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1

[Functional brain plasticity associated with motor learning].  

PubMed

This review presents the results of studies carried out in our laboratory that aim to investigate, through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the brain plasticity associated with motor sequence learning, defined as our ability to integrate simple stereotyped movements into a single motor representation. Following a brief description of Doyon and colleagues' model (2002, 2005, 2009) of motor skill learning that has guided this work, we then describe the functional changes that occur at the different (rapid, slow, automatization) acquisition phases, and propose specific roles that the putamen, the cerebellum and their motor-related cortical areas, play in this form of motor behavior. Finally, we put forward evidence that post-training, non-REM sleep (and spindles in Stage 2 sleep, in particular) contributes to the consolidation of a motor sequence memory trace, and that increased activity within the striatum and/or the hippocampus mediates this mnemonic process. PMID:21524407

Doyon, Julien; Orban, Pierre; Barakat, Marc; Debas, Karen; Lungu, Ovidiu; Albouy, Geneviève; Fogel, Stuart; Proulx, Sébastien; Laventure, Samuel; Deslauriers, Jonathan; Duchesne, Catherine; Carrier, Julie; Benali, Habib

2011-04-01

2

Narrative Skill in Children with Early Unilateral Brain Injury: A Possible Limit to Functional Plasticity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with pre- or perinatal brain injury (PL) exhibit marked plasticity for language learning. Previous work has focused mostly on the emergence of earlier-developing skills, such as vocabulary and syntax. Here we ask whether this plasticity for earlier-developing aspects of language extends to more complex, later-developing language functions…

Demir, Ozlem Ece; Levine, Susan C.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

2010-01-01

3

Brain plasticity and functionality explored by nonlinear optical microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In combination with fluorescent protein (XFP) expression techniques, two-photon microscopy has become an indispensable tool to image cortical plasticity in living mice. In parallel to its application in imaging, multi-photon absorption has also been used as a tool for the dissection of single neurites with submicrometric precision without causing any visible collateral damage to the surrounding neuronal structures. In this work, multi-photon nanosurgery is applied to dissect single climbing fibers expressing GFP in the cerebellar cortex. The morphological consequences are then characterized with time lapse 3-dimensional two-photon imaging over a period of minutes to days after the procedure. Preliminary investigations show that the laser induced fiber dissection recalls a regenerative process in the fiber itself over a period of days. These results show the possibility of this innovative technique to investigate regenerative processes in adult brain. In parallel with imaging and manipulation technique, non-linear microscopy offers the opportunity to optically record electrical activity in intact neuronal networks. In this work, we combined the advantages of second-harmonic generation (SHG) with a random access (RA) excitation scheme to realize a new microscope (RASH) capable of optically recording fast membrane potential events occurring in a wide-field of view. The RASH microscope, in combination with bulk loading of tissue with FM4-64 dye, was used to simultaneously record electrical activity from clusters of Purkinje cells in acute cerebellar slices. Complex spikes, both synchronous and asynchronous, were optically recorded simultaneously across a given population of neurons. Spontaneous electrical activity was also monitored simultaneously in pairs of neurons, where action potentials were recorded without averaging across trials. These results show the strength of this technique in describing the temporal dynamics of neuronal assemblies, opening promising perspectives in understanding the computations of neuronal networks.

Sacconi, L.; Allegra, L.; Buffelli, M.; Cesare, P.; D'Angelo, E.; Gandolfi, D.; Grasselli, G.; Lotti, J.; Mapelli, J.; Strata, P.; Pavone, F. S.

2010-02-01

4

Plasticity of Language-Related Brain Function During Recovery from Stroke  

E-print Network

Plasticity of Language-Related Brain Function During Recovery from Stroke Keith R. Thulborn, MD, Ph to correlate functional recovery from aphasia after acute stroke with the temporal evolution of the anatomic during recovery from acute stroke presenting with aphasia. Perfusion, diffusion, sodium, and conventional

5

Musical training as a framework for brain plasticity: behavior, function, and structure.  

PubMed

Musical training has emerged as a useful framework for the investigation of training-related plasticity in the human brain. Learning to play an instrument is a highly complex task that involves the interaction of several modalities and higher-order cognitive functions and that results in behavioral, structural, and functional changes on time scales ranging from days to years. While early work focused on comparison of musical experts and novices, more recently an increasing number of controlled training studies provide clear experimental evidence for training effects. Here, we review research investigating brain plasticity induced by musical training, highlight common patterns and possible underlying mechanisms of such plasticity, and integrate these studies with findings and models for mechanisms of plasticity in other domains. PMID:23141061

Herholz, Sibylle C; Zatorre, Robert J

2012-11-01

6

Differential pattern of functional brain plasticity after compassion and empathy training.  

PubMed

Although empathy is crucial for successful social interactions, excessive sharing of others' negative emotions may be maladaptive and constitute a source of burnout. To investigate functional neural plasticity underlying the augmentation of empathy and to test the counteracting potential of compassion, one group of participants was first trained in empathic resonance and subsequently in compassion. In response to videos depicting human suffering, empathy training, but not memory training (control group), increased negative affect and brain activations in anterior insula and anterior midcingulate cortex-brain regions previously associated with empathy for pain. In contrast, subsequent compassion training could reverse the increase in negative effect and, in contrast, augment self-reports of positive affect. In addition, compassion training increased activations in a non-overlapping brain network spanning ventral striatum, pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and medial orbitofrontal cortex. We conclude that training compassion may reflect a new coping strategy to overcome empathic distress and strengthen resilience. PMID:23576808

Klimecki, Olga M; Leiberg, Susanne; Ricard, Matthieu; Singer, Tania

2014-06-01

7

Chondroitinase Enhances Cortical Map Plasticity and Increases Functionally Active Sprouting Axons after Brain Injury  

PubMed Central

Abstract The beneficial effect of interventions with chondroitinase ABC enzyme to reduce axon growth-inhibitory chondroitin sulphate side chains after central nervous system injuries has been mainly attributed to enhanced axonal sprouting. After traumatic brain injury (TBI), it is unknown whether newly sprouting axons that occur as a result of interventional strategies are able to functionally contribute to existing circuitry, and it is uncertain whether maladaptive sprouting occurs to increase the well-known risk for seizure activity after TBI. Here, we show that after a controlled cortical impact injury in rats, chondroitinase infusion into injured cortex at 30?min and 3 days reduced c-Fos+ cell staining resulting from the injury alone at 1 week postinjury, indicating that at baseline, abnormal spontaneous activity is likely to be reduced, not increased, with this type of intervention. c-Fos+ cell staining elicited by neural activity from stimulation of the affected forelimb 1 week after injury was significantly enhanced by chondroitinase, indicating a widespread effect on cortical map plasticity. Underlying this map plasticity was a larger contribution of neuronal, rather than glial cells and an absence of c-Fos+ cells surrounded by perineuronal nets that were normally present in stimulated naïve rats. After injury, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan digestion produced the expected increase in growth-associated protein 43–positive axons and perikarya, of which a significantly greater number were double labeled for c-Fos after intervention with chondroitinase, compared to vehicle. These data indicate that chondroitinase produces significant gains in cortical map plasticity after TBI, and that either axonal sprouting and/or changes in perineuronal nets may underlie this effect. Chondroitinase dampens, rather than increases nonspecific c-Fos activity after brain injury, and induction of axonal sprouting is not maladaptive because greater numbers are functionally active and provide a significant contribution to forelimb circuitry after brain injury. PMID:23517225

Nogueira, Marcia S.M.; Verley, Derek R.; Sutton, Richard L.

2013-01-01

8

Structural and functional plasticity of the human brain in posttraumatic stress disorder  

PubMed Central

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with long-term changes in neurobiology. Brain areas involved in the stress response include the medial prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala. Neurohormonal systems that act on the brain areas to modulate PTSD symptoms and memory include glucocorticoids and norepinephrine. Dysfunction of these brain areas is responsible for the symptoms of PTSD. Brain imaging studies show that PTSD patients have increased amygdala reactivity during fear acquisition. Other studies show smaller hippocampal volume. A failure of medial prefrontal/anterior cingulate activation with re-experiencing of the trauma is hypothesized to represent a neural correlate of the failure of extinction seen in PTSD. The brain has the capacity for plasticity in the aftermath of traumatic stress. Antidepressant treatments and changes in environment can reverse the effects of stress on hippocampal neurogenesis, and humans with PTSD showed increased hippocampal volume with both paroxetine and phenytoin. PMID:18037014

Bremner, J. Douglas; Elzinga, Bernet; Schmahl, Christian; Vermetten, Eric

2011-01-01

9

Mechanistic Basis and Functional Roles of Long-Term Plasticity in Auditory Neurons Induced by a Brain-Generated Estrogen  

PubMed Central

The classic estrogen 17?-estradiol (E2) was recently identified as a novel modulator of hearing function. It is produced rapidly, in an experience-dependent fashion, by auditory cortical neurons of both males and females. This brain-generated E2 enhances the efficiency of auditory coding and improves the neural and behavioral discrimination of auditory cues. Remarkably, the effects of E2 are long-lasting and persist for hours after local rises in hormone levels have subsided. The mechanisms and functional consequences of this E2-induced plasticity of auditory responses are unknown. Here, we addressed these issues in the zebra finch model by combining intracerebral pharmacology, biochemical assays, in vivo neurophysiology in awake animals, and computational and information theoretical approaches. We show that auditory experience activates the MAPK pathway in an E2-dependent manner. This effect is mediated by estrogen receptor ? (ER?), which directly associates with MEKK1 to sequentially modulate MEK and ERK activation, where the latter is required for the engagement of downstream molecular targets. We further show that E2-mediated activation of the MAPK cascade is required for the long-lasting enhancement of auditory-evoked responses in the awake brain. Moreover, a functional consequence of this E2/MAPK activation is to sustain enhanced information handling and neural discrimination by auditory neurons for several hours following hormonal challenge. Our results demonstrate that brain-generated E2 engages, via a nongenomic interaction between an estrogen receptor and a kinase, a persistent form of experience-dependent plasticity that enhances the neural coding and discrimination of behaviorally relevant sensory signals in the adult vertebrate brain. PMID:23152630

Tremere, Liisa A.; Kovaleski, Ryan F.; Burrows, Kaiping; Jeong, Jin Kwon

2012-01-01

10

Morphological brain plasticity induced by musical expertise is accompanied by modulation of functional connectivity at rest.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to explore whether musical practice-related gray matter increases in brain regions are accompanied by modifications in their resting-state functional connectivity. 16 young musically experienced adults and 17 matched nonmusicians underwent an anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI). A whole-brain two-sample t test run on the T1-weighted structural images revealed four clusters exhibiting significant increases in gray matter (GM) volume in the musician group, located within the right posterior and middle cingulate gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus and right inferior orbitofrontal gyrus. Each cluster was used as a seed region to generate and compare whole-brain resting-state functional connectivity maps. The two clusters within the cingulate gyrus exhibited greater connectivity for musicians with the right prefrontal cortex and left temporal pole, which play a role in autobiographical and semantic memory, respectively. The cluster in the left superior temporal gyrus displayed enhanced connectivity with several language-related areas (e.g., left premotor cortex, bilateral supramarginal gyri). Finally, the cluster in the right inferior frontal gyrus displayed more synchronous activity at rest with claustrum, areas thought to play a role in binding sensory and motor information. We interpreted these findings as the consequence of repeated collaborative use in general networks supporting some of the memory, perceptual-motor and emotional features of musical practice. PMID:24418502

Fauvel, Baptiste; Groussard, Mathilde; Chételat, Gaël; Fouquet, Marine; Landeau, Brigitte; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice; Platel, Hervé

2014-04-15

11

Augmentation-related brain plasticity  

PubMed Central

Today, the anthropomorphism of the tools and the development of neural interfaces require reconsidering the concept of human-tools interaction in the framework of human augmentation. This review analyses the plastic process that the brain undergoes when it comes into contact with augmenting artificial sensors and effectors and, on the other hand, the changes that the use of external augmenting devices produces in the brain. Hitherto, few studies investigated the neural correlates of augmentation, but clues on it can be borrowed from logically-related paradigms: sensorimotor training, cognitive enhancement, cross-modal plasticity, sensorimotor functional substitution, use and embodiment of tools. Augmentation modifies function and structure of a number of areas, i.e., primary sensory cortices shape their receptive fields to become sensitive to novel inputs. Motor areas adapt the neuroprosthesis representation firing-rate to refine kinematics. As for normal motor outputs, the learning process recruits motor and premotor cortices and the acquisition of proficiency decreases attentional recruitment, focuses the activity on sensorimotor areas and increases the basal ganglia drive on the cortex. Augmentation deeply relies on the frontoparietal network. In particular, premotor cortex is involved in learning the control of an external effector and owns the tool motor representation, while the intraparietal sulcus extracts its visual features. In these areas, multisensory integration neurons enlarge their receptive fields to embody supernumerary limbs. For operating an anthropomorphic neuroprosthesis, the mirror system is required to understand the meaning of the action, the cerebellum for the formation of its internal model and the insula for its interoception. In conclusion, anthropomorphic sensorized devices can provide the critical sensory afferences to evolve the exploitation of tools through their embodiment, reshaping the body representation and the sense of the self. PMID:24966816

Di Pino, Giovanni; Maravita, Angelo; Zollo, Loredana; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

2014-01-01

12

Evidence for potentials and limitations of brain plasticity using an atlas of functional resectability of WHO grade II gliomas: towards a "minimal common brain".  

PubMed

Despite recent advances in non-invasive brain mapping imaging, the resectability of a given area in a patient harboring a WHO grade II glioma cannot be predicted preoperatively with high reliability, due to mechanisms of functional reorganization. Therefore, intraoperative mapping by direct electrical stimulation remains the gold standard for detection and preservation of eloquent areas during glioma surgery, because it enables to perform on-line anatomo-functional correlations. To study potentials and limitations of brain plasticity, we gathered 58 postoperative MRI of patients operated on for a WHO grade II glioma under direct electrical cortico-subcortical stimulation. Postoperative images were registered on the MNI template to construct an atlas of functional resectability for which each voxel represents the probability to observe residual non-resectable tumor, that is, non-compensable area. The resulting atlas offers a rigorous framework to identify areas with high plastic potential (i.e. with probabilities of residual tumor close to 0), with low compensatory capabilities (i.e. probabilities of residual tumor close to 1) and with intermediate level of resectability (probability around 0.5). The resulting atlas highlights the utmost importance of preserving a core of connectivity through the main associative pathways, namely, it supports the existence of a "minimal common brain" among patients. PMID:21414413

Ius, Tamara; Angelini, Elsa; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Duffau, Hugues

2011-06-01

13

Neural prostheses and brain plasticity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The success of modern neural prostheses is dependent on a complex interplay between the devices' hardware and software and the dynamic environment in which the devices operate: the patient's body or 'wetware'. Over 120 000 severe/profoundly deaf individuals presently receive information enabling auditory awareness and speech perception from cochlear implants. The cochlear implant therefore provides a useful case study for a review of the complex interactions between hardware, software and wetware, and of the important role of the dynamic nature of wetware. In the case of neural prostheses, the most critical component of that wetware is the central nervous system. This paper will examine the evidence of changes in the central auditory system that contribute to changes in performance with a cochlear implant, and discuss how these changes relate to electrophysiological and functional imaging studies in humans. The relationship between the human data and evidence from animals of the remarkable capacity for plastic change of the central auditory system, even into adulthood, will then be examined. Finally, we will discuss the role of brain plasticity in neural prostheses in general.

Fallon, James B.; Irvine, Dexter R. F.; Shepherd, Robert K.

2009-12-01

14

Chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced deficits in synaptic plasticity and neurocognitive functions: a role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor  

PubMed Central

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is well known for its metabolic as well as neurobehavioral consequences. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a major component of OSA. In recent years, substantial advances have been made in elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of chronic IH on neurocognitive functions, many of which are based on studies in animal models. A number of hypotheses have been put forward to explain chronic IH-induced neurological dysfunctions. Among these, the roles of oxidative stress and apoptosis-related neural injury are widely accepted. Here, focusing on results derived from animal studies, we highlight a possible role of reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in causing impairment in long-term synaptic plasticity and neurocognitive functions during chronic IH. The possible relationship between BDNF and previous findings on this subject will be elucidated. PMID:22212429

Xie, Hui; Yung, Wing-ho

2012-01-01

15

Nurturing brain plasticity: impact of environmental enrichment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental enrichment (EE) is known to profoundly affect the central nervous system (CNS) at the functional, anatomical and molecular level, both during the critical period and during adulthood. Recent studies focusing on the visual system have shown that these effects are associated with the recruitment of previously unsuspected neural plasticity processes. At early stages of brain development, EE triggers a

L Baroncelli; C Braschi; M Spolidoro; T Begenisic; A Sale; L Maffei

2010-01-01

16

The plastic brain: neoliberalism and the neuronal self.  

PubMed

Neuroscience-based representations and practices of the brain aimed at lay populations present the brain in ways that both affirm biological determinism and also celebrate plasticity, or the brain's ability to change structure and function. Popular uses of neuroscientific theories of brain plasticity are saturated with a neoliberal vision of the subject. Against more optimistic readings of plasticity, I view the popular deployment of plasticity through the framework of governmentality. I describe how popular brain discourse on plasticity opens up the brain to personal techniques of enhancement and risk avoidance, and how it promotes a neuronal self. I situate brain plasticity in a context of biomedical neoliberalism, where the engineering and modification of biological life is positioned as essential to selfhood and citizenship. PMID:20974696

Pitts-Taylor, Victoria

2010-11-01

17

Brain Development and CNS Plasticity  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Since the first developmental studies using fMRI there has been an almost logarithmic growth of investigations regarding functional\\u000a brain development. This growing knowledge, in combination with landmark animal studies of developmental neuroplasticity, has\\u000a provided us with significant insight into the nature of brain development and how brain maturation might map onto behavior.\\u000a Throughout this chapter we discuss how a number

Damien A. Fair; Bradley L. Schlaggar

18

Bridging from Cells to Cognition in Autism Pathophysiology: Biological Pathways to Defective Brain Function and Plasticity  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review evidence to support the model that autism may begin when a maternal environmental, infectious, or autoantibody insult causes inflammation which increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the fetus, leading to fetal DNA damage (nuclear and mitochondrial), and that these inflammatory and oxidative stressors persist beyond early development (with potential further exacerbations), producing ongoing functional consequences. In organs

Matthew P. Anderson; Brian S. Hooker; Martha R. Herbert

2008-01-01

19

Synaptic Plasticity: Multiple Forms, Functions, and Mechanisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experiences, whether they be learning in a classroom, a stressful event, or ingestion of a psychoactive substance, impact the brain by modifying the activity and organization of specific neural circuitry. A major mechanism by which the neural activity generated by an experience modifies brain function is via modifications of synaptic transmission; that is, synaptic plasticity. Here, we review current understanding

Ami Citri; Robert C Malenka

2008-01-01

20

Evolutionary Perspectives on Language and Brain Plasticity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review discusses how general principles of brain development have contributed to both human brain plasticity and the acquisition of the human capacity for speech. Specifically, the role played by plastic developmental processes in the evolution and development of articulate control over vocalization in speech is examined. (Contains…

Deacon, Terrence W.

2000-01-01

21

Bridging from Cells to Cognition in Autism Pathophysiology: Biological Pathways to Defective Brain Function and Plasticity  

SciTech Connect

We review evidence to support the model that autism may begin when a maternal environmental, infectious, or autoantibody insult causes inflammation which increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the fetus, leading to fetal DNA damage (nuclear and mitochondrial), and that these inflammatory and oxidative stressors persist beyond early development (with potential further exacerbations), producing ongoing functional consequences. In organs with a high metabolic demand such as the central nervous system, the continued use of mitochondria with DNA damage may generate additional ROS which will activate the innate immune system leading to more ROS production. Such a mechanism would self-sustain and possibly progressively worsen. The mitochondrial dysfunction and altered redox signal transduction pathways found in autism would conspire to activate both astroglia and microglia. These activated cells can then initiate a broad-spectrum proinflammatory gene response. Neurons may have acquired receptors for these inflammatory signals to inhibit neuronal signaling as a protection from excitotoxic damage during various pathologic insults (e.g., infection). In autism, over-zealous neuroinflammatory responses could not only influence neural developmental processes, but may more significantly impair neural signaling involved in cognition in an ongoing fashion. This model makes specific predictions in patients and experimental animal models and suggests a number of targets sites of intervention. Our model of potentially reversible pathophysiological mechanisms in autism motivates our hope that effective therapies may soon appear on the horizon.

Anderson, Matthew; Hooker, Brian S.; Herbert, Martha

2008-01-01

22

Ubiquitination in Postsynaptic Function and Plasticity  

PubMed Central

Neurons are highly specialized cells whose connectivity at synapses subserves rapid information transfer in the brain. Proper information processing, learning, and memory storage in the brain requires continuous remodeling of synaptic networks. Such remodeling includes synapse formation, elimination, synaptic protein turnover, and changes in synaptic transmission. An emergent mechanism for regulating synapse function is posttranslational modification through the ubiquitin pathway at the postsynaptic membrane. Here, we discuss recent findings implicating ubiquitination and protein degradation in postsynaptic function and plasticity. We describe postsynaptic ubiquitination pathways and their role in brain development, neuronal physiology, and brain disorders. PMID:20604708

Mabb, Angela M.; Ehlers, Michael D.

2011-01-01

23

SAHA enhances synaptic function and plasticity in vitro but has limited brain availability in vivo and does not impact cognition.  

PubMed

Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) used for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) and under consideration for other indications. In vivo studies suggest reducing HDAC function can enhance synaptic function and memory, raising the possibility that SAHA treatment could have neurological benefits. We first examined the impacts of SAHA on synaptic function in vitro using rat organotypic hippocampal brain slices. Following several days of SAHA treatment, basal excitatory but not inhibitory synaptic function was enhanced. Presynaptic release probability and intrinsic neuronal excitability were unaffected suggesting SAHA treatment selectively enhanced postsynaptic excitatory function. In addition, long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory synapses was augmented, while long-term depression (LTD) was impaired in SAHA treated slices. Despite the in vitro synaptic enhancements, in vivo SAHA treatment did not rescue memory deficits in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Along with the lack of behavioral impact, pharmacokinetic analysis indicated poor brain availability of SAHA. Broader assessment of in vivo SAHA treatment using high-content phenotypic characterization of C57Bl6 mice failed to demonstrate significant behavioral effects of up to 150 mg/kg SAHA following either acute or chronic injections. Potentially explaining the low brain exposure and lack of behavioral impacts, SAHA was found to be a substrate of the blood brain barrier (BBB) efflux transporters Pgp and Bcrp1. Thus while our in vitro data show that HDAC inhibition can enhance excitatory synaptic strength and potentiation, our in vivo data suggests limited brain availability may contribute to the lack of behavioral impact of SAHA following peripheral delivery. These results do not predict CNS effects of SAHA during clinical use and also emphasize the importance of analyzing brain drug levels when interpreting preclinical behavioral pharmacology. PMID:23922875

Hanson, Jesse E; La, Hank; Plise, Emile; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Ding, Xiao; Hanania, Taleen; Sabath, Emily V; Alexandrov, Vadim; Brunner, Dani; Leahy, Emer; Steiner, Pascal; Liu, Lichuan; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Zhou, Qiang

2013-01-01

24

Brain Structure and Brain Function  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper has attempted to provide information in brief form regarding the structure of the brain, the types of pathological conditions that involve the brain, some of the conventional neurological diagnostic methods, and illustrations of the importance of intact brain functions for performances in the area of language functions and visuo-spatial…

Reitan, Ralph M.

1970-01-01

25

Processing demands upon cognitive, linguistic, and articulatory functions promote grey matter plasticity in the adult multilingual brain: Insights from simultaneous interpreters.  

PubMed

Until now, considerable effort has been made to determine structural brain characteristics related to exceptional multilingual skills. However, at least one important question has not yet been satisfactorily addressed in the previous literature, namely whether and to which extent the processing demands upon cognitive, linguistic, and articulatory functions may promote grey matter plasticity in the adult multilingual brain. Based on the premise that simultaneous interpretation is a highly demanding linguistic task that places strong demands on executive and articulatory functions, here we compared grey matter volumes between professional simultaneous interpreters (SI) and multilingual control subjects. Thereby, we focused on a specific set of a-priori defined bilateral brain regions that have previously been shown to support neurocognitional aspects of language control and linguistic functions in the multilingual brain. These regions are the cingulate gyrus, caudate nucleus, frontal operculum (pars triangularis and opercularis), inferior parietal lobe (IPL) (supramarginal and angular gyrus), and the insula. As a main result, we found reduced grey matter volumes in professional SI, compared to multilingual controls, in the left middle-anterior cingulate gyrus, bilateral pars triangularis, left pars opercularis, bilateral middle part of the insula, and in the left supramarginal gyrus (SMG). Interestingly, grey matter volume in left pars triangularis, right pars opercularis, middle-anterior cingulate gyrus, and in the bilateral caudate nucleus was negatively correlated with the cumulative number of interpreting hours. Hence, we provide first evidence for an expertise-related grey matter architecture that may reflect a composite of brain characteristics that were still present before interpreting training and training-related changes. PMID:24699036

Elmer, Stefan; Hänggi, Jürgen; Jäncke, Lutz

2014-05-01

26

Human Functional Brain Imaging  

E-print Network

Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review Summary Brain Imaging #12 Dale ­ one of our first Trustees. Understanding the brain remains one of our key strategic aims today three-fold: · to identify the key landmarks and influences on the human functional brain imaging

Rambaut, Andrew

27

Zo Rebecca Hunter Plasticity of the adult human brain  

E-print Network

Zoë Rebecca Hunter Plasticity of the adult human brain and motor recovery after stroke PICS © Institute of Cognitive Science #12;1 Bachelor's Thesis Plasticity of the adult human brain and motor brain and motor recovery after stroke 2 Abstract Stroke may cause a major destruction of brain tissue

Kallenrode, May-Britt

28

Human Functional Brain Imaging  

E-print Network

Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review #12;2 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain ImagingThe Wellcome Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales, no's role in supporting human functional brain imaging and have informed `our' speculations for the future

Rambaut, Andrew

29

Contrasting Acute and Slow-Growing Lesions: A New Door to Brain Plasticity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The concept of plasticity describes the mechanisms that rearrange cerebral organization following a brain injury. During the last century, plasticity has been mainly investigated in humans with acute strokes. It was then shown: (i) that the brain is organized into highly specialized functional areas, often designated "eloquent" areas and (ii) that…

Desmurget, Michel; Bonnetblanc, FranCois; Duffau, Hugues

2007-01-01

30

Plasticity of resting state brain networks in recovery from stress  

PubMed Central

Chronic stress has been widely reported to have deleterious impact in multiple biological systems. Specifically, structural and functional remodeling of several brain regions following prolonged stress exposure have been described; importantly, some of these changes are eventually reversible. Recently, we showed the impact of stress on resting state networks (RSNs), but nothing is known about the plasticity of RSNs after recovery from stress. Herein, we examined the “plasticity” of RSNs, both at functional and structural levels, by comparing the same individuals before and after recovery from the exposure to chronic stress; results were also contrasted with a control group. Here we show that the stressed individuals after recovery displayed a decreased resting functional connectivity in the default mode network (DMN), ventral attention network (VAN), and sensorimotor network (SMN) when compared to themselves immediately after stress; however, this functional plastic recovery was only partial as when compared with the control group, as there were still areas of increased connectivity in dorsal attention network (DAN), SMN and primary visual network (VN) in participants recovered from stress. Data also shows that participants after recovery from stress displayed increased deactivations in DMN, SMN, and auditory network (AN), to levels similar to those of controls, showing a normalization of the deactivation pattern in RSNs after recovery from stress. In contrast, structural changes (volumetry) of the brain areas involving these networks are absent after the recovery period. These results reveal plastic phenomena in specific RSNs and a functional remodeling of the activation-deactivation pattern following recovery from chronic-stress, which is not accompanied by significant structural plasticity. PMID:24416009

Soares, Jose M.; Sampaio, Adriana; Marques, Paulo; Ferreira, Luis M.; Santos, Nadine C.; Marques, Fernanda; Palha, Joana A.; Cerqueira, Joao J.; Sousa, Nuno

2013-01-01

31

Resting-state fMRI: a window into human brain plasticity.  

PubMed

Although brain plasticity is greatest in the first few years of life, the brain continues to be shaped by experience throughout adulthood. Advances in fMRI have enabled us to examine the plasticity of large-scale networks using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) correlations measured at rest. Resting-state functional connectivity analysis makes it possible to measure task-independent changes in brain function and therefore could provide unique insights into experience-dependent brain plasticity in humans. Here, we evaluate the hypothesis that resting-state functional connectivity reflects the repeated history of co-activation between brain regions. To this end, we review resting-state fMRI studies in the sensory, motor, and cognitive learning literature. This body of research provides evidence that the brain's resting-state functional architecture displays dynamic properties in young adulthood. PMID:24561514

Guerra-Carrillo, Belén; Mackey, Allyson P; Bunge, Silvia A

2014-10-01

32

A saturated-fat diet aggravates the outcome of traumatic brain injury on hippocampal plasticity and cognitive function by reducing brain-derived neurotrophic factor  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have conducted studies to determine the potential of dietary factors to affect the capacity of the brain to compensate for insult. Rats were fed with a high-fat sucrose (HFS) diet, a popularly consumed diet in industrialized western societies, for 4 weeks before a mild fluid percussion injury (FPI) or sham surgery was performed. FPI impaired spatial learning capacity in

A. WU; R. MOLTENI; Z. YING; F. GOMEZ-PINILLA

2003-01-01

33

Regeneration and plasticity in the brain and spinal cord  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of brain plasticity covers all the mechanisms involved in the capacity of the brain to adjust and remodel itself in response to environmental requirements, experience, skill acquisition, and new challenges including brain lesions. Advances in neuroimaging and neurophysiologic techniques have increased our knowledge of task-related changes in cortical representation areas in the intact and injured human brain. The

Barbro B Johansson

2007-01-01

34

Plastic brains and the dialectics of dialectics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article advances the thinking of Lima, Ostermann and Rezende's "Marxism in Vygotskian approaches to cultural studies of science education" and Mark Zuss' response to their paper. Firstly, it introduces Catherine Malabou's concept of plasticity, from which Hegel's dialectic can be re-read as historical materialist self-determination in a way that embraces science but non-reductively, and which leads to the possibility of challenging theoretical rigidity as a form of transformative action. Secondly, this response article provides political analysis of scientific concepts as they reproduce and reinforce particular interests and are expropriated by policy makers and unaware teacher educators whose understanding lies within a technical-instrumentalism and diluted humanism framework. Both arguments feature the human brain as an object of research in science education. From Malabou, the emancipatory conceptualisation of the brain as material, historical and sociocultural; whilst `Brain Gym' exemplifies a non-science and nonsensical misappropriation of scientific concepts for commercial gain via a para-educational intervention.

Loxley, Andrew; Murphy, Colette; Seery, Aidan

2014-09-01

35

Age, Plasticity, and Homeostasis In Childhood Brain Disorders  

PubMed Central

It has been widely accepted that the younger the age and/or immaturity of the organism, the greater the brain plasticity, the young age plasticity privilege. This paper examines the relation of a young age to plasticity, reviewing human pediatric brain disorders, as well as selected animal models, human developmental and adult brain disorder studies. As well, we review developmental and childhood acquired disorders that involve a failure of regulatory homeostasis. Our core arguments are: Plasticity is neutral with respect to outcome. Although the effects of plasticity are often beneficial, the outcome of plasticity may be adaptive or maladaptive.The young age plasticity privilege has been overstated.Plastic change operates in concert with homeostatic mechanisms regulating change at every point in the lifespan.The same mechanisms that propel developmental change expose the immature brain to adverse events, making it more difficult for the immature than for the mature brain to sustain equilibrium between plasticity and homeostasis.Poor outcome in many neurodevelopmental disorders and childhood acquired brain insults is related to disequilibrium between plasticity and homeostasis. PMID:24096190

Dennis, Maureen; Spiegler, Brenda J.; Juranek, Jenifer J.; Bigler, Erin D.; Snead, O. Carter; Fletcher, Jack M.

2013-01-01

36

Plasticity of Nonneuronal Brain Tissue: Roles in Developmental Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Neuronal and nonneuronal plasticity are both affected by environmental and experiential factors. Remodeling of existing neurons induced by such factors has been observed throughout the brain, and includes alterations in dendritic field dimensions, synaptogenesis, and synaptic morphology. The brain loci affected by these plastic neuronal changes…

Dong, Willie K.; Greenough, William T.

2004-01-01

37

Factors Influencing Cerebral Plasticity in the Normal and Injured Brain  

PubMed Central

An important development in behavioral neuroscience in the past 20 years has been the demonstration that it is possible to stimulate functional recovery after cerebral injury in laboratory animals. Rodent models of cerebral injury provide an important tool for developing such rehabilitation programs. The models include analysis at different levels including detailed behavioral paradigms, electrophysiology, neuronal morphology, protein chemistry, and epigenetics. A significant challenge for the next 20 years will be the translation of this work to improve the outcome from brain injury and disease in humans. Our goal in the article will be to synthesize the multidisciplinary laboratory work on brain plasticity and behavior in the injured brain to inform the development of rehabilitation programs. PMID:21120136

Kolb, Bryan; Teskey, G. Campbell; Gibb, Robbin

2010-01-01

38

Brain function and chromatin plasticity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The characteristics of epigenetic control, including the potential for long-lasting, stable effects on gene expression that outlive an initial transient signal, could be of singular importance for post-mitotic neurons, which are subject to changes with short- to long-lasting influence on their activity and connectivity. Persistent changes in chromatin structure are thought to contribute to mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance. Recent advances

Catherine Dulac

2010-01-01

39

Split Brain Functioning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizing recent research, this article defines the functions performed by the left and right sides of the human brain. Attention is given to the right side, or the nondominant side, of the brain and its potential in terms of perception of the environment, music, art, geometry, and the aesthetics. (JC)

Cassel, Russell N.

1978-01-01

40

Measuring and Inducing Brain Plasticity in Chronic Aphasia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Brain plasticity associated with anomia recovery in aphasia is poorly understood. Here, I review four recent studies from my lab that focused on brain modulation associated with long-term anomia outcome, its behavioral treatment, and the use of transcranial brain stimulation to enhance anomia treatment success in individuals with chronic aphasia…

Fridriksson, Julius

2011-01-01

41

Split My Brain: A Case Study of Seizure Disorder and Brain Function  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This case involves a couple deciding whether or not their son should undergo brain surgery to treat a severe seizure disorder. In examining this dilemma, students apply knowledge of brain anatomy and function. They also learn about brain scanning techniques and discuss the plasticity of the brain.

Omarzu, Julia

2004-01-01

42

Computational anatomy for studying use-dependant brain plasticity  

PubMed Central

In this article we provide a comprehensive literature review on the in vivo assessment of use-dependant brain structure changes in humans using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational anatomy. We highlight the recent findings in this field that allow the uncovering of the basic principles behind brain plasticity in light of the existing theoretical models at various scales of observation. Given the current lack of in-depth understanding of the neurobiological basis of brain structure changes we emphasize the necessity of a paradigm shift in the investigation and interpretation of use-dependent brain plasticity. Novel quantitative MRI acquisition techniques provide access to brain tissue microstructural properties (e.g., myelin, iron, and water content) in-vivo, thereby allowing unprecedented specific insights into the mechanisms underlying brain plasticity. These quantitative MRI techniques require novel methods for image processing and analysis of longitudinal data allowing for straightforward interpretation and causality inferences. PMID:25018716

Draganski, Bogdan; Kherif, Ferath; Lutti, Antoine

2014-01-01

43

Brain Hemispheric Functioning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four articles consider brain hemisphere functioning of gifted students as it relates to gifted programs; alternation of education methodologies; spatial ability as an element of intellectual gifted functioning; and the interaction between hemisphere specialization, imagery, creative imagination, and sex differentiation. (SB)

Roeper Review, 1981

1981-01-01

44

Inhibitory synaptic plasticity: spike timing-dependence and putative network function  

PubMed Central

While the plasticity of excitatory synaptic connections in the brain has been widely studied, the plasticity of inhibitory connections is much less understood. Here, we present recent experimental and theoretical findings concerning the rules of spike timing-dependent inhibitory plasticity and their putative network function. This is a summary of a workshop at the COSYNE conference 2012. PMID:23882186

Vogels, T. P.; Froemke, R. C.; Doyon, N.; Gilson, M.; Haas, J. S.; Liu, R.; Maffei, A.; Miller, P.; Wierenga, C. J.; Woodin, M. A.; Zenke, F.; Sprekeler, H.

2013-01-01

45

Evidence for impaired plasticity after traumatic brain injury in the developing brain.  

PubMed

The robustness of plasticity mechanisms during brain development is essential for synaptic formation and has a beneficial outcome after sensory deprivation. However, the role of plasticity in recovery after acute brain injury in children has not been well defined. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability among children, and long-term disability from pediatric TBI can be particularly devastating. We investigated the altered cortical plasticity 2-3 weeks after injury in a pediatric rat model of TBI. Significant decreases in neurophysiological responses across the depth of the noninjured, primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in TBI rats, compared to age-matched controls, were detected with electrophysiological measurements of multi-unit activity (86.4% decrease), local field potential (75.3% decrease), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (77.6% decrease). Because the corpus callosum is a clinically important white matter tract that was shown to be consistently involved in post-traumatic axonal injury, we investigated its anatomical and functional characteristics after TBI. Indeed, corpus callosum abnormalities in TBI rats were detected with diffusion tensor imaging (9.3% decrease in fractional anisotropy) and histopathological analysis (14% myelination volume decreases). Whole-cell patch clamp recordings further revealed that TBI results in significant decreases in spontaneous firing rate (57% decrease) and the potential to induce long-term potentiation in neurons located in layer V of the noninjured S1 by stimulation of the corpus callosum (82% decrease). The results suggest that post-TBI plasticity can translate into inappropriate neuronal connections and dramatic changes in the function of neuronal networks. PMID:24050267

Li, Nan; Yang, Ya; Glover, David P; Zhang, Jiangyang; Saraswati, Manda; Robertson, Courtney; Pelled, Galit

2014-02-15

46

Assessing brain plasticity across the lifespan with transcranial magnetic stimulation: why, how, and what is the ultimate goal?  

PubMed Central

Sustaining brain and cognitive function across the lifespan must be one of the main biomedical goals of the twenty-first century. We need to aim to prevent neuropsychiatric diseases and, thus, to identify and remediate brain and cognitive dysfunction before clinical symptoms manifest and disability develops. The brain undergoes a complex array of changes from developmental years into old age, putatively the underpinnings of changes in cognition and behavior throughout life. A functionally “normal” brain is a changing brain, a brain whose capacity and mechanisms of change are shifting appropriately from one time-point to another in a given individual's life. Therefore, assessing the mechanisms of brain plasticity across the lifespan is critical to gain insight into an individual's brain health. Indexing brain plasticity in humans is possible with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which, in combination with neuroimaging, provides a powerful tool for exploring local cortical and brain network plasticity. Here, we review investigations to date, summarize findings, and discuss some of the challenges that need to be solved to enhance the use of TMS measures of brain plasticity across all ages. Ultimately, TMS measures of plasticity can become the foundation for a brain health index (BHI) to enable objective correlates of an individual's brain health over time, assessment across diseases and disorders, and reliable evaluation of indicators of efficacy of future preventive and therapeutic interventions. PMID:23565072

Freitas, Catarina; Farzan, Faranak; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

2013-01-01

47

Brain-machine interfaces can accelerate clarification of the principal mysteries and real plasticity of the brain  

PubMed Central

This perspective emphasizes that the brain-machine interface (BMI) research has the potential to clarify major mysteries of the brain and that such clarification of the mysteries by neuroscience is needed to develop BMIs. I enumerate five principal mysteries. The first is “how is information encoded in the brain?” This is the fundamental question for understanding what our minds are and is related to the verification of Hebb’s cell assembly theory. The second is “how is information distributed in the brain?” This is also a reconsideration of the functional localization of the brain. The third is “what is the function of the ongoing activity of the brain?” This is the problem of how the brain is active during no-task periods and what meaning such spontaneous activity has. The fourth is “how does the bodily behavior affect the brain function?” This is the problem of brain-body interaction, and obtaining a new “body” by a BMI leads to a possibility of changes in the owner’s brain. The last is “to what extent can the brain induce plasticity?” Most BMIs require changes in the brain’s neuronal activity to realize higher performance, and the neuronal operant conditioning inherent in the BMIs further enhances changes in the activity. PMID:24904323

Sakurai, Yoshio

2014-01-01

48

A Plastic Temporal Brain Code for Conscious State Generation  

PubMed Central

Consciousness is known to be limited in processing capacity and often described in terms of a unique processing stream across a single dimension: time. In this paper, we discuss a purely temporal pattern code, functionally decoupled from spatial signals, for conscious state generation in the brain. Arguments in favour of such a code include Dehaene et al.'s long-distance reverberation postulate, Ramachandran's remapping hypothesis, evidence for a temporal coherence index and coincidence detectors, and Grossberg's Adaptive Resonance Theory. A time-bin resonance model is developed, where temporal signatures of conscious states are generated on the basis of signal reverberation across large distances in highly plastic neural circuits. The temporal signatures are delivered by neural activity patterns which, beyond a certain statistical threshold, activate, maintain, and terminate a conscious brain state like a bar code would activate, maintain, or inactivate the electronic locks of a safe. Such temporal resonance would reflect a higher level of neural processing, independent from sensorial or perceptual brain mechanisms. PMID:19644552

Dresp-Langley, Birgitta; Durup, Jean

2009-01-01

49

BRAIN PLASTICITY AND HAND SURGERY: AN OVERVIEW  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hand is an extension of the brain, and the hand is projected and represented in large areas of the motor and sensory cortex. The brain is a complicated neural network which continuously remodels itself as a result of changes in sensory input. Such synaptic reorganizational changes may be activity-dependent, based on alterations in hand activity and tactile experience, or

G. LUNDBORG

2000-01-01

50

Brain Plasticity in Learning Visual Words  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study used event-related brain potentials and performance to trace changes in the underlying brain circuitry of undergraduates who spent 5 weeks learning a miniature artificial language. A reaction time task involving visual matching showed that words in the new language were processed like nonsense material before training, and like English words at the end of the 5 weeks of

Bruce D. McCandliss; Michael I. Posner; T. Givón

1997-01-01

51

Brain plasticity and antidepressant treatments: New cells, new connections  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is now a decade since we first wrote about the impact of antidepressant agents on plastic processes in the hippocampus\\u000a (Stewart and Reid, 1993). Since then, the roles of various forms of brain plasticity have moved centre stage in efforts to\\u000a understand the pathophysiology of depressive disorder. Here, we review the background to current views relating cytoarchitectural\\u000a and synaptic

Ian C. Reid; Caroline A. Stewart

2004-01-01

52

Reorganization and plastic changes of the human brain associated with skill learning and expertise.  

PubMed

Novel experience and learning new skills are known as modulators of brain function. Advances in non-invasive brain imaging have provided new insight into structural and functional reorganization associated with skill learning and expertise. Especially, significant imaging evidences come from the domains of sports and music. Data from in vivo imaging studies in sports and music have provided vital information on plausible neural substrates contributing to brain reorganization underlying skill acquisition in humans. This mini review will attempt to take a narrow snapshot of imaging findings demonstrating functional and structural plasticity that mediate skill learning and expertise while identifying converging areas of interest and possible avenues for future research. PMID:24550812

Chang, Yongmin

2014-01-01

53

Reorganization and plastic changes of the human brain associated with skill learning and expertise  

PubMed Central

Novel experience and learning new skills are known as modulators of brain function. Advances in non-invasive brain imaging have provided new insight into structural and functional reorganization associated with skill learning and expertise. Especially, significant imaging evidences come from the domains of sports and music. Data from in vivo imaging studies in sports and music have provided vital information on plausible neural substrates contributing to brain reorganization underlying skill acquisition in humans. This mini review will attempt to take a narrow snapshot of imaging findings demonstrating functional and structural plasticity that mediate skill learning and expertise while identifying converging areas of interest and possible avenues for future research. PMID:24550812

Chang, Yongmin

2014-01-01

54

Plastic Brains and the Dialectics of Dialectics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article advances the thinking of Lima, Ostermann and Rezende's "Marxism in Vygotskian approaches to cultural studies of science education" and Mark Zuss' response to their paper. Firstly, it introduces Catherine Malabou's concept of plasticity, from which Hegel's dialectic can be re-read as historical materialist…

Loxley, Andrew; Murphy, Colette; Seery, Aidan

2014-01-01

55

Removing brakes on adult brain plasticity: from molecular to behavioral interventions  

PubMed Central

Adult brain plasticity, although possible, remains more restricted in scope than during development. Here, we address conditions under which circuit rewiring may be facilitated in the mature brain. At a cellular and molecular level, adult plasticity is actively limited. Some of these “brakes” are structural, such as peri-neuronal nets or myelin, which inhibit neurite outgrowth. Others are functional, acting directly upon excitatory-inhibitory balance within local circuits. Plasticity in adulthood can be induced either by lifting these brakes through invasive interventions or by exploiting endogenous permissive factors, such as neuromodulators. Using the amblyopic visual system as a model, we discuss genetic, pharmacological, and environmental removal of brakes to enable recovery of vision in adult rodents. Although these mechanisms remain largely uncharted in the human, we consider how they may provide a biological foundation for the remarkable increase in plasticity after action video game play by amblyopic subjects. PMID:21068299

Bavelier, D.; Levi, D.M.; Li, R.W.; Dan, Y.; Hensch, T.K.

2010-01-01

56

Neural Functions of Matrix Metalloproteinases: Plasticity, Neurogenesis, and Disease  

PubMed Central

The brain changes in response to experience and altered environment. To do that, the nervous system often remodels the structures of neuronal circuits. This structural plasticity of the neuronal circuits appears to be controlled not only by intrinsic factors, but also by extrinsic mechanisms including modification of the extracellular matrix. Recent studies employing a range of animal models implicate that matrix metalloproteinases regulate multiple aspects of the neuronal development and remodeling in the brain. This paper aims to summarize recent advances of our knowledge on the neuronal functions of matrix metalloproteinases and discuss how they might relate in neuronal disease. PMID:22567285

Fujioka, Hiromi; Dairyo, Yusuke; Yasunaga, Kei-ichiro; Emoto, Kazuo

2012-01-01

57

Changes in liver mitochondrial plasticity induced by brain tumor  

PubMed Central

Background Accumulating data suggest that liver is a major target organ of systemic effects observed in the presence of a cancer. In this study, we investigated the consequences of the presence of chemically induced brain tumors in rats on biophysical parameters accounting for the dynamics of water in liver mitochondria. Methods Tumors of the central nervous system were induced by intraveinous administration of ethylnitrosourea (ENU) to pregnant females on the 19th day of gestation. The mitochondrial crude fraction was isolated from the liver of each animal and the dynamic parameters of total water and its macromolecule-associated fraction (structured water, H2Ost) were calculated from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements. Results The presence of a malignant brain tumor induced a loss of water structural order that implicated changes in the physical properties of the hydration shells of liver mitochondria macromolecules. This feature was linked to an increase in the membrane cholesterol content, a way to limit water penetration into the bilayer and then to reduce membrane permeability. As expected, these alterations in mitochondrial plasticity affected ionic exchanges and led to abnormal features of mitochondrial biogenesis and caspase activation. Conclusion This study enlightens the sensitivity of the structured water phase in the liver mitochondria machinery to external conditions such as tumor development at a distant site. The profound metabolic and functional changes led to abnormal features of ion transport, mitochondrial biogenesis and caspase activation. PMID:17018136

Pouliquen, Daniel; Olivier, Christophe; Debien, Emilie; Meflah , Khaled; Vallette, Francois M; Menanteau, Jean

2006-01-01

58

[Dehydroepiandrosterone and brain functioning].  

PubMed

The adrenal glands synthesize dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulphate form (DHEAS) more intensively than they do other steroid hormones. Researchers are interested in these hormones for several reasons. Firstly, for some years they have been trying to find the reason for DHEA and DHEAS to be synthesized and present in the organism in such high concentrations. Secondly, their attention have been attracted by age-dependent regression of DHEA, which is strictly determined. Thirdly, despite longstanding efforts of scientists, the physiological role and spectrum of the biological activity of DHEA is still unclear. Evidence of that DHEA and DHEAS can be synthesized in situ in the brain tissue, received in rat experiments, urged researchers to clarify the role of these neurosteroids in the CNS. The presented review covers ways of neurosteroid synthesis, possible mechanisms of the regulation of these processes, and their dynamics under the condition of stress. The authors analyze experimental and clinical observations undertaken with a goal to clarify a possible role of DHEA in the manifestation of various brain functions. Special attention is payed to ambiguous results of modern studies, dedicated to replacement therapy of various disorders of CNS functioning (Alzheimer's disease, depression, age-specific memory impairment, sleep disturbance etc.) with DHEAS. PMID:16149434

Goncharov, N P; Katsiia, G V; Nizhnik, A N

2005-01-01

59

Endogenous plastic composite material in the Alzheimer's brain.  

PubMed

Accumulation of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide in brain is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The resulting plaques though fibrous in nature may also consist of additional structures currently poorly defined. We hypothesize that plastic composite material contributes to plaque formation. This material is organized by polymers of acrolein, which is an oxidized lipid fragment found in AD. Acrolein, a 3-carbon compound, contains a carbonyl and a vinyl group that participate in polymerization via fundamental latex chemistry. The redox and surfactant properties of Abeta allow it to catalyze the polymerization of acrolein. We previously reported observations of thin plastic fragments of Abeta-polyacrolein. The current paper outlines the proposed steps in forming these plastic fragments. Endogenous plastic composite material may significantly contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:16678976

Seidler, N W; Craig, H D; Squire, T J

2006-01-01

60

cGMP Signalling in the Mammalian Brain: Role in Synaptic Plasticity and Behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

The second messenger cyclic guanosine 3?,5?-monophosphate (cGMP) plays a crucial role in the control of cardiovascular and\\u000a gastrointestinal homeostastis, but its effects on neuronal functions are less established. This review summarizes recent biochemical\\u000a and functional data on the role of the cGMP signalling pathway in the mammalian brain, with a focus on the regulation of synaptic\\u000a plasticity, learning, and other

Thomas Kleppisch; Robert Feil

61

Cyclosporin Ameliorates Traumatic Brain-Injury-Induced Alterations of Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although traumatic brain injury (TBI) often results in impaired learning and memory functions, the underlying mechanisms are unknown and there are currently no treatments that can preserve such functions. We studied plasticity at CA3–CA1 synapses in hippocampal slices from rats subjected to controlled cortical impact TBI. Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission was markedly impaired, whereas long-term depression (LTD) was

Benedict C. Albensi; Patrick G. Sullivan; Michael B. Thompson; Stephen W. Scheff; Mark P. Mattson

2000-01-01

62

Extremes of Lineage Plasticity in the Drosophila Brain  

PubMed Central

Summary An often-overlooked aspect of neural plasticity is the plasticity of neuronal composition, in which the numbers of neurons of particular classes are altered in response to environment and experience. The Drosophila brain features several well-characterized lineages in which a single neuroblast gives rise to multiple neuronal classes in a stereotyped sequence during development [1]. We find that in the intrinsic mushroom body neuron lineage, the numbers for each class are highly plastic, depending on the timing of temporal fate transitions and the rate of neuroblast proliferation. For example, mushroom body neuroblast cycling can continue under starvation conditions, uncoupled from temporal fate transitions that depend on extrinsic cues reflecting organismal growth and development. In contrast, the proliferation rates of antennal lobe lineages are closely associated with organismal development, and their temporal fate changes appear to be cell cycle-dependent, such that the same numbers and types of uniglomerular projection neurons innervate the antennal lobe following various perturbations. We propose that this surprising difference in plasticity for these brain lineages is adaptive, given their respective roles as parallel processors vs. discrete carriers of olfactory information. PMID:24055154

Lin, Suewei; Marin, Elizabeth C.; Yang, Ching-Po; Kao, Chih-Fei; Apenteng, Bettye A.; Huang, Yaling; O’Connor, Michael B.; Truman, James W.; Lee, Tzumin

2013-01-01

63

Indestructible plastic: the neuroscience of the new aging brain  

PubMed Central

In recent years, research on experience-dependent plasticity has provided valuable insight on adaptation to environmental input across the lifespan, and advances in understanding the minute cellular changes underlying the brain’s capacity for self-reorganization have opened exciting new possibilities for treating illness and injury. Ongoing work in this line of inquiry has also come to deeply influence another field: cognitive neuroscience of the normal aging. This complex process, once considered inevitable or beyond the reach of treatment, has been transformed into an arena of intense investigation and strategic intervention. However, important questions remain about this characterization of the aging brain, and the assumptions it makes about the social, cultural, and biological space occupied by cognition in the older individual and body. The following paper will provide a critical examination of the move from basic experiments on the neurophysiology of experience-dependent plasticity to the growing market for (and public conception of) cognitive aging as a medicalized space for intervention by neuroscience-backed technologies. Entangled with changing concepts of normality, pathology, and self-preservation, we will argue that this new understanding, led by personalized cognitive training strategies, is approaching a point where interdisciplinary research is crucial to provide a holistic and nuanced understanding of the aging process. This new outlook will allow us to move forward in a space where our knowledge, like our new conception of the brain, is never static. PMID:24782746

Holman, Constance; de Villers-Sidani, Etienne

2014-01-01

64

Late human brain plasticity: vestibular substitution with a tongue BrainPorthuman -machine interface  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT. The brain is capable of major reorganization even many,years after an injury, with appropriate rehabilitation. The highly plastic brain responds best when the therapy is motivating and has a benefit that is recognized by the patient. The major objective of this study was to estimate feasibility and efficacy of an electro-tactile vestibular substitution system,(ETVSS)in aiding recovery of posture control

Paul Bach-y-rita; Yuri Danilov; Mitchell E. Tylersup?; Robert J. Grimm

65

Cell biology of normal brain aging: synaptic plasticity-cell death.  

PubMed

Senescence of the brain seems to be related to increased levels of free oxygen radical (FOR). FOR may damage macromolecular compounds such as: proteins, lipids, and DNA. In the aging brain, increased FOR levels damage DNA, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and nuclear DNA (nDNA). In DNA they damage single and double strands, leading to mutations in mtDNA and nDNA. Damage to mtDNA seems to result in decay of mitochondria, decreased production of ATP, and in the activation of the apoptotic process. In the aging brain, apoptosis does not seem to be activated in wild-type p53-expressing cells because the elevated levels of the p53 protein are no longer accompanied by decreased levels of the Bcl-2 protein and increased levels of the Bax protein. It seems that, in the aging brain, changes in the metabolism of neurons may lead to their decreased numbers in the cerebral and cerebellar cortex, hippocampus, basal nucleus of Meynert, locus ceruleus, and substantia nigra, as well as to decreased numbers of synapses and disturbed stimulation of synaptic plasticity in the senescent brain. Simultaneously, a decrease in neurogenesis in the aging brain may lead to a decline in the maintenance of tissue integrity, function, and regenerative response. Environmental enrichment and physical activity may improve hippocampal neurogenesis and induce neuronal plasticity. The morphological lesions in the senescent brain are undoubtedly followed by a disturbed balance between various types of neurons in the CNS. Nevertheless, the high plasticity of the CNS in humans most probably does not allow for the development of abnormalities in higher functions. PMID:23740630

Dorszewska, Jolanta

2013-04-01

66

Differential Pharmacological Effects on Brain Reactivity and Plasticity in Alzheimer's Disease  

PubMed Central

Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) are the most commonly prescribed monotherapeutic medications for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, their underlying neurophysiological effects remain largely unknown. We investigated the effects of monotherapy (AChEI) and combination therapy (AChEI and memantine) on brain reactivity and plasticity. Patients treated with monotherapy (AChEI) (N?=?7) were compared to patients receiving combination therapy (COM) (N?=?9) and a group of age-matched, healthy controls (HCs) (N?=?13). Cortical reactivity and plasticity of the motor cortex were examined using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Cognitive functions were assessed with the cognitive subscale of the Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog), activities of daily living (ADLs) with the ADCS-ADL. In addition we assessed the degree of brain atrophy by measuring brain-scalp distances in seven different brain areas. Patient groups differed in resting motor threshold and brain atrophy, with COM showing a lower motor threshold but less atrophy than AChEI. COM showed similar plasticity effects as the HC group, while plasticity was reduced in AChEI. Long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI) was impaired in both patient groups when compared to HC. ADAS-Cog scores were positively correlated with LICI measures and with brain atrophy, specifically in the left inferior parietal cortex. AD patients treated with mono- or combination-therapy show distinct neurophysiological patterns. Further studies should investigate whether these measures might serve as biomarkers of treatment response and whether they could guide other therapeutic interventions. PMID:24109459

Brem, Anna-Katharine; Atkinson, Natasha J.; Seligson, Erica E.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

2013-01-01

67

Characterizing Brain Cortical Plasticity and Network Dynamics Across the Age-Span in Health and Disease with TMS-EEG and TMS-fMRI  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brain plasticity can be conceptualized as nature’s invention to overcome limitations of the genome and adapt to a rapidly\\u000a changing environment. As such, plasticity is an intrinsic property of the brain across the lifespan. However, mechanisms of\\u000a plasticity may vary with age. The combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with electroencephalography (EEG)\\u000a or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables clinicians

Alvaro Pascual-Leone; Catarina Freitas; Lindsay Oberman; Jared C. Horvath; Mark Halko; Mark Eldaief; Shahid Bashir; Marine Vernet; Mouhshin Shafi; Brandon Westover; Andrew M. Vahabzadeh-Hagh; Alexander Rotenberg

68

Evolution, development, and plasticity of the human brain: from molecules to bones  

PubMed Central

Neuroanatomical, molecular, and paleontological evidence is examined in light of human brain evolution. The brain of extant humans differs from the brains of other primates in its overall size and organization, and differences in size and organization of specific cortical areas and subcortical structures implicated into complex cognition and social and emotional processing. The human brain is also characterized by functional lateralizations, reflecting specializations of the cerebral hemispheres in humans for different types of processing, facilitating fast and reliable communication between neural cells in an enlarged brain. The features observed in the adult brain reflect human-specific patterns of brain development. Compared to the brains of other primates, the human brain takes longer to mature, promoting an extended period for establishing cortical microcircuitry and its modifications. Together, these features may underlie the prolonged period of learning and acquisition of technical and social skills necessary for survival, creating a unique cognitive and behavioral niche typical of our species. The neuroanatomical findings are in concordance with molecular analyses, which suggest a trend toward heterochrony in the expression of genes implicated in different functions. These include synaptogenesis, neuronal maturation, and plasticity in humans, mutations in genes implicated in neurite outgrowth and plasticity, and an increased role of regulatory mechanisms, potentially promoting fast modification of neuronal morphologies in response to new computational demands. At the same time, endocranial casts of fossil hominins provide an insight into the timing of the emergence of uniquely human features in the course of evolution. We conclude by proposing several ways of combining comparative neuroanatomy, molecular biology and insights gained from fossil endocasts in future research. PMID:24194709

Hrvoj-Mihic, Branka; Bienvenu, Thibault; Stefanacci, Lisa; Muotri, Alysson R.; Semendeferi, Katerina

2013-01-01

69

Methods for functional brain imaging  

E-print Network

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated the potential for non-invasive mapping of structure and function (fMRI) in the human brain. In this thesis, we propose a series of methodological developments towards ...

Witzel, Thomas, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01

70

Neural Plasticity and Neurorehabilitation Following Traumatic Brain Injury.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Rehabilitation following traumatic brain injury is not well understood and has relied primarily on findings from studies conducted in stroke. We have demonstrated that following CCI (a rodent model of contusion TBI), behavioral function was most enhanced ...

D. Kozlowski, T. Jones

2009-01-01

71

Neural Plasticity and Neurorehabilitation Following Traumatic Brain Injury.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Rehabilitation following traumatic brain injury is not well understood and has relied primarily on findings from studies conducted in stroke. We have demonstrated that following CCI (a rodent model of contusion TBI), behavioral function was most enhanced ...

D. Kozlowski

2011-01-01

72

Review of Research: Neuroscience and the Impact of Brain Plasticity on Braille Reading  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this systematic review of research, the author analyzes studies of neural cortical activation, brain plasticity, and braille reading. The conclusions regarding the brain's plasticity and ability to reorganize are encouraging for individuals with degenerative eye conditions or late-onset blindness because they indicate that the brain can make…

Hannan, Cheryl Kamei

2006-01-01

73

Multimodal MRI assessment of damage and plasticity caused by status epilepticus in the rat brain.  

PubMed

Status epilepticus or other brain-damaging insults launch a cascade of events that may lead to the development of epilepsy. MRI techniques available today, including T(2) - and T(1) -weighted imaging, functional MRI, manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and phase imaging, can detect not only damage caused by status epilepticus but also plastic changes in the brain that occur in response to damage. Optimal balance between damage and recovery processes is a key for planning possible treatments, and noninvasive imaging has the potential to greatly facilitate this process and to make personalized treatment plans possible. PMID:21967365

Gröhn, Olli; Sierra, Alejandra; Immonen, Riikka; Laitinen, Teemu; Lehtimäki, Kimmo; Airaksinen, Antti; Hayward, Nick; Nairismagi, Jaak; Lehto, Lauri; Pitkänen, Asla

2011-10-01

74

Plasticity of the human brain " We never use the same brain twice" Arno Villringer and Burkhard Pleger  

E-print Network

Plasticity of the human brain " We never use the same brain twice" Arno Villringer and Burkhard Pleger Max Planck Institute for Human Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Leipzig Summary With the advent of noninvasive neuroimaging the human brain has become accessible for invivo

75

Functional plasticity before the cradle: a review of neural functional imaging in the human fetus.  

PubMed

The organization of the brain is highly plastic in fetal life. Establishment of healthy neural functional systems during the fetal period is essential to normal growth and development. Across the last several decades, remarkable progress has been made in understanding the development of human fetal functional brain systems. This is largely due to advances in imaging methodologies. Fetal neuroimaging began in the 1950-1970's with fetal electroencephalography (EEG) applied during labor. Later, in the 1980's, magnetoencephalography (MEG) emerged as an effective approach for investigating fetal brain function. Most recently, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has arisen as an additional powerful approach for examining fetal brain function. This review will discuss major developmental findings from fetal imaging studies such as the maturation of prenatal sensory system functions, functional hemispheric asymmetry, and sensory-driven neurodevelopment. We describe how with improved imaging and analysis techniques, functional imaging of the fetus has the potential to assess the earliest point of neural maturation and provide insight into the patterning and sequence of normal and abnormal brain development. PMID:23542738

Anderson, Amy L; Thomason, Moriah E

2013-11-01

76

Alteration and Reorganization of Functional Networks: A New Perspective in Brain Injury Study  

PubMed Central

Plasticity is the mechanism underlying the brain’s potential capability to compensate injury. Recently several studies have shown how functional connections among the brain areas are severely altered by brain injury and plasticity leading to a reorganization of the networks. This new approach studies the impact of brain injury by means of alteration of functional interactions. The concept of functional connectivity refers to the statistical interdependencies between physiological time series simultaneously recorded in various areas of the brain and it could be an essential tool for brain functional studies, being its deviation from healthy reference an indicator for damage. In this article, we review studies investigating functional connectivity changes after brain injury and subsequent recovery, providing an accessible introduction to common mathematical methods to infer functional connectivity, exploring their capabilities, future perspectives, and clinical uses in brain injury studies. PMID:21960965

Castellanos, Nazareth P.; Bajo, Ricardo; Cuesta, Pablo; Villacorta-Atienza, Jose Antonio; Paul, Nuria; Garcia-Prieto, Juan; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestu, Fernando

2011-01-01

77

INVERTED-U FUNCTION RELATING CORTICAL PLASTICITY AND TASK DIFFICULTY  

E-print Network

INVERTED-U FUNCTION RELATING CORTICAL PLASTICITY AND TASK DIFFICULTY N. D. ENGINEER,a * C. T an inverted-U function relating neural plasticity and task difficulty. © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd; but see Brown et al., 2004; Ghose, 2004). Motivation is believed to regulate learning and plasticity (Bao

Kilgard, Michael P.

78

Plasticity of brain and cognition in older adults.  

PubMed

Aging is typically related to changes in brain and cognition, but the aging process is heterogeneous and differs between individuals. Recent research has started investigating the influence of cognitive and physical training on cognitive performance, functional brain activity, and brain structure in old age. The functional relevance of neural changes and the interactions among these changes following interventions is still a matter of debate. Here we selectively review research on structural and functional brain correlates of training-induced performance changes in healthy older adults and present exemplary longitudinal intervention studies sorted by the type of training applied (i.e., strategy-based training, process-specific training, and physical exercise). Although many training studies have been conducted recently, within each task domain, the number of studies that used comparable methods and techniques to assess behavioral and neural changes is limited. We suggest that future studies should include a multimodal approach to enhance the understanding of the relation between different levels of brain changes in aging and those changes that result from training. Investigating inter-individual differences in intervention-induced behavioral and neuronal changes would provide more information about who would benefit from a specific intervention and why. In addition, a more systematic examination of the time course of training-related structural and functional changes would improve the current level of knowledge about how learning is implemented in the brain and facilitate our understanding of contradictory results. PMID:25261907

Brehmer, Yvonne; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Wenger, Elisabeth; Lövdén, Martin

2014-11-01

79

Paired pulse ratio analysis of insulin-induced synaptic plasticity in the snail brain.  

PubMed

Insulin's action in the brain can directly alter cognitive functioning. We have recently shown that molluscan insulin-related peptides are upregulated following a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) training procedure. In addition, when mammalian insulin is superfused over the isolated Lymnaea stagnalis central nervous system, it elicits long-term synaptic enhancement at the monosynaptic connection between the cerebral giant cell and the buccal 1 (B1) motor neuron. This synaptic enhancement is thought to be a neural correlate of CTA. Here, we examined whether the observed changes in synaptic plasticity were the result of presynaptic and/or postsynaptic alterations using the paired pulse procedure. The paired pulse ratio was unaltered following insulin application, suggesting that insulin's effects on synaptic plasticity are mediated postsynaptically in the B1 motor neuron. Thus, it was suggested that postsynaptic changes need to be considered when insulin's actions on synaptic plasticity are examined. PMID:23393274

Murakami, Jun; Okada, Ryuichi; Fujito, Yutaka; Sakakibara, Manabu; Lukowiak, Ken; Ito, Etsuro

2013-05-15

80

Manipulating the extracellular matrix and its role in brain and spinal cord plasticity and repair.  

PubMed

Brain and spinal cord injury can result in permanent cognitive, motor, sensory and autonomic deficits. The central nervous system (CNS) has a poor intrinsic capacity for regeneration, although some functional recovery does occur. This is mainly in the form of sprouting, dendritic remodelling and changes in neuronal coding, firing and synaptic properties; elements collectively known as plasticity. An important approach to repair the injured CNS is therefore to harness, promote and refine plasticity. In the adult, this is partly limited by the extracellular matrix (ECM). While the ECM typically provides a supportive framework to CNS neurones, its role is not only structural; the ECM is homeostatic, actively regulatory and of great signalling importance, both directly via receptor or coreceptor-mediated action and via spatially and temporally relevant localization of other signalling molecules. In an injury or disease state, the ECM represents a key environment to support a healing and/or regenerative response. However, there are aspects of its composition which prove suboptimal for recovery: some molecules present in the ECM restrict plasticity and limit repair. An important therapeutic concept is therefore to render the ECM environment more permissive by manipulating key components, such as inhibitory chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans. In this review we discuss the major components of the ECM and the role they play during development and following brain or spinal cord injury and we consider a number of experimental strategies which involve manipulations of the ECM, with the aim of promoting functional recovery to the injured brain and spinal cord. PMID:24438519

Burnside, E R; Bradbury, E J

2014-02-01

81

Functional brain mapping of psychopathology  

PubMed Central

In this paper, we consider the impact that the novel functional neuroimaging techniques may have upon psychiatric illness. Functional neuroimaging has rapidly developed as a powerful tool in cognitive neuroscience and, in recent years, has seen widespread application in psychiatry. Although such studies have produced evidence for abnormal patterns of brain response in association with some pathological conditions, the core pathophysiologies remain unresolved. Although imaging techniques provide an unprecedented opportunity for investigation of physiological function of the living human brain, there are fundamental questions and assumptions which remain to be addressed. In this review we examine these conceptual issues under three broad sections: (1) characterising the clinical population of interest, (2) defining appropriate levels of description of normal brain function, and (3) relating these models to pathophysiological conditions. Parallel advances in each of these questions will be required before imaging techniques can impact on clinical decisions in psychiatry. PMID:11909899

Honey, G; Fletcher, P; Bullmore, E

2002-01-01

82

Adult neurogenesis and functional plasticity in neuronal circuits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The adult brain is a plastic place. To ensure that the mature nervous system's control of behaviour is flexible in the face of a varying environment, morphological and physiological changes are possible at many levels, including that of the entire cell. In two areas of the adult brain — the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus — new neurons are

Mariana Alonso; Matthew S. Grubb; Pierre-Marie Lledo

2006-01-01

83

[Sleep and brain function].  

PubMed

Lipocalin-type prostaglandin (PG) D synthase (L-PGDS) catalyzes the isomerization of PGH2, a common precursor of various prostanoids, to produce PGD2, a potent endogenous somnogen. L-PGDS is localized in the leptomeninges, choroid plexus, and oligodendrocytes of the central nervous system. PGD2 is proposed to be a major humoral sleep-inducing factor accumulated in the brain during wakefulness. PGD2 stimulates DP, receptors localized in the basal forebrain and increases the local extracellular concentration of adenosine, which activates A2A receptor-possessing neurons in the basal forebrain and/or ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO). The intracerebroventricular infusion of PGD2 or adenosine A2A receptor-agonists induces non-REM sleep and increases the expression of fos protein in VLPO. The activation of VLPO neurons is associated with decreased fos expression in the histaminergic tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN), one of the arousal centers. The GABAergic inhibition of TMN is involved in non-REM sleep induction by PGD2 or adenosine A2A receptor-agonists. The neural network between VLPO and TMN is considered to play a key role in the regulation of vigilance states. PMID:16986732

Urade, Yoshihiro; Mohri, Ikuko

2006-09-01

84

Length of Acupuncture Training and Structural Plastic Brain Changes in Professional Acupuncturists  

PubMed Central

Background The research on brain plasticity has fascinated researchers for decades. Use/training serves as an instrumental factor to influence brain neuroplasticity. Parallel to acquisition of behavioral expertise, extensive use/training is concomitant with substantial changes of cortical structure. Acupuncturists, serving as a model par excellence to study tactile-motor and emotional regulation plasticity, receive intensive training in national medical schools following standardized training protocol. Moreover, their behavioral expertise is corroborated during long-term clinical practice. Although our previous study reported functional plastic brain changes in the acupuncturists, whether or not structural plastic changes occurred in acupuncturists is yet elusive. Methodology/Principal Findings Cohorts of acupuncturists (N?=?22) and non-acupuncturists (N?=?22) were recruited. Behavioral tests were delivered to assess the acupuncturists’ behavioral expertise. The results confirmed acupuncturists’ tactile-motor skills and emotion regulation proficiency compared to non-acupuncturists. Using the voxel-based morphometry technique, we revealed larger grey matter volumes in acupuncturists in the hand representation of the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex (SI), the right lobule V/VI and the bilateral ventral anterior cingulate cortex/ventral medial prefrontal cortex. Grey matter volumes of the SI and Lobule V/VI positively correlated with the duration of acupuncture practice. Conclusions To our best knowledge, this study provides first evidence for the anatomical alterations in acupuncturists, which would possibly be the neural correlates underlying acupuncturists’ exceptional skills. On one hand, we suggest our findings may have ramifications for tactile-motor rehabilitation. On the other hand, our results in emotion regulation domain may serve as a target for our future studies, from which we can understand how modulations of aversive emotions elicited by empathic pain develop in the context of expertise. Future longitudinal study is necessary to establish the presence and direction of a causal link between practice/use and brain anatomy. PMID:23840505

Dong, Minghao; Zhao, Ling; Yuan, Kai; Zeng, Fang; Sun, Jinbo; Liu, Jixin; Yu, Dahua; von Deneen, Karen M.; Liang, Fanrong; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

2013-01-01

85

Exercise: a behavioral intervention to enhance brain health and plasticity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extensive research on humans suggests that exercise could have benefits for overall health and cognitive function, particularly in later life. Recent studies using animal models have been directed towards understanding the neurobiological bases of these benefits. It is now clear that voluntary exercise can increase levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other growth factors, stimulate neurogenesis, increase resistance to

Carl W. Cotman; Nicole C. Berchtold

2002-01-01

86

Training the Brain: Practical Applications of Neural Plasticity From the Intersection of Cognitive Neuroscience, Developmental Psychology, and Prevention Science  

PubMed Central

Prior researchers have shown that the brain has a remarkable ability for adapting to environmental changes. The positive effects of such neural plasticity include enhanced functioning in specific cognitive domains and shifts in cortical representation following naturally occurring cases of sensory deprivation; however, maladaptive changes in brain function and development owing to early developmental adversity and stress have also been well documented. Researchers examining enriched rearing environments in animals have revealed the potential for inducing positive brain plasticity effects and have helped to popularize methods for training the brain to reverse early brain deficits or to boost normal cognitive functioning. In this paper, two classes of empirically based methods of brain training in children are reviewed and critiqued: laboratory-based, mental process training paradigms and ecological interventions based upon neurocognitive conceptual models. Given the susceptibility of executive function disruption, special attention is paid to training programs that emphasize executive function enhancement. In addition, a third approach to brain training, aimed at tapping into compensatory processes, is postulated. Study results showing the effectiveness of this strategy in the field of neurorehabilitation and in terms of naturally occurring compensatory processing in human aging lend credence to the potential of this approach. PMID:21787037

Bryck, Richard L.; Fisher, Philip A.

2012-01-01

87

Degree of musical expertise modulates higher order brain functioning.  

PubMed

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show for the first time that levels of musical expertise stepwise modulate higher order brain functioning. This suggests that degree of training intensity drives such cerebral plasticity. Participants (non-musicians, amateurs, and expert musicians) listened to a comprehensive set of specifically composed string quartets with hierarchically manipulated endings. In particular, we implemented 2 irregularities at musical closure that differed in salience but were both within the tonality of the piece (in-key). Behavioral sensitivity scores (d') of both transgressions perfectly separated participants according to their level of musical expertise. By contrasting brain responses to harmonic transgressions against regular endings, functional brain imaging data showed compelling evidence for stepwise modulation of brain responses by both violation strength and expertise level in a fronto-temporal network hosting universal functions of working memory and attention. Additional independent testing evidenced an advantage in visual working memory for the professionals, which could be predicted by musical training intensity. The here introduced findings of brain plasticity demonstrate the progressive impact of musical training on cognitive brain functions that may manifest well beyond the field of music processing. PMID:22832388

Oechslin, Mathias S; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Lazeyras, François; Hauert, Claude-Alain; James, Clara E

2013-09-01

88

Training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control  

PubMed Central

Deficits in inhibitory control, the ability to suppress ongoing or planned motor or cognitive processes, contribute to many psychiatric and neurological disorders. The rehabilitation of inhibition-related disorders may therefore benefit from neuroplasticity-based training protocols aiming at normalizing inhibitory control proficiency and the underlying brain networks. Current literature on training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control suggests that improvements may follow either from the development of automatic forms of inhibition or from the strengthening of top-down, controlled inhibition. Automatic inhibition develops in conditions of consistent and repeated associations between inhibition-triggering stimuli and stopping goals. Once established, the stop signals directly elicit inhibition, thereby bypassing slow, top-down executive control and accelerating stopping processes. In contrast, training regimens involving varying stimulus-response associations or frequent inhibition failures prevent the development of automatic inhibition and thus strengthen top-down inhibitory processes rather than bottom-up ones. We discuss these findings in terms of developing optimal inhibitory control training regimens for rehabilitation purposes. PMID:23914169

Spierer, Lucas; Chavan, Camille F.; Manuel, Aurelie L.

2013-01-01

89

Cerebral asymmetry: a quantitative, multifactorial, and plastic brain phenotype.  

PubMed

The longitudinal fissure separates the human brain into two hemispheres that remain connected through the corpus callosum. The left and the right halves of the brain resemble each other, and almost every structure present in one side has an equivalent structure in the other. Despite this exceptional correspondence, the two hemispheres also display important anatomical differences and there is marked lateralization of certain cognitive and motor functions such as language and handedness. However, the mechanisms that underlie the establishment of these hemispheric specializations, as well as their physiological and behavioral implications, remain largely unknown. Thanks to recent advances in neuroimaging, a series of studies documenting variation in symmetry and asymmetry as a function of age, gender, brain region, and pathological state, have been published in the past decade. Here, we review evidence of normal and atypical cerebral asymmetry, and the factors that influence it at the macrostructural level. Given the prominent role that cerebral asymmetry plays in the organization of the brain, and its possible implication in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions, further research in this area is anticipated. PMID:22856374

Rentería, Miguel E

2012-06-01

90

Emerging roles of non-coding RNAs in brain evolution, development, plasticity and disease  

PubMed Central

Novel classes of small and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are being characterized at a rapid pace, driven by recent paradigm shifts in our understanding of genomic architecture, regulation and transcriptional output, as well as by innovations in sequencing technologies and computational and systems biology. These ncRNAs can interact with DNA, RNA and protein molecules; engage in diverse structural, functional and regulatory activities; and have roles in nuclear organization and transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic processes. This expanding inventory of ncRNAs is implicated in mediating a broad spectrum of processes including brain evolution, development, synaptic plasticity and disease pathogenesis. PMID:22814587

Qureshi, Irfan A.; Mehler, Mark F.

2012-01-01

91

Development/Plasticity/Repair A Structural MRI Study of Human Brain Development from  

E-print Network

Development/Plasticity/Repair A Structural MRI Study of Human Brain Development from Birth to 2 of postnatal brain development in humans. This period is likely to be critical in neurodevelopmental disorders Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7510 Brain development in the first 2 years after birth

Utah, University of

92

Effects of non-pharmacological or pharmacological interventions on cognition and brain plasticity of aging individuals  

PubMed Central

Brain aging and aging-related neurodegenerative disorders are major health challenges faced by modern societies. Brain aging is associated with cognitive and functional decline and represents the favourable background for the onset and development of dementia. Brain aging is associated with early and subtle anatomo-functional physiological changes that often precede the appearance of clinical signs of cognitive decline. Neuroimaging approaches unveiled the functional correlates of these alterations and helped in the identification of therapeutic targets that can be potentially useful in counteracting age-dependent cognitive decline. A growing body of evidence supports the notion that cognitive stimulation and aerobic training can preserve and enhance operational skills in elderly individuals as well as reduce the incidence of dementia. This review aims at providing an extensive and critical overview of the most recent data that support the efficacy of non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions aimed at enhancing cognition and brain plasticity in healthy elderly individuals as well as delaying the cognitive decline associated with dementia.

Pieramico, Valentina; Esposito, Roberto; Cesinaro, Stefano; Frazzini, Valerio; Sensi, Stefano L.

2014-01-01

93

Genetic Mapping of Brain Plasticity Across Development in Williams Syndrome: ERP Markers of Face and Language Processing  

PubMed Central

In Williams Syndrome (WS), a known genetic deletion results in atypical brain function with strengths in face and language processing. We examined how genetic influences on brain activity change with development. In three studies, ERPs from large samples of children, adolescents, and adults with the full genetic deletion for WS were compared to typically developing controls, and two adults with partial deletions for WS. Studies 1 and 2 identified ERP markers of brain plasticity in WS across development. Study 3 suggested that in adults with partial deletions for WS, specific genes may be differentially implicated in face and language processing. PMID:24219698

Mills, D. L.; Dai, L.; Fishman, I.; Yam, A.; Appelbaum, L. G.; Galaburda, A.; Bellugi, U.; Korenberg, J. R.

2014-01-01

94

Functional brain imaging across development.  

PubMed

The developmental cognitive neuroscience literature has grown exponentially over the last decade. This paper reviews the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature on brain function development of typically late developing functions of cognitive and motivation control, timing and attention as well as of resting state neural networks. Evidence shows that between childhood and adulthood, concomitant with cognitive maturation, there is progressively increased functional activation in task-relevant lateral and medial frontal, striatal and parieto-temporal brain regions that mediate these higher level control functions. This is accompanied by progressively stronger functional inter-regional connectivity within task-relevant fronto-striatal and fronto-parieto-temporal networks. Negative age associations are observed in earlier developing posterior and limbic regions, suggesting a shift with age from the recruitment of "bottom-up" processing regions towards "top-down" fronto-cortical and fronto-subcortical connections, leading to a more mature, supervised cognition. The resting state fMRI literature further complements this evidence by showing progressively stronger deactivation with age in anti-correlated task-negative resting state networks, which is associated with better task performance. Furthermore, connectivity analyses during the resting state show that with development increasingly stronger long-range connections are being formed, for example, between fronto-parietal and fronto-cerebellar connections, in both task-positive networks and in task-negative default mode networks, together with progressively lesser short-range connections, suggesting progressive functional integration and segregation with age. Overall, evidence suggests that throughout development between childhood and adulthood, there is progressive refinement and integration of both task-positive fronto-cortical and fronto-subcortical activation and task-negative deactivation, leading to a more mature and controlled cognition. PMID:22729957

Rubia, Katya

2013-12-01

95

SIRT1 is essential for normal cognitive function and synaptic plasticity  

PubMed Central

Conservation of normal cognitive functions relies on the proper performance of the nervous system at the cellular and molecular level. The mammalian NAD+-dependent deacetylase, SIRT1, impacts different processes potentially involved in the maintenance of brain integrity such as chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, cell survival and neurogenesis. Here we show that SIRT1 is expressed in neurons of the hippocampus, a key structure in learning and memory. Using a combination of behavioral and electrophysiological paradigms we analyzed the effects of SIRT1 deficiency and overexpression on mouse learning and memory as well as on synaptic plasticity. We demonstrated that the absence of SIRT1 impaired cognitive abilities, including immediate memory, classical conditioning and spatial learning. In addition, we found that the cognitive deficits in SIRT1 knockout mice were associated with defects in synaptic plasticity without alterations in basal synaptic transmission or NMDA receptor function. Brains of SIRT1-KO mice exhibited normal morphology and dendritic spine structure but display a decrease in dendritic branching, branch length and complexity of neuronal dendritic arbors. Also, a decrease in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and altered expression of hippocampal genes involved in synaptic function, lipid metabolism and myelination were detected in SIRT1-KO mice. In contrast, mice with high levels of SIRT1 expression in brain exhibited regular synaptic plasticity and memory. We conclude that SIRT1 is indispensable for normal learning, memory and synaptic plasticity in mice. PMID:20660252

Michan, Shaday; Li, Ying; Chou, Maggie Meng-Hsiu; Parrella, Edoardo; Ge, Huanying; Long, Jeffrey M.; Allard, Joanne S.; Lewis, Kaitlyn; Miller, Marshall; Xu, Wei; Mervis, Ronald F.; Chen, Jing; Guerin, Karen I.; Smith, Lois E. H.; McBurney, Michael W.; Sinclair, David A.; Baudry, Michel; de Cabo, Rafael; Longo, Valter D.

2010-01-01

96

Water diffusion reveals networks that modulate multiregional morphological plasticity after repetitive brain stimulation  

PubMed Central

Repetitive brain stimulation protocols induce plasticity in the stimulated site in brain slice models. Recent evidence from network models has indicated that additional plasticity-related changes occur in nonstimulated remote regions. Despite increasing use of brain stimulation protocols in experimental and clinical settings, the neural substrates underlying the additional effects in remote regions are unknown. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) probes water diffusion and can be used to estimate morphological changes in cortical tissue that occur with the induction of plasticity. Using DWI techniques, we estimated morphological changes induced by application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the left primary motor cortex (M1). We found that rTMS altered water diffusion in multiple regions including the left M1. Notably, the change in water diffusion was retained longest in the left M1 and remote regions that had a correlation of baseline fluctuations in water diffusion before rTMS. We conclude that synchronization of water diffusion at rest between stimulated and remote regions ensures retention of rTMS-induced changes in water diffusion in remote regions. Synchronized fluctuations in the morphology of cortical microstructures between stimulated and remote regions might identify networks that allow retention of plasticity-related morphological changes in multiple regions after brain stimulation protocols. These results increase our understanding of the effects of brain stimulation-induced plasticity on multiregional brain networks. DWI techniques could provide a tool to evaluate treatment effects of brain stimulation protocols in patients with brain disorders. PMID:24619090

Abe, Mitsunari; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Mima, Tatsuya

2014-01-01

97

D-Amino acids in brain neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity.  

PubMed

Far from our initial view of D-amino acids as being limited to invertebrates, they are now considered active molecules at synapses of mammalian central and peripheral nervous systems, capable of modulating synaptic communication within neuronal networks. In particular, experimental data accumulated in the last few decades show that through the regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission, D-serine influences the functional plasticity of cerebral circuitry throughout life. In addition, the modulation of NMDA-R-dependent signalling by D-aspartate has been demonstrated by pharmacological studies and after the targeted deletion of the D-aspartate-degrading enzyme. Considering the major contribution of the glutamatergic system to a wide range of neurological disorders such as schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, an improved understanding of the mechanisms of D-amino-acid-dependent neuromodulation will certainly offer new insights for the development of relevant strategies to treat these neurological diseases. PMID:22886346

Billard, Jean-Marie

2012-11-01

98

A role for synaptic plasticity in the adolescent development of executive function  

PubMed Central

Adolescent brain maturation is characterized by the emergence of executive function mediated by the prefrontal cortex, e.g., goal planning, inhibition of impulsive behavior and set shifting. Synaptic pruning of excitatory contacts is the signature morphologic event of late brain maturation during adolescence. Mounting evidence suggests that glutamate receptor-mediated synaptic plasticity, in particular long term depression (LTD), is important for elimination of synaptic contacts in brain development. This review examines the possibility (1) that LTD mechanisms are enhanced in the prefrontal cortex during adolescence due to ongoing synaptic pruning in this late developing cortex and (2) that enhanced synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex represents a key molecular substrate underlying the critical period for maturation of executive function. Molecular sites of interaction between environmental factors, such as alcohol and stress, and glutamate receptor mediated plasticity are considered. The accentuated negative impact of these factors during adolescence may be due in part to interference with LTD mechanisms that refine prefrontal cortical circuitry and when disrupted derail normal maturation of executive function. Diminished prefrontal cortical control over risk-taking behavior could further exacerbate negative outcomes associated with these behaviors, as for example addiction and depression. Greater insight into the neurobiology of the adolescent brain is needed to fully understand the molecular basis for heightened vulnerability during adolescence to the injurious effects of substance abuse and stress. PMID:23462989

Selemon, L D

2013-01-01

99

Wnts in adult brain: from synaptic plasticity to cognitive deficiencies  

PubMed Central

During development of the central nervous system the Wnt signaling pathway has been implicated in a wide spectrum of physiological processes, including neuronal connectivity and synapse formation. Wnt proteins and components of the Wnt pathway are expressed in the brain since early development to the adult life, however, little is known about its role in mature synapses. Here, we review evidences indicating that Wnt proteins participate in the remodeling of pre- and post-synaptic regions, thus modulating synaptic function. We include the most recent data in the literature showing that Wnts are constantly released in the brain to maintain the basal neural activity. Also, we review the evidences that involve components of the Wnt pathway in the development of neurological and mental disorders, including a special emphasis on in vivo studies that relate behavioral abnormalities to deficiencies in Wnt signaling. Finally, we include the evidences that support a neuroprotective role of Wnt proteins in Alzheimer’s disease. We postulate that deregulation in Wnt signaling might have a fundamental role in the origin of neurological diseases, by altering the synaptic function at stages where the phenotype is not yet established but when the cognitive decline starts. PMID:24348327

Oliva, Carolina A.; Vargas, Jessica Y.; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

2013-01-01

100

Aging and functional brain networks  

SciTech Connect

Aging is associated with changes in human brain anatomy and function and cognitive decline. Recent studies suggest the aging decline of major functional connectivity hubs in the 'default-mode' network (DMN). Aging effects on other networks, however, are largely unknown. We hypothesized that aging would be associated with a decline of short- and long-range functional connectivity density (FCD) hubs in the DMN. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated resting-state data sets corresponding to 913 healthy subjects from a public magnetic resonance imaging database using functional connectivity density mapping (FCDM), a voxelwise and data-driven approach, together with parallel computing. Aging was associated with pronounced long-range FCD decreases in DMN and dorsal attention network (DAN) and with increases in somatosensory and subcortical networks. Aging effects in these networks were stronger for long-range than for short-range FCD and were also detected at the level of the main functional hubs. Females had higher short- and long-range FCD in DMN and lower FCD in the somatosensory network than males, but the gender by age interaction effects were not significant for any of the networks or hubs. These findings suggest that long-range connections may be more vulnerable to aging effects than short-range connections and that, in addition to the DMN, the DAN is also sensitive to aging effects, which could underlie the deterioration of attention processes that occurs with aging.

Tomasi D.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.

2011-07-11

101

Performance enhancement at the cost of potential brain plasticity: neural ramifications of nootropic drugs in the healthy developing brain  

PubMed Central

Cognitive enhancement is perhaps one of the most intriguing and controversial topics in neuroscience today. Currently, the main classes of drugs used as potential cognitive enhancers include psychostimulants (methylphenidate (MPH), amphetamine), but wakefulness-promoting agents (modafinil) and glutamate activators (ampakine) are also frequently used. Pharmacologically, substances that enhance the components of the memory/learning circuits—dopamine, glutamate (neuronal excitation), and/or norepinephrine—stand to improve brain function in healthy individuals beyond their baseline functioning. In particular, non-medical use of prescription stimulants such as MPH and illicit use of psychostimulants for cognitive enhancement have seen a recent rise among teens and young adults in schools and college campuses. However, this enhancement likely comes with a neuronal, as well as ethical, cost. Altering glutamate function via the use of psychostimulants may impair behavioral flexibility, leading to the development and/or potentiation of addictive behaviors. Furthermore, dopamine and norepinephrine do not display linear effects; instead, their modulation of cognitive and neuronal function maps on an inverted-U curve. Healthy individuals run the risk of pushing themselves beyond optimal levels into hyperdopaminergic and hypernoradrenergic states, thus vitiating the very behaviors they are striving to improve. Finally, recent studies have begun to highlight potential damaging effects of stimulant exposure in healthy juveniles. This review explains how the main classes of cognitive enhancing drugs affect the learning and memory circuits, and highlights the potential risks and concerns in healthy individuals, particularly juveniles and adolescents. We emphasize the performance enhancement at the potential cost of brain plasticity that is associated with the neural ramifications of nootropic drugs in the healthy developing brain. PMID:24860437

Urban, Kimberly R.; Gao, Wen-Jun

2014-01-01

102

The role of sleep in memory consolidation and brain plasticity: dream or reality?  

PubMed

The notion that a good night of sleep improves memory is widely accepted by the general public. Among sleep scientists, however, the idea has been hotly debated for decades. In this review, the authors consider current evidence for and against the hypothesis that sleep facilitates memory consolidation and promotes plastic changes in the brain. They find that despite a steady accumulation of positive findings over the past decade, the precise role of sleep in memory and brain plasticity remains elusive. This impasse may be resolved by more integrated approaches that combine behavioral and neurophysiological measurements in well-described in vivo models of synaptic plasticity. PMID:17079514

Frank, Marcos G; Benington, Joel H

2006-12-01

103

Dolichol alters brain membrane functions  

SciTech Connect

It has been well demonstrated that there is a direct correlation between increase in dolichol level in brain and aging. An abnormally high level of dolichol was found in brain tissue of patients with pathological aging disorders. The aim of this study is to examine the physiological significance of dolichol affecting membrane transport activity and phospholipid acyl group turnover. Dolichol added to synaptic plasma membranes resulted in a biphasic effect on (Na/sup +/, K/sup +/)-ATPase, i.e., an enhancement of activity at low concentrations (5 ..mu..g/125 mg protein) and an inhibition of activity at high concentrations (40-100 ..mu..g). To probe the membrane acyl group turnover, the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-arachidonate into plasma membrane phospholipids was examined in the presence and absence of dolichol. Dolichol elicited an increase in the incorporation of label into phospholipids. However, the effects varied depending on whether BSA is present. In the absence of BSA, the increase in labeling of phosphatidylinositols is higher than that of phosphatidylcholines. These results suggest that dolichols, when inserted into membranes, may alter membrane functions.

Sun, G.Y.; Sun, A.Y.; Schroeder, F.; Wood, G.; Strong, R.

1986-03-05

104

Brain Surface Conformal Parameterization with Algebraic Functions  

E-print Network

Brain Surface Conformal Parameterization with Algebraic Functions Yalin Wang1,2 , Xianfeng Gu3 a brain surface to a multi-hole disk. The re- sulting parameterizations do not have any singularities of anatomical surfaces in MRI scans of the brain, in- cluding the hippocampi and the cerebral cortices

Wang, Yalin

105

Brain dynamics promotes function Carlos Lourenco  

E-print Network

Brain dynamics promotes function Carlos Louren¸co 1 Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon, 1049-001 Lisboa - Portugal Abstract. Dynamical structure in the brain promotes biological func- tion. Computational scientists have new opportunities to receive 'algorithmic' inspiration from brain processes

Lisboa, Universidade Técnica de

106

Promoting Motor Function by Exercising the Brain  

PubMed Central

Exercise represents a behavioral intervention that enhances brain health and motor function. The increase in cerebral blood volume in response to physical activity may be responsible for improving brain function. Among the various neuroimaging techniques used to monitor brain hemodynamic response during exercise, functional near-infrared spectroscopy could facilitate the measurement of task-related cortical responses noninvasively and is relatively robust with regard to the subjects’ motion. Although the components of optimal exercise interventions have not been determined, evidence from animal and human studies suggests that aerobic exercise with sufficiently high intensity has neuroprotective properties and promotes motor function. This review provides an insight into the effect of physical activity (based on endurance and resistance exercises) on brain function for producing movement. Since most progress in the study of brain function has come from patients with neurological disorders (e.g., stroke and Parkinson’s patients), this review presents some findings emphasizing training paradigms for restoring motor function. PMID:24961309

Perrey, Stephane

2013-01-01

107

Plasticity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Over the past 20 years, evidence has mounted regarding the capacity of the central nervous system to alter its structure and\\u000a function throughout life. Injury to the central nervous system appears to be a particularly potent trigger for plastic mechanisms\\u000a to be elicited. Following focal injury, widespread neurophysiological and neuroanatomical changes occur both in the peri-infarct\\u000a region, as well as

Randolph J. Nudo; Brian R. Christie; Andreas Frick; Richard Gray; Dax A. Hoffman; Lalania K. Schexnayder; Shigeo Watanabe; Li-Lian Yuan

2006-01-01

108

Complement emerges as a masterful regulator of CNS homeostasis, neural synaptic plasticity and cognitive function.  

PubMed

Growing evidence points to a previously elusive role of complement-modulated pathways in CNS development, neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Distinct complement effectors appear to play a multifaceted role in brain homeostasis by regulating synaptic pruning in the retinogeniculate system and sculpting functional neural circuits both in the developing and adult mammalian brain. A recent study by Perez-Alcazar et al. (2014) provides novel insights into this intricate interplay between complement and the dynamically regulated brain synaptic circuitry, by reporting that mice deficient in C3 exhibit enhanced hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and cognitive performance. This behavioral pattern is associated with an impact of C3 on the functional capacity of glutamatergic synapses, supporting a crucial role for complement in excitatory synapse elimination in the hippocampus. These findings add a fresh twist to this rapidly evolving research field, suggesting that discrete complement components may differentially modulate synaptic connectivity by wiring up with diverse neural effectors in different regions of the brain. The emerging role of complement in synaptogenesis and neural network plasticity opens new conceptual avenues for considering complement interception as a potential therapeutic modality for ameliorating progressive cognitive impairment in age-related, debilitating brain diseases with a prominent inflammatory signature. PMID:24975369

Mastellos, Dimitrios C

2014-11-01

109

Music mnemonics aid Verbal Memory and Induce Learning - Related Brain Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis.  

PubMed

Recent research on music and brain function has suggested that the temporal pattern structure in music and rhythm can enhance cognitive functions. To further elucidate this question specifically for memory, we investigated if a musical template can enhance verbal learning in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and if music-assisted learning will also influence short-term, system-level brain plasticity. We measured systems-level brain activity with oscillatory network synchronization during music-assisted learning. Specifically, we measured the spectral power of 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) in alpha and beta frequency bands in 54 patients with MS. The study sample was randomly divided into two groups, either hearing a spoken or a musical (sung) presentation of Rey's auditory verbal learning test. We defined the "learning-related synchronization" (LRS) as the percent change in EEG spectral power from the first time the word was presented to the average of the subsequent word encoding trials. LRS differed significantly between the music and the spoken conditions in low alpha and upper beta bands. Patients in the music condition showed overall better word memory and better word order memory and stronger bilateral frontal alpha LRS than patients in the spoken condition. The evidence suggests that a musical mnemonic recruits stronger oscillatory network synchronization in prefrontal areas in MS patients during word learning. It is suggested that the temporal structure implicit in musical stimuli enhances "deep encoding" during verbal learning and sharpens the timing of neural dynamics in brain networks degraded by demyelination in MS. PMID:24982626

Thaut, Michael H; Peterson, David A; McIntosh, Gerald C; Hoemberg, Volker

2014-01-01

110

Music mnemonics aid Verbal Memory and Induce Learning - Related Brain Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis  

PubMed Central

Recent research on music and brain function has suggested that the temporal pattern structure in music and rhythm can enhance cognitive functions. To further elucidate this question specifically for memory, we investigated if a musical template can enhance verbal learning in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and if music-assisted learning will also influence short-term, system-level brain plasticity. We measured systems-level brain activity with oscillatory network synchronization during music-assisted learning. Specifically, we measured the spectral power of 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) in alpha and beta frequency bands in 54 patients with MS. The study sample was randomly divided into two groups, either hearing a spoken or a musical (sung) presentation of Rey’s auditory verbal learning test. We defined the “learning-related synchronization” (LRS) as the percent change in EEG spectral power from the first time the word was presented to the average of the subsequent word encoding trials. LRS differed significantly between the music and the spoken conditions in low alpha and upper beta bands. Patients in the music condition showed overall better word memory and better word order memory and stronger bilateral frontal alpha LRS than patients in the spoken condition. The evidence suggests that a musical mnemonic recruits stronger oscillatory network synchronization in prefrontal areas in MS patients during word learning. It is suggested that the temporal structure implicit in musical stimuli enhances “deep encoding” during verbal learning and sharpens the timing of neural dynamics in brain networks degraded by demyelination in MS. PMID:24982626

Thaut, Michael H.; Peterson, David A.; McIntosh, Gerald C.; Hoemberg, Volker

2014-01-01

111

Norrin/Frizzled4 signaling in retinal vascular development and blood brain barrier plasticity  

PubMed Central

Norrin/Frizzled4 (Fz4) signaling activates the canonical Wnt pathway to control retinal vascular development. Using genetically engineered mice, we show that precocious Norrin production leads to premature retinal vascular invasion and delayed Norrin production leads to characteristic defects in intra-retinal vascular architecture. In genetic mosaics, wild type endothelial cells (ECs) instruct neighboring Fz4?/? ECs to produce an architecturally normal mosaic vasculature, a cell non-autonomous effect. However, over the ensuing weeks, Fz4?/? ECs are selectively eliminated from the mosaic vasculature, implying the existence of a quality control program that targets defective ECs. In the adult retina and cerebellum, gain or loss of Norrin/Fz4 signaling results in a cell-autonomous gain or loss, respectively, of blood retina barrier (BRB) and blood brain barrier (BBB) function, indicating an ongoing requirement for Frizzled signaling in barrier maintenance and substantial plasticity in mature CNS vascular structure. PMID:23217714

Wang, Yanshu; Rattner, Amir; Zhou, Yulian; Williams, John; Smallwood, Philip M.; Nathans, Jeremy

2012-01-01

112

Functional Data Analysis in Brain Imaging Studies  

PubMed Central

Functional data analysis (FDA) considers the continuity of the curves or functions, and is a topic of increasing interest in the statistics community. FDA is commonly applied to time-series and spatial-series studies. The development of functional brain imaging techniques in recent years made it possible to study the relationship between brain and mind over time. Consequently, an enormous amount of functional data is collected and needs to be analyzed. Functional techniques designed for these data are in strong demand. This paper discusses three statistically challenging problems utilizing FDA techniques in functional brain imaging analysis. These problems are dimension reduction (or feature extraction), spatial classification in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, and the inverse problem in magneto-encephalography studies. The application of FDA to these issues is relatively new but has been shown to be considerably effective. Future efforts can further explore the potential of FDA in functional brain imaging studies. PMID:21833205

Tian, Tian Siva

2010-01-01

113

Modafinil treatment prevents REM sleep deprivation-induced brain function impairment by increasing MMP-9 expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous work showed that sleep deprivation (SD) impairs hippocampal-dependent cognitive function and synaptic plasticity, and a novel wake-promoting agent modafinil prevents SD-induced memory impairment in rat. However, the mechanisms by which modafinil prevented REM-SD-induced impairment of brain function remain poorly understood. In the present study, rats were sleep-deprived by using the modified multiple platform method and brain function was detected.

Bin He; Hua Peng; Ying Zhao; Hui Zhou; Zhongxin Zhao

2011-01-01

114

Domestication and Plasticity of Brain Organization in Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sizes and histological differentiation of structures in the central nervous system of wild and domestic ducks were compared using allometric methods. Whole brain volume is 14.3% less in domestic ducks than in wild birds, and the size of certain brain structures is more variable in domestic ducks than in the wild birds. These findings are consistent with results of

Peter Ebinger

1995-01-01

115

Conditional Transgenesis and Recombination to Study the Molecular Mechanisms of Brain Plasticity and Memory  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the postgenomic era, a primary focus of mouse genetics is to elucidate the role of individual genesin vivo. However, in the nervous system, studying the contribution of specific genes to brain functions is difficult because the brain is a highly complex organ with multiple neuroanatomical structures, orchestrating virtually every function in the body. Further, higher-order brain functions such as

K. Baumgärtel; C. Fernández; T. Johansson; I. Mansuy

116

Early Life Stress Differentially Modulates Distinct Forms of Brain Plasticity in Young and Adult Mice  

PubMed Central

Background Early life trauma is an important risk factor for many psychiatric and somatic disorders in adulthood. As a growing body of evidence suggests that brain plasticity is disturbed in affective disorders, we examined the short-term and remote effects of early life stress on different forms of brain plasticity. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice were subjected to early deprivation by individually separating pups from their dam in the first two weeks after birth. Distinct forms of brain plasticity were assessed in the hippocampus by longitudinal MR volumetry, immunohistochemistry of neurogenesis, and whole-cell patch-clamp measurements of synaptic plasticity. Depression-related behavior was assessed by the forced swimming test in adult animals. Neuropeptides and their receptors were determined by real-time PCR and immunoassay. Early maternal deprivation caused a loss of hippocampal volume, which returned to normal in adulthood. Adult neurogenesis was unaffected by early life stress. Long-term synaptic potentiation, however, was normal immediately after the end of the stress protocol but was impaired in adult animals. In the forced swimming test, adult animals that had been subjected to early life stress showed increased immobility time. Levels of substance P were increased both in young and adult animals after early deprivation. Conclusion Hippocampal volume was affected by early life stress but recovered in adulthood which corresponded to normal adult neurogenesis. Synaptic plasticity, however, exhibited a delayed impairment. The modulation of synaptic plasticity by early life stress might contribute to affective dysfunction in adulthood. PMID:23071534

Reichardt, Wilfried; Clark, Kristin; Geiger, Julia; Gross, Claus M.; Heyer, Andrea; Neagu, Valentin; Bhatia, Harsharan; Atas, Hasan C.; Fiebich, Bernd L.; Bischofberger, Josef; Haas, Carola A.; Normann, Claus

2012-01-01

117

Energetic cost of brain functional connectivity  

PubMed Central

The brain's functional connectivity is complex, has high energetic cost, and requires efficient use of glucose, the brain's main energy source. It has been proposed that regions with a high degree of functional connectivity are energy efficient and can minimize consumption of glucose. However, the relationship between functional connectivity and energy consumption in the brain is poorly understood. To address this neglect, here we propose a simple model for the energy demands of brain functional connectivity, which we tested with positron emission tomography and MRI in 54 healthy volunteers at rest. Higher glucose metabolism was associated with proportionally larger MRI signal amplitudes, and a higher degree of connectivity was associated with nonlinear increases in metabolism, supporting our hypothesis for the energy efficiency of the connectivity hubs. Basal metabolism (in the absence of connectivity) accounted for 30% of brain glucose utilization, which suggests that the spontaneous brain activity accounts for 70% of the energy consumed by the brain. The energy efficiency of the connectivity hubs was higher for ventral precuneus, cerebellum, and subcortical hubs than for cortical hubs. The higher energy demands of brain communication that hinges upon higher connectivity could render brain hubs more vulnerable to deficits in energy delivery or utilization and help explain their sensitivity to neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23898179

Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

2013-01-01

118

Reversed timing-dependent associative plasticity in the human brain through interhemispheric interactions  

PubMed Central

Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) has been proposed as one of the key mechanisms underlying learning and memory. Repetitive median nerve stimulation, followed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1), defined as paired-associative stimulation (PAS), has been used as an in vivo model of STDP in humans. PAS-induced excitability changes in M1 have been repeatedly shown to be time-dependent in a STDP-like fashion, since synchronous arrival of inputs within M1 induces long-term potentiation-like effects, whereas an asynchronous arrival induces long-term depression (LTD)-like effects. Here, we show that interhemispheric inhibition of the sensorimotor network during PAS, with the peripheral stimulation over the hand ipsilateral to the motor cortex receiving TMS, results in a LTD-like effect, as opposed to the standard STDP-like effect seen for contralateral PAS. Furthermore, we could show that this reversed-associative plasticity critically depends on the timing interval between afferent and cortical stimulation. These results indicate that the outcome of associative stimulation in the human brain depends on functional network interactions (inhibition or facilitation) at a systems level and can either follow standard or reversed STDP-like mechanisms. PMID:23407353

Vollmann, Henning; Taubert, Marco; Sehm, Bernhard; Cohen, Leonardo G.; Villringer, Arno; Ragert, Patrick

2013-01-01

119

Brain Function: Implications for Schooling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The implications of cerebral dominance for curriculum and instruction are enormous. Cognitive style, sex differences, instructional materials preparation and selection, and testing are affected by right or left brain hemisphere dominance. (CJ)

Edwards, Clifford H.

1982-01-01

120

Functional Aspects of Creatine Kinase in Brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distinct isoenzyme-specific localization of creatine kinase (CK) isoenzymes found recently in brain suggests an important function for CK in brain energetics and points to adaptation of the CK system to the special energy requirements of different neuronal and glial cell types. For example, the presence of brain-type B-CK in Bergmann glial cells and astrocytes is very likely related to

Wolfram Hemmer; Theo Wallimann

1993-01-01

121

Toward discovery science of human brain function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although it is being successfully implemented for exploration of the genome, discovery science has eluded the functional neuroimaging community. The core challenge remains the development of common paradigms for interrogating the myriad functional systems in the brain without the constraints of a priori hypotheses. Resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) constitutes a candidate approach capable of addressing this challenge. Imaging the brain

B. B. Biswal; M. Mennes; X.-N. Zuo; S. Gohel; C. Kelly; S. M. Smith; C. F. Beckmann; J. S. Adelstein; R. L. Buckner; S. Colcombe; A.-M. Dogonowski; M. Ernst; D. Fair; M. Hampson; M. J. Hoptman; J. S. Hyde; V. J. Kiviniemi; R. Kotter; S.-J. Li; C.-P. Lin; M. J. Lowe; C. Mackay; D. J. Madden; K. H. Madsen; D. S. Margulies; H. S. Mayberg; K. McMahon; C. S. Monk; S. H. Mostofsky; B. J. Nagel; J. J. Pekar; S. J. Peltier; S. E. Petersen; V. Riedl; S. A. R. B. Rombouts; B. Rypma; B. L. Schlaggar; S. Schmidt; R. D. Seidler; G. J. Siegle; C. Sorg; G.-J. Teng; J. Veijola; A. Villringer; M. Walter; L. Wang; X.-C. Weng; S. Whitfield-Gabrieli; P. Williamson; C. Windischberger; Y.-F. Zang; H.-Y. Zhang; F. X. Castellanos; M. P. Milham

2010-01-01

122

Plastic neuroscience: studying what the brain cares about  

PubMed Central

Drawing on Allan Newell's “You can't play 20 questions with nature and win,” this article proposes that neuroscience needs to go beyond binary hypothesis testing and design experiments that follow what neurons care about. Examples from Lettvin et. al. are used to demonstrate that one can experimentally play with neurons and generate surprising results. In this manner, brains are not confused with persons, rather, persons are understood to do things with their brains. PMID:24795589

Dumit, Joseph

2014-01-01

123

On development of functional brain connectivity in the young brain  

PubMed Central

Our brain is a complex network of structurally and functionally interconnected regions, shaped to efficiently process and integrate information. The development from a brain equipped with basic functionalities to an efficient network facilitating complex behavior starts during gestation and continues into adulthood. Resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) enables the examination of developmental aspects of functional connectivity (FC) and functional brain networks. This review will discuss changes observed in the developing brain on the level of network FC from a gestational age of 20 weeks onwards. We discuss findings of resting-state fMRI studies showing that functional network development starts during gestation, creating a foundation for each of the resting-state networks (RSNs) to be established. Visual and sensorimotor areas are reported to develop first, with other networks, at different rates, increasing both in network connectivity and size over time. Reaching childhood, marked fine-tuning and specialization takes place in the regions necessary for higher-order cognitive functions. PMID:24115929

Hoff, G. E. Anna-Jasmijn; Van den Heuvel, M. P.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Kersbergen, Karina J.; De Vries, L. S.

2013-01-01

124

Functional connectivity hubs in the human brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brain networks appear to have few and well localized regions with high functional connectivity density (hubs) for fast integration of neural processing, and their dysfunction could contribute to neuropsychiatric diseases. However the variability in the distribution of these brain hubs is unknown due in part to the overwhelming computational demands associated to their localization. Recently we developed a fast algorithm

Dardo Tomasi; Nora D. Volkow

2011-01-01

125

Stem cell plasticity — building the brain of our dreams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many recent studies indicate that adult-derived stem cells are much more plastic than was previously thought, and that they can cross lineage boundaries and produce progeny of widely diverse types. This would increase the number of routes available for generating new cells for tissue repair, and would make patient-donated autografts more feasible. Beyond the attention-grabbing headlines that have appeared in

Sally Temple

2001-01-01

126

Brain lateralization and neural plasticity for musical and cognitive abilities in an epileptic musician.  

PubMed

The use of intracarotid propofol procedure (IPP) when assessing musical lateralization has not been reported in literature up to now. This procedure (similar to Wada Test) has provided the opportunity to investigate not only lateralization of language and memory functions on epileptic patients but also offers a functional mapping approach with superior spatial and temporal resolution to analyze the lateralization of musical abilities. Findings in literature suggest that musical training modifies functional and structural brain organization. We studied hemispheric lateralization in a professional musician, a 33 years old woman with refractory left medial temporal lobe (MTL) epilepsy (TLE). A longitudinal neuropsychological study was performed over a period of 21 months. Before epilepsy surgery, musical abilities, language and memory were tested during IPP by means of a novel and exhaustive neuropsychological battery focusing on the processing of music. We used a selection of stimuli to analyze listening, score reading, and tempo discrimination. Our results suggested that IPP is an excellent method to determine not only language, semantic, and episodic memory, but also musical dominance in a professional musician who may be candidate for epilepsy surgery. Neuropsychological testing revealed that right hemisphere's patient is involved in semantic and episodic musical memory processes, whereas her score reading and tempo processing require contribution from both hemispheres. At one-year follow-up, outcome was excellent with respect to seizures and professional skills, meanwhile cognitive abilities improved. These findings indicate that IPP helps to predict who might be at risk for postoperative musical, language, and memory deficits after epilepsy surgery. Our research suggests that musical expertise and epilepsy critically modifies long-term memory processes and induces brain structural and functional plasticity. PMID:24367312

Trujillo-Pozo, Isabel; Martín-Monzón, Isabel; Rodríguez-Romero, Rafael

2013-01-01

127

Brain lateralization and neural plasticity for musical and cognitive abilities in an epileptic musician  

PubMed Central

The use of intracarotid propofol procedure (IPP) when assessing musical lateralization has not been reported in literature up to now. This procedure (similar to Wada Test) has provided the opportunity to investigate not only lateralization of language and memory functions on epileptic patients but also offers a functional mapping approach with superior spatial and temporal resolution to analyze the lateralization of musical abilities. Findings in literature suggest that musical training modifies functional and structural brain organization. We studied hemispheric lateralization in a professional musician, a 33 years old woman with refractory left medial temporal lobe (MTL) epilepsy (TLE). A longitudinal neuropsychological study was performed over a period of 21 months. Before epilepsy surgery, musical abilities, language and memory were tested during IPP by means of a novel and exhaustive neuropsychological battery focusing on the processing of music. We used a selection of stimuli to analyze listening, score reading, and tempo discrimination. Our results suggested that IPP is an excellent method to determine not only language, semantic, and episodic memory, but also musical dominance in a professional musician who may be candidate for epilepsy surgery. Neuropsychological testing revealed that right hemisphere's patient is involved in semantic and episodic musical memory processes, whereas her score reading and tempo processing require contribution from both hemispheres. At one-year follow-up, outcome was excellent with respect to seizures and professional skills, meanwhile cognitive abilities improved. These findings indicate that IPP helps to predict who might be at risk for postoperative musical, language, and memory deficits after epilepsy surgery. Our research suggests that musical expertise and epilepsy critically modifies long-term memory processes and induces brain structural and functional plasticity. PMID:24367312

Trujillo-Pozo, Isabel; Martin-Monzon, Isabel; Rodriguez-Romero, Rafael

2013-01-01

128

Development/Plasticity/Repair Functional Requirements for Reward-Modulated  

E-print Network

, animals change their be- havior so as to receive rewards (e.g., juice or food pellets) or avoid aversiveDevelopment/Plasticity/Repair Functional Requirements for Reward-Modulated Spike by neuromodulation. We derive theoretical conditions for successful learning of reward-related behavior for a large

Gerstner, Wulfram

129

Computational role of disinhibition in brain function  

E-print Network

Neurons are connected to form functional networks in the brain. When neurons are combined in sequence, nontrivial effects arise. One example is disinhibition; that is, inhibition to another inhibitory factor. Disinhibition may be serving...

Yu, Yingwei

2009-06-02

130

Progress in Neurobiology 73 (2004) 6172 Motor rehabilitation and brain plasticity after hemiparetic stroke  

E-print Network

hemiparetic stroke Judith D. Schaechter MGH/MIT/HMS, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, 13th of motor rehabilitation and brain plasticity on recovery after hemiparetic stroke. It discusses the impact of intensive post-stroke motor rehabilitation on motor recovery. This is followed by an overview of our current

Schaechter, Judith D.

131

Development/Plasticity/Repair The Impoverished Brain: Disparities in Maternal Education  

E-print Network

. Maternal education, income, occupation, and social status combine to predict a child's socioeconomic status (SES), with maternal education being one of the strongest indicators of SES in studies of childDevelopment/Plasticity/Repair The Impoverished Brain: Disparities in Maternal Education Affect

Kraus, Nina

132

Principles of Experience-Dependent Neural Plasticity: Implications for Rehabilitation after Brain Damage  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This paper reviews 10 principles of experience-dependent neural plasticity and considerations in applying them to the damaged brain. Method: Neuroscience research using a variety of models of learning, neurological disease, and trauma are reviewed from the perspective of basic neuroscientists but in a manner intended to be useful for the…

Kleim, Jeffrey A.; Jones, Theresa A.

2008-01-01

133

POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP IN HUMAN BRAIN PLASTICITY, BECKMAN INSTITUTE, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS  

E-print Network

cognitive training in a complex video-game like environments, acting training, and fitness training in the interdisciplinary study of human brain and cognitive plasticity in several funded research projects including is scientifically interested in neuroplasticity and its relationship to cognition and performance. The successful

Pillow, Jonathan

134

Functional brain development in humans  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a continuing debate in developmental neuroscience about the importance of activity-dependent processes. The relatively delayed rate of development of the human brain, compared with that of other mammals, might make it more susceptible to the influence of postnatal experience. The human infant is well adapted to capitalize on this opportunity through primitive biases to attend to relevant stimuli

Mark H. Johnson

2001-01-01

135

Cortical plasticity and preserved function in early blindness.  

PubMed

The "neural Darwinism" theory predicts that when one sensory modality is lacking, as in congenital blindness, the target structures are taken over by the afferent inputs from other senses that will promote and control their functional maturation (Edelman, 1993). This view receives support from both cross-modal plasticity experiments in animal models and functional imaging studies in man, which are presented here. PMID:23453908

Renier, Laurent; De Volder, Anne G; Rauschecker, Josef P

2014-04-01

136

Structural and Functional Brain Abnormalities in Schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Schizophrenia is associated with changes in the structure and functioning of a number of key brain systems, including prefrontal and medial temporal lobe regions involved in working memory and declarative memory, respectively. Imaging techniques provide an unparalleled window into these changes, allowing repeated assessments across pre- and post-onset stages of the disorder and in relation to critical periods of brain development. Here we review recent directions in structural and functional neuroimaging research on schizophrenia. The view emerging from this work is that schizophrenia is fundamentally a disorder of disrupted neural connectivity, the sources of which appear to be genetic and environmental risk factors influencing brain development both prenatally and during adolescence.

Karlsgodt, Katherine H.; Sun, Daqiang; Cannon, Tyrone D.

2014-01-01

137

BrainKnowledge: A Human Brain Function Mapping Knowledge-Base System  

E-print Network

BrainKnowledge: A Human Brain Function Mapping Knowledge-Base System Mei-Yu Hsiao & Chien and interpretation of fMRI data. Here, we present a human brain function mapping knowledge-base system (BrainKnowledge) that associates fMRI data analysis and literature search func- tions. BrainKnowledge not only contains indexed

Chen, Chein Chung

138

Combined neuroimaging and gene expression analysis of the genetic basis of brain plasticity indicates across species homology.  

PubMed

Brain plasticity and memory formation depend on the expression of a large number of genes. This relationship had been studied using several experimental approaches and researchers have identified genes regulating plasticity through a variety of mechanisms. Despite this effort, a great deal remains unknown regarding the role of different genes in brain plasticity. Previous studies usually focused on specific brain structures and many of the genes influencing plasticity have yet to be identified. In this work, we integrate results of in vivo neuroimaging studies of plasticity with whole-brain gene expression data for the study of neuroplasticity. Brain regions, found in the imaging study to be involved in plasticity, are first spatially mapped to the anatomical framework of the genetic database. Feature ranking methods are then applied to identify genes that are differentially expressed in these regions. We find that many of our highly ranked genes are involved in synaptic transmission and that some of these genes have been previously associated with learning and memory. We show these results to be consistent when applying our method to gene expression data from four human subjects. Finally, by performing similar experiments in mice, we reveal significant cross species correlation in the ranking of genes. In addition to the identification of plasticity related candidate genes, our results also demonstrate the potential of data integration approaches as a tool to link high level phenomena such as learning and memory to underlying molecular mechanisms. Hum Brain Mapp 35:5888-5902, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25053200

Dinai, Yonatan; Wolf, Lior; Assaf, Yaniv

2014-12-01

139

Evidence for training-induced plasticity in multisensory brain structures: an MEG study.  

PubMed

Multisensory learning and resulting neural brain plasticity have recently become a topic of renewed interest in human cognitive neuroscience. Music notation reading is an ideal stimulus to study multisensory learning, as it allows studying the integration of visual, auditory and sensorimotor information processing. The present study aimed at answering whether multisensory learning alters uni-sensory structures, interconnections of uni-sensory structures or specific multisensory areas. In a short-term piano training procedure musically naive subjects were trained to play tone sequences from visually presented patterns in a music notation-like system [Auditory-Visual-Somatosensory group (AVS)], while another group received audio-visual training only that involved viewing the patterns and attentively listening to the recordings of the AVS training sessions [Auditory-Visual group (AV)]. Training-related changes in cortical networks were assessed by pre- and post-training magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings of an auditory, a visual and an integrated audio-visual mismatch negativity (MMN). The two groups (AVS and AV) were differently affected by the training. The results suggest that multisensory training alters the function of multisensory structures, and not the uni-sensory ones along with their interconnections, and thus provide an answer to an important question presented by cognitive models of multisensory training. PMID:22570723

Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Kuchenbuch, Anja; Herholz, Sibylle C; Pantev, Christo

2012-01-01

140

Progesterone Receptors: Form and Function in Brain  

PubMed Central

Emerging data indicate that progesterone has multiple non-reproductive functions in the central nervous system to regulate cognition, mood, inflammation, mitochondrial function, neurogenesis and regeneration, myelination and recovery from traumatic brain injury. Progesterone-regulated neural responses are mediated by an array of progesterone receptors (PR) that include the classic nuclear PRA and PRB receptors and splice variants of each, the seven transmembrane domain 7TMPR? and the membrane-associated 25-Dx PR (PGRMC1). These PRs induce classic regulation of gene expression while also transducing signaling cascades that originate at the cell membrane and ultimately activate transcription factors. Remarkably, PRs are broadly expressed throughout the brain and can be detected in every neural cell type. The distribution of PRs beyond hypothalamic borders, suggests a much broader role of progesterone in regulating neural function. Despite the large body of evidence regarding progesterone regulation of reproductive behaviors and estrogen-inducible responses as well as effects of progesterone metabolite neurosteroids, much remains to be discovered regarding the functional outcomes resulting from activation of the complex array of PRs in brain by gonadally and / or glial derived progesterone. Moreover, the impact of clinically used progestogens and developing selective PR modulators for targeted outcomes in brain is a critical avenue of investigation as the non-reproductive functions of PRs have far-reaching implications for hormone therapy to maintain neurological health and function throughout menopausal aging. PMID:18374402

Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Thompson, Richard F.; Foy, Michael R.; Baudry, Michel; Wang, JunMing; Finch, Caleb E; Morgan, Todd E.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Pike, Christian J.; Nilsen, Jon

2008-01-01

141

Brain plasticity through the life span: learning to learn and action video games.  

PubMed

The ability of the human brain to learn is exceptional. Yet, learning is typically quite specific to the exact task used during training, a limiting factor for practical applications such as rehabilitation, workforce training, or education. The possibility of identifying training regimens that have a broad enough impact to transfer to a variety of tasks is thus highly appealing. This work reviews how complex training environments such as action video game play may actually foster brain plasticity and learning. This enhanced learning capacity, termed learning to learn, is considered in light of its computational requirements and putative neural mechanisms. PMID:22715883

Bavelier, Daphne; Green, C Shawn; Pouget, Alexandre; Schrater, Paul

2012-01-01

142

Plasticity of inhibitory synapses in the brain: a possible memory mechanism that has been overlooked  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-term modification of transmission efficacy at inhibitory synapses has recently been discovered in several regions of the vertebrate brain, i.e. Mauthner cells of the goldfish, cerebellar Purkinje cells, deep cerebellar nuclei and the visual cortex. Synaptic plasticity at inhibitory synapses has properties similar to that of excitatory synapses, such as dependency on intracellular Ca2+ levels, input specificity, saturation and associativity.

Masanobu Kano

1995-01-01

143

Optogenetic approaches for functional mouse brain mapping  

PubMed Central

To better understand the connectivity of the brain, it is important to map both structural and functional connections between neurons and cortical regions. In recent years, a set of optogenetic tools have been developed that permit selective manipulation and investigation of neural systems. These tools have enabled the mapping of functional connections between stimulated cortical targets and other brain regions. Advantages of the approach include the ability to arbitrarily stimulate brain regions that express opsins, allowing for brain mapping independent of behavior or sensory processing. The ability of opsins to be rapidly and locally activated allows for investigation of connectivity with spatial resolution on the order of single neurons and temporal resolution on the order of milliseconds. Optogenetic methods for functional mapping have been applied in experiments ranging from in vitro investigation of microcircuits, to in vivo probing of inter-regional cortical connections, to examination of global connections within the whole brain. We review recently developed functional mapping methods that use optogenetic single-point stimulation in the rodent brain and employ cellular electrophysiology, evoked motor movements, voltage sensitive dyes (VSDs), calcium indicators, or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess activity. In particular we highlight results using red-shifted organic VSDs that permit high temporal resolution imaging in a manner spectrally separated from Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) activation. VSD maps stimulated by ChR2 were dependent on intracortical synaptic activity and were able to reflect circuits used for sensory processing. Although the methods reviewed are powerful, challenges remain with respect to finding approaches that permit selective high temporal resolution assessment of stimulated activity in animals that can be followed longitudinally. PMID:23596383

Lim, Diana H.; LeDue, Jeffrey; Mohajerani, Majid H.; Vanni, Matthieu P.; Murphy, Timothy H.

2013-01-01

144

Functional transcranial brain imaging by optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is applied to functional brain imaging in living mice. A near-diffraction-limited bright-field optical illumination is employed to achieve micrometer lateral resolution, and a dual-wavelength measurement is utilized to extract the blood oxygenation information. The variation in hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) along vascular branching has been imaged in a precapillary arteriolar tree and a postcapillary venular tree, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on in vivo volumetric imaging of brain microvascular morphology and oxygenation down to single capillaries through intact mouse skulls. It is anticipated that: (i) chronic imaging enabled by this minimally invasive procedure will advance the study of cortical plasticity and neurological diseases; (ii) revealing the neuroactivity-dependent changes in hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation will facilitate the understanding of neurovascular coupling at the capillary level; and (iii) combining functional OR-PAM and high-resolution blood flowmetry will have the potential to explore cellular pathways of brain energy metabolism.

Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Wang, Lihong V.

2009-07-01

145

Young blood reverses age-related impairments in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity in mice.  

PubMed

As human lifespan increases, a greater fraction of the population is suffering from age-related cognitive impairments, making it important to elucidate a means to combat the effects of aging. Here we report that exposure of an aged animal to young blood can counteract and reverse pre-existing effects of brain aging at the molecular, structural, functional and cognitive level. Genome-wide microarray analysis of heterochronic parabionts--in which circulatory systems of young and aged animals are connected--identified synaptic plasticity-related transcriptional changes in the hippocampus of aged mice. Dendritic spine density of mature neurons increased and synaptic plasticity improved in the hippocampus of aged heterochronic parabionts. At the cognitive level, systemic administration of young blood plasma into aged mice improved age-related cognitive impairments in both contextual fear conditioning and spatial learning and memory. Structural and cognitive enhancements elicited by exposure to young blood are mediated, in part, by activation of the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (Creb) in the aged hippocampus. Our data indicate that exposure of aged mice to young blood late in life is capable of rejuvenating synaptic plasticity and improving cognitive function. PMID:24793238

Villeda, Saul A; Plambeck, Kristopher E; Middeldorp, Jinte; Castellano, Joseph M; Mosher, Kira I; Luo, Jian; Smith, Lucas K; Bieri, Gregor; Lin, Karin; Berdnik, Daniela; Wabl, Rafael; Udeochu, Joe; Wheatley, Elizabeth G; Zou, Bende; Simmons, Danielle A; Xie, Xinmin S; Longo, Frank M; Wyss-Coray, Tony

2014-06-01

146

Press Release Fingerprints of higher brain functions  

E-print Network

Seite 1/3 Press Release Fingerprints of higher brain functions Neuroscientists uncover novel during information processing, may be `fingerprints' of these basic calculations. Such basic calculations of brainwaves, also known as oscillations, are `spec- tral fingerprints' of canonical neuronal computations

Tübingen, Universität

147

Functional relevance of cross-modal plasticity in blind humans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Functional imaging studies of people who were blind from an early age have revealed that their primary visual cortex can be activated by Braille reading and other tactile discrimination tasks. Other studies have also shown that visual cortical areas can be activated by somatosensory input in blind subjects but not those with sight. The significance of this cross-modal plasticity is unclear, however, as it is not known whether the visual cortex can process somatosensory information in a functionally relevant way. To address this issue, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation to disrupt the function of different cortical areas in people who were blind from an early age as they identified Braille or embossed Roman letters. Transient stimulation of the occipital (visual) cortex induced errors in both tasks and distorted the tactile perceptions of blind subjects. In contrast, occipital stimulation had no effect on tactile performance in normal-sighted subjects, whereas similar stimulation is known to disrupt their visual performance. We conclude that blindness from an early age can cause the visual cortex to be recruited to a role in somatosensory processing. We propose that this cross-modal plasticity may account in part for the superior tactile perceptual abilities of blind subjects.

Cohen, Leonardo G.; Celnik, Pablo; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Corwell, Brian; Faiz, Lala; Dambrosia, James; Honda, Manabu; Sadato, Norihiro; Gerloff, Christian; Catalá, M. Dolores; Hallett, Mark

1997-09-01

148

Brain imaging methods used in experimental brain research such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Functional  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT Brain imaging methods used in experimental brain research such as Positron Emission and are best understood in the context of the underlying 3D brain anatomy. In this paper, we present a novel Brain Mapping, Functional Imaging 1 INTRODUCTION Although the human brain is no longer the black box

Mueller, Klaus

149

DYNAMIC PLASTICITY: THE ROLE OF GLUCOCORTICOIDS, BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR AND OTHER TROPHIC FACTORS  

PubMed Central

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a secreted protein that has been linked to numerous aspects of plasticity in the central nervous system (CNS). Stress-induced remodeling of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdala is coincident with changes in the levels of BDNF, which has been shown to act as a trophic factor facilitating the survival of existing and newly born neurons. Initially, hippocampal atrophy after chronic stress was associated with reduced BDNF, leading to the hypothesis that stress-related learning deficits resulted from suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis. However, recent evidence suggests that BDNF also plays a rapid and essential role in regulating synaptic plasticity, providing another mechanism through which BDNF can modulate learning and memory after a stressful event. Numerous reports have shown BDNF levels are highly dynamic in response to stress, and not only vary across brain regions but also fluctuate rapidly, both immediately after a stressor and over the course of a chronic stress paradigm. Yet, BDNF alone is not sufficient to effect many of the changes observed after stress. Glucocorticoids and other molecules have been shown to act in conjunction with BDNF to facilitate both the morphological and molecular changes that occur, particularly changes in spine density and gene expression. This review briefly summarizes the evidence supporting BDNF’s role as a trophic factor modulating neuronal survival, and will primarily focus on the interactions between BDNF and other systems within the brain to facilitate synaptic plasticity. This growing body of evidence suggests a more nuanced role for BDNF in stress-related learning and memory, where it acts primarily as a facilitator of plasticity and is dependent upon the coactivation of glucocorticoids and other factors as the determinants of the final cellular response. PMID:22922121

GRAY, J. D.; MILNER, T. A.; MCEWEN, B. S.

2013-01-01

150

Homological scaffolds of brain functional networks.  

PubMed

Networks, as efficient representations of complex systems, have appealed to scientists for a long time and now permeate many areas of science, including neuroimaging (Bullmore and Sporns 2009 Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 10, 186-198. (doi:10.1038/nrn2618)). Traditionally, the structure of complex networks has been studied through their statistical properties and metrics concerned with node and link properties, e.g. degree-distribution, node centrality and modularity. Here, we study the characteristics of functional brain networks at the mesoscopic level from a novel perspective that highlights the role of inhomogeneities in the fabric of functional connections. This can be done by focusing on the features of a set of topological objects-homological cycles-associated with the weighted functional network. We leverage the detected topological information to define the homological scaffolds, a new set of objects designed to represent compactly the homological features of the correlation network and simultaneously make their homological properties amenable to networks theoretical methods. As a proof of principle,we apply these tools to compare resting state functional brain activity in 15 healthy volunteers after intravenous infusion of placebo and psilocybin-the main psychoactive component of magic mushrooms. The results show that the homological structure of the brain's functional patterns undergoes a dramatic change post-psilocybin, characterized by the appearance of many transient structures of low stability and of a small number of persistent ones that are not observed in the case of placebo. PMID:25401177

Petri, G; Expert, P; Turkheimer, F; Carhart-Harris, R; Nutt, D; Hellyer, P J; Vaccarino, F

2014-12-01

151

Electroencephalographic imaging of higher brain function.  

PubMed Central

High temporal resolution is necessary to resolve the rapidly changing patterns of brain activity that underlie mental function. Electroencephalography (EEG) provides temporal resolution in the millisecond range. However, traditional EEG technology and practice provide insufficient spatial detail to identify relationships between brain electrical events and structures and functions visualized by magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography. Recent advances help to overcome this problem by recording EEGs from more electrodes, by registering EEG data with anatomical images, and by correcting the distortion caused by volume conduction of EEG signals through the skull and scalp. In addition, statistical measurements of sub-second interdependences between EEG time-series recorded from different locations can help to generate hypotheses about the instantaneous functional networks that form between different cortical regions during perception, thought and action. Example applications are presented from studies of language, attention and working memory. Along with its unique ability to monitor brain function as people perform everyday activities in the real world, these advances make modern EEG an invaluable complement to other functional neuroimaging modalities. PMID:10466140

Gevins, A; Smith, M E; McEvoy, L K; Leong, H; Le, J

1999-01-01

152

The impact of receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes on brain plasticity.  

PubMed

Allosteric mechanisms in receptor heteromers markedly increase the repertoire of receptor recognition and signaling. Of high importance is the altered function in the receptor heteromer versus the receptor homomer. Such a change in receptor function is mainly brought about by agonist induced allosteric receptor-receptor interactions and leads to functional and structural plasticity. Receptor-receptor interactions integrating synaptic and volume transmission signals participate in a significant way in modulating bidirectional synaptic plasticity and thus Hebbian plasticity. One molecular mechanism that can contribute to a change of synaptic weight may be represented by multiple interactions between plasma membrane receptors forming higher order heteroreceptor complexes via oligomerization at the pre- and post-junctional level. Such long-lived heteroreceptor complexes may play a significant role in learning and memory. PMID:24894440

Fuxe, Kjell; Agnati, Luigi F; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

2014-07-01

153

Structural and functional neuroimaging studies of the suicidal brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Suicidality is a major challenge for today's health care. Evidence suggests that there are differences in cognitive functioning of suicidal patients but the knowledge about the underlying neurobiology is limited. Brain imaging offers the advantage of a non-invasive in vivo direct estimation of detailed brain structure, regional brain functioning and estimation of molecular processes in the brain.We have reviewed the

S. Desmyter; C. van Heeringen; K. Audenaert

2011-01-01

154

Chronic In Vivo Imaging Shows No Evidence of Dendritic Plasticity or Functional Remapping in the Contralesional Cortex after Stroke  

PubMed Central

Most stroke survivors exhibit a partial recovery from their deficits. This presumably occurs because of remapping of lost capabilities to functionally related brain areas. Functional brain imaging studies suggest that remapping in the contralateral uninjured cortex might represent a transient stage of compensatory plasticity. Some postmortem studies have also shown that cortical lesions, including stroke, can trigger dendritic plasticity in the contralateral hemisphere, but the data are controversial. We used longitudinal in vivo two-photon microscopy in the contralateral homotopic cortex to record changes in dendritic spines of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in green fluorescent protein mice. We could not detect de novo growth of dendrites or changes in the density or turnover of spines for up to 4 weeks after stroke. We also used intrinsic optical signal imaging to investigate whether the forepaw (FP) sensory representation is remapped to the spared homotopic cortex after stroke. Stimulation of the contralateral FP reliably produced strong intrinsic signals in the spared hemisphere, but we could never detect a signal with ipsilateral FP stimulation after stroke. This lack of contralateral plasticity at the level of apical dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons and FP sensory maps suggests that the contralesional cortex may not contribute to functional recovery after stroke and that, at least in mice, the peri-infarct cortex plays the dominant role in postischemic plasticity. PMID:22499800

Johnston, David G.; Denizet, Marie; Mostany, Ricardo

2013-01-01

155

Magnesium Protects Cognitive Functions and Synaptic Plasticity in Streptozotocin-Induced Sporadic Alzheimer's Model  

PubMed Central

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by profound synapse loss and impairments of learning and memory. Magnesium affects many biochemical mechanisms that are vital for neuronal properties and synaptic plasticity. Recent studies have demonstrated that the serum and brain magnesium levels are decreased in AD patients; however, the exact role of magnesium in AD pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we found that the intraperitoneal administration of magnesium sulfate increased the brain magnesium levels and protected learning and memory capacities in streptozotocin-induced sporadic AD model rats. We also found that magnesium sulfate reversed impairments in long-term potentiation (LTP), dendritic abnormalities, and the impaired recruitment of synaptic proteins. Magnesium sulfate treatment also decreased tau hyperphosphorylation by increasing the inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK-3? at serine 9, thereby increasing the activity of Akt at Ser473 and PI3K at Tyr458/199, and improving insulin sensitivity. We conclude that magnesium treatment protects cognitive function and synaptic plasticity by inhibiting GSK-3? in sporadic AD model rats, which suggests a potential role for magnesium in AD therapy. PMID:25268773

Bao, Jian; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Zeng, Juan; Liu, En-Jie; Li, Xiao-Guang; Huang, Rong-Xi; Gao, Di; Li, Meng-Zhu; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Gong-Ping; Wang, Jian-Zhi

2014-01-01

156

Retinoic Acid Signaling in the Functioning Brain  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Retinoic acid, an active form of vitamin A, regulates gene expression throughout the body, and many components of the signaling system through which it acts are present in the brain. Very little is known, however, about how retinoic acid functions in neurobiological systems. Several studies have provided evidence that retinoic acid plays a role in sleep, learning, and memory, but the precise mechanisms through which it influences these processes remain unclear. All of these processes involve local or long-range inhibition and synchronized neuronal activity between separate locations in the brain. A critical component in the generation of the synchronized firing of cortical neurons (cortical synchrony) is a network of inhibitory interneurons containing parvalbumin, a cell population affected by retinoid perturbations, such as exposure to a vitamin A overdose. An understanding of the role of retinoids in normal brain function would provide clues to the long-standing question of whether abnormalities in retinoic acid signaling contribute to the pathogenesis of some brain diseases with uncertain etiologies that involve both genetic and environmental factors.

Ursula C. Drager (University of Massachusetts Medical School;Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center REV)

2006-02-28

157

Environmental enrichment decreases GABAergic inhibition and improves cognitive abilities, synaptic plasticity, and visual functions in a mouse model of Down syndrome  

PubMed Central

Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic disorder associated with mental retardation. It has been repeatedly shown that Ts65Dn mice, the prime animal model for DS, have severe cognitive and neural plasticity defects due to excessive inhibition. We report that increasing sensory-motor stimulation in adulthood through environmental enrichment (EE) reduces brain inhibition levels and promotes recovery of spatial memory abilities, hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and visual functions in adult Ts65Dn mice. PMID:22207837

Begenisic, Tatjana; Spolidoro, Maria; Braschi, Chiara; Baroncelli, Laura; Milanese, Marco; Pietra, Gianluca; Fabbri, Maria E.; Bonanno, Giambattista; Cioni, Giovanni; Maffei, Lamberto; Sale, Alessandro

2011-01-01

158

The formation and function of the brain ventricular system  

E-print Network

The brain ventricular system is composed of a highly conserved set of cavities that contain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a protein-rich fluid essential for brain function. However, little is known about the function of ...

Chang, Jessica T. (Jessica Tzung-Min)

2012-01-01

159

Brain Function Lateralization and Language Acquisition: the Evidence from Japanese.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents evidence of differences in brain function lateralization between Japanese-speakers and speakers of Indo-European languages, and suggests that current conceptualizations of brain function specialization are not adequate. (AM)

Sanches, Mary

1979-01-01

160

When "altering brain function" becomes "mind control"  

PubMed Central

Functional neurosurgery has seen a resurgence of interest in surgical treatments for psychiatric illness. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) technology is the preferred tool in the current wave of clinical experiments because it allows clinicians to directly alter the functions of targeted brain regions, in a reversible manner, with the intent of correcting diseases of the mind, such as depression, addiction, anorexia nervosa, dementia, and obsessive compulsive disorder. These promising treatments raise a critical philosophical and humanitarian question. “Under what conditions does ‘altering brain function’ qualify as ‘mind control’?” In order to answer this question one needs a definition of mind control. To this end, we reviewed the relevant philosophical, ethical, and neurosurgical literature in order to create a set of criteria for what constitutes mind control in the context of DBS. We also outline clinical implications of these criteria. Finally, we demonstrate the relevance of the proposed criteria by focusing especially on serendipitous treatments involving DBS, i.e., cases in which an unintended therapeutic benefit occurred. These cases highlight the importance of gaining the consent of the subject for the new therapy in order to avoid committing an act of mind control.

Koivuniemi, Andrew; Otto, Kevin

2014-01-01

161

Neural Plasticity in Human Brain Connectivity: The Effects of Long Term Deep Brain Stimulation of the  

E-print Network

of the Subthalamic Nucleus in Parkinson's Disease Tim J. van Hartevelt1,2 , Joana Cabral2,3 , Gustavo Deco3,4 , Arne stimulation in bilateral subthalamic nuclei for Parkinson's Disease. This allowed us to analyse/limbic, and olfactory brain regions which are known to be affected in Parkinson's Disease. The nature of these changes

Deco, Gustavo

162

Neonatal infraorbital nerve crush-induced CNS synaptic plasticity and functional recovery.  

PubMed

Infraorbital nerve (ION) transection in neonatal rats leads to disruption of whisker-specific neural patterns (barrelettes), conversion of functional synapses into silent synapses, and reactive gliosis in the brain stem trigeminal principal nucleus (PrV). Here we tested the hypothesis that neonatal peripheral nerve crush injuries permit better functional recovery of associated central nervous system (CNS) synaptic circuitry compared with nerve transection. We developed an in vitro whisker pad-trigeminal ganglion (TG)-brain stem preparation in neonatal rats and tested functional recovery in the PrV following ION crush. Intracellular recordings revealed that 68% of TG cells innervate the whisker pad. We used the proportion of whisker pad-innervating TG cells as an index of ION function. The ION function was blocked by ?64%, immediately after mechanical crush, then it recovered beginning after 3 days postinjury and was complete by 7 days. We used this reversible nerve-injury model to study peripheral nerve injury-induced CNS synaptic plasticity. In the PrV, the incidence of silent synapses increased to ?3.5 times of control value by 2-3 days postinjury and decreased to control levels by 5-7 days postinjury. Peripheral nerve injury-induced reaction of astrocytes and microglia in the PrV was also reversible. Neonatal ION crush disrupted barrelette formation, and functional recovery was not accompanied by de novo barrelette formation, most likely due to occurrence of recovery postcritical period (P3) for pattern formation. Our results suggest that nerve crush is more permissive for successful regeneration and reconnection (collectively referred to as "recovery" here) of the sensory inputs between the periphery and the brain stem. PMID:24478162

Lo, Fu-Sun; Zhao, Shuxin; Erzurumlu, Reha S

2014-04-01

163

Different Plasticity Patterns of Language Function in Children With Perinatal and Childhood Stroke  

PubMed Central

Plasticity of language function after brain damage can depend on maturation of the brain. Children with left-hemisphere perinatal (n = 7) or childhood stroke (n = 5) and 12 controls were investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The verb generation and the sentence comprehension tasks were employed to activate the expressive and receptive language areas, respectively. Weighted laterality indices were calculated and correlated with results assessed by neuropsychological test battery. Compared to controls, children with childhood stroke showed significantly lower mean scores for the expressive (P < .05) and receptive (P = .05) language tests. On functional magnetic resonance imaging they showed left-side cortical activation, as did controls. Perinatal stroke patients showed atypical right-side or bilateral language lateralization during both tasks. Negative correlation for stroke patients was found between scores for expressive language tests and laterality index during the verb generation task. (Re)organization of language function differs in children with perinatal and childhood stroke and correlates with neurocognitive performance. PMID:23748202

Tomberg, Tiiu; Kepler, Joosep; Laugesaar, Rael; Kaldoja, Mari-Liis; Kepler, Kalle; Kolk, Anneli

2014-01-01

164

On the Plasticity of Regulatory T Cell Function  

PubMed Central

Regulatory T cells (Tregs) can suppress a wide variety of cell types, in diverse organ sites and inflammatory conditions. While Tregs possess multiple suppressive mechanisms, the number required for maximal function is unclear. Furthermore, whether any inter-relationship or cross-regulatory mechanisms exist to orchestrate and control their utilization is unknown. Here we assessed the functional capacity of Tregs lacking the ability to secrete both interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-35 (IL-35), which individually are required for maximal Treg activity. Surprisingly, IL-10/IL-35-double deficient Tregs were fully functional in vitro and in vivo. Loss of IL-10 and IL-35 was compensated for by a concurrent increase in cathepsin E (Ctse) expression, enhanced TRAIL (Tnfsf10) expression and soluble TRAIL release, rendering IL-10/IL-35-double deficient Tregs functionally dependent on TRAIL in vitro and in vivo. Lastly, while C57BL/6 Tregs are normally IL-10/IL-35-dependent, BALB/c Tregs, which express high levels of CTSE and enhanced TRAIL expression, are TRAIL-dependent by default. These data reveal that cross-regulatory pathways exist that control the utilization of suppressive mechanisms, thereby providing Treg functional plasticity. PMID:22013112

Pillai, Meenu R.; Collison, Lauren W.; Wang, Xiaohua; Finkelstein, David; Rehg, Jerold E.; Boyd, Kelli; Szymczak-Workman, Andrea L.; Doggett, Teresa; Griffith, Thomas S.; Ferguson, Thomas A.; Vignali, Dario A. A.

2011-01-01

165

Non-invasive brain-to-brain interface (BBI): establishing functional links between two brains.  

PubMed

Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is capable of modulating the neural activity of specific brain regions, with a potential role as a non-invasive computer-to-brain interface (CBI). In conjunction with the use of brain-to-computer interface (BCI) techniques that translate brain function to generate computer commands, we investigated the feasibility of using the FUS-based CBI to non-invasively establish a functional link between the brains of different species (i.e. human and Sprague-Dawley rat), thus creating a brain-to-brain interface (BBI). The implementation was aimed to non-invasively translate the human volunteer's intention to stimulate a rat's brain motor area that is responsible for the tail movement. The volunteer initiated the intention by looking at a strobe light flicker on a computer display, and the degree of synchronization in the electroencephalographic steady-state-visual-evoked-potentials (SSVEP) with respect to the strobe frequency was analyzed using a computer. Increased signal amplitude in the SSVEP, indicating the volunteer's intention, triggered the delivery of a burst-mode FUS (350 kHz ultrasound frequency, tone burst duration of 0.5 ms, pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz, given for 300 msec duration) to excite the motor area of an anesthetized rat transcranially. The successful excitation subsequently elicited the tail movement, which was detected by a motion sensor. The interface was achieved at 94.0±3.0% accuracy, with a time delay of 1.59±1.07 sec from the thought-initiation to the creation of the tail movement. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of a computer-mediated BBI that links central neural functions between two biological entities, which may confer unexplored opportunities in the study of neuroscience with potential implications for therapeutic applications. PMID:23573251

Yoo, Seung-Schik; Kim, Hyungmin; Filandrianos, Emmanuel; Taghados, Seyed Javid; Park, Shinsuk

2013-01-01

166

The blind brain: How (lack of) vision shapes the morphological and functional architecture of the human brain.  

PubMed

Since the early days, how we represent the world around us has been a matter of philosophical speculation. Over the last few decades, modern neuroscience, and specifically the development of methodologies for the structural and the functional exploration of the brain have made it possible to investigate old questions with an innovative approach. In this brief review, we discuss the main findings from a series of brain anatomical and functional studies conducted in sighted and congenitally blind individuals by our's and others' laboratories. Historically, research on the 'blind brain' has focused mainly on the cross-modal plastic changes that follow sensory deprivation. More recently, a novel line of research has been developed to determine to what extent visual experience is truly required to achieve a representation of the surrounding environment. Overall, the results of these studies indicate that most of the brain fine morphological and functional architecture is programmed to develop and function independently from any visual experience. Distinct cortical areas are able to process information in a supramodal fashion, that is, independently from the sensory modality that carries that information to the brain. These observations strongly support the hypothesis of a modality-independent, i.e. more abstract, cortical organization, and may contribute to explain how congenitally blind individuals may interact efficiently with an external world that they have never seen. PMID:24962172

Ricciardi, Emiliano; Handjaras, Giacomo; Pietrini, Pietro

2014-11-01

167

Brain microRNAs and insights into biological functions and therapeutic potential of brain enriched miRNA-128  

PubMed Central

MicroRNAs, the non-coding single-stranded RNA of 19–25 nucleotides are emerging as robust players of gene regulation. Plethora of evidences support that the ability of microRNAs to regulate several genes of a pathway or even multiple cross talking pathways have significant impact on a complex regulatory network and ultimately the physiological processes and diseases. Brain being a complex organ with several cell types, expresses more distinct miRNAs than any other tissues. This review aims to discuss about the microRNAs in brain development, function and their dysfunction in brain tumors. We also provide a comprehensive summary of targets of brain specific and brain enriched miRNAs that contribute to the diversity and plasticity of the brain. In particular, we uncover recent findings on miRNA-128, a brain-enriched microRNA that is induced during neuronal differentiation and whose aberrant expression has been reported in several cancers. This review describes the wide spectrum of targets of miRNA-128 that have been identified till date with potential roles in apoptosis, angiogenesis, proliferation, cholesterol metabolism, self renewal, invasion and cancer progression and how this knowledge might be exploited for the development of future miRNA-128 based therapies for the treatment of cancer as well as metabolic diseases. PMID:24555688

2014-01-01

168

Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Arterial Baroreceptor Pathways: Implications for Activity-Dependent Plasticity at Baroafferent Synapses  

PubMed Central

Functional characteristics of the arterial baroreceptor reflex change throughout ontogenesis, including perinatal adjustments of the reflex gain and adult resetting during hypertension. However, the cellular mechanisms that underlie these functional changes are not completely understood. Here, we provide evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin with a well-established role in activity-dependent neuronal plasticity, is abundantly expressed in vivo by a large subset of developing and adult rat baroreceptor afferents. Immunoreactivity to BDNF is present in the cell bodies of baroafferent neurons in the nodose ganglion (NG), their central projections in the solitary tract, and terminal-like structures in the lower brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). Using ELISA in situ combined with electrical field stimulation, we show that native BDNF is released from cultured newborn NG neurons in response to patterns that mimic the in vivo activity of baroreceptor afferents. In particular, high-frequency bursting patterns of baroreceptor firing, which are known to evoke plastic changes at baroreceptor synapses, are significantly more effective at releasing BDNF than tonic patterns of the same average frequency. Together, our study indicates that BDNF expressed by first-order baroreceptor neurons is a likely mediator of both developmental and post-developmental modifications at first-order synapses in arterial baroreceptor pathways. PMID:19054281

Martin, Jessica L.; Jenkins, Victoria K.; Hsieh, Hui-ya; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

2008-01-01

169

The Big Five default brain: functional evidence.  

PubMed

Recent neuroimaging studies have provided evidence that different dimensions of human personality may be associated with specific structural neuroanatomic correlates. Identifying brain correlates of a situation-independent personality structure would require evidence of a stable default mode of brain functioning. In this study, we investigated the correlates of the Big Five personality dimensions (Extraversion, Neuroticism, Openness/Intellect, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness) and the default mode network (DMN). Forty-nine healthy adults completed the NEO-Five Factor. The results showed that the Extraversion (E) and Agreeableness (A) were positively correlated with activity in the midline core of the DMN, whereas Neuroticism (N), Openness (O), and Conscientiousness (C) were correlated with the parietal cortex system. Activity of the anterior cingulate cortex was positively associated with A and negatively with C. Regions of the parietal lobe were differentially associated with each personality dimension. The present study not only confirms previous functional correlates regarding the Big Five personality dimensions, but it also expands our knowledge showing the association between different personality dimensions and specific patterns of brain activation at rest. PMID:23881294

Sampaio, Adriana; Soares, José Miguel; Coutinho, Joana; Sousa, Nuno; Gonçalves, Oscar F

2014-11-01

170

Scanning Laser Optical Tomography Resolves Structural Plasticity during Regeneration in an Insect Brain  

PubMed Central

Background Optical Projection Tomography (OPT) is a microscopic technique that generates three dimensional images from whole mount samples the size of which exceeds the maximum focal depth of confocal laser scanning microscopes. As an advancement of conventional emission-OPT, Scanning Laser Optical Tomography (SLOTy) allows simultaneous detection of fluorescence and absorbance with high sensitivity. In the present study, we employ SLOTy in a paradigm of brain plasticity in an insect model system. Methodology We visualize and quantify volumetric changes in sensory information procession centers in the adult locust, Locusta migratoria. Olfactory receptor neurons, which project from the antenna into the brain, are axotomized by crushing the antennal nerve or ablating the entire antenna. We follow the resulting degeneration and regeneration in the olfactory centers (antennal lobes and mushroom bodies) by measuring their size in reconstructed SLOTy images with respect to the untreated control side. Within three weeks post treatment antennal lobes with ablated antennae lose as much as 60% of their initial volume. In contrast, antennal lobes with crushed antennal nerves initially shrink as well, but regain size back to normal within three weeks. The combined application of transmission-and fluorescence projections of Neurobiotin labeled axotomized fibers confirms that recovery of normal size is restored by regenerated afferents. Remarkably, SLOTy images reveal that degeneration of olfactory receptor axons has a trans-synaptic effect on second order brain centers and leads to size reduction of the mushroom body calyx. Conclusions This study demonstrates that SLOTy is a suitable method for rapid screening of volumetric plasticity in insect brains and suggests its application also to vertebrate preparations. PMID:22829931

Eickhoff, Rene; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Scheiblich, Hannah; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Meyer, Heiko; Stern, Michael; Bicker, Gerd

2012-01-01

171

Forced arm use is superior to voluntary training for motor recovery and brain plasticity after cortical ischemia in rats  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose Both the immobilization of the unaffected arm combined with physical therapy (forced arm use, FAU) and voluntary exercise (VE) as model for enriched environment are promising approaches to enhance recovery after stroke. The genomic mechanisms involved in long-term plasticity changes after different means of rehabilitative training post-stroke are largely unexplored. The present investigation explored the effects of these physical therapies on behavioral recovery and molecular markers of regeneration after experimental ischemia. Methods 42 Wistar rats were randomly treated with either forced arm use (FAU, 1-sleeve plaster cast onto unaffected limb at 8/10 days), voluntary exercise (VE, connection of a freely accessible running wheel to cage), or controls with no access to a running wheel for 10 days starting at 48 hours after photothrombotic stroke of the sensorimotor cortex. Functional outcome was measured using sensorimotor test before ischemia, after ischemia, after the training period of 10 days, at 3 and 4 weeks after ischemia. Global gene expression changes were assessed from the ipsi- and contralateral cortex and the hippocampus. Results FAU-treated animals demonstrated significantly improved functional recovery compared to the VE-treated group. Both were superior to cage control. A large number of genes are altered by both training paradigms in the ipsi- and contralateral cortex and the hippocampus. Overall, the extent of changes observed correlated well with the functional recovery obtained. One category of genes overrepresented in the gene set is linked to neuronal plasticity processes, containing marker genes such as the NMDA 2a receptor, PKC ?, NTRK2, or MAP 1b. Conclusions We show that physical training after photothrombotic stroke significantly and permanently improves functional recovery after stroke, and that forced arm training is clearly superior to voluntary running training. The behavioral outcomes seen correlate with patterns and extent of gene expression changes in all brain areas examined. We propose that physical training induces a fundamental change in plasticity-relevant gene expression in several brain regions that enables recovery processes. These results contribute to the debate on optimal rehabilitation strategies, and provide a valuable source of molecular entry points for future pharmacological enhancement of recovery. PMID:24528872

2014-01-01

172

Anatomical Plasticity of Adult Brain is Titrated by Nogo Receptor 1  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Experience rearranges anatomical connectivity in the brain, but such plasticity is suppressed in adulthood. We examined the turnover of dendritic spines and axonal varicosities in the somatosensory cortex of mice lacking Nogo Receptor 1 (NgR1). Through adolescence, the anatomy and plasticity of ngr1 null mice are indistinguishable from control, but suppression of turnover after age 26 days fails to occur in ngr1?/? mice. Adolescent anatomical plasticity can be restored to one-year old mice by conditional deletion of ngr1. Suppression of anatomical dynamics by NgR1 is cell autonomous, and is phenocopied by deletion of Nogo-A ligand. Whisker removal deprives the somatosensory cortex of experience-dependent input and reduces dendritic spine turnover in adult ngr1?/? mice to control levels, while an acutely enriched environment increases dendritic spine dynamics in control mice to the level of ngr1?/? mice in a standard environment. Thus, NgR1 determines the low set point for synaptic turnover in adult cerebral cortex. PMID:23473316

Akbik, Feras V.; Bhagat, Sarah M.; Patel, Pujan R.; Cafferty, William B.J.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

2013-01-01

173

Functional Geometry Alignment and Localization of Brain Areas  

E-print Network

Functional Geometry Alignment and Localization of Brain Areas Georg Langs, Polina Golland Computer@bwh.harvard.edu, lrigolo@bwh.harvard.edu agolby@bwh.harvard.edu Abstract Matching functional brain regions across. It is particularly difficult, but highly relevant, for patients with pathologies such as brain tumors, which can

Golland, Polina

174

Noninvasive Functional Brain Mapping Using Registered Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation  

E-print Network

Non­invasive Functional Brain Mapping Using Registered Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation G Brain Mapping Using Registered Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation January 22, 1996 Abstract We describe the functional regions of the brain using a tran­ scranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) device. This device, when

175

Computational Modeling of High-Level Cognition and Brain Function  

E-print Network

Computational Modeling of High-Level Cognition and Brain Function Marcel Adam Just,* Patricia A. Carpenter, and Sashank Varma Center for Cognitive Brain Imaging, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh key properties of cortical function into the design of the modeling system. Hum. Brain Mapping 8

176

Fish & Chips: Functional Genomics of Social Plasticity in an African Cichlid Fish  

PubMed Central

Behaviour and physiology are regulated by both environment and social context. A central goal in the study of the social control of behaviour is to determine the underlying physiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms in the brain. The African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni has long been used as a model system to study how social interactions regulate neural and behavioural plasticity. In this species, males are either socially dominant and reproductively active or subordinate and reproductively suppressed. This phenotypic difference is reversible. Using an integrative approach that combines quantitative behavioural measurements, functional genomics and bioinformatic analyses, we examine neural gene expression in dominant and subordinate males as well as brooding females. We confirm the role of numerous candidate genes that are part of neuroendocrine pathways and show that specific co-regulated gene sets (modules), as well as specific functional Gene Ontology categories, are significantly associated with dominance or reproductive state. Finally, even though the dominant and subordinate phenotypes are robustly defined, we find a surprisingly high degree of individual variation in the transcript levels of the very genes that are differentially regulated between these phenotypes. Our results demonstrate the molecular complexity in the brain underlying social behaviour, identify novel targets for future studies, validate many candidate genes, and exploit individual variation in order to gain biological insights. PMID:18775941

Renn, Susan C.P.; Aubin-Horth, Nadia; Hofmann, Hans A.

2013-01-01

177

Violent Video Games Alter Brain Function in Young Men  

MedlinePLUS

... the RSNA Annual Meeting November 30, 2011 Violent Video Games Alter Brain Function in Young Men CHICAGO— ... fMRI) analysis of long-term effects of violent video game play on the brain has found changes ...

178

Blindness and brain plasticity: contribution of mental imagery? An fMRI study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to study brain plasticity in the visual cortex, in six subjects totally blind from birth. The protocol we used was the same as that employed in a prior study on blindfolded sighted subjects (Brain Res., 924 (2002) 176). The production of mental images from animal names versus passive listening to abstract words, involved, in the early blind subjects as well as in the blindfolded sighted subjects of our control group, the superior occipital, inferior and superior parietal areas, premotor area, visual association. Activation foci in the somatosensory areas in the left hemisphere, as well as in the temporal and fusiform gyri were only visible in the blind subjects. The experiment, which was repeated after a short period of rest, demonstrated, this time again, predominant involvement of the dorsal pathway and activation of the primary visual area (in a region of interest). With respect to the ongoing debate on brain reorganization, our study shows that the primary visual area is activated in early blind subjects, and that activation persists in a mental imagery task involving no sensory input other than verbal instructions. PMID:15130584

Lambert, S; Sampaio, E; Mauss, Y; Scheiber, C

2004-06-01

179

Early-life stress affects the structural and functional plasticity of the medial prefrontal cortex in adolescent rats.  

PubMed

Early life experiences are crucial factors that shape brain development and function due to their ability to induce structural and functional plasticity. Among these experiences, early-life stress (ELS) is known to interfere with brain development and maturation, increasing the risk of future psychopathologies, including depression, anxiety, and personality disorders. Moreover, ELS may contribute to the emergence of these psychopathologies during adolescence. In this present study, we investigated the effects of ELS, in the form of maternal separation (MS), on the structural and functional plasticity of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and anxiety-like behavior in adolescent male rats. We found that the MS procedure resulted in disturbances in mother-pup interactions that lasted until weaning and were most strongly demonstrated by increases in nursing behavior. Moreover, MS caused atrophy of the basal dendritic tree and reduced spine density on both the apical and basal dendrites in layer II/III pyramidal neurons of the mPFC. The structural changes were accompanied by an impairment of long-term potentiation processes and increased expression of key proteins, specifically glutamate receptor 1, glutamate receptor 2, postsynaptic density protein 95, ?Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and ?Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II phosphorylated at residue Thr305, that are engaged in long-term potentiation induction and maintenance in the mPFC. We also found that the MS animals were more anxious in the light/dark exploration test. The results of this study indicate that ELS has a significant impact on the structural and functional plasticity of the mPFC in adolescents. ELS-induced adaptive plasticity may underlie the pathomechanisms of some early-onset psychopathologies observed in adolescents. PMID:23581639

Chocyk, Agnieszka; Bobula, Bartosz; Dudys, Dorota; Przyborowska, Aleksandra; Majcher-Ma?lanka, Iwona; Hess, Grzegorz; W?dzony, Krzysztof

2013-07-01

180

Synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal slice: functional consequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are 3 known forms of synaptic plasticity at CNS synapses: long-term potentiation (LTP) mediated by NMDA receptor activation, LTP mediated by voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) activation, and long-term depression (LTD) mediated by the NMDA receptor. All 3 forms of synaptic plasticity can be observed in hippocampal CA1 cells, all are induced by afferent activation, all involve Ca2+ influx, and

T. J. Teyler; I. Cavus; C. Coussens

1995-01-01

181

Reestablishing Speech Understanding through Musical Ear Training after Cochlear Implantation A Study of the Potential Cortical Plasticity in the Brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cochlear implants (CIs) provide impressive speech perception for persons with se- vere hearing loss, but many CI recipients fail in perceiving speech prosody and music. Successful rehabilitation depends on cortical plasticity in the brain and postoperative measures. The present study evaluates the behavioral and neurologic effects of musical ear training on CI users' speech and music perception. The goal is

Bjørn Petersen; Malene V. Mortensen; Albert Gjedde; Peter Vuusta

182

Organization, development and function of complex brain networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research has revealed general principles in the structural and functional organization of complex networks which are shared by various natural, social and technological systems. This review examines these principles as applied to the organization, development and function of complex brain networks. Specifically, we examine the structural properties of large-scale anatomical and functional brain networks and discuss how they might

Olaf Sporns; Dante R. Chialvo; Marcus Kaiser; Claus C. Hilgetag

2004-01-01

183

Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Brain Function and Neurochemistry  

E-print Network

Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Brain Function and Neurochemistry KAMIL UGURBIL, DAE-SHIK KIM, TIM ANDERSEN, AND GREGOR ADRIANY Invited Paper In the past decade, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research approaches to map brain function. This capability, often referred to as functional magnetic resonance imaging

Duong, Timothy Q.

184

Higher brain functions served by the lowly rodent primary visual cortex.  

PubMed

It has been more than 50 years since the first description of ocular dominance plasticity--the profound modification of primary visual cortex (V1) following temporary monocular deprivation. This discovery immediately attracted the intense interest of neurobiologists focused on the general question of how experience and deprivation modify the brain as a potential substrate for learning and memory. The pace of discovery has quickened considerably in recent years as mice have become the preferred species to study visual cortical plasticity, and new studies have overturned the dogma that primary sensory cortex is immutable after a developmental critical period. Recent work has shown that, in addition to ocular dominance plasticity, adult visual cortex exhibits several forms of response modification previously considered the exclusive province of higher cortical areas. These "higher brain functions" include neural reports of stimulus familiarity, reward-timing prediction, and spatiotemporal sequence learning. Primary visual cortex can no longer be viewed as a simple visual feature detector with static properties determined during early development. Rodent V1 is a rich and dynamic cortical area in which functions normally associated only with "higher" brain regions can be studied at the mechanistic level. PMID:25225298

Gavornik, Jeffrey P; Bear, Mark F

2014-10-01

185

Mapping distributed brain function and networks with diffuse optical tomography  

PubMed Central

Mapping of human brain function has revolutionized systems neuroscience. However, traditional functional neuroimaging by positron emission tomography or functional magnetic resonance imaging cannot be used when applications require portability, or are contraindicated because of ionizing radiation (positron emission tomography) or implanted metal (functional magnetic resonance imaging). Optical neuroimaging offers a non-invasive alternative that is radiation free and compatible with implanted metal and electronic devices (for example, pacemakers). However, optical imaging technology has heretofore lacked the combination of spatial resolution and wide field of view sufficient to map distributed brain functions. Here, we present a high-density diffuse optical tomography imaging array that can map higher-order, distributed brain function. The system was tested by imaging four hierarchical language tasks and multiple resting-state networks including the dorsal attention and default mode networks. Finally, we imaged brain function in patients with Parkinson’s disease and implanted deep brain stimulators that preclude functional magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25083161

Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Ferradal, Silvina L.; Robichaux-Viehoever, Amy; Hassanpour, Mahlega S.; Dehghani, Hamid; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Hershey, Tamara; Culver, Joseph P.

2014-01-01

186

Mapping distributed brain function and networks with diffuse optical tomography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mapping of human brain function has revolutionized systems neuroscience. However, traditional functional neuroimaging by positron emission tomography or functional magnetic resonance imaging cannot be used when applications require portability, or are contraindicated because of ionizing radiation (positron emission tomography) or implanted metal (functional magnetic resonance imaging). Optical neuroimaging offers a non-invasive alternative that is radiation free and compatible with implanted metal and electronic devices (for example, pacemakers). However, optical imaging technology has heretofore lacked the combination of spatial resolution and wide field of view sufficient to map distributed brain functions. Here, we present a high-density diffuse optical tomography imaging array that can map higher-order, distributed brain function. The system was tested by imaging four hierarchical language tasks and multiple resting-state networks including the dorsal attention and default mode networks. Finally, we imaged brain function in patients with Parkinson's disease and implanted deep brain stimulators that preclude functional magnetic resonance imaging.

Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Ferradal, Silvina L.; Robichaux-Viehoever, Amy; Hassanpour, Mahlega S.; Dehghani, Hamid; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Hershey, Tamara; Culver, Joseph P.

2014-06-01

187

Effects of the diet on brain function  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The rates of synthesis by brain neurons of the neurotransmitters serotonin, acetylcholine, and the catecholamines depend on the brain levels of the respective precursor molecules. Brain levels of each precursor are influenced by their blood concentration, and for the amino acid precursors, by the blood levels of other amino acids as well. Since diet readily alters blood concentrations of each of these precursors, it thereby also influences the brain formation of their neutrotransmitter products.

Fernstrom, J. D.

1981-01-01

188

Abnormal structural and functional brain connectivity in gray matter heterotopia  

E-print Network

Purpose:? Periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) is a malformation of cortical development associated with epilepsy and dyslexia. Evidence suggests that heterotopic gray matter can be functional in brain malformations ...

Christodoulou, Joanna

189

ScaleScale--free Brain Functional Networksfree Brain Functional Networks victor@imedea.uib.es www.imedea.uib.es/~victor  

E-print Network

ScaleScale--free Brain Functional Networksfree Brain Functional Networks victor@imedea.uib.es wwwPlan Motivation: Networks & Brain How to get functional networks from fMRI Characterization of brain functional) Co-authorship of scientific papers #12;...... and the brainand the brain #12;""In catalogue" cortical

Oro, Daniel

190

Plasticity of the Injured Human Spinal Cord: Insights Revealed by Spinal Cord Functional MRI  

PubMed Central

Introduction While numerous studies have documented evidence for plasticity of the human brain there is little evidence that the human spinal cord can change after injury. Here, we employ a novel spinal fMRI design where we stimulate normal and abnormal sensory dermatomes in persons with traumatic spinal cord injury and perform a connectivity analysis to understand how spinal networks process information. Methods Spinal fMRI data was collected at 3 Tesla at two institutions from 38 individuals using the standard SEEP functional MR imaging techniques. Thermal stimulation was applied to four dermatomes in an interleaved timing pattern during each fMRI acquisition. SCI patients were stimulated in dermatomes both above (normal sensation) and below the level of their injury. Sub-group analysis was performed on healthy controls (n?=?20), complete SCI (n?=?3), incomplete SCI (n?=?9) and SCI patients who recovered full function (n?=?6). Results Patients with chronic incomplete SCI, when stimulated in a dermatome of normal sensation, showed an increased number of active voxels relative to controls (p?=?0.025). There was an inverse relationship between the degree of sensory impairment and the number of active voxels in the region of the spinal cord corresponding to that dermatome of abnormal sensation (R2?=?0.93, p<0.001). Lastly, a connectivity analysis demonstrated a significantly increased number of intraspinal connections in incomplete SCI patients relative to controls suggesting altered processing of afferent sensory signals. Conclusions In this work we demonstrate the use of spinal fMRI to investigate changes in spinal processing of somatosensory information in the human spinal cord. We provide evidence for plasticity of the human spinal cord after traumatic injury based on an increase in the average number of active voxels in dermatomes of normal sensation in chronic SCI patients and an increased number of intraspinal connections in incomplete SCI patients relative to healthy controls. PMID:23029097

Cadotte, David W.; Bosma, Rachael; Mikulis, David; Nugaeva, Natalia; Smith, Karen; Pokrupa, Ronald; Islam, Omar; Stroman, Patrick W.; Fehlings, Michael G.

2012-01-01

191

Neuropharmacology 37 (1998) 633655 Hebbian-like functional plasticity in the auditory cortex of the  

E-print Network

Neuropharmacology 37 (1998) 633­655 Hebbian-like functional plasticity in the auditory cortex, the necessary conditions, including those related to behavior, for lasting modifications to occur in correlated plasticity depends critically on behavior. During behavior, an increase in the correlation caused a short

Ahissar, Ehud

192

Phenotypic plasticity in Phragmites australis as a functional response to water depth  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have performed investigations to see if the emergent macrophyte Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. exhibits phenotypic plasticity as a response to water depth and if such responses in biomass allocation pattern and morphology are functional responses, improving the performance of the plant. In greenhouse experiments plants were grown in deep or shallow water to evaluate plastic responses. Allometric

Viveka Vretare; Stefan E. B Weisner; John A Strand; Wilhelm Granéli

2001-01-01

193

Plasticity of Attentional Functions in Older Adults after Non-Action Video Game Training: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

A major goal of recent research in aging has been to examine cognitive plasticity in older adults and its capacity to counteract cognitive decline. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether older adults could benefit from brain training with video games in a cross-modal oddball task designed to assess distraction and alertness. Twenty-seven healthy older adults participated in the study (15 in the experimental group, 12 in the control group. The experimental group received 20 1-hr video game training sessions using a commercially available brain-training package (Lumosity) involving problem solving, mental calculation, working memory and attention tasks. The control group did not practice this package and, instead, attended meetings with the other members of the study several times along the course of the study. Both groups were evaluated before and after the intervention using a cross-modal oddball task measuring alertness and distraction. The results showed a significant reduction of distraction and an increase of alertness in the experimental group and no variation in the control group. These results suggest neurocognitive plasticity in the old human brain as training enhanced cognitive performance on attentional functions. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02007616 PMID:24647551

Mayas, Julia; Parmentier, Fabrice B. R.; Andres, Pilar; Ballesteros, Soledad

2014-01-01

194

Deterioration of plasticity and metabolic homeostasis in the brain of the UCD-T2DM rat model of naturally occurring type-2 diabetes.  

PubMed

The rising prevalence of type-2 diabetes is becoming a pressing issue based on emerging reports that T2DM can also adversely impact mental health. We have utilized the UCD-T2DM rat model in which the onset of T2DM develops spontaneously across time and can serve to understand the pathophysiology of diabetes in humans. An increased insulin resistance index and plasma glucose levels manifested the onset of T2DM. There was a decrease in hippocampal insulin receptor signaling in the hippocampus, which correlated with peripheral insulin resistance index along the course of diabetes onset (r=-0.56, p<0.01). T2DM increased the hippocampal levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE; a marker of lipid peroxidation) in inverse proportion to the changes in the mitochondrial regulator PGC-1?. Disrupted energy homeostasis was further manifested by a concurrent reduction in energy metabolic markers, including TFAM, SIRT1, and AMPK phosphorylation. In addition, T2DM influenced brain plasticity as evidenced by a significant reduction of BDNF-TrkB signaling. These results suggest that the pathology of T2DM in the brain involves a progressive and coordinated disruption of insulin signaling, and energy homeostasis, with profound consequences for brain function and plasticity. All the described consequences of T2DM were attenuated by treatment with the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide. Similar results to those of liraglutide were obtained by exposing T2DM rats to a food energy restricted diet, which suggest that normalization of brain energy metabolism is a crucial factor to counteract central insulin sensitivity and synaptic plasticity associated with T2DM. PMID:24840661

Agrawal, Rahul; Zhuang, Yumei; Cummings, Bethany P; Stanhope, Kimber L; Graham, James L; Havel, Peter J; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

2014-09-01

195

Functional photoacoustic tomography of animal brains  

E-print Network

the most rewarding experience in my life. I would like to thank Dr. Lihong Wang for supporting me through his research funding and for providing me this great opportunity to study in his lab. His broad knowledge and acute insight guided me all through...-animal Brains in situ............................................................ 13 3.1 Photoacoustic imaging of mouse brains in situ................................... 13 3.2 Photoacoustic imaging of rat brains in situ...

Wang, Xueding

2005-11-01

196

What Is the Function of Mind and Brain?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Byrnes and Fox (1998) provide a useful and important overview of the ways in which cognitive neuroscientific research can inform educational research and practice, but leave unanswered the question: What is the function of mind and brain? An understanding of the function of mind and brain has implications for research in cognitive neuroscience and in educational psychology, and a number

David C. Geary

1998-01-01

197

Brain serotonin and pituitary-adrenal functions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It had been concluded by Scapagnini et al. (1971) that brain serotonin (5-HT) was involved in the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of the pituitary-adrenal system but not in the stress response. A study was conducted to investigate these findings further by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-HT levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. In a number of experiments brain 5-HT synthesis was inhibited with parachlorophenylalanine. In other tests it was tried to raise the level of brain 5-HT with precursors.

Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Berger, P.; Barchas, J. D.

1973-01-01

198

Spatial variability of functional brain networks in early-blind and sighted subjects.  

PubMed

To further the understanding how the human brain adapts to early-onset blindness, we searched in early-blind and normally-sighted subjects for functional brain networks showing the most and least spatial variabilities across subjects. We hypothesized that the functional networks compensating for early-onset blindness undergo cortical reorganization. To determine whether reorganization of functional networks affects spatial variability, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare brain networks, derived by independent component analysis, of 7 early-blind and 7 sighted subjects while they rested or listened to an audio drama. In both conditions, the blind compared with sighted subjects showed more spatial variability in a bilateral parietal network (comprising the inferior parietal and angular gyri and precuneus) and in a bilateral auditory network (comprising the superior temporal gyri). In contrast, a vision-related left-hemisphere-lateralized occipital network (comprising the superior, middle and inferior occipital gyri, fusiform and lingual gyri, and the calcarine sulcus) was less variable in blind than sighted subjects. Another visual network and a tactile network were spatially more variable in the blind than sighted subjects in one condition. We contemplate whether our results on inter-subject spatial variability of brain networks are related to experience-dependent brain plasticity, and we suggest that auditory and parietal networks undergo a stronger experience-dependent reorganization in the early-blind than sighted subjects while the opposite is true for the vision-related occipital network. PMID:24680867

Boldt, Robert; Seppä, Mika; Malinen, Sanna; Tikka, Pia; Hari, Riitta; Carlson, Synnöve

2014-07-15

199

Possible contributions of a novel form of synaptic plasticity in Aplysia to reward, memory, and their dysfunctions in mammalian brain  

PubMed Central

Recent studies in Aplysia have identified a new variation of synaptic plasticity in which modulatory transmitters enhance spontaneous release of glutamate, which then acts on postsynaptic receptors to recruit mechanisms of intermediate- and long-term plasticity. In this review I suggest the hypothesis that similar plasticity occurs in mammals, where it may contribute to reward, memory, and their dysfunctions in several psychiatric disorders. In Aplysia, spontaneous release is enhanced by activation of presynaptic serotonin receptors, but presynaptic D1 dopamine receptors or nicotinic acetylcholine receptors could play a similar role in mammals. Those receptors enhance spontaneous release of glutamate in hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, prefrontal cortex, ventral tegmental area, and nucleus accumbens. In all of those brain areas, glutamate can activate postsynaptic receptors to elevate Ca2+ and engage mechanisms of early-phase long-term potentiation (LTP), including AMPA receptor insertion, and of late-phase LTP, including protein synthesis and growth. Thus, presynaptic receptors and spontaneous release may contribute to postsynaptic mechanisms of plasticity in brain regions involved in reward and memory, and could play roles in disorders that affect plasticity in those regions, including addiction, Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). PMID:24049187

Hawkins, Robert D.

2013-01-01

200

Functional Genomics of Physiological Plasticity and Local Adaptation in Killifish  

PubMed Central

Evolutionary solutions to the physiological challenges of life in highly variable habitats can span the continuum from evolution of a cosmopolitan plastic phenotype to the evolution of locally adapted phenotypes. Killifish (Fundulus sp.) have evolved both highly plastic and locally adapted phenotypes within different selective contexts, providing a comparative system in which to explore the genomic underpinnings of physiological plasticity and adaptive variation. Importantly, extensive variation exists among populations and species for tolerance to a variety of stressors, and we exploit this variation in comparative studies to yield insights into the genomic basis of evolved phenotypic variation. Notably, species of Fundulus occupy the continuum of osmotic habitats from freshwater to marine and populations within Fundulus heteroclitus span far greater variation in pollution tolerance than across all species of fish. Here, we explore how transcriptome regulation underpins extreme physiological plasticity on osmotic shock and how genomic and transcriptomic variation is associated with locally evolved pollution tolerance. We show that F. heteroclitus quickly acclimate to extreme osmotic shock by mounting a dramatic rapid transcriptomic response including an early crisis control phase followed by a tissue remodeling phase involving many regulatory pathways. We also show that convergent evolution of locally adapted pollution tolerance involves complex patterns of gene expression and genome sequence variation, which is confounded with body-weight dependence for some genes. Similarly, exploiting the natural phenotypic variation associated with other established and emerging model organisms is likely to greatly accelerate the pace of discovery of the genomic basis of phenotypic variation. PMID:20581107

Galvez, Fernando; Zhang, Shujun; Williams, Larissa M.; Oleksiak, Marjorie F.

2011-01-01

201

Structure-function relationships in human brain development  

E-print Network

The integration of anatomical, functional, and developmental approaches in cognitive neuroscience is essential for generating mechanistic explanations of brain function. In this thesis, I first establish a proof-of-principle ...

Saygin, Zeynep Mevhibe

2012-01-01

202

Nonparametric hierarchical Bayesian model for functional brain parcellation  

E-print Network

We develop a method for unsupervised analysis of functional brain images that learns group-level patterns of functional response. Our algorithm is based on a generative model that comprises two main layers. At the lower ...

Lashkari, Danial

203

Brief Communications Efficiency of Functional Brain Networks and Intellectual Performance  

E-print Network

Our brain is a complex network in which information is continuously processed and transported between spatially distributed but functionally linked regions. Recent studies have shown that the functional connections of the brain network are organized in a highly efficient small-world manner, indicating a high level of local neighborhood clustering, together with the existence of more long-distance connectionsthatensureahighlevelofglobalcommunicationefficiencywithintheoverallnetwork.Suchanefficientnetworkarchitecture of our functional brain raises the question of a possible association between how efficiently the regions of our brain are functionally connected and our level of intelligence. Examining the overall organization of the brain network using graph analysis, we show a strong negative association between the normalized characteristic path length ? of the resting-state brain network and intelligence quotient (IQ). This suggests that human intellectual performance is likely to be related to how efficiently our brain integrates information between multiple brain regions. Most pronounced effects between normalized path length and IQ were found in frontal and parietal regions. Our findings indicate a strong positive association between the global efficiency of functional brain networks and intellectual performance.

Martijn P. Van Den Heuvel; Cornelis J. Stam; René S. Kahn; Hilleke E. Hulshoff Pol

204

Efficiency of weak brain connections support general cognitive functioning.  

PubMed

Brain network topology provides valuable information on healthy and pathological brain functioning. Novel approaches for brain network analysis have shown an association between topological properties and cognitive functioning. Under the assumption that "stronger is better", the exploration of brain properties has generally focused on the connectivity patterns of the most strongly correlated regions, whereas the role of weaker brain connections has remained obscure for years. Here, we assessed whether the different strength of connections between brain regions may explain individual differences in intelligence. We analyzed-functional connectivity at rest in ninety-eight healthy individuals of different age, and correlated several connectivity measures with full scale, verbal, and performance Intelligent Quotients (IQs). Our results showed that the variance in IQ levels was mostly explained by the distributed communication efficiency of brain networks built using moderately weak, long-distance connections, with only a smaller contribution of stronger connections. The variability in individual IQs was associated with the global efficiency of a pool of regions in the prefrontal lobes, hippocampus, temporal pole, and postcentral gyrus. These findings challenge the traditional view of a prominent role of strong functional brain connections in brain topology, and highlight the importance of both strong and weak connections in determining the functional architecture responsible for human intelligence variability. PMID:24585433

Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Galli, Giulia; Polizzotto, Nicola Riccardo; Rossi, Alessandro; Rossi, Simone

2014-09-01

205

Sugar for the brain: the role of glucose in physiological and pathological brain function  

PubMed Central

The mammalian brain depends upon glucose as its main source of energy, and tight regulation of glucose metabolism is critical for brain physiology. Consistent with its critical role for physiological brain function, disruption of normal glucose metabolism as well as its interdependence with cell death pathways forms the pathophysiological basis for many brain disorders. Here, we review recent advances in understanding how glucose metabolism sustains basic brain physiology. We aim at synthesizing these findings to form a comprehensive picture of the cooperation required between different systems and cell types, and the specific breakdowns in this cooperation which lead to disease. PMID:23968694

Mergenthaler, Philipp; Lindauer, Ute; Dienel, Gerald A.; Meisel, Andreas

2013-01-01

206

Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain Imaging | 1110 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990 20001993 20031996 20061991 20011994 20041997 20071992 20021995 20051998 20081999 2009 2010  

E-print Network

Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain Imaging | 1110 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain SINAPSE initiative launched 2010 NIH Human Connectome Project launched 2003 Dynamic causal modelling of human brain/Living Art Enterprises, Science Photo Libra

Rambaut, Andrew

207

The dynamic dielectric at a brain functional site and an em wave approach to functional brain imaging.  

PubMed

Functional brain imaging has tremendous applications. The existing methods for functional brain imaging include functional Magnetic Resonant Imaging (fMRI), scalp electroencephalography (EEG), implanted EEG, magnetoencephalography (MEG) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which have been widely and successfully applied to various brain imaging studies. To develop a new method for functional brain imaging, here we show that the dielectric at a brain functional site has a dynamic nature, varying with local neuronal activation as the permittivity of the dielectric varies with the ion concentration of the extracellular fluid surrounding neurons in activation. Therefore, the neuronal activation can be sensed by a radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) wave propagating through the site as the phase change of the EM wave varies with the permittivity. Such a dynamic nature of the dielectric at a brain functional site provides the basis for an RF EM wave approach to detecting and imaging neuronal activation at brain functional sites, leading to an RF EM wave approach to functional brain imaging. PMID:25367217

Li, X P; Xia, Q; Qu, D; Wu, T C; Yang, D G; Hao, W D; Jiang, X; Li, X M

2014-01-01

208

The Dynamic Dielectric at a Brain Functional Site and an EM Wave Approach to Functional Brain Imaging  

PubMed Central

Functional brain imaging has tremendous applications. The existing methods for functional brain imaging include functional Magnetic Resonant Imaging (fMRI), scalp electroencephalography (EEG), implanted EEG, magnetoencephalography (MEG) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which have been widely and successfully applied to various brain imaging studies. To develop a new method for functional brain imaging, here we show that the dielectric at a brain functional site has a dynamic nature, varying with local neuronal activation as the permittivity of the dielectric varies with the ion concentration of the extracellular fluid surrounding neurons in activation. Therefore, the neuronal activation can be sensed by a radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) wave propagating through the site as the phase change of the EM wave varies with the permittivity. Such a dynamic nature of the dielectric at a brain functional site provides the basis for an RF EM wave approach to detecting and imaging neuronal activation at brain functional sites, leading to an RF EM wave approach to functional brain imaging. PMID:25367217

Li, X. P.; Xia, Q.; Qu, D.; Wu, T. C.; Yang, D. G.; Hao, W. D.; Jiang, X.; Li, X. M.

2014-01-01

209

Comparison of Swallowing Functions Between Brain Tumor and Stroke Patients  

PubMed Central

Objective To compare the swallowing functions according to the lesion locations between brain tumor and stroke patients. Methods Forty brain tumor patients and the same number of age-, lesion-, and functional status-matching stroke patients were enrolled in this study. Before beginning the swallowing therapy, swallowing function was evaluated in all subjects by videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Brain lesions were classified as either supratentorial or in-fratentorial. We evaluated the following: the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Outcome Measurement System (NOMS) swallowing scale, clinical dysphagia scale, functional dysphagia scale (FDS), penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), oral transit time, pharyngeal transit time, the presence of vallecular pouch residue, pyriform sinus residue, laryngopharyngeal incoordination, premature spillage, a decreased swal-lowing reflex, pneumonia, and the feeding method at discharge. Results The incidence of dysphagia was similar in brain tumor and stroke patients. There were no differences in the results of the various swallowing scales and other parameters between the two groups. When compared brain tumor patients with supratentorial lesions, brain tumor patients with infratentorial lesions showed higher propor-tion of dysphagia (p=0.01), residue (p<0.01), FDS (p<0.01), PAS (p<0.01), and lower ASHA NOMS (p=0.02) at initial evaluation. However, there was no significant difference for the swallowing functions between benign and malig-nant brain tumor patients. Conclusion Swallowing function of brain tumor patients was not different from that of stroke patients according to matching age, location of lesion, and functional status. Similar to the stroke patients, brain tumor patients with infratentorial lesions present poor swallowing functions. However, the type of brain tumor as malignancy does not influence swallowing functions. PMID:24231855

Park, Dae Hwan; Lee, Sook Joung; Song, Yoon Bum

2013-01-01

210

Development of large-scale functional brain networks in children.  

PubMed

The ontogeny of large-scale functional organization of the human brain is not well understood. Here we use network analysis of intrinsic functional connectivity to characterize the organization of brain networks in 23 children (ages 7-9 y) and 22 young-adults (ages 19-22 y). Comparison of network properties, including path-length, clustering-coefficient, hierarchy, and regional connectivity, revealed that although children and young-adults' brains have similar "small-world" organization at the global level, they differ significantly in hierarchical organization and interregional connectivity. We found that subcortical areas were more strongly connected with primary sensory, association, and paralimbic areas in children, whereas young-adults showed stronger cortico-cortical connectivity between paralimbic, limbic, and association areas. Further, combined analysis of functional connectivity with wiring distance measures derived from white-matter fiber tracking revealed that the development of large-scale brain networks is characterized by weakening of short-range functional connectivity and strengthening of long-range functional connectivity. Importantly, our findings show that the dynamic process of over-connectivity followed by pruning, which rewires connectivity at the neuronal level, also operates at the systems level, helping to reconfigure and rebalance subcortical and paralimbic connectivity in the developing brain. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of network analysis of brain connectivity to elucidate key principles underlying functional brain maturation, paving the way for novel studies of disrupted brain connectivity in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism. PMID:19621066

Supekar, Kaustubh; Musen, Mark; Menon, Vinod

2009-07-01

211

The serotonin receptor 7 and the structural plasticity of brain circuits  

PubMed Central

Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) modulates numerous physiological processes in the nervous system. Together with its function as neurotransmitter, 5-HT regulates neurite outgrowth, dendritic spine shape and density, growth cone motility and synapse formation during development. In the mammalian brain 5-HT innervation is virtually ubiquitous and the diversity and specificity of its signaling and function arise from at least 20 different receptors, grouped in 7 classes. Here we will focus on the role 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7R) in the correct establishment of neuronal cytoarchitecture during development, as also suggested by its involvement in several neurodevelopmental disorders. The emerging picture shows that this receptor is a key player contributing not only to shape brain networks during development but also to remodel neuronal wiring in the mature brain, thus controlling cognitive and emotional responses. The activation of 5-HT7R might be one of the mechanisms underlying the ability of the CNS to respond to different stimuli by modulation of its circuit configuration. PMID:25309369

Volpicelli, Floriana; Speranza, Luisa; di Porzio, Umberto; Crispino, Marianna; Perrone-Capano, Carla

2014-01-01

212

State-related functional integration and functional segregation brain networks in schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Altered topological properties of brain connectivity networks have emerged as important features of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to investigate how the state-related modulations to graph measures of functional integration and functional segregation brain networks are disrupted in schizophrenia. Firstly, resting state and auditory oddball discrimination (AOD) fMRI data of healthy controls (HCs) and schizophrenia patients (SZs) were decomposed into spatially independent components (ICs) by group independent component analysis (ICA). Then, weighted positive and negative functional integration (inter-component networks) and functional segregation (intra-component networks) brain networks were built in each subject. Subsequently, connectivity strength, clustering coefficient, and global efficiency of all brain networks were statistically compared between groups (HCs and SZs) in each state and between states (rest and AOD) within group. We found that graph measures of negative functional integration brain network and several positive functional segregation brain networks were altered in schizophrenia during AOD task. The metrics of positive functional integration brain network and one positive functional segregation brain network were higher during the resting state than during the AOD task only in HCs. These findings imply that state-related characteristics of both functional integration and functional segregation brain networks are impaired in schizophrenia which provides new insight into the altered brain performance in this brain disorder. PMID:24094882

Yu, Qingbao; Sui, Jing; Kiehl, Kent A.; Pearlson, Godfrey; Calhoun, Vince D.

2013-01-01

213

Non-verbal emotion communication training induces specific changes in brain function and structure  

PubMed Central

The perception of emotional cues from voice and face is essential for social interaction. However, this process is altered in various psychiatric conditions along with impaired social functioning. Emotion communication trainings have been demonstrated to improve social interaction in healthy individuals and to reduce emotional communication deficits in psychiatric patients. Here, we investigated the impact of a non-verbal emotion communication training (NECT) on cerebral activation and brain structure in a controlled and combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and voxel-based morphometry study. NECT-specific reductions in brain activity occurred in a distributed set of brain regions including face and voice processing regions as well as emotion processing- and motor-related regions presumably reflecting training-induced familiarization with the evaluation of face/voice stimuli. Training-induced changes in non-verbal emotion sensitivity at the behavioral level and the respective cerebral activation patterns were correlated in the face-selective cortical areas in the posterior superior temporal sulcus and fusiform gyrus for valence ratings and in the temporal pole, lateral prefrontal cortex and midbrain/thalamus for the response times. A NECT-induced increase in gray matter (GM) volume was observed in the fusiform face area. Thus, NECT induces both functional and structural plasticity in the face processing system as well as functional plasticity in the emotion perception and evaluation system. We propose that functional alterations are presumably related to changes in sensory tuning in the decoding of emotional expressions. Taken together, these findings highlight that the present experimental design may serve as a valuable tool to investigate the altered behavioral and neuronal processing of emotional cues in psychiatric disorders as well as the impact of therapeutic interventions on brain function and structure. PMID:24146641

Kreifelts, Benjamin; Jacob, Heike; Bruck, Carolin; Erb, Michael; Ethofer, Thomas; Wildgruber, Dirk

2013-01-01

214

Evidence for hubs in human functional brain networks  

PubMed Central

Summary Hubs integrate and distribute information in powerful ways due to the number and positioning of their contacts in a network. Several resting state functional connectivity MRI reports have implicated regions of the default mode system as brain hubs; we demonstrate that previous degree-based approaches to hub identification may have identified portions of large brain systems rather than critical nodes of brain networks. We utilize two methods to identify hub-like brain regions: 1) finding network nodes that participate in multiple sub-networks of the brain, and 2) finding spatial locations where several systems are represented within a small volume. These methods converge on a distributed set of regions that differ from previous reports on hubs. This work identifies regions that support multiple systems, leading to spatially constrained predictions about brain function that may be tested in terms of lesions, evoked responses, and dynamic patterns of activity. PMID:23972601

Power, Jonathan D; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Petersen, Steven E

2013-01-01

215

Decoding brain states using functional magnetic resonance imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most leading research in basic and clinical neuroscience has been carried out by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI),\\u000a which detects the blood oxygenation level dependent signals associated with neural activities. Among new fMRI applications,\\u000a brain decoding is an emerging research area, which infers mental states from fMRI signals. Brain decoding using fMRI includes\\u000a classification, identification, and reconstruction of brain states.

Dongha Lee; Changwon Jang; Hae-Jeong Park

2011-01-01

216

Protein kinase A-dependent enhanced NMDA receptor function in pain-related synaptic plasticity in rat amygdala neurones  

PubMed Central

Mechanisms of pain-related plasticity in the amygdala, a key player in emotionality, were studied at the cellular and molecular levels in a model of arthritic pain. The influence of the arthritis pain state induced in vivo on synaptic transmission and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor function was examined in vitro using whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings of neurones in the latero-capsular part of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), which is now defined as the ‘nociceptive amygdala’. Synaptic transmission was evoked by electrical stimulation of afferents from the pontine parabrachial area (part of the spino-parabrachio-amygdaloid pain pathway) in brain slices from control rats and from arthritic rats. This study shows that pain-related synaptic plasticity is accompanied by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated enhanced NMDA-receptor function and increased phosphorylation of NMDA-receptor 1 (NR1) subunits. Synaptic plasticity in the arthritis pain model, but not normal synaptic transmission in control neurones, was inhibited by a selective NMDA receptor antagonist. Accordingly, an NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic component was recorded in neurones from arthritic animals, but not in control neurones, and was blocked by inhibition of PKA but not protein kinase C (PKC). Exogenous NMDA evoked a larger inward current in neurones from arthritic animals than in control neurones, indicating a postsynaptic effect. Paired-pulse facilitation, a measure of presynaptic mechanisms, was not affected by an NMDA-receptor antagonist. Increased levels of phosphorylated NR1 protein, but not of total NR1, were measured in the CeA of arthritic rats compared to controls. Our results suggest that pain-related synaptic plasticity in the amygdala involves a critical switch of postsynaptic NMDA receptor function through PKA-dependent NR1 phosphorylation. PMID:15760935

Bird, Gary C; Lash, L Leanne; Han, Jeong S; Zou, Xiaoju; Willis, William D; Neugebauer, Volker

2005-01-01

217

Norepinephrine and Neural Plasticity: The Effects of Xylamine on Experience-Induced Changes in Brain Weight, Memory, and Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hypothesis that norepinephrine (NE) is critically involved in neural plasticity was tested by administering xylamine, (N-2-chloroethyl-2-methylbenzylamine, 50 mg\\/kg ip) a noradrenergic neurotoxin, to young rats prior to maze training or environmentally enriched housing. In saline-treated rats, exposure to enriched conditions significantly increased the weight of occipital, dorsal, and ventral cortices and the remaining brain compared to individually housed rats.

S. Benloucif; E. L. Bennett; M. R. Rosenzweig

1995-01-01

218

Exploring the impact of plasticity-related recovery after brain damage in a connectionist model of single-word reading  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of retraining a damaged connectionist model of single-word reading was investigated with the aim of establishing\\u000a whether plasticity-related changes occurring during the recovery process can contribute to our understanding of the pattern\\u000a of dissociations found in brain-damaged patients. In particular, we sought to reproduce the strong frequency × consistency\\u000a interactions found in surface dyslexia. A replication of Plaut,

Stephen R. Welbourne; Matthew A. Lambon Ralph

2005-01-01

219

Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Induced Gene Expression Reveals Novel Actions of VGF in Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synaptic strengthening induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with learning and is coupled to transcrip- tional activation. However, identification of the spectrum of genes associated with BDNF-induced synaptic plasticity and the correlation of expression with learning paradigms in vivo has not yet been studied. Transcriptional analysis of BDNF-induced synaptic strengthening in cultured hippocampal neurons revealed increased expression of

Janet Alder; Smita Thakker-Varia; Debra A. Bangasser; May Kuroiwa; Mark R. Plummer; Tracey J. Shors; Ira B. Black

2003-01-01

220

Magnetic resonance functional imaging of the brain at 4 t  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging of human brain function using echo-planar imaging at 4 T gives good freedom from motion artifact, high signal-to-noise ratio\\/unit time, and adequate spatial resolution. Studies were made of brain activation associated with perceptual and cognitive tasks of several minutes duration.

P. Jezzard

1994-01-01

221

Rho GTPase-dependent plasticity of dendritic spines in the adult brain  

PubMed Central

Brain activity is associated with structural changes in the neural connections. However, in vivo imaging of the outer cortical layers has shown that dendritic spines, on which most excitatory synapses insist, are predominantly stable in adulthood. Changes in dendritic spines are governed by small GTPases of the Rho family through modulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Yet, while there are abundant data about this functional effect of Rho GTPases in vitro, there is limited evidence that Rho GTPase signaling in the brain is associated with changes in neuronal morphology. In the present work, both chronic in vivo two-photon imaging and Golgi staining reveal that the activation of Rho GTPases in the adult mouse brain is associated with little change of dendritic spines in the apical dendrites of primary visual cortex pyramidal neurons. On the contrary, considerable increase in spine density is observed (i) in the basal dendrites of the same neurons (ii) in both basal and apical dendrites of the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. While confirming that Rho GTPase-dependent increase in spine density can be substantial, the study indicates region and dendrite selectivity with relative stability of superficial cortical circuits. PMID:23734098

Martino, Assunta; Ettorre, Michele; Musilli, Marco; Lorenzetto, Erika; Buffelli, Mario; Diana, Giovanni

2013-01-01

222

Differential Modulation of Drug-Induced Structural and Functional Plasticity of Dendritic Spines  

PubMed Central

Drug-induced plasticity of excitatory synapses has been proposed to be the cellular mechanism underlying the aberrant learning associated with addiction. Exposure to various drugs of abuse causes both morphological plasticity of dendritic spines and functional plasticity of excitatory synaptic transmission. Chronic activation of ?-opioid receptors (MOR) in cultured hippocampal neurons causes two forms of synaptic plasticity: loss of dendritic spines and loss of synaptic ?-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. With use of live imaging, patch-clamp electrophysiology, and immunocytochemistry, the present study reveals that these two forms of synaptic plasticity are mediated by separate, but interactive, intracellular signaling cascades. The inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II with 1-[N,O-bis(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-N-methyl-l-tyrosyl]-4-phenylpiperazine (KN-62) blocks MOR-mediated structural plasticity of dendritic spines, but not MOR-mediated cellular redistribution of GluR1 and GluR2 AMPA receptor subunits. In contrast, the inhibition of calcineurin with tacrolimus (FK506) blocks both cellular processes. These findings support the idea that drug-induced structural and functional plasticity of dendritic spines is mediated by divergent, but interactive, signaling pathways. PMID:22596350

Miller, Eric C.; Zhang, Lei; Dummer, Benjamin W.; Cariveau, Desmond R.; Loh, Horace; Law, Ping-Yee

2012-01-01

223

Independent component analysis for intraoperative functional brain mapping using laser Doppler imaging  

E-print Network

Independent component analysis for intraoperative functional brain mapping using laser Doppler brain mapping Á Blood perfusion Purpose Intraoperative functional brain mapping during neurosurgery is useful prior to surgical removal of lesions close to functionally important regions. Presurgical planning

Floreano, Dario

224

Complex Networks - A Key to Understanding Brain Function  

SciTech Connect

The brain is a complex network of neurons, engaging in spontaneous and evoked activity that is thought to be the main substrate of mental life. How this complex system works together to process information and generate coherent cognitive states, even consciousness, is not yet well understood. In my talk I will review recent studies that have revealed characteristic structural and functional attributes of brain networks, and discuss efforts to build computational models of the brain that are informed by our growing knowledge of brain anatomy and physiology.

Sporns, Olaf (Indiana University) [Indiana University

2008-01-23

225

Complex Networks - A Key to Understanding Brain Function  

ScienceCinema

The brain is a complex network of neurons, engaging in spontaneous and evoked activity that is thought to be the main substrate of mental life.  How this complex system works together to process information and generate coherent cognitive states, even consciousness, is not yet well understood.  In my talk I will review recent studies that have revealed characteristic structural and functional attributes of brain networks, and discuss efforts to build computational models of the brain that are informed by our growing knowledge of brain anatomy and physiology.

Olaf Sporns

2010-01-08

226

Immune responses at brain barriers and implications for brain development and neurological function in later life  

PubMed Central

For a long time the brain has been considered an immune-privileged site due to a muted inflammatory response and the presence of protective brain barriers. It is now recognized that neuroinflammation may play an important role in almost all neurological disorders and that the brain barriers may be contributing through either normal immune signaling or disruption of their basic physiological mechanisms. The distinction between normal function and dysfunction at the barriers is difficult to dissect, partly due to a lack of understanding of normal barrier function and partly because of physiological changes that occur as part of normal development and ageing. Brain barriers consist of a number of interacting structural and physiological elements including tight junctions between adjacent barrier cells and an array of influx and efflux transporters. Despite these protective mechanisms, the capacity for immune-surveillance of the brain is maintained, and there is evidence of inflammatory signaling at the brain barriers that may be an important part of the body's response to damage or infection. This signaling system appears to change both with normal ageing, and during disease. Changes may affect diapedesis of immune cells and active molecular transfer, or cause rearrangement of the tight junctions and an increase in passive permeability across barrier interfaces. Here we review the many elements that contribute to brain barrier functions and how they respond to inflammation, particularly during development and aging. The implications of inflammation–induced barrier dysfunction for brain development and subsequent neurological function are also discussed. PMID:23986663

Stolp, Helen B.; Liddelow, Shane A.; Sa-Pereira, Ines; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Saunders, Norman R.

2013-01-01

227

UNDERSTANDING THE NEUROBIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS OF LEARNING AND MEMORY: MEMORY SYSTEMS OF THE BRAIN, LONG TERM POTENTIATION AND SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY PART III B  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY One of the central issues in neuroscience is concerned with the activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in learning and memory. In such context, changing the strength of synaptic activity between neurons has been widely accepted as the mechanism responsible by which memory traces are encoded and stored in the brain. Thus, the synaptic plasticity and memory hypothesis (SPM hypothesis) shows that

Philippe Leff; Héctor Romo; Maura Matus; Adriana Hernández; Juan Carlos Calva; Rodolfo Acevedo; Carlos Torner; Rafael Gutiérrez; Benito Anton

2002-01-01

228

Cellular and molecular analysis of neuronal structure plasticity in the mammalian cortex  

E-print Network

Despite decades of evidence for functional plasticity in the adult brain, the role of structural plasticity in its manifestation remains unclear. cpg15 is an activity-regulated gene encoding a membrane-bound ligand that ...

Lee, Wei-Chung Allen

2006-01-01

229

Dynamical intrinsic functional architecture of the brain during absence seizures.  

PubMed

Epilepsy is characterized by recurrent and temporary brain dysfunction due to discharges of interconnected groups of neurons. The brain of epilepsy patients has a dynamic bifurcation that switches between epileptic and normal states. The dysfunctional state involves large-scale brain networks. It is very important to understand the network mechanisms of seizure initiation, maintenance, and termination in epilepsy. Absence epilepsy provides a unique model for neuroimaging investigation on dynamic evolutions of brain networks over seizure repertoire. By using a dynamic functional connectivity and graph theoretical analyses to study absence seizures (AS), we aimed to obtain transition of network properties that account for seizure onset and offset. We measured resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) from children with AS. We used simultaneous EEG to define the preictal, ictal and postictal intervals of seizures. We measured dynamic connectivity maps of the thalamus network and the default mode network (DMN), as well as functional connectome topologies, during the three different seizure intervals. The analysis of dynamic changes of anti-correlation between the thalamus and the DMN is consistent with an inhibitory effect of seizures on the default mode of brain function, which gradually fades out after seizure onset. Also, we observed complex transitions of functional network topology, implicating adaptive reconfiguration of functional brain networks. In conclusion, our work revealed novel insights into modifications in large-scale functional connectome during AS, which may contribute to a better understanding the network mechanisms of state bifurcations in epileptogenesis. PMID:23913255

Liao, Wei; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Mantini, Dante; Xu, Qiang; Ji, Gong-Jun; Zhang, Han; Wang, Jue; Wang, Zhengge; Chen, Guanghui; Tian, Lei; Jiao, Qing; Zang, Yu-Feng; Lu, Guangming

2014-11-01

230

In vivo visuotopic brain mapping with manganese-enhanced MRI and resting-state functional connectivity MRI.  

PubMed

The rodents are an increasingly important model for understanding the mechanisms of development, plasticity, functional specialization and disease in the visual system. However, limited tools have been available for assessing the structural and functional connectivity of the visual brain network globally, in vivo and longitudinally. There are also ongoing debates on whether functional brain connectivity directly reflects structural brain connectivity. In this study, we explored the feasibility of manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) via 3 different routes of Mn(2+) administration for visuotopic brain mapping and understanding of physiological transport in normal and visually deprived adult rats. In addition, resting-state functional connectivity MRI (RSfcMRI) was performed to evaluate the intrinsic functional network and structural-functional relationships in the corresponding anatomical visual brain connections traced by MEMRI. Upon intravitreal, subcortical, and intracortical Mn(2+) injection, different topographic and layer-specific Mn enhancement patterns could be revealed in the visual cortex and subcortical visual nuclei along retinal, callosal, cortico-subcortical, transsynaptic and intracortical horizontal connections. Loss of visual input upon monocular enucleation to adult rats appeared to reduce interhemispheric polysynaptic Mn(2+) transfer but not intra- or inter-hemispheric monosynaptic Mn(2+) transport after Mn(2+) injection into visual cortex. In normal adults, both structural and functional connectivity by MEMRI and RSfcMRI was stronger interhemispherically between bilateral primary/secondary visual cortex (V1/V2) transition zones (TZ) than between V1/V2 TZ and other cortical nuclei. Intrahemispherically, structural and functional connectivity was stronger between visual cortex and subcortical visual nuclei than between visual cortex and other subcortical nuclei. The current results demonstrated the sensitivity of MEMRI and RSfcMRI for assessing the neuroarchitecture, neurophysiology and structural-functional relationships of the visual brains in vivo. These may possess great potentials for effective monitoring and understanding of the basic anatomical and functional connections in the visual system during development, plasticity, disease, pharmacological interventions and genetic modifications in future studies. PMID:24394694

Chan, Kevin C; Fan, Shu-Juan; Chan, Russell W; Cheng, Joe S; Zhou, Iris Y; Wu, Ed X

2014-04-15

231

Bioengineers Create Functional 3D Brain-Like Tissue  

MedlinePLUS

... neurons formed functional networks throughout the scaffold pores (dark areas). Image courtesy of Tufts University. As a ... consists of segregated regions of grey and white matter. In the brain, grey matter is comprised primarily ...

232

Functional geometry alignment and localization of brain areas  

E-print Network

Matching functional brain regions across individuals is a challenging task, largely due to the variability in their location and extent. It is particularly difficult, but highly relevant, for patients with pathologies such ...

Langs, Georg

233

Brain Responses to Acupuncture Are Probably Dependent on the Brain Functional Status  

PubMed Central

In recent years, neuroimaging studies of acupuncture have explored extensive aspects of brain responses to acupuncture in finding its underlying mechanisms. Most of these studies have been performed on healthy adults. Only a few studies have been performed on patients with diseases. Brain responses to acupuncture in patients with the same disease at different pathological stages have not been explored, although it may be more important and helpful in uncovering its underlying mechanisms. In the present study, we used fMRI to compare brain responses to acupuncture in patients with Bell's palsy at different pathological stages with normal controls and found that the brain response to acupuncture varied at different pathological stages of Bell's palsy. The brain response to acupuncture decreased in the early stages, increased in the later stages, and nearly returned to normal in the recovered group. All of the changes in the brain response to acupuncture could be explained as resulting from the changes in the brain functional status. Therefore, we proposed that the brain response to acupuncture is dependent on the brain functional status, while further investigation is needed to provide more evidence in support of this proposition. PMID:23737817

Sun, Jinbo; Xu, Chunsheng; Zhu, Yuanqiang; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

2013-01-01

234

The role of functional magnetic resonance imaging in brain surgery.  

PubMed

New functional neuroimaging techniques are changing our understanding of the human brain, and there is now convincing evidence to move away from the classic and clinical static concepts of functional topography. In a modern neurocognitive view, functions are thought to be represented in dynamic large-scale networks. The authors review the current (limited) role of functional MR imaging in brain surgery and the possibilities of new functional MR imaging techniques for research and neurosurgical practice. A critique of current clinical gold standard techniques (electrocortical stimulation and the Wada test) is given. PMID:20121439

Rutten, Geert-Jan; Ramsey, Nick F

2010-02-01

235

The challenge to remove diffuse low-grade gliomas while preserving brain functions.  

PubMed

WHO grade II glioma, i.e. diffuse low-grade glioma, is a pre-malignant tumour, usually revealed by seizures in young patients with a normal life. This tumour has a constant growth, and will inescapably become anaplastic. Surgical resection significantly increases the overall survival by delaying the malignant transformation. Thus, the dilemma is to perform early surgery in order to optimise the extent of resection (and thus the median survival) by removing smaller tumours while preserving the quality of life. To this end, the new concept proposed in this review is to achieve surgical resection according to functional and not to oncological boundaries. In other words, the principle is to first understand the cerebral anatomo-functional organisation at the individual level (because of a major inter-individual variability), with the aim of resecting a part of the brain invaded by a diffuse chronic disease, on the condition nonetheless that this part of the brain can be functionally compensated-i.e. with no consequences on the quality of life. To this end, in addition to the preoperative functional neuroimaging and the intraoperative electrical cortical mapping in awake patients, it is also crucial to map both horizontal cortico-cortical connectivity (long-distance association fibres) as well as vertical cortico-subcortical connectivity (projection fibres), with the aim to preserve the networks underlying the minimal common core of the brain. Interestingly, this "hodotopical" workframe, based on the study of both cortical epicentres and subcortical pathways, opens the door to mechanisms of functional reshaping. These recent technical and conceptual advances in the hodotopical and plastic view of brain processing have allowed a dramatic improvement of the benefit-to-risk ratio of surgery, concerning both oncological and functional outcomes. In summary, it is time to move towards "functional neurooncology" and "preventive neurosurgery" in low-grade gliomas. Stronger interactions with fundamental neurosciences should be developed, in order (1) to build updated models of cognition and brain plasticity; (2) to elaborate biomathematical models of low-grade glioma growth and migration; (3) to study in silico the dynamic interactions between the natural course of this disease and the adaptative behaviour of its host (the brain), with the goal to adapt the best individualised therapeutic strategy. PMID:22278663

Duffau, Hugues

2012-04-01

236

Gender Effect on Functional Networks in Resting Brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies have witnessed that complex brain networks have the properties of high global and local efficiency. In this\\u000a study, we investigated the gender effect on brain functional networks measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging\\u000a (fMRI). Our experimental results showed that there were no significant difference in global and local efficiency between male\\u000a and female. However, the gender-related effects on

Liang Wang; Chaozhe Zhu; Yong He; Qiuhai Zhong; Yufeng Zang

2007-01-01

237

Generating Text from Functional Brain Images  

PubMed Central

Recent work has shown that it is possible to take brain images acquired during viewing of a scene and reconstruct an approximation of the scene from those images. Here we show that it is also possible to generate text about the mental content reflected in brain images. We began with images collected as participants read names of concrete items (e.g., “Apartment’’) while also seeing line drawings of the item named. We built a model of the mental semantic representation of concrete concepts from text data and learned to map aspects of such representation to patterns of activation in the corresponding brain image. In order to validate this mapping, without accessing information about the items viewed for left-out individual brain images, we were able to generate from each one a collection of semantically pertinent words (e.g., “door,” “window” for “Apartment’’). Furthermore, we show that the ability to generate such words allows us to perform a classification task and thus validate our method quantitatively. PMID:21927602

Pereira, Francisco; Detre, Greg; Botvinick, Matthew

2011-01-01

238

Enabling Functional Neural Circuit Simulations with Distributed Computing of Neuromodulated Plasticity  

PubMed Central

A major puzzle in the field of computational neuroscience is how to relate system-level learning in higher organisms to synaptic plasticity. Recently, plasticity rules depending not only on pre- and post-synaptic activity but also on a third, non-local neuromodulatory signal have emerged as key candidates to bridge the gap between the macroscopic and the microscopic level of learning. Crucial insights into this topic are expected to be gained from simulations of neural systems, as these allow the simultaneous study of the multiple spatial and temporal scales that are involved in the problem. In particular, synaptic plasticity can be studied during the whole learning process, i.e., on a time scale of minutes to hours and across multiple brain areas. Implementing neuromodulated plasticity in large-scale network simulations where the neuromodulatory signal is dynamically generated by the network itself is challenging, because the network structure is commonly defined purely by the connectivity graph without explicit reference to the embedding of the nodes in physical space. Furthermore, the simulation of networks with realistic connectivity entails the use of distributed computing. A neuromodulated synapse must therefore be informed in an efficient way about the neuromodulatory signal, which is typically generated by a population of neurons located on different machines than either the pre- or post-synaptic neuron. Here, we develop a general framework to solve the problem of implementing neuromodulated plasticity in a time-driven distributed simulation, without reference to a particular implementation language, neuromodulator, or neuromodulated plasticity mechanism. We implement our framework in the simulator NEST and demonstrate excellent scaling up to 1024 processors for simulations of a recurrent network incorporating neuromodulated spike-timing dependent plasticity. PMID:21151370

Potjans, Wiebke; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus

2010-01-01

239

Human Brain Language Areas Identified by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) was used to identify candidate language processing areas in the intact hu- man brain. Language was defined broadly to include both phonological and lexical-semantic functions and to exclude sensory, motor, and general executive functions. The language activation task required phonetic and semantic analysis of aurally presented words and was compared with a control task involving

Jeffrey R. Binder; Julie A. Frost; Thomas A. Hammeke; Robert W. Cox; Stephen M. Rao; Thomas Prieto

1997-01-01

240

Links between metabolic plasticity and functional redundancy in freshwater bacterioplankton communities  

PubMed Central

Metabolic plasticity and functional redundancy are fundamental properties of microbial communities, which shape their response to environmental forcing, and also mediate the relationship between community composition and function. Yet, the actual quantification of these emergent community properties has been elusive, and we thus do not know how they vary across bacterial communities, and their relationship to environmental gradients and to each other. Here we present an experimental framework that allows us to simultaneously quantify metabolic plasticity and functional redundancy in freshwater bacterioplankton communities, and to explore connections that may exists between them. We define metabolic plasticity as the rate of change in single-cell properties (cell wall integrity, cell size, single-cell activity) relative to changes in community composition. Likewise, we define functional redundancy as the rate of change in carbon substrate uptake capacities relative to changes in community composition. We assessed these two key community attributes in transplant experiments where bacterioplankton from various aquatic habitats within the same watershed were transplanted from their original water to waters from other systems that differ in their main resources. Our results show that metabolic plasticity is an intrinsic property of bacterial communities, whereas the expression of functional redundancy appears to be more dependent on environmental factors. Furthermore, there was an overall strong positive relationship between the level of functional redundancy and of metabolic plasticity, suggesting no trade-offs between these community attributes but rather a possible co-selection. The apparent continuum in the expression of both functional redundancy and plasticity among bacterial communities and the link between them, in turn suggest that the link between community diversity and function may also vary along a continuum, from being very tight, to being weak, or absent. PMID:23675372

Comte, Jerome; Fauteux, Lisa; del Giorgio, Paul A.

2013-01-01

241

Set and setting: how behavioral state regulates sensory function and plasticity  

PubMed Central

Recently developed neuroimaging and electrophysiological techniques are allowing us to answer fundamental questions about how behavioral states regulate our perception of the external environment. Studies using these techniques have yielded surprising insights into how sensory processing is affected at the earliest stages by attention and motivation, and how new sensory information received during wakefulness (e.g., during learning) continues to affect sensory brain circuits (leading to plastic changes) during subsequent sleep. This review aims to describe how brain states affect sensory response properties among neurons in primary and secondary sensory cortices, and how this relates to psychophysical detection thresholds and performance on sensory discrimination tasks. This is not intended to serve as a comprehensive overview of all brain states, or all sensory systems, but instead as an illustrative description of how three specific state variables (attention, motivation, and vigilance [i.e., sleep vs. wakefulness]) affect sensory systems in which they have been best studied. PMID:23792020

Aton, Sara J.

2013-01-01

242

Specification of Scalar Functions of the Tensor-Nonlinear Constitutive Equations in the Theory of Plasticity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods are proposed to obtain a specific form of scalar functions that belong to the tensor-nonlinear constitutive equations linking generalized stresses and finite strains in the theory of plasticity. Experimental data obtained earlier are used to assign a specific form to these functions and substantiate the applicability of the tensor-nonlinear constitutive equations to the description of the deformation of body

Yu. N. Shevchenko; N. N. Tormakhov; R. G. Terekhov

2000-01-01

243

Yield functions that account for the effects of initial and subsequent plastic anisotropy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary A descriptive initial yield function is presented from an examination of experimentally determined yield loci, component plastic strain paths and Lode's parameters that indicate either a severe textural anisotropy in a material or a slight departure from the von Mises condition. The transition from the initial function to one that describes a subsequent yield surface which translates with the

D. W. A. Rees

1982-01-01

244

The Strength of Plastic Bonded Explosives as a Function of Pressure, Strain Rate and Temperature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements as a function of strain rate and temperature have indicated the importance of the polymer binder in determining the strength of plastic bonded explosives at ambient conditions and low strain rate. Recent measurements of strength as a function of pressure further support this conclusion. As pressure or strain rate are increased or temperature is decreased the strength increases as

Donald Wiegand

2005-01-01

245

Digital media, the developing brain and the interpretive plasticity of neuroplasticity.  

PubMed

The use and misuse of digital technologies among adolescents has been the focus of fiery debates among parents, educators, policy-makers and in the media. Recently, these debates have become shaped by emerging data from cognitive neuroscience on the development of the adolescent brain and cognition. "Neuroplasticity" has functioned as a powerful metaphor in arguments both for and against the pervasiveness of digital media cultures that increasingly characterize teenage life. In this paper, we propose that the debates concerning adolescents are the meeting point of two major social anxieties both of which are characterized by the threat of "abnormal" (social) behaviour: existing moral panics about adolescent behaviour in general and the growing alarm about intense, addictive, and widespread media consumption in modern societies. Neuroscience supports these fears but the same kinds of evidence are used to challenge these fears and reframe them in positive terms. Here, we analyze discourses about digital media, the Internet, and the adolescent brain in the scientific and lay literature. We argue that while the evidential basis is thin and ambiguous, it has immense social influence. We conclude by suggesting how we might move beyond the poles of neuro-alarmism and neuro-enthusiasm. By analyzing the neurological adolescent in the digital age as a socially extended mind, firstly, in the sense that adolescent cognition is distributed across the brain, body, and digital media tools and secondly, by viewing adolescent cognition as enabled and transformed by the institution of neuroscience, we aim to displace the normative terms of current debates. PMID:23599391

Choudhury, Suparna; McKinney, Kelly A

2013-04-01

246

The functional significance of brain metallothioneins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metallothioneins (MTs) are ubiquitous low molecular weight proteins characterized by their abundant content of cysteines. Two MT isoforms, MT-I and MT-lI, are expressed coordinately in all mammalian tissues. In the CNS, MT-I and MT-I! are conspicuously absent from neuronal populations, yet abundant in fibrous and protoplasmic astrocytes. A newly identified brain-specific MT gene, MT-Ill, is predominantly expressed in zinc-containing neurons

MICHAEL ASCHNER

247

Free D-aspartate regulates neuronal dendritic morphology, synaptic plasticity, gray matter volume and brain activity in mammals  

PubMed Central

D-aspartate (D-Asp) is an atypical amino acid, which is especially abundant in the developing mammalian brain, and can bind to and activate N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptors (NMDARs). In line with its pharmacological features, we find that mice chronically treated with D-Asp show enhanced NMDAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and basal cerebral blood volume in fronto-hippocampal areas. In addition, we show that both chronic administration of D-Asp and deletion of the gene coding for the catabolic enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) trigger plastic modifications of neuronal cytoarchitecture in the prefrontal cortex and CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and promote a cytochalasin D-sensitive form of synaptic plasticity in adult mouse brains. To translate these findings in humans and consistent with the experiments using Ddo gene targeting in animals, we performed a hierarchical stepwise translational genetic approach. Specifically, we investigated the association of variation in the gene coding for DDO with complex human prefrontal phenotypes. We demonstrate that genetic variation predicting reduced expression of DDO in postmortem human prefrontal cortex is mapped on greater prefrontal gray matter and activity during working memory as measured with MRI. In conclusion our results identify novel NMDAR-dependent effects of D-Asp on plasticity and physiology in rodents, which also map to prefrontal phenotypes in humans. PMID:25072322

Errico, F; Nistico, R; Di Giorgio, A; Squillace, M; Vitucci, D; Galbusera, A; Piccinin, S; Mango, D; Fazio, L; Middei, S; Trizio, S; Mercuri, N B; Teule, M A; Centonze, D; Gozzi, A; Blasi, G; Bertolino, A; Usiello, A

2014-01-01

248

Free D-aspartate regulates neuronal dendritic morphology, synaptic plasticity, gray matter volume and brain activity in mammals.  

PubMed

D-aspartate (D-Asp) is an atypical amino acid, which is especially abundant in the developing mammalian brain, and can bind to and activate N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptors (NMDARs). In line with its pharmacological features, we find that mice chronically treated with D-Asp show enhanced NMDAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and basal cerebral blood volume in fronto-hippocampal areas. In addition, we show that both chronic administration of D-Asp and deletion of the gene coding for the catabolic enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) trigger plastic modifications of neuronal cytoarchitecture in the prefrontal cortex and CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and promote a cytochalasin D-sensitive form of synaptic plasticity in adult mouse brains. To translate these findings in humans and consistent with the experiments using Ddo gene targeting in animals, we performed a hierarchical stepwise translational genetic approach. Specifically, we investigated the association of variation in the gene coding for DDO with complex human prefrontal phenotypes. We demonstrate that genetic variation predicting reduced expression of DDO in postmortem human prefrontal cortex is mapped on greater prefrontal gray matter and activity during working memory as measured with MRI. In conclusion our results identify novel NMDAR-dependent effects of D-Asp on plasticity and physiology in rodents, which also map to prefrontal phenotypes in humans. PMID:25072322

Errico, F; Nisticò, R; Di Giorgio, A; Squillace, M; Vitucci, D; Galbusera, A; Piccinin, S; Mango, D; Fazio, L; Middei, S; Trizio, S; Mercuri, N B; Teule, M A; Centonze, D; Gozzi, A; Blasi, G; Bertolino, A; Usiello, A

2014-01-01

249

Extending lifetime of plastic changes in the human brain Thomas Nyffeler,1  

E-print Network

plasticity, saccades, theta burst protocol, transcranial magnetic stimulation Abstract The ability transcranial magnetic stimulation to the frontal eye field of the human cortex. The results suggest to analyse human cerebral plasticity is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The application of a brief

Senn, Walter

250

Enhancement of cognitive function in models of brain disease through environmental enrichment and physical activity.  

PubMed

This review will provide an overview of the non-drug based approaches that have been demonstrated to enhance cognitive function of the compromised brain, primarily focussed on the two most widely adopted paradigms of environmental enrichment and enhanced physical exercise. Environmental enrichment involves the generation of novelty and complexity in animal housing conditions which facilitates enhanced sensory and cognitive stimulation as well as physical activity. In a wide variety of animal models of brain disorders, environmental enrichment and exercise have been found to have beneficial effects, including cognitive enhancement, delayed disease onset, enhanced cellular plasticity and associated molecular processes. Potential cellular and molecular mechanisms will also be discussed, which have relevance for the future development of 'enviromimetics', drugs which could mimic or enhance the beneficial effects of environmental stimulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'. PMID:22766390

Pang, Terence Y C; Hannan, Anthony J

2013-01-01

251

Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior  

E-print Network

Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior bertrand.thirion@inria.fr Abstract Spontaneous brain activity, as observed in functional neuroimaging, has been shown to display reproducible structure that expresses brain architecture and car- ries markers

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

252

The presence of perforated synapses in the striatum after dopamine depletion, is this a sign of maladaptive brain plasticity?  

PubMed

Synaptic plasticity is the process by which long-lasting changes take place at synaptic connections. The phenomenon itself is complex and can involve many levels of organization. Some authors separate forms into adaptations that have positive or negative consequences for the individual. It has been hypothesized that an increase in the number of synapses may represent a structural basis for the enduring expression of synaptic plasticity during some events that involve memory and learning; also, it has been suggested that perforated synapses increase in number after some diseases and experimental situations. The aim of this study was to analyze whether dopamine depletion induces changes in the synaptology of the corpus striatum of rats after the unilateral injection of 6-OHDA. The findings suggest that after the lesion, both contralateral and ipsilateral striata exhibit an increased length of the synaptic ending in ipsilateral (since third day) and contralateral striatum (since Day 20), loss of axospinous synapses in ipsilateral striatum and a significant increment in the number of perforated synapses, suggesting brain plasticity that might be deleterious for the spines, because this type of synaptic contacts are presumably excitatory, and in the absence of the modulatory effects of dopamine, the neuron could die through excitotoxic mechanisms. Thus, we can conclude that the presence of perforated synapses after striatal dopamine depletion might be a form of maladaptive synaptic plasticity. PMID:25246608

Anaya-Martínez, Verónica; Gutierrez-Valdez, Ana Luisa; Ordoñez-Librado, Jose Luis; Montiel-Flores, Enrique; Sánchez-Betancourt, Javier; Sánchez Vázquez Del Mercado, César; Reynoso-Erazo, Leonardo; Tron-Alvarez, Rocío; Avila-Costa, Maria Rosa

2014-12-01

253

Standardized Environmental Enrichment Supports Enhanced Brain Plasticity in Healthy Rats and Prevents Cognitive Impairment in Epileptic Rats  

PubMed Central

Environmental enrichment of laboratory animals influences brain plasticity, stimulates neurogenesis, increases neurotrophic factor expression, and protects against the effects of brain insult. However, these positive effects are not constantly observed, probably because standardized procedures of environmental enrichment are lacking. Therefore, we engineered an enriched cage (the Marlau™ cage), which offers: (1) minimally stressful social interactions; (2) increased voluntary exercise; (3) multiple entertaining activities; (4) cognitive stimulation (maze exploration), and (5) novelty (maze configuration changed three times a week). The maze, which separates food pellet and water bottle compartments, guarantees cognitive stimulation for all animals. Compared to rats raised in groups in conventional cages, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited increased cortical thickness, hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal levels of transcripts encoding various genes involved in tissue plasticity and remodeling. In addition, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited better performances in learning and memory, decreased anxiety-associated behaviors, and better recovery of basal plasma corticosterone level after acute restraint stress. Marlau™ cages also insure inter-experiment reproducibility in spatial learning and brain gene expression assays. Finally, housing rats in Marlau™ cages after severe status epilepticus at weaning prevents the cognitive impairment observed in rats subjected to the same insult and then housed in conventional cages. By providing a standardized enriched environment for rodents during housing, the Marlau™ cage should facilitate the uniformity of environmental enrichment across laboratories. PMID:23342033

Kouchi, Hayet Y.; Bodennec, Jacques; Morales, Anne; Georges, Beatrice; Bonnet, Chantal; Bouvard, Sandrine; Sloviter, Robert S.; Bezin, Laurent

2013-01-01

254

Functional streams and cortical integration in the human brain.  

PubMed

The processing of brain information relies on the organization of neuronal networks and circuits that in the end must provide the substrate for human cognition. However, the presence of highly complex and multirelay neuronal interactions has limited our ability to disentangle the assemblies of brain systems. The present review article focuses on the latest developments to understand the architecture of functional streams of the human brain at the large-scale level. Particularly, this article presents a comprehensive framework and recent findings about how the highly modular sensory cortex, such as the visual, somatosensory, auditory, as well as motor cortex areas, connects to more parallel-organized cortical hubs in the brain's functional connectome. PMID:24737695

Sepulcre, Jorge

2014-10-01

255

Functional diversity on synaptic plasticity mediated by endocannabinoids  

PubMed Central

Endocannabinoids (eCBs) act as modulators of synaptic transmission through activation of a number of receptors, including, but not limited to, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). eCBs share CB1 receptors as a common target with ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. Although THC has been used for recreational and medicinal purposes for thousands of years, little was known about its effects at the cellular level or on neuronal circuits. Identification of CB1 receptors and the subsequent development of its specific ligands has therefore enhanced our ability to study and bring together a substantial amount of knowledge regarding how marijuana and eCBs modify interneuronal communication. To date, the eCB system, composed of cannabinoid receptors, ligands and the relevant enzymes, is recognized as the best-described retrograde signalling system in the brain. Its impact on synaptic transmission is widespread and more diverse than initially thought. The aim of this review is to succinctly present the most common forms of eCB-mediated modulation of synaptic transmission, while also illustrating the multiplicity of effects resulting from specializations of this signalling system at the circuital level. PMID:23108543

Cachope, Roger

2012-01-01

256

Functional Brain Networks Develop from a “Local to Distributed” Organization  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mature human brain is organized into a collection of specialized functional networks that flexibly interact to support various cognitive functions. Studies of development often attempt to identify the organizing principles that guide the maturation of these functional networks. In this report, we combine resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI), graph analysis, community detection, and spring-embedding visualization techniques to analyze

Damien A. Fair; Alexander L. Cohen; Jonathan D. Power; Nico U. F. Dosenbach; Jessica A. Church; Francis M. Miezin; Bradley L. Schlaggar; Steven E. Petersen

2009-01-01

257

Rapid experience-dependent plasticity of synapse function and structure in ferret visual cortex in vivo  

E-print Network

The rules by which visual experience influences neuronal responses and structure in the developing brain are not well understood. To elucidate the relationship between rapid functional changes and dendritic spine remodeling ...

Yu, Hongbo

258

The adolescent brain: Insights from functional neuroimaging research  

PubMed Central

With the development of functional neuroimaging tools, the past two decades have witnessed an explosion of work examining functional brain maps, mostly in the adult brain. Against this backdrop of work in adults, developmental research begins to gather a substantial body of knowledge about brain maturation. The purpose of this review is to present some of these findings from the perspective of functional neuroimaging. First, a brief survey of available neuroimaging techniques (i.e., fMRI, MRS, MEG, PET, SPECT, and infrared techniques) is provided. Next, the key cognitive, emotional, and social changes taking place during adolescence are outlined. The third section gives examples of how these behavioral changes can be understood from a neuroscience perspective. The conclusion places this functional neuroimaging research in relation to clinical and molecular work, and shows how answers will ultimately come from the combined efforts of these disciplines. PMID:18383544

Ernst, M.; Mueller, S.C.

2009-01-01

259

Evolution of cognitive function via redeployment of brain areas.  

PubMed

The creative reuse of existing neural components may have played a significant role in the evolutionary development of cognition. There are obvious evolutionary advantages to such redeployment, and the data presented here confirm three important empirical predictions of this account of the development of cognition: 1) A typical brain area will be used by many cognitive functions in diverse task categories, (2) evolutionarily older brain areas will be deployed in more cognitive functions, and (3) more recent cognitive functions will use more, and more widely scattered, brain areas. These findings have implications not just for our understanding of the evolutionary origins of cognitive function but also for the practice of both clinical and experimental neuroscience. PMID:17229971

Anderson, Michael L

2007-02-01

260

Early Bifrontal Brain Injury: Disturbances in Cognitive Function Development  

PubMed Central

We describe six psychomotor, language, and neuropsychological sequential developmental evaluations in a boy who sustained a severe bifrontal traumatic brain injury (TBI) at 19 months of age. Visuospatial, drawing, and writing skills failed to develop normally. Gradually increasing difficulties were noted in language leading to reading and spontaneous speech difficulties. The last two evaluations showed executive deficits in inhibition, flexibility, and working memory. Those executive abnormalities seemed to be involved in the other impairments. In conclusion, early frontal brain injury disorganizes the development of cognitive functions, and interactions exist between executive function and other cognitive functions during development. PMID:21188227

Bonnier, Christine; Costet, Aurelie; Hmaimess, Ghassan; Catale, Corinne; Maillart, Christelle; Marique, Patricia

2010-01-01

261

Magnetic resonance and the human brain: anatomy, function and metabolism  

Microsoft Academic Search

.  The introduction and development, over the last three decades, of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopy technology\\u000a for in vivo studies of the human brain represents a truly remarkable achievement, with enormous scientific and clinical ramifications.\\u000a These effectively non-invasive techniques allow for studies of the anatomy, the function and the metabolism of the living\\u000a human brain. They have allowed

I.-F. Talos; A. Z. Mian; K. H. Zou; L. Hsu; D. Goldberg-Zimring; S. Haker; J. G. Bhagwat; R. V. Mulkern

2006-01-01

262

Structure and function of gap junctions in the developing brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gap-junction-dependent neuronal communication is widespread in the developing brain, and the prevalence of gap-junctional coupling is well correlated with specific developmental events. We summarize here our current knowledge of the contribution of gap junctions to brain development and propose that they carry out this role by taking advantage of the full complement of their functional properties. Thus, hemichannel activation may

Roberto Bruzzone; Rolf Dermietzel

2006-01-01

263

How does the metric choice affect brain functional connectivity networks?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brain functional connectivity has gained increasing interest over the last few years. The application of Graph Theory on functional connectivity networks (FCNs) has shed light into different topics related to physiology as well as pathology. To this end, different connectivity metrics may be used; however, some concerns are often raised related with inconsistency of results and their associated neurophysiological interpretations

C. Lithari; M. A. Klados; C. Papadelis; C. Pappas; M. Albani; P. D. Bamidis

264

Fractal analysis of resting state functional connectivity of the brain  

E-print Network

Fractal analysis of resting state functional connectivity of the brain Wonsang You1 , Sophie Achard neuroimaging data tend to exhibit fractal behavior where their power spectrums follow power-law scaling. Resting state functional connectivity is signicantly inuenced by fractal behav- ior which may not directly

265

Roles of mGluR5 in synaptic function and plasticity of the mouse thalamocortical pathway  

PubMed Central

The group I metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) has been implicated in the development of cortical sensory maps. However its precise roles in the synaptic function and plasticity of thalamocortical connections remain unknown. Here we first show that in mGluR5 knockout mice bred onto a C57BL6 background cyto-architectonic differentiation into barrels is missing, but the representations for large whiskers are identifiable as clusters of thalamocortical afferents. The altered dendritic morphology of cortical layer IV spiny stellate neurons in mGluR5 knockout mice implicates a role for mGluR5 in the dendritic morphogenesis of excitatory neurons. Next, in vivo single unit recordings of whisker evoked activity in mGluR5 knockout adults demonstrated a preserved topographical organization of the whisker representation, but a significantly diminished temporal discrimination of center to surround whiskers in the responses of individual neurons. To evaluate synaptic function at thalamocortical synapses in mGluR5 knockout mice, whole-cell voltage clamp recording was conducted in acute thalamocortical brain slices prepared from postnatal day 4–11 mice. At mGluR5 knockout thalamocortical synapses, NMDA currents decayed faster and synaptic strength was more easily reduced, but more difficult to strengthen by Hebbian-type pairing protocols, despite a normal developmental increase in AMPAR-mediated currents and presynaptic function. We have therefore demonstrated that mGluR5 is required for synaptic function/plasticity at thalamocortical synapses as barrels are forming and we propose that these functional alterations at the thalamocortical synapse are the basis of the abnormal anatomical and functional development of the somatosensory cortex in the mGluR5 knockout mouse. PMID:19519626

She, Wei-Chi; Quairiaux, Charles; Albright, Michael J.; Wang, Yu-Chi; Sanchez, Denisse E.; Chang, Poh-Shing; Welker, Egbert; Lu, Hui-Chen

2009-01-01

266

Democratic reinforcement: A principle for brain function  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a simple ``toy`` brain model. The model consists of a set of randomly connected, or layered integrate-and-fire neurons. Inputs to and outputs from the environment are connected randomly to subsets of neurons. The connections between firing neurons are strengthened or weakened according to whether the action was successful or not. Unlike previous reinforcement learning algorithms, the feedback from the environment is democratic: it affects all neurons in the same way, irrespective of their position in the network and independent of the output signal. Thus no unrealistic back propagation or other external computation is needed. This is accomplished by a global threshold regulation which allows the system to self-organize into a highly susceptible, possibly ``critical`` state with low activity and sparse connections between firing neurons. The low activity permits memory in quiescent areas to be conserved since only firing neurons are modified when new information is being taught.

Stassinopoulos, D.; Bak, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)] [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

1995-05-01

267

Effect of tumor resection on the characteristics of functional brain networks J. M. Hernndez,1  

E-print Network

Effect of tumor resection on the characteristics of functional brain networks H. Wang,1 L. Douw,2 J. The functional brain networks of a group of patients with brain tumors are measured before and after tumor with brain tumors before and after surgery, the aim of which was to remove the tumor. In brain tumor patients

Van Mieghem, Piet

268

Stereotactic PET atlas of the human brain: Aid for visual interpretation of functional brain images  

SciTech Connect

In the routine analysis of functional brain images obtained by PET, subjective visual interpretation is often used for anatomic localization. To enhance the accuracy and consistency of the anatomic interpretation, a PET stereotactic atlas and localization approach was designed for functional brain images. The PET atlas was constructed from a high-resolution [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) image set of a normal volunteer (a 41-yr-ld woman). The image set was reoriented stereotactically, according to the intercommissural (anterior and posterior commissures) line and transformed to the standard stereotactic atlas coordinates. Cerebral structures were annotated on the transaxial planes using a proportional grid system and surface-rendered images. The stereotactic localization technique was applied to image sets from patients with Alzheimer`s disease, and areas of functional alteration were localized visually by referring to the PET atlas. Major brain structures were identified on both transaxial planes and surface-rendered images. In the stereotactic system, anatomic correspondence between the PET atlas and stereotactically reoriented individual image sets of patients with Alzheimer`s disease facilitated both indirect and direct localization of the cerebral structures. Because rapid stereotactic alignment methods for PET images are now available for routine use, the PET atlas will serve as an aid for visual interpretation of functional brain images in the stereotactic system. Widespread application of stereotactic localization may be used in functional brain images, not only in the research setting, but also in routine clinical situations. 41 refs., 3 figs.

Minoshima, S.; Koeppe, R.A.; Frey, A.; Ishihara, M.; Kuhl, D.E. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

1994-06-01

269

Analyzing complex functional brain networks: Fusing statistics and network science to understand the brain  

PubMed Central

Complex functional brain network analyses have exploded over the last decade, gaining traction due to their profound clinical implications. The application of network science (an interdisciplinary offshoot of graph theory) has facilitated these analyses and enabled examining the brain as an integrated system that produces complex behaviors. While the field of statistics has been integral in advancing activation analyses and some connectivity analyses in functional neuroimaging research, it has yet to play a commensurate role in complex network analyses. Fusing novel statistical methods with network-based functional neuroimage analysis will engender powerful analytical tools that will aid in our understanding of normal brain function as well as alterations due to various brain disorders. Here we survey widely used statistical and network science tools for analyzing fMRI network data and discuss the challenges faced in filling some of the remaining methodological gaps. When applied and interpreted correctly, the fusion of network scientific and statistical methods has a chance to revolutionize the understanding of brain function. PMID:25309643

Simpson, Sean L.; Bowman, F. DuBois; Laurienti, Paul J.

2014-01-01

270

Potential of optical microangiography to monitor cerebral blood perfusion and vascular plasticity following traumatic brain injury in mice in vivo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical microanglography (OMAG) is a recently developed imaging modality capable of volumetric imaging of dynamic blood perfusion, down to capillary level resolution, with an imaging depth up to 2.00 mm beneath the tissue surface. We report the use of OMAG to monitor the cerebral blood flow (CBF) over the cortex of mouse brain upon traumatic brain injury (TBI), with the cranium left intact, for a period of two weeks on the same animal. We show the ability of OMAG to repeatedly image 3-D cerebral vasculatures during pre- and post-traumatic phases, and to visualize the changes of regulated CBF and the vascular plasticity after TBI. The results indicate the potential of OMAG to explore the mechanism involved in the rehabilitation of TBI.

Jia, Yali; Alkayed, Nabil; Wang, Ruikang K.

2009-07-01

271

Compensatory plasticity in the deaf brain: effects on perception of music.  

PubMed

When one sense is unavailable, sensory responsibilities shift and processing of the remaining modalities becomes enhanced to compensate for missing information. This shift, referred to as compensatory plasticity, results in a unique sensory experience for individuals who are deaf, including the manner in which music is perceived. This paper evaluates the neural, behavioural and cognitive evidence for compensatory plasticity following auditory deprivation and considers how this manifests in a unique experience of music that emphasizes visual and vibrotactile modalities. PMID:25354235

Good, Arla; Reed, Maureen J; Russo, Frank A

2014-01-01

272

Distinct Functions of Glial and Neuronal Dystroglycan in the Developing and Adult Mouse Brain  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Cobblestone (type II) lissencephaly and mental retardation are characteristic features of a subset of congenital muscular dystrophies that include Walker-Warburg Syndrome, Muscle-Eye-Brain disease, and Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy. Although the majority of clinical cases are genetically undefined, several causative genes have been identified that encode known or putative glycosyltransferases in the biosynthetic pathway of dystroglycan. Here we test the effects of brain-specific deletion of dystroglycan, and show distinct functions for neuronal and glial dystroglycan. Deletion of dystroglycan in the whole brain produced glial/neuronal heterotopia resembling the cerebral cortex malformation in cobblestone lissencephaly. In wild-type mice, dystroglycan stabilizes the basement membrane of the glia limitans, thereby supporting the cortical infrastructure necessary for neuronal migration. This function depends on extracellular dystroglycan interactions, since the cerebral cortex developed normally in transgenic mice that lack the dystroglycan intracellular domain. Also, forebrain histogenesis was preserved in mice with neuron-specific deletion of dystroglycan, but hippocampal long-term potentiation was blunted, as is also the case in the Largemyd mouse, in which dystroglycan glycosylation is disrupted. Our findings provide genetic evidence that neuronal dystroglycan plays a role in synaptic plasticity and that glial dystroglycan is involved in forebrain development. Differences in dystroglycan glycosylation in distinct cell types of the CNS may therefore contribute to the diversity of dystroglycan function in the CNS, as well as to the broad clinical spectrum of type II lissencephalies. PMID:20980614

Satz, Jakob S.; Ostendorf, Adam P.; Hou, Shangwei; Turner, Amy; Kusano, Hajime; Lee, Jane C.; Turk, Rolf; Nguyen, Huy; Ross-Barta, Susan E.; Westra, Steve; Hoshi, Toshinori; Moore, Steven A.; Campbell, Kevin P.

2010-01-01

273

Assortative mixing in functional brain networks during epileptic seizures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate assortativity of functional brain networks before, during, and after one-hundred epileptic seizures with different anatomical onset locations. We construct binary functional networks from multi-channel electroencephalographic data recorded from 60 epilepsy patients; and from time-resolved estimates of the assortativity coefficient, we conclude that positive degree-degree correlations are inherent to seizure dynamics. While seizures evolve, an increasing assortativity indicates a segregation of the underlying functional network into groups of brain regions that are only sparsely interconnected, if at all. Interestingly, assortativity decreases already prior to seizure end. Together with previous observations of characteristic temporal evolutions of global statistical properties and synchronizability of epileptic brain networks, our findings may help to gain deeper insights into the complicated dynamics underlying generation, propagation, and termination of seizures.

Bialonski, Stephan; Lehnertz, Klaus

2013-09-01

274

Assortative mixing in functional brain networks during epileptic seizures  

E-print Network

We investigate assortativity of functional brain networks before, during, and after one-hundred epileptic seizures with different anatomical onset locations. We construct binary functional networks from multi-channel electroencephalographic data recorded from 60 epilepsy patients, and from time-resolved estimates of the assortativity coefficient we conclude that positive degree-degree correlations are inherent to seizure dynamics. While seizures evolve, an increasing assortativity indicates a segregation of the underlying functional network into groups of brain regions that are only sparsely interconnected, if at all. Interestingly, assortativity decreases already prior to seizure end. Together with previous observations of characteristic temporal evolutions of global statistical properties and synchronizability of epileptic brain networks, our findings may help to gain deeper insights into the complicated dynamics underlying generation, propagation, and termination of seizures.

Bialonski, Stephan

2013-01-01

275

Neuron-glia networks: integral gear of brain function  

PubMed Central

Astrocytes, the most abundant glial cell in the brain, play critical roles in metabolic and homeostatic functions of the Nervous System; however, their participation in coding information and cognitive processes has been largely ignored. The strategic position of astrocyte processes facing synapses and the astrocyte ability to uptake neurotransmitters and release neuroactive substances, so-called “gliotransmitters”, provide the scenario for prolific neuron-astrocyte signaling. From studies at single-cell level to animal behavior, recent advances in technology and genetics have revealed the impact of astrocyte activity in brain function from cellular and synaptic physiology, neuronal circuits to behavior. The present review critically discusses the consequences of astrocyte signaling on synapses and networks, as well as its impact on neuronal information processing, showing that some crucial brain functions arise from the coordinated activity of neuron-glia networks.

Perea, Gertrudis; Sur, Mriganka; Araque, Alfonso

2014-01-01

276

Functional Clustering Drives Encoding Improvement in a Developing Brain Network during Awake Visual Learning  

E-print Network

Sensory experience drives dramatic structural and functional plasticity in developing neurons. However, for single-neuron plasticity to optimally improve whole-network encoding of sensory information, changes must be ...

Dunfield, Derek

277

Toward discovery science of human brain function  

E-print Network

Although it is being successfully implemented for exploration of the genome, discovery science has eluded the functional neuroimaging community. The core challenge remains the development of common paradigms for interrogating ...

Gabrieli, Susan

278

Reduction of brain kynurenic acid improves cognitive function.  

PubMed

The elevation of kynurenic acid (KYNA) observed in schizophrenic patients may contribute to core symptoms arising from glutamate hypofunction, including cognitive impairments. Although increased KYNA levels reduce excitatory neurotransmission, KYNA has been proposed to act as an endogenous antagonist at the glycine site of the glutamate NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and as a negative allosteric modulator at the ?7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Levels of KYNA are elevated in CSF and the postmortem brain of schizophrenia patients, and these elevated levels of KYNA could contribute to NMDAR hypofunction and the cognitive deficits and negative symptoms associated with this disease. However, the impact of endogenously produced KYNA on brain function and behavior is less well understood due to a paucity of pharmacological tools. To address this issue, we identified PF-04859989, a brain-penetrable inhibitor of kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II), the enzyme responsible for most brain KYNA synthesis. In rats, systemic administration of PF-04859989 dose-dependently reduced brain KYNA to as little as 28% of basal levels, and prevented amphetamine- and ketamine-induced disruption of auditory gating and improved performance in a sustained attention task. It also prevented ketamine-induced disruption of performance in a working memory task and a spatial memory task in rodents and nonhuman primates, respectively. Together, these findings support the hypotheses that endogenous KYNA impacts cognitive function and that inhibition of KAT II, and consequent lowering of endogenous brain KYNA levels, improves cognitive performance under conditions considered relevant for schizophrenia. PMID:25100593

Kozak, Rouba; Campbell, Brian M; Strick, Christine A; Horner, Weldon; Hoffmann, William E; Kiss, Tamas; Chapin, Douglas S; McGinnis, Dina; Abbott, Amanda L; Roberts, Brooke M; Fonseca, Kari; Guanowsky, Victor; Young, Damon A; Seymour, Patricia A; Dounay, Amy; Hajos, Mihaly; Williams, Graham V; Castner, Stacy A

2014-08-01

279

Hemispheric asymmetry of electroencephalography-based functional brain networks.  

PubMed

Electroencephalography (EEG)-based functional brain networks have been investigated frequently in health and disease. It has been shown that a number of graph theory metrics are disrupted in brain disorders. EEG-based brain networks are often studied in the whole-brain framework, where all the nodes are grouped into a single network. In this study, we studied the brain networks in two hemispheres and assessed whether there are any hemispheric-specific patterns in the properties of the networks. To this end, resting state closed-eyes EEGs from 44 healthy individuals were processed and the network structures were extracted separately for each hemisphere. We examined neurophysiologically meaningful graph theory metrics: global and local efficiency measures. The global efficiency did not show any hemispheric asymmetry, whereas the local connectivity showed rightward asymmetry for a range of intermediate density values for the constructed networks. Furthermore, the age of the participants showed significant direct correlations with the global efficiency of the left hemisphere, but only in the right hemisphere, with local connectivity. These results suggest that only local connectivity of EEG-based functional networks is associated with brain hemispheres. PMID:25191924

Jalili, Mahdi

2014-11-12

280

Functional Brain Network Changes Associated with Maintenance of Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis  

PubMed Central

In multiple sclerosis (MS) functional changes in connectivity due to cortical reorganization could lead to cognitive impairment (CI), or reflect a re-adjustment to reduce the clinical effects of widespread tissue damage. Such alterations in connectivity could result in changes in neural activation as assayed by executive function tasks. We examined cognitive function in MS patients with mild to moderate CI and age-matched controls. We evaluated brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the successful performance of the Wisconsin card sorting (WCS) task by MS patients, showing compensatory maintenance of normal function, as measured by response latency and error rate. To assess changes in functional connectivity throughout the brain, we performed a global functional brain network analysis by computing voxel-by-voxel correlations on the fMRI time series data and carrying out a hierarchical cluster analysis. We found that during the WCS task there is a significant reduction in the number of smaller size brain functional networks, and a change in the brain areas representing the nodes of these networks in MS patients compared to age-matched controls. There is also a concomitant increase in the strength of functional connections between brain loci separated at intermediate-scale distances in these patients. These functional alterations might reflect compensatory neuroplastic reorganization underlying maintenance of relatively normal cognitive function in the face of white matter lesions and cortical atrophy produced by MS. PMID:21152340

Helekar, Santosh A.; Shin, Jae C.; Mattson, Brandi J.; Bartley, Krystle; Stosic, Milena; Saldana-King, Toni; Montague, P. Read; Hutton, George J.

2010-01-01

281

Temporally-independent functional modes of spontaneous brain activity.  

PubMed

Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging has become a powerful tool for the study of functional networks in the brain. Even "at rest," the brain's different functional networks spontaneously fluctuate in their activity level; each network's spatial extent can therefore be mapped by finding temporal correlations between its different subregions. Current correlation-based approaches measure the average functional connectivity between regions, but this average is less meaningful for regions that are part of multiple networks; one ideally wants a network model that explicitly allows overlap, for example, allowing a region's activity pattern to reflect one network's activity some of the time, and another network's activity at other times. However, even those approaches that do allow overlap have often maximized mutual spatial independence, which may be suboptimal if distinct networks have significant overlap. In this work, we identify functionally distinct networks by virtue of their temporal independence, taking advantage of the additional temporal richness available via improvements in functional magnetic resonance imaging sampling rate. We identify multiple "temporal functional modes," including several that subdivide the default-mode network (and the regions anticorrelated with it) into several functionally distinct, spatially overlapping, networks, each with its own pattern of correlations and anticorrelations. These functionally distinct modes of spontaneous brain activity are, in general, quite different from resting-state networks previously reported, and may have greater biological interpretability. PMID:22323591

Smith, Stephen M; Miller, Karla L; Moeller, Steen; Xu, Junqian; Auerbach, Edward J; Woolrich, Mark W; Beckmann, Christian F; Jenkinson, Mark; Andersson, Jesper; Glasser, Matthew F; Van Essen, David C; Feinberg, David A; Yacoub, Essa S; Ugurbil, Kamil

2012-02-21

282

Neurosteroid Biosynthesis and Function in the Brain of Domestic Birds  

PubMed Central

It is now established that the brain and other nervous systems have the capability of forming steroids de novo, the so-called “neurosteroids.” The pioneering discovery of Baulieu and his colleagues, using rodents, has opened the door to a new research field of “neurosteroids.” In contrast to mammalian vertebrates, little has been known regarding de novo neurosteroidogenesis in the brain of birds. We therefore investigated neurosteroid formation and metabolism in the brain of quail, a domestic bird. Our studies over the past two decades demonstrated that the quail brain possesses cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), 3?-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/?5-?4-isomerase (3?-HSD), 5?-reductase, cytochrome P450 17?-hydroxylase/c17,20-lyase (P45017?,lyase), 17?-HSD, etc., and produces pregnenolone, progesterone, 5?-dihydroprogesterone (5?-DHP), 3?, 5?-tetrahydroprogesterone (3?, 5?-THP), androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol from cholesterol. Independently, Schlinger’s laboratory demonstrated that the brain of zebra finch, a songbird, also produces various neurosteroids. Thus, the formation and metabolism of neurosteroids from cholesterol is now known to occur in the brain of birds. In addition, we recently found that the quail brain expresses cytochrome P4507? and produces 7?- and 7?-hydroxypregnenolone, previously undescribed avian neurosteroids, from pregnenolone. This paper summarizes the advances made in our understanding of neurosteroid formation and metabolism in the brain of domestic birds. This paper also describes what are currently known about physiological changes in neurosteroid formation and biological functions of neurosteroids in the brain of domestic and other birds. PMID:22645509

Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

2011-01-01

283

Functional near-infrared spectroscopy maps cortical plasticity underlying altered motor performance induced by transcranial direct current stimulation  

PubMed Central

Abstract. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the human sensorimotor cortex during physical rehabilitation induces plasticity in the injured brain that improves motor performance. Bi-hemispheric tDCS is a noninvasive technique that modulates cortical activation by delivering weak current through a pair of anodal–cathodal (excitation–suppression) electrodes, placed on the scalp and centered over the primary motor cortex of each hemisphere. To quantify tDCS-induced plasticity during motor performance, sensorimotor cortical activity was mapped during an event-related, wrist flexion task by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) before, during, and after applying both possible bi-hemispheric tDCS montages in eight healthy adults. Additionally, torque applied to a lever device during isometric wrist flexion and surface electromyography measurements of major muscle group activity in both arms were acquired concurrently with fNIRS. This multiparameter approach found that hemispheric suppression contralateral to wrist flexion changed resting-state connectivity from intra-hemispheric to inter-hemispheric and increased flexion speed (p<0.05). Conversely, exciting this hemisphere increased opposing muscle output resulting in a decrease in speed but an increase in accuracy (p<0.05 for both). The findings of this work suggest that tDCS with fNIRS and concurrent multimotor measurements can provide insights into how neuroplasticity changes muscle output, which could find future use in guiding motor rehabilitation. PMID:24193947

Khan, Bilal; Hodics, Timea; Hervey, Nathan; Kondraske, George; Stowe, Ann M.; Alexandrakis, George

2013-01-01

284

Nutrition, brain function and cognitive performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Military interest in the effects of nutritional factors on cognitive function has stimulated considerable research on a variety of food constituents. This paper will review the research on the amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine, caffeine and carbohydrate. It will focus on research that addresses the potential utility of these compounds in military applications, particularly the acute, as opposed to chronic,

Harris R Lieberman

2003-01-01

285

Topographically specific functional connectivity between visual field maps in the human brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neural activity in mammalian brains exhibits large spontaneous fluctuations whose structure reveals the intrinsic functional connectivity of the brain on many spatial and temporal scales. Between remote brain regions, spontaneous activity is organized into large-scale functional networks. To date, it has remained unclear whether the intrinsic functional connectivity between brain regions scales down to the fine detail of anatomical connections,

Jakob Heinzle; Thorsten Kahnt; John-Dylan Haynes

2011-01-01

286

Hintz et al, Real-time neonatal optical functional brain imaging 335 J. Perinat. Med. Bedside functional imaging of the premature infant brain  

E-print Network

functional imaging of the premature infant brain 29 (2001) 335 343 during passive motor activation Susan R- aging techniques have come to the fore, which use brain metabolite concentration to map brain func- tion of the premature infant brain in the NICU using near-infrared technology. 2 Methods 2.1 DOTS Device Several years

287

Extraction, identification, and functional characterization of a bioactive substance from automated compound-handling plastic tips.  

PubMed

Disposable plastic labware is ubiquitous in contemporary pharmaceutical research laboratories. Plastic labware is routinely used for chemical compound storage and during automated liquid-handling processes that support assay development, high-throughput screening, structure-activity determinations, and liability profiling. However, there is little information available in the literature on the contaminants released from plastic labware upon DMSO exposure and their resultant effects on specific biological assays. The authors report here the extraction, by simple DMSO washing, of a biologically active substance from one particular size of disposable plastic tips used in automated compound handling. The active contaminant was identified as erucamide ((Z)-docos-13-enamide), a long-chain mono-unsaturated fatty acid amide commonly used in plastics manufacturing, by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis of the DMSO-extracted material. Tip extracts prepared in DMSO, as well as a commercially obtained sample of erucamide, were active in a functional bioassay of a known G-protein-coupled fatty acid receptor. A sample of a different disposable tip product from the same vendor did not release detectable erucamide following solvent extraction, and DMSO extracts prepared from this product were inactive in the receptor functional assay. These results demonstrate that solvent-extractable contaminants from some plastic labware used in the contemporary pharmaceutical research and development (R&D) environment can be introduced into physical and biological assays during routine compound management liquid-handling processes. These contaminants may further possess biological activity and are therefore a potential source of assay-specific confounding artifacts. PMID:19470712

Watson, John; Greenough, Emily B; Leet, John E; Ford, Michael J; Drexler, Dieter M; Belcastro, James V; Herbst, John J; Chatterjee, Moneesh; Banks, Martyn

2009-06-01

288

How a Child Builds Its Brain: Some Lessons from Animal Studies of Neural Plasticity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the potential vulnerability of children's brain development is generally recognized, relatively little is known about the timing, resiliency, or mechanisms involved. While animal research should be applied only cautiously to human policy, some findings do have important clinical implications. This paper briefly reviews animal studies demonstrating the effects of experience on brain structure. Contemporary theories emphasize the self-organizing potential

James E. Black

1998-01-01

289

Surrogate-assisted analysis of weighted functional brain networks  

E-print Network

Graph-theoretical analyses of complex brain networks is a rapidly evolving field with a strong impact for neuroscientific and related clinical research. Due to a number of confounding variables, however, a reliable and meaningful characterization of particularly functional brain networks is a major challenge. Addressing this problem, we present an analysis approach for weighted networks that makes use of surrogate networks with preserved edge weights or vertex strengths. We first investigate whether characteristics of weighted networks are influenced by trivial properties of the edge weights or vertex strengths (e.g., their standard deviations). If so, these influences are then effectively segregated with an appropriate surrogate normalization of the respective network characteristic. We demonstrate this approach by re-examining, in a time-resolved manner, weighted functional brain networks of epilepsy patients and control subjects derived from simultaneous EEG/MEG recordings during different behavioral state...

Ansmann, Gerrit

2014-01-01

290

The Role of Noise in Brain Function  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Noise plays a fundamental role in all living organisms from the earliest prokaryotes to advanced mammalian forms, such as ourselves. In the context of living organisms, the term 'noise' usually refers to the variance amongst measurements obtained from repeated identical experimental conditions, or from output signals from these systems. It is noteworthy that both these conditions are universally characterized by the presence of background fluctuations. In non-biological systems, such as electronics or in communications sciences, where the aim is to send error-free messages, noise was generally regarded as a problem. The discovery of Stochastic Resonances (SR) in non-linear dynamics brought a shift of perception where noise, rather than representing a problem, became fundamental to system function, especially so in biology. The question now is: to what extent is biological function dependent on random noise. Indeed, it seems feasible that noise also plays an important role in neuronal communication and oscillatory synchronization. Given this approach, it follows that determining Fisher information content could be relevant in neuronal communication. It also seems possible that the principle of least time, and that of the sum over histories, could be important basic principles in understanding the coherence dynamics responsible for action and perception. Ultimately, external noise cancellation combined with intrinsic noise signal embedding and, the use of the principle of least time may be considered an essential step in the organization of central nervous system (CNS) function.

Roy, S.; Llinás, R.

2012-12-01

291

Functional absence of brain photoreceptors mediating entrainment of circadian rhythms in the adult rat  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The photic energy penetrating into the brain was increased in adult rats sustaining craniotomies sealed with transparent plastic. After blinding, these animals failed to entrain their circadian food intake rhythm to light-dark cycles. Short pulses of light did not phase-shift the freerunning rhythm. We conclude that adult rats lack brain photoreceptors mediating entrainment of circadian rhythms.

G. A. Groos; D. van der Kooy

1981-01-01

292

"Hotheaded": the role OF TRPV1 in brain functions.  

PubMed

The TRPV1 (vanilloid 1) channel is best known for its role in sensory transmission in the nociceptive neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Although first studied in the dorsal root ganglia as the receptor for capsaicin, TRPV1 has been recently recognized to have a broader distribution in the central nervous system, where it is likely to constitute an atypical neurotransmission system involved in several functions through modulation of both neuronal and glial activities. The endovanilloid-activated brain TRPV1 channels seem to be involved in somatosensory, motor and visceral functions. Recent studies suggested that TRPV1 channels also account for more complex functions, as addiction, anxiety, mood and cognition/learning. However, more studies are needed before the relevance of TRPV1 in brain activity can be clearly stated. This review highlights the increasing importance of TRPV1 as a regulator of brain function and discusses possible bases for the future development of new therapeutic approaches that by targeting brain TRPV1 receptors might be used for the treatment of several neurological disorders. PMID:24887171

Martins, D; Tavares, I; Morgado, C

2014-10-01

293

Optimizing Experimental Design for Comparing Models of Brain Function  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents the first attempt to formalize the optimization of experimental design with the aim of comparing models of brain function based on neuroimaging data. We demonstrate our approach in the context of Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM), which relates experimental manipulations to observed network dynamics (via hidden neuronal states) and provides an inference framework for selecting among candidate models.

Jean Daunizeau; Kerstin Preuschoff; Karl Friston; Klaas Stephan

2011-01-01

294

Functional brain mapping of the relaxation response and meditation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Meditation is a conscious mental process that induces a set of integrated physiologic changes termed the relaxation response. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to identify and characterize the brain regions that are active during a simple form of meditation. Significant ( p , 10?7) signal increases were observed in the group-averaged data in the dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal

Sara W. Lazar; George Bush; Randy L. Gollub; Gregory L. Fricchione; Gurucharan Khalsa; Herbert Benson

2000-01-01

295

ARCHIVAL REPORT Functional Brain Activation to Emotionally Valenced  

E-print Network

to patterns found in adults and adolescents with major depression. These patterns were most strongly related to as preschool-onset depression (PO-MDD) (4­7). Adults and adolescents with MDD show altered functional brain with a History of Preschool-Onset Major Depression Deanna M. Barch, Michael S. Gaffrey, Kelly N. Botteron, Andrew

296

Investigating the Dynamics of Functional Brain Networks with MRI  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is sensitive to changes in blood oxygenation levels. While fMRI has traditionally mapped changes in these levels that localize to brain areas activated by an external stimulus, recent work has focused on detecting correlated, non-stimulus-related fluctuations in the fMRI signal throughout the brain. These fluctuations are believed to arise from spontaneous variations in local neural activity, and so correlated fluctuations from different brain areas may indicate coordinated activity. Maps of ``functional connectivity'' based upon these fluctuations show reproducible patterns of correlated signals. To date, research has focused on steady-state networks that persist over the entire imaging session (minutes). We are exploring the possibility of detecting changes in network activity on much shorter time scales (seconds). Preliminary analysis shows that power in the frequency band used to map functional connectivity varies over time, and that power differences correspond to changes in correlation between areas. We also detected phase differences in fluctuations that are consistent with propagating waves. These results indicate that time-varying analysis of fMRI data may provide insight into the dynamics of functional networks in the brain.

Keilholz, Shella; Majeed, Waqas

2008-03-01

297

The Strength of Plastic Bonded Explosives as a Function of Pressure, Strain Rate and Temperature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurements as a function of strain rate and temperature have indicated the importance of the polymer binder in determining the strength of plastic bonded explosives at ambient conditions and low strain rate. Recent measurements of strength as a function of pressure further support this conclusion. As pressure or strain rate are increased or temperature is decreased the strength increases as does the strength of many polymers. In addition, at relatively large values of pressure or strain rate and/or relatively low values of temperature the strength is less sensitive to changes of these quantities. These trends suggest that as the polymer binder becomes stronger with increasing pressure or strain rate or with decreasing temperature, the strength of the explosive component of these composites becomes more important in determining the strength of the composite. Results will be presented for plastic bonded explosives, e.g., LX-14, that demonstrate these trends as a function of pressure, strain rate and temperature.

Wiegand, Donald

2005-07-01

298

Functional craniology and brain evolution: from paleontology to biomedicine.  

PubMed

Anatomical systems are organized through a network of structural and functional relationships among their elements. This network of relationships is the result of evolution, it represents the actual target of selection, and it generates the set of rules orienting and constraining the morphogenetic processes. Understanding the relationship among cranial and cerebral components is necessary to investigate the factors that have influenced and characterized our neuroanatomy, and possible drawbacks associated with the evolution of large brains. The study of the spatial relationships between skull and brain in the human genus has direct relevance in cranial surgery. Geometrical modeling can provide functional perspectives in evolution and brain physiology, like in simulations to investigate metabolic heat production and dissipation in the endocranial form. Analysis of the evolutionary constraints between facial and neural blocks can provide new information on visual impairment. The study of brain form variation in fossil humans can supply a different perspective for interpreting the processes behind neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's disease. Following these examples, it is apparent that paleontology and biomedicine can exchange relevant information and contribute at the same time to the development of robust evolutionary hypotheses on brain evolution, while offering more comprehensive biological perspectives with regard to the interpretation of pathological processes. PMID:24765064

Bruner, Emiliano; de la Cuétara, José Manuel; Masters, Michael; Amano, Hideki; Ogihara, Naomichi

2014-01-01

299

Memory Function Before and After Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With and Without Brain Metastases  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To prospectively compare the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) on memory function in patients with and without brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with and without brain metastases (n = 44) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before RT (T0), after starting RT (T1), at the end of RT (T2), and 6-8 weeks (T3) after RT completion. Data were obtained from small-cell lung cancer patients treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation, patients with brain metastases treated with therapeutic cranial irradiation (TCI), and breast cancer patients treated with RT to the breast. Results: Before therapy, prophylactic cranial irradiation patients performed worse than TCI patients or than controls on most test scores. During and after WBRT, verbal memory function was influenced by pretreatment cognitive status (p < 0.001) and to a lesser extent by WBRT. Acute (T1) radiation effects on verbal memory function were only observed in TCI patients (p = 0.031). Subacute (T3) radiation effects on verbal memory function were observed in both TCI and prophylactic cranial irradiation patients (p = 0.006). These effects were more pronounced in patients with above-average performance at baseline. Visual memory and attention were not influenced by WBRT. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that WBRT causes cognitive dysfunction immediately after the beginning of RT in patients with brain metastases only. At 6-8 weeks after the end of WBRT, cognitive dysfunction was seen in patients with and without brain metastases. Because cognitive dysfunction after WBRT is restricted to verbal memory, patients should not avoid WBRT because of a fear of neurocognitive side effects.

Welzel, Grit [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)], E-mail: grit.welzel@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Fleckenstein, Katharina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Schaefer, Joerg; Hermann, Brigitte; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Mai, Sabine K.; Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

2008-12-01

300

Induction of the plasticity-associated immediate early gene Arc by stress and hallucinogens: role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.  

PubMed

Exposure to stress and hallucinogens in adulthood evokes persistent alterations in neurocircuitry and emotional behaviour. The structural and functional changes induced by stress and hallucinogen exposure are thought to involve transcriptional alterations in specific effector immediate early genes. The immediate early gene, activity regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc), is important for both activity and experience dependent plasticity. We sought to examine whether trophic factor signalling through brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) contributes to the neocortical regulation of Arc mRNA in response to distinct stimuli such as immobilization stress and the hallucinogen 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI). Acute exposure to either immobilization stress or DOI induced Arc mRNA levels within the neocortex. BDNF infusion into the neocortex led to a robust up-regulation of local Arc transcript expression. Further, baseline Arc mRNA expression in the neocortex was significantly decreased in inducible BDNF knockout mice with an adult-onset, forebrain specific BDNF loss. The induction of Arc mRNA levels in response to both acute immobilization stress or a single administration of DOI was significantly attenuated in the inducible BDNF knockout mice. Taken together, our results implicate trophic factor signalling through BDNF in the regulation of cortical Arc mRNA expression, both under baseline conditions and following stress and hallucinogen exposure. These findings suggest the possibility that the regulation of Arc expression via BDNF provides a molecular substrate for the structural and synaptic plasticity observed following stimuli such as stress and hallucinogens. PMID:22404904

Benekareddy, Madhurima; Nair, Amrita R; Dias, Brian G; Suri, Deepika; Autry, Anita E; Monteggia, Lisa M; Vaidya, Vidita A

2013-03-01

301

The Functional Connectivity Landscape of the Human Brain  

PubMed Central

Functional brain networks emerge and dissipate over a primarily static anatomical foundation. The dynamic basis of these networks is inter-regional communication involving local and distal regions. It is assumed that inter-regional distances play a pivotal role in modulating network dynamics. Using three different neuroimaging modalities, 6 datasets were evaluated to determine whether experimental manipulations asymmetrically affect functional relationships based on the distance between brain regions in human participants. Contrary to previous assumptions, here we show that short- and long-range connections are equally likely to strengthen or weaken in response to task demands. Additionally, connections between homotopic areas are the most stable and less likely to change compared to any other type of connection. Our results point to a functional connectivity landscape characterized by fluid transitions between local specialization and global integration. This ability to mediate functional properties irrespective of spatial distance may engender a diverse repertoire of cognitive processes when faced with a dynamic environment. PMID:25350370

Fatima, Zainab; Jonides, John; McIntosh, Anthony R.

2014-01-01

302

The functional connectivity landscape of the human brain.  

PubMed

Functional brain networks emerge and dissipate over a primarily static anatomical foundation. The dynamic basis of these networks is inter-regional communication involving local and distal regions. It is assumed that inter-regional distances play a pivotal role in modulating network dynamics. Using three different neuroimaging modalities, 6 datasets were evaluated to determine whether experimental manipulations asymmetrically affect functional relationships based on the distance between brain regions in human participants. Contrary to previous assumptions, here we show that short- and long-range connections are equally likely to strengthen or weaken in response to task demands. Additionally, connections between homotopic areas are the most stable and less likely to change compared to any other type of connection. Our results point to a functional connectivity landscape characterized by fluid transitions between local specialization and global integration. This ability to mediate functional properties irrespective of spatial distance may engender a diverse repertoire of cognitive processes when faced with a dynamic environment. PMID:25350370

Miši?, Bratislav; Fatima, Zainab; Askren, Mary K; Buschkuehl, Martin; Churchill, Nathan; Cimprich, Bernadine; Deldin, Patricia J; Jaeggi, Susanne; Jung, Misook; Korostil, Michele; Kross, Ethan; Krpan, Katherine M; Peltier, Scott; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A; Strother, Stephen C; Jonides, John; McIntosh, Anthony R; Berman, Marc G

2014-01-01

303

Beyond genotype: serotonin transporter epigenetic modification predicts human brain function.  

PubMed

We examined epigenetic regulation in regards to behaviorally and clinically relevant human brain function. Specifically, we found that increased promoter methylation of the serotonin transporter gene predicted increased threat-related amygdala reactivity and decreased mRNA expression in postmortem amygdala tissue. These patterns were independent of functional genetic variation in the same region. Furthermore, the association with amygdala reactivity was replicated in a second cohort and was robust to both sampling methods and age. PMID:25086606

Nikolova, Yuliya S; Koenen, Karestan C; Galea, Sandro; Wang, Chiou-Miin; Seney, Marianne L; Sibille, Etienne; Williamson, Douglas E; Hariri, Ahmad R

2014-09-01

304

Task-Specific Functional Brain Geometry from Model Maps  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we propose model maps to derive and repre- sent the intrinsic functional geometry of a brain from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data for a specific task. Model maps repre- sent the coherence of behavior of individual fMRI-measurements for a set of observations, or a time sequence. The maps establish a relation between individual positions in the

Georg Langs; Dimitris Samaras; Nikos Paragios; Jean Honorio; Nelly Alia-klein; Dardo Tomasi; Nora D. Volkow; Rita Z. Goldstein

2008-01-01

305

Prenatal and Infant Exposure to an Environmental Pollutant Damages Brain Architecture and Plasticity. Science Briefs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Science Briefs" summarize the findings and implications of a recent study in basic science or clinical research. This Brief reports on the study "Perinatal Exposure to a Noncoplanar Bichlorinated Biphenol Alters Tonotopy, Receptive Fields and Plasticity in the Auditory Cortex" (T. Kenet; R. C. Froemke; C. E. Schreiner; I. N. Pessah; and M. M.…

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2007

2007-01-01

306

Cerebral Protection, Brain Repair, Plasticity and Cell Therapy in Ischemic Stroke  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among available treatments in the acute ischemic stroke, only intravenous thrombolysis has been demonstrated to be efficacious. Although the majority of pharmacological neuroprotectants have been efficacious in experimental studies, they have failed in clinical trials. Hence, we need to consider integrated cerebral protection which includes the concept of cerebral repair by supporting cerebral plasticity. We provide a nonsystematic review of

María Gutiérrez; José Joaquín Merino; María Alonso de Leciñana; Exuperio Díez-Tejedor

2009-01-01

307

Structural and functional brain rewiring clarifies preserved interhemispheric transfer in humans born without the corpus callosum.  

PubMed

Why do humans born without the corpus callosum, the major interhemispheric commissure, lack the disconnection syndrome classically described in callosotomized patients? This paradox was discovered by Nobel laureate Roger Sperry in 1968, and has remained unsolved since then. To tackle the hypothesis that alternative neural pathways could explain this puzzle, we investigated patients with callosal dysgenesis using structural and functional neuroimaging, as well as neuropsychological assessments. We identified two anomalous white-matter tracts by deterministic and probabilistic tractography, and provide supporting resting-state functional neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence for their functional role in preserved interhemispheric transfer of complex tactile information, such as object recognition. These compensatory pathways connect the homotopic posterior parietal cortical areas (Brodmann areas 39 and surroundings) via the posterior and anterior commissures. We propose that anomalous brain circuitry of callosal dysgenesis is determined by long-distance plasticity, a set of hardware changes occurring in the developing brain after pathological interference. So far unknown, these pathological changes somehow divert growing axons away from the dorsal midline, creating alternative tracts through the ventral forebrain and the dorsal midbrain midline, with partial compensatory effects to the interhemispheric transfer of cortical function. PMID:24821757

Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Monteiro, Myriam; Andrade, Juliana; Bramati, Ivanei E; Vianna-Barbosa, Rodrigo; Marins, Theo; Rodrigues, Erika; Dantas, Natalia; Behrens, Timothy E J; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Moll, Jorge; Lent, Roberto

2014-05-27

308

Altered functional and structural brain network organization in autism.  

PubMed

Structural and functional underconnectivity have been reported for multiple brain regions, functional systems, and white matter tracts in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Although recent developments in complex network analysis have established that the brain is a modular network exhibiting small-world properties, network level organization has not been carefully examined in ASD. Here we used resting-state functional MRI (n = 42 ASD, n = 37 typically developing; TD) to show that children and adolescents with ASD display reduced short and long-range connectivity within functional systems (i.e., reduced functional integration) and stronger connectivity between functional systems (i.e., reduced functional segregation), particularly in default and higher-order visual regions. Using graph theoretical methods, we show that pairwise group differences in functional connectivity are reflected in network level reductions in modularity and clustering (local efficiency), but shorter characteristic path lengths (higher global efficiency). Structural networks, generated from diffusion tensor MRI derived fiber tracts (n = 51 ASD, n = 43 TD), displayed lower levels of white matter integrity yet higher numbers of fibers. TD and ASD individuals exhibited similar levels of correlation between raw measures of structural and functional connectivity (n = 35 ASD, n = 35 TD). However, a principal component analysis combining structural and functional network properties revealed that the balance of local and global efficiency between structural and functional networks was reduced in ASD, positively correlated with age, and inversely correlated with ASD symptom severity. Overall, our findings suggest that modeling the brain as a complex network will be highly informative in unraveling the biological basis of ASD and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24179761

Rudie, J D; Brown, J A; Beck-Pancer, D; Hernandez, L M; Dennis, E L; Thompson, P M; Bookheimer, S Y; Dapretto, M

2012-01-01

309

Functional brain imaging in gastroenterology: to new beginnings.  

PubMed

With more than 100 studies published over the past two decades, functional brain imaging research in gastroenterology has become an established field; one that has enabled improved insight into the supraspinal responses evoked by gastrointestinal stimulation both in health and disease. However, there remains considerable inter-study variation in the published results, largely owing to methodological differences in stimulation and recording techniques, heterogeneous patient selection, lack of control for psychological factors and so on. These issues with reproducibility, although not unique to studies of the gastrointestinal tract, can lead to unjustified inferences. To obtain consistent and more clinically relevant results, there is a need to optimize and standardize brain imaging studies across different centres. In addition, the use of complementary and more novel brain imaging modalities and analyses, which are now being used in other fields of research, might help unravel the factors at play in functional gastrointestinal disorders. This Review highlights the areas in which functional brain imaging has been useful and what it has revealed, the areas that are in need of improvement, and finally suggestions for future directions. PMID:24912384

Al Omran, Yasser; Aziz, Qasim

2014-09-01

310

Partial sleep in the context of augmentation of brain function  

PubMed Central

Inability to solve complex problems or errors in decision making is often attributed to poor brain processing, and raises the issue of brain augmentation. Investigation of neuronal activity in the cerebral cortex in the sleep-wake cycle offers insights into the mechanisms underlying the reduction in mental abilities for complex problem solving. Some cortical areas may transit into a sleep state while an organism is still awake. Such local sleep would reduce behavioral ability in the tasks for which the sleeping areas are crucial. The studies of this phenomenon have indicated that local sleep develops in high order cortical areas. This is why complex problem solving is mostly affected by local sleep, and prevention of local sleep might be a potential way of augmentation of brain function. For this approach to brain augmentation not to entail negative consequences for the organism, it is necessary to understand the functional role of sleep. Our studies have given an unexpected answer to this question. It was shown that cortical areas that process signals from extero- and proprioreceptors during wakefulness, switch to the processing of interoceptive information during sleep. It became clear that during sleep all “computational power” of the brain is directed to the restoration of the vital functions of internal organs. These results explain the logic behind the initiation of total and local sleep. Indeed, a mismatch between the current parameters of any visceral system and the genetically determined normal range would provide the feeling of tiredness, or sleep pressure. If an environmental situation allows falling asleep, the organism would transit to a normal total sleep in all cortical areas. However, if it is impossible to go to sleep immediately, partial sleep may develop in some cortical areas in the still behaviorally awake organism. This local sleep may reduce both the “intellectual power” and the restorative function of sleep for visceral organs. PMID:24822040

Pigarev, Ivan N.; Pigareva, Marina L.

2014-01-01

311

Brain structural and functional correlates of resilience to Bipolar Disorder  

PubMed Central

Background: Resilient adaptation can be construed in different ways, but as used here it refers to adaptive brain responses associated with avoidance of psychopathology despite expressed genetic predisposition to Bipolar Disorder (BD). Although family history of BD is associated with elevated risk of affective morbidity a significant proportion of first-degree relatives remain free of psychopathology. Examination of brain structure and function in these individuals may inform on adaptive responses that pre-empt disease expression. Methods: Data presented here are derived from the Vulnerability to Bipolar Disorders Study (VIBES) which includes BD patients, asymptomatic relatives and controls. Participants underwent extensive investigations including brain structural (sMRI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We present results from sMRI voxel-based-morphometry and from conventional and connectivity analyses of fMRI data obtained during the Stroop Colour Word Test (SCWT), a task of cognitive control during conflict resolution. All analyses were implemented using Statistical Parametric Mapping software version 5 (SPM5). Resilience in relatives was operationalized as the lifetime absence of clinical-range symptoms. Results: Resilient relatives of BD patients expressed structural, functional, and connectivity changes reflecting the effect of genetic risk on the brain. These included increased insular volume, decreased activation within the posterior and inferior parietal regions involved in selective attention during the SCWT, and reduced fronto-insular and fronto-cingulate connectivity. Resilience was associated with increased cerebellar vermal volume and enhanced functional coupling between the dorsal and the ventral prefrontal cortex during the SCWT. Conclusions: Our findings suggests the presence of biological mechanisms associated with resilient adaptation of brain networks and pave the way for the identification of outcome-specific trajectories given a bipolar genotype. PMID:22363273

Frangou, Sophia

2011-01-01

312

Partial sleep in the context of augmentation of brain function.  

PubMed

Inability to solve complex problems or errors in decision making is often attributed to poor brain processing, and raises the issue of brain augmentation. Investigation of neuronal activity in the cerebral cortex in the sleep-wake cycle offers insights into the mechanisms underlying the reduction in mental abilities for complex problem solving. Some cortical areas may transit into a sleep state while an organism is still awake. Such local sleep would reduce behavioral ability in the tasks for which the sleeping areas are crucial. The studies of this phenomenon have indicated that local sleep develops in high order cortical areas. This is why complex problem solving is mostly affected by local sleep, and prevention of local sleep might be a potential way of augmentation of brain function. For this approach to brain augmentation not to entail negative consequences for the organism, it is necessary to understand the functional role of sleep. Our studies have given an unexpected answer to this question. It was shown that cortical areas that process signals from extero- and proprioreceptors during wakefulness, switch to the processing of interoceptive information during sleep. It became clear that during sleep all "computational power" of the brain is directed to the restoration of the vital functions of internal organs. These results explain the logic behind the initiation of total and local sleep. Indeed, a mismatch between the current parameters of any visceral system and the genetically determined normal range would provide the feeling of tiredness, or sleep pressure. If an environmental situation allows falling asleep, the organism would transit to a normal total sleep in all cortical areas. However, if it is impossible to go to sleep immediately, partial sleep may develop in some cortical areas in the still behaviorally awake organism. This local sleep may reduce both the "intellectual power" and the restorative function of sleep for visceral organs. PMID:24822040

Pigarev, Ivan N; Pigareva, Marina L

2014-01-01

313

The Mouse Blood-Brain Barrier Transcriptome: A New Resource for Understanding the Development and Function of Brain Endothelial Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) maintains brain homeostasis and limits the entry of toxins and pathogens into the brain. Despite its importance, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating the development and function of this crucial barrier. In this study we have developed methods to highly purify and gene profile endothelial cells from different tissues, and by comparing the transcriptional

Richard Daneman; Lu Zhou; Dritan Agalliu; John D. Cahoy; Amit Kaushal; Ben A. Barres

2010-01-01

314

Musical training induces functional plasticity in perceptual and motor networks: insights from resting-state FMRI.  

PubMed

A number of previous studies have examined music-related plasticity in terms of multi-sensory and motor integration but little is known about the functional and effective connectivity patterns of spontaneous intrinsic activity in these systems during the resting state in musicians. Using functional connectivity and Granger causal analysis, functional and effective connectivity among the motor and multi-sensory (visual, auditory and somatosensory) cortices were evaluated using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in musicians and non-musicians. The results revealed that functional connectivity was significantly increased in the motor and multi-sensory cortices of musicians. Moreover, the Granger causality results demonstrated a significant increase outflow-inflow degree in the auditory cortex with the strongest causal outflow pattern of effective connectivity being found in musicians. These resting state fMRI findings indicate enhanced functional integration among the lower-level perceptual and motor networks in musicians, and may reflect functional consolidation (plasticity) resulting from long-term musical training, involving both multi-sensory and motor functional integration. PMID:22586478

Luo, Cheng; Guo, Zhi-wei; Lai, Yong-xiu; Liao, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Kendrick, Keith M; Yao, De-zhong; Li, Hong

2012-01-01

315

Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior  

E-print Network

Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior.thirion@inria.fr Abstract Spontaneous brain activity, as observed in functional neuroimaging, has been shown to display reproducible structure that expresses brain architecture and car- ries markers of brain pathologies

316

Totally tubular: the mystery behind function and origin of the brain ventricular system  

E-print Network

Totally tubular: the mystery behind function and origin of the brain ventricular system Laura Anne School, 240 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA, USA A unique feature of the vertebrate brain is the ventricular by neu- roepithelium. While CSF is critical for both adult brain function and embryonic brain development

Lowery, Laura Anne

317

Sleep restriction impairs blood-brain barrier function.  

PubMed

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a large regulatory and exchange interface between the brain and peripheral circulation. We propose that changes of the BBB contribute to many pathophysiological processes in the brain of subjects with chronic sleep restriction (CSR). To achieve CSR that mimics a common pattern of human sleep loss, we quantified a new procedure of sleep disruption in mice by a week of consecutive sleep recording. We then tested the hypothesis that CSR compromises microvascular function. CSR not only diminished endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase, endothelin1, and glucose transporter expression in cerebral microvessels of the BBB, but it also decreased 2-deoxy-glucose uptake by the brain. The expression of several tight junction proteins also was decreased, whereas the level of cyclooxygenase-2 increased. This coincided with an increase of paracellular permeability of the BBB to the small tracers sodium fluorescein and biotin. CSR for 6 d was sufficient to impair BBB structure and function, although the increase of paracellular permeability returned to baseline after 24 h of recovery sleep. This merits attention not only in neuroscience research but also in public health policy and clinical practice. PMID:25355222

He, Junyun; Hsuchou, Hung; He, Yi; Kastin, Abba J; Wang, Yuping; Pan, Weihong

2014-10-29

318

Recruiting specialized macrophages across the borders to restore brain functions.  

PubMed

Although is well accepted that the central nervous system has an immune privilege protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and maintained by the glia, it is also known that in homeostatic conditions, peripheral immune cells are able to penetrate to the deepest regions of brain without altering the structural integrity of the BBB. Nearly all neurological diseases, including degenerative, autoimmune or infectious ones, compromising brain functions, develop with a common pattern of inflammation in which macrophages and microglia activation have been regarded often as the "bad guys." However, recognizing the huge heterogeneity of macrophage populations and also the different expression properties of microglia, there is increasing evidence of alternative conditions in which these cells, if primed and addressed in the correct direction, could be essential for reparative and regenerative functions. The main proposal of this review is to integrate studies about macrophage's biology at the brain borders where the ultimate challenge is to penetrate through the BBB and contribute to change or even stop the course of disease. Thanks to the efforts made in the last century, this special wall is currently recognized as a highly regulated cooperative structure, in which their components form neurovascular units. This new scenario prompted us to review the precise cross-talk between the mind and body modes of immune response. PMID:25228859

Corraliza, Inés

2014-01-01

319

Resting-state functional brain connectivity: lessons from functional near-infrared spectroscopy.  

PubMed

Resting-state functional near-infrared spectroscopy (R-fNIRS) is an active area of interest and is currently attracting considerable attention as a new imaging tool for the study of resting-state brain function. Using variations in hemodynamic concentration signals, R-fNIRS measures the brain's low-frequency spontaneous neural activity, combining the advantages of portability, low-cost, high temporal sampling rate and less physical burden to participants. The temporal synchronization of spontaneous neuronal activity in anatomically separated regions is referred to as resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC). In the past several years, an increasing body of R-fNIRS RSFC studies has led to many important findings about functional integration among local or whole-brain regions by measuring inter-regional temporal synchronization. Here, we summarize recent advances made in the R-fNIRS RSFC methodologies, from the detection of RSFC (e.g., seed-based correlation analysis, independent component analysis, whole-brain correlation analysis, and graph-theoretical topological analysis), to the assessment of RSFC performance (e.g., reliability, repeatability, and validity), to the application of RSFC in studying normal development and brain disorders. The literature reviewed here suggests that RSFC analyses based on R-fNIRS data are valid and reliable for the study of brain function in healthy and diseased populations, thus providing a promising imaging tool for cognitive science and clinics. PMID:24022325

Niu, Haijing; He, Yong

2014-04-01

320

Transcranial brain stimulation to promote functional recovery after stroke  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review Noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) is increasingly used to enhance the recovery of function after stroke. The purpose of this review is to highlight and discuss some unresolved questions that need to be addressed to better understand and exploit the potential of NIBS as a therapeutic tool. Recent findings Recent meta-analyses showed that the treatment effects of NIBS in patients with stroke are rather inconsistent across studies and the evidence for therapeutic efficacy is still uncertain. This raises the question of how NIBS can be developed further to improve its therapeutic efficacy. Summary This review addressed six questions: How does NIBS facilitate the recovery of function after stroke? Which brain regions should be targeted by NIBS? Is there a particularly effective NIBS modality that should be used? Does the location of the stroke influence the therapeutic response? How often should NIBS be repeated? Is the functional state of the brain during or before NIBS relevant to therapeutic efficacy of NIBS? We argue that these questions need to be tackled to obtain sufficient mechanistic understanding of how NIBS facilitates the recovery of function. This knowledge will be critical to fully unfold the therapeutic effects of NIBS and will pave the way towards adaptive NIBS protocols, in which NIBS is tailored to the individual patient. PMID:24296641

Raffin, Estelle; Siebner, Hartwig R.

2014-01-01

321

Rehabilitation and plasticity.  

PubMed

Therapies for effective neurorehabiltiation are in part based on brain mechanism commonly described as neuroplasticity. These therapeutic approaches emphasize the re-learning of functionality that was lost due to the injury through reorganization of neural circuits in the remaining intact tissue. Important elements of these therapies are intensive and repetitive training, motivation and potentially interactive devices (therapy "robots") and supportive therapies such as brain stimulation or plasticity inducing medications. Because neuroplasticity-based interventions are complex and multifactorial optimized treatment protocols have to be developed before large clinical trials can provide the evidence of efficacy. PMID:23859967

Luft, Andreas R

2013-01-01

322

Localization of asymmetric brain function in emotion and depression.  

PubMed

Although numerous EEG studies have shown that depression is associated with abnormal functional asymmetries in frontal cortex, fMRI and PET studies have largely failed to identify specific brain areas showing this effect. The present study tested the hypothesis that emotion processes are related to asymmetric patterns of fMRI activity, particularly within dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Eleven depressed and 18 control participants identified the color in which pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant words were printed. Both groups showed a leftward lateralization for pleasant words in DLPFC. In a neighboring DLPFC area, the depression group showed more right-lateralized activation than controls, replicating EEG findings. These data confirm that emotional stimulus processing and trait depression are associated with asymmetric brain functions in distinct subregions of the DLPFC that may go undetected unless appropriate analytic procedures are used. PMID:20070577

Herrington, John D; Heller, Wendy; Mohanty, Aprajita; Engels, Anna S; Banich, Marie T; Webb, Andrew G; Miller, Gregory A

2010-05-01

323

Ivermectin excretion by isolated functionally intact brain endothelial capillaries  

PubMed Central

Functionally intact brain endothelial capillaries were isolated from porcine brain. p-Glycoprotein was localized at the lumenal membrane of intact capillaries by immunohistochemistry using a murine monoclonal antibody and a secondary FITC fluorescent labelled anti-mouse IgG. Western blot staining of p-glycoprotein in isolated endothelial cells confirmed the immunohistochemistry. Excretion of the fluorescent labelled anthelmintic drug Ivermectin (BODIPY-Ivermectin) was studied in the isolated brain endothelial capillaries. Drug accumulation in the capillary lumen was visualized by fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy and was measured by image analysis. Secretion of BODIPY-Ivermectin into the capillary lumen exhibited characteristics of specific and energy-dependent transport. Steady state lumenal fluorescence intensity averaged 1.6 times cellular fluorescence and was reduced 3?–?4 times below cellular levels when metabolism was inhibited by NaCN. BODIPY-Ivermectin secretion was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by unlabeled Ivermectin. In addition, lumenal but not cellular fluorescence intensity was significantly decreased when capillaries were incubated with PSC-833, Cyclosporin A or Verapamil, all inhibitors of p-glycoprotein. Conversely, unlabelled Ivermectin reduced the p-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated secretion of a fluorescent derivative of Verapamil, (BODIPY-Verapamil). BODIPY-Ivermectin secretion was not affected in the presence of Leucotriene C4 (LTC4), a potent inhibitor of multidrug resistance related protein (mrp)-mediated transport processes. In addition, excretion of Fluorescein-Methotrexate, an mrp-substrate, was not inhibited by Ivermectin. Uptake experiments with isolated porcine brain capillary cells showing increased cellular uptake of BODIPY-Ivermectin in the presence of unlabelled drug or PSC-833 supported the findings of a Pgp interaction in intact capillaries. The data are consistent with BODIPY-Ivermectin and Ivermectin being transported across the lumenal membrane of brain capillaries. For the first time Pgp-interaction of Ivermectin at the blood brain barrier is demonstrated on a cellular level in an intact vascular tissue. PMID:11159725

Nobmann, Stephanie; Bauer, Bjorn; Fricker, Gert

2001-01-01

324

Harnessing Brain Plasticity through Behavioral Techniques to Produce New Treatments in Neurorehabilitation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Basic behavioral neuroscience research with monkeys has given rise to an efficacious new approach to the rehabilitation of movement after stroke, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, and other types of neurological injury in humans termed Constraint-Induced Movement therapy or CI therapy. For the upper extremity, the treatment involves…

Taub, Edward

2004-01-01

325

Neuronal Plasticity and Dendritic Spines: Effect of Environmental Enrichment on Intact and Postischemic Rat Brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors compared the influence of environmental enrichment on intact and lesioned brain, and tested the hypothesis that postischemic exposure to an enriched environment can alter dendritic spine density in pyramidal neurons contralateral to a cortical infarct. The middle cerebral artery was occluded distal to the striatal branches in spontaneously hypertensive rats postoperatively housed either in a standard or in

Barbro B. Johansson; Pavel V. Belichenko

2002-01-01

326

Neurophysiological Architecture of Functional Magnetic Resonance Images of Human Brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated large-scale systems organization of the whole human brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired from healthy volunteers in a no-task or 'resting' state. Images were parcellated using a prior anatomical template, yielding regional mean time series for each of 90 regions (major cortical gyri and subcortical nuclei) in each subject. Significant pairwise func- tional connections, defined

Raymond Salvador; John Suckling; Martin R. Coleman; John D. Pickard; David Menon; Ed Bullmore

2005-01-01

327

Interaction of functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with brain structures.  

PubMed

Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are under clinical evaluation to enhance detection of neurodegenerative diseases. A major improvement would be to link therapeutic drugs to the SPIONs to achieve targeted drug delivery, either at the cell surface or intracellularly, together with active disease detection, without inducing cell reaction. Our objectives were to define the characteristics of SPIONS able to achieve cell-specific interaction with brain-derived structures. Our system consisted in an iron oxide core (9-10 nm diameter) coated either with dextran (Sinerem and Endorem) or various functionalized polyvinyl alcohols (PVAs) (PVA-SPIONs). We investigated the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and interaction of these various nanoparticles with brain-derived endothelial cells, microglial cells, and differentiating three-dimensional aggregates. None of the nanoparticles coated with dextran or the various PVAs was cytotoxic or induced the production of the inflammatory mediator NO used as a reporter for cell activation. AminoPVA-SPIONs were taken up by isolated brain-derived endothelial and microglial cells at a much higher level than the other SPIONs, and no inflammatory activation of these cells was observed. AminoPVA-SPIONs did not invade brain cells aggregates lower than the first cell layer and did not induce inflammatory reaction in the aggregates. Fluorescent aminoPVA-SPIONs derivatized with a fluorescent reporter molecule and confocal microscopy demonstrated intracellular uptake by microglial cells. Fluorescent aminoPVA-SPIONs were well tolerated by mice. Therefore, functionalized aminoPVA-SPIONs represent biocompatible potential vector systems for drug delivery to the brain that may be combined with MRI detection of active lesions in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:16608917

Cengelli, Feride; Maysinger, Dusica; Tschudi-Monnet, Florianne; Montet, Xavier; Corot, Claire; Petri-Fink, Alke; Hofmann, Heinrich; Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne

2006-07-01

328

Neural Plasticity: For Good and Bad  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The brain's ability to change its organization and function is necessary for normal development of the nervous system and it makes it possible to adapt to changing demands but it can also cause disorders when going awry. This property, known as neural plasticity, is only evident when induced, very much like genes. Plastic changes may be programmed and providing a ``midcourse correction" during childhood development. If that is not executed in the normal way severe developmental disorders such as autism may results. Normal development of functions and anatomical organization of the brain and the spinal cord depend on appropriate sensory stimulation and motor activations. So-called enriched sensory environments have been shown to be beneficial for cognitive development and enriched acoustic environment may even slow the progression of age-related hearing loss. It is possible that the beneficial effect of physical exercise is achieved through activation of neural plasticity. The beneficial effect of training after trauma to the brain or spinal cord is mainly achieved through shifting functions from damaged brain area to other parts of the central nervous system and adapting these parts to take over the functions that are lost. This is accomplished through activation of neural plasticity. Plastic changes can also be harmful and cause symptoms and signs of disorders such as some forms of chronic pain (central neuropathic pain) and severe tinnitus. We will call such disorders ``plasticity disorders".

Møller, A. R.

329

Interpreting the effects of altered brain anatomical connectivity on fMRI functional connectivity: a role for computational neural modeling  

PubMed Central

Recently, there have been a large number of studies using resting state fMRI to characterize abnormal brain connectivity in patients with a variety of neurological, psychiatric, and developmental disorders. However, interpreting what the differences in resting state fMRI functional connectivity (rsfMRI-FC) actually reflect in terms of the underlying neural pathology has proved to be elusive because of the complexity of brain anatomical connectivity. The same is the case for task-based fMRI studies. In the last few years, several groups have used large-scale neural modeling to help provide some insight into the relationship between brain anatomical connectivity and the corresponding patterns of fMRI-FC. In this paper we review several efforts at using large-scale neural modeling to investigate the relationship between structural connectivity and functional/effective connectivity to determine how alterations in structural connectivity are manifested in altered patterns of functional/effective connectivity. Because the alterations made in the anatomical connectivity between specific brain regions in the model are known in detail, one can use the results of these simulations to determine the corresponding alterations in rsfMRI-FC. Many of these simulation studies found that structural connectivity changes do not necessarily result in matching changes in functional/effective connectivity in the areas of structural modification. Often, it was observed that increases in functional/effective connectivity in the altered brain did not necessarily correspond to increases in the strength of the anatomical connection weights. Note that increases in rsfMRI-FC in patients have been interpreted in some cases as resulting from neural plasticity. These results suggest that this interpretation can be mistaken. The relevance of these simulation findings to the use of functional/effective fMRI connectivity as biomarkers for brain disorders is also discussed. PMID:24273500

Horwitz, Barry; Hwang, Chuhern; Alstott, Jeff

2013-01-01

330

Exploring the impact of plasticity-related recovery after brain damage in a connectionist model of single-word reading.  

PubMed

The effect of retraining a damaged connectionist model of single-word reading was investigated with the aim of establishing whether plasticity-related changes occurring during the recovery process can contribute to our understanding of the pattern of dissociations found in brain-damaged patients. In particular, we sought to reproduce the strong frequency x consistency interactions found in surface dyslexia. A replication of Plaut, McClelland, Seidenberg, and Patterson's (1996) model of word reading was damaged and then retrained, using a standard backpropagation algorithm. Immediately after damage, there was only a small frequency x consistency interaction. Retraining the damaged model crystallized out these small differences into a strong dissociation, very similar to the pattern found in surface dyslexic patients. What is more, the percentage of regularization errors, always high in surface dyslexics, increased greatly over the retraining period, moving from under 10% to over 80% in some simulations. These results suggest that the performance patterns of brain-damaged patients can owe as much to the substantial changes in the pattern of connectivity occurring during recovery as to the original premorbid structure. This finding is discussed in relation to the traditional cognitive neuropsychological assumptions of subtractivity and transparency. PMID:15913010

Welbourne, Stephen R; Ralph, Matthew A Lambon

2005-03-01

331

Functional MRI of the Brain in Women with Overactive Bladder: Brain Activation During Urinary Urgency  

PubMed Central

Objectives To identify abnormal function of the limbic cortex (LC) in response to urinary urgency among patients with Overactive Bladder (OAB) using brain functional MRI (fMRI) Methods 5 OAB subjects and 5 Controls underwent bladder filling and rated urgency sensations while fMRI measured activation in discrete volumes (voxels) within the brain. Changes in brain activation were related to bladder distension and individual subject’s rating of urgency via multiple regression analysis. Beta weights from regression equations were converted into percent signal change (PSC) for each voxel and PSC compared to the null hypothesis using T-tests. Significance threshold of P<.05 was applied along with a cluster size threshold of.32 ml (5 voxels). Results OAB patients showed increased brain activation in LC, specifically the insula (IN) and Anterior Cingulate Gyrus (ACG), associated with increased urgency. Urgency sensations during low volumes were associated with bilateral IN activation in OAB subjects (7,621 voxels right IN, 4,453 voxels left IN, mean beta weights .018 +/? .014 and .014 +/? .011) Minimal activation was present in Controls (790 voxels right IN, beta weight =.010 +/? .007). Urgency sensations during high volumes were associated with bilateral ACG activation in OAB subjects (2,304 voxels right IN, 5,005 voxels left IN, mean beta weights of 005 +/? .003 and 004+/?.003) without activation in Controls. Conclusions Urinary urgency in patients with OAB is associated with increased activation of the LC. This activation likely represents abnormal processing of sensory input in brain regions associated with emotional response to discomfort. PMID:21399722

Komesu, Yuko M.; Ketai, Loren H.; Mayer, Andrew R.; Teshiba, Terry M.; Rogers, Rebecca G.

2011-01-01

332

Plasticity of Cerebral Cortex in Development Jessica R. Newton and Mriganka Sur  

E-print Network

Plasticity of Cerebral Cortex in Development Jessica R. Newton and Mriganka Sur Department of Brain, development, activity, function, connectivity, emergent properties #12;Plasticity of cerebral cortex cerebral cortex is a convoluted sheet of neural tissue that forms the outer surface of the brain

Sur, Mriganka

333

The Influence of Dietary Factors in Central Nervous System Plasticity and Injury Recovery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although feeding is an essential component of life, it is only recently that the actions of foods on brain plasticity and function have been scrutinized. There is evidence that select dietary factors are important modifiers of brain plasticity and can have an impact on central nervous system health and disease. Results of new research indicate that dietary factors exert their

Fernando Gomez-Pinilla; Alexis G. Gomez

2011-01-01

334

Multifaceted Genomic Risk for Brain Function in Schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Recently, deriving candidate endophenotypes from brain imaging data has become a valuable approach to study genetic influences on schizophrenia (SZ), whose pathophysiology remains unclear. In this work we utilized a multivariate approach, parallel independent component analysis, to identify genomic risk components associated with brain function abnormalities in SZ. 5157 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were derived from genome-wide array based on their possible connections with SZ and further investigated for their associations with brain activations captured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a sensorimotor task. Using data from 92 SZ patients and 116 healthy controls, we detected a significant correlation (r= 0.29; p= 2.41×10?5) between one fMRI component and one SNP component, both of which significantly differentiated patients from controls. The fMRI component mainly consisted of precentral and postcentral gyri, the major activated regions in the motor task. On average, higher activation in these regions was observed in participants with higher loadings of the linked SNP component, predominantly contributed to by 253 SNPs. 138 identified SNPs were from known coding regions of 100 unique genes. 31 identified SNPs did not differ between groups, but moderately correlated with some other group-discriminating SNPs, indicating interactions among alleles contributing towards elevated SZ susceptibility. The genes associated with the identified SNPs participated in four neurotransmitter pathways: GABA receptor signaling, dopamine receptor signaling, neuregulin signaling and glutamate receptor signaling. In summary, our work provides further evidence for the complexity of genomic risk to the functional brain abnormality in SZ and suggests a pathological role of interactions between SNPs, genes and multiple neurotransmitter pathways. PMID:22440650

Chen, Jiayu; Calhoun, Vince D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Ehrlich, Stefan; Turner, Jessica A.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Wassink, Thomas H.; Michael, Andrew M; Liu, Jingyu

2012-01-01

335

Dysfunctional long-term potentiation-like plasticity in schizophrenia revealed by transcranial direct current stimulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neural and cortical plasticity represent the ability of the brain to reorganize its function in response to a challenge. Plasticity involves changing synaptic activity and connectivity. Long-term-potentiation is one important mechanism underlying these synaptic changes. Disturbed neuronal plasticity is considered to be part of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and has been linked to the different clinical features of this severe

Alkomiet Hasan; Michael A. Nitsche; Bettina Rein; Thomas Schneider-Axmann; Birgit Guse; Oliver Gruber; Peter Falkai; Thomas Wobrock

2011-01-01

336

The equivalent plastic strain-dependent Yld2000-2d yield function and the experimental verification  

Microsoft Academic Search

An equivalent plastic strain-dependent anisotropic material model was developed for 5754O aluminum alloy sheet. In the developed model, the anisotropy coefficients for Barlat’s Yld2000-2d anisotropic yield function were established as a function of the equivalent plastic strain. The developed anisotropic material model was implemented into the commercial FEM code ABAQUS as a user material subroutine (UMAT) for simulations. In order

Haibo Wang; Min Wan; Xiangdong Wu; Yu Yan

2009-01-01

337

Can structure predict function in the human brain?  

PubMed

Over the past decade, scientific interest in the properties of large-scale spontaneous neural dynamics has intensified. Concurrently, novel technologies have been developed for characterizing the connective anatomy of intra-regional circuits and inter-regional fiber pathways. It will soon be possible to build computational models that incorporate these newly detailed structural network measurements to make predictions of neural dynamics at multiple scales. Here, we review the practicality and the value of these efforts, while at the same time considering in which cases and to what extent structure does determine neural function. Studies of the healthy brain, of neural development, and of pathology all yield examples of direct correspondences between structural linkage and dynamical correlation. Theoretical arguments further support the notion that brain network topology and spatial embedding should strongly influence network dynamics. Although future models will need to be tested more quantitatively and against a wider range of empirical neurodynamic features, our present large-scale models can already predict the macroscopic pattern of dynamic correlation across the brain. We conclude that as neuroscience grapples with datasets of increasing completeness and complexity, and attempts to relate the structural and functional architectures discovered at different neural scales, the value of computational modeling will continue to grow. PMID:20116438

Honey, Christopher J; Thivierge, Jean-Philippe; Sporns, Olaf

2010-09-01

338

Kappa-opioid receptor signaling and brain reward function  

PubMed Central

The dynorphin-like peptides have profound effects on the state of the brain reward system and human and animal behavior. The dynorphin-like peptides affect locomotor activity, food intake, sexual behavior, anxiety-like behavior, and drug intake. Stimulation of kappa-opioid receptors, the endogenous receptor for the dynorphin-like peptides, inhibits dopamine release in the striatum (nucleus accumbens and caudate putamen) and induces a negative mood state in humans and animals. The administration of drugs of abuse increases the release of dopamine in the striatum and mediates the concomitant release of dynorphin-like peptides in this brain region. The reviewed studies suggest that chronic drug intake leads to an upregulation of the brain dynorphin system in the striatum and in particular in the dorsal part of the striatum/caudate putamen. This might inhibit drug-induced dopamine release and provide protection against the neurotoxic effects of high dopamine levels. After the discontinuation of chronic drug intake these neuroadaptations remain unopposed which has been suggested to contribute to the negative emotional state associated with drug withdrawal and increased drug intake. Kappa-opioid receptor agonists have also been shown to inhibit calcium channels. Calcium channel inhibitors have antidepressant-like effects and inhibit the release of norepinephrine. This might explain that in some studies kappa-opioid receptor agonists attenuate nicotine and opioid withdrawal symptomatology. A better understanding of the role of dynorphins in the regulation of brain reward function might contribute to the development of novel treatments for mood disorders and other disorders that stem from a dysregulation of the brain reward system. PMID:19804796

Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.

2009-01-01

339

Scientists Probe Immune System's Role in Brain Function and Neurological Disease  

E-print Network

Scientists Probe Immune System's Role in Brain Function and Neurological Disease Bridget M. Kuehn E in normal brain development and in the healthy adult brain. Studies also suggest that per- turbations of these roles may under- lie some neurological diseases. Contrary to dogma that the blood- brain barrier

Boulanger, Lisa

340

2 Towards the study of functional brain development in depression: An Interactive 3 Specialization approach  

E-print Network

U N C O R R E C T E D P R O O F 1 Review 2 Towards the study of functional brain development Brain 21 Brain development 22 Interactive Specialization 23 Preschool depression 24 Pediatric depression synthesizing established models 29of depression and normative brain development may help to overcome them. More

341

Light-induced morphological plasticity in the scleractinian coral Goniastrea pectinata and its functional significance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environment-induced i.e., phenotypically plastic, changes in morphology, are potentially an important life-history component of sessile corals. Previous reciprocal transplant experiments have demonstrated depth-related responses in various coral species, but the potential adaptive significance is rarely investigated. To test for small-scale morphological plasticity in the massive coral Goniastrea pectinata Ehrenberg 1834, fragments from five colonies were reciprocally transplanted between two depths at Raffles Lighthouse (Pulau Satumu), Singapore. After 163 days, all fragments were collected, cleared of tissue, and examined. Reaction norms and multivariate analysis of variance describe light-induced changes in corallite architecture and genotype × environment interactions. In fragments transplanted to the shallow station, calices were deeper, and septa were shorter than in fragments transplanted to the deep station. To explore the functional significance of this plasticity, a two-dimensional model of corallite shape was constructed. The induced calice morphology of the shallow-water transplants was efficient at shading, possibly to protect tissue from excess radiation, whereas the calice morphology found in the deep-water transplants was more efficient at capturing light when irradiance was low.

Ow, Y. X.; Todd, P. A.

2010-09-01

342

BRAIN REGENERATION IN PHYSIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY: THE IMMUNE SIGNATURE DRIVING THERAPEUTIC PLASTICITY OF NEURAL STEM CELLS  

PubMed Central

Regenerative processes occurring under physiological (maintenance) and pathological (reparative) conditions are a fundamental part of life and vary greatly among different species, individuals, and tissues. Physiological regeneration occurs naturally as a consequence of normal cell erosion, or as an inevitable outcome of any biological process aiming at the restoration of homeostasis. Reparative regeneration occurs as a consequence of tissue damage. Although the central nervous system (CNS) has been considered for years as a “perennial” tissue, it has recently become clear that both physiological and reparative regeneration occur also within the CNS to sustain tissue homeostasis and repair. Proliferation and differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) residing within the healthy CNS, or surviving injury, are considered crucial in sustaining these processes. Thus a large number of experimental stem cell-based transplantation systems for CNS repair have recently been established. The results suggest that transplanted NPCs promote tissue repair not only via cell replacement but also through their local contribution to changes in the diseased tissue milieu. This review focuses on the remarkable plasticity of endogenous and exogenous (transplanted) NPCs in promoting repair. Special attention will be given to the cross-talk existing between NPCs and CNS-resident microglia as well as CNS-infiltrating immune cells from the circulation, as a crucial event sustaining NPC-mediated neuroprotection. Finally, we will propose the concept of the context-dependent potency of transplanted NPCs (therapeutic plasticity) to exert multiple therapeutic actions, such as cell replacement, neurotrophic support, and immunomodulation, in CNS repair. PMID:22013212

Martino, Gianvito; Pluchino, Stefano; Bonfanti, Luca; Schwartz, Michal

2013-01-01

343

Resilience of human brain functional coactivation networks under thresholding  

E-print Network

Recent studies have demonstrated the existence of community structure and rich club nodes, (i.e., highly interconnected, high degree hub nodes), in human brain functional networks. The cognitive relevance of the detected modules and hubs has also been demonstrated, for both task based and default mode networks, suggesting that the brain self-organizes into patterns of co-activated sets of regions for performing specific tasks or in resting state. In this paper, we report studies on the resilience or robustness of this modular structure: under systematic erosion of connectivity in the network under thresholding, how resilient is the modularity and hub structure? The results show that the network shows show strong resilience properties, with the modularity and hub structure maintaining itself over a large range of connection strengths. Then, at a certain critical threshold that falls very close to 0, the connectivity, the modularity, and hub structure suddenly break down, showing a phase transition like propert...

Sarkar, S; Weng, H

2014-01-01

344

Compensatory plasticity: time matters  

PubMed Central

Plasticity in the human and animal brain is the rule, the base for development, and the way to deal effectively with the environment for making the most efficient use of all the senses. When the brain is deprived of one sensory modality, plasticity becomes compensatory: the exception that invalidates the general loss hypothesis giving the opportunity of effective change. Sensory deprivation comes with massive alterations in brain structure and function, behavioral outcomes, and neural interactions. Blind individuals do as good as the sighted and even more, show superior abilities in auditory, tactile and olfactory processing. This behavioral enhancement is accompanied with changes in occipital cortex function, where visual areas at different levels become responsive to non-visual information. The intact senses are in general used more efficiently in the blind but are also used more exclusively. New findings are disentangling these two aspects of compensatory plasticity. What is due to visual deprivation and what is dependent on the extended use of spared modalities? The latter seems to contribute highly to compensatory changes in the congenitally blind. Short-term deprivation through the use of blindfolds shows that cortical excitability of the visual cortex is likely to show rapid modulatory changes after few minutes of light deprivation and therefore changes are possible in adulthood. However, reorganization remains more pronounced in the congenitally blind. Cortico-cortical pathways between visual areas and the areas of preserved sensory modalities are inhibited in the presence of vision, but are unmasked after loss of vision or blindfolding as a mechanism likely to drive cross-modal information to the deafferented visual cortex. The development of specialized higher order visual pathways independently from early sensory experience is likely to preserve their function and switch to the intact modalities. Plasticity in the blind is also accompanied with neurochemical and morphological changes; both intrinsic connectivity and functional coupling at rest are altered but are likewise dependent on different sensory experience and training. PMID:24971056

Lazzouni, Latifa; Lepore, Franco

2014-01-01

345

Compensatory plasticity: time matters.  

PubMed

Plasticity in the human and animal brain is the rule, the base for development, and the way to deal effectively with the environment for making the most efficient use of all the senses. When the brain is deprived of one sensory modality, plasticity becomes compensatory: the exception that invalidates the general loss hypothesis giving the opportunity of effective change. Sensory deprivation comes with massive alterations in brain structure and function, behavioral outcomes, and neural interactions. Blind individuals do as good as the sighted and even more, show superior abilities in auditory, tactile and olfactory processing. This behavioral enhancement is accompanied with changes in occipital cortex function, where visual areas at different levels become responsive to non-visual information. The intact senses are in general used more efficiently in the blind but are also used more exclusively. New findings are disentangling these two aspects of compensatory plasticity. What is due to visual deprivation and what is dependent on the extended use of spared modalities? The latter seems to contribute highly to compensatory changes in the congenitally blind. Short-term deprivation through the use of blindfolds shows that cortical excitability of the visual cortex is likely to show rapid modulatory changes after few minutes of light deprivation and therefore changes are possible in adulthood. However, reorganization remains more pronounced in the congenitally blind. Cortico-cortical pathways between visual areas and the areas of preserved sensory modalities are inhibited in the presence of vision, but are unmasked after loss of vision or blindfolding as a mechanism likely to drive cross-modal information to the deafferented visual cortex. The development of specialized higher order visual pathways independently from early sensory experience is likely to preserve their function and switch to the intact modalities. Plasticity in the blind is also accompanied with neurochemical and morphological changes; both intrinsic connectivity and functional coupling at rest are altered but are likewise dependent on different sensory experience and training. PMID:24971056

Lazzouni, Latifa; Lepore, Franco

2014-01-01

346

Focal Gray Matter Plasticity as a Function of Long Duration Head-down Tilt Bed Rest  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Long duration spaceflight (i.e., > or = 22 days) has been associated with changes in sensorimotor systems, resulting in difficulties that astronauts experience with posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes. Whether these sensorimotor changes may be related to structural and functional brain changes is yet unknown. However, experimental studies revealed changes in the gray matter (GM) of the brain after simulated microgravity. Thus, it is possible that spaceflight may affect brain structure and thereby cognitive functioning and motor behavior. Long duration head-down tilt bed rest has been suggested as an exclusionary analog to study microgravity effects on the sensorimotor system. Bed rest mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both in- and post-flight, we are conducting a prospective longitudinal 70-day bed rest study as an analog to investigate the effects of microgravity on the brain. VBM analysis revealed a progressive decrease from pre- to in- bed rest in GM volume in bilateral areas including the frontal medial cortex, the insular cortex and the caudate. Over the same time period, there was a progressive increase in GM volume in the cerebellum, occipital-, and parietal cortex, including the precuneus. The majority of these changes did not fully recover during the post-bed rest period. Analysis of lobular GM volumes obtained with BRAINS showed significantly increased volume from pre-bed rest to in-bed rest in GM of the parietal lobe and the third ventricle. Temporal GM volume at 70 days in bed rest was smaller than that at the first pre-bed rest measurement. Trend analysis showed significant positive linear and negative quadratic relationships between parietal GM and time, a positive linear relationship between third ventricle volume and time, and a negative linear relationship between cerebellar GM volume and time. FM performance improved from pre-bed rest session 1 to session 2. From the second pre-bed rest measure to the last-day-in-bed rest, there was a significant decrease in performance that only partially recovered post-bed rest. No significant association was observed between changes in brain volume and changes in functional mobility. Extended bed rest, which is an analog for microgravity, can result in local volumetric GM increase and decrease and adversely affect functional mobility. These changes in brain structure and performance were not related in this sample. Whether the effects of bed rest dissipate at longer times post-bed rest, and if they are associated with behavior are important questions that warrant further research including more subjects and longer follow-up times.

Koppelmans, V.; DeDios, Y. E.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, P. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.

2014-01-01

347

The effects of methylphenidate on whole brain intrinsic functional connectivity.  

PubMed

Methylphenidate (MPH) is an indirect dopaminergic and noradrenergic agonist that is used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and that has shown therapeutic potential in neuropsychiatric diseases such as depression, dementia, and Parkinson's disease. While effects of MPH on task-induced brain activation have been investigated, little is known about how MPH influences the resting brain. To investigate the effects of 40 mg of oral MPH on intrinsic functional connectivity, we used resting state fMRI in 54 healthy male subjects in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Functional connectivity analysis employing ICA revealed seven resting state networks (RSN) of interest. Connectivity strength between the dorsal attention network and the thalamus was increased after MPH intake. Other RSN located in association cortex areas, such as the left and right frontoparietal networks and the executive control network, showed MPH-induced connectivity increase to sensory-motor and visual cortex regions and connectivity decrease to cortical and subcortical components of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits (CST). RSN located in sensory-motor cortex areas showed the opposite pattern with MPH-induced connectivity increase to CST components and connectivity decrease to sensory-motor and visual cortex regions. Our results provide evidence that MPH does not only alter intrinsic connectivity between brain areas involved in sustained attention, but that it also induces significant changes in the cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical connectivity of many other cognitive and sensory-motor RSN. Hum Brain Mapp 35:5379-5388, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24862742

Mueller, Sophia; Costa, Anna; Keeser, Daniel; Pogarell, Oliver; Berman, Albert; Coates, Ute; Reiser, Maximilian F; Riedel, Michael; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Ettinger, Ulrich; Meindl, Thomas

2014-11-01

348

Sleep-disordered breathing: effects on brain structure and function  

PubMed Central

Sleep-disordered breathing is accompanied by neural injury that affects a wide range of physiological systems which include processes for sensing chemoreception and airflow, driving respiratory musculature, timing circuitry for coordination of breathing patterning, and integration of blood pressure mechanisms with respiration. The damage also occurs in regions mediating emotion and mood, as well as areas regulating memory and cognitive functioning, and appears in structures that serve significant glycemic control processes. The injured structures include brain areas involved in hormone release and action of major neurotransmitters, including those playing a role in depression. The injury is reflected in a range of structural magnetic resonance procedures, and also appears as functional distortions of evoked activity in brain areas mediating vital autonomic and breathing functions. The damage is preferentially unilateral, and includes axonal projections; the asymmetry of the injury poses unique concerns for sympathetic discharge and potential consequences for arrhythmia. Sleep-disordered breathing should be viewed as a condition that includes central nervous system injury and impaired function; the processes underlying injury remain unclear. PMID:23643610

Harper, Ronald M.; Kumar, Rajesh; Ogren, Jennifer A.; Macey, Paul M.

2013-01-01

349

Imaging structural and functional brain networks in temporal lobe epilepsy  

PubMed Central

Early imaging studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) focused on the search for mesial temporal sclerosis, as its surgical removal results in clinically meaningful improvement in about 70% of patients. Nevertheless, a considerable subgroup of patients continues to suffer from post-operative seizures. Although the reasons for surgical failure are not fully understood, electrophysiological and imaging data suggest that anomalies extending beyond the temporal lobe may have negative impact on outcome. This hypothesis has revived the concept of human epilepsy as a disorder of distributed brain networks. Recent methodological advances in non-invasive neuroimaging have led to quantify structural and functional networks in vivo. While structural networks can be inferred from diffusion MRI tractography and inter-regional covariance patterns of structural measures such as cortical thickness, functional connectivity is generally computed based on statistical dependencies of neurophysiological time-series, measured through functional MRI or electroencephalographic techniques. This review considers the application of advanced analytical methods in structural and functional connectivity analyses in TLE. We will specifically highlight findings from graph-theoretical analysis that allow assessing the topological organization of brain networks. These studies have provided compelling evidence that TLE is a system disorder with profound alterations in local and distributed networks. In addition, there is emerging evidence for the utility of network properties as clinical diagnostic markers. Nowadays, a network perspective is considered to be essential to the understanding of the development, progression, and management of epilepsy. PMID:24098281

Bernhardt, Boris C.; Hong, SeokJun; Bernasconi, Andrea; Bernasconi, Neda

2013-01-01

350

Functional interactions between intrinsic brain activity and behavior.  

PubMed

The brain continuously maintains a remarkably high level of intrinsic activity. This activity is non-stationary and its dynamics reveal highly structured patterns across several spatial scales, from fine-grained functional architecture in sensory cortices to large-scale networks. The mechanistic function of this activity is only poorly understood. The central goal of the current review is to provide an integrated summary of recent studies on structure, dynamics and behavioral consequences of spontaneous brain activity. In light of these empirical observations we propose that the structure of ongoing activity and its itinerant nature can be understood as an indispensible memory system modeling the statistical structure of the world. We review the dynamic properties of ongoing activity, and how they are malleable over short to long temporal scales that permit adapting over a range of short- to long-term cognitive challenges. We conclude by reviewing how the functional significance of ongoing activity manifests in its impact on human action, perception, and higher cognitive function. PMID:23643921

Sadaghiani, Sepideh; Kleinschmidt, Andreas

2013-10-15

351

Effects of severing the corpus callosum on coherent electrical and hemodynamic interhemispheric oscillations intrinsic to functional brain networks.  

E-print Network

??Large scale functional brain networks, defined by synchronized spontaneous oscillations between spatially distinct anatomical regions, are essential to brain function and have been implicated in… (more)

Magnuson, Matthew Evan

2013-01-01

352

The functional plasticity of cells of the paraventricular nucleus of surviving sections of the hypothalamus.  

PubMed

Stimulation of the supraoptic nucleus in surviving coronal sections of the hypothalamus elicited in the paraventricular nucleus the appearance of focal potentials reflecting the generation of action potentials of a population of cells. Repeat stimulation was accompanied by a decrease in the descending phase of the focal potentials. Tetanization of the supraoptic nucleus led to the appearance of an additional wave in the descending phase of the focal potentials which was maintained for 15 min. The data obtained attest to the functional plasticity of cells of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. PMID:8332245

Mokrushin, A A; Emel'yanov, N A

1993-01-01

353

Emerging role of non-coding RNA in neural plasticity, cognitive function, and neuropsychiatric disorders  

PubMed Central

Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as critical regulators of transcription, epigenetic processes, and gene silencing, which make them ideal candidates for insight into molecular evolution and a better understanding of the molecular pathways of neuropsychiatric disease. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding various classes of ncRNAs and their role in neural plasticity and cognitive function, and highlight the potential contribution they may make to the development of a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, addiction, and fear-related anxiety disorders. PMID:22811697

Spadaro, Paola A.; Bredy, Timothy W.

2012-01-01

354

Reduced brain functional reserve and altered functional connectivity in patients with multiple sclerosis.  

PubMed

Cognitive dysfunction (affecting particularly attention and working memory) occurs early in patients with multiple sclerosis. Previous studies have focused on identifying potentially adaptive functional reorganization through recruitment of new brain regions that could limit expression of these deficits. However, lesion studies remind us that functional specializations in the brain make certain brain regions necessary for a given task. We therefore have asked whether altered functional interactions between regions normally recruited provide an alternative adaptive mechanism with multiple sclerosis pathology. We used a version of the n-back task to probe working memory in patients with early multiple sclerosis. We applied a functional connectivity analysis to test whether relationships between relative activations in different brain regions change in potentially adaptive ways with multiple sclerosis. We studied 21 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy controls with 3T functional MRI. The two groups performed equally well on the task. Task-related activations were found in similar regions for patients and controls. However, patients showed relatively reduced activation in the superior frontal and anterior cingulate gyri (P > 0.01). Patients also showed a variable, but generally substantially smaller increase in activation than healthy controls with greater task complexity, depending on the specific brain region assessed (P < 0.001). Functional connectivity analysis defined further differences not apparent from the univariate contrast of the task-associated activation patterns. Control subjects showed significantly greater correlations between right dorsolateral prefrontal and superior frontal/anterior cingulate activations (P < 0.05). Patients showed correlations between activations in the right and left prefrontal cortices, although this relationship was not significant in healthy controls (P < 0.05). We interpret these results as showing that, while cognitive processing in the task appears to be performed using similar brain regions in patients and controls, the patients have reduced functional reserve for cognition relevant to memory. Functional connectivity analysis suggests that altered inter-hemispheric interactions between dorsal and lateral prefrontal regions may provide an adaptive mechanism that could limit clinical expression of the disease distinct from recruitment of novel processing regions. Together, these results suggest that therapeutic enhancement of the coherence of interactions between brain regions normally recruited (functional enhancement), as well as recruitment of alternative areas or use of complementary cognitive strategies (both forms of adaptive functional change), may limit expression of cognitive impairments in multiple sclerosis. PMID:16251214

Cader, Sarah; Cifelli, Alberto; Abu-Omar, Yasir; Palace, Jacqueline; Matthews, Paul M

2006-02-01

355

Dissociations between behavioural and functional magnetic resonance imaging-based evaluations of cognitive function after brain injury  

PubMed Central

Functional neuroimaging methods hold promise for the identification of cognitive function and communication capacity in some severely brain-injured patients who may not retain sufficient motor function to demonstrate their abilities. We studied seven severely brain-injured patients and a control group of 14 subjects using a novel hierarchical functional magnetic resonance imaging assessment utilizing mental imagery responses. Whereas the control group showed consistent and accurate (for communication) blood-oxygen-level-dependent responses without exception, the brain-injured subjects showed a wide variation in the correlation of blood-oxygen-level-dependent responses and overt behavioural responses. Specifically, the brain-injured subjects dissociated bedside and functional magnetic resonance imaging-based command following and communication capabilities. These observations reveal significant challenges in developing validated functional magnetic resonance imaging-based methods for clinical use and raise interesting questions about underlying brain function assayed using these methods in brain-injured subjects. PMID:21354974

Bardin, Jonathan C.; Fins, Joseph J.; Katz, Douglas I.; Hersh, Jennifer; Heier, Linda A.; Tabelow, Karsten; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Ballon, Douglas J.; Schiff, Nicholas D.

2011-01-01

356

Behavioral relevance of the dynamics of the functional brain connectome.  

PubMed

Abstract While many previous studies assumed the functional connectivity (FC) between brain regions to be stationary, recent studies have demonstrated that FC dynamically varies across time. However, two challenges have limited the interpretability of dynamic FC information. First, a principled framework for selecting the temporal extent of the window used to examine the dynamics is lacking and this has resulted in ad-hoc selections of window lengths and subsequent divergent results. Second, it is unclear whether there is any behavioral relevance to the dynamics of the functional connectome in addition to that obtained from conventional static FC (SFC). In this work, we address these challenges by first proposing a principled framework for selecting the extent of the temporal windows in a dynamic and data-driven fashion based on statistical tests of the stationarity of time series. Further, we propose a method involving three levels of clustering-across space, time, and subjects-which allow for group-level inferences of the dynamics. Next, using a large resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and behavioral dataset from the Human Connectome Project, we demonstrate that metrics derived from dynamic FC can explain more than twice the variance in 75 behaviors across different domains (alertness, cognition, emotion, and personality traits) as compared with SFC in healthy individuals. Further, we found that individuals with brain networks exhibiting greater dynamics performed more favorably in behavioral tasks. This indicates that the ease with which brain regions engage or disengage may provide potential biomarkers for disorders involving altered neural circuitry. PMID:25163490

Jia, Hao; Hu, Xiaoping; Deshpande, Gopikrishna

2014-11-01

357

Mitochondrial activity and brain functions during cortical depolarization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cortical depolarization (CD) of the cerebral cortex could be developed under various pathophysiological conditions. In animal models, CD was recorded under partial or complete ischemia as well as when cortical spreading depression (SD) was induced externally or by internal stimulus. The development of CD in patients and the changes in various metabolic parameters, during CD, was rarely reported. Brain metabolic, hemodynamic, ionic and electrical responses to the CD event are dependent upon the O2 balance in the tissue. When the O2 balance is negative (i.e. ischemia), the CD process will be developed due to mitochondrial dysfunction, lack of energy and the inhibition of Na+-K+-ATPase. In contradiction, when oxygen is available (i.e. normoxia) the development of CD after induction of SD will accelerate mitochondrial respiration for retaining ionic homeostasis and normal brain functions. We used the multiparametric monitoring approach that enable real time monitoring of mitochondrial NADH redox state, microcirculatory blood flow and oxygenation, extracellular K+, Ca2+, H+ levels, DC steady potential and electrocorticogram (ECoG). This monitoring approach, provide a unique tool that has a significant value in analyzing the pathophysiology of the brain when SD developed under normoxia, ischemia, or hypoxia. We applied the same monitoring approach to patients suffered from severe head injury or exposed to neurosurgical procedures.

Mayevsky, Avraham; Sonn, Judith

2008-12-01

358

Exercise facilitates the action of dietary DHA on functional recovery after brain trauma  

PubMed Central

The abilities of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and exercise to counteract cognitive decay after TBI is getting increasing recognition; however, the possibility that these actions can be complementary remains just as an intriguing possibility. Here we have examined the likelihood that the combination of diet and exercise has the added potential to facilitate functional recovery following TBI. Rats received mild fluid percussion injury (mFPI) or sham injury and then were maintained on a diet high in DHA (1.2% DHA) with or without voluntary exercise for 12 days. We found that FPI reduced DHA content in the brain, which was accompanied by increased levels of lipid peroxidation assessed using 4-HHE. FPI reduced the enzymes Acox1 and 17 -HSD4, and the calcium-independent phospholipases A2 (iPLA2), which are involved in metabolism of membrane phospholipids. FPI reduced levels of syntaxin-3 (STX-3), involved in the action of membrane DHA on synaptic membrane expansion, and also reduced BDNF signaling through its TrkB receptor. These effects of FPI were optimally counteracted by the combination of DHA and exercise. Our results support the possibility that the complementary action of exercise is exerted on restoring membrane homeostasis after TBI, which is necessary for supporting synaptic plasticity and cognition. It is our contention that strategies that take advantage of the combined applications of diet and exercise may have additional effects to the injured brain. PMID:23811071

Wu, Aiguo; Ying, Zhe; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

2013-01-01

359

Individual Variability in Functional Connectivity Architecture of the Human Brain  

PubMed Central

Summary The fact that people think or behave differently from one another is rooted in individual differences in brain anatomy and connectivity. Here we used repeated-measurement resting-state functional MRI to explore inter-subject variability in connectivity. Individual differences in functional connectivity were heterogeneous across the cortex, with significantly higher variability in heteromodal association cortex and lower variability in unimodal cortices. Inter-subject variability in connectivity was significantly correlated with the degree of evolutionary cortical expansion, suggesting a potential evolutionary root of functional variability. The connectivity variability was also related to variability in sulcal depth but not cortical thickness, positively correlated with the degree of long-range connectivity but negatively correlated with local connectivity. A meta-analysis further revealed that regions predicting individual differences in cognitive domains are predominantly located in regions of high connectivity variability. Our findings have potential implications for understanding brain evolution and development, guiding intervention, and interpreting statistical maps in neuroimaging. PMID:23395382

Mueller, Sophia; Wang, Danhong; Fox, Michael D.; Thomas Yeo, B. T.; Sepulcre, Jorge; Sabuncu, Mert R.; Shafee, Rebecca; Lu, Jie; Liu, Hesheng

2013-01-01

360

Effects of alcohol intake on brain structure and function in non-alcohol-dependent drinkers  

Microsoft Academic Search

About 85% of the adult population in the Netherlands regularly drinks alcohol. Chronic excessive alcohol intake in alcohol-dependent individuals is known to have damaging effects on brain structure and function. Relatives of alcohol-dependent individuals display differences in brain function that are similar to those found in alcoholics, even if they have never been drinking alcohol. This suggests that brain damage

Eveline Astrid de Bruin

2005-01-01

361

Performance on an episodic encoding task yields further insight into functional brain development  

E-print Network

Performance on an episodic encoding task yields further insight into functional brain development August 2006 To further characterize changes in functional brain development that are associated in the direction predicted by the endpoint analysis. We conclude that the patterns of brain activation associated

362

Hubs of brain functional networks are radically reorganized in comatose patients  

E-print Network

Hubs of brain functional networks are radically reorganized in comatose patients S. Achard , C Human brain networks have topological properties in common with many other complex systems, prompting the question: what aspects of brain network organization are critical for distinctive functional properties

Boyer, Edmond

363

Predicting Brain States from fMRI Data: Incremental Functional Principal Component  

E-print Network

Predicting Brain States from fMRI Data: Incremental Functional Principal Component Regression S@science.uva.nl Abstract We propose a method for reconstruction of human brain states directly from func- tionalMRI data to the domain of stochastic functional measurements, facilitating evaluation of brain responses

Smeulders, Arnold

364

Predictive Modeling of fMRI Brain States using Functional Canonical Correlation Analysis  

E-print Network

Predictive Modeling of fMRI Brain States using Functional Canonical Correlation Analysis S Abstract. We present a novel method for predictive modeling of human brain states from functional for prediction of naturalistic stimuli from unknown fMRI data shows that the method nds highly predictive brain

Smeulders, Arnold

365

New Approaches for Exploring Anatomical and Functional Connectivity in the Human Brain  

E-print Network

REVIEWS New Approaches for Exploring Anatomical and Functional Connectivity in the Human Brain in the primate brain is based on the complementary principles of modular and distributed information processing. The former emphasizes the specialization of functions within different brain areas. The latter emphasizes

Penny, Will

366

The Role of the Met66 Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Allele in the Recovery of Executive Functioning after Combat-Related Traumatic Brain Injury  

PubMed Central

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family, promotes survival and synaptic plasticity in the human brain. The Val66Met polymorphism of the BDNF gene interferes with intracellular trafficking, packaging, and regulated secretion of this neurotrophin. The human prefrontal cortex (PFC) shows lifelong neuroplastic adaption implicating the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism in the recovery of higher-order executive functions after traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study, we examined the effect of this BDNF polymorphism on the recovery of executive functioning after TBI. We genotyped a sample of male Vietnam combat veterans consisting of a frontal lobe lesion group with focal penetrating head injuries and a non-head-injured control group for the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism. The Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System as a standardized psychometric battery was administrated to examine key domains of executive functions. The results revealed that the Met allele but not the hypothesized Val allele promotes recovery of executive functioning. Overall, the Met66 carriers in the lesion group performed as well as the Met66 carriers in the control group. The Met66 allele accounted for 6.2% of variance for executive functioning independently of other significant predictors including preinjury intelligence, left hemisphere volume loss, and dorsolateral PFC volume loss. The findings point to different mechanisms of the Val66Met BDNF gene in complex phenotypes under normal and pathological conditions. A better understanding of these mechanisms could be instrumental in the development and application of effective therapeutic strategies to facilitate recovery from TBI. PMID:21228168

Krueger, Frank; Pardini, Matteo; Huey, Edward D.; Raymont, Vanessa; Solomon, Jeffrey; Lipsky, Robert H.; Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Goldman, David; Grafman, Jordan

2011-01-01

367

Changes in brain functional network connectivity after stroke.  

PubMed

Studies have shown that functional network connection models can be used to study brain network changes in patients with schizophrenia. In this study, we inferred that these models could also be used to explore functional network connectivity changes in stroke patients. We used independent component analysis to find the motor areas of stroke patients, which is a novel way to determine these areas. In this study, we collected functional magnetic resonance imaging datasets from healthy controls and right-handed stroke patients following their first ever stroke. Using independent component analysis, six spatially independent components highly correlated to the experimental paradigm were extracted. Then, the functional network connectivity of both patients and controls was established to observe the differences between them. The results showed that there were 11 connections in the model in the stroke patients, while there were only four connections in the healthy controls. Further analysis found that some damaged connections may be compensated for by new indirect connections or circuits produced after stroke. These connections may have a direct correlation with the degree of stroke rehabilitation. Our findings suggest that functional network connectivity in stroke patients is more complex than that in hea-lthy controls, and that there is a compensation loop in the functional network following stroke. This implies that functional network reorganization plays a very important role in the process of rehabilitation after stroke. PMID:25206743

Li, Wei; Li, Yapeng; Zhu, Wenzhen; Chen, Xi

2014-01-01

368

The Role of Sleep in Memory Consolidation and Brain Plasticity: Dream or Reality?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The idea that sleep may facilitate learning and memory consolidation has attracted considerable attention in recent years, both within the sleep research community and among the general public. Learning-related functions of sleep have been more actively investigated over the past decade than any other class of sleep functions. Yet there is by no means universal acceptance within the sleep research

MARCOS G. FRANK; JOEL H. BENINGTON

2006-01-01

369

NF-?B/Rel Regulates Inhibitory and Excitatory Neuronal Function and Synaptic Plasticity  

PubMed Central

Changes in synaptic plasticity required for memory formation are dynamically regulated through opposing excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmissions. To explore the potential contribution of NF-?B/Rel to these processes, we generated transgenic mice conditionally expressing a potent NF-?B/Rel inhibitor termed I?B? superrepressor (I?B?-SR). Using the prion promoter-enhancer, I?B?-SR is robustly expressed in inhibitory GABAergic interneurons and, at lower levels, in excitatory neurons but not in glia. This neuronal pattern of I?B?-SR expression leads to decreased expression of glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), the enzyme required for synthesis of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter, ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in GABAergic interneurons. I?B?-SR expression also results in diminished basal GluR1 levels and impaired synaptic strength (input/output function), both of which are fully restored following activity-based task learning. Consistent with diminished GAD65-derived inhibitory tone and enhanced excitatory firing, I?B?-SR+ mice exhibit increased late-phase long-term potentiation, hyperactivity, seizures, increased exploratory activity, and enhanced spatial learning and memory. I?B?-SR+ neurons also express higher levels of the activity-regulated, cytoskeleton-associated (Arc) protein, consistent with neuronal hyperexcitability. These findings suggest that NF-?B/Rel transcription factors act as pivotal regulators of activity-dependent inhibitory and excitatory neuronal function regulating synaptic plasticity and memory. PMID:16980629

O'Mahony, Alison; Raber, Jacob; Montano, Mauricio; Foehr, Erik; Han, Victor; Lu, Shao-ming; Kwon, Hakju; LeFevour, Anthony; Chakraborty-Sett, Shikha; Greene, Warner C.

2006-01-01

370

Movement induced tremor in musicians and non-musicians reflects adaptive brain plasticity.  

PubMed

Evidence exists that motor dexterity is associated with a higher tremor amplitude of physiological tremor. Likewise, lower frequencies are associated with motor control. So far only case reports of a higher amplitude of physiological tremor in musicians exist. Moreover, no study has investigated lower frequencies during a finger movement task in musicians who can be regarded as a model of motor expertise. We developed a model and derived three hypotheses which we investigated in this study: (1) Tremor amplitude is higher in the range of physiological tremor and (2) higher for frequency ranges of dystonic tremor in musicians compared to non-musicians; (3) there is no difference in tremor amplitude at frequencies below 4 Hz. We measured tremor during a finger flexion-extension movement in 19 musicians (age 26.5 ± 8.2 years) and 24 age matched non-musicians (age 26.5 ± 8.7). By using empirical mode decomposition in combination with a Hilbert transform we obtained the instantaneous frequency and amplitude, allowing to compare tremor amplitudes throughout the movement at various frequency ranges. We found a significantly higher tremor amplitude in musicians for physiological tremor and a tendency toward a higher amplitude during most of the movement in the frequency range of 4-8 Hz, which, however, was not significant. No difference was found in the frequency range below 4 Hz for the flexion and for almost the entire extension movement. Our results corroborate findings that the 8-12 Hz oscillatory activity plays a role in motor dexterity. However, our results do not allow for the conclusion that tremor at the frequency range of 4-8 Hz is related to either plasticity induced changes that are beneficial for motor skill development nor to maladaptive changes as, e.g., focal dystonia. PMID:25120522

Lee, André; Schoonderwaldt, Erwin; Chadde, Mareike; Altenmüller, Eckart

2014-01-01

371

Adaptation of the communicative brain to post-lingual deafness. Evidence from functional imaging  

E-print Network

implantation offer a unique model of brain adaptation during sensory deprivation and recovery. Functional contributed to the exploration and better understanding of sensory deprivation, especially illuminating the effect of deafness on brain adaptation. Sensory deprivation leads to modifications in relative

372

Functional specificity for high-level linguistic processing in the human brain  

E-print Network

Neuroscientists have debated for centuries whether some regions of the human brain are selectively engaged in specific high-level mental functions or whether, instead, cognition is implemented in multifunctional brain ...

Fedorenko, Evelina G.

373

Impact of Low-Level Thyroid Hormone Disruption Induced by Propylthiouracil on Brain Development and Function.*  

EPA Science Inventory

The critical role of thyroid hormone (TH) in brain development is well established, severe deficiencies leading to significant neurological dysfunction. Much less information is available on more modest perturbations of TH on brain function. The present study induced varying degr...

374

Functional Genomics of Brain Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease: Focus on Selective Neuronal Vulnerability  

E-print Network

to account for the phenomenon of SNV. Functional genomic analyses, through unbiased whole genome expression studies, could lead to new insights into a complex process such as SNV. Genomic data generated using both human brain tissue and brains from animal...

Wang, Xinkun; Michaelis, Mary L.; Michaelis, Elias K.

2010-10-21

375

Higher Brain Functions Served by the Lowly Rodent Primary Visual Cortex  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It has been more than 50 years since the first description of ocular dominance plasticity--the profound modification of primary visual cortex (V1) following temporary monocular deprivation. This discovery immediately attracted the intense interest of neurobiologists focused on the general question of how experience and deprivation modify the brain…

Gavornik, Jeffrey P.; Bear, Mark F.

2014-01-01

376

Playing Super Mario induces structural brain plasticity: gray matter changes resulting from training with a commercial video game.  

PubMed

Video gaming is a highly pervasive activity, providing a multitude of complex cognitive and motor demands. Gaming can be seen as an intense training of several skills. Associated cerebral structural plasticity induced has not been investigated so far. Comparing a control with a video gaming training group that was trained for 2 months for at least 30 min per day with a platformer game, we found significant gray matter (GM) increase in right hippocampal formation (HC), right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and bilateral cerebellum in the training group. The HC increase correlated with changes from egocentric to allocentric navigation strategy. GM increases in HC and DLPFC correlated with participants' desire for video gaming, evidence suggesting a predictive role of desire in volume change. Video game training augments GM in brain areas crucial for spatial navigation, strategic planning, working memory and motor performance going along with evidence for behavioral changes of navigation strategy. The presented video game training could therefore be used to counteract known risk factors for mental disease such as smaller hippocampus and prefrontal cortex volume in, for example, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:24166407

Kühn, S; Gleich, T; Lorenz, R C; Lindenberger, U; Gallinat, J

2014-02-01

377

Alternative functions of core cell cycle regulators in neuronal migration, neuronal maturation, and synaptic plasticity  

PubMed Central

Recent studies have demonstrated that boundaries separating a cycling cell from a post-mitotic neuron are not as concrete as expected. Novel and unique physiological functions in neurons have been ascribed for proteins fundamentally required for cell cycle progression and control. These “core” cell cycle regulators serve diverse post-mitotic functions that span various developmental stages of a neuron, including neuronal migration, axonal elongation, axon pruning, dendrite morphogenesis, and synaptic maturation and plasticity. In this review, we detail the non-proliferative post-mitotic roles that these cell cycle proteins have recently been reported to play, the significance of their expression in neurons, mechanistic insight when available, and future prospects. PMID:19447088

Frank, Christopher L.; Tsai, Li-Huei

2009-01-01

378

Brain images, babies, and bathwater: critiquing critiques of functional neuroimaging.  

PubMed

Since the mid-1980s, psychologists and neuroscientists have used brain imaging to test hypotheses about human thought processes and their neural instantiation. In just three decades, functional neuroimaging has been transformed from a crude clinical tool to a widely used research method for understanding the human brain and mind. Such rapidly achieved success is bound to evoke skepticism. A degree of skepticism toward new methods and ideas is both inevitable and useful in any field. It is especially valuable in a science as young as cognitive neuroscience and its even younger siblings, social and affective neuroscience. Healthy skepticism encourages us to check our assumptions, recognize the limitations of our methods, and proceed thoughtfully. Skepticism itself, however, also must be examined. In this article, I review the most commonly voiced criticisms of functional neuroimaging. In the spirit of healthy skepticism, I will critically examine these criticisms themselves. Each contains at least a kernel of truth, although I will argue that in some cases the kernel has been over extended in ways that are inaccurate or misleading. PMID:24634081

Farah, Martha J

2014-01-01

379

[The stimulating impact of light on brain cognition function].  

PubMed

Light regulates multiple non-visual circadian, neuroendocrine, and neurobehavioral functions, and conveys a strong stimulating signal for alert-ness and cognition. This review summarizes a series of neuroimaging studies investigating the brain mechanisms underlying the latter stimulating impact of light. Results of these studies are compatible with a scenario where light would first hit subcortical areas involved in arousal regulation before affecting cortical areas involved in the ongoing non-visual cognitive process, and then cognitive performance. Recent data demonstrated that the non-visual impact of light is most likely triggered via outputs from intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC) expressing the photopigment melanopsin, which are maximally sensitive to blue light. In addition, the stimulating impact of light is intimately related to wakefulness regulation as it changes with circadian phase and sleep pressure. Finally, markers of inter-individual difference have also been described: age, PERIOD3 genotype, and psychiatric status. This review emphasizes the importance of light for human brain cognitive function and for cognition in general. PMID:25311026

Vandewalle, Gilles

2014-10-01

380

Age-dependent effects of chronic stress on brain plasticity and depressive behavior.  

PubMed

Exposure to chronic mild stress (CMS) is known to induce anhedonia in adult animals, and is associated with induction of depression in humans. However, the behavioral effects of CMS in young animals have not yet been characterized, and little is known about the long-term neurochemical effects of CMS in either young or adult animals. Here, we found that CMS induces anhedonia in adult but not in young animals, as measured by a set of behavioral paradigms. Furthermore, while CMS decreased neurogenesis and levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of adult animals, it increased these parameters in young animals. We also found that CMS altered alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) receptor GluR1 subunit levels in the hippocampus and the nucleus accumbens of adult, but not young animals. Finally, no significant differences were observed between the effects of CMS on circadian corticosterone levels in the different age groups. The substantially different neurochemical effects chronic stress exerts in young and adult animals may explain the behavioral resilience to such stress young animals possess. PMID:18752645

Toth, Erika; Gersner, Roman; Wilf-Yarkoni, Adi; Raizel, Hagit; Dar, Dalit E; Richter-Levin, Gal; Levit, Ofir; Zangen, Abraham

2008-10-01

381

The Functional Upregulation of Piriform Cortex Is Associated with Cross-Modal Plasticity in Loss of Whisker Tactile Inputs  

PubMed Central

Background Cross-modal plasticity is characterized as the hypersensitivity of remaining modalities after a sensory function is lost in rodents, which ensures their awareness to environmental changes. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying cross-modal sensory plasticity remain unclear. We aim to study the role of different types of neurons in cross-modal plasticity. Methodology/Principal Findings In addition to behavioral tasks in mice, whole-cell recordings at the excitatory and inhibitory neurons, and their two-photon imaging, were conducted in piriform cortex. We produced a mouse model of cross-modal sensory plasticity that olfactory function was upregulated by trimming whiskers to deprive their sensory inputs. In the meantime of olfactory hypersensitivity, pyramidal neurons and excitatory synapses were functionally upregulated, as well as GABAergic cells and inhibitory synapses were downregulated in piriform cortex from the mice of cross-modal sensory plasticity, compared with controls. A crosswire connection between barrel cortex and piriform cortex was established in cross-modal plasticity. Conclusion/Significance An upregulation of pyramidal neurons and a downregulation of GABAergic neurons strengthen the activities of neuronal networks in piriform cortex, which may be responsible for olfactory hypersensitivity after a loss of whisker tactile input. This finding provides the clues for developing therapeutic strategies to promote sensory recovery and substitution. PMID:22927919

Gao, Zilong; Chen, Ping; Ni, Hong; Guan, Sudong; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Jin-Hui

2012-01-01

382

Focal Gray Matter Plasticity as a Function of Long Duration Head-down Tilt Bed Rest  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Long duration spaceflight (i.e., 22 days or longer) has been associated with changes in sensorimotor systems, resulting in difficulties that astronauts experience with posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes. Whether these sensorimotor changes may be related to structural and functional brain changes is yet unknown. However, increased intracranial pressure that by itself has been related to microgravity-induced bodily fluid shifts: [1] has been associated with white matter microstructural damage, [2] Thus, it is possible that spaceflight may affect brain structure and thereby cognitive functioning. Long duration head-down tilt bed rest has been suggested as an exclusionary analog to study microgravity effects on the sensorimotor system, [3] Bed rest mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both in- and post-flight, we are conducting a prospective longitudinal 70-day bed rest study as an analog to investigate the effects of microgravity on brain structure, and [4] Here we present results of the first eight subjects.

Koppelmans, Vincent; Erdeniz, Burak; DeDios, Yiri; Wood, Scott; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia; Kofman, Igor; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

2014-01-01

383

VEGF induces sensory and motor peripheral plasticity, alters bladder function, and promotes visceral sensitivity  

PubMed Central

Background This work tests the hypothesis that bladder instillation with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) modulates sensory and motor nerve plasticity, and, consequently, bladder function and visceral sensitivity. In addition to C57BL/6J, ChAT-cre mice were used for visualization of bladder cholinergic nerves. The direct effect of VEGF on the density of sensory nerves expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) and cholinergic nerves (ChAT) was studied one week after one or two intravesical instillations of the growth factor. To study the effects of VEGF on bladder function, mice were intravesically instilled with VEGF and urodynamic evaluation was assessed. VEGF-induced alteration in bladder dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was performed on retrogradly labeled urinary bladder afferents by patch-clamp recording of voltage gated Na+ currents. Determination of VEGF-induced changes in sensitivity to abdominal mechanostimulation was performed by application of von Frey filaments. Results In addition to an overwhelming increase in TRPV1 immunoreactivity, VEGF instillation resulted in an increase in ChAT-directed expression of a fluorescent protein in several layers of the urinary bladder. Intravesical VEGF caused a profound change in the function of the urinary bladder: acute VEGF (1 week post VEGF treatment) reduced micturition pressure and longer treatment (2 weeks post-VEGF instillation) caused a substantial reduction in inter-micturition interval. In addition, intravesical VEGF resulted in an up-regulation of voltage gated Na+ channels (VGSC) in bladder DRG neurons and enhanced abdominal sensitivity to mechanical stimulation. Conclusions For the first time, evidence is presented indicating that VEGF instillation into the mouse bladder promotes a significant increase in peripheral nerve density together with alterations in bladder function and visceral sensitivity. The VEGF pathway is being proposed as a key modulator of neural plasticity in the pelvis and enhanced VEGF content may be associated with visceral hyperalgesia, abdominal discomfort, and/or pelvic pain. PMID:23249422

2012-01-01

384

Functional abnormalities in normally appearing athletes following mild traumatic brain injury: a functional MRI study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Memory problems are one of the most common symptoms of sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), known as concussion.\\u000a Surprisingly, little research has examined spatial memory in concussed athletes given its importance in athletic environments.\\u000a Here, we combine functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a virtual reality (VR) paradigm designed to investigate\\u000a the possibility of residual functional deficits in recently

Semyon M. Slobounov; K. Zhang; D. Pennell; W. Ray; B. Johnson; W. Sebastianelli

2010-01-01

385

Possible Contributions of a Novel Form of Synaptic Plasticity in "Aplysia" to Reward, Memory, and Their Dysfunctions in Mammalian Brain  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent studies in "Aplysia" have identified a new variation of synaptic plasticity in which modulatory transmitters enhance spontaneous release of glutamate, which then acts on postsynaptic receptors to recruit mechanisms of intermediate- and long-term plasticity. In this review I suggest the hypothesis that similar plasticity occurs in…

Hawkins, Robert D.

2013-01-01

386

Zinc homeostasis and functions of zinc in the brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The brain barrier system, i.e., the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers, is important for zinc homeostasis in the brain. Zinc is supplied to the brain via both barriers. A large portion of zinc serves as zinc metalloproteins in neurons and glial cells. Approximately 10% of the total zinc in the brain, probably ionic zinc, exists in the synaptic vesicles, and

Atsushi Takeda

2001-01-01

387

Brain imaging methods used in experimental brain research such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Functional  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT Brain imaging methods used in experimental brain research such as Positron Emission of methods create statistical parametric maps (SPMs) of the brain on a voxel- basis. In our approach, they are best understood in the context of the underly- ing 3-D brain anatomy. However, despite the power

Mueller, Klaus

388

Functional electrical stimulation-facilitated proliferation and regeneration of neural precursor cells in the brains of rats with cerebral infarction  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have shown that proliferation of endogenous neural precursor cells cannot alone compensate for the damage to neurons and axons. From the perspective of neural plasticity, we observed the effects of functional electrical stimulation treatment on endogenous neural precursor cell proliferation and expression of basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor in the rat brain on the infarct side. Functional electrical stimulation was performed in rat models of acute middle cerebral artery occlusion. Simultaneously, we set up a placebo stimulation group and a sham-operated group. Immunohistochemical staining showed that, at 7 and 14 days, compared with the placebo group, the numbers of nestin (a neural precursor cell marker)-positive cells in the subgranular zone and subventricular zone were increased in the functional electrical stimulation treatment group. Western blot assays and reverse-transcription PCR showed that total protein levels and gene expression of epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor were also upregulated on the infarct side. Prehensile traction test results showed that, at 14 days, prehension function of rats in the functional electrical stimulation group was significantly better than in the placebo group. These results suggest that functional electrical stimulation can promote endogenous neural precursor cell proliferation in the brains of acute cerebral infarction rats, enhance expression of basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor, and improve the motor function of rats.

Xiang, Yun; Liu, Huihua; Yan, Tiebin; Zhuang, Zhiqiang; Jin, Dongmei; Peng, Yuan

2014-01-01

389

Cortical and subcortical plasticity in the brains of humans, primates, and rats after damage to sensory afferents in the dorsal columns of the spinal cord  

PubMed Central

The failure of injured axons to regenerate following spinal cord injury deprives brain neurons of their normal sources of activation. These injuries also result in the reorganization of affected areas of the central nervous system that is thought to drive both the ensuing recovery of function and the formation of maladaptive neuronal circuitry. Better understanding of the physiological consequences of novel synaptic connections produced by injury and the mechanisms that control their formation are important to the development of new successful strategies for the treatment of patients with spinal cord injuries. Here we discuss the anatomical, physiological and behavioral changes that take place in response to injury-induced plasticity after damage to the dorsal column pathway in rats and monkeys. Complete section of the dorsal columns of the spinal cord at a high cervical level in monkeys and rats interrupts the ascending axon branches of low threshold mechanoreceptor afferents subserving the forelimb and the rest of the lower body. Such lesions render the corresponding part of the somatotopic representation of primary somatosensory cortex totally unresponsive to tactile stimuli. There are also behavioral consequences of the sensory loss, including an impaired use of the hand/forelimb in manipulating small objects. In monkeys, if some of the afferents from the hand remain intact after dorsal column lesions, these remaining afferents extensively reactivate portions of somatosensory cortex formerly representing the hand. This functional reorganization develops over a postoperative period of one month, during which hand use rapidly improves. These recoveries appear to be mediated, at least in part, by the sprouting of preserved afferents within the cuneate nucleus of the dorsal column-trigeminal complex. In rats, such functional collateral sprouting has been promoted by the post-lesion digestion of the perineuronal net in the cuneate nucleus. Thus, this and other therapeutic strategies have the potential of enhancing sensorimotor recoveries after spinal cord injuries in humans. PMID:17692844

Kaas, Jon H.; Qi, Hui-Xin; Burish, Mark; Gharbawie, Omar; Onifer, Stephen M.; Massey, James M.

2008-01-01

390

Williams Syndrome As a Model for Elucidation of the Pathway Genes - the Brain - Cognitive Functions: Genetics and Epigenetics  

PubMed Central

Genomic diseases or syndromes with multiple manifestations arise spontaneously and unpredictably as a result of contiguous deletions and duplications generated by unequal recombination in chromosomal regions with a specific architecture. The Williams syndrome is believed to be one of the most attractive models for linking genes, the brain, behavior and cognitive functions. It is a neurogenetic disorder resulting from a 1.5 Mb deletion at 7q11.23 which covers more than 20 genes; the hemizigosity of these genes leads to multiple manifestations, with the behavioral ones comprising three distinct domains: 1) visuo-spatial orientation; 2) verbal and linguistic defect; and 3) hypersocialisation. The shortest observed deletion leads to hemizigosity in only two genes: eln and limk1. Therefore, the first gene is supposed to be responsible for cardiovascular pathology; and the second one, for cognitive pathology. Since cognitive pathology diminishes with a patient’s age, the original idea of the crucial role of genes straightforwardly determining the brain’s morphology and behavior was substituted by ideas of the brain’s plasticity and the necessity of finding epigenetic factors that affect brain development and the functions manifested as behavioral changes. Recently, non-coding microRNAs (miRs) began to be considered as the main players in these epigenetic events. This review tackles the following problems: is it possible to develop relatively simple model systems to analyze the contribution of both a single gene and the consequences of its epigenetic regulation in the formation of the Williams syndrome’s cognitive phenotype? Is it possible to use Drosophila as a simple model system? PMID:24772323

Nikitina, E. A.; Medvedeva, A. V.; Zakharov, G. A.; Savvateeva-Popova, E. V.

2014-01-01

391

Long-term functional plasticity in plant hydraulic architecture in response to supplemental moisture  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Plasticity in structural and functional traits related to water balance may determine plant performance and survival in ecosystems characterized by water limitation or high levels of rainfall variability, particularly in perennial herbaceous species with long generation cycles. This paper addresses whether and the extent to which several such seasonal to long-term traits respond to changes in moisture availability. Methods Using a novel approach that integrates ecology, physiology and anatomy, a comparison was made of lifetime functional traits in the root xylem of a long-lived perennial herb (Potentilla diversifolia, Rosaceae) growing in dry habitats with those of nearby individuals growing where soil moisture had been supplemented for 14 years. Traditional parameters such as specific leaf area (SLA) and above-ground growth were also assessed. Key Results Individuals from the site receiving supplemental moisture consistently showed significant responses in all considered traits related to water balance: SLA was greater by 24 %; roots developed 19 % less starch storing tissue, an indicator for drought-stress tolerance; and vessel size distributions shifted towards wider elements that collectively conducted water 54 % more efficiently – but only during the years for which moisture was supplemented. In contrast, above-ground growth parameters showed insignificant or inconsistent responses. Conclusions The phenotypic changes documented represent consistent, dynamic responses to increased moisture availability that should increase plant competitive ability. The functional plasticity of xylem anatomy quantified in this study constitutes a mechanistic basis for anticipating the differential success of plant species in response to climate variability and change, particularly where water limitation occurs. PMID:22396436

von Arx, Georg; Archer, Steven R.; Hughes, Malcolm K.

2012-01-01

392

When Music and Long-Term Memory Interact: Effects of Musical Expertise on Functional and Structural Plasticity in the Hippocampus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of musical skills by musicians results in specific structural and functional modifications in the brain. Surprisingly, no functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study has investigated the impact of musical training on brain function during long-term memory retrieval, a faculty particularly important in music. Thus, using fMRI, we examined for the first time this process during a musical familiarity

Mathilde Groussard; Renaud La Joie; Géraldine Rauchs; Brigitte Landeau; Gaël Chételat; Fausto Viader; Béatrice Desgranges; Francis Eustache; Hervé Platel; André Aleman

2010-01-01

393

Quetiapine modulates functional connectivity in brain aggression networks.  

PubMed

Aggressive behavior is associated with dysfunctions in an affective regulation network encompassing amygdala and prefrontal areas such as orbitofrontal (OFC), anterior cingulate (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In particular, prefrontal regions have been postulated to control amygdala activity by inhibitory projections, and this process may be disrupted in aggressive individuals. The atypical antipsychotic quetiapine successfully attenuates aggressive behavior in various disorders; the underlying neural processes, however, are unknown. A strengthened functional coupling in the prefrontal-amygdala system may account for these anti-aggressive effects. An inhibition of this network has been reported for virtual aggression in violent video games as well. However, there have been so far no in-vivo observations of pharmacological influences on corticolimbic projections during human aggressive behavior. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, quetiapine and placebo were administered for three successive days prior to an fMRI experiment. In this experiment, functional brain connectivity was assessed during virtual aggressive behavior in a violent video game and an aggression-free control task in a non-violent modification. Quetiapine increased the functional connectivity of ACC and DLPFC with the amygdala during virtual aggression, whereas OFC-amygdala coupling was attenuated. These effects were observed neither for placebo nor for the non-violent control. These results demonstrate for the first time a pharmacological modification of aggression-related human brain networks in a naturalistic setting. The violence-specific modulation of prefrontal-amygdala networks appears to control aggressive behavior and provides a neurobiological model for the anti-aggressive effects of quetiapine. PMID:23501053

Klasen, Martin; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Schwenzer, Michael; Mathiak, Krystyna A; Sarkheil, Pegah; Weber, René; Mathiak, Klaus

2013-07-15

394

Thalamocortical inputs show post-critical-period plasticity.  

PubMed

Experience-dependent plasticity in the adult brain has clinical potential for functional rehabilitation following central and peripheral nerve injuries. Here, plasticity induced by unilateral infraorbital (IO) nerve resection in 4-week-old rats was mapped using MRI and synaptic mechanisms were elucidated by slice electrophysiology. Functional MRI demonstrates a cortical potentiation compared to thalamus 2 weeks after IO nerve resection. Tracing thalamocortical (TC) projections with manganese-enhanced MRI revealed circuit changes in the spared layer 4 (L4) barrel cortex. Brain slice electrophysiology revealed TC input strengthening onto L4 stellate cells due to an increase in postsynaptic strength and the number of functional synapses. This work shows that the TC input is a site for robust plasticity after the end of the previously defined critical period for this input. Thus, TC inputs may represent a major site for adult plasticity in contrast to the consensus that adult plasticity mainly occurs at cortico-cortical connections. PMID:22632730

Yu, Xin; Chung, Seungsoo; Chen, Der-Yow; Wang, Shumin; Dodd, Stephen J; Walters, Judith R; Isaac, John T R; Koretsky, Alan P

2012-05-24

395

Functional brain networks and cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

Graph-theoretical analyses of functional networks obtained with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have recently proven to be a useful approach for the study of the substrates underlying cognitive deficits in different diseases. We used this technique to investigate whether cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD) are associated with changes in global and local network measures. Thirty-six healthy controls (HC) and 66 PD patients matched for age, sex, and education were classified as having mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or not based on performance in the three mainly affected cognitive domains in PD: attention/executive, visuospatial/visuoperceptual (VS/VP), and declarative memory. Resting-state fMRI and graph theory analyses were used to evaluate network measures. We have found that patients with MCI had connectivity reductions predominantly affecting long-range connections as well as increased local interconnectedness manifested as higher measures of clustering, small-worldness, and modularity. The latter measures also tended to correlate negatively with cognitive performance in VS/VP and memory functions. Hub structure was also reorganized: normal hubs displayed reduced centrality and degree in MCI PD patients. Our study indicates that the topological properties of brain networks are changed in PD patients with cognitive deficits. Our findings provide novel data regarding the functional substrate of cognitive impairment in PD, which may prove to have value as a prognostic marker. PMID:24639411

Baggio, Hugo-Cesar; Sala-Llonch, Roser; Segura, Bàrbara; Marti, Maria-José; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Compta, Yaroslau; Tolosa, Eduardo; Junqué, Carme

2014-09-01

396

Compelling Evidence that Exposure Therapy for PTSD Normalizes Brain Function.  

PubMed

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is helping us better understand the neurologic pathways involved in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We previously reported that military service members with PTSD after deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan demonstrated significant improvement, or normalization, in the fMRI-measured activation of the amygdala, prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate gyrus following exposure therapy for PTSD. However, our original study design did not include repeat scans of control participants, rendering it difficult to discern how much of the observed normalization in brain activity is attributable to treatment, rather than merely a practice effect. Using the same Affective Stroop task paradigm, we now report on a larger sample of PTSD-positive combat veterans that we treated with exposure therapy, as well as a combat-exposed control group of service members who completed repeat scans at 3-4 month intervals. Findings from the treatment group are similar to our prior report. Combat controls showed no significant change on repeat scanning, indicating that the observed differences in the intervention group were in fact due to treatment. We continue to scan additional study participants, in order to determine whether virtual reality exposure therapy has a different impact on regional brain activation than other therapies for PTSD. PMID:24875691

Roy, Michael J; Costanzo, Michelle E; Blair, James R; Rizzo, Albert A

2014-01-01

397

Age-related reorganizational changes in modularity and functional connectivity of human brain networks.  

PubMed

Abstract The human brain undergoes both morphological and functional modifications across the human lifespan. It is important to understand the aspects of brain reorganization that are critical in normal aging. To address this question, one approach is to investigate age-related topological changes of the brain. In this study, we developed a brain network model using graph theory methods applied to the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data acquired from two groups of normal healthy adults classified by age. We found that brain functional networks demonstrated modular organization in both groups with modularity decreased with aging, suggesting less distinct functional divisions across whole brain networks. Local efficiency was also decreased with aging but not with global efficiency. Besides these brain-wide observations, we also observed consistent alterations of network properties at the regional level in the elderly, particularly in two major functional networks-the default mode network (DMN) and the sensorimotor network. Specifically, we found that measures of regional strength, local and global efficiency of functional connectivity were increased in the sensorimotor network while decreased in the DMN with aging. These results indicate that global reorganization of brain functional networks may reflect overall topological changes with aging and that aging likely alters individual brain networks differently depending on the functional properties. Moreover, these findings highly correspond to the observation of decline in cognitive functions but maintenance of primary information processing in normal healthy aging, implying an underlying compensation mechanism evolving with aging to support higher-level cognitive functioning. PMID:25183440

Song, Jie; Birn, Rasmus M; Boly, Mélanie; Meier, Timothy B; Nair, Veena A; Meyerand, Mary E; Prabhakaran, Vivek

2014-11-01

398

Quaternary dynamics and plasticity underlie small heat shock protein chaperone function  

PubMed Central

Small Heat Shock Proteins (sHSPs) are a diverse family of molecular chaperones that prevent protein aggregation by binding clients destabilized during cellular stress. Here we probe the architecture and dynamics of complexes formed between an oligomeric sHSP and client by employing unique mass spectrometry strategies. We observe over 300 different stoichiometries of interaction, demonstrating that an ensemble of structures underlies the protection these chaperones confer to unfolding clients. This astonishing heterogeneity not only makes the system quite distinct in behavior to ATP-dependent chaperones, but also renders it intractable by conventional structural biology approaches. We find that thermally regulated quaternary dynamics of the sHSP establish and maintain the plasticity of the system. This extends the paradigm that intrinsic dynamics are crucial to protein function to include equilibrium fluctuations in quaternary structure, and suggests they are integral to the sHSPs’ role in the cellular protein homeostasis network. PMID:20133845

Stengel, Florian; Baldwin, Andrew J.; Painter, Alexander J.; Jaya, Nomalie; Basha, Eman; Kay, Lewis E.; Vierling, Elizabeth; Robinson, Carol V.; Benesch, Justin L. P.

2010-01-01

399

Driving and Driven Architectures of Directed Small-World Human Brain Functional Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, increasing attention has been focused on the investigation of the human brain connectome that describes the patterns of structural and functional connectivity networks of the human brain. Many studies of the human connectome have demonstrated that the brain network follows a small-world topology with an intrinsically cohesive modular structure and includes several network hubs in the medial parietal regions.

Chaogan Yan; Yong He

2011-01-01

400

Categories and Functional Units: An Infinite Hierarchical Model for Brain Activations  

E-print Network

Categories and Functional Units: An Infinite Hierarchical Model for Brain Activations Danial present a model that describes the structure in the responses of different brain areas to a set of stimuli encodes the relationship between brain activations and fMRI time courses. A variational inference

Golland, Polina

401

The Organization of Local and Distant Functional Connectivity in the Human Brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Information processing in the human brain arises from both interactions between adjacent areas and from distant projections that form distributed brain systems. Here we map interactions across different spatial scales by estimating the degree of intrinsic functional connectivity for the local (?14 mm) neighborhood directly surrounding brain regions as contrasted with distant (>14 mm) interactions. The balance between local and

Jorge Sepulcre; Hesheng Liu; Tanveer Talukdar; Iñigo Martincorena; B. T. Thomas Yeo; Randy L. Buckner

2010-01-01

402

Complex brain networks: graph theoretical analysis of structural and functional systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent developments in the quantitative analysis of complex networks, based largely on graph theory, have been rapidly translated to studies of brain network organization. The brain's structural and functional systems have features of complex networks — such as small-world topology, highly connected hubs and modularity — both at the whole-brain scale of human neuroimaging and at a cellular scale in

Olaf Sporns; Ed Bullmore

2009-01-01

403

Expression and function of the LIM homeodomain protein Apterous during embryonic brain development of Drosophila  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyzed the expression and function of the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Apterous (Ap) in embryonic brain development of Drosophila. Expression of Ap in the embryonic brain begins at early stage 12 and is subsequently found in approximately 200 protocerebral neurons and in 4 deutocerebral neurons. Brain glia do not express Ap. Most of the Ap-expressing neurons are interneurons and project

Martin C. Herzig; Stefan Thor; John B. Thomas; Heinrich Reichert; Frank Hirth

2001-01-01

404

Imaging local brain function with emission computed tomography  

SciTech Connect

Positron emission tomography (PET) using /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to map local cerebral glucose utilization in the study of local cerebral function. This information differs fundamentally from structural assessment by means of computed tomography (CT). In normal human volunteers, the FDG scan was used to determine the cerebral metabolic response to conrolled sensory stimulation and the effects of aging. Cerebral metabolic patterns are distinctive among depressed and demented elderly patients. The FDG scan appears normal in the depressed patient, studded with multiple metabolic defects in patients with multiple infarct dementia, and in the patients with Alzheimer disease, metabolism is particularly reduced in the parietal cortex, but only slightly reduced in the caudate and thalamus. The interictal FDG scan effectively detects hypometabolic brain zones that are sites of onset for seizures in patients with partial epilepsy, even though these zones usually appear normal on CT scans. The future prospects of PET are discussed.

Kuhl, D.E.

1984-03-01

405

Working Memory Updating Function Training Influenced Brain Activity  

PubMed Central

Recent studies demonstrated that working memory could be improved by training. We recruited healthy adult participants and used adaptive running working memory training tasks with a double-blind design, combined with the event-related potentials (ERPs) approach, to explore the influence of updating function training on brain activity. Participants in the training group underwent training for 20 days. Compared with the control group, the training group's accuracy (ACC) in the two-back working memory task had no significant differences after training, but reaction time (RT) was reduced significantly. Besides, the amplitudes of N160 and P300 increased significantly whereas that of P200 decreased significantly. The results suggest that training could have improved the participants' capacity on both inhibitory and updating. PMID:24015182

Zhao, Xin; Zhou, Renlai; Fu, Li

2013-01-01

406

Functional plasticity in Alzheimer's disease: effect of cognitive training on language-related ERP components.  

PubMed

Starting from the observation of a reduced gray matter in the inferior temporal regions of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, the present study hypothesized an altered language-related functional activity in left occipito-temporal areas in AD, and the possibility of a plastic change of these regions induced by an intensive cognitive training. To this aim, eleven mild/moderate AD underwent to a 5-week cognitive training (40 h). Before and after the training, evoked potentials were recorded from 26 scalp electrodes during a lexical decision task which required word/no-word discrimination. Stimuli included high- and low-frequency words and non-words, and the recognition potential (RP) together with the N400 have been analyzed and compared with those collected from a matched healthy control group. Results comparing controls and patients before training showed a normal RP in AD patients with a clear peak over left occipito-temporal sites. In addition, controls exhibited a left anterior lateralization of N400 component to words and an inverted pattern for non-words, whereas an altered N400 with bilateral distribution at both word and non-word conditions was found in AD patients. After the cognitive training, AD patients did not show changes in the N400, but revealed a significant enhanced amplitude of RP to high-frequency words. Behavioral responses to the lexical decision task and scores from neuropsychological tests did not evidence improvements nor worsening after training. These data point to an intact functionality of left posterior linguistic networks in mild/moderate AD, and the possibility to increase plastically their activity after a cognitive training. PMID:23685197

Spironelli, Chiara; Bergamaschi, Susanna; Mondini, Sara; Villani, Daniele; Angrilli, Alessandro

2013-07-01

407

CX3CR1 deficiency leads to impairment of hippocampal cognitive function and synaptic plasticity.  

PubMed

The protective/neurotoxic role of fractalkine (CX3CL1) and its receptor CX3C chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1) signaling in neurodegenerative disease is an intricate and highly debated research topic and it is becoming even more complicated as new studies reveal discordant results. It appears that the CX3CL1/CX3CR1 axis plays a direct role in neurodegeneration and/or neuroprotection depending on the CNS insult. However, all the above studies focused on the role of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling in pathological conditions, ignoring the relevance of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling under physiological conditions. No approach to date has been taken to decipher the significance of defects in CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling in physiological condition. In the present study we used CX3CR1?/?, CX3CR1?/?, and wild-type mice to investigate the physiological role of CX3CR1 receptor in cognition and synaptic plasticity. Our results demonstrate for the first