Science.gov

Sample records for full-scale laboratory investigations

  1. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer

  2. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation: from laboratory to full-scale application.

    PubMed

    Ni, Shou-Qing; Zhang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    From discovery in the early 1990s to completion of full-scale anammox reactor, it took almost two decades to uncover the secret veil of anammox bacteria. There were three milestones during the commercialization of anammox: the development of the first enrichment culture medium, the completion of the first commercial anammox reactor, and the fast start-up of full-scale anammox plant. Till now, the culture of anammox bacteria experienced a big progress through two general strategies: (a) to start up a reactor from scratch and (b) to seed the reactor with enriched anammox sludge. The first full-scale anammox reactor took 3.5 years to realize full operation using the first approach due to several reasons besides the lack of anammox sludge. On the other hand, the first Asian anammox reactor started up in two months, thanks to the availability of anammox seed. Along with the implementation of anammox plants, anammox eventually becomes the priority choice for ammonium wastewater treatment. PMID:23956985

  3. Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation: From Laboratory to Full-Scale Application

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    From discovery in the early 1990s to completion of full-scale anammox reactor, it took almost two decades to uncover the secret veil of anammox bacteria. There were three milestones during the commercialization of anammox: the development of the first enrichment culture medium, the completion of the first commercial anammox reactor, and the fast start-up of full-scale anammox plant. Till now, the culture of anammox bacteria experienced a big progress through two general strategies: (a) to start up a reactor from scratch and (b) to seed the reactor with enriched anammox sludge. The first full-scale anammox reactor took 3.5 years to realize full operation using the first approach due to several reasons besides the lack of anammox sludge. On the other hand, the first Asian anammox reactor started up in two months, thanks to the availability of anammox seed. Along with the implementation of anammox plants, anammox eventually becomes the priority choice for ammonium wastewater treatment. PMID:23956985

  4. Investigation of a low NOx full-scale annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    An atmospheric test program was conducted to evaluate a low NOx annular combustor concept suitable for a supersonic, high-altitude aircraft application. The lean premixed combustor, known as the vortex air blast (VAB) concept, was tested as a 22.0-cm diameter model in the early development phases to arrive at basic design and performance criteria. Final demonstration testing was carried out on a full scale combustor of 0.66-m diameter. Variable geometry dilution ports were incorporated to allow operation of the combustor across the range of conditions between idle (T(in) = 422 K, T(out) = 917 K) and cruise (T(in) = 833 K, T(out) - 1778 K). Test results show that the design could meet the program NOx goal of 1.0 g NO2/kg fuel at a one-atmospheric simulated cruise condition.

  5. Facilities and Methods Used in Full-scale Airplane Crash-fire Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Dugald O.

    1952-01-01

    The facilities and the techniques employed in the conduct of full scale airplane crash-fire studies currently being conducted at the NACA Lewis laboratory are discussed herein. This investigation is part of a comprehensive study of the airplane crash-fire problem. The crash configuration chosen, the general physical layout of the crash site, the test methods, the instrumentation, the data-recording systems, and the post-crash examination procedure are described

  6. Hydraulics of laboratory and full-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors.

    PubMed

    Batstone, D J; Hernandez, J L A; Schmidt, J E

    2005-08-01

    Laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors are often used as test platforms to evaluate full-scale applications. However, for a given volume specific hydraulic loading rate and geometry, the gas and liquid flows increase proportionally with the cube root of volume. In this communication, we demonstrate that a laboratory-scale reactor had plug-flow hydraulics, while a full-scale reactor had mixed flow hydraulics. The laboratory-scale reactor could be modeled using an existing biochemical model, and parameters identified, but because of computational speed with plug-flow hydraulics, mixed systems are instead recommended for parameter identification studies. Because of the scaling issues identified, operational data should not be directly projected from laboratory-scale results to the full-scale design. PMID:15977253

  7. Acoustic resonance in tube bundles -- Comparison of full scale and laboratory test results

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, F.L.

    1995-12-01

    Full scale operational data from steam generator tube bundles exposed to hot gases in crossflow are compared with small scale laboratory test results with cold air. Vibration thresholds based on input energy, acoustic particle velocity and effective damping are evaluated and compared. It is shown that these parameters play an important role in the development, or suppression of acoustic resonance.

  8. Flow Field Thresholds for Bottom Roughness Transformation in Full Scale Laboratory Generated Waves and Solitary Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wengrove, M. E.; Foster, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    In field environments, bottom roughness transformation have been observed in response to extreme storm events, flooding, and tsunamis. Bottom roughness transformation is considered to be instances when an observed stable bed state (e.g. ripples) rapidly transforms into an alternate stable state (e.g. flat bed). This type of extreme change is observed when forcing mechanisms due to shear stress and pressure gradients reach significant magnitude and duration. This research utilizes a full scale wave laboratory environment (O.H. Hinsdale Large Wave Flume at Oregon State University) over a sandy substrate to closely investigate bottom boundary layer dynamics coupled with observations of extreme morphologic change from a rippled to a flat bed. The observational array includes two millimeter scale resolution profiling ADVs (Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter), a PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) used to estimate velocity fields as well as morphologic evolution, porewater pressure sensors, and multiple single point ADVs and wave gages. An emphasis is made towards investigating the effects of solitary waves (i.e. tsunamis) upon events of extreme morphologic change, both isolated as well as introduced into bimodal wave groups. Additionally, observations demonstrate that instances of roughness flattening and then rebuilding occurring within sets of irregular waves (i.e. storm events). During instances of rapid bed flattening boundary layer streaming is observed in coincidence with estimates of excess applied bed stress and exceedance of critical Shields parameter for sediment motion. Additionally, during extreme flattening, measured pressure gradients indicate conditions for pressure gradient induced sediment transport, supported by the porewater pressure sensor data and the estimated Sleath parameter.

  9. Introducing sequential managed aquifer recharge technology (SMART) - From laboratory to full-scale application.

    PubMed

    Regnery, Julia; Wing, Alexandre D; Kautz, Jessica; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-07-01

    Previous lab-scale studies demonstrated that stimulating the indigenous soil microbial community of groundwater recharge systems by manipulating the availability of biodegradable organic carbon (BDOC) and establishing sequential redox conditions in the subsurface resulted in enhanced removal of compounds with redox-dependent removal behavior such as trace organic chemicals. The aim of this study is to advance this concept from laboratory to full-scale application by introducing sequential managed aquifer recharge technology (SMART). To validate the concept of SMART, a full-scale managed aquifer recharge (MAR) facility in Colorado was studied for three years that featured the proposed sequential configuration: A short riverbank filtration passage followed by subsequent re-aeration and artificial recharge and recovery. Our findings demonstrate that sequential subsurface treatment zones characterized by carbon-rich (>3 mg/L BDOC) to carbon-depleted (≤1 mg/L BDOC) and predominant oxic redox conditions can be established at full-scale MAR facilities adopting the SMART concept. The sequential configuration resulted in substantially improved trace organic chemical removal (i.e. higher biodegradation rate coefficients) for moderately biodegradable compounds compared to conventional MAR systems with extended travel times in an anoxic aquifer. Furthermore, sorption batch experiments with clay materials dispersed in the subsurface implied that sorptive processes might also play a role in the attenuation and retardation of chlorinated flame retardants during MAR. Hence, understanding key factors controlling trace organic chemical removal performance during SMART allows for systems to be engineered for optimal efficiency, resulting in improved removal of constituents at shorter subsurface travel times and a potentially reduced physical footprint of MAR installations. PMID:27037769

  10. Characterisation of recycled mixed plastic solid wastes: Coupon and full-scale investigation.

    PubMed

    Bajracharya, Rohan Muni; Manalo, Allan C; Karunasena, Warna; Lau, Kin-Tak

    2016-02-01

    In Australia, the plastic solid waste (PSW) comprises 16% by weight of municipal solid waste but only about one-fourth are recycled. One of the best options to increase the recycling rate of mixed PSW is to convert them into products suitable for construction. However, a comprehensive understanding on the mechanical behaviour of mixed PSW under different loading conditions is important for their widespread use as a construction material. This study focuses on investigating the mechanical behaviour of recycled mixed PSW containing HDPE, LDPE and PP using coupon and full-scale specimens. From coupon test, the strength values were found to be 14.8, 19.8, 20, 5.6MPa in tension, compression, flexure and shear respectively, while the modulus of elasticity are 0.91, 1.03, 0.72GPa in tension, compression and flexure respectively. The coefficient of variance of the measured properties for coupon and fullscale specimens was less than 10% indicating that consistent material properties can be obtained for mixed PSW. More importantly, the strength properties of mixed PSW are comparable to softwood structural timber. The flexural behaviour of full-scale specimens was also predicted using fibre model analysis and finite element modelling. Comparison showed that using coupon specimen's properties, the flexural behaviour of the full-scale specimens can be predicted reliably which can eliminate the costly and time consuming arrangements for full-scale experimental tests. PMID:26597374

  11. Selection of the surface water treatment technology - a full-scale technological investigation.

    PubMed

    Pruss, Alina

    2015-01-01

    A technological investigation was carried out over a period of 2 years to evaluate surface water treatment technology. The study was performed in Poland, in three stages. From November 2011 to July 2012, for the first stage, flow tests with a capacity of 0.1-1.5 m³/h were performed simultaneously in three types of technical installations differing by coagulation modules. The outcome of the first stage was the choice of the technology for further investigation. The second stage was performed between September 2012 and March 2013 on a full-scale water treatment plant. Three large technical installations, operated in parallel, were analysed: coagulation with sludge flotation, micro-sand ballasted coagulation with sedimentation, coagulation with sedimentation and sludge recirculation. The capacity of the installations ranged from 10 to 40 m³/h. The third stage was also performed in a full-scale water treatment plant and was aimed at optimising the selected technology. This article presents the results of the second stage of the full-scale investigation. The critical treatment process, for the analysed water, was the coagulation in an acidic environment (6.5 < pH < 7.0) carried out in a system with rapid mixing, a flocculation chamber, preliminary separation of coagulation products, and removal of residual suspended solids through filtration. PMID:25746658

  12. A Theoretical Investigation of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Mechanics Applied to NASA Full Scale Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, N.; Thesken, J. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.; Palko, J.; Eldridge, J.; Sutter, J.; Saulsberry, R.; Beeson, H.

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the factors controlling the stress rupture life of the National Aeronautics and Space Agency's (NASA) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) continues. Kevlar(TradeMark) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar(TradeMark) filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However, due to the presence of a load sharing liner, the manufacturing induced residual stresses and the complex mechanical response, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. This paper is a companion to the experimental investigation reported in [1] and develops a theoretical framework necessary to design full-scale pathfinder experiments and accurately interpret the experimentally observed deformation and failure mechanisms leading up to static burst in COPVs. The fundamental mechanical response of COPVs is described using linear elasticity and thin shell theory and discussed in comparison to existing experimental observations. These comparisons reveal discrepancies between physical data and the current analytical results and suggest that the vessel's residual stress state and the spatial stress distribution as a function of pressure may be completely different from predictions based upon existing linear elastic analyses. The 3D elasticity of transversely isotropic spherical shells demonstrates that an overly compliant transverse stiffness relative to membrane stiffness can account for some of this by shifting a thin shell problem well into the realm of thick shell response. The use of calibration procedures are demonstrated as calibrated thin shell model results and finite element results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The successes reported here have lead to continuing work with full scale testing of larger NASA COPV

  13. A Theoretical Investigation of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Mechanics Applied to NASA Full Scale Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thesken, John C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. L.; Greene, N.; Palko, Joseph L.; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Sutter, James; Saulsberry, R.; Beeson, H.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the factors controlling the stress rupture life of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) continues. Kevlar (DuPont) fiber overwrapped tanks are of particular concern due to their long usage and the poorly understood stress rupture process in Kevlar filaments. Existing long term data show that the rupture process is a function of stress, temperature and time. However due to the presence of a load sharing liner, the manufacturing induced residual stresses and the complex mechanical response, the state of actual fiber stress in flight hardware and test articles is not clearly known. This paper is a companion to a previously reported experimental investigation and develops a theoretical framework necessary to design full-scale pathfinder experiments and accurately interpret the experimentally observed deformation and failure mechanisms leading up to static burst in COPVs. The fundamental mechanical response of COPVs is described using linear elasticity and thin shell theory and discussed in comparison to existing experimental observations. These comparisons reveal discrepancies between physical data and the current analytical results and suggest that the vessel s residual stress state and the spatial stress distribution as a function of pressure may be completely different from predictions based upon existing linear elastic analyses. The 3D elasticity of transversely isotropic spherical shells demonstrates that an overly compliant transverse stiffness relative to membrane stiffness can account for some of this by shifting a thin shell problem well into the realm of thick shell response. The use of calibration procedures are demonstrated as calibrated thin shell model results and finite element results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The successes reported here have lead to continuing work with full scale testing of larger NASA COPV

  14. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a Full-Scale Canard-Configured General Aviation Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, L. P.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a powered, full-scale model of a general aviation airplane employing a canard. Although primary emphasis of the investigation was placed on evaluating the aerodynamic performance and the stability and control characteristics of the basic configuration, tests were also conducted to study the following effects of varying the basic configuration: effect of Reynolds number; effect of canard; effect of outboard wing leading-edge droop; effect of center-of-gravity location; effect of elevator trim; effect of landing gear; effect of lateral-directional control; effect of power; effect of fixed transition; effect of water spray; effects of canard incidence, canard airfoil section, and canard position; and effects of winglets and upper winglet size. Additional aspects of the study were to determine the boundary-layer transition characteristics of airfoil surfaces and the effect of fixing the boundary layer to be turbulent by means of a transition strip near the leading edge. The tests were conducted at Reynolds numbers from 0.60 x 10 to the 6th power to 2.25x10 to the 6th power, based on the wing mean aerodynamic chord, at angles of attack from -4.5 deg to 41.5 deg, and at angles of sideslip from -15 deg to 15 deg.

  15. COMPARISON OF ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM LABORATORY AND FULL-SCALE THERMAL DEGRADATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples of sewage sludge burned at one fluidized-bed and three multiple-hearth incinerators were subjected to laboratory flow reactor thermal decomposition testing under both pyrolytic and oxidative atmospheres. he laboratory test results indicated that biomass decomposition prod...

  16. Assembly and maintenance of full scale NIF amplifiers in the amplifier module prototype laboratory (AMPLAB)

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J. A.

    1998-07-16

    Mechanical assembly and maintenance of the prototype National Ignition Facility amplifiers in the Amplifier Module Prototype Laboratory (AMPLAB) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory requires specialized equipment designed to manipulate large and delicate amplifier components in a safe and clean manner. Observations made during the operation of this assembly and maintenance equipment in AMPLAB provide design guidance for similar tools being built for the National Ignition Facility. Fixtures used for amplifier frame installation, laser slab and flashlamp cassette assembly, transport, and installation, and in-situ blastshield exchange are presented. Examples include a vacuum slab gripper, slab handling clean crane, slab cassette assembly fixture, sealed transport vehicle for slab cassette movement between the cleanroom and amplifier, slab cassette transfer fixture between the cleanroom and transport vehicle, and equipment needed for frame assembly unit, blastshield, an d flashlamp cassette installation and removal. The use of these tools for amplifier assembly, system reconfiguration, reflector replacement, and recovery from an abnormal occurrence such as a flashlamp explosion is described. Observations are made on the design and operation of these tools and their contribution to the final design.

  17. Full-scale wind tunnel investigation of a helicopter individual blade control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.; Leyland, Jane A.; Blaas, Achim

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the preparations and plans to test an individual rotor blade pitch control system in the 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. The test will be performed on a full-scale BO-105 rotor system using a control system made by Henschel Flugzeug-Werke, GmbH, Germany. The Individual Blade Control (IBC) actuators have been designed to replace the pitchlinks of the rotor system. The paper presents a brief historical perspective on the development of the individual blade control system and then describes the present IBC actuators and the wind tunnel test hardware. A discussion of the intended test matrix, expected potential benefits of IBC, and simulation results are included.

  18. Full-Scale Investigation of Several Jet-Engine Noise-Reduction Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, Willard D; Callaghan, Edmund E

    1958-01-01

    A number of noise-suppression nozzles were tested on full-scale engines. In general, these nozzles achieved noise reduction by the mixing interference of adjacent jets, that is, by using multiple-slot-nozzles. Several of the nozzles achieved reductions in sound power of approximately 5 decibels (nearly 70 percent) with small thrust losses (approx. 1 percent). The maximum sound-pressure level was reduced by as much as 18 decibels in particular frequency bands. Some of the nozzles showed considerable spatial asymmetry; that is, the sound field was not rotationally symmetrical. A method of calculating the limiting frequency effected by such nozzles is presented. Furthermore data are shown that appear to indicate that further reductions in sound power will not be easily achieved from nozzles using mixing interference as a means of noise suppression

  19. Full-scale wind tunnel-investigation of the Advanced Technology Light Twin-Engine airplane (ATLIT). [Langley full scale tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassell, J. L., Jr.; Newsom, W. A., Jr.; Yip, L. P.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance, stability, and control characteristics of the Advanced Technology Light Twin Engine airplane (ATLIT). Data were measured over an angle of attack range from -4 deg to 20 deg for various angles of sideslip between -5 deg and 15 deg at Reynolds numbers of 0.0000023 and 0.0000035 for various settings of power and flap deflection. Measurements were also made by means of special thrust torque balances to determine the installed propeller characteristics. Part of the investigation was devoted to drag cleanup of the basic airplane and to the evaluation of the effect of winglets on drag and stability.

  20. Wind-tunnel investigation of a full-scale canard-configured general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, L. P.; Coy, P. F.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a broad research program to provide a data base on advanced airplane configurations, a wind-tunnel investigation was conducted in the Langley 30-by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced canard-configured general aviation airplane. The investigation included measurements of forces and moments of the complete configuration, isolated canard loads, and pressure distributions on the wing, winglet, and canard. Flow visualization was obtained by using surface tufts to determine regions of flow separation and by using a chemical sublimation technique to determine boundary-layer transition locations. Additionally, other tests were conducted to determine simulated rain effects on boundary layer transition. Investigation of configuration effects included variations of canard locations, canard airfoil section, winglet size, and use of a leading-edge droop on the out-board section of the wing.

  1. Fatigue Investigation of Full-Scale Wing Panels of 7075 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, Claude B.; Ward, John F.

    1961-01-01

    Results are presented of a fatigue investigation conducted using 18 outer wing panels of T-29A airplanes. Constant-amplitude tests were performed using the resonant-frequency method at three different alternating load levels superposed on a 1 g, or level-flight mean load. Information is presented concerning crack location, cycles to crack initiation, crack propagation, and residual static strength.

  2. Full-scale Investigation of Several Jet-engine Noise-reduction Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, Willard D; Callaghan, Edmund E

    1957-01-01

    A number of nozzles which use the mixing interference of adjacent jets for noise suppression were investigated. Reductions in sound power of nearly 70 percent (5 db) with thrust losses of 1 percent were achieved. A method of calculating the limiting frequency affected by this type of suppression nozzle, that is , multiple-slot nozzles, is presented. Data are shown which indicate that further large reductions in sound power are not likely with mixing-interference nozzles.

  3. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a Full-Scale Model of the Hughes MX-904 Missile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted to determine the stability and control characteristics of a full-size model of the Hughes MX-904 missile. Aerodynamic characteristics of the complete model through moderate ranges of angles of attack and yaw, with an additional test made through an angle of attack of 180 degrees, are presented. The effects of horizontal tail deflection are also included.

  4. Flight Tests on U.S.S. Los Angeles. Part I : Full Scale Pressure Distribution Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De France, S J

    1930-01-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation was to obtain simultaneous data on the loads and stress experience in flight by the U. S. S. Los Angeles which could be used in rigid airship structure design. A secondary object of the investigation was to determine the turning and drag characteristics of the airship. The aerodynamic loading was obtained by measuring the pressure at 95 locations on the tail surfaces, 54 on the hull, and 5 on the passenger car. These measurements were made during a series of maneuvers consisting of turns and reversals in smooth air and during a cruise in rough air which was just short of squall proportions. The results of the pressure measurements on the hull indicate that the forces on the forebody of an airship are relatively small. The tail surface measurements show conclusively that the forces caused by gusts are much greater than those caused by horizontal maneuvers. In this investigation the tail surface loadings caused by gusts closely approached the designed loads of the tail structure. The turning and drag characteristics will be reported in separate reports.

  5. Summary of Results Obtained in Full-Scale Tunnel Investigation of the Ryan Flex-Wing Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph L., Jr.; Hassell, James L., Jr.

    1962-01-01

    The performance and static stability and control characteristics of the Ryan Flex-Wing airplane were determined in an investigation conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel through an angle-of-attack range of the keel from about 14 to 44 deg. for power-on and -off conditions. Comparisons of the wind-tunnel data with flight-test data obtained with the same airplane by the Ryan Aeronautical Company were made in a number of cases.

  6. Study of the near wake structure of a wind turbine comparing measurements from laboratory and full-scale experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Whale, J.; Skyner, D.J.; Papadopoulos, K.H.; Helmis, C.G.; Anderson, C.G.

    1996-06-01

    Wake flow measurements have been performed using the technique of particle image velocimetry (PIV) at stations downstream from a model wind turbine rotor, and evaluated against experimental data from two full-scale machines. Comparisons include both mean velocity and turbulent intensity cross-wake profiles at a range of tip speed ratios. The application of PIV to the study of wind turbine wakes is described in detail, including the steps required to ensure appropriate and accurate simulation of the flow field conditions. The results suggest that the PIV method is a potentially useful tool in the investigation of detailed wake flow, though significant differences are observed between wake velocity deficits at full- and model scale. These are discussed with regard to scale effect, the influence of terrain, model similarity, and the phenomenon of wake meandering and effective cross-wake smoothing. 17 refs., 13 figs.

  7. A Full-scale Investigation of the Effect of Several Factors on the Shimmy of Cantering Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Walter B , Jr

    1940-01-01

    A full-scale investigation has been conducted to determine the effect of various factors on the shimmy of castering wheels. The factors considered were the geometric arrangement, the tire types, the variations of load, the spindle moment of inertia, and the tire inflation. A comparison of the results of the present investigation with those calculated from existing theory was made. The constants needed in the calculations to determine the damping required for a castering wheel were measured. The results indicate that solid friction appears to be impracticable as the sole damping agent for castering nose wheels on large airplanes. Also it was concluded that the existing theory is adequate for calculating the damping required to prevent shimmy. The caster angle and the spindle moment of inertia were found to influence the solid friction required to prevent shimmy. The effect of variations in the type and the pressure of the tire was insignificant.

  8. Full-Scale Investigation of Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Typical Single-Sotor Helicopter in Forward Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingeldein, Richard C; Schaefer, Raymond F

    1948-01-01

    As part of the general helicopter research program being undertaken by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to provide designers with fundamental rotor information, the forward-flight performance characteristics of a typical single-rotor helicopter, which is equipped with main and tail rotors, have been investigated in the Langley full-scale tunnel. The test conditions included operation of tip-speed ratios from 0.10 to 0.27 and at thrust coefficients from 0.0030 to 0.0060. Results obtained with production rotor were compared with those for an alternate set of blades having closer rib spacing and a smoother and more accurately contoured surface in order to evaluate the performance gains that are available by the use of rotor blades having an improved surface condition. The wind tunnel results are shown to be in fair agreement with the results of both flight tests and theoretical predictions.

  9. Full Scale Tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Interior view of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model. (Small human figures have been added for scale.) On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow.

  10. Field application of a planted fixed bed reactor (PFR) for support media and rhizosphere investigation using undisturbed samples from full-scale constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Barreto, A B; Vasconcellos, G R; von Sperling, M; Kuschk, P; Kappelmeyer, U; Vasel, J L

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a novel method for investigations on undisturbed samples from full-scale horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands (HSSFCW). The planted fixed bed reactor (PFR), developed at the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research (UFZ), is a universal test unit for planted soil filters that reproduces the operational conditions of a constructed wetland (CW) system in laboratory scale. The present research proposes modifications on the PFR original configuration in order to allow its operation in field conditions. A mobile device to obtain undisturbed samples from real-scale HSSFCW was also developed. The experimental setting is presented with two possible operational configurations. The first allows the removal and replacement of undisturbed samples in the CW bed for laboratory investigations, guaranteeing sample integrity with a mobile device. The second allows the continuous operation of the PFR and undisturbed samples as a fraction of the support media, reproducing the same environmental conditions outside the real-scale system. Investigations on the hydrodynamics of the adapted PFR were carried out with saline tracer tests, validating the proposed adaptation. Six adapted PFR units were installed next to full-scale HSSFCW beds and fed with interstitial liquid pumped from two regions of planted and unplanted support media. Fourteen points were monitored along the system, covering carbon fractions, nitrogen and sulfate. The results indicate the method as a promising tool for investigations on CW support media, rhizosphere and open space for studies on CW modeling, respirometry, kinetic parameters, microbial communities, redox potential and plant influence on HSSFCW. PMID:26247753

  11. Phosphorus, copper and zinc in solid and liquid fractions from full-scale and laboratory-separated pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Olga; Hjorth, Maibritt; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2012-09-01

    Pig slurry separation is a slurry treatment technique that can reduce excess loads of P, Cu and Zn to the arable land. This study investigated the effects of different commercial and laboratory separation treatments for pig slurry on P, Cu and Zn distribution into solid and liquid fractions. Solid and liquid separation fractions were collected from two commercial separators installed on the farm. Five different separation treatments were performed (polymer flocculation and drainage; coagulation with iron sulphate addition and polymer flocculation and drainage; ozonation and centrifugation; centrifugation only; and natural sedimentation) on sow and suckling piglet raw slurry. Particle size fractionation was performed on raw slurry and all separation fractions by sequential wet sieving and P, Cu and Zn concentrations were then measured in the particle size classes. Dry matter and total P, Cu and Zn were separated with higher efficiency when chemical pretreatments with flocculants and coagulants were introduced before mechanical separation at both commercial and laboratory scale. When solid fractions are utilized as crop fertilizer (primarily as P fertilizer), the loads of Cu and Zn to the soils are not markedly different than the loads applied with raw slurry. When liquid fractions are used as crop fertilizer (primarily as N fertilizer), the loads of Cu and Zn are markedly lower than those supplied with raw slurry. The loads of Cu and Zn introduced to the soil were lowest on application of the liquid fraction produced by optimized separation treatments that included flocculation and coagulation. PMID:23240207

  12. Experimental Investigation of a Hypersonic Glider Configuration at a Mach Number of 6 and at Full-Scale Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiff, Alvin; Wilkins, Max E.

    1961-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a hypersonic glider configuration, consisting of a slender ogive cylinder with three highly swept wings, spaced 120 apart, with the wing chord equal to the body length, were investigated experimentally at a Mach number of 6 and at Reynolds numbers from 6 to 16 million. The objectives were to evaluate the theoretical procedures which had been used to estimate the performance of the glider, and also to evaluate the characteristics of the glider itself. A principal question concerned the viscous drag at full-scale Reynolds number, there being a large difference between the total drags for laminar and turbulent boundary layers. It was found that the procedures which had been applied for estimating minimum drag, drag due to lift, lift curve slope, and center of pressure were generally accurate within 10 percent. An important exception was the non-linear contribution to the lift coefficient which had been represented by a Newtonian term. Experimentally, the lift curve was nearly linear within the angle-of-attack range up to 10 deg. This error affected the estimated lift-drag ratio. The minimum drag measurements indicated that substantial amounts of turbulent boundary layer were present on all models tested, over a range of surface roughness from 5 microinches maximum to 200 microinches maximum. In fact, the minimum drag coefficients were nearly independent of the surface smoothness and fell between the estimated values for turbulent and laminar boundary layers, but closer to the turbulent value. At the highest test Reynolds numbers and at large angles of attack, there was some indication that the skin friction of the rough models was being increased by the surface roughness. At full-scale Reynolds number, the maximum lift-drag ratio with a leading edge of practical diameter (from the standpoint of leading-edge heating) was 4.0. The configuration was statically and dynamically stable in pitch and yaw, and the center of pressure was less

  13. Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Drag Characteristics of an HU2K Helicopter Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scallion, William I.

    1963-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel to determine the drag characteristics of the HU2K helicopter fuselage. The effects of body shape, engine operation, appendages, and leakage on the model drag were determined. The results of the tests showed that the largest single contribution to the parasite drag was that of the rotor hub installation which produced about 80 percent of the drag of the sealed and faired production body. Fairings on the rotor hub and blade retentions, or a cleaned-up hub and retentions, appeared to be the most effective single modifications tested. The total drag of all protuberances and air leakage also contributed a major part of the drag - an 83-percent increase over the drag of the sealed and faired production body. An additional increment of drag was caused by the basic shape of the fuselage - 19 percent more than the drag obtained when the fuselage shape was extensively refaired. Another sizable increment of drag was caused by the engine oil-cooler exit which gave a drag of 8 percent of that of the sealed and faired production body.

  14. Wind-tunnel investigation of a full-scale general aviation airplane equipped with an advanced natural laminar flow wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel to evaluate the performance, stability, and control characteristics of a full-scale general aviation airplane equipped with an advanced laminar flow wing. The study focused on the effects of natural laminar flow and advanced boundary layer transition on performance, stability, and control, and also on the effects of several wing leading edge modifications on the stall/departure resistance of the configuration. Data were measured over an angle-of-attack range from -6 to 40 deg and an angle-of-sideslip range from -6 to 20 deg. The Reynolds number was varied from 1.4 to 2.4 x 10 to the 6th power based on the mean aerodynamic chord. Additional measurements were made using hot-film and sublimating chemical techniques to determine the condition of the wing boundary layer, and wool tufts were used to study the wing stall characteristics. The investigation showed that large regions of natural laminar flow existed on the wing which would significantly enhance cruise performance. Also, because of the characteristics of the airfoil section, artificially tripping the wing boundary layer to a turbulent condition did not significantly effect the lift, stability, and control characteristics. The addition of a leading-edge droop arrangement was found to increase the stall angle of attack at the wingtips and, therefore, was considered to be effective in improving the stall/departure resistance of the configuration. Also the addition of the droop arrangement resulted in only minor increases in drag.

  15. Investigations of the boundary-layer control on a full scale swept wing with air bled off from the turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebuffet, Pierre; Poisson-Quinton, PH

    1952-01-01

    The following account reviews the various stages of a research program relative to the high-lift devices on a swept wing by combined suction and blowing (jet action), with ejectors fed by air bled off (extracted) from the turbojet. After reviewing the essential principles of the boundary-layer control obtained by comparison with theory, the electric analogies and the wind-tunnel tests as well as the essential elements of ejector operations, the writers describe the tests made in the large tunnel at Chalais-Meudon on a full-scale model of the SO 6020 wing.

  16. Full-scale wind-tunnel investigation of an Ayres S2R-800 Thrush Agricultural Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. L., Jr.; Mclemore, H. C.; White, R.; Jordan, F. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This paper summarizes the significant results of recent full-scale wind tunnel tests at the NASA-Langley Research Center of the Ayres S2R-800 Thrush Agricultural Aircraft. The purpose of the tests was to provide fundamental aerodynamic, performance, and stability and control information of the airplane and dispersal equipment; and to study near-field wake interaction characteristics behind the aircraft. The aerodynamic tests included the use of a propeller thrust-torque balance to measure the efficiency of the propeller in the presence of the engine and to provide data for determining slipstream interference effects and slip-stream drag.

  17. Closed-loop biomass co-firing in a laboratory reactor and in a full-scale boiler.

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Bryan M.; Williams, Robert B.; Turn, Scott Q.; Jakeway, Lee A.; Blevins, Linda Gail

    2004-05-01

    Co-firing tests were conducted in a pilot-scale reactor at Sandia National Laboratories and in a boiler at the Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar factory at Puunene, Hawaii. Combustion tests were performed in the Sandia Multi-Fuel Combustor using Australian coal, whole fiber cane including tops and leaves processed at three different levels (milled only, milled and leached, and milled followed by leaching and subsequent milling), and fiber cane stripped of its tops and leaves and heavily processed through subsequent milling, leaching, and milling cycles. Testing was performed for pure fuels and for biomass co-firing with the coal at levels of 30% and 70% by mass. The laboratory tests revealed the following information: (1) The biomass fuels convert their native nitrogen into NO more efficiently than coal because of higher volatile content and more reactive nitrogen complexes. (2) Adding coal to whole fiber cane to reduce its tendency to form deposits should not adversely affect NO emissions. ( 3 ) Stripped cane does not offer a NO advantage over whole cane when co-fired with coal. During the field test, Sandia measured 0 2 , C02, CO, SO2, and NO concentrations in the stack and gas velocities near the superheater. Gas concentrations and velocities fluctuated more during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. The mean 0 2 concentration was lower and the mean C02 concentration was higher during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. When normalized to a constant exhaust 0 2 concentration, mean CO concentration was higher and mean NO concentration was lower for biomass co-firing than for coal. The SO2 concentration tracked the use of Bunker C fuel oil. When normalized by the amount of boiler energy input, the amounts of NO and SO2 formed were lower during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. The difference between NOx trends in the lab and in the field are most likely a result of less effective heat and mass transfer in the boiler. Particles were

  18. The use of laboratory scale reactors to predict sensitivity to changes in operating conditions for full-scale anaerobic digestion treating municipal sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    McLeod, James D; Othman, Maazuza Z; Beale, David J; Joshi, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge is highly complex and prone to inhibition, which can cause major issues for digester operators. The result is that there have been numerous investigations into changes in operational conditions, however to date all have focused on the qualitative sensitivities, neglecting the quantitative. This study therefore aimed to determine the quantitative sensitivities by using factorial design of experiments and small semi continuous reactors. Analysis showed total and volatile solids removals are chiefly influenced by retention time, with 79% and 59% of the observed results being attributed to retention time respectively, whereas biogas was mainly influenced by loading rate, 38%, and temperature, 22%. Notably the regression model fitted to the experimental data predicted full-scale performance with a high level of precision, indicating that small reactors are subject to the same sensitivity of full-scale digesters and thus can be used to predict changes loading, retention time, and temperature. PMID:25918031

  19. Investigation of the fire performance of building insulation in full-scale and laboratory fire tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinfelder, W.A.

    1984-04-01

    Twenty-two insulations are exposed to fire tests including the 25 ft Tunnel test, the Attic Floor Radiant Panel test and actual fire conditions of a simulated attic configuration. The insulations consisted of a number of cellulose fiber insulations, utilizing various chemical treatments, glass fiber and mineral fiber insulations. The fire performance characteristics of the insulations were measured in each of the three test scenarios and the report compares their results.

  20. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; an fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293)

  1. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; and fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293).

  2. Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the VZ-5 Four-Propeller Deflected-Slipstream VTOL Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Marvin P.

    1963-01-01

    The investigation was conducted to determine the static stability and control characteristics of the VZ-5 VTOL air-plane over the speed range from hovering to forward flight. Force and moment data were taken over a range of angles of attack of 0 to 15 deg and a range of sideslip of +/-10 deg for flap deflections from 0 to 77 deg. The longitudinal stability and trim characteristics were found to be quite unacceptable and it did not seem that they could be corrected with any reasonable modifications to the airplane.

  3. A full-scale wind tunnel investigation of a helicopter bearingless main rotor. [Ames 40 by 80 Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmbrodt, W.; Mccloud, J. L., II

    1981-01-01

    A helicopter bearingless main rotor was tested. Areas of investigation included aeroelastic stability, aerodynamic performance, and rotor loads as a function of collective pitch setting, RPM, airspeed and shaft angle. The rotor/support system was tested with the wind tunnel balance dampers installed and, subsequently, removed. Modifications to the rotor hub were tested. These included a reduction in the rotor control system stiffness and increased flexbeam structural damping. The primary objective of the test was to determine aeroelastic stability of the fundamental flexbeam/blade chordwise bending mode. The rotor was stable for all conditions. Damping of the rotor chordwise bending mode increases with increased collective pitch angle at constant operating conditions. No significant decrease in rotor damping occured due to frequency coalescence between the blade chordwise fundamental bending mode and the support system.

  4. Investigation of correlation between full-scale and fifth-scale wind tunnel tests of a Bell helicopter Textron Model 222

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, P. K.

    1982-01-01

    Reasons for lack of correlation between data from a fifth-scale wind tunnel test of the Bell Helicopter Textron Model 222 and a full-scale test of the model 222 prototype in the NASA Ames 40-by 80-foot tunnel were investigated. This investigation centered around a carefully designed fifth-scale wind tunnel test of an accurately contoured model of the Model 222 prototype mounted on a replica of the full-scale mounting system. The improvement in correlation for drag characteristics in pitch and yaw with the fifth-scale model mounted on the replica system is shown. Interference between the model and mounting system was identified as a significant effect and was concluded to be a primary cause of the lack of correlation in the earlier tests.

  5. Numerical investigation of Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines: methodology development for single turbine and small array simulation, and application to flume and full-scale reference models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaherchi Mozafari, Amir Teymour

    A hierarchy of numerical models, Single Rotating Reference Frame (SRF) and Blade Element Model (BEM), were used for numerical investigation of horizontal axis Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Turbines. In the initial stage the SRF and BEM were used to simulate the performance and turbulent wake of a flume- and a full-scale MHK turbine reference model. A significant level of understanding and confidence was developed in the implementation of numerical models for simulation of a MHK turbine. This was achieved by simulation of the flume-scale turbine experiments and comparison between numerical and experimental results. Then the developed numerical methodology was applied to simulate the performance and wake of the full-scale MHK reference model (DOE Reference Model 1). In the second stage the BEM was used to simulate the experimental study of two different MHK turbine array configurations (i.e. two and three coaxial turbines). After developing a numerical methodology using the experimental comparison to simulate the flow field of a turbine array, this methodology was applied toward array optimization study of a full-scale model with the goal of proposing an optimized MHK turbine configuration with minimal computational cost and time. In the last stage the BEM was used to investigate one of the potential environmental effects of MHK turbine. A general methodological approach was developed and experimentally validated to investigate the effect of MHK turbine wake on the sedimentation process of suspended particles in a tidal channel.

  6. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Installation of Full Scale Tunnel (FST) power plant. Virginia Public Service Company could not supply adequate electricity to run the wind tunnels being built at Langley. (The Propeller Research Tunnel was powered by two submarine diesel engines.) This led to the consideration of a number of different ideas for generating electric power to drive the fan motors in the FST. The main proposition involved two 3000 hp and two 1000 hp diesel engines with directly connected generators. Another, proposition suggested 30 Liberty motors driving 600 hp DC generators in pairs. For a month, engineers at Langley were hopeful they could secure additional diesel engines from decommissioned Navy T-boats but the Navy could not offer a firm commitment regarding the future status of the submarines. By mid-December 1929, Virginia Public Service Company had agreed to supply service to the field at the north end of the King Street Bridge connecting Hampton and Langley Field. Thus, new plans for FST powerplant and motors were made. Smith DeFrance described the motors in NACA TR No. 459: 'The most commonly used power plant for operating a wind tunnel is a direct-current motor and motor-generator set with Ward Leonard control system. For the FST it was found that alternating current slip-ring induction motors, together with satisfactory control equipment, could be purchased for approximately 30 percent less than the direct-current equipment. Two 4000-horsepower slip-ring induction motors with 24 steps of speed between 75 and 300 r.p.m. were therefore installed.'

  7. Laboratory investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Ray W.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory studies related to cometary grains and the nuclei of comets can be broken down into three areas which relate to understanding the spectral properties, the formation mechanisms, and the evolution of grains and nuclei: (1) Spectral studies to be used in the interpretation of cometary spectra; (2) Sample preparation experiments which may shed light on the physical nature and history of cometary grains and nuclei by exploring the effects on grain emissivities resulting from the ways in which the samples are created; and (3) Grain processing experiments which should provide insight on the interaction of cometary grains with the environment in the immediate vicinity of the cometary nucleus as the comet travels from the Oort cloud through perihelion, and perhaps even suggestions regarding the relationship between interstellar grains and cometary matter. A summary is presented with a different view of lab experiments than is found in the literature, concentrating on measurement techniques and sample preparations especially relevant to cometary dust.

  8. Propulsion system tests on a full scale Centaur vehicle to investigate 3-burn mission capability of the D-lT configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groesbeck, W. A.; Baud, K. M.; Lacovic, R. F.; Tabata, W. K.; Szabo, S. V., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Propulsion system tests were conducted on a full scale Centaur vehicle to investigate system capability of the proposed D-lT configuration for a three-burn mission. This particular mission profile requires that the engines be capable of restarting and firing for a final maneuver after a 5-1/2-hour coast to synchronous orbit. The thermal conditioning requirements of the engine and propellant feed system components for engine start under these conditions were investigated. Performance data were also obtained on the D-lT type computer controlled propellant tank pressurization system. The test results demonstrated that the RL-10 engines on the Centaur vehicle could be started and run reliably after being thermally conditioned to predicted engine start conditions for a one, two and three burn mission. Investigation of the thermal margins also indicated that engine starts could be accomplished at the maximum predicted component temperature conditions with prestart durations less than planned for flight.

  9. Development and Deployment of a Full-Scale Cross-Flow Filtration System for Treatment of Liquid Low-Level Waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, T.E.

    2000-05-12

    A full-scale modular solid/liquid separation (SLS) system was designed, fabricated, installed, and successfully deployed for treatment of liquid low-level waste from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The SLS module, utilizing cross-flow filtration, was operated as part of an integrated tank waste pretreatment system (otherwise known as the Wastewater Triad) to remove suspended solids and prevent fouling of ion-exchange materials and heat exchange surfaces. The information gained from this testing was used to complete design specifications for the full-scale modular SLS system in May 1997. The contract for detailed design and fabrication of the system was awarded to NUMET in July 1997, and the design was completed in January 1998. Fabrication began in March 1998, and the completed system was delivered to ORNL on December 29, 1998. Installation of the system at the MVST facility was completed in May 1999. After completing an operational readiness assessment, approval was given to commence hot operations on June 7, 1999. Operations involving two of the eight MVSTs were performed safely and with very little unscheduled downtime. Filtration of supernatant from tank W-31 was completed on June 24, 1999 and W-26 processing was completed on August 20, 1999. The total volume processed during these two campaigns was about 45,000 gal. The suspended solids content of the liquid processed from tank W-31 was lower than expected, resulting in higher-than-expected filtrate production for nearly the entire operation. The liquid processed from tank W-26 was higher in suspended solids content, and filtrate production was lower, but comparable to the rates expected based on the results of previous pilot-scale, single-element filtration tests. The quality of the filtrate consistently met the requirements for feed to the downstream ion-exchange and evaporation processes. From an equipment and controls standpoint, the modular system (pumps

  10. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Modified propeller and spinner in Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model. On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel. 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow. This model can be constructed in a comparatively short time, using 2 by 4 framing with matched sheathing inside, and where circular sections are desired they can be obtained by nailing sheet metal to wooden ribs, which can be cut on the band saw. It is estimated that three months will be required for the construction and testing of such a model and that the cost will be approximately three thousand dollars, one thousand dollars of which will be for the motors. No suitable location appears to exist in any of our present buildings, and it may be necessary to build it outside and cover it with a roof.' George Lewis responded immediately (June 27) granting the authority to proceed. He urged Langley to expedite construction and to employ extra carpenters if necessary. Funds for the model came from the FST project

  11. Removal of organic matter from surface water during coagulation with sludge flotation and rapid filtration - a full-scale technological investigation.

    PubMed

    Pruss, Alina

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation with sludge flotation and rapid filtration was selected as a surface water treatment technology to be optimised with a full-scale investigation, which was carried out in Poland between August and October 2013. The river water treated was characterized by low alkalinity, high-temperature variability and a high organic matter content. In the course of technological studies, the processes of coagulation with sludge flotation and rapid filtration were analysed. The studies were performed in the most adverse conditions for the applied technology i.e. during the period of algal bloom and subsequent decomposition of dead plankton. Throughout the study, the river water contained mainly dissolved organic matter, with occasional increases in the concentration of the undissolved fraction during algal bloom. The undissolved total organic carbon (TOC) fraction was effectively removed through coagulation while small doses of ClO₂added prior to coagulation enhanced the process. The process of coagulation using high-coagulant doses at pH = 6.5 did not provide a reduction in the TOC value below the level of 4 mg C/L required for treated water. The effect was achieved by adding powdered activated carbon (PAC) before the filters. The coagulation products were characterised by low-hydraulic resistance which should be taken into account at the stage of water delivery to the filters, after flotation. PMID:25746659

  12. Langley Full-scale-tunnel Investigation of Maximum Lift and Stability Characteristics of an Airplane Having Approximately Triangular Plan Form (DM-1 Glider)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, J Calvin; Wilson, Herbert A JR

    1947-01-01

    An investigation of the DM-1 Glider, which had approximately triangular plan form, an aspect ratio of 1.8 and a 60 degree sweptback leading edge, has been conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel. The investigation consisted of the determination of the separate effects of the following modifications made to the glider on its maximum lift and stability characteristics: (a) installation of sharp leading edges over the inboard semispan of the wing, (b) removal of the vertical fin, (c) sealing of the elevon control-balance slots, (d) installation of redesigned thin vertical surfaces, (e) installation of faired sharp leading edges, and (f) installation of canopy. The maximum lift coefficient of the DM-1 glider was increased from 0.61 to 1.01 by the installation of semispan sharp leading edges, and from 1.01 to 1.24 by the removal of the vertical fin and sealing of the elevon control-balance slots. The highest maximum lift coefficient (1.32) was obtained when the faired sharp leading edges and the thin vertical surfaces were attached to the glider. The original DM-1 glider was longitudinally stable. The semispan sharp leading edges shifted the neutral point forward approximately 3 percent of the root chord at moderate lift coefficients, and the glider configuration with these sharp leading edges attached was longitudinally unstable, for the assumed center-of-gravity location, at lift coefficients above 0.73. Sealing the elevon control-balance slots and installing the faired sharp leading edges, the thin vertical surfaces, and the canopy shifted the neutral point forward approximately 8 percent of the root chord.

  13. FULL-SCALE LABORATORY SIMULATION FACILITY TO TEST PARTICULATE AND ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM A THIRD WORLD RESIDENTIAL COMBUSTION PROCESS. III. EVALUATIO OF A POTENTIAL TECHNIQUE FOR THE CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM THE INDOOR, OPEN HEARTH COMBUSTION OF COAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports controlled full-scale laboratory studies designed to determine if clay addition holds promise as a technique to control emissions from higher grade coals. NOTE: bnormally high rates of lung cancer are observed among persons in Xuan Wei County, China, who burn bi...

  14. Langley Full-Scale Tunnel Investigation of a 1/3-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF5U-1 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Roy H.; Cocke, Bennie W., Jr.; Proterra, Anthony J.

    1946-01-01

    The results of an investigation of a 1/3-scale model of the Chance Vought XF5U-1 airplane in the Langley full-scale tunnel are presented in this report. The maximum lift and stalling characteristics of several model configurations, the longitudinal stability characteristics of the model, and the effectiveness of the control surfaces were determined with the propellers removed. The propulsive characteristics, the effect of propeller operation on the lift, and the static thrust of the model propellers were determined at several propeller-blade angles. The results with the propellers removed showed that the maximum lift coefficient of the complete model configuration was only 0.97 was compared with the value of 1.31 for the model configuration in which the engine-air ducts and canopy are removed. The model with the propellers removed (normal center-of-gravity position) has a positive static margin, stick fixed, varying from 5 to 13 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord throughout the unstalled range of lift coefficients. The unit horizontal tail is sufficiently powerful to trim the airplane with the propellers removed throughout the unstalled range of lift coefficients. The peak propulsive efficiencies for beta = 20 degrees and beta = 30 degrees were increased 7 percent at C(sub L) congruent to 0.67 and 20 percent at C(sub L) congruent to 0.74, respectively, with the propellers rotating upward in the center than with the propellers rotating downward in the center. Indications are that the minimum forward-flight speed of the airplane for full-power operation at sea level will be about 90 miles per hour. Decreasing the weight and increasing the power reduced this value of minimum speed and there were no indications from the results of a lower limit to the minimum speed.

  15. An Investigation of a Full-Scale Model of the Republic XF-91 Airplane in the Ames 40- By 80-Foot Wind Tunnel: Pressure Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunton, Lynn W.; Dew, Joseph K.

    1949-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests of a full-scale model of the Republic XF-91 airplane were conducted to determine the distribution of pressure over the external wing fuel tank installation and over the vee tail and ventral fin. The data were obtained for a range of angles of attack and sideslip and elerudder deflection angles; the presentation is in tabular form.

  16. W4E HYDROPOWER DIRECT DRIVE IN-LINE HYDROTURBINE GENERATOR FULL SCALE PROTOTYPE VALIDATION TESTING REPORT MAY 2013 ALDEN LABORATORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Chad W

    2013-09-24

    The W4E is a patent-pending, direct-drive, variable force turbine/generator. The equipment generates electricity through the water dependent engagement of a ring of rotating magnets with coils mounted on a stator ring. Validation testing of the W4e was performed at Alden Laboratories in the Spring of 2013. The testing was independently observed and validated by GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. The observations made during testing and the results of the testing are included in the Test Summary Report

  17. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Wing and nacelle set-up in Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). The NACA conducted drag tests in 1931 on a P3M-1 nacelle which were presented in a special report to the Navy. Smith DeFrance described this work in the report's introduction: 'Tests were conducted in the full-scale wind tunnel on a five to four geared Pratt and Whitney Wasp engine mounted in a P3M-1 nacelle. In order to simulate the flight conditions the nacelle was assembled on a 15-foot span of wing from the same airplane. The purpose of the tests was to improve the cooling of the engine and to reduce the drag of the nacelle combination. Thermocouples were installed at various points on the cylinders and temperature readings were obtained from these by the power plants division. These results will be reported in a memorandum by that division. The drag results, which are covered by this memorandum, were obtained with the original nacelle condition as received from the Navy with the tail of the nacelle modified, with the nose section of the nacelle modified, with a Curtiss anti-drag ring attached to the engine, with a Type G ring developed by the N.A.C.A., and with a Type D cowling which was also developed by the N.A.C.A.' (p. 1)

  18. Education, Wechler's Full Scale IQ and "g."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colom, Roberto; Abad, Francisco J.; Garcia, Luis F.; Juan-Espinosa, Manuel

    2002-01-01

    Investigated whether average Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) differences can be attributed to "g" using the Spanish standardization sample of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale III (WAIS III) (n=703 females and 666 men). Results support the conclusion that WAIS III FSIQ does not directly or exclusively measure "g" across the full range of population…

  19. Experimental study of a mechanically ventilated double-skin facade with venetian sun-shading device: A full-scale investigation in controlled environment

    SciTech Connect

    Gavan, Valentin; Woloszyn, Monika; Kuznik, Frederic; Roux, Jean-Jacques

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this article is to present results of an experimental campaign performed on a full-scale facility provided with a double-skin facade. The behaviour of this architectural concept is tested under controlled climatic conditions. A summer case is scrutinised under different configurations: variation of the airflow through the double-skin facade and different angle of the solar shading device. This paper describes the experimental conditions, as well the test facility and the tested facade element. The results show the temperatures of the test cell and the facade and how they depend on the climatic conditions and the sun-shading device blade angles. One objective of this research was to measure and provide extensive data set detailing air and surface temperatures on the double-skin facade, together with airflow rates and air velocities. The experiments are fully described so that the results can be used for the validation of numerical models dealing with ventilated double-skin facades with venetian sun-shading device. (author)

  20. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; an fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293).

  1. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST): 120-Foot Truss hoisting, one and two point suspension. In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; and fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293)

  2. Investigation of the relationship between particulate-bound mercury and properties of fly ash in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Sen Li; Chin-Min Cheng; Bobby Chen; Yan Cao; Jacob Vervynckt; Amanda Adebambo; Wei-Ping Pan

    2007-12-15

    The properties of fly ash in coal-fired boilers influence the emission of mercury from power plants into the environment. In this study, seven different bituminous coals were burned in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler and the derived fly ash samples were collected from a mechanical hopper (MH) and an electrostatic precipitator hopper (ESP). The mercury content, specific surface area (SSA), unburned carbon, and elemental composition of the fly ash samples were analyzed to evaluate the correlation between the concentration of particulate-bound mercury and the properties of coal and fly ash. For a given coal, it was found that the mercury content in the fly ash collected from the ESP was greater than in the fly ash samples collected from the MHP. This phenomenon may be due to a lower temperature of flue gas at the ESP (about 135{sup o}C) compared to the temperature at the air preheater (about 350{sup o}C). Also, a significantly lower SSA observed in MH ash might also contribute to the observation. A comparison of the fly ash samples generated from seven different coals using statistical methods indicates that the mercury adsorbed on ESP fly ashes has a highly positive correlation with the unburned carbon content, manganese content, and SSA of the fly ash. Sulfur content in coal showed a significant negative correlation with the Hg adsorption. Manganese in fly ash is believed to participate in oxidizing volatile elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) to ionic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}). The oxidized mercury in flue gas can form a complex with the fly ash and then get removed before the flue gas leaves the stack of the boiler.

  3. Full-Scale Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Construction of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) balance. Smith DeFrance described the 6-component type balance in NACA TR No. 459 (which also includes a schematic diagram of the balance and its various parts). 'Ball and socket fittings at the top of each of the struts hod the axles of the airplane to be tested; the tail is attached to the triangular frame. These struts are secured to the turntable, which is attached to the floating frame. This frame rests on the struts (next to the concrete piers on all four corners), which transmit the lift forces to the scales (partially visible on the left). The drag linkage is attached to the floating frame on the center line and, working against a known counterweight, transmits the drag force to the scale (center, face out). The cross-wind force linkages are attached to the floating frame on the front and rear sides at the center line. These linkages, working against known counterweights, transmit the cross-wind force to scales (two front scales, face in). In the above manner the forces in three directions are measured and by combining the forces and the proper lever arms, the pitching, rolling, and yawing moments can be computed. The scales are of the dial type and are provided with solenoid-operated printing devices. When the proper test condition is obtained, a push-button switch is momentarily closed and the readings on all seven scales are recorded simultaneously, eliminating the possibility of personal errors.'

  4. Static-thrust Investigation of Full-scale PV-2 Helicopter Rotors Having NACA 0012.6 and 23012.6 Airfoil Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipson, Stanley

    1946-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to compare the performance of two 25-ft-diam rotors which had identical dimensions and were similar in construction but different in blade airfoil-sections. Tests were conducted at indicated blade pitch angles from 3 degrees to 11.5 degrees and rotor speeds of 200, 290, and 371 rpm. The 23012.6 rotor required 2 percent less power to hover than the 0012.6. At thrust coefficients above design, the performance of the 23012.6 became better than the 0012.6 rotor.

  5. Full scale wind tunnel investigation of a bearingless main helicopter rotor. [Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel test using the BO-105 helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A stability test program was conducted to determine the effects of airspeed, collective pitch, rotor speed and shaft angle on stability and loads at speeds beyond that attained in the BMR/BO-105 flight test program. Loads and performance data were gathered at forward speeds up to 165 knots. The effect of cyclic pitch perturbations on rotor response was investigated at simulated level flight conditions. Two configuration variations were tested for their effect on stability. One variable was the control system stiffness. An axially softer pitch link was installed in place of the standard BO-105 pitch link. The second variation was the addition of elastomeric damper strips to increase the structural damping. The BMR was stable at all conditions tested. At fixed collective pitch, shaft angle and rotor speed, damping generally increased between hover and 60 knots, remained relatively constant from 60 to 90 knots, then decreased above 90 knots. Analytical predictions are in good agreement with test data up to 90 knots, but the trend of decreasing damping above 90 knots is contrary to the theory.

  6. Full-Scale Tests of NACA Cowlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, Theodore; Brevoort, M J; Stickle, George W

    1937-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation has been carried on with full-scale models in the NACA 20-foot wind tunnel, the general purpose of which is to furnish information in regard to the physical functioning of the composite propeller-nacelle unit under all conditions of take-off, taxiing, and normal flight. This report deals exclusively with the cowling characteristics under condition of normal flight and includes the results of tests of numerous combinations of more than a dozen nose cowlings, about a dozen skirts, two propellers, two sizes of nacelle, as well as various types of spinners and other devices.

  7. A full-scale STOVL ejector experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barankiewicz, Wendy S.

    1993-01-01

    The design and development of thrust augmenting short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) ejectors has typically been an iterative process. In this investigation, static performance tests of a full-scale vertical lift ejector were performed at primary flow temperatures up to 1560 R (1100 F). Flow visualization (smoke generators, yarn tufts and paint dots) was used to assess inlet flowfield characteristics, especially around the primary nozzle and end plates. Performance calculations are presented for ambient temperatures close to 480 R (20 F) and 535 R (75 F) which simulate 'seasonal' aircraft operating conditions. Resulting thrust augmentation ratios are presented as functions of nozzle pressure ratio and temperature. Full-scale experimental tests such as this are expensive, and difficult to implement at engine exhaust temperatures. For this reason the utility of using similarity principles -- in particular, the Munk and Prim similarity principle for isentropic flow -- was explored. At different primary temperatures, exit pressure contours are compared for similarity. A nondimensional flow parameter is then shown to eliminate primary nozzle temperature dependence and verify similarity between the hot and cold flow experiments. Under the assumption that an appropriate similarity principle can be established, then properly chosen performance parameters should be similar for both hot flow and cold flow model tests.

  8. Full scale upper surface blown flap noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, L. J.; Homyak, L.; Jones, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A highly noise suppressed TF 34 engine was used to investigate the noise of several powered lift configurations involving upper surface blown (USB) flaps. The configuration variables were nozzle type (i.e. slot and circular with deflector), flap chord length, and flap angle. The results of velocity surveys at both the nozzle exit and the flap trailing edge are also presented and used for correlation of the noise data. Configurations using a long flap design were 4 db quieter than a short flap typical of current trends in USB flap design. The lower noise for the long flap is attributed primarily to the greater velocity decay of the jet at the flap trailing edge. The full-scale data revealed substantially more quadrupole noise in the region near the deflected jet than observed in previous sub-scale tests.

  9. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Model of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) under construction. On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. Small included angle for the exit cone; 2. Carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. Tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow. This model can be constructed in a comparatively short time, using 2 by 4 framing with matched sheathing inside, and where circular sections are desired they can be obtained by nailing sheet metal to wooden ribs, which can be cut on the band saw. It is estimated that three months will be required for the construction and testing of such a model and that the cost will be approximately three thousand dollars, one thousand dollars of which will be for the motors. No suitable location appears to exist in any of our present buildings, and it may be necessary to build it outside and cover it with a roof.' George Lewis responded immediately (June 27) granting the authority to proceed. He urged Langley to expedite construction and to employ extra carpenters if necessary. Funds for the model came from the FST project. In a 1979

  10. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Interior view of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model. On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel. 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow. This model can be constructed in a comparatively short time, using 2 by 4 framing with matched sheathing inside, and where circular sections are desired they can be obtained by nailing sheet metal to wooden ribs, which can be cut on the band saw. It is estimated that three months will be required for the construction and testing of such a model and that the cost will be approximately three thousand dollars, one thousand dollars of which will be for the motors. No suitable location appears to exist in any of our present buildings, and it may be necessary to build it outside and cover it with a roof.' George Lewis responded immediately (June 27) granting the authority to proceed. He urged Langley to expedite construction and to employ extra carpenters if necessary. Funds for the model came from the FST project. In a 1979

  11. Results of an investigation of the acoustic and vibrational environment of a full scale space shuttle orbiter structural test panel with simulated TPS in the Ames unitary plan wind tunnel, model 81-0, test OS8A and B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsland, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Results of tests OS8A and B and pertinent test and model information are presented. The test was conducted in two parts. Test OS8A was performed in the NASA/ARC unitary 11-foot section and OS8B was conducted in the NASA/ARC unitary 9 x 7 tunnel. Test objectives were to investigate thermal protection system (TPS) tile sensitivity to extreme pressure gradients and vibration and to define the TPS aerodynamic environment. The model utilized for OS8 was a full-scale representation of a portion of the space shuttle orbiter lower wing carry-through structure forward of the aft tank strut and propellant lines. Thermal protection tiles were simulated on the model. The model was instrumented with static pressure orifices, accelerometers, and dynamic pressure transducers (Kulites). A total rake was utilized to obtain boundary layer surveys.

  12. JWST Full Scale Model Being Built

    NASA Video Gallery

    : The full-scale model of the James Webb Space Telescope is constructed for the 2010 World Science Festival in Battery Park, NY. The model takes about five days to construct. This video contains a ...

  13. Full-scale granular sludge Anammox process.

    PubMed

    Abma, W R; Schultz, C E; Mulder, J W; van der Star, W R L; Strous, M; Tokutomi, T; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2007-01-01

    The start-up of the first full scale Anammox reactor is complete. The reactor shows stable operation, even at loading rates of 10 kg N/m3.d. This performance is the result of the formation of Anammox granules, which have a high density and settling velocities exceeding 100 m/h. With this performance, the Anammox granular sludge technology has been proven on full scale. PMID:17546966

  14. Full Scale Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-03-17

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride (BF3)-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated non-scintillating plastic fibers. Reported here are the results of tests of the full-scale 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT) and Saint Gobain, and is a follow-up report to an earlier one on a smaller prototype system.

  15. Full-scale wind-tunnel investigation of the effects of wing leading-edge modifications on the high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of a low-wing general aviation airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. L., Jr.; Newsom, W. A.; Satran, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a recent investigation to determine the effects of wing leading-edge modifications on the high angle-of-attack aerodynamic characteristics of a low-wing general aviation airplane in the Langley Full-Scale Wind Tunnel. The investigation was conducted to provide aerodynamic information for correlation and analysis of flight-test results obtained for the configuration. The wind-tunnel investigation consisted of force and moment measurements, wing pressure measurements, flow surveys, and flow visualization studies utilizing a tuft grid, smoke and nonintrusive mini-tufts which were illuminated by ultra-violet light. In addition to the tunnel scale system which measured overall forces and moments, the model was equipped with an auxiliary strain-gage balance within the left wing panel to measure lift and drag forces on the outer wing panel independent of the tunnel scale system. The leading-edge modifications studied included partial- and full-span leading-edge droop arrangements as well as leading-edge slats.

  16. An Investigation of the Wing and the Wing-Fuselage Combination of a Full-Scale Model of the Republic XP-91 Airplane in the Ames 40-by 80-Foot Wing Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunton, Lynn W.; Dew, Joseph K.

    1948-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests of a full-scale model of the Republic XP-91 airplane were conducted to determine the longitudinal and lateral characteristics of the wing alone and the wing-fuselage combination, the characteristics of the aileron, and the damping in roll af the wing alone. Various high-lift devices were investigated including trailing-edge split flaps and partial- and full-span leading-edge slats and Krueger-type nose flaps. Results of this investigation showed that a very significant gain in maximum lift could be achieved through use of the proper leading-edge device, The maximum lift coefficient of the model with split flaps and the original partial-span straight slats was only 1.2; whereas a value of approximately 1.8 was obtained by drooping the slat and extending it full span, Improvement in maximum lift of approximately the same amount resulted when a full-span nose flap was substituted for the original partial-span slat.

  17. Aircraft Engineering Conference 1934 - Full Scale Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1934-01-01

    Gathered together in the only facility big enough to hold them, attendees at Langleys 1934 aircraft Engineering Conference pose in the Full Scale Wind Tunnel underneath a Boeing P-26A Peashooter. Present, among other notables, were Orville Wright, Charles Lindbergh, and Howard Hughes.

  18. Full-scale studies of alum recovery

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    Full-scale testing was conducted at the Williams Water Treatment Plant to evaluate alum recovery. Two tests were conducted, one in August and one is September. The objective was to determine the dewaterability of the solids remaining after alum recovery on sand drying beds and to evaluate the effectiveness of the recovered alum as a coagulant in the water plant and for phosphorus removal at the wastewater plant.

  19. IRAC Full-Scale Flight Testbed Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, James A.; Pahle, Joseph; Cogan, Bruce R.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Bosworth, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Overview: Provide validation of adaptive control law concepts through full scale flight evaluation in a representative avionics architecture. Develop an understanding of aircraft dynamics of current vehicles in damaged and upset conditions Real-world conditions include: a) Turbulence, sensor noise, feedback biases; and b) Coupling between pilot and adaptive system. Simulated damage includes 1) "B" matrix (surface) failures; and 2) "A" matrix failures. Evaluate robustness of control systems to anticipated and unanticipated failures.

  20. X-38 Full Scale TPS Flight Qualification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfer, G.

    2002-01-01

    The X-38 of NASA which is an experimental vehicle to prove crucial technologies of a future Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station (ISS) will be equipped with a large number of newly developed components and systems. In particular, the thermal protection system of the most severely loaded surface areas such as the nose cap and the control surfaces represent a promising approach with respect to thermal endurance and re-usability aspects. The foremost nose section, the body flaps and a wing leading edge segment are all made from SiC-based fiber ceramics. Moreover, the body flap is an entire hot structure. The Nose Skirt Assembly and the Body Flap were developed and manufactured by German industry (MAN Technologie, DLR and ASTRIUM) within the frame of the national TETRA program. The Leading Edge Unit was developed and manufactured by MAN Technologie within the ESA-ARTP. As another effort within the TETRA program aimed at extending the national competence range, IABG developed and built a high-temperature test facility enabling full-scale flight qualification of thermal protection components. The main purpose of this facility was to allow application of all relevant load categories encountered during re-entry flight, i.e. thermal, mechanical and oxidative loads. The facility is in service since April 1999. Within the scope of the X-38 qualification tests the flexibility of the test facility could be demonstrated. Three full scale thermal protection components of X-38 which were very different in size, shape and test requirements were successfully flight qualified in the years 1999 - 2001. For all of the three components, namely the Leading Edge Unit, the Nose Skirt Assembly and the Body Flap, the time- dependent and locally variable temperature profiles of the re-entry flight had to be simulated in order to verify the structural integrity under thermal loads. Within these tests a superposition of the thermal loads with oxidative loads, with the

  1. Bacterial communities in full-scale wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka; Zielińska, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial metabolism determines the effectiveness of biological treatment of wastewater. Therefore, it is important to define the relations between the species structure and the performance of full-scale installations. Although there is much laboratory data on microbial consortia, our understanding of dependencies between the microbial structure and operational parameters of full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) is limited. This mini-review presents the types of microbial consortia in WWTP. Information is given on extracellular polymeric substances production as factor that is key for formation of spatial structures of microorganisms. Additionally, we discuss data on microbial groups including nitrifiers, denitrifiers, Anammox bacteria, and phosphate- and glycogen-accumulating bacteria in full-scale aerobic systems that was obtained with the use of molecular techniques, including high-throughput sequencing, to shed light on dependencies between the microbial ecology of biomass and the overall efficiency and functional stability of wastewater treatment systems. Sludge bulking in WWTPs is addressed, as well as the microbial composition of consortia involved in antibiotic and micropollutant removal. PMID:26931606

  2. Wind tunnel simulation of full scale vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorke, J. B.; Moffitt, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the important scaling parameters for the flow in the core region of a vortex generated by a rectangular wing tip. The effect of an unconventional planform, the ogee tip, on the tip vortex is also determined. For rectangular planform wings, the measured vortex core diameter to chord ratios, peak tangential velocity ratios, and axial velocity ratios are shown to be functions only of wing lift coefficient and elapsed time from vortex formation, and appear to be independent of both Mach number and Reynolds number. The peak tangential velocities in the diffuse vortex generated by the ogee tip are only 25 percent of those in the vortex generated by the rectangular wing.

  3. Laboratory Investigations on Percussive Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivade, S. B.; Murthy, Ch. S. N.; Vardhan, Harsha

    2013-10-01

    The laboratory investigation was carried out on ten rock samples using pneumatic drill with drill bits of different diameters. In general, the process of drilling always produces sound. Sound is generated from the bit-rock interface regardless of the material of the bit used in drilling. The predicted sound level and penetration rate are a product of the drill power and the physical properties of the rocks penetrated. Rock samples were collected from the field and physical properties of the rocks were determined in the laboratory. The sound level and penetration rates were correlated with the rock properties. The compressive strength and abrasivity exhibit strong correlations with the sound level and penetration rate. It was concluded that, among the rock properties included in this study, the compressive strength and abrasivity values are the dominant ones affecting the penetration rate and sound level of percussive drills. Though ten rock samples have been covered in this study, detailed analysis of only one of them is presented.

  4. Polyethylene encapsulation full-scale technology demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Lageraaen, P.R.

    1994-10-01

    A full-scale integrated technology demonstration of a polyethylene encapsulation process, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD), was conducted at the Environmental & Waste Technology Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL.) in September 1994. As part of the Polymer Solidification National Effort, polyethylene encapsulation has been developed and tested at BNL as an alternative solidification technology for improved, cost-effective treatment of low-level radioactive (LLW), hazardous and mixed wastes. A fully equipped production-scale system, capable of processing 900 kg/hr (2000 lb/hr), has been installed at BNL. The demonstration covered all facets of the integrated processing system including pre-treatment of aqueous wastes, precise feed metering, extrusion processing, on-line quality control monitoring, and process control.

  5. Full-scale hingeless rotor performance and loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Randall L.

    1995-01-01

    A full-scale BO-105 hingeless rotor system was tested in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel on the rotor test apparatus. Rotor performance, rotor loads, and aeroelastic stability as functions of both collective and cyclic pitch, tunnel velocity, and shaft angle were investigated. This test was performed in support of the Rotor Data Correlation Task under the U.S. Army/German Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperative Research in the Field of Helicopter Aeromechanics. The primary objective of this test program was to create a data base for full-scale hingeless rotor performance and structural blade loads. A secondary objective was to investigate the ability to match flight test conditions in the wind tunnel. This data base can be used for the experimental and analytical studies of hingeless rotor systems over large variations in rotor thrust and tunnel velocity. Rotor performance and structural loads for tunnel velocities from hover to 170 knots and thrust coefficients (C(sub T)/sigma) from 0.0 to 0.12 are presented in this report. Thrust sweeps at tunnel velocities of 10, 20, and 30 knots are also included in this data set.

  6. Microbubble Swarms in a Full-Scale Water Model Tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sheng; Cao, Xiangkun; Zou, Zongshu; Isac, Mihaiela; Guthrie, Roderick I. L.

    2016-08-01

    Water modeling, using microbubble swarms, was performed in a full-scale, four-strand, delta-shaped tundish, located at the McGill Metals Processing Centre (MMPC). The objective of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of microbubbles in removing inclusions smaller than 50 μm, applying the principles and conditions previously researched using a smaller scale arrangement. Air was injected into a full-scale model of a ladle shroud (the connecting tube through which liquid steel flows into the tundish below). The model ladle shroud was fitted with twelve, laser-drilled orifices, so as to create microbubbles. The bubbles generated using different gas injection protocols were recorded using a high-speed camera, and the bubble images were postprocessed using the commercial software, ImageJ. With this newly designed ladle shroud, bubble sizes could be reduced dramatically, to as small as a 675 µm average diameter. A three-dimensional, CFD model simulation was developed, using parameters obtained from the corresponding water model experiments, in order to predict the behavior of these microbubbles within the tundish and their potential influence on flow patterns and inclusion float-out capability.

  7. Full scale field demonstration of unheated anaerobic contact stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, R.M.; Fan, K.S.

    1983-09-01

    A full scale field demonstration of unheated anaerobic digestion, including both solids recycle and solids nonrecycle processes, was conducted at the Jackson Pike Wastewater Treatment Plant at Columbus, Ohio. Two digesters (locally called Tanks 4E and 6E) at this facility were used for this purpose. In the experimental system, the operating temperature was reduced gradually from 91/sup 0/F to 63/sup 0/F. There were eight periods in the Recycle Phase and four periods in the Nonrecycle Phase. Gas production, solids destruction, volatile fatty acid variation, alkalinity, and pH were monitored in each period. In addition, grease, long-chain fatty acids, and foaming were intensively investigated at the last two periods, C and D, of the Nonrecycle Phase. The objectives of this research were: (1) evaluation of the unheated anaerobic digestion in full scale field units, and (2) and development of criteria for design and operation of a cold anaerobic digester. 48 references, 41 figures, 84 tables.

  8. A Laboratory Investigation of Groupthink.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtright, John A.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the groupthink phenomenon under controlled, laboratory conditions. Results indicate that the presence or absence of disagreement (conflict, hostility) among members may be the best discriminator between groupthink and nongroupthink groups. (JMF)

  9. Full-scale laboratory simulation facility to test particulate and organic emissions from a Third World residential combustion process. III. Evaluation of a potential technique for the control of emissions from the indoor, open-hearth combustion of coal. Rept. for Jul 91-Feb 92

    SciTech Connect

    Lutes, C.C.; Ryan, J.V.; Harris, D.B.; Chapman, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reports controlled full-scale laboratory studies designed to determine if clay addition holds promise as a technique to control emissions from higher grade coals. (NOTE: Abnormally high rates of lung cancer are observed among persons in Xuan Wei County, China, who burn bituminous 'smoky' coal as compared with those who burn 'smokeless' coal, which is produced by mixing low grade coals with clay.) Statistically significant reductions in emissions of total particulate (70%), gravimetrically determined (nonvolatile) organics (70%), total chromatographable (semivolatile) organics (90%), and benzo(a)pyrene (65%) were observed (measured on a mass emitted/mass coal combusted basis) when clay binder material was added to a ground smoky coal. These reductions, however, did not fully account for the order of magnitude lower pollutant levels previously observed in homes burning smokeless (as compared to smoky) coal. Thus, the authors believe that the composition of the low rank coals used to produce smokeless coal also helps to control emissions.

  10. Acoustic measurements of a full-scale coaxial helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, M.; Peterson, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Acoustic data were obtained during a full-scale test of the XH-59A Advancing Blade Concept (ABC) Technology Demonstrator in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The XH-59A is a research helicopter with two coaxial rotors and hingeless blades. Performance, vibration, noise at various forward speeds, rotor lift coefficients, and rotor shaft angles of attack were investigated. In general, the noise level is shown to increase with rotor lift coefficient except under certain operating conditions where it is increased by significant impulsive blade/vortex interactions. The impulsivity appears to depend upon how the lift is distributed between the two rotors. The noise levels measured are shown to be slightly higher than on a modern conventional rotor tested in the same facility.

  11. Full-scale Transport Controlled Impact Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and NASA conducted a full-scale air-to-surface impact-survivable impact demonstration with a remotely piloted transport aircraft on 1 December 1984, at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The test article consisted of experiments, special equipment, and supporting systems, such as antimisting kerosene (AMK), crashworthiness structural/restraint, analytical modeling, cabin fire safety, flight data recorders, post-impact investigation, instrumentation/data acquisition systems, remotely piloted vehicle/flight control systems, range and flight safety provisions, etc. This report describes the aircraft, experiments, systems, activities, and events which lead up to the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID). An overview of the final unmanned remote control flight and sequence of impact events are delineated. Preliminary post CID observations are presented.

  12. Full-scale demonstration of improvement in aeration efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.A.; Kim, Y.K.; Krupa, J.J.; Shkreli, F.; Nasr, S.; Fitzpatrick, B.

    2000-06-01

    This paper describes the results of side-by-side full-scale aeration testing of a plug-flow process and a modified contact stabilization process incorporating an anaerobic selector at the wastewater treatment facility in Fredonia, NY. Over 40 tests were completed utilizing the off-gas technique during the 2-month investigation period (summer of 1995). Compared to the plug-flow process, the modified contact stabilization process with internal sludge recycle was shown to have higher {alpha} values and to require less blower energy consumption when the selector operation was properly controlled. Dissolved oxygen concentration, selector COD concentration, and internal recycle sludge levels were found to be critical parameters in the successful operation of the modified process. Higher internal recycle sludge levels allowed the plant to run at more stable operating conditions in terms of the oxygen transfer efficiency, {alpha}, and sludge volume index.

  13. Model of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) under construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Model of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) under construction. On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel. 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow. This model can be constructed in a comparatively short time, using 2 by 4 framing with matched sheathing inside, and where circular sections are desired they can be obtained by nailing sheet metal to wooden ribs, which can be cut on the band saw. It is estimated that three months will be required for the construction and testing of such a model and that the cost will be approximately three thousand dollars, one thousand dollars of which will be for the motors. No suitable location appears to exist in any of our present buildings, and it may be necessary to build it outside and cover it with a roof.' George Lewis responded immediately (June 27) granting the authority to proceed. He urged Langley to expedite construction and to employ extra carpenters if necessary. Funds for the model came from the FST project. In a 1979

  14. Regeneration of Exhausted Arsenic Adsorptive media of a Full Scale Treatment System

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will describe the method and results of laboratory tests showing the feasibility of regenerating exhausted, iron-based, adsorptive media and the results of a follow up regeneration test at a full scale system in Twentynine Palms CA. The laboratory studies on se...

  15. CALIBRATION OF FULL-SCALE OZONATION SYSTEMS WITH CONSERVATIVE AND REACTIVE TRACERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A full-scale ozonation reactor was characterized with respect to the overall oxidation budget by coupling laboratory kinetics with reactor hydraulics. The ozone decomposition kinetics and the ratio of the OH radical to the ozone concentration were determined in laboratory batch ...

  16. Crash pulse recorder--validation in full scale crash tests.

    PubMed

    Kullgren, A; Lie, A; Tingvall, C

    1995-10-01

    Estimation of the accident severity is a fundamental requirement in accident reconstruction and analysis. Accident severity can be measured in many different ways, but in frontal collisions change of velocity, energy equivalent speed or equivalent barrier speed are frequently used parameters. These parameters are most often estimated from vehicle deformation. It is known, however, that the quality of these estimates is limited if compared with these obtained in laboratory test conditions. To be able to achieve almost the same measurements and measurement accuracy in real-life accidents as in the laboratory, where the acceleration time history is measured, an on-board measurement technique is required. This presentation gives results of tests of a low cost device for measuring the crash pulse for a car involved in an accident, concerning systematic and random error. The device, called the Crash Pulse Recorder (CPR), has been tested previously in several sled tests. The CPR is based on measurement of the movement of the mass in a spring mass system in a collision. A brief description of its construction is also included. The CPR is an integral part of a large accident data collection system including interior and exterior deformation measurements and evaluation of injury outcome. This report presents the results of several full-scale crash tests, undertaken to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the CPR in cars in different impact modes. The tests comprised both offset and angled collisions. Most of the tests were car to car collisions, but barrier tests were also performed. The random error of the CPR was found to be 2.2 km/hr for the delta V measurements and 0.6 g for mean acceleration. PMID:8579702

  17. Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control Project Full Scale Flight Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Provide validation of adaptive control law concepts through full scale flight evaluation. Technical Approach: a) Engage failure mode - destabilizing or frozen surface. b) Perform formation flight and air-to-air tracking tasks. Evaluate adaptive algorithm: a) Stability metrics. b) Model following metrics. Full scale flight testing provides an ability to validate different adaptive flight control approaches. Full scale flight testing adds credence to NASA's research efforts. A sustained research effort is required to remove the road blocks and provide adaptive control as a viable design solution for increased aircraft resilience.

  18. Laboratory investigation of primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Stowasser, Michael; Taylor, Paul J; Pimenta, Eduardo; Ahmed, Ashraf H Al-Asaly; Gordon, Richard D

    2010-05-01

    Availability and wider application of the plasma aldosterone/renin ratio (ARR) as a screening test for primary aldosteronism (PA) has led to the recognition that PA is the most common potentially curable and specifically treatable form of hypertension, possibly accounting for as many as 5-13% of patients. Aldosterone excess also has adverse cardiovascular consequences that go above and beyond hypertension development. These findings support the concept that PA plays an important role in cardiovascular disease states and should be systematically sought and specifically treated, and have led to the development of a US Endocrine Society clinical guideline for the detection, diagnosis and management of this condition. Reliable detection requires that interfering factors (including medications known to alter the ratio) are controlled before ARR measurement (or their effects taken into account), and reliable methods such as fludrocortisone suppression testing are used to confirm PA. Because computed tomography frequently misses aldosterone-producing adenomas yet demonstrates non-functioning nodules, adrenal venous sampling is the only dependable way to differentiate unilateral (surgically correctable) from bilateral (usually treated with aldosterone antagonist medications) forms of PA. For the glucocorticoid-remediable form of PA (familial hyperaldosteronism type I), genetic testing for the causative 'hybrid' 11beta-hydroxylase/aldosterone synthase gene has greatly facilitated detection. Laboratory assessment (including suppression testing post-operatively, and renin measurement during treatment with aldosterone antagonist medications) can assist in assessing therapeutic responses and in guiding ongoing management. Development of new, highly reliable high-throughput mass spectrometric methods for measuring aldosterone and renin should further enhance detection and reliability of diagnostic workup for PA. PMID:20498828

  19. TESTING OF A FULL-SCALE ROTARY MICROFILTER FOR THE ENHANCED PROCESS FOR RADIONUCLIDES REMOVAL

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D; David Stefanko, D; Michael Poirier, M; Samuel Fink, S

    2009-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers are investigating and developing a rotary microfilter for solid-liquid separation applications in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. One application involves use in the Enhanced Processes for Radionuclide Removal (EPRR) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). To assess this application, the authors performed rotary filter testing with a full-scale, 25-disk unit manufactured by SpinTek Filtration with 0.5 micron filter media manufactured by Pall Corporation. The filter includes proprietary enhancements by SRNL. The most recent enhancement is replacement of the filter's main shaft seal with a John Crane Type 28LD gas-cooled seal. The feed material was SRS Tank 8F simulated sludge blended with monosodium titanate (MST). Testing examined total insoluble solids concentrations of 0.06 wt % (126 hours of testing) and 5 wt % (82 hours of testing). The following are conclusions from this testing.

  20. Full Scale Tunnel (FST) and Seaplane Tow Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Installation of Careystone covering at the Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) facility. The corrugated concrete and asbestos panels (1/4 inch thick; 42 inches wide; 62 inches long) which were used as siding and roofing for the Full-Scale Tunnel were manufactured by The Philip Carey Company. For the NACA, the choice of Careystone had been based on several factors. First and foremost was its low cost. NACA engineers had observed the very durable, low-maintenance and fireproof qualities of the concrete-asbestos covering of the airship hanger at Langley Field. Further, tests showed the material to be 3.8 times stronger than required (The maximum load the material was expected to withstand was 52 lbs. per square foot; the breaking load was 196 lbs. per sq. ft.). L4695 shows the interior view of construction of the Tow Tank. In the late 1920s, the NACA decided to investigate the aero/hydro dynamics of floats for seaplanes. A Hydrodynamics Branch was established in 1929 and special towing basin was authorized in March of that same year. Starr Truscott (the first head of the new division) described the tank in NACA TR 470: 'The N.A.C.A. tank is of the Froude type; that is, the model which is being tested is towed through still water at successive constant speeds from a carriage spanning the tank. At each constant speed the towing pull is measured, the trim and the rise, or change of draft, are recorded and, if the model is being towed at a fixed trim, the moment required to hold it there is measured and recorded.' 'The reinforced concrete basin containing the water has the following dimensions: (1) Length on water, extreme, 2,020 feet; (2) Normal width of water surface, 24 feet; (3) Normal depth of water, 12 feet; (4) Length of 12 foot depth, 1,980 feet.' This picture shows the tank before the coving was added. This brought the rails for the carriage closer together and helped suppress waves produced by the models. The finished tank would be filled with approximately 4 million

  1. The application of thermoelastic stress analysis to full-scale aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruehmann, R. K.; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.; Quinn, S.; Peton-Walter, J.; Mousty, P. A. N.

    2012-08-01

    Non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that can be applied in-situ are particularly relevant to the testing of large scale structures that cannot easily be taken into a laboratory for inspection. The application of established laboratory based techniques to the inspection of such structures therefore brings with it a new set of challenges associated with the change in operating environment between the laboratory and 'the field'. The current work investigates the use of thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) to inspect carbon fibre composite aerospace components for manufacturing defects and in-service damage. An initial study using single transient loads to obtain a measureable change in temperature that can be related to the change in the sum of the principal stresses showed a good agreement with the traditional methodology. However, for large structures, the energy required to obtain a sufficiently large stress change to obtain a resolvable measurement may require an actuator that is not easily portable. Hence a number of ideas have been proposed to reduce the power requirement and deal with small signal to noise ratios. This paper describes the use of natural frequency vibration modes to enable large stress changes to be generated with minimal power input. Established signal processing in the form of a lock-in amplifier and Fourier signal analysis is applied. Tests on a laboratory scale flat plate and full-scale representative wing skin and stringer specimen are presented.

  2. Investigative Learning: A Plan for Laboratory Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosinski, Robert J.

    This project originated with the desire to offer general biology students a laboratory experience which emphasizes scientific thinking rather than a review of lecture content. To create investigative laboratories without many of the practical problems of their implementation, this project uses a combination of "methods modules" for wetlabs and…

  3. Medical laboratory investigation of children's environmental health.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Harold E; Buka, Irena; Phillips, Scott

    2007-04-01

    Medical laboratory testing is vital for investigating and managing children who have environmentally related disorders and children with environmental chemical exposures. Few of these compounds can be measured in a routine clinical service laboratory. An understanding of the exposure circumstances and toxicology of the agent is required for the ordering and interpretation of tests. Test interpretation requires understanding of the capabilities and limitations of these tests. Adequate investigation, management, and follow-up of exposed children are mandatory. PMID:17448366

  4. Full-scale system impact analysis: Digital document storage project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Digital Document Storage Full Scale System can provide cost effective electronic document storage, retrieval, hard copy reproduction, and remote access for users of NASA Technical Reports. The desired functionality of the DDS system is highly dependent on the assumed requirements for remote access used in this Impact Analysis. It is highly recommended that NASA proceed with a phased, communications requirement analysis to ensure that adequate communications service can be supplied at a reasonable cost in order to validate recent working assumptions upon which the success of the DDS Full Scale System is dependent.

  5. Correlation of full-scale helicopter rotor performance in air with model-scale Freon data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, W. T., Jr.; Mantay, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in a transonic dynamics tunnel to measure the performance of a 1/5 scale model helicopter rotor in a Freon atmosphere. Comparisons were made between these data and full scale data obtained in air. Both the model and full scale tests were conducted at advance ratios between 0.30 and 0.40 and advancing tip Mach numbers between 0.79 and 0.95. Results show that correlation of model scale rotor performance data obtained in Freon with full scale rotor performance data in air is good with regard to data trends. Mach number effects were found to be essentially the same for the model rotor performance data obtained in Freon and the full scale rotor performance data obtained in air. It was determined that Reynolds number effects may be of the same magnitude or smaller than rotor solidity effects or blade elastic modeling in rotor aerodynamic performance testing.

  6. The requirements for a new full scale subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. W.; Mckinney, M. O.; Luidens, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Justification and requirements are presented for a large subsonic wind tunnel capable of testing full scale aircraft, rotor systems, and advanced V/STOL propulsion systems. The design considerations and constraints for such a facility are reviewed, and the trades between facility test capability and costs are discussed.

  7. Submarine in Full Scale Tunnel at NACA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    In 1950 Langley tested the drag characteristics of what was then the world's fastest submarine, the Albacore, in the 30 x 60 Full Scale Tunnel. Water and air are both essentially fluids of different densities. Air traveling at high speed can simulate water traveling at lower speed for many purposes.

  8. CLOSED-CYCLE TEXTILE DYEING: FULL-SCALE HYPERFILTRATION DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a project of joining a full-scale dynamic-membrane hyperfiltration (HF) system with an operating dye range. (HF is a membrane separation technique that has been used successfully to desalinate natural water. The dye range is a multi-purpose unit with a...

  9. Full Scale Wind Tunnel and Seaplane Tow Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction progress, aerials of East Area. L5169: Langley's seaplane towing facility (right) and the Full Scale Tunnel (left) were photographed in November of 1930. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 39), by James Schultz.

  10. Full scale assessment of pansharpening methods and data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiazzi, B.; Alparone, L.; Baronti, S.; Carlà, R.; Garzelli, A.; Santurri, L.

    2014-10-01

    Quality assessment of pansharpened images is traditionally carried out either at degraded spatial scale by checking the synthesis property ofWald's protocol or at the full spatial scale by separately checking the spectral and spatial consistencies. The spatial distortion of the QNR protocol and the spectral distortion of Khan's protocol may be combined into a unique quality index, referred to as hybrid QNR (HQNR), that is calculated at full scale. Alternatively, multiscale measurements of indices requiring a reference, like SAM, ERGAS and Q4, may be extrapolated to yield a quality measurement at the full scale of the fusion product, where a reference does not exist. Experiments on simulated Pĺeiades data, of which reference originals at full scale are available, highlight that quadratic polynomials having three-point support, i.e. fitting three measurements at as many progressively doubled scales, are adequate. Q4 is more suitable for extrapolation than ERGAS and SAM. The Q4 value predicted from multiscale measurements and the Q4 value measured at full scale thanks to the reference original, differ by very few percents for six different state-of-the-art methods that have been compared. HQNR is substantially comparable to the extrapolated Q4.

  11. Summary report on close-coupled subsurface barrier technology: Initial field trials to full-scale demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Heiser, J.H.; Dwyer, B.

    1997-09-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate the installation and measure the performance of a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional, low-cost, cement-grout containment barrier followed by a thin lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement-polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. The technology has matured from a regulatory investigation of the issues concerning the use of polymers to laboratory compatibility and performance measurements of various polymer systems to a pilot-scale, single column injection at Sandia to full-scale demonstration. The feasibility of the close-coupled barrier concept was proven in a full-scale cold demonstration at Hanford, Washington and then moved to the final stage with a full-scale demonstration at an actual remediation site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). At the Hanford demonstration the composite barrier was emplaced around and beneath a 20,000 liter tank. The secondary cement layer was constructed using conventional jet grouting techniques. Drilling was completed at a 45{degree} angle to the ground, forming a cone-shaped barrier. The primary barrier was placed by panel jet-grouting with a dual-wall drill stem using a two part polymer grout. The polymer chosen was a high molecular weight acrylic. At the BNL demonstration a V-trough barrier was installed using a conventional cement grout for the secondary layer and an acrylic-gel polymer for the primary layer. Construction techniques were identical to the Hanford installation. This report summarizes the technology development from pilot- to full-scale demonstrations and presents some of the performance and quality achievements attained.

  12. Laboratory Investigations of the Extreme Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pisin

    2003-08-06

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in our understanding of the extreme universe, which in turn points to even deeper questions to be further addressed. History has shown that the symbiosis between direct observations and laboratory investigation is instrumental in the progress of astrophysics. Current frontier astrophysical phenomena related to particle astrophysics and cosmology typically involve one or more of the following conditions: (1) extremely high energy events; (2) very high density, high temperature processes; (3) super strong field environments. Laboratory experiments using high intensity lasers and particle beams can calibrate astrophysical observation or detection processes, investigate the underlying dynamics of astrophysical phenomena, and probe into fundamental physics in extreme limits. We give examples of possible laboratory experiments that investigate into the extreme universe.

  13. Full Scale Wind Tunnel and Seaplane Tow Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction progress, Full Scale entrance cone looking north, exit cone looking south, wind vanes north end, wind vanes north end of east return passage, wind vanes south end of west exit cone looking north east, wind vanes at south end of east exit cone looking north west, entrance cone looking south from north end. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) entrance cone under construction. Smith DeFrance describes the entrance cone in NACA TR 459 as follows: 'The entrance cone is 75 feet in length and in this distance the cross section changes from a rectangle 72 by 110 feet to a 30 by 60 foot elliptic section. The area reduction in the entrance cone is slightly less than 5:1. The shape of the entrance cone was chosen to give as fas as possible a constant acceleration to the air stream and to retain a 9-foot length of nozzle for directing the flow.' (p. 293)

  14. On the Uses of Full-Scale Schlieren Flow Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settles, G. S.; Miller, J. D.; Dodson-Dreibelbis, L. J.

    2000-11-01

    A lens-and-grid-type schlieren system using a very large grid as a light source was described at earlier APS/DFD meetings. With a field-of-view of 2.3x2.9 m (7.5x9.5 feet), it is the largest indoor schlieren system in the world. Still and video examples of several full-scale airflows and heat-transfer problems visualized thus far will be shown. These include: heating and ventilation airflows, flows due to appliances and equipment, the thermal plumes of people, the aerodynamics of an explosive trace detection portal, gas leak detection, shock wave motion associated with aviation security problems, and heat transfer from live crops. Planned future projects include visualizing fume-hood and grocery display freezer airflows and studying the dispersion of insect repellent plumes at full scale.

  15. Full scale LANDSAT-D antenna pattern measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design verification of the LANDSAT-D antenna subsystem is addressed. In particular, the analysis of the antenna radiation patterns utilizing a full scale mockup of the LANDSAT-D satellite is discussed. Test antennas included two S-Band shaped beam antennas, two S-Band omni unit radiators (to operate in array), a GPS antenna, an X-Band shaped beam antenna, and one S-Band high-gain parabolic antenna.

  16. Full-Scale Flight Research Testbeds: Adaptive and Intelligent Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahle, Joe W.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the adaptive and intelligent control methods used for aircraft survival. The contents include: 1) Motivation for Adaptive Control; 2) Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control Project; 3) Full-scale Flight Assets in Use for IRAC; 4) NASA NF-15B Tail Number 837; 5) Gen II Direct Adaptive Control Architecture; 6) Limited Authority System; and 7) 837 Flight Experiments. A simulated destabilization failure analysis along with experience and lessons learned are also presented.

  17. Full-scale results for TAM limestone injection

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, S.

    1996-12-31

    Information is outlined on the use of thermally active marble (TAM) sorbents in boilers. Data are presented on: the comparison of TAM to limestone; NOVACON process development history; CFB test history; CFB pilot scale test; full-scale CFB trial; August, 1996 CFB demonstration; Foster Wheeler Mount Carmel sorbent feed rate comparison and Ca:S comparison; unburned carbon is ash; and advantages and savings in CFB boilers.

  18. Full scale tests of all-steel buckling restrained braces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ning; Wu, Bin; Li, Hui; Ou, Jinping; Yang, Weibiao

    2009-03-01

    Buckling-restrained braces (BRBs) are widely used seismic response-controlling members with excellent energy dissipation capacity without buckling at design deformation. However, the property of all-steel BRBs with cruciform cross section encased in a square steel tube remains insufficiently studied. In this paper, the properties of this kind of BRBs, which were used in two office buildings in Beijing, were examined by full-scale test. First, initial design was done according to the client's requirement. Then, two full-scale specimens were tested under uniaxial quasi-static cyclic loading. The test results indicate that there should be no welding in yielding portion of the core. Finally, the full-scale subassemblage test was done with an improved BRB and gusset plates installed in a frame. The result shows that the brace exhibited high energy dissipation capacity and stable hysteretic characteristic. According to the results from above tests, some important issues are summarized to provide advices for practical applications.

  19. Full-scale validation of wireless hybrid sensor on an in-service highway bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Shinae; Dahal, Sushil; Li, Jingcheng

    2013-04-01

    With the rapid development of electrical circuits, Micro electromechanical system (MEMS) and network technology, wireless smart sensor networks (WSSN) have shown significant potential for replacing existing wired SHM systems due to their cost effectiveness and versatility. A few structural systems have been monitored using WSSN measuring acceleration, temperature, wind speed, humidity; however, a multi-scale sensing device which has the capability to measure the displacement has not been yet developed. In the previous paper, a new high-accuracy displacement sensing system was developed combining a high resolution analog displacement sensor and MEMS-based wireless microprocessor platform. Also, the wireless sensor was calibrated in the laboratory to get the high precision displacement data from analog sensor, and its performance was validated to measure simulated thermal expansion of a laboratory bridge structure. This paper expands the validation of the developed system on full-scale experiments to measure both static and dynamic displacement of expansion joints, temperature, and vibration of an in-service highway bridge. A brief visual investigation of bridges, comparison between theoretical and measured thermal expansion are also provided. The developed system showed the capability to measure the displacement with accuracy of 0.00027 in.

  20. Open-Ended Laboratory Investigations with Drosophila.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertens, Thomas R.

    1983-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures (including matings performed), and results are presented for an open-ended investigation using the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. Once data are collected, students develop hypotheses to explain results as well as devise additional experiments to test their hypotheses. Calculation of chi-square for…

  1. Investigations for a Mobile Environmental Education Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, Ronald B.

    Envirpnmental investigations in this compilation were developed in conjunction with the establishment of a mobile environmental education laboratory, a demonstration project of the Kingsport (Tennessee) City School System. The 50 activities are divided into five categories: basic resources, environmental problems, living organisms, community…

  2. Computational Evaluation of Airframe Noise Reduction Concepts at Full Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Duda, Benjamin; Hazir, Andreas; Fares, Ehab

    2016-01-01

    High-fidelity simulations focused on full-scale evaluation of new technologies for mitigating flap and landing gear noise are presented. These noise reduction concepts were selected because of their superior acoustic performance, as demonstrated during NASA wind tunnel tests of an 18%-scale, semi-span model of a Gulfstream aircraft. The full-scale, full-aircraft, time-accurate simulations were performed with the lattice Boltzmann PowerFLOW(Registered Trademark) solver for free air at a Mach number of 0.2. Three aircraft configurations (flaps deflected at 39? without and with main gear deployed, and 0? flaps with main gear extended) were used to determine the aero-acoustic performance of the concepts on component-level (individually) and system-level (concurrent applica-tion) bases. Farfield noise spectra were obtained using a Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings acoustic analogy approach. Comparison of the predicted spectra without (baseline) and with the noise treatments applied showed that noise reduction benefits between 2-3 dB for the flap and 1.3-1.7 dB for the main landing gear are obtained. It was also found that the full extent of the benefits is being masked by the noise generated from the flap brackets and main gear cavities, which act as prominent secondary sources.

  3. Full Scale Wind Tunnel and Seaplane Tow Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction progress: Preparation for test of Careystone panels used to cover the exterior of the Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). The corrugated concrete and asbestos panels (1/4 inch thick; 42 inches wide; 62 inches long) which were used as siding and roofing for the Full-Scale Tunnel were manufactured by The Philip Carey Company. The NACA conducted seven different tests to determine the exact properties of the the substance which was called 'Careystone'. Three of these tests involved applying a load until the test panel ruptured. The results of these tests were supplied to the manufacturer but with the condition that the information remain confidential. The Philip Carey Company very much wanted to publicized the NACA test results (They had underbid the project in hopes of getting a strong return through an advertising campaign.) but the company's request was rejected out of hand as a violation of government policy. For the NACA, the choice of Careystone had been based on several factors. First and foremost was its low cost. NACA engineers had observed the very durable, low-maintenance and fireproof qualities of the concrete-asbestos covering of the airship hanger at Langley Field. Further, tests showed the material to be 3.8 times stronger than required (The maximum load the material was expected to withstand was 52 lbs. per square foot; the breaking load was 196 lbs. per sq. ft.).

  4. Full Scale Wind Tunnel and Seaplane Tow Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction progress, Full Scale exit cone looking south from entrance cone, east switchboard, west switchboard, wind vanes at north end looking north through entrance cone, north end looking south through entrance cone, entrance cone looking north from exit cone, wind vanes south end of west exit cone, wind vanes south end of east exit cone, Tow Channel trolley lines looking north, east and west incline braces at north end. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) exit cone construction and installation of fan motors. Smith DeFrance describes the entrance cone in NACA TR 459 as follows: 'Forward of the propellers and located on the center line of the tunnel is a smooth fairing which transforms the somewhat elliptic section of the single passage into two circular ones at the propellers. From the propellers aft, the exit cone is divided into two passages and each transforms in the length of 132 feet from a 35-foot 61/2-inch circular section to a 46-foot square. The included angle between the sides of each passage is 6 inches.' (p. 293)

  5. Cylindrical acoustical holography applied to full-scale jet noise.

    PubMed

    Wall, Alan T; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Krueger, David W; James, Michael M

    2014-09-01

    Near-field acoustical holography methods are used to predict sound radiation from an engine installed on a high-performance military fighter aircraft. Cylindrical holography techniques are an efficient approach to measure the large and complex sound fields produced by full-scale jets. It is shown that a ground-based, one-dimensional array of microphones can be used in conjunction with a cylindrical wave function field representation to provide a holographic reconstruction of the radiated sound field at low frequencies. In the current work, partial field decomposition methods and numerical extrapolation of data beyond the boundaries of the hologram aperture are required prior to holographic projection. Predicted jet noise source distributions and directionality are shown for four frequencies between 63 and 250 Hz. It is shown that the source distribution narrows and moves upstream, and that radiation directionality shifts toward the forward direction, with increasing frequency. A double-lobe feature of full-scale jet radiation is also demonstrated. PMID:25190387

  6. Freezable Radiator Coupon Testing and Full Scale Radiator Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean T.; Guinn, John; Cognata, Thomas; Navarro, Moses

    2009-01-01

    Freezable radiators offer an attractive solution to the issue of thermal control system scalability. As thermal environments change, a freezable radiator will effectively scale the total heat rejection it is capable of as a function of the thermal environment and flow rate through the radiator. Scalable thermal control systems are a critical technology for spacecraft that will endure missions with widely varying thermal requirements. These changing requirements are a result of the space craft s surroundings and because of different thermal loads during different mission phases. However, freezing and thawing (recovering) a radiator is a process that has historically proven very difficult to predict through modeling, resulting in highly inaccurate predictions of recovery time. This paper summarizes tests on three test articles that were performed to further empirically quantify the behavior of a simple freezable radiator, and the culmination of those tests into a full scale design. Each test article explored the bounds of freezing and recovery behavior, as well as providing thermo-physical data of the working fluid, a 50-50 mixture of DowFrost HD and water. These results were then used as a tool for developing correlated thermal model in Thermal Desktop which could be used for modeling the behavior of a full scale thermal control system for a lunar mission. The final design of a thermal control system for a lunar mission is also documented in this paper.

  7. Laboratory investigation of shuttle glow mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caledonia, G. E.; Holtzclaw, K. W.; Green, B. D.; Krech, R. H.; Leone, A.; Swenson, G.

    1990-10-01

    A fast oxygen atom source was used to investigate the Shuttle glow phenomena in the laboratory. Both room temperature and cooled targets were dosed with NO and then irradiated by 8 km/s oxygen atoms. The observed fluorescence is spectrally similar to that seen on the Shuttle supporting previous suggestions that recombination of O with surface bound NO is the responsible mechanism for the visible Shuttle glow.

  8. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Conduct Disorder: Symptom, Domain and Full-Scale Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelhorn, Heather L.; Stallings, Michael C.; Young, Susan E.; Corley, Robin P.; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Hewitt, John K.

    2005-01-01

    Background: We used variable threshold models which accounted for age and gender differences to investigate the genetic and environmental influences on DSM-IV conduct disorder (CD) at the level of symptoms, aggressive versus non-aggressive domains, and full-scale. Method: A community sample of 1100 twin pairs (age 11-18) was interviewed using the…

  9. Analysis of Unbound Aggregate Layer Deformation Behavior from Full Scale Aircraft Gear Loading with Wander

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Phillip Raymond

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the analysis of the behavior of unbound aggregates to offset wheel loads. Test data from full-scale aircraft gear loading conducted at the National Airport Pavement Test Facility (NAPTF) by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are used to investigate the effects of wander (offset loads) on the deformation behavior of…

  10. New Orleans full-scale trommel evaluation: interim test report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.

    1981-06-01

    This report presents the data from five tests of a full-scale trommel processing unsegregated municipal solid waste at throughtputs ranging from 58% to 175% of design capacity, or 32 to 98 Mg/h (36 to 109 tph). The tests were conducted between December 1980 and March 1981 at the Recovery 1 solid waste processing facility in New Orleans, La. Included in the report are a description of the equipment, discussion of the test procedures and primary summaries of data on the trommel mass balance and separation efficiency, and on the analysis of infeed and product samples for size, composition, density, and moisture. Heat content and ash values of the trommel oversize and recovery results on surrogate aluminum cans and flakes also are reported.

  11. Full scale subsonic wind tunnel requirements and design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. W.; Mort, K. W.; Hickey, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The justification and requirements are summarized for a large subsonic wind tunnel capable of testing full-scale aircraft, rotor systems, and advanced V/STOL aircraft propulsion systems. The design considerations and constraints for such a facility are reviewed, and the trades between facility test capability and costs are discussed. The design studies showed that the structural cost of this facility is the most important cost factor. For this reason (and other considerations such as requirements for engine exhaust gas purging) an open-return wind tunnel having two test sections was selected. The major technical problem in the design of an open-return wind tunnel is maintaining good test section flow quality in the presence of external winds. This problem has been studied extensively, and inlet and exhaust systems which provide satisfactory attenuation of the effects of external winds on test section flow quality were developed.

  12. N2O emissions from full-scale nitrifying biofilters.

    PubMed

    Bollon, Julien; Filali, Ahlem; Fayolle, Yannick; Guerin, Sabrina; Rocher, Vincent; Gillot, Sylvie

    2016-10-01

    A full-scale nitrifying biofilter was continuously monitored during two measurement periods (September 2014; February 2015) during which both gaseous and liquid N2O fluxes were monitored on-line. The results showed diurnal and seasonal variations of N2O emissions. A statistical model was run to determine the main operational parameters governing N2O emissions. Modification of the distribution between the gas phase and the liquid phase was observed related to the effects of temperature and aeration flow on the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa). With similar nitrification performance values, the N2O emission factor was twice as high during the winter campaign. The increase in N2O emissions in winter was correlated to higher effluent nitrite concentrations and suspected increased biofilm thickness. PMID:27318446

  13. Full-scale tilt-rotor hover performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felker, F. F.; Maisel, M. D.; Betzina, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    The hover performance of three full-scale rotors was measured at the Ames Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility. The rotors, all designed for tilt-rotor aircraft, were the original metal blades for the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft, a set of composite, advanced technology blades for the XV-15, and a 0.658-scale model of the proposed V-22A Osprey (JVX) rotor. The composite advanced technology blades for the XV-15 were tested with several alternate blade root and blade tip configurations. This paper presents the performance of these three rotors, shows the effects of tip Mach number and root and tip configuration changes on rotor performance, and presents data on rotor wake velocity distributions and tip vortex geometry. Measured rotor performance is compared with theoretical predictions, and the discrepancies are discussed.

  14. Defining Anaerobic Digestion Stability-Full Scale Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demitry, M. E., Sr.

    2014-12-01

    A full-scale anaerobic digester receiving a mixture of primary and secondary sludge was monitored for one hundred days. A chemical oxygen demand, COD, and a volatile solids, VS, mass balance was conducted to evaluate the stability of the digester and its capability of producing methane gas. The COD mass balance could account for nearly 90% of the methane gas produced while the VS mass balance showed that 91% of the organic matter removed resulted in biogas formation. Other parameters monitored included: pH, alkalinity, VFA, and propionic acid. The values of these parameters showed that steady state had occurred. Finally, at mesophilic temperature and at steady state performance, the anaerobic digester stability was defined as a constant ratio of methane produced per substrate of ΔVS (average ratio=0.404 l/g). This ratio can be used as universal metric to determine the anaerobic digester stability in an easy and inexpensive way.

  15. Full-scale Skylab Apollo telescope mount deployment tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricker, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    During the initial stages of the NASA Skylab orbit, the Apollo telescope mount (ATM) is deployed by the deployment assembly (DA) which clears the multiple docking adapter axial docking port. This is an essential prerequisite to docking the command service module with the orbital workshop and subsequent occupancy of the workshop by the Apollo three-man crew. The objectives of the full-scale NASA Skylab ATM deployment test program were (1) to evaluate the design concept of the DA and deployment mechanisms while functioning in a zero-g environment with simulated ATM mass properties and (2) to evaluate the effects of handling, transporting, and deployment with respect to the structural geometry and stability of the DA.

  16. Full-scale hydrogen anodes for immersed-tank electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Robert J.; Foller, Peter C.; Vora, Ravindra J.; Bombard, R. Todd; Demarinis, Michael

    1993-03-01

    Full-scale (1.2 m2) immersed-tank hydrogen-diffusion anodes have been prepared by a newly patented lamination technique onto metallic sheet substrates. The use of such free-standing electrodes has been characterized in the electrowinning of zinc, but the electrodes are also suitable for use in the electrowinning of other metals and in electroplating. The electrodes may find application in processes where voltage savings of approximately 1.8-2.0 V versus oxygen evolution are of importance, or where parasitic anodic oxidations need to be eliminated. The hydrogen-diffusion anode structure developed incorporates a novel microporous polymeric coating designed to prevent both the percolation of feed hydrogen through the electrode to the electrolyte and the seepage of electrolyte into the gas plenum.

  17. Full-Scale Demonstration Low-NOx Cell Burner retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-24

    The overall objective of the Full-Scale Low-NOx Cell (LNC) Burner Retrofit project is to demonstrate the cost-effective reduction of NOx generated by a large, base-loaded (70% capacity factor or greater), coal-fired utility boiler. Specific objectives include: at least 50% NOx reduction over standard two-nozzle cell burners, without degradation of boiler performance or life; acquire and evaluate emission and boiler performance data before and after the retrofit to determine NOx reduction and impact on overall boiler performance; and demonstrate that the LNC burner retrofits are the most cost-effective alternative to emerging, or commercially- available NOx control technology for units equipped with cell burners. The focus of this demonstration is to determine maximum NOx reduction capabilities without adversely impacting plant performance, operation and maintenance.

  18. Full-scale prestress loss monitoring of damaged RC structures using distributed optical fiber sensing technology.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chunguang; Zhou, Zhi; Ou, Jinping

    2012-01-01

    For the safety of prestressed structures, prestress loss is a critical issue that will increase with structural damage, so it is necessary to investigate prestress loss of prestressed structures under different damage scenarios. Unfortunately, to date, no qualified techniques are available due to difficulty for sensors to survive in harsh construction environments of long service life and large span. In this paper, a novel smart steel strand based on the Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) sensing technique was designed and manufactured, and then series of tests were used to characterize properties of the smart steel strands. Based on prestress loss principle analysis of damaged structures, laboratory tests of two similar beams with different damages were used to verify the concept of full-scale prestress loss monitoring of damaged reinforced concrete (RC) beams by using the smart steel strands. The prestress losses obtained from the Brillouin sensors are compared with that from conventional sensors, which provided the evolution law of prestress losses of damaged RC beams. The monitoring results from the proposed smart strand can reveal both spatial distribution and time history of prestress losses of damaged RC beams. PMID:22778590

  19. Full-Scale Prestress Loss Monitoring of Damaged RC Structures Using Distributed Optical Fiber Sensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chunguang; Zhou, Zhi; Ou, Jinping

    2012-01-01

    For the safety of prestressed structures, prestress loss is a critical issue that will increase with structural damage, so it is necessary to investigate prestress loss of prestressed structures under different damage scenarios. Unfortunately, to date, no qualified techniques are available due to difficulty for sensors to survive in harsh construction environments of long service life and large span. In this paper, a novel smart steel strand based on the Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) sensing technique was designed and manufactured, and then series of tests were used to characterize properties of the smart steel strands. Based on prestress loss principle analysis of damaged structures, laboratory tests of two similar beams with different damages were used to verify the concept of full-scale prestress loss monitoring of damaged reinforced concrete (RC) beams by using the smart steel strands. The prestress losses obtained from the Brillouin sensors are compared with that from conventional sensors, which provided the evolution law of prestress losses of damaged RC beams. The monitoring results from the proposed smart strand can reveal both spatial distribution and time history of prestress losses of damaged RC beams. PMID:22778590

  20. Full Scale Tunnel (FST) and Seaplane Tow Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Aerial and ground views of the overall construction of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) and the Seaplane Tow Channel. In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; an fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293). Ground shots of work in progress, aerials of east area.

  1. Full Scale Wind Tunnel and Seaplane Tow Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Construction progress, studding in Tow Channel office area, Full Scale motor fairing in west exit cone, motor fairing in east exit cone. Propeller and motor fairing for west exit cone. Smith DeFrance described the propellers and motors in NACA TR No. 459. ' The propellers are located side by side and 48 feet aft of the throat of the exit-cone bell. The propellers are 35 feet 5 inches in diameter and each consists of four cast aluminum alloy blades screwed into a cast steel hub.' 'The most commonly used power plant for operating a wind tunnel is a direct-current motor and motor-generator set with Ward Leonard control system. For the full-scale wind tunnel it was found that alternating current slip-ring induction motors, together with satisfactory control equipment, could be purchased for approximately 30 percent less than the direct-current equipment. Two 4,000-horsepower slip-ring induction motors with 24 steps of speed between 75 and 300 r.p.m. were therefore installed. In order to obtain the range of speed one pole change was provided and the other variations are obtained by the introduction of resistance in the rotor circuit. This control permits a variation in air speed from 25 to 118 miles per hour. The two motors are connected through an automatic switchboard to one drum-type controller located in the test chamber. All the control equipment is interlocked and connected through time-limit relays, so that regardless of how fast the controller handle is moved the motors will increase in speed at regular intervals.' (p. 294-295)

  2. Laboratory Investigations of Stratospheric Halogen Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, Paul H.; Nicovich, J. Michael; Stickel, Robert E.; Hynes, Anthony J.

    1997-01-01

    A final report for the NASA-supported project on laboratory investigations of stratospheric halogen chemistry is presented. In recent years, this project has focused on three areas of research: (1) kinetic, mechanistic, and thermochemical studies of reactions which produce weakly bound chemical species of atmospheric interest; (2) development of flash photolysis schemes for studying radical-radical reactions of stratospheric interest; and (3) photochemistry studies of interest for understanding stratospheric chemistry. The first section of this paper contains a discussion of work which has not yet been published. All subsequent chapters contain reprints of published papers that acknowledge support from this grant.

  3. Laboratory investigations of impact-generated plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, David A.; Schultz, Peter H.

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of plasma that was produced in laboratory by hypervelocity impacts were investigated to demonstrate the feasibility of generation of magnetic fields by meteoritic impacts and to explain the presence of paleomagnetic fields on the lunar surface. The impact-generated magnetic fields were found to exhibit spatial and temporal complexity that depended on the impact angle, the velocity, and the projectile/target composition. The results suggest that crater-related paleomagnetism associated with this mechanism should exhibit similar complexity with spatial wavelengths on the order of a fraction of the crater radius.

  4. Evaluation of full-scale biofilter media performance

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas-Gonzalez, B.; Ergas, S.J.; Switzenbaum, M.S.; Phillibert, N.

    1999-09-30

    The objective of this study was to characterize the key physical, chemical and biological properties of compost media from a full-scale biofiltration system used to control VOC emissions. Results of media characterization were used to assess the need for operational changes and media replacement. Biofilter media properties evaluated included: moisture content, pH, total organic carbon (TOC) and nitrogen content in water extracts and solid matrix, oxygen uptake rates, and microbial plate counts including total heterotrophs, oligotrophs, actinomycetes and fungi. Samples were taken from various locations and depths in the biofilter after three and five years of system operation. Media moisture content was highly variable, with samples from deeper in the bed dryer than surface samples. Low moisture contents were associated with low pH values and low oxygen uptake rates. Total organic carbon contents in water extracts were higher than typical biosolids compost in samples near the inlet to the biofilter, possibly due to extracellular polysaccharides. After five years of use, total nitrogen and organic carbon contents in the solid matrix did not significantly differ from initial levels or those in typical biosolids compost.

  5. Lightweight alumina refractory aggregate: Phase 3, Full-scale demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Swansiger, T.G.; Pearson, A.

    1996-07-16

    Technical problems (higher than target fired density, and poor intermediate strength after burnout but before sintering) were addressed and solved; solution involved use of large loading of CP-5 alumina (controlled pore, rehydratable), increased loading of one of the binders, and a steam aging step. Resistance of the lightweight aggregate in a brick formulation to steel slag penetration was assessed in a preliminary test and found to be almost as good as that of T-64. Pelletized process economic feasibility study was updated, based on production levels of 10,000 and 20,000 mt/year, the most up- to-date raw material costs, and the assumption of a retrofit into the Arkansas plant tabular production facility. For the 10,000 mt/y production level, the required selling price of 35% more than the T- 64 selling price exceeds the {le}25% objective. The market survey will determine whether to proceed with the full scale demonstration that will produce at least 54.4 mt (120,000 lb) of the aggregate for incorporation into products, followed by end-user testing and evaluation.

  6. Full-scale testing and analysis of fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M.; Gruber, M. L.; Wilkins, K. E.; Worden, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents recent results from a program in the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group to study the behavior of cracks in fuselage structures. The goal of this program is to improve methods for analyzing crack growth and residual strength in pressurized fuselages, thus improving new airplane designs and optimizing the required structural inspections for current models. The program consists of full-scale experimental testing of pressurized fuselage panels in both wide-body and narrow-body fixtures and finite element analyses to predict the results. The finite element analyses are geometrically nonlinear with material and fastener nonlinearity included on a case-by-case basis. The analysis results are compared with the strain gage, crack growth, and residual strength data from the experimental program. Most of the studies reported in this paper concern the behavior of single or multiple cracks in the lap joints of narrow-body airplanes (such as 727 and 737 commercial jets). The phenomenon where the crack trajectory is curved creating a 'flap' and resulting in a controlled decompression is discussed.

  7. Acoustic modal analysis of a full-scale annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic modal decomposition of the measured pressure field in a full scale annular combustor installed in a ducted test rig is described. The modal analysis, utilizing a least squares optimization routine, is facilitated by the assumption of randomly occurring pressure disturbances which generate equal amplitude clockwise and counter-clockwise pressure waves, and the assumption of statistical independence between modes. These assumptions are fully justified by the measured cross spectral phases between the various measurement points. The resultant modal decomposition indicates that higher order modes compose the dominant portion of the combustor pressure spectrum in the range of frequencies of interest in core noise studies. A second major finding is that, over the frequency range of interest, each individual mode which is present exists in virtual isolation over significant portions of the spectrum. Finally, a comparison between the present results and a limited amount of data obtained in an operating turbofan engine with the same combustor is made. The comparison is sufficiently favorable to warrant the conclusion that the structure of the combustor pressure field is preserved between the component facility and the engine. Previously announced in STAR as N83-21896

  8. Full Scale Tunnel (FST) and Seaplane Tow Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    L4855: Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) circuit breaker panel prior to installation. In NACA TR No. 459, Smith DeFrance notes that the FST differed from other wind tunnels in is use of alternating current slip-ring induction motors rather than a direct-current motor and motor-generator set. 'Two 4,000-horsepower slip-ring induction motors with 24 steps of speed between 75 and 300 r.p.m. were ...installed. In order to obtain the range of speed one pole change was provided and the other variations are obtained by the introduction of resistance in the rotor circuit. This control permits a variation in air speed from 25 to 118 miles per hour. The two motors are connected through an automatic switchboard to one drum-type controller located in the test chamber. All the control equipment is interlocked and connected through time-limit relays, so that regardless of how fast the controller handle is moved the motors will increase in speed at regular intervals.' (p. 294-295)

  9. Full-Scale Schlieren Visualization of Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. D.; Settles, G. S.

    1996-11-01

    The efficient removal of cooking effluents from commercial kitchens has been identified as the most pressing energy-related issue in the food service industry. A full-scale schlieren optical system with a 2.1x2.7m field-of-view, described at previous APS/DFD meetings, images the convective airflow associated with a typical gas-fired cooking griddle and ventilation hood. Previous attempts to visualize plumes from cooking equipment by smoke and neutrally-buoyant bubbles were not sufficiently keyed to thermal convection. Here, the point where the ventilation hood fails to capture the effluent plume is clearly visible, thus determining the boundary condition for a balanced ventilation system. Further, the strong influence of turbulent entrainment is seen in the behavior of the combustion products vented by the griddle and the interference caused by a makeup-air outlet located too close to the lip of the ventilation hood. Such applications of traditional fluid dynamics techniques and principles are believed to be important to the maturing of ventilation technology. (Research supported by EPRI and IFMA, Inc.)

  10. Acoustic modal analysis of a full-scale annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic modal decomposition of the measured pressure field in a full scale annular combustor installed in a ducted test rig is described. The modal analysis, utilizing a least squares optimization routine, is facilitated by the assumption of randomly occurring pressure disturbances which generate equal amplitude clockwise and counter-clockwise pressure waves, and the assumption of statistical independence between modes. These assumptions are fully justified by the measured cross spectral phases between the various measurement points. The resultant modal decomposition indicates that higher order modes compose the dominant portion of the combustor pressure spectrum in the range of frequencies of interest in core noise studies. A second major finding is that, over the frequency range of interest, each individual mode which is present exists in virtual isolation over significant portions of the spectrum. Finally, a comparison between the present results and a limited amount of data obtained in an operating turbofan engine with the same combustor is made. The comparison is sufficiently favorable to warrant the conclusion that the structure of the combustor pressure field is preserved between the component facility and the engine.

  11. Hover performance tests of full scale variable geometry rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorke, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Full scale whirl tests were conducted to determine the effects of interblade spatial relationships and pitch variations on the hover performance and acoustic signature of a 6-blade main rotor system. The variable geometry rotor (VGR) variations from the conventional baseline were accomplished by: (1) shifting the axial position of alternate blades by one chord-length to form two tip path planes; and (2) varying the relative azimuthal spacing from the upper rotor to the lagging hover rotor in four increments from 25.2 degrees to 62.1 degrees. For each of these four configurations, the differential collective pitch between upper and lower rotors was set at + or - 1 deg, 0 deg and -1 deg. Hover performance data for all configurations were acquired at blade tip Mach numbers of 0.523 and 0.45. Acoustic data were recorded at all test conditions, but analyzed only at 0 deg differential pitch at the higher rotor speed. The VGR configurations tested demonstrated improvements in thrust at constant power as high as 6 percent. Reductions of 3 PNdb in perceived noise level and of 4 db in blade passage frequency noise level were achieved at the higher thrust levels. Consistent correlation exists between performance and acoustic improvements. For any given azimuth spacing, performance was consistently better for the differential pitch condition of + or - 1 degree, i.e. with the upper rotor pitch one degree higher than the lower rotor.

  12. Full-Scale Crash Test of an MD-500 Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin

    2011-01-01

    A full-scale crash test was successfully conducted in March 2010 of an MD-500 helicopter at NASA Langley Research Center s Landing and Impact Research Facility. The reasons for conducting this test were threefold: 1 To generate data to be used with finite element computer modeling efforts, 2 To study the crashworthiness features typically associated with a small representative helicopter, and 3 To compare aircraft response to data collected from a previously conducted MD-500 crash test, which included an externally deployable energy absorbing (DEA) concept. Instrumentation on the airframe included accelerometers on various structural components of the airframe; and strain gages on keel beams, skid gear and portions of the skin. Three Anthropomorphic Test Devices and a specialized Human Surrogate Torso Model were also onboard to collect occupant loads for evaluation with common injury risk criteria. This paper presents background and results from this crash test conducted without the DEA concept. These results showed accelerations of approximately 30 to 50 g on the airframe at various locations, little energy attenuation through the airframe, and moderate to high probability of occupant injury for a variety of injury criteria.

  13. Freezable Radiator Model Correlation and Full Scale Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean T.; Navarro, Moses

    2010-01-01

    Freezable radiators offer an attractive solution to the issue of thermal control system scalability. As thermal environments change, a freezable radiator will effectively scale the total heat rejection it is capable of as a function of the thermal environment and flow rate through the radiator. Scalable thermal control systems are a critical technology for spacecraft that will endure missions with widely varying thermal requirements. These changing requirements are a result of the space craft s surroundings and because of different thermal loads during different mission phases. However, freezing and thawing (recovering) a radiator is a process that has historically proven very difficult to predict through modeling, resulting in highly inaccurate predictions of recovery time. This paper summarizes efforts made to correlate a Thermal Desktop (TM) model with empirical testing data from two test articles. A 50-50 mixture of DowFrost HD and water is used as the working fluid. Efforts to scale this model to a full scale design, as well as efforts to characterize various thermal control fluids at low temperatures are also discussed.

  14. Characterization results of the JUNGFRAU full scale readout ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozzanica, A.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brueckner, M.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jungmann-Smith, J.; Maliakal, D.; Mezza, D.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, C.; Schaedler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2016-02-01

    The two-dimensional pixel detector JUNGFRAU is designed for high performance photon science applications at free electron lasers and synchrotron light sources. It is developed for the SwissFEL currently under construction at the Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland. The detector is a hybrid pixel detector with a charge integration readout ASIC characterized by single photon sensitivity and a low noise performance over a dynamic range of 104 12 keV photons. Geometrically, a JUNGFRAU readout chip consists of 256×256 pixels of 75×75 μm2. The chips are bump bonded to 320 μm thick silicon sensors. Arrays of 2×4 chips are tiled to form modules of 4×8 cm2 area. Several multi-module systems with up to 16 Mpixels per system will be delivered to the two end stations at SwissFEL. The JUNGFRAU full scale readout ASIC and module design are presented along with characterization results of the first systems. Experiments from fluorescence X-ray, visible light illumination, and synchrotron irradiation are shown. The results include an electronic noise of ~50 electrons r.m.s., which enables single photon detection energies below 2 keV and a noise well below the Poisson statistical limit over the entire dynamic range. First imaging experiments are also shown.

  15. Full-scale testing and analysis of fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M.; Gruber, M. L.; Wilkins, K. E.; Worden, R. E.

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents recent results from a program in the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group to study the behavior of cracks in fuselage structures. The goal of this program is to improve methods for analyzing crack growth and residual strength in pressurized fuselages, thus improving new airplane designs and optimizing the required structural inspections for current models. The program consists of full-scale experimental testing of pressurized fuselage panels in both wide-body and narrow-body fixtures and finite element analyses to predict the results. The finite element analyses are geometrically nonlinear with material and fastener nonlinearity included on a case-by-case basis. The analysis results are compared with the strain gage, crack growth, and residual strength data from the experimental program. Most of the studies reported in this paper concern the behavior of single or multiple cracks in the lap joints of narrow-body airplanes (such as 727 and 737 commercial jets). The phenomenon where the crack trajectory is curved creating a 'flap' and resulting in a controlled decompression is discussed.

  16. Full-scale Experiments for Roadbed Cavity Detection with GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C.; Kang, W.; Son, J.

    2015-12-01

    Past few decades, deterioration of the underground facilities such as sewage facilities has increased significantly with growing urban development in Korea. The old damaged sewage pipes or conduits have washed away the surrounding soils beneath the roadbed, causing underground cavities and eventual ground depressions or sinkholes in the urban areas. Therefore, the detection of the roadbed cavities is increasingly required to prevent property damage and loss of human lives for precautionary measures. 3-D GPR technique was applied to conduct the full-scale experiment for roadbed cavity detection. The physical experiment has employed the soil characteristics of silty sand soils. The experimental site is composed of physically simulated cavities (Styrofoam, ɛr = 1.03) with dome-shaped structure and concrete sewage conduit. The simulated cavities were installed at regular intervals in spatial distribution. The land surface of the site was not paved with asphalt concrete at the current stage of the experiments. The results of the GPR measurements over the experimental site show that the reflection patterns from the simulated cavities are hyperbolic returns typical to the point source in 2-D perspective. A closer inspection of 3-D GPR volume data has yielded more clear interpretation than 2-D GPR data regarding where the cavities are situated in space. However, in case sewage conduits adjacent to the cavities are present, they could mask the GPR signals from cavities, leading misinterpretations. Therefore, data processing procedures should be more appropriately applied compared to the data for linear target detections. It is strongly believed that 3-D high density GPR data could be usefully applied to the roadbed cavity detections in the experiments. This study is an ongoing project of KIGAM and more realistic environments of the underground conditions would be prepared for the future study.

  17. Investigating Coccolithophorid Biology in the Sedimentary Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Barbarin, N.; Beaufort, L.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2014-12-01

    Coccolithophores are the ocean's dominant calcifying phytoplankton; they play an important, but poorly understood, role in long-term biogeochemical climatic feedbacks. Calcite producing marine organisms are likely to calcify less in a future world where higher carbon dioxide concentrations will lead to ocean acidification (OA), but coccolithophores may be the exception. In coccolithophores calcification occurs in an intracellular vesicle, where the site of calcite precipitation is buffered from the external environment and is subject to a uniquely high degree of biological control. Culture manipulation experiments mimicking the effects of OA in the laboratory have yielded empirical evidence for phenotypic plasticity, competition and evolutionary adaptation in asexual populations. However, the extent to which these results are representative of natural populations, and of the response over timescales of greater than a few hundred generations, is unclear. Here we describe a new sediment-based proxy for the PIC:POC (particulate inorganic to particulate organic carbon ratio) of coccolithophore biomass, which is equivalent to the fractional energy contribution to calcification at constant pH, and a biologically meaningful measure of the organism's tendency to calcify. Employing the geological record as a laboratory, we apply this proxy to sedimentary material from the southern Pacific Ocean to investigate the integrated response of real ancient coccolithophore populations to environmental change over many thousands of years. Our results provide a new perspective on phenotypic change in real populations of coccolithophorid algae over long timescales.

  18. Full-Scale Spectrum of Boundary-Layer Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsén, Xiaoli G.; Larsen, Søren E.; Petersen, Erik L.

    2016-05-01

    Extensive mean meteorological data and high frequency sonic anemometer data from two sites in Denmark, one coastal onshore and one offshore, have been used to study the full-scale spectrum of boundary-layer winds, over frequencies f from about 1 yr^{-1} to 10 Hz. 10-min cup anemometer data are used to estimate the spectrum from about 1 yr^{-1} to 0.05 min^{-1}; in addition, using 20-Hz sonic anemometer data, an ensemble of 1-day spectra covering the range 1 day^{-1} to 10 Hz has been calculated. The overlapping region in these two measured spectra is in good agreement. Classical topics regarding the various spectral ranges, including the spectral gap, are revisited. Following the seasonal peak at 1 yr^{-1}, the frequency spectrum fS( f) increases with f^{+1} and gradually reaches a peak at about 0.2 day^{-1}. From this peak to about 1 hr^{-1}, the spectrum fS( f) decreases with frequency with a -2 slope, followed by a -2/3 slope, which can be described by fS(f)=a_1f^{-2/3}+a_2f^{-2}, ending in the frequency range for which the debate on the spectral gap is ongoing. It is shown here that the spectral gap exists and can be modelled. The linear composition of the horizontal wind variation from the mesoscale and microscale gives the observed spectrum in the gap range, leading to a suggestion that mesoscale and microscale processes are uncorrelated. Depending on the relative strength of the two processes, the gap may be deep or shallow, visible or invisible. Generally, the depth of the gap decreases with height. In the low frequency region of the gap, the mesoscale spectrum shows a two-dimensional isotropic nature; in the high frequency region, the classical three-dimensional boundary-layer turbulence is evident. We also provide the cospectrum of the horizontal and vertical components, and the power spectra of the three velocity components over a wide range from 1 day^{-1} to 10 Hz, which is useful in determining the necessary sample duration when measuring turbulence

  19. A Method for Estimating Noise from Full-Scale Distributed Exhaust Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzie, Kevin W.; Schein, David B.

    2004-01-01

    A method to estimate the full-scale noise suppression from a scale model distributed exhaust nozzle (DEN) is presented. For a conventional scale model exhaust nozzle, Strouhal number scaling using a scale factor related to the nozzle exit area is typically applied that shifts model scale frequency in proportion to the geometric scale factor. However, model scale DEN designs have two inherent length scales. One is associated with the mini-nozzles, whose size do not change in going from model scale to full scale. The other is associated with the overall nozzle exit area which is much smaller than full size. Consequently, lower frequency energy that is generated by the coalesced jet plume should scale to lower frequency, but higher frequency energy generated by individual mini-jets does not shift frequency. In addition, jet-jet acoustic shielding by the array of mini-nozzles is a significant noise reduction effect that may change with DEN model size. A technique has been developed to scale laboratory model spectral data based on the premise that high and low frequency content must be treated differently during the scaling process. The model-scale distributed exhaust spectra are divided into low and high frequency regions that are then adjusted to full scale separately based on different physics-based scaling laws. The regions are then recombined to create an estimate of the full-scale acoustic spectra. These spectra can then be converted to perceived noise levels (PNL). The paper presents the details of this methodology and provides an example of the estimated noise suppression by a distributed exhaust nozzle compared to a round conic nozzle.

  20. UV/chlorine control of drinking water taste and odour at pilot and full-scale.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Bolton, James R; Andrews, Susan A; Hofmann, Ron

    2015-10-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) can be used to destroy taste and odour-causing compounds in drinking water. This work investigated both pilot- and full-scale performance of the novel ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine AOP for the destruction of geosmin, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and caffeine (as a surrogate) in two different surface waters. The efficiency of the UV/chlorine process at pH 7.5 and 8.5 was comparable to that of the UV/hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2) process under parallel conditions, and was superior at pH 6.5. Caffeine was found to be a suitable surrogate for geosmin and MIB, and could be used as a more economical alternative to geosmin or MIB spiking for site-specific full-scale testing. PMID:26025188

  1. Fatigue behavior of full-scale welded bridge attachments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. W.; Barthelemy, B. M.; Mertz, D. R.; Edinger, J. A.

    1980-11-01

    Findings of an extensive laboratory evaluation of the fatigue behavior of welded steel bridge members are reported. The fatigue strength of beams with web and flange lateral attachment plates are examined. In addition to providing a more comprehensive data base for this type of detail, the influence of lateral bracing members on the out-of-plane distortion of the lateral plates is explored. Work also was undertaken on the effectiveness of peening and gas tungsten arc remelting the fatigue-damaged connections and on the ability of drilled holes to arrest crack growth.

  2. Implementation of In-Situ Impedance Techniques on a Full Scale Aero-Engine System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaeta, R. J.; Mendoza, J. M.; Jones, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    Determination of acoustic liner impedance for jet engine applications remains a challenge for the designer. Although suitable models have been developed that take account of source amplitude and the local flow environment experienced by the liner, experimental validation of these models has been difficult. This is primarily due to the inability of researchers to faithfully mimic the environment in jet engine nacelles in the laboratory. An in-situ measurement technique, one that can be implemented in an actual engine, is desirable so an accurate impedance can be determined for future modeling and quality control. This paper documents the implementation of such a local acoustic impedance measurement technique that is used under controlled laboratory conditions as well as on full scale turbine engine liner test article. The objective for these series of in-situ measurements is to substantiate treatment design, provide understanding of flow effects on installed liner performance, and provide modeling input for fan noise propagation computations. A series of acoustic liner evaluation tests are performed that includes normal incidence tube, grazing incidence tube, and finally testing on a full scale engine on a static test stand. Lab tests were intended to provide insight and guidance for accurately measuring the impedance of the liner housed in the inlet of a Honeywell Tech7000 turbofan. Results have shown that one can acquire very reasonable liner impedance data for a full scale engine under realistic test conditions. Furthermore, higher fidelity results can be obtained by using a three-microphone coherence technique that can enhance signal-to-noise ratio at high engine power settings. This research has also confirmed the limitations of this particular type of in-situ measurement. This is most evident in the installation of instrumentation and its effect on what is being measured.

  3. Comparison between lab- and full-scale applications of in situ aeration of an old landfill and assessment of long-term emission development after completion

    SciTech Connect

    Hrad, Marlies; Gamperling, Oliver; Huber-Humer, Marion

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Current data on in situ aeration effects from the first Austrian full-scale case study. ► Data on lasting waste stabilisation after aeration completion. ► Information on the transferability of results from lab- to full-scale aeration. - Abstract: Sustainable landfilling has become a fundamental objective in many modern waste management concepts. In this context, the in situ aeration of landfills has been recognised for its potential to convert conventional anaerobic landfills into biological stabilised state, whereby both current and potential (long-term) emissions of the landfilled waste are mitigated. In recent years, different in situ aeration concepts have been successfully applied in Europe, North America and Asia, all pursuing different objectives and strategies. In Austria, the first full-scale application of in situ landfill aeration by means of low pressure air injection and simultaneous off-gas collection and treatment was implemented on an old, small municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill (2.6 ha) in autumn 2007. Complementary laboratory investigations were conducted with waste samples taken from the landfill site in order to provide more information on the transferability of the results from lab- to full-scale aeration measures. In addition, long-term emission development of the stabilised waste after aeration completion was assessed in an ongoing laboratory experiment. Although the initial waste material was described as mostly stable in terms of the biological parameters gas generation potential over 21 days (GP{sub 21}) and respiration activity over 4 days (RA{sub 4}), the lab-scale experiments indicated that aeration, which led to a significant improvement of leachate quality, was accompanied by further measurable changes in the solid waste material under optimised conditions. Even 75 weeks after aeration completion the leachate, as well as gaseous emissions from the stabilised waste material, remained low and stayed below the

  4. MICROBIAL DESTRUCTIONS ACHIEVED BY FULL-SCALE ANAEROBIC DIGESTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of studies undertaken to investigate the pathogen reducing capabilities of conventional sludge stabilization procedures, microbial reductions produced by mesophilic and thermophilic digestion at the Los Angeles Hyperion Plant were examined. Samples from the digester feed ...

  5. Case study of a full-scale evapotranspiration cover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, P.E.; Andraski, B.J.; Archibald, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The design, construction, and performance analyses of a 6.1 ha evapotranspiration (ET) landfill cover at the semiarid U.S. Army Fort Carson site, near Colorado Springs, Colo. are presented. Initial water-balance model simulations, using literature reported soil hydraulic data, aided selection of borrow-source soil type(s) that resulted in predictions of negligible annual drainage (???1 mm/year). Final construction design was based on refined water-balance simulations using laboratory determined soil hydraulic values from borrow area natural soil horizons that were described with USDA soil classification methods. Cover design components included a 122 cm thick clay loam (USDA), compaction ???80% of the standard Proctor maximum dry density (dry bulk density ???1.3 Mg/m3), erosion control measures, top soil amended with biosolids, and seeding with native grasses. Favorable hydrologic performance for a 5 year period was documented by lysimeter-measured and Richards'-based calculations of annual drainage that were all <0.4 mm/year. Water potential data suggest that ET removed water that infiltrated the cover and contributed to a persistent driving force for upward flow and removal of water from below the base of the cover. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  6. FULL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF TEXTILE DYE WASTEWATER REUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an examination of technologies by which textile processing wastewaters could be recycled or reused, thereby reducing the amounts discharged. One of these technologies, dyebath reconstitution and reuse, was investigated in detail: it was found to be envi...

  7. Investigating Evolutionary Biology in the Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McComas, William F., Ed.

    This document presents a collection of useful laboratory-based activities for teaching about evolution. Some of the activities in this monograph are previously unpublished exercises, some are new versions of well-known labs, a few make useful classroom demonstrations, and several require somewhat sophisticated equipment. As a group, the activities…

  8. A Meaningful Experience in Laboratory Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szinai, S. S.; Szinai, N.

    1976-01-01

    The framework of the course "Problems in Pharmaceutical Chemistry" was used to give second- and third-year pharmacy students at the University of Florida an opportunity to obtain an insight into the workings of laboratories dealing with drug-related problems. Goals, outline, and an illustrative project for the course are described. (LBH)

  9. Investigating Optimal Foraging Theory in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Siegfried; Grilliot, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    Optimal foraging theory is a principle that is often presented in the community ecology section of biology textbooks, but also can be demonstrated in the laboratory. We introduce a lab activity that uses an interactive strategy to teach high school and/or college students about this ecological concept. The activity is ideal because it engages…

  10. Development of a full scale selective oil agglomeration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, J.C.; Cooney, B.; Hoare, I.; Waugh, B.; Robinson, R.

    1998-12-31

    A research and development program managed by Australian Mining Investments Limited (AMI) on behalf of an investment syndicate was conducted with the objective of improving the efficiency and economy of the Selective Oil Agglomeration Process (SOAP), and developing viable commercial sized operating plants. Fewer than half the coal preparation plants in Australia beneficiate fine coal by froth flotation, the only viable alternative to SOAP for the recovery of low ash, fine and ultra fine coal. Those plants without flotation generally dispose of the ultra fine material, approximately {minus}100{micro}m in size, as tailings to waste. In the majority of cases this ultra fine waste contains more than 50% relatively low ash coal of saleable quality. It is believed that this coal constitutes a loss of 8--10 million tonnes per annum and that the coal mining industry would welcome a recovery process which has low capital and operating costs and will function automatically with minimal operator attention. The authors carried out a comprehensive literature study of selective oil agglomeration in order to gain a full understanding of the process and to plan the research program. Extensive studies were then undertaken on oil dispersion in the water phase, formation of oil water emulsions with surfactants and the optimization of surfactant selection. Oil and emulsion properties were investigated including stability, viscosity, temperature, concentration of components, time of formation, and cost. This work was followed by characterization studies on coals from the Gunnedah Basin and agglomeration test work on these coals. These agglomeration studies were performed firstly at bench level and then by using a small, 200 kg/hr continuous process development unit. The results were sufficiently encouraging to justify the design and construction of a fully instrumented, PLC controlled, 2 tph pilot plant at Gunnedah Colliery Coal Preparation Plant. Extensive trials were carried out on

  11. Effects of compressibility on the performance of two full-scale helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Paul J

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted on the Langley helicopter test tower to determine experimentally the effects of compressibility on the performance and blade pitching moments of two full-scale helicopter rotors. Two sets of rotor blades were tested which differed only in that the blades of one set incorporated -8 degrees of linear twist, whereas the blades of the other set were untwisted. The tests covered a range of tip speeds from 350 to 770 feet per second and a range of pitch angles from 0 degrees to the limit imposed by extreme vibration.

  12. FULL SCALE REGENERABLE HEPA FILTER DESIGN USING SINTERED METAL FILTER ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gil Ramos; Kenneth Rubow; Ronald Sekellick

    2002-11-27

    A Department of Energy funded contract involved the development of porous metal as a HEPA filter, and the subsequent design of a full-scale regenerable HEPA filtration system (RHFS). This RHFS could replace the glass fiber HEPA filters currently being used on the high level waste (HLW) tank ventilation system with a system that would be moisture tolerant, durable, and cleanable in place. The origins of the contract are a 1996 investigation at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) regarding the use of porous metal as a HEPA filter material. This contract was divided into Phases I, IIA and IIB. Phase I of the contract evaluated simple filter cylinders in a simulated High Level Waste (HLW) environment and the ability to clean and regenerate the filter media after fouling. Upon the successful completion of Phase I, Phase IIA was conducted, which included lab scale prototype testing and design of a full-scale system. The work completed under Phase IIA included development of a full-scale system design, development of a filter media meeting the HEPA filtration efficiency that would also be regenerable using prescribed cleaning procedures, and the testing of a single element system prototype at Savannah River. All contract objectives were met. The filter media selected was a nickel material already under development at Mott, which met the HEPA filtration efficiency standard. The Mott nickel media met and exceeded the HEPA requirement, providing 99.99% removal against a requirement of 99.97%. Double open-ended elements of this media were provided to the Savannah River Test Center for HLW simulation testing in the single element prototype filter. These elements performed well and further demonstrated the practicality of a metallic media regenerable HEPA filter system. An evaluation of the manufacturing method on many elements demonstrated the reproducibility to meet the HEPA filtration requirement. The full-scale design of the Mott RHFS incorporated several important

  13. 48 CFR 34.005-5 - Full-scale development contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Full-scale development... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING MAJOR SYSTEM ACQUISITION General 34.005-5 Full-scale development contracts. Whenever practicable, the full-scale development contracts should provide for the contractors...

  14. 48 CFR 34.005-5 - Full-scale development contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Full-scale development... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING MAJOR SYSTEM ACQUISITION General 34.005-5 Full-scale development contracts. Whenever practicable, the full-scale development contracts should provide for the contractors...

  15. 5 CFR 532.233 - Preparation for full-scale wage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Preparation for full-scale wage surveys... REGULATIONS PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.233 Preparation for full-scale wage surveys. (a) The local wage survey committee, prior to each full-scale survey: (1) Shall hold a...

  16. 48 CFR 34.005-5 - Full-scale development contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Full-scale development... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING MAJOR SYSTEM ACQUISITION General 34.005-5 Full-scale development contracts. Whenever practicable, the full-scale development contracts should provide for the contractors...

  17. 5 CFR 532.235 - Conduct of full-scale wage survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conduct of full-scale wage survey. 532... PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.235 Conduct of full-scale wage survey. (a) Wage... collection for a full-scale wage survey shall be accomplished by personal visit to the establishment....

  18. 48 CFR 34.005-5 - Full-scale development contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Full-scale development... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING MAJOR SYSTEM ACQUISITION General 34.005-5 Full-scale development contracts. Whenever practicable, the full-scale development contracts should provide for the contractors...

  19. 5 CFR 532.235 - Conduct of full-scale wage survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conduct of full-scale wage survey. 532... PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.235 Conduct of full-scale wage survey. (a) Wage... collection for a full-scale wage survey shall be accomplished by personal visit to the establishment....

  20. 5 CFR 532.233 - Preparation for full-scale wage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Preparation for full-scale wage surveys... REGULATIONS PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.233 Preparation for full-scale wage surveys. (a) The local wage survey committee, prior to each full-scale survey: (1) Shall hold a...

  1. 5 CFR 532.233 - Preparation for full-scale wage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Preparation for full-scale wage surveys... REGULATIONS PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.233 Preparation for full-scale wage surveys. (a) The local wage survey committee, prior to each full-scale survey: (1) Shall hold a...

  2. 5 CFR 532.235 - Conduct of full-scale wage survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conduct of full-scale wage survey. 532... PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.235 Conduct of full-scale wage survey. (a) Wage... collection for a full-scale wage survey shall be accomplished by personal visit to the establishment....

  3. 5 CFR 532.233 - Preparation for full-scale wage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Preparation for full-scale wage surveys... REGULATIONS PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.233 Preparation for full-scale wage surveys. (a) The local wage survey committee, prior to each full-scale survey: (1) Shall hold a...

  4. 48 CFR 34.005-5 - Full-scale development contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Full-scale development... SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING MAJOR SYSTEM ACQUISITION General 34.005-5 Full-scale development contracts. Whenever practicable, the full-scale development contracts should provide for the contractors...

  5. 5 CFR 532.235 - Conduct of full-scale wage survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conduct of full-scale wage survey. 532... PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.235 Conduct of full-scale wage survey. (a) Wage... collection for a full-scale wage survey shall be accomplished by personal visit to the establishment....

  6. 5 CFR 532.235 - Conduct of full-scale wage survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conduct of full-scale wage survey. 532... PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.235 Conduct of full-scale wage survey. (a) Wage... collection for a full-scale wage survey shall be accomplished by personal visit to the establishment....

  7. Experiences from the full-scale implementation of a new two-stage vertical flow constructed wetland design.

    PubMed

    Langergraber, Guenter; Pressl, Alexander; Haberl, Raimund

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the first full-scale implementation of a two-stage vertical flow constructed wetland (CW) system developed to increase nitrogen removal. The full-scale system was constructed for the Bärenkogelhaus, which is located in Styria at the top of a mountain, 1,168 m above sea level. The Bärenkogelhaus has a restaurant with 70 seats, 16 rooms for overnight guests and is a popular site for day visits, especially during weekends and public holidays. The CW treatment system was designed for a hydraulic load of 2,500 L.d(-1) with a specific surface area requirement of 2.7 m(2) per person equivalent (PE). It was built in fall 2009 and started operation in April 2010 when the restaurant was re-opened. Samples were taken between July 2010 and June 2013 and were analysed in the laboratory of the Institute of Sanitary Engineering at BOKU University using standard methods. During 2010 the restaurant at Bärenkogelhaus was open 5 days a week whereas from 2011 the Bärenkogelhaus was open only on demand for events. This resulted in decreased organic loads of the system in the later period. In general, the measured effluent concentrations were low and the removal efficiencies high. During the whole period the ammonia nitrogen effluent concentration was below 1 mg/L even at effluent water temperatures below 3 °C. Investigations during high-load periods, i.e. events like weddings and festivals at weekends, with more than 100 visitors, showed a very robust treatment performance of the two-stage CW system. Effluent concentrations of chemical oxygen demand and NH4-N were not affected by these events with high hydraulic loads. PMID:24473303

  8. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Laboratory investigations and... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.340 Laboratory investigations and... procedures applicable to the performance of investigations and tests at Corps of Engineers...

  9. Full scale validation of helminth ova (Ascaris suum) inactivation by different sludge treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Paulsrud, B; Gjerde, B; Lundar, A

    2004-01-01

    The Norwegian sewage sludge regulation requires disinfection (hygienisation) of all sludges for land application, and one of the criteria is that disinfected sludge should not contain viable helminth ova. All disinfection processes have to be designed and operated in order to comply with this criterion, and four processes employed in Norway (thermophilic aerobic pre-treatment, pre-pasteurisation, thermal vacuum drying in membrane filter presses and lime treatment) have been tested in full scale by inserting semipermeable bags of Ascaris suum eggs into the processes for certain times. For lime treatment supplementary laboratory tests have been conducted. The paper presents the results of the experiments, and it could be concluded that all processes, except lime treatment, could be operated at less stringent time-temperature regimes than commonly experienced at Norwegian plants today. PMID:15259948

  10. Submillimeter Laboratory Investigations: Spectroscopy and Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, Eric; DeLucia, Frank C.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave spectroscopy is conducted in our laboratory on several different types of spectrometers. Our standard spectrometer utilizes the output of a phase-locked klystron operating in the 40-60 GHz region, which is sent into a crossed-waveguide harmonic generator, or "multiplier". The high frequency millimeter-and submillimeter-wave radiation is transmitted via quasi-optical techniques through an absorption cell and then onto a detector, which is either an InSb hot electron bolometer cooled to 1.4 K or a Si bolometer cooled to 0.3 K. The detector response is sent to a computer for measurement and analysis. The frequency range produced and detected in this manner goes from 80 GHz to upwards of 1 THz. Spectra are normally taken with source modulation, with line frequencies typically measured to an accuracy of 50-100 kHz. Higher accuracy is available when needed. Recently, we developed a new, broad-band spectrometer in our laboratory based on a free-running backward wave oscillator (BWO) of Russian manufacture as the primary source of radiation. The so-called FASSST (fast-scan submillimeter spectroscopic technique) system uses fast-scan and optical calibration methods rather than the traditional locking techniques. The output power from the BWO is split such that 90% goes into the absorption cell while 10% is coupled to a 40-meter Fabry-Perot cavity, which yields fringe? for frequency measurement. Results from this spectrometer on the spectrum of nitric acid (HNO3) show that 100 GHz of spectral data can be obtained in 5 seconds with a measurement accuracy of 50 kHz. Currently, the frequency range of the FASSST system in our laboratory is roughly 100-700 GHz.

  11. CLOSURE OF HLW TANKS PHASE 2 FULL SCALE COOLING COILS GROUT FILL DEMONSTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E; Alex Cozzi, A

    2008-06-19

    This report documents the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) support for the Tank Closure and Technology Development (TCTD) group's strategy for closing high level radioactive waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Specifically, this task addresses the ability to successfully fill intact cooling coils, presently within the HLW tanks, with grout that satisfies the fresh and cured grout requirements [1] under simulated field conditions. The overall task was divided into two phases. The first phase was the development of a grout formulation that satisfies the processing requirements for filling the HLW tank cooling coils [5]. The second phase of the task, which is documented in this report, was the filling of full scale cooling coils under simulated field conditions using the grout formulation developed in the first phase. SRS Type I tank cooling coil assembly design drawings and pressure drop calculations were provided by the Liquid Waste (LW) customer to be used as the basis for configuring the test assemblies. The current concept for closing tanks equipped with internal cooling coils is to pump grout into the coils to inhibit pathways for infiltrating water. Access to the cooling coil assemblies is through the existing supply/return manifold headers located on top of the Type I tanks. The objectives for the second phase of the testing, as stated in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance plan (TTQAP) [2], were to: (1) Perform a demonstration test to assess cooling coil grout performance in simulated field conditions, and (2) Measure relevant properties of samples prepared under simulated field conditions. SRNL led the actual work of designing, fabricating and filling two full-scale cooling coil assemblies which were performed at Clemson Engineering Technologies Laboratory (CETL) using the South Carolina University Research and Education Foundation (SCUREF) program. A statement of work (SOW) was issued to CETL [6] to perform this work.

  12. Lysimeter study of commercial reactor waste forms: waste form acquisition characterization and full-scale leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    This report describes work conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) as part of a joint program with Savannah River Laboratory. Typical full-scale (55-gallon drum size) waste forms were acquired by BNL from a boiling water reactor (BWR) and a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Liquid waste stream activity concentrations were analyzed by gamma spectroscopy. This information was used to determine the waste from activity inventory, providing the necessary source term for lysimeter and leaching experiments. Predominant radionuclides of interest include /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs, and /sup 54/Mn. A full-scale leaching experiment was initiated by BNL encompassing four representative waste stream-solidification agent combinations. Waste streams tested include PWR evaporator concentrate (boric acid waste), BWR evaporator concentrate (sodium sulfate waste) and BWR evaporator concentrate plus ion exchange resins. Solidification agents include masonry cement, portland type III cement, and vinyl ester-styrene (Dow polymer). Analyses of leachates indicate measurable leach rates of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs, and /sup 60/Co from both BWR and PWR cement waste forms. The leach rates for both cesium isotopes in cement are at least two orders of magnitude greater than those for cobalt. Leachates from the BWR Dow polymer waste form include the same isotopes present in cement leachates, with the addition of /sup 54/Mn. Cesium leach rates from the Dow polymer waste form are approximately one order of magnitude lower than from an equivalent cement waste form. The /sup 60/Co cumulative fraction release, however, is approximately three times greater for the Dow polymer waste form.

  13. Modeling and Laboratory Investigations of Radiative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, Jacob; Laming, J. Martin; Manka, Charles; Moore, Christopher; Jones, Ted; Tam, Daniel

    2001-10-01

    Supernova remnants are often inhomogeneous, with knots or clumps of material expanding in ambient plasma. This structure may be initiated by hydrodynamic instabilities occurring during the explosion, but it may plausibly be amplified by instabilities of the expanding shocks such as, for example, corrugation instabilities described by D’yakov in 1954, Vishniac in 1983, and observed in the laboratory by Grun et al. in 1991. Shock instability can occur when radiation lowers the effective adiabatic index of the gas. In view of the difficulty of modeling radiation in non-equilibrium plasmas, and the dependence of shock instabilities on such radiation, we are performing a laboratory experiment to study radiative shocks. The shocks are generated in a miniature, laser-driven shock tube. The gas density inside the tube at any instant in time is measured using time and space-resolved interferometry, and the emission spectrum of the gas is measured with time-resolved spectroscopy. We simulate the experiment with a 1D code that models time dependent post-shock ionization and non-equilibrium radiative cooling. S. P. D’yakov, Zhurnal Eksperimentalnoi Teoreticheskoi Fiziki 27, 288 (1954); see also section 90 in L.D. Landau and E.M. Lifshitz, Fluid Mechanics (Butterworth-Heinemann 1987); E.T. Vishniac, Astrophys. J. 236, 880 (1983); J. Grun, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 66, 2738 (1991)

  14. The Locust Jump: An Integrated Laboratory Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jon

    2005-01-01

    The locust is well known for its ability to jump large distances to avoid predation. This class sets out a series of investigations into the mechanisms underlying the jump enabling students to bring together information from biomechanics, muscle physiology, and anatomy. The nature of the investigation allows it to be undertaken at a number of…

  15. Metabolic modelling of full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal sludge.

    PubMed

    Lanham, Ana B; Oehmen, Adrian; Saunders, Aaron M; Carvalho, Gilda; Nielsen, Per H; Reis, Maria A M

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates, for the first time, the application of metabolic models incorporating polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) towards describing the biochemical transformations of full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) activated sludge from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). For this purpose, it was required to modify previous metabolic models applied to lab-scale systems by incorporating the anaerobic utilisation of the TCA cycle and the aerobic maintenance processes based on sequential utilisation of polyhydroxyalkanoates, followed by glycogen and polyphosphate. The abundance of the PAO and GAO populations quantified by fluorescence in situ hybridisation served as the initial conditions of each biomass fraction, whereby the models were able to describe accurately the experimental data. The kinetic rates were found to change among the four different WWTPs studied or even in the same plant during different seasons, either suggesting the presence of additional PAO or GAO organisms, or varying microbial activities for the same organisms. Nevertheless, these variations in kinetic rates were largely found to be proportional to the difference in acetate uptake rate, suggesting a viable means of calibrating the metabolic model. The application of the metabolic model to full-scale sludge also revealed that different Accumulibacter clades likely possess different acetate uptake mechanisms, as a correlation was observed between the energetic requirement for acetate transport across the cell membrane with the diversity of Accumulibacter present. Using the model as a predictive tool, it was shown that lower acetate concentrations in the feed as well as longer aerobic retention times favour the dominance of the TCA metabolism over glycolysis, which could explain why the anaerobic TCA pathway seems to be more relevant in full-scale WWTPs than in lab-scale systems. PMID:25222332

  16. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that the

  17. Laboratory investigations of volatile trapping in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This research program consists of laboratory studies of the formation of ice at low temperatures to simulate the formation of comets in the outer solar nebula. The ice is condensed in the presence of various mixtures of gases at a given temperature, and then warmed to see at what temperatures the gases are released and how much gas was actually trapped. Our results to date indicate that the trapping of argon, krypton, and xenon in ice formed at approximately 50 K fractionates these gase in a way that fits the relative abundances found in the atmospheres of Mars and Earth. This is markedly different from the situation in chondritic meteorites, where the abundance of xenon is about equal to that of krypton. It appears that comets represent a better source for planetary volatiles than do the meteorites.

  18. Angiostrongyliasis in Thailand: epidemiology and laboratory investigations.

    PubMed

    Eamsobhana, Praphathip

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral angiostrongyliasis due to Angiostrongylus cantonensis continues to affect human health and productivity in Thailand. The dietary habits of the populace have been an important contributing factor, particularly in the northeast of the country where the disease is endemic and the indigenous people enjoy a local undercooked snail dish called "koi-hoi". Hundreds of cases of disease continue to be reported annually. Because of the difficulty in obtaining a definitive diagnosis, immunological methods have played an important role in the confirmation of A. cantonensis infection. Although enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot are test formats that have been used over the past decade, modern molecular approaches, such as PCR-based diagnostic techniques, are being developed and assessed as additional tests for the diagnosis of cerebral angiostrongyliasis. This short review focuses on the history, incidence, and laboratory diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis in Thailand. PMID:23901379

  19. Report on full-scale horizontal cable tray fire tests, FY 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Riches, W.M.

    1988-09-01

    In recent years, there has been much discussion throughout industry and various governmental and fire protection agencies relative to the flammability and fire propagation characteristics of electrical cables in open cable trays. It has been acknowledged that under actual fire conditions, in the presence of other combustibles, electrical cable insulation can contribute to combustible fire loading and toxicity of smoke generation. Considerable research has been conducted on vertical cable tray fire propagation, mostly under small scale laboratory conditions. In July 1987, the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory initiated a program of full scale, horizontal cable tray fire tests, in the absence of other building combustible loading, to determine the flammability and rate of horizontal fire propagation in cable tray configurations and cable mixes typical of those existing in underground tunnel enclosures and support buildings at the Laboratory. The series of tests addressed the effects of ventilation rates and cable tray fill, fire fighting techniques, and effectiveness and value of automatic sprinklers, smoke detection and cable coating fire barriers in detecting, controlling or extinguishing a cable tray fire. This report includes a description of the series of fire tests completed in June 1988, as well as conclusions reached from the test results.

  20. Laboratory Investigations of Catalysis on Grain Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. C.; Ferrante, R. F.; Moore, M. H.; Hallenbeck, S. L.

    1998-09-01

    We have begun a set of laboratory measurements to study the possible conversion of CO into CH_4 and other alkanes via Fischer-Tropsch catalysis in the presence of interstellar dust analogs containing iron. The dust analogs are sub-micron size iron silicate smokes made in a grain condensation chamber by reacting SiH_4 with O_2 in the presence of Fe (CO)_5 . The smokes are amorphous in phase and composition; based on our gas adsorption measurements they have a surface area of near 125 m(2) g(-1) . In the catalytic experiment, a mixture of H_2 + CO (2 : 1) is continuously circulated in a closed system through 0.1 g of iron silicate smoke. The smoke is heated to near 300 C while the gas reacts for a 3 hour period. The reacted gas is condensed onto a 10 K mirror attached to the tail of a cryostat. The infrared spectrum of the condensed gas is used to identify new species formed by catalysis. There is evidence for the conversion of CO into CH_4, C_2H_6 and C_2H_4. Similarly obtained background spectra not containing the catalyst do not show the same spectral signatures. Further experiments will quantitatively determine the efficiency of this conversion to determine if grain-catalyzed reactions such as these could play an important role in the chemistry of the solar nebula.NASA/Goddard

  1. Laboratory Investigation of the Airglow Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Brian; Yu, Shanshan; Crawford, Timothy J.; Miller, Charles E.; Yee, Jeng-Hwa

    2013-06-01

    We report the first high spectral resolution laboratory measurements of oxygen A-band night glow simulated using a static discharge cell. Our static discharge system reproduces the conditions of the mesospheric oxygen night glow - suggesting O(^1D) + O_2 as the primary source of the emission. Additionally, use of the static cell has enabled us to collect spectra for rare molecular oxygen isotopologues using isotopically enriched samples. The (0,0), (0,1), and (1,1) b-Xvibrational bands were observed with a Bruker 125 HR for all six isotopologues. The (1,2) and (2,2) bands were observed also for the main isotopologue. The frequencies of the observed (0,1) transitions resolved discrepancies in Raman data for (16-17, 17-17, and 17-18), enabling us to improve the vibrational parameterization of the ground electronic state in the global fit of Yu et al. Rotationally resolved intensities were determined for the (0,0), (0,1) and (1,1) bands. The experimental band intensity ratios I(0,0)/I(0,1) = 13.6 and I(0,0)/I(1,1) = 60 are in excellent agreement with the recent mesospheric remote sensing data. S. Yu, C.E. Miller, B.J. Drouin, H.S.P. Müller, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 024304, 2012

  2. Simulation-Based Airframe Noise Prediction of a Full-Scale, Full Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Fares, Ehab

    2016-01-01

    A previously validated computational approach applied to an 18%-scale, semi-span Gulfstream aircraft model was extended to the full-scale, full-span aircraft in the present investigation. The full-scale flap and main landing gear geometries used in the simulations are nearly identical to those flown on the actual aircraft. The lattice Boltzmann solver PowerFLOW® was used to perform time-accurate predictions of the flow field associated with this aircraft. The simulations were performed at a Mach number of 0.2 with the flap deflected 39 deg. and main landing gear deployed (landing configuration). Special attention was paid to the accurate prediction of major sources of flap tip and main landing gear noise. Computed farfield noise spectra for three selected baseline configurations (flap deflected 39 deg. with and without main gear extended, and flap deflected 0 deg. with gear deployed) are presented. The flap brackets are shown to be important contributors to the farfield noise spectra in the mid- to high-frequency range. Simulated farfield noise spectra for the baseline configurations, obtained using a Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings acoustic analogy approach, were found to be in close agreement with acoustic measurements acquired during the 2006 NASA-Gulfstream joint flight test of the same aircraft.

  3. Full-scale testing of an Ogee tip rotor. [in the Langley whirl tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantay, W. R.; Campbell, R. L.; Shidler, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    Full scale tests were utilized to investigate the effect of the ogee tip on helicopter rotor acoustics, performance, and loads. Two facilities were used: the Langley whirl tower and a UH-1H helicopter. The text matrix for hover on the whirl tower involved thrust values from 0 to 44 480 N (10,000 lb) at several tip Mach numbers for both standard and Ogee rotors. The full scale testing on the UH-1H encompassed the major portion of the flight envelope for that aircraft. Both near field acoustic measurements and far field flyover data were obtained for both the ogee and standard rotors. Data analysis of the whirl tower test shows that the ogee tip does significantly diffuse the tip vortex while providing some improvement in hover performance at low and moderate thrust coefficients. Flight testing of both rotors indicates that the strong impulsive noise signature of the standard rotor can be reduced with the ogee rotor. Analysis of the spectra indicates a reduction in energy in the 250 Hz and 1000 Hz range for the ogee rotor. Forward flight performance was significantly improved with the ogee configuration for a large number of flight conditions. Further, rotor control loads were reduced through use of this advanced tip rotor.

  4. Composting kinetics in full-scale mechanical-biological treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Marco; Antunes, Fernando; Gonçalves, Manuel Souteiro; Morvan, Bernard; Silveira, Ana

    2010-10-01

    This study focuses on the investigation of the kinetics of municipal solid waste composting in three full-scale mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) plants. The aims were to test a kinetic model based on volatile solids (VS) content change for describing the composting process in MBT plants, and to identify the model parameters that affected the estimation of the reaction rate constant most. To achieve this, VS content and several environmental conditions, namely temperature, moisture content, oxygen concentration and total bulk density were monitored throughout the composting process. Experimental data was fitted with a first-order kinetic model, and a rate constant (k) characteristic of composting under optimum environmental conditions was obtained. The kinetic model satisfactorily described the experimental data for the three MBT plants. k values ranged from 0.043+/-0.002 d(-1) to 0.082+/-0.011 d(-1). Sensitivity analysis showed that the model parameters that most affected the estimation of k were the initial biodegradable volatile solids content, the maximum temperature for biodegradation and the optimum moisture content. In conclusion, we show for the first time that full-scale MBT plants can be successfully modelled with a composting kinetic model. PMID:20493677

  5. Ice Crystal Icing Engine Testing in the NASA Glenn Research Center's Propulsion Systems Laboratory: Altitude Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a full scale ice crystal icing turbofan engine test using an obsolete Allied Signal ALF502-R5 engine in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center. The test article used was the exact engine that experienced a loss of power event after the ingestion of ice crystals while operating at high altitude during a 1997 Honeywell flight test campaign investigating the turbofan engine ice crystal icing phenomena. The test plan included test points conducted at the known flight test campaign field event pressure altitude and at various pressure altitudes ranging from low to high throughout the engine operating envelope. The test article experienced a loss of power event at each of the altitudes tested. For each pressure altitude test point conducted the ambient static temperature was predicted using a NASA engine icing risk computer model for the given ambient static pressure while maintaining the engine speed.

  6. A road pavement full-scale test track containing stabilized bottom ashes.

    PubMed

    Toraldo, E; Saponaro, S

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a road pavement full-scale test track built by using stabilized bottom ash (SBA) from an Italian municipal solid waste incinerator as the aggregate in granular foundation, cement-bound mixes and asphalt concretes. The investigation focused on both the performance and the environmental compatibility of such mixes, especially with regard to the effects of mixing, laying and compaction. From the road construction point of view, the performance related to the effects of mixing, laying and compaction on constructability was assessed, as well as the volumetric and the mechanical properties. Environmental aspects were investigated by leaching tests. The results suggested that SBA meets the environmental Italian law for the reuse of non-hazardous waste and could be used as road material with the procedures, plants and equipment currently used for road construction. PMID:25354811

  7. Surface runoff from full-scale coal combustion product pavements during accelerated loading

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.M.; Taerakul, P.; Tu, W.; Zand, B.; Butalia, T.; Wolfe, W.; Walker, H.

    2008-08-15

    In this study, the release of metals and metalloids from full-scale portland cement concrete pavements containing coal combustion products (CCPs) was evaluated by laboratory leaching tests and accelerated loading of full-scale pavement sections under well-controlled conditions. An equivalent of 20 years of highway traffic loading was simulated at the OSU/OU Accelerated Pavement Load Facility (APLF). Three types of portland cement concrete driving surface layers were tested, including a control section (i.e., ordinary portland cement (PC) concrete) containing no fly ash and two sections in which fly ash was substituted for a fraction of the cement; i.e., 30% fly ash (FA30) and 50% fly ash (FA50). In general, the concentrations of minor and trace elements were higher in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachates than in the leachates obtained from synthetic precipitation leaching procedure and ASTM leaching procedures. Importantly, none of the leachate concentrations exceeded the TCLP limits or primary drinking water standards. Surface runoff monitoring results showed the highest release rates of inorganic elements from the FA50 concrete pavement, whereas there were little differences in release rates between PC and FA30 concretes. The release of elements generally decreased with increasing pavement loading. Except for Cr, elements were released as particulates (>0.45 {mu} m) rather than dissolved constituents. The incorporation of fly ash in the PC cement concrete pavements examined in this study resulted in little or no deleterious environmental impact from the leaching of inorganic elements over the lifetime of the pavement system.

  8. Mars Science Laboratory Mission and Science Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotzinger, John P.; Crisp, Joy; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Anderson, Robert C.; Baker, Charles J.; Barry, Robert; Blake, David F.; Conrad, Pamela; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Ferdowski, Bobak; Gellert, Ralf; Gilbert, John B.; Golombek, Matt; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Hassler, Donald M.; Jandura, Louise; Litvak, Maxim; Mahaffy, Paul; Maki, Justin; Meyer, Michael; Malin, Michael C.; Mitrofanov, Igor; Simmonds, John J.; Vaniman, David; Welch, Richard V.; Wiens, Roger C.

    2012-09-01

    Scheduled to land in August of 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission was initiated to explore the habitability of Mars. This includes both modern environments as well as ancient environments recorded by the stratigraphic rock record preserved at the Gale crater landing site. The Curiosity rover has a designed lifetime of at least one Mars year (˜23 months), and drive capability of at least 20 km. Curiosity's science payload was specifically assembled to assess habitability and includes a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer and gas analyzer that will search for organic carbon in rocks, regolith fines, and the atmosphere (SAM instrument); an x-ray diffractometer that will determine mineralogical diversity (CheMin instrument); focusable cameras that can image landscapes and rock/regolith textures in natural color (MAHLI, MARDI, and Mastcam instruments); an alpha-particle x-ray spectrometer for in situ determination of rock and soil chemistry (APXS instrument); a laser-induced breakdown spectrometer to remotely sense the chemical composition of rocks and minerals (ChemCam instrument); an active neutron spectrometer designed to search for water in rocks/regolith (DAN instrument); a weather station to measure modern-day environmental variables (REMS instrument); and a sensor designed for continuous monitoring of background solar and cosmic radiation (RAD instrument). The various payload elements will work together to detect and study potential sampling targets with remote and in situ measurements; to acquire samples of rock, soil, and atmosphere and analyze them in onboard analytical instruments; and to observe the environment around the rover. The 155-km diameter Gale crater was chosen as Curiosity's field site based on several attributes: an interior mountain of ancient flat-lying strata extending almost 5 km above the elevation of the landing site; the lower few hundred meters of the mountain show a progression with relative age from clay-bearing to sulfate

  9. Laboratory investigations in cell biology. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Bregman, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    This text contains 18 lab projects that explore the structural, biochemical, and physiological nature of eukaryotic cells. Topics are largely traditional, however, several investigations employ new methodologies. Offers extended coverage of biochemistry. Materials have been selected for availability and ease of handling: e.g. Project 4 - extraction of DNA and RNA done with calf liver, Project 9 - succinate dehydrogenase activity studied in mitochondria isolated from cauliflower. There is more procedural detail than found in most lab manuals, negating the need for constant instructional details. And a variety of methodologies is introduced, such as Cytochemistry, Spectrophotometry, Electrophoresis, Cell Fractionation, silver staining of active sites of RNA transcription, and many more. Pages are perforated for collecting and grading.

  10. Design and performance of a full-scale spray calciner for nonradioactive high-level-waste-vitrification studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, F.A.

    1981-06-01

    In the spray calcination process, liquid waste is spray-dried in a heated-wall spray dryer (termed a spray calciner), and then it may be combined in solid form with a glass-forming frit. This mixture is then melted in a continuous ceramic melter or in an in-can melter. Several sizes of spray calciners have been tested at PNL- laboratory scale, pilot scale and full scale. Summarized here is the experience gained during the operation of PNL's full-scale spray calciner, which has solidified approx. 38,000 L of simulated acid wastes and approx. 352,000 L of simulated neutralized wastes in 1830 h of processing time. Operating principles, operating experience, design aspects, and system descriptions of a full-scale spray calciner are discussed. Individual test run summaries are given in Appendix A. Appendices B and C are studies made by Bechtel Inc., under contract by PNL. These studies concern, respectively, feed systems for the spray calciner process and a spray calciner vibration analysis. Appendix D is a detailed structural analysis made at PNL of the spray calciner. These appendices are included in the report to provide a complete description of the spray calciner and to include all major studies made concerning PNL's full-scale spray calciner.

  11. Assembly and maintenance of full-scale NIF amplifiers in the Amplifier Module Prototype Laboratory (AMPLAB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, John A.

    1999-07-01

    Mechanical assembly and maintenance of the prototype NIF amplifiers in the AMPLAB at LLNL requires specialized equipment designed to manipulate large and delicate component in a safe and clean manner. Observations made during the operation of this assembly and maintenance equipment in AMPLAB provide design guidance for similar tools being built for the NIF. Fixtures used for amplifier frame installation, laser slab and flashlamp cassette assembly, transport, and installation, and in-situ blastshield exchange are presented. Examples include a vacuum slab gripper, slab handling clean crane, slab cassette assembly fixture, sealed transport vehicle for slab cassette movement between the cleanroom and amplifier, slab cassette transfer fixture between the cleanroom and transport vehicle, and equipment needed for frame assembly unit, blastshield, and flashlamp cassette installation and removal. The use of these tools for amplifier assembly , system reconfiguration, reflector replacement, and recovery from an abnormal occurrence such as a flashlamp explosion is described. Observations are made on the design and operation of these tools and their contribution to the final design of their NIF counterparts.

  12. Mars Science Laboratory Mission and Science Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotzinger, John P.; Crisp, Joy; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Anderson, Robert C.; Baker, Charles J.; Barry, Robert; Blake, David F.; Conrad, Pamela; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Ferdowski, Bobak; Gellert, Ralf; Gilbert, John B.; Golombek, Matt; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Hassler, Donald M.; Jandura, Louise; Litvak, Maxim; Mahaffy, Paul; Maki, Justin; Meyer, Michael; Malin, Michael C.; Mitrofanov, Igor; Simmonds, John J.; Vaniman, David; Welch, Richard V.; Wiens, Roger C.

    2012-09-01

    Scheduled to land in August of 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission was initiated to explore the habitability of Mars. This includes both modern environments as well as ancient environments recorded by the stratigraphic rock record preserved at the Gale crater landing site. The Curiosity rover has a designed lifetime of at least one Mars year (˜23 months), and drive capability of at least 20 km. Curiosity's science payload was specifically assembled to assess habitability and includes a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer and gas analyzer that will search for organic carbon in rocks, regolith fines, and the atmosphere (SAM instrument); an x-ray diffractometer that will determine mineralogical diversity (CheMin instrument); focusable cameras that can image landscapes and rock/regolith textures in natural color (MAHLI, MARDI, and Mastcam instruments); an alpha-particle x-ray spectrometer for in situ determination of rock and soil chemistry (APXS instrument); a laser-induced breakdown spectrometer to remotely sense the chemical composition of rocks and minerals (ChemCam instrument); an active neutron spectrometer designed to search for water in rocks/regolith (DAN instrument); a weather station to measure modern-day environmental variables (REMS instrument); and a sensor designed for continuous monitoring of background solar and cosmic radiation (RAD instrument). The various payload elements will work together to detect and study potential sampling targets with remote and in situ measurements; to acquire samples of rock, soil, and atmosphere and analyze them in onboard analytical instruments; and to observe the environment around the rover. The 155-km diameter Gale crater was chosen as Curiosity's field site based on several attributes: an interior mountain of ancient flat-lying strata extending almost 5 km above the elevation of the landing site; the lower few hundred meters of the mountain show a progression with relative age from clay-bearing to sulfate

  13. Laboratory investigation of nonlinear whistler wave processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amatucci, Bill; Tejero, Erik; Crabtree, Chris; Enloe, Lon; Blackwell, Dave; Ganguli, Guru

    2015-11-01

    Nonlinear interactions involving whistler wave turbulence result from processes such as wave-particle interactions in the radiation belts and instability generation in sharp magnetospheric boundary layers. Nonlinear scattering of large amplitude waves off thermal electrons substantially changes the wave vector direction and energy flux, while inducing a small frequency shift [Crabtree, Phys. Plasmas 19, 032903 (2012)]. This nonlinear scattering of primarily electrostatic lower hybrid waves into electromagnetic whistler modes is being investigated in the NRL Space Chamber under conditions scaled to match the respective environments. Lower hybrid waves are generated directly by antennas or self-consistently from sheared cross-magnetic field flows with scale length less than an ion gyroradius via the Electron-Ion Hybrid Instability [Ganguli, Phys. Fluids 31, 2753 (1988)), Amatucci, Phys. Plasmas 10, 1963 (2003)]. Sufficiently large amplitude lower hybrid waves have been observed to convert into whistler modes by scattering from thermal electrons. The plasma response as a function of transmitted lower hybrid wave amplitude is monitored with magnetic loop antennas. Details of the observed wave spectra and mode characteristics will be presented. This work supported by the NRL Base Program.

  14. Full-scale upper-surface-blown flap noise. [for short haul STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, L. J.; Homyak, L.; Jones, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A highly noise-suppressed TF 34 engine was used to investigate the noise of several powered lift configurations involving upper-surface-blown (USB) flaps. The configuration variables were nozzle type (i.e. slot and circular with deflector), flap chord-length, and flap angle. The results of velocity surveys at both the nozzle exit and the flap trailing edge are used for correlation of the noise data. Configurations using a long flap design were 4 dB quieter than a short flap typical of current trends in USB flap design. The lower noise for the long flap is attributed primarily to the greater velocity decay of the jet at the flap trailing edge. The full-scale data revealed substantially more quadrupole noise in the region near the deflected jet than observed in previous sub-scale tests.

  15. Molecular analysis of methanogens involved in methanogenic degradation of tetramethylammonium hydroxide in full-scale bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Whang, Liang-Ming; Hu, Tai-Ho; Liu, Pao-Wen Grace; Hung, Yu-Ching; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Wu, Yi-Ju; Chang, Shao-Hsiung

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated methanogenic communities involved in degradation of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) in three full-scale bioreactors treating TMAH-containing wastewater. Based on the results of terminal-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and quantitative PCR analyses targeting the methyl-coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit (mcrA) genes retrieved from three bioreactors, Methanomethylovorans and Methanosarcina were the dominant methanogens involved in the methanogenic degradation of TMAH in the bioreactors. Furthermore, batch experiments were conducted to evaluate mcrA messenger RNA (mRNA) expression during methanogenic TMAH degradation, and the results indicated that a higher level of TMAH favored mcrA mRNA expression by Methansarcina, while Methanomethylovorans could only express considerable amount of mcrA mRNA at a lower level of TMAH. These results suggest that Methansarcina is responsible for methanogenic TMAH degradation at higher TMAH concentrations, while Methanomethylovorans may be important at a lower TMAH condition. PMID:25261128

  16. A full-scale study of mixing and foaming in egg-shaped anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Bhargavi; Miot, Alexandre; Jones, Bonnie; Klibert, Corey; Pagilla, Krishna R

    2015-09-01

    Seasonal foaming in full-scale egg-shaped digesters (ESD) at the Oceanside Water Pollution Control Plant was investigated over a two-year period. The causes and contributors of anaerobic digestion (AD) foaming, namely, Gordonia amarae filaments and mixing effects were evaluated in these ESDs. The seasonal presence of high levels of G. amarae as a primary cause and excessive induced mixing as an important contributor of AD foaming has been established. The induced mixing frequency in the ESDs was gradually reduced and eventually shut off in a series of controlled experimental phases. Total solids and temperature profiles indicated that reducing mixing frequency did not significantly impact digester performance or disrupt the homogeneity of digester contents, although it did reduce the occurrence of foam in the digesters. Excessive induced mixing, a contributor to foaming, increased foam events at G. amarae thresholds above 10(6)intersections/mg VSS in the mixed liquor. PMID:26080103

  17. Wind Tunnel Visualization of the Flow Over a Full-Scale F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanser, Wendy R.; Botha, Gavin J.; James, Kevin D.; Crowder, James P.; Schmitz, Fredric H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The proposed paper presents flow visualization performed during experiments conducted on a full-scale F/A-18 aircraft in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind-Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. This investigation used both surface and off-surface flow visualization techniques to examine the flow field on the forebody, canopy, leading edge extensions (LEXs), and wings. The various techniques used to visualize the flow field were fluorescent tufts, flow cones treated with reflective material, smoke in combination with a laser light sheet, and a video imaging system. The flow visualization experiments were conducted over an angle of attack range from 20deg to 45deg and over a sideslip range from -10deg to 10deg. The results show regions of attached and separated flow on the forebody, canopy, and wings. Additionally, the vortical flow is clearly visible over the leading-edge extensions, canopy, and wings.

  18. Inflight source noise of an advanced full-scale single-rotation propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Loeffler, Irvin J.

    1991-01-01

    Flight tests to define the far field tone source at cruise conditions were completed on the full scale SR-7L advanced turboprop which was installed on the left wing of a Gulfstream II aircraft. This program, designated Propfan Test Assessment (PTA), involved aeroacoustic testing of the propeller over a range of test conditions. These measurements defined source levels for input into long distance propagation models to predict en route noise. Inflight data were taken for 7 test cases. The sideline directivities measured by the Learjet showed expected maximum levels near 105 degrees from the propeller upstream axis. However, azimuthal directivities based on the maximum observed sideline tone levels showed highest levels below the aircraft. An investigation of the effect of propeller tip speed showed that the tone level of reduction associated with reductions in propeller tip speed is more significant in the horizontal plane than below the aircraft.

  19. Strain concentrations in pipelines with concrete coating full scale bending tests and analytical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Verley, R.; Ness, O.B.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of full scale bending tests on 16 in. and 20 in. diameter, concrete coated pipes with polyethene and asphalt corrosion coatings. Constant moment, four-point bending was applied to a pipe string consisting of one pipe joint welded between two half-length joints. The strain concentration factor (SCF) at the field joints (FJ), expressing the ratio between the strain in the FJ and the average strain for the pipe joint, was investigated and compared to predictions using an analytical model presented in an accompanying paper (Ness and Verley, 1995). Material tests on the pipe steel, the corrosion coating and the concrete were conducted. The analytical model is found to give a good prediction of the strain distribution along the pipe joint, for both the steel and the concrete, and therefore also of the SCF. The sliding of the concrete over the steel is also predicted reasonably well.

  20. Experimental evaluation of a self-powered smart damping system in reducing vibrations of a full-scale stay cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In-Ho; Jung, Hyung-Jo; Koo, Jeong-Hoi

    2010-11-01

    This paper investigates the effectiveness of a self-powered smart damping system consisting of a magnetorheological (MR) damper and an electromagnetic induction (EMI) device in reducing cable vibrations. The proposed smart damping system incorporates an EMI device, which is capable of converting vibration energy into useful electrical energy. Thus, the incorporated EMI device can be used as an alternative power source for the MR damper, making it a self-powering system. The primary goal of this experimental study is to evaluate the performance of the proposed smart damping system using a full-scale, 44.7 m long, high-tension cable. To this end, an EMI part and an MR damper were designed and manufactured. Using a cable test setup in a laboratory setting, a series of tests were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the self-powered smart damping system in reducing free vibration responses of the cable. The performances of the proposed smart damping system are compared with those of an equivalent passive system. Moreover, the damping characteristics of the smart damping system and the passive system are compared. The experimental results show that the self-powered smart damping system outperforms the passive control cases in reducing the vibrations of the cable. The results also show that the EMI can operate the smart damping system as a sole power source, demonstrating the feasibility of the self-powering capability of the system.

  1. The Communication of Laboratory Investigations by University Entrants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Bob; Kaunda, Loveness; Allie, Saalih; Buffler, Andy; Lubben, Fred

    2000-01-01

    Analyses the ways in which university-entrant science students carry out and communicate experimental activities, and identifies a model to explain characteristic communication practices. Observes the investigative strategies of participant students who have a lack of experience with laboratory work and scientific writing. Uses laboratory reports…

  2. Full-scale testing and progressive damage modeling of sandwich composite aircraft fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    A comprehensive experimental and computational investigation was conducted to characterize the fracture behavior and structural response of large sandwich composite aircraft fuselage panels containing artificial damage in the form of holes and notches. Full-scale tests were conducted where panels were subjected to quasi-static combined pressure, hoop, and axial loading up to failure. The panels were constructed using plain-weave carbon/epoxy prepreg face sheets and a Nomex honeycomb core. Panel deformation and notch tip damage development were monitored during the tests using several techniques, including optical observations, strain gages, digital image correlation (DIC), acoustic emission (AE), and frequency response (FR). Additional pretest and posttest inspections were performed via thermography, computer-aided tap tests, ultrasound, x-radiography, and scanning electron microscopy. The framework to simulate damage progression and to predict residual strength through use of the finite element (FE) method was developed. The DIC provided local and full-field strain fields corresponding to changes in the state-of-damage and identified the strain components driving damage progression. AE was monitored during loading of all panels and data analysis methodologies were developed to enable real-time determination of damage initiation, progression, and severity in large composite structures. The FR technique has been developed, evaluating its potential as a real-time nondestructive inspection technique applicable to large composite structures. Due to the large disparity in scale between the fuselage panels and the artificial damage, a global/local analysis was performed. The global FE models fully represented the specific geometries, composite lay-ups, and loading mechanisms of the full-scale tests. A progressive damage model was implemented in the local FE models, allowing the gradual failure of elements in the vicinity of the artificial damage. A set of modifications

  3. Hydrodynamic parameters estimation from self-potential data in a controlled full scale site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidichimo, Francesco; De Biase, Michele; Rizzo, Enzo; Masi, Salvatore; Straface, Salvatore

    2015-03-01

    A multi-physical approach developed for the hydrodynamic characterization of porous media using hydrogeophysical information is presented. Several pumping tests were performed in the Hydrogeosite Laboratory, a controlled full-scale site designed and constructed at the CNR-IMAA (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto di Metodologia per l'Analisi Ambientale), in Marsico Nuovo (Basilicata Region, Southern Italy), in order to obtain an intermediate stage between laboratory experiments and field survey. The facility consists of a pool, used to study water infiltration processes, to simulate the space and time dynamics of subsurface contamination phenomena, to improve and to find new relationship between geophysical and hydrogeological parameters, to test and to calibrate new geophysical techniques and instruments. Therefore, the Hydrogeosite Laboratory has the advantage of carrying out controlled experiments, like in a flow cell or sandbox, but at field comparable scale. The data collected during the experiments have been used to estimate the saturated hydraulic conductivity ks [ms-1] using a coupled inversion model working in transient conditions, made up of the modified Richards equation describing the water flow in a variably saturated porous medium and the Poisson equation providing the self-potential ϕ [V], which naturally occurs at points of the soil surface owing to the presence of an electric field produced by the motion of underground electrolytic fluids through porous systems. The result obtained by this multi-physical numerical approach, which removes all the approximations adopted in previous works, makes a useful instrument for real heterogeneous aquifer characterization and for predictive analysis of its behavior.

  4. Inquiry, Investigation, and Communication in the Student-Directed Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janners, Martha Y.

    1988-01-01

    Describes how to organize a student-directed laboratory investigation which is based on amphibian metamorphosis, lasts for nearly a term, and involves extensive group effort. Explains the assignment, student response and opinion, formal paper, and instructor responsibilities. (RT)

  5. Application of full-scale three-dimensional models in patients with rheumatoid cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Takeshi; Fukuoka, Muneyoshi; Tanaka, Nobuhiko; Iguchi, Hirotaka; Furuya, Aiharu; Okamoto, Hideki; Wada, Ikuo; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2008-01-01

    Full-scale three-dimensional (3D) models offer a useful tool in preoperative planning, allowing full-scale stereoscopic recognition from any direction and distance with tactile feedback. Although skills and implants have progressed with various innovations, rheumatoid cervical spine surgery remains challenging. No previous studies have documented the usefulness of full-scale 3D models in this complicated situation. The present study assessed the utility of full-scale 3D models in rheumatoid cervical spine surgery. Polyurethane or plaster 3D models of 15 full-sized occipitocervical or upper cervical spines were fabricated using rapid prototyping (stereolithography) techniques from 1-mm slices of individual CT data. A comfortable alignment for patients was reproduced from CT data obtained with the patient in a comfortable occipitocervical position. Usefulness of these models was analyzed. Using models as a template, appropriate shape of the plate-rod construct could be created in advance. No troublesome Halo-vests were needed for preoperative adjustment of occipitocervical angle. No patients complained of dysphasia following surgery. Screw entry points and trajectories were simultaneously determined with full-scale dimensions and perspective, proving particularly valuable in cases involving high-riding vertebral artery. Full-scale stereoscopic recognition has never been achieved with any existing imaging modalities. Full-scale 3D models thus appear useful and applicable to all complicated spinal surgeries. The combination of computer-assisted navigation systems and full-scale 3D models appears likely to provide much better surgical results. PMID:18247063

  6. Evolving desiderata for validating engineered-physics systems without full-scale testing

    SciTech Connect

    Langenbrunner, James R; Booker, Jane M; Hemez, Francois M; Ross, Timothy J

    2010-01-01

    Theory and principles of engineered-physics designs do not change over time, but the actual engineered product does evolve. Engineered components are prescient to the physics and change with time. Parts are never produced exactly as designed, assembled as designed, or remain unperturbed over time. For this reason, validation of performance may be regarded as evolving over time. Desired use of products evolves with time. These pragmatic realities require flexibility, understanding, and robustness-to-ignorance. Validation without full-scale testing involves engineering, small-scale experiments, physics theory and full-scale computer-simulation validation. We have previously published an approach to validation without full-scale testing using information integration, small-scale tests, theory and full-scale simulations [Langenbrunner et al. 2008]. This approach adds value, but also adds complexity and uncertainty due to inference. We illustrate a validation example that manages evolving desiderata without full-scale testing.

  7. A metagenome of a full-scale microbial community carrying out enhanced biological phosphorus removal

    PubMed Central

    Albertsen, Mads; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Nielsen, Kåre Lehmann

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is widely used for removal of phosphorus from wastewater. In this study, a metagenome (18.2 Gb) was generated using Illumina sequencing from a full-scale EBPR plant to study the community structure and genetic potential. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (qFISH) was applied as an independent method to evaluate the community structure. The results were in qualitative agreement, but a DNA extraction bias against gram positive bacteria using standard extraction protocols was identified, which would not have been identified without the use of qFISH. The genetic potential for community function showed enrichment of genes involved in phosphate metabolism and biofilm formation, reflecting the selective pressure of the EBPR process. Most contigs in the assembled metagenome had low similarity to genes from currently sequenced genomes, underlining the need for more reference genomes of key EBPR species. Only the genome of ‘Candidatus Accumulibacter', a genus of phosphorus-removing organisms, was closely enough related to the species present in the metagenome to allow for detailed investigations. Accumulibacter accounted for only 4.8% of all bacteria by qFISH, but the depth of sequencing enabled detailed insight into their microdiversity in the full-scale plant. Only 15% of the reads matching Accumulibacter had a high similarity (>95%) to the sequenced Accumulibacter clade IIA strain UW-1 genome, indicating the presence of some microdiversity. The differences in gene complement between the Accumulibacter clades were limited to genes for extracellular polymeric substances and phage-related genes, suggesting a selective pressure from phages on the Accumulibacter diversity. PMID:22170425

  8. End-effects-regime in full scale and lab scale rocket nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo, Raymundo; Tinney, Charles; Baars, Woutijn; Ruf, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Modern rockets utilize a thrust-optimized parabolic-contour design for their nozzles for its high performance and reliability. However, the evolving internal flow structures within these high area ratio rocket nozzles during start up generate a powerful amount of vibro-acoustic loads that act on the launch vehicle. Modern rockets must be designed to accommodate for these heavy loads or else risk a catastrophic failure. This study quantifies a particular moment referred to as the ``end-effects regime,'' or the largest source of vibro-acoustic loading during start-up [Nave & Coffey, AIAA Paper 1973-1284]. Measurements from full scale ignitions are compared with aerodynamically scaled representations in a fully anechoic chamber. Laboratory scale data is then matched with both static and dynamic wall pressure measurements to capture the associating shock structures within the nozzle. The event generated during the ``end-effects regime'' was successfully reproduced in the both the lab-scale models, and was characterized in terms of its mean, variance and skewness, as well as the spectral properties of the signal obtained by way of time-frequency analyses.

  9. Evaluation of defense-waste glass produced by full-scale vitrification equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Lukacs, J.M.; Petkus, L.L.; Mellinger, G.B.

    1981-09-01

    Three full-scale vitrification processes at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory produced over 67,000 kg of simulated nuclear-waste glass from March 1979 to August 1980. Samples were analyzed to monitor process operation and evaluate the resulting glass product. These processes are: Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter (SC/ICM); Spray Calciner/Calcine-Fed Ceramic Melter (SC/CFCM); and Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter (LFCM). Waste components in the process feed varied less than +- 10%. The SC/ICM and SC/CFCM which use separate waste and frit feed systems showed larger glass compositional variation than the LFCM, which processed only premixed feed during this period. The SC/ICM and SC/CFCM product contained significant amounts of acmite crystals, while the LFCM product was largely amorphous. In addition, the lower portion of all SC/ICM-filled canisters contained a zone rich in waste components. A product chemical durability as determined by pH4 and soxhlet leach tests varied considerably. Aside from increased durability under pH4 conditions with decreasing waste content, glass composition, microstructure and melting process did not correlate with glass durability. For all samples analyzed, the weight loss under pH4 conditions ranged from 17.7 to 85.2 wt %. Soxhlet conditions produced weight losses from 1.78 to 3.56 wt %.

  10. FULL-SCALE TREATMENT WETLANDS FOR METAL REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E; John Gladden, J

    2007-03-22

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River National Laboratory. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, and water routinely failed toxicity tests. These conditions necessitated treatment of nearly one million gallons of water per day plus storm runoff. Washington Savannah River Company personnel explored options to bring process and runoff waters into compliance with the permit conditions, including source reduction, engineering solutions, and biological solutions. A conceptual design for a constructed wetland treatment system (WTS) was developed and the full-scale system was constructed and began operation in 2000. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland with a hydraulic retention time of approximately 48 hours. Copper, mercury, and lead removal efficiencies are very high, all in excess of 80% removal from water passing through the wetland system. Zinc removal is 60%, and nickel is generally unaffected. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Concentrations of metals in the A-01 WTS sediments generally decrease with depth and along the flow path through the wetland. Sequential extraction results indicate that most metals are tightly bound to wetland sediments.

  11. Performance of a full-scale ITER metal hydride storage bed in comparison with requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Beloglazov, S.; Glugla, M.; Fanghaenel, E.; Perevezentsev, A.; Wagner, R.

    2008-07-15

    The storage of hydrogen isotopes as metal hydride is the technique chosen for the ITER Tritium Plant Storage and Delivery System (SDS). A prototype storage bed of a full-scale has been designed, manufactured and intensively tested at the Tritium Laboratory, addressing main performance parameters specified for the ITER application. The main requirements for the hydrogen storage bed are a strict physical limitation of the tritium storage capacity (currently 70 g T{sub 2}), a high supply flow rate of hydrogen isotopes, in-situ calorimetry capabilities with an accuracy of 1 g and a fully tritium compatible design. The pressure composition isotherm of the ZrCo hydrogen system, as a reference material for ITER, is characterised by significant slope. As a result technical implementation of the ZrCo hydride bed in the SDS system requires further considerations. The paper presents the experience from the operation of ZrCo getter bed including loading/de-loading operation, calorimetric loop performance, and active gas cooling of the bed for fast absorption operation. The implications of hydride material characteristics on the SDS system configuration and design are discussed. (authors)

  12. Full-scale semispan tests of a business-jet wing with a natural laminar flow airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A full-scale semispan model was investigated to evaluate and document the low-speed, high-lift characteristics of a business-jet class wing that utilized the HSNLF(1)-0213 airfoil section and a single-slotted flap system. Also, boundary-layer transition effects were examined, a segmented leading-edge droop for improved stall/spin resistance was studied, and two roll-controlled devices were evaluated. The wind-tunnel investigation showed that deployment of single-slotted, trailing-edge flap was effective in providing substantial increments in lift required for takeoff and landing performance. Fixed-transition studies to investigate premature tripping of the boundary layer indicated no adverse effects in lift and pitching-moment characteristics for either the cruise or landing configuration. The full-scale results also suggested the need to further optimize the leading-edge droop design that was developed in the subscale tests.

  13. Full-Scale Cask Testing and Public Acceptance of Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments - 12254

    SciTech Connect

    Dilger, Fred; Halstead, Robert J.; Ballard, James D.

    2012-07-01

    Full-scale physical testing of spent fuel shipping casks has been proposed by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) 2006 report on spent nuclear fuel transportation, and by the Presidential Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future 2011 draft report. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2005 proposed full-scale testing of a rail cask, and considered 'regulatory limits' testing of both rail and truck casks (SRM SECY-05-0051). The recent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project, NRC evaluation of extended spent fuel storage (possibly beyond 60-120 years) before transportation, nuclear industry adoption of very large dual-purpose canisters for spent fuel storage and transport, and the deliberations of the BRC, will fundamentally change assumptions about the future spent fuel transportation system, and reopen the debate over shipping cask performance in severe accidents and acts of sabotage. This paper examines possible approaches to full-scale testing for enhancing public confidence in risk analyses, perception of risk, and acceptance of spent fuel shipments. The paper reviews the literature on public perception of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste transportation risks. We review and summarize opinion surveys sponsored by the State of Nevada over the past two decades, which show consistent patterns of concern among Nevada residents about health and safety impacts, and socioeconomic impacts such as reduced property values along likely transportation routes. We also review and summarize the large body of public opinion survey research on transportation concerns at regional and national levels. The paper reviews three past cask testing programs, the way in which these cask testing program results were portrayed in films and videos, and examines public and official responses to these three programs: the 1970's impact and fire testing of spent fuel truck casks at Sandia National Laboratories, the 1980's

  14. An Investigative, Cooperative Learning Approach to the General Microbiology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seifert, Kyle; Fenster, Amy; Dilts, Judith A.; Temple, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Investigative- and cooperative-based learning strategies have been used effectively in a variety of classrooms to enhance student learning and engagement. In the General Microbiology laboratory for juniors and seniors at James Madison University, these strategies were combined to make a semester-long, investigative, cooperative learning experience…

  15. Full-scale semi-span tests of an advanced NLF business jet wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Davis, Patrick J.; Muchmore, C. Byram

    1987-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center's 30- by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel on a full-scale semispan model to evaluate and document the low-speed, high-lift characteristics of a business-jet class wing utilizing the HSNLF(1)-0213 airfoil section and a single slotted flap system. In addition to the high-lift studies, evaluations of boundary layer transition effects, the effectiveness of a segmented leading-edge droop for improved stall/spin resistance, and roll control effectiveness with and without flap deflection were made. The wind-tunnel investigation showed that deployment of a single-slotted trailing-edge flap provided substantial increments in lift. Fixed transition studies indicated no adverse effects on lift and pitching-moment characteristics for either the cruise or landing configuration. Subscale roll damping tests also indicated that stall/spin resistance could be enhanced through the use of a properly designed leading-edge droop.

  16. CFD study of temperature distribution in full scale boiler adopting in-furnace coal blending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhil, S. S. A.; Hasini, H.; Shuaib, N. H.

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes the investigation of temperature characteristics of an in-furnace combustion using different coals in a 700 MW full scale boiler. Single mixture fraction approach is adopted for combustion model of both primary and secondary coals. The primary coal was based on the properties of Adaro which has been used as the design coal for the boiler under investigation. The secondary blend coal was selected based on sub-bituminous coal with higher calorific value. Both coals are simultaneously injected into the furnace at alternate coal burner elevations. The general prediction of the temperature contours at primary combustion zone shows identical pattern compared with conventional single coal combustion in similar furnace. Reasonable agreement was achieved by the prediction of the average temperature at furnace exit. The temperature distribution is at different furnace elevation is non-uniform with higher temperature predicted at circumferential "ring-like" region at lower burner levels for both cases. The maximum flame temperature is higher at the elevation where coal of higher calorific value is injected. The temperature magnitude is within the accepTable limit and the variations does not differ much compared to the conventional single coal combustion.

  17. The use of model-test data for predicting full-scale ACV resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forstell, B. G.; Harry, C. W.

    The paper summarizes the analysis of test data obtained with a 1/12-scale model of the Amphibious Assault Landing Craft (AALC) JEFF(B). The analysis was conducted with the objective of improving the accuracy of drag predictions for a JEFF(B)-type air-cushion vehicle (ACV). Model test results, scaled to full-scale, are compared with full-scale drag obtained in various sea states during JEFF(B) trials. From the results of this comparison, it is found that the Froude-scale model rough-water drag data is consistently greater than full-scale derived drag, and is a function of both wave height and craft forward speed. Results are presented indicating that Froude scaling model data obtained in calm water also causes an over-prediction of calm-water drag at full-scale. An empirical correction that was developed for use on a JEFF(B)-type craft is discussed.

  18. 5 CFR 532.233 - Preparation for full-scale wage surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the prevailing rate law for labor and agency representatives to participate in the wage survey process... REGULATIONS PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.233 Preparation for full-scale...

  19. Startup of reactors for anoxic ammonium oxidation: experiences from the first full-scale anammox reactor in Rotterdam.

    PubMed

    van der Star, Wouter R L; Abma, Wiebe R; Blommers, Dennis; Mulder, Jan-Willem; Tokutomi, Takaaki; Strous, Marc; Picioreanu, Cristian; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2007-10-01

    The first full-scale anammox reactor in the world was started in Rotterdam (NL). The reactor was scaled-up directly from laboratory-scale to full-scale and treats up to 750 kg-N/d. In the initial phase of the startup, anammox conversions could not be identified by traditional methods, but quantitative PCR proved to be a reliable indicator for growth of the anammox population, indicating an anammox doubling time of 10-12 days. The experience gained during this first startup in combination with the availability of seed sludge from this reactor, will lead to a faster startup of anammox reactors in the future. The anammox reactor type employed in Rotterdam was compared to other reactor types for the anammox process. Reactors with a high specific surface area like the granular sludge reactor employed in Rotterdam provide the highest volumetric loading rates. Mass transfer of nitrite into the biofilm is limiting the conversion of those reactor types that have a lower specific surface area. Now the first full-scale commercial anammox reactor is in operation, a consistent and descriptive nomenclature is suggested for reactors in which the anammox process is employed. PMID:17583763

  20. Fluid mechanics of dynamic stall. II - Prediction of full scale characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical extrapolations are made from experimental subscale dynamics to predict full scale characteristics of dynamic stall. The method proceeds by establishing analytic relationships between dynamic and static aerodynamic characteristics induced by viscous flow effects. The method is then validated by predicting dynamic test results on the basis of corresponding static test data obtained at the same subscale flow conditions, and the effect of Reynolds number on the static aerodynamic characteristics are determined from subscale to full scale flow conditions.

  1. Experimental results of the investigation of a laboratory cold seal TEC

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, V.I.; Mironov, V.S.; Kiryushenko, A.I.; Mikheyev, A.S.; Tulin, S.M.; Meleta, Y.A.; Yarygin, D.V.; Wolff, L.R.

    1998-07-01

    The results of experimental investigation of characteristics of a laboratory Cold Seal Thermionic Energy Converter (CS TEC) with a built-in gas regulated heat pipe are discussed. They were obtained to justify the electric-thermal-physical characteristics of a flame heated CS TEC. The CS TEC design is being developed by a joint Russian-Dutch team of researchers with support of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). The concept of this flame heated Cold Seal TEC was presented in a previous publication. This paper deals with experimental data on the emission properties of electrodes and the voltage-current characteristics (JVC) of an electrically heated laboratory TEC. They were studied over a wide interval of variation in the electrode temperature and interelectrode distance. The cesium vapour working pressure in the interelectrode space was regulated both by the conventional method (using a cesium reservoir) and by means of a gas regulated cesium heat pipe. This allows one to use a rubber (viton) seal in the non-condensing gas (argon) area. The acquired experimental characteristics will allow one to identify the inner parameters at further stages of their work when testing the full-scale flame heated CS TEC.

  2. Investigation of a Full-scale, Cascade-type Thrust Reverser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Robert C; Algranti, Joseph S

    1957-01-01

    A double set of turning vanes was carried inside the jet tailpipe. To produce reverse thrust, the tailpipe opens into two side sections and the turning vanes move outward to form a V-shaped cascade, which deflects the exhaust-gas flow. Forward and reverse net thrust were measured over a range of engine speeds with the airplane stationary. Taxi tests were made to determine the comparative stopping distances using wheel braking and reverse thrust separately, and a combination of both. The effect of turning-vane spacing on thrust-reverser performance was determined by scale-model tests using unheated air.

  3. FULL-SCALE CHAMBER INVESTIGATION AND SIMULATION OF AIR FRESHENER EMISSIONS IN THE PRESENCE OF OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses results of tests, conducted in the EPA large chamber facility, determining emissions and chemical degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from one electrical plug-in type pine-scented air freshener in the presence of ozone supplied by a device markete...

  4. Thermal process of fluff: preliminary tests on a full-scale treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Mancini, G; Tamma, R; Viotti, P

    2010-01-01

    Until only recently fluff has been largely disposed of in controlled landfill sites. However, in Europe environmental regulations, including the EU Landfill Directive 1999/31/EC and ELV (End of Life Vehicle) Directive 2000/53/EC, have dramatically increased the pressure on all stakeholders to develop alternative solutions. As increasingly stringent legislation forces Shredder Residues (SR) to be diverted from landfilling, newly developed technologies will be in a position to compete for the market value of disposing of the waste. However, the fluff waste stream is so variable that it cannot be automatically assumed that processes developed for one type of fluff will prove to be suitable for other fluff streams. This situation has contributed towards convincing stakeholders to withhold investment funds or delay taking decisions as to how best to proceed; as a consequence, very few technologies have been fully developed on a commercial basis. It is of particular interest therefore that commercial alternatives to be used in dealing with this complex waste stream should be identified. The present paper illustrates the findings of a full-scale thermal treatment performed on SR samples obtained from various shredding plants. The outcome of the study provides an important contribution towards assessing the feasibility and reliability of the process, thus constituting a basic prerequisite for process performance evaluation. The full-scale plant, designed for the thermo-valorization of tyres, was purpose-modified to allow for fluff combustion. Three different fluff compositions (car fluff with different percentage of shredding, whites and 100% car fluff) were taken into consideration. Both the raw samples and solid products were thoroughly characterized. Combustion emissions were continuously analyzed during the test period, alternatively operating for tyre and fluff combustion. Classification of combustion residues for landfill disposal was carried out indicating only 2

  5. Test of P3M-1 nacelle in Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Test of P3M-1 nacelle in Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). The NACA conducted drag tests on P3M-1 nacelle in 1931 which were presented in a special report to the Navy. Smith DeFrance described this work in the report's introduction: 'Tests were conducted in the full-scale wind tunnel on a five to four geared Pratt and Whitney Wasp engine mounted in a P3M-1 nacelle. In order to simulate the flight conditions the nacelle was assembled on a 15-foot span of wing from the same airplane. The purpose of the tests was to improve the cooling of the engine and to reduce the drag of the nacelle combination. Thermocouples were installed at various points on the cylinders and temperature readings were obtained from these by the power plants division. These results will be reported in a memorandum by that division. The drag results, which are covered by this memorandum, were obtained with the original nacelle condition as received from the Navy with the tail of the nacelle modified, with the nose section of the nacelle modified, with a Curtiss anti-drag ring attached to the engine, with a Type G ring developed by the N.A.C.A., and with a Type D cowling which was also developed by the N.A.C.A.' (p. 1) This picture shows the engine with a Curtiss anti-drag ring attached. The NACA tested several different modifications and cowlings as noted above. The Navy did not want to make any major structural alterations to the original wing and nacelle installation. Thus, the NACA did not conduct a full investigation of the aerodynamics of this particular configuration. DeFrance concludes his report with this note: 'in view of the limitations of the test, the drag data for the combinations tested may be summarized, and considering the necessity of temperature control and accessibility to the engine it is apparent that the best combination tested was with the large nose piece, the Curtiss anti-drag ring, and the modified tail section.'

  6. Operation of a full-scale pumped flow biofilm reactor (PFBR) under two aeration regimes.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, E; Rodgers, M; Clifford, E

    2011-01-01

    A novel technology suitable for centralised and decentralised wastewater treatment has been developed, extensively tested at laboratory-scale, and trialled at a number of sites for populations ranging from 15 to 400 population equivalents (PE). The two-reactor-tank pumped flow biofilm reactor (PFBR) is characterised by: (i) its simple construction; (ii) its ease of operation and maintenance; (iii) low operating costs; (iv) low sludge production; and (v) comprising no moving parts or compressors, other than hydraulic pumps. By operating the system in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) mode, the following treatment can be achieved: 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total suspended solids (TSS) reduction; nitrification and denitrification. During a 100-day full-scale plant study treating municipal wastewater and operating at 165 PE and 200 PE (Experiments 1 and 2, respectively), maximum average removals of 94% BOD5, 86% TSS and 80% ammonium-nitrogen (NH4-N) were achieved. During the latter part of Experiment 2, effluent concentrations averaged: 14 mg BOD5/l; 32 mg COD(filtered)/l; 14 mg TSS/l; 4.4 mg NH4-N/l; and 4.0 mg NO3-N/l (nitrate-nitrogen). The average energy consumption was 0.46-0.63 kWh/m3(treated) or 1.25-1.76 kWh/kg BOD5 removed. No maintenance was required during these experiments. The PFBR technology offers a low energy, minimal maintenance technology for the treatment of municipal wastewater. PMID:22214073

  7. Control of modular multilevel converters for grid integration of full-scale wind energy conversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Suman

    The growing demand for wind power generation has pushed the capacity of wind turbines towards MW power levels. Higher capacity of the wind turbines necessitates operation of the generators and power electronic conversion systems at higher voltage/power levels. The power electronic conversion system of a wind energy conversion system (WECS) needs to meet the stringent requirements in terms of reliability, efficiency, scalability and ease of maintenance, power quality, and dv/dt stress on the generator/transformer. Although the multilevel converters including the neutral point clamped (NPC) converter and the active NPC converter meet most of the requirements, they fall short in reliability and scalability. Motivated by modularity/scalability feature of the modular multilevel converter (MMC), this research is to enable the MMC to meet all of the stringent requirements of the WECS by addressing their unique control challenges. This research presents systematic modeling and control of the MMC to enable it to be a potential converter topology for grid integration of full-scale WECSs. Based on the developed models, appropriate control systems for control of circulating current and capacitor voltages under fixed- and variable-frequency operations are proposed. Using the developed MMC models, a gradient-based cosimulation algorithm to optimize the gains of the developed control systems, is proposed. Performance/effectiveness of the developed models and the proposed control systems for the back-to-back MMC-based WECS are evaluated/verified based on simulations studies in the PSCAD/EMTDC software environment and experimental case studies on a laboratory-scale hardware prototype.

  8. FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

    2003-05-07

    Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

  9. Full Scale Field Trial of the Low Temperature Mercury Capture Process

    SciTech Connect

    Locke, James; Winschel, Richard

    2012-05-21

    CONSOL Energy Inc., with partial funding from the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory, designed a full-scale installation for a field trial of the Low-Temperature Mercury Control (LTMC) process, which has the ability to reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants by over 90 percent, by cooling flue gas temperatures to approximately 230°F and absorbing the mercury on the native carbon in the fly ash, as was recently demonstrated by CONSOL R&D on a slip-stream pilot plant at the Allegheny Energy Mitchell Station with partial support by DOE. LTMC has the potential to remove over 90 percent of the flue gas mercury at a cost at least an order of magnitude lower (on a $/lb mercury removed basis) than activated carbon injection. The technology is suitable for retrofitting to existing and new plants, and, although it is best suited to bituminous coal-fired plants, it may have some applicability to the full range of coal types. Installation plans were altered and moved from the original project host site, PPL Martins Creek plant, to a second host site at Allegheny Energy's R. Paul Smith plant, before installation actually occurred at the Jamestown (New York) Board of Public Utilities (BPU) Samuel A. Carlson (Carlson) Municipal Generating Station Unit 12, where the LTMC system was operated on a limited basis. At Carlson, over 60% mercury removal was demonstrated by cooling the flue gas to 220-230°F at the ESP inlet via humidification. The host unit ESP operation was unaffected by the humidification and performed satisfactorily at low temperature conditions.

  10. Optimization of Preprocessing and Densification of Sorghum Stover at Full-scale Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Neal A. Yancey; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Craig C. Conner; Christopher T. Wright

    2011-08-01

    Transportation costs can be a prohibitive step in bringing biomass to a preprocessing location or biofuel refinery. One alternative to transporting biomass in baled or loose format to a preprocessing location, is to utilize a mobile preprocessing system that can be relocated to various locations where biomass is stored, preprocess and densify the biomass, then ship it to the refinery as needed. The Idaho National Laboratory has a full scale 'Process Demonstration Unit' PDU which includes a stage 1 grinder, hammer mill, drier, pellet mill, and cooler with the associated conveyance system components. Testing at bench and pilot scale has been conducted to determine effects of moisture on preprocessing, crop varieties on preprocessing efficiency and product quality. The INLs PDU provides an opportunity to test the conclusions made at the bench and pilot scale on full industrial scale systems. Each component of the PDU is operated from a central operating station where data is collected to determine power consumption rates for each step in the process. The power for each electrical motor in the system is monitored from the control station to monitor for problems and determine optimal conditions for the system performance. The data can then be viewed to observe how changes in biomass input parameters (moisture and crop type for example), mechanical changes (screen size, biomass drying, pellet size, grinding speed, etc.,), or other variations effect the power consumption of the system. Sorgum in four foot round bales was tested in the system using a series of 6 different screen sizes including: 3/16 in., 1 in., 2 in., 3 in., 4 in., and 6 in. The effect on power consumption, product quality, and production rate were measured to determine optimal conditions.