Science.gov

Sample records for fully implantable stimulator

  1. A fully implantable rodent neural stimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, D. W. J.; Grayden, D. B.; Shepherd, R. K.; Fallon, J. B.

    2012-02-01

    The ability to electrically stimulate neural and other excitable tissues in behaving experimental animals is invaluable for both the development of neural prostheses and basic neurological research. We developed a fully implantable neural stimulator that is able to deliver two channels of intra-cochlear electrical stimulation in the rat. It is powered via a novel omni-directional inductive link and includes an on-board microcontroller with integrated radio link, programmable current sources and switching circuitry to generate charge-balanced biphasic stimulation. We tested the implant in vivo and were able to elicit both neural and behavioural responses. The implants continued to function for up to five months in vivo. While targeted to cochlear stimulation, with appropriate electrode arrays the stimulator is well suited to stimulating other neurons within the peripheral or central nervous systems. Moreover, it includes significant on-board data acquisition and processing capabilities, which could potentially make it a useful platform for telemetry applications, where there is a need to chronically monitor physiological variables in unrestrained animals.

  2. A fully implanted programmable stimulator based on wireless communication for epidural spinal cord stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Xu, Qi; He, Jiping; Ren, Hangkong; Zhou, Houlun; Zheng, Kejia

    2012-03-15

    Clinical research indicates that the epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS) has shown potential in promoting locomotor recovery in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (ISCI). This paper presents the development of a fully implantable voltage-regulated stimulator with bi-directional wireless communication for investigating underlying neural mechanisms of ESCS facilitating motor function improvement. The stimulation system consists of a computer, an external controller, an implantable pulse generator (IPG), a magnet, the extension leads and a stimulation electrode. The telemetry transmission between the IPG and the external controller is achieved by a commercially available transceiver chip with 2.4GHz carrier band. The magnet is used to activate the IPG only when necessary to minimize the power consumption. The encapsulated IPG measures 33mm×24mm×8mm, with a total mass of ∼12.6g. Feasibility experiments are conducted in three Sprague-Dawley rats to validate the function of the stimulator, and to investigate the relationship between lumbar-sacral ESCS and hindlimb electromyography (EMG) responses. The results show that the stimulation system provides an effective tool for investigation of ESCS application in motor function recovery in small animals. PMID:22085835

  3. A Fully-Implantable Cochlear Implant SoC with Piezoelectric Middle-Ear Sensor and Arbitrary Waveform Neural Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Marcus; Jin, Rui; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Stankovic, Konstantina M.; Chandrakasan, Anantha P.

    2015-01-01

    A system-on-chip for an invisible, fully-implantable cochlear implant is presented. Implantable acoustic sensing is achieved by interfacing the SoC to a piezoelectric sensor that detects the sound-induced motion of the middle ear. Measurements from human cadaveric ears demonstrate that the sensor can detect sounds between 40 and 90 dB SPL over the speech bandwidth. A highly-reconfigurable digital sound processor enables system power scalability by reconfiguring the number of channels, and provides programmable features to enable a patient-specific fit. A mixed-signal arbitrary waveform neural stimulator enables energy-optimal stimulation pulses to be delivered to the auditory nerve. The energy-optimal waveform is validated with in-vivo measurements from four human subjects which show a 15% to 35% energy saving over the conventional rectangular waveform. Prototyped in a 0.18 μm high-voltage CMOS technology, the SoC in 8-channel mode consumes 572 μW of power including stimulation. The SoC integrates implantable acoustic sensing, sound processing, and neural stimulation on one chip to minimize the implant size, and proof-of-concept is demonstrated with measurements from a human cadaver ear. PMID:26251552

  4. Fully Implantable Peripheral Nerve Stimulation for the Treatment of Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vu Q. C.; Bock, William C.; Groves, Christine C.; Whitney, Marybeth; Bennett, Maria E.; Lechman, Tina E.; Strother, Robert; Grill, Julie H.; Stager, Kathryn W.; Chae, John

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the first participant treated with a fully-implantable, single-lead peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) system for refractory hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP). During the 6-wk trial-stage, a temporary lead was placed percutaneously near the terminal branches of the axillary nerve to the deltoid. The primary outcome measure was the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form Question 3 (BPI-3), a 0–10 pain numeric rating scale. The participant experienced 75% pain reduction and proceeded to the implant-stage where he received a single-lead, implantable pulse generator. After 3-wks, the participant became pain-free. However, 7-wks after implantation, the system was turned off due to an unrelated acute medical illness. HSP reemerged with BPI-3 of 9. After 11-wks of recovery, PNS was reinitiated and the participant became pain-free through the 9-months follow-up. At 12-months, BPI-3 was a 1. This case report demonstrates the feasibility of a single-lead, fully-implantable PNS system for refractory HSP. PMID:25251248

  5. A Fully Implantable Stimulator With Wireless Power and Data Transmission for Experimental Investigation of Epidural Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Hu, Dingyin; Duan, Bingyu; He, Jiping

    2015-07-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS) combined with partial weight-bearing therapy (PWBT) has been shown to facilitate recovery of functional walking for individuals after spinal cord injury (SCI). The investigation of neural mechanisms of recovery from SCI under this treatment has been conducted broadly in rodent models, yet a suitable ESCS system is still unavailable. This paper describes a practical, programmable, and fully implantable stimulator for laboratory research on rats to explore fundamental neurophysiological principles for functional recovery after SCI. The ESCS system is composed of a personal digital assistant (PDA), an external controller, an implantable pulse generator (IPG), lead extension, and stimulating electrodes. The stimulation parameters can be programmed and adjusted through a graphical user interface on the PDA. The external controller is placed on the rat back and communicates with the PDA via radio-frequency (RF) telemetry. An RF carrier from the class-E power amplifier in the external controller provides both data and power for the IPG through an inductive link. The IPG is built around a microcontroller unit to generate voltage-regulated pulses delivered to the bipolar electrode for ESCS in rats. The encapsulated IPG measures 22 mm × 23 mm × 7 mm with a mass of  ∼  3.78 g. This fully implantable batteryless stimulator provided a simplified and efficient method to carry out chronic experiments in untethered animals for medical electro-neurological research. PMID:25680207

  6. A fully implantable stimulator with wireless power and data transmission for experimental use in epidural spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Li, Jun; Han, Wenjuan; Zhou, Houlun

    2011-01-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation (ESCS) combined with partial weight bearing therapy (PWBT) has been reported to facilitate recovery of functional walking for individuals after chronic incomplete spinal cord injury. This paper describes a low cost, fully implantable, advanced ESCS stimulator that can be manufactured in a research laboratory for use in small animals. The system is composed of four main parts: an external personal digital assistant (PDA), an external controller, an implantable pulse generator (IPG), lead extension and electrode. The PDA allows the experimenter to program the stimulation parameters through a user-friendly graphical interface. The external controller placed on the rat back communicates with PDA via RF telemetry. The IPG generates the biphasic charge-balanced voltage-regulated pulses, which are delivered to the bipolar electrode by the lead extension to achieve chronic ESCS in freely moving rats. A RF carrier from the Class-E amplifier in the external controller provides both data and power for the implanted circuitry through a closely coupled inductive link. The IPG is hermetically packaged using a silicon elastomer and measures 22 mm × 23 mm × 7 mm with a mass of ~3.78 g. PMID:22256007

  7. A Fully-Implanted Intramuscular Bipolar Myoelectric Signal Recording Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Memberg, William D.; Stage, Thomas G.; Kirsch, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop a fully-implanted, intramuscular, bipolar, myoelectric signal recording electrode (IM-MES) for functional electrical stimulation (FES), prosthetic myoelectric control, and other permanently implantable systems. Materials and Methods An existing fully-implanted intramuscular stimulating electrode was modified at each end to allow bipolar recording. The design change also required a modification of the implantation method. Mechanical and in vivo testing was performed on the novel components of the electrode. The first clinical application is also described. Results The electrode design modifications did not create any areas of excess mechanical strain on the wires at the distal end where the leads were wound into electrode surfaces. In vivo testing showed that the IM-MES electrode recorded myoelectric signals that were equivalent to an existing epimysial MES electrode. The modified implantation method was simple to implement. The IM-MES electrode was used in an upper extremity FES system in an individual with a spinal cord injury, and provided signals that were suitable for a command signal. Conclusions A fully-implanted, bipolar intramuscular recording electrode (IM-MES) was developed. Implantation of the IM-MES is straightforward and almost any muscle can be targeted. Testing has been performed to demonstrate the suitability of the IM-MES electrode for clinical use. Initial clinical applications were successful. PMID:24612356

  8. A Fully Implantable 96-channel Neural Data Acquisition System

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Michael; Bossetti, Chad A; Jochum, Thomas A; Callender, Stephen H; Nicolelis, Miguel A L; Turner, Dennis A; Wolf, Patrick D

    2009-01-01

    A fully implantable neural data acquisition system is a key component of a clinically viable brain-machine interface. This type of system must communicate with the outside world and obtain power without the use of wires that cross through the skin. We present a 96-channel fully implantable neural data acquisition system. This system performs spike detection and extraction within the body and wirelessly transmits data to an external unit. Power is supplied wirelessly through the use of inductively-coupled coils. The system was implanted acutely in sheep and successfully recorded, processed, and transmitted neural data. Bidirectional communication between the implanted system and an external unit was successful over a range of 2 m. The system is also shown to integrate well into a brain-machine interface. This demonstration of a high channel-count fully implanted neural data acquisition system is a critical step in the development of a clinically viable brain-machine interface. PMID:19255459

  9. Considering optogenetic stimulation for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Jeschke, Marcus; Moser, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    Electrical cochlear implants are by far the most successful neuroprostheses and have been implanted in over 300,000 people worldwide. Cochlear implants enable open speech comprehension in most patients but are limited in providing music appreciation and speech understanding in noisy environments. This is generally considered to be due to low frequency resolution as a consequence of wide current spread from stimulation contacts. Accordingly, the number of independently usable stimulation channels is limited to less than a dozen. As light can be conveniently focused, optical stimulation might provide an alternative approach to cochlear implants with increased number of independent stimulation channels. Here, we focus on summarizing recent work on optogenetic stimulation as one way to develop optical cochlear implants. We conclude that proof of principle has been presented for optogenetic stimulation of the cochlea and central auditory neurons in rodents as well as for the technical realization of flexible μLED-based multichannel cochlear implants. Still, much remains to be done in order to advance the technique for auditory research and even more for eventual clinical translation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:25601298

  10. Polymeric packaging for fully implantable wireless neural microsensors.

    PubMed

    Aceros, Juan; Yin, Ming; Borton, David A; Patterson, William R; Bull, Christopher; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2012-01-01

    We present polymeric packaging methods used for subcutaneous, fully implantable, broadband, and wireless neurosensors. A new tool for accelerated testing and characterization of biocompatible polymeric packaging materials and processes is described along with specialized test units to simulate our fully implantable neurosensor components, materials and fabrication processes. A brief description of the implantable systems is presented along with their current encapsulation methods based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Results from in-vivo testing of multiple implanted neurosensors in swine and non-human primates are presented. Finally, a novel augmenting polymer thin film material to complement the currently employed PDMS is introduced. This thin layer coating material is based on the Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) process of Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and Oxygen (O(2)). PMID:23365999

  11. Polymeric Packaging for Fully Implantable Wireless Neural Microsensors

    PubMed Central

    Aceros, Juan; Yin, Ming; Borton, David A.; Patterson, William R.; Bull, Christopher; Nurmikko, Arto V.

    2014-01-01

    We present polymeric packaging methods used for subcutaneous, fully implantable, broadband, and wireless neurosensors. A new tool for accelerated testing and characterization of biocompatible polymeric packaging materials and processes is described along with specialized test units to simulate our fully implantable neurosensor components, materials and fabrication processes. A brief description of the implantable systems is presented along with their current encapsulation methods based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Results from in-vivo testing of multiple implanted neurosensors in swine and non-human primates are presented. Finally, a novel augmenting polymer thin film material to complement the currently employed PDMS is introduced. This thin layer coating material is based on the Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) process of Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and Oxygen (O2). PMID:23365999

  12. Wirelessly powering miniature implants for optogenetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Alexander J.; Ho, John S.; Tanabe, Yuji; Neofytou, Evgenios; Beygui, Ramin E.; Poon, Ada S. Y.

    2013-10-01

    Conventional methods for in vivo optogenetic stimulation require optical fibers or mounted prosthesis. We present an approach for wirelessly powering implantable stimulators using electromagnetic midfield. By exploiting the properties of the midfield, we demonstrate the ability to generate high intensity light pulses in a freely moving animal.

  13. 21 CFR 882.5860 - Implanted neuromuscular stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted neuromuscular stimulator. 882.5860... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5860 Implanted neuromuscular stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted neuromuscular stimulator is a device that...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5860 - Implanted neuromuscular stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted neuromuscular stimulator. 882.5860... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5860 Implanted neuromuscular stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted neuromuscular stimulator is a device that...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  16. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  17. 21 CFR 882.5860 - Implanted neuromuscular stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted neuromuscular stimulator. 882.5860... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5860 Implanted neuromuscular stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted neuromuscular stimulator is a device that...

  18. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  19. Useful applications and limits of battery powered implants in functional electrical stimulations.

    PubMed

    Lanmüller, H; Bijak, M; Mayr, W; Rafolt, D; Sauermann, S; Thoma, H

    1997-03-01

    Battery powered stimulation implants have been well-known for a long time as heart pacemakers. In the last few years, fully implantable stimulators have been used in the field of functional electrical stimulation (FES) for applications like dynamic cardiomyoplasty and electro-stimulated graciloplasty for fecal incontinence. The error rate of battery powered implants is significantly smaller than that for conventional stimulator systems, and the quality of life for the patients is increased because the need for an external power and control unit is eliminated. The use of battery powered implants is limited by the complexity of the stimulation control strategies and the battery capacity. Therefore, applications like the stimulation of lower extremities for walking, cochlea stimulation, or direct muscle stimulation cannot be supported. The improvement of implantable batteries, microcontrollers, and ultralow power products is ongoing. In the future, battery powered implants will also meet the requirements of complex applications. Systems for restoration of hand and breathing functions after spinal cord injury can be the next field of use for battery powered implants. For these purposes, we developed a battery powered multichannel implant with a sufficient life span for phrenic pacing. The problems during development and the limits of this system are described in this paper. PMID:9148707

  20. [Anesthesia management in implantation of baroreceptor stimulators].

    PubMed

    Werner, T; Lebar, L; Wittmann, S; Keyser, A; Fischer, M; Schmidli, J; Graf, B M; Zausig, Y A

    2015-09-01

    Baroreceptor stimulators are novel implantable devices that activate the carotid baroreceptor reflex. This results in a decrease in activity of the sympathetic nervous system and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. In patients with drug-resistant hypertension, permanent electrical activation of the baroreceptor reflex results in blood pressure reduction and cardiac remodeling. For correct intraoperative electrode placement at the carotid bifurcation, the baroreceptor reflex needs to be activated several times. Many common anesthetic agents, such as inhalation anesthetics and propofol dampen or inhibit the baroreceptor reflex and complicate or even prevent successful placement. Therefore, a specific anesthesia and pharmacological management is necessary to ensure successful implantation of baroreceptor reflex stimulators. PMID:26275386

  1. Revision surgeries following vagus nerve stimulator implantation.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sandi; Lin, Yimo; Curry, Daniel J; Reddy, Gaddum D; Warnke, Peter C

    2016-08-01

    The vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) has been shown to provide a safe, albeit costly, treatment for intractable epilepsy. We aimed to analyze the incidence, timing, and clinical/demographic associations of revision surgery post-VNS implantation in epilepsy patients. The Thomson Reuters MarketScan database, containing data from 23-50million individuals, was used. Epilepsy patients receiving VNS implantations from 2003 to 2009 were identified by Current Procedural Terminology and International Classification Of Diseases Ninth Revision codes. Incidence and timing of subsequent implant-related surgeries were recorded. Events were described using time-to-event methodology, with Kaplan-Meier failure estimation/Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for clinical/demographic factors. In 1234 patients, average incidence of revision surgeries over 6years of follow-up were <1%, <3%, 4-10%, and <1% for VNS electrode revision, battery revision/removal, battery replacement/implantation, and infection washout, respectively. For electrode revision and battery revision/replacement, the incidence was higher in the first year and for battery replacement in later years. Age, sex, insurance type, or geographic region did not significantly impact event occurrence. Implant-related revision surgeries are rare. Some events occur more often in certain follow-up years than others; none are significantly impacted by age, sex, insurance type, or geographic region. The most common reason for revision was battery replacement several years after VNS placement. PMID:27050913

  2. An implantable neural stimulator for intraspinal microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Troyk, Philip R; Mushahwar, Vivian K; Stein, Richard B; Suh, Sungjae; Everaert, Dirk; Holinski, Brad; Hu, Zhe; DeMichele, Glenn; Kerns, Douglas; Kayvani, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a wireless stimulator device for use in animal experiments as part of an ongoing investigation into intraspinal stimulation (ISMS) for restoration of walking in humans with spinal cord injury. The principle behind using ISMS is the activation of residual motor-control neural networks within the spinal cord ventral horn below the level of lesion following a spinal cord injury. The attractiveness to this technique is that a small number of electrodes can be used to induce bilateral walking patterns in the lower limbs. In combination with advanced feedback algorithms, ISMS has the potential to restore walking for distances that exceed that produced by other types of functional electrical stimulation. Recent acute animal experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of using ISMS to produce the coordinated walking patterns. Here we described a wireless implantable stimulation system to be used in chronic animal experiments and for providing the basis for a system suitable for use in humans. Electrical operation of the wireless system is described, including a demonstration of reverse telemetry for monitoring the stimulating electrode voltages. PMID:23366038

  3. The use of implantable bone stimulators in nonunion treatment.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael S; Anglen, Jeffrey O

    2010-03-01

    Delayed or failure of bone healing in fracture, osteotomy, and arthrodesis patients continues to be a clinical dilemma. Electromagnetic stimulation is 1 modality demonstrated in many studies to aid bone healing; however, relatively few studies depict the use and complications associated with direct current implantable bone stimulators. Over a 9-year period, we studied a consecutive series of 120 adult patients who underwent implantation of a direct current bone stimulator. The goals of this study were to determine the time until healing, the presence of infection, and the need for additional nonunion surgery or salvage procedure following internal bone stimulator placement for nonunion treatment. Of the factors affecting the time until healing, tobacco smoking was a significant factor associated with increased time until healing. Tobacco smoking and duration of nonunion prior to implantable bone stimulator placement were both significant factors in the need for revision nonunion surgery or salvage procedure after implantable bone stimulator placement. Deep soft tissue infection or osteomyelitis was a significant factor predicting prolonged time to healing, subsequent infection following implantable bone stimulator placement, and the need for revision or salvage surgery. With the relative lack of complications directly attributable to electromagnetic implantable bone stimulators, their use may be an effective adjuvant to stable internal fixation and autogenous bone grafting in healing nonunions. However, the use of implantable bone stimulators in patients with nonunion prior to deep soft tissue infection or osteomyelitis exhibited an increased rate of postoperative infection in this study. PMID:20349861

  4. Soft, stretchable, fully implantable miniaturized optoelectronic systems for wireless optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Il; Brenner, Daniel S.; Shin, Gunchul; Morgan, Clinton D.; Copits, Bryan A.; Chung, Ha Uk; Pullen, Melanie Y.; Noh, Kyung Nim; Davidson, Steve; Oh, Soong Ju; Yoon, Jangyeol; Jang, Kyung-In; Samineni, Vijay K.; Norman, Megan; Grajales-Reyes, Jose G.; Vogt, Sherri K; Sundaram, Saranya S.; Wilson, Kellie M.; Ha, Jeong Sook; Xu, Renxiao; Pan, Taisong; Kim, Tae-il; Huang, Yonggang; Montana, Michael C.; Golden, Judith P.; Bruchas, Michael R.; Gereau, Robert W.; Rogers, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics allows rapid, temporally specific control of neuronal activity via targeted expression and activation of light-sensitive proteins. Implementation typically requires remote light sources and fiber-optic delivery schemes that impose significant physical constraints on natural behaviors. In this report we bypass these limitations using novel technologies that combine thin, mechanically soft neural interfaces with fully implantable, stretchable wireless radio power and control systems. The resulting devices achieve optogenetic modulation of the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system. This is demonstrated with two form factors; stretchable film appliques that interface directly with peripheral nerves, and flexible filaments that insert into the narrow confines of the spinal epidural space. These soft, thin devices are minimally invasive, and histological tests suggest they can be used in chronic studies. We demonstrate the power of this technology by modulating peripheral and spinal pain circuitry, providing evidence for the potential widespread use of these devices in research and future clinical applications of optogenetics outside the brain. PMID:26551059

  5. International Classification of Reliability for Implanted Cochlear Implant Receiver Stimulators

    PubMed Central

    Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Backous, Douglas D.; Balkany, Thomas J.; Briggs, Robert J. S.; Gantz, Bruce J.; van Hasselt, Andrew; Kim, Chong Sun; Kubo, Takeshi; Lenarz, Thomas; Pillsbury, Harold C.; O’Donoghue, Gerard M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To design an international standard to be used when reporting reliability of the implanted components of cochlear implant systems to appropriate governmental authorities, cochlear implant (CI) centers, and for journal editors in evaluating manuscripts involving cochlear implant reliability. Study Design The International Consensus Group for Cochlear Implant Reliability Reporting was assembled to unify ongoing efforts in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Australia to create a consistent and comprehensive classification system for the implanted components of CI systems across manufacturers. Setting All members of the consensus group are from tertiary referral cochlear implant centers. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measure A clinically relevant classification scheme adapted from principles of ISO standard 5841-2:2000 (1) originally designed for reporting reliability of cardiac pacemakers, pulse generators, or leads. Results Standard definitions for device failure, survival time, clinical benefit, reduced clinical benefit, and specification were generated. Time intervals for reporting back to implant centers for devices tested to be “out of specification,” categorization of explanted devices, the method of cumulative survival reporting, and content of reliability reports to be issued by manufacturers was agreed upon by all members. The methodology for calculating Cumulative survival was adapted from ISO standard 5841-2:2000 (1). Conclusion The International Consensus Group on Cochlear Implant Device Reliability Reporting recommends compliance to this new standard in reporting reliability of implanted CI components by all manufacturers of CIs and the adoption of this standard as a minimal reporting guideline for editors of journals publishing cochlear implant research results. PMID:20864879

  6. 21 CFR 882.5860 - Implanted neuromuscular stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Date PMA or notice of completion of PDP is required. A PMA or notice of completion of a PDP for a.... Any other implanted neuromuscular stimulator shall have an approved PMA or declared completed PDP...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5860 - Implanted neuromuscular stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Date PMA or notice of completion of PDP is required. A PMA or notice of completion of a PDP for a.... Any other implanted neuromuscular stimulator shall have an approved PMA or declared completed PDP...

  8. Remote Electrical Stimulation by Means of Implanted Rectifiers

    PubMed Central

    Ivorra, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Miniaturization of active implantable medical devices is currently compromised by the available means for electrically powering them. Most common energy supply techniques for implants – batteries and inductive couplers – comprise bulky parts which, in most cases, are significantly larger than the circuitry they feed. Here, for overcoming such miniaturization bottleneck in the case of implants for electrical stimulation, it is proposed to make those implants act as rectifiers of high frequency bursts supplied by remote electrodes. In this way, low frequency currents will be generated locally around the implant and these low frequency currents will perform stimulation of excitable tissues whereas the high frequency currents will cause only innocuous heating. The present study numerically demonstrates that low frequency currents capable of stimulation can be produced by a miniature device behaving as a diode when high frequency currents, neither capable of thermal damage nor of stimulation, flow through the tissue where the device is implanted. Moreover, experimental evidence is provided by an in vivo proof of concept model consisting of an anesthetized earthworm in which a commercial diode was implanted. With currently available microelectronic techniques, very thin stimulation capsules (diameter <500 µm) deliverable by injection are easily conceivable. PMID:21850274

  9. Remote electrical stimulation by means of implanted rectifiers.

    PubMed

    Ivorra, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Miniaturization of active implantable medical devices is currently compromised by the available means for electrically powering them. Most common energy supply techniques for implants--batteries and inductive couplers--comprise bulky parts which, in most cases, are significantly larger than the circuitry they feed. Here, for overcoming such miniaturization bottleneck in the case of implants for electrical stimulation, it is proposed to make those implants act as rectifiers of high frequency bursts supplied by remote electrodes. In this way, low frequency currents will be generated locally around the implant and these low frequency currents will perform stimulation of excitable tissues whereas the high frequency currents will cause only innocuous heating. The present study numerically demonstrates that low frequency currents capable of stimulation can be produced by a miniature device behaving as a diode when high frequency currents, neither capable of thermal damage nor of stimulation, flow through the tissue where the device is implanted. Moreover, experimental evidence is provided by an in vivo proof of concept model consisting of an anesthetized earthworm in which a commercial diode was implanted. With currently available microelectronic techniques, very thin stimulation capsules (diameter <500 µm) deliverable by injection are easily conceivable. PMID:21850274

  10. Design and operation of a fully implantable SMA actuated implant for correcting short bowel syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utter, Brent; Luntz, Jonathan; Brei, Diann; Teitelbaum, Daniel; Okawada, Manabu; Miyasaka, Eiichi

    2009-03-01

    Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) is medical condition characterized by insufficient small intestine length, leading to improper nutrient absorption and significant mortality rates. The complications of current treatment methods have encouraged the development of a novel treatment method based on mechanotransduction, the process through which mechanical tensile loading induces longitudinal growth of intestine. Animal based studies with simple extension devices have demonstrated the potential of the treatment to grow healthy bowel, but an implantable device suitable for clinical use remains undeveloped. This paper presents the development of an instrumented fully implantable bowel extender based upon a shape memory alloy driven linear ratchet that can be controlled and monitored remotely. The overall bowel extender system is described with respect to specifications for pig experimental tests. The functionality of the mechanical and electrical subsystems of the device are detailed and experimentally validated on the bench top, in segments of living bowel tissue removed from a pig, and in cadaveric pigs. Mechanical loading characteristics and safe load limits on bowel tissue are identified. Results from these experiments establish the readiness of the device to be tested in living pigs, enabling studies to move one step closer to clinical studies.

  11. A novel system design for implantable stimulator application.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Wen; Chung, Wen-Yaw; Chuang, Chiung-Cheng; Wei, Ru-Liang; Dai, Ji-Xuan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel and implantable micro-stimulator design. Instead of generating the stimulating pulses by using the conventional computerized controller such as FPGA or MCU, the pulse width modulation (PWM) has been used to control the stimulation. The proposed system need not program the computerized controller, so it simplifies the circuit complexity and achieves the low-cost issue. The proposed micro-stimulator chip has a 5-bits programmable current selectivity and uses pulse width modulation skill to adjust the pulse width. Besides, the system has four different stimulation frequencies to be chosen and provides normal, random, and burst stimulation pulses for the practical situation. PMID:17271204

  12. Composite implants coated with biodegradable polymers prevent stimulating tumor progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litviakov, N. V.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Perelmuter, V. M.; Kulbakin, D. E.; Bolbasov, E. N.; Tsyganov, M. M.; Zheravin, A. A.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this experiment we studied oncologic safety of model implants created using the solution blow spinning method with the use of the PURASORB PL-38 polylactic acid polymer and organic mineral filler which was obtained via laser ablation of a solid target made of dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate. For this purpose the implant was introduced into the area of Wistar rats' iliums, and on day 17 after the surgery the Walker sarcoma was transplanted into the area of the implant. We evaluated the implant's influence on the primary tumor growth, hematogenous and lymphogenous metastasis of the Walker sarcoma. In comparison with sham operated animals the implant group demonstrated significant inhibition of hematogenous metastasis on day 34 after the surgery. The metastasis inhibition index (MII) equaled 94% and the metastases growth inhibition index (MGII) equaled 83%. The metastasis frequency of the Walker sarcoma in para aortic lymph nodes in the implant group was not statistically different from the control frequency; there was also no influence of the implant on the primary tumor growth noted. In case of the Walker sarcoma transplantation into the calf and the palmar pad of the ipsilateral limb to the one with the implant in the ilium, we could not note any attraction of tumor cells to the implant area, i.e. stimulation of the Walker sarcoma relapse by the implant. Thus, the research concluded that the studied implant meets the requirements of oncologic safety.

  13. Chronic cortical and electromyographic recordings from a fully implantable device: preclinical experience in a nonhuman primate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryapolova-Webb, Elena; Afshar, Pedram; Stanslaski, Scott; Denison, Tim; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Starr, Philip A.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Analysis of intra- and perioperatively recorded cortical and basal ganglia local field potentials in human movement disorders has provided great insight into the pathophysiology of diseases such as Parkinson's, dystonia, and essential tremor. However, in order to better understand the network abnormalities and effects of chronic therapeutic stimulation in these disorders, long-term recording from a fully implantable data collection system is needed. Approach. A fully implantable investigational data collection system, the Activa® PC + S neurostimulator (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN), has been developed for human use. Here, we tested its utility for extended intracranial recording in the motor system of a nonhuman primate. The system was attached to two quadripolar paddle arrays: one covering sensorimotor cortex, and one covering a proximal forelimb muscle, to study simultaneous cortical field potentials and electromyography during spontaneous transitions from rest to movement. Main results. Over 24 months of recording, movement-related changes in physiologically relevant frequency bands were readily detected, including beta and gamma signals at approximately 2.5 μV/\\sqrtHz and 0.7 μV/\\sqrt{Hz}, respectively. The system architecture allowed for flexible recording configurations and algorithm triggered data recording. In the course of physiological analyses, sensing artifacts were observed (˜1 μVrms stationary tones at fixed frequency), which were mitigated either with post-processing or algorithm design and did not impact the scientific conclusions. Histological examination revealed no underlying tissue damage; however, a fibrous capsule had developed around the paddles, demonstrating a potential mechanism for the observed signal amplitude reduction. Significance. This study establishes the usefulness of this system in measuring chronic brain and muscle signals. Use of this system may potentially be valuable in human trials of chronic brain

  14. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5870 - Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain....5870 Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a peripheral...

  16. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  17. 21 CFR 882.5870 - Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain....5870 Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a peripheral...

  18. 21 CFR 882.5870 - Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain....5870 Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a peripheral...

  19. 21 CFR 882.5870 - Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain....5870 Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a peripheral...

  20. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  1. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  2. 21 CFR 882.5870 - Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain....5870 Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a peripheral...

  3. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  4. An Implanted, Stimulated Muscle Powered Piezoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Gustafson, Kenneth; Kilgore, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    A totally implantable piezoelectric generator system able to harness power from electrically activated muscle could be used to augment the power systems of implanted medical devices, such as neural prostheses, by reducing the number of battery replacement surgeries or by allowing periods of untethered functionality. The features of our generator design are no moving parts and the use of a portion of the generated power for system operation and regulation. A software model of the system has been developed and simulations have been performed to predict the output power as the system parameters were varied within their constraints. Mechanical forces that mimic muscle forces have been experimentally applied to a piezoelectric generator to verify the accuracy of the simulations and to explore losses due to mechanical coupling. Depending on the selection of system parameters, software simulations predict that this generator concept can generate up to approximately 700 W of power, which is greater than the power necessary to drive the generator, conservatively estimated to be 50 W. These results suggest that this concept has the potential to be an implantable, self-replenishing power source and further investigation is underway.

  5. Waveform efficiency analysis of auditory nerve fiber stimulation for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Lotfi Navaii, Mehdi; Sadjedi, Hamed; Jalali, Mohsen

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation of the electrical stimulation efficiency of various stimulating waveforms is an important issue for efficient neural stimulator design. Concerning the implantable micro devices design, it is also necessary to consider the feasibility of hardware implementation of the desired waveforms. In this paper, the charge, power and energy efficiency of four waveforms (i.e. square, rising ramp, triangular and rising ramp-decaying exponential) in various durations have been simulated and evaluated based on the computational model of the auditory nerve fibers. Moreover, for a fair comparison of their feasibility, a fully integrated current generator circuit has been developed so that the desired stimulating waveforms can be generated. The simulation results show that stimulation with the square waveforms is a proper choice in short and intermediate durations while the rising ramp-decaying exponential or triangular waveforms can be employed for long durations. PMID:23918258

  6. [Implantable nerve stimulation for obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Afonso Delgado, Lidia; Micoulaud Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Monteyrol, Pierre-Jean; Philip, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a common disorder that has been identified as a contributor to cardiovascular disease making it a major public health problem. Continuous positive airway pressure is the standard treatment but compliance is suboptimal. Mandibular advancement devices and surgery have limited indications, inconstant efficiency and potential irreversible side effects. Stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve, that innervates the genioglossus, a protrusor muscle of the tongue, is now a new treatment option for moderate and severe cases of OSAHS. Two types of stimulation are currently available: stimulation synchronous with inspiration and continuous stimulation. The indication of each type of stimulation and long-term effects still need to be assessed but the implantable nerve stimulation is a promising treatment for patients without a therapy solution so far. PMID:26796478

  7. SaBer DBS: a fully programmable, rechargeable, bilateral, charge-balanced preclinical microstimulator for long-term neural stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Samuel G.; Porr, Bernd; Riddell, John; Winter, Christine; Grace, Anthony A.

    2013-01-01

    To effectively study the mechanisms by which deep brain stimulation (DBS) produces its therapeutic benefit and to evaluate new therapeutic indications, it is vital to administer DBS over an extended period of time in awake, freely behaving animals. To date multiple preclinical stimulators have been designed and described. However, these stimulators have failed to incorporate some of the design criteria necessary to provide a system analogous to those used clinically. Here we define these design criteria and propose an improved and complete preclinical DBS system. This system is fully programmable in frequency, pulse-width and current amplitude, has a rechargeable battery and delivers biphasic, charge-balanced output to two independent electrodes. The system has been optimized for either implantation or for use externally via attachment to rodent jackets. PMID:23305773

  8. A Wireless Implantable Switched-Capacitor Based Optogenetic Stimulating System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Kwon, Ki-Yong; Li, Wen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a power-efficient implantable optogenetic interface using a wireless switched-capacitor based stimulating (SCS) system. The SCS efficiently charges storage capacitors directly from an inductive link and periodically discharges them into an array of micro-LEDs, providing high instantaneous power without affecting wireless link and system supply voltage. A custom-designed computer interface in LabVIEW environment wirelessly controls stimulation parameters through the inductive link, and an optrode array enables simultaneous neural recording along with optical stimulation. The 4-channel SCS system prototype has been implemented in a 0.35-μm CMOS process and combined with the optrode array. In vivo experiments involving light-induced local field potentials verified the efficacy of the SCS system. An implantable version of the SCS system with flexible hermetic sealing is under development for chronic experiments. PMID:25570099

  9. A wireless implantable switched-capacitor based optogenetic stimulating system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Kwon, Ki-Yong; Li, Wen; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a power-efficient implantable optogenetic interface using a wireless switched-capacitor based stimulating (SCS) system. The SCS efficiently charges storage capacitors directly from an inductive link and periodically discharges them into an array of micro-LEDs, providing high instantaneous power without affecting wireless link and system supply voltage. A custom-designed computer interface in LabVIEW environment wirelessly controls stimulation parameters through the inductive link, and an optrode array enables simultaneous neural recording along with optical stimulation. The 4-channel SCS system prototype has been implemented in a 0.35-μm CMOS process and combined with the optrode array. In vivo experiments involving light-induced local field potentials verified the efficacy of the SCS system. An implantable version of the SCS system with flexible hermetic sealing is under development for chronic experiments. PMID:25570099

  10. Electrophysiological channel interactions using focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Shefin S.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Wise, Andrew K.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fallon, James B.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Speech intelligibility with existing multichannel cochlear implants (CIs) is thought to be limited by poor spatial selectivity and interactions between CI channels caused by overlapping activation with monopolar (MP) stimulation. Our previous studies have shown that focused multipolar (FMP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation produce more restricted neural activation in the inferior colliculus (IC), compared to MP stimulation. Approach. This study explored interactions in the IC produced by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels. We recorded multi-unit neural activity in the IC of anaesthetized cats with normal and severely degenerated spiral ganglion neuron populations in response to FMP, TP and MP stimulation from a 14 channel CI. Stimuli were applied to a ‘fixed’ CI channel, chosen toward the middle of the cochlear electrode array, and the effects of simultaneously stimulating a more apical ‘test’ CI channel were measured as a function of spatial separation between the two stimulation channels and stimulus level of the fixed channel. Channel interactions were quantified by changes in neural responses and IC threshold (i.e., threshold shift) elicited by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels, compared to stimulation of the test channel alone. Main results. Channel interactions were significantly lower for FMP and TP than for MP stimulation (p < 0.001), whereas no significant difference was observed between FMP and TP stimulation. With MP stimulation, threshold shifts increased with decreased inter-electrode spacing and increased stimulus levels of the fixed channel. For FMP and TP stimulation, channel interactions were found to be similar for different inter-electrode spacing and stimulus levels of the fixed channel. Significance. The present study demonstrates how the degree of channel interactions in a CI can be controlled using stimulation configurations such as FMP and TP; such knowledge is essential in enhancing CI function in complex

  11. An implantable 64-channel neural interface with reconfigurable recording and stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Jesse J; Baldwin, Keith; Kindle, Alex; Guyon, Daniel; Nugent, Brian; Segura, Carlos; Rodriguez, John; Czarnecki, Andrew; Dispirito, Hailey J; Lachapelle, John; Parks, Philip D; Moran, James; Widge, Alik S; Dougherty, Darin D; Eskandar, Emad N

    2015-08-01

    Next generation implantable medical devices will have the potential to provide more precise and effective therapies through adaptive closed-loop controllers that combine sensing and stimulation across larger numbers of electrode channels. A major challenge in the design of such devices is balancing increased functionality and channel counts with the miniaturization required for implantation within small anatomical spaces. Customized therapies will require adaptive systems capable of tuning which channels are sensed and stimulated to overcome variability in patient-specific needs, surgical placement of electrodes, and chronic physiological responses. In order to address these challenges, we have designed a miniaturized implantable fully-reconfigurable front-end system that is integrated into the distal end of an 8-wire lead, enabling up to 64 electrodes to be dynamically configured for sensing and stimulation. Full reconfigurability is enabled by two custom 32×2 cross-point switch (CPS) matrix ASICs which can route any electrode to either an amplifier with reprogrammable bandwidth and integrated ADC or to one of two independent stimulation channels that can be driven through the lead. The 8-wire circuit includes a digital interface for robust communication as well as a charge-balanced powering scheme for enhanced safety. The system is encased in a hermetic package designed to fit within a 14 mm bur-hole in the skull for neuromodulation of the brain, but could easily be adapted to enhance therapies across a broad spectrum of applications. PMID:26738108

  12. [A fully-implantable active hearing device in congenital auricular atresia].

    PubMed

    Siegert, R; Neumann, C

    2014-07-01

    Active implantable hearing devices were primarily developed for sensorineural hearing loss. The vibrator coupling mechanisms were oriented towards normal middle ear anatomy and function. The aim of this project was to modify the only fully implantable hearing device with an implantable microphone for application in congenital auricular atresia, Carina™, and to introduce the modified device into the clinic. A special prosthesis was developed for the transducer and its individual coupling achieved by a special cramping system. The system was implanted in 5 patients with congenital auricular atresia. Audiological results were good; with patients' hearing gain exceeding 30 dB HL. Anatomic limits to the system's indications and technical drawbacks are also discussed. PMID:25056646

  13. Spontaneous Lead Breakage in Implanted Spinal Cord Stimulation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hun; Son, Hye Min; Choi, Jong Bum; Moon, Jee Youn

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has become an established clinical option for treatment of refractory chronic pain. Current hardware and implantation techniques for SCS are already highly developed and continuously improving; however, equipment failures over the course of long-term treatment are still encountered in a relatively high proportion of the cases treated with it. Percutaneous SCS leads seem to be particularly prone to dislocation and insulation failures. We describe our experience of lead breakage in the inserted spinal cord stimulator to a complex regional pain syndrome patient who obtained satisfactory pain relief after the revision of SCS. PMID:20552080

  14. Abnormal pitch perception produced by cochlear implant stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Tang, Qing; Lu, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary cochlear implants with multiple electrode stimulation can produce good speech perception but poor music perception. Hindered by the lack of a gold standard to quantify electric pitch, relatively little is known about the nature and extent of the electric pitch abnormalities and their impact on cochlear implant performance. Here we overcame this obstacle by comparing acoustic and electric pitch perception in 3 unilateral cochlear-implant subjects who had functionally usable acoustic hearing throughout the audiometric frequency range in the non-implant ear. First, to establish a baseline, we measured and found slightly impaired pure tone frequency discrimination and nearly perfect melody recognition in all 3 subjects' acoustic ear. Second, using pure tones in the acoustic ear to match electric pitch induced by an intra-cochlear electrode, we found that the frequency-electrode function was not only 1-2 octaves lower, but also 2 times more compressed in frequency range than the normal cochlear frequency-place function. Third, we derived frequency difference limens in electric pitch and found that the equivalent electric frequency discrimination was 24 times worse than normal-hearing controls. These 3 abnormalities are likely a result of a combination of broad electric field, distant intra-cochlear electrode placement, and non-uniform spiral ganglion cell distribution and survival, all of which are inherent to the electrode-nerve interface in contemporary cochlear implants. Previous studies emphasized on the "mean" shape of the frequency-electrode function, but the present study indicates that the large "variance" of this function, reflecting poor electric pitch discriminability, is the main factor limiting contemporary cochlear implant performance. PMID:24551131

  15. Abnormal Pitch Perception Produced by Cochlear Implant Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Tang, Qing; Lu, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary cochlear implants with multiple electrode stimulation can produce good speech perception but poor music perception. Hindered by the lack of a gold standard to quantify electric pitch, relatively little is known about the nature and extent of the electric pitch abnormalities and their impact on cochlear implant performance. Here we overcame this obstacle by comparing acoustic and electric pitch perception in 3 unilateral cochlear-implant subjects who had functionally usable acoustic hearing throughout the audiometric frequency range in the non-implant ear. First, to establish a baseline, we measured and found slightly impaired pure tone frequency discrimination and nearly perfect melody recognition in all 3 subjects’ acoustic ear. Second, using pure tones in the acoustic ear to match electric pitch induced by an intra-cochlear electrode, we found that the frequency-electrode function was not only 1–2 octaves lower, but also 2 times more compressed in frequency range than the normal cochlear frequency-place function. Third, we derived frequency difference limens in electric pitch and found that the equivalent electric frequency discrimination was 24 times worse than normal-hearing controls. These 3 abnormalities are likely a result of a combination of broad electric field, distant intra-cochlear electrode placement, and non-uniform spiral ganglion cell distribution and survival, all of which are inherent to the electrode-nerve interface in contemporary cochlear implants. Previous studies emphasized on the “mean” shape of the frequency-electrode function, but the present study indicates that the large “variance” of this function, reflecting poor electric pitch discriminability, is the main factor limiting contemporary cochlear implant performance. PMID:24551131

  16. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  17. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  18. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  19. A New Trans-Tympanic Microphone Approach for Fully Implantable Hearing Devices

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seong Tak; Shin, Dong Ho; Lim, Hyung-Gyu; Seong, Ki-Woong; Gottlieb, Peter; Puria, Sunil; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Cho, Jin-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Fully implantable hearing devices (FIHDs) have been developed as a new technology to overcome the disadvantages of conventional acoustic hearing aids. The implantable microphones currently used in FIHDs, however, have difficulty achieving high sensitivity to environmental sounds, low sensitivity to body noise, and ease of implantation. In general, implantable microphones may be placed under the skin in the temporal bone region of the skull. In this situation, body noise picked up during mastication and touching can be significant, and the layer of skin and hair can both attenuate and distort sounds. The new approach presently proposed is a microphone implanted at the tympanic membrane. This method increases the microphone’s sensitivity by utilizing the pinna’s directionally dependent sound collection capabilities and the natural resonances of the ear canal. The sensitivity and insertion loss of this microphone were measured in human cadaveric specimens in the 0.1 to 16 kHz frequency range. In addition, the maximum stable gain due to feedback between the trans-tympanic microphone and a round-window-drive transducer, was measured. The results confirmed in situ high-performance capabilities of the proposed trans-tympanic microphone. PMID:26371007

  20. Numerical simulation of electrically stimulated osteogenesis in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Acosta, J C; Garzón-Alvarado, D A; Lancellotti, V

    2014-04-01

    Cell behavior and tissue formation are influenced by a static electric field (EF). Several protocols for EF exposure are aimed at increasing the rate of tissue recovery and reducing the healing times in wounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of the EF action on cells and tissues are still a matter of research. In this work we introduce a mathematical model for electrically stimulated osteogenesis at the bone-dental implant interface. The model describes the influence of the EF in the most critical biological processes leading to bone formation at the bone-dental implant interface. The numerical solution is able to reproduce the distribution of spatial-temporal patterns describing the influence of EF during blood clotting, osteogenic cell migration, granulation tissue formation, displacements of the fibrillar matrix, and formation of new bone. In addition, the model describes the EF-mediated cell behavior and tissue formation which lead to an increased osteogenesis in both smooth and rough implant surfaces. Since numerical results compare favorably with experimental evidence, the model can be used to predict the outcome of using electrostimulation in other types of wounds and tissues. PMID:24413341

  1. An NFC-Enabled CMOS IC for a Wireless Fully Implantable Glucose Sensor.

    PubMed

    DeHennis, Andrew; Getzlaff, Stefan; Grice, David; Mailand, Marko

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated circuit (IC) that merges integrated optical and temperature transducers, optical interface circuitry, and a near-field communication (NFC)-enabled digital, wireless readout for a fully passive implantable sensor platform to measure glucose in people with diabetes. A flip-chip mounted LED and monolithically integrated photodiodes serve as the transduction front-end to enable fluorescence readout. A wide-range programmable transimpedance amplifier adapts the sensor signals to the input of an 11-bit analog-to-digital converter digitizing the measurements. Measurement readout is enabled by means of wireless backscatter modulation to a remote NFC reader. The system is able to resolve current levels of less than 10 pA with a single fluorescent measurement energy consumption of less than 1 μJ. The wireless IC is fabricated in a 0.6-μm-CMOS process and utilizes a 13.56-MHz-based ISO15693 for passive wireless readout through a NFC interface. The IC is utilized as the core interface to a fluorescent, glucose transducer to enable a fully implantable sensor-based continuous glucose monitoring system. PMID:26372659

  2. Design and Evaluation of a Robust PID Controller for a Fully Implantable Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus could be greatly improved by applying a closed-loop control strategy to insulin delivery, also known as an artificial pancreas (AP). In this work, we outline the design of a fully implantable AP using intraperitoneal (IP) insulin delivery and glucose sensing. The design process utilizes the rapid glucose sensing and insulin action offered by the IP space to tune a PID controller with insulin feedback to provide safe and effective insulin delivery. The controller was tuned to meet robust performance and stability specifications. An anti-reset windup strategy was introduced to prevent dangerous undershoot toward hypoglycemia after a large meal disturbance. The final controller design achieved 78% of time within the tight glycemic range of 80–140 mg/dL, with no time spent in hypoglycemia. The next step is to test this controller design in an animal model to evaluate the in vivo performance. PMID:26538805

  3. First permanent human implant of the Stimulus Router System, a novel neuroprosthesis: preliminary testing of a polarity reversing stimulation technique.

    PubMed

    Gan, Liu Shi; Ravid, Einat N; Kowalczewski, Jan; Gauthier, Michel; Olson, Jaret; Morhart, Michael; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Neuroprostheses (NPs) are electrical stimulators that help to restore sensory or motor functions lost as a result of neural damage. The Stimulus Router System (SRS) is a new type of NP developed in our laboratory. The system uses fully implanted, passive leads to "capture" and "route" some of the current flowing between pairs of surface electrodes to the vicinity of the target nerves, hence eliminating the need for an implanted stimulator. In June 2008, 3 SRS leads were implanted in a tetraplegic man for restoration of grasp and release. To reduce the size of the external wristlet and thereby optimize usability, we recently implemented a polarity reversing stimulation technique that allowed us to eliminate a reference electrode. Selective activation of three target muscles was achieved by switching the polarities of the stimulus current delivered between pairs of surface electrodes located over the pick-up terminals of the implanted leads and reducing the amplitude of the secondary phases of the stimulus pulses. PMID:22254983

  4. The 128-channel fully differential digital integrated neural recording and stimulation interface.

    PubMed

    Shahrokhi, Farzaneh; Abdelhalim, Karim; Serletis, Demitre; Carlen, Peter L; Genov, Roman

    2010-06-01

    We present a fully differential 128-channel integrated neural interface. It consists of an array of 8 X 16 low-power low-noise signal-recording and generation circuits for electrical neural activity monitoring and stimulation, respectively. The recording channel has two stages of signal amplification and conditioning with and a fully differential 8-b column-parallel successive approximation (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The total measured power consumption of each recording channel, including the SAR ADC, is 15.5 ¿W. The measured input-referred noise is 6.08 ¿ Vrms over a 5-kHz bandwidth, resulting in a noise efficiency factor of 5.6. The stimulation channel performs monophasic or biphasic voltage-mode stimulation, with a maximum stimulation current of 5 mA and a quiescent power dissipation of 51.5 ¿W. The design is implemented in 0.35-¿m complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology with the channel pitch of 200 ¿m for a total die size of 3.4 mm × 2.5 mm and a total power consumption of 9.33 mW. The neural interface was validated in in vitro recording of a low-Mg(2+)/high-K(+) epileptic seizure model in an intact hippocampus of a mouse. PMID:23853339

  5. A 32-channel fully implantable wireless neurosensor for simultaneous recording from two cortical regions

    PubMed Central

    Aceros, Juan; Yin, Ming; Borton, David A.; Patterson, William R.; Nurmikko, Arto V.

    2014-01-01

    We present a fully implantable, wireless, neurosensor for multiple-location neural interface applications. The device integrates two independent 16-channel intracortical microelectrode arrays and can simultaneously acquire 32 channels of broadband neural data from two separate cortical areas. The system-on-chip implantable sensor is built on a flexible Kapton polymer substrate and incorporates three very low power subunits: two cortical subunits connected to a common subcutaneous subunit. Each cortical subunit has an ultra-low power 16-channel preamplifier and multiplexer integrated onto a cortical microelectrode array. The subcutaneous epicranial unit has an inductively coupled power supply, two analog-to-digital converters, a low power digital controller chip, and microlaser-based infrared telemetry. The entire system is soft encapsulated with biocompatible flexible materials for in vivo applications. Broadband neural data is conditioned, amplified, and analog multiplexed by each of the cortical subunits and passed to the subcutaneous component, where it is digitized and combined with synchronization data and wirelessly transmitted transcutaneously using high speed infrared telemetry. PMID:22254801

  6. Design and Evaluation of a Fully Implantable Control Unit for Blood Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Unthan, Kristin; Gräf, Felix; Laumen, Marco; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Sommer, Christoph; Lanmüller, Hermann; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    As the number of donor hearts is limited while more and more patients suffer from end stage biventricular heart failure, Total Artificial Hearts become a promising alternative to conventional treatment. While pneumatic devices sufficiently supply the patients with blood flow, the patient's quality of life is limited by the percutaneous pressure lines and the size of the external control unit. This paper describes the development of the control unit of the ReinHeart, a fully implantable Total Artificial Heart. General requirements for any implantable control unit are defined from a technical and medical point of view: necessity of a Transcutaneous Energy Transmission, autonomous operation, safety, geometry, and efficiency. Based on the requirements, a prototype is designed; it incorporates a LiFePo4 battery pack with charger, a rectifier for transcutaneous energy transmission, the motor's driver electronics, and a microcontroller which monitors and controls all functions. In validation tests, the control unit demonstrated a stable operation on TET and battery supply and a safe switching from one supply to the other. The overall mean efficiency is 14% on TET and 22% on battery supply. The control unit is suitable for chronic animal trials of the ReinHeart. PMID:26583095

  7. A 32-channel fully implantable wireless neurosensor for simultaneous recording from two cortical regions.

    PubMed

    Aceros, Juan; Yin, Ming; Borton, David A; Patterson, William R; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2011-01-01

    We present a fully implantable, wireless, neurosensor for multiple-location neural interface applications. The device integrates two independent 16-channel intracortical microelectrode arrays and can simultaneously acquire 32 channels of broadband neural data from two separate cortical areas. The system-on-chip implantable sensor is built on a flexible Kapton polymer substrate and incorporates three very low power subunits: two cortical subunits connected to a common subcutaneous subunit. Each cortical subunit has an ultra-low power 16-channel preamplifier and multiplexer integrated onto a cortical microelectrode array. The subcutaneous epicranial unit has an inductively coupled power supply, two analog-to-digital converters, a low power digital controller chip, and microlaser-based infrared telemetry. The entire system is soft encapsulated with biocompatible flexible materials for in vivo applications. Broadband neural data is conditioned, amplified, and analog multiplexed by each of the cortical subunits and passed to the subcutaneous component, where it is digitized and combined with synchronization data and wirelessly transmitted transcutaneously using high speed infrared telemetry. PMID:22254801

  8. Carina® and Esteem®: A Systematic Review of Fully Implantable Hearing Devices

    PubMed Central

    Pulcherio, Janaina Oliveira Bentivi; Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Burke, Patrick Rademaker; Monsanto, Rafael da Costa; de Brito, Rubens; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the outcomes of the fully implantable middle ear devices Carina and Esteem regarding the treatment of hearing loss. Data Sources PubMed, Embase, Scielo, and Cochrane Library databases were searched. Study Selection Abstracts of 77 citations were screened, and 43 articles were selected for full review. From those, 22 studies and two literature reviews in English directly demonstrating the results of Carina and Esteem were included. Data Extraction There were a total of 244 patients ranging from 18 to 88 years. One hundred and 10 patients were implanted with Carina and with 134 Esteem. There were registered 92 males and 67 females. Five studies provided no information about patients’ age or gender. From the data available, the follow-up ranged from 2 to 29.4 months. Data Synthesis The comparison of the results about word recognition is difficult as there was no standardization of measurement. The results were obtained from various sound intensities and different frequencies. The outcomes comparing to conventional HAs were conflicting. Nevertheless, all results comparing to unaided condition showed improvement and showed a subjective improvement of quality of life. Conclusion There are still some problems to be solved, mainly related to device functioning and price. Due to the relatively few publications available and small sample sizes, we must be careful in extrapolating these results to a broader population. Additionally, none of all these studies represented level high levels of evidence (i.e. randomized controlled trials). PMID:25329463

  9. Design and Evaluation of a Fully Implantable Control Unit for Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Unthan, Kristin; Gräf, Felix; Laumen, Marco; Finocchiaro, Thomas; Sommer, Christoph; Lanmüller, Hermann; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    As the number of donor hearts is limited while more and more patients suffer from end stage biventricular heart failure, Total Artificial Hearts become a promising alternative to conventional treatment. While pneumatic devices sufficiently supply the patients with blood flow, the patient's quality of life is limited by the percutaneous pressure lines and the size of the external control unit. This paper describes the development of the control unit of the ReinHeart, a fully implantable Total Artificial Heart. General requirements for any implantable control unit are defined from a technical and medical point of view: necessity of a Transcutaneous Energy Transmission, autonomous operation, safety, geometry, and efficiency. Based on the requirements, a prototype is designed; it incorporates a LiFePo4 battery pack with charger, a rectifier for transcutaneous energy transmission, the motor's driver electronics, and a microcontroller which monitors and controls all functions. In validation tests, the control unit demonstrated a stable operation on TET and battery supply and a safe switching from one supply to the other. The overall mean efficiency is 14% on TET and 22% on battery supply. The control unit is suitable for chronic animal trials of the ReinHeart. PMID:26583095

  10. Sphenopalatine ganglion electrical nerve stimulation implant for intractable facial pain.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Foad; Reddy, Chandan G

    2015-01-01

    Persistent idiopathic facial pain can be extremely difficult and significantly challenging to manage for the patient and the clinician. Pharmacological treatment of these painful conditions is not always successful. It has been suggested that the autonomic reflex plays an important role in the pathophysiology of headaches and facial neuralgia. The key structure in the expression of cranial autonomic symptoms is the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG), also known as the pterygopalatine ganglion. The role of the SPG in the pathophysiology of headaches and facial pain has become clearer in the past decade. In this case report, we describe a 30 year-old woman with insidious onset of right facial pain. She was suffering from daily pain for more than 9 years prior to her visit at the pain clinic. Her pain was constant with episodic aggravation without a predisposing trigger factor. The patient was evaluated by multiple different specialties and tried multimodal therapy, which included antiepileptic medications, with minimal pain relief. A SPG block using short-acting local anesthetic provided significant temporary pain relief. The second and third attempt of SPG block using different local anesthetic medications demonstrated the same responses. After a thorough psychological assessment and ruling out the presence of a correctable cause for the pain, we decided to proceed with SPG electrical neuromodulation. The patient reported significant pain relief during the electrical nerve stimulation trial. The patient underwent a permanent implant of the neurostimulation electrode in the SPG region. The patient was successfully taken off opioid medication and her pain was dramatically responsive during a 6 month follow-up visit. In this article we describe the SPG nerve stimulation and the technical aspect of pterygopalatine fossa electrode placement. The pterygoplatine fossa is an easily accessible location. This case report will be encouraging for physicians treating intractable

  11. A reliable method for intracranial electrode implantation and chronic electrical stimulation in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Electrical stimulation of brain structures has been widely used in rodent models for kindling or modeling deep brain stimulation used clinically. This requires surgical implantation of intracranial electrodes and subsequent chronic stimulation in individual animals for several weeks. Anchoring screws and dental acrylic have long been used to secure implanted intracranial electrodes in rats. However, such an approach is limited when carried out in mouse models as the thin mouse skull may not be strong enough to accommodate the anchoring screws. We describe here a screw-free, glue-based method for implanting bipolar stimulating electrodes in the mouse brain and validate this method in a mouse model of hippocampal electrical kindling. Methods Male C57 black mice (initial ages of 6–8 months) were used in the present experiments. Bipolar electrodes were implanted bilaterally in the hippocampal CA3 area for electrical stimulation and electroencephalographic recordings. The electrodes were secured onto the skull via glue and dental acrylic but without anchoring screws. A daily stimulation protocol was used to induce electrographic discharges and motor seizures. The locations of implanted electrodes were verified by hippocampal electrographic activities and later histological assessments. Results Using the glue-based implantation method, we implanted bilateral bipolar electrodes in 25 mice. Electrographic discharges and motor seizures were successfully induced via hippocampal electrical kindling. Importantly, no animal encountered infection in the implanted area or a loss of implanted electrodes after 4–6 months of repetitive stimulation/recording. Conclusion We suggest that the glue-based, screw-free method is reliable for chronic brain stimulation and high-quality electroencephalographic recordings in mice. The technical aspects described this study may help future studies in mouse models. PMID:23914984

  12. Assessment of Mechanical Stability and Safety for Fully Edentulous Maxilla with Dental Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arahira, Takaaki; Todo, Mitsugu; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    A three-dimensional maxillary bone model was constructed using CT-images. The distribution of Young’s modulus was also estimated from the bone mineral density distribution. Four or six implants were embedded into the maxillary model and a metal prosthesis was attached to the implants. Computational analysis of the maxilla model was performed in order to characterize effects of the number of embedded implants on the stress state of the maxilla under two different loading conditions. For the two loading conditions, the distribution of strain energy density was severely concentrated especially around the right-molar implant, suggesting bone damage and absorption in this region. The 4-implants model with rear implantation and shortened prosthesis showed almost the same value of strain energy density in the 6-implants model. It is thus concluded that this kind of 3-D modeling could clinically be used for predicting the optimal position of implantation corresponding to each patient.

  13. A Fully Implantable, Programmable and Multimodal Neuroprocessor for Wireless, Cortically Controlled Brain-Machine Interface Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fei; Aghagolzadeh, Mehdi; Oweiss, Karim

    2012-01-01

    Reliability, scalability and clinical viability are of utmost importance in the design of wireless Brain Machine Interface systems (BMIs). This paper reports on the design and implementation of a neuroprocessor for conditioning raw extracellular neural signals recorded through microelectrode arrays chronically implanted in the brain of awake behaving rats. The neuroprocessor design exploits a sparse representation of the neural signals to combat the limited wireless telemetry bandwidth. We demonstrate a multimodal processing capability (monitoring, compression, and spike sorting) inherent in the neuroprocessor to support a wide range of scenarios in real experimental conditions. A wireless transmission link with rate-dependent compression strategy is shown to preserve information fidelity in the neural data. At 32 channels, the neuroprocessor has been fully implemented on a 5mm×5mm nano-FPGA, and the prototyping resulted in 5.19 mW power consumption, bringing its performance within the power-size constraints for clinical use. The optimal design for compression and sorting performance was evaluated for multiple sampling frequencies, wavelet basis choice and power consumption. PMID:23050029

  14. Stimulation Stability and Selectivity of Chronically Implanted Multicontact Nerve Cuff Electrodes in the Human Upper Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Polasek, Katharine H.; Hoyen, Harry A.; Keith, Michael W.; Kirsch, Robert F.; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2010-01-01

    Nine spiral nerve cuff electrodes were implanted in two human subjects for up to three years with no adverse functional effects. The objective of this study was to look at the long term nerve and muscle response to stimulation through nerve cuff electrodes. The nerve conduction velocity remained within the clinically accepted range for the entire testing period. The stimulation thresholds stabilized after approximately 20 weeks. The variability in the activation over time was not different from muscle-based electrodes used in implanted functional electrical stimulation systems. Three electrodes had multiple, independent contacts to evaluate selective recruitment of muscles. A single muscle could be selectively activated from each electrode using single-contact stimulation and the selectivity was increased with the use of field steering techniques. The selectivity after three years was consistent with selectivity measured during the implant surgery. Nerve cuff electrodes are effective for chronic muscle activation and multichannel functional electrical stimulation in humans. PMID:19775987

  15. A PARYLENE-BASED MICROELECTRODE ARRAY IMPLANT FOR SPINAL CORD STIMULATION IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Nandra, Mandheerej. S.; Lavrov, Igor A.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2011-01-01

    The design and fabrication of an epidural spinal cord implant using a parylene-based microelectrode array is presented. Rats with hindlimb paralysis from a complete spinal cord transection were implanted with the device and studied for up to eight weeks, where we have demonstrated recovery of hindlimb stepping functionality through pulsed stimulation. The microelectrode array allows for a high degree of freedom and specificity in selecting the site of stimulation compared to wire-based implants, and triggers varied biological responses that can lead to an increased understanding of the spinal cord and locomotion recovery for victims of spinal cord injury. PMID:21841938

  16. Two-way communication for programming and measurement in a miniature implantable stimulator.

    PubMed

    Thil, M A; Gérard, B; Jarvis, J C; Delbeke, J

    2005-07-01

    Implantable stimulators are needed for chronic electrical stimulation of nerves and muscles in experimental studies. The device described exploits the versatility of current microcontrollers for stimulation and communication in a miniature implant. Their standard outputs can provide the required selectable constant-current sources. In this device, pre-programmed stimulation paradigms were selected by transcutaneous light pulses. The potential of a programmable integrated circuit (PIC) was thus exploited. Implantable devices must be biocompatible. A novel encapsulation method that require no specialised equipment and that used two classical encapsulants, silicone and Teflon was developed. It was tested for implantation periods of up to four weeks. A novel way to estimate electrode impedance in awake animals is also presented. It was thus possible to follow the evolution of the nerve-electrode interface and, if necessary, to adjust the stimulation parameters. In practice, the electrode voltage at the end of a known constant-current pulse was measured by the PIC. The binary coded value was then indicated to the user as a series of muscle twitches that represented the binary value of the impedance measurement. This neurostimulator has been successfully tested in vitro and in vivo. Thresholds and impedance values were chronically monitored following implantation of a self-sizing spiral cuff electrode. Impedance variations in the first weeks could reflect morphological changes usually observed after the implantation of such electrodes. PMID:16255437

  17. CUSTOM-FIT RADIOLUCENT CRANIAL IMPLANTS FOR NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL RECORDING AND STIMULATION

    PubMed Central

    Mulliken, Grant H; Bichot, Narcisse P; Ghadooshahy, Azriel; Sharma, Jitendra; Kornblith, Simon; Philcock, Michael; Desimone, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Recording and manipulating neural activity in awake behaving animal models requires long-term implantation of cranial implants that must address a variety of design considerations, which include preventing infection, minimizing tissue damage, mechanical strength of the implant, and MRI compatibility. New Method Here we address these issues by designing legless, custom-fit cranial implants using structural MRI-based reconstruction of the skull and that are made from carbon-reinforced PEEK. Results We report several novel custom-fit radiolucent implant designs, which include a legless recording chamber, a legless stimulation chamber, a multi-channel microdrive and a head post. The fit to the skull was excellent in all cases, with no visible gaps between the base of the implants and the skull. The wound margin was minimal in size and showed no sign of infection or skin recession. Comparison with Existing Methods Cranial implants used for neurophysiological investigation in awake behaving animals often employ methyl methacrylate (MMA) to serve as a bonding agent to secure the implant to the skull. Other designs rely on radially extending legs to secure the implant. Both of these methods have significant drawbacks. MMA is toxic to bone and frequently leads to infection while radially extending legs cause the skin to recede away from the implant, ultimately exposing bone and proliferating granulation tissue. Conclusions These radiolucent implants constitute a set of technologies suitable for reliable long-term recording, which minimize infection and tissue damage. PMID:25542350

  18. Effects of Vestibular Prosthesis Electrode Implantation and Stimulation on Hearing in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y.; Della Santina, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation on hearing in rhesus monkeys, we measured auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) in four rhesus monkeys before and after unilateral implantation of vestibular prosthesis electrodes in each of 3 left semicircular canals (SCC). Each of the 3 left SCCs were implanted with electrodes via a transmastoid approach. Right ears, which served as controls, were not surgically manipulated. Hearing tests were conducted before implantation (BI) and then 4 weeks post implantation both without electrical stimulation (NS) and with electrical stimulation (S). During the latter condition, prosthetic electrical stimuli encoding 3 dimensions of head angular velocity were delivered to the 3 ampullary branches of the left vestibular nerve via each of 3 electrode pairs of a multichannel vestibular prosthesis. Electrical stimuli comprised charge-balanced biphasic pulses at a baseline rate of 94 pulses/sec, with pulse frequency modulated from 48–222 pulses/s by head angular velocity. ABR hearing thresholds to clicks and tone pips at 1, 2, and 4 kHz increased by 5–10 dB from BI to NS and increased another ~5 dB from NS to S in implanted ears. No significant change was seen in right ears. DPOAE amplitudes decreased by 2–14 dB from BI to NS in implanted ears. There was a slight but insignificant decrease of DPOAE amplitude and a corresponding increase of DPOAE/Noise floor ratio between NS and S in implanted ears. Vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation have small but measurable effects on hearing in rhesus monkeys. Coupled with the clinical observation that patients with cochlear implants only rarely exhibit signs of vestibular injury or spurious vestibular nerve stimulation, these results suggest that although implantation and activation of multichannel vestibular prosthesis electrodes in human will carry a risk of hearing loss

  19. In vivo stimulation of bone formation by aluminum and oxygen plasma surface-modified magnesium implants.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hoi Man; Zhao, Ying; Tam, Vivian; Wu, Shuilin; Chu, Paul K; Zheng, Yufeng; To, Michael Kai Tsun; Leung, Frankie K L; Luk, Keith D K; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Yeung, Kelvin W K

    2013-12-01

    A newly developed magnesium implant is used to stimulate bone formation in vivo. The magnesium implant after undergoing dual aluminum and oxygen plasma implantation is able to suppress rapid corrosion, leaching of magnesium ions, as well as hydrogen gas release from the biodegradable alloy in simulated body fluid (SBF). No released aluminum is detected from the SBF extract and enhanced corrosion resistance properties are confirmed by electrochemical tests. In vitro studies reveal enhanced growth of GFP mouse osteoblasts on the aluminum oxide coated sample, but not on the untreated sample. In addition to that a small amount (50 ppm) of magnesium ions can enhance osteogenic differentiation as reported previously, our present data show a low concentration of hydrogen can give rise to the same effect. To compare the bone volume change between the plasma-treated magnesium implant and untreated control, micro-computed tomography is performed and the plasma-treated implant is found to induce significant new bone formation adjacent to the implant from day 1 until the end of the animal study. On the contrary, bone loss is observed during the first week post-operation from the untreated magnesium sample. Owing to the protection offered by the Al2O3 layer, the plasma-treated implant degrades more slowly and the small amount of released magnesium ions stimulate new bone formation locally as revealed by histological analyses. Scanning electron microscopy discloses that the Al2O3 layer at the bone-implant interface is still present two months after implantation. In addition, no inflammation or tissue necrosis is observed from both treated and untreated implants. These promising results suggest that the plasma-treated magnesium implant can stimulate bone formation in vivo in a minimal invasive way and without causing post-operative complications. PMID:24060425

  20. Non-penetrating round window electrode stimulation for tinnitus therapy followed by cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Gentiana I; Sarnes, Petra; Warnecke, Athanasia; Stöver, Timo; Jäger, Burkard; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Lenarz, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    One main theory behind the origin of tinnitus is based on the idea that alterations of the spontaneous electrical activity within the auditory system lead to abnormal firing patterns in the affected nervous structures [1]. A possible therapeutic option is the use of electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve for the recovery or at least limitation of the abnormal firing pattern to a level that can be easily tolerated by the patient. The Tinnelec Implant consists of a single non-penetrating stimulation electrode connected to a Neurelec cochlear implant system. As a first feasibility study, before starting implantations in hearing patients, we thought to assess the potential of the Tinnelec stimulation to treat tinnitus in unilateral deaf patients, analysing hereby its effectivity and risks. Three patients suffering from unilateral tinnitus resistant to pharmacological treatment and ipsilateral severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss/deafness were implanted with a Tinnelec system between September 2007 and July 2008, at the ENT Department of Hannover Medical School. The stimulation strategy was chosen to induce alleviation of the tinnitus through suppression, masking and/or habituation and the response of each patient on the treatment was monitored using a visual analogue scale (VAS) on loudness and annoyance of tinnitus, mood of the patient, as well as the tinnitus handicap inventory (THI). All patients had a benefit from the electrical stimulation for their tinnitus (THI-score improvement of 20-70), however, not all participants profited from the Tinnelec system in same way and degree. In one patient, despite good results, the device had to be replaced with a conventional cochlear implant because of Tinnelec-independent increase in hearing loss on the contralateral ear. Additionally, due to the extension of cochlear implant indications, the devices of the other two patients have been meanwhile replaced with a conventional cochlear implant to benefit

  1. Use of tricalcium phosphate or electrical stimulation to enhance the bone-porous implant interface.

    PubMed

    Berry, J L; Geiger, J M; Moran, J M; Skraba, J S; Greenwald, A S

    1986-01-01

    Implant stabilization by biologic ingrowth into a porous surface offers a durable method of prosthetic fixation. These systems, however, lack the immediate stability offered by the use of acrylic bone cement. The interface strength of porous coated Co--Cr--Mo in a canine model does not approach that of acrylic bone cement until two weeks postoperatively. It is expected that this would be a minimum time period in clinical applications. Both chemical and electrical means have been advocated as methods to affect tissue ingrowth. A study using a canine model was undertaken to determine tissue ingrowth rates utilizing examples of these two methods: (1) impregnation of the porous structures with tricalcium phosphate powder (TCP); or (2) the application of an electrical stimulator to the implant with the implant itself serving as the cathode. Ten implants were coated with TCP, two each at weekly intervals from 1 to 5 weeks. Plain porous rods were likewise implanted, serving as the controls. While histology did reveal a slightly more dense bony structure, the interface bond strength was not affected by TCP. Electrical stimulation of the implant was similarly investigated with an additional time period of 10 weeks. Compared to the controls, the electrically stimulated implants reveal no statistically demonstratable difference in interface strength. Histologic specimens indicate larger areas of calcification than are observed in the controls. PMID:3949824

  2. New cosurface capacitive stimulators for the development of active osseointegrative implantable devices.

    PubMed

    Soares Dos Santos, Marco P; Marote, Ana; Santos, T; Torrão, João; Ramos, A; Simões, José A O; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A B; Furlani, Edward P; Vieira, Sandra I; Ferreira, Jorge A F

    2016-01-01

    Non-drug strategies based on biophysical stimulation have been emphasized for the treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal conditions. However, to date, an effective stimulation system for intracorporeal therapies has not been proposed. This is particularly true for active intramedullary implants that aim to optimize osseointegration. The increasing demand for these implants, particularly for hip and knee replacements, has driven the design of innovative stimulation systems that are effective in bone-implant integration. In this paper, a new cosurface-based capacitive system concept is proposed for the design of implantable devices that deliver controllable and personalized electric field stimuli to target tissues. A prototype architecture of this system was constructed for in vitro tests, and its ability to deliver controllable stimuli was numerically analyzed. Successful results were obtained for osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation in the in vitro tests. This work provides, for the first time, a design of a stimulation system that can be embedded in active implantable devices for controllable bone-implant integration and regeneration. The proposed cosurface design holds potential for the implementation of novel and innovative personalized stimulatory therapies based on the delivery of electric fields to bone cells. PMID:27456818

  3. New cosurface capacitive stimulators for the development of active osseointegrative implantable devices

    PubMed Central

    Soares dos Santos, Marco P.; Marote, Ana; Santos, T.; Torrão, João; Ramos, A.; Simões, José A. O.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.; Furlani, Edward P.; Vieira, Sandra I.; Ferreira, Jorge A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Non-drug strategies based on biophysical stimulation have been emphasized for the treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal conditions. However, to date, an effective stimulation system for intracorporeal therapies has not been proposed. This is particularly true for active intramedullary implants that aim to optimize osseointegration. The increasing demand for these implants, particularly for hip and knee replacements, has driven the design of innovative stimulation systems that are effective in bone-implant integration. In this paper, a new cosurface-based capacitive system concept is proposed for the design of implantable devices that deliver controllable and personalized electric field stimuli to target tissues. A prototype architecture of this system was constructed for in vitro tests, and its ability to deliver controllable stimuli was numerically analyzed. Successful results were obtained for osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation in the in vitro tests. This work provides, for the first time, a design of a stimulation system that can be embedded in active implantable devices for controllable bone-implant integration and regeneration. The proposed cosurface design holds potential for the implementation of novel and innovative personalized stimulatory therapies based on the delivery of electric fields to bone cells. PMID:27456818

  4. Possibilities of implanted control in stimulated light scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarenko, Anatoliy G.; Andreev, Alexandr N.; Kanaev, Andrey V.

    2004-09-01

    Some possibilities of simple and thus reliable schemes of experiment "self-control" exploiting intrinsic features of studied non-linear phenomena like wave front reversal under stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) rather than outer sensors and controls are described. The schemes discussed provide input signal dynamic region broadening in stimulated scattering converters and angle of synchronism self-tuning while two frequency pumping.

  5. Evaluation of focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants in acutely deafened cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Shefin S.; Wise, Andrew K.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fallon, James B.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. The conductive nature of the fluids and tissues of the cochlea can lead to broad activation of spiral ganglion neurons using contemporary cochlear implant stimulation configurations such as monopolar (MP) stimulation. The relatively poor spatial selectivity is thought to limit implant performance, particularly in noisy environments. Several current focusing techniques have been proposed to reduce the spread of activation with the aim towards achieving improved clinical performance. Approach. The present research evaluated the efficacy of focused multipolar (FMP) stimulation, a relatively new focusing technique in the cochlea, and compared its efficacy to both MP stimulation and tripolar (TP) stimulation. The spread of neural activity across the inferior colliculus (IC), measured by recording the spatial tuning curve, was used as a measure of spatial selectivity. Adult cats (n = 6) were acutely deafened and implanted with an intracochlear electrode array before multi-unit responses were recorded across the cochleotopic gradient of the contralateral IC. Recordings were made in response to acoustic and electrical stimulation using the MP, TP and FMP configurations. Main results. FMP and TP stimulation resulted in greater spatial selectivity than MP stimulation. However, thresholds were significantly higher (p < 0.001) for FMP and TP stimulation compared to MP stimulation. There were no differences found in spatial selectivity and threshold between FMP and TP stimulation. Significance. The greater spatial selectivity of FMP and TP stimulation would be expected to result in improved clinical performance. However, further research will be required to demonstrate the efficacy of these modes of stimulation after longer durations of deafness.

  6. Cochlear Implant Stimulation of a Hearing Ear Generates Separate Electrophonic and Electroneural Responses

    PubMed Central

    Baumhoff, Peter; Kral, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Electroacoustic stimulation in subjects with residual hearing is becoming more widely used in clinical practice. However, little is known about the properties of electrically induced responses in the hearing cochlea. In the present study, normal-hearing guinea pig cochleae underwent cochlear implantation through a cochleostomy without significant loss of hearing. Using recordings of unit activity in the midbrain, we were able to investigate the excitation patterns throughout the tonotopic field determined by acoustic stimulation. With the cochlear implant and the midbrain multielectrode arrays left in place, the ears were pharmacologically deafened and electrical stimulation was repeated in the deafened condition. The results demonstrate that, in addition to direct neuronal (electroneuronal) stimulation, in the hearing cochlea excitation of the hair cells occurs (“electrophonic responses”) at the cochlear site corresponding to the dominant temporal frequency components of the electrical stimulus, provided these are < 12 kHz. The slope of the rate–level functions of the neurons in the deafened condition was steeper and the firing rate was higher than in the hearing condition at those sites that were activated in the two conditions. Finally, in a monopolar stimulation configuration, the differences between hearing status conditions were smaller than in the narrower (bipolar) configurations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Stimulation with cochlear implants and hearing aids is becoming more widely clinically used in subjects with residual hearing. The neurophysiological characteristics underlying electroacoustic stimulation and the mechanism of its benefit remain unclear. The present study directly demonstrates that cochlear implantation does not interfere with the normal mechanical and physiological function of the cochlea. For the first time, it double-dissociates the electrical responses of hair cells (electrophonic responses) from responses of the auditory nerve

  7. Characterization of a Polymer-Based, Fully Organic Prosthesis for Implantation into the Subretinal Space of the Rat.

    PubMed

    Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Di Paolo, Mattia; Ghezzi, Diego; Mete, Maurizio; Di Marco, Stefano; Maya-Vetencourt, José Fernando; Maccarone, Rita; Desii, Andrea; Di Fonzo, Fabio; Bramini, Mattia; Russo, Angela; Laudato, Lucia; Donelli, Ilaria; Cilli, Michele; Freddi, Giuliano; Pertile, Grazia; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Bisti, Silvia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Replacement strategies arise as promising approaches in case of inherited retinal dystrophies leading to blindness. A fully organic retinal prosthesis made of conjugated polymers layered onto a silk fibroin substrate is engineered. First, the biophysical and surface properties are characterized; then, the long-term biocompatibility is assessed after implantation of the organic device in the subretinal space of 3-months-old rats for a period of five months. The results indicate a good stability of the subretinal implants over time, with preservation of the physical properties of the polymeric layer and a tight contact with the outer retina. Immunoinflammatory markers detect only a modest tissue reaction to the surgical insult and the foreign body that peaks shortly after surgery and progressively decreases with time to normal levels at five months after implantation. Importantly, the integrity of the polymeric layer in direct contact with the retinal tissue is preserved after five months of implantation. The recovery of the foreign-body tissue reaction is also associated with a normal b-wave in the electroretinographic response. The results demonstrate that the device implanted in nondystrophic eyes is well tolerated, highly biocompatible, and suitable as retinal prosthesis in case of photoreceptor degeneration. PMID:27240295

  8. Implantable power generation system utilizing muscle contractions excited by electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Genta; Hijikata, Wataru; Tomioka, Kota; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2016-06-01

    An implantable power generation system driven by muscle contractions for supplying power to active implantable medical devices, such as pacemakers and neurostimulators, is proposed. In this system, a muscle is intentionally contracted by an electrical stimulation in accordance with the demands of the active implantable medical device for electrical power. The proposed system, which comprises a small electromagnetic induction generator, electrodes with an electrical circuit for stimulation and a transmission device to convert the linear motion of the muscle contractions into rotational motion for the magneto rotor, generates electrical energy. In an ex vivo demonstration using the gastrocnemius muscle of a toad, which was 28 mm in length and weighed 1.3 g, the electrical energy generated by the prototype exceeded the energy consumed for electrical stimulation, with the net power being 111 µW. It was demonstrated that the proposed implantable power generation system has the potential to replace implantable batteries for active implantable medical devices. PMID:27006422

  9. Spatio-temporal source modeling of evoked potentials to acoustic and cochlear implant stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ponton, C W; Don, M; Waring, M D; Eggermont, J J; Masuda, A

    1993-01-01

    Spatio-temporal source modeling (STSM) of event-related potentials was used to estimate the loci and characteristics of cortical activity evoked by acoustic stimulation in normal hearing subjects and by electrical stimulation in cochlear implant (CI) subjects. In both groups of subjects, source solutions obtained for the N1/P2 complex were located in the superior half of the temporal lobe in the head model. Results indicate that it may be possible to determine whether stimulation of different implant channels activates different regions of cochleotopically organized auditory cortex. Auditory system activation can be assessed further by examining the characteristics of the source wave forms. For example, subjects whose cochlear implants provided auditory sensations and normal hearing subjects had similar source activity. In contrast, a subject in whom implant activation evoked eyelid movements exhibited different source wave forms. STSM analysis may provide an electrophysiological technique for guiding rehabilitation programs based on the capabilities of the individual implant user and for disentangling the complex response patterns to electrical stimulation of the brain. PMID:7694834

  10. Speech perception with interaction-compensated simultaneous stimulation and long pulse durations in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Schatzer, Reinhold; Koroleva, Inna; Griessner, Andreas; Levin, Sergey; Kusovkov, Vladislav; Yanov, Yuri; Zierhofer, Clemens

    2015-04-01

    Early multi-channel designs in the history of cochlear implant development were based on a vocoder-type processing of frequency channels and presented bands of compressed analog stimulus waveforms simultaneously on multiple tonotopically arranged electrodes. The realization that the direct summation of electrical fields as a result of simultaneous electrode stimulation exacerbates interactions among the stimulation channels and limits cochlear implant outcome led to the breakthrough in the development of cochlear implants, the continuous interleaved (CIS) sampling coding strategy. By interleaving stimulation pulses across electrodes, CIS activates only a single electrode at each point in time, preventing a direct summation of electrical fields and hence the primary component of channel interactions. In this paper we show that a previously presented approach of simultaneous stimulation with channel interaction compensation (CIC) may also ameliorate the deleterious effects of simultaneous channel interaction on speech perception. In an acute study conducted in eleven experienced MED-EL implant users, configurations involving simultaneous stimulation with CIC and doubled pulse phase durations have been investigated. As pairs of electrodes were activated simultaneously and pulse durations were doubled, carrier rates remained the same. Comparison conditions involved both CIS and fine structure (FS) strategies, either with strictly sequential or paired-simultaneous stimulation. Results showed no statistical difference in the perception of sentences in noise and monosyllables for sequential and paired-simultaneous stimulation with doubled phase durations. This suggests that CIC can largely compensate for the effects of simultaneous channel interaction, for both CIS and FS coding strategies. A simultaneous stimulation paradigm has a number of potential advantages over a traditional sequential interleaved design. The flexibility gained when dropping the requirement of

  11. Plasma Implantation Technology for Upcoming Ultra Shallow and Highly Doped Fully Depleted Silicon On Insulator Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzatti, Frederic; Milési, Frederic; Delaye, Vincent; Duchaine, Julian; Torregrosa, Frank; Etienne, Hasnaa; Yckache, Karim

    2011-01-01

    To face the continuous dimensions downscaling for upcoming semiconductor devices, we have investigated a plasma immersion ion implantation way and have compared the results to a conventional one. This new implantation method allows, in particular, high and thin doping concentration to field source and drain requirements for 32 nm node and below. In addition to this key step, a silicon selective epitaxy growth has been performed. Thus, n-type and p-type ion implantations have been carried out on thin blanket SOI substrates in Pulsion® plasma ion implantation tool manufactured by Ion Beam Services, with AsH3, BF3 or B2H6 precursors. Then a recrystallization annealing followed by silicon selective epitaxial growth has been performed in a reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition tool. Regarding n-type implantation we observed a poly-silicon growth in areas where the top silicon has been amorphous down to the buried oxide and a mono-silicon growth for areas where the top silicon has not been completely amorphous. Indeed, in this case recrystallization annealing was not sufficient to allow lengthwise solid phase epitaxy growth whereas there were no difficulties for axial one. Regarding p-type implantations no epitaxial growths have been observed at all. This lack of growth cannot be explained by a complete silicon amorphization which would have led to a growth of poly-silicon like for n-type implantation. According to our first results this growth vacancy could be explained by the very high boron atoms concentration on the substrate surface. The latter being resistant to HF-last cleaning could thus block silicon nucleation. However some rinsing processes, more or less aggressive, have been tested to remove this boron silicon alloy layer. Among these different tests, hydrochloric or plasma etching have provided, in some specific cases, promising results allowing an epitaxial silicon growth.

  12. A Battery-Less, Implantable Neuro-Electronic Interface for Studying the Mechanisms of Deep Brain Stimulation in Rat Models.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Po; Yeh, Chun-Yi; Huang, Pin-Yang; Wang, Zong-Ye; Cheng, Hsiang-Hui; Li, Yi-Ting; Chuang, Chi-Fen; Huang, Po-Chiun; Tang, Kea-Tiong; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Chang, Yen-Chung; Yeh, Shih-Rung; Chen, Hsin

    2016-02-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been a promising alternative for treating several neural disorders, the mechanisms underlying the DBS remain not fully understood. As rat models provide the advantage of recording and stimulating different disease-related regions simultaneously, this paper proposes a battery-less, implantable neuro-electronic interface suitable for studying DBS mechanisms with a freely-moving rat. The neuro-electronic interface mainly consists of a microsystem able to interact with eight different brain regions bi-directionally and simultaneously. To minimize the size of the implant, the microsystem receives power and transmits data through a single coil. In addition, particular attention is paid to the capability of recording neural activities right after each stimulation, so as to acquire information on how stimulations modulate neural activities. The microsystem has been fabricated with the standard 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The chip area is 7.74 mm (2) , and the microsystem is able to operate with a single supply voltage of 1 V. The wireless interface allows a maximum power of 10 mW to be transmitted together with either uplink or downlink data at a rate of 2 Mbps or 100 kbps, respectively. The input referred noise of recording amplifiers is 1.16 μVrms, and the stimulation voltage is tunable from 1.5 V to 4.5 V with 5-bit resolution. After the electrical functionality of the microsystem is tested, the capability of the microsystem to interface with rat brain is further examined and compared with conventional instruments. All experimental results are presented and discussed in this paper. PMID:25838526

  13. Concept Developed for an Implanted Stimulated Muscle-Powered Piezoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Kilgore, Kevin; Ercegovic, David; Gustafson, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    Implanted electronic devices are typically powered by batteries or transcutaneous power transmission. Batteries must be replaced or recharged, and transcutaneous power sources burden the patient or subject with external equipment prone to failure. A completely self-sustaining implanted power source would alleviate these limitations. Skeletal muscle provides an available autologous power source containing native chemical energy that produces power in excess of the requirements for muscle activation by motor nerve stimulation. A concept has been developed to convert stimulated skeletal muscle power into electrical energy (see the preceding illustration). We propose to connect a piezoelectric generator between a muscle tendon and bone. Electrically stimulated muscle contractions would exert force on the piezoelectric generator, charging a storage circuit that would be used to power the stimulator and other devices.

  14. Toward an implantable functional electrical stimulation device to correct strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Federico G.; Isobe, Jun; Zealear, David; Judy, Jack W.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Patnode, Stephanie; Lee, Hyowon; Hahn, Brian T.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the feasibility of electrically stimulating the lateral rectus muscle to recover its physiologic abduction ability in cases of complete sixth cranial (abducens) nerve palsy. METHODS In the feline lateral rectus muscle model, the effects of a charge-balanced, biphasic, current-controlled stimulus on the movement of the eye were investigated while stimulation frequency, amplitude, and pulse duration was varied. Eye deflection was measured with a force transducer. Denervated conditions were simulated by injection of botulinum toxin A. RESULTS Three chemically denervated and 4 control lateral rectus muscles were analyzed. In control lateral rectus muscles, the minimum fusion frequency was approximately 170 Hz, and the maximum evoked abduction was 27°. The minimum fusion frequency was unchanged after 4 weeks of chemical denervation. Stimulation of chemically denervated lateral rectus muscle resulted in 17° of abduction. For both innervated and chemically denervated lateral rectus muscle, frequencies greater than 175 Hz yielded very little increase in abduction. Modulating amplitude produced noticeable movement throughout the tested range (0.2 to 9 mA). CONCLUSIONS Results from the feline lateral rectus muscle showed that electrical stimulation is a feasible approach to evoke a contraction from a denervated lateral rectus muscle. The degree of denervation of the feline lateral rectus muscle was indeterminate. Varying the stimulation amplitude allowed greater eye movement. It is very likely that both frequency and amplitude must be modulated for finer control of static eye position. PMID:19375369

  15. Evoked EMG-based torque prediction under muscle fatigue in implanted neural stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Zhang, Qin; Guiraud, David; Fattal, Charles

    2011-10-01

    In patients with complete spinal cord injury, fatigue occurs rapidly and there is no proprioceptive feedback regarding the current muscle condition. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the muscle state and assess the expected muscle response to improve the current FES system toward adaptive force/torque control in the presence of muscle fatigue. Our team implanted neural and epimysial electrodes in a complete paraplegic patient in 1999. We carried out a case study, in the specific case of implanted stimulation, in order to verify the corresponding torque prediction based on stimulus evoked EMG (eEMG) when muscle fatigue is occurring during electrical stimulation. Indeed, in implanted stimulation, the relationship between stimulation parameters and output torques is more stable than external stimulation in which the electrode location strongly affects the quality of the recruitment. Thus, the assumption that changes in the stimulation-torque relationship would be mainly due to muscle fatigue can be made reasonably. The eEMG was proved to be correlated to the generated torque during the continuous stimulation while the frequency of eEMG also decreased during fatigue. The median frequency showed a similar variation trend to the mean absolute value of eEMG. Torque prediction during fatigue-inducing tests was performed based on eEMG in model cross-validation where the model was identified using recruitment test data. The torque prediction, apart from the potentiation period, showed acceptable tracking performances that would enable us to perform adaptive closed-loop control through implanted neural stimulation in the future.

  16. Evoked EMG-based torque prediction under muscle fatigue in implanted neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Zhang, Qin; Guiraud, David; Fattal, Charles

    2011-12-01

    In patients with complete spinal cord injury, fatigue occurs rapidly and there is no proprioceptive feedback regarding the current muscle condition. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the muscle state and assess the expected muscle response to improve the current FES system toward adaptive force/torque control in the presence of muscle fatigue. Our team implanted neural and epimysial electrodes in a complete paraplegic patient in 1999. We carried out a case study, in the specific case of implanted stimulation, in order to verify the corresponding torque prediction based on stimulus evoked EMG (eEMG) when muscle fatigue is occurring during electrical stimulation. Indeed, in implanted stimulation, the relationship between stimulation parameters and output torques is more stable than external stimulation in which the electrode location strongly affects the quality of the recruitment. Thus, the assumption that changes in the stimulation-torque relationship would be mainly due to muscle fatigue can be made reasonably. The eEMG was proved to be correlated to the generated torque during the continuous stimulation while the frequency of eEMG also decreased during fatigue. The median frequency showed a similar variation trend to the mean absolute value of eEMG. Torque prediction during fatigue-inducing tests was performed based on eEMG in model cross-validation where the model was identified using recruitment test data. The torque prediction, apart from the potentiation period, showed acceptable tracking performances that would enable us to perform adaptive closed-loop control through implanted neural stimulation in the future. PMID:21975831

  17. Improvement of radiation hardness in fully-depleted SOI n-MOSFETs using Ge-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H.F.; Chung, J.E. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science); Kalkhoran, N.M.; Namavar, F. ); Annamalai, N.K.; Shedd, W.M. )

    1994-12-01

    This work demonstrates a well-controlled technique of channel defect engineering by implanting germanium into the channel of a Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) MOSFET to generate subgap energy states. These subgap states act as minority-carrier lifetime killers to reduce parasitic bipolar effects. The Ge-implant also serves the dual purpose of positioning most of the subgap states in the back interface region which retard the total dose responses of off-state leakage and front-channel threshold voltage.

  18. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date premarket approval application (PMA) or notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is.... Any other implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief shall have an approved PMA...

  19. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... implanted receiver. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food... cord stimulator for bladder evacuation shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in...

  20. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... implanted receiver. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food... cord stimulator for bladder evacuation shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in...

  1. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date premarket approval application (PMA) or notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is.... Any other implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief shall have an approved PMA...

  2. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic... to subsurface areas of a patient's brain to treat severe intractable pain. The stimulator consists of an implanted receiver with electrodes that are placed within a patient's brain and an...

  3. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic... to subsurface areas of a patient's brain to treat severe intractable pain. The stimulator consists of an implanted receiver with electrodes that are placed within a patient's brain and an...

  4. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator. 882.5830 Section 882.5830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... which an abnormally low amount of air enters the lungs) caused by brain stem disease, high...

  5. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator. 882.5830 Section 882.5830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... which an abnormally low amount of air enters the lungs) caused by brain stem disease, high...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5840 - Implanted intracerebral/subcortical stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic... to subsurface areas of a patient's brain to treat severe intractable pain. The stimulator consists of an implanted receiver with electrodes that are placed within a patient's brain and an...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator. 882.5830 Section 882.5830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... which an abnormally low amount of air enters the lungs) caused by brain stem disease, high...

  8. Effect of Zhuyun recipe on endometrial pinopode expression in mice with embryonic implantation dysfunction and ovulation stimulation

    PubMed Central

    YU, NAN; YAN, WENJIE; WANG, YAQIN; YIN, TAILANG; GUO, YUE; YANG, JING

    2015-01-01

    Zhuyun recipe (ZYR) is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been widely used as an infertility treatment for a number of years. Although the therapeutic effects are desirable and satisfactory, the therapeutic mechanism of ZYR remains poorly understood. In the present study, pinopodes were investigated as an important morphological marker of endometrial receptivity, in order to further investigate the therapeutic mechanism of ZYR. The expression of pinopodes during the implantation window was observed using scanning electron microscopy in mice with induced ovarian stimulation (OS) and embryo implantation dysfunction (EID). A marked decrease in the number of fully developed pinopodes was observed on the endometrial surface in the OS and EID model mice, which was in accordance with the decreased pregnancy rate and number of embryonic implantation sites when compared with the control. Following treatment with ZYR, the spatial and temporal expression of pinopodes in the OS and EID mice was found to be similar to the control mice. In conclusion, ZYR was demonstrated to improve endometrial receptivity in OS and EID mice through significant improvements in the spatial and temporal expression of pinopodes. PMID:25574221

  9. Nanomaterials and synergistic low intensity direct current (LIDC) stimulation technology for orthopaedic implantable medical devices

    PubMed Central

    Samberg, Meghan E.; Cohen, Paul H.; Wysk, Richard A.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials play a significant role in biomedical research and applications due to their unique biological, mechanical, and electrical properties. In recent years, they have been utilised to improve the functionality and reliability of a wide range of implantable medical devices ranging from well-established orthopaedic residual hardware devices (e.g. hip implants) that can repair defects in skeletal systems to emerging tissue engineering scaffolds that can repair or replace organ functions. This review summarizes the applications and efficacies of these nanomaterials that include synthetic or naturally occurring metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites in orthopaedic implants, the largest market segment of implantable medical devices. The importance of synergistic engineering techniques that can augment or enhance the performance of nanomaterial applications in orthopaedic implants is also discussed,, the focus being on a low intensity direct electric current (LIDC) stimulation technology to promote the long-term antibacterial efficacy of oligodynamic metal-based surfaces by ionization, while potentially accelerating tissue growth and osseointegration. While many nanomaterials have clearly demonstrated their ability to provide more effective implantable medical surfaces, further decisive investigations are necessary before they can translate into medically safe and commercially viable clinical applications. The paper concludes with a discussion about some of the critical impending issues with the application of nanomaterials-based technologies in implantable medical devices, and potential directions to address these. PMID:23335493

  10. In Vivo Demonstration of a Self-Sustaining, Implantable, Stimulated-Muscle-Powered Piezoelectric Generator Prototype

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, B. E.; Kilgore, K. L.; Gustafson, K. J.

    2010-01-01

    An implantable, stimulated-muscle-powered piezoelectric active energy harvesting generator was previously designed to exploit the fact that the mechanical output power of muscle is substantially greater than the electrical power necessary to stimulate the muscle’s motor nerve. We reduced to practice the concept by building a prototype generator and stimulator. We demonstrated its feasibility in vivo, using rabbit quadriceps to drive the generator. The generated power was sufficient for self-sustaining operation of the stimulator and additional harnessed power was dissipated through a load resistor. The prototype generator was developed and the power generating capabilities were tested with a mechanical muscle analog. In vivo generated power matched the mechanical muscle analog, verifying its usefulness as a test-bed for generator development. Generator output power was dependent on the muscle stimulation parameters. Simulations and in vivo testing demonstrated that for a fixed number of stimuli/minute, two stimuli applied at a high frequency generated greater power than single stimuli or tetanic contractions. Larger muscles and circuitry improvements are expected to increase available power. An implanted, self-replenishing power source has the potential to augment implanted battery or transcutaneously powered electronic medical devices. PMID:19657742

  11. Visual and refractive outcomes after implantation of a fully diffractive trifocal lens

    PubMed Central

    Cochener, Béatrice; Vryghem, Jérome; Rozot, Pascal; Lesieur, Gilles; Heireman, Steven; Blanckaert, Johan A; Van Acker, Emmanuel; Ghekiere, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to record the visual outcomes of patients treated by six surgeons after implantation of a trifocal lens. Methods The setting for this study comprised six ophthalmology units and eye clinics in Belgium and France, with a coordinating center in France, and data management and statistical analysis in France and Belgium. Ninety-four eyes from 47 patients were implanted with a trifocal FineVision® intraocular lens by six surgeons. Monocular and binocular, uncorrected and best distance-corrected, and photopic and mesopic visual acuity was measured, as well as the defocus curve between +4 D and −4 D with best distance correction. Results Near and far monocular visual acuities were similar to the data published after bifocal intraocular lens implantation. Intermediate vision was improved, and was demonstrated by scores of near visual acuity as well as far visual acuity with defocus −1.5 D-add lens. Far vision is maintained in mesopic conditions. Conclusion The trifocal intraocular lens provides good far, intermediate, and near visual acuity. PMID:22969289

  12. Overdentures on Implants for Better Quality of Life Among the Fully Edentulous Patients - Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Nikolovska, Julijana; Petrovski, Dragan; Petricevic, Nikola; Kapusevska, Biljana; Korunoska-Stevkovska, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Global aging population has brought several challenges for their medical systems and total edentulism is one of them. The fabrication of removable acrylic dentures seems to be a simple and cheap treatment solution, but a majority of patients is not satisfied with their functional instability, causing limited diets, mouth soreness, speech and psycho-social problems etc. The results in many studies indicate an impact of oral conditions associated with the full denture wearing on oral-health related quality of life, especially in lower jaw. The reason for improper denture retention could be alveolar ridge bone resorption and numerous studies about this problem are plausible. Bone resorption in lower jaw may turn the alveolar ridge into a flabby soft tissue which is unable to sustain proper denture retention. The implant-retained prosthesis is an alternative treatment option in these situations. Implants will provide retention, stability, function and aesthetics and they are not so expensive solution. The aim of this article is to show solving of retention problems of a lower denture in two different clinical cases using implants and without any special technology. PMID:27442389

  13. The Codacs™ Direct Acoustic Cochlear Implant Actuator: Exploring Alternative Stimulation Sites and Their Stimulation Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Grossöhmichen, Martin; Salcher, Rolf; Kreipe, Hans-Heinrich; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    This work assesses the efficiency of the Codacs system actuator (Cochlear Ltd., Sydney Australia) in different inner ear stimulation modalities. Originally the actuator was intended for direct perilymph stimulation after stapedotomy using a piston prosthesis. A possible alternative application is the stimulation of middle ear structures or the round window (RW). Here the perilymph stimulation with a K-piston through a stapes footplate (SFP) fenestration (N = 10) as well as stimulation of the stapes head (SH) with a Bell prosthesis (N = 9), SFP stimulation with an Omega/Aerial prosthesis (N = 8) and reverse RW stimulation (N = 10) were performed in cadaveric human temporal bones (TBs). Codacs actuator output is expressed as equivalent sound pressure level (eq. SPL) using RW and SFP displacement responses, measured by Laser Doppler velocimetry as reference. The axial actuator coupling force in stimulation of stapes and RW was adjusted to ~ 5 mN. The Bell prosthesis and Omega/Aerial prosthesis stimulation generated similar mean eq. SPLs (Bell: 127.5–141.8 eq. dB SPL; Omega/Aerial: 123.6–143.9 eq. dB SPL), being significantly more efficient than K-piston perilymph stimulation (108.6–131.6 eq. dB SPL) and RW stimulation (108.3–128.2 eq. dB SPL). Our results demonstrate that SH, SFP and RW are adequate alternative stimulation sites for the Codacs actuator using coupling prostheses and an axial coupling force of ~ 5 mN. Based on the eq. SPLs, all investigated methods were adequate for in vivo hearing aid applications, provided that experimental conditions including constant coupling force will be implemented. PMID:25785860

  14. Fabrication and In vivo Evaluation of Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) Stimulus Electrodes for Fully Implantable Retinal Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kigure, Chikashi; Naganuma, Hideki; Sasaki, Yuichiro; Kino, Hisashi; Tomita, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2013-04-01

    The development of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) stimulus electrodes and the relationship between the electrical stimulation of a rabbit retina and electrically evoked potential (EEP) were studied in detail. We fabricated implantable flexible cables with Pt, IrOx, and PEDOT electrodes and evaluated the electrochemical impedances (EIs) and charge injection capacities (CICs) of such electrodes. From the result, we confirmed that PEDOT electrodes have both lower EIs and larger CICs than Pt and IrOx electrodes. In addition, we performed in vivo experiments with PEDOT electrodes and clarified the relationships between the electrical stimulation of the rabbit retina and EEP. It is highly probable that visual restoration will be realized safely with PEDOT electrodes.

  15. A Single-Chip Full-Duplex High Speed Transceiver for Multi-Site Stimulating and Recording Neural Implants.

    PubMed

    Mirbozorgi, S Abdollah; Bahrami, Hadi; Sawan, Mohamad; Rusch, Leslie A; Gosselin, Benoit

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel, fully-integrated, low-power full-duplex transceiver (FDT) to support high-density and bidirectional neural interfacing applications (high-channel count stimulating and recording) with asymmetric data rates: higher rates are required for recording (uplink signals) than stimulation (downlink signals). The transmitter (TX) and receiver (RX) share a single antenna to reduce implant size and complexity. The TX uses impulse radio ultra-wide band (IR-UWB) based on an edge combining approach, and the RX uses a novel 2.4-GHz on-off keying (OOK) receiver. Proper isolation (>20 dB) between the TX and RX path is implemented 1) by shaping the transmitted pulses to fall within the unregulated UWB spectrum (3.1-7 GHz), and 2) by space-efficient filtering (avoiding a circulator or diplexer) of the downlink OOK spectrum in the RX low-noise amplifier. The UWB 3.1-7 GHz transmitter can use either OOK or binary phase shift keying (BPSK) modulation schemes. The proposed FDT provides dual band 500-Mbps TX uplink data rate and 100 Mbps RX downlink data rate, and it is fully integrated into standard TSMC 0.18- μm CMOS within a total size of 0.8 mm(2). The total measured power consumption is 10.4 mW in full duplex mode (5 mW at 100 Mbps for RX, and 5.4 mW at 500 Mbps or 10.8 pJ/bit for TX). Additionally, a 3-coil inductive link along with on-chip power management circuits allows to powering up the implantable transceiver wirelessly by delivering 25 mW extracted from a 13.56-MHz carrier signal, at a total efficiency of 41.6%. PMID:26469635

  16. Implantation of a defibrillator in a patient with an upper airway stimulation device.

    PubMed

    Ong, Adrian A; O'Brien, Terrence X; Nguyen, Shaun A; Gillespie, M Boyd

    2016-02-01

    The patient is a 62-year-old man with continuous positive airway pressure-intolerant obstructive sleep apnea who was enrolled in a study for a hypoglossal nerve upper airway stimulation device (UAS). Nearly 2.5 years later, he was admitted to the hospital for unstable angina. Diagnostic workup revealed a prior myocardial infarction, an ejection fraction of 30% on maximal medical therapy, and episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia. During hospitalization, the patient received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). This is the first reported case of simultaneous use of a UAS and an ICD, and we report no untoward device interference between the two implantable devices. PMID:26403681

  17. Psychophysics, fitting, and signal processing for combined hearing aid and cochlear implant stimulation.

    PubMed

    Francart, Tom; McDermott, Hugh J

    2013-01-01

    The addition of acoustic stimulation to electric stimulation via a cochlear implant has been shown to be advantageous for speech perception in noise, sound quality, music perception, and sound source localization. However, the signal processing and fitting procedures of current cochlear implants and hearing aids were developed independently, precluding several potential advantages of bimodal stimulation, such as improved sound source localization and binaural unmasking of speech in noise. While there is a large and increasing population of implantees who use a hearing aid, there are currently no generally accepted fitting methods for this configuration. It is not practical to fit current commercial devices to achieve optimal binaural loudness balance or optimal binaural cue transmission for arbitrary signals and levels. There are several promising experimental signal processing systems specifically designed for bimodal stimulation. In this article, basic psychophysical studies with electric acoustic stimulation are reviewed, along with the current state of the art in fitting, and experimental signal processing techniques for electric acoustic stimulation. PMID:24165299

  18. Successful Treatment of Occipital Neuralgia with Implantable Peripheral Nerve Stimulation in a Pacemaker-Dependent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Chaiban, Gassan; Tolba, Reda; Eissa, Hazem; Lirette, Lesley Smallwood; Almualim, Mohammed; Malaty, Adham; Atallah, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve stimulation has been used to treat patients with occipital nerve–related chronic headaches who have been unsuccessful with less invasive therapeutic approaches. Patients with pacemaker-dependent cardiac conduction abnormalities require unique consideration prior to the implantation of peripheral nerve stimulators because the placement of the devices may lead to failure of the systems secondary to electromagnetic interference or crosstalk between the devices. Case Report An 86-year-old female who suffered from chronic right-sided cervicogenic headaches and neck pain had received only temporary relief from previous treatments. Additional comorbidities included longstanding pacemaker-dependent atrioventricular node conduction disease. Because the extent to which nerve stimulators electrically interact with pacemakers is unclear, we tunneled the leads to the lumbar region of the back and placed the generator on the contralateral side to the pacemaker to minimize the chance that the 2 devices would interfere. The patient has remained pain free for 1 year since implantation. Conclusion Although no current published trials evaluate the degree of interference between medical devices, case reports increasingly suggest that simultaneous implantation of a spinal cord stimulator and pacemaker is safe as long as precautions are taken and the devices are checked periodically, particularly when the devices are adjusted. PMID:24688344

  19. Feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using electronic portal imaging: A comparison of methods

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Emma J. . E-mail: eharris@icr.ac.uk; McNair, Helen A.; Evans, Phillip M.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using portal images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device. Methods and Materials: We have made a direct comparison of 4 different methods (2 template matching-based methods, a method incorporating attenuation and constellation analyses and a cross correlation method) that have been published in the literature for the automatic detection of fiducial markers. The cross-correlation technique requires a-priory information from the portal images, therefore the technique is not fully automated for the first treatment fraction. Images of 7 patients implanted with gold fiducial markers (8 mm in length and 1 mm in diameter) were acquired before treatment (set-up images) and during treatment (movie images) using 1MU and 15MU per image respectively. Images included: 75 anterior (AP) and 69 lateral (LAT) set-up images and 51 AP and 83 LAT movie images. Using the different methods described in the literature, marker positions were automatically identified. Results: The method based upon cross correlation techniques gave the highest percentage detection success rate of 99% (AP) and 83% (LAT) set-up (1MU) images. The methods gave detection success rates of less than 91% (AP) and 42% (LAT) set-up images. The amount of a-priory information used and how it affects the way the techniques are implemented, is discussed. Conclusions: Fully automated marker detection in set-up images for the first treatment fraction is unachievable using these methods and that using cross-correlation is the best technique for automatic detection on subsequent radiotherapy treatment fractions.

  20. Continuous Thoracic Sympathetic Ganglion Block in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Patients with Spinal Cord Stimulation Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, EungDon; Roh, MiSun; Kim, SooHyang; Jo, DaeHyun

    2016-01-01

    The sympathetic block is widely used for treating neuropathic pain such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). However, single sympathetic block often provides only short-term effect. Moreover, frequent procedures for sympathetic block may increase the risk of complications. The use of epidural route may be limited by concern of infection in case of previous implantation of the spinal cord stimulation (SCS). In contrast, a continuous sympathetic block can be administered without such concerns. The continuous thoracic sympathetic block (TSGB) has been used to treat the ischemic disease and other neuropathic conditions such as postherpetic neuralgia. We administered continuous thoracic sympathetic block using catheter in CRPS patients who underwent SCS implantations and achieved desirable outcomes. We believe a continuous sympathetic block is a considerable option before performing neurolysis or radiofrequency rhizotomy and even after SCS implantation.

  1. Stimulation with chronically implanted microelectrodes in the cochlear nucleus of the cat: histologic and physiologic effects.

    PubMed

    McCreery, D B; Yuen, T G; Agnew, W F; Bullara, L A

    1992-09-01

    The effects of several hours of continuous electrical stimulation in the cats' cochlear nucleus with chronically implanted activated iridium microelectrodes was investigated from the changes in the evoked response near the inferior colliculus and also by histologic evaluation of the stimulated tissue. The stimulating microelectrodes had geometric surface areas of 75-500 microns2. They were pulsed continuously for 4 h, at a pulse repetition rate of 200 Hz, using charge-balanced pulse pairs. The charge per phase was 1.8 or 3.6 nC/ph. The animals were sacrificed for histologic evaluation 2 h, or several days later. The only remarkable histologic change resulting from the 4 h of stimulation was some aggregation of lymphocytes at the site of stimulation. However, depression of the electrical excitability of neurons near the sites often persisted for several days after 4 h of stimulation at 3.6 nC/phase. The charge per phase of the stimulus pulse pair was correlated strongly with the depression of excitability, and there was a weaker correlation between the depression and the amplitude of the first phase of voltage transient induced across the electrode-tissue interface. The charge density, calculated from the geometric surface area of the stimulating electrodes, was poorly correlated with the severity of the depression. The findings suggest a means of detecting impending stimulation-induced neural damage while it is still reversible. PMID:1429250

  2. Assessment of responses to cochlear implant stimulation at different levels of the auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Paul J; Brown, Carolyn J

    2015-04-01

    This paper reviews characteristics of both the electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) and analogous measures of cortically evoked responses (CAEP) to electrical stimulation in cochlear implant users. Specific comparisons are made between the two levels of processing for measures of threshold, growth of responses with increasing stimulus level, changes in stimulation electrode and, finally, in temporal response properties. The results are interpreted in a context that ECAPs primarily reflect the characteristics of the electrode-neural interface for an individual ear. CAEPs clearly are dependent on those peripheral responses but also reflect differences in central processing among individual implant users. The potential applicability of combined measures in clinical situations is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:25445817

  3. Image-guidance enables new methods for customizing cochlear implant stimulation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Jack H.; Labadie, Robert F.; Gifford, René H.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, cochlear implants (CIs) have become what is arguably the most successful neural prosthesis to date. Despite this success, a significant number of CI recipients experience marginal hearing restoration, and, even among the best performers, restoration to normal fidelity is rare. In this article, we present image processing techniques that can be used to detect, for the first time, the positions of implanted CI electrodes and the nerves they stimulate for individual CI users. These techniques permit development of new, customized CI stimulation strategies. We present one such strategy and show that it leads to significant hearing improvement in an experiment conducted with 11 CI recipients. These results indicate that image-guidance can be used to improve hearing outcomes for many existing CI recipients without requiring additional surgical procedures. PMID:23529109

  4. Assessment of responses to cochlear implant stimulation at different levels of the auditory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Paul J.; Brown, Carolyn J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews characteristics of both the electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) and analogous measures of cortically evoked responses (CAEP) to electrical stimulation in cochlear implant users. Specific comparisons are made between the two levels of processing for measures of threshold, growth of responses with increasing stimulus level, changes in stimulation electrode and, finally, in temporal response properties. The results are interpreted in a context that ECAPs primarily reflect the characteristics of the electrode-neural interface for an individual ear. CAEPs clearly are dependent on those peripheral responses but also reflect differences in central processing among individual implant users. The potential applicability of combined measures in clinical situations is discussed. PMID:25445817

  5. Neural signal processing and closed-loop control algorithm design for an implanted neural recording and stimulation system.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Lei; McConley, Marc; Angermueller, Kai; Goldberg, David; Corba, Massimiliano; Kim, Louis; Moran, James; Parks, Philip D; Sang Chin; Widge, Alik S; Dougherty, Darin D; Eskandar, Emad N

    2015-08-01

    A fully autonomous intracranial device is built to continually record neural activities in different parts of the brain, process these sampled signals, decode features that correlate to behaviors and neuropsychiatric states, and use these features to deliver brain stimulation in a closed-loop fashion. In this paper, we describe the sampling and stimulation aspects of such a device. We first describe the signal processing algorithms of two unsupervised spike sorting methods. Next, we describe the LFP time-frequency analysis and feature derivation from the two spike sorting methods. Spike sorting includes a novel approach to constructing a dictionary learning algorithm in a Compressed Sensing (CS) framework. We present a joint prediction scheme to determine the class of neural spikes in the dictionary learning framework; and, the second approach is a modified OSort algorithm which is implemented in a distributed system optimized for power efficiency. Furthermore, sorted spikes and time-frequency analysis of LFP signals can be used to generate derived features (including cross-frequency coupling, spike-field coupling). We then show how these derived features can be used in the design and development of novel decode and closed-loop control algorithms that are optimized to apply deep brain stimulation based on a patient's neuropsychiatric state. For the control algorithm, we define the state vector as representative of a patient's impulsivity, avoidance, inhibition, etc. Controller parameters are optimized to apply stimulation based on the state vector's current state as well as its historical values. The overall algorithm and software design for our implantable neural recording and stimulation system uses an innovative, adaptable, and reprogrammable architecture that enables advancement of the state-of-the-art in closed-loop neural control while also meeting the challenges of system power constraints and concurrent development with ongoing scientific research designed

  6. Long-term stimulation by active epiretinal implants in normal and RCD1 dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güven, Dilek; Weiland, James D.; Fujii, Gildo; Mech, Brian V.; Mahadevappa, Manjunatha; Greenberg, Robert; Roizenblatt, Roberto; Qiu, Guanting; La Bree, Laurie; Wang, Xiaopeng; Hinton, David; Humayun, Mark S.

    2005-03-01

    An epiretinal prosthesis, consisting of an extraocular microelectronic stimulator and an intraocular electrode array, was implanted in one eye of three blind and three sighted dogs. Three dogs (2 blind, 1 normal) were stimulated for 120 days, and two dogs (both normal) for 60 and 103 days respectively for 8-10 h/day at levels of 0.1 mC cm-2 and 0.05 mC cm-2, with each stimulus level presented to half of the array. One blind dog was kept as an inactive implant control. During the study period, electroretinograms (ERG) and fundus photographs were recorded. At the end of the study period, the dogs were sacrificed and histological and morphometric evaluation was made of the retina. No inflammatory reaction, neovascularization or hemorrhage was observed during the follow-up examinations. ERGs were unchanged. Stimulus levels used were of sufficient amplitude to elicit cortical evoked potentials. Histological evaluation showed no inflammatory infiltrates or changes in retina morphometry related to electrical stimulation when compared to the unstimulated control eye. Morphometric analysis revealed no consistent differences relating to electrical stimulation. In summary, chronic electrical stimulation of the dog retina at up to 0.1 mC cm-2 with an epiretinal prosthesis does not appear to adversely affect the retina. This study is supported by The Fletcher Jones Foundation, National Eye Institute Grants 1R24EY12893 and EY03040, the Whitaker Foundation and Second Sight Medical Products, Inc.

  7. Simulated phase-locking stimulation: An improved signal processing strategy for cochlear implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xihong; Qu, Hongwei; Chen, Jing; Qu, Tianshu; Li, Liang

    2005-04-01

    Electrical stimulation of the auditory pathway produces different patterns of neural activity than those acoustically elicited. Traditional signal-processing strategies for cochlear implant usually do not utilize phase information contained in sound waves. Here, to evaluate potential advantages of introducing phase information to cochlear implant devices, a new signal processing method, so called simulated phase-locking stimulation (SPLS), was developed. To convey phase information of sound signals to the auditory nerve, electrical stimulation pulses were delivered at the zero-crossing time of sine waves of frequency bands after band-pass filtering and envelope extraction. The advantages of the SPLS method over the method of Continuous Interleaved Sampling (CIS+) were demonstrated by both objective evaluations, such as the spectro-temporal modulation index (STMI), and subjective evaluations, such as recognition of processed Chinese speech by normal hearing listeners under either noise (energetic) masking or speech (informational) masking conditions. The results suggest that the SPLS method is able to improve the function of cochlear devices by extracting and transferring fine-structure signals, which are important for cochlear-implant listeners to perceive tonal speech and music.

  8. Hypoglossal Nerve Stimulator Implantation in an Adolescent With Down Syndrome and Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Diercks, Gillian R; Keamy, Donald; Kinane, Thomas Bernard; Skotko, Brian; Schwartz, Allison; Grealish, Ellen; Dobrowski, John; Soose, Ryan; Hartnick, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is more common in children with Down syndrome, affecting up to 60% of patients, and may persist in up to 50% of patients after adenotonsillectomy. These children with persistent moderate to severe OSA require continuous positive airway pressure, which is often poorly tolerated, or even tracheotomy for severe cases. The hypoglossal nerve stimulator is an implantable device that produces an electrical impulse to the anterior branches of the hypoglossal nerve, resulting in tongue protrusion in response to respiratory variation. It is an effective treatment of sleep apnea in select adult patients because it allows for alleviation of tongue base collapse, improving airway obstruction. Herein we describe the first pediatric hypoglossal nerve stimulator implantation, which was performed in an adolescent with Down syndrome and refractory severe OSA (apnea hypopnea index [AHI]: 48.5 events/hour). The patient would not tolerate continuous positive airway pressure and required a long-standing tracheotomy. Hypoglossal nerve stimulator therapy was well tolerated and effective, resulting in significant improvement in the patient's OSA (overall AHI: 3.4 events/hour; AHI: 2.5-9.7 events/hour at optimal voltage settings depending on sleep stage and body position). Five months after implantation, the patient's tracheotomy was successfully removed and he continues to do well with nightly therapy. PMID:27244805

  9. Growth of interleaved masking patterns for cochlear implant listeners at different stimulation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Bom Jun; van den Honert, Chris; Parkinson, Wendy

    2003-04-01

    This study investigates the pattern of growth of masking (GOM) for interleaved masking with Nucleus cochlear implant users. For an interleaved masking paradigm, where the masker and probe overlap in a same time window, the masker may have contrasting effects: it may increase the threshold (as a masker normally does) or decrease it due to a neural summation effect, facilitating detection of the probe. Several stimulation rates and masker levels were tested to examine under what conditions what phenomenon would occur. The results indicated that, in most of the conditions, the amount of masking was positive, i.e., the facilitating effect was not consistently observed. However, the slope of the GOM appears to be dependent upon the stimulation rate: the higher the stimulation rate, the lower the slope, implying that the facilitating effect might be always present and make a bigger impact on overall masking as the stimulation rate becomes high. The amount of masking was also often nonzero (positive) even when the masker was below the threshold level. Overall, the present findings indicate that interleaved masking should be handled with care to understand cochlear implant users speech perception and improve speech coding, as it contains some nontraditional aspects of masking.

  10. Binaural release from masking with single- and multi-electrode stimulation in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Todd, Ann E; Goupell, Matthew J; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2016-07-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) provide children with access to speech information from a young age. Despite bilateral cochlear implantation becoming common, use of spatial cues in free field is smaller than in normal-hearing children. Clinically fit CIs are not synchronized across the ears; thus binaural experiments must utilize research processors that can control binaural cues with precision. Research to date has used single pairs of electrodes, which is insufficient for representing speech. Little is known about how children with bilateral CIs process binaural information with multi-electrode stimulation. Toward the goal of improving binaural unmasking of speech, this study evaluated binaural unmasking with multi- and single-electrode stimulation. Results showed that performance with multi-electrode stimulation was similar to the best performance with single-electrode stimulation. This was similar to the pattern of performance shown by normal-hearing adults when presented an acoustic CI simulation. Diotic and dichotic signal detection thresholds of the children with CIs were similar to those of normal-hearing children listening to a CI simulation. The magnitude of binaural unmasking was not related to whether the children with CIs had good interaural time difference sensitivity. Results support the potential for benefits from binaural hearing and speech unmasking in children with bilateral CIs. PMID:27475132

  11. Spinal cord stimulation with implanted epidural paddle lead relieves chronic axial low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Stidd, David A; Rivero, Sergio; Weinand, Martin E

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) provides significant relief for lumbosacral radiculopathy refractory to both medical and surgical treatment, but historically only offers limited relief for axial low back pain (LBP). We aim to evaluate the response of chronic axial LBP treated with SCS using a surgically implanted epidural paddle lead. Materials and methods This is a retrospective review of a consecutive series of patients with exclusive LBP or predominant LBP associated with lower extremity (LE) pain evaluated and treated with SCS using an implanted paddle lead within the dorsal thoracic epidural space. Baseline LBP, and if present LE pain, were recorded using the visual analogue scale (VAS) at an initial evaluation. At a follow-up visit (a minimum of 12 months later), LBP and LE pain after a spinal cord stimulator implantation were again recorded using the VAS. Patients were also asked to estimate total LBP pain relief achieved. Results Patients with either exclusive (n=7) or predominant (n=2) axial LBP were treated with SCS by implantation of a paddle lead at an average spine level of T9. The baseline VAS score for LBP was 7.2; after a follow-up of 20 months, the score decreased to 2.3 (P=0.003). The LE pain VAS score decreased from 7.5 to 0.0 (P=0.103). Patients also reported a subjective 66.4% decrease of their LBP at follow-up. There were no surgical complications. Conclusions Axial LBP is refractory to many treatments, including SCS. SCS using a surgically implanted paddle electrode provides significant pain relief for chronic axial LPB, and is a safe treatment modality. PMID:25143753

  12. Towards fully automated closed-loop Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's disease patients: A LAMSTAR-based tremor predictor.

    PubMed

    Khobragade, Nivedita; Graupe, Daniel; Tuninetti, Daniela

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes the application of the LAMSTAR (LArge Memory STorage and Retrieval) neural network for prediction of onset of tremor in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients to allow for on-off adaptive control of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). Currently, the therapeutic treatment of PD by DBS is an open-loop system where continuous stimulation is applied to a target area in the brain. This work demonstrates a fully automated closed-loop DBS system so that stimulation can be applied on-demand only when needed to treat PD symptoms. The proposed LAMSTAR network uses spectral, entropy and recurrence rate parameters for prediction of the advent of tremor after the DBS stimulation is switched off. These parameters are extracted from non-invasively collected surface electromyography and accelerometry signals. The LAMSTAR network has useful characteristics, such as fast retrieval of patterns and ability to handle large amount of data of different types, which make it attractive for medical applications. Out of 21 trials blue from one subject, the average ratio of delay in prediction of tremor to the actual delay in observed tremor from the time stimulation was switched off achieved by the proposed LAMSTAR network is 0.77. Moreover, sensitivity of 100% and overall performance better than previously proposed Back Propagation neural networks is obtained. PMID:26736828

  13. Bifocal cortical electrical stimulation for pain by interdural implantation of the electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sakas, Damianos E; Flaskas, Theofanis N; Panourias, Ioannis G; Georgakoulias, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    Chronic electrical cortical stimulation (ECS) is an evolving therapy for alleviating treatment-refractory chronic pain syndromes. In this report, the authors describe a modified technique of ECS that involves resection of dural strips and interdural placement of the electrodes as a patch, and bifocal stimulation by implanting 2 electrode strips, that is, one over the motor and one over the sensory cortices. The technique was used in 4 patients with treatment-refractory pain syndromes: a 76-year-old woman with poststroke central pain, 2 women, (71 and 73 years old) with trigeminal pain, and a 44-year-old man with phantom limb pain. All 4 patients experienced a sustained significant improvement in the intensity of pain and have gained a substantially improved functionality and quality of life. An important finding in these patients was the constancy of impedance within a narrow values range throughout the postoperative period. For the cases, the follow-up exceeds 24, 15, 12, and 9 months. The factors affecting the efficacy of ECS are discussed. In the authors' opinion, interdural implantation of the electrodes holds the promise to improve the efficacy and consistency of ECS compared with the standard epidural or subdural implantation without increasing the risk of the procedure. The technical considerations and the potential therapeutic advantages of the interdural bifocal approach are discussed. PMID:20597601

  14. Enhanced tissue integration of implantable electrodes for sensing, and stimulation, via radio frequency glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Laurie M.

    Biopotential electrodes are conductive materials that convert electronic currents to or from ionic currents for sensing, and stimulating specific tissue sites for medical applications. Implanted electrodes become "walled off" by the foreign body tissue reactions producing poorly attached scar capsules dominated by surrounding dense collagenous lamellae and source fibroblasts which are electrically resistive. The conductive interstitial fluid that is typical between an electrode and the resistive capsule allows spurious current paths. The insulating layer increases the distance between the electrode and the target sites and poor attachment often results in electrode migration within the host tissue. This investigation tested the hypothesis that surface-energy modulation of electrodes, via Radio Frequency Glow Discharge Treatment (RFGDT), can improve the performance of tissue-implantable electrodes by reducing the foreign body tissue reaction and enhancing interfacial bonding between the tissue and electrode material. Previously published findings were reproduced in a pilot study of explanted reference grade medical-grade methyl silicone (PDMS) and commercially pure titanium (cpTi) materials and their tissue capsules from 30-day subcutaneous exposures in Balb/C mice. The low-critical surface tension PDMS produced thick, dense, poorly attached scar capsules while the higher-surface-energy commercially pure titanium (cpTi) produced more cellular and strongly attached tissue layers difficult to delaminate from the biomaterial. For the main body of work, cpTi, capacitor-grade Tantalum (Ta), and synthetic heart valve-quality Pyrolytic Carbon (PyC) were evaluated, representative of potential high-surface-energy implant electrode materials. Their surface characteristics were determined as-manufactured and after Radio Frequency Glow Discharge Treatment (RFGDT) by Critical Surface Tension (CST) measurement, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X

  15. An Integrated Implantable Stimulator That is Fail-Safe Without Off-Chip Blocking-Capacitors.

    PubMed

    Xiao Liu; Demosthenous, A; Donaldson, N

    2008-09-01

    We present a neural stimulator chip with an output stage (electrode driving circuit) that is fail-safe under single-fault conditions without the need for off-chip blocking-capacitors. To miniaturize the stimulator output stage two novel techniques are introduced. The first technique is a new current generator circuit reducing to a single step the translation of the digital input bits into the stimulus current, thus minimizing silicon area and power consumption compared to previous works. The current generator uses voltage-controlled resistors implemented by MOS transistors in the deep triode region. The second technique is a new stimulator output stage circuit with blocking-capacitor safety protection using a high-frequency current-switching (HFCS) technique. Unlike conventional stimulator output stage circuits for implantable functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems which require blocking-capacitors in the microfarad range, our proposed approach allows capacitance reduction to the picofarad range, thus the blocking-capacitors can be integrated on-chip. The prototype four-channel neural stimulator chip was fabricated in XFAB's 1-mum silicon-on-insulator CMOS technology and can operate from a power supply between 5-18 V. The stimulus current is generated by active charging and passive discharging. We obtained recordings of action potentials and a strength-duration curve from the sciatic nerve of a frog with the stimulator chip which demonstrate the HFCS technique. The average power consumption for a typical 1-mA 20-Hz single-channel stimulation using a book electrode, is 200 muW from a 6 V power supply. The silicon area occupation is 0.38 mm(2) per channel. PMID:23852972

  16. Preclinical Evaluation of Poly(HEMA-co-acrylamide) Hydrogels Encapsulating Glucose Oxidase and Palladium Benzoporphyrin as Fully Implantable Glucose Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Rachel M.; Roberts, Jason R.; Nichols, Scott P.; Gamsey, Soya; Wisniewski, Natalie A.; McShane, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) require percutaneous wire probes to monitor glucose. Sensors based on luminescent hydrogels are being explored as fully implantable alternatives to traditional CGMs. Our previous work investigated hydrogel matrices functionalized with enzymes and oxygen-quenched phosphors, demonstrating sensitivity to glucose, range of response, and biofouling strongly depend on the matrix material. Here, we further investigate the effect of matrix composition on overall performance in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Sensors based on three hydrogels, a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) homopolymer and 2 poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-acrylamide) (pHEMA-co-AAm) copolymers, were compared. These were used to entrap glucose oxidase (GOx), catalase, and an oxygen-sensitive benzoporphyrin phosphor. All sensor formulations were evaluated for glucose response and stability at physiological temperatures. Selected sensors were then evaluated as implanted sensors in a porcine model challenged with glucose and insulin. The animal protocol used in this study was approved by an IACUC committee at Texas A&M University. Results: PHEMA-co-AAm copolymer hydrogels (75:25 HEMA:AAm) yielded the most even GOx and dye dispersion throughout the hydrogel matrix and best preserved GOx apparent activity. In response to in vitro glucose challenges, this formulation exhibited a dynamic range of 12-167 mg/dL, a sensitivity of 1.44 ± 0.46 µs/(mg/dL), and tracked closely with reference capillary blood glucose values in vivo. Conclusions: The hydrogel-based sensors exhibited excellent sensitivity and sufficiently rapid response to the glucose levels achieved in vivo, proving feasibility of these materials for use in real-time glucose tracking. Extending the dynamic range and assessing long-term effects in vivo are ongoing efforts. PMID:26085565

  17. Frequency-place map for electrical stimulation in cochlear implants: Change over time.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Katrien; Landsberger, David M; Van de Heyning, Paul H; Voormolen, Maurits; Kleine Punte, Andrea; Schatzer, Reinhold; Zierhofer, Clemens

    2015-08-01

    The relationship between the place of electrical stimulation from a cochlear implant and the corresponding perceived pitch remains uncertain. Previous studies have estimated what the pitch corresponding to a particular location should be. However, perceptual verification is difficult because a subject needs both a cochlear implant and sufficient residual hearing to reliably compare electric and acoustic pitches. Additional complications can arise from the possibility that the pitch corresponding to an electrode may change as the auditory system adapts to a sound processor. In the following experiment, five subjects with normal or near-to-normal hearing in one ear and a cochlear implant with a long electrode array in the other ear were studied. Pitch matches were made between single electrode pulse trains and acoustic tones before activation of the speech processor to gain an estimate of the pitch provided by electrical stimulation at a given insertion angle without the influence of exposure to a sound processor. The pitch matches were repeated after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of experience with the sound processor to evaluate the effect of adaptation over time. Pre-activation pitch matches were lower than would be estimated by a spiral ganglion pitch map. Deviations were largest for stimulation below 240° degrees and smallest above 480°. With experience, pitch matches shifted towards the frequency-to-electrode allocation. However, no statistically significant pitch shifts were observed over time. The likely explanation for the lack of pitch change is that the frequency-to-electrode allocations for the long electrode arrays were already similar to the pre-activation pitch matches. Minimal place pitch shifts over time suggest a minimal amount of perceptual remapping needed for the integration of electric and acoustic stimuli, which may contribute to shorter times to asymptotic performance. PMID:25840373

  18. Wireless charing pillow for a fully implantable hearing aid: Design of a circular array coil based on finite element analysis for reducing magnetic weak zones.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyung-Gyu; Kim, Jong Hoon; Shin, Dong Ho; Woo, Seong Tak; Seong, Ki Woong; Lee, Jyung Hyun; Kim, Myoung Nam; Wei, Qun; Cho, Jin-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Many types of fully implantable hearing aids have been developed. Most of these devices are implanted behind the ear. To maintain the implanted device for a long period of time, a rechargeable battery and wireless power transmission are used. Because inductive coupling is the most renowned method for wireless power transmission, many types of fully implantable hearing aids are transcutaneously powered using inductively coupled coils. Some patients with an implantable hearing aid require a method for conveniently charging their hearing aid while they are resting or sleeping. To address this need, a wireless charging pillow has been developed that employs a circular array coil as one of its primary parts. In this device, all primary coils are simultaneously driven to maintain an effective charging area regardless of head motion. In this case, however, there may be a magnetic weak zone that cannot be charged at the specific secondary coil's location on the array coil. In this study, assuming that a maximum charging distance is 4 cm, a circular array coil-serving as a primary part of the charging pillow-was designed using finite element analysis. Based on experimental results, the proposed device can charge an implantable hearing aid without a magnetic weak zone within 4 cm of the perpendicular distance between the primary and secondary coils. PMID:26405942

  19. Cortical stimulation mapping using epidurally implanted thin-film microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Molina-Luna, Katiuska; Buitrago, Manuel M; Hertler, Benjamin; Schubring, Maximilian; Haiss, Florent; Nisch, Wilfried; Schulz, Jörg B; Luft, Andreas R

    2007-03-30

    Stimulation mapping of motor cortex is an important tool for assessing motor cortex physiology. Existing techniques include intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) which has high spatial resolution but damages cortical integrity by needle penetrations, and transcranial stimulation which is non-invasive but lacks focality and spatial resolution. A minimally invasive epidural microstimulation (EMS) technique using chronically implanted polyimide-based thin-film microelectrode arrays (72 contacts) was tested in rat motor cortex and compared to ICMS within individual animals. Results demonstrate reliable mapping with high reproducibility and validity with respect to ICMS. No histological evidence of cortical damage and the absence of motor deficits as determined by performance of a motor skill reaching task, demonstrate the safety of the method. EMS is specifically suitable for experiments integrating electrophysiology with behavioral and molecular biology techniques. PMID:17178423

  20. The parturient with implanted spinal cord stimulator: management and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Young, Adam C; Lubenow, Timothy R; Buvanendran, Asokumar

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is an approved treatment for complex regional pain syndrome and other chronic pain conditions. These devices enable women with chronic pain to maintain relatively normal lives, with some encountering pregnancy. Use of previously implanted SCS systems in pregnant women is considered controversial due to lack of long-term prospective studies evaluating both maternal and fetal safety. Seven patients at a university pain clinic were identified as having SCS implanted before becoming pregnant. Data on these patients before, during, and after labor were collected through chart review and patient interview. Onset of labor varied among the 7 patients (2 preterm and 5 term). Mode of anesthesia for delivery included 4 neuraxial anesthetics, with 3 successfully obtaining an adequate level of anesthesia for delivery. Four general anesthetics were administered for cesarean delivery, one of which included a failed attempt at neuraxial anesthesia. All infants were born healthy. Management approaches and outcomes in our patients, as well as those previously reported are discussed within this article. Definitive conclusions cannot be drawn from this small cohort. We believe that management of a parturient with an implanted SCS requires careful planning between all peripartum physicians. PMID:25899957

  1. A wirelessly controlled implantable LED system for deep brain optogenetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Mark A.; Go, Vinson; Murphy, Tracy; Fu, Quanhai; Morizio, James; Yin, Henry H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years optogenetics has rapidly become an essential technique in neuroscience. Its temporal and spatial specificity, combined with efficacy in manipulating neuronal activity, are especially useful in studying the behavior of awake behaving animals. Conventional optogenetics, however, requires the use of lasers and optic fibers, which can place considerable restrictions on behavior. Here we combined a wirelessly controlled interface and small implantable light-emitting diode (LED) that allows flexible and precise placement of light source to illuminate any brain area. We tested this wireless LED system in vivo, in transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin-2 in striatonigral neurons expressing D1-like dopamine receptors. In all mice tested, we were able to elicit movements reliably. The frequency of twitches induced by high power stimulation is proportional to the frequency of stimulation. At lower power, contraversive turning was observed. Moreover, the implanted LED remains effective over 50 days after surgery, demonstrating the long-term stability of the light source. Our results show that the wireless LED system can be used to manipulate neural activity chronically in behaving mice without impeding natural movements. PMID:25713516

  2. Bio-Impedance Characterization Technique with Implantable Neural Stimulator Using Biphasic Current Stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yi-Kai; Chang, Chih-Wei; Liu, Wentai

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the bio-impedance and its equivalent circuit model at the electrode-electrolyte/tissue interface is important in the application of functional electrical stimulation. Impedance can be used as a merit to evaluate the proximity between electrodes and targeted tissues. Understanding the equivalent circuit parameters of the electrode can further be leveraged to set a safe boundary for stimulus parameters in order not to exceed the water window of electrodes. In this paper, we present an impedance characterization technique and implement a proof-of-concept system using an implantable neural stimulator and an off-the-shelf microcontroller. The proposed technique yields the parameters of the equivalent circuit of an electrode through large signal analysis by injecting a single low-intensity biphasic current stimulus with deliberately inserted inter-pulse delay and by acquiring the transient electrode voltage at three well-specified timings. Using low-intensity stimulus allows the derivation of electrode double layer capacitance since capacitive charge-injection dominates when electrode overpotential is small. Insertion of the inter-pulse delay creates a controlled discharge time to estimate the Faradic resistance. The proposed method has been validated by measuring the impedance of a) an emulated Randles cells made of discrete circuit components and b) a custom-made platinum electrode array in-vitro, and comparing estimated parameters with the results derived from an impedance analyzer. The proposed technique can be integrated into implantable or commercial neural stimulator system at low extra power consumption, low extra-hardware cost, and light computation. PMID:25569999

  3. Cytokine Profiling in the Eutopic Endometrium of Adenomyosis During the Implantation Window After Ovarian Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhihong, N; Yun, F; Pinggui, Z; Sulian, Z; Zhang, Aijun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to clarify the inflammatory cytokine profile of endometrium in patients with adenomyosis during the implantation window after ovarian stimulation. Eighteen patients with adenomyosis and 24 control patients undergoing in vitro fertilization treatment were included in this prospective case-control study. Regular gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocol was used for ovarian stimulation. Endometrial samples were obtained 7 days after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) injection (hCG + 7). Cytokine levels in endometrium secretions from women with and without adenomyosis were assayed by multiplex immunoassay, levels of interleukin (IL) 6 (25.9 ± 6.6 vs 12.4 ± 3.4 pg/mL; P = .001), IL-10 (10.4 ± 2.9 vs 15.6 ± 4.2 pg/mL; P = .001), IL-17 (11.9 ± 3.0 vs 14.2 ± 3.9 pg/mL; P = .046), interferon-γ (11.7 ± 3.5 vs 8.0 ± 3.4 pg/mL; P = .001), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1; 37.1 ± 6.5 vs 16.4 ± 3.2 pg/mL; P = .001) were significantly different between patients with adenomyosis and control groups, respectively. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that CD-68+, IL-6, and MCP-1 expression were higher and IL-10 was lower in adenomyosis endometrium epithelia compared to controls. In conclusion, within the implantation window of ovarian stimulation cycles, macrophages, IL-6, IL-10, and MCP-1 are expressed differently in the endometrium of women with adenomyosis, which may correlate with compromised endometrium receptivity. We postulated that cytokines of endometrial secretions expressed differently in patients with adenomyosis may contribute to impaired endometrium receptivity in these patients. PMID:26239388

  4. A zero-voltage switching technique for minimizing the current-source power of implanted stimulators.

    PubMed

    Çilingiroğlu, Uğur; İpek, Sercan

    2013-08-01

    The current-source power of an implanted stimulator is reduced almost to the theoretical minimum by driving the electrodes directly from the secondary port of the inductive link with a dedicated zero-voltage switching power supply. A feedback loop confined to the secondary of the inductive link adjusts the timing and conduction angle of switching to provide just the right amount of supply voltage needed for keeping the current-source voltage constant at or slightly above the compliance limit. Since drive is based on current rather than voltage, and supply-voltage update is near real-time, the quality of the current pulses is high regardless of how the electrode impedance evolves during stimulation. By scaling the switching frequency according to power demand, the technique further improves overall power consumption of the stimulator. The technique is implemented with a very simple control circuitry comprising a comparator, a Schmitt trigger and a logic gate of seven devices in addition to an on-chip switch and an off-chip capacitor. The power consumed by the proposed supply circuit itself is no larger than what the linear regulator of a conventional supply typically consumes for the same stimulation current. Still, the sum of supply and current-source power is typically between 20% and 75% of the conventional source power alone. Functionality of the proposed driver is verified experimentally on a proof-of-concept prototype built with 3.3 V devices in a 0.18 μm CMOS technology. PMID:23893206

  5. Development of a loudness normalisation strategy for combined cochlear implant and acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Francart, Tom; McDermott, Hugh J

    2012-12-01

    Users of a cochlear implant together with a hearing aid in the non-implanted ear currently use devices that were developed separately and are often fitted separately. This results in very different growth of loudness with level in the two ears, potentially leading to decreased wearing comfort and suboptimal perception of interaural level differences. A loudness equalisation strategy, named 'SCORE bimodal', is proposed. It equalises loudness growth for the two modalities using existing models of loudness for acoustic and electric stimulation, and is suitable for implementation in wearable devices. Loudness balancing experiments were performed with six bimodal listeners to validate the strategy. In a first set of experiments, the function of each loudness model used was validated by balancing the loudness of four harmonic complexes of different bandwidths, ranging from 200 Hz to 1000 Hz, separately for each ear. Both the electric and acoustic loudness models predicted the data well. In a second set of experiments, binaural balancing was done for the same stimuli. It was found that SCORE significantly improved binaural balance. PMID:23000118

  6. Compact stacked planar inverted-F antenna for passive deep brain stimulation implants.

    PubMed

    Hosain, Md Kamal; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Tye, Susannah; Mortazavi, Daryoush; Kaynak, Akif

    2012-01-01

    A compact meandered three-layer stacked circular planar inverted-F antenna is designed and simulated at the UHF band (902.75 - 927.25 MHz) for passive deep brain stimulation implants. The UHF band is used because it offers small antenna size, and high data rate. The top and middle radiating layers are meandered, and low cost substrate and superstrate materials are used to limit the radius and height of the antenna to 5 mm and 1.64 mm, respectively. A dielectric substrate of FR-4 of ε(r)= 4.7 and δ= 0.018, and a biocompatible superstrate of silicone of er= 3.7 and d= 0.003 with thickness of 0.2 mm are used in the design. The resonance frequency of the proposed antenna is 918 MHz with a bandwidth of 24 MHz at return loss of -10 dB in free space. The antenna parameter such as 3D gain pattern of the designed antenna within a skin-tissue model is evaluated by using the finite element method. The compactness, wide bandwidth, round shape, and stable characteristics in skin make this antenna suitable for DBS. The feasibility of the wireless power transmission to the implant in the human head is also examined. PMID:23366026

  7. Effects of Maternal Sensitivity and Cognitive and Linguistic Stimulation on Cochlear Implant Users' Language Development over Four Years

    PubMed Central

    Quittner, Alexandra L.; Cruz, Ivette; Barker, David H.; Tobey, Emily; Eisenberg, Laurie S.; Niparko, John K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effects of observed maternal sensitivity (MS), cognitive stimulation (CS), and linguistic stimulation on the 4-year growth of oral language in young, deaf children receiving a cochlear implant. Previous studies of cochlear implants have not considered the effects of parental behaviors on language outcomes. Study design In this prospective, multisite study, we evaluated parent–child interactions during structured and unstructured play tasks and their effects on oral language development in 188 deaf children receiving a cochlear implant and 97 normal-hearing children as controls. Parent–child interactions were rated on a 7-point scale using the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Early Childcare Study codes, which have well-established psychometric properties. Language was assessed using the MacArthur Bates Communicative Development Inventories, the Reynell Developmental Language Scales, and the Comprehensive Assessment of Spoken Language. Results We used mixed longitudinal modeling to test our hypotheses. After accounting for early hearing experience and child and family demographics, MS and CS predicted significant increases in the growth of oral language. Linguistic stimulation was related to language growth only in the context of high MS. Conclusion The magnitude of effects of MS and CS on the growth of language was similar to that found for age at cochlear implantation, suggesting that addressing parenting behaviors is a critical target for early language learning after implantation. PMID:22985723

  8. Auditory steady-state responses in cochlear implant users: Effect of modulation frequency and stimulation artifacts.

    PubMed

    Gransier, Robin; Deprez, Hanne; Hofmann, Michael; Moonen, Marc; van Wieringen, Astrid; Wouters, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that objective measures based on stimulation with low-rate pulse trains fail to predict the threshold levels of cochlear implant (CI) users for high-rate pulse trains, as used in clinical devices. Electrically evoked auditory steady-state responses (EASSRs) can be elicited by modulated high-rate pulse trains, and can potentially be used to objectively determine threshold levels of CI users. The responsiveness of the auditory pathway of profoundly hearing-impaired CI users to modulation frequencies is, however, not known. In the present study we investigated the responsiveness of the auditory pathway of CI users to a monopolar 500 pulses per second (pps) pulse train modulated between 1 and 100 Hz. EASSRs to forty-three modulation frequencies, elicited at the subject's maximum comfort level, were recorded by means of electroencephalography. Stimulation artifacts were removed by a linear interpolation between a pre- and post-stimulus sample (i.e., blanking). The phase delay across modulation frequencies was used to differentiate between the neural response and a possible residual stimulation artifact after blanking. Stimulation artifacts were longer than the inter-pulse interval of the 500pps pulse train for recording electrodes ipsilateral to the CI. As a result the stimulation artifacts could not be removed by artifact removal on the bases of linear interpolation for recording electrodes ipsilateral to the CI. However, artifact-free responses could be obtained in all subjects from recording electrodes contralateral to the CI, when subject specific reference electrodes (Cz or Fpz) were used. EASSRs to modulation frequencies within the 30-50 Hz range resulted in significant responses in all subjects. Only a small number of significant responses could be obtained, during a measurement period of 5 min, that originate from the brain stem (i.e., modulation frequencies in the 80-100 Hz range). This reduced synchronized activity of brain stem

  9. Multi-microphone adaptive noise reduction strategies for coordinated stimulation in bilateral cochlear implant devices.

    PubMed

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Loizou, Philipos C

    2010-05-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (BI-CI) recipients achieve high word recognition scores in quiet listening conditions. Still, there is a substantial drop in speech recognition performance when there is reverberation and more than one interferers. BI-CI users utilize information from just two directional microphones placed on opposite sides of the head in a so-called independent stimulation mode. To enhance the ability of BI-CI users to communicate in noise, the use of two computationally inexpensive multi-microphone adaptive noise reduction strategies exploiting information simultaneously collected by the microphones associated with two behind-the-ear (BTE) processors (one per ear) is proposed. To this end, as many as four microphones are employed (two omni-directional and two directional) in each of the two BTE processors (one per ear). In the proposed two-microphone binaural strategies, all four microphones (two behind each ear) are being used in a coordinated stimulation mode. The hypothesis is that such strategies combine spatial information from all microphones to form a better representation of the target than that made available with only a single input. Speech intelligibility is assessed in BI-CI listeners using IEEE sentences corrupted by up to three steady speech-shaped noise sources. Results indicate that multi-microphone strategies improve speech understanding in single- and multi-noise source scenarios. PMID:21117762

  10. Influence of implantation on the electrochemical properties of smooth and porous TiN coatings for stimulation electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijs, S.; Sørensen, C.; Sørensen, S.; Rechendorff, K.; Fjorback, M.; Rijkhoff, N. J. M.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. To determine whether changes in electrochemical properties of porous titanium nitride (TiN) electrodes as a function of time after implantation are different from those of smooth TiN electrodes. Approach. Eight smooth and 8 porous TiN coated electrodes were implanted in 8 rats. Before implantation, voltage transients, cyclic voltammograms and impedance spectra were recorded in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). After implantation, these measurements were done weekly to investigate how smooth and porous electrodes were affected by implantation. Main results. The electrode capacitance of the porous TiN electrodes decreased more than the capacitance of the smooth electrodes due to acute implantation under fast measurement conditions (such as stimulation pulses). This indicates that protein adhesion presents a greater diffusion limitation for counter-ions for the porous than for the smooth electrodes. The changes in electrochemical properties during the implanted period were similar for smooth and porous TiN electrodes, indicating that cell adhesion poses a similar diffusion limitation for smooth and porous electrodes. Significance. This knowledge can be used to optimize the porous structure of the TiN film, so that the effect of protein adhesion on the electrochemical properties is diminished. Alternatively, an additional coating could be applied on the porous TiN that would prevent or minimize protein adhesion.

  11. Perceptual Spaces Induced by Cochlear Implant All-Polar Stimulation Mode.

    PubMed

    Marozeau, Jeremy; McKay, Colette M

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that a main limitation of the cochlear implant is the spread of current induced by each electrode, which activates an inappropriately large range of sensory neurons. To reduce this spread, an alternative stimulation mode, the all-polar mode, was tested with five participants. It was designed to activate all the electrodes simultaneously with appropriate current levels and polarities to recruit narrower regions of auditory nerves at specific intracochlear electrode positions (denoted all-polar electrodes). In this study, the all-polar mode was compared with the current commercial stimulation mode: the monopolar mode. The participants were asked to judge the sound dissimilarity between pairs of two-electrode pulse-train stimuli that differed in the electrode positions and were presented in either monopolar or all-polar mode with pulses on the two electrodes presented either sequentially or simultaneously. The dissimilarity ratings were analyzed using a multidimensional scaling technique and three-dimensional stimulus perceptual spaces were produced. For all the conditions (mode and simultaneity), the first perceptual dimension was highly correlated with the position of the most apical activated electrode of the electrical stimulation and the second dimension with the position of the most basal electrode. In both sequential and simultaneous conditions, the monopolar and all-polar stimuli were significantly separated by a third dimension, which may indicate that all-polar stimuli have a perceptual quality that differs from monopolar stimuli. Overall, the results suggest that both modes might successfully represent spectral information in a sound processing strategy. PMID:27604784

  12. Package architecture and component design for an implanted neural stimulator with closed loop control.

    PubMed

    Bjune, Caroline K; Marinis, Thomas F; Brady, Jeanne M; Moran, James; Wheeler, Jesse; Sriram, Tirunelveli S; Parks, Philip D; Widge, Alik S; Dougherty, Darin D; Eskandar, Emad N

    2015-08-01

    An implanted neural stimulator with closed loop control requires electrodes for stimulation pulses and recording neuron activity. Our system features arrays of 64 electrodes. Each electrode can be addressed through a cross bar switch, to enable it to be used for stimulation or recording. This electrode switch, a bank of low noise amplifiers with an integrated analog to digital converter, power conditioning electronics, and a communications and control gate array are co-located with the electrode array in a 14 millimeter diameter satellite package that is designed to be flush mounted in a skull burr hole. Our system features five satellite packages connected to a central hub processor-controller via ten conductor cables that terminate in a custom designed, miniaturized connector. The connector incorporates features of high reliability, military grade devices and utilizes three distinct seals to isolate the contacts from fluid permeation. The hub system is comprised of a connector header, hermetic electronics package, and rechargeable battery pack, which are mounted on and electrically interconnected by a flexible circuit board. The assembly is over molded with a compliant silicone rubber. The electronics package contains two antennas, a large coil, used for recharging the battery and a high bandwidth antenna that is used to download data and update software. The package is assembled from two machined alumina pieces, a flat base with brazed in, electrical feed through pins and a rectangular cover with rounded corners. Titanium seal rings are brazed onto these two pieces so that they can be sealed by laser welding. A third system antenna is incorporated in the flexible circuit board. It is used to communicate with an externally worn control package, which monitors the health of the system and allows both the user and clinician to control or modify various system function parameters. PMID:26738106

  13. An in vitro model for investigating impedance changes with cell growth and electrical stimulation: implications for cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbold, Carrie; Richardson, Rachael; Huang, Christie Q.; Milojevic, Dusan; Cowan, Robert; Shepherd, Robert

    2004-12-01

    The impedance of stimulating electrodes used in cochlear implants and other neural prostheses often increases post-implantation, and is thought to be due to fibrous tissue encapsulation of the electrode array. Increased impedance results in higher power requirements to stimulate target neurons at set charge densities. We developed an in vitro model to investigate the electrode-tissue interface in a highly controlled environment. This model was tested using three cell types, with and without charge-balanced biphasic electrical stimulation. Under standard tissue culture conditions, a monolayer of cells was grown over the electrode surface. Electrode impedance increased in proportion to the extent of cell coverage of the electrode. Cell type was a significant factor in the amount of impedance increase, with kidney epithelial cells (MDCK) creating the greatest impedance, followed by dissociated rat skin fibroblasts and then macrophages (J774). The application of electrical stimulation to cell-covered electrodes caused impedance fluctuations similar to that seen in vivo, with a lowering of impedance immediately following stimulation, and a recovery to pre-stimulation levels during inactive periods. Examination of these electrodes suggests that the stimulation-induced impedance changes were due to the amount of cell cover over the electrodes. This in vitro technique accurately models the changes in impedance observed with neural prostheses in vivo, and shows the close relationship between impedance and tissue coverage adjacent to the electrode surface. We believe that this in vitro approach holds great promise to further our knowledge of the mechanisms contributing to electrode impedance.

  14. Role of bimodal stimulation for auditory-perceptual skills development in children with a unilateral cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Marsella, P; Giannantonio, S; Scorpecci, A; Pianesi, F; Micardi, M; Resca, A

    2015-12-01

    This is a prospective randomised study that evaluated the differences arising from a bimodal stimulation compared to a monaural electrical stimulation in deaf children, particularly in terms of auditory-perceptual skills development. We enrolled 39 children aged 12 to 36 months, suffering from severe-to-profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with residual hearing on at least one side. All were unilaterally implanted: 21 wore only the cochlear implant (CI) (unilateral CI group), while the other 18 used the CI and a contralateral hearing aid at the same time (bimodal group). They were assessed with a test battery designed to appraise preverbal and verbal auditory-perceptual skills immediately before and 6 and 12 months after implantation. No statistically significant differences were observed between groups at time 0, while at 6 and 12 months children in the bimodal group had better scores in each test than peers in the unilateral CI group. Therefore, although unilateral deafness/hearing does not undermine hearing acuity in normal listening, the simultaneous use of a CI and a contralateral hearing aid (binaural hearing through a bimodal stimulation) provides an advantage in terms of acquisition of auditory-perceptual skills, allowing children to achieve the basic milestones of auditory perception faster and in greater number than children with only one CI. Thus, "keeping awake" the contralateral auditory pathway, albeit not crucial in determining auditory acuity, guarantees benefits compared with the use of the implant alone. These findings provide initial evidence to establish shared guidelines for better rehabilitation of patients undergoing unilateral cochlear implantation, and add more evidence regarding the correct indications for bilateral cochlear implantation. PMID:26900251

  15. Gastric electrical stimulation treatment of type 2 diabetes: effects of implantation versus meal-mediated stimulation. A randomized blinded cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Lebovitz, Harold E; Ludvik, Bernhard; Kozakowski, Jaroslaw; Tarnowski, Wieslaw; Zelewski, Mateusz; Yaniv, Irit; Schwartz, Tse'ela

    2015-07-14

    Gastric electrical stimulation with the implanted DIAMOND device has been shown to improve glycemic control and decrease weight and systolic blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic agents. The objective of this study was to determine if device implantation alone (placebo effect) contributes to the long-term metabolic benefits of DIAMOND(®) meal-mediated gastric electrical stimulation in patients with type 2 diabetes. The study was a 48 week randomized, blinded, cross-over trial in university centers comparing glycemic improvement of DIAMOND(®) implanted patients with type 2 diabetic with no activation of the electrical stimulation (placebo) versus meal-mediated activation of the electrical signal. The endpoint was improvement in glycemic control (HbA1c) from baseline to 24 and 48 weeks. In period 1 (0-24 weeks), equal improvement in HbA1c occurred independent of whether the meal-mediated electrical stimulation was turned on or left off (HbA1c -0.80% and -0.85% [-8.8 and -9.0 mmol/mol]). The device placebo improvement proved to be transient as it was lost in period 2 (25-48 weeks). With electrical stimulation turned off, HbA1c returned toward baseline values (8.06 compared to 8.32%; 64.2 to 67.4 mmol/mol, P = 0.465). In contrast, turning the electrical stimulation on in period 2 sustained the decrease in HbA1c from baseline (-0.93%, -10.1mmol/mol, P = 0.001) observed in period 1. The results indicate that implantation of the DIAMOND device causes a transient improvement in HbA1c which is not sustained beyond 24 weeks. Meal-mediated electrical stimulation accounts for the significant improvement in HbA1c beyond 24 weeks. PMID:26177957

  16. Gastric electrical stimulation treatment of type 2 diabetes: effects of implantation versus meal-mediated stimulation. A randomized blinded cross-over trial

    PubMed Central

    Lebovitz, Harold E; Ludvik, Bernhard; Kozakowski, Jaroslaw; Tarnowski, Wieslaw; Zelewski, Mateusz; Yaniv, Irit; Schwartz, Tse’ela

    2015-01-01

    Gastric electrical stimulation with the implanted DIAMOND device has been shown to improve glycemic control and decrease weight and systolic blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic agents. The objective of this study was to determine if device implantation alone (placebo effect) contributes to the long-term metabolic benefits of DIAMOND® meal-mediated gastric electrical stimulation in patients with type 2 diabetes. The study was a 48 week randomized, blinded, cross-over trial in university centers comparing glycemic improvement of DIAMOND® implanted patients with type 2 diabetic with no activation of the electrical stimulation (placebo) versus meal-mediated activation of the electrical signal. The endpoint was improvement in glycemic control (HbA1c) from baseline to 24 and 48 weeks. In period 1 (0–24 weeks), equal improvement in HbA1c occurred independent of whether the meal-mediated electrical stimulation was turned on or left off (HbA1c −0.80% and −0.85% [−8.8 and −9.0 mmol/mol]). The device placebo improvement proved to be transient as it was lost in period 2 (25–48 weeks). With electrical stimulation turned off, HbA1c returned toward baseline values (8.06 compared to 8.32%; 64.2 to 67.4 mmol/mol, P = 0.465). In contrast, turning the electrical stimulation on in period 2 sustained the decrease in HbA1c from baseline (−0.93%, −10.1mmol/mol, P = 0.001) observed in period 1. The results indicate that implantation of the DIAMOND device causes a transient improvement in HbA1c which is not sustained beyond 24 weeks. Meal-mediated electrical stimulation accounts for the significant improvement in HbA1c beyond 24 weeks. PMID:26177957

  17. Mandibular reconstruction with a prefabricated free vascularized fibula and implant-supported prosthesis based on fully three-dimensional virtual planning.

    PubMed

    Freudlsperger, Christian; Bodem, Jens Philipp; Engel, Eva; Hoffmann, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Because optimal reconstruction of maxillofacial defects requires functional rehabilitation, the current study demonstrates the successful secondary reconstruction of a large mandibular continuity defect using a fully digitally planned prefabricated free vascularized fibula with immediate implant-supported prosthodontic restoration. A 56-year-old man presented with a large mandibular continuity defect after resection of an enlarged squamous cell carcinoma arising from the floor of the mouth. For secondary reconstruction, the shape of the neomandible and implant position for support of the lower prosthesis were planned virtually. The combined cutting and drilling guide was printed in 3 dimensions. In a 2-step surgical approach, first, the implants were inserted into the fibula and covered with a split-thickness skin graft to form a neogingiva. In a second operation, the fibula was harvested, osteotomized, and fixed with the denture on the preinserted implants. The fibula was placed to its final position guided by the occlusion. Using three-dimensional virtual backward planning, it was feasible to perform a mandibular reconstruction with immediate prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:24670276

  18. Implantable electrical bone stimulation for arthrodeses of the foot and ankle in high-risk patients: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Amol; DiDomenico, Lawrence A; Widtfeldt, Arthur; Adams, Todd; Kim, Will

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed arthrodesis procedures performed in the foot and ankle of high-risk patients following implantation of an internal electrical bone stimulator. Criteria defining patients as "high risk" included diabetes, obesity, habitual tobacco and/or alcohol use, immunosuppressive therapy, and previous history of nonunion. Standard arthrodesis protocol of bone graft and internal fixation was supplemented with the implantable electrical bone stimulator. A retrospective, multicenter review was conducted of 26 patients (28 cases) who underwent 28 forefoot and hindfoot arthrodeses from 1998 to 2002. Complete fusion was defined as bony trabeculation across the joint, lack of motion across the joint, maintenance of hardware/fixation, and absence of radiographic signs of nonunion or pseudoarthrosis. Radiographic consolidation was achieved in 24 of the 28 cases at an average 10.3+/-4.0 weeks. Followup averaged 27.2 months. Complications included 2 patients who sustained breakage of the cables to the bone stimulator. Five patients underwent additional surgery. Four of the 5 patients had additional surgery in order to achieve arthrodesis. All 4 went on to subsequent arthrodesis. This study demonstrates how arthrodesis of the foot and ankle may be enhanced by the use of implantable electrical bone stimulation. PMID:16257674

  19. Evaluation of a cochlear-implant processing strategy incorporating phantom stimulation and asymmetric pulses

    PubMed Central

    Monstrey, Jolijn; Deeks, John M.; Macherey, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a speech-processing strategy in which the lowest frequency channel is conveyed using an asymmetric pulse shape and “phantom stimulation”, where current is injected into one intra-cochlear electrode and where the return current is shared between an intra-cochlear and an extra-cochlear electrode. This strategy is expected to provide more selective excitation of the cochlear apex, compared to a standard strategy where the lowest-frequency channel is conveyed by symmetric pulses in monopolar mode. In both strategies all other channels were conveyed by monopolar stimulation. Design Within-subjects comparison between the two strategies. Four experiments: (1) discrimination between the strategies, controlling for loudness differences, (2) consonant identification, (3) recognition of lowpass-filtered sentences in quiet, (4) sentence recognition in the presence of a competing speaker. Study sample Eight users of the Advanced Bionics CII/Hi-Res 90k cochlear implant. Results Listeners could easily discriminate between the two strategies but no consistent differences in performance were observed. Conclusions The proposed method does not improve speech perception, at least in the short term. PMID:25358027

  20. Stimulation of rat cutaneous fibroblasts and their synthetic activity by implants of powdered nacre (mother of pearl).

    PubMed

    Lopez, E; Le Faou, A; Borzeix, S; Berland, S

    2000-02-01

    The components of the cutaneous envelope, the epidermis and the dermis, change in response to aging or environmental stress factors. The fibroblasts involved in maintaining skin tone are the main targets. Nacre, mother of pearl, from Pinctada maxima, which can stimulate and regulate bone forming cells, was implanted in the dermis of rats to test its action on the skin fibroblasts. This report describes the effect of nacre on the skin fibroblast recruitment and physiological activity. It resulted in enhanced extracellular matrix synthesis and the production of components implicated in cell to cell adhesion and communication (such as decorine) and in tissue regeneration (type I and type III collagens). The nacre implant produced a well vascularized tissue. The physiological conditions in the region around the implant are thus those required for the positive interactions between the dermis and epidermis which are fundamental for the physiological function of the skin. PMID:10798323

  1. Do we need to establish guidelines for patients with neuromodulation implantable devices, including spinal cord stimulators undergoing nonspinal surgeries?

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Ramsis F.; Tverdohleb, Tatiana; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation is currently approved to treat chronic intractable pain of the trunk and limbs. However, such implantable electronic devices are vulnerable to external electrical currents and magnetic fields. Within the hospitals and modern operating rooms (ORs), there is an abundance of electrical devices and other types of equipment that could interfere with such devices. Despite the increasing number of patients with neuromodulation implantable devices, there are no written guidelines available or consensus of cautions for such patients undergoing unrelated surgery. Case Descriptions: A 60-year-old female with a permanent St. Jude's spinal cord stimulator (SCS) presented for open total abdominal hysterectomy. Both the anesthesia and gynecology staffs were aware of the device presence, but were unaware of any precautions regarding intraoperative management. The device was found to be nonmagnetic resonance imaging compatible, and bipolar cautery was used instead of monopolar cautery. A 59-year-old female with a 9-year-old permanent Medtronic SCS, presented for right total hip arthroplasty. The device was switched off prior to entering the OR, bipolar cautery was used, and grounding pads were placed away from her battery site. In each case, the manufacturer's representative was contacted preoperative. Both surgeries proceeded uneventfully. Conclusions: The Food and Drug Administration safety information manual warns about the use of diathermy, concomitant implanted stimulation devices, lithotripsy, external defibrillation, radiation therapy, ultrasonic scanning, and high-output ultrasound, all of which can lead to permanent implant damage if not turned off prior to undertaking procedures. Lack of uniform guidelines makes intraoperative management, as well as remote anesthesia care of patients with previously implanted SCSs unsafe. PMID:26958424

  2. Active books: the design of an implantable stimulator that minimizes cable count using integrated circuits very close to electrodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Demosthenous, Andreas; Vanhoestenberghe, Anne; Jiang, Dai; Donaldson, Nick

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an integrated stimulator that can be embedded in implantable electrode books for interfacing with nerve roots at the cauda equina. The Active Book overcomes the limitation of conventional nerve root stimulators which can only support a small number of stimulating electrodes due to cable count restriction through the dura. Instead, a distributed stimulation system with many tripole electrodes can be configured using several Active Books which are addressed sequentially. The stimulator was fabricated in a 0.6-μm high-voltage CMOS process and occupies a silicon area of 4.2 × 6.5 mm(2). The circuit was designed to deliver up to 8 mA stimulus current to tripole electrodes from an 18 V power supply. Input pad count is limited to five (two power and three control lines) hence requiring a specific procedure for downloading stimulation commands to the chip and extracting information from it. Supported commands include adjusting the amplitude of stimulus current, varying the current ratio at the two anodes in each channel, and measuring relative humidity inside the chip package. In addition to stimulation mode, the chip supports quiescent mode, dissipating less than 100 nA current from the power supply. The performance of the stimulator chip was verified with bench tests including measurements using tripoles in saline. PMID:23853144

  3. [Long-term adaptation of the patients to electrical stimulation in the course of rehabilitation following cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Kruglov, A V; Potalova, L A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study long-term adaptation of the patients to electrical stimulation in the course of rehabilitation following cochlear implantation. The following parameters were determined: variations of threshold auditory sensation of electrical stimulation (ESS), alteration of the maximum electrical stimulation comfort level (MCL), changes in the dynamic range (DR) of the stimulus and changes in the threshold auditory nerve action potentials (ANAP). The observations on ESS dynamics and DR of the stimulus were collected during 2 years after the first connection of the processor in a group of 27 patients. The data obtained from the 3rd, 12th, and 20th stimulation channels were included in the study. The observations on ANAP dynamics were collected during 1 year after surgery in a group of 112 patients. It was shown that ESS variations largely occurred within the first two weeks after connection and did not reach statistical significance. In contrast, MCL and DR changes showed a stably increasing tendency throughout the entire period of observations, with the enhancement of MCL of DR amounting to 25-28% and roughly 50% of the initial values respectively. Threshold auditory sensation of electrical stimulation significantly decreased by the time of the first connection of the implant compared with the surgical data. Further changes in threshold ESS were relatively small and did not reach statistical significance. PMID:25246204

  4. Characterization of pulse amplitude and pulse rate modulation for a human vestibular implant during acute electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. A. K.; DiGiovanna, J.; Cavuscens, S.; Ranieri, M.; Guinand, N.; van de Berg, R.; Carpaneto, J.; Kingma, H.; Guyot, J.-P.; Micera, S.; Perez Fornos, A.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. The vestibular system provides essential information about balance and spatial orientation via the brain to other sensory and motor systems. Bilateral vestibular loss significantly reduces quality of life, but vestibular implants (VIs) have demonstrated potential to restore lost function. However, optimal electrical stimulation strategies have not yet been identified in patients. In this study, we compared the two most common strategies, pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) and pulse rate modulation (PRM), in patients. Approach. Four subjects with a modified cochlear implant including electrodes targeting the peripheral vestibular nerve branches were tested. Charge-equivalent PAM and PRM were applied after adaptation to baseline stimulation. Vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movement responses were recorded to evaluate stimulation efficacy during acute clinical testing sessions. Main results. PAM evoked larger amplitude eye movement responses than PRM. Eye movement response axes for lateral canal stimulation were marginally better aligned with PRM than with PAM. A neural network model was developed for the tested stimulation strategies to provide insights on possible neural mechanisms. This model suggested that PAM would consistently cause a larger ensemble firing rate of neurons and thus larger responses than PRM. Significance. Due to the larger magnitude of eye movement responses, our findings strongly suggest PAM as the preferred strategy for initial VI modulation.

  5. A good preoperative response to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation predicts a better therapeutic effect of implanted occipital nerve stimulation in pharmacologically intractable headaches.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jean-Paul; Nizard, Julien; Kuhn, Emmanuelle; Carduner, Florence; Penverne, Frédérique; Verleysen-Robin, Marie-Christine; Terreaux, Luc; de Gaalon, Solène; Raoul, Sylvie; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) is a surgical approach to treat patients with medically intractable chronic headache disorders. However, no preoperative test has been yet validated to allow candidates to be selected for implantation. In this study, the analgesic efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was tested for 1 to 3 months in 41 patients with pharmacologically intractable headache disorders of various origins, using a new technique of electrode placement over the occipital nerve. ONS electrodes were subsequently implanted in 33 patients (occipital neuralgia [n=15], cervicogenic headache [n=7], cluster headache [n=6], chronic migraine [n=5]) who had responded at least moderately to TENS. Assessment was performed up to five years after implantation (three years on average), based on the mean and maximum daily pain intensity scored on a 0-10 visual analogue scale and the number of headache days per month. Both TENS and chronic ONS therapy were found to be efficacious (57-76% improvement compared to baseline on the various clinical variables). The efficacy of ONS was better in cases of good or very good preoperative response to TENS than in cases of moderate response to TENS. Implanted ONS may be a valuable therapeutic option in the long term for patients with pharmacologically intractable chronic headache. Although we cannot conclude in patients with poor or no response to TENS, a good or very good response to TENS can support the indication of ONS therapy. This preoperative test could particularly be useful in patients with chronic migraine, in whom it may be difficult to indicate an invasive technique of cranial neurostimulation. PMID:26895733

  6. Effect of Stimulation Rate on Cochlear Implant Users’ Phoneme, Word and Sentence Recognition in Quiet and in Noise

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Robert V.; Cruz, Rachel J.; Galvin, John J.

    2011-01-01

    High stimulation rates in cochlear implants (CI) offer better temporal sampling, can induce stochastic-like firing of auditory neurons and can increase the electric dynamic range, all of which could improve CI speech performance. While commercial CI have employed increasingly high stimulation rates, no clear or consistent advantage has been shown for high rates. In this study, speech recognition was acutely measured with experimental processors in 7 CI subjects (Clarion CII users). The stimulation rate varied between (approx.) 600 and 4800 pulses per second per electrode (ppse) and the number of active electrodes varied between 4 and 16. Vowel, consonant, consonant-nucleus-consonant word and IEEE sentence recognition was acutely measured in quiet and in steady noise (+10 dB signal-to-noise ratio). Subjective quality ratings were obtained for each of the experimental processors in quiet and in noise. Except for a small difference for vowel recognition in quiet, there were no significant differences in performance among the experimental stimulation rates for any of the speech measures. There was also a small but significant increase in subjective quality rating as stimulation rates increased from 1200 to 2400 ppse in noise. Consistent with previous studies, performance significantly improved as the number of electrodes was increased from 4 to 8, but no significant difference showed between 8, 12 and 16 electrodes. Altogether, there was little-to-no advantage of high stimulation rates in quiet or in noise, at least for the present speech tests and conditions. PMID:20639631

  7. Speech Perception and Localisation with SCORE Bimodal: A Loudness Normalisation Strategy for Combined Cochlear Implant and Hearing Aid Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Francart, Tom; McDermott, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    A significant fraction of newly implanted cochlear implant recipients use a hearing aid in their non-implanted ear. SCORE bimodal is a sound processing strategy developed for this configuration, aimed at normalising loudness perception and improving binaural loudness balance. Speech perception performance in quiet and noise and sound localisation ability of six bimodal listeners were measured with and without application of SCORE. Speech perception in quiet was measured either with only acoustic, only electric, or bimodal stimulation, at soft and normal conversational levels. For speech in quiet there was a significant improvement with application of SCORE. Speech perception in noise was measured for either steady-state noise, fluctuating noise, or a competing talker, at conversational levels with bimodal stimulation. For speech in noise there was no significant effect of application of SCORE. Modelling of interaural loudness differences in a long-term-average-speech-spectrum-weighted click train indicated that left-right discrimination of sound sources can improve with application of SCORE. As SCORE was found to leave speech perception unaffected or to improve it, it seems suitable for implementation in clinical devices. PMID:23115622

  8. Effects of Pulse Shape and Polarity on Sensitivity to Cochlear Implant Stimulation: A Chronic Study in Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Macherey, Olivier; Cazals, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Most cochlear implants (CIs) stimulate the auditory nerve with trains of symmetric biphasic pulses consisting of two phases of opposite polarity. Animal and human studies have shown that both polarities can elicit neural responses. In human CI listeners, studies have shown that at suprathreshold levels, the anodic phase is more effective than the cathodic phase. In contrast, animal studies usually show the opposite trend. Although the reason for this discrepancy remains unclear, computational modelling results have proposed that the degeneration of the peripheral processes of the neurons could lead to a higher efficiency of anodic stimulation. We tested this hypothesis in ten guinea pigs who were deafened with an injection of sysomycin and implanted with a single ball electrode inserted in the first turn of the cochlea. Animals were tested at regular intervals between 1 week after deafening and up to 1 year for some of them. Our hypothesis was that if the effect of polarity is determined by the presence or absence of peripheral processes, the difference in polarity efficiency should change over time because of a progressive neural degeneration. Stimuli consisted of charge-balanced symmetric and asymmetric pulses allowing us to observe the response to each polarity individually. For all stimuli, the inferior colliculus evoked potential was measured. Results show that the cathodic phase was more effective than the anodic phase and that this remained so even several months after deafening. This suggests that neural degeneration cannot entirely account for the higher efficiency of anodic stimulation observed in human CI listeners. PMID:27080654

  9. Evaluation of focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants in long-term deafened cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Shefin S.; Wise, Andrew K.; Fallon, James B.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. Focused multipolar (FMP) stimulation has been shown to produce restricted neural activation using intracochlear stimulation in animals with a normal population of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). However, in a clinical setting, the widespread loss of SGNs and peripheral fibres following deafness is expected to influence the effectiveness of FMP. Approach. We compared the efficacy of FMP stimulation to both monopolar (MP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation in long-term deafened cat cochleae (n = 8). Unlike our previous study, these cochleae contained <10% of the normal SGN population adjacent to the electrode array. We also evaluated the effect of electrode position on stimulation modes by using either modiolar facing or lateral wall facing half-band electrodes. The spread of neural activity across the inferior colliculus, a major nucleus within the central auditory pathway, was used as a measure of spatial selectivity. Main results. In cochleae with significant SGN degeneration, we observed that FMP and TP stimulation resulted in greater spatial selectivity than MP stimulation (p < 0.001). However, thresholds were significantly higher for FMP and TP stimulation compared to MP stimulation (p < 0.001). No difference between FMP and TP stimulation was found in any measures. The high threshold levels for FMP stimulation was significantly reduced without compromising spatial selectivity by varying the degree of current focusing (referred as ‘partial-FMP’ stimulation). Spatial selectivity of all stimulation modes was unaffected by the electrode position. Finally, spatial selectivity in long-term deafened cochleae was significantly less than that of cochleae with normal SGN population (George S S et al 2014 J. Neural Eng. 11 065003). Significance. The present results indicate that the greater spatial selectivity of FMP and TP stimulation over MP stimulation is maintained in cochleae with significant neural degeneration and is not adversely affected by electrode

  10. Cathodic voltage-controlled electrical stimulation of titanium implants as treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus periprosthetic infections.

    PubMed

    Ehrensberger, Mark T; Tobias, Menachem E; Nodzo, Scott R; Hansen, Lisa A; Luke-Marshall, Nicole R; Cole, Ross F; Wild, Linda M; Campagnari, Anthony A

    2015-02-01

    Effective treatment options are often limited for implant-associated orthopedic infections. In this study we evaluated the antimicrobial effects of applying cathodic voltage-controlled electrical stimulation (CVCES) of -1.8 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) to commercially pure titanium (cpTi) substrates with preformed biofilm-like structures of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The in vitro studies showed that as compared to the open circuit potential (OCP) conditions, CVCES of -1.8 V for 1 h significantly reduced the colony-forming units (CFU) of MRSA enumerated from the cpTi by 97% (1.89 × 106 vs 6.45 × 104 CFU/ml) and from the surrounding solution by 92% (6.63 × 105 vs. 5.15 × 104 CFU/ml). The in vivo studies, utilizing a rodent periprosthetic infection model, showed that as compared to the OCP conditions, CVCES at -1.8 V for 1 h significantly reduced MRSA CFUs in the bone tissue by 87% (1.15 × 105 vs. 1.48 × 104 CFU/ml) and reduced CFU on the cpTi implant by 98% (5.48 × 104 vs 1.16 × 103 CFU/ml). The stimulation was not associated with histological changes in the host tissue surrounding the implant. As compared to the OCP conditions, the -1.8 V stimulation significantly increased the interfacial capacitance (18.93 vs. 98.25 μF/cm(2)) and decreased polarization resistance (868,250 vs. 108 Ω-cm(2)) of the cpTi. The antimicrobial effects are thought to be associated with these voltage-dependent electrochemical surface properties of the cpTi. PMID:25522969

  11. Safe transcranial electric stimulation motor evoked potential monitoring during posterior spinal fusion in two patients with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Yellin, Joseph L; Wiggins, Cheryl R; Franco, Alier J; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    2016-08-01

    Transcranial electric stimulation (TES) motor evoked potentials (MEPs) have become a regular part of intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring (IONM) for posterior spinal fusion (PSF) surgery. Almost all of the relative contraindications to TES have come and gone. One exception is in the case of patients with a cochlear implant (CI). Herein we illustrate two cases of pediatric patients with CIs who underwent PSF using TES MEPs as part of IONM. In both instances the patients displayed no untoward effects from TES, and post-operatively both CIs were intact and functioning as they were prior to surgery. PMID:26103915

  12. First-in-Man Demonstration of Fully Implanted Myoelectric Sensors for Control of an Advanced Electromechanical Arm by Transradial Amputees

    PubMed Central

    Pasquina, Paul F.; Evangelista, Melissa; Carvalho, Antonio J.; Lockhart, Joseph; Griffin, Sarah; Nanos, George; McKay, Patricia; Hansen, Morten; Ipsen, Derek; Vandersea, James; Butkus, Josef; Miller, Matthew; Murphy, Ian; Hankin, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Advanced motorized prosthetic devices are currently controlled by EMG signals generated by residual muscles and recorded by surface electrodes on the skin. These surface recordings are often inconsistent and unreliable, leading to high prosthetic abandonment rates for individuals with upper limb amputation. Surface electrodes are limited because of poor skin contact, socket rotation, residual limb sweating, and their ability to only record signals from superficial muscles, whose function frequently does not relate to the intended prosthetic function. More sophisticated prosthetic devices require a stable and reliable interface between the user and robotic hand to improve upper limb prosthetic function. New Method Implantable Myoelectric Sensors (IMES®) are small electrodes intended to detect and wirelessly transmit EMG signals to an electromechanical prosthetic hand via an electromagnetic coil built into the prosthetic socket. This system is designed to simultaneously capture EMG signals from multiple residual limb muscles, allowing the natural control of multiple degrees of freedom simultaneously. Results We report the status of the first FDA-approved clinical trial of the IMES® System. This study is currently in progress, limiting reporting to only preliminary results. Comparison with Existing Methods Our first subject has reported the ability to accomplish a greater variety and complexity of tasks in his everyday life compared to what could be achieved with his previous myoelectric prosthesis. Conclusion The interim results of this study indicate the feasibility of utilizing IMES® technology to reliably sense and wirelessly transmit EMG signals from residual muscles to intuitively control a three degree-of-freedom prosthetic arm. PMID:25102286

  13. In Situ Characterization of Stimulating Microelectrode Arrays: Study of an Idealized Structure Based on Argus II Retinal implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandagor, Vincent; Cela, Carlos J.; Sanders, Charlene A.; Greenbaum, Elias; Lazzi, Gianluca; Zhou, David D.; Castro, Richard; Gaikwad, Sanjay; Little, Jim

    The development of a retinal prosthesis for artificial sight includes a study of the factors affecting the structural and functional stability of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Although neuron depolarization and propagation of electrical signals have been studied for nearly a century, the use of multielectrode stimulation as a proposed therapy to treat blindness is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology research. Mapping and characterizing the topographic information contained in the electric field potentials and understanding how this information is transmitted and interpreted in the visual cortex is still very much a work in progress. In order to characterize the electrical field patterns generated by the device, an in vitro prototype that mimics several of the physical and chemical parameters of the in vivo visual implant device was fabricated. We carried out multiple electrical measurements in a model "eye," beginning with a single electrode, followed by a 9-electrode array structure, both idealized components based on the Argus II retinal implants. Correlating the information contained in the topographic features of the electric fields with psychophysical testing in patients may help reduce the time required for patients to convert the electrical patterns into graphic signals.

  14. Wireless data and power transfer of an optogenetic implantable visual cortex stimulator.

    PubMed

    Fattah, Nabeel; Laha, Soumyasanta; Sokolov, Danil; Chester, Graeme; Degenaar, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the wireless data and power transfer for a novel optogenetic visual cortex implant system was demonstrated by using pork tissue mimic in-vitro at the ISM 2.4 GHz and 13.5 MHz frequency band respectively. The observed data rate was 120 kbps with no loss in data for up to a thickness of 35 mm in both water & pork. To increase the power level of the implant a Class E power amplifier is separately designed and simulated for the transmitter end and has an output power of around 223 mW with an efficiency of 81.83%. The transferred power at the receiver was measured to be 66.80 mW for the pork tissue medium considering a distance of 5 mm between the transmitter and the receiver coils, with a coupling coefficient of ~0.8. This serves the power requirement of the visual cortex implant. PMID:26738150

  15. Rate discrimination at low pulse rates in normal-hearing and cochlear implant listeners: Influence of intracochlear stimulation site.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Pierre; Macherey, Olivier; Meunier, Sabine; Roman, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Temporal pitch perception in cochlear implantees remains weaker than in normal hearing listeners and is usually limited to rates below about 300 pulses per second (pps). Recent studies have suggested that stimulating the apical part of the cochlea may improve the temporal coding of pitch by cochlear implants (CIs), compared to stimulating other sites. The present study focuses on rate discrimination at low pulse rates (ranging from 20 to 104 pps). Two experiments measured and compared pulse rate difference limens (DLs) at four fundamental frequencies (ranging from 20 to 104 Hz) in both CI and normal-hearing (NH) listeners. Experiment 1 measured DLs in users of the (Med-El CI, Innsbruck, Austria) device for two electrodes (one apical and one basal). In experiment 2, DLs for NH listeners were compared for unresolved harmonic complex tones filtered in two frequency regions (lower cut-off frequencies of 1200 and 3600 Hz, respectively) and for different bandwidths. Pulse rate discrimination performance was significantly better when stimulation was provided by the apical electrode in CI users and by the lower-frequency tone complexes in NH listeners. This set of data appears consistent with better temporal coding when stimulation originates from apical regions of the cochlea. PMID:27106306

  16. Implanted Electrical Stimulation of the Trunk for Seated Postural Stability and Function after Cervical SCI: A Single Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Triolo, Ronald J.; Boggs, Lisa; Miller, Michael E.; Nemunaitis, Gregory; Nagy, Jennifer; Bailey, Stephanie Nogan

    2008-01-01

    Objective(s) To explore and quantify the physical and functional effects of stabilizing the torso with electrical stimulation of the paralyzed hip and trunk musculature after motor complete tetraplegia. Design Single-subject case study with repeated measures and concurrent controls. Setting Academic outpatient rehabilitation center. Participants Forty-four year old male with C4 ASIA A tetraplegia 20 years post spinal cord injury. Intervention A surgically implanted multichannel pulse generator and intramuscular stimulating electrodes to activate lumbar erector spinae, quadratus lumborum, and gluteus maximus muscles bilaterally. Main Outcome Measure(s) Outcomes assessed with and without stimulation included a) spinal alignment and pelvic orientation, b) pulmonary function and ventilatory volumes, c) forward bimanual reaching distance, d) seated stability and resistance to externally applied disturbances, e) maximal force and speed of rowing-like movements, and the ability to f) independently return to an erect seated position from full forward or lateral flexion, and g) roll in bed without assistance. Results Stimulation improved spinal convexity and kyphosis by 26° and 21°, reduced posterior pelvic tilt by 11°; increased forced expiratory volume and vital capacity by 10% and 22%, and improved forward reach by > 7 cm. Average resistance to sagittal disturbances increased by > 40% (p<0.002) and mean force exerted during underhanded pulling more than doubled (p=0.014) with stimulation. Restoration of upright sitting in both sagittal and coronal planes and bed turning were made possible through appropriately timed activation of the hip and trunk muscles. Conclusions A neuroprosthesis for controlling the paralyzed torso can positively impact spinal alignment, seated posture, pulmonary function, trunk stability, and reach. Stimulation of hip and trunk muscles can improve performance of activities of daily living as well as enable independent wheelchair and bed

  17. Microbial stimulation fully differentiates monocytes to DC-SIGN/CD209+ dendritic cells for immune T cell areas

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Cheolho; Matos, Ines; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Dandamudi, Durga Bhavani; Shrestha, Elina; Longhi, M. Paula; Jeffrey, Kate L.; Anthony, Robert M.; Kluger, Courtney; Nchinda, Godwin; Koh, Hyein; Rodriguez, Anthony; Idoyaga, Juliana; Pack, Maggi; Velinzon, Klara; Park, Chae Gyu; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Dendritic cells (DCs), critical antigen presenting cells for immune control, normally derive from bone marrow precursors distinct from monocytes. It is not yet established if the large reservoir of monocytes can develop into cells with critical features of DCs in vivo. We now show that fully differentiated Mo-DCs develop in mice and DC-SIGN/CD209a marks the cells. Mo-DCs are recruited from blood monocytes into lymph nodes by lipopolysaccharide and live or dead gram negative bacteria. Mobilization requires TLR4 and its CD14 coreceptor and Trif. When tested for antigen presenting function, Mo-DCs are as active as classical DCs, including cross presentation of proteins and live gram negative bacteria on MHC I in vivo. Fully differentiated Mo-DCs acquire DC morphology and localize to T cell areas via L-selectin and CCR7. Thus the blood monocyte reservoir becomes the dominant presenting cell in response to select microbes, yielding DC-SIGN+ cells with critical functions of DCs. PMID:21029863

  18. Biophysical stimulation and the periprosthetic bone: is there a rationale in the use of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields after a hip or knee implant?

    PubMed

    Massari, L; Osti, R; Lorusso, V; Setti, S; Caruso, G

    2015-01-01

    The biophysical stimulation of bone and cartilage, using Pulsed ElectroMagnetic Fields (PEMF), covers many different aspects of bone formation and/or cartilage repair, such as healing of delayed or non-union of fracture, bone necrosis, osteocartilagineous defects. To date there are no specific data on the effects of PEMFs in osteointegration of prosthetic implants but there are some papers that denote clinical advantages, in terms of early recovery, in patients treated with these procedures. Considering these clinical applications, PEMF stimulation around hip or knee joint implants could be useful to reduce the bone oedema, pain and to reduce excessive bone reabsorption around the femoral stems. PMID:26753669

  19. Vibrotactile stimulation for the adventitiously deaf: an alternative to cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Leder, S B; Spitzer, J B; Milner, P; Flevaris-Phillips, C; Richardson, F

    1986-10-01

    Acoustic correlates of the prosodic features identifying English contrastive stress, ie, fundamental frequency (Fo), duration and intensity, and listener perceptions were investigated in a profoundly adventitiously deaf subject (D) pre/postvibrotactile stimulation, and in an age-peer normally-hearing person as a control (N). Stimuli were a group of general American English words in which a change of function from noun to verb was associated with a shift of stress from initial to final syllable, eg, CON'test vs conTEST'. Prior to vibrotactile stimulation, D was unable to produce contrastive stress correctly. Only final syllable intensity differences were noted, but proved to be inadequate cues for contrastive stress. Vibrotactile stimulation resulted in changes, specifically significantly higher Fo for initial stressed vs unstressed syllables, significantly louder intensity for final stressed vs unstressed syllables, and significantly longer duration for final stressed vs unstressed syllables. Perceptually, listeners judged D's contrastive stress placement as always occurring on the final syllable previbrotactile stimulation and as 78% correct postvibrotactile stimulation. N's contrastive stress placement was always correct. It was concluded that use of vibrotactile stimulation enhanced D's production and resulted in listeners' perceptions of correct prosody. PMID:3767627

  20. Cortical activation in profoundly deaf patients during cochlear implant stimulation demonstrated by H sub 2 (15)O PET

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, H.; Lamprecht, A.; Kuehn, A.R.; Roden, W.; Vosteen, K.H.; Feinendegen, L.E. )

    1991-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are used to provide sensations of sound to profoundly deaf patients. The performance of the CI is assessed mainly by the subjective reports of patients. The aim of this study was to look for objective cortical responses to the stimulation of the CI. Two postlingually and two prelingually deaf patients were investigated by positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 15}O-labeled water (H{sub 2}{sup 15}O) to determine the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Instead of quantifying rCBF in absolute terms, it was estimated by referring the regional tissue concentration of H{sub 2}{sup 15}O to the mean whole brain concentration. CI stimulation encoded from white noise and sequential words led to an increased rCBF in the primary and secondary (Wernicke) auditory cortex. Relative elevations of up to 33% were observed bilaterally, although they were higher contralateral to the CI. These results were obtained not only in the postlingually deaf patients but also in two patients who had never been able to hear. Thus, it could be demonstrated that PET measurements of cerebral H{sub 2}{sup 15}O distribution yield objective responses of the central auditory system during electrical stimulation by CIs in profoundly deaf patients.

  1. Neuronal loss due to prolonged controlled-current stimulation with chronically implanted microelectrodes in the cat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    McCreery, Douglas; Pikov, Victor; Troyk, Philip R

    2010-06-01

    Activated iridium microelectrodes were implanted for 450-1282 days in the sensorimotor cortex of seven adult domestic cats and then pulsed for 240 h (8 h per day for 30 days) at 50 Hz. Continuous stimulation at 2 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 100 microC cm(-2) produced no detectable change in neuronal density in the tissue surrounding the microelectrode tips. However, pulsing with a continuous 100% duty cycle at 4 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 200 microC cm(-2) induced loss of cortical neurons over a radius of at least 150 microm from the electrode tips. The same stimulus regimen but with a duty cycle of 50% (1 s of stimulation, and then 1 s without stimulation repeated for 8 h) produced neuronal loss within a smaller radius, approximately 60 microm from the center of the electrode tips. However, there also was significant loss of neurons surrounding the unpulsed electrodes, presumably as a result of mechanical injury due to their insertion into and long-term residence in the tissue, and this was responsible for most of the neuronal loss within 150 microm of the electrodes pulsed with the 50% duty cycle. PMID:20460692

  2. Neuronal loss due to prolonged controlled-current stimulation with chronically implanted microelectrodes in the cat cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreery, Douglas; Pikov, Victor; Troyk, Philip R.

    2010-06-01

    Activated iridium microelectrodes were implanted for 450-1282 days in the sensorimotor cortex of seven adult domestic cats and then pulsed for 240 h (8 h per day for 30 days) at 50 Hz. Continuous stimulation at 2 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 100 µC cm-2 produced no detectable change in neuronal density in the tissue surrounding the microelectrode tips. However, pulsing with a continuous 100% duty cycle at 4 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 200 µC cm-2 induced loss of cortical neurons over a radius of at least 150 µm from the electrode tips. The same stimulus regimen but with a duty cycle of 50% (1 s of stimulation, and then 1 s without stimulation repeated for 8 h) produced neuronal loss within a smaller radius, approximately 60 µm from the center of the electrode tips. However, there also was significant loss of neurons surrounding the unpulsed electrodes, presumably as a result of mechanical injury due to their insertion into and long-term residence in the tissue, and this was responsible for most of the neuronal loss within 150 µm of the electrodes pulsed with the 50% duty cycle.

  3. Fully Synthetic Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enabled by Isonitrile-Mediated Coupling of Large, Side-Chain-Unprotected Peptides.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Andrew G; Johnston, Eric V; Shieh, Jae-Hung; Sondey, Joseph P; Hendrickson, Ronald C; Moore, Malcolm A S; Danishefsky, Samuel J

    2015-10-14

    Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is an endogenous glycoprotein involved in hematopoiesis. Natively glycosylated and nonglycosylated recombinant forms, lenograstim and filgrastim, respectively, are used clinically to manage neutropenia in patients undergoing chemotherapeutic treatment. Despite their comparable therapeutic potential, the purpose of O-linked glycosylation at Thr133 remains a subject of controversy. In light of this, we have developed a synthetic platform to prepare G-CSF aglycone with the goal of enabling access to native and designed glycoforms with site-selectivity and glycan homogeneity. To address the synthesis of a relatively large, aggregation-prone sequence, we advanced an isonitrile-mediated ligation method. The chemoselective activation and coupling of C-terminal peptidyl Gly thioacids with the N-terminus of an unprotected peptide provide ligated peptides directly in a manner complementary to that with conventional native chemical ligation-desulfurization strategies. Herein, we describe the details and application of this method as it enabled the convergent total synthesis of G-CSF aglycone. PMID:26401918

  4. The pros and cons of intraoperative CT scan in evaluation of deep brain stimulation lead implantation: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Servello, Domenico; Zekaj, Edvin; Saleh, Christian; Pacchetti, Claudio; Porta, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and tremor. The efficacy of DBS depends on the correct lead positioning. The commonly adopted postoperative radiological evaluation is performed with computed tomography (CT) scan and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: We conducted a retrospective study on 202 patients who underwent DBS from January 2009 to October 2013. DBS indications were PD, progressive supranuclear palsy, tremor, dystonia, Tourette syndrome, obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and Huntington's disease. Preoperatively, all patients underwent brain MRI and brain CT scan with the stereotactic frame positioned. The lead location was confirmed intraoperatively with CT. The CT images were subsequently transferred to the Stealth Station Medtronic and merged with the preoperative planning. On the first or second day after, implantation we performed a brain MRI to confirm the correct position of the lead. Results: In 14 patients, leads were in suboptimal position after intraoperative CT scan positioning. The cases with alteration in the Z-axis were corrected immediately under fluoroscopic guidance. In all the 14 patients, an immediate repositioning was done. Conclusions: Based on our data, intraoperative CT scan is fast, safe, and a useful tool in the evaluation of the position of the implanted lead. It also reduces the patient's discomfort derived from the transfer of the patient from the operating room to the radiological department. However, intraoperative CT should not be considered as a substitute for postoperative MRI. PMID:27583182

  5. Inner ear implants for experimental electrical stimulation of auditory nerve arrays.

    PubMed

    Xue, X L; Pfingst, B E

    1989-06-01

    Electrode arrays chronically implanted in the inner ear are gaining increased use for experimental studies of the auditory nervous system, as well as for studies related to development of improved auditory prostheses. Commercially available electrode arrays are designed for human use and thus may be unsuitable for experimental studies, particularly in small animals. This paper describes a simple, inexpensive method for making custom electrode arrays in a variety of configurations, suitable for animals ranging from small rodents to non-human primates. PMID:2755177

  6. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... III (premarket approval). (c) Date premarket approval application (PMA) or notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be... nerve stimulator shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before being placed...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... III (premarket approval). (c) Date premarket approval application (PMA) or notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be... nerve stimulator shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before being placed...

  8. Consonant recognition as a function of the number of stimulation channels in the Hybrid short-electrode cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Lina A J; Turner, Christopher W; Karsten, Sue A; Erenberg, Sheryl R; Taylor, Jessica; Gantz, Bruce J

    2012-11-01

    Consonant recognition was measured as a function of the number of stimulation channels for Hybrid short-electrode cochlear implant (CI) users, long-electrode CI users, and normal-hearing (NH) listeners in quiet and background noise. Short-electrode CI subjects were tested with 1-6 channels allocated to a frequency range of 1063-7938 Hz. Long-electrode CI subjects were tested with 1-6, 8, or 22 channels allocated to 188-7938 Hz, or 1-6 or 15 channels from the basal 15 electrodes allocated to 1063-7938 Hz. NH listeners were tested with simulations of each CI group/condition. Despite differences in intracochlear electrode spacing for equivalent channel conditions, all CI subject groups performed similarly at each channel condition and improved up to at least four channels in quiet and noise. All CI subject groups underperformed relative to NH subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that the limited channel benefit seen for CI users may not be due solely to increases in channel interactions as a function of electrode density. Other factors such as pre-operative patient history, location of stimulation in the base versus apex, or a limit on the number of electric channels that can be processed cognitively, may also interact with the effects of electrode contact spacing along the cochlea. PMID:23145621

  9. Development of implantable optoelectronic module for optical brain tissue stimulation in freely moving mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakov, Konstantin; Czajkowski, Rafał; Kaźmierczak, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    The research aims to design and manufacture of wireless optogenetics devices for freely moving animals in cages IntelliCage system. The purpose of the device is to stimulate specific brain regions using light. The constructed device consists of a light source and optical fibre structure responsible for delivering light into the corresponding region of the brain of the animal. The size of the animal (mouse) and the fact that it is freely moving imposes substantial limitations with respect to the size and weight of the optoelectronic device. The present paper describes research on optical fibre structure fabrication, assembling it to the small size (less than 500 × 500 μm2 top surface) LED chip and experimental validation of the optoelectronic stimulator.

  10. Topography of Auditory Nerve Projections to the Cochlear Nucleus in Cats after Neonatal Deafness and Electrical Stimulation by a Cochlear Implant

    PubMed Central

    Hradek, Gary T.; Bonham, Ben H.; Snyder, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that auditory nerve projections from the cochlear spiral ganglion (SG) to the cochlear nucleus (CN) exhibit clear cochleotopic organization in adult cats deafened as neonates before hearing onset. However, the topographic specificity of these CN projections in deafened animals is proportionately broader than normal (less precise relative to the CN frequency gradient). This study examined SG-to-CN projections in adult cats that were deafened as neonates and received a unilateral cochlear implant at ∼7 weeks of age. Following several months of electrical stimulation, SG projections from the stimulated cochleae were compared to projections from contralateral, non-implanted ears. The fundamental organization of SG projections into frequency band laminae was clearly evident, and discrete projections were always observed following double SG injections in deafened cochleae, despite severe auditory deprivation and/or broad electrical activation of the SG. However, when normalized for the smaller CN size after deafness, AVCN, PVCN, and DCN projections on the stimulated side were broader by 32%, 34%, and 53%, respectively, than projections in normal animals (although absolute projection widths were comparable to normal). Further, there was no significant difference between projections from stimulated and contralateral non-implanted cochleae. These findings suggest that early normal auditory experience may be essential for normal development and/or maintenance of the topographic precision of SG-to-CN projections. After early deafness, the CN is smaller than normal, the topographic distribution of these neural projections that underlie frequency resolution in the central auditory system is proportionately broader, and projections from adjacent SG sectors are more overlapping. Several months of stimulation by a cochlear implant (beginning at ∼7 weeks of age) did not lessen or exacerbate these degenerative changes observed in adulthood. One clinical

  11. Stimulation through electrodes implanted near the subthalamic nucleus activates projections to motor areas of cerebral cortex in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Colum D; Webb, Ruth M; Silberstein, Paul; Tisch, Steven; Asselman, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Rothwell, John C

    2005-03-01

    High-frequency electrical stimulation through electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been shown to reduce significantly the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Despite the success of this treatment, the mechanisms of action of stimulation are poorly understood. To elucidate further the mechanisms of action of deep brain stimulation and its effects on cortical activity, we recorded electroencephalographic potentials from 61 scalp-surface electrodes during low-frequency (5-10 Hz) bipolar stimulation in 11 patients with advanced PD (14 implanted electrodes were tested). In all electrodes tested, stimulation through at least one of the four contacts produced a medium-latency waveform with an average onset of 14 +/- 3 ms and peak at 23 +/- 4 ms. This potential typically increased in magnitude across contacts from ventral to dorsal. Within-subject comparisons of median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials demonstrated that the generator of the medium-latency potential was within the primary sensorimotor cortex or lateral premotor cortex ipsilateral to stimulation. The timing and topography of this potential were consistent with indirect activation of the cortex by excitation of pallido-thalamic axons that traverse the dorsal aspect of the STN. The potential evoked by stimulation through the contact used for optimal clinical effect was highly variable across electrodes and frequently different from the medium-latency potential described above, suggesting that the neuronal elements mediating the medium-latency potential were different from those that mediate the clinical effects. PMID:15813949

  12. Restoration of ankle movements with the ActiGait implantable drop foot stimulator: a safe and reliable treatment option for permanent central leg palsy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Klaus Daniel; Polanski, Witold Henryk; Schulz, Anne-Kathrin; Jöbges, Michael; Hoff, Hansjoerg; Schackert, Gabriele; Pinzer, Thomas; Sobottka, Stephan B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The ActiGait drop foot stimulator is a promising technique for restoration of lost ankle function by an implantable hybrid stimulation system. It allows ankle dorsiflexion by active peroneal nerve stimulation during the swing phase of gait. In this paper the authors report the outcome of the first prospective study on a large number of patients with stroke-related drop foot. METHODS Twenty-seven patients who experienced a stroke and with persisting spastic leg paresis received an implantable ActiGait drop foot stimulator for restoration of ankle movement after successful surface test stimulation. After 3 to 5 weeks, the stimulator was activated, and gait speed, gait endurance, and activation time of the system were evaluated and compared with preoperative gait tests. In addition, patient satisfaction was assessed using a questionnaire. RESULTS Postoperative gait speed significantly improved from 33.9 seconds per 20 meters to 17.9 seconds per 20 meters (p < 0.0001), gait endurance from 196 meters in 6 minutes to 401 meters in 6 minutes (p < 0.0001), and activation time from 20.5 seconds to 10.6 seconds on average (p < 0.0001). In 2 patients with nerve injury, surgical repositioning of the electrode cuff became necessary. One patient showed a delayed wound healing, and in another patient the system had to be removed because of a wound infection. Marked improvement in mobility, social participation, and quality of life was confirmed by 89% to 96% of patients. CONCLUSIONS The ActiGait implantable drop foot stimulator improves gait speed, endurance, and quality of life in patients with stroke-related drop foot. Regarding gait speed, the ActiGait system appears to be advantageous compared with foot orthosis or surface stimulation devices. Randomized trials with more patients and longer observation periods are needed to prove the long-term benefit of this device. PMID:26207599

  13. A microfabricated coil for implantable applications of magnetic spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yu-Min Fu; Che-Yu Chen; Xin-Hong Qian; Yu-Ting Cheng; Chung-Yu Wu; Jui-Sheng Sun; Chien-Chun Huang; Chao-Kai Hu

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a microfabricated inductive coil comprising of 125-turn coil windings and a MnZn-based magnetic core in a volume of 200 mm(3) is presented for the magnetic neural stimulation in a spinal cord. The coil winding with the parallel-linkage design instead of the typical serial-linkage one is proposed not only to provide better design flexibility to the current mode driving circuit but also to simplify the fabrication process of the 3-D inductive coil, which can further advance the coil miniaturization. Experimental results show the microcoil with a 1.5 A, 1 kHz square-wave current input can induce a voltages of ~220 μV on the conducting wire with an impedance of ~0.2 Ω @ 1 kHz, 1 mm separation. PMID:26737882

  14. Understanding the effect of noise on electrical stimulation sequences in cochlear implants and its impact on speech intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Obaid Ur Rehman; van Dijk, Bas; Moonen, Marc; Wouters, Jan

    2013-05-01

    The present study investigates the most important factors that limit the intelligibility of the cochlear implant (CI) processed speech in noisy environments. The electrical stimulation sequences provided in CIs are affected by the noise in the following three manners. First of all, the natural gaps in the speech are filled, which distorts the low-frequency ON/OFF modulations of the speech signal. Secondly, speech envelopes are distorted to include modulations of both speech and noise. Lastly, the N-of-M type of speech coding strategies may select the noise dominated channels instead of the dominant speech channels at low signal-to-noise ratio's (SNRs). Different stimulation sequences are tested with CI subjects to study how these three noise effects individually limit the intelligibility of the CI processed speech. Tests are also conducted with normal hearing (NH) subjects using vocoded speech to identify any significant differences in the noise reduction requirements and speech distortion limitations between the two subject groups. Results indicate that compared to NH subjects CI subjects can tolerate significantly lower levels of steady state speech shaped noise in the speech gaps but at the same time can tolerate comparable levels of distortions in the speech segments. Furthermore, modulations in the stimulus current level have no effect on speech intelligibility as long as the channel selection remains ideal. Finally, wrong maxima selection together with the introduction of noise in the speech gaps significantly degrades the intelligibility. At low SNRs wrong maxima selection introduces interruptions in the speech and makes it difficult to fuse noisy and interrupted speech signals into a coherent speech stream. PMID:23396271

  15. [Bone Conduction and Active Middle Ear Implants].

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, S; Thomas, J P; Dazert, S

    2016-05-01

    The majority of patients with moderate to severe hearing loss can be supplied with conventional hearing aids depending on severity and cause for hearing loss in a satisfying way. However, some patients either do not benefit enough from conventional hearing aids or cannot wear them due to inflammatory reactions and chronic infections of the external auditory canal or due to anatomical reasons. For these patients there are fully- and semi-implantable middle ear and bone conduction implants available. These devices either directly stimulate the skull (bone conduction devices), middle ear structures (active middle ear implants) or the cochlea itself (direct acoustic stimulation). Patients who failed surgical hearing rehabilitation or do not benefit from conventional hearing aids may achieve a significant better speech understanding and tremendous improvement in quality of life by implantable hearing devices with careful attention to the audiological and anatomical indication criteria. PMID:27135430

  16. Biochemical acclimation, stomatal limitation and precipitation patterns underlie decreases in photosynthetic stimulation of soybean (Glycine max) at elevated [CO₂] and temperatures under fully open air field conditions.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, David M; Ruiz-Vera, Ursula M; Siebers, Matthew H; Gray, Sharon B; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R

    2014-09-01

    The net effect of elevated [CO2] and temperature on photosynthetic acclimation and plant productivity is poorly resolved. We assessed the effects of canopy warming and fully open air [CO2] enrichment on (1) the acclimation of two biochemical parameters that frequently limit photosynthesis (A), the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco (Vc,max) and the maximum potential linear electron flux through photosystem II (Jmax), (2) the associated responses of leaf structural and chemical properties related to A, as well as (3) the stomatal limitation (l) imposed on A, for soybean over two growing seasons in a conventionally managed agricultural field in Illinois, USA. Acclimation to elevated [CO2] was consistent over two growing seasons with respect to Vc,max and Jmax. However, elevated temperature significantly decreased Jmax contributing to lower photosynthetic stimulation by elevated CO2. Large seasonal differences in precipitation altered soil moisture availability modulating the complex effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on biochemical and structural properties related to A. Elevated temperature also reduced the benefit of elevated [CO2] by eliminating decreases in stomatal limitation at elevated [CO2]. These results highlight the critical importance of considering multiple environmental factors (i.e. temperature, moisture, [CO2]) when trying to predict plant productivity in the context of climate change. PMID:25113459

  17. Application of a pitch perception model to investigate the effect of stimulation field spread on the pitch ranking abilities of cochlear implant recipients.

    PubMed

    Erfanian Saeedi, Nafise; Blamey, Peter J; Burkitt, Anthony N; Grayden, David B

    2014-10-01

    Although many cochlear implant (CI) recipients perceive speech very well in favorable conditions, they still have difficulty with music, speech in noisy environments, and tonal languages. Studies show that CI users' performance in these tasks are correlated with their ability to perceive pitch. The spread of stimulation field from the electrodes to the auditory nerve is one of the factors affecting performance. This study proposes a model of auditory perception to predict the performance of CI users in pitch ranking tasks using an existing sound processing scheme. The model is then used as a platform to investigate the effect of stimulation field spread on performance. PMID:25193552

  18. The Safety of Using Body-Transmit MRI in Patients with Implanted Deep Brain Stimulation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Joshua; Papadaki, Anastasia; White, Mark; Mancini, Laura; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Thornton, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for patients with movement disorders. Patients receiving chronic DBS provide a unique opportunity to explore the underlying mechanisms of DBS using functional MRI. It has been shown that the main safety concern with MRI in these patients is heating at the electrode tips – which can be minimised with strict adherence to a supervised acquisition protocol using a head-transmit/receive coil at 1.5T. MRI using the body-transmit coil with a multi-channel receive head coil has a number of potential advantages including an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Study outline We compared the safety of cranial MRI in an in vitro model of bilateral DBS using both head-transmit and body-transmit coils. We performed fibre-optic thermometry at a Medtronic ActivaPC device and Medtronic 3389 electrodes during turbo-spin echo (TSE) MRI using both coil arrangements at 1.5T and 3T, in addition to gradient-echo echo-planar fMRI exposure at 1.5T. Finally, we investigated the effect of transmit-coil choice on DBS stimulus delivery during MRI. Results Temperature increases were consistently largest at the electrode tips. Changing from head- to body-transmit coil significantly increased the electrode temperature elevation during TSE scans with scanner-reported head SAR 0.2W/kg from 0.45°C to 0.79°C (p<0.001) at 1.5T, and from 1.25°C to 1.44°C (p<0.001) at 3T. The position of the phantom relative to the body coil significantly impacted on electrode heating at 1.5T; however, the greatest heating observed in any position tested remained <1°C at this field strength. Conclusions We conclude that (1) with our specific hardware and SAR-limited protocol, body-transmit cranial MRI at 1.5T does not produce heating exceeding international guidelines, even in cases of poorly positioned patients, (2) cranial MRI at 3T can readily produce heating exceeding international guidelines, (3) patients with ActivaPC Medtronic systems are safe

  19. Morphological correlates of hearing loss after cochlear implantation and electro-acoustic stimulation in a hearing-impaired Guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Lina A J; Stark, Gemaine; Nguyen-Huynh, Anh T; Spear, Kayce A; Zhang, Hongzheng; Tanaka, Chiemi; Li, Hongzhe

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid or electro-acoustic stimulation (EAS) cochlear implants (CIs) are designed to provide high-frequency electric hearing together with residual low-frequency acoustic hearing. However, 30-50% of EAS CI recipients lose residual hearing after implantation. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanisms of EAS-induced hearing loss in an animal model with high-frequency hearing loss. Guinea pigs were exposed to 24 h of noise (12-24 kHz at 116 dB) to induce a high-frequency hearing loss. After recovery, two groups of animals were implanted (n = 6 per group), with one group receiving chronic acoustic and electric stimulation for 10 weeks, and the other group receiving no stimulation during this time frame. A third group (n = 6) was not implanted, but received chronic acoustic stimulation. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded biweekly to monitor changes in hearing. The organ of Corti was immunolabeled with phalloidin, anti-CtBP2, and anti-GluR2 to quantify hair cells, ribbons and post-synaptic receptors. The lateral wall was immunolabeled with phalloidin and lectin to quantify stria vascularis capillary diameters. Bimodal or trimodal diameter distributions were observed; the number and location of peaks were objectively determined using the Aikake Information Criterion and Expectation Maximization algorithm. Noise exposure led to immediate hearing loss at 16-32 kHz for all groups. Cochlear implantation led to additional hearing loss at 4-8 kHz; this hearing loss was negatively and positively correlated with minimum and maximum peaks of the bimodal or trimodal distributions of stria vascularis capillary diameters, respectively. After chronic stimulation, no significant group changes in thresholds were seen; however, elevated thresholds at 1 kHz in implanted, stimulated animals were significantly correlated with decreased presynaptic ribbon and postsynaptic receptor counts. Inner and outer hair cell counts did not differ between groups and

  20. Morphological Correlates of Hearing Loss after Cochlear Implantation and Electro-Acoustic Stimulation in a Hearing-Impaired Guinea Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Lina A.J.; Stark, Gemaine; Nguyen-Huynh, Anh T.; Spear, Kayce A.; Zhang, Hongzheng; Tanaka, Chiemi; Li, Hongzhe

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid or electro-acoustic stimulation (EAS) cochlear implants (CIs) are designed to provide high-frequency electric hearing together with residual low-frequency acoustic hearing. However, 30-50% of EAS CI recipients lose residual hearing after implantation. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanisms of EAS-induced hearing loss in an animal model with high-frequency hearing loss. Guinea pigs were exposed to 24 hours of noise (12-24 kHz at 116 dB) to induce a high-frequency hearing loss. After recovery, two groups of animals were implanted (n=6 per group), with one group receiving chronic acoustic and electric stimulation for 10 weeks, and the other group receiving no stimulation during this time frame. A third group (n=6) was not implanted, but received chronic acoustic stimulation. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded biweekly to monitor changes in hearing. The organ of Corti was immunolabeled with phalloidin, anti-CtBP2, and anti-GluR2 to quantify hair cells, ribbons and post-synaptic receptors. The lateral wall was immunolabeled with phalloidin and lectin to quantify stria vascularis capillary diameters. Bimodal or trimodal diameter distributions were observed; the number and location of peaks were objectively determined using the Aikake Information Criterion and Expectation Maximization algorithm. Noise exposure led to immediate hearing loss at 16-32 kHz for all groups. Cochlear implantation led to additional hearing loss at 4-8 kHz; this hearing loss was negatively and positively correlated with minimum and maximum peaks of the bimodal or trimodal distributions of stria vascularis capillary diameters, respectively. After chronic stimulation, no significant group changes in thresholds were seen; however, elevated thresholds at 1 kHz in implanted, stimulated animals were significantly correlated with decreased presynaptic ribbon and postsynaptic receptor counts. Inner and outer hair cell counts did not differ between groups and were not

  1. Electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve: the coding of frequency, the perception of pitch and the development of cochlear implant speech processing strategies for profoundly deaf people.

    PubMed

    Clark, G M

    1996-09-01

    1. The development of speech processing strategies for multiple-channel cochlear implants has depended on encoding sound frequencies and intensities as temporal and spatial patterns of electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve fibres so that speech information of most importance of intelligibility could be transmitted. 2. Initial physiological studies showed that rate encoding of electrical stimulation above 200 pulses/s could not reproduce the normal response patterns in auditory neurons for acoustic stimulation in the speech frequency range above 200 Hz and suggested that place coding was appropriate for the higher frequencies. 3. Rate difference limens in the experimental animal were only similar to those for sound up to 200 Hz. 4. Rate difference limens in implant patients were similar to those obtained in the experimental animal. 5. Satisfactory rate discrimination could be made for durations of 50 and 100 ms, but not 25 ms. This made rate suitable for encoding longer duration suprasegmental speech information, but not segmental information, such as consonants. The rate of stimulation could also be perceived as pitch, discriminated at different electrode sites along the cochlea and discriminated for stimuli across electrodes. 6. Place pitch could be scaled according to the site of stimulation in the cochlea so that a frequency scale was preserved and it also had a different quality from rate pitch and was described as tonality. Place pitch could also be discriminated for the shorter durations (25 ms) required for identifying consonants. 7. The inaugural speech processing strategy encoded the second formant frequencies (concentrations of frequency energy in the mid frequency range of most importance for speech intelligibility) as place of stimulation, the voicing frequency as rate of stimulation and the intensity as current level. Our further speech processing strategies have extracted additional frequency information and coded this as place of stimulation

  2. A fully integrated 200 µW, 40 pJ/b wireless transmitter for implanted medical devices and neural prostheses.

    PubMed

    Goodarzy, F; Skafidas, E

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a wireless transmitter suitable for implanted medical devices (IMDs) and neural prostheses. The transmitter achieves 500 kbps data rate while consuming a peak power of 200 µW from a 1.2 V supply in a 130 nm technology and has an active area of 35 µm by 45 µm. The transmitter works in the Medical Implant Communication Service (MICS) frequency band (401-406 MHz) and transmits the signal at a power of -20 dBm while achieves energy efficiency of 40 pJ/b. The transmitter achieves this performance through a modified pulse position modulation called saturated analog signal (SAS) which has been tailored to reduce not only the peak and average power consumption but also helps reduces the number of elements required for signal generation and dispenses the need for a crystal which in turn minimizes the overall footprint of the transmitter. The transmitter can also dynamically trade off duty cycling and energy consumption with data rate and range requirements for better operability on a constantly changing environment due to the inherent flexibility of the modulation scheme. PMID:24110420

  3. Retrograde peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Jumshad B; Shivakumar, B; Sudarsan, Sabitha; Arun, K V; Kumar, T S S

    2010-01-01

    Retrograde peri-implantitis constitutes an important cause for implant failure. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove difficult to identify and hence institution of early treatment may not be possible. This paper presents a report of four cases of (the implant placed developing to) retrograde peri-implantitis. Three of these implants were successfully restored to their fully functional state while one was lost due to extensive damage. The paper highlights the importance of recognizing the etiopathogenic mechanisms, preoperative assessment, and a strong postoperative maintenance protocol to avoid retrograde peri-implant inflammation. PMID:20922082

  4. The multi-channel cochlear implant: multi-disciplinary development of electrical stimulation of the cochlea and the resulting clinical benefit.

    PubMed

    Clark, Graeme M

    2015-04-01

    This multi-disciplinary research showed sound could be coded by electrical stimulation of the cochlea and peripheral auditory nervous system. But the temporal coding of frequency as seen in the experimental animal, was inadequate for the important speech frequencies. The data indicated the limitation was due in particular to deterministic firing of neurons and failure to reproduce the normal fine temporo-spatial pattern of neural responses seen with sound. However, the data also showed the need for the place coding of frequency, and this meant multi-electrodes inserted into the cochlea. Nevertheless, before this was evaluated on people we undertook biological safety studies to determine the effects of surgical trauma and electrical stimuli, and how to prevent infection. Then our research demonstrated place of stimulation had timbre and was perceived as vowels. This led to our discovery in 1978 of the formant-extraction speech code that first enabled severely-profoundly deaf people to understand running speech. This result in people who had hearing before becoming severely deaf was an outcome not previously considered possible. In 1985 it was the first multi-channel implant to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It was also the fore runner of our advanced formant and fixed filter strategies When these codes were used from 1985 for those born deaf or deafened early in life we discovered there was a critical period when brain plasticity would allow speech perception and language to be developed near- normally, and this required in particular the acquisition of place coding. In 1990 this led to the first cochlear implant to be approved by the FDA for use in children. Finally, we achieved binaural hearing in 1989 with bilateral cochlear implants, followed by bimodal speech processing in 1990 with a hearing aid in one ear and implant in the other. The above research has been developed industrially, with for example 250,000 people worldwide receiving

  5. Report of whole-brain radiation therapy in a patient with an implanted deep brain stimulator: important neurosurgical considerations and radiotherapy practice principles.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Rupesh; Berriochoa, Camille A; Murphy, Erin S; Machado, Andre G; Chao, Samuel T; Suh, John H; Stephans, Kevin L

    2016-04-01

    Patients with implanted neuromodulation devices present potential challenges for radiation therapy treatment planning and delivery. Although guidelines exist regarding the irradiation of cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators, fewer data and less clinical experience exist regarding the effects of radiation therapy on less frequently used devices, such as deep brain stimulators. A 79-year-old woman with a history of coarse tremors effectively managed with deep brain stimulation presented with multiple intracranial metastases from a newly diagnosed lung cancer and was referred for whole-brain radiation therapy. She was treated with a German helmet technique to a total dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions using 6 MV photons via opposed lateral fields with the neurostimulator turned off prior to delivery of each fraction. The patient tolerated the treatment well with no acute complications and no apparent change in the functionality of her neurostimulator device or effect on her underlying neuromuscular disorder. This represents the first reported case of the safe delivery of whole-brain radiation therapy in a patient with an implanted neurostimulator device. In cases such as this, neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists should have discussions with patients about the risks of brain injury, device malfunction or failure of the device, and plans for rigorous testing of the device before and after radiation therapy. PMID:26315009

  6. Are there a guidelines for implantable spinal cord stimulator therapy in patients using chronic anticoagulation therapy? - A review of decision-making in the high-risk patient

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Ramsis F.; Lissounov, Alexei; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulators (SCSs) are gaining increasing indications and utility in an expanding variety of clinical conditions. Complications and initial expenses have historically prevented the early use of SCS therapy despite ongoing efforts to educate and promote its utilization. At present, there exists no literature evidence of SCS implantation in a chronically anticoagulated patient, and neuromodulation manufacturers are conspicuously silent in providing warnings or recommendations in the face of anticoagulant use chronically. It would appear as through these issues demand scrutiny and industry as well as neuromodulation society advocacy and support in terms of the provision of coherent guidelines on how to proceed. Case Description: A 79-year-old male returned to the neurosurgical clinic with persistent low back pain and leg heaviness due to adjacent level degenerative spondylosis and severe thoracic spinal stenosis. The patient had a notable history of multiple comorbidities along with atrial fibrillation requiring chronic anticoagulation. On initial presentation, he was educated with three choice of conservative medical therapy, intrathecal drug delivery system implantation, or additional lumbar decompression laminectomy with instrumented fusion of T10-L3 and a palliative surgical lead SCS implantation. Description: A 79-year-old male returned to the neurosurgical clinic with persistent low back pain and leg heaviness due to adjacent level degenerative spondylosis and severe thoracic spinal stenosis. The patient had a notable history of multiple comorbidities along with atrial fibrillation requiring chronic anticoagulation. On initial presentation, he was educated with three choice of conservative medical therapy, intrathecal drug delivery system implantation, or additional lumbar decompression laminectomy with instrumented fusion of T10-L3 and a palliative surgical lead SCS implantation. Conclusion: Our literature search did not reveal any

  7. The Effect of Age at Cochlear Implant Initial Stimulation on Expressive Language Growth in Infants and Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomblin, J. Bruce; Barker, Brittan A.; Spencer, Linda J.; Zhang, Xuyang; Gantz, Bruce J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the growth of expressive language skills in children who received cochlear implants (CIs) in infancy. Repeated language measures were gathered from 29 children who received CIs between 10 and 40 months of age. Both cross-sectional and growth curve analyses were used to assess the relationship between expressive language…

  8. Perception of Suprasegmental Speech Features via Bimodal Stimulation: Cochlear Implant on One Ear and Hearing Aid on the Other

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Harel, Tamar; Shpak, Talma; Luntz, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the contribution of acoustic hearing to the perception of suprasegmental features by adults who use a cochlear implant (CI) and a hearing aid (HA) in opposite ears. Method: 23 adults participated in this study. Perception of suprasegmental features--intonation, syllable stress, and word…

  9. Continuous light after a long-day treatment is equivalent to melatonin implants to stimulate testosterone secretion in Alpine male goats.

    PubMed

    Delgadillo, J A; Vélez, L I; Flores, J A

    2016-04-01

    In rams, artificial long days followed by continuous light stimulate testosterone secretion during the non-breeding season. The objective of this study was to determine whether artificial long days followed by continuous light could stimulate testosterone secretion in Alpine bucks as well as in those exposed to long days followed by a melatonin treatment. All bucks were kept in shaded open pens. Control males were exposed to natural photoperiod conditions (n=5). Males of the two experimental groups were exposed to 2.5 months of long days from 1 December (n=5 each). On 16 February, one group of males was exposed to 24 h of light per day until 30 June; the other group was exposed to natural variations of photoperiod and received two s.c. melatonin implants. Testicular weight was determined every 2 weeks, and the plasma testosterone concentrations once a week. In the control and the two photoperiodic-treated groups, a treatment×time interaction was detected for testicular weight and plasma testosterone concentrations (P<0.001). In control bucks, testicular weight increased from January and peaked in June, whereas in both photoperiodic-treated groups, this variable increased from January, but peaked in April, when the values were higher than in controls (P<0.05). In the control group, plasma testosterone concentrations remained low from January to June, whereas in both photoperiodic-treated groups, this variable remained low from January to March; thereafter, these levels increased in both photoperiodic-treated groups, and were higher than controls in April and May (P<0.05). We conclude that continuous light after a long-day treatment stimulate testosterone secretion in Alpine male goats during the non-breeding season as well as the long days followed by a melatonin treatment. Therefore, continuous light could replace the implants of melatonin. PMID:26527165

  10. Intracranial electrode implantation produces regional neuroinflammation and memory deficits in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kuttner-Hirshler, Y.; Biegon, A.; Kuttner-Hirshler, Y.; Polat, U.; Biegon, A.

    2009-12-21

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The procedure entails intracranial implantation of an electrode in a specific brain structure followed by chronic stimulation. Although the beneficial effects of DBS on motor symptoms in PD are well known, it is often accompanied by cognitive impairments, the origin of which is not fully understood. To explore the possible contribution of the surgical procedure itself, we studied the effect of electrode implantation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on regional neuroinflammation and memory function in rats implanted bilaterally with stainless steel electrodes. Age-matched sham and intact rats were used as controls. Brains were removed 1 or 8 weeks post-implantation and processed for in vitro autoradiography with [(3)H]PK11195, an established marker of microglial activation. Memory function was assessed by the novel object recognition test (ORT) before surgery and 2 and 8 weeks after surgery. Electrode implantation produced region-dependent changes in ligand binding density in the implanted brains at 1 as well as 8 weeks post-implantation. Cortical regions showed more intense and widespread neuroinflammation than striatal or thalamic structures. Furthermore, implanted animals showed deficits in ORT performance 2 and 8 weeks post-implantation. Thus, electrode implantation resulted in a widespread and persistent neuroinflammation and sustained memory impairment. These results suggest that the insertion and continued presence of electrodes in the brain, even without stimulation, may lead to inflammation-mediated cognitive deficits in susceptible individuals, as observed in patients treated with DBS.

  11. Biochemical acclimation, stomatal limitation and precipitation patterns underlie decreases in photosynthetic stimulation of Soybean (Glycine max) at elevated [CO2] and temperatures under fully open air field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The net effect of elevated [CO2] and temperature on photosynthetic acclimation and plant productivity is poorly resolved. We assessed the effects of canopy warming and fully open air [CO2] enrichment on 1) the acclimation of two biochemical parameters that frequently limit photosynthesis (A), the ma...

  12. Microelectrode Guided Implantation of Electrodes into the Subthalamic Nucleus of Rats for Long-term Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fluri, Felix; Bieber, Micheal; Volkmann, Jens; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a widely used and effective therapy for several neurologic disorders, such as idiopathic Parkinson's disease, dystonia or tremor. DBS is based on the delivery of electrical stimuli to specific deep anatomic structures of the central nervous system. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of DBS remain enigmatic. This has led to an interest in investigating the impact of DBS in animal models, especially in rats. As DBS is a long-term therapy, research should be focused on molecular-genetic changes of neural circuits that occur several weeks after DBS. Long-term DBS in rats is challenging because the rats move around in their cage, which causes problems in keeping in place the wire leading from the head of the animal to the stimulator. Furthermore, target structures for stimulation in the rat brain are small and therefore electrodes cannot easily be placed at the required position. Thus, a set-up for long-lasting stimulation of rats using platinum/iridium electrodes with an impedance of about 1 MΩ was developed for this study. An electrode with these specifications allows for not only adequate stimulation but also recording of deep brain structures to identify the target area for DBS. In our set-up, an electrode with a plug for the wire was embedded in dental cement with four anchoring screws secured onto the skull. The wire from the plug to the stimulator was protected by a stainless-steel spring. A swivel was connected to the circuit to prevent the wire from becoming tangled. Overall, this stimulation set-up offers a high degree of free mobility for the rat and enables the head plug, as well as the wire connection between the plug and the stimulator, to retain long-lasting strength. PMID:26485522

  13. Fully committed.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, R

    1997-01-01

    In India, HIV/AIDS is spreading rapidly because of high-risk heterosexual behavior and IV drug use. The Indian government has responded to the epidemic by creating a National AIDS Control Program in 1987 and a National AIDS Control Organization in 1992, which implemented a 5-year strategic play at the cost of Rs. 2.8 billion. The national program sought to 1) prevent and control sexually transmitted disease, 2) ensure the safety of the blood supply, 3) strengthen program management capabilities, 4) stimulate social mobilization, 5) launch an intensive national health communications campaign focussed on the needs of the rural population, 6) train physicians in the clinical management of HIV/AIDS, and 7) create 107 sentinel HIV surveillance sites. The achievements of this program during the past 5 years have revealed areas that require an expanded response. India is promoting condom use through social marketing, improving family counseling and clinical management of hospitalized AIDS patients, intensifying research to discover treatment modalities within the tradition of indigenous medicine, and taking measures to prevent social discrimination of HIV-infected people. The National AIDS Control Program for 1997-2002 will prioritize empowerment of women and protection of infected children through a multisectoral approach. The Indian government is currently negotiating with the World Bank for a second loan to cover the continuation of this program and pledges to join other nations in the battle against HIV/AIDS. PMID:12293667

  14. Integrated approach for smart implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) device with real time ECG monitoring: use of flexible sensors for localized arrhythmia sensing and stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Munish; Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C.; Miranda, Aimon C.; Gelot, Shyam; Moreno, Wilfrido; Adithya, Prashanth C.; Law, Catherine; Tipparaju, Srinivas M.

    2013-01-01

    Arrhythmias are the most common cause of death associated with sudden death and are common in US and worldwide. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), evolving from pacemakers and development of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), has been adopted for therapeutic use and demonstrated benefits in patients over the years due to its design and intricate functionality. Recent research has been focused on significant design improvement and efforts are dedicated toward device size reduction, weight and functionality in commercially available ICD's since its invention in the 1960's. Commercially available CRT-D has shown advancement on both clinical and technical side. However, improved focus is required on the device miniaturization, technologically supported and integrated wireless based system for real time heart monitoring electrocardiogram (ECG). In the present report a concise overview for the state-of-the art technology in ICDs and avenues for future development are presented. A unique perspective is also included for ICD device miniaturization and integration of flexible sensing array. Sensor array integration along with its capabilities for identifying localized arrhythmia detection and targeted stimulation for enhancing ICD device capabilities is reviewed. PMID:24167492

  15. Self-Tracking Energy Transfer for Neural Stimulation in Untethered Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, John S.; Tanabe, Yuji; Iyer, Shrivats Mohan; Christensen, Amelia J.; Grosenick, Logan; Deisseroth, Karl; Delp, Scott L.; Poon, Ada S. Y.

    2015-08-01

    Optical or electrical stimulation of neural circuits in mice during natural behavior is an important paradigm for studying brain function. Conventional systems for optogenetics and electrical microstimulation require tethers or large head-mounted devices that disrupt animal behavior. We report a method for wireless powering of small-scale implanted devices based on the strong localization of energy that occurs during resonant interaction between a radio-frequency cavity and intrinsic modes in mice. The system features self-tracking over a wide (16-cm diameter) operational area, and is used to demonstrate wireless activation of cortical neurons with miniaturized stimulators (10 mm3 , 20 mg) fully implanted under the skin.

  16. Intracranial electrode implantation produces regional neuroinflammation and memory deficits in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hirshler, Yafit (Kuttner); Polat, Uri; Biegon, Anat

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). The procedure entails intracranial implantation of an electrode in a specific brain structure followed by chronic stimulation. Although the beneficial effects of DBS on motor symptoms in PD are well known, it is often accompanied by cognitive impairments the origin of which is not fully understood. To explore the possible contribution of the surgical procedure itself, we studied the effect of electrode implantation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on regional neuroinflammation and memory function in rats implanted bilaterally with stainless steel electrodes. Age-matched sham and intact rats were used as controls. Brains were removed one week or eight weeks post implantation and processed for in vitro autoradiography with [3H]PK11195, an established marker of microglial activation. Memory function was assessed by the novel object recognition test (ORT) before surgery and two and eight weeks after surgery. Electrode implantation produced region-dependent changes in ligand binding density in the implanted brains at one week as well as eight weeks post implantation. Cortical regions showed more intense and widespread neuroinflammation than striatal or thalamic structures. Furthermore, implanted animals showed deficits in ORT performance two and eight weeks post implantation. Thus, electrode implantation resulted in a widespread and persistent neuroinflammation and sustained memory impairment. These results suggest that the insertion and continued presence of electrodes in the brain, even without stimulation, may lead to inflammation-mediated cognitive deficits in susceptible individuals, as observed in patients treated with DBS. PMID:20026042

  17. Estimating dose to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator outside the treatment fields using a skin QED diode, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters, and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Maria F.; Song, Yulin; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Li Jingdong; Huang, David; Burman, Chandra

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the relative sensitivity of skin QED diodes, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) (microStar Trade-Mark-Sign DOT, Landauer), and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a function of distance from a photon beam field edge when applied to measure dose at out-of-field points. These detectors have been used to estimate radiation dose to patients' implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) located outside the treatment field. The ICDs have a thin outer case made of 0.4- to 0.6-mm-thick titanium ({approx}2.4-mm tissue equivalent). A 5-mm bolus, being the equivalent depth of the devices under the patient's skin, was placed over the ICDs. Response per unit absorbed dose-to-water was measured for each of the dosimeters with and without bolus on the beam central axis (CAX) and at a distance up to 20 cm from the CAX. Doses were measured with an ionization chamber at various depths for 6- and 15-MV x-rays on a Varian Clinac-iX linear accelerator. Relative sensitivity of the detectors was determined as the ratio of the sensitivity at each off-axis distance to that at the CAX. The detector sensitivity as a function of the distance from the field edge changed by {+-} 3% (1-11%) for LiF TLD-700, decreased by 10% (5-21%) for OSLD, and increased by 16% (11-19%) for the skin QED diode (Sun Nuclear Corp.) at the equivalent depth of 5 mm for 6- or 15-MV photon energies. Our results showed that the use of bolus with proper thickness (i.e., {approx}d{sub max} of the photon energy) on the top of the ICD would reduce the scattered dose to a lower level. Dosimeters should be calibrated out-of-field and preferably with bolus equal in thickness to the depth of interest. This can be readily performed in clinic.

  18. Implantable medical devices MRI safe.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Renzo; Hecker, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators like deep brain stimulator electrodes, spiral cord stimulators, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, retinal implants, hearing aids, electro cardio gram (ECG) leads, or devices in interventional MRI such as vascular guide wires or catheters are affected by MRI magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Design of MRI Safe medical devices requires computer modeling, bench testing, phantom testing, and animal studies. Implanted medical devices can be MRI unsafe, MRI conditional or MRI safe (see glossary). In the following paragraphs we will investigate how to design implanted medical devices MRI safe. PMID:23739365

  19. [Implantable hearing aids].

    PubMed

    Luers, J C; Beutner, D; Hüttenbrink, K-B

    2011-10-01

    Strictly speaking, implantable hearing aids are technical systems that process audiological signals and convey these by direct mechanical stimulation of the ossicular chain or cochlea. They have certain benefits over conventional hearing aids in terms of wearing comfort and general acceptance. As current studies lack convincing audiological results, the indications for implantable hearing aids are primarily of medical or cosmetic nature. To date, three systems are available in Germany: Vibrant Soundbridge®, Carina®, and Esteem®. Because the performance of the different implantable and nonimplantable hearing systems together with various surgical procedures are currently undergoing major changes, audiological indications may also develop in the future. PMID:21956678

  20. [Implantation of collagen coated hydroxyapatite particles. A clinical-histological study in humans].

    PubMed

    Sanz, M; Bascones, A; Kessler, A; García Nuñez, J; Newman, M G; Robertson, M A; Carranza, F A

    1989-05-01

    In this study, histologic behaviour of collagen coated hydroxylapatite particles implanted in human periodontal osseous defects has been analyzed. This material was surgically implanted in four patients, and reentry and block biopsies were carried out 4 and 6 months later. The histologic results demonstrate that this material is well tolerated by surrounding tissues, not eliciting an inflammatory reaction. At four months, the hydroxylapatite particles appear encapsulated by a very cellular connective tissue and at 6 months are found in direct contact with osteoid and mature bone. This material acts as a filler material, being fully biocompatible and stimulating an osseoconductive reaction of the adjacent alveolar bone. PMID:2637052

  1. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  2. Electrical stimulation of a small brain area reversibly disrupts consciousness.

    PubMed

    Koubeissi, Mohamad Z; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Beltagy, Abdelrahman; Picard, Fabienne

    2014-08-01

    The neural mechanisms that underlie consciousness are not fully understood. We describe a region in the human brain where electrical stimulation reproducibly disrupted consciousness. A 54-year-old woman with intractable epilepsy underwent depth electrode implantation and electrical stimulation mapping. The electrode whose stimulation disrupted consciousness was between the left claustrum and anterior-dorsal insula. Stimulation of electrodes within 5mm did not affect consciousness. We studied the interdependencies among depth recording signals as a function of time by nonlinear regression analysis (h(2) coefficient) during stimulations that altered consciousness and stimulations of the same electrode at lower current intensities that were asymptomatic. Stimulation of the claustral electrode reproducibly resulted in a complete arrest of volitional behavior, unresponsiveness, and amnesia without negative motor symptoms or mere aphasia. The disruption of consciousness did not outlast the stimulation and occurred without any epileptiform discharges. We found a significant increase in correlation for interactions affecting medial parietal and posterior frontal channels during stimulations that disrupted consciousness compared with those that did not. Our findings suggest that the left claustrum/anterior insula is an important part of a network that subserves consciousness and that disruption of consciousness is related to increased EEG signal synchrony within frontal-parietal networks. PMID:24967698

  3. Implantable electrical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fully implantable and self contained device is disclosed composed of a flexible electrode array for surrounding damaged nerves and a signal generator for driving the electrode array with periodic electrical impulses of nanoampere magnitude to induce regeneration of the damaged nerves.

  4. CHAPTER: In-Situ Characterization of Stimulating Microelectrode Arrays: Study of an Idealized Structure Based on Argus II Retinal implantsBOOK TITLE: Implantable Neural Prostheses 2: Techniques and Engineering Approaches, D.M. Zhou and E. Greenbaum, Eds., Springer, NY 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Elias; Sanders, Charlene A; Kandagor, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    The development of a retinal prosthesis for artificial sight includes a study of the factors affecting the structural and functional stability of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Although neuron depolarization and propagation of electrical signals have been studied for nearly a century, the use of multielectrode stimulation as a proposed therapy to treat blindness is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology research. Mapping and characterizing the topographic information contained in the electric field potentials and understanding how this information is transmitted and interpreted in the visual cortex is still very much a work in progress. In order to characterize the electrical field patterns generated by the device, an in vitro prototype that mimics several of the physical and chemical parameters of the in vivo visual implant device was fabricated. We carried out multiple electrical measurements in a model 'eye,' beginning with a single electrode, followed by a 9-electrode array structure, both idealized components based on the Argus II retinal implants. Correlating the information contained in the topographic features of the electric fields with psychophysical testing in patients may help reduce the time required for patients to convert the electrical patterns into graphic signals.

  5. Design, fabrication and perivascular implantation of bioactive scaffolds engineered with human adventitial progenitor cells for stimulation of arteriogenesis in peripheral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Carrabba, M; De Maria, C; Oikawa, A; Reni, C; Rodriguez-Arabaolaza, I; Spencer, H; Slater, S; Avolio, E; Dang, Z; Spinetti, G; Madeddu, P; Vozzi, G

    2016-03-01

    Cell therapy represents a promising option for revascularization of ischemic tissues. However, injection of dispersed cells is not optimal to ensure precise homing into the recipient's vasculature. Implantation of cell-engineered scaffolds around the occluded artery may obviate these limitations. Here, we employed the synthetic polymer polycaprolactone for fabrication of 3D woodpile- or channel-shaped scaffolds by a computer-assisted writing system (pressure assisted micro-syringe square), followed by deposition of gelatin (GL) nanofibers by electro-spinning. Scaffolds were then cross-linked with natural (genipin, GP) or synthetic (3-glycidyloxy-propyl-trimethoxy-silane, GPTMS) agents to improve mechanical properties and durability in vivo. The composite scaffolds were next fixed by crown inserts in each well of a multi-well plate and seeded with adventitial progenitor cells (APCs, 3 cell lines in duplicate), which were isolated/expanded from human saphenous vein surgical leftovers. Cell density, alignment, proliferation and viability were assessed 1 week later. Data from in vitro assays showed channel-shaped/GPTMS-crosslinked scaffolds confer APCs with best alignment and survival/growth characteristics. Based on these results, channel-shaped/GPTMS-crosslinked scaffolds with or without APCs were implanted around the femoral artery of mice with unilateral limb ischemia. Perivascular implantation of scaffolds accelerated limb blood flow recovery, as assessed by laser Doppler or fluorescent microspheres, and increased arterial collaterals around the femoral artery and in limb muscles compared with non-implanted controls. Blood flow recovery and perivascular arteriogenesis were additionally incremented by APC-engineered scaffolds. In conclusion, perivascular application of human APC-engineered scaffolds may represent a novel option for targeted delivery of therapeutic cells in patients with critical limb ischemia. PMID:27011300

  6. Implantable microscale neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Karen C

    2007-12-01

    Implantable neural microsystems provide an interface to the nervous system, giving cellular resolution to physiological processes unattainable today with non-invasive methods. Such implantable microelectrode arrays are being developed to simultaneously sample signals at many points in the tissue, providing insight into processes such as movement control, memory formation, and perception. These electrode arrays have been microfabricated on a variety of substrates, including silicon, using both surface and bulk micromachining techniques, and more recently, polymers. Current approaches to achieving a stable long-term tissue interface focus on engineering the surface properties of the implant, including coatings that discourage protein adsorption or release bioactive molecules. The implementation of a wireless interface requires consideration of the necessary data flow, amplification, signal processing, and packaging. In future, the realization of a fully implantable neural microsystem will contribute to both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as a neuroprosthetic interface to restore motor functions in paralyzed patients. PMID:17252207

  7. Optical Stimulation of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alexander C.; Stoddart, Paul R.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2014-01-01

    Our capacity to interface with the nervous system remains overwhelmingly reliant on electrical stimulation devices, such as electrode arrays and cuff electrodes that can stimulate both central and peripheral nervous systems. However, electrical stimulation has to deal with multiple challenges, including selectivity, spatial resolution, mechanical stability, implant-induced injury and the subsequent inflammatory response. Optical stimulation techniques may avoid some of these challenges by providing more selective stimulation, higher spatial resolution and reduced invasiveness of the device, while also avoiding the electrical artefacts that complicate recordings of electrically stimulated neuronal activity. This review explores the current status of optical stimulation techniques, including optogenetic methods, photoactive molecule approaches and infrared neural stimulation, together with emerging techniques such as hybrid optical-electrical stimulation, nanoparticle enhanced stimulation and optoelectric methods. Infrared neural stimulation is particularly emphasised, due to the potential for direct activation of neural tissue by infrared light, as opposed to techniques that rely on the introduction of exogenous light responsive materials. However, infrared neural stimulation remains imperfectly understood, and techniques for accurately delivering light are still under development. While the various techniques reviewed here confirm the overall feasibility of optical stimulation, a number of challenges remain to be overcome before they can deliver their full potential. PMID:26322269

  8. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  9. Goserelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    Goserelin implant is used in combination with radiation therapy and other medications to treat localized prostate cancer and is ... treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications called gonadotropin- ...

  10. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are ... of-hearing can get help from them. The implant consists of two parts. One part sits on ...

  11. Carmustine Implant

    MedlinePlus

    Carmustine implant is used along with surgery and sometimes radiation therapy to treat malignant glioma (a certain type of ... Carmustine implant comes as a small wafer that is placed in the brain by a doctor during surgery to ...

  12. Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updated Safety Information (Consumer Article) FDA Provides Updated Safety Data on Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants (Press Announcement) [ARCHIVED] Breast Implant Guidance for Industry (2006) Post Approval Studies Webpage Freedom of Information ...

  13. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... antenna. This part of the implant receives the sound, converts the sound into an electrical signal, and sends it to ... implants allow deaf people to receive and process sounds and speech. However, these devices do not restore ...

  14. Hypo-glycosylated Human Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (hFSH21/18) is much more active in vitro than Fully-glycosylated hFSH (hFSH24)

    PubMed Central

    Bousfield, George R.; Butnev, Vladimir Y.; Butnev, Viktor Y.; Hiromasa, Yasuaki; Harvey, David J.; May, Jeffrey V.

    2014-01-01

    Hypo-glycosylated hFSH21/18 (possesses FSHβ21 and FSH18 bands) was isolated from hLH preparations by immunoaffinity chromatography followed by gel filtration. Fully-glycosylated hFSH24 was prepared by combining the fully-glycosylated FSHβ24 variant with hCGα and isolating the heterodimer. The hFSH21/18 glycoform preparation was significantly smaller than the hFSH24 preparation and possessed 60% oligomannose glycans, which is unusual for hFSH. Hypo-glycosylated hFSH21/18 was 9- to 26-fold more active than fully-glycosylated hFSH24 in FSH radioligand assays. Significantly greater binding of 125I-hFSH21/18 tracer than hFSH24 tracer was observed in all competitive binding assays. In addition, higher binding of hFSH21/18 was noted in association and saturation binding assays, in which twice as much hFSH21/18 was bound as hFSH24. This suggests that more ligand binding sites are available to hFSH21/18 in FSHR than to hFSH24. Hypo-glycosylated hFSH21/18 also bound rat FSHRs more rapidly, exhibiting almost no lag in binding, whereas hFSH24 specific binding proceeded very slowly for almost the first hour of incubation. PMID:24291635

  15. Neuroprotection trek--the next generation: neuromodulation I. Techniques--deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Russell J.

    2003-01-01

    Neuromodulation denotes controlled electrical stimulation of the central or peripheral nervous system. The three forms of neuromodulation described in this paper-deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation-were chosen primarily for their demonstrated or potential clinical usefulness. Deep brain stimulation is a completely implanted technique for improving movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, by very focal electrical stimulation of the brain-a technique that employs well-established hardware (electrode and pulse generator/battery). Vagus nerve stimulation is similar to deep brain stimulation in being well-established (for the treatment of refractory epilepsy), completely implanted, and having hardware that can be considered standard at the present time. Vagus nerve stimulation differs from deep brain stimulation, however, in that afferent stimulation of the vagus nerve results in diffuse effects on many regions throughout the brain. Although use of deep brain stimulation for applications beyond movement disorders will no doubt involve placing the stimulating electrode(s) in regions other than the thalamus, subthalamus, or globus pallidus, the use of vagus nerve stimulation for applications beyond epilepsy-for example, depression and eating disorders-is unlikely to require altering the hardware significantly (although stimulation protocols may differ). Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an example of an external or non-implanted, intermittent (at least given the current state of the hardware) stimulation technique, the clinical value of which for neuromodulation and neuroprotection remains to be determined.

  16. Treatment of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus With Bone Marrow Stimulation and Chitosan–Glycerol Phosphate/Blood Implants (BST-CarGel)

    PubMed Central

    Vilá y Rico, Jesús; Dalmau, Antonio; Chaqués, Francisco Javier; Asunción, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stimulation (BMS) techniques represent the first-line treatment for unstable osteochondral lesions of the talus or after conservative treatment failure. These techniques are intended to penetrate the subchondral bone to elicit bleeding and allow precursor cells and cytokines from bone marrow to populate the lesion. However, the fibrocartilaginous repair tissue arising after marrow stimulation confers inferior mechanical and biological properties compared with the original hyaline cartilage. The limitations of BMS can be overcome by the use of the soluble chitosan-based polymer BST-CarGel (Piramal Life Sciences, Laval, Quebec, Canada). When mixed with freshly drawn autologous whole blood and applied to a lesion surgically prepared by BMS, BST-CarGel acts as a natural bioscaffold that increases the quantity and improves the residency of the blood clot formed in the cartilage lesion, enhancing the local healing response. The use of BST-CarGel has been previously described in the knee and hip joints with successful results. We describe the arthroscopic technique for BST-CarGel application in combination with BMS techniques for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus. PMID:26870643

  17. Immediate Return to Ambulation and Improved Functional Capacity for Rehabilitation in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Early Implantation of a Spinal Cord Stimulation System.

    PubMed

    Goff, Brandon Jesse; Naber, Jeremy Wingseng; McCallin, John Patrick; Lopez, Edward Michael; Guthmiller, Kevin Brant; Lautenschlager, Karl Alan; Lai, Tristan Toll; Hommer, Dean Harry; Marin, Gonzalez Raul

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a neuropathic pain condition that is characterized by vasomotor, sensory, sudomotor, and motor symptoms. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been successfully utilized for the treatment of pain refractory to conventional therapies. We present a case of a previously highly functioning 54-year-old female who developed a rarely reported case of idiopathic CRPS of the right ankle which spontaneously occurred four months after an uncomplicated anterior cervical disc fusion. This condition resulted in severe pain and functional impairment that was unresponsive to pharmacological management. The patient's rehabilitation was severely stymied by her excruciating pain. However, with the initiation of spinal cord stimulation, her pain was adequately controlled allowing for progression to full unassisted ambulation, advancing functional capacity, and improving quality of life. This case report supports the concept that rapid progression to neuromodulation, rather than delays that occur due to attempts at serial sympathetic blocks, may better control symptoms leading allowing for a more meaningful recovery. PMID:25525522

  18. Immediate Return to Ambulation and Improved Functional Capacity for Rehabilitation in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Early Implantation of a Spinal Cord Stimulation System

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Brandon Jesse; Naber, Jeremy Wingseng; McCallin, John Patrick; Lopez, Edward Michael; Guthmiller, Kevin Brant; Lautenschlager, Karl Alan; Lai, Tristan Toll; Hommer, Dean Harry; Marin, Gonzalez Raul

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a neuropathic pain condition that is characterized by vasomotor, sensory, sudomotor, and motor symptoms. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been successfully utilized for the treatment of pain refractory to conventional therapies. We present a case of a previously highly functioning 54-year-old female who developed a rarely reported case of idiopathic CRPS of the right ankle which spontaneously occurred four months after an uncomplicated anterior cervical disc fusion. This condition resulted in severe pain and functional impairment that was unresponsive to pharmacological management. The patient's rehabilitation was severely stymied by her excruciating pain. However, with the initiation of spinal cord stimulation, her pain was adequately controlled allowing for progression to full unassisted ambulation, advancing functional capacity, and improving quality of life. This case report supports the concept that rapid progression to neuromodulation, rather than delays that occur due to attempts at serial sympathetic blocks, may better control symptoms leading allowing for a more meaningful recovery. PMID:25525522

  19. Fully Integrated Biochip Platforms for Advanced Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Sandro; Ghoreishizadeh, Sara; Olivo, Jacopo; Taurino, Irene; Baj-Rossi, Camilla; Cavallini, Andrea; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Dehollain, Catherine; Burleson, Wayne; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microelectronics and biosensors are enabling developments of innovative biochips for advanced healthcare by providing fully integrated platforms for continuous monitoring of a large set of human disease biomarkers. Continuous monitoring of several human metabolites can be addressed by using fully integrated and minimally invasive devices located in the sub-cutis, typically in the peritoneal region. This extends the techniques of continuous monitoring of glucose currently being pursued with diabetic patients. However, several issues have to be considered in order to succeed in developing fully integrated and minimally invasive implantable devices. These innovative devices require a high-degree of integration, minimal invasive surgery, long-term biocompatibility, security and privacy in data transmission, high reliability, high reproducibility, high specificity, low detection limit and high sensitivity. Recent advances in the field have already proposed possible solutions for several of these issues. The aim of the present paper is to present a broad spectrum of recent results and to propose future directions of development in order to obtain fully implantable systems for the continuous monitoring of the human metabolism in advanced healthcare applications. PMID:23112644

  20. Fully integrated biochip platforms for advanced healthcare.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Sandro; Ghoreishizadeh, Sara; Olivo, Jacopo; Taurino, Irene; Baj-Rossi, Camilla; Cavallini, Andrea; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Dehollain, Catherine; Burleson, Wayne; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microelectronics and biosensors are enabling developments of innovative biochips for advanced healthcare by providing fully integrated platforms for continuous monitoring of a large set of human disease biomarkers. Continuous monitoring of several human metabolites can be addressed by using fully integrated and minimally invasive devices located in the sub-cutis, typically in the peritoneal region. This extends the techniques of continuous monitoring of glucose currently being pursued with diabetic patients. However, several issues have to be considered in order to succeed in developing fully integrated and minimally invasive implantable devices. These innovative devices require a high-degree of integration, minimal invasive surgery, long-term biocompatibility, security and privacy in data transmission, high reliability, high reproducibility, high specificity, low detection limit and high sensitivity. Recent advances in the field have already proposed possible solutions for several of these issues. The aim of the present paper is to present a broad spectrum of recent results and to propose future directions of development in order to obtain fully implantable systems for the continuous monitoring of the human metabolism in advanced healthcare applications. PMID:23112644

  1. IMPORTANCE OF COCHLEAR HEALTH FOR IMPLANT FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Pfingst, Bryan E.; Zhou, Ning; Colesa, Deborah J.; Watts, Melissa M.; Strahl, Stefan B.; Garadat, Soha N.; Schvartz-Leyzac, Kara C.; Budenz, Cameron L.; Raphael, Yehoash; Zwolan, Teresa A.

    2014-01-01

    Amazing progress has been made in providing useful hearing to hearing-impaired individuals using cochlear implants, but challenges remain. One such challenge is understanding the effects of partial degeneration of the auditory nerve, the target of cochlear implant stimulation. Here we review studies from our human and animal laboratories aimed at characterizing the health of the implanted cochlea and the auditory nerve. We use the data on cochlear and neural health to guide rehabilitation strategies. The data also motivate the development of tissue-engineering procedures to preserve or build a healthy cochlea and improve performance obtained by cochlear implant recipients or eventually replace the need for a cochlear implant. PMID:25261772

  2. Auditory midbrain implant: a review.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hubert H; Lenarz, Minoo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The auditory midbrain implant (AMI) is a new hearing prosthesis designed for stimulation of the inferior colliculus in deaf patients who cannot sufficiently benefit from cochlear implants. The authors have begun clinical trials in which five patients have been implanted with a single shank AMI array (20 electrodes). The goal of this review is to summarize the development and research that has led to the translation of the AMI from a concept into the first patients. This study presents the rationale and design concept for the AMI as well a summary of the animal safety and feasibility studies that were required for clinical approval. The authors also present the initial surgical, psychophysical, and speech results from the first three implanted patients. Overall, the results have been encouraging in terms of the safety and functionality of the implant. All patients obtain improvements in hearing capabilities on a daily basis. However, performance varies dramatically across patients depending on the implant location within the midbrain with the best performer still not able to achieve open set speech perception without lip-reading cues. Stimulation of the auditory midbrain provides a wide range of level, spectral, and temporal cues, all of which are important for speech understanding, but they do not appear to sufficiently fuse together to enable open set speech perception with the currently used stimulation strategies. Finally, several issues and hypotheses for why current patients obtain limited speech perception along with several feasible solutions for improving AMI implementation are presented. PMID:19762428

  3. Auditory Midbrain Implant: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hubert H.; Lenarz, Minoo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The auditory midbrain implant (AMI) is a new hearing prosthesis designed for stimulation of the inferior colliculus in deaf patients who cannot sufficiently benefit from cochlear implants. The authors have begun clinical trials in which five patients have been implanted with a single shank AMI array (20 electrodes). The goal of this review is to summarize the development and research that has led to the translation of the AMI from a concept into the first patients. This study presents the rationale and design concept for the AMI as well a summary of the animal safety and feasibility studies that were required for clinical approval. The authors also present the initial surgical, psychophysical, and speech results from the first three implanted patients. Overall, the results have been encouraging in terms of the safety and functionality of the implant. All patients obtain improvements in hearing capabilities on a daily basis. However, performance varies dramatically across patients depending on the implant location within the midbrain with the best performer still not able to achieve open set speech perception without lip-reading cues. Stimulation of the auditory midbrain provides a wide range of level, spectral, and temporal cues, all of which are important for speech understanding, but they do not appear to sufficiently fuse together to enable open set speech perception with the currently used stimulation strategies. Finally, several issues and hypotheses for why current patients obtain limited speech perception along with several feasible solutions for improving AMI implementation are presented. PMID:19762428

  4. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  5. High Productivity Implantation ''PARTIAL IMPLANT''

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Masayoshi; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sakai, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Takao

    2008-11-03

    The patterned ion implantation 'PARTIAL IMPLANT' has been developed as a productivity improvement tool. The Partial Implant can form several different ion dose areas on the wafer surface by controlling the speed of wafer moving and the stepwise rotation of twist axis. The Partial Implant system contains two implant methods. One method is 'DIVIDE PARTIAL IMPLANT', that is aimed at reducing the consumption of the wafer. The Divide Partial Implant evenly divides dose area on one wafer surface into two or three different dose part. Any dose can be selected in each area. So the consumption of the wafer for experimental implantation can be reduced. The second method is 'RING PARTIAL IMPLANT' that is aimed at improving yield by correcting electrical characteristic of devices. The Ring Partial Implant can form concentric ion dose areas. The dose of wafer external area can be selected to be within plus or minus 30% of dose of wafer central area. So the electrical characteristic of devices can be corrected by controlling dose at edge side on the wafer.

  6. Cochlear implant simulator for surgical technique analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turok, Rebecca L.; Labadie, Robert F.; Wanna, George B.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Noble, Jack H.

    2014-03-01

    Cochlear Implant (CI) surgery is a procedure in which an electrode array is inserted into the cochlea. The electrode array is used to stimulate auditory nerve fibers and restore hearing for people with severe to profound hearing loss. The primary goals when placing the electrode array are to fully insert the array into the cochlea while minimizing trauma to the cochlea. Studying the relationship between surgical outcome and various surgical techniques has been difficult since trauma and electrode placement are generally unknown without histology. Our group has created a CI placement simulator that combines an interactive 3D visualization environment with a haptic-feedback-enabled controller. Surgical techniques and patient anatomy can be varied between simulations so that outcomes can be studied under varied conditions. With this system, we envision that through numerous trials we will be able to statistically analyze how outcomes relate to surgical techniques. As a first test of this system, in this work, we have designed an experiment in which we compare the spatial distribution of forces imparted to the cochlea in the array insertion procedure when using two different but commonly used surgical techniques for cochlear access, called round window and cochleostomy access. Our results suggest that CIs implanted using round window access may cause less trauma to deeper intracochlear structures than cochleostomy techniques. This result is of interest because it challenges traditional thinking in the otological community but might offer an explanation for recent anecdotal evidence that suggests that round window access techniques lead to better outcomes.

  7. Multipartite Fully Entangled Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianwei

    2016-06-01

    Fully entangled fraction is a definition for bipartite states, which is tightly related to bipartite maximally entangled states, and has clear experimental and theoretical significance. In this work, we generalize it to multipartite case, we call the generalized version multipartite fully entangled fraction (MFEF). MFEF measures the closeness of a state to GHZ states. The analytical expressions of MFEF are very difficult to obtain except for very special states, however, we show that, the MFEF of any state is determined by a system of finite-order polynomial equations. Therefore, the MFEF can be efficiently numerically computed.

  8. Implant Design in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Taek

    2016-01-01

    When performing cementless hip arthroplasty, it is critical to achieve firm primary mechanical stability followed by biological fixation. In order to achieve this, it is essential to fully understand characteristics of implant design. In this review, the authors review fixation principles for a variety of implants used for cementless hip replacement and considerations for making an optimal selection. PMID:27536647

  9. Automatic electrode configuration selection for image-guided cochlear implant programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yiyuan; Dawant, Benoit M.; Noble, Jack H.

    2015-03-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are neural prosthetics that stimulate the auditory nerve pathways within the cochlea using an implanted electrode array to restore hearing. After implantation, the CI is programmed by an audiologist who determines which electrodes are active, i.e., the electrode configuration, and selects other stimulation settings. Recent clinical studies by our group have shown that hearing outcomes can be significantly improved by using an image-guided electrode configuration selection technique we have designed. Our goal in this work is to automate the electrode configuration selection step with the long term goal of developing a fully automatic system that can be translated to the clinic. Until now, the electrode configuration selection step has been performed by an expert with the assistance of image analysis-based estimates of the electrode-neural interface. To automatically determine the electrode configuration, we have designed an optimization approach and propose the use of a cost function with feature terms designed to interpret the image analysis data in a similar fashion as the expert. Further, we have designed an approach to select parameters in the cost function using our database of existing electrode configuration plans as training data. The results we present show that our automatic approach results in electrode configurations that are better or equally as good as manually selected configurations in over 80% of the cases tested. This method represents a crucial step towards clinical translation of our image-guided cochlear implant programming system.

  10. [Implant allergies].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Thomsen, M

    2010-03-01

    An increasing number of patients receive and benefit from osteosynthesis materials or artificial joint replacement. The most common complications are mechanical problems or infection. Metals like nickel, chromium and cobalt as well as bone cement components like acrylates and gentamicin are potential contact allergens which can cause intolerance reactions to implants. Eczema, delayed wound/bone healing, recurrent effusions, pain and implant loosening all have been described as manifestation of implant allergy. In contrast to the high incidence of cutaneous metal allergy, allergies associated with implants are rare. Diagnosis of metal implant allergy is still difficult. Thus differential diagnoses--in particular infection--have to be excluded and a combined approach of allergologic diagnostics by patch test and histopathology of peri-implant tissue is recommended. It is still unknown which conditions induce allergic sensitization to implants or trigger peri-implant allergic reactions in the case of preexisting cutaneous metal allergy. Despite the risk of developing complications being unclear, titanium based osteosynthesis materials are recommended for metal allergic patients and the use of metal-metal couplings in arthroplasty is not recommended for such patients. If the regular CoCr-polyethylene articulation is employed, the patient should give informed written consent. PMID:20204719