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Sample records for function metabolic control

  1. Circadian Clock Control of Liver Metabolic Functions.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Hans; Asher, Gad

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous biological timekeeping system that synchronizes physiology and behavior to day/night cycles. A wide variety of processes throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract and notably the liver appear to be under circadian control. These include various metabolic functions such as nutrient uptake, processing, and detoxification, which align organ function to cycle with nutrient supply and demand. Remarkably, genetic or environmental disruption of the circadian clock can cause metabolic diseases or exacerbate pathological states. In addition, modern lifestyles force more and more people worldwide into asynchrony between the external time and their circadian clock, resulting in a constant state of social jetlag. Recent evidence indicates that interactions between altered energy metabolism and disruptions in the circadian clock create a downward spiral that can lead to diabetes and other metabolic diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of rhythmic processes in the liver and highlight the functions of circadian clock genes under physiological and pathological conditions; we focus on their roles in regulation of hepatic glucose as well as lipid and bile acid metabolism and detoxification and their potential effects on the development of fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26657326

  2. Hypothalamic inflammation in the control of metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Valdearcos, Martin; Xu, Allison W; Koliwad, Suneil K

    2015-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity leads to devastating and common chronic diseases, fueling ongoing interest in determining new mechanisms underlying both obesity and its consequences. It is now well known that chronic overnutrition produces a unique form of inflammation in peripheral insulin target tissues, and efforts to limit this inflammation have met with some success in preserving insulin sensitivity in obese individuals. Recently, the activation of inflammatory pathways by dietary excess has also been observed among cells located in the mediobasal hypothalamus, a brain area that exerts central control over peripheral glucose, fat, and energy metabolism. Here we review progress in the field of diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation, drawing key distinctions between metabolic inflammation in the hypothalamus and that occurring in peripheral tissues. We focus on specific stimuli of the inflammatory response, the roles of individual hypothalamic cell types, and the links between hypothalamic inflammation and metabolic function under normal and pathophysiological circumstances. Finally, we explore the concept of controlling hypothalamic inflammation to mitigate metabolic disease. PMID:25668019

  3. Metabolic control of regulatory T cell development and function.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hu; Chi, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain immune tolerance and play an important role in immunological diseases and cancers. Recent studies have revealed an intricate relationship between Treg biology and host and microbial metabolism. Various metabolites or nutrients produced by host and commensal microbes, such as vitamins and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), regulate Treg generation, trafficking, and function. Furthermore, cell intrinsic metabolic programs, orchestrated by mTOR and other metabolic sensors, modulate Foxp3 induction and Treg suppressive activity. Conversely, Tregs are crucial in regulating obesity-associated inflammation and host metabolic balance, and in shaping homeostasis of gut microbiota. We review here the interplay between Tregs and metabolism, with a particular focus on how host, commensal, and cellular metabolism impinge upon Treg homeostasis and function. PMID:25248463

  4. Norepinephrine transporter function and autonomic control of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Boschmann, Michael; Schroeder, Christoph; Christensen, Niels Juel; Tank, Jens; Krupp, Goetz; Biaggioni, Italo; Klaus, Susanne; Sharma, Arya M; Luft, Friedrich C; Jordan, Jens

    2002-11-01

    Genetic variability, numerous medications, and some illicit drugs influence norepinephrine transporter (NET) function; however, the metabolic consequences of NET inhibition are poorly understood. We performed a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial in 15 healthy subjects who ingested 8 mg of the selective NET inhibitor reboxetine or placebo. Energy expenditure and substrate oxidation rates were determined by indirect calorimetry before and during iv infusion of 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 micro g isoproterenol/min. Adipose tissue metabolism was studied by microdialysis before and during local isoproterenol perfusion. At rest, energy expenditure and substrate oxidation rates did not differ between reboxetine and placebo treatment. At 1 micro g/min isoproterenol, energy expenditure was significantly increased in men (+15%) and women (+20%) with both reboxetine and placebo treatment. However, carbohydrate oxidation rate was significantly higher with reboxetine compared with placebo. Baseline and isoproterenol-stimulated adipose tissue blood flow was about 2-fold higher with reboxetine vs. placebo. Furthermore, glucose supply and metabolism was significantly increased and lipid mobilization much more stimulated in adipose tissue under reboxetine when compared with placebo at all isoproterenol concentrations used. We conclude that acute NET inhibition increases adipose tissue glucose uptake and metabolism. While lipid mobilization is increased, overall lipid oxidation is decreased during beta-adrenergic stimulation. This effect cannot be explained by increased systemic or adipose tissue norepinephrine concentrations. Instead, NET inhibition may sensitize adipose tissue to beta-adrenergic stimulation. PMID:12414883

  5. Mouse Oocyte Control of Granulosa Cell Development and Function: Paracrine Regulation of Cumulus Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Su, You-Qiang; Sugiura, Koji; Eppig, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Bi-directional communication between oocytes and the companion granulosa cells is essential for the development and functions of both compartments. Oocytes are deficient in their ability to transport certain amino acids and in carrying out glycolysis and cholesterol biosynthesis, and require that cumulus cells provide them with the specific amino acids and the products in these metabolic pathways. Oocytes control metabolic activities in cumulus cells by promoting the expression of genes in cumulus cells encoding specific amino acid transporters and enzymes essential for the oocyte-deficient metabolic processes. Hence, oocytes outsource metabolic functions to cumulus cells to compensate for oocyte metabolic deficiencies. Oocyte control of granulosa cell metabolism may also participate in regulating the rate of follicular development in coordination with endocrine, paracrine and autocrine signals. Oocytes influence granulosa cell development mainly by secretion of paracrine factors although juxtacrine signals probably also participate. Key oocyte-derived paracine factors include growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9), bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) 15, and fibroblast growth factor 8B (FGF8B). PMID:19197803

  6. Metabolic Control of Dendritic Cell Activation and Function: Recent Advances and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Everts, Bart; Pearce, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key regulators of both immunity and tolerance by controlling activation and polarization of effector T helper cell and regulatory T cell responses. Therefore, there is a major focus on developing approaches to manipulate DC function for immunotherapy. It is well known that changes in cellular activation are coupled to profound changes in cellular metabolism. Over the past decade there is a growing appreciation that these metabolic changes also underlie the capacity of immune cells to perform particular functions. This has led to the concept that the manipulation of cellular metabolism can be used to shape innate and adaptive immune responses. While most of our understanding in this area has been gained from studies with T cells and macrophages, evidence is emerging that the activation and function of DCs are also dictated by the type of metabolism these cells commit to. We here discuss these new insights and explore whether targeting of metabolic pathways in DCs could hold promise as a novel approach to manipulate the functional properties of DCs for clinical purposes. PMID:24847328

  7. The Deubiquitylase MATH-33 Controls DAF-16 Stability and Function in Metabolism and Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Heimbucher, Thomas; Liu, Zheng; Bossard, Carine; McCloskey, Richard; Carrano, Andrea C.; Riedel, Christian G.; Tanasa, Bogdan; Klammt, Christian; Fonslow, Bryan R.; Riera, Celine E.; Lillemeier, Bjorn F.; Kemphues, Kenneth; Yates, John R.; O'Shea, Clodagh; Hunter, Tony; Dillin, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY One of the major determinants of aging in organisms ranging from worms to man are FOXO family transcription factors, which are downstream effectors of Insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS). The molecular mechanisms that actively promote DAF16/FOXO stability and function are unknown. Here we identify the deubiquitylating enzyme MATH-33 as an essential DAF-16 regulator in IIS, which stabilizes active DAF-16 protein levels and, as a consequence, influences DAF-16 functions, such as metabolism, stress response and longevity in C. elegans. MATH-33 associates with DAF-16 in cellulo and in vitro. MATH-33 functions as a deubiquitylase by actively removing ubiquitin moieties from DAF-16, thus counteracting the action of the RLE-1 E3-ubiquitin ligase. Our findings support a model in which MATH-33 promotes DAF-16 stability in response to decreased IIS by directly modulating its ubiquitylation state, suggesting that regulated oscillations in the stability of DAF-16 protein play an integral role in controlling processes such as metabolism and longevity. PMID:26154057

  8. Primary Graft Function, Metabolic Control, and Graft Survival After Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Arnalsteen, Laurent; Sergent, Geraldine; Defrance, Frederique; Gmyr, Valery; Declerck, Nicole; Raverdy, Violeta; Vandewalle, Brigitte; Pigny, Pascal; Noel, Christian; Pattou, Francois

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the influence of primary graft function (PGF) on graft survival and metabolic control after islet transplantation with the Edmonton protocol. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 14 consecutive patients with brittle type 1 diabetes were enrolled in this phase 2 study and received median 12,479 islet equivalents per kilogram of body weight (interquartile range 11,072–15,755) in two or three sequential infusions within 67 days (44–95). PGF was estimated 1 month after the last infusion by the β-score, a previously validated index (range 0–8) based on insulin or oral treatment requirements, plasma C-peptide, blood glucose, and A1C. Primary outcome was graft survival, defined as insulin independence with A1C ≤6.5%. RESULTS All patients gained insulin independence within 12 days (6–23) after the last infusion. PGF was optimal (β-score ≥7) in nine patients and suboptimal (β-score ≤6) in five. At last follow-up, 3.3 years (2.8–4.0) after islet transplantation, eight patients (57%) remained insulin independent with A1C ≤6.5%, including seven patients with optimal PGF (78%) and one with suboptimal PGF (20%) (P = 0.01, log-rank test). Graft survival was not significantly influenced by HLA mismatches or by preexisting islet autoantibodies. A1C, mean glucose, glucose variability (assessed with continuous glucose monitoring system), and glucose tolerance (using an oral glucose tolerance test) were markedly improved when compared with baseline values and were significantly lower in patients with optimal PGF than in those with suboptimal PGF. CONCLUSIONS Optimal PGF was associated with prolonged graft survival and better metabolic control after islet transplantation. This early outcome may represent a valuable end point in future clinical trials. PMID:19638525

  9. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2004-03-16

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  10. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2006-10-17

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  11. Metabolic Plasticity in Cancer Cells: Reconnecting Mitochondrial Function to Cancer Control

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujan, V. Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous increase in glycolytic activity defines one of the key metabolic alterations in cancer cells. A realization of this feature has led to critical advancements in cancer detection techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) as well as a number of therapeutic avenues targeting the key glycolytic steps within a cancer cell. A normal healthy cell’s survival relies on a sensitive balance between the primordial glycolysis and a more regulated mitochondrial bioenergetics. The salient difference between these two bioenergetics pathways is that oxygen availability is an obligatory requirement for mitochondrial pathway while glycolysis can function without oxygen. Early observations that some cancer cells up-regulate glycolytic activity even in the presence of oxygen (aerobic glycolysis) led to a hypothesis that such an altered cancer cell metabolism stems from inherent mitochondrial dysfunction. While a general validity of this hypothesis is still being debated, a number of recent research efforts have yielded clarity on the physiological origins of this aerobic glycolysis phenotype in cancer cells. Building on these recent studies, we present a generalized scheme of cancer cell metabolism and propose a novel hypothesis that might rationalize new avenues of cancer intervention. PMID:26457230

  12. SIRT1-dependent regulation of chromatin and transcription: linking NAD(+) metabolism and signaling to the control of cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Kraus, W Lee

    2010-08-01

    Sirtuins comprise a family of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases and ADP-ribosyltransferases. Mammalian SIRT1 - a homolog of yeast Sir2, the prototypical member of the sirtuin family - is an important regulator of metabolism, cell differentiation and senescence, stress response, and cancer. As an NAD(+)-dependent enzyme, SIRT1 regulates gene expression programs in response to cellular metabolic status, thereby coordinating metabolic adaptation of the whole organism. Several important mechanisms have emerged for SIRT1-dependent regulation of transcription. First, SIRT1 can modulate chromatin function through direct deacetylation of histones as well as by promoting alterations in the methylation of histones and DNA, leading to the repression of transcription. The latter is accomplished through the recruitment of other nuclear enzymes to chromatin for histone methylation and DNA CpG methylation, suggesting a broader role of SIRT1 in epigenetic regulation. Second, SIRT1 can interact and deacetylate a broad range of transcription factors and coregulators, thereby regulating target gene expression both positively and negatively. Cellular energy state, specifically NAD(+) metabolism, plays a major role in the regulation of SIRT1 activity. Recent studies on the NAD(+) biosynthetic enzymes in the salvage pathway, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (NMNAT-1), have revealed important functions for these enzymes in SIRT1-dependent transcription regulation. The collective molecular actions of SIRT1 control specific patterns of gene expression that modulate a wide variety of physiological outcomes. PMID:19879981

  13. Effect of the metabolic syndrome on male reproductive function: a case-controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Leisegang, K; Udodong, A; Bouic, P J D; Henkel, R R

    2014-03-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of various risk factors. This study aimed to investigate the effect of MetS on testosterone and progesterone, and semen parameters, in a case-controlled pilot study. Male patients (n = 54) had body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and blood pressure recorded. Blood was analysed for HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose. Saliva was assayed for free testosterone and free progesterone. Ejaculates were analysed for volume, sperm concentration, total sperm count, motility, vitality, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), DNA fragmentation and leucocyte concentration. Participants were divided into the control group (n = 28) and the MetS group (n = 26). Differences were found between the groups for body mass index, WHR, blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides and glucose. The MetS group showed significant reductions in sperm concentration (P = 0.0026), total sperm count (P = 0.0034), total motility (P = 0.0291), sperm vitality (P = 0.002), MMP (P = 0.0039), free testosterone (P = 0.0093) and free progesterone (P = 0.0130), while values for DNA fragmentation increased (P = 0.0287). Results indicate that patients with MetS have compromised sperm parameters in the absence of leucocytospermia. A reduction in free progesterone suggests that steroidogenesis cascades may be compromised. It is hypothesised that a systemic pro-inflammatory state with oxidative stress associated with MetS may provide a novel explanation. PMID:23278477

  14. Structural and Functional Study of Yer067w, a New Protein Involved in Yeast Metabolism Control and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Domitrovic, Tatiana; Kozlov, Guennadi; Freire, João Claudio Gonçalves; Masuda, Claudio Akio; da Silva Almeida, Marcius; Montero-Lomeli, Mónica; Atella, Georgia Correa; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Gehring, Kalle; Kurtenbach, Eleonora

    2010-01-01

    The genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is arguably the best studied eukaryotic genome, and yet, it contains approximately 1000 genes that are still relatively uncharacterized. As the majority of these ORFs have no homologs with characterized sequence or protein structure, traditional sequence-based approaches cannot be applied to deduce their biological function. Here, we characterize YER067W, a conserved gene of unknown function that is strongly induced in response to many stress conditions and repressed in drug resistant yeast strains. Gene expression patterns of YER067W and its paralog YIL057C suggest an involvement in energy metabolism. We show that yeast lacking YER067W display altered levels of reserve carbohydrates and a growth deficiency in media that requires aerobic metabolism. Impaired mitochondrial function and overall reduction of ergosterol content in the YER067W deleted strain explained the observed 2- and 4-fold increase in resistance to the drugs fluconazole and amphotericin B, respectively. Cell fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that Yer067w is associated with cellular membranes despite the absence of a transmembrane domain in the protein. Finally, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of Yer067w shows an alpha-beta fold with low similarity to known structures and a putative functional site. YER067W's involvement with aerobic energetic metabolism suggests the assignment of the gene name RGI1, standing for respiratory growth induced 1. Altogether, the results shed light on a previously uncharacterized protein family and provide basis for further studies of its apparent role in energy metabolism control and drug resistance. PMID:20567505

  15. Metabolic control of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Green, Douglas R.; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Summary Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of “metabolic checkpoints” that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss. PMID:25237106

  16. Acylation of Biomolecules in Prokaryotes: a Widespread Strategy for the Control of Biological Function and Metabolic Stress.

    PubMed

    Hentchel, Kristy L; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2015-09-01

    Acylation of biomolecules (e.g., proteins and small molecules) is a process that occurs in cells of all domains of life and has emerged as a critical mechanism for the control of many aspects of cellular physiology, including chromatin maintenance, transcriptional regulation, primary metabolism, cell structure, and likely other cellular processes. Although this review focuses on the use of acetyl moieties to modify a protein or small molecule, it is clear that cells can use many weak organic acids (e.g., short-, medium-, and long-chain mono- and dicarboxylic aliphatics and aromatics) to modify a large suite of targets. Acetylation of biomolecules has been studied for decades within the context of histone-dependent regulation of gene expression and antibiotic resistance. It was not until the early 2000s that the connection between metabolism, physiology, and protein acetylation was reported. This was the first instance of a metabolic enzyme (acetyl coenzyme A [acetyl-CoA] synthetase) whose activity was controlled by acetylation via a regulatory system responsive to physiological cues. The above-mentioned system was comprised of an acyltransferase and a partner deacylase. Given the reversibility of the acylation process, this system is also referred to as reversible lysine acylation (RLA). A wealth of information has been obtained since the discovery of RLA in prokaryotes, and we are just beginning to visualize the extent of the impact that this regulatory system has on cell function. PMID:26179745

  17. Evaluation of the ovarian reserve function in patients with metabolic syndrome in relation to healthy controls and different age groups

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the ovarian reserve function in female patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Methods This study evaluated 136 subjects, 67 with MetS and 69 controls. Subjects were divided into three age groups. Group I included 49 subjects aged 20–29 years, 22 with MetS and 27 controls; group II included 45 subjects aged 30–39 years, 22 with MetS and 23 controls; and group III included 42 subjects aged 40–49 years, 23 with MetS and 19 controls. Demographic characteristics, anthropometrics, blood biochemistry, and gonadotrophic hormones were compared as total ovarian volume and antral follicle count on ovarian transvaginal ultrasonography. Results Serum levels of FSH, LH, E2 and progesterone were similar in the MetS and control groups, while testosterone levels were significantly higher in MetS patients than controls, both in the overall population (p = 0.024) and in those aged 20–29 years (p = 0.018). Total ovarian volume was significantly lower in MetS patients than controls, in both the overall population (p = 0.003) and those aged 20–29 years (p = 0.018), while antral follicle counts were similar. Ovarian volume correlated positively with antral follicle count (AFC) (r = 0.37; p < 0.001) and negatively with age (r = 0.34; p < 0.001) and FSH concentration (r = 0.21; p = 0.013). AFC was negatively correlated with age (r = 0.36; p < 0.001). Conclusion Ovarian reserve function is significantly lower in MetS patients than in healthy control subjects, particularly in women aged 20–29 years. PMID:24955131

  18. Functional Roles of FgLaeA in Controlling Secondary Metabolism, Sexual Development, and Virulence in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Seong-Mi; McCormick, Susan P.; Butchko, Robert A. E.; Proctor, Robert H.; Yun, Sung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight in cereal crops, produces mycotoxins such as trichothecenes and zearalenone in infected plants. Here, we focused on the function of FgLaeA in F. graminearum, a homolog of Aspergillus nidulans LaeA encoding the global regulator for both secondary metabolism and sexual development. Prior to gene analysis, we constructed a novel luciferase reporter system consisting of a transgenic F. graminearum strain expressing a firefly luciferase gene under control of the promoter for either TRI6 or ZEB2 controlling the biosynthesis of these mycotoxins. Targeted deletion of FgLaeA led to a dramatic reduction of luminescence in reporter strains, indicating that FgLaeA controls the expression of these transcription factors in F. graminearum; reduced toxin accumulation was further confirmed by GC-MS analysis. Overexpression of FgLaeA caused the increased production of trichothecenes and additional metabolites. RNA seq-analysis revealed that gene member(s) belonging to ∼70% of total tentative gene clusters, which were previously proposed, were differentially expressed in the ΔFgLaeA strain. In addition, ΔFgLaeA strains exhibited an earlier induction of sexual fruiting body (perithecia) formation and drastically reduced disease symptoms in wheat, indicating that FgLaeA seems to negatively control perithecial induction, but positively control virulence toward the host plant. FgLaeA was constitutively expressed under both mycotoxin production and sexual development conditions. Overexpression of a GFP-FgLaeA fusion construct in the ΔFgLaeA strain restored all phenotypic changes to wild-type levels and led to constitutive expression of GFP in both nuclei and cytoplasm at different developmental stages. A split luciferase assay demonstrated that FgLaeA was able to interact with FgVeA, a homolog of A. nidulans veA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that FgLaeA, a member of putative FgVeA complex, controls secondary

  19. Dietary and Metabolic Control of Stem Cell Function in Physiology and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mihaylova, Maria M.; Sabatini, David M.; Yilmaz, Ömer H.

    2014-01-01

    Organismal diet has a profound impact on tissue homeostasis and health in mammals. Adult stem cells are a keystone of tissue homeostasis that alter tissue composition by balancing self-renewal and differentiation divisions. Because somatic stem cells may respond to shifts in organismal physiology to orchestrate tissue remodeling and some cancers are understood to arise from transformed stem cells, there is a likely possibility that organismal diet, stem cell function, and cancer initiation are interconnected. Here we will explore the emerging effects of diet on nutrient-sensing pathways active in mammalian tissue stem cells and their relevance to normal and cancerous growth. PMID:24607404

  20. Lactate Regulates Metabolic and Pro-inflammatory Circuits in Control of T Cell Migration and Effector Functions

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Robert; Smith, Joanne; Rocher-Ros, Vidalba; Nadkarni, Suchita; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; D’Acquisto, Fulvio; Bland, Elliot J.; Bombardieri, Michele; Pitzalis, Costantino; Perretti, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Lactate has long been considered a “waste” by-product of cell metabolism, and it accumulates at sites of inflammation. Recent findings have identified lactate as an active metabolite in cell signalling, although its effects on immune cells during inflammation are largely unexplored. Here we ask whether lactate is responsible for T cells remaining entrapped in inflammatory sites, where they perpetuate the chronic inflammatory process. We show that lactate accumulates in the synovia of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Extracellular sodium lactate and lactic acid inhibit the motility of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. This selective control of T cell motility is mediated via subtype-specific transporters (Slc5a12 and Slc16a1) that we find selectively expressed by CD4+ and CD8+ subsets, respectively. We further show both in vitro and in vivo that the sodium lactate-mediated inhibition of CD4+ T cell motility is due to an interference with glycolysis activated upon engagement of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 with the chemokine CXCL10. In contrast, we find the lactic acid effect on CD8+ T cell motility to be independent of glycolysis control. In CD4+ T helper cells, sodium lactate also induces a switch towards the Th17 subset that produces large amounts of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17, whereas in CD8+ T cells, lactic acid causes the loss of their cytolytic function. We further show that the expression of lactate transporters correlates with the clinical T cell score in the synovia of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Finally, pharmacological or antibody-mediated blockade of subtype-specific lactate transporters on T cells results in their release from the inflammatory site in an in vivo model of peritonitis. By establishing a novel role of lactate in control of proinflammatory T cell motility and effector functions, our findings provide a potential molecular mechanism for T cell entrapment and functional changes in inflammatory sites that drive chronic

  1. Metabolic Regulation of Regulatory T Cell Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Coe, David John; Kishore, Madhav; Marelli-Berg, Federica

    2014-01-01

    It is now well established that the effector T cell (Teff) response is regulated by a series of metabolic switches. Quiescent T cells predominantly require adenosine triphosphate-generating processes, whereas proliferating Teff require high metabolic flux through growth-promoting pathways, such as glycolysis. Pathways that control metabolism and immune cell function are intimately linked, and changes in cell metabolism at both the cell and system levels have been shown to enhance or suppress specific T cell effector functions. Furthermore, functionally distinct T cell subsets require distinct energetic and biosynthetic pathways to support their specific functional needs. In particular, naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Treg) are characterized by a unique metabolic signature distinct to that of conventional Teff cells. We here briefly review the signaling pathways that control Treg metabolism and how this metabolic phenotype integrates their differentiation and function. Ultimately, these metabolic features may provide new opportunities for the therapeutic modulation of unwanted immune responses. PMID:25477880

  2. Blueberries improve endothelial function, but not blood pressure, in adults with metabolic syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stull, April J; Cash, Katherine C; Champagne, Catherine M; Gupta, Alok K; Boston, Raymond; Beyl, Robbie A; Johnson, William D; Cefalu, William T

    2015-06-01

    Blueberry consumption has been shown to have various health benefits in humans. However, little is known about the effect of blueberry consumption on blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in humans. The present study investigated the role of blueberry consumption on modifying blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In addition, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity (secondary measurements) were also assessed. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study was conducted in 44 adults (blueberry, n = 23; and placebo, n = 21). They were randomized to receive a blueberry or placebo smoothie twice daily for six weeks. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity were assessed pre- and post-intervention. The blood pressure and insulin sensitivity did not differ between the blueberry and placebo groups. However, the mean change in resting endothelial function, expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI), was improved significantly more in the group consuming the blueberries versus the placebo group (p = 0.024). Even after adjusting for confounding factors, i.e., the percent body fat and gender, the blueberry group still had a greater improvement in endothelial function when compared to their counterpart (RHI; 0.32 ± 0.13 versus -0.33 ± 0.14; p = 0.0023). In conclusion, daily dietary consumption of blueberries did not improve blood pressure, but improved (i.e., increased) endothelial function over six weeks in subjects with metabolic syndrome. PMID:26024297

  3. Mammalian aquaglyceroporin function in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Laforenza, Umberto; Bottino, Cinzia; Gastaldi, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Aquaglyceroporins are integral membrane proteins that are permeable to glycerol as well as water. The movement of glycerol from a tissue/organ to the plasma and vice versa requires the presence of different aquaglyceroporins that can regulate the entrance or the exit of glycerol across the plasma membrane. Actually, different aquaglyceroporins have been discovered in the adipose tissue, small intestine, liver, kidney, heart, skeletal muscle, endocrine pancreas and capillary endothelium, and their differential expression could be related to obesity and the type 2 diabetes. Here we describe the expression and function of different aquaglyceroporins in physiological condition and in obesity and type 2 diabetes, suggesting they are potential therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. PMID:26456554

  4. Metabolic Control of Redox and Redox Control of Metabolism in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reduction-oxidation (Redox) status operates as a major integrator of subcellular and extracellular metabolism and is simultaneously itself regulated by metabolic processes. Redox status not only dominates cellular metabolism due to the prominence of NAD(H) and NADP(H) couples in myriad metabolic reactions but also acts as an effective signal that informs the cell of the prevailing environmental conditions. After relay of this information, the cell is able to appropriately respond via a range of mechanisms, including directly affecting cellular functioning and reprogramming nuclear gene expression. Recent Advances: The facile accession of Arabidopsis knockout mutants alongside the adoption of broad-scale post-genomic approaches, which are able to provide transcriptomic-, proteomic-, and metabolomic-level information alongside traditional biochemical and emerging cell biological techniques, has dramatically advanced our understanding of redox status control. This review summarizes redox status control of metabolism and the metabolic control of redox status at both cellular and subcellular levels. Critical Issues: It is becoming apparent that plastid, mitochondria, and peroxisome functions influence a wide range of processes outside of the organelles themselves. While knowledge of the network of metabolic pathways and their intraorganellar redox status regulation has increased in the last years, little is known about the interorganellar redox signals coordinating these networks. A current challenge is, therefore, synthesizing our knowledge and planning experiments that tackle redox status regulation at both inter- and intracellular levels. Future Directions: Emerging tools are enabling ever-increasing spatiotemporal resolution of metabolism and imaging of redox status components. Broader application of these tools will likely greatly enhance our understanding of the interplay of redox status and metabolism as well as elucidating and

  5. Metabolic Syndrome Biomarkers Predict Lung Function Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Bushra; Weiden, Michael D.; Kwon, Sophia; Gracely, Edward J.; Comfort, Ashley L.; Ferrier, Natalia; Kasturiarachchi, Kusali J.; Cohen, Hillel W.; Aldrich, Thomas K.; Rom, William N.; Kelly, Kerry; Prezant, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Cross-sectional studies demonstrate an association between metabolic syndrome and impaired lung function. Objectives: To define if metabolic syndrome biomarkers are risk factors for loss of lung function after irritant exposure. Methods: A nested case-control study of Fire Department of New York personnel with normal pre–September 11th FEV1 and who presented for subspecialty pulmonary evaluation before March 10, 2008. We correlated metabolic syndrome biomarkers obtained within 6 months of World Trade Center dust exposure with subsequent FEV1. FEV1 at subspecialty pulmonary evaluation within 6.5 years defined disease status; cases had FEV1 less than lower limit of normal, whereas control subjects had FEV1 greater than or equal to lower limit of normal. Measurements and Main Results: Clinical data and serum sampled at the first monitoring examination within 6 months of September 11, 2001, assessed body mass index, heart rate, serum glucose, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), leptin, pancreatic polypeptide, and amylin. Cases and control subjects had significant differences in HDL less than 40 mg/dl with triglycerides greater than or equal to 150 mg/dl, heart rate greater than or equal to 66 bpm, and leptin greater than or equal to 10,300 pg/ml. Each increased the odds of abnormal FEV1 at pulmonary evaluation by more than twofold, whereas amylin greater than or equal to 116 pg/ml decreased the odds by 84%, in a multibiomarker model adjusting for age, race, body mass index, and World Trade Center arrival time. This model had a sensitivity of 41%, a specificity of 86%, and a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve of 0.77. Conclusions: Abnormal triglycerides and HDL and elevated heart rate and leptin are independent risk factors of greater susceptibility to lung function impairment after September 11, 2001, whereas elevated amylin is protective. Metabolic biomarkers are predictors of lung disease, and may be useful for assessing

  6. Metabolic regulation of stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Burgess, R J; Agathocleous, M; Morrison, S J

    2014-07-01

    Stem cell function is regulated by intrinsic mechanisms, such as transcriptional and epigenetic regulators, as well as extrinsic mechanisms, such as short-range signals from the niche and long-range humoral signals. Interactions between these regulatory mechanisms and cellular metabolism are just beginning to be identified. In multiple systems, differentiation is accompanied by changes in glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation and the levels of reactive oxygen species. Indeed, metabolic pathways regulate proliferation and differentiation by regulating energy production and the generation of substrates for biosynthetic pathways. Some metabolic pathways appear to function differently in stem cells as compared with restricted progenitors and differentiated cells. They also appear to influence stem cell function by regulating signal transduction, epigenetic marks and oxidative stress. Studies to date illustrate the importance of metabolism in the regulation of stem cell function and suggest complex cross-regulation likely exists between metabolism and other stem cell regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24697828

  7. Gas biology: tiny molecules controlling metabolic systems.

    PubMed

    Kajimura, Mayumi; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Takenouchi, Toshiki; Morikawa, Takayuki; Hishiki, Takako; Yukutake, Yoshinori; Suematsu, Makoto

    2012-11-15

    It has been recognized that gaseous molecules and their signaling cascades play a vital role in alterations of metabolic systems in physiologic and pathologic conditions. Contrary to this awareness, detailed mechanisms whereby gases exert their actions, in particular in vivo, have been unclear because of several reasons. Gaseous signaling involves diverse reactions with metal centers of metalloproteins and thiol modification of cysteine residues of proteins. Both the multiplicity of gas targets and the technical limitations in accessing local gas concentrations make dissection of exact actions of any gas mediator a challenge. However, a series of advanced technologies now offer ways to explore gas-responsive regulatory processes in vivo. Imaging mass spectrometry combined with quantitative metabolomics by capillary-electrophoresis/mass spectrometry reveals spatio-temporal profiles of many metabolites. Comparing the metabolic footprinting of murine samples with a targeted deletion of a specific gas-producing enzyme makes it possible to determine sites of actions of the gas. In this review, we intend to elaborate on the ideas how small gaseous molecules interact with metabolic systems to control organ functions such as cerebral vascular tone and energy metabolism in vivo. PMID:22516267

  8. Autophagy in cardiac metabolic control: Novel mechanisms for cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yufei; Zhao, Cong; Yang, Pingzhen; Wang, Xianbao; Wang, Lizi; Chen, Aihua

    2016-09-01

    As an extensively studied quality control system, autophagy is responsible for clearance of dysfunctional organelles and damaged marcomolecules in cells. In addition to its biological recycling function, autophagy plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndromes such as obesity and diabetes. In particular, metabolic disorders contribute to cardiovascular disease development. As energy required to maintain cardiac cells functional is immense, disturbances in the balance between anabolic and catabolic metabolism possibly contribute to cardiovascular disorders. Therefore, an urgent need to expand our knowledge on the role of autophagy on the metabolic regulation of hearts emerges. In this review, the potential relationship between autophagic activity and cardiac metabolism is explored and we also discuss how dysregulated autophagy leads to severe cardiac disorders from the perspective of metabolic control. PMID:27191043

  9. The colon: Absorptive, seccretory and metabolic functions.

    PubMed

    Cummings, J G

    1975-01-01

    The role which the human colon fulfils in digestion and metabolism remains largely undocumented. Its capacity to conserve water and electrolytes is well known although how this is controlled is uncertain. In the animal kingdom, calcium and magnesium absorption from the colon are improtant as are absorption and synthesis of vitamins. The abundant microflora of the human colon gives it unique properties. Dietary residue is metabolised forming short-chain fatty acids, hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane; whilst 20% of urea synthesised in man is broken down in the colon to ammonia, which is reabsorbed, and carbonic acid. The microflora also degrades a wide variety of organic compounds including food additives, drugs, bile salts, and cholesterol which may be relevant to the development of colon cancer. Regional differences in colonic function also exist making interpretation of data from this relatively inaccessible organ more difficult. PMID:1205009

  10. Functional roles of FgLaeA in controlling secondary metabolism, sexual development, and virulence in Fusarium graminearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium graminearum, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight in cereal crops, produces mycotoxins such as trichothecenes and zearalenone in infected plants. Here, we focused on the function of FgLaeA in F. graminearum, a homolog of Aspergillus nidulans LaeA encoding the global regulator for both s...

  11. Primitive control of cellular metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitz, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    It is pointed out that control substances must have existed from the earliest times in the evolution of life and that the same control mechanisms must exist today. The investigation reported is concerned with the concept that carbon dioxide is a primitive regulator of cell function. The effects of carbon dioxide on cellular materials are examined, taking into account questions of solubilization, dissociation, changes of charge, stabilization, structural changes, wettability, the exclusion of other gases, the activation of compounds, changes in plasticity, and changes in membrane permeability.

  12. Circadian control of glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne; Fliers, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has risen to epidemic proportions. The pathophysiology of T2DM is complex and involves insulin resistance, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and visceral adiposity. It has been known for decades that a disruption of biological rhythms (which happens the most profoundly with shift work) increases the risk of developing obesity and T2DM. Recent evidence from basal studies has further sparked interest in the involvement of daily rhythms (and their disruption) in the development of obesity and T2DM. Most living organisms have molecular clocks in almost every tissue, which govern rhythmicity in many domains of physiology, such as rest/activity rhythms, feeding/fasting rhythms, and hormonal secretion. Here we present the latest research describing the specific role played by the molecular clock mechanism in the control of glucose metabolism and speculate on how disruption of these tissue clocks may lead to the disturbances in glucose homeostasis. PMID:24944897

  13. Pericellular pH homeostasis is a primary function of the Warburg effect; Inversion of metabolic systems to control lactate steady state in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A; Boukli, Nawal; Rivera, Nery; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    2012-01-01

    2.0 Summary The Warburg effect describes a heightened propensity of tumor cells to produce lactic acid in the presence or absence of O2. Currently, a generally held notion is that the Warburg effect is related to energy. Using whole-genome, proteomic MALDI-TOF-MS and metabolite analysis, we investigate the Warburg effect in malignant N2a cells. The findings show that the Warburg effect serves a functional role in regulating acidic pericellular pH (pHe), which is mediated by metabolic inversion or a fluctuating dominance between glycolytic-rate-substrate level phosphorylation (SLP) and mitochondrial (mt) oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to control lactic acid. Alkaline pHe elevated SLP/OXPHOS ratio (approximately 98% SLP/OXPHOS); vs. neutral (approximately 56% SLP/OXPHOS) or acidic (approximately 93 % OXPHOS/SLP). Acidic pHe paralleled greater expression of mitochondrial biogenesis and OXPHOS genes, such as complex III–V (Uqcr10, Atp5, and Cox7c), mt Fmc1, Romo1, Tmem 173, Tomm6, aldehyde dehydrogenase, mt Sod2 adjunct to loss of mt fission (Mff) and mt biogenesis component PPAR-γ co-activator 1. Moreover, acidic pHe corresponded to metabolic efficiency evidenced by a rise in mTOR nutrient sensor GßL, its downstream target (Eif4ebp1), insulin modulators (Trib3,Fetub) and loss of catabolic (Hadhb,Bdh1,Pygl) / glycolytic processes (aldolase C, pyruvate kinase, Nampt and aldose-reductase). In contrast, alkaline pHe initiated loss of mitofusin 2, complex II-IV (Sdhaf1,Uqcrq,Cox4i2,Aldh1l2), aconitase, mitochondrial carrier triple repeat 1 and mt biosynthetic (Coq2,Coq5,Coq9). In conclusion, the Warburg effect may serve as negative feed-back loop which regulates the pHe toward a broad acidic range by altering lactic acid production through inversion of metabolic systems. These effects were independent of change in O2 concentration or glucose supply. PMID:22320183

  14. Functions for diverse metabolic activities in heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Su, Xue Bessie; Pillus, Lorraine

    2016-03-15

    Growing evidence demonstrates that metabolism and chromatin dynamics are not separate processes but that they functionally intersect in many ways. For example, the lysine biosynthetic enzyme homocitrate synthase was recently shown to have unexpected functions in DNA damage repair, raising the question of whether other amino acid metabolic enzymes participate in chromatin regulation. Using an in silico screen combined with reporter assays, we discovered that a diverse range of metabolic enzymes function in heterochromatin regulation. Extended analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Gdh1) revealed that it regulates silent information regulator complex recruitment to telomeres and ribosomal DNA. Enhanced N-terminal histone H3 proteolysis is observed in GDH1 mutants, consistent with telomeric silencing defects. A conserved catalytic Asp residue is required for Gdh1's functions in telomeric silencing and H3 clipping. Genetic modulation of α-ketoglutarate levels demonstrates a key regulatory role for this metabolite in telomeric silencing. The metabolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase thus has important and previously unsuspected roles in regulating chromatin-related processes. PMID:26936955

  15. Metabolic hormones in saliva: origins and functions

    PubMed Central

    Zolotukhin, S.

    2012-01-01

    The salivary proteome consists of thousands of proteins, which include, among others, hormonal modulators of energy intake and output. Although the functions of this prominent category of hormones in whole body energy metabolism are well characterized, their functions in the oral cavity, whether as a salivary component, or when expressed in taste cells, are less studied and poorly understood. The respective receptors for the majority of salivary metabolic hormones have been also shown to be expressed in salivary glands, taste cells, or other cells in the oral mucosa. This review provides a comprehensive account of the gastrointestinal hormones, adipokines, and neuropeptides identified in saliva, salivary glands, or lingual epithelium, as well as their respective cognate receptors expressed in the oral cavity. Surprisingly, few functions are assigned to salivary metabolic hormones, and these functions are mostly associated with the modulation of taste perception. Because of the well-characterized correlation between impaired oral nutrient sensing and increased energy intake and body mass index, a conceptually provocative point of view is introduced, whereupon it is argued that targeted changes in the composition of saliva could affect whole body metabolism in response to the activation of cognate receptors expressed locally in the oral mucosa. PMID:22994880

  16. Lactate preserves neuronal metabolism and function following antecedent recurrent hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Raimund I.; Jiang, Lihong; Herman, Peter; Zhao, Chen; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Mason, Graeme F.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Rothman, Douglas L.; Sherwin, Robert S.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia occurs frequently during intensive insulin therapy in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and remains the single most important obstacle in achieving tight glycemic control. Using a rodent model of hypoglycemia, we demonstrated that exposure to antecedent recurrent hypoglycemia leads to adaptations of brain metabolism so that modest increments in circulating lactate allow the brain to function normally under acute hypoglycemic conditions. We characterized 3 major factors underlying this effect. First, we measured enhanced transport of lactate both into as well as out of the brain that resulted in only a small increase of its contribution to total brain oxidative capacity, suggesting that it was not the major fuel. Second, we observed a doubling of the glucose contribution to brain metabolism under hypoglycemic conditions that restored metabolic activity to levels otherwise only observed at euglycemia. Third, we determined that elevated lactate is critical for maintaining glucose metabolism under hypoglycemia, which preserves neuronal function. These unexpected findings suggest that while lactate uptake was enhanced, it is insufficient to support metabolism as an alternate substrate to replace glucose. Lactate is, however, able to modulate metabolic and neuronal activity, serving as a “metabolic regulator” instead. PMID:23543056

  17. On functional module detection in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Koch, Ina; Ackermann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes) and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models. PMID:24958145

  18. On Functional Module Detection in Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Ina; Ackermann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes) and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models. PMID:24958145

  19. Control of fluxes in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Basler, Georg; Nikoloski, Zoran; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Barabási, Albert-László; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the control of large-scale metabolic networks is central to biology and medicine. However, existing approaches either require specifying a cellular objective or can only be used for small networks. We introduce new coupling types describing the relations between reaction activities, and develop an efficient computational framework, which does not require any cellular objective for systematic studies of large-scale metabolism. We identify the driver reactions facilitating control of 23 metabolic networks from all kingdoms of life. We find that unicellular organisms require a smaller degree of control than multicellular organisms. Driver reactions are under complex cellular regulation in Escherichia coli, indicating their preeminent role in facilitating cellular control. In human cancer cells, driver reactions play pivotal roles in malignancy and represent potential therapeutic targets. The developed framework helps us gain insights into regulatory principles of diseases and facilitates design of engineering strategies at the interface of gene regulation, signaling, and metabolism. PMID:27197218

  20. Heart Failure and Loss of Metabolic Control

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao V.; Li, Dan L.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, currently affecting 5 million Americans. A syndrome defined on clinical terms, heart failure is the end-result of events occurring in multiple heart diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, genetic mutations and diabetes, and metabolic dysregulation is a hallmark feature. Mounting evidence from clinical and preclinical studies suggests strongly that fatty acid uptake and oxidation are adversely affected, especially in end-stage heart failure. Moreover, metabolic flexibility, the heart’s ability to move freely among diverse energy substrates, is impaired in heart failure. Indeed, impairment of the heart’s ability to adapt to its metabolic milieu, and associated metabolic derangement, are important contributing factors in heart failure pathogenesis. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms governing metabolic control in heart failure will provide critical insights into disease initiation and progression, raising the prospect of advances with clinical relevance. PMID:24336014

  1. Regulation and control of metabolic fluxes in microbes.

    PubMed

    Gerosa, Luca; Sauer, Uwe

    2011-08-01

    After about ten years of research renaissance in metabolism, the present challenge is to understand how metabolic fluxes are controlled by a complex interplay of overlapping regulatory mechanisms. Reconstruction of various regulatory network topologies is steaming, illustrating that we underestimated the broad importance of post-translational modifications such as enzyme phosphorylation or acetylation for microbial metabolism. With the growing topological knowledge, the functional relevance of these regulatory events becomes an even more pressing need. A major knowledge gap resides in the regulatory network of protein-metabolite interactions, simply because we lacked pertinent methods for systematic analyses - but a start has now been made. Perhaps most dramatic was the conceptual shift in our perception of metabolism from an engine of cellular operation to a generator of input and feedback signals for regulatory circuits that govern many important decisions on cell proliferation, differentiation, death, and naturally metabolism. PMID:21600757

  2. Protein Quality Control and Metabolism: Bidirectional Control in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao V.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of heart disease, especially heart failure, continues to increase, and cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. As cardiomyocytes are essentially irreplaceable, protein quality control is pivotal to cellular homeostasis and, ultimately, cardiac performance. Three evolutionarily conserved mechanisms – autophagy, the unfolded protein response, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system– act in concert to degrade misfolded proteins and eliminate defective organelles. Recent advances have revealed that these mechanisms are intimately associated with cellular metabolism. Going forward, comprehensive understanding of the role of protein quality control mechanisms in cardiac pathology will require integration of metabolic pathways and metabolic control. PMID:25651176

  3. Positive Regulatory Control Loop between Gut Leptin and Intestinal GLUT2/GLUT5 Transporters Links to Hepatic Metabolic Functions in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Sakar, Yassine; Nazaret, Corinne; Lettéron, Philippe; Ait Omar, Amal; Avenati, Mathilde; Viollet, Benoît; Ducroc, Robert; Bado, André

    2009-01-01

    metabolic functions in the liver. This loop appears to be a new mechanism (possibly pathogenic) by which fructose consumption rapidly becomes highly lipogenic and deleterious. PMID:19956534

  4. Metabolic Functions of the Lung, Disorders and Associated Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The primary function of the lungs is gas exchange. Approximately 400 million years ago, the Earth’s atmosphere gained enough oxygen in the gas phase for the animals that emerged from the sea to breathe air. The first lungs were merely primitive air sacs with a few vessels in the walls that served as accessory organs of gas exchange to supplement the gills. Eons later, as animals grew accustomed to a solely terrestrial life, the lungs became highly compartmentalized to provide the vast air-blood surface necessary for O2 uptake and CO2 elimination, and a respiratory control system was developed to regulate breathing in accordance with metabolic demands and other needs. With the evolution and phylogenetic development, lungs were taking a variety of other specialized functions to maintain homeostasis, which we will call the non-respiratory functions of the lung and that often, and by mistake, are believed to have little or no connection with the replacement gas. In this review, we focus on the metabolic functions of the lung, perhaps the least known, and mainly, in the lipid metabolism and blood-adult lung vascular endothelium interaction. When these functions are altered, respiratory disorders or diseases appear, which are discussed concisely, emphasizing how they impact the most important function of the lungs: external respiration.

  5. Automatic analysis of the control of metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Bayram, M

    1996-09-01

    In this paper we apply computer algebra techniques to analyze the control of metabolic networks. For this purpose, a computer program based on metabolic control theory was developed. When a stoichiometry matrix of the metabolic networks is given, the program calculates all the control coefficients (flux and metabolic control coefficients, summation and connectivity relationships) using elasticity coefficients. The program can be applied to any metabolic network which includes unlimited steps and intermediate metabolites. PMID:8889337

  6. Mitochondrial Dynamics Controls T Cell Fate through Metabolic Programming.

    PubMed

    Buck, Michael D; O'Sullivan, David; Klein Geltink, Ramon I; Curtis, Jonathan D; Chang, Chih-Hao; Sanin, David E; Qiu, Jing; Kretz, Oliver; Braas, Daniel; van der Windt, Gerritje J W; Chen, Qiongyu; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; O'Neill, Christina M; Edelson, Brian T; Pearce, Edward J; Sesaki, Hiromi; Huber, Tobias B; Rambold, Angelika S; Pearce, Erika L

    2016-06-30

    Activated effector T (TE) cells augment anabolic pathways of metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis, while memory T (TM) cells engage catabolic pathways, like fatty acid oxidation (FAO). However, signals that drive these differences remain unclear. Mitochondria are metabolic organelles that actively transform their ultrastructure. Therefore, we questioned whether mitochondrial dynamics controls T cell metabolism. We show that TE cells have punctate mitochondria, while TM cells maintain fused networks. The fusion protein Opa1 is required for TM, but not TE cells after infection, and enforcing fusion in TE cells imposes TM cell characteristics and enhances antitumor function. Our data suggest that, by altering cristae morphology, fusion in TM cells configures electron transport chain (ETC) complex associations favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and FAO, while fission in TE cells leads to cristae expansion, reducing ETC efficiency and promoting aerobic glycolysis. Thus, mitochondrial remodeling is a signaling mechanism that instructs T cell metabolic programming. PMID:27293185

  7. Application of computer algebra-techniques to metabolic control analysis.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Mustafa; Celik, Ercan

    2003-05-01

    For practical purposes the calculation of rate constants is not particularly valuable, since their physical significance is not clear. Of greater practical use are metabolic control coefficients and elasticities. Given the definition of the flux control coefficients C(E)(J), concentration control coefficient C(E)(X) and elasticity epsilon (X)(v(1)). We can calculate symbolic formulae for these using computer algebra-techniques. These are then functions of V(max), K(m), K(i) enzyme and concentrations. Having derived estimates of V(max), K(m), K(i) using the fitting method we can then calculate values of the control coefficients and elasticities. Furthermore we can calculate the metabolic control parameters using symbolic values for the conventional kinetic parameters. Using these we have verified the summation and connectivity theorems. This is a useful cross check on the reliability of the calculations. PMID:12821311

  8. β-cell function is associated with metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects

    PubMed Central

    Baez-Duarte, Blanca G; Sánchez-Guillén, María Del Carmen; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Zamora-Ginez, Irma; Leon-Chavez, Bertha Alicia; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Islas-Andrade, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Aims The clinical diagnosis of metabolic syndrome does not find any parameters to evaluate the insulin sensitivity (IS) or β-cell function. The evaluation of these parameters would detect early risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between β-cell function and presence of metabolic syndrome in Mexican subjects. Material and methods This study is part of the Mexican Survey on the Prevention of Diabetes (MexDiab Study) with headquarters in the city of Puebla, Mexico. The study comprised of 444 subjects of both genders, aged between 18 and 60 years and allocated into two study groups: (1) control group of individuals at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome and (2) group composed of subjects with metabolic syndrome and diagnosed according to the criteria of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Defection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Anthropometric, biochemical, and clinical assessments were carried out. Results Average age of the subjects in the control group (n = 254) was 35.7 ± 11.5 years and 42.0 ± 10.7 years for subjects in the metabolic syndrome group (n = 190). Subjects at metabolic balance without metabolic syndrome showed decreased IS, increased insulin resistance (IR), and altered β-cell function. Individuals with metabolic syndrome showed a high prevalence (P ≤ 0.05) of family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This group also showed a significant metabolic imbalance with glucose and insulin levels and lipid profile outside the ranges considered safe to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease and T2D. Conclusion The main finding in this study was the detection of altered β-cell function, decreased IS, an increased IR in subjects at metabolic balance, and the progressive deterioration of β-cell function and IS in subjects with metabolic syndrome as the number of features of metabolic syndrome increases

  9. Molecular, metabolic, and genetic control: An introduction.

    PubMed

    Tyson, John J.; Mackey, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    The living cell is a miniature, self-reproducing, biochemical machine. Like all machines, it has a power supply, a set of working components that carry out its necessary tasks, and control systems that ensure the proper coordination of these tasks. In this Special Issue, we focus on the molecular regulatory systems that control cell metabolism, gene expression, environmental responses, development, and reproduction. As for the control systems in human-engineered machines, these regulatory networks can be described by nonlinear dynamical equations, for example, ordinary differential equations, reaction-diffusion equations, stochastic differential equations, or cellular automata. The articles collected here illustrate (i) a range of theoretical problems presented by modern concepts of cellular regulation, (ii) some strategies for converting molecular mechanisms into dynamical systems, (iii) some useful mathematical tools for analyzing and simulating these systems, and (iv) the sort of results that derive from serious interplay between theory and experiment. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779443

  10. Regulation of cardiac metabolism and function by lipogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Bednarski, Tomasz; Pyrkowska, Aleksandra; Opasińska, Agnieszka; Dobrzyń, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited capacity for lipogenesis and de novo lipid synthesis. However, expression of lipogenic genes in cardiomyocytes is unexpectedly high. Recent studies showed that lipogenic genes are important factors regulating cardiac metabolism and function. Long chain fatty acids are a major source of ATP required for proper heart function, and under aerobic conditions, the heart derives 60-90% of the energy necessary for contractile function from fatty acid oxidation. On the other hand, cardiac lipid over-accumulation (e.g. ceramides, diacylglycerols) leads to heart dysfunction. Downregulation of the lipogenic genes' expression (e.g. sterol regulatory element binding protein 1, stearoyl-CoA desaturase, acetyl-CoA kwacarboxylase) decreased heart steatosis and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, improving systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle. Lipogenic factors also regulate fatty acids and glucose utilization in the heart, underlining their important role in maintaining energetic homeostasis in pathological states. Fatty acid synthase, the enzyme catalyzing fatty acids de novo synthesis, affects cardiac calcium signaling through regulation of L-type calcium channel activity. Thus, a growing body of evidence suggests that the role of lipogenic genes in cardiomyocytes may be distinct from other tissues. Here, we review recent advances made in understanding the role of lipogenic genes in the control of heart metabolism and its involvement in the pathogenesis of lipotoxic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27333934

  11. Role and function of short chain fatty acids in rumen epithelial metabolism, development and importance of the rumen epithelium in understanding control of transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The epithelial lining of the rumen is uniquely placed to have impact on the nutrient metabolism of the animal. The symbiotic relationship with the microbial populations that inhabit the rumen, serves to provide a constant supply of nutrients from roughage that would otherwise be unusable. Metaboli...

  12. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions. PMID:26616172

  13. Metabolic regulation of stem cell function in tissue homeostasis and organismal ageing.

    PubMed

    Chandel, Navdeep S; Jasper, Heinrich; Ho, Theodore T; Passegué, Emmanuelle

    2016-08-01

    Many tissues and organ systems in metazoans have the intrinsic capacity to regenerate, which is driven and maintained largely by tissue-resident somatic stem cell populations. Ageing is accompanied by a deregulation of stem cell function and a decline in regenerative capacity, often resulting in degenerative diseases. The identification of strategies to maintain stem cell function and regulation is therefore a promising avenue to allay a wide range of age-related diseases. Studies in various organisms have revealed a central role for metabolic pathways in the regulation of stem cell function. Ageing is associated with extensive metabolic changes, and interventions that influence cellular metabolism have long been recognized as robust lifespan-extending measures. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the metabolic control of stem cell function, and how stem cell metabolism relates to homeostasis and ageing. PMID:27428307

  14. Fueling Immunity: Insights into Metabolism and Lymphocyte Function

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Erika L.; Poffenberger, Maya C.; Chang, Chih-Hao; Jones, Russell G.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphocytes face major metabolic challenges upon activation. They must meet the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of increased cell proliferation and also adapt to changing environmental conditions, in which nutrients and oxygen may be limiting. An emerging theme in immunology is that metabolic reprogramming and lymphocyte activation are intricately linked. However, why T cells adopt specific metabolic programs and the impact that these programs have on T cell function and, ultimately, immunological outcome remain unclear. Research on tumor cell metabolism has provided valuable insight into metabolic pathways important for cell proliferation and the influence of metabolites themselves on signal transduction and epigenetic programming. In this Review, we highlight emerging concepts regarding metabolic reprogramming in proliferating cells and discuss their potential impact on T cell fate and function. PMID:24115444

  15. Vinpocetine modulates metabolic activity and function during retinal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nivison-Smith, Lisa; O'Brien, Brendan J; Truong, Mai; Guo, Cindy X; Kalloniatis, Michael; Acosta, Monica L

    2015-05-01

    Vinpocetine protects against a range of degenerative conditions and insults of the central nervous system via multiple modes of action. Little is known, however, of its effects on metabolism. This may be highly relevant, as vinpocetine is highly protective against ischemia, a process that inhibits normal metabolic function. This study uses the ischemic retina as a model to characterize vinpocetine's effects on metabolism. Vinpocetine reduced the metabolic demand of the retina following ex vivo hypoxia and ischemia to normal levels based on lactate dehydrogenase activity. Vinpocetine delivered similar effects in an in vivo model of retinal ischemia-reperfusion, possibly through increasing glucose availability. Vinpocetine's effects on glucose also appeared to improve glutamate homeostasis in ischemic Müller cells. Other actions of vinpocetine following ischemia-reperfusion, such as reduced cell death and improved retinal function, were possibly a combination of the drug's actions on metabolism and other retinal pathways. Vinpocetine's metabolic effects appeared independent of its other known actions in ischemia, as it recovered retinal function in a separate metabolic model where the glutamate-to-glutamine metabolic pathway was inhibited in Müller cells. The results of this study indicate that vinpocetine mediates ischemic damage partly through altered metabolism and has potential beneficial effects as a treatment for ischemia of neuronal tissues. PMID:25696811

  16. 2011 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism, & Function Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Benning

    2011-02-04

    This is the second Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function'. It covers current topics in lipid structure, metabolism and function in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms including seed plants, algae, mosses and ferns. Work in photosynthetic bacteria is considered as well as it serves the understanding of specific aspects of lipid metabolism in plants. Breakthroughs are discussed in research on plant lipids as diverse as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, lipids of the cell surface, isoprenoids, fatty acids and their derivatives. The program covers nine concepts at the forefront of research under which afore mentioned plant lipid classes are discussed. The goal is to integrate areas such as lipid signaling, basic lipid metabolism, membrane function, lipid analysis, and lipid engineering to achieve a high level of stimulating interaction among diverse researchers with interests in plant lipids. One Emphasis is on the dynamics and regulation of lipid metabolism during plant cell development and in response to environmental factors.

  17. Calcitonin control of calcium metabolism during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soliman, Karam F. A.

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this proposal is to elucidate calcitonin role in calcium homeostasis during weightlessness. In this investigation our objectives are to study: the effect of weightlessness on thyroid and serum calcitonin, the effect of weightlessness on the circadian variation of calcitonin in serum and the thyroid gland, the role of light as zeitgeber for calcitonin circadian rhythm, the circadian pattern of thyroid sensitivity to release calcitonin in response to calcium load, and the role of serotonin and norepinephrine in the control of calcitonin release. The main objective of this research/proposal is to establish the role of calcitonin in calcium metabolism during weightlessness condition. Understanding the mechanism of these abnormalities will help in developing therapeutic means to counter calcium imbalance in spaceflights.

  18. Feeding, evaluating, and controlling rumen function.

    PubMed

    Lean, Ian J; Golder, Helen M; Hall, Mary Beth

    2014-11-01

    Achieving optimal rumen function requires an understanding of feeds and systems of nutritional evaluation. Key influences on optimal function include achieving good dry matter intake. The function of feeds in the rumen depends on other factors including chemical composition, rate of passage, degradation rate of the feed, availability of other substrates and cofactors, and individual animal variation. This article discusses carbohydrate, protein, and fat metabolism in the rumen, and provides practical means of evaluation of rations in the field. Conditions under which rumen function is suboptimal (ie, acidosis and bloat) are discussed, and methods for control examined. PMID:25249402

  19. The central melanocortin system directly controls peripheral lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nogueiras, Ruben; Wiedmer, Petra; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Keogh, Julia M.; Sutton, Gregory M.; Pfluger, Paul T.; Castaneda, Tamara R.; Neschen, Susanne; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Howles, Philip N.; Morgan, Donald A.; Benoit, Stephen C.; Szanto, Ildiko; Schrott, Brigitte; Schürmann, Annette; Joost, Hans-Georg; Hammond, Craig; Hui, David Y.; Woods, Stephen C.; Rahmouni, Kamal; Butler, Andrew A.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Tschöp, Matthias H.

    2007-01-01

    Disruptions of the melanocortin signaling system have been linked to obesity. We investigated a possible role of the central nervous melanocortin system (CNS-Mcr) in the control of adiposity through effects on nutrient partitioning and cellular lipid metabolism independent of nutrient intake. We report that pharmacological inhibition of melanocortin receptors (Mcr) in rats and genetic disruption of Mc4r in mice directly and potently promoted lipid uptake, triglyceride synthesis, and fat accumulation in white adipose tissue (WAT), while increased CNS-Mcr signaling triggered lipid mobilization. These effects were independent of food intake and preceded changes in adiposity. In addition, decreased CNS-Mcr signaling promoted increased insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake in WAT while decreasing glucose utilization in muscle and brown adipose tissue. Such CNS control of peripheral nutrient partitioning depended on sympathetic nervous system function and was enhanced by synergistic effects on liver triglyceride synthesis. Our findings offer an explanation for enhanced adiposity resulting from decreased melanocortin signaling, even in the absence of hyperphagia, and are consistent with feeding-independent changes in substrate utilization as reflected by respiratory quotient, which is increased with chronic Mcr blockade in rodents and in humans with loss-of-function mutations in MC4R. We also reveal molecular underpinnings for direct control of the CNS-Mcr over lipid metabolism. These results suggest ways to design more efficient pharmacological methods for controlling adiposity. PMID:17885689

  20. Estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ are essential coordinators of cardiac metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; McDonald, Caitlin; Petrenko, Nataliya B; Leblanc, Mathias; Wang, Tao; Giguere, Vincent; Evans, Ronald M; Patel, Vickas V; Pei, Liming

    2015-04-01

    Almost all cellular functions are powered by a continuous energy supply derived from cellular metabolism. However, it is little understood how cellular energy production is coordinated with diverse energy-consuming cellular functions. Here, using the cardiac muscle system, we demonstrate that nuclear receptors estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ are essential transcriptional coordinators of cardiac energy production and consumption. On the one hand, ERRα and ERRγ together are vital for intact cardiomyocyte metabolism by directly controlling expression of genes important for mitochondrial functions and dynamics. On the other hand, ERRα and ERRγ influence major cardiomyocyte energy consumption functions through direct transcriptional regulation of key contraction, calcium homeostasis, and conduction genes. Mice lacking both ERRα and cardiac ERRγ develop severe bradycardia, lethal cardiomyopathy, and heart failure featuring metabolic, contractile, and conduction dysfunctions. These results illustrate that the ERR transcriptional pathway is essential to couple cellular energy metabolism with energy consumption processes in order to maintain normal cardiac function. PMID:25624346

  1. Estrogen-Related Receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ Are Essential Coordinators of Cardiac Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; McDonald, Caitlin; Petrenko, Nataliya B.; Leblanc, Mathias; Wang, Tao; Giguere, Vincent; Evans, Ronald M.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all cellular functions are powered by a continuous energy supply derived from cellular metabolism. However, it is little understood how cellular energy production is coordinated with diverse energy-consuming cellular functions. Here, using the cardiac muscle system, we demonstrate that nuclear receptors estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ are essential transcriptional coordinators of cardiac energy production and consumption. On the one hand, ERRα and ERRγ together are vital for intact cardiomyocyte metabolism by directly controlling expression of genes important for mitochondrial functions and dynamics. On the other hand, ERRα and ERRγ influence major cardiomyocyte energy consumption functions through direct transcriptional regulation of key contraction, calcium homeostasis, and conduction genes. Mice lacking both ERRα and cardiac ERRγ develop severe bradycardia, lethal cardiomyopathy, and heart failure featuring metabolic, contractile, and conduction dysfunctions. These results illustrate that the ERR transcriptional pathway is essential to couple cellular energy metabolism with energy consumption processes in order to maintain normal cardiac function. PMID:25624346

  2. Steviol glycosides: chemical diversity, metabolism, and function.

    PubMed

    Ceunen, Stijn; Geuns, Jan M C

    2013-06-28

    Steviol glycosides are a group of highly sweet diterpene glycosides discovered in only a few plant species, most notably the Paraguayan shrub Stevia rebaudiana. During the past few decades, the nutritional and pharmacological benefits of these secondary metabolites have become increasingly apparent. While these properties are now widely recognized, many aspects related to their in vivo biochemistry and metabolism and their relationship to the overall plant physiology of S. rebaudiana are not yet understood. Furthermore, the large size of the steviol glycoside pool commonly found within S. rebaudiana leaves implies a significant metabolic investment and poses questions regarding the benefits S. rebaudiana might gain from their accumulation. The current review intends to thoroughly discuss the available knowledge on these issues. PMID:23713723

  3. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; Orwoll, Shiela; McCarron, David A.

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P < 0.001), elevated parathyroid hormone levels (P < 0.001), reduced calcitonin levels (P < 0.05), unchanged 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) levels, and elevated skull (P < 0.01) and reduced femur bone mineral density. Basal and thrombin-stimulated platelet free calcium (intracellular calcium concentration) were also reduced (P < 0.05). There was a tendency for indirect systolic BP to be reduced in conscious flight animals (P = 0.057). However, mean arterial pressure was elevated (P < 0.001) after anesthesia. Dietary calcium altered all aspects of calcium metabolism (P < 0.001), as well as BP (P < 0.001), but the only interaction with flight was a relatively greater increase in ionized calcium in flight animals fed low- compared with high-calcium diets (P < 0.05). The results indicate that 1) flight-induced disruptions of calcium metabolism are relatively impervious to dietary calcium in the short term, 2) increased ionized calcium did not normalize low-calcium-induced elevations of BP, and 3) parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  4. The Edinburgh human metabolic network reconstruction and its functional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongwu; Sorokin, Anatoly; Mazein, Alexander; Selkov, Alex; Selkov, Evgeni; Demin, Oleg; Goryanin, Igor

    2007-01-01

    A better understanding of human metabolism and its relationship with diseases is an important task in human systems biology studies. In this paper, we present a high-quality human metabolic network manually reconstructed by integrating genome annotation information from different databases and metabolic reaction information from literature. The network contains nearly 3000 metabolic reactions, which were reorganized into about 70 human-specific metabolic pathways according to their functional relationships. By analysis of the functional connectivity of the metabolites in the network, the bow-tie structure, which was found previously by structure analysis, is reconfirmed. Furthermore, the distribution of the disease related genes in the network suggests that the IN (substrates) subset of the bow-tie structure has more flexibility than other parts. PMID:17882155

  5. Metabolic control of hepatic gluconeogenesis during exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Dohm, G L; Newsholme, E A

    1983-01-01

    Prolonged exercise increased the concentrations of the hexose phosphates and phosphoenolpyruvate and depressed those of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, triose phosphates and pyruvate in the liver of the rat. Since exercise increases gluconeogenic flux, these changes in metabolite concentrations suggest that metabolic control is exerted, at least, at the fructose 6-phosphate/fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate substrate cycles. Exercise increased the maximal activities of glucose 6-phosphatase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, pyruvate kinase and pyruvate carboxylase in the liver, but there were no changes in those of glucokinase, 6-phosphofructokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Exercise changed the concentrations of several allosteric effectors of the glycolytic or gluconeogenic enzymes in liver; the concentrations of acetyl-CoA, ADP and AMP were increased, whereas those of ATP, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and fructose 2,6-bisphosphate were decreased. The effect of exercise on the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation state of pyruvate kinase was investigated by measuring the activities under conditions of saturating and subsaturating concentrations of substrate. The submaximal activity of pyruvate kinase (0.5 mM-phosphoenolpyruvate), expressed as percentage of Vmax., decreased in the exercised animals to less than half that found in the controls. These changes suggest that hepatic pyruvate kinase is less active during exercise, possibly owing to phosphorylation of the enzyme, and this may play a role in increasing the rate of gluconeogenesis. PMID:6224482

  6. Physiology of leptin: energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeong-Kyu; Ahima, Rexford S.

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue and regulates energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function, metabolism, immune function and other systems through its effects on the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. Leptin administration has been shown to restore metabolic and neuroendocrine abnormalities in individuals with leptin-deficient states, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and lipoatrophy. In contrast, obese individuals are resistant to leptin. Recombinant leptin is beneficial in patients with congenital leptin deficiency or generalized lipodystrophy. However, further research on molecular mediators of leptin resistance is needed for the development of targeted leptin sensitizing therapies for obesity and related metabolic diseases. PMID:25199978

  7. Microalgal Metabolic Network Model Refinement through High-Throughput Functional Metabolic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Dohai, Bushra Saeed; Cai, Hong; Nelson, David R.; Jijakli, Kenan; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic modeling provides the means to define metabolic processes at a systems level; however, genome-scale metabolic models often remain incomplete in their description of metabolic networks and may include reactions that are experimentally unverified. This shortcoming is exacerbated in reconstructed models of newly isolated algal species, as there may be little to no biochemical evidence available for the metabolism of such isolates. The phenotype microarray (PM) technology (Biolog, Hayward, CA, USA) provides an efficient, high-throughput method to functionally define cellular metabolic activities in response to a large array of entry metabolites. The platform can experimentally verify many of the unverified reactions in a network model as well as identify missing or new reactions in the reconstructed metabolic model. The PM technology has been used for metabolic phenotyping of non-photosynthetic bacteria and fungi, but it has not been reported for the phenotyping of microalgae. Here, we introduce the use of PM assays in a systematic way to the study of microalgae, applying it specifically to the green microalgal model species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results obtained in this study validate a number of existing annotated metabolic reactions and identify a number of novel and unexpected metabolites. The obtained information was used to expand and refine the existing COBRA-based C. reinhardtii metabolic network model iRC1080. Over 254 reactions were added to the network, and the effects of these additions on flux distribution within the network are described. The novel reactions include the support of metabolism by a number of d-amino acids, l-dipeptides, and l-tripeptides as nitrogen sources, as well as support of cellular respiration by cysteamine-S-phosphate as a phosphorus source. The protocol developed here can be used as a foundation to functionally profile other microalgae such as known microalgae mutants and novel isolates. PMID:25540776

  8. Control of macrophage metabolism and activation by mTOR and Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J.; Aksoylar, H. Ibrahim; Horng, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells that assume a variety of functions depending on their tissue of residence and tissue state. They maintain homeostasis as well as coordinate responses to stresses such as infection and metabolic challenge. The ability of macrophages to acquire diverse, context-dependent activities requires their activation (or polarization) to distinct functional states. While macrophage activation is well understood at the level of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation, the metabolic underpinnings are poorly understood. Importantly, emerging studies indicate that metabolic shifts play a pivotal role in control of macrophage activation and acquisition of context-dependent effector activities. The signals that drive macrophage activation impinge on metabolic pathways, allowing for coordinate control of macrophage activation and metabolism. Here we discuss how mTOR and Akt, major metabolic regulators and targets of such activation signals, control macrophage metabolism and activation. Dysregulated macrophage activities contribute to many diseases, including infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases and cancer, thus a better understanding of metabolic control of macrophage activation could pave the way to the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26360589

  9. Fatty acid metabolism in the regulation of T cell function.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Matthias; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2015-02-01

    The specific regulation of cellular metabolic processes is of major importance for directing immune cell differentiation and function. We review recent evidence indicating that changes in basic cellular lipid metabolism have critical effects on T cell proliferation and cell fate decisions. While induction of de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis is essential for activation-induced proliferation and differentiation of effector T cells, FA catabolism via β-oxidation is important for the development of CD8(+) T cell memory as well as for the differentiation of CD4(+) regulatory T cells. We consider the influence of lipid metabolism and metabolic intermediates on the regulation of signaling and transcriptional pathways via post-translational modifications, and discuss how an improved understanding of FA metabolism may reveal strategies for manipulating immune responses towards therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25592731

  10. [Energy metabolism and myocardial function in myocardiodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Temirova, K V; Kurlygina, L A; Zavodskaia, I S; Novikova, N A

    1976-09-01

    A total of 92 patients with chronic tonsilitis and cardiovascular changes were subjected to clinical observations, ECG analysis, potassium and nitroglycerine tests, and studies of the lactic acid level and creatinekinase activity as indces of myocardial metabolism. The examinations were conducted prior to and following tonsillectomy. In a majority of patients a correlation was revealed between the degree of ECG changes and the serum lactic acid level, as well as between the ECG improvement and a reduction of the lactic acid level following tonsillectomy. Three stages of tonsillogenic myocardiodystrophy were distinguished. The obtained data indicate the rationale of the used tests for the evaluation of the myocardial meabolism alterations and of the efficacy of treatment of chronic tonsillitis patients. PMID:1011536

  11. Dependence of hippocampal function on ERRγ-regulated mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pei, Liming; Mu, Yangling; Leblanc, Mathias; Alaynick, William; Barish, Grant D; Pankratz, Matthew; Tseng, Tiffany W; Kaufman, Samantha; Liddle, Christopher; Yu, Ruth T; Downes, Michael; Pfaff, Samuel L; Auwerx, Johan; Gage, Fred H; Evans, Ronald M

    2015-04-01

    Neurons utilize mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) to generate energy essential for survival, function, and behavioral output. Unlike most cells that burn both fat and sugar, neurons only burn sugar. Despite its importance, how neurons meet the increased energy demands of complex behaviors such as learning and memory is poorly understood. Here we show that the estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) orchestrates the expression of a distinct neural gene network promoting mitochondrial oxidative metabolism that reflects the extraordinary neuronal dependence on glucose. ERRγ(-/-) neurons exhibit decreased metabolic capacity. Impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP) in ERRγ(-/-) hippocampal slices can be fully rescued by the mitochondrial OxPhos substrate pyruvate, functionally linking the ERRγ knockout metabolic phenotype and memory formation. Consistent with this notion, mice lacking neuronal ERRγ in cerebral cortex and hippocampus exhibit defects in spatial learning and memory. These findings implicate neuronal ERRγ in the metabolic adaptations required for memory formation. PMID:25863252

  12. Precision Metabolic Engineering: the Design of Responsive, Selective, and Controllable Metabolic Systems

    PubMed Central

    McNerney, Monica P.; Watstein, Daniel M.; Styczynski, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is generally focused on static optimization of cells to maximize production of a desired product, though recently dynamic metabolic engineering has explored how metabolic programs can be varied over time to improve titer. However, these are not the only types of applications where metabolic engineering could make a significant impact. Here, we discuss a new conceptual framework, termed “precision metabolic engineering,” involving the design and engineering of systems that make different products in response to different signals. Rather than focusing on maximizing titer, these types of applications typically have three hallmarks: sensing signals that determine the desired metabolic target, completely directing metabolic flux in response to those signals, and producing sharp responses at specific signal thresholds. In this review, we will first discuss and provide examples of precision metabolic engineering. We will then discuss each of these hallmarks and identify which existing metabolic engineering methods can be applied to accomplish those tasks, as well as some of their shortcomings. Ultimately, precise control of metabolic systems has the potential to enable a host of new metabolic engineering and synthetic biology applications for any problem where flexibility of response to an external signal could be useful. PMID:26189665

  13. Diverse Activities of Histone Acylations Connect Metabolism to Chromatin Function.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arnob; Abmayr, Susan M; Workman, Jerry L

    2016-08-18

    Modifications of histones play important roles in balancing transcriptional output. The discovery of acyl marks, besides histone acetylation, has added to the functional diversity of histone modifications. Since all modifications use metabolic intermediates as substrates for chromatin-modifying enzymes, the prevalent landscape of histone modifications in any cell type is a snapshot of its metabolic status. Here, we review some of the current findings of how differential use of histone acylations regulates gene expression as response to metabolic changes and differentiation programs. PMID:27540855

  14. Brain glucose metabolism during hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes: insights from functional and metabolic neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Rooijackers, Hanne M M; Wiegers, Evita C; Tack, Cees J; van der Graaf, Marinette; de Galan, Bastiaan E

    2016-02-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most frequent complication of insulin therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes. Since the brain is reliant on circulating glucose as its main source of energy, hypoglycemia poses a threat for normal brain function. Paradoxically, although hypoglycemia commonly induces immediate decline in cognitive function, long-lasting changes in brain structure and cognitive function are uncommon in patients with type 1 diabetes. In fact, recurrent hypoglycemia initiates a process of habituation that suppresses hormonal responses to and impairs awareness of subsequent hypoglycemia, which has been attributed to adaptations in the brain. These observations sparked great scientific interest into the brain's handling of glucose during (recurrent) hypoglycemia. Various neuroimaging techniques have been employed to study brain (glucose) metabolism, including PET, fMRI, MRS and ASL. This review discusses what is currently known about cerebral metabolism during hypoglycemia, and how findings obtained by functional and metabolic neuroimaging techniques contributed to this knowledge. PMID:26521082

  15. Pathways and functions of gut microbiota metabolism impacting host physiology.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Smitha; Alden, Nicholas; Lee, Kyongbum

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial populations in the human intestine impact host physiological functions through their metabolic activity. In addition to performing essential catabolic and biotransformation functions, the gut microbiota produces bioactive small molecules that mediate interactions with the host and contribute to the neurohumoral axes connecting the intestine with other parts of the body. This review discusses recent progress in characterizing the metabolic products of the gut microbiota and their biological functions, focusing on studies that investigate the responsible bacterial pathways and cognate host receptors. Several key areas are highlighted for future development: context-based analysis targeting pathways; integration of analytical approaches; metabolic modeling; and synthetic systems for in vivo manipulation of microbiota functions. Prospectively, these developments could further our mechanistic understanding of host-microbiota interactions. PMID:26340103

  16. Metabolic Assessment of Suited Mobility Using Functional Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J. R.; McFarland, S. M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Existing methods for evaluating extravehicular activity (EVA) suit mobility have typically focused on isolated joint range of motion or torque, but these techniques have little to do with how well a crewmember functionally performs in an EVA suit. To evaluate suited mobility at the system level through measuring metabolic cost (MC) of functional tasks.

  17. NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD Metabolism in Vascular Repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Li, Wen-Lin; Liu, Jian-Min; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Vascular repair plays important roles in postischemic remodeling and rehabilitation in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a well-known coenzyme involved in electron transport chain for generation of adenosine triphosphate, has emerged as an important controller regulating various biological signaling pathways. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the rate-limiting enzyme for NAD biosynthesis in mammals. NAMPT may also act in a nonenzymatic manner, presumably mediated by unknown receptor(s). Rapidly accumulating data in the past decade show that NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD metabolism regulate fundamental biological functions in endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and endothelial progenitor cells. The NAD-consuming proteins, including sirtuins, poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs), and CD38, may contribute to the regulatory effects of NAMPT-NAD axis in these cells and vascular repair. This review discusses the current data regarding NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD metabolism in vascular repair and the clinical potential translational application of NAMPT-related products in treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. PMID:26485210

  18. The LKB1-AMPK pathway: metabolism and growth control in tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, David B.; Shaw, Reuben J.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, studies of the human tumor suppressor LKB1 have uncovered a novel signaling pathway that links cell metabolism to growth control and cell polarity. LKB1 encodes a serine/threonine kinase that directly phosphorylates and activates AMPK, a central metabolic sensor. AMPK regulates lipid, cholesterol and glucose metabolism in specialized metabolic tissues such as liver, muscle, and adipose, a function that has made it a key therapeutic target in patients with diabetes. The connection of AMPK with several tumor suppressors suggests that therapeutic manipulation of this pathway with established diabetes drugs warrants further investigation in patients with cancer. PMID:19629071

  19. Effect of Meditation on Endothelial Function in Black Americans with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vaccarino, Viola; Kondwani, Kofi A.; Kelley, Mary E.; Murrah, Nancy V.; Boyd, Linda; Ahmed, Yusuf; Meng, Yuan X.; Gibbons, Gary H.; Hooper, W. Craig; De Staercke, Christine; Quyyumi, Arshed A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Psychological stress may play a role in metabolic syndrome. A consequence of metabolic syndrome is endothelial dysfunction, which is also influenced by psychological stress. We sought to compare the effect of consciously resting meditation (CRM), a sound (mantra)-based meditation, with a control intervention of health education (HE) on endothelial function in the setting of metabolic syndrome. Methods Sixty-eight black Americans with metabolic system risk factors (age 30 to 65 years) were randomized to either CRM (N=33), or to HE (N=35); interventions were matched for frequency and duration of sessions and lasted 12 months. Endothelial function was assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Arterial elasticity, metabolic risk factors, psychosocial and behavioral variables were secondary endpoints. Results Although FMD % improved in the CRM group over 12 months, this increase was not significantly higher than in the HE group (p=0.51 for the interaction between group and time). Non-endothelium dependent dilation and arterial elasticity did not change in either group. Most metabolic syndrome risk factors showed beneficial trends in the CRM group only. A risk factor score counting the number of metabolic syndrome components decreased in the CRM group but not in the control HE group (p=0.049 for the interaction between treatment group and time). Conclusions Among black Americans with metabolic syndrome risk factors, CRM, a sound-based meditation, did not improve endothelial function significantly more than a control intervention of health education. CRM resulted in favorable trends in metabolic syndrome risk factors which were examined as secondary outcomes. PMID:23788695

  20. Space Station CMIF extended duration metabolic control test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, Richard G.; Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Ogle, Kathryn Y.; Wieland, Paul O.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Extended Duration Metabolic Control Test (EMCT) was conducted at the MSFC Core Module Integration Facility. The primary objective of the EMCT was to gather performance data from a partially-closed regenerative Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system functioning under steady-state conditions. Included is a description of the EMCT configuration, a summary of events, a discussion of anomalies that occurred during the test, and detailed results and analysis from individual measurements of water and gas samples taken during the test. A comparison of the physical, chemical, and microbiological methods used in the post test laboratory analyses of the water samples is included. The preprototype ECLS hardware used in the test, providing an overall process description and theory of operation for each hardware item. Analytical results pertaining to a system level mass balance and selected system power estimates are also included.

  1. Thermodynamic-based computational profiling of cellular regulatory control in hepatocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Beard, Daniel A; Qian, Hong

    2005-03-01

    Thermodynamic-based constraints on biochemical fluxes and concentrations are applied in concert with mass balance of fluxes in glycogenesis and glycogenolysis in a model of hepatic cell metabolism. Constraint-based modeling methods that facilitate predictions of reactant concentrations, reaction potentials, and enzyme activities are introduced to identify putative regulatory and control sites in biological networks by computing the minimal control scheme necessary to switch between metabolic modes. Computational predictions of control sites in glycogenic and glycogenolytic operational modes in the hepatocyte network compare favorably with known regulatory mechanisms. The developed hepatic metabolic model is used to computationally analyze the impairment of glucose production in von Gierke's and Hers' diseases, two metabolic diseases impacting glycogen metabolism. The computational methodology introduced here can be generalized to identify downstream targets of agonists, to systematically probe possible drug targets, and to predict the effects of specific inhibitors (or activators) on integrated network function. PMID:15507536

  2. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms in myocardial function and dysfunction are firmly established in both animal models and humans. For example, the incidence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death increases when organisms awaken. Such observations have classically been explained by circadian rhythms in neurohumoral...

  3. Preserved pontine glucose metabolism in Alzheimer disease: A reference region for functional brain image (PET) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Frey, K.A.; Foster, N.L.; Kuhl, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Our goal was to examine regional preservation of energy metabolism in Alzheimer disease (AD) and to evaluate effects of PET data normalization to reference regions. Regional metabolic rates in the pons, thalamus, putamen, sensorimotor cortex, visual cortex, and cerebellum (reference regions) were determined stereotaxically and examined in 37 patients with probable AD and 22 normal controls based on quantitative {sup 18}FDG-PET measurements. Following normalization of metabolic rates of the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain to each reference region, distinctions of the two groups were assessed. The pons showed the best preservation of glucose metabolism in AD. Other reference regions showed relatively preserved metabolism compared with the parietotemporal association cortex and whole brain, but had significant metabolic reduction. Data normalization to the pons not only enhanced statistical significance of metabolic reduction in the parietotemporal association cortex, but also preserved the presence of global cerebral metabolic reduction indicated in analysis of the quantitative data. Energy metabolism in the pons in probable AD is well preserved. The pons is a reliable reference for data normalization and will enhance diagnostic accuracy and efficiency of quantitative and nonquantitative functional brain imaging. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Functional-metabolic imaging of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sharp, S E; Parisi, M T; Gelfand, M J; Yanik, G A; Shulkin, B L

    2013-03-01

    Neuroblastoma is the third most common malignant solid tumor of childhood. It originates from primitive neural crest cells of the sympathetic nervous system. Many imaging procedures help guide therapy and predict outcomes. Anatomic imaging methods, such as CT and MRI, are most useful for evaluation of the primary tumor mass and nearby involved lymph nodes. Functional imaging tracers, such as [123I]MIBG, [18F]FDG, and [99mTc]MDP, are used to assess the extent of disease and to search for distant metastases. [123I]MIBG is the principal functional imaging tracer for the detection and monitoring of neuroblastoma. [18F]FDG PET/CT is an alternative that is valuable in tumors with poor or no MIBG-uptake. [99mTc]MDP bone scans may be useful to assess cortical bone metastases. This article will review the use of [123I]MIBG and other functional imaging agents for the management of patients with neuroblastoma. PMID:23474631

  5. Sleep Control, GPCRs, and Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    Modern lifestyles prolong daily activities into the nighttime, disrupting circadian rhythms, which may cause sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbances have been implicated in the dysregulation of blood glucose levels and reported to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and diabetic complications. Sleep disorders are treated using anti-insomnia drugs that target ionotropic and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists, melatonin agonists, and orexin receptor antagonists. A deeper understanding of the effects of these medications on glucose metabolism and their underlying mechanisms of action is crucial for the treatment of diabetic patients with sleep disorders. In this review we focus on the beneficial impact of sleep on glucose metabolism and suggest a possible strategy for therapeutic intervention against sleep-related metabolic disorders. PMID:27461005

  6. [Basic mechanisms: structure, function and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Errico, Teresa L; Chen, Xiangyu; Martin Campos, Jesús M; Julve, Josep; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present basic information on the lipoprotein physiology. The protein fraction of lipoproteins consists of several apolipoproteins and enzymes whose functions are lipid transport and metabolism. Classification of lipoproteins is based on their density. Chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL can be isolated by ultracentrifugation. Both chylomicrons- and VLDL-triglycerides are transported from the intestine and liver, respectively, to the peripheral tissues. The metabolism of VLDL originates IDL and LDL. LDL is the main transporter of cholesterol to extrahepatic tissues. HDL mobilizes cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver where it is secreted to bile as free cholesterol or bile salts, a process termed reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein metabolism can be regulated by nuclear receptors that regulate the expression of genes involved in triglyceride and apolipoprotein metabolism. PMID:23769508

  7. Metabolism Is Central to Tolerogenic Dendritic Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Wen Jing; Ahl, Patricia Jennifer; Connolly, John Edward

    2016-01-01

    Immunological tolerance is a fundamental tenant of immune homeostasis and overall health. Self-tolerance is a critical component of the immune system that allows for the recognition of self, resulting in hyporeactivity instead of immunogenicity. Dendritic cells are central to the establishment of dominant immune tolerance through the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and regulatory polarization of T cells. Cellular metabolism holds the key to determining DC immunogenic or tolerogenic cell fate. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cell maturation leads to a shift toward a glycolytic metabolic state and preferred use of glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, tolerogenic dendritic cells favor oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. This dichotomous metabolic reprogramming of dendritic cells drives differential cellular function and plays a role in pathologies, such as autoimmune disease. Pharmacological alterations in metabolism have promising therapeutic potential. PMID:26980944

  8. Metabolism control by the circadian clock and vice versa

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms govern a wide variety of physiological and metabolic functions in most organisms. At the heart of these regulatory pathways in mammals is the clock machinery, a remarkably coordinated transcription-translation system that relies on dynamic changes in chromatin states. Recent findings indicate that regulation also goes the other way, as specific elements of the clock can sense changes in the cellular metabolism. Understanding in full detail the intimate links between cellular metabolism and the circadian clock machinery will provide not only crucial insights into system physiology but also new avenues toward pharmacological intervention of metabolic disorders. PMID:19421159

  9. Metabolic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis: case control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of classical cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, obesity, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia is highly prevalent in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of metabolic syndrome (MS) in RA patients, and to evaluate the relationships between metabolic syndrome and RA. Methods The study was conducted on 120 RA patients according to the 1987 revised American College of Rheumatology classification criteria, and 100 age and sex matched apparently healthy controls. The frequency of metabolic syndrome was assessed using six Metabolic Syndrome definitions (Joint Consensus 2009, National Cholesterol Education Programme 2004 and 2001, International Diabetes Federation, World Health Organisation and European Group for Study of Insulin Resistance). Logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of metabolic Syndrome. Results The frequency of metabolic syndrome varied from 18 to 48.6% in RA according to the definition used and was significantly higher than controls (for all definitions p<0.05). In multivariate analysis, higher ESR was independently associated with the presence of Met S (OR =1.36; CI: 1.18–2.12; p = 0.03). Glucocorticoid use, but not other disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), values remained significant independent predictors of the presence of metabolic syndrome in RA patients (OR = 1.45; CI: 1.12–2.14; p = 0.04). Conclusions In summary, the frequency of metabolic syndrome in RA varies according to the definition used and was significantly higher compared to controls (for all definitions p<0.05). Higher systemic inflammatory marker, and glucocorticoids use were independent predictors associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome in patients with RA. These findings suggest that physicians should screen for metabolic syndrome in patients with RA to control its components and therefore reduce the risk of

  10. Phosphatidylserine in the Brain: Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Yong; Huang, Bill X.; Spector, Arthur A.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is the major anionic phospholipid class particularly enriched in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in neural tissues. PS is synthesized from phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine by exchanging the base head group with serine in reactions are catalyzed by phosphatidylserine synthase 1 and phosphatidylserine synthase 2 located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Activation of Akt, Raf-1 and protein kinase C signaling, which supports neuronal survival and differentiation, requires interaction of these proteins with PS localized in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, neurotransmitter release by exocytosis and a number of synaptic receptors and proteins are modulated by PS present in the neuronal membranes. Brain is highly enriched with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and brain PS has a high DHA content. By promoting PS synthesis, DHA can uniquely expand the PS pool in neuronal membranes and thereby influence PS-dependent signaling and protein function. Ethanol decreases DHA-promoted PS synthesis and accumulation in neurons, which may contribute to the deleterious effects of ethanol intake. Improvement of some memory functions has been observed in cognitively impaired subjects as a result of PS supplementation, but the mechanism is unclear. PMID:24992464

  11. Myocardial Function and Lipid Metabolism in the Chronic Alcoholic Animal

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Timothy J.; Khan, Mohammad I.; Ettinger, Philip O.; Haider, Bunyad; Lyons, Michael M.; Oldewurtel, Henry A.; Weber, Marilyn

    1974-01-01

    In view of the variables that obscure the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy, a study was undertaken in mongrel dogs fed ethanol as 36% of calories for up to 22 mo. Both the experimental and control groups maintained body weight, hematocrit, plasma vitamin, and protein levels. Left ventricular function was evaluated in the intact anesthetized dog using indicator dilution for end-diastolic and stroke volume determinations. During increased afterload with angiotensin, the ethanol group exhibited a larger rise of end-diastolic pressure (P<0.01), whereas end-diastolic and stroke volume responses were significantly less than in controls. Preload increments with saline elicited a significantly higher end-diastolic pressure rise in the ethanol group (P<0.01). No hypertrophy, inflammation, or fibrosis was present and it was postulated that the enhanced diastolic stiffness was related to accumulation of Alcian Blue-positive material in the ventricular interstitium. To evaluate myocardial lipid metabolism, [1-14C]oleic acid was infused systemically. Plasma specific activity and myocardial lipid uptake were similar in both groups. There was a significantly increased incorporation of label into triglyceride, associated with a reduced 14CO2 production, considered the basis for a twofold increment of triglyceride content. In addition, diminished incorporation of [14C]oleic acid into phospholipid was observed accompanied by morphologic abnormalities of cardiac cell membranes. Potassium loss and sodium gain, like the lipid alteration, was more prominent in the subendocardium. Thus, chronic ethanol ingestion in this animal model is associated with abnormalities of ventricular function without evident malnutrition, analogous to the preclinical malfunction described in the human alcoholic. Images PMID:4368946

  12. Metabolic control of cancer cell stemness: Lessons from iPS cells

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel prized discovery of nuclear reprogramming is swiftly providing mechanistic evidence of a role for metabolism in the generation of cancer stem cells (CSC). Traditionally, the metabolic demands of tumors have been viewed as drivers of the genetic programming detected in cancer tissues. Beyond the energetic requirements of specific cancer cell states, it is increasingly recognized that metabolism per se controls epi-transcriptional networks to dictate cancer cell fate, i.e., metabolism can define CSC. Here I review the CSC-related metabolic features found in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to provide an easily understandable framework in which the infrastructure and functioning of cellular metabolism might control the efficiency and kinetics of reprogramming in the re-routing of non-CSC to CSC-like cellular states. I suggest exploring how metabolism-dependent regulation of epigenetics can play a role in directing CSC states beyond conventional energetic demands of stage-specific cancer cell states, opening a new dimension of cancer in which the “physiological state” of CSC might be governed not only by cell-autonomous cues but also by local micro-environmental and systemic metabolo-epigenetic interactions. Forthcoming studies should decipher how specific metabolites integrate and mediate the overlap between the CSC-intrinsic “micro-epigenetics” and the “upstream” local and systemic “macro-epigenetics," thus paving the way for targeted epigenetic regulation of CSCs through metabolic modulation including "smart foods" or systemic "metabolic nichotherapies." PMID:25738999

  13. Metabolic control of cancer cell stemness: Lessons from iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel prized discovery of nuclear reprogramming is swiftly providing mechanistic evidence of a role for metabolism in the generation of cancer stem cells (CSC). Traditionally, the metabolic demands of tumors have been viewed as drivers of the genetic programming detected in cancer tissues. Beyond the energetic requirements of specific cancer cell states, it is increasingly recognized that metabolism per se controls epi-transcriptional networks to dictate cancer cell fate, i.e., metabolism can define CSC. Here I review the CSC-related metabolic features found in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to provide an easily understandable framework in which the infrastructure and functioning of cellular metabolism might control the efficiency and kinetics of reprogramming in the re-routing of non-CSC to CSC-like cellular states. I suggest exploring how metabolism-dependent regulation of epigenetics can play a role in directing CSC states beyond conventional energetic demands of stage-specific cancer cell states, opening a new dimension of cancer in which the "physiological state" of CSC might be governed not only by cell-autonomous cues but also by local micro-environmental and systemic metabolo-epigenetic interactions. Forthcoming studies should decipher how specific metabolites integrate and mediate the overlap between the CSC-intrinsic "micro-epigenetics" and the "upstream" local and systemic "macro-epigenetics," thus paving the way for targeted epigenetic regulation of CSCs through metabolic modulation including "smart foods" or systemic "metabolic nichotherapies." PMID:25738999

  14. Resting amygdala and medial prefrontal metabolism predicts functional activation of the fear extinction circuit

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Zeidan, Mohamed A.; Furtak, Sharon C.; Pitman, Roger K.; Quirk, Gregory J.; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Individual differences in ability to control fear have been linked to activation of dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. This study investigated whether functional variance in this network can be predicted by resting metabolism in these same regions. Methods Healthy subject volunteers were studied with positron emission tomography using [18F]-deoxyglucose to measure resting brain metabolism. This was followed by a two-day fear conditioning and extinction training paradigm in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner to measure brain activation during fear extinction and its recall. Skin conductance response was used to index conditioned responding. Resting metabolism in amygdala, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and ventromedial prefrontal cortex were used to predict responses during fear extinction and extinction recall. Results During extinction training, resting amygdala metabolism positively predicted ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and negatively predicted dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, activation. In contrast, during extinction recall, resting amygdala metabolism negatively predicted ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and positively predicted dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, activation. Resting dorsal anterior cingulate cortex metabolism predicted fear expression (skin conductance response) during extinction recall. Conclusions Brain metabolism at rest predicts neuronal reactivity and skin conductance changes associated with recall of the fear extinction memory. PMID:22318762

  15. Metabolic functions of FABPs— mechanisms and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.; Bernlohr, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular and extracellular interactions with proteins enables the functional and mechanistic diversity of lipids. Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) were originally described as intracellular proteins that can affect lipid fluxes, metabolism and signalling within cells. As the functions of this protein family have been further elucidated, it has become evident that they are critical mediators of metabolism and inflammatory processes, both locally and systemically, and therefore are potential therapeutic targets for immunometabolic diseases. In particular, genetic deficiency and small molecule-mediated inhibition of FABP4 (also known as aP2) and FABP5 can potently improve glucose homeostasis and reduce atherosclerosis in mouse models. Further research has shown that in addition to their intracellular roles, some FABPs are found outside the cells, and FABP4 undergoes regulated, vesicular secretion. The circulating form of FABP4 has crucial hormonal functions in systemic metabolism. In this Review we discuss the roles and regulation of both intracellular and extracellular FABP actions, highlighting new insights that might direct drug discovery efforts and opportunities for management of chronic metabolic diseases. PMID:26260145

  16. Simple topological properties predict functional misannotations in a metabolic network

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Pinney, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Misannotation in sequence databases is an important obstacle for automated tools for gene function annotation, which rely extensively on comparison with sequences with known function. To improve current annotations and prevent future propagation of errors, sequence-independent tools are, therefore, needed to assist in the identification of misannotated gene products. In the case of enzymatic functions, each functional assignment implies the existence of a reaction within the organism’s metabolic network; a first approximation to a genome-scale metabolic model can be obtained directly from an automated genome annotation. Any obvious problems in the network, such as dead end or disconnected reactions, can, therefore, be strong indications of misannotation. Results: We demonstrate that a machine-learning approach using only network topological features can successfully predict the validity of enzyme annotations. The predictions are tested at three different levels. A random forest using topological features of the metabolic network and trained on curated sets of correct and incorrect enzyme assignments was found to have an accuracy of up to 86% in 5-fold cross-validation experiments. Further cross-validation against unseen enzyme superfamilies indicates that this classifier can successfully extrapolate beyond the classes of enzyme present in the training data. The random forest model was applied to several automated genome annotations, achieving an accuracy of in most cases when validated against recent genome-scale metabolic models. We also observe that when applied to draft metabolic networks for multiple species, a clear negative correlation is observed between predicted annotation quality and phylogenetic distance to the major model organism for biochemistry (Escherichia coli for prokaryotes and Homo sapiens for eukaryotes). Contact: j.pinney@imperial.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID

  17. Muscle microvasculature's structural and functional specializations facilitate muscle metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Yvo H A M; Barrett, Eugene J

    2016-03-15

    We review the evolving findings from studies that examine the relationship between the structural and functional properties of skeletal muscle's vasculature and muscle metabolism. Unique aspects of the organization of the muscle microvasculature are highlighted. We discuss the role of vasomotion at the microscopic level and of flowmotion at the tissue level as modulators of perfusion distribution in muscle. We then consider in some detail how insulin and exercise each modulate muscle perfusion at both the microvascular and whole tissue level. The central role of the vascular endothelial cell in modulating both perfusion and transendothelial insulin and nutrient transport is also reviewed. The relationship between muscle metabolic insulin resistance and the vascular action of insulin in muscle continues to indicate an important role for the microvasculature as a target for insulin action and that impairing insulin's microvascular action significantly affects body glucose metabolism. PMID:26714849

  18. Effect of metabolic syndrome on mitsugumin 53 expression and function.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hanley; Liu, Jason; Bian, Zehua; Cui, Yuqi; Zhou, Xinyu; Zhou, Xuefeng; Zhang, Bo; Adesanya, T M Ayodele; Yi, Frank; Park, Ki Ho; Tan, Tao; Chen, Zhishui; Zhu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia that increases the individual's likelihood of developing cardiovascular diseases. Patients inflicted with metabolic disorders also suffer from tissue repair defect. Mitsugumin 53 (MG53) is a protein essential to cellular membrane repair. It facilitates the nucleation of intracellular vesicles to sites of membrane disruption to create repair patches, contributing to the regenerative capacity of skeletal and cardiac muscle tissues upon injury. Since individuals suffering from metabolic syndrome possess tissue regeneration deficiency and MG53 plays a crucial role in restoring membrane integrity, we studied MG53 activity in mice models exhibiting metabolic disorders induced by a 6 month high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. Western blotting showed that MG53 expression is not altered within the skeletal and cardiac muscles of mice with metabolic syndrome. Rather, we found that MG53 levels in blood circulation were actually reduced. This data directly contradicts findings presented by Song et. al that indict MG53 as a causative factor for metabolic syndrome (Nature 494, 375-379). The diminished MG53 serum level observed may contribute to the inadequate tissue repair aptitude exhibited by diabetic patients. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analyses reveal that skeletal muscle fibers of mice with metabolic disorders experience localization of subcellular MG53 around mitochondria. This clustering may represent an adaptive response to oxidative stress resulting from HFD feeding and may implicate MG53 as a guardian to protect damaged mitochondria. Therapeutic approaches that elevate MG53 expression in serum circulation may be a novel method to treat the degenerative tissue repair function of diabetic patients. PMID:25950605

  19. Dietary Fiber Supplements: Effects in Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome and Relationship to Gastrointestinal Functions

    PubMed Central

    Papathanasopoulos, Athanasios; Camilleri, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fiber (DF) is a term that reflects to a heterogenous group of natural food sources, processed grains and commercial supplements. Several forms of DF have been used as complementary or alternative agents in the management of manifestations of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity. Not surprisingly, there is a great variation in the biological efficacy of DF in metabolic syndrome and body weight control. Diverse factors and mechanisms have been reported as mediators of the effects of DF on the metabolic syndrome and obesity. Among this array of mechanisms, the modulation of gastric sensorimotor influences appears to be crucial for the effects of DF, but also quite variable. This article focuses on the role, mechanism of action and benefits of different forms of fiber and supplements on obesity and metabolic syndrome, glycemia, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular risk, and explores the effects of DF on gastric sensorimotor function and satiety in mediating these actions of DF. PMID:19931537

  20. Metabolic control of puberty onset: new players, new mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Roa, Juan; García-Galiano, David; Castellano, Juan M; Gaytan, Francisco; Pinilla, Leonor; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2010-08-01

    Puberty, as the end-point of a complex series of maturational events affecting the components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, is gated by the state of body energy reserves and sensitive to different metabolic cues; conditions of severe metabolic stress and energy unbalance (from anorexia to morbid obesity) being commonly linked to perturbation of the onset of puberty. In the last two decades, the neuroendocrine mechanisms responsible for the tight coupling between energy homeostasis and puberty onset have begun to be deciphered. These seemingly involve a plethora of metabolic hormones and neuropeptides, which impinge and integrate (mostly) at the hypothalamic centers governing reproduction. Yet, characterization of the mechanisms of action of such regulators (and even their nature and physiological relevance) still remains incomplete. In this review, we will summarize some recent developments in our knowledge of the effects and mechanisms of action of two key metabolic hormones, leptin and ghrelin, in the control of puberty onset. In addition, the roles of the hypothalamic Kiss1 system in the metabolic gating of puberty will be reviewed, with special attention to its regulation by leptin and the recent identification of the putative roles of Crtc1 and mTOR signaling as molecular conduits for the metabolic control of Kiss1 expression. Elucidation of these novel players and regulatory mechanisms will help for a better understanding of the determinants of the timing of puberty, and its eventual alterations in adverse metabolic conditions. PMID:20026241

  1. Dependence of Hippocampal Function on ERRγ Regulated Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Liming; Mu, Yangling; Leblanc, Mathias; Alaynick, William; Barish, Grant D.; Pankratz, Matthew; Tseng, Tiffany W.; Kaufman, Samantha; Liddle, Christopher; Yu, Ruth T.; Downes, Michael; Pfaff, Samuel L.; Auwerx, Johan; Gage, Fred H.; Evans, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurons utilize mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) to generate energy essential for survival, function and behavioral output. Unlike most cells that burn both fat and sugar, neurons only burn sugar. Despite its importance, how neurons meet the increased energy demands of complex behaviors such as learning and memory is poorly understood. Here we show that the estrogen related receptor gamma (ERRγ) orchestrates the expression of a distinct neural gene network promoting mitochondrial oxidative metabolism that reflects the extraordinary neuronal dependence on glucose. ERRγ−/− neurons exhibit decreased metabolic capacity. Impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP) in ERRγ−/− hippocampal slices can be fully rescued by the mitochondrial OxPhos substrate pyruvate, functionally linking the ERRγ knockout metabolic phenotype and memory formation. Consistent with this notion, mice lacking neuronal ERRγ in cerebral cortex and hippocampus exhibit defects in spatial learning and memory. These findings implicate neuronal ERRγ in the metabolic adaptations required for memory formation. PMID:25863252

  2. The Tacrolimus Metabolism Rate Influences Renal Function after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Fortmann, Christian; Koch, Raphael; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Pabst, Dirk; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kabar, Iyad; Hüsing, Anna; Wolters, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    The effective calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) tacrolimus (Tac) is an integral part of the standard immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation (RTx). However, as a potent CNI it has nephrotoxic potential leading to impaired renal function in some cases. Therefore, it is of high clinical impact to identify factors which can predict who is endangered to develop CNI toxicity. We hypothesized that the Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the dose (C/D ratio) is such a simple predictor. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of the C/D ratio on kidney function after RTx. Renal function was analyzed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after RTx in 248 patients with an immunosuppressive regimen including basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. According to keep the approach simple, patients were split into three C/D groups: fast, intermediate and slow metabolizers. Notably, compared with slow metabolizers fast metabolizers of Tac showed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values at all the time points analyzed. Moreover, fast metabolizers underwent more indication renal biopsies (p = 0.006) which revealed a higher incidence of CNI nephrotoxicity (p = 0.015) and BK nephropathy (p = 0.024) in this group. We herein identified the C/D ratio as an easy calculable risk factor for the development of CNI nephrotoxicity and BK nephropathy after RTx. We propose that the simple C/D ratio should be taken into account early in patient’s risk management strategies. PMID:25340655

  3. The tacrolimus metabolism rate influences renal function after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thölking, Gerold; Fortmann, Christian; Koch, Raphael; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Pabst, Dirk; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Kabar, Iyad; Hüsing, Anna; Wolters, Heiner; Reuter, Stefan; Suwelack, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The effective calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) tacrolimus (Tac) is an integral part of the standard immunosuppressive regimen after renal transplantation (RTx). However, as a potent CNI it has nephrotoxic potential leading to impaired renal function in some cases. Therefore, it is of high clinical impact to identify factors which can predict who is endangered to develop CNI toxicity. We hypothesized that the Tac metabolism rate expressed as the blood concentration normalized by the dose (C/D ratio) is such a simple predictor. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of the C/D ratio on kidney function after RTx. Renal function was analyzed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after RTx in 248 patients with an immunosuppressive regimen including basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. According to keep the approach simple, patients were split into three C/D groups: fast, intermediate and slow metabolizers. Notably, compared with slow metabolizers fast metabolizers of Tac showed significantly lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values at all the time points analyzed. Moreover, fast metabolizers underwent more indication renal biopsies (p = 0.006) which revealed a higher incidence of CNI nephrotoxicity (p = 0.015) and BK nephropathy (p = 0.024) in this group. We herein identified the C/D ratio as an easy calculable risk factor for the development of CNI nephrotoxicity and BK nephropathy after RTx. We propose that the simple C/D ratio should be taken into account early in patient's risk management strategies. PMID:25340655

  4. Cocoa flavanol consumption improves cognitive function, blood pressure control, and metabolic profile in elderly subjects: the Cocoa, Cognition, and Aging (CoCoA) Study—a randomized controlled trial1234

    PubMed Central

    Mastroiacovo, Daniela; Kwik-Uribe, Catherine; Grassi, Davide; Necozione, Stefano; Raffaele, Angelo; Pistacchio, Luana; Righetti, Roberta; Bocale, Raffaella; Lechiara, Maria Carmela; Marini, Carmine; Ferri, Claudio; Desideri, Giovambattista

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent evidence has indicated that flavanol consumption may have many health benefits in humans, including improved cognitive activities. Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of flavanol consumption on cognitive performance in cognitively intact elderly subjects. Design: This was a double-blind, controlled, parallel-arm study conducted in 90 elderly individuals without clinical evidence of cognitive dysfunction who were randomly assigned to consume daily for 8 wk a drink containing 993 mg [high flavanol (HF)], 520 mg [intermediate flavanol (IF)], or 48 mg [low flavanol (LF)] cocoa flavanols (CFs). Cognitive function was assessed at baseline and after 8 wk by using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Trail Making Test (TMT) A and B, and the Verbal Fluency Test (VFT). Results: The changes in MMSE score in response to the 3 different treatments were not different. In contrast, there was a positive impact of the intervention on specific aspects of cognitive function. Mean changes (±SEs) in the time required to complete the TMT A and B after consumption of the HF (−8.6 ± 0.4 and −16.5 ± 0.8 s, respectively) and IF (−6.7 ± 0.5 and −14.2 ± 0.5 s, respectively) drinks significantly (P < 0.0001) differed from that after consumption of the LF drinks (−0.8 ± 1.6 and −1.1 ± 0.7 s, respectively). Similarly, VFT scores significantly improved among all treatment groups, but the magnitude of improvement in the VFT score was significantly (P < 0.0001) greater in the HF group (7.7 ± 1.1 words/60 s) than in the IF (3.6 ± 1.2 words/60 s) and LF (1.3 ± 0.5 words/60 s) groups. Significantly different improvements in insulin resistance (P < 0.0001), blood pressure (P < 0.0001), and lipid peroxidation (P = 0.001) were also observed for the HF and IF groups in comparison with the LF group. Changes in insulin resistance explained ∼17% of changes in composite z score (partial r2 = 0.1703, P < 0.0001). Conclusions: This dietary

  5. Experimental determination of group flux control coefficients in metabolic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, T.W.; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1998-04-20

    Grouping of reactions around key metabolite branch points can facilitate the study of metabolic control of complex metabolic networks. This top-down Metabolic Control Analysis is exemplified through the introduction of group control coefficients whose magnitudes provide a measure of the relative impact of each reaction group on the overall network flux, as well as on the overall network stability, following enzymatic amplification. In this article, the authors demonstrate the application of previously developed theory to the determination of group flux control coefficients. Experimental data for the changes in metabolic fluxes obtained in response to the introduction of six different environmental perturbations are used to determine the group flux control coefficients for three reaction groups formed around the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate branch point. The consistency of the obtained group flux control coefficient estimates is systematically analyzed to ensure that all necessary conditions are satisfied. The magnitudes of the determined control coefficients suggest that the control of lysine production flux in Corynebacterium glutamicum cells at a growth base state resides within the lysine biosynthetic pathway that begins with the PEP/PYR carboxylation anaplorotic pathway.

  6. Mutant p53 exerts oncogenic functions by modulating cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ge; Myers, Jeffrey N

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic function of p53 is important for its oncosuppressive function. Mutant p53 (mutp53) with gain of oncogenic function can regulate cell metabolism. Our recent study revealed a novel transcription-independent mechanism for a gain-of-function mutp53 that directly inhibits activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to promote cancer cell metabolism. PMID:27308343

  7. Metabolic functions of glucocorticoid receptor in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Taiyi; Harris, Charles A.; Wang, Jen-Chywan

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) exert key metabolic influences on skeletal muscle. GCs increase protein degradation and decrease protein synthesis. The released amino acids are mobilized from skeletal muscle to liver, where they serve as substrates for hepatic gluconeogenesis. This metabolic response is critical for mammals’ survival under stressful conditions, such as fasting and starvation. GCs suppress insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and utilization and glycogen synthesis, and play a permissive role for catecholamine-induced glycogenolysis, thus preserving the level of circulating glucose, the major energy source for the brain. However, chronic or excess exposure of GCs can induce muscle atrophy and insulin resistance. GCs convey their signal mainly through the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While GR can act through different mechanisms, one of its major actions is to regulate the transcription of its primary target genes through genomic glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) by directly binding to DNA or tethering onto other DNA-binding transcription factors. These GR primary targets trigger physiological and pathological responses of GCs. Much progress has been made to understand how GCs regulate protein and glucose metabolism. In this review, we will discuss how GR primary target genes confer metabolic functions of GCs, and the mechanisms governing the transcriptional regulation of these targets. Comprehending these processes not only contributes to the fundamental understanding of mammalian physiology, but also will provide invaluable insight for improved GC therapeutics. PMID:23523565

  8. A Comparison of the Effects of the GLP-1 Analogue Liraglutide and Insulin Glargine on Endothelial Function and Metabolic Parameters: A Randomized, Controlled Trial Sapporo Athero-Incretin Study 2 (SAIS2)

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Furumoto, Tomoo; Oba, Koji; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Arina; Kondo, Takuma; Tsuchida, Kenichi; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Manda, Naoki; Kurihara, Yoshio; Aoki, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives GLP-1 improves hyperglycemia, and it has been reported to have favorable effects on atherosclerosis. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether GLP-1 is able to improve endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of the GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide on endothelial function and glycemic metabolism compared with insulin glargine therapy. Materials and Methods In this multicenter, prospective randomized parallel-group comparison study, 31 diabetic outpatients (aged 60.3 ± 10.3 years with HbA1c levels of 8.6 ± 0.8%) with current metformin and/or sulfonylurea treatment were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive liraglutide or glargine therapy once daily for 14 weeks. Flow mediated dilation (FMD), a comprehensive panel of hemodynamic parameters (Task Force Monitor), and serum metabolic markers were assessed before and after the treatment period. Results A greater reduction (worsening) in %FMD was observed in the glargine group, although this change was not statistically different from the liraglutide group (liraglutide; 5.7 to 5.4%, glargine 6.7 to 5.7%). The augmentation index, C-peptide index, derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites and BMI were significantly improved in the liraglutide group. Central systolic blood pressure and NT-proBNP also tended to be improved in the liraglutide-treated group, while improvements in HbA1c levels were similar between groups. Cardiac index, blood pressure and most other metabolic parameters were not different. Conclusions Regardless of glycemic improvement, early liraglutide therapy did not affect endothelial function but may provide favorable effects on beta-cell function and cardioprotection in type 2 diabetics without advanced atherosclerosis. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry System as trial ID UMIN000005331. PMID:26284918

  9. New insights on glucosylated lipids: metabolism and functions.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Kohyama-Koganeya, Ayako; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2013-09-01

    Ceramide, cholesterol, and phosphatidic acid are major basic structures for cell membrane lipids. These lipids are modified with glucose to generate glucosylceramide (GlcCer), cholesterylglucoside (ChlGlc), and phosphatidylglucoside (PtdGlc), respectively. Glucosylation dramatically changes the functional properties of lipids. For instance, ceramide acts as a strong tumor suppressor that causes apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, while GlcCer has an opposite effect, downregulating ceramide activities. All glucosylated lipids are enriched in lipid rafts or microdomains and play fundamental roles in a variety of cellular processes. In this review, we discuss the biological functions and metabolism of these three glucosylated lipids. PMID:23770033

  10. Detection of driver metabolites in the human liver metabolic network using structural controllability analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal states in human liver metabolism are major causes of human liver diseases ranging from hepatitis to hepatic tumor. The accumulation in relevant data makes it feasible to derive a large-scale human liver metabolic network (HLMN) and to discover important biological principles or drug-targets based on network analysis. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis (which is a newly prevailed concept in networks) to biological networks. The exploration on the connections between structural controllability theory and the HLMN could be used to uncover valuable information on the human liver metabolism from a fresh perspective. Results We applied structural controllability analysis to the HLMN and detected driver metabolites. The driver metabolites tend to have strong ability to influence the states of other metabolites and weak susceptibility to be influenced by the states of others. In addition, the metabolites were classified into three classes: critical, high-frequency and low-frequency driver metabolites. Among the identified 36 critical driver metabolites, 27 metabolites were found to be essential; the high-frequency driver metabolites tend to participate in different metabolic pathways, which are important in regulating the whole metabolic systems. Moreover, we explored some other possible connections between the structural controllability theory and the HLMN, and find that transport reactions and the environment play important roles in the human liver metabolism. Conclusion There are interesting connections between the structural controllability theory and the human liver metabolism: driver metabolites have essential biological functions; the crucial role of extracellular metabolites and transport reactions in controlling the HLMN highlights the importance of the environment in the health of human liver metabolism. PMID:24885538

  11. Regulation of polyamine metabolism by translational control.

    PubMed

    Perez-Leal, Oscar; Merali, Salim

    2012-02-01

    Polyamines are low molecular weight, positively charged compounds that are ubiquitous in all living cells. They play a crucial role in many biochemical processes including regulation of transcription and translation, modulation of enzyme activities, regulation of ion channels and apoptosis. A strict balance between synthesis, catabolism and excretion tightly controls the cellular concentration of polyamines. The concentrations of rate-limiting enzymes in the polyamine synthesis and degradation pathways are regulated at different levels, including transcription, translation and degradation. Polyamines can modulate the translation of most of the enzymes required for their synthesis and catabolism through feedback mechanisms that are unique for each enzyme. Translational control is associated with cis-acting and trans-acting factors that can be influenced by the concentration of polyamines through mechanisms that are not completely understood. In this review, we present an overview of the translational control mechanisms of the proteins in the polyamine pathway, including ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), ODC antizyme, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase and spermidine/spermine N(1) acetyltransferase, highlighting the areas where more research is needed. A better understanding of the translational control of these enzymes would offer the possibility of a novel pharmacological intervention against cancer and other diseases. PMID:21811825

  12. Brain glycogen—new perspectives on its metabolic function and regulation at the subcellular level

    PubMed Central

    Obel, Linea F.; Müller, Margit S.; Walls, Anne B.; Sickmann, Helle M.; Bak, Lasse K.; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia. In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies—it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms underlying glycogen metabolism. Based on (1) the compartmentation of the interconnected second messenger pathways controlling glycogen metabolism (calcium and cAMP), (2) alterations in the subcellular location of glycogen-associated enzymes and proteins induced by the metabolic status and (3) a sequential component in the intermolecular mechanisms of glycogen metabolism, we suggest that glycogen metabolism in astrocytes is compartmentalized at the subcellular level. As a consequence, the meaning and importance of conventional terms used to describe glycogen metabolism (e.g., turnover) is challenged. Overall, this review represents an overview of contemporary knowledge about brain glycogen and its metabolism and function. However, it also has a sharp focus on what we do not know, which is perhaps even more important for the future quest of uncovering the roles of glycogen in brain physiology and pathology. PMID:22403540

  13. Sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases: natural functions and applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhong

    2012-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of negatively charged monosaccharides which are commonly presented as the terminal residues in glycans of the glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface or as components of capsular polysaccharides or lipooligosaccharides of some pathogenic bacteria. Due to their important biological and pathological functions, the biosynthesis, activation, transfer, breaking down, and recycle of sialic acids are attracting increasing attention. The understanding of the sialic acid metabolism in eukaryotes and bacteria leads to the development of metabolic engineering approaches for elucidating the important functions of sialic acid in mammalian systems and for large-scale production of sialosides using engineered bacterial cells. As the key enzymes in biosynthesis of sialylated structures, sialyltransferases have been continuously identified from various sources and characterized. Protein crystal structures of seven sialyltransferases have been reported. Wild-type sialyltransferases and their mutants have been applied with or without other sialoside biosynthetic enzymes for producing complex sialic acid-containing oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. This mini-review focuses on current understanding and applications of sialic acid metabolism and sialyltransferases. PMID:22526796

  14. Sphingosine 1-phosphate in blood: function, metabolism, and fate.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Andreas V; Reimann, Christina-Maria; Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Gräler, Markus H

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lipid metabolite and a ligand of five G protein-coupled cell surface receptors S1PR1 to S1PR5. These receptors are expressed on various cells and cell types of the immune, cardiovascular, respiratory, hepatic, reproductive, and neurologic systems, and S1P has an impact on many different pathophysiological conditions including autoimmune, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, deafness, osteogenesis, and reproduction. While these diverse signalling properties of S1P have been extensively reviewed, the particular role of S1P in blood is still a matter of debate. Blood contains the highest S1P concentration of all body compartments, and several questions are still not sufficiently answered: Where does it come from and how is it metabolized? Why is the concentration of S1P in blood so high? Are minor changes of the high blood S1P concentrations physiologically relevant? Do blood cells and vascular endothelial cells that are constantly exposed to high blood S1P levels still respond to S1P via S1P receptors? Recent data reveal new insights into the functional role and the metabolic fate of blood-borne S1P. This review aims to summarize our current knowledge regarding the source, secretion, transportation, function, metabolism, and fate of S1P in blood. PMID:24977489

  15. Functional foods as potential therapeutic options for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brown, L; Poudyal, H; Panchal, S K

    2015-11-01

    Obesity as part of metabolic syndrome is a major lifestyle disorder throughout the world. Current drug treatments for obesity produce small and usually unsustainable decreases in body weight with the risk of major adverse effects. Surgery has been the only treatment producing successful long-term weight loss. As a different but complementary approach, lifestyle modification including the use of functional foods could produce a reliable decrease in obesity with decreased comorbidities. Functional foods may include fruits such as berries, vegetables, fibre-enriched grains and beverages such as tea and coffee. Although health improvements continue to be reported for these functional foods in rodent studies, further evidence showing the translation of these results into humans is required. Thus, the concept that these fruits and vegetables will act as functional foods in humans to reduce obesity and thereby improve health remains intuitive and possible rather than proven. PMID:26345360

  16. [Glucose Metabolism: Stress Hyperglycemia and Glucose Control].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2016-05-01

    It is important for the anesthesiologists to understand pathophysiology of perioperative stress hyperglycemia, because it offers strategies for treatment of stress hyperglycemia. The effect of glucose tolerance is different in the choice of the anesthetic agent used in daily clinical setting. Specifically, the volatile anesthetics inhibit insulin secretion after glucose load and affects glucose tolerance. During minor surgery by the remifentanil anesthesia, the stress reaction is hard to be induced, suggesting that we should consider low-dose glucose load. Finally it is necessary to perform the glycemic control of the patients who fell into stress hyperglycemia depending on the individual patient. However, there are a lot of questions to be answered in the future. The prognosis of the perioperative patients is more likely to be greatly improved if we can control stress hyperglycemia. PMID:27319094

  17. Triacylglycerol Metabolism, Function, and Accumulation in Plant Vegetative Tissues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changcheng; Shanklin, John

    2016-04-29

    Oils in the form of triacylglycerols are the most abundant energy-dense storage compounds in eukaryotes, and their metabolism plays a key role in cellular energy balance, lipid homeostasis, growth, and maintenance. Plants accumulate oils primarily in seeds and fruits. Plant oils are used for food and feed and, increasingly, as feedstocks for biodiesel and industrial chemicals. Although plant vegetative tissues do not accumulate significant levels of triacylglycerols, they possess a high capacity for their synthesis, storage, and metabolism. The development of plants that accumulate oil in vegetative tissues presents an opportunity for expanded production of triacylglycerols as a renewable and sustainable bioenergy source. Here, we review recent progress in the understanding of triacylglycerol synthesis, turnover, storage, and function in leaves and discuss emerging genetic engineering strategies targeted at enhancing triacylglycerol accumulation in biomass crops. Such plants could potentially be modified to produce oleochemical feedstocks or nutraceuticals. PMID:26845499

  18. Control of mitochondrial metabolism and systemic energy homeostasis by microRNAs 378 and 378*

    PubMed Central

    Carrer, Michele; Liu, Ning; Grueter, Chad E.; Williams, Andrew H.; Frisard, Madlyn I.; Hulver, Matthew W.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and deranged regulation of metabolic genes. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1β (PGC-1β) is a transcriptional coactivator that regulates metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis through stimulation of nuclear hormone receptors and other transcription factors. We report that the PGC-1β gene encodes two microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-378 and miR-378*, which counterbalance the metabolic actions of PGC-1β. Mice genetically lacking miR-378 and miR-378* are resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity and exhibit enhanced mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism and elevated oxidative capacity of insulin-target tissues. Among the many targets of these miRNAs, carnitine O-acetyltransferase, a mitochondrial enzyme involved in fatty acid metabolism, and MED13, a component of the Mediator complex that controls nuclear hormone receptor activity, are repressed by miR-378 and miR-378*, respectively, and are elevated in the livers of miR-378/378* KO mice. Consistent with these targets as contributors to the metabolic actions of miR-378 and miR-378*, previous studies have implicated carnitine O-acetyltransferase and MED13 in metabolic syndrome and obesity. Our findings identify miR-378 and miR-378* as integral components of a regulatory circuit that functions under conditions of metabolic stress to control systemic energy homeostasis and the overall oxidative capacity of insulin target tissues. Thus, these miRNAs provide potential targets for pharmacologic intervention in obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:22949648

  19. Feasibility of protein-sparing modified fast by tube (ProMoFasT) in obesity treatment: a phase II pilot trial on clinical safety and efficacy (appetite control, body composition, muscular strength, metabolic pattern, pulmonary function test).

    PubMed

    Sukkar, S G; Signori, A; Borrini, C; Barisione, G; Ivaldi, C; Romeo, C; Gradaschi, R; Machello, N; Nanetti, E; Vaccaro, A L

    2013-01-01

    Anecdotal data in the last few years suggest that protein-sparing modified diet (PSMF) delivered by naso-gastric tube enteral (with continuous feeding) could attain an significant weight loss and control of appetite oral feeding, but no phase II studies on safety and efficacy have been done up to now. To verify the safety and efficacy of a protein-sparing modified fast administered by naso-gastric tube (ProMoFasT) for 10 days followed by 20 days of a low-calorie diet, in patients with morbid obesity (appetite control, fat free mass maintenance, pulmonary function tests and metabolic pattern, side effects), 26 patients with a BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) have been selected. The patients had to follow a protein-sparing fast by enteral nutrition (ProMoFasT) for 24 h/day, for 10 days followed by 20 days of low-calorie diet (LCD). The endpoint was represented by body weight, BMI, abdominal circumference, Haber's appetite test, body composition by body impedance assessment (BIA), handgrip strength test, metabolic pattern, pulmonary function test. Safety was assessed by evaluation of complications and side effects of PSMF and/or enteral nutrition. In this report the results on safety and efficacy are described after 10 and 30 days of treatment. After the recruiting phase, a total of 22 patients out of 26 enrolled [14 (63.6 %) females] were evaluated in this study. Globally almost all clinical parameters changed significantly during first 10 days. Total body weight significantly decreased after 10 days (∆-6.1 ± 2; p < 0.001) and this decrease is maintained in the following 20 days of LCD (∆ = -5.88 ± 1.79; p < 0.001). Also the abdominal circumference significantly decreased after 10 days [median (range): -4.5 (-30 to 0); p < 0.001] maintained then in the following 20 days of LCD [median (range) = -7 (-23.5 to -2); p < 0.001]. All BIA parameters significantly changed after 10 and 30 days from baseline. All parameters except BF had a significant

  20. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD+ and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools. PMID:25837229

  1. Control of heme metabolism with synthetic metalloporphyrins.

    PubMed Central

    Kappas, A; Drummond, G S

    1986-01-01

    Studies with synthetic metal-porphyrin complexes in which the central iron atom of heme is replaced by other elements indicate that those heme analogues that cannot be enzymatically degraded to bile pigments possess novel biological properties that may have considerable clinical as well as experimental value. Such studies have revealed the important role that the central metal atom plays in determining the physiological and pharmacological properties of metal-porphyrin complexes; and they have demonstrated that the form in which animals and humans are exposed to trace metals, i.e., inorganic, organified, porphyrin-chelated, etc., can be of great importance in determining the biological responses that such elements elicit, especially with respect to actions on heme synthesis and degradation and cytochrome P-450 formation and function. Study of the biological properties of synthetic metalloporphyrins represents a potentially fruitful area of research and the results may have significant value for basic as well as clinical disciplines. PMID:3511095

  2. Physiology and genetics of metabolic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1992-01-01

    This work seeks to understand the role of gene expression in regulating glycolytic enzyme synthesis in a balance that allows proper glycoltic flux control. The seven genes targeted for study in this laboratory have been cloned and sequenced, and molecular details of regulation have been investigated. Clear that glycolytic enzyme synthesis is coordinated to prevent the build up of toxic metabolic intermediates. The genetic mechanisms responsible for regulating balanced expression of the EntnerDoudoroff and glycolytic genes in Z. mobilis are beginning to be understood. Several layers of genetic control, perhaps in a hierarchal arrangement act in concert to determine the relative abundance of the glycolytic enzymes. These genetic controls involve differential translational efficiency, highly conserved promoter sequences, transcription factors, differential mRNA stabilities, and nucleolytic mRNA processing. The serendipitous cloning of the glucose facilitator, glf, as a result of linkage to several other genes of interest will have a significant impact on the study of Z. mobilis metabolism. The glucose facilitator is being characterized in a genetically reconstituted system in E. coli. Molecular genetic studies indicate that the ratio of glf expression to that of glk, zmf, and edd is carefully regulated, and suggests a critical role in metabolic control. Regulation of glycolytic gene expression is now sufficiently well understood to allow use of the glycolytic genes as tools to manipulate specified enzyme levels for the purpose of analyzing metabolic flux control. The critical genes have been subcloned for stable expression in Z. mobilis and placed under control of a regulated promoter system involving the tac promoter, the lacI repressor, and gene induction in by IPTG. HPLC methods have been developed that allow quantitation of virtually all of the metabolic intermediates in the cell pool.

  3. Akt-mTORC1 signaling regulates Acly to integrate metabolic input to control of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J; Aksoylar, Halil Ibrahim; Yu, Jiujiu; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Worth, Andrew J; Iyer, Shankar S; Wang, Jiawei; Ben-Sahra, Issam; Byles, Vanessa; Polynne-Stapornkul, Tiffany; Espinosa, Erika C; Lamming, Dudley; Manning, Brendan D; Zhang, Yijing; Blair, Ian A; Horng, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation/polarization to distinct functional states is critically supported by metabolic shifts. How polarizing signals coordinate metabolic and functional reprogramming, and the potential implications for control of macrophage activation, remains poorly understood. Here we show that IL-4 signaling co-opts the Akt-mTORC1 pathway to regulate Acly, a key enzyme in Ac-CoA synthesis, leading to increased histone acetylation and M2 gene induction. Only a subset of M2 genes is controlled in this way, including those regulating cellular proliferation and chemokine production. Moreover, metabolic signals impinge on the Akt-mTORC1 axis for such control of M2 activation. We propose that Akt-mTORC1 signaling calibrates metabolic state to energetically demanding aspects of M2 activation, which may define a new role for metabolism in supporting macrophage activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11612.001 PMID:26894960

  4. Functional genomics of Plasmodium falciparum using metabolic modelling and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheim, Rebecca D.; Soldati-Favre, Dominique; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is an obligate intracellular parasite and the leading cause of severe malaria responsible for tremendous morbidity and mortality particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Successful completion of the P. falciparum genome sequencing project in 2002 provided a comprehensive foundation for functional genomic studies on this pathogen in the following decade. Over this period, a large spectrum of experimental approaches has been deployed to improve and expand the scope of functionally annotated genes. Meanwhile, rapidly evolving methods of systems biology have also begun to contribute to a more global understanding of various aspects of the biology and pathogenesis of malaria. Herein we provide an overview on metabolic modelling, which has the capability to integrate information from functional genomics studies in P. falciparum and guide future malaria research efforts towards the identification of novel candidate drug targets. PMID:23793264

  5. mTOR and metabolic pathways in T cell quiescence and functional activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Chi, Hongbo

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), an evolutionally conserved serine and threonine kinase, plays a critical role in the promotion of cell growth and proliferation via integration of cellular and environmental cues. In adaptive immunity, the mTOR pathway orchestrates multiple physiological processes including the development and homeostasis of T cells under steady state, and their subsequent activation and differentiation upon antigen recognition. Associated with such fate decisions is the dynamic reprogramming of T cell metabolic pathways, as naïve, activated and memory cells are defined by distinct bioenergetic and biosynthetic activities. Emerging evidence indicates that mTOR signaling intersects with T cell metabolism at two major levels to constitute a critical control mechanism of T cell fate decisions. First, as a central environmental sensor, mTOR links immune signaling and the availability of nutrients, especially amino acids. Second, mTOR activates specific metabolic pathways in T cells such as aerobic glycolysis (also known as the “Warburg effect”) in a process dependent upon the induction of transcription factors MYC and HIF1α. Understanding how mTOR interplays with T cell metabolism to dictate T cell fates and functions will provide fundamental insights into the mechanism of immune responses and the development of novel therapeutics against immune-mediated diseases. In this review, we summarize the current advances on mTOR signaling and T cell metabolism in the control of development, homeostasis, activation and differentiation of T cells. PMID:23375549

  6. Discrete Functions of Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbα Couple Metabolism to the Clock

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxiang; Fang, Bin; Emmett, Matthew J.; Damle, Manashree; Sun, Zheng; Feng, Dan; Armour, Sean M.; Remsberg, Jarrett R.; Jager, Jennifer; Soccio, Raymond E.; Steger, David J.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Circadian and metabolic physiology are intricately intertwined, as illustrated by Rev-erbα, a transcription factor (TF) that functions both as a core repressive component of the cell autonomous clock and as a regulator of metabolic genes. Here we show that Rev-erbα modulates the clock and metabolism by different genomic mechanisms. Clock control requires Rev-erbα to bind directly to the genome at its cognate sites, where it competes with activating ROR TFs. By contrast, Rev-erbα regulates metabolic genes primarily by recruiting the HDAC3 corepressor to sites to which it is tethered by cell type-specific transcription factors. Thus, direct competition between Rev-erbα and ROR TFs provides a universal mechanism for self-sustained control of molecular clock across all tissues, whereas Rev-erbα utilizes lineage-determining factors to convey a tissue-specific epigenomic rhythm that regulates metabolism tailored to the specific need of that tissue. PMID:26044300

  7. Skeletal Muscle Phospholipid Metabolism Regulates Insulin Sensitivity and Contractile Function.

    PubMed

    Funai, Katsuhiko; Lodhi, Irfan J; Spears, Larry D; Yin, Li; Song, Haowei; Klein, Samuel; Semenkovich, Clay F

    2016-02-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is an early defect in the development of type 2 diabetes. Lipid overload induces insulin resistance in muscle and alters the composition of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). To test the hypothesis that skeletal muscle phospholipid metabolism regulates systemic glucose metabolism, we perturbed choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase 1 (CEPT1), the terminal enzyme in the Kennedy pathway of phospholipid synthesis. In C2C12 cells, CEPT1 knockdown altered SR phospholipid composition and calcium flux. In mice, diet-induced obesity, which decreases insulin sensitivity, increased muscle CEPT1 expression. In high-fat diet-fed mice with skeletal muscle-specific knockout of CEPT1, systemic and muscle-based approaches demonstrated increased muscle insulin sensitivity. In CEPT1-deficient muscles, an altered SR phospholipid milieu decreased sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase-dependent calcium uptake, activating calcium-signaling pathways known to improve insulin sensitivity. Altered muscle SR calcium handling also rendered these mice exercise intolerant. In obese humans, surgery-induced weight loss increased insulin sensitivity and decreased skeletal muscle CEPT1 protein. In obese humans spanning a spectrum of metabolic health, muscle CEPT1 mRNA was inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity. These results suggest that high-fat feeding and obesity induce CEPT1, which remodels the SR to preserve contractile function at the expense of insulin sensitivity. PMID:26512026

  8. From Elements to Metabolism: Linking Organismal Stoichiometry to Ecosystem Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. J.; Nifong, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Metabolism is an integrative metric of ecosystem function and energetics, synthesizing the relative contributions of multiple inputs, processes, and interactions. Stoichiometry is a framework based on elemental ratios for understanding how organisms interact within ecosystems. Linking the two has the potential to yield fresh insight about how ecosystems utilize elements and energy. We sought to quantify the link between the stoichiometry of ecosystem metabolism, specifically the C:N:P ratios of integrated autotrophic assimilation, and the stoichiometric tissue ratios observed in the dominant autotrophs. Using high frequency in situ nutrient sensors we estimated the assimilatory fluxes of C, N, and P in multiple spring-fed rivers of varying autotrophic species composition. We measured autotroph cover in each spring river, collected composite vegetation samples, and evaluated tissue stoichiometry; as expected, we observed large differences in C:N and N:P between algal and vascular plant taxa. We observed associations between measured tissue stoichiometry and elemental ratios at the ecosystem scale, suggesting that aggregated assimilatory fluxes may be useful for partitioning primary production and linking organismal nutrient content to the stoichiometry of ecosystem metabolism.

  9. Metabolic Control Analysis: A Tool for Designing Strategies to Manipulate Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Olín-Sandoval, Viridiana

    2008-01-01

    The traditional experimental approaches used for changing the flux or the concentration of a particular metabolite of a metabolic pathway have been mostly based on the inhibition or over-expression of the presumed rate-limiting step. However, the attempts to manipulate a metabolic pathway by following such approach have proved to be unsuccessful. Metabolic Control Analysis (MCA) establishes how to determine, quantitatively, the degree of control that a given enzyme exerts on flux and on the concentration of metabolites, thus substituting the intuitive, qualitative concept of rate limiting step. Moreover, MCA helps to understand (i) the underlying mechanisms by which a given enzyme exerts high or low control and (ii) why the control of the pathway is shared by several pathway enzymes and transporters. By applying MCA it is possible to identify the steps that should be modified to achieve a successful alteration of flux or metabolite concentration in pathways of biotechnological (e.g., large scale metabolite production) or clinical relevance (e.g., drug therapy). The different MCA experimental approaches developed for the determination of the flux-control distribution in several pathways are described. Full understanding of the pathway properties when is working under a variety of conditions can help to attain a successful manipulation of flux and metabolite concentration. PMID:18629230

  10. mTOR, metabolism, and the regulation of T-cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Waickman, Adam T; Powell, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Upon antigen recognition, naive T cells undergo rapid expansion and activation. The energy requirements for this expansion are formidable, and T-cell activation is accompanied by dramatic changes in cellular metabolism. Furthermore, the outcome of antigen engagement is guided by multiple cues derived from the immune microenvironment. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is emerging as a central integrator of these signals playing a critical role in driving T-cell differentiation and function. Indeed, multiple metabolic programs are controlled by mTOR signaling. In this review, we discuss the role of mTOR in regulating metabolism and how these pathways intersect with the ability of mTOR to integrate cues that guide the outcome of T-cell receptor engagement. PMID:22889214

  11. The effect of ozone inhalation on metabolic functioning of vascular endothelium and on ventilatory function

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K.B.; White, H.J.; Sargent, N.E. )

    1991-06-15

    The primary purpose of this research was to determine the effect of ozone inhalation on pulmonary vascular endothelium. Male Fischer-344 rats were exposed to 0.5 or 0.7 ppm ozone, 20 hr/day for 7 days. Lungs were excised and perfused with Krebs medium containing (14C)serotonin or (14C)hippurylhistidylleucine (HHL). When compared to controls, the animals exposed to the lower ozone concentration showed no statistically significant changes in serotonin removal. In contrast, the higher ozone concentration resulted in a 32% decrease (p less than 0.0001) in serotonin removal, but had no effect on HHL. Rats similarly exposed to 0.7 ppm ozone but allowed to recover for 14 days in clean air showed no decrease in serotonin removal compared to their controls. Animals exposed sequentially to 0.5 ppm ozone for 7 days and then to 0.7 ppm for 7 days showed no alteration in serotonin metabolism, suggesting the development of tolerance initiated by the lower dose. After 7 days exposure to 0.7 ppm ozone, lung ventilatory function measurements revealed small though significant decreases in several parameters. Electron microscopic evaluation of lung capillary endothelium from animals exposed to the 0.7 ppm ozone showed no changes. Positive control animals exposed to greater than 95% oxygen, 20 hr/day for 2 days showed a 23% decrease in serotonin removal (p less than 0.03) and a 12% decrease in HHL removal (p less than 0.017). These studies indicate that inhalation of ozone can induce functional alterations in the lung endothelium, and that this effect occurs at a dosage of ozone that produces minimal ventilatory changes and no observable endothelial ultrastructural changes.

  12. Microspectrofluorometry for metabolic control analysis and the study of organelle morphogenesis in cell differentiation and transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Kohen, Elli; Kohen, Cahide; Pinon, Raul

    1994-02-01

    Microspectrofluorometry has been used in conjunction with fluorescence micrography for metabolic control analysis in normal and genetically deficient human fibroblasts, as well as human melanoma cells. These studies point to the role of mitochondria as the `cell's policeman' with regard to metabolic control. Cytotoxic agents active on mitochondrial structure and function (i.e. anthralin, azelaic acid) produce an unleashing of extramitochondrial pathways characterized by large and out-of-control NAD(P)H transients elicited by microinjected substrates. An interesting aspect has been the demonstration of an active nuclear energy metabolism, by NAD(P)H fluorescence excited at 365 nm, which may help to link cell bioenergetics to gene expression in the eukaryotes by the use of DNA probes. The metabolic control analysis of cell bioenergetics has been extended to the pathways involved in the cell's handling of cytotoxic agents. Non invasive fluorescence equipment offers possibilities for diagnostics and therapeutics in dermatology. Structure and function studies can be carried out at considerably enhanced resolution and with on-line interpretation by introducing scanning nearfield optics microscopy (SNOM) and real-time interactive parameter experimentation control (RIPEC).

  13. Lipopolysaccharide markedly changes glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function in the longissimus muscle of pigs.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Huang, Y; Yin, C; Guo, J; Zhao, R; Yang, X

    2016-07-01

    Most previous studies on the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in pigs focused on the body's immune response, and few reports paid attention to body metabolism changes. To better understand the glucose metabolism changes in skeletal muscle following LPS challenge and to clarify the possible mechanism, 12 growing pigs were employed. Animals were treated with either 2 ml of saline or 15 µg/kg BW LPS, and samples were collected 6 h later. The glycolysis status and mitochondrial function in the longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of pigs were analyzed. The results showed that serum lactate content and NADH content in LD muscle significantly increased compared with the control group. Most glycolysis-related genes expression, as well as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase and lactic dehydrogenase activity, in LD muscle was significantly higher compared with the control group. Mitochondrial complexes I and IV significantly increased, while mitochondrial ATP concentration markedly decreased. Significantly increased calcium content in the mitochondria was observed, and endoplasm reticulum (ER) stress has been demonstrated in the present study. The results showed that LPS treatment markedly changes glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function in the LD muscle of pigs, and increased calcium content induced by ER stress was possibly involved. The results provide new clues for clarifying metabolic diseases in muscle induced by LPS. PMID:26863995

  14. Feed your head: neurodevelopmental control of feeding and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel A; Blackshaw, Seth

    2014-01-01

    During critical periods of development early in life, excessive or scarce nutritional environments can disrupt the development of central feeding and metabolic neural circuitry, leading to obesity and metabolic disorders in adulthood. A better understanding of the genetic networks that control the development of feeding and metabolic neural circuits, along with knowledge of how and where dietary signals disrupt this process, can serve as the basis for future therapies aimed at reversing the public health crisis that is now building as a result of the global obesity epidemic. This review of animal and human studies highlights recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that regulate the development of central feeding circuitries, the mechanisms by which gestational and early postnatal nutritional status affects this process, and approaches aimed at counteracting the deleterious effects of early over- and underfeeding. PMID:24274739

  15. Feed Your Head: Neurodevelopmental Control of Feeding and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel A.; Blackshaw, Seth

    2014-01-01

    During critical periods of development early in life, excessive or scarce nutritional environments can disrupt the development of central feeding and metabolic neural circuitry, leading to obesity and metabolic disorders in adulthood. A better understanding of the genetic networks that control the development of feeding and metabolic neural circuits, along with knowledge of how and where dietary signals disrupt this process, can serve as the basis for future therapies aimed at reversing the public health crisis that is now building as a result of the global obesity epidemic. This review of animal and human studies highlights recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that regulate the development of central feeding circuitries, the mechanisms by which gestational and early postnatal nutritional status affects this process, and approaches aimed at counteracting the deleterious effects of early over- and underfeeding. PMID:24274739

  16. Metabolic control of the Treg/Th17 axis

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Joseph; Pardoll, Drew; Pan, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Summary The interplay of the immune system with other aspects of physiology is continually being revealed and in some cases studied in considerable mechanistic detail. A prime example is the influence of metabolic cues on immune responses. It is well appreciated that upon activation, T cells take on a metabolic profile profoundly distinct from that of their quiescent and anergic counterparts; however, a number of recent breakthroughs have greatly expanded our knowledge of how aspects of cellular metabolism can shape a T-cell response. Particularly important are findings that certain environmental cues can tilt the delicate balance between inflammation and immune tolerance by skewing T-cell fate decisions toward either the T-helper 17 (Th17) or T-regulatory (Treg) cell lineage. Recognizing the unappreciated immune modifying potential of metabolic factors and particularly those involved in the generation of these functionally opposing T-cell subsets will likely add new and potent therapies to our repertoire for treating immune mediated pathologies. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent findings linking certain metabolic pathways, enzymes, and byproducts to shifts in the balance between Th17 and Treg cell populations. These advances highlight numerous opportunities for immune modulation. PMID:23405895

  17. Metabolic control of the Treg/Th17 axis.

    PubMed

    Barbi, Joseph; Pardoll, Drew; Pan, Fan

    2013-03-01

    The interplay of the immune system with other aspects of physiology is continually being revealed and in some cases studied in considerable mechanistic detail. A prime example is the influence of metabolic cues on immune responses. It is well appreciated that upon activation, T cells take on a metabolic profile profoundly distinct from that of their quiescent and anergic counterparts; however, a number of recent breakthroughs have greatly expanded our knowledge of how aspects of cellular metabolism can shape a T-cell response. Particularly important are findings that certain environmental cues can tilt the delicate balance between inflammation and immune tolerance by skewing T-cell fate decisions toward either the T-helper 17 (Th17) or T-regulatory (Treg) cell lineage. Recognizing the unappreciated immune-modifying potential of metabolic factors and particularly those involved in the generation of these functionally opposing T-cell subsets will likely add new and potent therapies to our repertoire for treating immune mediated pathologies. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent findings linking certain metabolic pathways, enzymes, and by-products to shifts in the balance between Th17 and Treg cell populations. These advances highlight numerous opportunities for immune modulation. PMID:23405895

  18. Voluntary exercise improves hypothalamic and metabolic function in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Laing, Brenton T; Do, Khoa; Matsubara, Tomoko; Wert, David W; Avery, Michael J; Langdon, Erin M; Zheng, Donghai; Huang, Hu

    2016-05-01

    Exercise plays a critical role in regulating glucose homeostasis and body weight. However, the mechanism of exercise on metabolic functions associated with the CNS has not been fully understood. C57BL6 male mice (n=45) were divided into three groups: normal chow diet, high-fat diet (HFD) treatment, and HFD along with voluntary running wheel exercise training for 12 weeks. Metabolic function was examined by the Comprehensive Lab Animal Monitoring System and magnetic resonance imaging; phenotypic analysis included measurements of body weight, food intake, glucose and insulin tolerance tests, as well as insulin and leptin sensitivity studies. By immunohistochemistry, the amount changes in the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, neuronal proliferative maker Ki67, apoptosis positive cells as well as pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons in the arcuate area of the hypothalamus was identified. We found that 12 weeks of voluntary exercise training partially reduced body weight gain and adiposity induced by an HFD. Insulin and leptin sensitivity were enhanced in the exercise training group verses the HFD group. Furthermore, the HFD-impaired POMC-expressing neuron is remarkably restored in the exercise training group. The restoration of POMC neuron number may be due to neuroprotective effects of exercise on POMC neurons, as evidenced by altered proliferation and apoptosis. In conclusion, our data suggest that voluntary exercise training improves metabolic symptoms induced by HFD, in part through protected POMC-expressing neuron from HFD and enhanced leptin signaling in the hypothalamus that regulates whole-body energy homeostasis. PMID:26931136

  19. The Role of Metabolic Surgery on Blood Pressure Control.

    PubMed

    Schiavon, Carlos Aurelio; Drager, Luciano F; Bortolotto, Luiz A; Amodeo, Celso; Ikeoka, Dimas; Berwanger, Otávio; Cohen, Ricardo Vitor

    2016-08-01

    Obesity and hypertension are growing epidemics in the modern world. Lifestyle changes and medical treatment for obesity have disappointing long-term results and albeit drugs for hypertension are usually very effective, the necessity of multiple pills and frequent side effects make the adherence to treatment a huge challenge for healthcare systems. Bariatric/metabolic surgery is a very effective treatment and an exponential number of studies have been showing its positive impact beyond weight loss, mainly on type 2 diabetes. There is also growing evidence suggesting that bariatric/metabolic surgery is associated with reduced incidence of cardiovascular events, but the impact on hypertension and other components of metabolic syndrome usually derive from trials' secondary end points. Taking this limitation in mind, bariatric/metabolic surgery action on blood pressure is reaching a significant proportion of hypertension resolution or improvement. In this review, we discussed the current evidence on the impact of bariatric/metabolic surgery on blood pressure control and pointed out perspectives in this research area. PMID:27324638

  20. Controlling Cell Function with Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrksich, Milan

    2012-02-01

    This presentation will describe the use of patterned substrates to control cell shape with examples that illustrate the ways in which cell shape can regulate cell function. Most cells are adherent and must attach to and spread on a surface in order to survive, proliferate and function. In tissue, this surface is the extracellular matrix (ECM), an insoluble scaffold formed by the assembly of several large proteins---including fibronectin, the laminins and collagens and others---but in the laboratory, the surface is prepared by adsorbing protein to glass slides. To pattern cells, gold-coated slides are patterned with microcontact printing to create geometric features that promote cell attachment and that are surrounded by inert regions. Cells attach to these substrates and spread to adopt the shape defined by the underlying pattern and remain stable in culture for several days. Examples will be described that used a series of shapes to reveal the relationship between the shape of the cell and the structure of its cytoskeleton. These geometric cues were used to control cell polarity and the tension, or contractility, present in the cytoskeleton. These rules were further used to control the shapes of mesenchymal stem cells and in turn to control the differentiation of these cells into specialized cell types. For example, stem cells that were patterned into a ``star'' shape preferentially differentiated into bone cells whereas those that were patterned into a ``flower'' shape preferred a fat cell fate. These influences of shape on differentiation depend on the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton. These examples, and others, reveal that shape is an important cue that informs cell function and that can be combined with the more common soluble cues to direct and study cell function.

  1. Physical, metabolic and developmental functions of the seed coat

    PubMed Central

    Radchuk, Volodymyr; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2014-01-01

    The conventional understanding of the role of the seed coat is that it provides a protective layer for the developing zygote. Recent data show that the picture is more nuanced. The seed coat certainly represents a first line of defense against adverse external factors, but it also acts as channel for transmitting environmental cues to the interior of the seed. The latter function primes the seed to adjust its metabolism in response to changes in its external environment. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a comprehensive view of the structure and functionality of the seed coat, and to expose its hidden interaction with both the endosperm and embryo. Any breeding and/or biotechnology intervention seeking to increase seed size or modify seed features will have to consider the implications on this tripartite interaction. PMID:25346737

  2. Effect of Dance Exercise on Cognitive Function in Elderly Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se-Hong; Kim, Minjeong; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Lim, Hyun-Kook; Kang, Sung-Goo; Cho, Jung-hyoun; Park, Seo-Jin; Song, Sang-Wook

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. The purpose of this prospective pilot study was to examine the effects of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome. The participants included 38 elderly metabolic syndrome patients with normal cognitive function (26 exercise group and 12 control group). The exercise group performed dance exercise twice a week for 6 months. Cognitive function was assessed in all participants using the Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s disease (CERAD-K). Repeated-measures ANCOVA was used to assess the effect of dance exercise on cognitive function and cardiometabolic risk factors. Compared with the control group, the exercise group significantly improved in verbal fluency (p = 0.048), word list delayed recall (p = 0.038), word list recognition (p = 0.007), and total CERAD-K score (p = 0.037). However, no significance difference was found in body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, and HDL cholesterol between groups over the 6-month period. In the present study, six months of dance exercise improved cognitive function in older adults with metabolic syndrome. Thus, dance exercise may reduce the risk for cognitive disorders in elderly people with metabolic syndrome. Key points Metabolic syndrome (MS) is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. Aerobic exercise improves cognitive function in elderly people and contributes to the prevention of degenerative neurological disease and brain damage. Dance sport is a form of aerobic exercise that has the additional benefits of stimulating the emotions, promoting social interaction, and exposing subjects to acoustic stimulation and music. In the present study, dance exercise for a 6-month period improved cognitive function in older adults with MS. In particular, positive effects were observed in verbal fluency, word

  3. Effect of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Hong; Kim, Minjeong; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Lim, Hyun-Kook; Kang, Sung-Goo; Cho, Jung-Hyoun; Park, Seo-Jin; Song, Sang-Wook

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. The purpose of this prospective pilot study was to examine the effects of dance exercise on cognitive function in elderly patients with metabolic syndrome. The participants included 38 elderly metabolic syndrome patients with normal cognitive function (26 exercise group and 12 control group). The exercise group performed dance exercise twice a week for 6 months. Cognitive function was assessed in all participants using the Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's disease (CERAD-K). Repeated-measures ANCOVA was used to assess the effect of dance exercise on cognitive function and cardiometabolic risk factors. Compared with the control group, the exercise group significantly improved in verbal fluency (p = 0.048), word list delayed recall (p = 0.038), word list recognition (p = 0.007), and total CERAD-K score (p = 0.037). However, no significance difference was found in body mass index, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride, and HDL cholesterol between groups over the 6-month period. In the present study, six months of dance exercise improved cognitive function in older adults with metabolic syndrome. Thus, dance exercise may reduce the risk for cognitive disorders in elderly people with metabolic syndrome. Key pointsMetabolic syndrome (MS) is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment.Aerobic exercise improves cognitive function in elderly people and contributes to the prevention of degenerative neurological disease and brain damage. Dance sport is a form of aerobic exercise that has the additional benefits of stimulating the emotions, promoting social interaction, and exposing subjects to acoustic stimulation and music.In the present study, dance exercise for a 6-month period improved cognitive function in older adults with MS. In particular, positive effects were observed in verbal fluency, word list

  4. Microvascular function, metabolic syndrome, and novel risk factor status in women with cardiac syndrome X.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Sachin T; Ferrell, William R; Petrie, John R; Scherbakova, Olga; Greer, Ian A; Cobbe, Stuart M; Sattar, Naveed

    2006-06-15

    To characterize microvascular function, candidate risk pathways, and metabolic syndrome prevalence in women with cardiac syndrome X, 52 nondiabetic women with angiographically normal epicardial arteries but >1 mm of planar ST depression during exercise testing (patients) and 24 healthy controls of similar age were recruited. In addition to fasting blood samples and anthropometric measurements, forearm cutaneous microvascular function after iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was assessed by laser Doppler imaging. Despite body mass index correction and a larger proportion on statin therapy, patients had high levels of insulin (p=0.016), triglycerides (p=0.018), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (p=0.021), von Willebrand factor (p=0.005), and leptin (p=0.005) and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p=0.042) compared with controls. Consistent with these data, 30% of patients but only 8% of controls fulfilled criteria for the metabolic syndrome as defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (p=0.015). Endothelium-dependent and -independent microvascular functions were markedly impaired in patients (p<0.001), and the odds ratio for cardiac syndrome X was 7.38 (95% confidence interval 2.2 to 24.7) if the acetylcholine response was <8,710 flux units. In conclusion, women with cardiac syndrome X more commonly have metabolic syndrome and related adiposity, metabolic, and inflammatory derangements. They also have significantly impaired skin microvascular function as assessed by laser Doppler imaging, consistent with generalized vascular dysfunction, a finding with potential diagnostic implications. PMID:16765122

  5. Aflatoxicosis alters avian renal function, calcium, and vitamin D metabolism.

    PubMed

    Glahn, R P; Beers, K W; Bottje, W G; Wideman, R F; Huff, W E; Thomas, W

    1991-11-01

    Experiments were designed to determine the effects of aflatoxicosis on avian renal function, calcium (CA), inorganic phosphorous (Pi), and vitamin D metabolism, and to determine if the effects of aflatoxin are reversible upon discontinuation of toxin administration. Three-week-old male broiler chickens (n = 12 per treatment) received aflatoxin (AF; 2 mg/kg po) or an equal volume of corn oil, the AF carrier vehicle, for 10 consecutive days. After 10 d of treatment, half of the birds from each treatment group were anesthetized and prepared for renal function analysis, which included a 2-h phosphate loading period. Ten days after discontinuation of AF treatment, the remaining birds in each treatment group were anesthetized and prepared for renal function analysis. AF decreased plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] levels after 5 d of treatment. After 10 d of treatment, urine flow rate (V), fractional sodium excretion (FENa), and fractional potassium excretion (FEK) were lower in AF-treated birds. In addition, total plasma Ca tended to be lower (p = .10) and fractional Ca excretion (FECa) tended to be higher (p = .10) in the AF-treated birds. Intravenous phosphate loading produced a sharp increase in urine hydrogen ion concentration ([H+]) in the AF-treated birds. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was reduced and plasma osmolality was increased in AF-treated birds 10 d after discontinuation of toxin administration. The results indicate that AF directly or indirectly affects Ca and Pi metabolism in avians. At the present time, the effects may be related to altered vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) metabolism. Aflatoxicosis may decrease endogenous PTH synthesis and the renal sensitivity to PTH. The AF-related increase in urine [H+] during phosphate loading is probably due to increased Na+/H+ counterport, suggesting that AF stimulates sodium reabsorption. Also, the decrease in GFR exhibited 10 d after toxin removal indicates

  6. Sequence- and Structure-Based Functional Annotation and Assessment of Metabolic Transporters in Aspergillus oryzae: A Representative Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Raethong, Nachon; Wong-ekkabut, Jirasak; Laoteng, Kobkul; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae is widely used for the industrial production of enzymes. In A. oryzae metabolism, transporters appear to play crucial roles in controlling the flux of molecules for energy generation, nutrients delivery, and waste elimination in the cell. While the A. oryzae genome sequence is available, transporter annotation remains limited and thus the connectivity of metabolic networks is incomplete. In this study, we developed a metabolic annotation strategy to understand the relationship between the sequence, structure, and function for annotation of A. oryzae metabolic transporters. Sequence-based analysis with manual curation showed that 58 genes of 12,096 total genes in the A. oryzae genome encoded metabolic transporters. Under consensus integrative databases, 55 unambiguous metabolic transporter genes were distributed into channels and pores (7 genes), electrochemical potential-driven transporters (33 genes), and primary active transporters (15 genes). To reveal the transporter functional role, a combination of homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation was implemented to assess the relationship between sequence to structure and structure to function. As in the energy metabolism of A. oryzae, the H+-ATPase encoded by the AO090005000842 gene was selected as a representative case study of multilevel linkage annotation. Our developed strategy can be used for enhancing metabolic network reconstruction. PMID:27274991

  7. Intraspecific variation in flight metabolic rate in the bumblebee Bombus impatiens: repeatability and functional determinants in workers and drones.

    PubMed

    Darveau, Charles-A; Billardon, Fannie; Bélanger, Kasandra

    2014-02-15

    The evolution of flight energetics requires that phenotypes be variable, repeatable and heritable. We studied intraspecific variation in flight energetics in order to assess the repeatability of flight metabolic rate and wingbeat frequency, as well as the functional basis of phenotypic variation in workers and drones of the bumblebee species Bombus impatiens. We showed that flight metabolic rate and wingbeat frequency were highly repeatable in workers, even when controlling for body mass variation using residual analysis. We did not detect significant repeatability in drones, but a smaller range of variation might have prevented us from finding significant values in our sample. Based on our results and previous findings, we associated the high repeatability of flight phenotypes in workers to the functional links between body mass, thorax mass, wing size, wingbeat frequency and metabolic rate. Moreover, differences between workers and drones were as predicted from these functional associations, where drones had larger wings for their size, lower wingbeat frequency and lower flight metabolic rate. We also investigated thoracic muscle metabolic phenotypes by measuring the activity of carbohydrate metabolism enzymes, and we found positive correlations between mass-independent metabolic rate and the activity of all enzymes measured, but in workers only. When comparing workers and drones that differ in flight metabolic rate, only the activity of the enzymes hexokinase and trehalase showed the predicted differences. Overall, our study indicates that there should be correlated evolution among physiological phenotypes at multiple levels of organization and morphological traits associated with flight. PMID:24198266

  8. Exploring Metabolic Pathways and Regulation through Functional Chemoproteomic and Metabolomic Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Nomura, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing efforts have revealed a strikingly large number of uncharacterized genes, including poorly or uncharacterized metabolic enzymes, metabolites, and metabolic networks that operate in normal physiology, and also those enzymes and pathways that may be rewired under pathological conditions. Though deciphering the functions of the uncharacterized metabolic genome is a challenging prospect, it also presents an opportunity for identifying novel metabolic nodes that may be important in disease therapy. In this review, we will discuss the chemoproteomic and metabolomic platforms employed in identifying, characterizing, and targeting nodal metabolic pathways important in physiology and disease, describing an integrated workflow for functional mapping of metabolic enzymes. PMID:25237861

  9. Experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis compromises ureagenesis, an essential hepatic metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Karen Louise; Grønbæk, Henning; Glavind, Emilie; Hebbard, Lionel; Jessen, Niels; Clouston, Andrew; George, Jacob; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2014-08-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasing in prevalence, yet its consequences for liver function are unknown. We studied ureagenesis, an essential metabolic liver function of importance for whole body nitrogen homeostasis, in a rodent model of diet-induced NASH. Rats were fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet for 4 and 16 wk, resulting in early and advanced experimental NASH, respectively. We examined the urea cycle enzyme mRNAs in liver tissue, the hepatocyte urea cycle enzyme proteins, and the in vivo capacity of urea-nitrogen synthesis (CUNS). Early NASH decreased all of the urea cycle mRNAs to an average of 60% and the ornithine transcarbamylase protein to 10%, whereas the CUNS remained unchanged. Advanced NASH further decreased the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase protein to 63% and, in addition, decreased the CUNS by 20% [from 5.65 ± 0.23 to 4.58 ± 0.30 μmol × (min × 100 g)(-1); P = 0.01]. Early NASH compromised the genes and enzyme proteins involved in ureagenesis, whereas advanced NASH resulted in a functional reduction in the capacity for ureagenesis. The pattern of urea cycle perturbations suggests a prevailing mitochondrial impairment by NASH. The decrease in CUNS has consequences for the ability of the body to adjust to changes in the requirements for nitrogen homeostasis e.g., at stressful events. NASH, thus, in terms of metabolic consequences, is not an innocuous lesion, and the manifestations of the damage seem to be a continuum with increasing disease severity. PMID:24924745

  10. Is there more to learn about functional vitamin D metabolism?

    PubMed

    DeLuca, Hector F

    2015-04-01

    The state of information on the enzymes responsible for the conversion of vitamin D3 to 1α,25-dhydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3), the metabolic active form responsible for the well-known function of vitamin D on calcium metabolism and bone mineralization has been briefly reviewed. There remains an unidentified enzyme responsible for 25% of the 25-hydroxylation of vitamin D3, while 75% of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH-D3) arises from CYP2R1. The well-established suppression of multiple sclerosis (MS) by sunlight has been confirmed using the mouse model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This suppression results from a narrow band of ultraviolet light (300-315nm) that does not increase serum 25-OH-D3. Thus, UV light suppresses EAE by a mechanism not involving vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency unexpectedly suppresses the development of EAE. Further, vitamin D receptor knockout in susceptible mice also prevents the development of EAE. On the other hand, deletion of CYP2R1 and the 1α-hydroxylase, CYP27B1, does not impair the development of EAE. Thus, either vitamin D itself or a heretofore-unknown metabolite is needed for the development of a component of the immune system necessary for development of EAE. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'. PMID:25194637

  11. Silibinin Regulates Lipid Metabolism and Differentiation in Functional Human Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Barbagallo, Ignazio; Vanella, Luca; Cambria, Maria T.; Tibullo, Daniele; Godos, Justyna; Guarnaccia, Laura; Zappalà, Agata; Galvano, Fabio; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Silibinin, a natural plant flavonolignan is the main active constituent found in milk thistle (Silybum marianum). It is known to have hepatoprotective, anti-neoplastic effect, and suppresses lipid accumulation in adipocytes. Objective of this study was to investigate the effect of silibinin on adipogenic differentiation and thermogenic capacity of human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells. Silibinin (10 μM) treatment, either at the beginning or at the end of adipogenic differentiation, resulted in an increase of SIRT-1, PPARα, Pgc-1α, and UCPs gene expression. Moreover, silibinin administration resulted in a decrease of PPARγ, FABP4, FAS, and MEST/PEG1 gene expression during the differentiation, confirming that this compound is able to reduce fatty acid accumulation and adipocyte size. Our data showed that silibinin regulated adipocyte lipid metabolism, inducing thermogenesis and promoting a brown remodeling in adipocyte. Taken together, our findings suggest that silibinin increases UCPs expression by stimulation of SIRT1, PPARα, and Pgc-1α, improved metabolic parameters, decreased lipid mass leading to the formation of functional adipocytes. PMID:26834634

  12. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  13. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme.

    PubMed

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  14. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism and surfactant function in preterm, ventilated lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, A.H.; Ikegami, M.; Seidner, S.R.; Pettenazzo, A.; Ruffini, L.

    1989-02-01

    Preterm lambs were delivered at 138 days gestational age and ventilated for periods up to 24 h in order to study surfactant metabolism and surfactant function. The surfactant-saturated phosphatidylcholine pool in the alveolar wash was 13 +/- 4 mumol/kg and did not change from 10 min to 24 h after birth. Trace amounts of labeled natural sheep surfactant were mixed with fetal lung fluid at birth. By 24 h, 80% of the label had become lung-tissue-associated, yet there was no loss of label from phosphatidylcholine in the lungs when calculated as the sum of the lung tissue plus alveolar wash. De novo synthesized phosphatidylcholine was labeled with choline given by intravascular injection at 1 h of age. Labeled phosphatidylcholine accumulated in the lung tissue linearly to 24 h, and the labeled phosphatidylcholine moved through lamellar body to alveolar pools. The turnover time for alveolar phosphatidylcholine was estimated to be about 13 h, indicating an active metabolic pool. A less surface-active surfactant fraction recovered as a supernatant after centrifugation of the alveolar washes at 40,000 x g increased from birth to 10 min of ventilation, but no subsequent changes in the distribution of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in surfactant fractions occurred. The results were consistent with recycling pathway(s) that maintained surface-active surfactant pools in preterm ventilated lambs.

  15. Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on Metabolic Parameters and Reproductive Function in Female Ossabaw Minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Newell-Fugate, Annie E; Taibl, Jessica N; Clark, Sherrie G; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Sturek, Michael; Krisher, Rebecca L

    2014-01-01

    This study characterizes the effect of an excess-calorie, high-fat, high-cholesterol, high-fructose diet on metabolic parameters and reproductive function in female Ossabaw minipigs. Cycling sows were fed a hypercaloric, high-fat, high-cholesterol, and high-fructose diet (obese, n = 4) or a control diet (control, n = 5) for 13 mo. During the final 4 mo, ovarian ultrasonography was done, blood was collected, and weights and measures were taken. Pigs then underwent ovarian stimulation. Cycle length and androstenedione, total testosterone, progesterone, estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, insulin, fructosamine, lipid, and glucose levels were measured. In addition, adipose tissue aromatase gene expression was assessed. As compared with control pigs, obese pigs were hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic; had elevated total cholesterol, triglyceride, and leptin levels, and demonstrated abdominal adiposity. Visceral adipose tissue of obese pigs, as compared with control pigs, showed increased aromatase gene expression. Obese pigs had longer estrous cycles, higher serum androstenedione, and higher luteal phase serum luteinizing hormone, compared with control pigs. During the luteal phase, obese pigs had more medium, ovulatory, and cystic ovarian follicles, whereas control pigs had more small ovarian follicles. When fed an excess-calorie, high-fat, high-cholesterol, high-fructose diet, female Ossabaw minipigs develop obesity, metabolic syndrome, and abnormal reproductive function. This animal model may be applicable to studies of the effects of obesity on fertility in women. PMID:24512960

  16. Functional or Anaphoric Control in Jordanian Arabic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Haq, Fawwaz Al-Abed

    1992-01-01

    Discusses functional and anaphoric control in complex sentences (sentences with more than one verb) in Jordanian Arabic within the framework of Lexical-Functional Grammar. It is argued that Jordanian Arabic utilizes anaphoric rather that functional control. (18 references) (JL)

  17. Maternal blood metal levels and fetal markers of metabolic function

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley-Martin, Jillian; Dodds, Linda; Arbuckle, Tye E.; Ettinger, Adrienne S.; Shapiro, Gabriel D.; Fisher, Mandy; Taback, Shayne; Bouchard, Maryse F.; Monnier, Patricia; Dallaire, Renee; Fraser, William D.

    2015-01-15

    Exposure to metals commonly found in the environment has been hypothesized to be associated with measures of fetal growth but the epidemiological literature is limited. The Maternal–Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) study recruited 2001 women during the first trimester of pregnancy from 10 Canadian sites. Our objective was to assess the association between prenatal exposure to metals (lead, arsenic, cadmium, and mercury) and fetal metabolic function. Average maternal metal concentrations in 1st and 3rd trimester blood samples were used to represent prenatal metals exposure. Leptin and adiponectin were measured in 1363 cord blood samples and served as markers of fetal metabolic function. Polytomous logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between metals and both high (≥90%) and low (≤10%) fetal adiponectin and leptin levels. Leptin levels were significantly higher in female infants compared to males. A significant relationship between maternal blood cadmium and odds of high leptin was observed among males but not females in adjusted models. When adjusting for birth weight z-score, lead was associated with an increased odd of high leptin. No other significant associations were found at the top or bottom 10th percentile in either leptin or adiponectin models. This study supports the proposition that maternal levels of cadmium influence cord blood adipokine levels in a sex-dependent manner. Further investigation is required to confirm these findings and to determine how such findings at birth will translate into childhood anthropometric measures. - Highlights: • We determined relationships between maternal metal levels and cord blood adipokines. • Cord blood leptin levels were higher among female than male infants. • Maternal cadmium was associated with elevated leptin in male, not female infants. • No significant associations were observed between metals and

  18. Relationships between Mitochondrial Function and Metabolic Flexibility in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    van de Weijer, Tineke; Sparks, Lauren Marie; Phielix, Esther; Meex, Ruth Carla; van Herpen, Noud Antonius; Hesselink, Matthijs Karel C.; Schrauwen, Patrick; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera Bettina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mitochondrial dysfunction, lipid accumulation, insulin resistance and metabolic inflexibility have been implicated in the etiology of type 2 diabetes (T2D), yet their interrelationship remains speculative. We investigated these interrelationships in a group of T2D and obese normoglycemic control subjects. Methods 49 non-insulin dependent male T2D patients and 54 male control subjects were enrolled, and a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and indirect calorimetry were performed. A muscle biopsy was taken and intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) was measured. In vivo mitochondrial function was measured by PCr recovery in 30 T2D patients and 31 control subjects. Results Fasting NEFA levels were significantly elevated in T2D patients compared with controls, but IMCL was not different. Mitochondrial function in T2D patients was compromised by 12.5% (p<0.01). Whole body glucose disposal (WGD) was higher at baseline and lower after insulin stimulation. Metabolic flexibility (ΔRER) was lower in the type 2 diabetic patients (0.050±0.033 vs. 0.093±0.050, p<0.01). Mitochondrial function was the sole predictor of basal respiratory exchange ratio (RER) (R2 = 0.18, p<0.05); whereas WGD predicted both insulin-stimulated RER (R2 = 0.29, p<0.001) and metabolic flexibility (R2 = 0.40, p<0.001). Conclusions These results indicate that defects in skeletal muscle in vivo mitochondrial function in type 2 diabetic patients are only reflected in basal substrate oxidation and highlight the importance of glucose disposal rate as a determinant of substrate utilization in response to insulin. PMID:23418416

  19. Mitochondria and carbon monoxide: cytoprotection and control of cell metabolism - a role for Ca(2+) ?

    PubMed

    R Oliveira, Sara; Queiroga, Cláudia S F; Vieira, Helena L A

    2016-08-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenously produced gasotransmitter with important biological functions: anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis, vasomodulation and cell metabolism modulation. The most recognized cellular target for CO is the mitochondria. Physiological concentrations of CO generate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are signalling molecules for CO-induced pathways. Indeed, small amounts of ROS promote cytoprotection by a preconditioning effect. Furthermore, CO prevents cell death by limiting mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, which inhibits the release of pro-apoptotic factors into the cytosol; both events are ROS dependent. CO also increases the ability of mitochondria to take up Ca(2+) . Mitochondrial metabolism is modulated by CO, namely by increasing TCA cycle rate, oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial biogenesis, which, in turn, increases ATP production. CO's modulation of metabolism might be important for cellular response to diseases, namely cancer and ischaemic diseases. Finally, another cytoprotective role of CO involves the control of Ca(2+) channels. By limiting the activity of T-type and L-type Ca(2+) channels, CO prevents excitotoxicity-induced cell death and modulates cell proliferation. Several questions concerning Ca(2+) signalling, mitochondria and CO can be asked, for instance whether CO modulation of cell metabolism would be dependent on the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake capacity, since small amounts of Ca(2+) can increase mitochondrial metabolism. Whether CO controls Ca(2+) communication between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum is another open field of research. In summary, CO emerges as a key gasotransmitter in the control of several cellular functions of mitochondria: metabolism, cell death and Ca(2+) signalling. PMID:26377343

  20. Role of glycolytic intermediate in regulation: Improving lycopene production in Escherichia coli by engineering metabolic control

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W.R.; Liao, J.C.

    2001-06-01

    Metabolic engineering in the postgenomic era is expected to benefit from a full understanding of the biosynthetic capability of microorganisms as a result of the progress being made in bioinformatics and functional genomics. The immediate advantage of such information is to allow the rational design of novel pathways and the elimination of native reactions that are detrimental or unnecessary for the desired purpose. However, with the ability to manipulate metabolic pathways becoming more effective, metabolic engineering will need to face a new challenge: the reengineering of the regulatory hierarchy that controls gene expression in those pathways. In addition to constructing the genetic composition of a metabolic pathway, they propose that it will become just as important to consider the dynamics of pathways gene expression. It has been widely observed that high-level induction of a recombinant protein or pathway leads to growth retardation and reduced metabolic activity. These phenotypic characteristics result from the fact that the constant demands of production placed upon the cell interfere with its changing requirements for growth. They believe that this common situation in metabolic engineering can be alleviated by designing a dynamic controller that is able to sense the metabolic state of the cell and regulate the expression of the recombinant pathway accordingly. This approach, which is termed metabolic control engineering, involves redesigning the native regulatory circuits and applying them to the recombinant pathway. The general goal of such an effort will be to control the flux to the recombinant pathway adaptively according to the cell's metabolic state. The dynamically controlled recombinant pathway can potentially lead to enhanced production, minimized growth retardation, and reduced toxic by-product formation. The regulation of gene expression in response to the physiological state is also essential to the success of gene therapy. Here they

  1. Sense and Nonsense in Metabolic Control of Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jill E.; Klingerman, Candice M.; Abdulhay, Amir

    2012-01-01

    An exciting synergistic interaction occurs among researchers working at the interface of reproductive biology and energy homeostasis. Reproductive biologists benefit from the theories, experimental designs, and methodologies used by experts on energy homeostasis while they bring context and meaning to the study of energy homeostasis. There is a growing recognition that identification of candidate genes for obesity is little more than meaningless reductionism unless those genes and their expression are placed in a developmental, environmental, and evolutionary context. Reproductive biology provides this context because metabolic energy is the most important factor that controls reproductive success and gonadal hormones affect energy intake, storage, and expenditure. Reproductive hormone secretion changes during development, and reproductive success is key to evolutionary adaptation, the process that most likely molded the mechanisms that control energy balance. It is likely that by viewing energy intake, storage, and expenditure in the context of reproductive success, we will gain insight into human obesity, eating disorders, diabetes, and other pathologies related to fuel homeostasis. This review emphasizes the metabolic hypothesis: a sensory system monitors the availability of oxidizable metabolic fuels and orchestrates behavioral motivation to optimize reproductive success in environments where energy availability fluctuates or is unpredictable. PMID:22649413

  2. Ghrelin action in the brain controls adipocyte metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Theander-Carrillo, Claudia; Wiedmer, Petra; Cettour-Rose, Philippe; Nogueiras, Ruben; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul; Castaneda, Tamara R.; Muzzin, Patrick; Schürmann, Annette; Szanto, Ildiko; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise

    2006-01-01

    Many homeostatic processes, including appetite and food intake, are controlled by neuroendocrine circuits involving the CNS. The CNS also directly regulates adipocyte metabolism, as we have shown here by examining central action of the orexigenic hormone ghrelin. Chronic central ghrelin infusion resulted in increases in the glucose utilization rate of white and brown adipose tissue without affecting skeletal muscle. In white adipocytes, mRNA expression of various fat storage–promoting enzymes such as lipoprotein lipase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase α, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase–1 was markedly increased, while that of the rate-limiting step in fat oxidation, carnitine palmitoyl transferase–1α, was decreased. In brown adipocytes, central ghrelin infusion resulted in lowered expression of the thermogenesis-related mitochondrial uncoupling proteins 1 and 3. These ghrelin effects were dose dependent, occurred independently from ghrelin-induced hyperphagia, and seemed to be mediated by the sympathetic nervous system. Additionally, the expression of some fat storage enzymes was decreased in ghrelin-deficient mice, which led us to conclude that central ghrelin is of physiological relevance in the control of cell metabolism in adipose tissue. These results unravel the existence of what we believe to be a new CNS-based neuroendocrine circuit regulating metabolic homeostasis of adipose tissue. PMID:16767221

  3. Arginase 1 is an innate lymphoid-cell-intrinsic metabolic checkpoint controlling type 2 inflammation.

    PubMed

    Monticelli, Laurel A; Buck, Michael D; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Saenz, Steven A; Tait Wojno, Elia D; Yudanin, Naomi A; Osborne, Lisa C; Hepworth, Matthew R; Tran, Sara V; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Shah, Hardik; Cross, Justin R; Diamond, Joshua M; Cantu, Edward; Christie, Jason D; Pearce, Erika L; Artis, David

    2016-06-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) regulate tissue inflammation and repair after activation by cell-extrinsic factors such as host-derived cytokines. However, the cell-intrinsic metabolic pathways that control ILC2 function are undefined. Here we demonstrate that expression of the enzyme arginase-1 (Arg1) during acute or chronic lung inflammation is a conserved trait of mouse and human ILC2s. Deletion of mouse ILC-intrinsic Arg1 abrogated type 2 lung inflammation by restraining ILC2 proliferation and dampening cytokine production. Mechanistically, inhibition of Arg1 enzymatic activity disrupted multiple components of ILC2 metabolic programming by altering arginine catabolism, impairing polyamine biosynthesis and reducing aerobic glycolysis. These data identify Arg1 as a key regulator of ILC2 bioenergetics that controls proliferative capacity and proinflammatory functions promoting type 2 inflammation. PMID:27043409

  4. Metabolic regulation of T cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Park, Benjamin V.; Pan, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Upon encountering pathogens, T cells mount immune responses by proliferating, increasing cellular mass and differentiating. These cellular changes impose significant energetic challenges on T cells. It was believed that TCR and cytokine-mediated signaling are dominant dictators of T cell-mediated immune responses. Recently, it was recognized that T cells utilize metabolic transporters and metabolic sensors that allow them to rapidly respond to nutrient-limiting inflammatory environments. Metabolic sensors allow T cells to find a balance between energy consumption (anabolic metabolism) and production (catabolic metabolism) in order to mount effective immune responses. Also, metabolic regulators interact with cytokine-dependent transcriptional regulators, suggesting a more integrative and advanced model of T cell activation and differentiation. In this review, we will discuss recent discoveries regarding the roles of metabolic regulators in effector and memory T cell development and their interaction with canonical transcription factors. PMID:26277275

  5. Metabolism alteration in follicular niche: The nexus among intermediary metabolism, mitochondrial function, and classic polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongcui; Zhao, Yue; Li, Tianjie; Li, Min; Li, Junsheng; Li, Rong; Liu, Ping; Yu, Yang; Qiao, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Classic polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a high-risk phenotype accompanied by increased risks of reproductive and metabolic abnormalities; however, the local metabolism characteristics of the ovaries and their effects on germ cell development are unclear. The present study used targeted metabolomics to detect alterations in the intermediate metabolites of follicular fluid from classic PCOS patients, and the results indicated that hyperandrogenism but not obesity induced the changed intermediate metabolites in classic PCOS patients. Regarding the direct contact, we identified mitochondrial function, redox potential, and oxidative stress in cumulus cells which were necessary to support oocyte growth before fertilization, and suggested dysfunction of mitochondria, imbalanced redox potential, and increased oxidative stress in cumulus cells of classic PCOS patients. Follicular fluid intermediary metabolic profiles provide signatures of classic PCOS ovary local metabolism and establish a close link with mitochondria dysfunction of cumulus cells, highlighting the role of metabolic signal and mitochondrial cross talk involved in the pathogenesis of classic PCOS. PMID:26057937

  6. Metabolite Valves: Dynamic Control of Metabolic Flux for Pathway Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Kristala

    2015-03-01

    Microbial strains have been successfully engineered to produce a wide variety of chemical compounds, several of which have been commercialized. As new products are targeted for biological synthesis, yield is frequently considered a primary driver towards determining feasibility. Theoretical yields can be calculated, establishing an upper limit on the potential conversion of starting substrates to target compounds. Such yields typically ignore loss of substrate to byproducts, with the assumption that competing reactions can be eliminated, usually by deleting the genes encoding the corresponding enzymes. However, when an enzyme encodes an essential gene, especially one involved in primary metabolism, deletion is not a viable option. Reducing gene expression in a static fashion is possible, but this solution ignores the metabolic demand needed for synthesis of the enzymes required for the desired pathway. We have developed Metabolite valves to address this challenge. The valves are designed to allow high flux through the essential enzyme during an initial period where growth is favored. Following an external perturbation, enzyme activity is then reduced, enabling a higher precursor pool to be diverted towards the pathway of interest. We have designed valves with control at both the transcriptional and post-translational levels. In both cases, key enzymes in glucose metabolism are regulated, and two different compounds are targeted for heterologous production. We have measured increased concentrations of intracellular metabolites once the valve is closed, and have demonstrated that these increased pools lead to increased product yields. These metabolite valves should prove broadly useful for dynamic control of metabolic flux, resulting in improvements in product yields.

  7. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... convert or use energy, such as: Breathing Circulating blood Controlling body temperature Contracting muscles Digesting food and nutrients Eliminating waste through urine and feces Functioning of the brain and nerves

  8. Metabolic control of adult neural stem cell activity by Fasn-dependent lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Knobloch, Marlen; Braun, Simon M. G.; Zurkirchen, Luis; von Schoultz, Carolin; Zamboni, Nicola; Arauzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Kovacs, Werner J.; Karalay, Özlem; Suter, Ueli; Machado, Raquel A. C.; Roccio, Marta; Lutolf, Matthias P.; Semenkovich, Clay F.; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms controlling the proliferative activity of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs) have a pivotal role to ensure life-long neurogenesis in the mammalian brain1. How metabolic programs are coupled with NSPC activity remains unknown. Here we show that fatty acid synthase (Fasn), the key enzyme of de novo lipogenesis2, is highly active in adult NSPCs and that conditional deletion of Fasn in mouse NSPCs impairs adult neurogenesis. The rate of de novo lipid synthesis and subsequent proliferation of NSPCs is regulated by Spot14, a gene previously implicated in lipid metabolism3–5, that we found to be selectively expressed in low proliferating adult NSPCs. Spot14 reduces the availability of malonyl-CoA6, which is an essential substrate for Fasn to fuel lipogenesis. Thus, we identify here a functional coupling between the regulation of lipid metabolism and adult NSPC proliferation. PMID:23201681

  9. Understanding the control of acyl flux through the lipid metabolic network of plant oil biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bates, Philip D

    2016-09-01

    Plant oil biosynthesis involves a complex metabolic network with multiple subcellular compartments, parallel pathways, cycles, and pathways that have a dual function to produce essential membrane lipids and triacylglycerol. Modern molecular biology techniques provide tools to alter plant oil compositions through bioengineering, however with few exceptions the final composition of triacylglycerol cannot be predicted. One reason for limited success in oilseed bioengineering is the inadequate understanding of how to control the flux of fatty acids through various fatty acid modification, and triacylglycerol assembly pathways of the lipid metabolic network. This review focuses on the mechanisms of acyl flux through the lipid metabolic network, and highlights where uncertainty resides in our understanding of seed oil biosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:27003249

  10. Modular metabolic control analysis of large responses in branched systems--application to aspartate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Fernando; Acerenza, Luis

    2011-07-01

    Organisms subject to changing environmental conditions or experimental protocols show complex patterns of responses. The design principles behind these patterns are still poorly understood. Here, modular metabolic control analysis is developed to deal with large changes in branched pathways. Modular aggregation of the system dramatically reduces the number of explicit variables and modulation sites. Thus, the resulting number of control coefficients, which describe system responses, is small. Three properties determine the pattern for large changes in the variables: the values of infinitesimal control coefficients, the effect of large rate changes on the control coefficients and the range of rate changes preserving feasible intermediate concentrations. Importantly, this pattern gives information about the possibility of obtaining large variable changes by changing parameters inside the module, without the need to perform any parameter modulations. The framework is applied to a detailed model of Asp metabolism. The system is aggregated in one supply module, producing Thr from Asp (SM1), and two demand modules, incorporating Thr (DM2) and Ile (DM3) into protein. Their fluxes are: J(1), J(2), and J(3), respectively. The analysis shows similar high infinitesimal control coefficients of J(2) by the rates of SM1 and DM2 (C(v1)(J2) = 0.6 and C(v2)(J2) = 0.7, respectively). In addition, these coefficients present only moderate decreases when the rates of the corresponding modules are increased. However, the range of feasible rate changes in SM1 is narrow. Therefore, for large increases in J(2) to be obtained, DM2 must be modulated. Of the rich network of allosteric interactions present, only two groups of inhibitions generate the control pattern for large responses. PMID:21592306

  11. Metabolism and Ovarian Function in PCOS Women: A Therapeutic Approach with Inositols.

    PubMed

    Laganà, Antonio Simone; Rossetti, Paola; Buscema, Massimo; La Vignera, Sandro; Condorelli, Rosita Angela; Gullo, Giuseppe; Granese, Roberta; Triolo, Onofrio

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by chronical anovulation and hyperandrogenism which may be present in a different degree of severity. Insulin-resistance and hyperinsulinemia are the main physiopathological basis of this syndrome and the failure of inositol-mediated signaling may concur to them. Myo (MI) and D-chiro-inositol (DCI), the most studied inositol isoforms, are classified as insulin sensitizers. In form of glycans, DCI-phosphoglycan and MI-phosphoglycan control key enzymes were involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. In form of phosphoinositides, they play an important role as second messengers in several cellular biological functions. Considering the key role played by insulin-resistance and androgen excess in PCOS patients, the insulin-sensitizing effects of both MI and DCI were tested in order to ameliorate symptoms and signs of this syndrome, including the possibility to restore patients' fertility. Accumulating evidence suggests that both isoforms of inositol are effective in improving ovarian function and metabolism in patients with PCOS, although MI showed the most marked effect on the metabolic profile, whereas DCI reduced hyperandrogenism better. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on inositol signaling and correlate data on biological functions of these multifaceted molecules, in view of a rational use for the therapy in women with PCOS. PMID:27579037

  12. Metabolism and Ovarian Function in PCOS Women: A Therapeutic Approach with Inositols

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Paola; Buscema, Massimo; Condorelli, Rosita Angela; Gullo, Giuseppe; Triolo, Onofrio

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by chronical anovulation and hyperandrogenism which may be present in a different degree of severity. Insulin-resistance and hyperinsulinemia are the main physiopathological basis of this syndrome and the failure of inositol-mediated signaling may concur to them. Myo (MI) and D-chiro-inositol (DCI), the most studied inositol isoforms, are classified as insulin sensitizers. In form of glycans, DCI-phosphoglycan and MI-phosphoglycan control key enzymes were involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. In form of phosphoinositides, they play an important role as second messengers in several cellular biological functions. Considering the key role played by insulin-resistance and androgen excess in PCOS patients, the insulin-sensitizing effects of both MI and DCI were tested in order to ameliorate symptoms and signs of this syndrome, including the possibility to restore patients' fertility. Accumulating evidence suggests that both isoforms of inositol are effective in improving ovarian function and metabolism in patients with PCOS, although MI showed the most marked effect on the metabolic profile, whereas DCI reduced hyperandrogenism better. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on inositol signaling and correlate data on biological functions of these multifaceted molecules, in view of a rational use for the therapy in women with PCOS. PMID:27579037

  13. Control of sulfur partitioning between primary and secondary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mugford, Sarah G; Lee, Bok-Rye; Koprivova, Anna; Matthewman, Colette; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur is an essential nutrient for all organisms. Plants take up most sulfur as inorganic sulfate, reduce it and incorporate it into cysteine during primary sulfate assimilation. However, some of the sulfate is partitioned into the secondary metabolism to synthesize a variety of sulfated compounds. The two pathways of sulfate utilization branch after activation of sulfate to adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS). Recently we showed that the enzyme APS kinase limits the availability of activated sulfate for the synthesis of sulfated secondary compounds in Arabidopsis. To further dissect the control of sulfur partitioning between the primary and secondary metabolism, we analysed plants in which activities of enzymes that use APS as a substrate were increased or reduced. Reduction in APS kinase activity led to reduced levels of glucosinolates as a major class of sulfated secondary metabolites and an increased concentration of thiols, products of primary reduction. However, over-expression of this gene does not affect the levels of glucosinolates. Over-expression of APS reductase had no effect on glucosinolate levels but did increase thiol levels, but neither glucosinolate nor thiol levels were affected in mutants lacking the APR2 isoform of this enzyme. Measuring the flux through sulfate assimilation using [(35) S]sulfate confirmed the larger flow of sulfur to primary assimilation when APS kinase activity was reduced. Thus, at least in Arabidopsis, the interplay between APS reductase and APS kinase is important for sulfur partitioning between the primary and secondary metabolism. PMID:21175893

  14. Metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria, the combined approach: kinetic modelling, metabolic control and experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoefnagel, Marcel H N; Starrenburg, Marjo J C; Martens, Dirk E; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Van Swam, Iris I; Bongers, Roger; Westerhoff, Hans V; Snoep, Jacky L

    2002-04-01

    Everyone who has ever tried to radically change metabolic fluxes knows that it is often harder to determine which enzymes have to be modified than it is to actually implement these changes. In the more traditional genetic engineering approaches 'bottle-necks' are pinpointed using qualitative, intuitive approaches, but the alleviation of suspected 'rate-limiting' steps has not often been successful. Here the authors demonstrate that a model of pyruvate distribution in Lactococcus lactis based on enzyme kinetics in combination with metabolic control analysis clearly indicates the key control points in the flux to acetoin and diacetyl, important flavour compounds. The model presented here (available at http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za/wcfs.html) showed that the enzymes with the greatest effect on this flux resided outside the acetolactate synthase branch itself. Experiments confirmed the predictions of the model, i.e. knocking out lactate dehydrogenase and overexpressing NADH oxidase increased the flux through the acetolactate synthase branch from 0 to 75% of measured product formation rates. PMID:11932446

  15. Moderate exercise increases the metabolism and immune function of lymphocytes in rats.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Francisco; Bacurau, Aline Villa Nova; Pereira, Guilherme Borges; Araújo, Ronaldo Carvalho; Almeida, Sandro Soares; Moraes, Milton Rocha; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Costa Rosa, Luis Fernando Bicudo Pereira; Navalta, James; Prestes, Jonato; Bacurau, Reury Frank Pereira

    2013-05-01

    Exercise modulates both glucose and glutamine metabolism which influences lymphocyte function. We investigated the influence of chronic moderate exercise on glucose and glutamine metabolism in lymphocytes, the associated influence on proliferation, and cytokine and immunoglobulin production. Male Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were placed in an exercise training group (N = 15, 1 h day(-1) at 60 % VO₂max, 5 days week(-1)) for 8 weeks of exercise, or a sedentary control group. Twenty-four hours following the final training session, lymphocytes were separated, and the incorporation of [U-14C]-glucose, [U-14C]-glutamine, and [2-14C]-thymidine from the supernatant was measured. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, hexokinase, and glutaminase was measured. Lymphocytes were stimulated with ConA and LPS and incubated with the Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine and plasma IgG and IgE were measured. Glutamine metabolism increased in both T and B lymphocytes in the trained group. In the trained group, proliferative capacity increased T lymphocytes under ConA stimulation, and increased B lymphocytes with LPS. There was a significant increase in IL-2 production and decrease in IL-4 in the trained group compared with sedentary controls. IL-2R and TNFR increased in trained rats while IL-4R decreased and were more pronounced in T lymphocytes compared with B lymphocytes. In both lymphocyte subsets, exercise training significantly increased the expression of CD54+ and CD30+ cell markers. Exercise training increased plasma IgG compared with the sedentary group. In conclusion, moderate exercise training improves immune function and metabolism in T and B lymphocytes, reflecting an increased ability to respond to immune challenges. PMID:23212119

  16. Liver disease alters high-density lipoprotein composition, metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Trieb, Markus; Horvath, Angela; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Spindelboeck, Walter; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Taschler, Ulrike; Curcic, Sanja; Stauber, Rudolf E; Holzer, Michael; Pasterk, Lisa; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2016-07-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are important endogenous inhibitors of inflammatory responses. Functional impairment of HDL might contribute to the excess mortality experienced by patients with liver disease, but the effect of cirrhosis on HDL metabolism and function remain elusive. To get an integrated measure of HDL quantity and quality, we assessed several metrics of HDL function using apolipoprotein (apo) B-depleted sera from patients with compensated cirrhosis, patients with acutely decompensated cirrhosis and healthy controls. We observed that sera of cirrhotic patients showed reduced levels of HDL-cholesterol and profoundly suppressed activities of several enzymes involved in HDL maturation and metabolism. Native gel electrophoresis analyses revealed that cirrhotic serum HDL shifts towards the larger HDL2 subclass. Proteomic assessment of isolated HDL identified several proteins, including apoA-I, apoC-III, apoE, paraoxonase 1 and acute phase serum amyloid A to be significantly altered in cirrhotic patients. With regard to function, these alterations in levels, composition and structure of HDL were strongly associated with metrics of function of apoB-depleted sera, including cholesterol efflux capability, paraoxonase activity, the ability to inhibit monocyte production of cytokines and endothelial regenerative activities. Of particular interest, cholesterol efflux capacity appeared to be strongly associated with liver disease mortality. Our findings may be clinically relevant and improve our ability to monitor cirrhotic patients at high risk. PMID:27106140

  17. A Modeling and Simulation Approach to the Study of Metabolic Control Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Caso, Carlos; Sanchez-Jimenez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Angel

    2002-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis has contributed to the rapid advance in our understanding of metabolic regulation. However, up to now this topic has not been covered properly in biochemistry courses. This work reports the development and implementation of a practical lesson on metabolic control analysis (MCA) using modeling and simulation. The…

  18. Functional characterization of Yersinia pestis aerobic glycerol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Willias, Stephan P; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L

    2014-11-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Orientalis isolates have lost the capacity to ferment glycerol. Herein we provide experimental validation that a 93 bp in-frame deletion within the glpD gene encoding the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase present in all biovar Orientalis strains is sufficient to disrupt aerobic glycerol fermentation. Furthermore, the inability to ferment glycerol is often insured by a variety of additional mutations within the glpFKX operon which prevents glycerol internalization and conversion to glycerol-3-phosphate. The physiological impact of functional glpFKX in the presence of dysfunctional glpD was assessed. Results demonstrate no change in growth kinetics at 26 °C and 37 °C. Mutants deficient in glpD displayed decreased intracellular accumulation of glycerol-3-phosphate, a characterized inhibitor of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) activation. Since CRP is rigorously involved in global regulation Y. pestis virulence, we tested a possible influence of a single glpD mutation on virulence. Nonetheless, subcutaneous and intranasal murine challenge was not impacted by glycerol metabolism. As quantified by crystal violet assay, biofilm formation of the glpD-deficient KIM6+ mutant was mildly repressed; whereas, chromosomal restoration of glpD in CO92 resulted in a significant increase in biofilm formation. PMID:25220241

  19. Updated knowledge about polyphenols: functions, bioavailability, metabolism, and health.

    PubMed

    Landete, J M

    2012-01-01

    Polyphenols are important constituents of food products of plant origin. Fruits, vegetables, and beverages are the main sources of phenolic compounds in the human diet. These compounds are directly related to sensory characteristics of foods such as flavor, astringency and color. Polyphenols are extensively metabolized both in tissues and by the colonic microbiota. Normally, the circulating polyphenols are glucuronidated and/or sulphated and no free aglycones are found in plasma. The presence of phenolic compounds in the diet is beneficial to health due to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilating properties. The health effects of polyphenols depend on the amount consumed and their bioavailability. Moreover, polyphenols are able to kill or inhibit the growth of microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, or protozoans. Some dietary polyphenols may have significant effects on the colonic flora providing a type of prebiotic effect. The anti-nutrient properties of polyphenols are also discussed in this paper. The antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, vasodilating, and prebiotic properties of polyphenols make them potential functional foods. PMID:22747081

  20. Development of baked and extruded functional foods from metabolic syndrome specific ingredient mix.

    PubMed

    Miglani, Neetu; Bains, Kiran; Kaur, Harpreet

    2015-09-01

    The study was aimed to develop baked and extruded functional foods from Metabolic Syndrome (MS) specific designed ingredient mixes with optimum amino acid makeup using key food ingredients with functional properties such as whole cereals, legumes, skimmed milk powder, along with flaxseeds and fenugreek seeds. Two cereals viz. barley and oats and four pulses viz. mung bean, cowpea, bengal gram and soybean were blended in different proportions in order to balance the limiting amino acid lysine in the wheat flour. Three products namely bread, extruded snack and noodles prepared from twenty five ingredient mixes. Six ingredient mixes of breads and four ingredient mixes each of extruded snack and noodles specifically designed for MS patients were organoleptically at par with control wheat flour products. The acceptable products had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher lysine, crude protein, ash and fibre and low carbohydrates in compare control whole wheat flour products, hence appropriate for MS patients. PMID:26345000

  1. (Physiology and genetics of metabolic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis)

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.

    1992-01-01

    The funded research deals with the physiology and genetics of glycolytic flux control in Zymomonas mobilis. Two fundamental biological questions are begin addressed: First, how do the enzymes of glycolytic pathways act in concert to regulate metabolic flux Second, what is the role of gene expression in regulating high level synthesis of the glycolytic enzymes in a balance that allows proper glycolytic flux control The specific objectives of the grant are as follows: 1. To clone the structural and regulatory regions of the Z. mobilis genes encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglucose isomerase, enolase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, 2- keto-3-deoxy- 6-phosphogluconate aldolase, glucokinase and fructokinase. 2. To characterize the structure of these genes with respect to nucleotide sequence, transcriptional initiation sites promoter location, evolutionary relatedness to similar genes from other organisms, and organization of these genes on the genome. 3. To investigate the effects of genetically engineered alterations in the levels of the cloned enzymes on metabolic flux and cell growth. 4. To study transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. The first two specific objectives have now been fully completed. Significant progress has been made on the fourth objective and work on the third objective is well underway.

  2. Comparative genomics of metabolic capacities of regulons controlled by cis-regulatory RNA motifs in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In silico comparative genomics approaches have been efficiently used for functional prediction and reconstruction of metabolic and regulatory networks. Riboswitches are metabolite-sensing structures often found in bacterial mRNA leaders controlling gene expression on transcriptional or translational levels. An increasing number of riboswitches and other cis-regulatory RNAs have been recently classified into numerous RNA families in the Rfam database. High conservation of these RNA motifs provides a unique advantage for their genomic identification and comparative analysis. Results A comparative genomics approach implemented in the RegPredict tool was used for reconstruction and functional annotation of regulons controlled by RNAs from 43 Rfam families in diverse taxonomic groups of Bacteria. The inferred regulons include ~5200 cis-regulatory RNAs and more than 12000 target genes in 255 microbial genomes. All predicted RNA-regulated genes were classified into specific and overall functional categories. Analysis of taxonomic distribution of these categories allowed us to establish major functional preferences for each analyzed cis-regulatory RNA motif family. Overall, most RNA motif regulons showed predictable functional content in accordance with their experimentally established effector ligands. Our results suggest that some RNA motifs (including thiamin pyrophosphate and cobalamin riboswitches that control the cofactor metabolism) are widespread and likely originated from the last common ancestor of all bacteria. However, many more analyzed RNA motifs are restricted to a narrow taxonomic group of bacteria and likely represent more recent evolutionary innovations. Conclusions The reconstructed regulatory networks for major known RNA motifs substantially expand the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in bacteria. The inferred regulons can be used for genetic experiments, functional annotations of genes, metabolic reconstruction and

  3. Adipocyte Versus Somatotrope Leptin: Regulation of Metabolic Functions in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Odle, Angela Katherine; Allensworth-James, Melody; Haney, Anessa; Akhter, Noor; Syed, Mohsin; Childs, Gwen V

    2016-04-01

    Leptin regulates food intake and energy expenditure (EE) and is produced in adipocytes, the pituitary, and several other tissues. Animals that are leptin or leptin receptor deficient have major metabolic complications, including obesity. This study tests the hypothesis that the pituitary somatotrope may contribute a source of leptin that maintains some of these metabolic functions. We created 2 different tissue-specific leptin knockout animals: a Somatotrope-Lep-null model and an Adipocyte-Lep-null model. Metabolic analysis of both models, along with a global deletion model, was performed. The Somatotrope-Lep-null animals had fewer somatotropes, and females had a 76% decrease in serum prolactin. During the dark (feeding) phase, females had a 35% increase in ambulation coupled with a 4% increase in EE. Mutants showed no change in food intake or weight gain and EE was unchanged in males. During the light (sleep) phase, Somatotrope-Lep-null mutant males had lower EE and females continued to have higher EE. The respiratory quotients (RQs) of mutants and littermate controls were decreased in males and increased in females; all were within the range that indicates predominant carbohydrate burning. The massively obese Adipocyte-Lep-null animals, however, had significant increases in food intake, sleep, and increased EE, with decreased activity. Changes in RQ were sexually dimorphic, with female mutants having higher RQ and males having decreased RQ. We conclude that both adipocyte and somatotrope leptin contribute to the metabolic homeostasis of the mouse, and that extraadipocyte sources of leptin cannot overcome the major metabolic challenges seen in these animals. PMID:26859333

  4. Control of respiratory and cardiovascular functions by leptin

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, M.; Werner, I.F.; Zoccal, D.B.; Menani, J.V.; Colombari, E.; Hall, J.E.; da Silva, A.A.; do Carmo, J.M.; Colombari, D.S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Leptin, a peptide hormone produced by adipose tissue, acts in brain centers that control critical physiological functions such as metabolism, breathing and cardiovascular regulation. The importance of leptin for respiratory control is evident by the fact that leptin deficient mice exhibit impaired ventilatory responses to carbon dioxide (CO2), which can be corrected by intracerebroventricular leptin replacement therapy. Leptin is also recognized as an important link between obesity and hypertension. Humans and animal models lacking either leptin or functional leptin receptors exhibit many characteristics of the metabolic syndrome, including hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and visceral adiposity, but do not exhibit increased sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and have normal to lower blood pressure (BP) compared to lean controls. Even though previous studies have extensively focused on the brain sites and intracellular signaling pathways involved in leptin effects on food intake and energy balance, the mechanisms that mediate the actions of leptin on breathing and cardiovascular function are only beginning to be elucidated. This mini-review summarizes recent advances on the effects of leptin on cardiovascular and respiratory control with emphasis on the neural control of respiratory function and autonomic activity. PMID:25645056

  5. Correlating Structure and Function of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes: Progress and Ongoing Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eric F.; Connick, J. Patrick; Reed, James R.; Backes, Wayne L.; Desai, Manoj C.; Xu, Lianhong; Estrada, D. Fernando; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics at Experimental Biology held April 20-24 in Boston, MA. Presentations discussed the status of cytochrome P450 (P450) knowledge, emphasizing advances and challenges in relating structure with function and in applying this information to drug design. First, at least one structure of most major human drug-metabolizing P450 enzymes is known. However, the flexibility of these active sites can limit the predictive value of one structure for other ligands. A second limitation is our coarse-grain understanding of P450 interactions with membranes, other P450 enzymes, NADPH–cytochrome P450 reductase, and cytochrome b5. Recent work has examined differential P450 interactions with reductase in mixed P450 systems and P450:P450 complexes in reconstituted systems and cells, suggesting another level of functional control. In addition, protein nuclear magnetic resonance is a new approach to probe these protein/protein interactions, identifying interacting b5 and P450 surfaces, showing that b5 and reductase binding are mutually exclusive, and demonstrating ligand modulation of CYP17A1/b5 interactions. One desired outcome is the application of such information to control drug metabolism and/or design selective P450 inhibitors. A final presentation highlighted development of a CYP3A4 inhibitor that slows clearance of human immunodeficiency virus drugs otherwise rapidly metabolized by CYP3A4. Although understanding P450 structure/function relationships is an ongoing challenge, translational advances will benefit from continued integration of existing and new biophysical approaches. PMID:24130370

  6. Resting cerebral metabolism correlates with skin conductance and functional brain activation during fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Zeidan, Mohamed A; Pitman, Roger K; Milad, Mohammed R

    2012-02-01

    We investigated whether resting brain metabolism can be used to predict autonomic and neuronal responses during fear conditioning in 20 healthy humans. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was measured via positron emission tomography at rest. During conditioning, autonomic responses were measured via skin conductance, and blood oxygen level dependent signal was measured via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Resting dorsal anterior cingulate metabolism positively predicted differentially conditioned skin conductance responses. Midbrain and insula resting metabolism negatively predicted midbrain and insula functional reactivity, while dorsal anterior cingulate resting metabolism positively predicted midbrain functional reactivity. We conclude that resting metabolism in limbic areas can predict some aspects of psychophysiological and neuronal reactivity during fear learning. PMID:22207247

  7. Resting cerebral metabolism correlates with skin conductance and functional brain activation during fear conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Zeidan, Mohamed A.; Pitman, Roger K; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether resting brain metabolism can be used to predict autonomic and neuronal responses during fear conditioning in 20 healthy humans. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was measured via positron emission tomography at rest. During conditioning, autonomic responses were measured via skin conductance, and blood oxygen level dependent signal was measured via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Resting dorsal anterior cingulate metabolism positively predicted differentially conditioned skin conductance responses. Midbrain and insula resting metabolism negatively predicted midbrain and insula functional reactivity, while dorsal anterior cingulate resting metabolism positively predicted midbrain functional reactivity. We conclude that resting metabolism in limbic areas can predict some aspects of psychophysiological and neuronal reactivity during fear learning. PMID:22207247

  8. Metabolic transistor strategy for controlling electron transfer chain activity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui; Tuli, Leepika; Bennett, George N.; San, Ka-Yiu

    2015-01-01

    A novel strategy to finely control a large metabolic flux by using a “metabolic transistor” approach was established. In this approach a small change in the level or availability of an essential component for the process is controlled by adding a competitive reaction that affects a precursor or an intermediate in its biosynthetic pathway. The change of the basal level of the essential component, considered as a base current in a transistor, has a large effect on the flux through the major pathway. In this way, the fine-tuning of a large flux can be accomplished. The “metabolic transistor” strategy was applied to controlling electron transfer chain function by manipulation of the quinone synthesis pathway in Escherichia coli. The achievement of a theoretical yield of lactate production under aerobic conditions via this strategy upon manipulation of the biosynthetic pathway of the key participant, ubiquinone-8 (Q8), in an E. coli strain provides an in vivo, genetically tunable means to control the activity of the electron transfer chain and manipulate the production of reduced products while limiting consumption of oxygen to a defined amount. PMID:25596510

  9. Integrative functional genomic analysis unveils the differing dysregulated metabolic processes across hepatocellular carcinoma stages.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Vignesh; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2016-08-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly heterogeneous disease and the development of targeted therapeutics is still at an early stage. The 'omics' based genome-wide profiling comprising the transcriptome, miRNome and proteome are highly useful in identifying the deregulated molecular processes involved in hepatocarcinogenesis. One of the end products and processes of the central dogma being the metabolites and metabolic processes mediate the cellular functions. In recent years, metabolomics based investigations have revealed the major deregulated metabolic processes involved in carcinogenesis. However, the integrative analysis of the holistic metabolic processes with genomics is at an early stage. Since the gene-sets are highly useful in assessing the biological processes and pathways, we made an attempt to infer the deregulated cellular metabolic processes involved in HCC by employing metabolism associated gene-set enrichment analysis. Further, the metabolic process enrichment scores were integrated with the transcriptome profiles of HCC. Integrative analysis shows three distinct metabolic deregulations: i) hepatocyte function related molecular processes involving lipid/fatty acid/bile acid synthesis, ii) inflammatory processes with cytokine, sphingolipid & chondriotin sulphate metabolism and iii) enriched nucleotide metabolic process involving purine/pyrimidine & glucose mediated catabolic process, in hepatocarcinogenesis. The three distinct metabolic processes were found to occur both in tumor and liver cancer cell line profiles. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the metabolic processes along with clinical sample information has identified two major clusters based on AFP (alpha-fetoprotein) and metastasis. The study reveals the three major regulatory processes involved in HCC stages. PMID:27107678

  10. Metabolic control of YAP and TAZ by the mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Giovanni; Ruggeri, Naomi; Specchia, Valeria; Cordenonsi, Michelangelo; Mano, Miguel; Dupont, Sirio; Manfrin, Andrea; Ingallina, Eleonora; Sommaggio, Roberta; Piazza, Silvano; Rosato, Antonio; Piccolo, Stefano; Del Sal, Giannino

    2014-04-01

    The YAP and TAZ mediators of the Hippo pathway (hereafter called YAP/TAZ) promote tissue proliferation and organ growth. However, how their biological properties intersect with cellular metabolism remains unexplained. Here, we show that YAP/TAZ activity is controlled by the SREBP/mevalonate pathway. Inhibition of the rate-limiting enzyme of this pathway (HMG-CoA reductase) by statins opposes YAP/TAZ nuclear localization and transcriptional responses. Mechanistically, the geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate produced by the mevalonate cascade is required for activation of Rho GTPases that, in turn, activate YAP/TAZ by inhibiting their phosphorylation and promoting their nuclear accumulation. The mevalonate-YAP/TAZ axis is required for proliferation and self-renewal of breast cancer cells. In Drosophila melanogaster, inhibition of mevalonate biosynthesis and geranylgeranylation blunts the eye overgrowth induced by Yorkie, the YAP/TAZ orthologue. In tumour cells, YAP/TAZ activation is promoted by increased levels of mevalonic acid produced by SREBP transcriptional activity, which is induced by its oncogenic cofactor mutant p53. These findings reveal an additional layer of YAP/TAZ regulation by metabolic cues. PMID:24658687

  11. Metabolic profiling of Lolium perenne shows functional integration of metabolic responses to diverse subtoxic conditions of chemical stress.

    PubMed

    Serra, Anne-Antonella; Couée, Ivan; Renault, David; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Sulmon, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    Plant communities are confronted with a great variety of environmental chemical stresses. Characterization of chemical stress in higher plants has often been focused on single or closely related stressors under acute exposure, or restricted to a selective number of molecular targets. In order to understand plant functioning under chemical stress conditions close to environmental pollution conditions, the C3 grass Lolium perenne was subjected to a panel of different chemical stressors (pesticide, pesticide degradation compound, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and heavy metal) under conditions of seed-level or root-level subtoxic exposure. Physiological and metabolic profiling analysis on roots and shoots revealed that all of these subtoxic chemical stresses resulted in discrete physiological perturbations and complex metabolic shifts. These metabolic shifts involved stressor-specific effects, indicating multilevel mechanisms of action, such as the effects of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid on quinate levels. They also involved major generic effects that linked all of the subtoxic chemical stresses with major modifications of nitrogen metabolism, especially affecting asparagine, and of photorespiration, especially affecting alanine and glycerate. Stress-related physiological effects and metabolic adjustments were shown to be integrated through a complex network of metabolic correlations converging on Asn, Leu, Ser, and glucose-6-phosphate, which could potentially be modulated by differential dynamics and interconversion of soluble sugars (sucrose, trehalose, fructose, and glucose). Underlying metabolic, regulatory, and signalling mechanisms linking these subtoxic chemical stresses with a generic impact on nitrogen metabolism and photorespiration are discussed in relation to carbohydrate and low-energy sensing. PMID:25618145

  12. Metabolic profiling of Lolium perenne shows functional integration of metabolic responses to diverse subtoxic conditions of chemical stress

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Anne-Antonella; Couée, Ivan; Renault, David; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Sulmon, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Plant communities are confronted with a great variety of environmental chemical stresses. Characterization of chemical stress in higher plants has often been focused on single or closely related stressors under acute exposure, or restricted to a selective number of molecular targets. In order to understand plant functioning under chemical stress conditions close to environmental pollution conditions, the C3 grass Lolium perenne was subjected to a panel of different chemical stressors (pesticide, pesticide degradation compound, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and heavy metal) under conditions of seed-level or root-level subtoxic exposure. Physiological and metabolic profiling analysis on roots and shoots revealed that all of these subtoxic chemical stresses resulted in discrete physiological perturbations and complex metabolic shifts. These metabolic shifts involved stressor-specific effects, indicating multilevel mechanisms of action, such as the effects of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid on quinate levels. They also involved major generic effects that linked all of the subtoxic chemical stresses with major modifications of nitrogen metabolism, especially affecting asparagine, and of photorespiration, especially affecting alanine and glycerate. Stress-related physiological effects and metabolic adjustments were shown to be integrated through a complex network of metabolic correlations converging on Asn, Leu, Ser, and glucose-6-phosphate, which could potentially be modulated by differential dynamics and interconversion of soluble sugars (sucrose, trehalose, fructose, and glucose). Underlying metabolic, regulatory, and signalling mechanisms linking these subtoxic chemical stresses with a generic impact on nitrogen metabolism and photorespiration are discussed in relation to carbohydrate and low-energy sensing. PMID:25618145

  13. Allophanate hydrolase, not urease, functions in bacterial cyanuric acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gang; Shapir, Nir; Sadowsky, Michael J; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2005-08-01

    Growth substrates containing an s-triazine ring are typically metabolized by bacteria to liberate 3 mol of ammonia via the intermediate cyanuric acid. Over a 25-year period, a number of original research papers and reviews have stated that cyanuric acid is metabolized in two steps to the 2-nitrogen intermediate urea. In the present study, allophanate, not urea, was shown to be the 2-nitrogen intermediate in cyanuric acid metabolism in all the bacteria examined. Six different experimental results supported this conclusion: (i) synthetic allophanate was shown to readily decarboxylate to form urea under acidic extraction and chromatography conditions used in previous studies; (ii) alkaline extraction methods were used to stabilize and detect allophanate in bacteria actively metabolizing cyanuric acid; (iii) the kinetic course of allophanate formation and disappearance was consistent with its being an intermediate in cyanuric acid metabolism, and no urea was observed in those experiments; (iv) protein extracts from cells grown on cyanuric acid contained allophanate hydrolase activity; (v) genes encoding the enzymes AtzE and AtzF, which produce and hydrolyze allophanate, respectively, were found in several cyanuric acid-metabolizing bacteria; and (vi) TrzF, an AtzF homolog found in Enterobacter cloacae strain 99, was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and shown to have allophanate hydrolase activity. In addition, we have observed that there are a large number of genes homologous to atzF and trzF distributed in phylogenetically distinct bacteria. In total, the data indicate that s-triazine metabolism in a broad class of bacteria proceeds through allophanate via allophanate hydrolase, rather than through urea using urease. PMID:16085834

  14. Tributyltin chloride leads to adiposity and impairs metabolic functions in the rat liver and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Bertuloso, Bruno D; Podratz, Priscila L; Merlo, Eduardo; de Araújo, Julia F P; Lima, Leandro C F; de Miguel, Emilio C; de Souza, Leticia N; Gava, Agata L; de Oliveira, Miriane; Miranda-Alves, Leandro; Carneiro, Maria T W D; Nogueira, Celia R; Graceli, Jones B

    2015-05-19

    Tributyltin chloride (TBT) is an environmental contaminant used in antifouling paints of boats. Endocrine disruptor effects of TBT are well established in animal models. However, the adverse effects on metabolism are less well understood. The toxicity of TBT in the white adipose tissue (WAT), liver and pancreas of female rats were assessed. Animals were divided into control and TBT (0.1 μg/kg/day) groups. TBT induced an increase in the body weight of the rats by the 15th day of oral exposure. The weight gain was associated with high parametrial (PR) and retroperitoneal (RP) WAT weights. TBT-treatment increased the adiposity, inflammation and expression of ERα and PPARγ proteins in both RP and PR WAT. In 3T3-L1 cells, estrogen treatment reduced lipid droplets accumulation, however increased the ERα protein expression. In contrast, TBT-treatment increased the lipid accumulation and reduced the ERα expression. WAT metabolic changes led to hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation, increase of PPARγ and reduction of ERα protein expression. Accordingly, there were increases in the glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests with increases in the number of pancreatic islets and insulin levels. These findings suggest that TBT leads to adiposity in WAT specifically, impairing the metabolic functions of the liver and pancreas. PMID:25819109

  15. Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases: structure/function, genetic polymorphisms and role in drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) oxygenates drugs and xenobiotics containing a “soft-nucleophile”, usually nitrogen or sulfur. FMO, like cytochrome P450 (CYP), is a monooxygenase, utilizing the reducing equivalents of NADPH to reduce 1 atom of molecular oxygen to water, while the other atom is used to oxidize the substrate. FMO and CYP also exhibit similar tissue and cellular location, molecular weight, substrate specificity, and exist as multiple enzymes under developmental control. The human FMO functional gene family is much smaller (5 families each with a single member) than CYP. FMO does not require a reductase to transfer electrons from NADPH and the catalytic cycle of the 2 monooxygenases is strikingly different. Another distinction is the lack of induction of FMOs by xenobiotics. In general, CYP is the major contributor to oxidative xenobiotic metabolism. However, FMO activity may be of significance in a number of cases and should not be overlooked. FMO and CYP have overlapping substrate specificities, but often yield distinct metabolites with potentially significant toxicological/pharmacological consequences. The physiological function(s) of FMO are poorly understood. Three of the 5 expressed human FMO genes, FMO1, FMO2 and FMO3, exhibit genetic polymorphisms. The most studied of these is FMO3 (adult human liver) in which mutant alleles contribute to the disease known as trimethylaminuria. The consequences of these FMO genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism and human health are areas of research requiring further exploration. PMID:15922018

  16. Identification of Functional Differences in Metabolic Networks Using Comparative Genomics and Constraint-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Joshua J.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-scale network reconstructions are useful tools for understanding cellular metabolism, and comparisons of such reconstructions can provide insight into metabolic differences between organisms. Recent efforts toward comparing genome-scale models have focused primarily on aligning metabolic networks at the reaction level and then looking at differences and similarities in reaction and gene content. However, these reaction comparison approaches are time-consuming and do not identify the effect network differences have on the functional states of the network. We have developed a bilevel mixed-integer programming approach, CONGA, to identify functional differences between metabolic networks by comparing network reconstructions aligned at the gene level. We first identify orthologous genes across two reconstructions and then use CONGA to identify conditions under which differences in gene content give rise to differences in metabolic capabilities. By seeking genes whose deletion in one or both models disproportionately changes flux through a selected reaction (e.g., growth or by-product secretion) in one model over another, we are able to identify structural metabolic network differences enabling unique metabolic capabilities. Using CONGA, we explore functional differences between two metabolic reconstructions of Escherichia coli and identify a set of reactions responsible for chemical production differences between the two models. We also use this approach to aid in the development of a genome-scale model of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Finally, we propose potential antimicrobial targets in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus based on differences in their metabolic capabilities. Through these examples, we demonstrate that a gene-centric approach to comparing metabolic networks allows for a rapid comparison of metabolic models at a functional level. Using CONGA, we can identify differences in reaction and gene content which give rise to different

  17. Controlled delivery of a metabolic modulator promotes regulatory T cells and restrains autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gammon, Joshua M; Tostanoski, Lisa H; Adapa, Arjun R; Chiu, Yu-Chieh; Jewell, Christopher M

    2015-07-28

    Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system abnormally recognizes and attacks self-molecules. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a powerful role in initiating adaptive immune response, and are therefore a recent target for autoimmune therapies. N-Phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide (PHCCC), a small molecule glutamate receptor enhancer, alters how DCs metabolize glutamate, skewing cytokine secretion to bias T cell function. These effects provide protection in mouse models of multiple sclerosis (MS) by polarizing T cells away from inflammatory TH17 cells and toward regulatory T cells (TREG) when mice receive daily systemic injections of PHCCC. However, frequent, continued treatment is required to generate and maintain therapeutic benefits. Thus, the use of PHCCC is limited by poor solubility, the need for frequent dosing, and cell toxicity. We hypothesized that controlled release of PHCCC from degradable nanoparticles (NPs) might address these challenges by altering DC function to maintain efficacy with reduced treatment frequency and toxicity. This idea could serve as a new strategy for harnessing biomaterials to polarize immune function through controlled delivery of metabolic modulators. PHCCC was readily encapsulated in nanoparticles, with controlled release of 89% of drug into media over three days. Culture of primary DCs or DC and T cell co-cultures with PHCCC NPs reduced DC activation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, while shifting T cells away from TH17 and toward TREG phenotypes. Importantly, PHCCC delivered to cells in NPs was 36-fold less toxic compared with soluble PHCCC. Treatment of mice with PHCCC NPs every three days delayed disease onset and decreased disease severity compared with mice treated with soluble drug at the same dose and frequency. These results highlight the potential to promote tolerance through controlled delivery of metabolic modulators that alter DC signaling to polarize T cells, and suggest future

  18. Storage Reserve Accumulation in Arabidopsis: Metabolic and Developmental Control of Seed Filling

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Sébastien; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Miquel, Martine; Rochat, Christine; Lepiniec, Loïc

    2008-01-01

    In the life cycle of higher plants, seed development is a key process connecting two distinct sporophytic generations. Seed development can be divided into embryo morphogenesis and seed maturation. An essential metabolic function of maturing seeds is the deposition of storage compounds that are mobilised to fuel post-germinative seedling growth. Given the importance of seeds for food and animal feed and considering the tremendous interest in using seed storage products as sustainable industrial feedstocks to replace diminishing fossil reserves, understanding the metabolic and developmental control of seed filling constitutes a major focus of plant research. Arabidopsis thaliana is an oilseed species closely related to the agronomically important Brassica oilseed crops. The main storage compounds accumulated in seeds of A. thaliana consist of oil stored as triacylglycerols (TAGs) and seed storage proteins (SSPs). Extensive tools developed for the molecular dissection of A. thaliana development and metabolism together with analytical and cytological procedures adapted for very small seeds have led to a good description of the biochemical pathways producing storage compounds. In recent years, studies using these tools have shed new light on the intricate regulatory network controlling the seed maturation process. This network involves sugar and hormone signalling together with a set of developmentally regulated transcription factors. Although much remains to be elucidated, the framework of the regulatory system controlling seed filling is coming into focus. PMID:22303238

  19. Butyrate alleviates metabolic impairments and protects pancreatic β cell function in pregnant mice with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua-Ping; Chen, Xuan; Li, Ming-Qing

    2013-01-01

    The relative or absolute deficiency of pancreatic β-cell mass function underlies the pathogenesis of diabetes. It is necessary to alleviate the metabolic stress and reduce the demand for insulin to decrease the effects of mutations affecting β-cell expansion. Butyrate is a natural nutrient existed in food and can also be produced physiologically through the intestinal fermentation of fiber. Pregnancy and obesity model would be helpful for understanding how β-cell adapt to insulin resistance and how butyrate alleviate the metabolic impairment and protect pancreatic β cell function in pregnant mice with obesity. C57BL/6J female mice were divided into three groups and fed with high fat food (HF group, 40% energy from fat), high fat with sodium butyrate food (HSF group, 95% HF with 5% butyrate), or control food (CF group, 14% energy from fat), respectively. The feeding would last for 14 weeks before mating and throughout the gestation period. A subset of dams were sacrificed at gestational day (GD) 14.5 to evaluate the changes of metabolism and β-cell function, mass, proliferation and apoptosis, inflammatory reaction of islet from different diet. Pancreases were double immuno-labeled to assess the islet morphology, insulin expression, expression of proliferation gene PCNA and anti-apoptosis gene bcl-2. Moreover, we detected the expression of NF-κB, phosphorylated NF-κB (pNF-κB) to evaluate the islet inflammatory response with immunohistochemistry. Mice fed with HSF showed obviously changes including the decreased values of weight gain, glucose, insulin, triglyceride and total cholesterol level of blood compared with high fat diet group, and the reduced circulating maternal pro-inflammation factors at GD14.5. Mice fed with HF displayed β-cell hyperplasia with a greater β-cell size and β-cell area in pancreas. Furthermore, the higher ratio of apoptosis and inflammatory response were found in HF group compared with HSF and CF group, while the proliferation

  20. A Strategy for Functional Interpretation of Metabolomic Time Series Data in Context of Metabolic Network Information

    PubMed Central

    Nägele, Thomas; Fürtauer, Lisa; Nagler, Matthias; Weiszmann, Jakob; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    The functional connection of experimental metabolic time series data with biochemical network information is an important, yet complex, issue in systems biology. Frequently, experimental analysis of diurnal, circadian, or developmental dynamics of metabolism results in a comprehensive and multidimensional data matrix comprising information about metabolite concentrations, protein levels, and/or enzyme activities. While, irrespective of the type of organism, the experimental high-throughput analysis of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome has become a common part of many systems biological studies, functional data integration in a biochemical and physiological context is still challenging. Here, an approach is presented which addresses the functional connection of experimental time series data with biochemical network information which can be inferred, for example, from a metabolic network reconstruction. Based on a time-continuous and variance-weighted regression analysis of experimental data, metabolic functions, i.e., first-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations, were related to time-dependent changes in other biochemically relevant metabolic functions, i.e., second-order derivatives of metabolite concentrations. This finally revealed time points of perturbed dependencies in metabolic functions indicating a modified biochemical interaction. The approach was validated using previously published experimental data on a diurnal time course of metabolite levels, enzyme activities, and metabolic flux simulations. To support and ease the presented approach of functional time series analysis, a graphical user interface including a test data set and a manual is provided which can be run within the numerical software environment Matlab®. PMID:27014700

  1. Functional genomics tools applied to plant metabolism: a survey on plant respiration, its connections and the annotation of complex gene functions

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Wagner L.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Williams, Thomas C. R.

    2012-01-01

    The application of post-genomic techniques in plant respiration studies has greatly improved our ability to assign functions to gene products. In addition it has also revealed previously unappreciated interactions between distal elements of metabolism. Such results have reinforced the need to consider plant respiratory metabolism as part of a complex network and making sense of such interactions will ultimately require the construction of predictive and mechanistic models. Transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and the quantification of metabolic flux will be of great value in creating such models both by facilitating the annotation of complex gene function, determining their structure and by furnishing the quantitative data required to test them. In this review, we highlight how these experimental approaches have contributed to our current understanding of plant respiratory metabolism and its interplay with associated process (e.g., photosynthesis, photorespiration, and nitrogen metabolism). We also discuss how data from these techniques may be integrated, with the ultimate aim of identifying mechanisms that control and regulate plant respiration and discovering novel gene functions with potential biotechnological implications. PMID:22973288

  2. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of ‘coherence’, we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data. PMID:27585741

  3. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of 'coherence', we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data. PMID:27585741

  4. Metabolic fate and function of dietary glutamate in the gut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glutamate is a major constituent of dietary protein and is also consumed in many prepared foods as an additive in the form of monosodium glutamate. Evidence from human and animal studies indicates that glutamate is a major oxidative fuel for the gut and that dietary glutamate is extensively metabol...

  5. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John H Wiley and Sons; 2013: ...

  6. Improved Metabolic Control in Diabetes, HSP60, and Proinflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, Claudio; Kim, Eunjung; Knowlton, Anne A.

    2012-01-01

    The diabetes-atherosclerosis relationship remains to be fully defined. Repeated prolonged hyperglycemia, increased ROS production and endothelial dysfunction are important factors. One theory is that increased blood levels of heat shock protein (HSP)60 are proinflammatory, through activation of innate immunity, and contribute to the progression of vascular disease. It was hypothesized that improvement of diabetes control in patients presenting with metabolic syndrome would lower HSP60, and anti-HSP60 antibody levels and decrease inflammatory markers. Paired sera of 17 Italian patients, before and after intensive treatment, were assayed for cytokines, HSP60 and anti-HSP60 antibodies. As expected, intensive treatment was associated with a decrease in HgbA1C (P < 0.001) and BMI (P < 0.001). After treatment, there was a significant decrease in IL-6 (P < 0.05). HSP60 levels were before treatment −6.9 + 1.9, after treatment −7.1 + 2.0 ng/mL (P = ns). Overall HSP60 concentrations were lower than published reports. Anti-HSP60 antibody titers were high and did not decrease with treatment. In conclusion, improvement of diabetic control did not alter HSP60 concentrations or antiHSP60 antibody titers, but led to a reduction of IL-6 levels. PMID:22924123

  7. Relationships Among HIV Infection, Metabolic Risk Factors, and Left Ventricular Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Overton, Edgar Turner; Mondy, Kristin; de las Fuentes, Lisa; Davila-Roman, Victor G.; Waggoner, Alan D.; Reeds, Dominic N.; Lassa-Claxton, Sherry; Krauss, Melissa J.; Peterson, Linda R.; Yarasheski, Kevin E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Our objective was to determine if the presence of metabolic complications (MC) conveyed an additional risk for left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in people with HIV. HIV+ and HIV− men and women were categorized into four groups: (1) HIV+ with MC (43±7 years, n=64), (2) HIV+ without MC (42±7 years, n=59), (3) HIV− with MC (44±8 years, n=37), or (4) HIV− controls without MC (42±8 years, n=41). All participants underwent two-dimensional (2-D), Doppler, and tissue Doppler echocardiography. Overall, the prevalence of systolic dysfunction (15 vs. 4%, p=0.02) and LV hypertrophy (9 vs. 1%, p=0.03) was greater in HIV+ than in HIV− participants. Participants with MC had a greater prevalence of LV hypertrophy (10% vs. 1%). Early mitral annular velocity during diastole was significantly (p<0.005) lower in groups with MC (HIV+/MC+: 11.6±2.3, HIV−/MC+: 12.0±2.3 vs. HIV+/MC−: 12.4±2.3, HIV−/MC−: 13.1±2.4 cm/s) and tended to be lower in groups with HIV (p=0.10). However, there was no interaction effect of HIV and MC for any systolic or diastolic variable. Regardless of HIV status, participants with MC had reduced LV diastolic function. Although both the presence of MC and HIV infection were associated with lower diastolic function, there was no additive negative effect of HIV on diastolic function beyond the effect of MC. Also, HIV was independently associated with lower systolic function. Clinical monitoring of LV function in individuals with metabolic risk factors, regardless of HIV status, is warranted. PMID:23574474

  8. Overexpression of SIRT1 in Mouse Forebrain Impairs Lipid/Glucose Metabolism and Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongmei; Qiu, Yifu; Gao, Xiang; Yuan, Xiao-Bing; Zhai, Qiwei

    2011-01-01

    SIRT1 plays crucial roles in glucose and lipid metabolism, and has various functions in different tissues including brain. The brain-specific SIRT1 knockout mice display defects in somatotropic signaling, memory and synaptic plasticity. And the female mice without SIRT1 in POMC neuron are more sensitive to diet-induced obesity. Here we created transgenic mice overexpressing SIRT1 in striatum and hippocampus under the control of CaMKIIα promoter. These mice, especially females, exhibited increased fat accumulation accompanied by significant upregulation of adipogenic genes in white adipose tissue. Glucose tolerance of the mice was also impaired with decreased Glut4 mRNA levels in muscle. Moreover, the SIRT1 overexpressing mice showed decreased energy expenditure, and concomitantly mitochondria-related genes were decreased in muscle. In addition, these mice showed unusual spontaneous physical activity pattern, decreased activity in open field and rotarod performance. Further studies demonstrated that SIRT1 deacetylated IRS-2, and upregulated phosphorylation level of IRS-2 and ERK1/2 in striatum. Meanwhile, the neurotransmitter signaling in striatum and the expression of endocrine hormones in hypothalamus and serum T3, T4 levels were altered. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that SIRT1 in forebrain regulates lipid/glucose metabolism and motor function. PMID:21738790

  9. A computer program for the algebraic determination of control coefficients in Metabolic Control Analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S; Fell, D A

    1993-06-01

    A computer program (MetaCon) is described for the evaluation of flux control, concentration control and branch-point distribution control coefficients of a metabolic pathway. Requiring only the reaction scheme as input, the program produces algebraic expressions for the control coefficients in terms of elasticity coefficients, metabolite concentrations and pathway fluxes. Any of these variables can be substituted by numeric or simple algebraic expressions; the expressions will then be automatically rearranged in terms of the remaining unknown variables. When all variables have been substituted, numeric values will be obtained for the control coefficients. The program is a computerized implementation of the matrix method for the determination of control coefficients. The features of MetaCon are compared with those of other programs available to workers in Metabolic Control Analysis. Potential benefits of, and methods of using, MetaCon are discussed. The mathematical background and validity of the matrix method rules are discussed, and the algorithm used by MetaCon is described. The matrix method is shown to be a specific case of a previously described general formalism for calculating control coefficients. PMID:8503870

  10. Mechanisms Linking Energy Substrate Metabolism to the Function of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Carley, Andrew N.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Lewandowski, E. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic signaling mechanisms are increasingly recognized to mediate the cellular response to alterations in workload demand, as a consequence of physiological and pathophysiological challenges. Thus, an understanding of the metabolic mechanisms coordinating activity in the cytosol with the energy-providing pathways in the mitochondrial matrix becomes critical for deepening our insights into the pathogenic changes that occur in the stressed cardiomyocyte. Processes that exchange both metabolic intermediates and cations between the cytosol and mitochondria enable transduction of dynamic changes in contractile state to the mitochondrial compartment of the cell. Disruption of such metabolic transduction pathways has severe consequences for the energetic support of contractile function in the heart and is implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Deficiencies in metabolic reserve and impaired metabolic transduction in the cardiomyocyte can result from inherent deficiencies in metabolic phenotype or maladaptive changes in metabolic enzyme expression and regulation in the response to pathogenic stress. This review examines both current and emerging concepts of the functional linkage between the cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix with a specific focus on metabolic reserve and energetic efficiency. These principles of exchange and transport mechanisms across the mitochondrial membrane are reviewed for the failing heart from the perspectives of chronic pressure overload and diabetes mellitus. PMID:24526677

  11. Posttranscriptional Control of T Cell Effector Function by Aerobic Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Curtis, Jonathan D.; Maggi, Leonard B.; Faubert, Brandon; Villarino, Alejandro V.; O’Sullivan, David; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; van der Windt, Gerritje J.W.; Blagih, Julianna; Qiu, Jing; Weber, Jason D.; Pearce, Edward J.; Jones, Russell G.; Pearce, Erika L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A “switch” from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to aerobic glycolysis is a hallmark of T cell activation and is thought to be required to meet the metabolic demands of proliferation. However, why proliferating cells adopt this less efficient metabolism, especially in an oxygen-replete environment, remains incompletely understood. We show here that aerobic glycolysis is specifically required for effector function in T cells but that this pathway is not necessary for proliferation or survival. When activated T cells are provided with costimulation and growth factors but are blocked from engaging glycolysis, their ability to produce IFN-γ is markedly compromised. This defect is translational and is regulated by the binding of the glycolysis enzyme GAPDH to AU-rich elements within the 3′ UTR of IFN-γ mRNA. GAPDH, by engaging/disengaging glycolysis and through fluctuations in its expression, controls effector cytokine production. Thus, aerobic glycolysis is a metabolically regulated signaling mechanism needed to control cellular function. PMID:23746840

  12. Detecting Functional Groups of Arabidopsis Mutants by Metabolic Profiling and Evaluation of Pleiotropic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jörg; Börnke, Frederik; Schmiedl, Alfred; Kleine, Tatjana; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic profiles and fingerprints of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with various defects in plastidic sugar metabolism or photosynthesis were analyzed to elucidate if the genetic mutations can be traced by comparing their metabolic status. Using a platform of chromatographic and spectrometric tools data from untargeted full MS scans as well as from selected metabolites including major carbohydrates, phosphorylated intermediates, carboxylates, free amino acids, major antioxidants, and plastidic pigments were evaluated. Our key observations are that by multivariate statistical analysis each mutant can be separated by a unique metabolic signature. Closely related mutants come close. Thus metabolic profiles of sugar mutants are different but more similar than those of photosynthesis mutants. All mutants show pleiotropic responses mirrored in their metabolic status. These pleiotropic responses are typical and can be used for separating and grouping of the mutants. Our findings show that metabolite fingerprints can be taken to classify mutants and hence may be used to sort genes into functional groups. PMID:22639613

  13. The brown fat secretome: metabolic functions beyond thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Xiao; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Lin, Jiandie D.

    2015-01-01

    Brown fat is highly active in fuel oxidation and dissipates chemical energy through uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)-mediated heat production. Activation of brown fat leads to increased energy expenditure, reduced adiposity, and lower plasma glucose and lipid levels, thus contributing to better homeostasis. Uncoupled respiration and thermogenesis have been considered to be responsible for the metabolic benefits of brown adipose tissue. Recent studies have demonstrated that brown adipocytes also secrete factors that act locally and systemically to influence fuel and energy metabolism. This review discusses the evidence supporting a thermogenesis-independent role of brown fat, particularly through its release of secreted factors, and their implications in physiology and therapeutic development. PMID:25843910

  14. Neutrophil lipoxygenase metabolism and adhesive function following acute thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Damtew, B; Marino, J A; Fratianne, R B; Spagnuolo, P J

    1993-02-01

    Leukotrienes, especially leukotriene B4, are important modulators of various neutrophil functions including adherence and chemotaxis. In previous work, we demonstrated that neutrophil adherence to extracellular matrixes was diminished in the acute stages of burn injury. In this study, we demonstrated that neutrophil adhesion to human and bovine endothelium in the baseline state and after stimulation with leukotriene B4 is depressed markedly after burn injury. The defect in stimulated adherence to endothelium was not specific to leukotriene B4 because impaired adhesion was observed with n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and ionophore A23187 as well. Moreover, the adherence defect correlated with 95% and 81% decreases in the release of leukotriene B4 and 5-hydroxy-(6E,87,117,147)-eicosatetraenoic acid, respectively, from burn PMN treated with A23187. Burn neutrophils also released proportionately more byproducts of leukotriene B4 omega oxidation, particularly 20-COOH-leukotriene B4, than did control neutrophils. When examined 3 1/2 weeks after injury, abnormalities in neutrophil leukotriene B4 generation and the adherence of burn neutrophils had recovered to near normal values. To determine whether the decreased release of leukotriene B4 from burn neutrophils was due to increased degradation or diminished synthesis of leukotriene B4, we examined the degradation of exogenous tritiated leukotriene B4 as well as the production of leukotriene B4 from tritiated arachidonic acid in neutrophils. Burn neutrophils converted significantly greater quantities of tritiated leukotriene B4 to tritiated 20-COOH-leukotriene B4 and synthesized markedly less tritiated leukotriene B4 from tritiated arachidonic acid than did control neutrophils, suggesting that decreased leukotriene B4 release by burn neutrophils was the result of both enhanced degradation and decreased synthesis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8381849

  15. The functions of cardiolipin in cellular metabolism-potential modifiers of the Barth syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Raja, Vaishnavi; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2014-04-01

    The phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) plays a role in many cellular functions and signaling pathways both inside and outside of mitochondria. This review focuses on the role of CL in energy metabolism. Many reactions of electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, the transport of metabolites required for these processes, and the stabilization of electron transport chain supercomplexes require CL. Recent studies indicate that CL is required for the synthesis of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) co-factors, which are essential for numerous metabolic pathways. Activation of carnitine shuttle enzymes that are required for fatty acid metabolism is CL dependent. The presence of substantial amounts of CL in the peroxisomal membrane suggests that CL may be required for peroxisomal functions. Understanding the role of CL in energy metabolism may identify physiological modifiers that exacerbate the loss of CL and underlie the variation in symptoms observed in Barth syndrome, a genetic disorder of CL metabolism. PMID:24445246

  16. Functional Role of PPARs in Ruminants: Potential Targets for Fine-Tuning Metabolism during Growth and Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuowen; Khan, Muhammad J.; Loor, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    Characterization and biological roles of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isotypes are well known in monogastrics, but not in ruminants. However, a wealth of information has accumulated in little more than a decade on ruminant PPARs including isotype tissue distribution, response to synthetic and natural agonists, gene targets, and factors affecting their expression. Functional characterization demonstrated that, as in monogastrics, the PPAR isotypes control expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism, anti-inflammatory response, development, and growth. Contrary to mouse, however, the PPARγ gene network appears to controls milk fat synthesis in lactating ruminants. As in monogastrics, PPAR isotypes in ruminants are activated by long-chain fatty acids, therefore, making them ideal candidates for fine-tuning metabolism in this species via nutrients. In this regard, using information accumulated in ruminants and monogastrics, we propose a model of PPAR isotype-driven biological functions encompassing key tissues during the peripartal period in dairy cattle. PMID:23737762

  17. Natural Products as Tools for Defining How Cellular Metabolism Influences Cellular Immune and Inflammatory Function during Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral infections like those caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cause disease that establishes an ongoing state of chronic inflammation. While there have been tremendous improvements towards curing HCV with directly acting antiviral agents (DAA) and keeping HIV viral loads below detection with antiretroviral therapy (ART), there is still a need to control inflammation in these diseases. Recent studies indicate that many natural products like curcumin, resveratrol and silymarin alter cellular metabolism and signal transduction pathways via enzymes such as adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), and these pathways directly influence cellular inflammatory status (such as NF-κB) and immune function. Natural products represent a vast toolkit to dissect and define how cellular metabolism controls cellular immune and inflammatory function. PMID:26633463

  18. Metabolic Management during Critical Illness: Glycemic Control in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Honiden, Shyoko; Inzucchi, Silvio E

    2015-12-01

    Hyperglycemia is a commonly encountered metabolic derangement in the ICU. Important cellular pathways, such as those related to oxidant stress, immunity, and cellular homeostasis, can become deranged with prolonged and uncontrolled hyperglycemia. There is additionally a complex interplay between nutritional status, ambient glucose concentrations, and protein catabolism. While the nuances of glucose management in the ICU have been debated, results from landmark studies support the notion that for most critically ill patients moderate glycemic control is appropriate, as reflected by recent guidelines. Beyond the target population and optimal glucose range, additional factors such as hypoglycemia and glucose variability are important metrics to follow. In this regard, new technologies such as continuous glucose sensors may help alleviate the risks associated with such glucose fluctuations in the ICU. In this review, we will explore the impact of hyperglycemia upon critical cellular pathways and how nutrition provided in the ICU affects blood glucose. Additionally, important clinical trials to date will be summarized. A practical and comprehensive approach to glucose management in the ICU will be outlined, touching upon important issues such as glucose variability, target population, and hypoglycemia. PMID:26595046

  19. Factors Controlling Carbon Metabolism and Humification in Different Soil Agroecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Doni, S.; Macci, C.; Peruzzi, E.; Ceccanti, B.; Masciandaro, G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the processes that control humic carbon sequestration in soil. Three experimental sites differing in terms of management system and climate were selected: (i) Abanilla-Spain, soil treated with municipal solid wastes in Mediterranean semiarid climate; (ii) Puch-Germany, soil under intensive tillage and conventional agriculture in continental climate; and (iii) Alberese-Italy, soil under organic and conventional agriculture in Mediterranean subarid climate. The chemical-structural and biochemical soil properties at the initial sampling time and one year later were evaluated. The soils under organic (Alberese, soil cultivated with Triticum durum Desf.) and nonintensive management practices (Puch, soil cultivated with Triticum aestivum L. and Avena sativa L.) showed higher enzymatically active humic carbon, total organic carbon, humification index (B/E3s), and metabolic potential (dehydrogenase activity/water soluble carbon) if compared with conventional agriculture and plough-based tillage, respectively. In Abanilla, the application of municipal solid wastes stimulated the specific β-glucosidase activity (extracellular β-glucosidase activity/extractable humic carbon) and promoted the increase of humic substances with respect to untreated soil. The evolution of the chemical and biochemical status of the soils along a climatic gradient suggested that the adoption of certain management practices could be very promising in increasing SOC sequestration potential. PMID:25614887

  20. Imaging vertebrate digestive function and lipid metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Otis, Jessica P.; Farber, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Challenges in imaging lipid-processing events in live, intact vertebrate models have historically led to reliance on cultured cell studies, thus hampering our understanding of lipid metabolism and gastrointestinal physiology. Fluorescently-labeled molecules, such as BODIPY-labeled lipids, can reveal lipid-processing events in live zebrafish (Danio rerio) and has expanded our understanding of digestive physiology. This review will cover recent advances from the past two to three years in the use of fluorescence-based imaging techniques in live zebrafish to characterize gastrointestinal physiology in health and disease and to conduct small molecule screens to discover therapeutic compounds. PMID:24187571

  1. Functional characterization of an invertase inhibitor gene involved in sucrose metabolism in tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Jiang, Jing; Yang, Yan-li; Wang, Zhi-he

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we produced tomato plants overexpressing an invertase inhibitor gene (Sly-INH) from tomato, using a simple and efficient transient transformation system. Compared with control plants, the expression of Sly-INH was highly upregulated in Sly-INH overexpressing plants, as indicated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Physiological analysis revealed that Sly-INH inhibited the activity of cell wall invertase (CWIN), which increased sugar accumulation in tomato fruit. Furthermore, Sly-INH mediated sucrose metabolism by regulating CWIN activity. Our results suggest that invertase activity is potentially regulated by the Sly-INH inhibitor at the post-translational level, and they demonstrate that the transient transformation system is an effective method for determining the functions of genes in tomato. PMID:26465132

  2. Functional characterization of an invertase inhibitor gene involved in sucrose metabolism in tomato fruit*

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Ning; JIANG, Jing; YANG, Yan-li; WANG, Zhi-he

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we produced tomato plants overexpressing an invertase inhibitor gene (Sly-INH) from tomato, using a simple and efficient transient transformation system. Compared with control plants, the expression of Sly-INH was highly upregulated in Sly-INH overexpressing plants, as indicated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Physiological analysis revealed that Sly-INH inhibited the activity of cell wall invertase (CWIN), which increased sugar accumulation in tomato fruit. Furthermore, Sly-INH mediated sucrose metabolism by regulating CWIN activity. Our results suggest that invertase activity is potentially regulated by the Sly-INH inhibitor at the post-translational level, and they demonstrate that the transient transformation system is an effective method for determining the functions of genes in tomato. PMID:26465132

  3. High density lipoprotein and metabolic disease: Potential benefits of restoring its functional properties

    PubMed Central

    Klancic, Teja; Woodward, Lavinia; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Background High density lipoproteins (HDLs) are thought to be atheroprotective and to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Besides their antioxidant, antithrombotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic properties in the vasculature, HDLs also improve glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. Scope of the review Herein, we review the functional role of HDLs to improve metabolic disorders, especially those involving insulin resistance and to induce regression of CVD with a particular focus on current pharmacological treatment options as well as lifestyle interventions, particularly exercise. Major conclusions Functional properties of HDLs continue to be considered important mediators to reverse metabolic dysfunction and to regress atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle changes are often recommended to reduce the risk of CVD, with exercise being one of the most important of these. Understanding how exercise improves HDL function will likely lead to new approaches to battle the expanding burden of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27110484

  4. Role of mitochondrial function in cell death and body metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the key players in apoptosis and necrosis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted r0 cells were resistant to diverse apoptosis inducers such as TNF-alpha, TNFSF10, staurosporine and p53. Apoptosis resistance was accompanied by the absence of mitochondrial potential loss or cytochrome c translocation. r0 cells were also resistant to necrosis induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) donors due to upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as manganese superoxide dismutase. Mitochondria also has a close relationship with autophagy that plays a critical role in the turnover of senescent organelles or dysfunctional proteins and may be included in 'cell death' category. It was demonstrated that autophagy deficiency in insulin target tissues such as skeletal muscle induces mitochondrial stress response, which leads to the induction of FGF21 as a 'mitokine' and affects the whole body metabolism. These results show that mitochondria are not simply the power plants of cells generating ATP, but are closely related to several types of cell death and autophagy. Mitochondria affect various pathophysiological events related to diverse disorders such as cancer, metabolic disorders and aging. PMID:27100503

  5. Bisphosphorylated metabolites of glycerate, glucose, and fructose: functions, metabolism and molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Carreras, J; Bartrons, R; Climent, F; Cusso, R

    1986-12-01

    2,3-Bisphosphoglycerate, glucose 1,6-P2 and fructose 2,6-P2 have been recognized as regulatory signals implicated in the control of metabolism, oxygen affinity of red cells and other cellular functions. The alterations of their metabolism constitute a novel area in molecular pathology. The concentration of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate in erythrocytes changes in a number of pathological conditions. An inherited deficiency of the multifunctional enzyme involved in the synthesis and breakdown of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate in erythrocytes has been reported. The levels of glucose 1,6-P2 are reduced in the liver and in the muscle of rats with experimentally induced diabetes. In muscle of genetically dystrophic mice a decrease in the levels of glucose 1,6-P2 has been found, probably resulting from enhancement of glucose 1,6-P2 phosphatase activity. Fructose 2,6-P2 levels are decreased in the liver of experimental diabetic mice and rats, and elevated in the liver of genetically obese animals. PMID:3555887

  6. Protective Effects of Antioxidant Fortified Diet on Renal Function and Metabolic Profile in Obese Zucker Rat

    PubMed Central

    Slyvka, Yuriy; Inman, Sharon R.; Malgor, Ramiro; Jackson, Edwin J.; Yee, Jennifer; Oshogwemoh, Olusayo; Adame, John; Nowak, Felicia V.

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its complications, including nephropathy. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that a diet fortified with antioxidants would be beneficial to delay or prevent the progression of this disease. Male and female Zucker fa/fa rats were fed a control or an antioxidant (AO) fortified diet starting at four weeks of age. Metabolic parameters, renal function and renal histopathology were analyzed at 6, 13 and 20 weeks of age. Females on the AO diet had significantly lower blood glucose at 6 and 13 weeks, less severe renal pathology at 20 weeks, and higher glomerular filtration rates (GFR) at 20 weeks than age matched females on the regular diet (p < 0.05). Metabolic parameters including blood glucose, insulin resistance and serum cholesterol, and mean arterial pressure (MAP), worsened with age in both males and females, as expected. GFR decreased and renal pathology also became more severe with age. Finally, females on the AO diet had higher GFRs and lower MAP at 20 weeks than males on the same diet. This may denote a protective effect of the AO diet in females, but not in males. These findings may have implications for the role of antioxidants as therapy in humans with T2DM. PMID:19051067

  7. A Transcript-Specific eIF3 Complex Mediates Global Translational Control of Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shah, Meera; Su, Dan; Scheliga, Judith S; Pluskal, Tomáš; Boronat, Susanna; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Campos, Alexandre Rosa; Qi, Feng; Hidalgo, Elena; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Wolf, Dieter A

    2016-08-16

    The multi-subunit eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF3 is thought to assist in the recruitment of ribosomes to mRNA. The expression of eIF3 subunits is frequently disrupted in human cancers, but the specific roles of individual subunits in mRNA translation and cancer remain elusive. Using global transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic profiling, we found a striking failure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells lacking eIF3e and eIF3d to synthesize components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, leading to a defect in respiration, endogenous oxidative stress, and premature aging. Energy balance was maintained, however, by a switch to glycolysis with increased glucose uptake, upregulation of glycolytic enzymes, and strict dependence on a fermentable carbon source. This metabolic regulatory function appears to be conserved in human cells where eIF3e binds metabolic mRNAs and promotes their translation. Thus, via its eIF3d-eIF3e module, eIF3 orchestrates an mRNA-specific translational mechanism controlling energy metabolism that may be disrupted in cancer. PMID:27477275

  8. Perilipin A and the control of triacylglycerol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Brasaemle, Dawn L; Subramanian, Vidya; Garcia, Anne; Marcinkiewicz, Amy; Rothenberg, Alexis

    2009-06-01

    Perilipin A is the most abundant protein associated with the lipid droplets of adipocytes and functions to control both basal and stimulated lipolysis. Under basal or fed conditions, perilipin A shields stored triacylglycerols from cytosolic lipases, thus promoting triacylglycerol storage. When catecholamines bind to cell surface receptors to initiate signals that activate cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), phosphorylated perilipin A facilitates maximal lipolysis. Mutagenesis studies have revealed that central sequences of moderately hydrophobic amino acids are required to target nascent perilipin A to lipid droplets and provide an anchor into the hydrophobic environment of lipid droplets. Sequences of amino acids in the unique carboxyl terminus of perilipin A and those in amino terminal sequences flanking the first hydrophobic stretch are required for the barrier function of perilipin A in promoting triacylglycerol storage. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of serine residues within six PKA consensus sites of perilipin A reveal functions for phosphorylation of at least three of the sites. Phosphorylation of one or more of the serines within three amino terminal PKA sites is required to facilitate hormone-sensitive lipase access to lipid substrates. Phosphorylation of serines within two carboxyl terminal sites is also required for maximal lipolysis. Phosphorylation of serine 492 (site 5) triggers a massive remodeling of lipid droplets, whereby large peri-nuclear lipid droplets fragment into myriad lipid micro-droplets that scatter throughout the cytoplasm. We hypothesize that perilipin A binds accessory proteins to provide assistance in carrying out these functions. PMID:19116774

  9. Emerging roles of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 in the metabolic control of reproduction.

    PubMed

    García-Galiano, David; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Nesfatin-1, derived from the precursor NEFA/nucleobindin2 (NUCB2), was initially identified as a feeding-suppressing neuropeptide, acting at central (mainly, hypothalamic) levels in a leptin-independent manner. However, recent experimental evidence strongly suggests that, rather than being a simple anorectic hypothalamic signal, nesfatin-1 operates at different tissues as an integral regulator of energy homeostasis and closely related neuroendocrine functions. On the latter, growing, albeit as yet fragmentary, evidence has pointed out recently that NUCB2/ nesfatin-1 is involved in the regulation of different aspects of reproductive maturation and function, by acting probably at different levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. As documented by rodent studies, the reproductive facet of nesfatin-1 likely includes (i) a permissive role in (female) pubertal maturation, (ii) stimulatory effects on the gonadotropic axis, whose magnitude, in terms of LH responses, varies depending on the maturational stage and probably the sex and species, and (iii) direct expression and actions in the gonads. These features, together with the proven expression of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 in tissues with essential roles in the metabolic control of reproduction, such as the hypothalamus, adipose and pancreas, support a putative role of nesfatin-1 as neurohormonal signal linking body metabolic status, puberty and fertility. Curiously enough, although its reproductive dimension seems to be conserved in non-mammalian vertebrates, recent studies in goldfish have surfaced predominant inhibitory actions of nesfatin-1 at different levels of the HPG axis in fish. These findings illustrate our as yet limited understanding of this aspect of nesfatin-1 physiology, whose relevance in the joint control of metabolism and reproduction in health and disease warrants further investigation. PMID:23537080

  10. Microbial community assembly and metabolic function during mammalian corpse decomposition.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Jessica L; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Weiss, Sophie; Lax, Simon; Van Treuren, Will; Hyde, Embriette R; Song, Se Jin; Amir, Amnon; Larsen, Peter; Sangwan, Naseer; Haarmann, Daniel; Humphrey, Greg C; Ackermann, Gail; Thompson, Luke R; Lauber, Christian; Bibat, Alexander; Nicholas, Catherine; Gebert, Matthew J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Reed, Sasha C; Gilbert, Jack A; Lynne, Aaron M; Bucheli, Sibyl R; Carter, David O; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate corpse decomposition provides an important stage in nutrient cycling in most terrestrial habitats, yet microbially mediated processes are poorly understood. Here we combine deep microbial community characterization, community-level metabolic reconstruction, and soil biogeochemical assessment to understand the principles governing microbial community assembly during decomposition of mouse and human corpses on different soil substrates. We find a suite of bacterial and fungal groups that contribute to nitrogen cycling and a reproducible network of decomposers that emerge on predictable time scales. Our results show that this decomposer community is derived primarily from bulk soil, but key decomposers are ubiquitous in low abundance. Soil type was not a dominant factor driving community development, and the process of decomposition is sufficiently reproducible to offer new opportunities for forensic investigations. PMID:26657285

  11. Microbial community assembly and metabolic function during mammalian corpse decomposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metcalf, Jessica L; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Weiss, Sophie; Lax, Simon; Van Treuren, Will; Hyde, Embriette R.; Song, Se Jin; Amir, Amnon; Larsen, Peter; Sangwan, Naseer; Haarmann, Daniel; Humphrey, Greg C; Ackermann, Gail; Thompson, Luke R; Lauber, Christian; Bibat, Alexander; Nicholas, Catherine; Gebert, Matthew J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Reed, Sasha C.; Gilbert, Jack A; Lynne, Aaron M; Bucheli, Sibyl R; Carter, David O; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate corpse decomposition provides an important stage in nutrient cycling in most terrestrial habitats, yet microbially mediated processes are poorly understood. Here we combine deep microbial community characterization, community-level metabolic reconstruction, and soil biogeochemical assessment to understand the principles governing microbial community assembly during decomposition of mouse and human corpses on different soil substrates. We find a suite of bacterial and fungal groups that contribute to nitrogen cycling and a reproducible network of decomposers that emerge on predictable time scales. Our results show that this decomposer community is derived primarily from bulk soil, but key decomposers are ubiquitous in low abundance. Soil type was not a dominant factor driving community development, and the process of decomposition is sufficiently reproducible to offer new opportunities for forensic investigations.

  12. Transfer Function Control for Biometric Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmiel, Alan J. (Inventor); Humphreys, Bradley T. (Inventor); Grodinsky, Carlos M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A modular apparatus for acquiring biometric data may include circuitry operative to receive an input signal indicative of a biometric condition, the circuitry being configured to process the input signal according to a transfer function thereof and to provide a corresponding processed input signal. A controller is configured to provide at least one control signal to the circuitry to programmatically modify the transfer function of the modular system to facilitate acquisition of the biometric data.

  13. A gut–brain neural circuit controlled by intestinal gluconeogenesis is crucial in metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Soty, Maud; Penhoat, Armelle; Amigo-Correig, Marta; Vinera, Jennifer; Sardella, Anne; Vullin-Bouilloux, Fanny; Zitoun, Carine; Houberdon, Isabelle; Mithieux, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Certain nutrients positively regulate energy homeostasis via intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN). The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of a deficient IGN in glucose control independently of nutritional environment. Methods We used mice deficient in the intestine glucose-6 phosphatase catalytic unit, the key enzyme of IGN (I-G6pc−/− mice). We evaluated a number of parameters involved in energy homeostasis, including insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycaemic clamp), the pancreatic function (insulin secretion in vivo and in isolated islets) and the hypothalamic homeostatic function (leptin sensitivity). Results Intestinal-G6pc−/− mice exhibit slight fasting hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and a deteriorated pancreatic function, despite normal diet with no change in body weight. These defects evoking type 2 diabetes (T2D) derive from the basal activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). They are corrected by treatment with an inhibitor of α-2 adrenergic receptors. Deregulation in a key target of IGN, the homeostatic hypothalamic function (highlighted here through leptin resistance) is a mechanistic link. Hence the leptin resistance and metabolic disorders in I-G6pc−/− mice are corrected by rescuing IGN by portal glucose infusion. Finally, I-G6pc−/− mice develop the hyperglycaemia characteristic of T2D more rapidly under high fat/high sucrose diet. Conclusions Intestinal gluconeogenesis is a mandatory function for the healthy neural control of glucose homeostasis. PMID:25685698

  14. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  15. Locomotor Adaptation Improves Balance Control, Multitasking Ability and Reduces the Metabolic Cost of Postural Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. D.; Miller, C. A.; Ploutz-Snyder, R. J.; Guined, J. R.; Buxton, R. E.; Cohen, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    During exploration-class missions, sensorimotor disturbances may lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial introduction to a novel gravitational environment following a landing on a planetary surface. The overall goal of our current project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability training program to facilitate rapid adaptation to these environments. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene. It provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. Greater metabolic cost incurred during balance instability means more physical work is required during adaptation to new environments possibly affecting crewmembers? ability to perform mission critical tasks during early surface operations on planetary expeditions. The goal of this study was to characterize adaptation to a discordant sensory challenge across a number of performance modalities including locomotor stability, multi-tasking ability and metabolic cost. METHODS: Subjects (n=15) walked (4.0 km/h) on a treadmill for an 8 -minute baseline walking period followed by 20-minutes of walking (4.0 km/h) with support surface motion (0.3 Hz, sinusoidal lateral motion, peak amplitude 25.4 cm) provided by the treadmill/motion-base system. Stride frequency and auditory reaction time were collected as measures of locomotor stability and multi-tasking ability, respectively. Metabolic data (VO2) were collected via a portable metabolic gas analysis system. RESULTS: At the onset of lateral support surface motion, subj ects walking on our treadmill showed an increase in stride frequency and auditory reaction time indicating initial balance and multi-tasking disturbances. During the 20-minute adaptation period, balance control and multi-tasking performance improved. Similarly, throughout the 20-minute adaptation period, VO2 gradually

  16. Systems mapping of metabolic genes through control theory☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guodong; Kong, Lan; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Chenguang; Wu, Rongling

    2014-01-01

    The formation of any complex phenotype involves a web of metabolic pathways in which one chemical is transformed through the catalysis of enzymes into another. Traditional approaches for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are based on a direct association analysis between DNA marker genotypes and end-point phenotypes, neglecting the mechanistic processes of how a phenotype is formed biochemically. Here, we propose a new dynamic framework for mapping metabolic QTLs (mQTLs) responsible for phenotypic formation. By treating metabolic pathways as a biological system, robust differential equations have proven to be a powerful means of studying and predicting the dynamic behavior of biochemical reactions that cause a high-order phenotype. The new framework integrates these differential equations into a statistical mixture model for QTL mapping. Since the mathematical parameters that define the emergent properties of the metabolic system can be estimated and tested for different mQTL genotypes, the framework allows the dynamic pattern of genetic effects to be quantified on metabolic capacity and efficacy across a time-space scale. Based on a recent study of glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we design and perform a series of simulation studies to investigate the statistical properties of the framework and validate its usefulness and utilization in practice. This framework can be generalized to mapping QTLs for any other dynamic systems and may stimulate pharmacogenetic research toward personalized drug and treatment intervention. PMID:23603209

  17. L-carnitine--metabolic functions and meaning in humans life.

    PubMed

    Pekala, Jolanta; Patkowska-Sokoła, Bozena; Bodkowski, Robert; Jamroz, Dorota; Nowakowski, Piotr; Lochyński, Stanisław; Librowski, Tadeusz

    2011-09-01

    L-Carnitine is an endogenous molecule involved in fatty acid metabolism, biosynthesized within the human body using amino acids: L-lysine and L-methionine, as substrates. L-Carnitine can also be found in many foods, but red meats, such as beef and lamb, are the best choices for adding carnitine into the diet. Good carnitine sources also include fish, poultry and milk. Essentially, L-carnitine transports the chains of fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix, thus allowing the cells to break down fat and get energy from the stored fat reserves. Recent studies have started to shed light on the beneficial effects of L-carnitine when used in various clinical therapies. Because L-carnitine and its esters help reduce oxidative stress, they have been proposed as a treatment for many conditions, i.e. heart failure, angina and weight loss. For other conditions, such as fatigue or improving exercise performance, L-carnitine appears safe but does not seem to have a significant effect. The presented review of the literature suggests that continued studies are required before L-carnitine administration could be recommended as a routine procedure in the noted disorders. Further research is warranted in order to evaluate the biochemical, pharmacological, and physiological determinants of the response to carnitine supplementation, as well as to determine the potential benefits of carnitine supplements in selected categories of individuals who do not have fatty acid oxidation defects. PMID:21561431

  18. Molecular changes in hepatic metabolism and transport in cirrhosis and their functional importance

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph G; Götze, Oliver; Geier, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the common endpoint of many hepatic diseases and represents a relevant risk for liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. The progress of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis is accompanied by deteriorating liver function. This review summarizes the regulatory and functional changes in phase I and phase II metabolic enzymes as well as transport proteins and provides an overview regarding lipid and glucose metabolism in cirrhotic patients. Interestingly, phase I enzymes are generally downregulated transcriptionally, while phase II enzymes are mostly preserved transcriptionally but are reduced in their function. Transport proteins are regulated in a specific way that resembles the molecular changes observed in obstructive cholestasis. Lipid and glucose metabolism are characterized by insulin resistance and catabolism, leading to the disturbance of energy expenditure and wasting. Possible non-invasive tests, especially breath tests, for components of liver metabolism are discussed. The heterogeneity and complexity of changes in hepatic metabolism complicate the assessment of liver function in individual patients. Additionally, studies in humans are rare, and species differences preclude the transferability of data from rodents to humans. In clinical practice, some established global scores or criteria form the basis for the functional evaluation of patients with liver cirrhosis, but difficult treatment decisions such as selection for transplantation or resection require further research regarding the application of existing non-invasive tests and the development of more specific tests. PMID:26755861

  19. Functional integration changes in regional brain glucose metabolism from childhood to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Nicola; Archambaud, Frédérique; Goldman, Serge; Baete, Kristof; Van Laere, Koen; Wens, Vincent; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Chiron, Catherine; De Tiège, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the age-related changes in resting-state neurometabolic connectivity from childhood to adulthood (6-50 years old). Fifty-four healthy adult subjects and twenty-three pseudo-healthy children underwent [(18) F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography at rest. Using statistical parametric mapping (SPM8), age and age squared were first used as covariate of interest to identify linear and non-linear age effects on the regional distribution of glucose metabolism throughout the brain. Then, by selecting voxels of interest (VOI) within the regions showing significant age-related metabolic changes, a psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis was used to search for age-induced changes in the contribution of VOIs to the metabolic activity in other brain areas. Significant linear or non-linear age-related changes in regional glucose metabolism were found in prefrontal cortices (DMPFC/ACC), cerebellar lobules, and thalamo-hippocampal areas bilaterally. Decreases were found in the contribution of thalamic, hippocampal, and cerebellar regions to DMPFC/ACC metabolic activity as well as in the contribution of hippocampi to preSMA and right IFG metabolic activities. Increases were found in the contribution of the right hippocampus to insular cortex and of the cerebellar lobule IX to superior parietal cortex metabolic activities. This study evidences significant linear or non-linear age-related changes in regional glucose metabolism of mesial prefrontal, thalamic, mesiotemporal, and cerebellar areas, associated with significant modifications in neurometabolic connectivity involving fronto-thalamic, fronto-hippocampal, and fronto-cerebellar networks. These changes in functional brain integration likely represent a metabolic correlate of age-dependent effects on sensory, motor, and high-level cognitive functional networks. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3017-3030, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27133021

  20. Genome-wide functional annotation and structural verification of metabolic ORFeome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent advances in the field of metabolic engineering have been expedited by the availability of genome sequences and metabolic modelling approaches. The complete sequencing of the C. reinhardtii genome has made this unicellular alga a good candidate for metabolic engineering studies; however, the annotation of the relevant genes has not been validated and the much-needed metabolic ORFeome is currently unavailable. We describe our efforts on the functional annotation of the ORF models released by the Joint Genome Institute (JGI), prediction of their subcellular localizations, and experimental verification of their structural annotation at the genome scale. Results We assigned enzymatic functions to the translated JGI ORF models of C. reinhardtii by reciprocal BLAST searches of the putative proteome against the UniProt and AraCyc enzyme databases. The best match for each translated ORF was identified and the EC numbers were transferred onto the ORF models. Enzymatic functional assignment was extended to the paralogs of the ORFs by clustering ORFs using BLASTCLUST. In total, we assigned 911 enzymatic functions, including 886 EC numbers, to 1,427 transcripts. We further annotated the enzymatic ORFs by prediction of their subcellular localization. The majority of the ORFs are predicted to be compartmentalized in the cytosol and chloroplast. We verified the structure of the metabolism-related ORF models by reverse transcription-PCR of the functionally annotated ORFs. Following amplification and cloning, we carried out 454FLX and Sanger sequencing of the ORFs. Based on alignment of the 454FLX reads to the ORF predicted sequences, we obtained more than 90% coverage for more than 80% of the ORFs. In total, 1,087 ORF models were verified by 454 and Sanger sequencing methods. We obtained expression evidence for 98% of the metabolic ORFs in the algal cells grown under constant light in the presence of acetate. Conclusions We functionally annotated approximately 1

  1. Sensitive cells: enabling tools for static and dynamic control of microbial metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Cress, Brady F; Trantas, Emmanouil A; Ververidis, Filippos; Linhardt, Robert J; Koffas, Mattheos Ag

    2015-12-01

    Natural metabolic pathways are dynamically regulated at the transcriptional, translational, and protein levels. Despite this, traditional pathway engineering has relied on static control strategies to engender changes in metabolism, most likely due to ease of implementation and perceived predictability of design outcome. Increasingly in recent years, however, metabolic engineers have drawn inspiration from natural systems and have begun to harness dynamically controlled regulatory machinery to improve design of engineered microorganisms for production of specialty and commodity chemicals. Here, we review recent enabling technologies for engineering static control over pathway expression levels, and we discuss state-of-the-art dynamic control strategies that have yielded improved outcomes in the field of microbial metabolic engineering. Furthermore, we emphasize design of a novel class of genetically encoded controllers that will facilitate automatic, transient tuning of synthetic and endogenous pathways. PMID:26453934

  2. Emergence of Complexity in Protein Functions and Metabolic Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andzej

    2009-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences and subsequently subjecting them to in vitro evolution. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions, important clues have been uncovered. Considerable progress has been also achieved in understanding the origins of membrane proteins. We will address this issue in the example of ion channels - proteins that mediate transport of ions across cell walls. Remarkably, despite overall complexity of these proteins in contemporary cells, their structural motifs are quite simple, with -helices being most common. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and simple, natural channels, I will show that, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during

  3. Proteomics-based metabolic modeling reveals that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) controls endothelial cell (EC) permeability.

    PubMed

    Patella, Francesca; Schug, Zachary T; Persi, Erez; Neilson, Lisa J; Erami, Zahra; Avanzato, Daniele; Maione, Federica; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R; Mackay, Gillian; Zheng, Liang; Reid, Steven; Frezza, Christian; Giraudo, Enrico; Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Anderson, Kurt; Ruppin, Eytan; Gottlieb, Eyal; Zanivan, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) play a key role to maintain the functionality of blood vessels. Altered EC permeability causes severe impairment in vessel stability and is a hallmark of pathologies such as cancer and thrombosis. Integrating label-free quantitative proteomics data into genome-wide metabolic modeling, we built up a model that predicts the metabolic fluxes in ECs when cultured on a tridimensional matrix and organize into a vascular-like network. We discovered how fatty acid oxidation increases when ECs are assembled into a fully formed network that can be disrupted by inhibiting CPT1A, the fatty acid oxidation rate-limiting enzyme. Acute CPT1A inhibition reduces cellular ATP levels and oxygen consumption, which are restored by replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Remarkably, global phosphoproteomic changes measured upon acute CPT1A inhibition pinpointed altered calcium signaling. Indeed, CPT1A inhibition increases intracellular calcium oscillations. Finally, inhibiting CPT1A induces hyperpermeability in vitro and leakage of blood vessel in vivo, which were restored blocking calcium influx or replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fatty acid oxidation emerges as central regulator of endothelial functions and blood vessel stability and druggable pathway to control pathological vascular permeability. PMID:25573745

  4. Exercise-stimulated interleukin-15 is controlled by AMPK and regulates skin metabolism and aging.

    PubMed

    Crane, Justin D; MacNeil, Lauren G; Lally, James S; Ford, Rebecca J; Bujak, Adam L; Brar, Ikdip K; Kemp, Bruce E; Raha, Sandeep; Steinberg, Gregory R; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    Aging is commonly associated with a structural deterioration of skin that compromises its barrier function, healing, and susceptibility to disease. Several lines of evidence show that these changes are driven largely by impaired tissue mitochondrial metabolism. While exercise is associated with numerous health benefits, there is no evidence that it affects skin tissue or that endocrine muscle-to-skin signaling occurs. We demonstrate that endurance exercise attenuates age-associated changes to skin in humans and mice and identify exercise-induced IL-15 as a novel regulator of mitochondrial function in aging skin. We show that exercise controls IL-15 expression in part through skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a central regulator of metabolism, and that the elimination of muscle AMPK causes a deterioration of skin structure. Finally, we establish that daily IL-15 therapy mimics some of the anti-aging effects of exercise on muscle and skin in mice. Thus, we elucidate a mechanism by which exercise confers health benefits to skin and suggest that low-dose IL-15 therapy may prove to be a beneficial strategy to attenuate skin aging. PMID:25902870

  5. Proteomics-Based Metabolic Modeling Reveals That Fatty Acid Oxidation (FAO) Controls Endothelial Cell (EC) Permeability*

    PubMed Central

    Patella, Francesca; Schug, Zachary T.; Persi, Erez; Neilson, Lisa J.; Erami, Zahra; Avanzato, Daniele; Maione, Federica; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R.; Mackay, Gillian; Zheng, Liang; Reid, Steven; Frezza, Christian; Giraudo, Enrico; Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Anderson, Kurt; Ruppin, Eytan; Gottlieb, Eyal; Zanivan, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) play a key role to maintain the functionality of blood vessels. Altered EC permeability causes severe impairment in vessel stability and is a hallmark of pathologies such as cancer and thrombosis. Integrating label-free quantitative proteomics data into genome-wide metabolic modeling, we built up a model that predicts the metabolic fluxes in ECs when cultured on a tridimensional matrix and organize into a vascular-like network. We discovered how fatty acid oxidation increases when ECs are assembled into a fully formed network that can be disrupted by inhibiting CPT1A, the fatty acid oxidation rate-limiting enzyme. Acute CPT1A inhibition reduces cellular ATP levels and oxygen consumption, which are restored by replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Remarkably, global phosphoproteomic changes measured upon acute CPT1A inhibition pinpointed altered calcium signaling. Indeed, CPT1A inhibition increases intracellular calcium oscillations. Finally, inhibiting CPT1A induces hyperpermeability in vitro and leakage of blood vessel in vivo, which were restored blocking calcium influx or replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fatty acid oxidation emerges as central regulator of endothelial functions and blood vessel stability and druggable pathway to control pathological vascular permeability. PMID:25573745

  6. The preprotein translocase YidC controls respiratory metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Preeti; Gantasala, Nagavara Prasad; Choudhary, Eira; Singh, Nirpendra; Abdin, Malik Zainul; Agarwal, Nisheeth

    2016-01-01

    The YidC-Oxa1-Alb3 preprotein translocases play a vital role in membrane insertion of proteins in eukaryotes and bacteria. In a recent study we observed that Rv3921c, which encodes putative YidC translocase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is essential for in vitro growth of bacteria. However, the exact function of this particular protein remains to identify in mycobacterial pathogens. By performing a systematic study here we show that YidC of Mtb is an envelope protein, which is required for production of ATP and maintenance of cellular redox balance. Drastic effects of depletion of Rv3921c on the expression of hypoxic genes, ATP synthases, and many proteins of central metabolic and respiratory pathways shed a significant light on the function of YidC towards controlling respiratory metabolism in Mtb. Association of YidC with proteins such as succinate dehydrogenases and ubiquinol-cytochrome C reductase further confirms its role in respiration. Finally we demonstrate that YidC is required for the intracellular survival of Mtb in human macrophages. PMID:27166092

  7. The preprotein translocase YidC controls respiratory metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Preeti; Gantasala, Nagavara Prasad; Choudhary, Eira; Singh, Nirpendra; Abdin, Malik Zainul; Agarwal, Nisheeth

    2016-01-01

    The YidC–Oxa1–Alb3 preprotein translocases play a vital role in membrane insertion of proteins in eukaryotes and bacteria. In a recent study we observed that Rv3921c, which encodes putative YidC translocase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is essential for in vitro growth of bacteria. However, the exact function of this particular protein remains to identify in mycobacterial pathogens. By performing a systematic study here we show that YidC of Mtb is an envelope protein, which is required for production of ATP and maintenance of cellular redox balance. Drastic effects of depletion of Rv3921c on the expression of hypoxic genes, ATP synthases, and many proteins of central metabolic and respiratory pathways shed a significant light on the function of YidC towards controlling respiratory metabolism in Mtb. Association of YidC with proteins such as succinate dehydrogenases and ubiquinol-cytochrome C reductase further confirms its role in respiration. Finally we demonstrate that YidC is required for the intracellular survival of Mtb in human macrophages. PMID:27166092

  8. Exercise-stimulated interleukin-15 is controlled by AMPK and regulates skin metabolism and aging

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Justin D; MacNeil, Lauren G; Lally, James S; Ford, Rebecca J; Bujak, Adam L; Brar, Ikdip K; Kemp, Bruce E; Raha, Sandeep; Steinberg, Gregory R; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Aging is commonly associated with a structural deterioration of skin that compromises its barrier function, healing, and susceptibility to disease. Several lines of evidence show that these changes are driven largely by impaired tissue mitochondrial metabolism. While exercise is associated with numerous health benefits, there is no evidence that it affects skin tissue or that endocrine muscle-to-skin signaling occurs. We demonstrate that endurance exercise attenuates age-associated changes to skin in humans and mice and identify exercise-induced IL-15 as a novel regulator of mitochondrial function in aging skin. We show that exercise controls IL-15 expression in part through skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a central regulator of metabolism, and that the elimination of muscle AMPK causes a deterioration of skin structure. Finally, we establish that daily IL-15 therapy mimics some of the anti-aging effects of exercise on muscle and skin in mice. Thus, we elucidate a mechanism by which exercise confers health benefits to skin and suggest that low-dose IL-15 therapy may prove to be a beneficial strategy to attenuate skin aging. PMID:25902870

  9. Embryonic MicroRNA-369 Controls Metabolic Splicing Factors and Urges Cellular Reprograming

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Masamitsu; Koseki, Jun; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Dewi, Dyah Laksmi; Ozaki, Miyuki; Noguchi, Yuko; Mimori, Koshi; Gotoh, Noriko; Tanuma, Nobuhiro; Shima, Hiroshi; Doki, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Noncoding microRNAs inhibit translation and lower the transcript stability of coding mRNA, however miR-369 s, in aberrant silencing genomic regions, stabilizes target proteins under cellular stress. We found that in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells led to chromatin methylation of histone H3K4 at the miR-369 region on chromosome 12qF in mice, which is expressed in embryonic cells and is critical for pluripotency. Proteomic analyses revealed that miR-369 stabilized translation of pyruvate kinase (Pkm2) splicing factors such as HNRNPA2B1. Overexpression of miR-369 stimulated Pkm2 splicing and enhanced induction of cellular reprogramming by induced pluripotent stem cell factors, whereas miR-369 knockdown resulted in suppression. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the Argonaute complex contained the fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 and HNRNPA2B1 in a miR-369-depedent manner. Our findings demonstrate a unique role of the embryonic miR-369-HNRNPA2B1 axis in controlling metabolic enzyme function, and suggest a novel pathway linking epigenetic, transcriptional, and metabolic control in cell reprogramming. PMID:26176628

  10. Engineering a Lysine-ON Riboswitch for Metabolic Control of Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Bang; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-12-18

    Riboswitches are natural RNA elements that regulate gene expression by binding a ligand. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of altering a natural lysine-OFF riboswitch from Eschericia coli (ECRS) to a synthetic lysine-ON riboswitch and using it for metabolic control. To this end, a lysine-ON riboswitch library was constructed using tetA-based dual genetic selection. After screening the library, the functionality of the selected lysine-ON riboswitches was examined using a report gene, lacZ. Selected lysine-ON riboswitches were introduced into the lysE gene (encoding a lysine transport protein) of Corynebacterium glutamicum and used to achieve dynamic control of lysine transport in a recombinant lysine-producing strain, C. glutamicum LPECRS, which bears a deregulated aspartokinase and a lysine-OFF riboswitch for dynamic control of the enzyme citrate synthase. Batch fermentation results of the strains showed that the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain with an additional lysine-ON riboswitch for the control of lysE achieved a 21% increase in the yield of lysine compared to that of the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain and even a 89% increase in yield compared to that of the strain with deregulated aspartokinase. This work provides a useful approach to generate lysine-ON riboswitches for C. glutamicum metabolic engineering and demonstrates for the first time a synergetic effect of lysine-ON and -OFF riboswitches for improving lysine production in this industrially important microorganism. The approach can be used to dynamically control other genes and can be applied to other microorganisms. PMID:26300047