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Sample records for fully integrated fiber-optic

  1. Fiber optic control system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, G. L.; Glasheen, W. M.; Russell, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    A total fiber optic, integrated propulsion/flight control system concept for advanced fighter aircraft is presented. Fiber optic technology pertaining to this system is identified and evaluated for application readiness. A fiber optic sensor vendor survey was completed, and the results are reported. The advantages of centralized/direct architecture are reviewed, and the concept of the protocol branch is explained. Preliminary protocol branch selections are made based on the F-18/F404 application. Concepts for new optical tools are described. Development plans for the optical technology and the described system are included.

  2. Integrated optics for fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minford, W. J.; Depaula, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    Recent progress achieved in the field of fiber-optic sensor applications is discussed with emphasis placed on LiNbO3-based integrated optics (IO). Particular consideration is given to advanced electromagnetic-field sensors, an integrated laser vibrometer system, and a fiber-optic gyroscope system. It is shown that the multifunction IO chips have enabled high perforamance fiber-optic sensors (e.g., fiber-optic gyros), provided advanced and unique signal processing capabilities and advanced architectures, and have a potential of making fiber-optic sensors at low cost.

  3. Fully automatic fiber optic polarization analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marć, P.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.; Stasiewicz, K.

    2008-04-01

    Since many years one of the topic our research team are multi-parametric fiber optic polarization sensors. In the paper is presented a new version of the Fiber-Optic Interferometric Polarization Analyzer (FOIPA). This system is based on modified Sagnac interferometer and it was equipped with automatic current driven polarization controllers driven by special analog output card and detection system based on data acquisition card and LabVIEW software. This system was called full automatic fiber optic interferometric polarization analyzer. Used in the system automatic, temperature driven polarization controllers allow working in feedback electronic loop with data acquisition system and they function as calibration and stabilization subsystem. Specially developed detection system allow measuring amplitudes of first three tones of the AC parts of two electric signals as well as they DC voltages. That advantages have given possibility replaced an expensive lock-in amplifier and make data performance and polarization parameters calculation more faster and easier. It was necessary to implement special procedure to proper SOP identification In the paper are presented theoretical and experimental analyzes of the uncertainties, also. Finally a comparison with commercially available polarization analyzer is shown.

  4. Multicomponent glass fiber optic integrated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pysz, Dariusz; Kujawa, Ireneusz; Szarniak, Przemyslaw; Franczyk, Marcin; Stepien, Ryszard; Buczynski, Ryszard

    2005-09-01

    A range of integrated fiber optic structures - lightguides, image guides, multicapillary arrays, microstructured (photonic) fibers - manufactured in the Institute of Electronic Materials Technology (ITME) is described. All these structures are made of multicomponent glasses (a part of them melted in ITME). They can be manufactured in similar multistep process that involves drawing glass or lightguide rods and tubes preparing glass performs, stacking a bundle with rods and (or) tubes, drawing multifiber or multicapillary performs. Structure formation, technological process, characterization and applications of different integrated structures are presented.

  5. Smart fabrics: integrating fiber optic sensors and information networks.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Mahmoud

    2004-01-01

    "Smart Fabrics" are defined as fabrics capable of monitoring their own "health", and sensing environmental conditions. They consist of special type of sensors, signal processing, and communication network embedded into textile substrate. Available conventional sensors and networking systems are not fully technologically mature for such applications. New classes of miniature sensors, signal processing and networking systems are urgently needed for such application. Also, the methodology for integration into textile structures has to be developed. In this paper, the development of smart fabrics with embedded fiber optic systems is presented for applications in health monitoring and diagnostics. Successful development of such smart fabrics with embedded sensors and networks is mainly dependent on the development of the proper miniature sensors technology, and on the integration of these sensors into textile structures. The developed smart fabrics will be discussed and samples of the results will be presented. PMID:15718661

  6. Fundamental concepts of integrated and fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter discusses fiber optic and integrated optic sensor concepts. Unfortunately, there is no standard method to categorize these sensor concepts. Here, fiber optic and integrated optic sensor concepts will be categorized by the primary modulation technique. These modulation techniques have been classified as: intensity, phase, wavelength, polarization, and time/frequency modulation. All modulate the output light with respect to changes in the physical or chemical property to be measured. Each primary modulation technique is then divided into fiber optic and integrated optic sections which are treated independently. For each sensor concept, possible sensor applications are discussed. The sensors and references discussed are not exhaustive, but sufficient to give the reader an overview of sensor concepts developed to date. Sensor multiplexing techniques such as wavelength division, time division, and frequency division will not be discussed as they are beyond the scope of this report.

  7. Integrated optical chip in fiber optic gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunduru, Vardhani; VaraLakshmi, R.; Dhanunjay, .; Karthik, .

    2010-02-01

    Fiber optic gyroscope is an important development in the field of fiber optic sensors. It is now considered an alternative technology to the mechanical and laser gyroscopes for the inertial guidance and control applications. The advantages of FOG over mechanical gyroscopes are many like instantaneous operation, wide dynamic range, no g-sensitivity, maintenance free, and capability to withstand high shock and vibration and so on. The advantages over laser gyroscopes include cost effectiveness, light weight, low power consumption and improved ruggedness. The optical gyroscope principle was first demonstrated by Sagnac in 1913. Optical gyroscopes implemented so far use Sagnac effect, which states that an optical path difference induced by counter propagating beams in a rotating reference frame is proportional to the absolute rotation. The main requirement of a FOG is perfect reciprocity, i.e. in the absence of rotation, the counter propagating beams inside the fiber must travel identical paths thus resulting in zero phase shift. The phase shift in a Sagnac interferometer not only comprises of a non-reciprocal sources that set practical performance limits. These non-reciprocal sources generate random time varying output resulting in a bias drift even under zero rotation rates, which causes serious problems in present day gyroscope. In a FOG the reciprocal configuration ensures the bias stability, signal processing is used to obtain maximum sensitivity, a broad band source is used to eliminate the effect of back scattering, polarization coupling and Kerr effect and the closed loop operation is used to linearize the scale factor and improve its stability.

  8. Multiwavelength monolithic integrated fiber optics terminal - An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear-Zino, J. D.; Rice, R. R.; Powers, J. K.; Bryan, D. A.; Hall, D. G.; Dalke, E. A.; Reed, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper serves as an update for the Multiwavelength Monolithic Integrated Fiber Optic Terminal (MMIFOT) being developed by MDAC-St. Louis for NASA's Johnson Space Center. The program objective is to utilize guided wave optical technology to develop a passive optical wavelength multiplexing subsystem with a single mode optical fiber serving as the transmission medium.

  9. Integral window hermetic fiber optic components

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, R.D.; Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.; Waker, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    In the fabrication of igniters, actuators, detonators, and other pyrotechnic devices to be activated by a laser beam, an integral optical glass window is formed by placing a preform in the structural member of the device and then melting the glass and sealing it in place by heating at a temperature between the ceramming temperature of the glass and the melting point of the metal, followed by rapid furnace cooling to avoid devitrification. No other sealing material is needed to achieve hermeticity. A preferred embodiment of this type of device is fabricated by allowing the molten glass to flow further and form a plano-convex lens integral with and at the bottom of the window. The lens functions to decrease the beam divergence caused by refraction of the laser light passing through the window when the device is fired by means of a laser beam.

  10. Fiber optic to integrated optical chip coupler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikulski, Joseph I. (Inventor); Ramer, O. Glenn (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Optical fibers are clamped by a block onto a substrate. Thereupon, metal is plated over the fibers to hold them in place upon the substrate. The clamp block is removed and the opening, resulting from the clamp block's presence, is then plated in. The built-up metallic body is a coupling which holds the fibers in position so that the ends can be polished for coupling to an integrated optical chip upon a coupling fixture.

  11. Development of the multiwavelength monolithic integrated fiber optics terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, C. R.; Bryan, D. A.; Powers, J. K.; Rice, R. R.; Nettle, V. H.; Dalke, E. A.; Reed, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Multiwavelength Monolithic Integrated Fiber Optic Terminal (MMIFOT) for the NASA Johnson Space Center. The program objective is to utilize guided wave optical technology to develop wavelength-multiplexing and -demultiplexing units, using a single mode optical fiber for transmission between terminals. Intensity modulated injection laser diodes, chirped diffraction gratings and thin film lenses are used to achieve the wavelength-multiplexing and -demultiplexing. The video and audio data transmission test of an integrated optical unit with a Luneburg collimation lens, waveguide diffraction grating and step index condensing lens is described.

  12. Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity

    DOEpatents

    Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P.

    1996-10-22

    This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosynthetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosynthetic monitoring system. 6 figs.

  13. Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity

    DOEpatents

    Staller, George E.; Wemple, Robert P.

    1996-01-01

    This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosythetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosythetic monitoring system.

  14. Characterization of integrated fiber optic sensors in smart textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jianming; El-Sherif, Mahmoud A.; Khalil, Saif; Fairneny, James

    2004-03-01

    Smart textiles with integrated fiber optic sensors have been studied for various applications including in-situ measurement of load/deformation on the textiles. Two types of silica multimode optical fibers were successfully integrated into 4/4 Twill-woven and Plain-woven textiles along the warp direction of the textile structures for sensing of applied load conditions. The sensing mechanism is based on the MPD (Modal Power Distribution) technique, which employs the principle of intensity modulation based on modal power redistribution of the propagating light within multimode fibers caused by external perturbations. In the presence of transverse load applied to an integrated optical fiber, the redistribution of the modal power is an indication of the applied load. The spatial modal power redistribution was clearly recorded as a function of the optical intensity profile. Based on the uni-axial tensile test results, the relationship between the mechanical behavior of the textile and the output of the embedded fiber-optic sensor was established and understood. It is clearly demonstrated that the sensitivity and dynamic range of this type of intensity-based sensor is determined by the interaction between the fabric yarns and optical fibers, which are closely related with the textile structure and the type of optical fiber.

  15. Fully Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Sensor Based on the Kerr Nonlinear Optical Effect, the Photoelastic Effect, and Counterpropagating Optical Pulses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapteyn, Kelvin Lloyd

    1995-01-01

    Since the first fiber optic strain gage was described in 1978, a lot of research effort has been applied to the development of various fiber optic strain measurement schemes. Most of the approaches that have been studied so far measure the total strain from one end of the fiber to the other. Other approaches make "quasi-distributed" measurements based on measuring the change in length of several segments of the fiber. The eventual goal of these quasi-distributed systems is to reduce the segment length or the gage length until a continuous strain distribution could be measured. In this dissertation, a fully distributed fiber optic strain and temperature sensor is developed. This sensor is based on a strong Kerr effect in combination with a greatly increased photoelastic response and short, counterpropagating optical pulses. In combination with much shorter optical pulses, this approach promises great improvements in strain sensitivity and resolution. In addition, this system is capable of separating out strain components in both transverse directions of a polarization maintaining fiber as well as the axial strain component and the temperature at every point along the fiber. The measurement of three dimensional strain data and temperature in a fully distributed sensor is a very significant improvement over any previous system. The sensor should provide a very powerful tool for crack and flaw detection as well as other applications that need a strain distribution. Primary applications are expected to be nondestructive testing and health monitoring of composite structures by embedding the fiber sensor into the composite during manufacture. Such a sensor would be protected from environmental damage and would provide data on the internal integrity of the structure.

  16. Status of the Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1993-05-01

    This report presents a discussion of the progress made in the NASA/NAVY Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program. This program will culminate in open-loop flight tests of passive optical sensors and associated electro-optics on an F-18 aircraft. Currently, the program is in the final stages of hardware fabrication and environmental testing of the passive optical sensors and electro-optics. This program is a foundation for future Fly-by-Light (FBL) programs. The term Fly-by-Light is used to describe the utilization of passive optical sensors and fiber optic data links for monitoring and control of aircraft in which sensor and actuation signals are transmitted optically. The benefits of this technology for advanced aircraft include the following: improved reliability and reduced certification cost due to greater immunity to EME (electromagnetic effects); reduced harness volume and weight; elimination of short circuits and sparking in wiring due to insulation deterioration; lower maintenance costs (fewer components); greater flexibility in data bus protocol and architecture; absence of ground loops; and higher operating temperatures for electrically passive optical sensors.

  17. Status of the Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a discussion of the progress made in the NASA/NAVY Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program. This program will culminate in open-loop flight tests of passive optical sensors and associated electro-optics on an F-18 aircraft. Currently, the program is in the final stages of hardware fabrication and environmental testing of the passive optical sensors and electro-optics. This program is a foundation for future Fly-by-Light (FBL) programs. The term Fly-by-Light is used to describe the utilization of passive optical sensors and fiber optic data links for monitoring and control of aircraft in which sensor and actuation signals are transmitted optically. The benefits of this technology for advanced aircraft include the following: improved reliability and reduced certification cost due to greater immunity to EME (electromagnetic effects); reduced harness volume and weight; elimination of short circuits and sparking in wiring due to insulation deterioration; lower maintenance costs (fewer components); greater flexibility in data bus protocol and architecture; absence of ground loops; and higher operating temperatures for electrically passive optical sensors.

  18. Fiber optic probes for laser light scattering: Ground based evaluation for micgrogravity flight experimentation. Integrated coherent imaging fiber optic systems for laser light scattering and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans Singh

    1994-01-01

    The research work presented in this report has established a new class of backscatter fiber optics probes for remote dynamic light scattering capability over a range of scattering angles from 94 degrees to 175 degrees. The fiber optic probes provide remote access to scattering systems, and can be utilized in either a noninvasive or invasive configuration. The fiber optics create an interference free data channel to inaccessible and harsh environments. Results from several studies of concentrated suspension, microemulsions, and protein systems are presented. The second part of the report describes the development of a new technology of wavefront processing within the optical fiber, that is, integrated fiber optics. Results have been very encouraging and the technology promises to have significant impact on the development of fiber optic sensors in a variety of fields ranging from environmental monitoring to optical recording, from biomedical sensing to photolithography.

  19. Fiber optics for controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    The design, development, and testing of a fiber optic integrated propulsion/flight control system for an advanced supersonic dash aircraft (flies at supersonic speeds for short periods of time) is the goal of the joint NASA/DOD Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program. Phase 1 provided a comparison of electronic and optical control systems, identified the status of current optical sensor technology, defined the aircraft sensor/actuator environment, proposed architectures for fully optical control systems, and provided schedules for development. Overall, it was determined that there are sufficient continued efforts to develop such a system. It was also determined that it is feasible to build a fiber optic control system for the development of a data base for this technology, but that further work is necessary in sensors, actuators, and components to develop an optimum design, fully fiber optic integrated control system compatible with advanced aircraft environments. Phase 2 is to design, construct, and ground test a fly by light control system. Its first task is to provide a detailed design of the electro-optic architecture.

  20. Integrated Fiber-Optic Light Probe: Measurement of Static Deflections in Rotating Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, Anatole P.

    1998-01-01

    At the NASA Lewis Research Center, in cooperation with Integrated Fiber Optic Systems, Inc., an integrated fiber-optic light probe system was designed, fabricated, and tested for monitoring blade tip deflections, vibrations, and to some extent, changes in the blade tip clearances of a turbomachinery fan or a compressor rotor. The system comprises a set of integrated fiber-optic light probes that are positioned to detect the passing blade tip at the leading and trailing edges. In this configuration, measurements of both nonsynchronous blade vibrations and steady-state blade deflections can be made from the timing information provided by each light probe-consisting of an integrated fiber-optic transmitting channel and numerical aperture receiving fibers, all mounted in the same cylindrical housing. With integrated fiber-optic technology, a spatial resolution of 50 mm is possible while the outer diameter is kept below 2.5 mm. To evaluate these probes, we took measurements in a single-stage compressor facility and an advanced fan rig in Lewis' 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel.

  1. Integrability of an inhomogeneous nonlinear Schroedinger equation in Bose-Einstein condensates and fiber optics

    SciTech Connect

    Brugarino, Tommaso; Sciacca, Michele

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we investigate the integrability of an inhomogeneous nonlinear Schroedinger equation, which has several applications in many branches of physics, as in Bose-Einstein condensates and fiber optics. The main issue deals with Painleve property (PP) and Liouville integrability for a nonlinear Schroedinger-type equation. Solutions of the integrable equation are obtained by means of the Darboux transformation. Finally, some applications on fiber optics and Bose-Einstein condensates are proposed (including Bose-Einstein condensates in three-dimensional in cylindrical symmetry).

  2. Cryogenic Fiber Optic Assemblies for Spaceflight Environments: Design, Manufacturing, Testing, and Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomes, W. Joe; Ott, Melanie N.; Chuska, Richard; Switzer, Robert; Onuma, Eleanya; Blair, Diana; Frese, Erich; Matyseck, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Fiber optic assemblies have been used on spaceflight missions for many years as an enabling technology for routing, transmitting, and detecting optical signals. Due to the overwhelming success of NASA in implementing fiber optic assemblies on spaceflight science-based instruments, system scientists increasingly request fibers that perform in extreme environments while still maintaining very high optical transmission, stability, and reliability. Many new applications require fiber optic assemblies that will operate down to cryogenic temperatures as low as 20 Kelvin. In order for the fiber assemblies to operate with little loss in optical throughput at these extreme temperatures requires a system level approach all the way from how the fiber assembly is manufactured to how it is held, routed, and integrated. The NASA Goddard Code 562 Photonics Group has been designing, manufacturing, testing, and integrating fiber optics for spaceflight and other high reliability applications for nearly 20 years. Design techniques and lessons learned over the years are consistently applied to developing new fiber optic assemblies that meet these demanding environments. System level trades, fiber assembly design methods, manufacturing, testing, and integration will be discussed. Specific recent examples of ground support equipment for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST); the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2); and others will be included.

  3. Fiber-optic sensor integration and multiplexing techniques for smart skin applications

    SciTech Connect

    Muhs, J.D.; Allison, S.W.; Janke, C.J.; Kercel, S.; Smith, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    Integration and multiplexing techniques for smart skin applications using optical fibers has become an increasingly important topic of research in recent years. This paper reviews the initial stages of research in this area at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Specifically, results from first generation fiber-optic temperature and strain sensor development efforts are given, along with a discussion of various integration and multiplexing techniques proposed for future development.

  4. Fiber-optic sensor integration and multiplexing techniques for smart skin applications

    SciTech Connect

    Muhs, J.D.; Allison, S.W.; Janke, C.J.; Kercel, S.; Smith, D.B.

    1991-12-31

    Integration and multiplexing techniques for smart skin applications using optical fibers has become an increasingly important topic of research in recent years. This paper reviews the initial stages of research in this area at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Specifically, results from first generation fiber-optic temperature and strain sensor development efforts are given, along with a discussion of various integration and multiplexing techniques proposed for future development.

  5. Integration of long-gage fiber optic sensor into a fiber-reinforced composite sensing tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisic, Branko; Inaudi, Daniele

    2003-07-01

    Thermoplastic and thermoset fiber-reinforced composite materials are well established in aerospace engineering, but also more and more used in the oil and gas industry as well as in civil engineering. In these applications they are mainly used to reinfoce, repair or straighten existing structures, but recently full-composite structures have also been built. Independently from the domain of the use, there is a need for these composite structures to be monitored. Since the composite materials are usually applied in the form of thin tapes or sheets, sensors have to be embedded within the structure, depending on structural layer that has to be monitored. Embedding the sensors may have as a consequence a significant decrease of the mechanical properties of the composite material due to the dimensions of the sensor. The solution presented in this paper is integration of a fiber optic sensor directly into the main composite component, i.e. into the composite tape. In this paper we present the development of a thermoplastic fiber-reinforced composite tape with integrated long-gage fiber-optic sensors. The fiber-optic sensors are selected due to small transversal dimension and good compatibility with the plastic materials. The tape with integrated optical fiber can be used for tape winding of a structural element, embedded between different layers, but also as a separate sensor - a sensing tape. The optical and mechanical properties of the tapes with sensor are tested. The sensing tape is then installed onto the rail along with standard long-gage fiber optic sensor, additional tests are performed and performance of both sensor compared. The integration of optical fiber into the composite tape, the results of the tests as well as the performances of the tape with integrated optical fiber are presented in this paper.

  6. Method of making an integral window hermetic fiber optic component

    DOEpatents

    Dalton, Rick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.; Massey, Richard T.; Waker, Damon A.

    1996-11-12

    In the fabrication of igniters, actuators, detonators, and other pyrotechnic devices to be activated by a laser beam, an integral optical glass window is formed by placing a preform in the structural member of the device and then melting the glass and sealing it in place by heating at a temperature between the ceramming temperature of the glass and the melting point of the metal, followed by rapid furnace cooling to avoid devitrification. No other sealing material is needed to achieve hermeticity. A preferred embodiment of this type of device is fabricated by allowing the molten glass to flow further and form a plano-convex lens integral with and at the bottom of the window. The lens functions to decrease the beam divergence caused by refraction of the laser light passing through the window when the device is fired by means of a laser beam.

  7. Method of making an integral window hermetic fiber optic component

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, R.D.; Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.; Waker, D.A.

    1996-11-12

    In the fabrication of igniters, actuators, detonators, and other pyrotechnic devices to be activated by a laser beam, an integral optical glass window is formed by placing a preform in the structural member of the device and then melting the glass and sealing it in place by heating at a temperature between the ceramming temperature of the glass and the melting point of the metal, followed by rapid furnace cooling to avoid devitrification. No other sealing material is needed to achieve hermeticity. A preferred embodiment of this type of device is fabricated by allowing the molten glass to flow further and form a plano-convex lens integral with and at the bottom of the window. The lens functions to decrease the beam divergence caused by refraction of the laser light passing through the window when the device is fired by means of a laser beam. 9 figs.

  8. Direct B-integral measurement, and SPM compensation in fiber optic CPA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, S.; Mielke, M.

    2014-09-01

    A direct B-integral measurement, and SPM compensation method in fiber optic CPA systems is demonstrated. For a pair of input pulses, the chirped nature of the amplification transforms a nonlinear phase change into a temporal amplitude change resulted in a satellite side pulses generation. The SHG autocorrelation measurement of these satellite pulses is directly correlated to B-integral value. Then the accumulated SPM is removed by precompensation of the spectral phase. The degree of compensation again confirmed the described B-integral measurement result.

  9. Integration of fiber optical shape sensing with medical visualization for minimal-invasive interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetz, Torben; Waltermann, Christian; Angelmahr, Martin; Ojdanic, Darko; Schade, Wolfgang; Witte, Michael; Hahn, Horst Karl

    2015-03-01

    We present a fiber optical shape sensing system that allows to track the shape of a standard telecom fiber with fiber Bragg grating. The shape sensing information is combined with a medical visualization platform to visualize the shape sensing information together with medical images and post-processing results like 3D models, vessel graphs, or segmentation results. The framework has a modular nature to use it for various medical applications like catheter or needle based interventions. The technology has potential in the medical area as it is MR-compatible and can easily be integrated in catheters and needles due to its small size.

  10. Fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, J.; Sohler, W.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the developments in the field of fiber optics sensor technology is presented along with a discussion of the advantages of optical measuring instruments as compared with electronic sensors. The two primary types of fiber optics sensors, specifically those with multiwave fibers and those with monowave fibers, are described. Examples of each major sensor type are presented and discussed. Multiwave detectors include external and internal fiber optics sensors. Among the monowave detectors are Mach-Zender interferometers, Michelson interferometers, Sagnac interferometers (optical gyroscopes), waveguide resonators, and polarimeter sensors. Integrated optical sensors and their application in spectroscopy are briefly discussed.

  11. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, James K.

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  12. Potential for integrated optical circuits in advanced aircraft with fiber optic control and monitoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The current Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program is reviewed and the potential role of IOCs in FOCSI applications is described. The program is intended for building, environmentally testing, and demonstrating operation in piggyback flight tests (no active control with optical sensors) of a representative sensor system for propulsion and flight control. The optical sensor systems are to be designed to fit alongside the bill-of-materials sensors for comparison. The sensors are to be connected to electrooptic architecture cards which will contain the optical sources and detectors to recover and process the modulated optical signals. The FOCSI program is to collect data on the behavior of passive optical sensor systems in a flight environment and provide valuable information on installation amd maintenance problems for this technology, as well as component survivability (light sources, connectors, optical fibers, etc.).

  13. Fiber optic gyroscope using an eight-component LiNbO3 integrated optic circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minford, W. J.; Stone, F. T.; Youmans, B. R.; Bartman, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    A LiNbO3 integrated optic circuit (IOC) containing eight optical functions has been successfully incorporated into an interferometric fiber optic gyroscope. The IOC has the minimum configuration optical functions (a phase modulator, a polarizer, and two beam splitters) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory's novel beat detection circuit (a phase modulator, two optical taps, and a beam splitter) which provides a means of directly reading angular position and rotation rate. The optical subsystem consisting of the fiber-pigtailed IOC and a sensing coil of 945 meters of polarization-maintaining fiber has a loss of 18.7dB, which includes 9dB due to the architecture and unpolarized source. A random walk coefficient was measured using an edge-emitting LED as the source.

  14. Fiber optics for controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1987-01-01

    The challenge of those involved in control-system hardware development is to accommodate an ever-increasing complexity in aircraft control, while limiting the size and weight of the components and improving system reliability. A technology that displays promise towards this end is the area of fiber optics for controls. The primary advantages of employing optical fibers, passive optical sensors, and optically controlled actuators are weight and volume reduction, immunity from electromagnetic effects, superior bandwidth capabilities, and freedom from short circuits and sparking contacts. Since 1975, NASA Lewis has performed in-house, contract, and grant research in fiber optic sensors, high-temperature electro-optic switches, and fly-by-light control-system architecture. Passive optical sensor development is an essential yet challenging area of work and has therefore received much attention during this period. A major effort to develop fly-by-light control-system technology, known as the Fiber-Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program, was initiated in 1985 as a cooperative effort between NASA and DOD. Phase 1 of FOCSI, completed in 1986, was aimed at the design of a fiber-optic integrated propulsion/flight control system. Phase 2, yet to be initiated, will provide subcomponent and system development, and a system engine test. In addition to a summary of the benefits of fiber optics, the FOCSI program, sensor advances, and future directions in the NASA Lewis program will be discussed.

  15. Fabrication of a miniaturized capillary waveguide integrated fiber-optic sensor for fluoride determination.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Wang, Chengjie; Tao, Tao; Duan, Ming; Tan, Jun; Wu, Jiayi; Wang, Dong

    2016-05-10

    Fluoride concentration is a key aspect of water quality and essential for human health. Too much or too little fluoride intake from water supplies is harmful to public health. In this study, a capillary waveguide integrated fiber-optic sensor was fabricated for fluoride measurement in water samples. The sensor was modularly designed with three parts, i.e., a light source, capillary flow cell and detector. When light propagated from a light emitting diode (LED) to the capillary waveguide cell through an excitation fiber, it interacted with the sensing reagent, and its intensity changed with different fluoride concentrations. Then, the light propagated to the detector through a detection fiber for absorption determination of fluoride according to Beer's law. This miniaturized sensor showed advantages of fast analysis (9.2 s) and small reagent demand (200 μL) per sample, and it also had a low detection limit (8 ppb) and high selectivity for fluoride determination. The sensor was applied to fluoride determination in different water samples. The results obtained were compared with those obtained by conventional spectrophotometry and ion chromatography, showing agreement and validating the sensor's potential application. PMID:27067512

  16. Design and implementation of interface units for high speed fiber optics local area networks and broadband integrated services digital networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobagi, Fouad A.; Dalgic, Ismail; Pang, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The design and implementation of interface units for high speed Fiber Optic Local Area Networks and Broadband Integrated Services Digital Networks are discussed. During the last years, a number of network adapters that are designed to support high speed communications have emerged. This approach to the design of a high speed network interface unit was to implement package processing functions in hardware, using VLSI technology. The VLSI hardware implementation of a buffer management unit, which is required in such architectures, is described.

  17. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1993-10-05

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

  18. Fiber optic monitoring device

    SciTech Connect

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  19. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  20. Performance of Integrated Fiber Optic, Piezoelectric, and Shape Memory Alloy Actuators/Sensors in Thermoset Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trottier, C. Michael

    1996-01-01

    Recently, scientists and engineers have investigated the advantages of smart materials and structures by including actuators in material systems for controlling and altering the response of structural environments. Applications of these materials systems include vibration suppression/isolation, precision positioning, damage detection and tunable devices. Some of the embedded materials being investigated for accomplishing these tasks include piezoelectric ceramics, shape memory alloys, and fiber optics. These materials have some benefits and some shortcomings; each is being studied for use in active material design in the SPICES (Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost Effective Structures) Consortium. The focus of this paper concerns the manufacturing aspects of smart structures by incorporating piezoelectric ceramics, shape memory alloys and fiber optics in a reinforced thermoset matrix via resin transfer molding (RTM).

  1. Simultaneous measurements of pure scintillation and Cerenkov signals in an integrated fiber-optic dosimeter for electron beam therapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Jeon, Dayeong; Hong, Seunghan; Kim, Seon Geun; Sim, Hyeok In; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2013-11-18

    For real-time dosimetry in electron beam therapy, an integrated fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD) is developed using a water-equivalent dosimeter probe, four transmitting optical fibers, and a multichannel light-measuring device. The dosimeter probe is composed of two inner sensors, a scintillation sensor and a Cerenkov sensor, and each sensor has two different channels. Accordingly, we measured four separate light signals from each channel in the dosimeter probe, simultaneously, and then obtained the scintillation and Cerenkov signals using a subtraction method. To evaluate the performance of the integrated FOD, we measured the light signals according to the irradiation angle of the electron beam, the depth variation of the solid water phantom, and the electron beam energy. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the pure scintillation and Cerenkov signals obtained by an integrated FOD system based on a subtraction method can be effectively used for calibrating the conditions of high-energy electron beams in radiotherapy. PMID:24514292

  2. An integrated fiber-optic probe combined with support vector regression for fast estimation of optical properties of turbid media.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Fu, Xiaping; Ying, Yibin; Fang, Zhenhuan

    2015-06-23

    A fiber-optic probe system was developed to estimate the optical properties of turbid media based on spatially resolved diffuse reflectance. Because of the limitations in numerical calculation of radiative transfer equation (RTE), diffusion approximation (DA) and Monte Carlo simulations (MC), support vector regression (SVR) was introduced to model the relationship between diffuse reflectance values and optical properties. The SVR models of four collection fibers were trained by phantoms in calibration set with a wide range of optical properties which represented products of different applications, then the optical properties of phantoms in prediction set were predicted after an optimal searching on SVR models. The results indicated that the SVR model was capable of describing the relationship with little deviation in forward validation. The correlation coefficient (R) of reduced scattering coefficient μ'(s) and absorption coefficient μ(a) in the prediction set were 0.9907 and 0.9980, respectively. The root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) of μ'(s) and μ(a) in inverse validation were 0.411 cm(-1) and 0.338 cm(-1), respectively. The results indicated that the integrated fiber-optic probe system combined with SVR model were suitable for fast and accurate estimation of optical properties of turbid media based on spatially resolved diffuse reflectance. PMID:26092344

  3. Strain distribution and crack detection in thin unbonded concrete pavement overlays with fully distributed fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yi; Chen, Genda

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the feasibility of strain measurement and crack detection in thin unbonded concrete pavement overlays with pulse prepump Brillouin optical time domain analysis. Single-mode optical fibers with two-layer and three-layer coatings, respectively, were applied as fully distributed sensors, their performances were compared with analytical predictions. They were successfully protected from damage during concrete casting of three full-scale concrete panels when 5 to 10-cm-thick protective mortar covers had been set for 2 h. Experimental results from three-point loading tests of the panels indicated that the strain distributions measured from the two types of sensors were in good agreement, and cracks can be detected at sharp peaks of the measured strain distributions. The two-layer and three-layer coated fibers can be used to measure strains up to 2.33% and 2.42% with a corresponding sensitivity of 5.43×10-5 and 4.66×10-5 GHz/μɛ, respectively. Two cracks as close as 7 to 9 cm can be clearly detected. The measured strains in optical fiber were lower than the analytical prediction by 10% to 25%. Their difference likely resulted from strain transfer through various coatings, idealized point loading, varying optical fiber embedment, and concrete heterogeneity.

  4. Fiber Optics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  5. Fiber optic chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chuck C.; McCrae, David A.; Saaski, Elric W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides a broad overview of the field of fiber optic chemical sensors. Several different types of fiber optic sensors and probes are described, and references are cited for each category discussed.

  6. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  7. Integration of nonlinearity-management and dispersion-management for pulses in fiber-optic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driben, Rodislav; Malomed, Boris A.; Mahlab, Uri

    2004-03-01

    We introduce a model of a long-haul fiber-optic link that uses a combination of the nonlinearity- and dispersion-compensation (management) to stabilize nonsoliton pulses. The compensation of the accumulated fiber nonlinearity, and simultaneously pulse reshaping, which helps to suppress the inter-symbol interference (ISI, i.e., blurring of blank spaces between adjacent pulses), are performed by second-harmonic-generating modules, which are periodically inserted together with amplifiers. We demonstrate that the dispersion-management (DM), which was not included in an earlier considered model, drastically improves stability of the pulses. The stable-transmission length for an isolated pulse, which was less than 10 fiber spans with the use of the nonlinearity-management only, becomes indefinitely long. It is demonstrated too that the pulse is quite robust against fluctuations of its initial parameters, and the scheme operates efficiently in a very broad parameter range. The interaction between pulses can be safely suppressed for the transmission distance exceeding 16 spans (≃1000 km). The smallest temporal separation between adjacent pulses, which is necessary to prevent the ISI, attains a minimum in the case of moderate DM, similar to known results for the DM solitons. The mutually-induced distortion of co-propagating pulses being accounted for by the emission of radiation, a plausible way to further increase the stable-transmission limit is to introduce bandpass filters.

  8. Structural integrity and damage assessment of high performance arresting cable systems using an embedded distributed fiber optic sensor (EDIFOS) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Sunjian; Esterkin, Yan; Prohaska, John; Bentley, Doug; Glasgow, Andy; Campbell, Richard

    2010-04-01

    Redondo Optics in collaboration with the Cortland Cable Company, TMT Laboratories, and Applied Fiber under a US Navy SBIR project is developing an embedded distributed fiber optic sensor (EDIFOSTM) system for the real-time, structural health monitoring, damage assessment, and lifetime prediction of next generation synthetic material arresting gear cables. The EDIFOSTM system represents a new, highly robust and reliable, technology that can be use for the structural damage assessment of critical cable infrastructures. The Navy is currently investigating the use of new, all-synthetic- material arresting cables. The arresting cable is one of the most stressed components in the entire arresting gear landing system. Synthetic rope materials offer higher performance in terms of the strength-to-weight characteristics, which improves the arresting gear engine's performance resulting in reduced wind-over-deck requirements, higher aircraft bring-back-weight capability, simplified operation, maintenance, supportability, and reduced life cycle costs. While employing synthetic cables offers many advantages for the Navy's future needs, the unknown failure modes of these cables remains a high technical risk. For these reasons, Redondo Optics is investigating the use of embedded fiber optic sensors within the synthetic arresting cables to provide real-time structural assessment of the cable state, and to inform the operator when a particular cable has suffered impact damage, is near failure, or is approaching the limit of its service lifetime. To date, ROI and its collaborators have developed a technique for embedding multiple sensor fibers within the strands of high performance synthetic material cables and use the embedded fiber sensors to monitor the structural integrity of the cable structures during tensile and compressive loads exceeding over 175,000-lbsf without any damage to the cable structure or the embedded fiber sensors.

  9. Fiber optic snapshot hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansur, David J.; Rentz Dupuis, Julia; Vaillancourt, Robert

    2012-06-01

    OPTRA is developing a snapshot hyperspectral imager (HSI) employing a fiber optic bundle and dispersive spectrometer. The fiber optic bundle converts a broadband spatial image to an array of fiber columns which serve as multiple entrance slits to a prism spectrometer. The dispersed spatially resolved spectra are then sampled by a two-dimensional focal plane array (FPA) at a greater than 30 Hz update rate, thereby qualifying the system as snapshot. Unlike snapshot HSI systems based on computed tomography or coded apertures, our approach requires only the remapping of the FPA frame into hyperspectral cubes rather than a complex reconstruction. Our system has high radiometric efficiency and throughput supporting sufficient signal to noise for hyperspectral imaging measurements made over very short integration times (< 33 ms). The overall approach is compact, low cost, and contains no moving parts, making it ideal for unmanned airborne surveillance. In this paper we present a preliminary design for the fiber optic snapshot HSI system.

  10. Development of integrated damage detection system for international America's Cup class yacht structures using a fiber optic distributed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyoshi, Shimada; Naruse, Hiroshi; Uzawa, Kyoshi; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro

    2000-06-01

    We constructed a new health monitoring system to detect damage using a fiber optic distributed sensor, namely a Brillouin optical time domain reflectometer (BOTDR), and installed it in International America's Cup Class (IACC) yachts, the Japanese entry in America's Cup 2000. IACC yachts are designed to be as fast as possible, so it is essential that they are lightweight and encounter minimum water resistance. Advanced composite sandwich structures, made with carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) skins and a honeycomb core, are used to achieve the lightweight structure. Yacht structure designs push the strength of the materials to their limit and so it is important to detect highly stressed or damaged regions that might cause a catastrophic fracture. The BOTDR measures changes in the Brillouin frequency shift caused by distributed strain along one optical fiber. We undertook two experiments: a pulling test and a four point bending test on a composite beam. The former showed that no slippage occurred between the optical fiber glass and its coating. The latter confirmed that a debonding between the skin and the core of 300 mm length could be found with the BOTDR. Next we examined the effectiveness with which this system can assess the structural integrity of IACC yachts. The results show that our system has the potential for use as a damage detection system for smart structures.

  11. Ec-135 Fiber Optic Technology Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Jan R...; Hodges, Harry N.

    1984-10-01

    Fiber optic technology offers many advantages for upgrading nuclear survivability in systems such as the Airborne Command Post EC-135 aircraft, including weight and cost savings, EMI and EMC immunity, high data rates. The greatest advantage seen for nuclear survivable systems, however, is that a fiber optic system's EMP hardness can be maintained more easily with the use of fiber optics than with shielded cables or other protective methods. TRW recently completed a study to determine the feasibility of using fiber optic technology in an EC-135 aircraft environment. Since this study was conducted for a USAF Logistics Command Agency, a feasible system had to be one which could be realistically priced by an integrating contractor. Thus, any fiber optic approach would have to be well developed before it could be considered feasible. During the course of the study problem areas were encountered which are associated with the readiness of the technology for use rather than with the technology itself. These included connectors, standards, fiber radiation resistance, busing, maintenance, and logistics. Because these problems areas have not been resolved, it was concluded that fiber optic technology, despite its advantages, is not ready for directed procurement (i.e., included as a requirement in a prime mission equipment specification). However, offers by a manufacturer to use fiber optic technology in lieu of conventional technology should be considered. This paper treats these problems in more detail, addresses the areas which need further development, and discusses the hardness maintenance advantages of using fiber optic technology.

  12. Applications for fiber optic sensing in the upstream oil and gas industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Chris S.

    2015-05-01

    Fiber optic sensing has been used in an increasing number of applications in the upstream oil and gas industry over the past 20 years. In some cases, fiber optic sensing is providing measurements where traditional measurement technologies could not. This paper will provide a general overview of these applications and describe how the use of fiber optic sensing is enabling these applications. Technologies such as Bragg gratings, distributed temperature and acoustic sensing, interferometric sensing, and Brillouin scattering will be discussed. Applications for optic sensing include a range of possibilities from a single pressure measurement point in the wellbore to multizone pressure and flow monitoring. Some applications make use of fully distributed measurements including thermal profiling of the well. Outside of the wellbore, fiber optic sensors are used in applications for flowline and pipeline monitoring and for riser integrity monitoring. Applications to be described in this paper include in-flow profiling, well integrity, production monitoring, and steam chamber growth. These applications will cover well types such as injectors, producers, hydraulic fracturing, and thermal recovery. Many of these applications use the measurements provided by fiber optic sensing to improve enhanced oil recovery operations. The growing use of fiber optic sensors is providing improved measurement capabilities leading to the generation of actionable data for enhanced production optimization. This not only increases the recovered amount of production fluids but can also enhance wellbore integrity and safety.

  13. The Fiber Optic Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the fiber optics programs at the Career and Technical Center in Berlin, Pennsylvania and the Charles S. Monroe Technology Center in Loudoun County, Virginia. Discusses the involvement of the Fiber Optic Association with education, research and development, manufacturing, sales, distribution, installation, and maintenance of fiber optic…

  14. Quantitative optical coherence elastography based on fiber-optic probe with integrated Fabry-Perot force sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yi; Wang, Yahui; Xu, Yiqing; Chandra, Namas; Haorah, James; Hubbi, Basil; Pfister, Bryan J.; Liu, Xuan

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a versatile imaging technique and has great potential in tissue characterization for breast cancer diagnosis and surgical guidance. In addition to structural difference, cancerous breast tissue is usually stiffer compared to normal adipose breast tissue. However, previous studies on compression optical coherence elastography (OCE) are qualitative rather than quantitative. It is challenging to identify the cancerous status of tissue based on qualitative OCE results obtained from different measurement sessions or from different patients. Therefore, it is critical to develop technique that integrates structural imaging and force sensing, for quantitative elasticity characterization of breast tissue. In this work, we demonstrate a quantitative OCE (qOCE) microsurgery device which simultaneously quantifies force exerted to tissue and measures the resultant tissue deformation. The qOCE system is based on a spectral domain OCT engine operated at 1300 nm and a probe with an integrated Febry-Perot (FP) interferometric cavity at its distal end. The FP cavity is formed by the cleaved end of the lead-in fiber and the end surface of a GRIN lens which allows light to incident into tissue for structural imaging. The force exerted to tissue is quantified by the change of FP cavity length which is interrogated by a fiber-optic common-paths phase resolved OCT system with sub-nanometer sensitivity. Simultaneously, image of the tissue structure is acquired from photons returned from tissue through the GRIN lens. Tissue deformation is obtained through Doppler analysis. Tissue elasticity can be quantified by comparing the force exerted and tissue deformation.

  15. Fiber optics for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The increased use of composites makes the digital control more susceptible to electromagnetic effects. In order to provide the protection to the digital control additional shielding will be required as well as protective circuitry for the electronics. This results in increased weight and reduced reliability. The advantages that fiber optic technology provides for advanced aircraft applications is recognized. The use of optical signals to carry information between the aircraft and the control module provides immunity from contamination by electromagnetic sources as well as other important benefits such as reduced weight and volume resulting from the elimination of the shielding and the replacement of metal conductors with low weight glass fibers. In 1975 NASA began work to develop passive optical sensors for use with fiber optics in aircraft control systems. The problem now is to choose the best optical sensor concepts and evaluate them for use. In 1985 NASA and DOD entered into a joint program, Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI), to look at optical technology specifically for use in advanced aircraft systems. The results of this program are discussed. The conclusion of the study indicated that the use of fiber optic technology in advanced aircraft systems is feasible and desirable. The study pointed to a lack of available sensors from vendors capable of operating in the adverse environments of advanced aircraft.

  16. Fiber optics for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    The increased use of composites makes the digital control more susceptible to electromagnetic effects. In order to provide the protection to the digital control additional shielding will be required as well as protective circuitry for the electronics. This results in increased weight and reduced reliability. The advantages that fiber optic technology provides for advanced aircraft applications is recognized. The use of optical signals to carry information between the aircraft and the control module provides immunity from contamination by electromagnetic sources as well as other important benefits such as reduced weight and volume resulting from the elimination of the shielding and the replacement of metal conductors with low weight glass fibers. In 1975 NASA began work to develop passive optical sensors for use with fiber optics in aircraft control systems. The problem now is to choose the best optical sensor concepts and evaluate them for use. In 1985 NASA and DOD entered into a joint program, Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI), to look at optical technology specifically for use in advanced aircraft systems. The results of this program are discussed. The conclusion of the study indicated that the use of fiber optic technology in advanced aircraft systems is feasible and desirable. The study pointed to a lack of available sensors from vendors capable of operating in the adverse environments of advanced aircraft.

  17. Python fiber optic seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a high security fiber optic seal that incorporates tamper resistance features that are not available in commercial fiber optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking that component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that will record the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program then compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL is also developing a Polaroid reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  18. Precision Fiber Optic Sensor Market Forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeff D.; Glasco, Jon; Dixon, Frank W.

    1986-01-01

    The worldwide market for precision fiber optic sensors is forecasted, 1984-1994. The forecast is based upon o Analysis of fiber optic sensor and related component current technology, and a forecast of technology advancement o Review and projection of demand for precision sensing, and the penetration which fiber optics will make into this market The analysis and projections are based mainly on interviews conducted worldwide with research teams, government agencies, systems contractors, medical and industrial laboratories, component suppliers and others. The worldwide market for precision (interferometric) fiber optic sensing systems is forecasted to exceed $0.8 billion by 1994. The forecast is segmented by geographical region (Europe, Japan and North America) and by function; o Gyroscope o Sonar o Gradiometer/Magnetometer o Other - Chemical Composition - Atmospheric Acoustic - Temperature - Position - Pressure Requirements for components are reviewed. These include special fiber, emitters and detectors, modulators, couplers, switches, integrated optical circuits and integrated optoelectronics. The advancement in component performance is forecasted. The major driving forces creating fiber optic sensor markets are reviewed. These include fiber optic sensor technical and economic advantages, increasingly stringent operational requirements, and technology evolution. The leading fiber optic sensor and related component development programs are reviewed. Component sources are listed. Funding sources for sensor and component development are outlined, and trends forecasted.

  19. Fiber Optic Control System Integration program: for optical flight control system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Thomas L.; Seal, Daniel W.

    1994-10-01

    Hardware and software were developed for optical feedback links in the flight control system of an F/A-18 aircraft. Developments included passive optical sensors and optoelectronics to operate the sensors. Sensors with different methods of operation were obtained from different manufacturers and integrated with common optoelectronics. The sensors were the following: Air Data Temperature; Air Data Pressure; and Leading Edge Flap, Nose Wheel Steering, Trailing Edge Flap, Pitch Stick, Rudder, Rudder Pedal, Stabilator, and Engine Power Lever Control Position. The sensors were built for a variety of aircraft locations and harsh environments. The sensors and optoelectronics were as similar as practical to a production system. The integrated system was installed by NASA for flight testing. Wavelength Division Multiplexing proved successful as a system design philosophy. Some sensors appeared to be better choices for aircraft applications than others, with digital sensors generally being better than analog sensors, and rotary sensors generally being better than linear sensors. The most successful sensor approaches were selected for use in a follow-on program in which the sensors will not just be flown on the aircraft and their performance recorded; but, the optical sensors will be used in closing flight control loops.

  20. Fiber optically integrated cost-effective spectrometer for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remund, Stefan; Bossen, Anke; Chen, Xianfeng; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Lin; Považay, Boris; Meier, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    A tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) was integrated as the dispersive element in a high performance biomedical imaging system. The spectrum emitted by the 23 mm long active region of the fiber is projected through custom designed optics consisting of a cylindrical lens for vertical beam collimation and successively by an achromatic doublet onto a linear detector array. High resolution tomograms of biomedical samples were successfully acquired by the frequency domain OCT-system. Tomograms of ophthalmic and dermal samples obtained by the frequency domain OCT-system were obtained achieving 2.84 μm axial and 10.2 μm lateral resolution. The miniaturization reduces costs and has the potential to further extend the field of application for OCT-systems in biology, medicine and technology.

  1. Fiber optic communication links

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Fiber optics is a new, emerging technology which offers relief from many of the problems which limited past communications links. Its inherent noise immunity and high bandwidth open the door for new designs with greater capabilities. Being a new technology, certain problems can be encountered in specifying and installing a fiber optic link. A general fiber optic system is discussed with emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages. It is not intended to be technical in nature, but a general discussion. Finally, a general purpose prototype Sandia communications link is presented.

  2. Fiber-optic integration and efficient detection schemes for optomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Justin D.

    With the advent of the laser in the year 1960, the field of optics experienced a renaissance from what was considered to be a dull, solved subject to an active area of development, with applications and discoveries which are yet to be exhausted 55 years later. Light is now nearly ubiquitous not only in cutting-edge research in physics, chemistry, and biology, but also in modern technology and infrastructure. One quality of light, that of the imparted radiation pressure force upon reflection from an object, has attracted intense interest from researchers seeking to precisely monitor and control the motional degrees of freedom of an object using light. These optomechanical interactions have inspired myriad proposals, ranging from quantum memories and transducers in quantum information networks to precision metrology of classical forces. Alongside advances in micro- and nano-fabrication, the burgeoning field of optomechanics has yielded a class of highly engineered systems designed to produce strong interactions between light and motion. Optomechanical crystals are one such system in which the patterning of periodic holes in thin dielectric films traps both light and sound waves to a micro-scale volume. These devices feature strong radiation pressure coupling between high-quality optical cavity modes and internal nanomechanical resonances. Whether for applications in the quantum or classical domain, the utility of optomechanical crystals hinges on the degree to which light radiating from the device, having interacted with mechanical motion, can be collected and detected in an experimental apparatus consisting of conventional optical components such as lenses and optical fibers. While several efficient methods of optical coupling exist to meet this task, most are unsuitable for the cryogenic or vacuum integration required for many applications. The first portion of this dissertation will detail the development of robust and efficient methods of optically coupling

  3. Fiber Optic Control System integration for advanced aircraft. Electro-optic and sensor fabrication, integration, and environmental testing for flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, Daniel W.; Weaver, Thomas L.; Kessler, Bradley L.; Bedoya, Carlos A.; Mattes, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the design, development, and testing of passive fiber optic sensors and a multiplexing electro-optic architecture (EOA) for installation and flight test on a NASA-owned F-18 aircraft. This hardware was developed under the Fiber Optic Control Systems for Advanced Aircraft program, part of a multiyear NASA initiative to design, develop, and demonstrate through flight test 'fly-by-light' systems for application to advanced aircraft flight and propulsion control. This development included the design and production of 10 passive optical sensors and associated multiplexed EOA hardware based on wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) technology. A variety of sensor types (rotary position, linear position, temperature, and pressure) incorporating a broad range of sensor technologies (WDM analog, WDM digital, analog microbend, and fluorescent time rate of decay) were obtained from different manufacturers and functionally integrated with an independently designed EOA. The sensors were built for installation in a variety of aircraft locations, placing the sensors in a variety of harsh environments. The sensors and EOA were designed and built to have the resulting devices be as close as practical to a production system. The integrated system was delivered to NASA for flight testing on a NASA-owned F-18 aircraft. Development and integration testing of the system provided valuable information as to which sensor types were simplest to design and build for a military aircraft environment and which types were simplest to operate with a multiplexed EOA. Not all sensor types met the full range of performance and environmental requirements. EOA development problems provided information on directions to pursue in future fly-by-light flight control development programs. Lessons learned in the development of the EOA and sensor hardware are summarized.

  4. Fiber optic and laser sensors VII; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 5-7, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Udd, Eric (Editor); Depaula, Ramon P. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on fiber optic and laser sensors are presented. Individual topics addressed include: fiber optic photoelastic pressure sensor for high-temperature gases, fiber optic gyroscope using an eight-component LiNbO3 integrated optic circuit, design and performance of a fiber optic gyroscope using integrated optics, digital angular position sensor using wavelength division multiplexing, simple repeatable fiber optic intensity sensor for temperature measurement, compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth-doped fiber optic thermometer.

  5. Current Applications of Analog Fiber Optics in the NASA/JPL Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, G.

    1993-01-01

    Analog fiber optic technology. Enables a fully integrated Deep Space Communications complex. Enables sharing of expensive subsystems. Enables RF carrier arraying of antennas separated by tens of kilometers. Provides improved complex reliability and flexibility. Enables improved performance. Provides significant cost reductions.

  6. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  7. Fiber optic data transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shreve, Steven T.

    1987-01-01

    The Ohio University Avionics Engineering Center is currently developing a fiber optic data bus transmission and reception system that could eventually replace copper cable connections in airplanes. The original form of the system will transmit information from an encoder to a transponder via a fiber optic cable. An altimeter and an altitude display are connected to a fiber optic transmitter by copper cable. The transmitter converts the altimetry data from nine bit parallel to serial form and send these data through a fiber optic cable to a receiver. The receiver converts the data using a cable similar to that used between the altimeter and display. The transmitting and receiving ends also include a display readout. After completion and ground testing of the data bus, the system will be tested in an airborne environment.

  8. Infrared fiber optic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of IR fiber optics for use in astronomical and other space applications is summarized. Candidate materials were sought for use in the 1 to 200 micron and the 200 to 1000 micron wavelength range. Synthesis and optical characterization were carried out on several of these materials in bulk form. And the fabrication of a few materials in single crystal fiber optic form were studied.

  9. Fiber optics in adverse environments

    SciTech Connect

    Lyous, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation effects in optical fibers are considered, taking into account recent progress in the investigation of radiation resistant optical fibers, radiation damage in optical fibers, radiation-induced transient absorption in optical fibers, X-ray-induced transient attenuation at low temperatures in polymer clad silica (PCS) fibers, optical fiber composition and radiation hardness, the response of irradiated optical waveguides at low temperatures, and the effect of ionizing radiation on fiber-optic waveguides. Other topics explored are related to environmental effects on components of fiber optic systems, and radiation detection systems using optical fibers. Fiber optic systems in adverse environments are also discussed, giving attention to the survivability of Army fiber optics systems, space application of fiber optics systems, fiber optic wavelength multiplexing for civil aviation applications, a new fiber optic data bus topology, fiber optics for aircraft engine/inlet control, and application of fiber optics in high voltage substations.

  10. Fiber optic interconnect and optoelectronic packaging challenges for future generation avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beranek, Mark W.

    2007-02-01

    Forecasting avionics industry fiber optic interconnect and optoelectronic packaging challenges that lie ahead first requires an assumption that military avionics architectures will evolve from today's centralized/unified concept based on gigabit laser, optical-to-electrical-to-optical switching and optical backplane technology, to a future federated/distributed or centralized/unified concept based on gigabit tunable laser, electro-optical switch and add-drop wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technology. The requirement to incorporate avionics optical built-in test (BIT) in military avionics fiber optic systems is also assumed to be correct. Taking these assumptions further indicates that future avionics systems engineering will use WDM technology combined with photonic circuit integration and advanced packaging to form the technical basis of the next generation military avionics onboard local area network (LAN). Following this theme, fiber optic cable plants will evolve from today's multimode interconnect solution to a single mode interconnect solution that is highly installable, maintainable, reliable and supportable. Ultimately optical BIT for fiber optic fault detection and isolation will be incorporated as an integral part of a total WDM-based avionics LAN solution. Cost-efficient single mode active and passive photonic component integration and packaging integration is needed to enable reliable operation in the harsh military avionics application environment. Rugged multimode fiber-based transmitters and receivers (transceivers) with in-package optical BIT capability are also needed to enable fully BIT capable single-wavelength fiber optic links on both legacy and future aerospace platforms.

  11. Fiber-optic fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Flusberg, Benjamin A; Cocker, Eric D; Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Jung, Juergen C; Cheung, Eunice L M; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    Optical fibers guide light between separate locations and enable new types of fluorescence imaging. Fiber-optic fluorescence imaging systems include portable handheld microscopes, flexible endoscopes well suited for imaging within hollow tissue cavities and microendoscopes that allow minimally invasive high-resolution imaging deep within tissue. A challenge in the creation of such devices is the design and integration of miniaturized optical and mechanical components. Until recently, fiber-based fluorescence imaging was mainly limited to epifluorescence and scanning confocal modalities. Two new classes of photonic crystal fiber facilitate ultrashort pulse delivery for fiber-optic two-photon fluorescence imaging. An upcoming generation of fluorescence imaging devices will be based on microfabricated device components. PMID:16299479

  12. Fully Integral, Flexible Composite Driveshaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrie, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    An all-composite driveshaft incorporating integral flexible diaphragms was developed for prime contractor testing. This new approach makes obsolete the split lines required to attach metallic flex elements and either metallic or composite spacing tubes in current solutions. Subcritical driveshaft weights can be achieved that are half that of incumbent technology for typical rotary wing shaft lengths. Spacing tubes compose an integral part of the initial tooling but remain part of the finished shaft and control natural frequencies and torsional stability. A concurrently engineered manufacturing process and design for performance competes with incumbent solutions at significantly lower weight and with the probability of improved damage tolerance and fatigue life.

  13. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chuck C.; Saaski, Elric W.; McCrae, David A.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes a novel fiber optic-based hydrogen sensor. The sensor consists of a thin-film etalon, constructed on the distal end of a fiber optic. The exterior mirror of the etalon is palladium or a palladium-alloy, which undergoes an optical change upon exposure to hydrogen. Data is presented on fiber optic sensors constructed with palladium and several alloys of palladium. The linearity of the optical response of these sensors to hydrogen is examined. Etalons made with pure palladium are found to be desirable for sensing low concentrations of hydrogen, or for one-time exposure to high concentrations of hydrogen. Etalons made from palladium alloys are found to be more desirable in applications were repeated cycling in high concentrations of hydrogen occurs.

  14. Fiber optic attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzetti, Mike F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber optic attenuator of the invention is a mandrel structure through which a bundle of optical fibers is wrapped around in a complete circle. The mandrel structure includes a flexible cylindrical sheath through which the bundle passes. A set screw on the mandrel structure impacts one side of the sheath against two posts on the opposite side of the sheath. By rotating the screw, the sheath is deformed to extend partially between the two posts, bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius controlled by rotating the set screw. Bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius causes light in each optical fiber to be lost in the cladding, the amount depending upon the radius about which the bundle is bent.

  15. Fiber optic interferometric accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, S.T.; Danver, B.; Tveten, A.; Dandridge, A.

    1996-04-01

    Recent progress on the development of flexural disk based fiber optic acceleration sensors is reported. Appropriate geometric considerations have resulted in fiber optic accelerometers with many desirable features including (i) high sensitivity ({approx_gt}20 dB rerad/g), (ii) flat frequency response (200 Hz to {approx_gt}10 kHz), and (iii) low pressure ({lt}{minus}180 dB rerad/{mu}Pa) and transverse sensitivity ({lt}{minus}30 dB). Alternate transducer designs are discussed and preliminary results reported. Various optical multiplexing schemes for accelerometer arrays are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Fiber optic connector

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, S.; Muhs, J.D.

    1996-10-22

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded are disclosed. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled. 3 figs.

  17. Fiber optic connector

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, Slobodan; Muhs, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled.

  18. Channel access schemes and fiber optic configurations for integrated-services local area networks. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassehi, M. Mehdi

    1987-01-01

    Local Area Networks are in common use for data communications and have enjoyed great success. Recently, there is a growing interest in using a single network to support many applications in addition to traditional data traffic. These additional applications introduce new requirements in terms of volume of traffic and real-time delivery of data which are not met by existing networks. To satisfy these requirements, a high-bandwidth tranmission medium, such as fiber optics, and a distributed channel access scheme for the efficient sharing of the bandwidth among the various applications are needed. As far as the throughput-delay requirements of the various application are concerned, a network structure along with a distributed channel access are proposed which incorporate appropriate scheduling policies for the transmission of outstanding messages on the network. A dynamic scheduling policy was devised which outperforms all existing policies in terms of minimizing the expected cost per message. A broadcast mechanism was devised for the efficient dissemination of all relevant information. Fiber optic technology is considered for the high-bandwidth transmisison medium.

  19. Challenges to design and demonstrate fiber optic sensors on an aircraft engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppel, Gary L.; Chung, Kiyoung

    1994-10-01

    Fiber optic sensing techniques for measuring temperature, position, speed, and flame presence were passively demonstrated on the F404-400 augmented turbofan engine for the NASA FOCSI (Fiber Optic Control System Integration) program. From early definition through detail design, fabrication, and testing, these components began to meet requirements as candidates for future engine product applications. In this paper we describe a number of issues that were considered leading to engine ground and flight testing for FOCSI, and some issues that surfaced as a result of the program. Functionality of the FOCSI sensor set is described. Emphasis is placed on setting goals of fully meeting performance requirements over the entire range of service conditions. Some fundamental mechanical design ground rules are presented, and issues associated with using fiber optic cables and electro-optic circuitry are exposed. Finally, some methods of installing demonstrational sensor hardware and acquiring the sensor measurements while minimizing interference with normal engine operation are described.

  20. Fiber-Optic Sensing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, M.; Baylor, L.C.; Bave, S.

    1996-10-24

    This article offers a basic review of fiber-optic sensing technology, or more specifically, fiber-optic sensing technology as applied to the qualitative or quantitative identification of a chemical sample, and how it works,

  1. Fiber optic accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    August, Rudolf R. (Inventor); Strahan, Virgil H. (Inventor); James, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Nichols, Donald K. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An inexpensive, light weight fiber optic accelerometer to convert input mechanical motion (e.g. acceleration) into digitized optical output signals. The output of the accelerometer may be connected directly to data processing apparatus without the necessity of space consuming analog to digital interface means.

  2. Fiber optic accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahan, Virgil H. (Inventor); James, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Quick, William H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An inexpensive, light weight fiber optic accelerometer to convert input mechanical motion (e.g. acceleration) into digitized optical output signals. The output of the accelerometer may be connected directly to data processing apparatus without the necessity of space consuming analog to digital interface means.

  3. Fiber optic choline biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Cao, Xiaojian; Jia, Ke; Chai, Xueting; Lu, Hua; Lu, Zuhong

    2001-10-01

    A fiber optic fluorescence biosensor for choline is introduced in this paper. Choline is an important neurotransmitter in mammals. Due to the growing needs for on-site clinical monitoring of the choline, much effect has been devoted to develop choline biosensors. Fiber-optic fluorescence biosensors have many advantages, including miniaturization, flexibility, and lack of electrical contact and interference. The choline fiber-optic biosensor we designed implemented a bifurcated fiber to perform fluorescence measurements. The light of the blue LED is coupled into one end of the fiber as excitation and the emission spectrum from sensing film is monitored by fiber-spectrometer (S2000, Ocean Optics) through the other end of the fiber. The sensing end of the fiber is coated with Nafion film dispersed with choline oxidase and oxygen sensitive luminescent Ru(II) complex (Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II), hexahydrate). Choline oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of choline to betaine and hydrogen peroxide while consuming oxygen. The fluorescence intensity of oxygen- sensitive Ru(II) are related to the choline concentration. The response of the fiber-optic sensor in choline solution is represented and discussed. The result indicates a low-cost, high-performance, portable choline biosensor.

  4. Fiber Optics and Library Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Michael

    1984-01-01

    This article examines fiber optic technology, explains some of the key terminology, and speculates about the way fiber optics will change our world. Applications of fiber optics to library systems in three major areas--linkage of a number of mainframe computers, local area networks, and main trunk communications--are highlighted. (EJS)

  5. Buying Fiber-Optic Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Describes consortia formed by college and university administrators to buy, manage, and maintain their own fiber-optic networks with the goals of cutting costs of leasing fiber-optic cable and planning for the future. Growth capacity is the real advantage of owning fiber-optic systems. (SLD)

  6. Fully integrated, fully automated generation of short tandem repeat profiles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The generation of short tandem repeat profiles, also referred to as ‘DNA typing,’ is not currently performed outside the laboratory because the process requires highly skilled technical operators and a controlled laboratory environment and infrastructure with several specialized instruments. The goal of this work was to develop a fully integrated system for the automated generation of short tandem repeat profiles from buccal swab samples, to improve forensic laboratory process flow as well as to enable short tandem repeat profile generation to be performed in police stations and in field-forward military, intelligence, and homeland security settings. Results An integrated system was developed consisting of an injection-molded microfluidic BioChipSet cassette, a ruggedized instrument, and expert system software. For each of five buccal swabs, the system purifies DNA using guanidinium-based lysis and silica binding, amplifies 15 short tandem repeat loci and the amelogenin locus, electrophoretically separates the resulting amplicons, and generates a profile. No operator processing of the samples is required, and the time from swab insertion to profile generation is 84 minutes. All required reagents are contained within the BioChipSet cassette; these consist of a lyophilized polymerase chain reaction mix and liquids for purification and electrophoretic separation. Profiles obtained from fully automated runs demonstrate that the integrated system generates concordant short tandem repeat profiles. The system exhibits single-base resolution from 100 to greater than 500 bases, with inter-run precision with a standard deviation of ±0.05 - 0.10 bases for most alleles. The reagents are stable for at least 6 months at 22°C, and the instrument has been designed and tested to Military Standard 810F for shock and vibration ruggedization. A nontechnical user can operate the system within or outside the laboratory. Conclusions The integrated system represents the

  7. Integrated optics, fiber optics and holography; International School on Coherent Optics and Holography, 2nd, Varna, Bulgaria, September 28-October 3, 1981, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simova, P.; Savatinova, I.; Tsonev, L.

    Attention is given to such topics as developments in multimode and monomode integrated optics, the use of holographic techniques to produce integrated-optic elements, the fabrication of optical strip waveguides by diffusion and ion implantation, and the fabrication and investigation of optically controlled CdS(x)Se(1-x) thin-film waveguides. Papers are also presented on the theory of fiber-optic waveguides, mode power distribution measurements in optical fibers, methods for determining the index profile distribution in optical fibers, and highlights of optical-fiber communications systems. The physical properties of media for optical memories and holography, the synthesis of spatial-frequency filters for a coherent optical processor, and pulsed holography and its application are also examined. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  8. Fiber optics: A research paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drone, Melinda M.

    1987-01-01

    Some basic aspects concerning fiber optics are examined. Some history leading up to the development of optical fibers which are now used in the transmission of data in many areas of the world is discussed. Basic theory of the operation of fiber optics is discussed along with methods for improving performance of the optical fiber through much research and design. Splices and connectors are compared and short haul and long haul fiber optic networks are discussed. Fiber optics plays many roles in the commercial world. The use of fiber optics for communication applications is emphasized.

  9. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  10. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  11. Fiber optic flocculation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lun K.; Stelwagen, Uilke

    1994-02-01

    A fiber optic flocculation sensor based on measuring the intensity of light reflected by solid particles in suspension (i.e. paper pulp) in a well defined measurement volume, was constructed. This sensor is designed for monitoring the flocculation state of paper pulp in the papermaking process. The flocculation determines to a great extent the quality of the final product, the paper. Tests with different types of pulp were performed in both a closed loop system and a small paper machine. In this investigation the flocculation state is expressed as a root mean square flocculation index. The flocculation index delivered by this fiber optic system shows a very high correlation with the flocculation index provided by a camera system `looking at' the same pulp, while the latter has a great resemblance with the human perception of the flocculation.

  12. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOEpatents

    Kuzmenko, Paul J.; Davis, Donald T.

    1994-01-01

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optic fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends.

  13. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOEpatents

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Davis, D.T.

    1994-05-10

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is disclosed. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optical fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends. 2 figures.

  14. Development of an Integrated Raman and Turbidity Fiber Optic Sensor for the In-Situ Analysis of High Level Nuclear Waste - 13532

    SciTech Connect

    Gasbarro, Christina; Bello, Job; Bryan, Samuel; Lines, Amanda; Levitskaia, Tatiana

    2013-07-01

    Stored nuclear waste must be retrieved from storage, treated, separated into low- and high-level waste streams, and finally put into a disposal form that effectively encapsulates the waste and isolates it from the environment for a long period of time. Before waste retrieval can be done, waste composition needs to be characterized so that proper safety precautions can be implemented during the retrieval process. In addition, there is a need for active monitoring of the dynamic chemistry of the waste during storage since the waste composition can become highly corrosive. This work describes the development of a novel, integrated fiber optic Raman and light scattering probe for in situ use in nuclear waste solutions. The dual Raman and turbidity sensor provides simultaneous chemical identification of nuclear waste as well as information concerning the suspended particles in the waste using a common laser excitation source. (authors)

  15. Integration of Fiber-Optic Sensor Arrays into a Multi-Modal Tactile Sensor Processing System for Robotic End-Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Peter; Kirchner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing complexity of robotic missions and the development towards long-term autonomous systems, the need for multi-modal sensing of the environment increases. Until now, the use of tactile sensor systems has been mostly based on sensing one modality of forces in the robotic end-effector. The use of a multi-modal tactile sensory system is motivated, which combines static and dynamic force sensor arrays together with an absolute force measurement system. This publication is focused on the development of a compact sensor interface for a fiber-optic sensor array, as optic measurement principles tend to have a bulky interface. Mechanical, electrical and software approaches are combined to realize an integrated structure that provides decentralized data pre-processing of the tactile measurements. Local behaviors are implemented using this setup to show the effectiveness of this approach. PMID:24743158

  16. Integration of fiber-optic sensor arrays into a multi-modal tactile sensor processing system for robotic end-effectors.

    PubMed

    Kampmann, Peter; Kirchner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing complexity of robotic missions and the development towards long-term autonomous systems, the need for multi-modal sensing of the environment increases. Until now, the use of tactile sensor systems has been mostly based on sensing one modality of forces in the robotic end-effector. The use of a multi-modal tactile sensory system is motivated, which combines static and dynamic force sensor arrays together with an absolute force measurement system. This publication is focused on the development of a compact sensor interface for a fiber-optic sensor array, as optic measurement principles tend to have a bulky interface. Mechanical, electrical and software approaches are combined to realize an integrated structure that provides decentralized data pre-processing of the tactile measurements. Local behaviors are implemented using this setup to show the effectiveness of this approach. PMID:24743158

  17. Development of an Integrated Raman and Turbidity Fiber Optic Sensor for the In-Situ Analysis of High Level Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gasbarro, Christina; Bello, Job M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Lines, Amanda M.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2013-02-24

    Stored nuclear waste must be retrieved from storage, treated, separated into low- and high-level waste streams, and finally put into a disposal form that effectively encapsulates the waste and isolates it from the environment for a long period of time. Before waste retrieval can be done, waste composition needs to be characterized so that proper safety precautions can be implemented during the retrieval process. In addition, there is a need for active monitoring of the dynamic chemistry of the waste during storage since the waste composition can become highly corrosive. This work describes the development of a novel, integrated fiber optic Raman and light scattering probe for in situ use in nuclear waste solutions. The dual Raman and turbidity sensor provides simultaneous chemical identification of nuclear waste as well as information concerning the suspended particles in the waste using a common laser excitation source.

  18. Fiber optic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  19. Fiber optic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Judy K.; Ward, Thomas E.; Grey, Alan E.

    1990-04-01

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  20. Fiber Optic Attenuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Mike Buzzetti designed a fiber optic attenuator while working at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, intended for use in NASA's Deep Space Network. Buzzetti subsequently patented and received an exclusive license to commercialize the device, and founded Nanometer Technologies to produce it. The attenuator functions without introducing measurable back-reflection or insertion loss, and is relatively insensitive to vibration and changes in temperature. Applications include cable television, telephone networks, other signal distribution networks, and laboratory instrumentation.

  1. Fiber optics welder

    DOEpatents

    Higgins, R.W.; Robichaud, R.E.

    A system is described for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45/sup 0/ angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  2. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  3. Noncontact fiber optic micrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt Ibarra, F.; Guajardo-Gonzalez, Candelario; Castillo-Guzman, Arturo; Guzman-Ramos, Valentin; Selvas, Romeo

    2010-10-01

    A sensor instrument able to measuring the thickness of different semitransparent objects with a resolution of one micron is described. This is based on a fiber optic reflectometer and a laser autofocus system and permit to measuring the thickness of thin surfaces such as semiconductor films, plastic materials and semitransparent objects. The response time for the measuring was roughly 2 sec and the thickness results were compared with a digital mechanical micrometer and both are in good agreement.

  4. Infrared Fiber Optic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Successive years of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Langley Research Center to Sensiv Inc., a joint venture between Foster-Miller Inc. and Isorad, Ltd., assisted in the creation of remote fiber optic sensing systems. NASA's SBIR interest in infrared, fiber optic sensor technology was geared to monitoring the curing cycles of advanced composite materials. These funds helped in the fabrication of an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. Foster-Miller ingenuity allowed infrared transmitting optical fibers to combine with Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to enable remote sensing. Sensiv probes operate in the mid-infrared range of the spectrum, although modifications to the instrument also permits its use in the near-infrared region. The Sensiv needle-probe is built to be placed in a liquid or powder and analyze the chemicals in the mixture. Other applications of the probe system include food processing control; combustion control in furnaces; and maintenance problem solving.

  5. Fully Integrated Biochip Platforms for Advanced Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Sandro; Ghoreishizadeh, Sara; Olivo, Jacopo; Taurino, Irene; Baj-Rossi, Camilla; Cavallini, Andrea; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Dehollain, Catherine; Burleson, Wayne; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microelectronics and biosensors are enabling developments of innovative biochips for advanced healthcare by providing fully integrated platforms for continuous monitoring of a large set of human disease biomarkers. Continuous monitoring of several human metabolites can be addressed by using fully integrated and minimally invasive devices located in the sub-cutis, typically in the peritoneal region. This extends the techniques of continuous monitoring of glucose currently being pursued with diabetic patients. However, several issues have to be considered in order to succeed in developing fully integrated and minimally invasive implantable devices. These innovative devices require a high-degree of integration, minimal invasive surgery, long-term biocompatibility, security and privacy in data transmission, high reliability, high reproducibility, high specificity, low detection limit and high sensitivity. Recent advances in the field have already proposed possible solutions for several of these issues. The aim of the present paper is to present a broad spectrum of recent results and to propose future directions of development in order to obtain fully implantable systems for the continuous monitoring of the human metabolism in advanced healthcare applications. PMID:23112644

  6. Fully integrated biochip platforms for advanced healthcare.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Sandro; Ghoreishizadeh, Sara; Olivo, Jacopo; Taurino, Irene; Baj-Rossi, Camilla; Cavallini, Andrea; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Dehollain, Catherine; Burleson, Wayne; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microelectronics and biosensors are enabling developments of innovative biochips for advanced healthcare by providing fully integrated platforms for continuous monitoring of a large set of human disease biomarkers. Continuous monitoring of several human metabolites can be addressed by using fully integrated and minimally invasive devices located in the sub-cutis, typically in the peritoneal region. This extends the techniques of continuous monitoring of glucose currently being pursued with diabetic patients. However, several issues have to be considered in order to succeed in developing fully integrated and minimally invasive implantable devices. These innovative devices require a high-degree of integration, minimal invasive surgery, long-term biocompatibility, security and privacy in data transmission, high reliability, high reproducibility, high specificity, low detection limit and high sensitivity. Recent advances in the field have already proposed possible solutions for several of these issues. The aim of the present paper is to present a broad spectrum of recent results and to propose future directions of development in order to obtain fully implantable systems for the continuous monitoring of the human metabolism in advanced healthcare applications. PMID:23112644

  7. Fiber Optic Fabry-Perot Current Sensor Integrated with Magnetic Fluid Using a Fiber Bragg Grating Demodulation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ji; Wang, Qi; Liu, Xu; Luo, Hong

    2015-01-01

    An optical fiber current sensor based on Fabry-Perot interferometer using a fiber Bragg grating demodulation is proposed. Magnetic fluid is used as a sensitive medium in fiber optical Fabry-Perot (F-P) cavity for the optical characteristic of magnetic-controlled refractive index. A Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is connected after the F-P interferometer which is used to reflect the optical power at the Bragg wavelength of the interference transmission spectrum. The corresponding reflective power of the FBG will change with different external current intensity, due to the shift on the interference spectrum of the F-P interferometer. The sensing probe has the advantages of convenient measurement for its demodulation, low cost and high current measurement accuracy on account of its sensing structure. Experimental results show that an optimal sensitivity of 0.8522 nw/A and measurement resolution of 0.001 A is obtained with a FBG at 1550 nm with 99% reflectivity. PMID:26184201

  8. Fiber Optic Fabry-Perot Current Sensor Integrated with Magnetic Fluid Using a Fiber Bragg Grating Demodulation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ji; Wang, Qi; Liu, Xu; Luo, Hong

    2015-01-01

    An optical fiber current sensor based on Fabry-Perot interferometer using a fiber Bragg grating demodulation is proposed. Magnetic fluid is used as a sensitive medium in fiber optical Fabry-Perot (F-P) cavity for the optical characteristic of magnetic-controlled refractive index. A Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is connected after the F-P interferometer which is used to reflect the optical power at the Bragg wavelength of the interference transmission spectrum. The corresponding reflective power of the FBG will change with different external current intensity, due to the shift on the interference spectrum of the F-P interferometer. The sensing probe has the advantages of convenient measurement for its demodulation, low cost and high current measurement accuracy on account of its sensing structure. Experimental results show that an optimal sensitivity of 0.8522 nw/A and measurement resolution of 0.001 A is obtained with a FBG at 1550 nm with 99% reflectivity. PMID:26184201

  9. Fiber optic pressure sensors for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.

    1995-04-01

    In the last few years, the nuclear industry has experienced some problems with the performance of pressure transmitters and has been interested in new sensors based on new technologies. Fiber optic pressure sensors offer the potential to improve on or overcome some of the limitations of existing pressure sensors. Up to now, research has been motivated towards development and refinement of fiber optic sensing technology. In most applications, reliability studies and failure mode analyses remain to be exhaustively conducted. Fiber optic sensors have currently penetrated certain cutting edge markets where they possess necessary inherent advantages over other existing technologies. In these markets (e.g. biomedical, aerospace, automotive, and petrochemical), fiber optic sensors are able to perform measurements for which no alternate sensor previously existed. Fiber optic sensing technology has not yet been fully adopted into the mainstream sensing market. This may be due to not only the current premium price of fiber optic sensors, but also the lack of characterization of their possible performance disadvantages. In other words, in conservative industries, the known disadvantages of conventional sensors are sometimes preferable to unknown or not fully characterized (but potentially fewer and less critical) disadvantages of fiber optic sensors. A six-month feasibility study has been initiated under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the performance and reliability of existing fiber optic pressure sensors for use in nuclear power plants. This assessment will include establishment of the state of the art in fiber optic pressure sensing, characterization of the reliability of fiber optic pressure sensors, and determination of the strengths and limitations of these sensors for nuclear safety-related services.

  10. Hybrid Fiber-Optic/CCD Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goss, W. C.; Janesick, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low noise and linearity of charge-coupled devices (CCD's) combined with optical waveguide components in hybrid, integrated chip package. Concept used to measure laser flux in fiber-gyro application using sensing fibers that range from several to several tens of kilometers in length. Potential applications include optical delay measurement and linear detector of light flux emanating from fiber-optic waveguides.

  11. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  12. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor); Mattes, Brenton L. (Inventor); Charnetski, Clark J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  13. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  14. Fiber optic photoplethysmograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokun, Leszek J.; Domanski, Andrzej W.

    1991-07-01

    Using a very well known characteristic of infrared radiation absorbance by human skin versus the length of radiation wave and by application of the newest achievements of radiation detecting techniques and very fast computing techniques - the authors have designed and manufactured the complete computer system for noninvasive diagnosis of blood vessels in legs. As the basic unit in this system, fiber-optic photoplethysmograph was applied. The measurement method used here was very well described by V. Blazek and some other scientists. This article presents photoplethysmograph and all features of the computer system.

  15. Fully passive-alignment pluggable compact parallel optical interconnection modules based on a direct-butt-coupling structure for fiber-optic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kwon-Seob; Park, Hyoung-Jun; Kang, Hyun Seo; Kim, Young Sun; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2016-02-01

    A low-cost packaging method utilizing a fully passive optical alignment and surface-mounting method is demonstrated for pluggable compact and slim multichannel optical interconnection modules using a VCSEL/PIN-PD chip array. The modules are based on a nonplanar bent right-angle electrical signal path on a silicon platform and direct-butt-optical coupling without a bulky and expensive microlens array. The measured optical direct-butt-coupling efficiencies of each channel without any bulky optics are as high as 33% and 95% for the transmitter and receiver, respectively. Excellent lateral optical alignment tolerance of larger than 60 μm for both the transmitter and receiver module significantly reduces the manufacturing and material costs as well as the packaging time. The clear eye diagrams, extinction ratios higher than 8 dB at 10.3 Gbps for the transmitter module, and receiver sensitivity of better than -13.1 dBm at 10.3 Gbps and a bit error rate of 10-12 for all channels are demonstrated. Considering that the optical output power of the transmitter is greater than 0 dBm, the module has a sufficient power margin of about 13 dB for 10.3 Gbps operations for all channels.

  16. Fiber optic light sensor.

    PubMed

    Chudyk, Wayne; Flynn, Kyle F

    2015-06-01

    We describe a low-cost fiber optic sensor for measuring photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in turbulent flow. Existing technology was combined in a novel way for probe development addressing the need for a small but durable instrument for use in flowing water. Optical components including fiber optics and a wide-spectrum light detector were used to separate light collection from electronic detection so that measurements could be completed in either the field or laboratory, in air or underwater. Connection of the detector to Arduino open-source electronics and a portable personal computer (PC) enabled signal processing and allowed data to be stored in a spreadsheet for ease of analysis. Calibration to a commercial cosine-corrected instrument showed suitable agreement with the added benefit that the small sensor face allowed measurements in tight spaces such as close to the streambed or within leafy or filamentous plant growth. Subsequently, we applied the probe in a separate study where over 35 experiments were successfully completed to characterize downward light attenuation in filamentous algae in turbulent flow. PMID:26009160

  17. Electrospun Amplified Fiber Optics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm–1). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics. PMID:25710188

  18. Subsea fiber-optic communications

    SciTech Connect

    High, G.; Wright, P.J.

    1997-05-01

    High-cost and hazardous nature of recovering hydrocarbons offshore have led to the trend towards growth in subsea production control. The extended step-out distances of subsea completions is increasing the volume and complexity of subsea data communications beyond the capacity of conventional systems. Improved reservoir management using intelligent sensors, metering, and process equipment, requiring real-time monitoring and control, dictates the use of wideband communication. Fiber optics offers the necessary volume of data transmission, with the high-noise immunity needed for data integrity and safe operation, under the severe Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI) environments created where high power motors and power cables are used subsea. The marinizing of optical, opto-electronic communication components for production control, data acquisition of subsea completions for the offshore oil industry are described.

  19. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Grant, S.A.

    1999-08-17

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy. 4 figs.

  20. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Grant, Sheila A.

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy.

  1. Shedding Light on Fiber Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    Explains the principles of fiber optics as a medium for light-wave communication. Current uses of fiber systems on college campuses include voice, video, and local area network applications. A group of seven school districts in Minnesota are linked via fiber-optic cables. Other uses are discussed. (MLF)

  2. Fiber-optic proximity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Hermann, W. A.; Primus, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Proximity sensor for mechanical hand of remote manipulator incorporates fiber optics to conduct signals between light source and light detector. Fiber optics are not prone to noise from electromagnetic interference and radio-frequency interference as are sensors using long electrical cables.

  3. Python fiber-optic seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed a high-security fiber-optic seal that incorporates tamper-resistance features not available in commercial fiber-optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber-optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber-optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber-optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper-resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking this component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that records the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL also is developing a Polaroid Reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  4. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

  5. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  6. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  7. Fiber optic TV direct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassak, John E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the operational television (OTV) technology was to develop a multiple camera system (up to 256 cameras) for NASA Kennedy installations where camera video, synchronization, control, and status data are transmitted bidirectionally via a single fiber cable at distances in excess of five miles. It is shown that the benefits (such as improved video performance, immunity from electromagnetic interference and radio frequency interference, elimination of repeater stations, and more system configuration flexibility) can be realized if application of the proven fiber optic transmission concept is used. The control system will marry the lens, pan and tilt, and camera control functions into a modular based Local Area Network (LAN) control network. Such a system does not exist commercially at present since the Television Broadcast Industry's current practice is to divorce the positional controls from the camera control system. The application software developed for this system will have direct applicability to similar systems in industry using LAN based control systems.

  8. PCB with fully integrated optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Gregor; Satzinger, Valentin; Schmidt, Volker; Schmid, Gerhard; Leeb, Walter R.

    2011-01-01

    The increasing demand for miniaturization and design flexibility of polymer optical waveguides integrated into electrical printed circuit boards (PCB) calls for new coupling and integration concepts. We report on a method that allows the coupling of optical waveguides to electro-optical components as well as the integration of an entire optical link into the PCB. The electro-optical devices such as lasers and photodiodes are assembled on the PCB and then embedded in an optically transparent material. A focused femtosecond laser beam stimulates a polymerization reaction based on a two-photon absorption effect in the optical material and locally increases the refractive index of the material. In this way waveguide cores can be realized and the embedded components can be connected optically. This approach does not only allow a precise alignment of the waveguide end faces to the components but also offers a truly 3-dimensional routing capability of the waveguides. Using this technology we were able to realize butt-coupling and mirror-coupling interface solutions in several demonstrators. We were also manufacturing demonstrator boards with fully integrated driver and preamplifier chips, which show very low power consumption of down to 10 mW for about 2.5 Gbit/s. Furthermore, demonstrators with interconnects at two different optical layers were realized.

  9. Vibration Performance Comparison Study on Current Fiber Optic Connector Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Thomes Jr., William J.; LaRocca, Frank V.; Switzer, Robert C.; Chuska, Rick F.; Macmurphy, Shawn L.

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic cables are increasingly being used in harsh environments where they are subjected to vibration. Understanding the degradation in performance under these conditions is essential for integration of the fibers into the given application. System constraints oftentimes require fiber optic connectors so subsystems can be removed or assembled as needed. In the present work, various types of fiber optic connectors were monitored in-situ during vibration testing to examine the transient change in optical transmission and the steady-state variation following the event. Inspection of the fiber endfaces and connectors was performed at chosen intervals throughout the testing.

  10. Vibration performance comparison study on current fiber optic connector technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomes, William J., Jr.; LaRocca, Frank V.; Switzer, Robert C.; Ott, Melanie N.; Chuska, Richard F.; Macmurphy, Shawn L.

    2008-08-01

    Fiber optic cables are increasingly being used in harsh environments where they are subjected to vibration. Understanding the degradation in performance under these conditions is essential for integration of the fibers into the given application. System constraints often require fiber optic connectors so that subsystems can be removed or assembled as needed. In the present work, various types of fiber optic connectors were monitored in-situ during vibration testing to examine the transient change in optical transmission and the steady-state variation following the event. The fiber endfaces and connectors were inspected at selected intervals throughout the testing.

  11. Avioptics - The application of fiber optics in a military aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, William P., Jr.

    This paper focuses on current military work to develop fiber-optic standards and systems for enhancements to existing aircraft platforms and the implementation of state-of-the-art avionics and airborne sensor systems in next-generation fighters. Aircraft applications of fiber optics presently focus on the technology's ability to provide enhanced physical characteristics, greater bandwidth, and better channel integrity. The lighter weight and smaller size of fiber cables are a primary consideration for utilizing a fiber medium. The physical advantages of fiber versus wire cables include enhanced durability and flexibility of the fiber, while channel integrity is improved by a fiber's nonconductive composition. The application of fiber optics in an airborne stores management system is described which can be effectively implemented to demonstrate many aspects of fiber-optic technology in aircraft.

  12. Fiber-Optic Communication Technology Branching Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. C.

    1985-02-01

    This tutorial review of fiber-optic branching devices covers example uses of branching devices, device types, device-performance characteristics, examples of current technology, and system-design methodology. The discussion is limited to passive single- and multimode devices fabricated from optical fibers or graded-index components. Integrated-optic, wavelength-division-multiplexing, and polarization-selective devices are not specifically addressed.

  13. Fiber-Optic Ammonia Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    Reversible, colorimetric fiber-optic sensors are undergoing development for use in measuring concentrations of ammonia in air at levels relevant to human health [0 to 50 parts per million (ppm)]. A sensor of this type includes an optical fiber that has been modified by replacing a portion of its cladding with a polymer coat that contains a dye that reacts reversibly with ammonia and changes color when it does so. The change in color is measured as a change in the amount of light transmitted from one end of the fiber to the other. Responses are reversible and proportional to the concentration of ammonia over the range from 9 to 175 ppm and in some cases the range of reversibility extends up to 270 ppm. The characteristic time for the response of a sensor to rise from 10 to 90 percent of full scale is about 25 seconds. These sensors are fully operational in pure carbon dioxide and are not adversely affected by humidity. This work was done by Michael T. Carter

  14. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, W. W.; Glenn, W. H.; Snitzer, E.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature sensor has been developed that utilizes the temperature dependent absorption of a rare earth doped optical fiber. The temperature measurement is localized at a remote position by splicing a short section of the rare earth fiber into a loop of commercial data communication fiber that sends and returns an optical probe signal to the temperature sensitive section of fiber. The optical probe signal is generated from two different wavelength filtered LED sources. A four port fiber optic coupler combines the two separate wavelength signals into the fiber sensing loop. Time multiplexing is used so that each signal wavelength is present at a different time. A reference signal level measurement is also made from the LED sources and a ratio taken with the sensor signal to produce a transmission measurement of the fiber loop. The transmission is affected differently at each wavelength by the rare earth temperature sensitive fiber. The temperature is determined from a ratio of the two transmission measurements. This method eliminates any ambiguity with respect to changes in signal level in the fiber loop such as mating and unmating optical connectors. The temperature range of the sensor is limited to about 800 C by the temperature limit fo the feed fibers.

  15. Fiber Optics: A Bright Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, James, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an overview of the impact of fiber optics on telecommunications and its application to information processing and library services, including information retrieval, news services, remote transmission of library services, and library networking. (RAA)

  16. Fiber optic combiner and duplicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The investigation of the possible development of two optical devices, one to take two images as inputs and to present their arithmetic sum as a single output, the other to take one image as input and present two identical images as outputs is described. Significant engineering time was invested in establishing precision fiber optics drawing capabilities, real time monitoring of the fiber size and exact measuring of fiber optics ribbons. Various assembly procedures and tooling designs were investigated and prototype models were built and evaluated that established technical assurance that the device was feasible and could be fabricated. Although the interleaver specification in its entirety was not achieved, the techniques developed in the course of the program improved the quality of images transmitted by fiber optic arrays by at least an order of magnitude. These techniques are already being applied to the manufacture of precise fiber optic components.

  17. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  18. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, Tom; Spector, Garry B.

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  19. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, William Lance; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology has emerged in recent years offering tremendous advantages over conventional aircraft instrumentation systems. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over their conventional counterparts are well established; they are lighter, smaller, and can provide enormous numbers of measurements at a fraction of the total sensor weight. After a brief overview of conventional and fiber-optic sensing technology, this paper presents an overview of the research that has been conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in recent years to advance this promising new technology. Research and development areas include system and algorithm development, sensor characterization and attachment, and real-time experimentally-derived parameter monitoring for ground- and flight-based applications. The vision of fiber optic smart structure technology is presented and its potential benefits to aerospace vehicles throughout the lifecycle, from preliminary design to final retirement, are presented.

  20. Mobile fiber optic emission spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W.A.; Coleman, C.J.; McCarty, J.E.; Beck, R.S.

    1997-05-01

    Technical Assistance Request HLW/DWPF-TAR-970064 asked SRTC to evaluate the use of a fiber optic coupled emission spectrometer. The spectrometer would provide additional ICP analyses in the DWPF laboratory.

  1. Arc detector uses fiber optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, E. J.; Leech, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Arc detector for protecting high-power microwave klystron oscillators uses fiber optics connected to remote solid-state light-sensing circuits. Detector is more reliable, smaller, and sensitive than other systems that locate detector in waveguide.

  2. Fiber-optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect

    O`Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Jantzen, C.M.; Ramsey, W.G.; Hopkins, C.D.

    1993-10-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) have developed a class of fiber-optic temperature sensors based upon temperature induced changes in the absorption spectrum of selected materials. For example, a neodymium (Nd) doped glass sensor can be used over a very broad temperature range ({minus}196 to 500{degree}C) and provide good precision and accuracy ({plus_minus}1{degree}C). This type temperature probe is constructed so that light from a fiber optic cable shines through the Nd glass and is reflected onto a second fiber optic cable. Light from this second fiber optic is measured by a diode array spectrophotometer, and the absorption spectrum of the Nd glass used to compute temperature.

  3. Fiber Optic Experience with the Smart Actuation System on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavala, Eddie

    1997-01-01

    High bandwidth, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and potential weight savings have led to the development of fiber optic technology for future aerospace vehicle systems. This technology has been incorporated in a new smart actuator as the primary communication interface. The use of fiber optics simplified system integration and significantly reduced wire count. Flight test results showed that fiber optics could be used in aircraft systems and identified critical areas of development of fly-by-light technology. This paper documents the fiber optic experience gained as a result of this program, and identifies general design considerations that could be used in a variety of specific applications of fiber optic technology. Environmental sensitivities of fiber optic system components that significantly contribute to optical power variation are discussed. Although a calibration procedure successfully minimized the effect of fiber optic sensitivities, more standardized calibration methods are needed to ensure system operation and reliability in future aerospace vehicle systems.

  4. Small Business Innovations (Fiber Optics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Foster-Miller, Inc. Waltham, MA developed the In-Situ Fiber Optic Polymer Reaction Monitor which could lead to higher yields and lower costs in complex composite manufacturing. The monitor, developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Langley Research Center, uses an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. It is the first analytical system capable of directly measuring the chemistry of advanced composite materials.

  5. Integration of 150 Gbps/fiber optical engines based on multicore fibers and 6-channel VCSELs and PDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karppinen, Mikko; Tanskanen, Antti; Heikkinen, Veli; Myöhänen, Petri; Salminen, Noora; Ollila, Jyrki; Tapaninen, Olli; Westbergh, Petter; Gustavsson, Johan; Larsson, Anders; Safaisini, Rashid; King, Roger; Ko, Minsu; Kissinger, Dietmar; ćaǧrı Ulusoy, Ahmet; Taunay, Thierry; Bansal, Lalit; Grüner-Nielsen, Lars; Kehayas, Efstratios; Edmunds, James; Stampoulidis, Leontios

    2016-03-01

    Multicore fiber enables a parallel optic data link with a single optical fiber, thus providing an attractive way to increase the total throughput and the integration density of the interconnections. We study and present photonics integration technologies and optical coupling approaches for multicore transmitter and receiver subassemblies. Such optical engines are implemented and characterized using multimode 6-core fibers and multicore-optimized active devices: 850-nm VCSEL and PD arrays with circular layout and multi-channel driver and receiver ICs. They are developed for bit-rates of 25 Gbps/channel and beyond, i.e. <150 Gbps per fiber, and also optimized for ruggedized transceivers with extended operation temperature range, for harsh environment applications, including space.

  6. Fiber optic frequency transfer link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primas, Lori E. (Inventor); Sydnor, Richard L. (Inventor); Lutes, George F. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A reference frequency distribution system is disclosed for transmitting a reference frequency from a reference unit to a remote unit while keeping the reference frequency at the reference unit and the remote unit in phase. A fiber optic cable connects the reference unit to the remote unit. A frequency source at the reference unit produces a reference frequency having an adjustable phase. A fiber optic transmitter at the reference unit modulates a light beam with the reference frequency and transmits the light beam into the fiber optic cable. A 50/50 reflector at the remote unit reflects a first portion of the light beam from the reference unit back into the fiber optic cable to the reference unit. A first fiber optic receiver disposed at the remote unit receives a second portion of the light beam and demodulates the reference frequency to be used at the remote unit. A second fiber optic receiver disposed at the reference unit receives the first portion of the light beam and demodulates a reference frequency component. A phase conjugator is connected to the frequency source for comparing the phase of the reference frequency component to the phase of the reference frequency modulating the light beam being transmitted from the reference unit to maintain a conjugate (anti-symmetric) relationship between the reference frequency component and the reference frequency modulating the light beam where virtually no phase difference exists between the phase of the reference frequency component and the phase of the reference frequency modulating the light beam.

  7. Communications satellites versus fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, A. M., Jr.

    Examples of the interfaces encountered in the provision of intercity, long-distance service in the U.S. are examined, and a comparison is conducted of the costs of the Intercity, Long-Distance portion of a single voice circuit derived from either fixed satellite trunking service or fiber optic bulk capacity. It is estimated that by the end of 1988, fiber optic should span the nation connecting New York and Washington with Los Angeles and San Francisco. It is shown that once fiber connects a given pair of cities, it becomes the least costly transmission medium, especially compared to fixed satellite service. Attention is given to equivalent transmission capacities, six providers of fiber optic capacity, a total satellite capacity comparison, an economic lifetime comparison, satellite and fiber optic network maps, satellite city-pair distance and cost matrices, and fiber optic city-pair distance matrices. It is pointed out that certain future CONUS satellite service applications will be inherently invulnerable to terrestrial fiber optics serving fixed routes.

  8. Fiber Optic Smart Structures And Skins Conference II Fiber Optics Smart Structures Program At Utias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Measures, Raymond M.

    1990-02-01

    Structurally integrated arrays of fiber optic sensors could serve as an effective nervous system for future Smart Structures. The structural integrity of such structures would be monitored throughout their life making obsolete the catastropic failures that sometimes plague aircraft, trains, cars......today. In addition the strain, deformation, vibration and temperature state of these structures could also be monitored. Our research program is directed at both the development and application of this new technology. We have built and carefully characterized a localized, all-fiber, dual wavelength polarimetric fiber optic sensor. We have also developed a localized, all-fiber, Michelson fiber optic sensor that has measured the strain within a thermoplastic and detected the acoustic emission associated with delamination within a composite. It has also been used as the basis of an optical strain rosette . We have demonstrated that embedded optical fibers do not reduce the strength or damage resistance of composites but can detect load-induced growth of damage. Within the past week we have completed the first fabrication of an aircraft composite leading edge with a built' in fiber optic damage detection system.

  9. Fiber optic sensor-based intelligent coal mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Wang, C.; Wei, Y.; Ni, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Q.; Ma, L.; Shi, Z.; Liu, X.

    2007-07-01

    Fiber optic sensors have become increasingly attractive for application in advanced intelligent coal mines, which consist of extensive sensor network to monitor the structural integrity, environmental safety and production parameters. Fiber optic based strain (mining pressure), temperature, water pressure, methane gas, seismic and ultrasound sensors can be used to monitor the condition of the coal mine and provide information for accident prediction and early warning. We report for the first time an all fiber optic comprehensive coal mine safety monitoring system. The system is capable of methane gas monitoring, temperature monitoring, seismic event and mine pressure detection and water pressure monitoring. The advantages of this fiber optic sensor system include intrinsic safety in explosive environment and multiparameter monitoring. The technology potentially can be used to replace many discrete and incompatible monitoring systems currently deployed in the coal mines and consequently greatly enhance coal mine safety.

  10. Hybrid Piezoelectric/Fiber-Optic Sensor Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Mark; Qing, Xinlin

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid piezoelectric/fiber-optic (HyPFO) sensor sheets are undergoing development. They are intended for use in nondestructive evaluation and long-term monitoring of the integrity of diverse structures, including aerospace, aeronautical, automotive, and large stationary ones. It is anticipated that the further development and subsequent commercialization of the HyPFO sensor systems will lead to economic benefits in the form of increased safety, reduction of life-cycle costs through real-time structural monitoring, increased structural reliability, reduction of maintenance costs, and increased readiness for service. The concept of a HyPFO sensor sheet is a generalization of the concept of a SMART Layer(TradeMark), which is a patented device that comprises a thin dielectric film containing an embedded network of distributed piezoelectric actuator/sensors. Such a device can be mounted on the surface of a metallic structure or embedded inside a composite-material structure during fabrication of the structure. There is has been substantial interest in incorporating sensors other than piezoelectric ones into SMART Layer(TradeMark) networks: in particular, because of the popularity of the use of fiber-optic sensors for monitoring the "health" of structures in recent years, it was decided to incorporate fiber-optic sensors, giving rise to the concept of HyPFO devices.

  11. Aircraft fiber optic structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrad, Nezih

    2012-06-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is a sought after concept that is expected to advance military maintenance programs, increase platform operational safety and reduce its life cycle cost. Such concept is further considered to constitute a major building block of any Integrated Health Management (IHM) capability. Since 65% to 80% of military assets' Life Cycle Cost (LCC) is devoted to operations and support (O&S), the aerospace industry and military sectors continue to look for opportunities to exploit SHM systems, capability and tools. Over the past several years, countless SHM concepts and technologies have emerged. Among those, fiber optic based systems were identified of significant potential. This paper introduces the elements of an SHM system and investigates key issues impeding the commercial implementation of fiber optic based SHM capability. In particular, this paper presents an experimental study of short gauge, intrinsic, spectrometric-based in-fiber Bragg grating sensors, for potential use as a component of an SHM system. Fiber optic Bragg grating sensors are evaluated against resistance strain gauges for strain monitoring, sensitivity, accuracy, reliability, and fatigue durability. Strain field disturbance is also investigated by "embedding" the sensors under a photoelastic coating in order to illustrate sensor intrusiveness in an embedded configuration.

  12. Fiber optic, Faraday rotation current sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Veeser, L.R.; Day, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    At the Second Megagauss Conference in 1979, there were reports of experiments that used the Faraday magneto-optic effect in a glass rod to measure large electric current pulses or magnetic fields. Since then we have seen the development of single-mode optical fibers that can carry polarized light in a closed loop around a current load. A fiber optic Faraday rotation sensor will integrate the flux, instead of sampling it at a discrete point, to get a measurement independent of the current distribution. Early Faraday rotation experiments using optical fibers to measure currents dealt with problems such as fiber birefringence and difficulties in launching light into the tiny fiber cores. We have built on those experiments, working to reduce the effects of shocks and obtaining higher bandwidths, absolute calibration, and computerized recording and data analysis, to develop the Faraday rotation sensors into a routine current diagnostic. For large current pulses we find reduced sensitivity to electromagnetic interference and other backgrounds than for Rogowski loops; often the fiber optic sensors are useful where conductive probes cannot be used at all. In this paper we describe the fiber optic sensors and some practical matters involved in fielding them.

  13. Fiber-optic couplers. January 1973-February 1988 (citations from the NTIS data base). Report for January 1973-February 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the design, fabrication, analysis, performance evaluation, and applications of fiber-optic couplers. Topics include optical coupling for fiber-optic transmission lines, frequency and wavelength division multiplexing, multiwavelength coupler-decouplers, single mode and multimode couplers, and fiber-optic gyroscope applications. Various types of couplers are examined including waveguide, star, access, duplex, data bus, passive, tee, and holographic. Patented fiber-optic devices using couplers are included. Citations concerning fiber-optic connectors are excluded and examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 218 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  14. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  15. Fiber optics: A brief introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gruchalla, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    A basic introduction into the principles of fiber optics is presented. A review of both the underlying physical principles and the individual elements of typical fiber-optic systems are presented. The optical phenomenon of total internal reflection is reviewed. The basic construction of the optical fiber is presented. Both step-index and graded-index fiber designs are reviewed. Multimode and single-mode fiber constructions are considered and typical performance parameters given. Typical optical-fiber bandwidth and loss characteristics are compared to various common coaxial cables, waveguides, and air transmission. The constructions of optical-fiber cables are reviewed. Both loose-tube and tightly-buffered designs are considered. Several optical connection approaches are presented. Photographs of several representative optical connectors are included. Light Emitting Diode and Laser Diode emitters for fiber-optic applications are reviewed, and some advantages and shortcomings of each are considered. The phenomenon of modal noise is briefly explained. Both PIN and Avalanche photodetectors are reviewed and their performance parameters compared. Methods of data transmission over optical fiber are introduced. Principles of Wavelength, Frequency, and Time Division Multiplexing are briefly presented. The technology of fiber-optic sensors is briefly reviewed with basic principles introduced. The performance of a fiber-optic strain sensor is included as a practical example. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Bidirectional fiber optic cable adapter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linehan, M.; Gee, N. B.; Taylor, R.

    1983-02-01

    The technical objective of the BIFOCS program was to develop, build, and test a full-duplex single fiber, fiber optic link, operating in the 1.0 micron to 1.6 micron region, capable of transmitting 20 Mb/s data (10 to the -9th power BER) over a range of at least 10 km, with a goal of 15 km. The link MTBF goal was 5 X 10 to the 3rd power hours and operation over a temperature range of 0 to 50 C. The fiber optic cable consisted of sections not exceeding 2 km in length joined by commercially available dry fiber optic connectors. The system performed successfully at ambient temperature over 15 km of cable.

  17. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate.

  18. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-05-21

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate. 4 figures.

  19. Fiber-Optic Terahertz Data-Communication Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, Peter L.; Lambert, James L.; Morookian, John M.; Bergman, Larry A.

    1994-01-01

    Network protocols implemented in optical domain. Fiber-optic data-communication networks utilize fully available bandwidth of single-mode optical fibers. Two key features of method: use of subpicosecond laser pulses as carrier signals and spectral phase modulation of pulses for optical implementation of code-division multiple access as multiplexing network protocol. Local-area network designed according to concept offers full crossbar functionality, security of data in transit through network, and capacity about 100 times that of typical fiber-optic local-area network in current use.

  20. Fiber Optics: Deregulate and Deploy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwinski, Jan H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes fiber optic technology, explains its use in education and commercial settings, and recommends regulations and legislation that will speed its use to create broadband information networks. Topics discussed include distance learning; interactive video; costs; and the roles of policy makers, lawmakers, public advocacy groups, and consumers.…

  1. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  2. Fiber optic refractive index monitor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan David

    2002-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the change in refractive index of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the index of the liquid is significantly less than the index of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its index is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.

  3. Applications of fiber optics in physical protection

    SciTech Connect

    Buckle, T.H.

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to provide technical information useful for the development of fiber-optic communications and intrusion detection subsystems relevant to physical protection. There are major sections on fiber-optic technology and applications. Other topics include fiber-optic system components and systems engineering. This document also contains a glossary, a list of standards and specifications, and a list of fiber-optic equipment vendors.

  4. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  5. Fiber Optic Resource For Test Equipment (FORTE) Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramdev, Anita

    1988-08-01

    Avionic systems are incorporating an increasing amount of fiber optics. FORTE is a 6.2 R&D program developed atthe Naval Air Engineering Center (NAVATRENGCEN) to support fiber optic avionic systems. In the 4th quarter FY85 an electro-optical test device design was initiated. The design is required to be modular, digitally controlled and fully duplexed. FORTE will be utilized in automatic test equipment as an "asset" to handle the optical signal portion of testing. The Breadboarding phase of the design has been completed and the brassboard is under fabrication. The system capabilities are three bidirectional independent channels at 820nm, 860nm and 1300nm. The fiber size is 100/140nm GRIN Multimode. Programmability is achieved through the IEEE-488 interface bus. One of the future directions of the program is to build an in-house capability, with lab facilities to support, maintain and develop fiber optic systems. Follow-on work will constitute a fiber optic system requirements analysis with fiber optic application and their fault modes. This will be followed by a development program to augment the current brassboard.

  6. Fiber optical sensors for enhanced battery safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jan; Nedjalkov, Antonio; Doering, Alexander; Angelmahr, Martin; Schade, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Over the last years, battery safety becomes more and more important due to the wide spread of high-capacity lithium ion batteries applied in e.g. consumer electronics and electrical power storages for vehicles or stationary energy storage systems. However, for these types of batteries, malfunctions could be highly dangerous and all aspects of safety issues are not sufficiently considered, yet. Therefore, the improvement of the battery safety behavior is one of the most important issues discussed in actual research projects. In this paper the application of fiber optical sensors for enhanced battery safety is presented. The temperature is one of the most critical parameters indicating a failure of the cell, but even state-to-the-art battery management systems (BMS) are not able to monitor and interpret the distributed temperature field of a total battery storage system sufficiently. Furthermore, the volume expansion of the battery cell, which could be monitored by the strain on the cells' surfaces, is one additional parameter not considered up to now. Both parameters could be simultaneous monitored by fiber optical sensor arrays, consisting of discrete fiber Bragg grating (FBG) elements. The FBG sensors are directly attached on the surface of the cell, recording the temperature as well as the strain distribution highly accurate and close-meshed. Failures and malfunction such as overcharging, gassing, and thermal runaway can be early predicted and avoided to extend the battery lifetime and enhance the operational battery safety. Moreover, battery aging effects lead to variations in the volume change behavior which can be detected additionally. Hence, a battery fully equipped with fiber optical sensor arrays in combination with an appropriate BMS enables a safe and continuous utilization of the energy storage system even under harsh conditions like rapid charging.

  7. Fiber optic hardware for transport aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John A.

    Fiber Optic Technology is being developed for aircraft and offers benefits in system performance and manufacturing cost reduction. Thr fiber optic systems have high bandwidths that exceeds all of the new aircraft design requirements and exceptional electromagnetic interference (EMI) immunity. Additionally, fiber optic systems have been installed in production aircraft proving design feasiblity.

  8. Fiber optic hardware for transport aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John A.

    1994-10-01

    Aircraft manufacturers are developing fiber optic technology to exploit the benefits in system performance and manufacturing cost reduction. The fiber optic systems have high bandwidths and exceptional Electromagnetic Interference immunity that exceeds all new aircraft design requirements. Additionally, aircraft manufacturers have shown production readiness of fiber optic systems and design feasibility.

  9. Overview of Fiber-Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Moore, Emery L.

    1987-01-01

    Design, development, and sensitivity of sensors using fiber optics reviewed. State-of-the-art and probable future developments of sensors using fiber optics described in report including references to work in field. Serves to update previously published surveys. Systems incorporating fiber-optic sensors used in medical diagnosis, navigation, robotics, sonar, power industry, and industrial controls.

  10. Fiber optic sensing for ultrasonic NDE

    SciTech Connect

    Dudderar, T.D.; Burger, C.P.; Gilbert, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Peters, B.R.

    1987-09-01

    An innovative approach to nondestructive evaluation (NDE) using noncontacting optical sensors has demonstrated. In this effort a single mode optical fiber interferometer (OFI) was used to sense the presence and form of Rayleigh waves traveling along the surface of a steel test bar at a velocity of nearly 3mm/..mu.. s. Acousto-optic time-domain data was successfully used to detect the presence and locate the position of a test flaw (a machined slot) in the bar, and spectrum analysis was used to estimate its geometry and size. This approach has many potential applications in the ultrasonic evaluation of real flaws in structures with complex geometries. Coupled with the authors' earlier work demonstrating the feasibility of generating acoustic waves in metals using laser light pulses transmitted through the fiber optic probes, this latest achievement points to the development of a fully noncontacting, fiber optic based thermal-acousto-photonic (TAP) NDE system, with potential applications to the reliability testing of many important structures where composition, scale, geometry, or restricted access preclude the use of conventional NDE techniques.

  11. Silicon fiber optic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Pocha, Michael D.; Swierkowski, Steve P.; Wood, Billy E.

    2007-10-02

    A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially or wholly reflective surface on the free end of an integrated elongate channel or an integrated bounding wall of a chip of a wafer and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. Such a constructed device can be utilized to detect one or more physical parameters, such as, for example, strain, through the optical fiber using an optical detection system to provide measuring accuracies of less than aboutb0.1%.

  12. Development of an otolaryngological interferometric fiber optic diagnostic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conerty, Michelle D.; Castracane, James; Saravia, Eduardo; Parnes, Steven M.; Cacace, Anthony T.

    1992-08-01

    Current medical instrumentation research at InterScience, Inc. is aimed at utilizing state of the art electro-optics in the development of a diagnostic fiber optic instrument capable of quantifying vibration patterns in real time. This work is in collaboration with the Division of Otolaryngology of the Albany Medical College. The innovative diagnostic probe system design involves the miniaturization of an electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) system through the use of fiber optic elements coupled with high speed image acquisition from a solid state matrix detector. Subsequent frame by frame processing produces a high quality three-dimensional spatial representation of the vibrational pattern. The diagnostic probe system is being developed for quantitative tympanic membrane and vocal cord vibration analysis. The significance of the introduction of this instrument to the medical community is the contribution it could make in the efficiency and effectiveness of the diagnosis of otolaryngological disorders. Specific applications include the evaluation of tympanosclerosis, stiffness related middle ear disorders, ossicular chain abnormalities, tympanic membrane replacement, vocal dysphonias, and early detection of laryngeal carcinomas, cysts, and phenomenological properties of mucosal wave dynamics. The current instrumentation research is focused on the production of a prototype system for clinical trials. This research is based in ESPI optical system development and miniaturization, system hardware and software development, and clinical design of the probe heads within anatomical limitations. Significant advantages of this diagnostic tool over currently used instrumentation and procedures are the real time capabilities of the instrument, the ability to quantify the vibrational pattern in time and space, and the possibility of establishing a database of patient history and disorder characteristics. Once fully developed and integrated into the clinical

  13. Fiber optic micro accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    2005-07-26

    An accelerometer includes a wafer, a proof mass integrated into the wafer, at least one spring member connected to the proof mass, and an optical fiber. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially reflective surface on the proof mass and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. The two partially reflective surfaces are used to detect movement of the proof mass through the optical fiber, using an optical detection system.

  14. Design of fiber optic probes for laser light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Chu, Benjamin

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative analysis is presented of the role of optical fibers in laser light scattering. Design of a general fiber optic/microlens probe by means of ray tracing is described. Several different geometries employing an optical fiber of the type used in lightwave communications and a graded index microlens are considered. Experimental results using a nonimaging fiber optic detector probe show that due to geometrical limitations of single mode fibers, a probe using a multimode optical fiber has better performance, for both static and dynamic measurements of the scattered light intensity, compared with a probe using a single mode fiber. Fiber optic detector probes are shown to be more efficient at data collection when compared with conventional approaches to measurements of the scattered laser light. Integration of fiber optic detector probes into a fiber optic spectrometer offers considerable miniaturization of conventional light scattering spectrometers, which can be made arbitrarily small. In addition static and dynamic measurements of scattered light can be made within the scattering cell and consequently very close to the scattering center.

  15. Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Fiber Optics but Were Afraid to Ask...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Explains light-wave communication and optical fibers. The impact of fiber optics on communication is discussed; uses of fiber optic technology in elementary, secondary, and higher education are described; and possible futures of light-wave communication are considered, including Integrated Services Digital Networks and the National Research and…

  16. Fiber optic accelerometers and seismometers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.A. |

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents performance and figures-of-merit of fiber optic interferometric accelerometers and seismometers using flexural disk, mandrel, and fluid filled transducers. Flexural disk devices having sensitivities of 50 radians/g and operating bandwidths to 2 kHz have been reported. This sensitivity corresponds to a minimum detectable signal of 20 nano-g/{radical}Hz for a system demodulation noise floor of 1 micro-radian/{radical}Hz. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Portable multichannel fiber optic biosensor for field detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Joel P.; Saaski, Elric W.; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Anderson, George P.; Ligler, Frances S.

    1997-04-01

    A compact, portable fiber optic biosensor is developed that enables monitoring of up to four fiber optic probes simultaneously. The sensor employs a novel optical fiber bundle jumper for exciting and collecting fluorescence emission from the evanescent wave fiber optic probes. A single fiber in the center of the bundle couples laser excitation into the sensor probe, while the surrounding fibers collect the returning fluorescent emission light. This design requires no beamsplitter, enabling the detection optics and control circuitry to be reduced to a 4 X 6 in. circuit card. Four of these cards are integrated into a single portable system. Results from detection assays for hazardous biological agents and an environmental pollutant are shown.

  18. Overview of advanced components for fiber optic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Stowe, David W.

    1986-01-01

    The basic operating principles and potential performance of several state-of-the-art fiber-optic devices are illustrated with diagrams and briefly characterized. Technologies examined include high-birefringence polarization-maintaining fibers and directional couplers, single-mode fiber polarizers and cut-off polarizers, optical-fiber modulators with radially poled piezoactive polymer (PVF2) jackets, and piezoelectric-squeezer polarization modulators. The need for improved manufacturing techniques to make such fiber-optic devices cost-competitive with their thin-film integrated-optics analogs is indicated.

  19. Fiber-Optic Distribution Of Pulsed Power To Multiple Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold

    1996-01-01

    Optoelectronic systems designed according to time-sharing scheme distribute optical power to multiple integrated-circuit-based sensors in fiber-optic networks. Networks combine flexibility of electronic sensing circuits with advantage of electrical isolation afforded by use of optical fibers instead of electrical conductors to transmit both signals and power. Fiber optics resist corrosion and immune to electromagnetic interference. Sensor networks of this type useful in variety of applications; for example, in monitoring strains in aircraft, buildings, and bridges, and in monitoring and controlling shapes of flexible structures.

  20. Towards Fully Integrated Wireless Impedimetric Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Segura-Quijano, Fredy; Sacristán-Riquelme, Jordi; García-Cantón, Jesús; Osés, Maria Teresa; Baldi, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We report on the design and characterization of the building blocks of a single-chip wireless chemical sensor fabricated with a commercial complementary metal-oxide-silicon (CMOS) technology, which includes two types of transducers for impedimetric measurements (4-electrode array and two interdigitated electrodes), instrumentation circuits, and a metal coil and circuits for inductive power and data transfer. The electrodes have been formed with a polycrystalline silicon layer of the technology by a simple post-process that does not require additional deposition or lithography steps, but just etching steps. A linear response to both conductivity and permittivity of solutions has been obtained. Wireless communication of the sensor chip with a readout unit has been demonstrated. The design of the chip was prepared for individual block characterization and not for full system characterization. The integration of chemical transducers within monolithic wireless platforms will lead to smaller, cheaper, and more reliable chemical microsensors, and will open up the door to numerous new applications where liquid mediums that are enclosed in sealed receptacles have to be measured. PMID:22319342

  1. ATLAS from Data Research Associates: A Fully Integrated Automation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellinger, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    This detailed description of a fully integrated, turnkey library system includes a complete profile of the system (functions, operational characteristics, hardware, operating system, minimum memory and pricing); history of the technologies involved; and descriptions of customer services and availability. (CLB)

  2. Fiber Optic Wink-around Speed of Light Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, James A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which a recycling oscillator has been designed having a fiber optic data link that closes the loop. Outlines the use of this wink-around system to determine the speed of light and suggests additional application for measuring integrated circuit propagation delays to subnanosecond resolution. (GS)

  3. Fully-printed, all-polymer integrated twilight switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Erba, Giorgio; Perinot, Andrea; Grimoldi, Andrea; Natali, Dario; Caironi, Mario

    2015-10-01

    In this contribution we demonstrate an integrated photoactive switch employing a fully-printed planar photodetector and complementary Schmitt trigger. A photoactive switch is fundamental to several light driven systems, such as twilight sensors or industrial machinery control devices. This paper explores a fabrication methodology that enables reliable complementary logic building blocks and photodetectors with a fully-printed, all-polymer approach, resulting in a semi-transparent integrated system on a single plastic foil.

  4. Photoelastic Fiber-Optic Accelerometers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wei

    This dissertation introduces a completely new class of fiber-optic accelerometers based on the principles of photoelasticity. Two different types of accelerometers are designed and developed. The first is a general purpose accelerometer which employs a sensing element made from an optically sensitive photoelastic plastic; the unit is designed with a relatively low natural frequency and a high sensitivity. The second is a shock accelerometer which employs a glass GRIN lens as its sensing element; the unit is designed with a relatively high frequency and a wide measurement range. In both cases, a low-cost LED is employed as an incoherent light source; multimode optical fibers having a hard plastic cladding are used to transmit signals between the acceleration transducer and the conditioning electronics. The dissertation includes a brief introduction to accelerometer measurement in which current applications and associated problems are presented; detailed descriptions of the operating principles and design criteria considered when building an accelerometer; prior related research; discussions involving photoelastic fiber-optic transducers; a comprehensive analysis of sensing elements; the designs for the overall measurement systems; and, the results obtained by testing prototypes produced from the final designs. The qualitative and quantitative analyses contained herein represent a unique blend of mechanics, physics and electro-optics. A number of new discoveries are reported especially in conjunction with the analysis of the GRIN lens. Several new definitions are introduced, some of which make it possible to compare the performance of the photoelastic fiber-optic accelerometers to that of their more conventional counterparts. The test results show that both accelerometers meet their design requirements and their performance is comparable to some of the best accelerometers commercially available.

  5. Fiber optic smart structures for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udd, Eric

    Fiber optic smart structures as applied to aerospace platforms are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on advantages of these structures which include weight saving for equivalent performance, immunity to electromagnetic interference, the ability to multiplex a number of fiber optic sensors along a single line, the inherent high bandwidth of fiber optic sensors and the data links supporting them, the ability to perform in extremely hostile environments at high temperatures, vibration, and shock loadings. It is concluded that fiber optic smart structures have a considerable potential to enhance the value of future aircraft and spacecraft through improved reliability, maintainability, and flight performance augmentation.

  6. Fiber-optic liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber-optic liquid level sensor measures the height of a column of liquid through the hydrostatic pressure it produces. The sensor employs a fiber-optic displacement sensor to detect the pressure-induced displacement of the center of a corrugated diaphragm.

  7. Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.; Farmer, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements.

  8. Spectrum-Modulating Fiber-Optic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, Glenn; Fritsch, Klaus

    1989-01-01

    Family of spectrum-modulating fiber-optic sensors undergoing development for use in aircraft-engine control systems. Fiber-optic sensors offer advantages of small size, high bandwidth, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and light weight. Furthermore, they reduce number of locations on aircraft to which electrical power has to be supplied.

  9. Fiber optic sensors for corrosion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Alphonso C.

    1993-01-01

    The development of fiber optic sensors for the detection of a variety of material parameters has grown tremendously over the past several years. Additionally, the potential for analytical applications of fiber optic sensors have become more widely used. New pH sensors have also been developed using fiber optic techniques to detect fluorescence characteristics from immobilized fluorogenic reagent chemicals. The primary purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using fiber optic sensors to detect the presence of Al(sup 3+) ions made in the process of environmental corrosion of aluminum materials. The Al(sup 3+) ions plus a variety of other type of metal ions can be detected using analytical techniques along with fiber optic sensors.

  10. Fiber-Optic Chemical and Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sherif, Mahmoud

    In the past 15 years, the fiber-optic communication industry has literally revolutionized the telecommunication industry by providing higher performance and more reliable telecommunication links. In parallel to these developments, and due to the high volume production of fiber-optic components at reasonable performance and costs, other industries associated with fiber optics have been developed like the sensors industry. As component prices have fallen and quality improvements have been made, the ability of fiber-optic sensors to displace conventional sensors have become a reality. A major category in fiber-optic sensors is the chemical and biosensors. These sensors can provide numerous advantages over conventional sensors. These advantages are higher performance, light weight, small and compact size, immunity to electromagnetic interference, remote sensing, ability to be multiplexed, and ability to be embedded into various structures and materials. The sensor's sensitivity and selectivity are enhanced by using optical transducers capable of precise detection of surround changes.

  11. Opportunities for efficient fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, J. M.; Buelow, R. F.; Frankiewicz, G. P.

    2007-09-01

    High efficiency distributed lighting systems for general lighting applications, delivering light comparable to but with an energy saving of 80% or more over traditional sources have recently become available. This remarkable achievement is due to: the development of long lived high efficiency light sources that match the color rendition and warmth of traditional incandescent and fluorescent sources; the creation of a new generation of non-imaging collectors to efficiently collect and direct the light; and the availability of low loss and low cost light pipes to distribute the light. Given these improvements many incandescent, halogen and even fluorescent applications are now best served using fiber optic lighting technology. In achieving practical systems, a number of significant technical problems have been overcome. In this paper we shall review some of these solutions as well as indicate our view of the direction and impact of future advances.

  12. Sensitive fiber-optic immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Irene M.; Love, Walter F.; Slovacek, Rudolf E.

    1991-07-01

    The principles of evanescent wave theory were applied to an immunological sensor for detecting the cardiac-specific isoenzyme creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB). The detection of the CK-MB isoenzyme is used in conjunction with the total CK measurement in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. The clinical range for CK-MB is from 2-100 ng/ml. Previous work which utilized the fluorophor, Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), was able to discriminate between 0 and 3 ng/ml CK-MB. Use of the fluorophor B-phycoerythrin (BPE) increased the assay sensitivity to 0.1 ng/ml CK-MB. The data was collected for 15 minutes using an optical launch and collection angle of 25 degree(s). This fiber optic based system is homogeneous and requires no subsequent washing, handling, or processing steps after exposure to the sample.

  13. A fiber optic damage monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, C. K.; Cielo, P.; Farnell, G. W.; Parker, M.

    A simplified fiber-optic damage monitoring system for on-line assessments of the condition of composite structural materials in F/A-18 fighters is described. Optical fibers are implanted into the composite mesh in a configuration with horizontal and vertical orientations. When light is pumped into the fibers, and failure of transmittance in either the x- or y-coordinates indicates the location of a defect at that coordinate, as revealed by the fiber damage. Attaching photodiodes to the optic fibers and connecting the entire system to a video camera and computer permits on-line monitoring of the mesh-holding panels. Sample results are provided from a system with multimode step index fibers, a VAX 11/780 computer and a video camera with a 488 x 380 cell photodiode array. Image subtraction is an effective means for fast determination of the identities of broken fibers by comparisons of images of arrays of original and damaged fibers.

  14. Fiber optic hydrogen detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Alex A.; Larson, David B.; Wuestling, Mark D.

    1999-12-01

    Commercial and military launch vehicles are designed to use hydrogen as the main propellant, which is very volatile, extremely flammable, and highly explosive. Current detection systems uses Teflon transfer tubes at a large number of vehicle locations through which gas samples are drawn and the stream analyzed by a mass spectrometer. A concern with this approach is the high cost of the system. Also, the current system does not provide leak location and is not in real-time. This system is very complex and cumbersome for production and ground support measurement personnel. The fiber optic micromirror sensor under development for cryogenic environment relies on a reversible chemical interaction causing a change in reflectivity of a thin film of coated Palladium. The magnitude of the reflectivity change is correlated to hydrogen concentration. The sensor uses only a tiny light beam, with no electricity whatsoever at the sensor, leading to devices that is intrinsically safe from explosive ignition. The sensor, extremely small in size and weight detects, hydrogen concentration using a passive element consisting of chemically reactive microcoatings deposited on the surface of a glass microlens, which is then bonded to an optical fiber. The system uses a multiplexing technique with a fiber optic driver-receiver consisting of a modulated LED source that is launched into the sensor, and a photodiode detector that synchronously measures the reflected signal. The system incorporates a microprocessor (or PC) to perform the data analysis and storage, as well as trending and set alarm function. As it is a low cost system with a fast response, many more detection sensors can be used that will be extremely helpful in determining leak location for safety of crew and vehicles during launch operations.

  15. Architectures of fiber optic network in telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Irina B.; Vasile, Alexandru; Filip, Luminita E.

    2005-08-01

    The operators of telecommunications have targeted their efforts towards realizing applications using broad band fiber optics systems in the access network. Thus, a new concept related to the implementation of fiber optic transmission systems, named FITL (Fiber In The Loop) has appeared. The fiber optic transmission systems have been extensively used for realizing the transport and intercommunication of the public telecommunication network, as well as for assuring the access to the telecommunication systems of the great corporations. Still, the segment of the residential users and small corporations did not benefit on large scale of this technology implementation. For the purpose of defining fiber optic applications, more types of architectures were conceived, like: bus, ring, star, tree. In the case of tree-like networks passive splitters (that"s where the name of PON comes from - Passive Optical Network-), which reduce significantly the costs of the fiber optic access, by separating the costs of the optical electronic components. That's why the passive fiber optics architectures (PON represent a viable solution for realizing the access at the user's loop. The main types of fiber optics architectures included in this work are: FTTC (Fiber To The Curb); FTTB (Fiber To The Building); FTTH (Fiber To The Home).

  16. Harsh environment fiber optic connectors/testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Douglas A.

    2014-09-01

    Fiber optic systems are used frequently in military, aerospace and commercial aviation programs. There is a long history of implementing fiber optic data transfer for aircraft control, for harsh environment use in local area networks and more recently for in-flight entertainment systems. The advantages of fiber optics include high data rate capacity, low weight, immunity to EMI/RFI, and security from signal tapping. Technicians must be trained particularly to install and maintain fiber systems, but it is not necessarily more difficult than wire systems. However, the testing of the fiber optic interconnection system must be conducted in a standardized manner to assure proper performance. Testing can be conducted with slight differences in the set-up and procedure that produce significantly different test results. This paper reviews various options of interconnect configurations and discusses how these options can affect the performance, maintenance required and longevity of a fiber optic system, depending on the environment. Proper test methods are discussed. There is a review of the essentials of proper fiber optic testing and impact of changing such test parameters as input launch conditions, wavelength considerations, power meter options and the basic methods of testing. This becomes important right from the start when the supplier test data differs from the user's data check upon receiving the product. It also is important in periodic testing. Properly conducting the fiber optic testing will eliminate confusion and produce meaningful test results for a given harsh environment application.

  17. Fiber Optic Connector Polishing Fixture Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolasinski, John R. (Inventor); Moszcziewski, Joseph Roch (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A fiber optic connector polishing fixture assembly for sup- porting a terminus of a fiber optic cable before a polishing surface. The assembly comprises: a fiber optic polishing fixture adapted to support the terminus before the polishing surface; a fixture support connected to the fixture for sup- porting the fixture before the polishing surface; and an adjustable connection between the fixture and the fixture support having user accessible adjustment controls for allowing a user to operate the controls to shift the fixture and fixture support relative to one another for substantially eliminating an apex offset of the terminus with respect to the polishing surface.

  18. Fiber optic sensors for smart taxiways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, Douglas D.; Fuerstenau, Norbert; Goetze, Wolfgang

    1995-09-01

    Fiber-optic sensors could offer advantages in the field of airport ground traffic monitoring: immunity to electromagnetic interference, installation without costly and time consuming airfield closures, and low loss, low noise optical connection between sensors and signal processing equipment. This paper describes fiber-optic sensors developed for airport taxiway monitoring and the first steps toward their installation in an experimental surface movement guidance and control system at the Braunschweig airport. Initial results obtained with fiber- optic light barriers and vibration sensors are reported. The feasibility of employing interferometric strain gauges for this application will be discussed based on sensor characteristics obtained through measurements of strain in an aircraft structure in flight.

  19. Great prospects for fiber optics sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide noise immunity and galvanic insulation at the measurement point. Interest in such sensors is increasing for these reasons. In the United States sales are expected to increase from 12 million dollars in 1981 to 180 million in 1991. Interferometric sensors based on single modus fibers deliver extremely high sensitivity, while sensors based on multi-modus fibers are more easily manufactured. The fiber optic sensors which are available today are based on point measurements. Development of fiber optic sensors in Norway is being carried out at the Central institute and has resulted in the development of medical manometers which are now undergoing clinical testing.

  20. High-temperature fiber optic pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthold, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to a program to develop fiber optic methods to measure diaphragm deflection. The end application is intended for pressure transducers capable of operating to 540 C. In this paper are reported the results of a laboratory study to characterize the performance of the fiber-optic microbend sensor. The data presented include sensitivity and spring constant. The advantages and limitations of the microbend sensor for static pressure measurement applications are described. A proposed design is presented for a 540 C pressure transducer using the fiber optic microbend sensor.

  1. Fiber optic gyros: the vision realized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlath, George A.

    2006-08-01

    Over thirty five years have elapsed since the fiber optic gyro was proposed by Vali and Shorthill. In those decades, fiber gyros have matured. They are competing head to head with existing technologies such as mechanical gyros and RLGs in tactical, navigation and strategic applications and are winning. Northrop Grumman has produced the majority of fiber optic gyros and fiber optic gyro based inertial products in the world. This paper will cover the various Northrop fiber gyro products, the platforms they are used on, as well as production and top level system data.

  2. Fiber optic communication in borehole applications

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, R.J.; Morgan, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    The Telemetry Technology Development Department have, in support of the Advanced Geophysical Technology Department and the Oil Recovery Technology Partnership, developed a fiber optic communication capability for use in borehole applications. This environment requires the use of packaging and component technologies to operate at high temperature (up to 175{degrees}C) and survive rugged handling. Fiber optic wireline technology has been developed by The Rochester Corporation under contract to Sandia National Labs and produced a very rugged, versatile wireline cable. This development has utilized commercial fiber optic component technologies and demonstrated their utility in extreme operating environments.

  3. Multichannel fiber optic broadband video communication system for monitoring CT/MR examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. K.; Kangarloo, Hooshang; Tecotzky, Raymond H.; Cheng, Xin; Vanderweit, Don

    1991-05-01

    The Department of Radiological Sciences, UCLA operates five MR and four CT scanners located in three different buildings and two mobile sites. We have designed and implemented a multi-channel fiber optic broadband video communication system connecting these scanners together. This system consists of baseband fiber optic transmitters and receivers, a multiplexing headend, and broadband fiber optic transmitters and receivers. It can serve up to 5 km. The video signal from each scanner is sent through a baseband fiber optic link to the headend, where it is frequency modulated and distributed over broadband fiber optic links. A receiver, consisting of a demodulator, a TV monitor, and a channel selector, is placed at fourteen strategic locations including the fiber optic hub rooms, chest, neuroradiology, abdomen, bone, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and pediatric reading rooms as well as scheduling rooms. A radiologist can use any of these fourteen receivers to view a patient''s CT/MR image in real time by selecting the proper channel assigned to the scanner, and use the telephone to communicate with the technologist to monitor the examination. This fiber optic broadband video communication system has been integrated into daily clinical use.

  4. Triaxial fiber optic magnetic field sensor for MRI applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filograno, Massimo L.; Pisco, Marco; Catalano, Angelo; Forte, Ernesto; Aiello, Marco; Soricelli, Andrea; Davino, Daniele; Visone, Ciro; Cutolo, Antonello; Cusano, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we report a fiber-optic triaxial magnetic field sensor, based on Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) integrated with giant magnetostrictive material, the Terfenol-D. The realized sensor has been designed and engineered for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) applications. A full magneto-optical characterization of the triaxial sensing probe has been carried out, providing the complex relationship among the FBGs wavelength shift and the applied magnetostatic field vector. Finally, the developed fiber optic sensors have been arranged in a sensor network composed of 20 triaxial sensors for mapping the magnetic field distribution in a MRI-room at a diagnostic center in Naples (SDN), equipped with Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) instrumentation. Experimental results reveal that the proposed sensor network can be efficiently used in MRI centers for performing quality assurance tests, paving the way for novel integrated tools to measure the magnetic dose accumulated day by day by MRI operators.

  5. Fiber optic communication technology; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, August 23, 24, 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleekamp, C. W.

    Fiber optic components are considered, taking into account a review of developments related to optical fibers, a review of fiber optic cable technology, aspects of fiber system testing, fiber optic splices, a critical review of fiber optic connectors, and fiber optic communication technology branching devices. Developments concerning fiber optic systems are also discussed, giving attention to optoelectronic issues in fiber optic communications, digital fiber optic systems, wideband analog fiber optic systems, fiber optic local area networks, and wavelength division multiplexing.

  6. Reliability of fiber optic emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twu, B.; Kung, H.

    1982-08-01

    Over the past few years a number of fiber optic links were introduced by an American company. Various transmitter-fiber-receiver combinations were studied to satisfy different link performance and reliability requirements. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) were generally used in the transmitter mode. Attention is given to the characteristics of four types of LED's which had been developed, GaAsP LEDs were made from epi-layers grown by vapor phase epitaxy on GaAs substrate. The composition of GaAs and GaP was adjusted to achieve light emission at the desired wavelength. The p-n junction was formed by diffusing zinc into n type epi-layers. GaAlAs LEDs were made from epi-layers grown by liquid phase epitaxy on GaAs substrate. Long term reliability of four LEDs was evaluated. GaAsP diodes showed gradual degradation as a whole. GaAlAs emitters showed insignificant gradual degradation, but they exhibited dark line or dark spot related catastrophic degradation.

  7. Remotely readable fiber optic compass

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Swift, Gregory W.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1986-01-01

    A remotely readable fiber optic compass. A sheet polarizer is affixed to a magnet rotatably mounted in a compass body, such that the polarizer rotates with the magnet. The optical axis of the sheet polarizer is preferably aligned with the north-south axis of the magnet. A single excitation light beam is divided into four identical beams, two of which are passed through the sheet polarizer and through two fixed polarizing sheets which have their optical axes at right angles to one another. The angle of the compass magnet with respect to a fixed axis of the compass body can be determined by measuring the ratio of the intensities of the two light beams. The remaining ambiguity as to which of the four possible quadrants the magnet is pointing to is resolved by the second pair of light beams, which are passed through the sheet polarizer at positions which are transected by two semicircular opaque strips formed on the sheet polarizer. The incoming excitation beam and the four return beams are communicated by means of optical fibers, giving a remotely readable compass which has no electrical parts.

  8. Remotely readable fiber optic compass

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, A.; Swift, G.W.; Garrett, S.L.

    1985-04-30

    A remotely readable fiber optic compass. A sheet polarizer is affixed to a magnet rotatably mounted in a compass body, such that the polarizer rotates with the magnet. The optical axis of the sheet polarizer is preferably aligned with the north-south axis of the magnet. A single excitation light beam is divided into four identical beams, two of which are passed through the sheet polarizer and through two fixed polarizing sheets which have their optical axes at right angles to one another. The angle of the compass magnet with respect to a fixed axis of the compass body can be determined by measuring the ratio of the intensities of the two light beams. The remaining ambiguity as to which of the four possible quadrants the magnet is pointing to is resolved by the second pair of light beams, which are passed through the sheet polarizer at positions which are transected by two semicircular opaque strips formed on the sheet polarizer. The incoming excitation beam and the four return beams are communicated by means of optical fibers, giving a remotely readable compass which has no electrical parts.

  9. Fiber Optic Sensors for Health Monitoring of Morphing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Timothy; Wood, Karen; Childers, Brooks; Cano, Roberto; Jensen, Brian; Rogowski, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors are being developed for health monitoring of future aircraft. Aircraft health monitoring involves the use of strain, temperature, vibration and chemical sensors. These sensors will measure load and vibration signatures that will be used to infer structural integrity. Sine the aircraft morphing program assumes that future aircraft will be aerodynamically reconfigurable there is also a requirement for pressure, flow and shape sensors. In some cases a single fiber may be used for measuring several different parameters. The objective of the current program is to develop techniques for using optical fibers to monitor composite cure in real time during manufacture and to monitor in-service structural integrity of the composite structure. Graphite-epoxy panels were fabricated with integrated optical fibers of various types. The panels were mechanically and thermally tested to evaluate composite strength and sensor durability. Finally the performance of the fiber optic sensors was determined. Experimental results are presented evaluating the performance of embedded and surface mounted optical fibers for measuring strain, temperature and chemical composition. The performance of the fiber optic sensors was determined by direct comparison with results from more conventional instrumentation. The facilities for fabricating optical fiber and associated sensors and methods of demodulating Bragg gratings for strain measurement will be described.

  10. Fiber Optic Network Design Expert System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artz, Timothy J.; Wnek, Roy M.

    1987-05-01

    The Fiber Optic Network Design Expert System (FONDES) is an engineering tool for the specification, design, and evaluation of fiber optic transmission systems. FONDES encompasses a design rule base and a data base of specifications of system components. This package applies to fiber optic design work in two ways, as a design-to-specification tool and a system performance prediction model. The FONDES rule base embodies the logic of design engineering. It can be used to produce a system design given a requirement specification or it can be used to predict system performance given a system design. The periodically updated FONDES data base contains performance specifications, price, and availability data for current fiber optic system components. FONDES is implemented in an artificial intelligence language, TURBO-PROLOG, and runs on an IBM-PC.

  11. Spaceborne Fiber Optic Data Bus (SFODB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretthauer, Joy W.; Chalfant, Chuck H.; Orlando, Fred J.; Rezek, Ed; Sawyer, Marc

    1998-01-01

    The SFODB is a standardized, gigabit per second, highly reliable, fault tolerant fiber optic network. SFODB was designed to the harsh space environments and real-time, on-board data handling applications of high speed, remote sensing spacecraft.

  12. Fiber optics - Failure modes and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyle, Richard A., Jr.

    A study was conducted to investigate the frequency and cause of failures of fiber-optic transmitters, waveguides, receivers, connectors, and splices. To accomplish this, quantitative and qualitative data were collected and evaluated to determine why and when failures occurred and to identify design options which can be made to avoid these failure conditions. An understanding of fiber-optic device failure modes and mechanisms is critical to insuring unit reliability, improving the manufacturing process, and allowing design flexibility of the overall fiber-optic system. The author summarizes the specific failure modes uncovered for typical items such as transmitters, receivers, fiber, cable, connectors, and splices. He also discusses fiber-optic performance criteria, design considerations, failure rate data, and failure mode information.

  13. Electromagnetic enviromental effects on shipboard fiber optic installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucholz, Roger C.

    1991-02-01

    The inherent immunity of fiber optic materials to electromagnetic environmental effects provides numerous opportunities for wide-spread use of fiber optics aboard ship. Federal budget constraints may reduce the development of new fiber optic systems to address military applications. However there are sufficient similarities between industrial and military sensor needs to warrant use of off-the-shelf fiber optic sensor systems.

  14. Fiber optic chemical sensors on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.; Ricco, A.J.; Grunthaner, F.J.; Lane, A.L.

    1993-12-31

    A fiber optic chemical sensing instrument is described that will measure the reactivity of the martian soil and atmosphere. The self- contained instrument monitors reflectivity changes in reactive thin films caused by chemical reactions with the martian soil or atmosphere. Data from over 200 separate thin-film-coated optical fibers are recorded simultaneously. This fiber optic sensing technology has many advantages for planetary exploration and monitoring applications on manned spacecraft, in addition to many practical terrestrial uses.

  15. Adjustable Fiber Optic Microwave Transversal Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shadaram, Mehdi; Lutes, George F.; Logan, Ronald T.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1994-01-01

    Microwave transversal filters implemented as adjustable tapped fiber optic delay lines developed. Main advantages of these filters (in comparison with conventional microwave transversal filters) are small size, light weight, no need for matching of radio-frequency impedances, no need for shielding against electromagnetic radiation at suboptical frequencies, no need for mechanical tuning, high stability of amplitude and phase, and active control of transfer functions. Weights of taps in fiber optic delay lines adjusted.

  16. Improved Microwave Fiber-Optic Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T.; Lutes, George F.

    1995-01-01

    High power output and narrow linewidth of Nd:YAG laser and external modulator combination enable higher stability and higher dynamic range fiber-optic transmission of microwave signals over longer distances. System prototype to test concept of high fidelity transmission of received microwave signals over fiber-optic cables, without need to downconvert microwave signals for transmission. Useful in distribution of future, more stable, frequency reference signals, phased array radar systems, and aircraft landing systems using bistatic radar.

  17. Sealed fiber-optic bundle feedthrough

    DOEpatents

    Tanner, Carol E.

    2002-01-01

    A sealed fiber-optic bundle feedthrough by which a multitude of fiber-optic elements may be passed through an opening or port in a wall or structure separating two environments at different pressures or temperatures while maintaining the desired pressure or temperature in each environment. The feedthrough comprises a rigid sleeve of suitable material, a bundle of individual optical fibers, and a resin-based sealing material that bonds the individual optical fibers to each other and to the rigid sleeve.

  18. Fiber-optic sensor applications in civil and geotechnical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habel, Wolfgang R.; Krebber, Katerina

    2011-09-01

    Different types of fiber-optic sensors based on glass or polymeric fibers are used to evaluate material behavior or to monitor the integrity and long-term stability of load-bearing structure components. Fiber-optic sensors have been established as a new and innovative measurement technology in very different fields, such as material science, civil engineering, light-weight structures, geotechnical areas as well as chemical and high-voltage substations. Very often, mechanical quantities such as deformation, strain or vibration are requested. However, measurement of chemical quantities in materials and structure components, such as pH value in steel reinforced concrete members also provides information about the integrity of concrete structures. A special fiber-optic chemical sensor for monitoring the alkaline state (pH value) of the cementitious matrix in steel-reinforced concrete structures with the purpose of early detection of corrosion-initiating factors is described. The paper presents the use of several fiber-optic sensor technologies in engineering. One example concerns the use of highly resolving concrete-embeddable fiber Fabry-Perot acoustic emission (AE) sensors for the assessment of the bearing behaviour of large concrete piles in existing foundations or during and after its installation. Another example concerns fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors attached to anchor steels (micro piles) to measure the strain distribution in loaded soil anchors. Polymer optical fibers (POF) can be — because of their high elasticity and high ultimate strain — well integrated into textiles to monitor their deformation behaviour. Such "intelligent" textiles are capable of monitoring displacement of soil or slopes, critical mechanical deformation in geotechnical structures (dikes, dams, and embankments) as well as in masonry structures during and after earthquakes.

  19. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  20. Fiber optic sensors for gas turbine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Emily Yixie (Inventor); Brown, Dale Marius (Inventor); Petrucco, Louis Jacob (Inventor); Lovett, Jeffery Allan (Inventor); Daum, Wolfgang (Inventor); Dunki-Jacobs, Robert John (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting flashback occurrences in a premixed combustor system having at least one fuel nozzle includes at least one photodetector and at least one fiber optic element coupled between the at least one photodetector and a test region of the combustor system wherein a respective flame of the fuel nozzle is not present under normal operating conditions. A signal processor monitors a signal of the photodetector. The fiber optic element can include at least one optical fiber positioned within a protective tube. The fiber optic element can include two fiber optic elements coupled to the test region. The optical fiber and the protective tube can have lengths sufficient to situate the photodetector outside of an engine compartment. A plurality of fuel nozzles and a plurality of fiber optic elements can be used with the fiber optic elements being coupled to respective fuel nozzles and either to the photodetector or, wherein a plurality of photodetectors are used, to respective ones of the plurality of photodetectors. The signal processor can include a digital signal processor.

  1. Honeywell FLASH fiber optic motherboard evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, Kent

    1996-10-01

    The use of fiber optic data transmission media can make significant contributions in achieving increasing performance and reduced life cycle cost requirements placed on commercial and military transport aircraft. For complete end-to-end fiber optic transmission, photonics technologies and techniques need to be understood and applied internally to the aircraft line replaceable units as well as externally on the interconnecting aircraft cable plant. During a portion of the Honeywell contribution to Task 2A on the Fly- by-Light Advanced System Hardware program, evaluations were done on a fiber optic transmission media implementation internal to a Primary Flight Control Computer (PFCC). The PFCC internal fiber optic transmission media implementation included a fiber optic backplane, an optical card-edge connector, and an optical source/detector coupler/installation. The performance of these optical media components were evaluated over typical aircraft environmental stresses of temperature, vibration, and humidity. These optical media components represent key technologies to the computer end-to-end fiber optic transmission capability on commercial and military transport aircraft. The evaluations and technical readiness assessments of these technologies will enable better perspectives on productization of fly-by-light systems requiring their utilizations.

  2. Fiber optic sensors for gas turbine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Emily Yixie (Inventor); Brown, Dale Marius (Inventor); Petrucco, Louis Jacob (Inventor); Lovett, Jeffery Allan (Inventor); Daum, Wolfgang (Inventor); Dunki-Jacobs, Robert John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting flashback occurrences in a premixed combustor system having at least one fuel nozzle includes at least one photodetector and at least one fiber optic element coupled between the at least one photodetector and a test region of the combustor system wherein a respective flame of the fuel nozzle is not present under normal operating conditions. A signal processor monitors a signal of the photodetector. The fiber optic element can include at least one optical fiber positioned within a protective tube. The fiber optic element can include two fiber optic elements coupled to the test region. The optical fiber and the protective tube can have lengths sufficient to situate the photodetector outside of an engine compartment. A plurality of fuel nozzles and a plurality of fiber optic elements can be used with the fiber optic elements being coupled to respective fuel nozzles and either to the photodetector or, wherein a plurality of photodetectors are used, to respective ones of the plurality of photodetectors. The signal processor can include a digital signal processor.

  3. Fiber optic sensors for gas turbine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Emily Yixie (Inventor); Petrucco, Louis Jacob (Inventor); Daum, Wolfgang (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting flashback occurrences in a premixed combustor system having at least one fuel nozzle includes at least one photodetector and at least one fiber optic element coupled between the at least one photodetector and a test region of the combustor system wherein a respective flame of the fuel nozzle is not present under normal operating conditions. A signal processor monitors a signal of the photodetector. The fiber optic element can include at least one optical fiber positioned within a protective tube. The fiber optic element can include two fiber optic elements coupled to the test region. The optical fiber and the protective tube can have lengths sufficient to situate the photodetector outside of an engine compartment. A plurality of fuel nozzles and a plurality of fiber optic elements can be used with the fiber optic elements being coupled to respective fuel nozzles and either to the photodetector or, wherein a plurality of photodetectors are used, to respective ones of the plurality of photodetectors. The signal processor can include a digital signal processor.

  4. Research for Electronic Fiber Optics Technologists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Ellis E.

    1999-01-01

    The intent of this project was to provide research experiences for socially and economically disadvantaged students in networking via fiber optics. The objectives of this project were: 1) To provide knowledge and skills needed by students to use the tools and equipment essential to networking NASA's and the university's topologies; 2) To provide the student researchers with needed mathematical skills and concepts to progress in fiber optic technology; 3) To afford the principal investigator an opportunity to become certified in fiber optics; 4) To build a transmitter and receiver circuit that will be linked by fiber-optic cable to demonstrate mastery of concepts; and 5) To conduct research for NASA and the University in the fiber-optic system. The research will attempt to develop applications for THUNDER (Thin-layer Composite Unimorph Ferroelectric Driver and Sensor) and LARC-SI (Langley Research Center- Soluble Polyimide), (inventions at NASA/LaRC) and fiber-optic technology that will be beneficial to NASA, the university and the consumer. This research has the potential of improving the nation's manpower in the area of fiberoptic technology. It will allow students the opportunity to participate in visible research at NASA and in industry.

  5. Fiber Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Air Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided. PMID:22163816

  6. Fiber optic sensors for structural health monitoring of air platforms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided. PMID:22163816

  7. Minutes of the Fiber Optics Standardization Planning Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-12-01

    Partial Contents: Report on NATO Allied Publications for Fiber Optics Components, IECSC, International Electro-Technical Commission Subcommittee 46E on Fiber Optics, EIA TR-44, Optical Communications Systems Committee Report, Fiber Optic Technology Center Briefing, Report on Cleaved-Coupled-Cavity (C3), Semiconductor Lasers, EIA P6.7 Fiber Optic Cable Committee Report, and Report on EIA P-6.1 Committee on Fiber Optics.

  8. Interferometric closed-loop fiber-optic gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkishko, Yuri N.; Fedorov, Vyacheslav &.; Prilutskii, Victor &.; Ponomarev, Vladimir G.; Morev, Ivan V.; Kostritskii, Sergey M.

    2012-02-01

    The operation of Fiber Optic Gyro is based on the Sagnac Effect which states that light beams propagating along opposite directions in a rotating frame experience an optical path length difference. These two counter-propagating waves propagate within a closed fiber coil, and when this coil rotates the resultant phase difference is proportional to the rotation rate Ω. Fiber optic gyroscopes are desirable devices for many navigation and guidance applications because, being solid state devices, they have several major advantages including light weight, long working lifetimes, no moving parts and operate using low voltage power. In this paper the Optolink's single-axis and three-axis fiber optic gyroscopes are described. The Optolink's FOGs consist of the light-emitting diode, one or three photodetectors, circulators and polarization maintaining fiber couplers to divide the light into two or three parts, one or three sets of ring interferometers to sense one or three orthogonal angular rates, and installed PCB signal processing circuits. The ring interferometer consists of a multifunction integrated optic chip and polarization maintaining fiber coil, both these components are designed and fabricated by Optolink. The results illustrate the versatility of the technology, showing its potential to meet both the low-cost, compact sized needs of tactical guidance, as well as the very high performance needs of inertial navigation and precision applications. The optic and electronic blocks of closed-loop gyroscopes with integrated optic components are also considered in this paper.

  9. Fiber-optic currents measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, P.R.; Looney, L.D.; Tabaka, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    Polarization maintaining pigtailed laser diodes have greatly increased the ease with which fiber-optic sensors for Faraday current measurements on large pulsed experiments can be deployed. 670, 830, and 1300 nm units are readily available. Such diode lasers can easily be mounted in an RF shielded box along with the simple electronics and batteries to power them. Our units measure 16.5 [times] 8 [times] 6 cm. and have a single external control; an on off switch. They use two 1.5 volt C'' cell batteries. By using an LT1073 chip in the electronics the batteries are an energy source rather than a voltage source. These units can provide 100 mA drive to a LT015MD laser diode so that 1 mW of 830 nm fight exits the fiber pigtail for up to 23 hours with no detectable droop in power. For the sensor element twisted single mode low birefringence fibers are wrapped around the region of interest. The fiber pigtail is fused to the sensor section so changes in alignment are avoided. The light exiting the fiber sensor section is immediately analyzed by a compact, 3 [times] 3.5 [times] 5 cm, bulk optical unit which outputs quadrature optical signals into two multimode fibers leading to detectors in a screen room. The system is thus completely free of ground loops and is as immune to noise as the screen room. These sensors have the usual advantages claimed for them and the all dielectric feature was the original reason for their use on our experiments. The ease of deployment however is not usually cited. On our Pegasus II experiment the need arose for a total current measurement at the main header of the capacitor banks. A single turn of optical fiber was easily strung in a 6.4 m diameter circle and attached to laser and analyzer in a few hours.

  10. Fiber-optic currents measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, P.R.; Looney, L.D.; Tabaka, L.J.

    1993-03-01

    Polarization maintaining pigtailed laser diodes have greatly increased the ease with which fiber-optic sensors for Faraday current measurements on large pulsed experiments can be deployed. 670, 830, and 1300 nm units are readily available. Such diode lasers can easily be mounted in an RF shielded box along with the simple electronics and batteries to power them. Our units measure 16.5 {times} 8 {times} 6 cm. and have a single external control; an on off switch. They use two 1.5 volt ``C`` cell batteries. By using an LT1073 chip in the electronics the batteries are an energy source rather than a voltage source. These units can provide 100 mA drive to a LT015MD laser diode so that 1 mW of 830 nm fight exits the fiber pigtail for up to 23 hours with no detectable droop in power. For the sensor element twisted single mode low birefringence fibers are wrapped around the region of interest. The fiber pigtail is fused to the sensor section so changes in alignment are avoided. The light exiting the fiber sensor section is immediately analyzed by a compact, 3 {times} 3.5 {times} 5 cm, bulk optical unit which outputs quadrature optical signals into two multimode fibers leading to detectors in a screen room. The system is thus completely free of ground loops and is as immune to noise as the screen room. These sensors have the usual advantages claimed for them and the all dielectric feature was the original reason for their use on our experiments. The ease of deployment however is not usually cited. On our Pegasus II experiment the need arose for a total current measurement at the main header of the capacitor banks. A single turn of optical fiber was easily strung in a 6.4 m diameter circle and attached to laser and analyzer in a few hours.

  11. Glucose determination with fiber optic spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, Eva; Kemper, Ulf; Barschdorff, Dieter

    1999-05-01

    Noninvasive blood glucose monitoring is the aim of research activities concerning the detection of small glucose concentrations dissolved in water and blood plasma. One approach for these measurements is the exploitation of absorption bands in the near infrared. However, the strong absorption of water represents a major difficulty. Transmission measurements of glucose dissolved in water and in blood plasma in the spectral region around 1600 nm with one- beam spectrometers and a FT-IR spectrometer are discussed. The evaluation of the data is carried out using a two-layer Lambert-Beer model and neural networks. In order to reduce the dimensions of a potential measuring device, an integrated acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) with an Erbium doped fiber amplifier as a radiation source is used. The fiber optic components are examined concerning their suitability. The smallest concentrations of glucose dissolved in water that can be separated are approximately 50 mg/dl. In the range of 50 mg/dl to 1000 mg/dl a correlation coefficient of 0.98 between real and estimated glucose concentrations is achieved using neural networks. In blood plasma so far glucose concentrations of about 100 mg/dl can be distinguished with good accuracy.

  12. Infrared fiber optic focal plane dispersers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Far infrared transmissive fiber optics as a component in the design of integrated far infrared focal plane array utilization is discussed. A tightly packed bundle of fibers is placed at the focal plane, where an array of infrared detectors would normally reside, and then fanned out in two or three dimensions to individual detectors. Subsequently, the detectors are multiplexed by cryogenic electronics for relay of the data. A second possible application is frequency up-conversion (v sub 1 + v sub 2 = v sub 3), which takes advantage of the nonlinear optical index of refraction of certain infrared transmissive materials in fiber form. Again, a fiber bundle is utilized as above, but now a laser of frequency v sub 1 is mixed with the incoming radiation of frequency v sub 1 within the nonlinear fiber material. The sum, v sub 2 is then detected by near infrared or visible detectors which are more sensitive than those available at v sub 2. Due to the geometrical size limitations of detectors such as photomultipliers, the focal plane dispersal technique is advantageous for imaging up-conversion.

  13. Intelligent pipelines using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Rod C.; Morison, W. D.; Manuelpillai, Gerald N.

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the application of "long gage" fiber optic sensors (FOS) to monitor the behaviour and integrity of pipelines. A description of the long gage sensor technology is provided, together with the sensor system developed for structural applications. Tests were conducted on pipe sections under a variety of load conditions, including internal pressure, axial compression, bending and local buckling. Long gage sensors were boneded to the pipes and displacements measured using a FOX-TEK FTI 3300 instrument that employs an interferometric technique to obtain displacements to an acuracy of 20 microns. Results obtained showed that the FOS could track changes in loads, detect prebuckling deformations, and measure post-buckling plastic strains. The long gage sensors were then applied to a tailings pipeline in northern Alberta, Canada) to monitor continuously the pipe wall thinning due to erosion/corosion. Employing the FTI 3300 with a PC containing an Aircard for wireless transmission, test data were monitored remotely through internet access. Using analytical models in combination with real-time measurements of the pipe's response, predictions of the operational lifetime for the pipe were made.

  14. Universal fiber-optic C.I.E. colorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for color measurements according to the C.I.E. system comprises a first fiber optic cable for receiving and linearizing light from a light source, a lens system for spectrally displaying the linearized light and focusing the light on one end of a trifurcated fiber optic assembly that integrates and separates the light according to the three C.I.E. tristimulus functions. The separated light is received by three photodiodes and electronically evaluated to determine the magnitude of the light corresponding to the tristimulus functions. The fiber optic assembly is made by forming, at one end, a bundle of optic fibers to match the contours of one of the tristimulus functions, encapsulating that bundle, adding a second bundle that, together with the first bundle, will match the contours of the first plus one other tristimulus function, encapsulating that second bundle, then adding a third bundle which together with the first and second bundles, has contours matching the sum of all three tristimulus functions. At the other end of the assembly the three bundles are separated and aligned with their respective photodiodes.

  15. Scaling of electroresistance effect in fully integrated ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuwasib, Mohammad; Lu, Haidong; Li, Tao; Buragohain, Pratyush; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Gruverman, Alexei; Singisetti, Uttam

    2016-04-01

    Systematic investigation of the scalability for tunneling electroresistance (TER) of integrated Co/BaTiO3/SrRuO3 ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) has been performed from micron to deep submicron dimensions. Pulsed measurements of the transient currents confirm the ferroelectric switching behavior of the FTJs, while the hysteresis loops measured by means of piezoresponse force microscopy verify the scalability of these structures. Fully integrated functional FTJ devices with the size of 300 × 300 nm2 exhibiting a tunneling electroresistance (TER) effect of the order of 2.7 × 104% have been fabricated and tested. Measured current density of 75 A/cm2 for the ON state and a long polarization retention time of ON state (>10 h) show a lot of promise for implementation of high-density BaTiO3-based FTJ memory devices in future.

  16. Fiber Optic Microswitch For Industrial Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desforges, F. X.; Jeunhomme, L. B.; Graindorge, Ph.; LeBoudec, G.

    1988-03-01

    Process control instrumentation is a large potential market for fiber optic sensors and particulary for fiber optic microswitches. Use of such devices brings a lot of advantages such as lighter cables, E.M. immunity, intrinsic security due to optical measurement, no grounding problems and so on. However, commercially available fiber optic microswitches exhibit high insertion losses as well as non optimal mechanical design. In fact, these drawbacks are due to operation principles which are based on a mobile shutter displaced between two fibers. The fiber optic microswitch we present here, has been specially designed for harsh environments (oil industry). The patented operation principle uses only one fiber placed in front of a retroreflecting material by the mean of a fiber optic connector. The use of this retroreflector material allows an important reduction of the position tolerances required in two fibers devices, as well as easier fabrication and potential mass production of the optical microswitch. Moreover, such a configuration yields good performances in term of reflection coefficient leading to large dynamic range and consequently large distances (up to 250 m) between the optical microswitch and its optoelectronic instrument. Optomechanical design of the microswitch as well as electronic design of the optoelectronic instrument will be examined and discussed.

  17. Fabrication of an InP/GaInAsP based integrated gain-coupled DFB laser/M-Z phase modulator for 10Gb/sec fiber optic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Puetz, N.; Adams, D.M.; Rolland, C.; Moore, R.; Mallard, R.

    1996-12-31

    The monolithic integration of lasers and modulators is an attractive approach for the manufacture of compact, low-chirp light sources with low packaging costs for high bit rate (10Gb/s) long haul fiber optic transmission systems. In this presentation the authors describe the fabrication of an InGaAsP/InP-based Mach/Zehnder phase modulator with a gain-coupled DFB laser which achieves 10Gb/s transmission at 1.55 {micro}m over 100km of non-dispersion shifted fiber. The use of an interferometric modulator provides greater freedom for the control of chirp when compared to modulation by electroabsorption. A strained layer multi quantum well gain-coupled DFB laser was employed for the cw-source because of its potential for very high yield of devices which laser in a single mode and for its greater immunity to external reflection. The integration of a phase modulator with a laser requires the deposition of InGaAsP-based quantum wells with different thicknesses over different, but adjacent areas of the InP substrate. Previous efforts of this kind employed Selective Area Epitaxy. Although SAE is an elegant method of locally varying thicknesses of epitaxial films it does not allow the independent growth of different numbers of quantum wells. Therefore, it reduces the designer`s flexibility in choosing the optimum parameters for wells and barriers as well as confinement layers (thickness, number, composition, doping) independently for both the laser and the modulator. For exactly that reason the authors have decided to pursue the butt-coupled approach and deposit the layer sequences for laser and modulator in 2 separate growth runs.

  18. SAFENET 2 fiber optic implementation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, V. W.; Sevinsky, T. P.; Owens, F. J.

    1991-06-01

    The SAFENET II draft Military Handbook, MCCR-0036-DRAFT, establishes requirements and provides guidance for the implementation of a Survivable Adaptable Fiber Optic Network. SAFENET II. The fiber optics communications channel essentially adopts the ANSI Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) Physical Layer Medium Dependent (PMD) Specification, modified by a requirement for increased transmitter optical output power and decreased minimum receiver optical input power (increased sensitivity) to provide a 21 dB overall optical flux budget between (and including) the equipment fiber optic interface connectors (FOIC). A network of cables, optical bypass switches, and spliced fiber joints is described in the Handbook which permit ring operation through up to 5 bypassed nodes while maintaining a minimum 6 dB link optical power margin.

  19. Fiber optic gyro development at Honeywell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Glen A.; Sanders, Steven J.; Strandjord, Lee K.; Qiu, Tiequn; Wu, Jianfeng; Smiciklas, Marc; Mead, Derek; Mosor, Sorin; Arrizon, Alejo; Ho, Waymon; Salit, Mary

    2016-05-01

    Two major architectures of fiber optic gyroscopes have been under development at Honeywell in recent years. The interferometric fiber optic gyro (IFOG) has been in production and deployment for various high performance space and marine applications. Different designs, offering very low noise, ranging from better than navigation grade to ultra-precise performance have been tested and produced. The resonator fiber optic gyro (RFOG) is also under development, primarily for its attractive potential for civil navigation usage, but also because of its scalability to other performance. New techniques to address optical backscatter and laser frequency noise have been developed and demonstrated. Development of novel, enhanced RFOG architectures using hollow core fiber, silicon optical bench technology, and highly stable multifrequency laser sources are discussed.

  20. Hot Springs-Garrison Fiber Optic Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to upgrade its operational telecommunications system between the Hot Springs Substation and the Garrison Substation using a fiber optic system. The project would primarily involve installing 190 kilometers (120 miles) of fiber optic cable on existing transmission structures and installing new fiber optic equipment in BPA`s substation yards and control houses. BPA prepared an environmental assessment (EA) evaluating the proposed action. This EA was published in October 1994. The EA identifies a number of minor impacts that might occur as a result of the proposed action, as well as some recommended mitigation measures. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) identifies specific measures to avoid, minimize, or compensate for impacts identified in the EA.

  1. Hermetic fiber optic modules for avionics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Eric; Kazemi, Alex; Koshinz, Dennis; Soares, Harold; Hager, Harold

    2010-04-01

    In the past, Boeing had successfully developed and produced the hermetic ARINC 636 fiber optic transmitter and receiver modules for the PLANET System in the Boeing 777 commercial airplanes. These hermetic fiber optic modules had demonstrated over 4 millions aggregate flight hours with zero failure; the hermetic fiber seal technology is a key contributor to this outstanding reliability record. Recently, we have investigated failure mechanisms in commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hermetic mini-dil (dual-in-line) laser diode modules; and developed new hermetic fiber seal process for low cost mini-dil form factor packages. In addition, we are also developing cost effective hermetic multi-channel fiber optic array modules technology for aerospace applications.

  2. Fiber-optic lattice signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moslehi, B.; Goodman, J. W.; Shaw, H. J.; Tur, M.

    1984-07-01

    It is pointed out that fiber-optic signal processing devices can be constructed to perform various functions, such as convolution, correlation, matrix operations, and frequency filtering. Previous studies have concentrated on classical tapped-delay-line forms (transversal filters). The present investigation is concerned with different fiber-optic structures, taking into account lattice (or ladder) forms, which can be used as alternatives for performing optical signal processing. The elements to perform the various signal processing operations are considered along with fiber-optic lattice configurations. Aspects of mathematical analysis are discussed, taking into account Z-transform techniques, transfer-matrix and chain-matrix formulations, modern control theory formulations, and positive optical systems. Attention is given to time-domain signal processing applications, and frequency-domain signal processing applications.

  3. Data acquisition with fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kist, R.

    The advantages of using fiber optic sensors for data acquisition are discussed, and their present utilization in this area is examined. Because of their high cost, these sensors are not likely to be competitive in general metrological applications in the near future. They do, however, provide important advantages in specific areas such as isolation against high voltage and immunity against electromagnetic fields and explosive and/or corrosive environments. They also offer the possibility of miniaturized and compact packaging of the sensing element an application within a broad temperature range. Multimode fiber optic sensors for parameters such as temperature, pressure, and refractive index have more immediate commercial potential than monomode fiber optic sensors, which have higher costs. The latter allow for high precision solutions of metrological tasks under specific conditions, and will be utilized in the foreseeable future.

  4. Lightning vulnerability of fiber-optic cables.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

    2008-06-01

    One reason to use optical fibers to transmit data is for isolation from unintended electrical energy. Using fiber optics in an application where the fiber cable/system penetrates the aperture of a grounded enclosure serves two purposes: first, it allows for control signals to be transmitted where they are required, and second, the insulating properties of the fiber system help to electrically isolate the fiber terminations on the inside of the grounded enclosure. A fundamental question is whether fiber optic cables can allow electrical energy to pass through a grounded enclosure, with a lightning strike representing an extreme but very important case. A DC test bed capable of producing voltages up to 200 kV was used to characterize electrical properties of a variety of fiber optic cable samples. Leakage current in the samples were measured with a micro-Ammeter. In addition to the leakage current measurements, samples were also tested to DC voltage breakdown. After the fiber optic cables samples were tested with DC methods, they were tested under representative lightning conditions at the Sandia Lightning Simulator (SLS). Simulated lightning currents of 30 kA and 200 kA were selected for this test series. This paper documents measurement methods and test results for DC high voltage and simulated lightning tests performed at the Sandia Lightning Simulator on fiber optic cables. The tests performed at the SLS evaluated whether electrical energy can be conducted inside or along the surface of a fiber optic cable into a grounded enclosure under representative lightning conditions.

  5. Fiber optic sensor for methane hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Virendra; Chandra, Dinesh

    1999-11-01

    Different types of fiber optic methane sensor, especially for ming application, have been reviewed in this paper. Optical absorption and differential optical absorption techniques for the remote detection of methane gas using low-loss silica fiber have been discussed. IR fiber optic, sol-gel and correlation spectroscopy methods have been described in brief. Another noble technique based on attenuation of evanescent field has been enunciated using D- fiber. Merits and demerits of each technique and its suitability to mining industry have been highlighted. Optical fiber, being a dielectric, non-metallic and non- sparking, is an intrinsically safe media and is ideally suited to the hazardous environment present in mines.

  6. Spaceborne Fiber Optic Data Bus (SFODB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretthauer, Joy W.; Chalfant, Chuck H.; Orlando, Fred J.; Parkerson, P.; Rezek, Ed; Sawyer, Marc

    1999-01-01

    Spaceborne Fiber Optic Data Bus (SFODB) is an IEEE 1393 compliant, gigabit per second, fiber optic network specifically designed to support the real-time, on-board data handling requirements of remote sensing spacecraft. The network is fault tolerant highly reliable, and capable of withstanding the rigors of launch and the harsh space environment. SFODB achieves this operational and environmental performance while maintaining the small size, light weight, and low power necessary for spaceborne applications. On December 9, 1998, SFODB was successfully demonstrated at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC).

  7. Fiber optic hydrogen sensors: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minghong; Dai, Jixiang

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen is one of the next generation energies in the future, which shows promising applications in aerospace and chemical industries. Hydrogen leakage monitoring is very dangerous and important because of its low ignition energy, high combustion efficiency, and smallest molecule. This paper reviews the state-of-art development of the fiber optic hydrogen sensing technology. The main developing trends of fiber optic hydrogen sensors are based on two kinds of hydrogen sensitive materials, i.e. palladium-alloy thin films and Pt-doped WO3 coatings. In this review work, the advantages and disadvantages of these two kinds of sensing technologies will be evaluated.

  8. Characterization of Fiber Optic CMM Probe System

    SciTech Connect

    K.W.Swallow

    2007-05-15

    This report documents a study completed on the fiber optic probe system that is a part of the Werth optical CMM. This study was necessary due to a lack of documentation from the vendor for the proper use and calibration of the fiber probe, and was performed in support of the Lithographie Galvanoformung Abformung (LIGA) development program at the FM&T. As a result of this study, a better understanding of the fiber optic probe has been developed, including guidelines for its proper use and calibration.

  9. Clinical measurements using fiber optic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, J.N.

    1987-09-01

    The use of fiber optics in clinical measurements for illumination and imaging is widespread, but a more advanced sensing concept can be realized. The attachment of species specific fiber terminations at the distal end of the fiber optic so that in-situ analysis can be made is discussed along with measurement instrumentation. These terminations are called optrodes (optical electrodes), and a group of optrodes are presently under development for the in-vivo and in-vitro identification and quantification of species of interest to the clinician. The current development includes pH, carbon dioxide, potassium, and anti-cancer drugs. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Fully integrated aerodynamic/dynamic optimization of helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Lamarsh, William J., II; Adelman, Howard M.

    1992-01-01

    A fully integrated aerodynamic/dynamic optimization procedure is described for helicopter rotor blades. The procedure combines performance and dynamic analyses with a general purpose optimizer. The procedure minimizes a linear combination of power required (in hover, forward flight, and maneuver) and vibratory hub shear. The design variables include pretwist, taper initiation, taper ratio, root chord, blade stiffnesses, tuning masses, and tuning mass locations. Aerodynamic constraints consist of limits on power required in hover, forward flight and maneuvers; airfoil section stall; drag divergence Mach number; minimum tip chord; and trim. Dynamic constraints are on frequencies, minimum autorotational inertia, and maximum blade weight. The procedure is demonstrated for two cases. In the first case, the objective function involves power required (in hover, forward flight and maneuver) and dynamics. The second case involves only hover power and dynamics. The designs from the integrated procedure are compared with designs from a sequential optimization approach in which the blade is first optimized for performance and then for dynamics. In both cases, the integrated approach is superior.