRF01_AE (env C2-V3) pattern similar to CRF69_01B. Sequence analysis of four near full-length HIV-1 genomes revealed a unique phylogenetic cluster distinct from previously reported CRFs. Of the four recombinants, three shared an identical mosaic structure including seven breakpoints in the gag, pol, vif, and env regions, designated CRF76_01B. The one remaining recombinant had additional recombination breakpoints in the vpu region and exhibited another unique recombinant form composed of CRF76_01B and B. These findings provide important insight into the transmission dynamics of HIV-1 in Asia that may be important for its effective prevention. PMID:26528581

  12. Reconstitution and Functional Analysis of a Full-Length Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase on a Supported Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of membrane-associated viral proteins is complicated by the challenge of investigating their enzymatic activities in the native membrane-bound state. To permit functional characterization of these proteins, we hypothesized that the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) can support in situ reconstitution of membrane-associated viral protein complexes. As proof-of-principle, we selected the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase which is essential for HCV genome replication, and determined that the SLB platform enables functional reconstitution of membrane protein activity. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring enabled label-free detection of full-length NS5B membrane association, its interaction with replicase subunits NS3, NS5A, and template RNA, and most importantly its RNA synthesis activity. This latter activity could be inhibited by the addition of candidate small molecule drugs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the SLB platform can support functional studies of membrane-associated viral proteins engaged in critical biological activities. PMID:27504492

  13. Interaction of the Full-length Bax Protein with Biomimetic Mitochondrial Liposomes: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Fluorescence Study

    SciTech Connect

    Satsoura, D; Kucerka, Norbert; Shivakumar, S; Pencer, J; Griffiths, C; Leber, B; Andrews, D.W; Katsaras, John; Fradin, C

    2012-01-01

    In response to apoptotic stimuli, the pro-apoptotic protein Bax inserts in the outer mitochondrial membrane, resulting in the formation of pores and the release of several mitochondrial components, and sealing the cell's fate. To study the binding of Bax to membranes, we used an in vitro system consisting of 50 nm diameter liposomes prepared with a lipid composition mimicking that of mitochondrial membranes in which recombinant purified full-length Bax was inserted via activation with purified tBid. We detected the association of the protein with the membrane using fluorescence fluctuation methods, and found that it could well be described by an equilibrium between soluble and membrane-bound Bax and that at a high protein-toliposome ratio the binding seemed to saturate at about 15 Bax proteins per 50 nm diameter liposome. We then obtained structural data for samples in this saturated binding regime using small-angle neutron scattering under different contrast matching conditions. Utilizing a simple model to fit the neutron data, we observed that a significant amount of the protein mass protrudes above the membrane, in contrast to the conjecture that all of the membrane-associated Bax states are umbrella-like. Upon protein binding, we also observed a thinning of the lipid bilayer accompanied by an increase in liposome radius, an effect reminiscent of the action of antimicrobial peptides on membranes.

  14. Reconstitution and Functional Analysis of a Full-Length Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase on a Supported Lipid Bilayer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam-Joon; Pham, Edward A; Hagey, Rachel J; Lévêque, Vincent J; Ma, Han; Klumpp, Klaus; Glenn, Jeffrey S

    2016-07-27

    Therapeutic targeting of membrane-associated viral proteins is complicated by the challenge of investigating their enzymatic activities in the native membrane-bound state. To permit functional characterization of these proteins, we hypothesized that the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) can support in situ reconstitution of membrane-associated viral protein complexes. As proof-of-principle, we selected the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase which is essential for HCV genome replication, and determined that the SLB platform enables functional reconstitution of membrane protein activity. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring enabled label-free detection of full-length NS5B membrane association, its interaction with replicase subunits NS3, NS5A, and template RNA, and most importantly its RNA synthesis activity. This latter activity could be inhibited by the addition of candidate small molecule drugs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the SLB platform can support functional studies of membrane-associated viral proteins engaged in critical biological activities. PMID:27504492

  15. Llama immunization with full-length VAR2CSA generates cross-reactive and inhibitory single-domain antibodies against the DBL1X domain.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Silva, Sofia; Gangnard, Stéphane; Vidal, Marta; Vuchelen, Anneleen; Dechavanne, Sebastien; Chan, Sherwin; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Ramboarina, Stephanie; Chêne, Arnaud; Gamain, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    VAR2CSA stands today as the leading vaccine candidate aiming to protect future pregnant women living in malaria endemic areas against the severe clinical outcomes of pregnancy associated malaria (PAM). The rational design of an efficient VAR2CSA-based vaccine relies on a profound understanding of the molecular interactions associated with P. falciparum infected erythrocyte sequestration in the placenta. Following immunization of a llama with the full-length VAR2CSA recombinant protein, we have expressed and characterized a panel of 19 nanobodies able to recognize the recombinant VAR2CSA as well as the surface of erythrocytes infected with parasites originating from different parts of the world. Domain mapping revealed that a large majority of nanobodies targeted DBL1X whereas a few of them were directed towards DBL4ε, DBL5ε and DBL6ε. One nanobody targeting the DBL1X was able to recognize the native VAR2CSA protein of the three parasite lines tested. Furthermore, four nanobodies targeting DBL1X reproducibly inhibited CSA adhesion of erythrocytes infected with the homologous NF54-CSA parasite strain, providing evidences that DBL1X domain is part or close to the CSA binding site. These nanobodies could serve as useful tools to identify conserved epitopes shared between different variants and to characterize the interactions between VAR2CSA and CSA. PMID:25487735

  16. RNase HI overproduction is required for efficient full-length RNA synthesis in the absence of topoisomerase I in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Baaklini, Imad; Hraiky, Chadi; Rallu, Fabien; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Drolet, Marc

    2004-10-01

    It has long been known that Escherichia coli cells deprived of topoisomerase I (topA null mutants) do not grow. Because mutations reducing DNA gyrase activity and, as a consequence, negative supercoiling, occur to compensate for the loss of topA function, it has been assumed that excessive negative supercoiling is somehow involved in the growth inhibition of topA null mutants. However, how excess negative supercoiling inhibits growth is still unknown. We have previously shown that the overproduction of RNase HI, an enzyme that degrades the RNA portion of an R-loop, can partially compensate for the growth defects because of the absence of topoisomerase I. In this article, we have studied the effects of gyrase reactivation on the physiology of actively growing topA null cells. We found that growth immediately and almost completely ceases upon gyrase reactivation, unless RNase HI is overproduced. Northern blot analysis shows that the cells have a significantly reduced ability to accumulate full-length mRNAs when RNase HI is not overproduced. Interestingly, similar phenotypes, although less severe, are also seen when bacterial cells lacking RNase HI activity are grown and treated in the same way. All together, our results suggest that excess negative supercoiling promotes the formation of R-loops, which, in turn, inhibit RNA synthesis. PMID:15458416

  17. KIAA1114, a full-length protein encoded by the trophinin gene, is a novel surface marker for isolating tumor-initiating cells of multiple hepatocellular carcinoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae Won; Yang, Hyun Gul; Kang, Moon Cheol; Lee, Seungwon; Namkoong, Hong; Lee, Seung-Woo; Sung, Young Chul

    2014-01-01

    Identification of novel biomarkers for tumor-initiating cells (TICs) is of critical importance for developing diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against cancers. Here we identified the role of KIAA1114, a full-length translational product of the trophinin gene, as a distinctive marker for TICs in human liver cancer by developing a DNA vaccine-induced monoclonal antibody targeting the putative extracellular domain of KIAA1114. Compared with other established markers of liver TICs, KIAA1114 was unique in that its expression was detected in both alpha fetoprotein (AFP)-positive and AFP-negative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines with the expression levels of KIAA1114 being positively correlated to their tumorigenic potentials. Notably, KIAA1114 expression was strongly detected in primary hepatic tumor, but neither in the adjacent non-tumorous tissue from the same patient nor normal liver tissue. KIAA1114high cells isolated from HCC cell lines displayed TIC-like features with superior functional and phenotypic traits compared to their KIAA1114low counterparts, including tumorigenic abilities in xenotransplantation model, in vitro colony- and spheroid-forming capabilities, expression of stemness-associated genes, and migratory capacity. Our findings not only address the value of a novel antigen, KIAA1114, as a potential diagnostic factor of human liver cancer, but also as an independent biomarker for identifying TIC populations that could be broadly applied to the heterogeneous HCC subtypes. PMID:24713374

  18. Update on the efficacy, safety, and adherence to treatment of full length parathyroid hormone, PTH (1-84), in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Pietrogrande, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Full length (1-84) parathyroid hormone (PTH) was introduced in Europe as a treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis in 2006. The efficacy of PTH (1-84) in the prevention of vertebral fractures is very high, and is similar to that of teriparatide. Its action in the prevention of femoral fractures has yet to be fully demonstrated, but the incidence of such fractures in trials was very low, and a decrease in nonvertebral fractures was seen in high-risk patients. The effect on bone mineral density (BMD) was clearly demonstrated in the spine and also in the hip. The effects on BMD were evident and increased progressively with treatment until 36 months. After its discontinuation there was a clear decrease in BMD if no antiresorptive treatment was initiated. Increases in bone volumetric density and bone volume in trabecular sites were also reported. Moreover, a bone volume increase was detected in cortical sites. Hypercalcemia and hypercalciuria are frequent consequences of PTH treatment, but rarely have clinical effects and are usually well controlled by reducing calcium and vitamin D supplementation. PMID:21072288

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of a calreticulin cDNA from the pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    PubMed

    Li, Xundong; Zhuo, Kan; Luo, Mei; Sun, Longhua; Liao, Jinling

    2011-06-01

    The cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding a calreticulin from the pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is described herein. The full-length cDNA (Bx-crt-1) contained a 1200 bp open reading frame that could be translated to a 399 amino acid polypeptide. The deduced protein contained highly conserved regions of a calreticulin gene and had 66.2-70.1% amino acid sequence identity to other calreticulin sequences from nematodes. RNAi, RT-PCR amplification, and southern blot suggest that Bx-crt-1 may be important for the development of B. xylophilus. PMID:21371475

  20. Isolation and characterization of a Paracentrotus lividus cDNA encoding a stress-inducible chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Gianguzza, Fabrizio; Antonietta Ragusa, Maria; Roccheri, Maria Carmela; Liegro, Italia Di; Rinaldi, Anna Maria

    2000-01-01

    Chaperonins are ubiquitous proteins that facilitate protein folding in an adenosine triphosphate–dependent manner. Here we report the isolation of a sea urchin cDNA (Plhsp60) coding for mitochondrial chaperonin (Cpn60), whose basal expression is further enhanced by heat shock. The described cDNA corresponds to a full-length mRNA encoding a protein of 582 amino acids, the first 32 of which constitute a putative mitochondrial targeting leader sequence. Comparative analysis has demonstrated that this protein is highly conserved in evolution. PMID:11147969

  1. Benchmarking of the Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencing for quantitative and qualitative assessment of cDNA populations

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomopoulos, Spyros; Wang, Yu Chang; Djambazian, Haig; Badescu, Dunarel; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2016-01-01

    To assess the performance of the Oxford Nanopore Technologies MinION sequencing platform, cDNAs from the External RNA Controls Consortium (ERCC) RNA Spike-In mix were sequenced. This mix mimics mammalian mRNA species and consists of 92 polyadenylated transcripts with known concentration. cDNA libraries were generated using a template switching protocol to facilitate the direct comparison between different sequencing platforms. The MinION performance was assessed for its ability to sequence the cDNAs directly with good accuracy in terms of abundance and full length. The abundance of the ERCC cDNA molecules sequenced by MinION agreed with their expected concentration. No length or GC content bias was observed. The majority of cDNAs were sequenced as full length. Additionally, a complex cDNA population derived from a human HEK-293 cell line was sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2500, PacBio RS II and ONT MinION platforms. We observed that there was a good agreement in the measured cDNA abundance between PacBio RS II and ONT MinION (rpearson = 0.82, isoforms with length more than 700bp) and between Illumina HiSeq 2500 and ONT MinION (rpearson = 0.75). This indicates that the ONT MinION can sequence quantitatively both long and short full length cDNA molecules. PMID:27554526

  2. Benchmarking of the Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencing for quantitative and qualitative assessment of cDNA populations.

    PubMed

    Oikonomopoulos, Spyros; Wang, Yu Chang; Djambazian, Haig; Badescu, Dunarel; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2016-01-01

    To assess the performance of the Oxford Nanopore Technologies MinION sequencing platform, cDNAs from the External RNA Controls Consortium (ERCC) RNA Spike-In mix were sequenced. This mix mimics mammalian mRNA species and consists of 92 polyadenylated transcripts with known concentration. cDNA libraries were generated using a template switching protocol to facilitate the direct comparison between different sequencing platforms. The MinION performance was assessed for its ability to sequence the cDNAs directly with good accuracy in terms of abundance and full length. The abundance of the ERCC cDNA molecules sequenced by MinION agreed with their expected concentration. No length or GC content bias was observed. The majority of cDNAs were sequenced as full length. Additionally, a complex cDNA population derived from a human HEK-293 cell line was sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2500, PacBio RS II and ONT MinION platforms. We observed that there was a good agreement in the measured cDNA abundance between PacBio RS II and ONT MinION (rpearson = 0.82, isoforms with length more than 700bp) and between Illumina HiSeq 2500 and ONT MinION (rpearson = 0.75). This indicates that the ONT MinION can sequence quantitatively both long and short full length cDNA molecules. PMID:27554526

  3. Structure of the HIV-1 Full-Length Capsid Protein in a Conformationally Trapped Unassembled State Induced by Small-Molecule Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Shoucheng; Betts, Laurie; Yang, Ruifeng; Shi, Haibin; Concel, Jason; Ahn, Jinwoo; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun; Yeh, Joanne I.

    2012-11-26

    The capsid (CA) protein plays crucial roles in HIV infection and replication, essential to viral maturation. The absence of high-resolution structural data on unassembled CA hinders the development of antivirals effective in inhibiting assembly. Unlike enzymes that have targetable, functional substrate-binding sites, the CA does not have a known site that affects catalytic or other innate activity, which can be more readily targeted in drug development efforts. We report the crystal structure of the HIV-1 CA, revealing the domain organization in the context of the wild-type full-length (FL) unassembled CA. The FL CA adopts an antiparallel dimer configuration, exhibiting a domain organization sterically incompatible with capsid assembly. A small compound, generated in situ during crystallization, is bound tightly at a hinge site ('H site'), indicating that binding at this interdomain region stabilizes the ADP conformation. Electron microscopy studies on nascent crystals reveal both dimeric and hexameric lattices coexisting within a single condition, in agreement with the interconvertibility of oligomeric forms and supporting the feasibility of promoting assembly-incompetent dimeric states. Solution characterization in the presence of the H-site ligand shows predominantly unassembled dimeric CA, even under conditions that promote assembly. Our structure elucidation of the HIV-1 FL CA and characterization of a potential allosteric binding site provides three-dimensional views of an assembly-defective conformation, a state targeted in, and thus directly relevant to, inhibitor development. Based on our findings, we propose an unprecedented means of preventing CA assembly, by 'conformationally trapping' CA in assembly-incompetent conformational states induced by H-site binding.

  4. Amyloid Core Formed of Full-Length Recombinant Mouse Prion Protein Involves Sequence 127–143 but Not Sequence 107–126

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Biswanath; Lee, Chung-Yu; Lin, Chen; Chen, Eric H.-L.; Huang, Chao-Li; Yang, Chien-Chih; Chen, Rita P.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    The principal event underlying the development of prion disease is the conversion of soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) into its disease-causing isoform, PrPSc. This conversion is associated with a marked change in secondary structure from predominantly α-helical to a high β-sheet content, ultimately leading to the formation of aggregates consisting of ordered fibrillar assemblies referred to as amyloid. In vitro, recombinant prion proteins and short prion peptides from various species have been shown to form amyloid under various conditions and it has been proposed that, theoretically, any protein and peptide could form amyloid under appropriate conditions. To identify the peptide segment involved in the amyloid core formed from recombinant full-length mouse prion protein mPrP(23–230), we carried out seed-induced amyloid formation from recombinant prion protein in the presence of seeds generated from the short prion peptides mPrP(107–143), mPrP(107–126), and mPrP(127–143). Our results showed that the amyloid fibrils formed from mPrP(107–143) and mPrP(127–143), but not those formed from mPrP(107–126), were able to seed the amyloidogenesis of mPrP(23–230), showing that the segment residing in sequence 127–143 was used to form the amyloid core in the fibrillization of mPrP(23–230). PMID:23844138

  5. Full-length M and L RNA sequences of tospovirus isolate 2009-GZT, which causes necrotic ringspot on tomato in China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kuanyu; Liu, Hongguang; Yin, Yueyan; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Yeh, Shyi-Dong; Zhang, Zhongkai; Dong, Jiahong

    2016-05-01

    The virus isolate 2009-GZT, collected from tomato in Guizhou province of China, was identified as a new member of the genus Tospovirus based on its S RNA sequence. Because its provisional name, "tomato necrotic spot virus" (TNSV), was identical to an already existing member of the genus Ilarvirus, 2009-GZT was renamed "tomato necrotic spot-associated virus" (TNSaV). In this study, the full-length sequences of the genomic M and L RNAs of TNSaV were determined and analyzed. The M RNA has 4,773 nucleotides (nt), encoding the NSm protein of 309 aa (34.4 kDa) in the viral (v) strand and the glycoprotein precursor (Gn/Gc) of 1123 aa (128 kDa) in the viral complementary (vc) strand. The NSm and Gn/Gc of TNSaV share the highest aa sequence identity (86.2 % and 86.9 %, respectively) with those of tomato zonate spot virus. The L RNA contains 8,908 nt and codes for the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of 2885 aa (332 kDa) in the vc strand. The RdRp of TNSaV shares the highest aa sequence identity (85.2 %) with that of calla lily chlorotic spot virus (CCSV). Serological assays showed that TNSaV cross-reacts with rabbit antisera against watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV) NP and CCSV NP, indicating that TNSaV is a member of the WSMoV serogroup. PMID:26887969

  6. Full-Length Structures of BenM and Two Variants Reveal Different Oligomerization Schemes for LysR-Type Transcriptional Regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruangprasert, Ajchareeya; Craven, Sarah H.; Neidle, Ellen L.; Momany, Cory

    2010-11-30

    BenM, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) from the bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi, responds synergistically to benzoate and cis,cis-muconate. With these effectors, BenM activates gene expression during benzoate consumption. Without effectors, BenM represses transcription. Here, X-ray crystallography was used to determine the full-length structures of BenM and two variants that activate transcription without benzoate or cis,cis-muconate: BenM(R156H) and BenM(E226K). Previous studies indicate that these regulators function as tetramers. Here, interconnections between subunits in the crystals prevented the formation of a closed oligomer and highlighted the inherent flexibility of this multidomain regulator. Nevertheless, analysis of subunit interfaces suggested the functional significance of key interactions. The structures of BenM and its variants were nearly identical, implying that transcriptional differences rely on factors beyond major conformational changes defined solely by sequence. Comparisons of BenM with other LTTRs, including unpublished structures in the Protein Data Bank, revealed extensive variation in the relative orientations of DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector-binding domains (EBDs). To form dimers, different LTTRs used similar interfaces between two EBDs, each containing two subdomains: EBD-I and EBD-II. Surprisingly, the dimers used three substantially different schemes to form higher-order oligomers. In one scheme used by BenM, oligomer assembly involved contacts between the EBD-II regions and the DBD regions of adjacent subunits. In another scheme, there were no contacts between the EBDs; only the DBDs were involved in tetramer formation. In the third scheme, the oligomer interface involved DBD and EBD-I/EBD-II contacts. These diverse schemes demonstrate novel variation in the oligomeric structures of individual LTTRs within this large and important family.

  7. Crystal Structure of Full-length Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv Glycogen Branching Enzyme; Insights of N-Terminal [beta]-Sandwich in Sustrate Specifity and Enzymatic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Kuntal; Kumar, Shiva; Sharma, Shikha; Garg, Saurabh Kumar; Alam, Mohammad Suhail; Xu, H. Eric; Agrawal, Pushpa; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2010-07-13

    The open reading frame Rv1326c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv encodes for an {alpha}-1,4-glucan branching enzyme (MtbGlgB, EC 2.4.1.18, Uniprot entry Q10625). This enzyme belongs to glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 13 and catalyzes the branching of a linear glucose chain during glycogenesis by cleaving a 1 {yields} 4 bond and making a new 1 {yields} 6 bond. Here, we show the crystal structure of full-length MtbGlgB (MtbGlgBWT) at 2.33-{angstrom} resolution. MtbGlgBWT contains four domains: N1 {beta}-sandwich, N2 {beta}-sandwich, a central ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} domain that houses the catalytic site, and a C-terminal {beta}-sandwich. We have assayed the amylase activity with amylose and starch as substrates and the glycogen branching activity using amylose as a substrate for MtbGlgBWT and the N1 domain-deleted (the first 108 residues deleted) Mtb{Delta}108GlgB protein. The N1 {beta}-sandwich, which is formed by the first 105 amino acids and superimposes well with the N2 {beta}-sandwich, is shown to have an influence in substrate binding in the amylase assay. Also, we have checked and shown that several GH13 family inhibitors are ineffective against MtbGlgBWT and Mtb{Delta}108GlgB. We propose a two-step reaction mechanism, for the amylase activity (1 {yields} 4 bond breakage) and isomerization (1 {yields} 6 bond formation), which occurs in the same catalytic pocket. The structural and functional properties of MtbGlgB and Mtb{Delta}108GlgB are compared with those of the N-terminal 112-amino acid-deleted Escherichia coli GlgB (EC{Delta}112GlgB).

  8. The E1 copper binding domain of full-length amyloid precursor protein mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition in brain metastatic prostate cancer DU145 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, Mallory Blanthorn-Hazell, Sophee Delury, Craig Parkin, Edward

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • Copper levels are elevated in the tumour microenvironment. • APP mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition of DU145 prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • The APP intracellular domain is a prerequisite; soluble forms have no effect. • The E1 CuBD of APP is also a prerequisite. • APP copper binding potentially mitigates copper-induced PCa cell growth inhibition. - Abstract: Copper plays an important role in the aetiology and growth of tumours and levels of the metal are increased in the serum and tumour tissue of patients affected by a range of cancers including prostate cancer (PCa). The molecular mechanisms that enable cancer cells to proliferate in the presence of elevated copper levels are, therefore, of key importance in our understanding of tumour growth progression. In the current study, we have examined the role played by the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in mitigating copper-induced growth inhibition of the PCa cell line, DU145. A range of APP molecular constructs were stably over-expressed in DU145 cells and their effects on cell proliferation in the presence of copper were monitored. Our results show that endogenous APP expression was induced by sub-toxic copper concentrations in DU145 cells and over-expression of the wild-type protein was able to mitigate copper-induced growth inhibition via a mechanism involving the cytosolic and E1 copper binding domains of the full-length protein. APP likely represents one of a range of copper binding proteins that PCa cells employ in order to ensure efficient proliferation despite elevated concentrations of the metal within the tumour microenvironment. Targeting the expression of such proteins may contribute to therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancers.

  9. Subtype-independent near full-length HIV-1 genome sequencing and assembly to be used in large molecular epidemiological studies and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Sebastian; Nowak, Piotr; Neogi, Ujjwal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV-1 near full-length genome (HIV-NFLG) sequencing from plasma is an attractive multidimensional tool to apply in large-scale population-based molecular epidemiological studies. It also enables genotypic resistance testing (GRT) for all drug target sites allowing effective intervention strategies for control and prevention in high-risk population groups. Thus, the main objective of this study was to develop a simplified subtype-independent, cost- and labour-efficient HIV-NFLG protocol that can be used in clinical management as well as in molecular epidemiological studies. Methods Plasma samples (n=30) were obtained from HIV-1B (n=10), HIV-1C (n=10), CRF01_AE (n=5) and CRF01_AG (n=5) infected individuals with minimum viral load >1120 copies/ml. The amplification was performed with two large amplicons of 5.5 kb and 3.7 kb, sequenced with 17 primers to obtain HIV-NFLG. GRT was validated against ViroSeq™ HIV-1 Genotyping System. Results After excluding four plasma samples with low-quality RNA, a total of 26 samples were attempted. Among them, NFLG was obtained from 24 (92%) samples with the lowest viral load being 3000 copies/ml. High (>99%) concordance was observed between HIV-NFLG and ViroSeq™ when determining the drug resistance mutations (DRMs). The N384I connection mutation was additionally detected by NFLG in two samples. Conclusions Our high efficiency subtype-independent HIV-NFLG is a simple and promising approach to be used in large-scale molecular epidemiological studies. It will facilitate the understanding of the HIV-1 pandemic population dynamics and outline effective intervention strategies. Furthermore, it can potentially be applicable in clinical management of drug resistance by evaluating DRMs against all available antiretrovirals in a single assay. PMID:26115688

  10. Full-length CD4 electroinserted in the erythrocyte membrane as a long-lived inhibitor of infection by human immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Zeira, M.; Volsky, D.J. ); Tosi, P.F.; Mouneimne, Y.; Lazarte, J.; Sneed, L.; Nicolau, C. )

    1991-05-15

    Recombinant full-length CD4 expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 cells with the baculovirus system was electroinserted in erythrocyte (RBC) membranes. Of the inserted CD4, 70% was correctly oriented as shown by fluorescence quenching experiments with fluorescein-labeled CD4. The inserted CD4 displayed the same epitopes as the naturally occurring CD4 in human T4 cells. Double-labeling experiments ({sup 125}I-CD4 and {sup 51}Cr-RBC) showed that the half-life of CD4 electroinserted in RBC membrane in rabbits was approximately 7 days. Using the fluorescence dequenching technique with octadecylrhodamine B-labeled human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, the authors showed fusion of the HIV envelope with the plasma membrane of RBC-CD4, whereas no such fusion could be detected with RBC. The dequenching efficiency of RBC-CD4 is the same as that of CEM cells. Exposure to anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody OKT4A, which binds to the CD4 region that attaches to envelope glycoprotein gp120, caused a significant decrease in the dequenching of fluorescence. In vitro infectivity studies showed that preincubation of HIV-1 with RBC-CD4 reduced by 80-90% the appearance of HIV antigens in target cells, the amount of viral reverse transcriptase, and the amount of p24 core antigen produced by the target cells. RBC-CD4, but not RBCs, aggregated with chronically HIV-1-infected T cells and caused formation of giant cells. These data show that the RBC-CD4 reagent is relatively long lived in circulation and efficient in attaching to HIV-1 and HIV-infected cells, and thus it may have value as a therapeutic agent against AIDS.

  11. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α(-/-) cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α(-/-) cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α(-/-) cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration). PMID:27065079

  12. Structure of the Full-Length Human RPA14/32 Complex Gives Insights Into the Mechanism of DNA Binding And Complex Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, X.; Habel, J.E.; Kabaleeswaran, V.; Snell, E.H.; Wold, M.S.; Borgstahl, G.E.O.

    2009-06-03

    Replication protein A (RPA) is the ubiquitous, eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein and is essential for DNA replication, recombination, and repair. Here, crystal structures of the soluble RPA heterodimer, composed of the RPA14 and RPA32 subunits, have been determined for the full-length protein in multiple crystal forms. In all crystals, the electron density for the N-terminal (residues 1--42) and C-terminal (residues 175--270) regions of RPA32 is weak and of poor quality indicating that these regions are disordered and/or assume multiple positions in the crystals. Hence, the RPA32 N terminus, that is hyperphosphorylated in a cell-cycle-dependent manner and in response to DNA damaging agents, appears to be inherently disordered in the unphosphorylated state. The C-terminal, winged helix-loop-helix, protein-protein interaction domain adopts several conformations perhaps to facilitate its interaction with various proteins. Although the ordered regions of RPA14/32 resemble the previously solved protease-resistant core crystal structure, the quaternary structures between the heterodimers are quite different. Thus, the four-helix bundle quaternary assembly noted in the original core structure is unlikely to be related to the quaternary structure of the intact heterotrimer. An organic ligand binding site between subunits RPA14 and RPA32 was identified to bind dioxane. Comparison of the ssDNA binding surfaces of RPA70 with RPA14/32 showed that the lower affinity of RPA14/32 can be attributed to a shallower binding crevice with reduced positive electrostatic charge.

  13. BAY 81-8973, a full-length recombinant factor VIII: Human heat shock protein 70 improves the manufacturing process without affecting clinical safety.

    PubMed

    Maas Enriquez, Monika; Thrift, John; Garger, Stephen; Katterle, Yvonne

    2016-11-01

    BAY 81-8973 is a full-length, unmodified recombinant human factor VIII (FVIII) approved for the treatment of hemophilia A. BAY 81-8973 has the same amino acid sequence as the currently marketed sucrose-formulated recombinant FVIII (rFVIII-FS) product and is produced using additional advanced manufacturing technologies. One of the key manufacturing advances for BAY 81-8973 is introduction of the gene for human heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) into the rFVIII-FS cell line. HSP70 facilitates proper folding of proteins, enhances cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis, and potentially impacts rFVIII glycosylation. HSP70 expression in the BAY 81-8973 cell line along with other manufacturing advances resulted in a higher-producing cell line and improvements in the pharmacokinetics of the final product as determined in clinical studies. HSP70 protein is not detected in the harvest or in the final BAY 81-8973 product. However, because this is a new process, clinical trial safety assessments included monitoring for anti-HSP70 antibodies. Most patients, across all age groups, had low levels of anti-HSP70 antibodies before exposure to the investigational product. During BAY 81-8973 treatment, 5% of patients had sporadic increases in anti-HSP70 antibody levels above a predefined threshold (cutoff value, 239 ng/mL). No clinical symptoms related to anti-HSP70 antibody development occurred. In conclusion, addition of HSP70 to the BAY 81-8973 cell line is an innovative technology for manufacturing rFVIII aimed at improving protein folding and expression. Improved pharmacokinetics and no effect on safety of BAY 81-8973 were observed in clinical trials in patients with hemophilia A. PMID:27436242

  14. Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of Near Full-Length HIV-1 Subtypes A, B, G and Unique Recombinant AC and AD Viral Strains Identified in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Eduan; Holzmayer, Vera; Jacobs, Graeme B.; de Oliveira, Tulio; Brennan, Catherine A.; Hackett, John; van Rensburg, Estrelita Janse

    2015-01-01

    Abstract By the end of 2012, more than 6.1 million people were infected with HIV-1 in South Africa. Subtype C was responsible for the majority of these infections and more than 300 near full-length genomes (NFLGs) have been published. Currently very few non-subtype C isolates have been identified and characterized within the country, particularly full genome non-C isolates. Seven patients from the Tygerberg Virology (TV) cohort were previously identified as possible non-C subtypes and were selected for further analyses. RNA was isolated from five individuals (TV047, TV096, TV101, TV218, and TV546) and DNA from TV016 and TV1057. The NFLGs of these samples were amplified in overlapping fragments and sequenced. Online subtyping tools REGA version 3 and jpHMM were used to screen for subtypes and recombinants. Maximum likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analysis (phyML) was used to infer subtypes and SimPlot was used to confirm possible intersubtype recombinants. We identified three subtype B (TV016, TV047, and TV1057) isolates, one subtype A1 (TV096), one subtype G (TV546), one unique AD (TV101), and one unique AC (TV218) recombinant form. This is the first NFLG of subtype G that has been described in South Africa. The subtype B sequences described also increased the NFLG subtype B sequences in Africa from three to six. There is a need for more NFLG sequences, as partial HIV-1 sequences may underrepresent viral recombinant forms. It is also necessary to continue monitoring the evolution and spread of HIV-1 in South Africa, because understanding viral diversity may play an important role in HIV-1 prevention strategies. PMID:25492033

  15. Therapeutic effects of recombinant forms of full-length and truncated human surfactant protein D in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mamta; Madan, Taruna; Waters, Patrick; Sonar, Sanchaita; Singh, Shiv K; Kamran, Mohammad F; Bernal, Andrés López; Sarma, P Usha; Singh, Vijay K; Crouch, Erika C; Kishore, Uday

    2009-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (Afu) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that can cause fatal invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in immunocompromised individuals. Previously, surfactant protein D (SP-D), a surfactant-associated innate immune molecule, has been shown to enhance phagocytosis and killing of Afu conidia by phagocytic cells in vitro. An intranasal treatment of SP-D significantly increased survival in a murine model of IPA. Here we have examined mechanisms via which recombinant forms of full-length (hSP-D) or truncated human SP-D (rhSP-D) offer protection in a murine model of IPA that were immunosuppressed with hydrocortisone and challenged intranasally with Afu conidia prior to the treatment. SP-D or rhSP-D treatment increased the survival rate to 70% and 80%, respectively (100% mortality on day 7 in IPA mice), with concomitant reduction in the growth of fungal hyphae in the lungs, and increased levels of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma in the lung suspension supernatants, as compared to untreated IPA mice. The level of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) in the lung cell suspension was also raised considerably following treatment with SP-D or rhSP-D. Our results appear to reaffirm the notion that under immunocompromised conditions, human SP-D or its truncated form can offer therapeutic protection against fatal challenge with Afu conidia challenge. Taken together, the SP-D-mediated protective mechanisms include enhanced phagocytosis by recruited macrophages and neutrophils and fungistatic properties, suppression of the levels of pathogenic Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), enhanced local production of protective Th1 cytokines, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma, and that of protective C-C chemokine, MIP-1 alpha. PMID:19403176

  16. Mesenchymal stromal cell delivery of full-length tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand is superior to soluble type for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, ZhengQiang; Kolluri, Krishna K.; Sage, Elizabeth K.; Gowers, Kate H.C.; Janes, Sam M.

    2015-01-01

    Background aims Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) delivery of pro-apoptotic tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is an attractive strategy for anticancer therapy. MSCs expressing full-length human TRAIL (flT) or its soluble form (sT) have previously been shown to be effective for cancer killing. However, a comparison between the two forms has never been performed, leaving it unclear which approach is most effective. This study addresses the issue for the possible clinical application of TRAIL-expressing MSCs in the future. Methods MSCs were transduced with lentiviruses expressing flT or an isoleucine zipper-fused sT. TRAIL expression was examined and cancer cell apoptosis was measured after treatment with transduced MSCs or with MSC-derived soluble TRAIL. Results The transduction does not adversely affect cell phenotype. The sT-transduced MSCs (MSC-sT) secrete abundant levels of soluble TRAIL but do not present the protein on the cell surface. Interestingly, the flT-transduced MSCs (MSC-flT) not only express cell-surface TRAIL but also release flT into medium. These cells were examined for inducing apoptosis in 20 cancer cell lines. MSC-sT cells showed very limited effects. By contrast, MSC-flT cells demonstrated high cancer cell-killing efficiency. More importantly, MSC-flT cells can overcome some cancer cell resistance to recombinant TRAIL. In addition, both cell surface flT and secreted flT are functional for inducing apoptosis. The secreted flT was found to have higher cancer cell-killing capacity than either recombinant TRAIL or MSC-secreted sT. Conclusions These observations demonstrate that MSC delivery of flT is superior to MSC delivery of sT for cancer therapy. PMID:25888191

  17. Effect of the electrostatic surface potential on the oligomerization of full-length human recombinant prion protein at single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Lou, Zhichao; Zhang, Haiqian; Xu, Bingqian

    2016-03-21

    The electrostatic surface potential (ESP) of prion oligomers has critical influences on the aggregating processes of the prion molecules. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) and structural simulation were combined to investigate the molecular basis of the full-length human recombinant prion oligomerization on mica surfaces. The high resolution non-intrusive AFM images showed that the prion oligomers formed different patterns on mica surfaces at different buffer pH values. The basic binding units for the large oligomers were determined to be prion momoners (Ms), dimers (Ds), and trimers (Ts). The forming of the D and T units happened through the binding of hydrophobic β-sheets of the M units. In contrast, the α-helices of these M, D, and T units were the binding areas for the formation of large oligomers. At pH 4.5, the binding units M, D, and T showed clear polarized ESP distributions on the surface domains, while at pH 7.0, they showed more evenly distributed ESPs. Based on the conformations of oligomers observed from AFM images, the D and T units were more abundantly on mica surface at pH 4.5 because the ESP re-distribution of M units helped to stabilize these larger oligomers. The amino acid side chains involved in the binding interfaces were stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions. The detailed analysis of the charged side chains at pH 4.5 indicated that the polarized ESPs induced the aggregations among M, D, and T to form larger oligomers. Therefore, the hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions worked together to form the stabilized prion oligomers. PMID:27004887

  18. Structure of the HIV-1 Full-Length Capsid in a Conformationally-Trapped Unassembled State Induced by Small-Molecule Binding

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shoucheng; Betts, Laurie; Yang, Ruifeng; Shi, Haibin; Concel, Jason; Ahn, Jinwoo; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun; Yeh, Joanne I.

    2011-01-01

    The capsid protein (CA) plays crucial roles in HIV-infection and replication, essential to viral maturation. The absence of high-resolution structural data on unassembled CA hinders the development of antivirals effective in inhibiting assembly. Unlike enzymes that have targetable functional substrate binding sites, the CA does not have a known site that affects catalytic or other innate activity, which can be more readily targeted in drug development efforts. We report the crystal structure of the HIV-1 CA, revealing the domain organization in context of the wild-type full-length (FL) unassembled CA. The FL CA adopts an antiparallel dimer (APD) configuration, exhibiting a domain organization sterically incompatible with capsid assembly. A small compound, generated in-situ during crystallization, is bound tightly at a hinge-site (“H-site”), indicating that binding at this interdomain region stabilizes the ADP conformation. Electron microscopy studies on nascent crystals reveal both dimeric and hexameric lattices coexisting within a single condition, in agreement with the interconvertibility of oligomeric forms and supporting the feasibility of promoting assembly-incompetent dimeric states. Solution characterization in the presence of the H-site ligand shows predominantly unassembled dimeric CA, even under conditions that promote assembly. Our structure elucidation of the HIV-1 FL CA and characterization of a potential allosteric binding site provides 3D views of an assembly-defective conformation, a state targeted in and, thus, directly relevant to, inhibitor development. Based on our findings, we propose an unprecedented means of preventing CA assembly, by ‘conformationally-trapping’ CA in assembly-incompetent conformational states, induced by H-site binding. PMID:21146540

  19. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α−/− cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α−/− cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α−/− cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration). PMID:27065079

  20. Proteome Analysis of Liver Cells Expressing a Full- Length Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Replicon and Biopsy Specimens of Posttransplantation Liver from HCV-Infected Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Chan, Eric Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Qian, Weijun; Stastna, Miroslava; Baas, Tracey; Camp, David G.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2005-06-01

    The development of a reproducible model system for the study of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has the potential to significantly enhance the study of virus-host interactions and provide future direction for modeling the pathogenesis of HCV. While there are studies describing global gene expression changes associated with HCV infection, changes in the proteome have not been characterized. We report the first large scale proteome analysis of the highly permissive Huh-7.5 cell line containing a full length HCV replicon. We detected > 4,400 proteins in this cell line, including HCV replicon proteins, using multidimensional liquid chromatographic (LC) separations coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). The set of Huh-7.5 proteins confidently identified is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive yet reported for a human cell line. Consistent with the literature, a comparison of Huh-7.5 cells (+) and (-) the HCV replicon identified expression changes of proteins involved in lipid metabolism. We extended these analyses to liver biopsy material from HCV-infected patients where > 1,500 proteins were detected from 2 {micro}g protein lysate using the Huh-7.5 protein database and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy. These findings demonstrate the utility of multidimensional proteome analysis of the HCV replicon model system for assisting the determination of proteins/pathways affected by HCV infection. Our ability to extend these analyses to the highly complex proteome of small liver biopsies with limiting protein yields offers the unique opportunity to begin evaluating the clinical significance of protein expression changes associated with HCV infection.

  1. Effect of the electrostatic surface potential on the oligomerization of full-length human recombinant prion protein at single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Lou, Zhichao; Zhang, Haiqian; Xu, Bingqian

    2016-03-01

    The electrostatic surface potential (ESP) of prion oligomers has critical influences on the aggregating processes of the prion molecules. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) and structural simulation were combined to investigate the molecular basis of the full-length human recombinant prion oligomerization on mica surfaces. The high resolution non-intrusive AFM images showed that the prion oligomers formed different patterns on mica surfaces at different buffer pH values. The basic binding units for the large oligomers were determined to be prion momoners (Ms), dimers (Ds), and trimers (Ts). The forming of the D and T units happened through the binding of hydrophobic β-sheets of the M units. In contrast, the α-helices of these M, D, and T units were the binding areas for the formation of large oligomers. At pH 4.5, the binding units M, D, and T showed clear polarized ESP distributions on the surface domains, while at pH 7.0, they showed more evenly distributed ESPs. Based on the conformations of oligomers observed from AFM images, the D and T units were more abundantly on mica surface at pH 4.5 because the ESP re-distribution of M units helped to stabilize these larger oligomers. The amino acid side chains involved in the binding interfaces were stabilized by hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions. The detailed analysis of the charged side chains at pH 4.5 indicated that the polarized ESPs induced the aggregations among M, D, and T to form larger oligomers. Therefore, the hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions worked together to form the stabilized prion oligomers.

  2. Study of Full-Length Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus Genomes with Envelope Gene Polymorphism in a Specific-Pathogen-Free Large White Swine Herd

    PubMed Central

    Bösch, Steffi; Arnauld, Claire; Jestin, André

    2000-01-01

    Specific-pathogen-free (SPF) swine appear to be the most appropriate candidate for pig to human xenotransplantation. Still, the risk of endogenous retrovirus transmission represents a major obstacle, since two human-tropic porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) had been characterized in vitro (P. Le Tissier, J. P. Stoye, Y. Takeuchi, C. Patience, and R. A. Weiss, Nature 389:681–682, 1997). Here we addressed the question of PERV distribution in a French Large White SPF pig herd in vivo. First, PCR screening for previously described PERV envelope genes envA, envB, and envC (D. E. Akiyoshi, M. Denaro, H. Zhu, J. L. Greenstein, P. Banerjee, and J. A. Fishman, J. Virol. 72:4503–4507, 1998; Le Tissier et al., op. cit.). demonstrated ubiquity of envA and envB sequences, whereas envC genes were absent in some animals. On this basis, selective out-breeding of pigs of remote origin might be a means to reduce proviral load in organ donors. Second, we investigated PERV genome carriage in envC negative swine. Eleven distinct full-length PERV transcripts were isolated. The sequence of the complete envelope open reading frame was determined. The deduced amino acid sequences revealed the existence of four clones with functional and five clones with defective PERV PK-15 A- and B-like envelope sequences. The occurrence of easily detectable levels of PERV variants in different pig tissues in vivo heightens the need to assess PERV transmission in xenotransplantation animal models. PMID:10954559

  3. Recombinant production and characterization of full-length and truncated β-1,3-glucanase PglA from Paenibacillus sp. S09

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    of non-catalytic modules on enzymatic properties of β-1,3-glucanase. Activity comparison of full-length PglA and truncated forms revealed the negative effect of C-terminal region on thermal stability of the enzyme. Both the N-and C-terminal domains exerted strong binding activity toward insoluble β-1,3-glucan, and could be classified into CBM families. PMID:24283345

  4. Ultra-Deep Sequencing of HIV-1 near Full-Length and Partial Proviral Genomes Reveals High Genetic Diversity among Brazilian Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Pessôa, Rodrigo; Loureiro, Paula; Esther Lopes, Maria; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna B. F.; Sabino, Ester C; Busch, Michael P.; Sanabani, Sabri S

    2016-01-01

    Background Here, we aimed to gain a comprehensive picture of the HIV-1 diversity in the northeast and southeast part of Brazil. To this end, a high-throughput sequencing-by-synthesis protocol and instrument were used to characterize the near full length (NFLG) and partial HIV-1 proviral genome in 259 HIV-1 infected blood donors at four major blood centers in Brazil: Pro-Sangue foundation (São Paulo state (SP), n 51), Hemominas foundation (Minas Gerais state (MG), n 41), Hemope foundation (Recife state (PE), n 96) and Hemorio blood bank (Rio de Janeiro (RJ), n 70). Materials and Methods A total of 259 blood samples were obtained from 195 donors with long-standing infections and 64 donors with a lack of stage information. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to amplify the HIV-1 NFLGs from five overlapping fragments. The amplicons were molecularly bar-coded, pooled, and sequenced by Illumina paired-end protocol. Results Of the 259 samples studied, 208 (80%) NFLGs and 49 (18.8%) partial fragments were de novo assembled into contiguous sequences and successfully subtyped. Of these 257 samples, 183 (71.2%) were pure subtypes consisting of clade B (n = 167, 65%), C (n = 10, 3.9%), F1 (n = 4, 1.5%), and D (n = 2, 0.7%). Recombinant viruses were detected in 74 (28.8%) samples and consist of unique BF1 (n = 41, 15.9%), BC (n = 7, 2.7%), BCF1 (n = 4, 1.5%), CF1 and CDK (n = 1, 0.4%, each), CRF70_BF1 (n = 4, 1.5%), CRF71_BF1 (n = 12, 4.7%), and CRF72_BF1 (n = 4, 1.5%). Evidence of dual infection was detected in four patients coinfected with the same subtype (n = 3) and distinct subtype (n = 1). Conclusion Based on this work, subtype B appears to be the prevalent subtype followed by a high proportion of intersubtype recombinants that appeared to be arising continually in this country. Our study represents the largest analysis of the viral NFLG ever undertaken worldwide and provides insights into the understanding the genesis of the HIV-1

  5. Immunization of malignant melanoma patients with full-length NY-ESO-1 protein using Toll-like receptor 7 agonist imiquimod as vaccine adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sylvia; O'Neill, David W.; Nonaka, Daisuke; Hardin, Elizabeth; Chiriboga, Luis; Siu, Kimberly; Cruz, Crystal M.; Angiulli, Angelica; Angiulli, Francesca; Ritter, Erika; Holman, Rose Marie; Shapiro, Richard L.; Berman, Russell S.; Berner, Natalie; Shao, Yongzhao; Manches, Olivier; Pan, Linda; Venhaus, Ralph R.; Hoffman, Eric W.; Jungbluth, Achim; Gnjatic, Sacha; Old, Lloyd; Pavlick, Anna C.; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2008-01-01

    T cell-mediated immunity to microbes and to cancer can be enhanced by the activation of dendritic cells (DCs) via Toll-like receptors (TLRs). In this study, we evaluated the safety and feasibility of topical imiquimod, a TLR7 agonist, in a series of vaccinations (26) proteins,(27) and DNA, (28, 29) as well as in vaccines using recombinant Listeria(30) or DCs.(31) In humans, it was shown that topical imiquimod treatment may enhance the immunogenicity of a melanoma peptide vaccine when given with systemic FLT3 ligand. (32) In addition, injection of immature DCs into imiquimod pretreated skin lead to DC activation in situ and enhanced migratory capacity to draining lymph nodes in cancer patients. (33) In this study, we test the safety and feasibility of imiquimod in a vaccine against the cancer/testis antigen NY-ESO-1, and evaluate the immunogenicity of the combination. NY-ESO-1 is detectable in approximately 30% of metastatic melanomas. (34-36) It is against the cancer/testis antigen NY-ESO-1 in patients with malignant melanoma. Recombinant, full-length NY-ESO-1 protein was administered intradermally into imiquimod pre-conditioned sites followed by additional topical applications of imiquimod. The regimen was very well-tolerated with only mild and transient local reactions and constitutional symptoms. Secondarily, we examined the systemic immune response induced by the imiquimod/NY-ESO-1 combination, and show that it elicited both humoral and cellular responses in a significant fraction of patients. Skin biopsies were assessed for imiquimod's in situ immunomodulatory effects. Compared with untreated skin, topical imiquimod induced dermal mononuclear cell infiltrates in all patients composed primarily of T cells, monocytes, macrophages, myeloid DCs and natural killer (NK) cells, and to a lesser extent plasmacytoid DCs. DC activation was evident. This study demonstrates the feasibility and excellent safety profile of a topically applied TLR7 agonist utilized as a

  6. Experimental Pathways towards Developing a Rotavirus Reverse Genetics System: Synthetic Full Length Rotavirus ssRNAs Are Neither Infectious nor Translated in Permissive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Richards, James E.; Desselberger, Ulrich; Lever, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    At present the ability to create rationally engineered mutant rotaviruses is limited because of the lack of a tractable helper virus-free reverse genetics system. Using the cell culture adapted bovine RV RF strain (G6P6 [1]), we have attempted to recover infectious RV by co-transfecting in vitro transcribed ssRNAs which are identical in sequence to the positive sense strand of each of the 11 dsRNA genomic segments of the RF strain. The RNAs were produced either from cDNAs cloned by a target sequence-independent procedure, or from purified double layered RV particles (DLPs). We have validated their translational function by in vitro synthesis of 35S-labelled proteins in rabbit reticulocyte lysates; all 11 proteins encoded by the RV genome were expressed. Transfection experiments with DLP- or cDNA-derived ssRNAs suggested that the RNAs do not act independently as mRNAs for protein synthesis, once delivered into various mammalian cell lines, and exhibit cytotoxicity. Transfected RNAs were not infectious since a viral cytopathic effect was not observed after infection of MA104 cells with lysates from transfected cells. By contrast, an engineered mRNA encoding eGFP was expressed when transfected under identical conditions into the same cell lines. Co-expression of plasmids encoding NSP2 and NSP5 using a fowlpox T7 polymerase recombinant virus revealed viroplasm-like structure formation, but this did not enable the translation of transfected RV ssRNAs. Attempts to recover RV from ssRNAs transcribed intracellularly from transfected cDNAs were also unsuccessful and suggested that these RNAs were also not translated, in contrast to successful translation from a transfected cDNA encoding an eGFP mRNA. PMID:24019962

  7. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1997-06-10

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3{prime} noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  8. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  9. Cloning and expression of Brassica napus beta-carbonic anhydrase cDNA.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qiu-Hong; Li, Mao-Teng; Yu, Long-Jiang

    2009-01-01

    A new full-length beta-carbonic anhydrase cDNA was obtained from Brassica napus by homologous cloning. The cDNA has an open-reading frame of 996 nucleotides, encoding 331 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 35,692 Da and an estimated pI value of 5.459. The deduced amino acid sequence of beta-carbonic anhydrase from Brassica napus shared significant identity with beta-carbonic anhydrases from Brassica carinata, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Thlaspi caerulescens (97.9%, 94%, and 93.5% identity, respectively). This cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) using the expression vector pET-32a(+). The expression band corresponded to the calculated mass plus the N-terminal fusion protein derived from the vector. PMID:20158161

  10. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of cDNA for human. beta. -glucuronidase

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, A.; Kyle, J.W.; Miller, R.D.; Hoffmann, J.W.; Powell, P.P.; Grubb, J.H.; Sly, W.S.; Tropak, M.; Guise, K.S.; Gravel, R.A.

    1987-02-01

    The authors report here the cDNA sequence for human placental ..beta..-glucuronidase (..beta..-D-glucuronoside glucuronosohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.31) and demonstrate expression of the human enzyme in transfected COS cells. They also sequenced a partial cDNA clone from human fibroblasts that contained a 153-base-pair deletion within the coding sequence and found a second type of cDNA clone from placenta that contained the same deletion. Nuclease S1 mapping studies demonstrated two types of mRNAs in human placenta that corresponded to the two types of cDNA clones isolated. The NH/sub 2/-terminal amino acid sequence determined for human spleen ..beta..-glucuronidase agreed with that inferred from the DNA sequence of the two placental clones, beginning at amino acid 23, suggesting a cleaved signal sequence of 22 amino acids. When transfected into COS cells, plasmids containing either placental clone expressed an immunoprecipitable protein that contained N-linked oligosaccharides as evidenced by sensitivity to endoglycosidase F. However, only transfection with the clone containing the 153-base-pair segment led to expression of human ..beta..-glucuronidase activity. These studies provide the sequence for the full-length cDNA for human ..beta..-glucuronidase, demonstrate the existence of two populations of mRNA for ..beta..-glucuronidase in human placenta, only one of which specifies a catalytically active enzyme, and illustrate the importance of expression studies in verifying that a cDNA is functionally full-length.

  11. First full-length genome sequence of the polerovirus luffa aphid-borne yellows virus (LABYV) reveals the presence of at least two consensus sequences in an isolate from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Knierim, Dennis; Maiss, Edgar; Kenyon, Lawrence; Winter, Stephan; Menzel, Wulf

    2015-10-01

    Luffa aphid-borne yellows virus (LABYV) was proposed as the name for a previously undescribed polerovirus based on partial genome sequences obtained from samples of cucurbit plants collected in Thailand between 2008 and 2013. In this study, we determined the first full-length genome sequence of LABYV. Based on phylogenetic analysis and genome properties, it is clear that this virus represents a distinct species in the genus Polerovirus. Analysis of sequences from sample TH24, which was collected in 2010 from a luffa plant in Thailand, reveals the presence of two different full-length genome consensus sequences. PMID:26195192

  12. Cloning, expression, and mapping of GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase cDNA from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    Zou, Li-Ping; Li, Han-Xia; Ouyang, Bo; Zhang, Jun-Hong; Ye, Zhi-Biao

    2006-08-01

    GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP, EC 2.7.7.22) catalyzes the synthesis of GDP-D-mannose and represents the first committed step in plant ascorbic acid biosynthesis. Using potato GMP cDNA sequence as a querying probe, 65 highly homologous tomato ESTs were obtained from dbEST of GenBank and the putative cDNA sequence of tomato GMP was assembled. The full-length GMP cDNA of tomato was cloned by RACE-PCR with primers designed according to the assembled cDNA sequence. The full-length cDNA sequence contained a complete open reading frame (ORF) of 1,086 bp, which encoded 361 amino acid residues. This gene was designated as LeGMP (GenBank accession No. AY605668). Homology analysis of LeGMP showed a 96% identity with potato GMP and the deduced amino acid showed 99%, 97%, 91% and 89% homology with GMP from potato, tobacco, alfalfa and Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that LeGMP was constitutively expressed in roots, stems, leaves, flowers and fruits of tomato; but the expression levels varied. LeGMP was mapped to 3-D using 75 tomato introgression lines (ILs), each containing a single homozygous RFLP-defined chromosome segment from the green-fruited species Lycopersicon pennellii. PMID:16939010

  13. Mechanistic studies on full length and the catalytic domain of the tandem SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase: analysis of phosphoenzyme levels and Vmax stimulatory effects of glycerol and of a phosphotyrosyl peptide ligand.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Walsh, C T

    1997-03-11

    SHP-1, a protein tyrosine phosphatase containing two tandem SH2 domains, is autoinhibited at rest by its N-terminal SH2 (N-SH2) domain. Relief from autoinhibition and a subsequent 10-60-fold increase in V(max) have been observed upon N-SH2 domain engagement by a specific phosphotyrosyl ligand or upon deletion of the SH2 domains to yield the catalytic PTPase domain. In this study, we observed that glycerol and propane-1,2-diols, at concentrations of 4-6 M, accelerated the k(cat) of the full length enzyme by 47-fold and of the PTPase domain by 8-fold. Glycerol also increases the rate of proteolytic cleavage between the SH2 and catalytic PTPase domains. In stopped-flow studies using p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) as a substrate, a burst of p-nitrophenolate in the full length enzyme was not observed; however, a 50-70% stoichiometric burst was observed with the PTPase domain. Rapid quench studies using [32P]pNPP as a substrate showed a very low level of covalent [32P]phosphocysteinyl enzyme intermediate accumulation: 0.06% in the full length enzyme and 1% in the PTP domain. Stimulation by glycerol reduced the accumulating levels of phosphocysteinyl enzyme in both cases of full length SHP-1 and the PTPase domain; however, glycerol is not acting as a cosubstrate since no glycerophosphate product was detectable. It is likely that, for full length SHP-1, with pNPP as a model substrate, enzyme-substrate complex (ES) accumulates in its basal autoinhibited state, whereas enzyme-product complex (EP(i)) accumulates in its pY ligand-bound activated state. Glycerol probably relaxes the compact structure of SHP-1 and the PTP domain, thereby accelerating the catalytic rates in both cases by increasing forward reaction rates of ES and EP(i). PMID:9062130

  14. Human DNA ligase I cDNA: Cloning and functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.E.; Kodama, Kenichi; Tomkinson, A.E.; Lindahl, T.; Lasko, D.D. ); Johnston, L.H. )

    1990-09-01

    Human cDNA clones encoding the major DNA ligase activity in proliferating cells, DNA ligase I, were isolated by two independent methods. In one approach, a human cDNA library was screened by hybridization with oligonucleotides deduced from partial amino acid sequence of purified bovine DNA ligase I. In an alternative approach, a human cDNA library was screened for functional expression of a polypeptide able to complement a cdc9 temperature-sensitive DNA ligase mutant of Saccharomuces cerevisiae. The sequence of an apparently full-length cDNA encodes a 102-kDa protein, indistinguishable in size from authentic human DNA ligase I. The deduced amino acid sequence of the human DNA ligase I cDNA is 40% homologous to the smaller DNA ligases of S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, homology being confined to the carboxyl-terminal regions of the respective proteins. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is transcribed from a single-copy gene on chromosome 19.

  15. Screening of a peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cDNA library to isolate a Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitor clone.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Judith A; Viquez, Olga M; Konan, Koffi N; Dodo, Hortense W

    2005-03-23

    Peanut crop losses due to insect and pest infestation cost peanut farmers nearly 20% of their annual yields. The conventional use of chemicals to combat this problem is costly and toxic to humans and livestock and leads to the development of resistance by target insects. Transgenic plants expressing a trypsin inhibitor gene in tobacco and cowpea have proven to be efficient for resistance against insects. Therefore, a transgenic peanut overexpressing a trypsin inhibitor gene could be an alternative solution to the use of toxic chemicals. Five Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitor (BBTI) proteins were previously isolated from peanut. However, to date, neither cDNA nor genomic DNA sequences are available. The objective of this research was to screen a peanut cDNA library to isolate and sequence at least one full-length peanut BBTI cDNA clone. Two heterologous oligonucleotides were constructed on the basis of a garden pea (Pisum sativa) trypsin inhibitor nucleotide sequence and used as probes to screen a peanut lambda gt-11 cDNA library. Two positive and identical cDNA clones were isolated, subcloned into a pBluescript vector, and sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed a full-length BBTI cDNA of about 243 bp, with a start codon ATG at position +1 and a stop codon TGA at position +243. In the 3' end, two poly adenylation signals (AATAAA) were identified at positions +261 and +269. The isolated cDNA clone encodes a protein of 80 amino acid residues including a leader sequence of 11 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence is 100% identical to published sequences of peanut BBTI AI, AII, BI, and BIII and 81% identical to BII. PMID:15769131

  16. Expression and characterization of full-length human heme oxygenase-1: the presence of intact membrane-binding region leads to increased binding affinity for NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Huber, Warren J; Backes, Wayne L

    2007-10-30

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is the chief regulatory enzyme in the oxidative degradation of heme to biliverdin. In the process of heme degradation, HO-1 receives the electrons necessary for catalysis from the flavoprotein NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR), releasing free iron and carbon monoxide. Much of the recent research involving heme oxygenase has been done using a 30 kDa soluble form of the enzyme, which lacks the membrane binding region (C-terminal 23 amino acids). The goal of this study was to express and purify a full-length human HO-1 (hHO-1) protein; however, due to the lability of the full-length form, a rapid purification procedure was required. This was accomplished by use of a glutathione-s-transferase (GST)-tagged hHO-1 construct. Although the procedure permitted the generation of a full-length HO-1, this form was contaminated with a 30 kDa degradation product that could not be eliminated. Therefore, attempts were made to remove a putative secondary thrombin cleavage site by a conservative mutation of amino acid 254, which replaces arginine with lysine. This mutation allowed the expression and purification of a full-length hHO-1 protein. Unlike wild type (WT) HO-1, the R254K mutant could be purified to a single 32 kDa protein capable of degrading heme at the same rate as the WT enzyme. The R254K full-length form had a specific activity of approximately 200-225 nmol of bilirubin h-1 nmol-1 HO-1 as compared to approximately 140-150 nmol of bilirubin h-1 nmol-1 for the WT form, which contains the 30 kDa contaminant. This is a 2-3-fold increase from the previously reported soluble 30 kDa HO-1, suggesting that the C-terminal 23 amino acids are essential for maximal catalytic activity. Because the membrane-spanning domain is present, the full-length hHO-1 has the potential to incorporate into phospholipid membranes, which can be reconstituted at known concentrations, in combination with other endoplasmic reticulum resident enzymes. PMID:17915953

  17. Horse cDNA clones encoding two MHC class I genes

    SciTech Connect

    Barbis, D.P.; Maher, J.K.; Stanek, J.; Klaunberg, B.A.; Antczak, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    Two full-length clones encoding MHC class I genes were isolated by screening a horse cDNA library, using a probe encoding in human HLA-A2.2Y allele. The library was made in the pcDNA1 vector (Invitrogen, San Diego, CA), using mRNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from a Thoroughbred stallion (No. 0834) homozygous for a common horse MHC haplotype (ELA-A2, -B2, -D2; Antczak et al. 1984; Donaldson et al. 1988). The clones were sequenced, using SP6 and T7 universal primers and horse-specific oligonucleotides designed to extend previously determined sequences.

  18. Structure of full-length Drosophila cryptochrome

    SciTech Connect

    Zoltowski, Brian D.; Vaidya, Anand T.; Top, Deniz; Widom, Joanne; Young, Michael W.; Crane, Brian R.

    2011-12-15

    The cryptochrome/photolyase (CRY/PL) family of photoreceptors mediates adaptive responses to ultraviolet and blue light exposure in all kingdoms of life. Whereas PLs function predominantly in DNA repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 6-4 photolesions caused by ultraviolet radiation, CRYs transduce signals important for growth, development, magnetosensitivity and circadian clocks. Despite these diverse functions, PLs/CRYs preserve a common structural fold, a dependence on flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and an internal photoactivation mechanism. However, members of the CRY/PL family differ in the substrates recognized (protein or DNA), photochemical reactions catalysed and involvement of an antenna cofactor. It is largely unknown how the animal CRYs that regulate circadian rhythms act on their substrates. CRYs contain a variable carboxy-terminal tail that appends the conserved PL homology domain (PHD) and is important for function. Here, we report a 2.3-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Drosophila CRY with an intact C terminus. The C-terminal helix docks in the analogous groove that binds DNA substrates in PLs. Conserved Trp536 juts into the CRY catalytic centre to mimic PL recognition of DNA photolesions. The FAD anionic semiquinone found in the crystals assumes a conformation to facilitate restructuring of the tail helix. These results help reconcile the diverse functions of the CRY/PL family by demonstrating how conserved protein architecture and photochemistry can be elaborated into a range of light-driven functions.

  19. The 35-amino acid C2 protein of Cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus, Burewala, implicated in resistance breaking in cotton, retains some activities of the full-length protein.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Fazal; Iqbal, Zafar; Briddon, Rob W; Vazquez, Franck; Saeed, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    With one exception, all the begomoviruses characterized so far encode an ~134-amino acid (aa) (A)C2 protein. The exception is the "Burewala" strain of Cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV-Bu), associated with resistance breaking in cotton across Pakistan and northwestern India, that encodes a truncated 35-aa C2. The C2 protein encoded by begomoviruses performs multiple functions including suppression of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), modulating microRNA (miRNA) expression and may be a pathogenicity determinant. The study described here was designed to investigate whether the CLCuKoV-Bu 35-aa C2 retains the activities of the full-length C2 protein. The results showed the 35-aa C2 of CLCuKoV-Bu acts as a pathogenicity determinant, suppresses PTGS and upregulates miRNA expression when expressed from a Potato virus X vector in Nicotiana benthamiana. The symptoms induced by expression of full-length C2 were more severe than those induced by the 35-aa C2. The accumulation of most developmental miRNAs decreases with the full-length C2 protein and increases with the 35-aa peptide of CLCuKoV-Bu. The study also revealed that 35-aa peptide of CLCuKoV-Bu maintains suppressor of silencing activity at a level equal to that of full-length C2. The significance of the results with respect to virus fitness and resistance breaking is discussed. PMID:27209537

  20. [Construction of an infectious cDNA clone derived from foot-and-mouth disease virus O/QYYS/s/06].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shousheng; Zhao, Qizu; Liu, Xiangtao; Sun, Yanwei; Ren, Tao; Zhang, Guihong; Qi, Wenbao; Zha, Yunfeng; Kong, Lingchen; Zhang, Han; Fan, Huiying; Liao, Ming

    2009-07-01

    After sequencing, we amplified and cloned foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) O/QYYS/s/06 whole genome by three fragments. These three fragments were cloned into vector P43 one by one to construct recombinant plasmid P43C, which carried the full-length cDNA of FMDV O/QYYS/s/06. Then, plasmid P43C and plasmid T7 expressing T7 RNA polymerase were co-transfected into BHK-21 cells. After 48 h, we harvested the culture broth from transfected BHK-21 cells and inoculated into 2-3 day-old sucking mice. After four generation passage, the virus harvested from sucking mice was confirmed to be type O FMDV by the indirect hemagglutination test, sucking mice's neutralization test and sequencing. The results showed that we have successfully constructed the full-length cDNA clone of FMDV O/QYYS/s/06 strain. PMID:19835137

  1. Characterisation of full-length mitochondrial copies and partial nuclear copies (numts) of the cytochrome b and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I genes of Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Hammondia heydorni and Hammondia triffittae (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae).

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Bjørn

    2013-04-01

    Genomic DNA was extracted from three oocyst isolates of Hammondia triffittae from foxes and two oocyst isolates of Hammondia heydorni from dogs, as well as from cell culture-derived tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii (RH strain) and Neospora caninum (NC-Liverpool strain), and examined by PCR with primers targeting the cytochrome b (cytb) and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) genes in order to characterise both genes and, if possible, the remainder of the mitochondrial genome of these species. Several primers were designed and used in various combinations to amplify regions within and between both genes and to determine gene order. When certain forward primers targeting cytb were used in combination with certain reverse primers targeting cox1, two overlapping sequences were obtained for each species and isolate studied, which showed that a full-length copy of cytb was followed 36-37 bp downstream by a full-length copy of cox1, and these sequences are believed to represent the true mitochondrial genes and the gene order in the mitochondrial genome of the four species examined. The cytb of T. gondii, N. caninum, H. heydorni and H. triffittae comprised a total of 1,080 bp (359 amino acids) and used ATG and TAA as start and stop codon, respectively. The cox1 of these species also used TAA as stop codon, whereas the most likely start codon was ATG, resulting in a gene comprising 1,491 bp (496 amino acids). Pair-wise sequence comparisons based on either cytb or cox1 clearly separated T. gondii from N. caninum and both of these species from the two Hammondia species, whereas the latter two species were 100 % identical at cytb and shared 99.3 % identity at cox1. Phylogenetic analyses using the maximum-likelihood method confirmed these findings and placed T. gondii in a clade separate from the three other species and all four Toxoplasmatinae in a sister clade to Eimeria spp. PCR with other primers and/or primer pairs than those used to obtain the full-length

  2. Cloning and sequencing of chloroperoxidase cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, G H; Kenigsberg, P; Axley, M J; Nuell, M; Hager, L P

    1986-01-01

    An oligod-d(T) 12-18 primed cDNA library has been prepared from Caldariomyces fumago mRNA. A clone containing a full-length insert was sequenced on the supercoiled plasmid, pBR322. The complete primary sequence of chloroperoxidase has been derived. We have also determined about 73% of the peptide sequence by amino acid sequencing. The DNA sequence data matches all of the available known peptide sequences. The mature polypeptide contains 300 amino acids having a combined molecular weight of 32,974 daltons. A putative signal peptide of 21 amino acids is proposed from DNA sequence data. The chloroperoxidase gene encodes three potential glycosylation sites recognized as Asn-X-Thr/Ser sequences. Three cysteine residues are found in the protein sequence. A small region around Cys87 bears a minimal homology to the active site of cytochrome P450cam. No other heme protein homologues can be detected. We propose that Cys87 serves as a thiolate ligand to the iron of heme prosthetic group. A rare arginine codon, AGG, is used three times out of twelve in contrast to the very infrequent use of this codon in E. coli or yeast. PMID:3774552

  3. Origin of hepatitis C virus genotype 3 in Africa as estimated through an evolutionary analysis of the full-length genomes of nine subtypes, including the newly sequenced 3d and 3e.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhua; Lu, Ling; Murphy, Donald G; Negro, Francesco; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2014-08-01

    We characterized the full-length genomes of nine hepatitis C virus genotype 3 (HCV-3) isolates: QC7, QC8, QC9, QC10, QC34, QC88, NE145, NE274 and 811. To the best of our knowledge, NE274 and NE145 were the first full-length genomes for confirming the provisionally assigned subtypes 3d and 3e, respectively, whereas 811 represented the first HCV-3 isolate that had its extreme 3' UTR terminus sequenced. Based on these full-length genomes, together with 42 references representing eight assigned subtypes and an unclassified variant of HCV-3, and 10 sequences of six other genotypes, a timescaled phylogenetic tree was reconstructed after an evolutionary analysis using a coalescent Bayesian procedure. The results indicated that subtypes 3a, 3d and 3e formed a subset with a common ancestor dated to ~202.89 [95% highest posterior density (HPD): 160.11, 264.6] years ago. The analysis of all of the HCV-3 sequences as a single lineage resulted in the dating of the divergence time to ~457.81 (95% HPD: 350.62, 587.53) years ago, whereas the common ancestor of all of the seven HCV genotypes dated to ~780.86 (95% HPD: 592.15, 1021.34) years ago. As subtype 3h and the unclassified variant were relatives, and represented the oldest HCV-3 lineages with origins in Africa and the Middle East, these findings may indicate the ancestral origin of HCV-3 in Africa. We speculate that the ancestral HCV-3 strains may have been brought to South Asia from Africa by land and/or across the sea to result in its indigenous circulation in that region. The spread was estimated to have occurred in the era after Vasco da Gama had completed his expeditions by sailing along the eastern coast of Africa to India. However, before this era, Arabians had practised slave trading from Africa to the Middle East and South Asia for centuries, which may have mediated the earliest spread of HCV-3. PMID:24795446

  4. Cloning a Chymotrypsin-Like 1 (CTRL-1) Protease cDNA from the Jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yunwi; Kwon, Young Chul; Bae, Seong Kyeong; Hwang, Duhyeon; Yang, Hye Ryeon; Choudhary, Indu; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Yum, Seungshic; Shin, Kyoungsoon; Yoon, Won Duk; Kang, Changkeun; Kim, Euikyung

    2016-01-01

    An enzyme in a nematocyst extract of the Nemopilema nomurai jellyfish, caught off the coast of the Republic of Korea, catalyzed the cleavage of chymotrypsin substrate in an amidolytic kinetic assay, and this activity was inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride. We isolated the full-length cDNA sequence of this enzyme, which contains 850 nucleotides, with an open reading frame of 801 encoding 266 amino acids. A blast analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence showed 41% identity with human chymotrypsin-like (CTRL) and the CTRL-1 precursor. Therefore, we designated this enzyme N. nomurai CTRL-1. The primary structure of N. nomurai CTRL-1 includes a leader peptide and a highly conserved catalytic triad of His(69), Asp(117), and Ser(216). The disulfide bonds of chymotrypsin and the substrate-binding sites are highly conserved compared with the CTRLs of other species, including mammalian species. Nemopilema nomurai CTRL-1 is evolutionarily more closely related to Actinopterygii than to Scyphozoan (Aurelia aurita) or Hydrozoan (Hydra vulgaris). The N. nomurai CTRL1 was amplified from the genomic DNA with PCR using specific primers designed based on the full-length cDNA, and then sequenced. The N. nomurai CTRL1 gene contains 2434 nucleotides and four distinct exons. The 5' donor splice (GT) and 3' acceptor splice sequences (AG) are wholly conserved. This is the first report of the CTRL1 gene and cDNA structures in the jellyfish N. nomurai. PMID:27399771

  5. Cloning a Chymotrypsin-Like 1 (CTRL-1) Protease cDNA from the Jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Yunwi; Kwon, Young Chul; Bae, Seong Kyeong; Hwang, Duhyeon; Yang, Hye Ryeon; Choudhary, Indu; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Yum, Seungshic; Shin, Kyoungsoon; Yoon, Won Duk; Kang, Changkeun; Kim, Euikyung

    2016-01-01

    An enzyme in a nematocyst extract of the Nemopilema nomurai jellyfish, caught off the coast of the Republic of Korea, catalyzed the cleavage of chymotrypsin substrate in an amidolytic kinetic assay, and this activity was inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride. We isolated the full-length cDNA sequence of this enzyme, which contains 850 nucleotides, with an open reading frame of 801 encoding 266 amino acids. A blast analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence showed 41% identity with human chymotrypsin-like (CTRL) and the CTRL-1 precursor. Therefore, we designated this enzyme N. nomurai CTRL-1. The primary structure of N. nomurai CTRL-1 includes a leader peptide and a highly conserved catalytic triad of His69, Asp117, and Ser216. The disulfide bonds of chymotrypsin and the substrate-binding sites are highly conserved compared with the CTRLs of other species, including mammalian species. Nemopilema nomurai CTRL-1 is evolutionarily more closely related to Actinopterygii than to Scyphozoan (Aurelia aurita) or Hydrozoan (Hydra vulgaris). The N. nomurai CTRL1 was amplified from the genomic DNA with PCR using specific primers designed based on the full-length cDNA, and then sequenced. The N. nomurai CTRL1 gene contains 2434 nucleotides and four distinct exons. The 5′ donor splice (GT) and 3′ acceptor splice sequences (AG) are wholly conserved. This is the first report of the CTRL1 gene and cDNA structures in the jellyfish N. nomurai. PMID:27399771

  6. Molecular cloning of cDNA encoding an unrecognized component of amyloid in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Uéda, K; Fukushima, H; Masliah, E; Xia, Y; Iwai, A; Yoshimoto, M; Otero, D A; Kondo, J; Ihara, Y; Saitoh, T

    1993-01-01

    A neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD) is a widespread amyloid deposition. We analyzed the entire amino acid sequences in an amyloid preparation and found, in addition to the major beta/A4-protein (A beta) fragment, two unknown peptides. We raised antibodies against synthetic peptides using subsequences of these peptides. These antibodies immunostained amyloid in neuritic and diffuse plaques as well as vascular amyloid. Electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that the immunostaining was localized on amyloid fibrils. We have isolated an apparently full-length cDNA encoding a 140-amino-acid protein within which two previously unreported amyloid sequences are encoded in tandem in the most hydrophobic domain. We tentatively named this 35-amino acid peptide NAC (non-A beta component of AD amyloid) and its precursor NACP. NAC is the second component, after A beta, identified chemically in the purified AD amyloid preparation. Secondary structure predictions indicate that the NAC peptide sequence has a strong tendency to form beta-structures consistent with its association with amyloid. NACP is detected as a M(r) 19,000 protein in the cytosolic fraction of brain homogenates and comigrates on immunoblots with NACP synthesized in Escherichia coli from NACP cDNA. NACP mRNA is expressed principally in brain but is also expressed in low concentrations in all tissues examined except in liver, suggesting its ubiquitous and brain-specific functions. The availability of the cDNA encoding full-length NACP should help to elucidate the mechanisms of amyloidosis in AD. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:8248242

  7. Cloning of a short HLA-DQ beta locus-specific cDNA probe: typing for DQw specificities.

    PubMed

    Sood, S K; McCusker, C T; Singal, D P

    1989-01-01

    A short HLA-DQ beta locus-specific (141 bp) probe was cloned from the full-length pII-beta-1 cDNA. Pst 1-digested genomic DNA from homozygous typing cell lines (HTC) was hybridized with this short DQ beta locus-specific, pDQ beta 141, probe. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns generated with this DQ beta locus-specific probe were compared with those obtained with the full-length (627 bp) DQ beta, pII-beta-1, probe. The results demonstrate that the RFLP patterns with the pDQ beta 141 probe were very simple, and no crossreacting DR beta and DX beta bands were observed. DQw1, 2, 3 and 4 specificities could each be identified by a single RFLP. PMID:2467193

  8. Mitotic stability and nuclear inheritance of integrated viral cDNA in engineered hypovirulent strains of the chestnut blight fungus.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B; Choi, G H; Nuss, D L

    1993-01-01

    Transmissible hypovirulence is a novel form of biological control in which virulence of a fungal pathogen is attenuated by an endogenous RNA virus. The feasibility of engineering hypovirulence was recently demonstrated by transformation of the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica, with a full-length cDNA copy of a hypovirulence-associated viral RNA. Engineered hypovirulent transformants were found to contain both a chromsomally integrated cDNA copy of the viral genome and a resurrected cytoplasmically replicating double-stranded RNA form. We now report stable maintenance of integrated viral cDNA through repeated rounds of asexual sporulation and passages on host plant tissue. We also demonstrate stable nuclear inheritance of the integrated viral cDNA and resurrection of the cytoplasmic viral double-stranded RNA form in progeny resulting from the mating of an engineered hypovirulent C. parasitica strain and a vegetatively incompatible virulent strain. Mitotic stability of the viral cDNA ensures highly efficient transmission of the hypovirulence phenotype through conidia. Meiotic transmission, a mode not observed for natural hypovirulent strains, introduces virus into ascospore progeny representing a spectrum of vegetative compatibility groups, thereby circumventing barriers to anastomosis-mediated transmission imposed by the fungal vegetative incompatibility system. These transmission properties significantly enhance the potential of engineered hypovirulent C. parasitica strains as effective biocontrol agents. Images PMID:8344241

  9. Characterization of cDNA clones encoding rabbit and human serum paraoxonase: The mature protein retains its signal sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, C.; Richter, R.J.; Humbert, R.; Omiecinski, C.J.; Furlong, C.E. ); Chapline, C.; Crabb, J.W. )

    1991-10-22

    Serum paraoxonase hydrolyzes the toxic metabolites of a variety of organophosphorus insecticides. High serum paraoxonase levels appear to protect against the neurotoxic effects of organophosphorus substrates of this enzyme. The amino acid sequence accounting for 42% of rabbit paraoxonase was determined. From these data, two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized and used to screen a rabbit liver cDNA library. Human paraoxonase clones were isolated from a liver cDNA library by using the rabbit cDNA as a hybridization probe. Inserts from three of the longest clones were sequenced, and one full-length clone contained an open reading frame encoding 355 amino acids, four less than the rabbit paraoxonase protein. Amino-terminal sequences derived from purified rabbit and human paraoxonase proteins suggested that the signal sequence is retained, with the exception of the initiator methionine residue. Characterization of the rabbit and human paraoxonase cDNA clones confirms that the signal sequences are not processed, except for the N-terminal methionine residue. The rabbit and human cDNA clones demonstrate striking nucleotide and deduced amino acid similarities (greater than 85%), suggesting an important metabolic role and constraints on the evolution of this protein.

  10. Characterisation and expression of a cDNA encoding the 80-kDa large subunit of Schistosoma japonicum calpain.

    PubMed

    Scott, J C; McManus, D P

    2000-01-01

    We describe the cloning of a full length calpain-encoding cDNA constructed from two truncated cDNAs isolated from a cDNA library prepared with mRNA isolated from adult worms of the Philippine strain of Schistosoma japonicum. The cDNA sequence is 2.456 kb in length and predicts a protein of 758 residues with a molecular mass of 86.61 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.34. Probes spanning the entire calpain cDNA hybridised to multiple bands in genomic DNAs of Philippine (SjP) and Chinese (SjC) S. japonicum, with some restriction fragment length polymorphisms evident between the two strains. Northern hybridisation analysis indicated that the cDNA codes for a single RNA transcript between 2.6 and 3.6 kb in size in the SjP and SjC genomes. After subcloning in the QIA express vectors pQE-31 and pQE-40 and subsequent expression, the recombinant protein was purified and shown to bind calcium. The availability of recombinant S. japonicum calpain will allow its future evaluation as a vaccine candidate, especially in light of recent work with the S. mansoni homologue which has provided evidence that this protein may be a target of protective immunity. PMID:11227760

  11. Impact of a deletion of the full-length and short isoform of p75NTR on cholinergic innervation and the population of postmitotic doublecortin positive cells in the dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Poser, Robert; Dokter, Martin; von Bohlen und Halbach, Viola; Berger, Stefan M.; Busch, Ruben; Baldus, Marian; Unsicker, Klaus; von Bohlen und Halbach, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of mice carrying a deletion of the pan-neurotrophin receptor p75NTR have allowed identifying p75NTR as an important structural regulator of the hippocampus. Most of the previous analyses were done using p75NTRExIII knockout mice which still express the short isoform of p75NTR. To scrutinize the role of p75NTR in the hippocampus, we analyzed adult and aged p75NTRExIV knockout mice, in which both, the short and the full-length isoform are deleted. Deletion of these isoforms induced morphological alterations in the adult dentate gyrus (DG), leading to an increase in the thickness of the molecular and granular layer. Based on these observations, we next determined the morphological substrates that might contribute to this phenotype. The cholinergic innervation of the molecular and granular layer of the DG was found to be significantly increased in the knockout mice. Furthermore, adult neurogenesis in the DG was found to be significantly altered with increased numbers of doublecortin (DCX) positive cells and reduced numbers of apoptotic cells in p75NTRExIV knockout mice. However, cell proliferation as measured by phosphohiston H3 (PH3) positive cell numbers was not affected. These morphological alterations (number of DCX-positive cells and increased cholinergic fiber densities) as well as reduced cell death in the DG are likely to contribute to the observed thickening of the granular layer in p75NTRExIV knockout mice. In addition, Sholl-analysis of DCX-positive neurons revealed a higher dendritic complexity and could thus be a possible morphological correlate for the increased thickness of the molecular layer in p75NTR deficient animals. Our data clearly demonstrate that deletion of both, the short and the full-length isoform of p75NTR affects DG morphology, due to alterations of the cholinergic system and an imbalance between neurogenesis and programmed cell death within the subgranular zone. PMID:26074780

  12. Cloning and expression of a novel chicken sulfotransferase cDNA regulated by GH.

    PubMed

    Cao, H; Agarwal, S K; Burnside, J

    1999-03-01

    We have used mRNA differential display to compare gene expression in normal and GH receptor-deficient dwarf chickens, and report here the characterization of one differentially expressed gene, which shows significant sequence identity to the sulfotransferase gene family. Partial cDNA clones were isolated from a chicken liver cDNA library and an additional sequence was obtained using 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends. A complete cDNA probe hybridizes to three transcripts (2.4, 2.0 and 1.45 kb) on Northern blots of chicken liver RNA, which differ in the length of the 3' untranslated region. All three transcripts are expressed at higher levels in normal vs dwarf chickens, as expected for a GH-regulated gene. The expression of this sulfotransferase mRNA was also detected in skeletal muscle, but not other tissues. The administration of GH to chickens increased the hepatic expression within 1 h, suggesting this sulfotransferase could be directly regulated by GH. Sulfotransferase activity, using estradiol or corticosterone as substrate, is detected in cells transfected with an expression vector containing the full-length cDNA. The sequence of this sulfotransferase does not show significant similarity with any subfamily of the sulfotransferases and its endogenous substrate is presently unknown. However, we speculate that GH activation of sulfotransferase activity could play a role in reducing concentrations of growth-antagonistic steroid hormones in GH target tissues. These results demonstrate the usefulness of differential display in this model system to identify genes that play a role in mediating GH action. PMID:10076195

  13. Paramyosin from the parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei: cDNA cloning and heterologous expression.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, J G; Ljunggren, E L; Bergström, K

    2001-05-01

    The burrowing mite Sarcoptes scabiei is the causative agent of the highly contagious disease sarcoptic mange or scabies. So far, there is no in vitro propagation system for S. scabiei available, and mites used for various purposes must be isolated from infected hosts. Lack of parasite-derived material has limited the possibilities to study several aspects of scabies, including pathogenesis and immunity. It has also hampered the development of high performance serological assays. We have now constructed an S. scabiei cDNA expression library with mRNA purified from mites isolated from red foxes. Immunoscreening of the library enabled us to clone a full-length cDNA coding for a 102.5 kDa protein. Sequence similarity searches identified the protein as a paramyosin. Recombinant S. scabiei paramyosin expressed in Escherichia coli was recognized by sera from dogs and swine infected with S. scabiei. We also designed a small paramyosin construct of about 17 kDa that included the N-terminal part, an evolutionary variable part of the helical core, and the C-terminal part of the molecule. The miniaturized protein was efficiently expressed in E. coli and was recognized by sera from immunized rabbits. These data demonstrate that the cDNA library can assist in the isolation of important S. scabiei antigens and that recombinant proteins can be useful for the study of scabies. PMID:11393829

  14. Efficient recovery of infectious vesicular stomatitis virus entirely from cDNA clones.

    PubMed

    Whelan, S P; Ball, L A; Barr, J N; Wertz, G T

    1995-08-29

    Infectious vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), the prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus, was recovered from a full-length cDNA clone of the viral genome. Bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase expressed from a recombinant vaccinia virus was used to drive the synthesis of a genome-length positive-sense transcript of VSV from a cDNA clone in baby hamster kidney cells that were simultaneously expressing the VSV nucleocapsid protein, phosphoprotein, and polymerase from separate plasmids. Up to 10(5) infectious virus particles were obtained from transfection of 10(6) cells, as determined by plaque assays. This virus was amplified on passage, neutralized by VSV-specific antiserum, and shown to possess specific nucleotide sequence markers characteristic of the cDNA. This achievement renders the biology of VSV fully accessible to genetic manipulation of the viral genome. In contrast to the success with positive-sense RNA, attempts to recover infectious virus from negative-sense T7 transcripts were uniformly unsuccessful, because T7 RNA polymerase terminated transcription at or near the VSV intergenic junctions. PMID:7667300

  15. Construction of cDNA library and preliminary analysis of expressed sequence tags from Siberian tiger

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-Qing; Lu, Tao-Feng; Feng, Bao-Gang; Liu, Dan; Guan, Wei-Jun; Ma, Yue-Hui

    2010-01-01

    In this study we successfully constructed a full-length cDNA library from Siberian tiger, Panthera tigris altaica, the most well-known wild Animal. Total RNA was extracted from cultured Siberian tiger fibroblasts in vitro. The titers of primary and amplified libraries were 1.30×106 pfu/ml and 1.62×109 pfu/ml respectively. The proportion of recombinants from unamplified library was 90.5% and average length of exogenous inserts was 1.13 kb. A total of 282 individual ESTs with sizes ranging from 328 to 1,142bps were then analyzed the BLASTX score revealed that 53.9% of the sequences were classified as strong match, 38.6% as nominal and 7.4% as weak match. 28.0% of them were found to be related to enzyme/catalytic protein, 20.9% ESTs to metabolism, 13.1% ESTs to transport, 12.1% ESTs to signal transducer/cell communication, 9.9% ESTs to structure protein, 3.9% ESTs to immunity protein/defense metabolism, 3.2% ESTs to cell cycle, and 8.9 ESTs classified as novel genes. These results demonstrated that the reliability and representativeness of the cDNA library attained to the requirements of a standard cDNA library. This library provided a useful platform for the functional genomic research of Siberian tigers. PMID:20941376

  16. cDNA cloning of human plasminogen activator-inhibitor from endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, D; Zeheb, R; Yang, A Y; Rafferty, U M; Andreasen, P A; Nielsen, L; Dano, K; Lebo, R V; Gelehrter, T D

    1986-01-01

    Full-length cDNA for plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) was isolated from a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) lambda gt11 cDNA library. Three overlapping clones were identified by immunologic screening of 10(6) recombinant phage using a rabbit anti-human fibrosarcoma PAI-1 antiserum. The fusion proteins encoded by these three clones also react strongly with a monoclonal mouse anti-human fibrosarcoma PAI-1 antibody. By nucleotide sequence analysis, PAI-1 cDNA encodes a protein containing 402 amino acids with a predicted, nonglycosylated molecular mass of 45 kD. Identity of this material as authentic PAI-1 was confirmed by the presence of high level homology with the primary amino acid sequence of an internal peptide prepared from purified rat hepatoma PAI-1. The predicted amino acid sequence also reveals extensive homology with other members of the serine protease inhibitor gene family. Cultured HUVECs contain two PAI-1 mRNA species, both encoded by a single gene, differing by 1 kb in the 3' untranslated region. The PAI-1 gene is located on human chromosome 7. Images PMID:3097076

  17. Ohanin, a novel protein from king cobra venom: its cDNA and genomic organization.

    PubMed

    Pung, Yuh Fen; Kumar, Sanjeed Vijaya; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Fry, Bryan G; Kumar, Prakash P; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2006-04-26

    Ohanin, from king cobra venom, is a novel protein which induces hypolocomotion and hyperalgesia in mice [Pung, Y.F., Wong, P.T.H., Kumar, P.P., Hodgson W.C., Kini, R.M., 2005. Ohanin, a novel protein from king cobra venom induces hypolocomotion and hyperalgesia in mice. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 13137-13147.]. It is weakly similar to PRY-SPRY domains (B30.2-like domain). Here we report the complete cDNA and genomic organization of ohanin. Interestingly, cDNA sequence does not show significant sequence similarity to any known sequences, including those of B30.2-like domain-containing proteins. Its full-length cDNA sequence of 1558 bp encodes for prepro-ohanin with a propeptide segment at the C-terminal. Ohanin is the first member of a new subfamily of proteins containing B30.2-like domain with short N-terminal segment. We named this subfamily as vespryns. There are two mRNA subtypes differing in their 5'-untranslated regions. Southern hybridization study shows that ohanin is encoded by a single gene. Its genomic sequence is 7086 bp with five exons and four introns, and the two types of mRNAs are generated by alternative splicing of exon 2. Our results indicate that ohanin and vespryns may have evolved from the same ancestral gene as B30.2 domain. PMID:16472942

  18. Construction of sized eukaryotic cDNA libraries using low input of total environmental metatranscriptomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Construction of high quality cDNA libraries from the usually low amounts of eukaryotic mRNA extracted from environmental samples is essential in functional metatranscriptomics for the selection of functional, full-length genes encoding proteins of interest. Many of the inserts in libraries constructed by standard methods are represented by truncated cDNAs due to premature stoppage of reverse transcriptase activity and preferential cloning of short cDNAs. Results We report here a simple and cost effective technique for preparation of sized eukaryotic cDNA libraries from as low as three microgram of total soil RNA dominated by ribosomal and bacterial RNA. cDNAs synthesized by a template switching approach were size-fractionated by two dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis prior to PCR amplification and cloning. Effective size selection was demonstrated by PCR amplification of conserved gene families specific of each size class. Libraries of more than one million independent inserts whose sizes ranged between one and four kb were thus produced. Up to 80% of the insert sequences were homologous to eukaryotic gene sequences present in public databases. Conclusions A simple and cost effective technique has been developed to construct sized eukaryotic cDNA libraries from environmental samples. This technique will facilitate expression cloning of environmental eukaryotic genes and contribute to a better understanding of basic biological and/or ecological processes carried out by eukaryotic microbial communities. PMID:25183040

  19. Rapid and Efficient cDNA Library Screening by Self-Ligation ofInverse PCR Products (SLIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Stapleton, Mark; George, Reed A.; Yu, Charles; Wan, Kenneth H.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2005-04-22

    The production of comprehensive cDNA clone collections is an important goal of the human and model organism genome projects. cDNA sequences are used to determine the structures of transcripts, including splice junctions, polyadenylation sites, and 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). cDNA collections are also valuable resources for functional studies of genes and proteins. Expressed Sequence Tag (EST)sequencing is the method of choice for recovering cDNAs representing a majority of the transcripts encoded in a eukaryotic genome. However, EST sequencing samples a library at random, so it realizes diminishing returns as the project progresses. To drive cDNA collections toward completion new methods are needed to recover cDNAs representing specific genes and alternative transcripts, including transcripts with low expression levels. We describe a simple and effective inverse-PCR-based method for screening plasmid libraries to recover intact cDNAs for specific transcripts. We tested the method by screening libraries used in our Drosophila EST projects for 153 transcription factor genes that were not yet represented by full-length cDNAs. We recovered target-specific clones for 104 of the genes: 46 exactly match, 30 improve and 28partially match current gene annotations. Successful application of the screening method depends on cDNA library complexity and quality of the gene models. The approach should be effective for improving cDNA collections for other model organisms and the human. It also provides a simple and rapid method for isolating cDNAs of interest in any system for which plasmid cDNA libraries and complete or partial gene sequences are available.

  20. Analysis of ORF5 and Full-Length Genome Sequences of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Isolates of Genotypes 1 and 2 Retrieved Worldwide Provides Evidence that Recombination Is a Common Phenomenon and May Produce Mosaic Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Valls, G. E.; Kvisgaard, L. K.; Tello, M.; Darwich, L.; Cortey, M.; Burgara-Estrella, A. J.; Hernández, J.; Larsen, L. E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombination is currently recognized as a factor for high genetic diversity, but the frequency of such recombination events and the genome segments involved are not well known. In the present study, we initially focused on the detection of recombinant porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolates by examining previously published data sets of ORF5 sequences (genotypes 1 and 2) obtained worldwide. We then examined full-length genome sequences in order to determine potential recombination breakpoints along the viral genome. For ORF5, 11 sets of genotype 1 sequences from different geographical areas, including 2 Asian, 1 American, and 7 European regions, and three sets of genotype 2, including sets from China, Mexico, and the United States, were analyzed separately. Potential recombination breakpoints were detected in 10/11 genotype 1 sets, including 9 cases in which the clustering of at least one isolate was different before and after the breakpoints. In genotype 2, potential breakpoints and different tree clustering of at least one strain before and after the breakpoint were observed in 2 out of 3 sets. The results indicated that most of the ORF5 data sets contained at least one recombinant sequence. When the full-length genome sequences were examined, both genotype 1 and 2 sets presented breakpoints (10 and 9, respectively), resulting in significantly different topologies before and after the breakpoints. Mosaic genomes were detected in genotype 1 sequences. These results may have significant implications for the understanding of the molecular epidemiology of PRRSV. IMPORTANCE PRRSV is one of the most important viruses affecting swine production worldwide, causing big economic losses and sanitary problems. One of the key questions on PRRSV arises from its genetic diversity, which is thought to have a direct impact on immunobiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and vaccine efficacy. One of the causes of this genetic diversity is

  1. Phylogenetic analysis based on full-length large subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequence comparison reveals that Neospora caninum is more closely related to Hammondia heydorni than to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Mugridge, N B; Morrison, D A; Heckeroth, A R; Johnson, A M; Tenter, A M

    1999-10-01

    Since its first description in the late 1980s, Neospora caninum has been recognised as a prominent tissue cyst-forming parasite due to its ability to induce congenital disease and abortion in animals, especially cattle. It is found worldwide and is a cause of significant economic losses for the livestock industry. However, its place within the family Sarcocystidae, like that of several other taxa, remains unresolved. Neospora caninum shares several morphological and life cycle characters with Hammondia heydorni, although it is most commonly thought of as being a close relative of Toxoplasma gondii. This study presents information regarding the phylogenetic relationship of N. caninum to species currently classified into the genus Hammondia, as well as to two strains (RH and ME49) of T. gondii based on the full-length large subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Phylogenetic analyses using two alignment strategies and three different tree-building methods showed that the two species in the genus Hammondia are paraphyletic. Neospora caninum was shown to form a monophyletic clade with H. heydorni instead of T. gondii, which in turn was shown to be most closely related to H. hammondi. The finding that N. caninum and H. heydorni are closely related phylogenetically may aid the elucidation of currently unknown aspects of their biology and epidemiology, and suggests that H. heydorni should be considered in the differential diagnosis of N. caninum from other apicomplexan parasites. PMID:10608441

  2. Complex Mosaic Composition of Near Full-Length Genomes of Two NED (NIH-ENVA-DOD) Subtype Panel HIV Type 1 Strains, BCF-Dioum and BCF-Kita, Originating from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Brian T.; Tolzmann, Catlin A.; Ouma, Annastasia; Bremer, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Sequence characterization of the near full-length genomes of HIV-1 isolates BCF-Dioum and BCF-Kita, originating from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), was continued. These NED panel isolates, contributed by F. Brun-Vezinet (ENVA-France), were first identified as subtypes G and H, respectively. Our earlier analyses of portions of their pol genes showed that both were likely to be intersubtype recombinants of different composition. This study analyzed the remainder of each genome, confirming them to be complex recombinants. The BCF-Dioum genome resembles CRF06_cpx strains found in West Africa, composed of subtypes A/G/J/K. The BCF-Kita genome is a unique complex recombinant A–F–G–H–K–U strain. These data support previous observations of the complexity of strains originating from the DRC. BCF-Dioum may be a suitable strain for standards and reagents since it matches a defined circulating recombinant form. Studies and reagents made from BCF-Kita should take into account its complex genome. PMID:19795987

  3. Using RNA-Seq to assemble a rose transcriptome with more than 13,000 full-length expressed genes and to develop the WagRhSNP 68k Axiom SNP array for rose (Rosa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Koning-Boucoiran, Carole F. S.; Esselink, G. Danny; Vukosavljev, Mirjana; van 't Westende, Wendy P. C.; Gitonga, Virginia W.; Krens, Frans A.; Voorrips, Roeland E.; van de Weg, W. Eric; Schulz, Dietmar; Debener, Thomas; Maliepaard, Chris; Arens, Paul; Smulders, Marinus J. M.

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop a versatile and large SNP array for rose, we set out to mine ESTs from diverse sets of rose germplasm. For this RNA-Seq libraries containing about 700 million reads were generated from tetraploid cut and garden roses using Illumina paired-end sequencing, and from diploid Rosa multiflora using 454 sequencing. Separate de novo assemblies were performed in order to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within and between rose varieties. SNPs among tetraploid roses were selected for constructing a genotyping array that can be employed for genetic mapping and marker-trait association discovery in breeding programs based on tetraploid germplasm, both from cut roses and from garden roses. In total 68,893 SNPs were included on the WagRhSNP Axiom array. Next, an orthology-guided assembly was performed for the construction of a non-redundant rose transcriptome database. A total of 21,740 transcripts had significant hits with orthologous genes in the strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.) genome. Of these 13,390 appeared to contain the full-length coding regions. This newly established transcriptome resource adds considerably to the currently available sequence resources for the Rosaceae family in general and the genus Rosa in particular. PMID:25954285

  4. Full-Length Genome Analyses of Two New Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Strains from Mustached Monkeys (C. Cephus) in Gabon Illustrate a Complex Evolutionary History among the SIVmus/mon/gsn Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Liégeois, Florian; Schmidt, Fabian; Boué, Vanina; Butel, Christelle; Mouacha, Fatima; Ngari, Paul; Mve Ondo, Bertrand; Leroy, Eric; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine; Rouet, François

    2014-01-01

    The Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) mus/mon/gsn lineage is a descendant of one of the precursor viruses to the HIV-1/SIVcpz/gor viral lineage. SIVmus and SIVgsn were sequenced from mustached and greater spot nosed monkeys in Cameroon and SIVmon from mona monkeys in Cameroon and Nigeria. In order to further document the genetic diversity of SIVmus, we analyzed two full-length genomes of new strains identified in Gabon. The whole genomes obtained showed the expected reading frames for gag, pol, vif, vpr, tat, rev, env, nef, and also for a vpu gene. Analyses showed that the Gabonese SIVmus strains were closely related and formed a monophyletic clade within the SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Nonetheless, within this lineage, the position of both new SIVmus differed according to the gene analyzed. In pol and nef gene, phylogenetic topologies suggested different evolutions for each of the two new SIVmus strains whereas in the other nucleic fragments studied, their positions fluctuated between SIVmon, SIVmus-1, and SIVgsn. In addition, in C1 domain of env, we identified an insertion of seven amino acids characteristic for the SIVmus/mon/gsn and HIV‑1/SIVcpz/SIVgor lineages. Our results show a high genetic diversity of SIVmus in mustached monkeys and suggest cross-species transmission events and recombination within SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Additionally, in Central Africa, hunters continue to be exposed to these simian viruses, and this represents a potential threat to humans. PMID:25054885

  5. In vitro binding of anthrax protective antigen on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface through Hoc-capsid interactions: A strategy for efficient display of large full-length proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shivachandra, Sathish B.; Rao, Mangala; Janosi, Laszlo; Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Matyas, Gary R.; Alving, Carl R.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Rao, Venigalla B. . E-mail: rao@cua.edu

    2006-02-05

    An in vitro binding system is described to display large full-length proteins on bacteriophage T4 capsid surface at high density. The phage T4 icosahedral capsid features 155 copies of a nonessential highly antigenic outer capsid protein, Hoc, at the center of each major capsid protein hexon. Gene fusions were engineered to express the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA) from Bacillus anthracis fused to the N-terminus of Hoc and the 130-kDa PA-Hoc protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The purified PA-Hoc was assembled in vitro on hoc {sup -} phage particles. Binding was specific, stable, and of high affinity. This defined in vitro system allowed manipulation of the copy number of displayed PA and imposed no significant limitation on the size of the displayed antigen. In contrast to in vivo display systems, the in vitro approach allows all the capsid binding sites to be occupied by the 130-kDa PA-Hoc fusion protein. The PA-T4 particles were immunogenic in mice in the absence of an adjuvant, eliciting strong PA-specific antibodies and anthrax lethal toxin neutralizing antibodies. The in vitro display on phage T4 offers a novel platform for potential construction of customized vaccines against anthrax and other infectious diseases.

  6. Near full-length genome sequence of a novel HIV-1 recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B) detected among men who have sex with men in Jilin Province, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingguang; Feng, Yi; Yang, Yao; Chen, Yanli; Guo, Qi; Sun, Liuyan; Zang, Xihui; Xing, Hui; Shao, Yiming

    2014-07-01

    We report here a novel HIV-1 recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B) detected from a comprehensive HIV-1 molecular epidemiologic study among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jilin province of northeastern China. The near full-length genome (NFLG) analyses showed that the novel HIV-1 recombinant isolate (JL.RF07) was composed of CRF01_AE cluster 5 (northeastern China origin) and subtype B (U.S. and European origin), with six recombinant breakpoints observed in the pol, vif, tat, rev, and env gene regions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detection of a novel HIV-1 recombinant form (CRF01_AE/B) in Jilin, which may indicate an active transmission network of HIV-1 infection among MSM in the region. Further studies of the molecular epidemiology of the HIV-1 epidemic among MSM in northeastern China are necessary to gain a fuller understanding of the transmission network and potential public health impact of HIV-1 among MSM in this region. PMID:24521207

  7. Near Full-Length Genomic Characterization of a Novel HIV Type 1 CRF01_AE/CRF07_BC Recombinant Form Transmitted Between a Heterosexual Couple in Guangxi, China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhe; Shen, Zhiyong; Xiong, Runsong; Liang, Fuxiong; Liang, Shujia; Li, Jianjun; Tan, Guangjie; Jiang, He; Yang, Xiaoyi; Li, Fan; Liao, Lingjie; Shao, Yiming; Feng, Yi; Zhu, Qiuying

    2016-07-01

    In this research, we reported a new second generation recombinant form (GXDY460B) between circulating recombinant form (CRF)01_AE and CRF07_BC in a seroconversion couple who obtained the virus from her husband by heterosexual behavior. The analysis result of the near full-length genomic characterization showed that the genome comprises at least 12 interlaced segments, including six CRF07_BC and six CRF01_AE segments, with CRF07_BC as the main framework. Cocirculation of multiple virus subtypes and multiple infection routes have existed for a long time in Guangxi, but the recombinant strain was rarely reported among heterosexual transmission population because of its lower crowd confounding degree than men who have sex with men and injecting drug user population. It is the first time that the unique recombinant form (URF) between CRF01_AE and CRF07_BC was identified among heterosexual transmission in Guangxi. The emergence of the novel recombinant helps to understand the pattern of the URF virus. PMID:26892263

  8. Using RNA-Seq to assemble a rose transcriptome with more than 13,000 full-length expressed genes and to develop the WagRhSNP 68k Axiom SNP array for rose (Rosa L.).

    PubMed

    Koning-Boucoiran, Carole F S; Esselink, G Danny; Vukosavljev, Mirjana; van 't Westende, Wendy P C; Gitonga, Virginia W; Krens, Frans A; Voorrips, Roeland E; van de Weg, W Eric; Schulz, Dietmar; Debener, Thomas; Maliepaard, Chris; Arens, Paul; Smulders, Marinus J M

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop a versatile and large SNP array for rose, we set out to mine ESTs from diverse sets of rose germplasm. For this RNA-Seq libraries containing about 700 million reads were generated from tetraploid cut and garden roses using Illumina paired-end sequencing, and from diploid Rosa multiflora using 454 sequencing. Separate de novo assemblies were performed in order to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within and between rose varieties. SNPs among tetraploid roses were selected for constructing a genotyping array that can be employed for genetic mapping and marker-trait association discovery in breeding programs based on tetraploid germplasm, both from cut roses and from garden roses. In total 68,893 SNPs were included on the WagRhSNP Axiom array. Next, an orthology-guided assembly was performed for the construction of a non-redundant rose transcriptome database. A total of 21,740 transcripts had significant hits with orthologous genes in the strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.) genome. Of these 13,390 appeared to contain the full-length coding regions. This newly established transcriptome resource adds considerably to the currently available sequence resources for the Rosaceae family in general and the genus Rosa in particular. PMID:25954285

  9. Evaluation of carrier-mediated siRNA delivery: lessons for the design of a stem-loop qPCR-based approach for quantification of intracellular full-length siRNA.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Stefano; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Foged, Camilla

    2013-03-28

    Harnessing the RNA interference (RNAi) process with chemically synthesized small interfering RNA (siRNA) is dependent on the development of efficient delivery vehicles that can help overcome the numerous barriers existing for siRNA delivery. However, quantifying the intracellular amount of siRNA delivered by use of carriers remains an analytical challenge. The purpose of the present study was to optimize and validate an analytical protocol based on stem-loop reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT qPCR) to quantitatively monitor the carrier-mediated intracellular siRNA delivery. An in vitro cell culture model system expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was used to develop the assay, which was based on the intracellular quantification of a full-length double-stranded Dicer substrate siRNA by stem-loop RT qPCR. The result is a well-documented protocol for accurate and sensitive determination of the effective intracellular siRNA concentration upon transfection with different reagents. Specific guidelines for the customization of the protocol are provided and reported together with an example of its application for studying a specific siRNA delivery case. The outcome of the present study is a thoroughly discussed analytical protocol generally applicable to characterize carrier-mediated siRNA delivery processes. PMID:23313963

  10. Apoptosis induced by a HIPK2 full-length-specific siRNA is due to off-target effects rather than prevalence of HIPK2-Δe8 isoform.

    PubMed

    Di Rocco, Giuliana; Verdina, Alessandra; Gatti, Veronica; Virdia, Ilaria; Toietta, Gabriele; Todaro, Matilde; Stassi, Giorgio; Soddu, Silvia

    2016-01-12

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are widely used to study gene function and extensively exploited for their potential therapeutic applications. HIPK2 is an evolutionary conserved kinase that binds and phosphorylates several proteins directly or indirectly related to apoptosis. Recently, an alternatively spliced isoform skipping 81 nucleotides of exon 8 (Hipk2-Δe8) has been described. Selective depletion of Hipk2 full-length (Hipk2-FL) with a specific siRNA that spares the Hipk2-Δe8 isoform has been shown to strongly induce apoptosis, suggesting an unpredicted dominant-negative effect of Hipk2-FL over the Δe8 isoform. From this observation, we sought to take advantage and assessed the therapeutic potential of generating Hipk2 isoform unbalance in tumor-initiating cells derived from colorectal cancer patients. Strong reduction of cell viability was induced in vitro and in vivo by the originally described exon 8-specific siRNA, supporting a potential therapeutic application. However, validation analyses performed with additional exon8-specific siRNAs with different stabilities showed that all exon8-targeting siRNAs can induce comparable Hipk2 isoform unbalance but only the originally reported e8-siRNA promotes cell death. These data show that loss of viability does not depend on the prevalence of Hipk2-Δe8 isoform but it is rather due to microRNA-like off-target effects. PMID:26625198

  11. Full-length genome analyses of two new simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains from mustached monkeys (C. Cephus) in Gabon illustrate a complex evolutionary history among the SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage.

    PubMed

    Liégeois, Florian; Schmidt, Fabian; Boué, Vanina; Butel, Christelle; Mouacha, Fatima; Ngari, Paul; Ondo, Bertrand Mve; Leroy, Eric; Heeney, Jonathan L; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine; Rouet, François

    2014-07-01

    The Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) mus/mon/gsn lineage is a descendant of one of the precursor viruses to the HIV-1/SIVcpz/gor viral lineage. SIVmus and SIVgsn were sequenced from mustached and greater spot nosed monkeys in Cameroon and SIVmon from mona monkeys in Cameroon and Nigeria. In order to further document the genetic diversity of SIVmus, we analyzed two full-length genomes of new strains identified in Gabon. The whole genomes obtained showed the expected reading frames for gag, pol, vif, vpr, tat, rev, env, nef, and also for a vpu gene. Analyses showed that the Gabonese SIVmus strains were closely related and formed a monophyletic clade within the SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Nonetheless, within this lineage, the position of both new SIVmus differed according to the gene analyzed. In pol and nef gene, phylogenetic topologies suggested different evolutions for each of the two new SIVmus strains whereas in the other nucleic fragments studied, their positions fluctuated between SIVmon, SIVmus-1, and SIVgsn. In addition, in C1 domain of env, we identified an insertion of seven amino acids characteristic for the SIVmus/mon/gsn and HIV‑1/SIVcpz/SIVgor lineages. Our results show a high genetic diversity of SIVmus in mustached monkeys and suggest cross-species transmission events and recombination within SIVmus/mon/gsn lineage. Additionally, in Central Africa, hunters continue to be exposed to these simian viruses, and this represents a potential threat to humans. PMID:25054885

  12. A Method to Produce and Purify Full-Length Recombinant Alpha Dystroglycan: Analysis of N- and O-Linked Monosaccharide Composition in CHO Cells with or without LARGE Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung Hae; Xu, Rui; Martin, Paul

    2013-01-01

    α dystroglycan (αDG) is part of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein (DAG) complex, a series of cytoskeletal, transmembrane, and membrane-associated proteins that serve to link the extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding individual skeletal myofibers to the intracellular F-actin cytoskeleton. Glycosylation and ECM protein binding to αDG are regulated by a number of genes that, when defective, give rise to congenital or limb-girdle forms of muscular dystrophy termed dystroglycanopathies. One such dystroglycanopathy gene is LARGE. Here, we describe a method to produce and purify full-length, furin-resistant, recombinant αDG from CHO cells and CHO cells overexpressing LARGE (CHO-LARGE). In addition, we analyze the O- and N-linked monosaccharide composition of such proteins. αDG purified from CHO-LARGE cells had increased molar content of xylose and fucose relative to CHO, while no significant changes were found in N-linked monosaccharides. Glucuronic acid could not be quantified by the methods used. These studies describe a method to produce and purify the milligram amounts of αDG needed for certain biochemical methods, including monosaccharide analysis. Key words: Dystroglycan, muscular dystrophy, xylose, fucose, laminin, LARGE Correspondence: Paul.Martin@nationwidechildrens.org PMID:23390591

  13. Job Enrichment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Rick

    1970-01-01

    Job enrichment means giving people more decision-making power, more responsibility, more grasp of the totality of the job, and a sense of their own importance in the company. This article presents evidence of the successful working of this approach (Donnelly Mirrors), and the lack of success with an opposing approach (General Motors). (NL)

  14. Oreochromis mossambicus (tilapia) corticotropin-releasing hormone: cDNA sequence and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    van Enckevort, F H; Pepels, P P; Leunissen, J A; Martens, G J; Wendelaar Bonga, S E; Balm, P H

    2000-02-01

    Although hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is involved in the stress response in all vertebrate groups, only a limited number of studies on this neuroendocrine peptide deals with non-mammalian neuroendocrine systems. We determined the cDNA sequence of the CRH precursor of the teleost Oreochromis mossambicus (tilapia) and studied the biological potency of the CRH peptide in a homologous teleost bioassay. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with degenerate and specific primers yielded fragments of tilapia CRH cDNA. Full-length CRH cDNA (988 nucleotides) was obtained by screening a tilapia hypothalamus cDNA library with the tilapia CRH PCR products. The precursor sequence (167 amino acids) contains a signal peptide, the CRH peptide and a motif conserved among all vertebrate CRH precursors. Tilapia CRH (41 aa) displays between 63% and 80% amino acid sequence identity to CRH from other vertebrates, whereas the degree of identity to members of the urotensin I/urocortin lineage is considerably lower. In a phylogenetic tree, based on alignment of all full CRH peptide precursors presently known, the three teleost CRH precursors (tilapia; sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka; white sucker, Catostomus commersoni) form a monophyletic group distinct from amphibian and mammalian precursors. Despite the differences between the primary structures of tilapia and rat CRH, maximally effective concentrations of tilapia and rat CRH were equally potent in stimulating adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and alpha-MSH release by tilapia pituitaries in vitro. The tilapia and salmon CRH sequences show that more variation exists between orthologous vertebrate CRH structures, and teleost CRHs in particular than previously recognized. Whether the structural differences reflect different mechanisms of action of this peptide in the stress response remains to be investigated. PMID:10718913

  15. Characterization of cDNA clones for the human c-yes gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sukegawa, J; Semba, K; Yamanashi, Y; Nishizawa, M; Miyajima, N; Yamamoto, T; Toyoshima, K

    1987-01-01

    Three c-yes cDNA clones were obtained from poly(A)+ RNA of human embryo fibroblasts. Sequence analysis of the clones showed that they contained inserts corresponding to nearly full-length human c-yes mRNA, which could encode a polypeptide of 543 amino acids with a relative molecular weight (Mr) of 60,801. The predicted amino acid sequence of the protein has no apparent membrane-spanning region or suspected ligand binding domain and closely resembles pp60c-src. Comparison of the sequences of c-yes and v-yes revealed that the v-yes gene contains most of the c-yes coding sequence except the region encoding its extreme carboxyl terminus. The region missing from the v-yes protein is the part that is highly conserved in cellular gene products of the protein-tyrosine kinase family. PMID:2436037

  16. Production of Arrayed and Rearrayed cDNA Libraries for Public Use

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, K

    2005-08-29

    Researchers studying genes and their protein products need an easily available source for that gene. The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is an important source of such genes in the form of arrayed cDNA libraries. The arrayed clones and associated data are available to the public, free of restriction. Libraries are transformed and titered into 384-well master plates, from which 2-8 copies are made. One copy plate is stored by LLNL while others are sent to sequencing groups, plate distributors, and to the group which contributed the library. Clones found to be unique and/or full-length are rearrayed and also made publicly available. Bioinformatics tools supporting the use of I.M.A.G.E. clones are accessible via the World Wide Web.

  17. Rat cellular retinol-binding protein: cDNA sequence and rapid retinol-dependent accumulation of mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, D R; Lloyd, R S; Chytil, F

    1987-01-01

    Cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) may be an important mediator of vitamin A action. We report here the identification of a cDNA clone corresponding to the rat CRBP gene. The cDNA is 695 nucleotides long, with an open reading frame corresponding to a protein of 134 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence is identical with that of rat CRBP. The nucleotide sequence shows 90.5% similarity with the human CRBP cDNA sequence. Genomic DNA analysis indicates that CRBP is present in one, or at most two, copies within the rat genome. Analysis of mRNA reveals a single species in every tissue tested and suggests that the isolated cDNA is full-length. Finally, when retinol-deficient rats are fed retinyl acetate for 4 hr, about 4-fold accumulation of CRBP-specific mRNA is observed in the lungs. This rapid effect suggests that the micronutrient retinol may directly influence the expression of its specific intracellular binding protein. Images PMID:3472205

  18. Multiple different defense mechanisms are activated in the young transgenic tobacco plants which express the full length genome of the Tobacco mosaic virus, and are resistant against this virus.

    PubMed

    Jada, Balaji; Soitamo, Arto J; Siddiqui, Shahid Aslam; Murukesan, Gayatri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Salakoski, Tapio; Lehto, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    Previously described transgenic tobacco lines express the full length infectious Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) genome under the 35S promoter (Siddiqui et al., 2007. Mol Plant Microbe Interact, 20: 1489-1494). Through their young stages these plants exhibit strong resistance against both the endogenously expressed and exogenously inoculated TMV, but at the age of about 7-8 weeks they break into TMV infection, with typical severe virus symptoms. Infections with some other viruses (Potato viruses Y, A, and X) induce the breaking of the TMV resistance and lead to synergistic proliferation of both viruses. To deduce the gene functions related to this early resistance, we have performed microarray analysis of the transgenic plants during the early resistant stage, and after the resistance break, and also of TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants. Comparison of these transcriptomes to those of corresponding wild type healthy plants indicated that 1362, 1150 and 550 transcripts were up-regulated in the transgenic plants before and after the resistance break, and in the TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants, respectively, and 1422, 1200 and 480 transcripts were down-regulated in these plants, respectively. These transcriptome alterations were distinctly different between the three types of plants, and it appears that several different mechanisms, such as the enhanced expression of the defense, hormone signaling and protein degradation pathways contributed to the TMV-resistance in the young transgenic plants. In addition to these alterations, we also observed a distinct and unique gene expression alteration in these plants, which was the strong suppression of the translational machinery. This may also contribute to the resistance by slowing down the synthesis of viral proteins. Viral replication potential may also be suppressed, to some extent, by the reduction of the translation initiation and elongation factors eIF-3 and eEF1A and B, which are required for the TMV replication

  19. Multiple Different Defense Mechanisms Are Activated in the Young Transgenic Tobacco Plants Which Express the Full Length Genome of the Tobacco Mosaic Virus, and Are Resistant against this Virus

    PubMed Central

    Jada, Balaji; Soitamo, Arto J.; Siddiqui, Shahid Aslam; Murukesan, Gayatri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Salakoski, Tapio; Lehto, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    Previously described transgenic tobacco lines express the full length infectious Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) genome under the 35S promoter (Siddiqui et al., 2007. Mol Plant Microbe Interact, 20: 1489–1494). Through their young stages these plants exhibit strong resistance against both the endogenously expressed and exogenously inoculated TMV, but at the age of about 7–8 weeks they break into TMV infection, with typical severe virus symptoms. Infections with some other viruses (Potato viruses Y, A, and X) induce the breaking of the TMV resistance and lead to synergistic proliferation of both viruses. To deduce the gene functions related to this early resistance, we have performed microarray analysis of the transgenic plants during the early resistant stage, and after the resistance break, and also of TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants. Comparison of these transcriptomes to those of corresponding wild type healthy plants indicated that 1362, 1150 and 550 transcripts were up-regulated in the transgenic plants before and after the resistance break, and in the TMV-infected wild type tobacco plants, respectively, and 1422, 1200 and 480 transcripts were down-regulated in these plants, respectively. These transcriptome alterations were distinctly different between the three types of plants, and it appears that several different mechanisms, such as the enhanced expression of the defense, hormone signaling and protein degradation pathways contributed to the TMV-resistance in the young transgenic plants. In addition to these alterations, we also observed a distinct and unique gene expression alteration in these plants, which was the strong suppression of the translational machinery. This may also contribute to the resistance by slowing down the synthesis of viral proteins. Viral replication potential may also be suppressed, to some extent, by the reduction of the translation initiation and elongation factors eIF-3 and eEF1A and B, which are required for the TMV

  20. High, broad, polyfunctional, and durable T cell immune responses induced in mice by a novel hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine candidate (MVA-HCV) based on modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the nearly full-length HCV genome.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carmen E; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Cepeda, María Victoria; Mingorance, Lidia; García-Arriaza, Juan; Vandermeeren, Andrea; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar S; Esteban, Mariano

    2013-07-01

    A major goal in the control of hepatitis C infection is the development of a vaccine. Here, we have developed a novel HCV vaccine candidate based on the highly attenuated poxvirus vector MVA (referred to as MVA-HCV) expressing the nearly full-length (7.9-kbp) HCV sequence, with the aim to target almost all of the T and B cell determinants described for HCV. In infected cells, MVA-HCV produces a polyprotein that is subsequently processed into the structural and nonstructural HCV proteins, triggering the cytoplasmic accumulation of dense membrane aggregates. In both C57BL/6 and transgenic HLA-A2-vaccinated mice, MVA-HCV induced high, broad, polyfunctional, and long-lasting HCV-specific T cell immune responses. The vaccine-induced T cell response was mainly mediated by CD8 T cells; however, although lower in magnitude, the CD4(+) T cells were highly polyfunctional. In homologous protocol (MVA-HCV/MVA-HCV) the main CD8(+) T cell target was p7+NS2, whereas in heterologous combination (DNA-HCV/MVA-HCV) the main target was NS3. Antigenic responses were also detected against other HCV proteins (Core, E1-E2, and NS4), but the magnitude of the responses was dependent on the protocol used. The majority of the HCV-induced CD8(+) T cells were triple or quadruple cytokine producers. The MVA-HCV vaccine induced memory CD8(+) T cell responses with an effector memory phenotype. Overall, our data showed that MVA-HCV induced broad, highly polyfunctional, and durable T cell responses of a magnitude and quality that might be associated with protective immunity and open the path for future considerations of MVA-HCV as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine candidate against HCV. PMID:23596307

  1. cDNA cloning and expression of Blo t 11, the Blomia tropicalis allergen homologous to paramyosin.

    PubMed

    Ramos, J D; Cheong, N; Lee, B W; Chua, K Y; Nge, C; Wah, L B; Yan, C K

    2001-12-01

    Blomia tropicalis is an important mite species in many parts of the world and the most predominant mite species in tropical countries. The prevalence of sensitization to this species has probably been underestimated because commercial extracts are largely unavailable. Identification and characterization of B. tropicalis allergens is an important step toward understanding the role of this species in allergic sensitization and could provide appropriate reagents for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. This paper describes the isolation, sequence analysis, expression and allergenicity of a cDNA gene coding for a B. tropicalis allergen with homology to paramyosin, a high-molecular-weight allergen previously identified in Dermatophagoides farinae. The full-length Blo t 11 cDNA gene was isolated by cDNA library screening, 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends and long-distance PCR. Sequence analysis was performed with a combination of CLUSTAL W, CGC and BLAST program packages. The cDNA gene was expressed as a GST fusion protein in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography using the glutathione Sepharose column. Allergenicity of the rBlo t 11 was tested by human IgE dot blot immunoassay. Blo t 11 is a 3,111-bp cDNA gene with a 2,625-bp open reading frame coding for an 875-amino acid protein, exhibiting significant homology with different invertebrate paramyosins. The human IgE dot blot immunoassay showed that the rBlo t 11 reacted positively to 52% (33/63) of sera from asthmatic patients. Blo t 11 is the homolog of Der f 11 exhibiting potentially important allergenic activity. PMID:11815735

  2. Molecular characteristics and expression of calmodulin cDNA from the freshwater pearl mussel, Hyriopsis schlegelii.

    PubMed

    Zeng, L-G; Wang, J-H; Li, Y-J; Sheng, J-Q; Gu, Q; Hong, Y-J

    2012-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a multifunctional intracellular calcium ion receptor protein that participates in a range of cellular processes, including calcium metabolism in mussels. To investigate the role of CaM in freshwater mollusk shell calcium metabolism, the full-length CaM cDNA was isolated from the freshwater pearl mussel, Hyriopsis schlegelii (referred to as hsCaM) using SMART RACE technology. The full-length hsCaM was 855 bp in size, containing a 70-bp 5'-untranslated sequence, a 447-bp open reading frame, a 309-bp 3'-untranslated sequence, and a 26-nucleotide long poly(A) tail. The hsCaM mRNA expression in different mussel tissues was examined using real-time PCR. The hsCaM mRNA was found to be ubiquitously expressed, but far more abundant in the gill, foot, and mantle than in the posterior adductor muscle. Real-time PCR was also used to determine hsCaM mRNA expression levels in mantle tissues of H. schlegelii at different ages. No significant differences between one-, two-, and three-year-old mussels were detected, but expression increased in four-year-old mussels and then decreased in five-year-old mussels. CaM appears to be involved in calcium regulation of the mantle in four-year-old mussels, which may secrete more mother of pearl during pearl culture. PMID:22290464

  3. CUDC-101, a Novel Inhibitor of Full-Length Androgen Receptor (flAR) and Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7) Activity: Mechanism of Action and In Vivo Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huiying; Mediwala, Sanjay N; Szafran, Adam T; Mancini, Michael A; Marcelli, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is an androgen receptor (AR)-dependent disease expected to cause the death of more than 27,000 Americans in 2015. There are only a few available treatments for CRPC, making the discovery of new drugs an urgent need. We report that CUDC-101 (an inhibitor od HER2/NEU, EGFR and HDAC) inhibits both the full length AR (flAR) and the AR variant AR-V7. This observation prompted experiments to discover which of the known activities of CUDC-101 is responsible for the inhibition of flAR/AR-V7 signaling. We used pharmacologic and genetic approaches, and found that the effect of CUDC-101 on flAR and AR-V7 was duplicated only by other HDAC inhibitors, or by silencing the HDAC isoforms HDAC5 and HDAC10. We observed that CUDC-101 treatment or AR-V7 silencing by RNAi equally reduced transcription of the AR-V7 target gene, PSA, without affecting viability of 22Rv1 cells. However, when cellular proliferation was used as an end point, CUDC-101 was more effective than AR-V7 silencing, raising the prospect that CUDC-101 has additional targets beside AR-V7. In support of this, we found that CUDC-101 increased the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, and decreased that of the oncogene HER2/NEU. To determine if CUDC-101 reduces growth in a xenograft model of prostate cancer, this drug was given for 14 days to castrated male SCID mice inoculated with 22Rv1 cells. Compared to vehicle, CUDC-101 reduced xenograft growth in a statistically significant way, and without macroscopic side effects. These studies demonstrate that CUDC-101 inhibits wtAR and AR-V7 activity and growth of 22Rv1 cells in vitro and in vivo. These effects result from the ability of CUDC-101 to target not only HDAC signaling, which was associated with decreased flAR and AR-V7 activity, but multiple additional oncogenic pathways. These observations raise the possibility that treatment of CRPC may be achieved by using similarly multi-targeted approaches. PMID

  4. Apical expression of human full-length hCEACAM1-4L protein renders the Madin Darby Canine Kidney cells responsive to lipopolysaccharide leading to TLR4-dependent Erk1/2 and p38 MAPK signalling.

    PubMed

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Beau, Isabelle; Rougeaux, Clémence; Kansau, Imad; Fabrega, Sylvie; Brice, Cédric; Korotkova, Natalia; Moseley, Steve L; Servin, Alain L

    2011-05-01

    CEACAM1 expressed by granulocytes and epithelial cells is recognized as a membrane-associated receptor by some Gram-negative pathogens. Here we report a previously unsuspected role of human CEACAM1-4L (hCEACAM1-4L) in polarized epithelial cells. We find that in contrast with non-transfected cells, Madin Darby Canine Kidney strain II (MDCK) engineered for the apical expression of the long cytoplasmic chain protein hCEACAM1-4L showed a serum-independent increase in the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) after treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of wild-type, diffusely adhering Afa/Dr Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) strain IH11128. Aggregates of FITC-LPS bind the apical domain of MDCK-hCEACAM1-4L cells colocalizing with the apically expressed hCEACAM1-4L protein and do not bind MDCK-pCEP cells, and surface plasmon resonance analysis shows that LPS binds to the extracellular domain of the CEACAM1-4L protein. We showed that cell polarization and lipid rafts positively control the LPS-IH11128-induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 in MDCK-hCEACAM1-4L cells. Structure-function analysis using mutated hCEACAM1-4L protein shows that the cytoplasmic domain of the protein is needed for LPS-induced MAPK signalling, and that phosphorylation of Tyr-residues is not increased in association with MAPK signalling. The hCEACAM1-4L-dependent Erk1/2 phosphorylation develops in the presence of lipid A and does not develop in the presence of penta-acylated LPS. Finally, small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of canine TLR4 abolishes the hCEACAM1-4L-dependent, LPS-induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2. Collectively, our results support the notion that the apically expressed, full-length hCEACAM1-4L protein functions as a novel LPS-conveying molecule at the mucosal surface of polarized epithelial cells for subsequent MD-2/TLR4 receptor-dependent MAPK Erk1/2 and p38 signalling. PMID:21352462

  5. Full-length de novo assembly of RNA-seq data in pea (Pisum sativum L.) provides a gene expression atlas and gives insights into root nodulation in this species.

    PubMed

    Alves-Carvalho, Susete; Aubert, Grégoire; Carrère, Sébastien; Cruaud, Corinne; Brochot, Anne-Lise; Jacquin, Françoise; Klein, Anthony; Martin, Chantal; Boucherot, Karen; Kreplak, Jonathan; da Silva, Corinne; Moreau, Sandra; Gamas, Pascal; Wincker, Patrick; Gouzy, Jérôme; Burstin, Judith

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies allow an almost exhaustive survey of the transcriptome, even in species with no available genome sequence. To produce a Unigene set representing most of the expressed genes of pea, 20 cDNA libraries produced from various plant tissues harvested at various developmental stages from plants grown under contrasting nitrogen conditions were sequenced. Around one billion reads and 100 Gb of sequence were de novo assembled. Following several steps of redundancy reduction, 46 099 contigs with N50 length of 1667 nt were identified. These constitute the 'Caméor' Unigene set. The high depth of sequencing allowed identification of rare transcripts and detected expression for approximately 80% of contigs in each library. The Unigene set is now available online (http://bios.dijon.inra.fr/FATAL/cgi/pscam.cgi), allowing (i) searches for pea orthologs of candidate genes based on gene sequences from other species, or based on annotation, (ii) determination of transcript expression patterns using various metrics, (iii) identification of uncharacterized genes with interesting patterns of expression, and (iv) comparison of gene ontology pathways between tissues. This resource has allowed identification of the pea orthologs of major nodulation genes characterized in recent years in model species, as a major step towards deciphering unresolved pea nodulation phenotypes. In addition to a remarkable conservation of the early transcriptome nodulation apparatus between pea and Medicago truncatula, some specific features were highlighted. The resource provides a reference for the pea exome, and will facilitate transcriptome and proteome approaches as well as SNP discovery in pea. PMID:26296678

  6. Identification and cDNA cloning of a protein abundantly expressed during apple fruit development.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Mori, H; Yamaki, S

    1999-02-01

    A 60 kDa protein (MF-60) abundantly appearing in matured apple fruit was detected by SDS-PAGE of the soluble protein. It was partially purified through Butyl-Toyopearl and DEAE-cellulose. Its partial amino acid sequences were determined to isolate a full-length cDNA. MF-60 cDNA (mf-60) consisting of 1,825 bp containing an open reading frame of 1,524 bp and encoding a 54.2 kDa polypeptide. The deduced polypeptide of mf-60 has 81.1% identity to turgor-responsive protein 26 g from wilted garden pea shoot. Northern blot and Western blot analyses showed that the levels of the protein and the transcript of MF-60 changed in parallel through the developmental season; they were very low in young fruit at 36 DAF and 60 DAF, started to increase at 85 DAF, and then remained at a higher level from 114 DAF to 176 DAF. These results suggested that MF-60 functions are connected with fruit development but not with the fruit ripening induced by ethylene. PMID:10202815

  7. Construction and biological activities of the first infectious cDNA clones of the genus Foveavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Baozhong; Venkataraman, Srividhya; Li, Caihong; Wang, Weizhou; Dayan-Glick, Cathy; Mawassi, Munir

    2013-01-20

    Grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus (GRSPaV, genus Foveavirus, family Betaflexiviridae) is one of the most prevalent viruses in grapevines and is associated with three distinct diseases: rupestris stem pitting, vein necrosis and Syrah decline. Little is known about the biology and pathological properties of GRSPaV. In this work, we engineered a full-length infectious cDNA clone for GRSPaV and a GFP-tagged variant, both under the transcriptional control of Cauliflower mosaic virus 35 S promoter. We demonstrated that these cDNA clones were infectious in grapevines and Nicotiana benthamiana through fluorescence microscopy, RT-PCR, Western blotting and immuno electron microscopy. Interestingly, GRSPaV does not cause systemic infection in four of the most commonly used herbaceous plants, even in the presence of the movement proteins of two other viruses which are known to complement numerous movement-defective viruses. These infectious clones are the first of members of Foveavirus which would allow further investigations into mechanisms governing different aspects of replication for GRSPaV and perhaps related viruses.

  8. Phenoloxidase from the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus: cDNA cloning, expression and substrate specificity analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingwei; Zhou, Zunchun; Dong, Ying; Sun, Hongjuan; Chen, Zhong; Yang, Aifu; Gao, Shan; Wang, Bai; Jiang, Bei; Guan, Xiaoyan

    2014-02-01

    Phenoloxidase (PO) is a crucial component of the immune system of echinoderms. In the present study, the full-length cDNA of PO (AjPO) was cloned from coelomocytes of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus using 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR method, which is 2508 bp, with an open reading frame (ORF) of 2040 bp encoding 679 amino acids. AjPO contains a transmembrane domain, and three Cu-oxidase domains with copper binding centers formed by 10 histidines, one cysteine and one methionine respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that AjPO was clustered with laccase-type POs of invertebrates. Using the isolated membrane proteins as crude AjPO, the enzyme could catalyze the substrates catechol, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), dopamine and hydroquinone, but failed to oxidize tyrosine. The results described above collectively proved that AjPO was a membrane-binding laccase-type PO. The quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that AjPO mRNA was expressed in muscle, body wall, coelomocytes, tube feet, respiratory tree and intestine with the highest expression level in coelomocytes. AjPO could be significantly induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), Zymosan A and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C), suggesting AjPO is closely involved in the defense against the infection of bacteria, fungi and double-stranded RNA viruses. PMID:24355405

  9. Brief report: genome sequence and construction of an infectious cDNA clone of Ribgrass mosaic virus from Chinese cabbage in Korea.

    PubMed

    Ryu, So-Young; Hong, Jin-Sung; Rhee, Sun-Ju; Lee, Gung Pyo

    2012-04-01

    Ribgrass mosaic virus (RMV) has severely decreased the production and lowered quality of Chinese cabbage co-infected with Turnip mosaic virus (63.4%) in Korea. The complete genome sequence of RMV isolated from Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis was determined. The full genome consisted of 6,304 nucleotides and showed sequence identities of 91.5-94.2% with the corresponding genome of other RMV strains. Full-length cDNA of RMV-Br was amplified by RT-PCR with a 5'-end primer harboring a T7 promoter sequence and a 3'-end RMV specific primer. Subsequently, the full-length cDNA was cloned into plasmid vectors. Capped transcripts synthesized from the cDNA clone were highly infectious and caused characteristic symptoms in B. rapa ssp. pekinensis and several indicator plants, similar to wild type RMV. Since there has not been found RMV resistant Chinese cabbage yet and the virus has been prevalent already throughout the natural fields of Korea, the identification of full sequence and development of infectious clone would help developing breeding program for RMV resistant crops. PMID:22143325

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding the gibberellin biosynthetic enzyme ent-kaurene synthase B from pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima L.).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Saito, T; Abe, H; Yamane, H; Murofushi, N; Kamiya, Y

    1996-08-01

    The first committed step in the formation of diterpenoids leading to gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis is the conversion of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP) to ent-kaurene. ent-Kaurene synthase A (KSA) catalyzes the conversion of GGDP to copalyl diphosphate (CDP), which is subsequently converted to ent-kaurene by ent-kaurene synthase B (KSB). A full-length KSB cDNA was isolated from developing cotyledons in immature seeds of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima L.). Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed from the amino acid sequences obtained from the purified protein to amplify a cDNA fragment, which was used for library screening. The isolated full-length cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein, which demonstrated the KSB activity to cyclize [3H]CDP to [3H]ent-kaurene. The KSB transcript was most abundant in growing tissues, but was detected in every organ in pumpkin seedlings. The deduced amino acid sequence shares significant homology with other terpene cyclases, including the conserved DDXXD motif, a putative divalent metal ion-diphosphate complex binding site. A putative transit peptide sequence that may target the translated product into the plastids is present in the N-terminal region. PMID:8771778

  11. Classical swine fever virus: recovery of infectious viruses from cDNA constructs and generation of recombinant cytopathogenic defective interfering particles.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, G; Thiel, H J; Rümenapf, T

    1996-01-01

    The 5'- and 3'-terminal sequences of the genomic RNA from classical swine fever virus (CSFV) were determined, and the resulting information was used for construction of full-length CSFV cDNA clones. After transfection of in vitro-transcribed RNA derived from a cDNA construct, infectious CSFV was recovered from porcine cells. To confirm the de novo generation of infectious CSFV from cloned DNA, a genetically tagged CSFV was constructed. In comparison with parental CSFV, the recombinant viruses were retarded in growth by about 1 order of magnitude. Introduction of a deletion by exchange of part of the full-length construct for corresponding cDNA fragments derived from the genomes of cytopathogenic CSFV defective interfering particles (DIs) (G. Meyers and H.-J. Thiel, J. Virol. 69:3683-3689. 1995) resulted in recovery of cytopathogenic DIs in the DI genomes is responsible for their cytopathogenicity. The established system will allow novel approaches to analysis of pestiviral molecular biology and in particular to elucidation of the molecular basis of attenuation and cytopathogenicity of these viruses. PMID:8627678

  12. Molecular cloning of a cDNA for human {triangle}{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase, the gene defective in type 2 hyperprolinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, C.A.; Lin, W.; Valle, D.

    1994-09-01

    P5C dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.1.12) is a mitochondrial matrix NAD(P) dependent enzyme catalyzing the conversion of P5C, derived from either proline or ornithine, to glutamate. This reaction is an important component in the pathway interconnecting the urea cycle with the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Deficiency of P5C dehydrogenase causes type 2 hyperprolinemia (HPII), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by seizures, hyperprolinemia and accumulation of P5C. To investigate the molecular basis of HPII and the pathophysiology of gyrate atrophy, a disorder of ornithine metabolism, we have cloned a cDNA for P5C dehydrogenase. Utilizing published sequences of peptides from purified human P5C dehydrogenase and the nucleotide sequence of yeast P5C dehydrogenase, we designed degenerate PCR primers to amplify cDNAs from a HepG2 cDNA library. We identified an amplified fragment of the correct size that encoded one of the many peptides and used it to clone near full length clones of the corresponding cDNA. The longest is 1.8 kb with a 1,485 bp ORF encoding a protein corresponding to the C terminal 495 residues of yeast P5C dehydrogenase. The predicted amino acid sequence of this clone has 100% identity to published sequence of human P5C dehydrogenase peptides and 42% identity with the corresponding sequence of the yeast enzyme. This cDNA detects a 2.3 kb transcript in Northern blots of fibroblast RNA. We conclude we have cloned a near full length cDNA for human P5C dehydrogenase. Studies investigating the molecular basis of HPII are in progress.

  13. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of cDNA Encoding a Putative Stress-Induced Heat-Shock Protein from Camelus dromedarius

    PubMed Central

    Elrobh, Mohamed S.; Alanazi, Mohammad S.; Khan, Wajahatullah; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Al-Amri, Abdullah; Bazzi, Mohammad D.

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are ubiquitous, induced under a number of environmental and metabolic stresses, with highly conserved DNA sequences among mammalian species. Camelus dromedaries (the Arabian camel) domesticated under semi-desert environments, is well adapted to tolerate and survive against severe drought and high temperatures for extended periods. This is the first report of molecular cloning and characterization of full length cDNA of encoding a putative stress-induced heat shock HSPA6 protein (also called HSP70B′) from Arabian camel. A full-length cDNA (2417 bp) was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and cloned in pET-b expression vector. The sequence analysis of HSPA6 gene showed 1932 bp-long open reading frame encoding 643 amino acids. The complete cDNA sequence of the Arabian camel HSPA6 gene was submitted to NCBI GeneBank (accession number HQ214118.1). The BLAST analysis indicated that C. dromedaries HSPA6 gene nucleotides shared high similarity (77–91%) with heat shock gene nucleotide of other mammals. The deduced 643 amino acid sequences (accession number ADO12067.1) showed that the predicted protein has an estimated molecular weight of 70.5 kDa with a predicted isoelectric point (pI) of 6.0. The comparative analyses of camel HSPA6 protein sequences with other mammalian heat shock proteins (HSPs) showed high identity (80–94%). Predicted camel HSPA6 protein structure using Protein 3D structural analysis high similarities with human and mouse HSPs. Taken together, this study indicates that the cDNA sequences of HSPA6 gene and its amino acid and protein structure from the Arabian camel are highly conserved and have similarities with other mammalian species. PMID:21845074

  14. In vitro expression of human p53 cDNA clones and characterization of the cloned human p53 gene.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D; Laver-Rudich, Z; Rotter, V

    1985-08-01

    The human p53 gene was cloned and characterized by using a battery of p53 DNA clones. A series of human cDNA clones of various sizes and relative localizations to the mRNA molecule were isolated by using the human p53-H14 (2.35-kilobase) cDNA probe which we previously cloned. One such isolate, clone p53-H7 (2.65 kilobases), spans the entire human mature p53 mRNA molecule. Construction of the human cDNA clones in the pSP65 RNA transcription vector facilitated the generation of p53 transcripts by the SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase. The p53-specific RNA transcripts obtained without further processing were translated into p53 proteins in a cell-free system. By using this rapid in vitro transcription-translation assay, we found that whereas clone p53-H7 (2.65 kilobases) coded for a mature-sized p53 protein, a shorter cDNA clone, p53-H13 (1.8 kilobases), dictated the synthesis of a smaller-sized p53 protein (45 kilodaltons). The p53 proteins synthesized in vitro immunoprecipitated efficiently with human-specific anti-p53 antibodies. Genomic analysis of human DNA revealed the presence of a single p53 gene residing within two EcoRI fragments. Heteroduplex analysis between the full-length cDNA clone p53-H7 and the cloned p53 gene indicated the presence of seven major exons. PMID:3018534

  15. Isolation of distinct cDNA clones encoding HLA-DR beta chains by use of an expression assay.

    PubMed Central

    Long, E O; Wake, C T; Strubin, M; Gross, N; Accolla, R S; Carrel, S; Mach, B

    1982-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding different human Ia antigen beta chains were isolated by use of a complementation-expression assay in Xenopus oocytes. The assay was based on two previous findings. First, oocytes injected with mRNA from a human B-cell line express HLA-DR antigen. The three intracellular DR chains are assembled in oocytes and can be immunoprecipitated with anti-DR monoclonal antibodies. Second, we have isolated cDNA clones encoding DR alpha and intermediate chains. In order to identify beta-chain cDNA clones, mRNA was hybrid-selected with pools of cDNA clones, mixed with mRNA for the alpha and intermediate chains, and injected into oocytes. We isolated two distinct clones that could select DR beta-chain mRNA as demonstrated by assembly of the translation product with DR alpha chains and immunoprecipitation with DR-specific monoclonal antibodies. One clone is specific for a beta chain of the DR locus. The other clone, much weaker in its ability to select DR mRNA, encodes another Ia-like beta chain. Full-length cDNA clones corresponding to the DR and Ia-like beta chains were isolated and compared. Cross-hybridization was detectable in the coding regions but not in the 3' untranslated regions. Distinct RNAs homologous to the DR and the Ia-like beta-chain clones were present in B cells but were undetectable in three T-cell lines. Images PMID:6818545

  16. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of a yak (Bos grunniens) κ-casein cDNA from lactating mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Bai, W L; Yin, R H; Dou, Q L; Jiang, W Q; Zhao, S J; Ma, Z J; Luo, G B; Zhao, Z H

    2011-04-01

    κ-Casein is one of the major proteins in the milk of mammals. It plays an important role in determining the size and specific function of milk micelles. We have previously identified and characterized a genetic variant of yak κ-casein by evaluating genomic DNA. Here, we isolate and characterize a yak κ-casein cDNA harboring the full-length open reading frame (ORF) from lactating mammary gland. Total RNA was extracted from mammary tissue of lactating female yak, and the κ-casein cDNA were synthesized by RT-PCR technique, then cloned and sequenced. The obtained cDNA of 660-bp contained an ORF sufficient to encode the entire amino acid sequence of κ-casein precursor protein consisting of 190 amino acids with a signal peptide of 21 amino acids. Yak κ-casein has a predicted molecular mass of 19,006.588 Da with a calculated isoelectric point of 7.245. Compared with the corresponding sequences in GenBank of cattle, buffalo, sheep, goat, Arabian camel, horse, and rabbit, yak κ-casein sequence had identity of 64.76-98.78% in cDNA, and identity of 44.79-98.42% and similarity of 53.65-98.42% in deduced amino acids, revealing a high homology with the other livestock species. Based on κ-casein cDNA sequences, the phylogenetic analysis indicated that yak κ-casein had a close relationship with that of cattle. This work might be useful in the genetic engineering researches for yak κ-casein. PMID:21104027

  17. cDNA cloning and promoter analysis of rat caspase-9.

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, J; Yi, X; Venkatachalam, M A; Dong, Z

    2001-01-01

    Caspase-9 is the apex caspase of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, which plays a critical role in apoptotic initiation and progression. However, gene regulation of caspase-9 is largely unknown. This is in part due to the lack of information on the gene promoter. Here we have cloned the full-length cDNA of rat caspase-9 and have isolated promoter regions of this gene. The rat caspase-9 cDNA of 2058 bp predicts a protein of 454 amino acids, which contains a caspase-recruitment domain ('CARD') at the N-terminus and enzymic domains at the C-terminus. The enzyme's active site, with a characteristic motif of QACGG, was also identified. Overall, rat and human caspase-9 have 71% identity. With the cDNA sequence, we subsequently isolated the proximal 5'-flanking regions of rat caspase-9 by the procedure of genomic walking. The 2270 bp genomic segment is 'TATA-less', but contains several GC boxes. Elements binding known transcription factors such as Sp-1, Pit-1, CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP), glucocorticoid receptor and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) were also identified. When cloned into reporter gene vectors, the genomic segment showed significant promoter activity, indicating that the 5'-flanking regions isolated by genomic walking contain the gene promoter of rat caspase-9. Of significance is that the cloned promoter segments were activated by severe hypoxia, conditions inducing caspase-9 transcription. Thus, the genomic sequences reported here contain not only the basal promoter of rat caspase-9 but also regulatory elements responsive to pathophysiological stimuli including hypoxia. PMID:11695991

  18. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  19. Transfection of C6 Glioma Cells with Connexin 43 cDNA: Analysis of Expression, Intercellular Coupling, and Cell Proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.; Caveney, S.; Kidder, G. M.; Naus, C. C. G.

    1991-03-01

    C6 glioma cells express low levels of the gap junction protein connexin 43 and its mRNA and display very weak dye coupling. When implanted into the rat cerebrum, these cells quickly give rise to a large glioma. To investigate the role of gap junctions in the tumor characteristics of these cells, we have used Lipofectin-mediated transfection to introduce a full-length cDNA encoding connexin 43. Several transfected clones were obtained that exhibited various amounts of connexin 43 mRNA transcribed from the inserted cDNA. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed an increase in the amount of connexin 43 immunoreactivity in the transfected cells, being localized at areas of intercellular contact as well as in the cytoplasm. The level of dye coupling was also assessed and found to correlate with the amount of connexin 43 mRNA. When cell proliferation was followed over several days, cells expressing the transfected cDNA grew more slowly than nontransfected cells. These transfected cells will be useful in examining the role of gap junctions in tumorigenesis.

  20. Human platelet/erythroleukemia cell prostaglandin G/H synthase: cDNA cloning, expression, and gene chromosomal assignment.

    PubMed

    Funk, C D; Funk, L B; Kennedy, M E; Pong, A S; Fitzgerald, G A

    1991-06-01

    Platelets metabolize arachidonic acid to thromboxane A2, a potent platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor compound. The first step of this transformation is catalyzed by prostaglandin (PG) G/H synthase, a target site for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We have isolated the cDNA for both human platelet and human erythroleukemia cell PGG/H synthase using the polymerase chain reaction and conventional screening procedures. The cDNA encoding the full-length protein was expressed in COS-M6 cells. Microsomal fractions from transfected cells produced prostaglandin endoperoxide-derived products which were inhibited by indomethacin and aspirin. Mutagenesis of the serine residue at position 529, the putative aspirin acetylation site, to an asparagine reduced cyclooxygenase activity to barely detectable levels, an effect observed previously with the expressed sheep vesicular gland enzyme. Platelet-derived growth factor and phorbol ester differentially regulated the expression of PGG/H synthase mRNA levels in the megakaryocytic/platelet-like HEL cell line. The PGG/H synthase gene was assigned to chromosome 9 by analysis of a human--hamster somatic hybrid DNA panel. The availability of platelet PGG/H synthase cDNA should enhance our understanding of the important structure/function domains of this protein and its gene regulation. PMID:1907252

  1. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and expression in Escherichia coli of Camelus dromedarius glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase cDNA.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Hesham Mahmoud; Alanazi, Mohammad Saud; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Al-Amri, Abdullah; Khan, Zahid

    2012-06-01

    This study determined the full length sequence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase cDNA (G6PD) from the Arabian camel Camelus dromedarius using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The C. dromedarius G6PD has an open reading frame of 1545 bp, and the cDNA encodes a protein of 515 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 59.0 KDa. The amino acid sequence showed the highest identity with Equus caballus (92%) and Homo sapiens (92%). The G6PD cDNA was cloned and expressed into Escherichia coli as a fusion protein and was purified in a single chromatographic step using nickel affinity gel column. The purity and the molecular weight of the enzyme were checked on SDS-PAGE and the purified enzyme showed a single band on the gel with a molecular weight of 63.0 KDa. The specific activity of G6PD was determined to be 289.6 EU/mg protein with a fold purification of 95.45 and yield of 56.8%. PMID:22538316

  2. Cloning of the cDNA for U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein from Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Czernik, A. J.; An, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a plant cDNA that encodes U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) 70K protein. The plant U1 snRNP 70K protein cDNA is not full length and lacks the coding region for 68 amino acids in the amino-terminal region as compared to human U1 snRNP 70K protein. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the plant U1 snRNP 70K protein with the amino acid sequence of animal and yeast U1 snRNP 70K protein showed a high degree of homology. The plant U1 snRNP 70K protein is more closely related to the human counter part than to the yeast 70K protein. The carboxy-terminal half is less well conserved but, like the vertebrate 70K proteins, is rich in charged amino acids. Northern analysis with the RNA isolated from different parts of the plant indicates that the snRNP 70K gene is expressed in all of the parts tested. Southern blotting of genomic DNA using the cDNA indicates that the U1 snRNP 70K protein is coded by a single gene.

  3. Molecular and characterization of NnPPO cDNA from lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) in rhizome browning.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Yu, A Q; Yang, M G; Zhou, M Q; Hu, Z L

    2016-01-01

    The complete cDNA (NnPPO) of polyphenol oxidase in Nelumbo nucifera was successfully isolated, using Rapid amplification cDNA end (RACE) assays. The full-length cDNA of NnPPO was 2069 bp in size, containing a 1791 bp open reading frame coding 597 amino acids. The putative NnPPO possessed the conserved active sites and domains for PPO function. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that NnPPO shared high homology with PPO of high plants, and the homology modeling proved that NnPPO had the typical structure of PPO family. In order to characterize the role of NnPPO, Real-time PCR assay demonstrated that NnPPO mRNA was expressed in different tissues of N. nucifera including young leave, rhizome, flower, root and leafstalk, with the highest expression in rhizome. Patterns of NnPPO expression in rhizome illustrated its mRNA level was significantly elevated, which was consistent with the change of NnPPO activity during rhizome browning. Therefore, transcriptional activation of NnPPO was probably the main reason causing rhizome browning. PMID:27188738

  4. Human platelet/erythroleukemia cell prostaglandin G/H synthase: cDNA cloning, expression, and gene chromosomal assignment

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, C.D.; Funk, L.B.; Kennedy, M.E.; Pong, A.S.; Fitzgerald, G.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Platelets metabolize arachidonic acid to thromboxane A{sub 2}, a potent platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor compound. The first step of this transformation is catalyzed by prostaglandin (PG) G/H synthase, a target site for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We have isolated the cDNA for both human platelet and human erythroleukemia cell PGG/H synthase using the polymerase chain reaction and conventional screening procedures. The cDNA encoding the full-length protein was expressed in COS-M6 cells. Microsomal fractions from transfected cells produced prostaglandin endoperoxide derived products which were inhibited by indomethacin and aspirin. Mutagenesis of the serine residue at position 529, the putative aspirin acetylation site, to an asparagine reduced cyclooxygenase activity to barely detectable levels, an effect observed previously with the expressed sheep vesicular gland enzyme. Platelet-derived growth factor and phorbol ester differentially regulated the expression of PGG/H synthase mRNA levels in the megakaryocytic/platelet-like HEL cell line. The PGG/H synthase gene was assigned to chromosome 9 by analysis of a human-hamster somatic hybrid DNA panel. The availability of platelet PGG/H synthase cDNA should enhance our understanding of the important structure/function domains of this protein and it gene regulation.

  5. cDNA cloning, characterization and expression analysis of the antioxidant enzyme gene, catalase, of Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingli; Li, Fuhua; Zhang, Xiaojun; Dong, Bo; Zhang, Jiquan; Xie, Yusu; Xiang, Jianhai

    2008-05-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant protein that protects organisms against various oxidative stresses by eliminating hydrogen peroxide. The full-length catalase cDNA of Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis was cloned from the hepatopancreas using degenerate primers by the method of 3' and 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR. The cDNA sequence consists of 1892 bp with a 1560 bp open reading frame, encoding 520 amino acids with high identity to invertebrate, vertebrate and even bacterial catalases. The sequence includes the catalytic residues His71, Asn144, and Tyr354. The molecular mass of the predicted protein is 58824.04 Da with an estimated pI of 6.63. Sequence comparison showed that the deduced amino acid sequence of F. chinensis catalase shares 96%, 73%, 71% and 70% identity with that of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, Abalone Haliotis discus hannai, Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri and Human Homo sapiens, respectively. Catalase transcripts were detected in hepatopancreas, hemocytes, lymphoid organ, intestine, ovary, muscle and gill by real-time PCR. The variation of catalase mRNA transcripts in hemocytes and hepatopancreas was also quantified by real-time PCR and the result indicated that the catalase showed up-regulated expression trends in hemocytes at 14 h and in hepatopancreas at 37 h after injection with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). PMID:18353680

  6. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 and identification of related transmembrane antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Szala, S.; Kasai, Yasushi; Steplewski, Z.; Rodeck, U.; Koprowski, H.; Linnenbach, A.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 is a monoclonal antibody-defined cell surface glycoprotein of 27-34 kDa. By using the high-efficiency COS cell expression system, a full-length cDNA clone for CO-029 was isolated. When transiently expressed in COS cells, the cDNA clone directed the synthesis of an antigen reactive to monoclonal antibody CO-029 in mixed hemadsorption and immunoblot assays. Sequence analysis revealed that CO-029 belongs to a family of cell surface antigens that includes the melanoma-associated antigen ME491, the leukocyte cell surface antigen CD37, and the Sm23 antigen of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. CO-029 and ME491 antigen expression and the effect of their corresponding monoclonal antibodies on cell growth were compared in human tumor cell lines of various histologic origins.

  7. Creation of Functional Viruses from Non-Functional cDNA Clones Obtained from an RNA Virus Population by the Use of Ancestral Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Dräger, Carolin; Orton, Richard J; Blome, Sandra; Höper, Dirk; Beer, Martin; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses have the highest known mutation rates. Consequently it is likely that a high proportion of individual RNA virus genomes, isolated from an infected host, will contain lethal mutations and be non-functional. This is problematic if the aim is to clone and investigate high-fitness, functional cDNAs and may also pose problems for sequence-based analysis of viral evolution. To address these challenges we have performed a study of the evolution of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) using deep sequencing and analysis of 84 full-length cDNA clones, each representing individual genomes from a moderately virulent isolate. In addition to here being used as a model for RNA viruses generally, CSFV has high socioeconomic importance and remains a threat to animal welfare and pig production. We find that the majority of the investigated genomes are non-functional and only 12% produced infectious RNA transcripts. Full length sequencing of cDNA clones and deep sequencing of the parental population identified substitutions important for the observed phenotypes. The investigated cDNA clones were furthermore used as the basis for inferring the sequence of functional viruses. Since each unique clone must necessarily be the descendant of a functional ancestor, we hypothesized that it should be possible to produce functional clones by reconstructing ancestral sequences. To test this we used phylogenetic methods to infer two ancestral sequences, which were then reconstructed as cDNA clones. Viruses rescued from the reconstructed cDNAs were tested in cell culture and pigs. Both reconstructed ancestral genomes proved functional, and displayed distinct phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. We suggest that reconstruction of ancestral viruses is a useful tool for experimental and computational investigations of virulence and viral evolution. Importantly, ancestral reconstruction can be done even on the basis of a set of sequences that all correspond to non-functional variants. PMID

  8. Creation of Functional Viruses from Non-Functional cDNA Clones Obtained from an RNA Virus Population by the Use of Ancestral Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Dräger, Carolin; Orton, Richard J; Blome, Sandra; Höper, Dirk; Beer, Martin; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses have the highest known mutation rates. Consequently it is likely that a high proportion of individual RNA virus genomes, isolated from an infected host, will contain lethal mutations and be non-functional. This is problematic if the aim is to clone and investigate high-fitness, functional cDNAs and may also pose problems for sequence-based analysis of viral evolution. To address these challenges we have performed a study of the evolution of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) using deep sequencing and analysis of 84 full-length cDNA clones, each representing individual genomes from a moderately virulent isolate. In addition to here being used as a model for RNA viruses generally, CSFV has high socioeconomic importance and remains a threat to animal welfare and pig production. We find that the majority of the investigated genomes are non-functional and only 12% produced infectious RNA transcripts. Full length sequencing of cDNA clones and deep sequencing of the parental population identified substitutions important for the observed phenotypes. The investigated cDNA clones were furthermore used as the basis for inferring the sequence of functional viruses. Since each unique clone must necessarily be the descendant of a functional ancestor, we hypothesized that it should be possible to produce functional clones by reconstructing ancestral sequences. To test this we used phylogenetic methods to infer two ancestral sequences, which were then reconstructed as cDNA clones. Viruses rescued from the reconstructed cDNAs were tested in cell culture and pigs. Both reconstructed ancestral genomes proved functional, and displayed distinct phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. We suggest that reconstruction of ancestral viruses is a useful tool for experimental and computational investigations of virulence and viral evolution. Importantly, ancestral reconstruction can be done even on the basis of a set of sequences that all correspond to non-functional variants. PMID

  9. Juvenile psittacine environmental enrichment.

    PubMed

    Simone-Freilicher, Elisabeth; Rupley, Agnes E

    2015-05-01

    Environmental enrichment is of great import to the emotional, intellectual, and physical development of the juvenile psittacine and their success in the human home environment. Five major types of enrichment include social, occupational, physical, sensory, and nutritional. Occupational enrichment includes exercise and psychological enrichment. Physical enrichment includes the cage and accessories and the external home environment. Sensory enrichment may be visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, or taste oriented. Nutritional enrichment includes variations in appearance, type, and frequency of diet, and treats, novelty, and foraging. Two phases of the preadult period deserve special enrichment considerations: the development of autonomy and puberty. PMID:25902270

  10. cDNA cloning and disruption of the major vault protein alpha gene (mvpA) in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Vasu, S K; Kedersha, N L; Rome, L H

    1993-07-25

    Vaults are large cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein particles found in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Dictyostelium vaults contain two major proteins, MVP alpha (94.2 kDa) and MVP beta (approximately 92 kDa). Using an anti-rat vault antibody, we screened a Dictyostelium cDNA expression library and isolated a 2.8-kilobase pair clone that contained a single full-length reading frame. The identity of the clone was established by the presence of a predicted 20-amino acid sequence identical to that found in a peptide sequenced from purified MVP alpha. We have disrupted the single copy gene using homologous recombination and have demonstrated a loss of MVP alpha. Although the cells still produce MVP beta, they do not contain characteristic vault particles, suggesting that MVP alpha is required for normal vault structure. These cells should be a valuable tool for elucidating the function of vaults. PMID:8340365

  11. Cloning of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rho 1 cDNA: a GABA receptor subunit highly expressed in the retina.

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, G R; Lu, L; O'Hara, B F; Kasch, L M; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C; Donovan, D M; Shimada, S; Antonarakis, S E; Guggino, W B; Uhl, G R

    1991-01-01

    Type A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors are a family of ligand-gated chloride channels that are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system. Molecular cloning has revealed diversity in the subunits that compose this heterooligomeric receptor, but each previously elucidated subunit displays amino acid similarity in conserved structural elements. We have used these highly conserved regions to identify additional members of this family by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One PCR product was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a human retina cDNA library. The mature protein predicted from this cDNA sequence in 458 amino acids long and displays between 30 and 38% amino acid similarity to the previously identified GABAA subunits. This gene is expressed primarily in the retina but transcripts are also detected in the brain, lung, and thymus. Injection of Xenopus oocytes with RNA transcribed in vitro produces a GABA-responsive chloride conductance and expression of the cDNA in COS cells yields GABA-displaceable muscimol binding. These features are consistent with our identification of a GABA subunit, GABA rho 1, with prominent retinal expression that increases the diversity and tissue specificity of this ligand-gated ion-channel receptor family. Images PMID:1849271

  12. Isolation of cDNA from Jacaratia mexicana encoding a mexicain-like cysteine protease gene.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Martínez, Erick M; Herrera-Ramírez, Alejandra C; Badillo-Corona, Jesús Agustín; Garibay-Orijel, Claudio; González-Rábade, Nuria; Oliver-Salvador, María Del Carmen

    2012-07-01

    Cysteine proteases (CPs) from the C1 family, which are similar to papain, can be found in animals and plants, as well as some viruses and prokaryotes. These enzymes have diverse physiological functions and are thus very attractive for science and industry. Jacaratia mexicana, a member of the Caricaceae plant family, contains several CPs, the principal being mexicain, found to favorably compete against papain for many industrial applications due to its high stability and specific activity. In this study, leaves of J. mexicana were used to isolate a CP-coding gene, similar to those that code for mexicain and chymomexicain. By using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) as well as oligonucleotide design from papain-like conserved amino acids (aa), a sequence of 1404 bp consisting of a 5' terminal untran