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Sample records for functional health literacy

  1. Functional Health Literacy and Smoking Cessation Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varekojis, Sarah M.; Miller, Larry; Schiller, M. Rosita; Stein, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the relationship between functional health literacy level and smoking cessation outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: Participants in an inpatient smoking cessation program in a mid-western city in the USA were enrolled and the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults was administered while the…

  2. Health Literacy

    MedlinePlus

    Health literacy refers to how well a person can get the health information and services that they need, ... million adults in the United States have low health literacy. It affects their ability to make health decisions. ...

  3. Health Literacy, Cognitive Ability, and Functional Health Status among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Serper, Marina; Patzer, Rachel E; Curtis, Laura M; Smith, Samuel G; O'Conor, Rachel; Baker, David W; Wolf, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether previously noted associations between health literacy and functional health status might be explained by cognitive function. Data Sources/Study Setting Health Literacy and Cognition in Older Adults (“LitCog,” prospective study funded by National Institute on Aging). Data presented are from interviews conducted among 784 adults, ages 55–74 years receiving care at an academic general medicine clinic or one of four federally qualified health centers in Chicago from 2008 to 2010. Study Design Study participants completed structured, in-person interviews administered by trained research assistants. Data Collection Health literacy was measured using the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults, Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine, and Newest Vital Sign. Cognitive function was assessed using measures of long-term and working memory, processing speed, reasoning, and verbal ability. Functional health was assessed with SF-36 physical health summary scale and Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System short form subscales for depression and anxiety. Principal Findings All health literacy measures were significantly correlated with all cognitive domains. In multivariable analyses, inadequate health literacy was associated with worse physical health and more depressive symptoms. After adjusting for cognitive abilities, associations between health literacy, physical health, and depressive symptoms were attenuated and no longer significant. Conclusions Cognitive function explains a significant proportion of the associations between health literacy, physical health, and depression among older adults. Interventions to reduce literacy disparities in health care should minimize the cognitive burden in behaviors patients must adopt to manage personal health. PMID:24476068

  4. Health Literacy

    MedlinePlus

    Health literacy refers to how well a person can get the health information and services that they need, and how ... is also about using them to make good health decisions. It involves differences that people have in ...

  5. Transformative Learning Intervention: Effect on Functional Health Literacy and Diabetes Knowledge in Older African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ntiri, Daphne W.; Stewart, Merry

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a transformative learning (TL) intervention on functional health literacy and diabetes knowledge in older African Americans. Twenty participants from senior community centers completed a six-session intervention. The short-form Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (s-TOFHLA), Literacy Assessment for…

  6. Functional Health Literacy and Mental Health in Urban and Rural Mothers of Children Enrolled in Early Intervention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizur-Barnekow, Kris; Doering, Jennifer; Cashin, Susan; Patrick, Timothy; Rhyner, Paula

    2010-01-01

    "Functional health literacy," a component of health literacy, refers to the ability to read and interpret medical information. The Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) measures the ability to read and interpret medical information. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess and compare levels of maternal functional…

  7. Limited Health Literacy and Decline in Executive Function in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sequeira, Shwetha S.; Eggermont, Laura H. P.; Silliman, Rebecca A.; Bickmore, Timothy W.; Henault, Lori E.; Winter, Michael R.; Nelson, Kerrie; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Limited health literacy is associated with worse executive function, but the association between limited health literacy and decline in executive function has not been established because of a lack of longitudinal studies. The authors aimed to examine this association by studying a prospective cohort in the setting of a randomized controlled trial to promote walking in older adults. Participants were community-dwelling older adults (65 years of age or older) who scored 2 or more on the Mini-Cog, without depression (score of less than 15 on the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire), and who completed baseline and 12-month evaluations (n = 226). Health literacy was measured using the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Executive function measured at baseline and 12 months using the Trail Making Test (TMT), Controlled Oral Word Association Test, and Category Fluency. The associations between health literacy and 12-month decline in each test of executive function were modeled using multivariate linear regression. Health literacy was found to be limited in 37% of participants. Limited health literacy was associated with reduced performance on all 3 executive function tests. In fully adjusted models, limited health literacy was associated with greater 12-month decline in performance on the TMT than higher health literacy (p = .01). In conclusion, older adults with limited health literacy are at risk for more rapid decline in scores on the TMT, a measure of executive function. PMID:24093352

  8. Health Literacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help in ensuring there has been understanding. Full Text Ideally, skills related to “teach to goal” help ... patient improve his or her own self management. Full Text Health care systems can also address limited literacy. ...

  9. Aging and Functional Health Literacy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, Jane; Wolf, Michael S.; von Wagner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To review the evidence on the association between age and limited health literacy, overall and by health literacy test, and to investigate the mediating role of cognitive function. Method: The Embase, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO databases were searched. Eligible studies were conducted in any country or language, included participants aged ≥50 years, presented a measure of association between age and health literacy, and were published through September 2013. Results: Seventy analyses in 60 studies were included in the systematic review; 29 of these were included in the meta-analysis. Older age was strongly associated with limited health literacy in analyses that measured health literacy as reading comprehension, reasoning, and numeracy skills (random-effects odds ratio [OR] = 4.20; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.13–5.64). By contrast, older age was weakly associated with limited health literacy in studies that measured health literacy as medical vocabulary (random-effects OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.03–1.37). Evidence on the mediating role of cognitive function was limited. Discussion: Health literacy tests that utilize a range of fluid cognitive abilities and mirror everyday health tasks frequently observe skill limitations among older adults. Vocabulary-based health literacy skills appear more stable with age. Researchers should select measurement tests wisely when assessing health literacy of older adults. PMID:25504637

  10. Health Literacy Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Literacy and Health Outcomes Strategies Resources What is health literacy? Health literacy is the degree to which individuals ... the information understandable. Back to Top Why is health literacy important? Only 12 percent of adults have Proficient ...

  11. Literacy and Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, Esther; Mooney, Angela

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the relationship between literacy and health disparities, focusing on the concept of health literacy. Recommendations are provided for ways to bridge the health literacy gap for learners in adult basic education and family literacy programs.

  12. [Concept analysis of health literacy].

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei-Chuan; Chen, Yueh-Chih; Chang, Shu-Chuan

    2009-10-01

    Health literacy has risen to become one of the dominant issues in Taiwan's healthcare system today. Level of health literacy impacts upon public health outcomes. Nevertheless, healthcare professionals in Taiwan remain largely unfamiliar with the concept and importance of health literacy. This paper employs concept analysis as described by Walker & Avant to introduce and analyze the attributes, antecedents and consequences of health literacy. Defining attributes of health literacy include: 1. enabling an individual to function successfully in a healthcare context; 2. facilitating the obtaining, comprehending, communicating and evaluating of health information to make appropriate health decisions and conduct positive health practices; and 3. achieving a good health status. The antecedent of health literacy is literacy. Consequences of health literacy include differences in health outcomes such as health knowledge, use of healthcare services and health status. Hopefully, through concept analysis, findings can help promote nursing clinical practice and related research quality. PMID:19760583

  13. Learn about Health Literacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Learn About Health Literacy Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir frame support ... of Public Health, explain health literacy. What Is Health Literacy? The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of ...

  14. Health Literacy and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Cajita, Maan Isabella; Cajita, Tara Rafaela; Han, Hae-Ra

    2015-01-01

    Background Low health literacy affects millions of Americans, putting those who are affected at a disadvantage and at risk for poorer health outcomes. Low health literacy can act as a barrier to effective disease self-management; this is especially true for chronic diseases such as heart failure (HF) that require complicated self-care regimens. Purpose This systematic review examined quantitative research literature published between 1999 and 2014 to explore the role of health literacy among HF patients. The specific aims of the systematic review are to (1) describe the prevalence of low health literacy among HF patients, (2) explore the predictors of low health literacy among HF patients, and (3) discuss the relationship between health literacy and HF self-care and common HF outcomes. Methods A systematic search of the following databases was conducted, PubMed, CINAHL Plus, Embase, PsycINFO, and Scopus, using relevant keywords and clear inclusion and exclusion criteria. Conclusions An average of 39% of HF patients have low health literacy. Age, race/ethnicity, years of education, and cognitive function are predictors of health literacy. In addition, adequate health literacy is consistently correlated with higher HF knowledge and higher salt knowledge. Clinical Implications Considering the prevalence of low health literacy among in the HF population, nurses and healthcare professionals need to recognize the consequences of low health literacy and adopt strategies that could minimize its detrimental effect on the patient's health outcomes. PMID:25569150

  15. Health Literacy and Health Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... When compared to those with adequate health literacy skills, studies have shown that patients with limited health literacy ... literacy skills. 12 Back to Top Health status Studies demonstrate that persons with limited health literacy skills are significantly more likely than persons with adequate ...

  16. Interaction between functional health literacy and telehomecare: Short-term effects from a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Korsbakke Emtekaer Haesum, Lisa; Ehlers, Lars; Hejlesen, Ole K

    2016-09-01

    This study was conducted as part of a randomized, controlled trial, and explored whether the introduction of a Danish telehomecare intervention, referred to as 'the Telekit', and its associated educational components affect functional health literacy. The study sample consisted of 60 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in the intervention group who received the Telekit, and 56 in the control group; all participants were collected from the large-scale, randomized TeleCare North trial by consecutive sampling. To avoid recall bias, the design did not include a baseline measurement, comparing instead the post-intervention measurements between the intervention and control groups. First, the comparability of the two groups was determined, and statistically significant differences in their functional health literacy scores were examined using an independent t-test. Furthermore, the associations between functional health literacy and both groups were tested using multiple regression analysis. No statistically significant difference was observed between the intervention and control groups, suggesting that the introduction of the Telekit and its associated educational components has no effect on functional health literacy. However, further research should be conducted using a larger sample. PMID:26856258

  17. Health Literacy Education within Adult Literacy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Sandra J.

    2011-01-01

    Building health literacy skills among adult learners has the potential to contribute to efforts to eliminate health disparities and improve health outcomes. Adults with limited literacy skills are more likely to be underserved by health services and at risk for poorer health. Recognition of the need for stronger health literacy skills and a desire…

  18. Towards an understanding of the relationship of functional literacy and numeracy to geographical health inequalities.

    PubMed

    Moon, Graham; Aitken, Grant; Roderick, Paul; Fraser, Simon; Rowlands, Gill

    2015-10-01

    The relative contributions of functional literacy and functional numeracy to health disparities remain poorly understood in developed world contexts. We seek to unpack their distinctive contributions and to examine how these contributions are framed by place-based deprivation and rurality. We present a multilevel logistic analysis of the 2011 Skills for Life Survey (SfLS), a representative governmental survey of adults aged 16-65 in England. Outcome measures were self-assessed health status and the presence of self-reported long-term health conditions. Exposure variables were functional literacy (FL) and functional numeracy (FN). Age, sex, individual socio-economic status, ethnicity, whether English was a first language, non-UK birthplaces, housing tenure and geography were included as potential confounders and mediators. Geography was measured as area-based deprivation and urban/rural status. FL and FN were both independently associated with self-assessed health status, though the association attenuated after taking account of confounders and mediators. For long-term conditions, the association with FN remained significant following inclusion of confounders and mediators whilst FL attenuated to non-significance. Rurality did not influence these associations. Area deprivation was a significant factor in attenuating the association between FL and self-assessed health status. Policy makers and health professionals will need to be aware of the distinctive impact of FN as well as FL when combating health inequalities, promoting health and managing long-term conditions. PMID:26363450

  19. Promoting Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    McCray, Alexa T.

    2005-01-01

    This report reviews some of the extensive literature in health literacy, much of it focused on the intersection of low literacy and the understanding of basic health care information. Several articles describe methods for assessing health literacy as well as methods for assessing the readability of texts, although generally these latter have not been developed with health materials in mind. Other studies have looked more closely at the mismatch between patients' literacy levels and the readability of materials intended for use by those patients. A number of studies have investigated the phenomenon of literacy from the perspective of patients' interactions in the health care setting, the disenfranchisement of some patients because of their low literacy skills, the difficulty some patients have in navigating the health care system, the quality of the communication between doctors and their patients including the cultural overlay of such exchanges, and ultimately the effect of low literacy on health outcomes. Finally, the impact of new information technologies has been studied by a number of investigators. There remain many opportunities for conducting further research to gain a better understanding of the complex interactions between general literacy, health literacy, information technologies, and the existing health care infrastructure. PMID:15561782

  20. Health literacy: an introduction to the literature.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Richard

    Adult literacy is inextricably linked with adults' understanding of educational and informational materials concerning their health. Approximately 90 million American adults are functionally illiterate or have only marginal reading skills. This article describe the impact of poor literacy skills on patient health and the scope of the challenges to health literacy. The author also describes simple steps which dentists can undertake to identify patients with poor literacy skills and methods which may help improve educational programs for those patients. PMID:16605212

  1. Management of children's fever by parents and caregivers: Practical measurement of functional health literacy.

    PubMed

    Emmerton, Lynne; Chaw, Xin Yao; Kelly, Fiona; Kairuz, Therese; Marriott, Jennifer; Wheeler, Amanda; Moles, Rebekah

    2014-12-01

    Functional health literacy is founded on general and numerical literacy and practical skills and is required for the appropriate and effective management of health symptoms in children. This study aimed to assess the health literacy skills of parents and caregivers of preschool-aged children, using a progressive scenario describing a child with fever and presenting tasks relating to selection of a medicine and hypothetical dosing of their child. Participants (n = 417) from 33 childcare- and health-related sites in Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne and Auckland completed the study. Participants' responses were largely appropriate regarding actions in response to worsening symptoms, selection of an appropriate product (from a limited range), whereby 84.5% of responses were for a single-ingredient paracetamol product and use of the package directions to state the frequency of dosing (93.1% of frequencies appropriate for paracetamol and 66.7% for ibuprofen). However, in only 50.8% of cases was an appropriate weight-based dose calculated, and doses were not measured to within 10% of the stated dose in 16.7% of cases. Future studies should focus on skill development via educational campaigns for parents and caregivers. PMID:23908369

  2. Health Literacy, Social Support, and Health Status among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Arozullah, Ahsan M.; Cho, Young Ik; Crittenden, Kathleen; Vicencio, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The study examines whether social support interacts with health literacy in affecting the health status of older adults. Health literacy is assessed using the short version of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Social support is measured with the Medical Outcome Study social support scale. Results show, unexpectedly, that rather…

  3. Health literacy among adults in Yazd, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Haerian, Ahmad; Moghaddam, Mohammad Hossein Baghiayni; Ehrampoush, Mohammad Hassan; Bazm, Soheila; Bahsoun, Maryam Hassan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to assess the health literacy levels and determine the relationship between health literacy with demographic variables and the socioeconomic status Three hundred and eighty adults, 18 years and older, were randomly selected and assessed by the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) instrument in two sections of reading comprehension and numeracy. The second instrument used to detect the relationship between the demographic variables and socio-economic status and the level of health literacy of the subjects of adults in Yazd district. Three hundred and eighty adults, 18 years and older, were randomly selected and assessed by the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) instrument in two sections of reading comprehension and numeracy. The second instrument used to detect the relationship between the demographic variables and socio-economic status and the level of health literacy of the subjects. The mean score of a participant's health literacy was 73.33 ± 1.29. Fifty-four percent of the individuals had adequate health literacy and the rest of them had limited health literacy. The mean score of functional health literacy was significantly different by socio-economic status (p0.05) and the years of schooling (P = 0.00). On the basis of linear regression, in this research, the years of schooling (B0.28, p0.01) and marital status (B = 3.08, p0.05) were two predictors of health literacy. PMID:27462633

  4. Health Literacy and Health Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Health Promotion relied extensively on both the Institute of Medicine (2004) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (2004) reports, which include comprehensive reviews of the literature on health literacy and ...

  5. A Critical Look at Health Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Daphne

    2001-01-01

    Discusses health literacy studies in medical journals, definitions of health literacy, ways to recognize patients with low literacy skills, and implications for adult literacy education. Urges more discussion and collaboration between adult literacy and health professionals. (Contains 37 references.) (SK)

  6. Addressing Low Literacy and Health Literacy in Clinical Oncology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sofia F.; Hahn, Elizabeth A.; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Low functional literacy and low health literacy continue to be under-recognized and are associated with poorer patient health outcomes. Health literacy is a dynamic state influenced by how well a healthcare system delivers information and services that match patients’ abilities, needs and preferences. Oncology care poses considerable health literacy demands on patients who are expected to process high stakes information about complex multidisciplinary treatment over lengths of time. Much of the information provided to patients in clinical care and research is beyond their literacy levels. In this paper, we provide an overview of currently available guidelines and resources to improve how the needs of patients with diverse literacy skills are met by cancer care providers and clinics. We present recommendations for health literacy assessment in clinical practice and ways to enhance the usability of health information and services by improving written materials and verbal communication, incorporating multimedia and culturally appropriate approaches, and promoting health literacy in cancer care settings. The paper also includes a list of additional resources that can be used to develop and implement health literacy initiatives in cancer care clinics. PMID:20464884

  7. Functional Validity of a Judgment Skills Measure within the Concept of Health Literacy for Sleeping Disorder Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dubowicz, Arthur; Schulz, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of health literacy has been widened to include higher order aspects such as patient decision-making skills while its measurement continued to rely narrowly on reading and numeracy skills, known as functional health literacy. We developed a Judgment Skills measure, designed to assess patients’ ability to make appropriate decisions with regard to their condition. The measure offers scenarios with answer options ranked for biomedical adequacy. This study aims to examine the psychometric properties and the functional validity of the Judgment Skills measure. A self-administered survey among 87 primary insomnia patients in the Italian-speaking part of Switzerland was conducted. The extensive path model included variables such as functional health literacy, coping with the medical condition, experience of the scenario, sleep quality, duration suffering, education, and age. Correlation analyses were conducted to link the variables. The Judgment Skills measure showed the expected significant correlations. In general, higher Judgment Skills were related to coping strategies leading to better health outcomes. Functional health literacy correlated highly with education, while Judgment Skills did not, which confirmed the conceptual difference of these skills. The findings propose a model for conducting research that does embrace the broader conceptualization of health literacy. PMID:25329537

  8. Health literacy and global cognitive function predict e-mail but not internet use in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Schprechman, Jared P; Gathright, Emily C; Goldstein, Carly M; Guerini, Kate A; Dolansky, Mary A; Redle, Joseph; Hughes, Joel W

    2013-01-01

    Background. The internet offers a potential for improving patient knowledge, and e-mail may be used in patient communication with providers. However, barriers to internet and e-mail use, such as low health literacy and cognitive impairment, may prevent patients from using technological resources. Purpose. We investigated whether health literacy, heart failure knowledge, and cognitive function were related to internet and e-mail use in older adults with heart failure (HF). Methods. Older adults (N = 119) with heart failure (69.84 ± 9.09 years) completed measures of health literacy, heart failure knowledge, cognitive functioning, and internet use in a cross-sectional study. Results. Internet and e-mail use were reported in 78.2% and 71.4% of this sample of patients with HF, respectively. Controlling for age and education, logistic regression analyses indicated that higher health literacy predicted e-mail (P < .05) but not internet use. Global cognitive function predicted e-mail (P < .05) but not internet use. Only 45% used the Internet to obtain information on HF and internet use was not associated with greater HF knowledge. Conclusions. The majority of HF patients use the internet and e-mail, but poor health literacy and cognitive impairment may prevent some patients from accessing these resources. Future studies that examine specific internet and email interventions to increase HF knowledge are needed. PMID:24282634

  9. Health Literacy and Global Cognitive Function Predict E-Mail but Not Internet Use in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schprechman, Jared P.; Gathright, Emily C.; Goldstein, Carly M.; Guerini, Kate A.; Dolansky, Mary A.; Redle, Joseph; Hughes, Joel W.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The internet offers a potential for improving patient knowledge, and e-mail may be used in patient communication with providers. However, barriers to internet and e-mail use, such as low health literacy and cognitive impairment, may prevent patients from using technological resources. Purpose. We investigated whether health literacy, heart failure knowledge, and cognitive function were related to internet and e-mail use in older adults with heart failure (HF). Methods. Older adults (N = 119) with heart failure (69.84 ± 9.09 years) completed measures of health literacy, heart failure knowledge, cognitive functioning, and internet use in a cross-sectional study. Results. Internet and e-mail use were reported in 78.2% and 71.4% of this sample of patients with HF, respectively. Controlling for age and education, logistic regression analyses indicated that higher health literacy predicted e-mail (P < .05) but not internet use. Global cognitive function predicted e-mail (P < .05) but not internet use. Only 45% used the Internet to obtain information on HF and internet use was not associated with greater HF knowledge. Conclusions. The majority of HF patients use the internet and e-mail, but poor health literacy and cognitive impairment may prevent some patients from accessing these resources. Future studies that examine specific internet and email interventions to increase HF knowledge are needed. PMID:24282634

  10. Aging and Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kay H.

    2014-01-01

    A recent study comparing older adults’ health literacy skills with their satisfaction with health care providers’ communication efforts did not find a correlation between the two measures. However, the results were interesting, including the fact that almost 40 percent of participants experienced moderate to severe difficulties in understanding everyday health information as presented in a food label (Newest Vital Sign assessment). This has implications for senior patient engagement in health care, particularly at a time when so many health transactions such as scheduling and records requests, not to mention general health information, are moving to online only format. Librarians should be aware of the issues surrounding health literacy in older adults and work with providers to address those deficits in health care navigation in this population. PMID:24634614

  11. Health literacy and diabetic foot ulcer healing

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, David J; Hampton, Michelle; Hoffstad, Ole; Malay, D. Scot; Thom, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The adherence by patients to diabetic foot ulcer therapy is often difficult. The goal of this study was to begin to understand how a patient’s health literacy affects their foot ulcer management decisions. Initially using a cross-sectional study design, we evaluated diabetics with foot ulcers within 4 weeks of being asked to participate in a longitudinal study. We assessed health literacy using measures of general health literacy, diabetes health literacy, diabetes self-efficacy, and diabetes numeracy. Individuals enrolled in the study had higher health literacy based on the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (33.8 (SD 2.3) versus 27.3 (SD 9.6); p=0.009) as compared to individuals who previously declined an invitation to enroll in the study. Furthermore, patients with lower Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults scores had larger (p=0.04) and older (p=0.125) wounds (markers for poorer prognosis). Other measures of literacy showed similar results. In conclusion, those with diminished health literacy were less likely to enroll in an investigational study and had wounds that were less likely to heal. PMID:25923608

  12. Health literacy and diabetic foot ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Margolis, David J; Hampton, Michelle; Hoffstad, Ole; Malay, D Scot; Thom, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The adherence by patients to diabetic foot ulcer therapy is often difficult. The goal of this study was to begin to understand how a patient's health literacy affects their foot ulcer management decisions. Initially using a cross-sectional study design, we evaluated diabetics with foot ulcers within 4 weeks of being asked to participate in a longitudinal study. We assessed health literacy using measures of general health literacy, diabetes health literacy, diabetes self-efficacy, and diabetes numeracy. Individuals enrolled in the study had higher health literacy based on the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults [33.8 (SD 2.3) versus 27.3 (SD 9.6); p = 0.009] as compared to individuals who previously declined an invitation to enroll in the study. Furthermore, patients with lower Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults scores had larger (p = 0.04) and older (p = 0.125) wounds (markers for poorer prognosis). Other measures of literacy showed similar results. In conclusion, those with diminished health literacy were less likely to enroll in an investigational study and had wounds that were less likely to heal. PMID:25923608

  13. Measuring English Linguistic Proficiency and Functional Health Literacy Levels in Two Languages: Implications for Reaching Latino Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas-Guyler, Liliana; Britigan, Denise H.; Murnan, Judy; King, Keith; Vaughn, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to determine the health literacy levels of Latinos in the Greater Cincinnati Area in both English and Spanish by utilizing two standardized quantitative measures of health literacy, and to undertake an assessment of the relationship between language, health literacy and acculturation in this community. Given a rapid…

  14. The Impact of Functional Health Literacy and Acculturation on the Oral Health Status of Somali Refugees Living in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jo Hunter; Cochran, Jennifer; Doros, Gheorghe; Rybin, Denis; Henshaw, Michelle; Barnes, Linda L.; Paasche-Orlow, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the impact of health literacy and acculturation on oral health status of Somali refugees in Massachusetts. Methods. Between December 2009 and June 2011, we surveyed 439 adult Somalis who had lived in the United States 10 years or less. Assessments included oral examinations with decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) counts and measurement of spoken English and health literacy. We tested associations with generalized linear regression models. Results. Participants had means of 1.4 decayed, 2.8 missing, and 1.3 filled teeth. Among participants who had been in the United States 0 to 4 years, lower health literacy scores correlated with lower DMFT (rate ratio [RR] = 0.78; P = .016). Among participants who had been in the country 5 to 10 years, lower literacy scores correlated with higher DMFT (RR = 1.37; P = .012). Literacy was not significantly associated with decayed teeth. Lower literacy scores correlated marginally with lower risk of periodontal disease (odds ratio = 0.22; P = .047). Conclusions. Worsening oral health of Somali refugees over time may be linked to less access to preventive care and less utilization of beneficial oral hygiene practices. PMID:23327248

  15. Health Literacy, Cognitive Function, Proper Use, and Adherence to Inhaled Asthma Controller Medications Among Older Adults With Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Michael S.; Smith, Samuel G.; Martynenko, Melissa; Vicencio, Daniel P.; Sano, Mary; Wisnivesky, Juan P.; Federman, Alex D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We sought to investigate the degree to which cognitive skills explain associations between health literacy and asthma-related medication use among older adults with asthma. METHODS: Patients aged ≥ 60 years receiving care at eight outpatient clinics (primary care, geriatrics, pulmonology, allergy, and immunology) in New York, New York, and Chicago, Illinois, were recruited to participate in structured, in-person interviews as part of the Asthma Beliefs and Literacy in the Elderly (ABLE) study (n = 425). Behaviors related to medication use were investigated, including adherence to prescribed regimens, metered-dose inhaler (MDI) technique, and dry powder inhaler (DPI) technique. Health literacy was measured using the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Cognitive function was assessed in terms of fluid (working memory, processing speed, executive function) and crystallized (verbal) ability. RESULTS: The mean age of participants was 68 years; 40% were Hispanic and 30% non-Hispanic black. More than one-third (38%) were adherent to their controller medication, 53% demonstrated proper DPI technique, and 38% demonstrated correct MDI technique. In multivariable analyses, limited literacy was associated with poorer adherence to controller medication (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.29-4.08) and incorrect DPI (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.81-6.83) and MDI (OR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.01-2.65) techniques. Fluid and crystallized abilities were independently associated with medication behaviors. However, when fluid abilities were added to the model, literacy associations were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Among older patients with asthma, interventions to promote proper medication use should simplify tasks and patient roles to overcome cognitive load and suboptimal performance in self-care. PMID:25275432

  16. The Prevalence of Limited Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Parker, Ruth M; Gazmararian, Julie A; Nielsen-Bohlman, Lynn T; Rudd, Rima R

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To systematically review U.S. studies examining the prevalence of limited health literacy and to synthesize these findings by evaluating demographic associations in pooled analyses. DESIGN We searched the literature for the period 1963 through January 2004 and identified 2,132 references related to a set of specified search terms. Of the 134 articles and published abstracts retrieved, 85 met inclusion criteria, which were 1) conducted in the United States with ≥25 adults, 2) addressed a hypothesis related to health care, 3) identified a measurement instrument, and 4) presented primary data. The authors extracted data to compare studies by population, methods, and results. MAIN RESULTS The 85 studies reviewed include data on 31,129 subjects, and report a prevalence of low health literacy between 0% and 68%. Pooled analyses of these data reveal that the weighted prevalence of low health literacy was 26% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22% to 29%) and of marginal health literacy was 20% (95% CI, 16% to 23%). Most studies used either the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) or versions of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA). The prevalence of low health literacy was not associated with gender (P =.38) or measurement instrument (P =.23) but was associated with level of education (P =.02), ethnicity (P =.0003), and age (P =.004). CONCLUSIONS A pooled analysis of published reports on health literacy cannot provide a nationally representative prevalence estimate. This systematic review exhibits that limited health literacy, as depicted in the medical literature, is prevalent and is consistently associated with education, ethnicity, and age. It is essential to simplify health services and improve health education. Such changes have the potential to improve the health of Americans and address the health disparities that exist today. PMID:15836552

  17. Health Literacy Among People with Serious Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Whitney; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Bill Baerentzen, M; Britigan, Denise H

    2016-05-01

    People diagnosed with a mental illness are at higher risk of developing preventable chronic diseases; thus, health literacy improvements may have great potential to impact health outcomes for this typically underserved population. However, there is a dearth of research on health literacy of persons with severe mental illness. The purpose of this research was to investigate aspects of health literacy and identify factors associated with low literacy among adults with severe mental illness using three literacy assessment tools. Seventy-one adults with serious mental illness were assessed and a high proportion had limited literacy levels: 42 % with the Single Item Literacy Screener, 50 % with the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine-Short Form, and 67 % with the Newest Vital Sign. Findings suggest that individuals with certain mental illnesses and lower functioning may have more difficulty understanding health information and have limited numerical literacy. PMID:26443671

  18. Perceptions of a HIV testing message targeted for at-risk adults with low functional health literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Susan L.

    This study analyses warehoused data collected by Georgia State University and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (GSU/CDC) researchers after developing an HIV testing message for urban adults with low functional health literacy. It expands previous work by examining data collected when 202 primarily African-American homeless clients of an urban community based organization (CBO) reviewed both the low literacy brochure (Wallace et al., 2006) and a standard HIV brochure (Georgia Department of Human Resources, 1997). Participants' health literacy was assessed using 2 measures; the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine or REALM (Davis, Crouch, Long & Green) and the Test of Functional Health Literacy Assessment or TOFHLA (Nurss, Parker & Baker, 2001). HIV risk was determined using an interview questionnaire developed by the research group (Belcher, Deming, Hunter & Wallace, 2005) which allowed participants to self-report recent alcohol and drug use, sexual behavior, sexually transmitted disease (STD) history and exposure to abuse and sexual coercion. Open-ended response questions regarding readability, understanding, main message, and importance for each brochure provided the qualitative data. This analysis confirms previous work showing accessibility, readability, cultural sensitivity and user-friendly formatting are important when attempting to engage at-risk adults with varying levels of functional health literacy in an HIV testing message. The visual aspects of the brochure can be essential in capturing the reader's attention and should be relevant to the target audience (Wallace, Deming, Hunter, Belcher & Choi, 2006). Mono-colored graphics may be perceived as dated and irrelevant or worse yet, threatening to some readers. Whenever possible culturally appropriate color photos of people depicting relevant content should replace excess text and difficult medical terms should be eliminated. Wording on the cover and within the brochure should be used to

  19. Health Literacy in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ickes, Melinda J.; Cottrell, Randall

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the health literacy levels, and the potential importance of healthy literacy, of college students. Participants: Courses were randomly selected from all upper level undergraduate courses at a large Research I university to obtain a sample size of N = 399. Methods: During the 2007-2008 school year,…

  20. Validation of Turkish health literacy measures.

    PubMed

    Eyüboğlu, Ezgi; Schulz, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to validate a Turkish version of the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy (S-TOFHLA) (Baker et al, Development of a brief test to measure functional health literacy. Patient Educ Counsel 1999; 38: :33-42) and a Turkish version of the Chew self-report scale (Chew et al., Brief questions to identify patients with inadequate health literacy. Family Med, 2004; 36: :588-94) for measuring functional health literacy. The original English version of the S-TOFHLA and the Chew items were translated by applying standardized translation methods and cultural adaptations, and both were administered to a sample of diabetes patients (N = 302) in two diabetes clinics in one of the major cities in Turkey. Self-administered paper-pencil questionnaires were distributed to eligible outpatients who had a clinic appointment. In addition to the S-TOFHLA measurement and the Chew screening questions, gender, age, educational attainment, income, marital status and diabetes knowledge were obtained. The Turkish version of S-TOFHLA showed high internal consistency. Both S-TOFHLA and the Chew screening scale correlated significantly with known predictors of health literacy: age, education and income. The Chew scale was also related weakly but significantly with general diabetes knowledge. It is expected that the Turkish versions of S-TOFHLA and the Chew scale will be used in Turkey as well as in other countries with large Turkish communities. PMID:25586111

  1. Towards a Health Literacy Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novitzky, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The health and wellbeing agenda is gaining momentum. Most recently, a major review of the curriculum for England's primary schools suggested that "wellbeing, happiness and healthy living" could be one of six broad areas of learning to replace individual subjects. Health literacy is one component of the health and wellbeing agenda and this has been…

  2. Nurse Overestimation of Patients' Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Dickens, Carolyn; Lambert, Bruce L.; Cromwell, Terese; Piano, Mariann R.

    2013-01-01

    Patient education and effective communication are core elements of the nursing profession; therefore, awareness of a patient's health literacy is integral to patient care, safety, education, and counseling. Several past studies have suggested that health care providers overestimate their patient's health literacy. In this study, the authors compare inpatient nurses' estimate of their patient's health literacy to the patient's health literacy using Newest Vital Sign as the health literacy measurement. A total of 65 patients and 30 nurses were enrolled in this trial. The results demonstrate that nurses incorrectly identify patients with low health literacy. In addition, overestimates outnumber underestimates 6 to 1. The results reinforce previous evidence that health care providers overestimate a patient's health literacy. The overestimation of a patient's health literacy by nursing personnel may contribute to the widespread problem of poor health outcomes and hospital readmission rates. PMID:24093346

  3. Promoting health literacy with orofacial myofunctional patients.

    PubMed

    Reed, Hope C

    2007-11-01

    The definition of health literacy is provided along with information substantiating its importance. Focused initiatives, the consequences of poor health literacy, and at-risk populations are briefly discussed. The focus of this article is the application of health literacy principles to the discipline of orofacial myology and how the promotion of health literacy facilitates positive growth for patients, orfacial myologists, and the professions. The article concludes with a vision for a health literate society. PMID:18942479

  4. Health Literacy and Adult Basic Education Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golbeck, Amanda L.; Ahlers-Schmidt, Carolyn R.; Paschal, Angelia M.

    2005-01-01

    Adult basic education (ABE) is an ideal venue for developing health literacy skills. Literacy and numeracy assessments used in ABE were identified and the most common were examined for health components. Only the Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS) included health. The two most common health literacy assessments used in general…

  5. Building Successful Partnerships in Health Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Sue; Dale, Helen; Gabler, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Health literacy, the ability to obtain and understand information and services to make good health decisions, has received much attention recently. Literacy is a stronger predictor of health status than age, income, race, ethnicity, employment status, or educational level. Inadequate health literacy costs the United States an estimated $100-$236…

  6. Health literacy and patient portals.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yulong; Orr, Martin; Warren, Jim

    2015-06-01

    Health literacy has been described as the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions. Improving health literacy may serve to promote concordance with therapy, engage patients in their own health care, and improve health outcomes. Patient portal technology aims at enabling patients and families to have easy access to key information in their own medical records and to communicate with their health care providers electronically. However, there is a gap in our understanding of how portals will improve patient outcome. The authors believe patient portal technology presents an opportunity to improve patient concordance with prescribed therapy, if adequate support is provided to equip patients (and family/carers) with the knowledge needed to utilise the health information available via the portals. Research is needed to understand what a health consumer will use patient portals for and how to support a user to realise the technology's potential. PMID:26125067

  7. Health literacy and its influencing factors in Iranian diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Zahra; Tehrani Banihashemi, Arash; Asgharifard, Homa; Bahramian, Mehran; Baradaran, Hamid Reza; Khamseh, Mohammad E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health literacy is the ability to obtain, read, understand and use healthcare information to make appropriate health decisions and follow instructions for treatment. The aim of this study was to identify the effect of various factors on health literacy in patients with diabetes. Methods: 407 patients with diabetes older than 15 years of age were identified from the Diabetes Clinic affiliated to the Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism (IEM) of Iran University of Medical Sciences. We assessed patients' health literacy using the Persian version of Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) questionnaire. Results: Mean age of the patients was 55.8 ± 11.3 years, and 61.7% the participants were female.. Overall, 18.2% of the patients had adequate health literacy skills, 11.8% had marginal and 70.0% inadequate health literacy skills. Male participants performed better than females (p< 0.01) and older patients had lower health literacy score than younger patients (p< 0.001). Furthermore, patients with higher educational and occupational levels had higher functional health literacy score than those with lower levels (p< 0.001). Conclusion: Health literacy score in Iranian patients with diabetes seems inadequate. Therefrom effective interventions should be designed and implemented for this group of patients to improve diabetes outcomes. PMID:26478888

  8. Connecting for health literacy: health information partners.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, Karyn L; Muhammad, Abdul-Ali; Downey, Stacey; Kind, Terry

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a community-based health information partnership to address health literacy and health information inequalities in marginalized communities. Public health, medical, literacy, and library practitioners promote health literacy through outreach, training, and professional development activities in community settings. They create learning environments for people to develop the necessary knowledge and skills to better understand health information and health policy so they can make decisions concerning personal and community health. Outreach activities focus on visits to neighborhood health centers, health fairs, health exhibits at union meetings and conferences; training programs involve hands-on, peer-led computer classes for people living with HIV and for the general public; and professional development programs connect librarians, health providers, public health workers, and literacy teachers in joint planning and learning. Several learners currently participate in and lead community health education programs and HIV advocacy. The coalition's strength develops from strongly shared objectives, an absence of territoriality, and a core active leadership group. PMID:18544664

  9. Oral Health Literacy Assessment: development of an oral health literacy instrument for Spanish speakers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jessica; Stucky, Brian; Rozier, Gary; Lee, Shoou-Yih; Zeldin, Leslie P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop an oral health literacy instrument for Spanish-speaking adults, evaluate its psychometric properties, and determine its comparability to an English version. Methods The Oral Health Literacy Assessment in Spanish (OHLA-S) and English (OHLA-E) are designed with a word recognition section and a comprehension section using the multiple-choice format developed by an expert panel. Validation of OHLA-S and OHLA-E involved comparing the instrument with other health literacy instruments in a sample of 201 Spanish-speaking and 204 English-speaking subjects. Comparability between Spanish and English versions was assessed by testing for differential item functioning (DIF) using item response theory. Results We considered three OHLA-S scoring systems. Based on validity and reliability comparisons, 24 items were retained in the OHLA-S instrument. OHLA-S was correlated with another health literacy instrument, Spanish Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (P < 0.05). Significant correlations were also found between OHLA-S and years of schooling, oral health knowledge, overall health, and an understanding of written health-care materials (P < 0.05). OHLA-S displayed satisfactory reliability with a Cronbach Alpha of 0.70-0.80. DIF results suggested that OHLA-S and OHLA-E scores were not comparable at a given level of oral health literacy. Conclusions OHLA-S has acceptable reliability and validity. OHLA-S and OHLA-E are two different measurement tools and should not be used to compare oral health literacy between English- and Spanish-speaking populations. PMID:23215757

  10. Health and Literacy: Perspectives in 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shohet, Linda

    The concepts of literacy and health have been evolving and broadening, and interest in the connections between the two has been growing in Australia and elsewhere. However, the scope of practices related to health literacy in the health fields and in the adult literacy education field have remained fairly static. Research has identified the…

  11. Health Literacy and Women's Health-Related Behaviors in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Tsai, Tzu-I; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Ken N.

    2012-01-01

    Extant health literacy research is unclear about the contribution of health literacy to health behaviors and is limited regarding women's health issues. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the association between health literacy and five health behaviors (Pap smear screening, annual physical checkup, smoking, checking food…

  12. Health Literacy beyond Basic Skills. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Research documenting links between levels of education and health outcomes suggests people with higher educational attainment may have a health advantage. Health literacy issues that go beyond basic skills include health information communication; literacy and health as cultural and social practices; a relationship among health information,…

  13. Addressing health literacy in patient decision aids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective use of a patient decision aid (PtDA) can be affected by the user’s health literacy and the PtDA’s characteristics. Systematic reviews of the relevant literature can guide PtDA developers to attend to the health literacy needs of patients. The reviews reported here aimed to assess: 1. a) the effects of health literacy / numeracy on selected decision-making outcomes, and b) the effects of interventions designed to mitigate the influence of lower health literacy on decision-making outcomes, and 2. the extent to which existing PtDAs a) account for health literacy, and b) are tested in lower health literacy populations. Methods We reviewed literature for evidence relevant to these two aims. When high-quality systematic reviews existed, we summarized their evidence. When reviews were unavailable, we conducted our own systematic reviews. Results Aim 1: In an existing systematic review of PtDA trials, lower health literacy was associated with lower patient health knowledge (14 of 16 eligible studies). Fourteen studies reported practical design strategies to improve knowledge for lower health literacy patients. In our own systematic review, no studies reported on values clarity per se, but in 2 lower health literacy was related to higher decisional uncertainty and regret. Lower health literacy was associated with less desire for involvement in 3 studies, less question-asking in 2, and less patient-centered communication in 4 studies; its effects on other measures of patient involvement were mixed. Only one study assessed the effects of a health literacy intervention on outcomes; it showed that using video to improve the salience of health states reduced decisional uncertainty. Aim 2: In our review of 97 trials, only 3 PtDAs overtly addressed the needs of lower health literacy users. In 90% of trials, user health literacy and readability of the PtDA were not reported. However, increases in knowledge and informed choice were reported in those studies

  14. Health Literacy Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... terms. Back to Top What is cultural and linguistic competency? Culture affects how people communicate, understand, and respond to health information. Cultural and linguistic competency of health professionals can contribute to health ...

  15. Health Literacy Concepts in Nursing Education.

    PubMed

    Kennard, Deborah K

    2016-01-01

    The impact of low health literacy on the health care system is astronomical. The ability to learn, retain, and apply health information is greatly affected by health literacy and thus greatly affects patient outcomes. The responsibility of patient education is mostly shouldered by nurses and yet nursing is the discipline that is most lacking in knowledge and awareness about health literacy. Providing nursing students with the necessary tools to assess patient health literacy and to assess their own patient teaching is a vital component of patient education. Nursing curricula is the place to start. PMID:27209875

  16. Update on Health Literacy and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Stacy Cooper; Brega, Angela G.; Crutchfield, Trisha M.; Elasy, Tom; Herr, Haley; Kaphingst, Kimberly; Karter, Andrew J.; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Osborn, Chandra Y.; Pignone, Michael; Rothman, Russell; Schillinger, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Inadequate literacy is common among patients with diabetes and may lead to adverse outcomes. We reviewed the relationship between literacy and health outcomes in patients with diabetes and potential interventions to improve such outcomes. Methods We reviewed 79 articles covering three key domains: 1) evaluation of screening tools to identify inadequate literacy and numeracy; 2) the relationships of a range of diabetes-related health outcomes with literacy and numeracy; and 3) interventions to reduce literacy-related differences in health outcomes. Results Several screening tools are available to assess patients' print literacy and numeracy skills, some of which specifically address diabetes. Literacy and numeracy are consistently associated with diabetes-related knowledge. Some studies suggest literacy and numeracy are associated with intermediate outcomes, including self-efficacy, communication, and self-care (including adherence), but the relationship between literacy and glycemic control is mixed. Few studies have assessed more distal health outcomes, including diabetes-related complications, health care utilization, safety, or quality of life, but available studies suggest low literacy may be associated with an increased risk of complications, including hypoglycemia. Several interventions appear effective in improving diabetes-related outcomes regardless of literacy status, but it is unclear if these interventions can reduce literacy-related differences in outcomes. Conclusions Low literacy is associated with less diabetes-related knowledge and may be related to other important health outcomes. Further studies are needed to better elucidate pathways by which literacy skills affect health outcomes. Promising interventions are available to improve diabetes outcomes for patients with low literacy, but more research is needed to determine their effectiveness outside of research settings. PMID:24947871

  17. Diabetes Literacy: Health and Adult Literacy Practitioners in Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes pedagogy in a series of "diabetes literacy" programs involving culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. The programs were jointly delivered in local community sites, including neighbourhood centres and public housing halls, by qualified nutritionists from a public health service and adult literacy teachers…

  18. Health Literacy: Can We Live without It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, Priscilla G.

    2010-01-01

    Health literacy is the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information well enough to make appropriate health decisions. An estimated 90 million people are affected by inadequate health literacy, and may misunderstand medical information, fail to adhere to treatments, be admitted to the hospital more frequently, and have a…

  19. Comparison of brief health literacy screens in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Kiechle, Eric S; Hnat, Andrew T; Norman, Kenneth E; Viera, Anthony J; DeWalt, Darren A; Brice, Jane H

    2015-01-01

    Measuring health literacy efficiently yet accurately is of interest both clinically and in research. The authors examined 6 brief health literacy measures and compared their categorization of patient health literacy levels and their comparative associations with patients' health status. The authors assessed 400 emergency department patients with the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults, the Newest Vital Sign, Single Item Literacy Screen, brief screening questions, Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine-Revised, and the Medical Term Recognition Test. The authors analyzed data using Spearman's correlation coefficients and ran separate logistic regressions for each instrument for patient self-reported health status. Tests differed in the proportion of patients' skills classified as adequate, but all instruments were significantly correlated; instruments targeting similar skills were more strongly correlated. Scoring poorly on any instrument was significantly associated with worse health status after adjusting for age, sex and race, with a score in the combined inadequate/marginal category on the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults carrying the largest risk (OR = 2.94, 95% CI [1.23, 7.05]). Future research will need to further elaborate instrument differences in predicting different outcomes. PMID:25807061

  20. Health Literacy and Injury Prevention Behaviors Among Caregivers of Infants

    PubMed Central

    Heerman, William J.; Perrin, Eliana M.; Yin, H. Shonna; Sanders, Lee M.; Eden, Svetlana K.; Shintani, Ayumi; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Bronaugh, Andrea B.; Barkin, Shari L.; Rothman, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Unintentional injury is a leading cause of infant mortality. Purpose To examine the role of caregiver health literacy in infant injury prevention behaviors. Methods A cross-sectional analysis of data collected in 2010–2012 from a randomized trial at four pediatric clinics was performed in 2012–2013. Caregiver health literacy was assessed with the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Caregiver-reported adherence to American Academy of Pediatrics-recommended injury prevention behaviors was assessed across seven domains: (1) car seat position; (2) car seat use; (3) sleeping safety; (4) fire safety; (5) hot water safety; (6) fall prevention; and (7) firearm safety. Results Data were analyzed from 844 English and Spanish-speaking caregivers of 2-month-old children. Many caregivers were non-adherent with injury prevention guidelines, regardless of health literacy. Notably, 42.6% inappropriately placed their children in the prone position to sleep, and 88.6% did not have their hot water heater set <120°F. Eleven percent of caregivers were categorized as having low health literacy. Low caregiver health literacy, compared to adequate health literacy, was significantly associated with increased odds of caregiver non-adherence with recommended behaviors for car seat position (AOR=3.4, 95% CI=1.6, 7.1), and fire safety (AOR=2.0, 95% CI=1.02, 4.1) recommendations. Caregivers with low health literacy were less likely to be non-adherent to fall prevention recommendations (AOR=0.5, 95% CI=0.2, 0.9). Conclusions Non-adherence to injury prevention guidelines was common. Low caregiver health literacy was significantly associated with some injury prevention behaviors. Future interventions should consider the role of health literacy in promoting injury prevention. PMID:24745634

  1. Health literacy lost in translations? Introducing the European Health Literacy Glossary.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Kristine; Brand, Helmut

    2014-12-01

    Health literacy has gained momentum in the Western world, yet in Europe the concept of health literacy is only marginally integrated in research, policy and practice. The present paper presents how translation may act as an influential factor with regard to integration of the health literacy notion in Europe. This study has compared five data sources that provide translations of health literacy: The European Union's Health Strategy; the translations applied in the European Health Literacy Project; national health expert opinions and Google Translate. The comparison integrated Peter Fawcett's translation techniques as a framework for analysis. The results showed a total of 28 translations: 22 from the European Union Health Strategy; 6 from the HLS-EU project; 17 from experts; 25 from Google Translate. Some countries are consistent in translations of health literacy, other countries diverge, the reasons being that health literacy is not yet mainstreamed and the translations are primarily driven by a latent polarized discourse of the concept of literacy. The study showed that translations in general reveals enriched insights in the cohesion of health literacy as one notion and provides the European Health Literacy Glossary that can inform health professionals, academia and decision-makers to further advance health literacy across Europe. PMID:23479322

  2. Limited health literacy in advanced kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Dominic M; Bradley, John A; Bradley, Clare; Draper, Heather; Johnson, Rachel; Metcalfe, Wendy; Oniscu, Gabriel; Robb, Matthew; Tomson, Charles; Watson, Chris; Ravanan, Rommel; Roderick, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Limited health literacy may reduce the ability of patients with advanced kidney disease to understand their disease and treatment and take part in shared decision making. In dialysis and transplant patients, limited health literacy has been associated with low socioeconomic status, comorbidity, and mortality. Here, we investigated the prevalence and associations of limited health literacy using data from the United Kingdom-wide Access to Transplantation and Transplant Outcome Measures (ATTOM) program. Incident dialysis, incident transplant, and transplant wait-listed patients ages 18 to 75 were recruited from 2011 to 2013 and data were collected from patient questionnaires and case notes. A score >2 in the Single-Item Literacy Screener was used to define limited health literacy. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify patient factors associated with limited health literacy. We studied 6842 patients, 2621 were incident dialysis, 1959 were wait-listed, and 2262 were incident transplant. Limited health literacy prevalence was 20%, 15%, and 12% in each group, respectively. Limited health literacy was independently associated with low socioeconomic status, poor English fluency, and comorbidity. However, transplant wait-listing, preemptive transplantation, and live-donor transplantation were associated with increasing health literacy. PMID:27521115

  3. Quick Guide to Health Literacy and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Quick Guide to Health Literacy and Older Adults skip to content ODPHP Health Communication Healthy People 2010 Health Communication Focus Area Health Literacy Improvement Consumer and Patient e-Health Resources Health ...

  4. Implications of Literacy Related to Comprehension of Environmental Health Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Martha Ann

    2010-01-01

    Health literacy involves basic reading and numeracy, which allow a person to function as a health care consumer, by reading, understanding, evaluating and using information in health documents. For thirty years, the gap between the reading level of most of the public, eighth grade, and the reading level of most written health information, above…

  5. Planning, Programing, and Administration of Functional Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhola, H. S.

    The document was prepared as part of a UNESCO contract to train 16 counterpart officials of UNESCO-sponsored literacy projects. Functional literacy was studied in three parts, all dealing with the total planning process. First was project planning. Literacy projects must consider national educational plans and be related to relevant economic…

  6. Accessibility: global gateway to health literacy.

    PubMed

    Perlow, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Health literacy, cited as essential to achieving Healthy People 2010's goals to "increase quality and years of healthy life" and to "eliminate health disparities," is defined by Healthy People as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions." Accessibility, by definition, the aforementioned "capacity to obtain," thus is health literacy's primary prerequisite. Accessibility's designation as the global gateway to health literacy is predicated also on life's realities: global aging and climate change, war and terrorism, and life-extending medical and technological advances. People with diverse access needs are health professionals' raison d'être. However, accessibility, consummately cross-cultural and universal, is virtually absent as a topic of health promotion and practice research and scholarly discussion of health literacy and equity. A call to action to place accessibility in its rightful premier position on the profession's agenda is issued. PMID:18955546

  7. Reclaiming "Old" Literacies in the New Literacy Information Age: The Functional Literacies of the Mediated Workstation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Ryan; Goggin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    For many writing faculty, electronic or digital literacies may not play an overtly significant role in their course designs and teaching practices, but these literacies still play a significant role in how students write. Whether or not writing teachers want to accept it, functional computer literacies are an important aspect of teaching writing.…

  8. Measurement of cancer health literacy and identification of patients with limited cancer health literacy.

    PubMed

    Dumenci, Levent; Matsuyama, Robin; Riddle, Daniel L; Cartwright, Laura A; Perera, Robert A; Chung, Harold; Siminoff, Laura A

    2014-01-01

    Health literacy is related to a broad range of health outcomes. This study was designed to develop a psychometrically sound instrument designed to measure cancer health literacy along a continuum (CHLT-30), to develop another instrument designed to determine whether a patient has limited cancer health literacy (CHLT-6), and to estimate the prevalence of limited cancer health literacy. The Cancer Health Literacy Study involving 1,306 Black and White cancer patients was conducted between April 2011 and April 2013 in the Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and surrounding oncology clinics. A continuous latent variable modeling framework was adopted to dimensionally represent cancer health literacy, whereas discrete latent variable modeling was used to estimate the prevalence rates of limited cancer health literacy. Self confidence about engaging in health decisions was used as the primary outcome in external validation of new instruments. Results from a comprehensive analysis strongly supported the construct validity and reliability of the CHLT-30 and CHLT-6. For both instruments, measurement invariance tests ruled out item/test bias to explain gender and race/ethnicity differences in test scores. The limited cancer health literacy rate was 18%, a subpopulation consisting of overrepresented Black, undereducated, and low-income cancer patients. Overall, the results supported the conclusion that the CHLT-30 accurately measures cancer health literacy along a continuum and that the CHLT-6 efficiently identifies patients with limited cancer health literacy with high accuracy. PMID:25315594

  9. Health Literacy Association With Health Behaviors and Health Care Utilization in Multiple Sclerosis: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Amber; Tyry, Tuula; Fox, Robert J; Cutter, Gary R

    2014-01-01

    Background Low health literacy is generally associated with poor health outcomes; however, health literacy has received little attention in multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the health literacy of persons with MS using the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry. Methods In 2012, we conducted a cross-sectional study of health literacy among NARCOMS participants. Respondents completed the Medical Term Recognition Test (METER) which assesses the ability to distinguish medical and nonmedical words, and the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) instrument which evaluates reading, interpretation, and numeracy skills. Respondents reported their sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviors, comorbidities, visits to the emergency room (ER), and hospitalizations in the last 6 months. We used logistic regression to evaluate the characteristics associated with functional literacy, and the association between functional literacy and health care utilization. Results Of 13,020 eligible participants, 8934 (68.6%) completed the questionnaire and were US residents. Most of them performed well on the instruments with 81.04% (7066/8719) having functional literacy on the METER and 74.62% (6666/8933) having adequate literacy on the NVS. Low literacy on the METER or the NVS was associated with smoking, being overweight or obese (all P<.001). After adjustment, low literacy on the METER was associated with ER visits (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.10-1.48) and hospitalizations (OR 1.19, 95% CI 0.98-1.44). Findings were similar for the NVS. Conclusions In the NARCOMS cohort, functional health literacy is high. However, lower levels of health literacy are associated with adverse health behaviors and greater health care utilization. PMID:24513479

  10. The Relationship between Health Literacy and Health Disparities: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mantwill, Sarah; Monestel-Umaña, Silvia; Schulz, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Health literacy is commonly associated with many of the antecedents of health disparities. Yet the precise nature of the relationship between health literacy and disparities remains unclear. A systematic review was conducted to better understand in how far the relationship between health literacy and health disparities has been systematically studied and which potential relationships and pathways have been identified. Methods Five databases, including PubMed/MEDLINE and CINAHL, were searched for peer-reviewed studies. Publications were included in the review when they (1) included a valid measure of health literacy, (2) explicitly conceived a health disparity as related to a social disparity, such as race/ethnicity or education and (3) when results were presented by comparing two or more groups afflicted by a social disparity investigating the effect of health literacy on health outcomes. Two reviewers evaluated each study for inclusion and abstracted relevant information. Findings were ordered according to the disparities identified and the role of health literacy in explaining them. Results 36 studies were included in the final synthesis. Most of the studies investigated racial/ethnic disparities, followed by some few studies that systematically investigated educational disparities. Some evidence was found on the mediating function of health literacy on self-rated health status across racial/ethnic and educational disparities, as well as on the potential effect of health literacy and numeracy on reducing racial/ethnic disparities in medication adherence and understanding of medication intake. Conclusion Overall the evidence on the relationship between health literacy and disparities is still mixed and fairly limited. Studies largely varied with regard to health(-related) outcomes under investigation and the health literacy assessments used. Further, many studies lacked a specific description of the nature of the disparity that was explored and a clear

  11. Health literacy and women's health-related behaviors in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shoou-Yih D; Tsai, Tzu-I; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Ken N

    2012-04-01

    Extant health literacy research is unclear about the contribution of health literacy to health behaviors and is limited regarding women's health issues. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the association between health literacy and five health behaviors (Pap smear screening, annual physical checkup, smoking, checking food expiration dates, and monitoring physical changes) in women and to test whether the association is mediated by health knowledge. A national sample of 1,754 female adults in Taiwan was included in the study. Result showed that health literacy was positively and independently related to checking food expiration dates and monitoring physical changes, and that health literacy was not related to physical checkup and Pap smear screening. Interestingly, women with high health literacy were more likely to be a current smoker. Study findings suggest that efforts to improve health promotion behaviors in women should consider health literacy as an important factor and that the effect of health literacy on health prevention behaviors may vary by women's access to care. PMID:21742948

  12. Health and Literacy: What Is the Connection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baergen-Fladager, Sharlene

    Studies in Canada have shown that between 16 percent and 38 percent of Canadians are illiterate or have low literacy skills and, therefore, have difficulties in accessing and using medical care and medical information. They have also found a contributory connection between low literacy and poor health and over-use or inappropriate use of health…

  13. Health, Communication and Literacy: An Annotated Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beveridge, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    This bibliography is an update of an earlier version published by The Centre for Literacy in the Fall of 1995. In this edition, the authors have added more than twenty entries on articles which have appeared since 1995. Interest in the topic of literacy and health has grown enormously as indicated by the large number of titles which show up in a…

  14. Health Literacy in Primary Care Practice.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Lauren; Salzman, Brooke; Snyderman, Danielle

    2015-07-15

    Health literacy includes a set of skills needed to make appropriate health decisions and successfully navigate the health care system. These skills include reading, writing, numeracy, communication, and, increasingly, the use of electronic technology. National data indicate that more than one-third of U.S. adults have limited health literacy, which contributes to poor health outcomes and affects patient safety, and health care access and quality. Although there are a number of tools that screen for limited health literacy, they are primarily used for research. Routinely screening patients for health literacy has not been shown to improve outcomes and is not recommended. Instead, multiple professional organizations recommend using universal health literacy precautions to provide understandable and accessible information to all patients, regardless of their literacy or education levels. This includes avoiding medical jargon, breaking down information or instructions into small concrete steps, limiting the focus of a visit to three key points or tasks, and assessing for comprehension. Additionally, printed information should be written at or below a fifth- to sixth-grade reading level. Visual aids, graphs, or pictures can enhance patient understanding, as can more concrete presentation of numerical information. PMID:26176370

  15. Health Literacy and Health Actions: A Review and a Framework from Health Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Wagner, Christian; Steptoe, Andrew; Wolf, Michael S.; Wardle, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The association between performance on health literacy measures and health outcomes is well established. The next step is to understand the processes through which health literacy affects health. This review introduces a framework drawing on ideas from health psychology and proposing that associations between health literacy and health outcomes…

  16. The Relationship between Functional Health Literacy and Obstructive Sleep Apnea and its Related Risk Factors and Comorbidities in a Population Cohort of Men

    PubMed Central

    Li, Joule J.; Appleton, Sarah L.; Wittert, Gary A.; Vakulin, Andrew; McEvoy, R. Douglas; Antic, Nick A.; Adams, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine the relationship between functional health literacy (FHL) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), its diagnosis, related risk factors, and comorbidities. Design: Population cohort study. Setting: Adelaide, South Australia, 2011-12. Participants: 1,021 Men Androgen Inflammation Lifestyle Environment and Stress Study participants aged ≥ 40 years, of whom 627 were identified with OSA by self-report (n = 184 previously diagnosed) or with in-home polysomnography in 837 randomly selected participants without self-reported OSA (n = 443 previously undiagnosed). Interventions: The Newest Vital Sign assessed FHL in 88% of participants. Full in-home unattended polysomnography (Embletta X100) was scored by 2007 AASM (alternative) criteria. Measurements and Results: FHL was adequate in 75.3% (n = 122) of previously diagnosed and 68.3% (n = 261) of previously undiagnosed OSA. Not having a previous diagnosis was independently associated with inadequate FHL (odds ratio [OR]:2.84, 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.25-6.45) and workforce participation (OR = 2.04, 95%CI = 1.01-4.00), and inversely associated with previous snoring (OR = 0.48, 95%CI = 0.29-0.81), obesity (OR = 0.35, 95%CI = 0.15-0.81), and cardiovascular disease (OR = 0.45, 95%CI = 0.24-0.85). In polysomnography participants, inadequate FHL was independently associated with previously undiagnosed OSA (OR = 2.43, 95%CI = 1.40-4.20). In undiagnosed men, less than adequate FHL was independently associated with sedentary lifestyle (OR = 2.42, 95%CI = 1.36-4.29), and depression (OR = 2.50, 95%CI = 1.23-5.09) and inadequate FHL was associated with current smoking (OR = 2.87, 95%CI = 1.21-6.84). The depression association was attenuated after additional adjustment for comorbidities and general health (OR = 2.04, 95%CI = 0.93-4.49, P = 0.076). In previously diagnosed OSA, less than adequate FHL was independently associated with cardiovascular disease (OR = 2.76, 95%CI = 1.09-7.01). Conclusions: Limited

  17. Assessing the Impact of Health Literacy on Education Retention of Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schnepel, Loretta; Smotherman, Carmen; Livingood, William; Dodani, Sunita; Antonios, Nader; Lukens-Bull, Katryne; Balls-Berry, Joyce; Johnson, Yvonne; Miller, Terri; Hodges, Wayne; Falk, Diane; Wood, David; Silliman, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Inadequate health literacy is a pervasive problem with major implications for reduced health status and health disparities. Despite the role of focused education in both primary and secondary prevention of stroke, the effect of health literacy on stroke education retention has not been reported. We examined the relationship of health literacy to the retention of knowledge after recommended stroke education. Methods This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted at an urban safety-net hospital. Study subjects were patients older than 18 admitted to the hospital stroke unit with a diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke who were able to provide informed consent to participate (N = 100). Health literacy levels were measured by using the short form of Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Patient education was provided to patients at an inpatient stroke unit by using standardized protocols, in compliance with Joint Commission specifications. The education outcomes for poststroke care education, knowledge retention, was assessed for each subject. The effect of health literacy on the Stroke Patient Education Retention scores was assessed by using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Of the 100 participating patients, 59% had inadequate to marginal health literacy. Stroke patients who had marginal health literacy (mean score, 7.45; standard deviation [SD], 1.9) or adequate health literacy (mean score, 7.31; SD, 1.76) had statistically higher education outcome scores than those identified as having inadequate health literacy (mean score, 5.58; SD, 2.06). Results from multivariate analysis indicated that adequate health literacy was most predictive of education outcome retention. Conclusions This study demonstrated a clear relationship between health literacy and stroke education outcomes. Studies are needed to better understand the relationship of health literacy to key educational outcomes for primary or secondary prevention of stroke and to

  18. Health Literacies: Pedagogies and Understandings of Bodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrench, Alison; Garrett, Robyne

    2014-01-01

    The development of health literacies, in relation to health, well-being, safety and physical activity, is a key pillar of the "Australian Curriculum: Health and Physical Education". Implications, therefore, arise for teachers of health and physical education (HPE) and their pedagogical practices. These practices of HPE inform ways of…

  19. Health literacy in Europe: comparative results of the European health literacy survey (HLS-EU)

    PubMed Central

    Pelikan, Jürgen M.; Röthlin, Florian; Ganahl, Kristin; Slonska, Zofia; Doyle, Gerardine; Fullam, James; Kondilis, Barbara; Agrafiotis, Demosthenes; Uiters, Ellen; Falcon, Maria; Mensing, Monika; Tchamov, Kancho; van den Broucke, Stephan; Brand, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health literacy concerns the capacities of people to meet the complex demands of health in modern society. In spite of the growing attention for the concept among European health policymakers, researchers and practitioners, information about the status of health literacy in Europe remains scarce. This article presents selected findings from the first European comparative survey on health literacy in populations. Methods: The European health literacy survey (HLS-EU) was conducted in eight countries: Austria, Bulgaria, Germany, Greece, Ireland, the Netherlands, Poland and Spain (n = 1000 per country, n = 8000 total sample). Data collection was based on Eurobarometer standards and the implementation of the HLS-EU-Q (questionnaire) in computer-assisted or paper-assisted personal interviews. Results: The HLS-EU-Q constructed four levels of health literacy: insufficient, problematic, sufficient and excellent. At least 1 in 10 (12%) respondents showed insufficient health literacy and almost 1 in 2 (47%) had limited (insufficient or problematic) health literacy. However, the distribution of levels differed substantially across countries (29–62%). Subgroups within the population, defined by financial deprivation, low social status, low education or old age, had higher proportions of people with limited health literacy, suggesting the presence of a social gradient which was also confirmed by raw bivariate correlations and a multivariate linear regression model. Discussion: Limited health literacy represents an important challenge for health policies and practices across Europe, but to a different degree for different countries. The social gradient in health literacy must be taken into account when developing public health strategies to improve health equity in Europe. PMID:25843827

  20. Improving Health Outcomes for Low Health Literacy Heart Failure Patients.

    PubMed

    Friel, Catherine J

    2016-09-01

    According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (2003), only 12% of U.S. adults have a proficient level of health literacy, with adults 65 years and older more likely to have a below basic or a basic health literacy level. An estimated 5.8 million individuals in the United States have heart failure (HF) and it is one of the most common reasons for those aged 65 and over to be hospitalized. Many patients with HF are at risk for poor health outcomes due to low health literacy. This article reviews the literature with regard to the effectiveness of methods used to address low health literacy among HF patients and describes a pilot study implemented by a home care agency in the northeast to address high HF readmission rates. PMID:27580282

  1. The Health Literacy and ESL study: a community-based intervention for Spanish-speaking adults.

    PubMed

    Soto Mas, Francisco; Ji, Ming; Fuentes, Brenda O; Tinajero, Josefina

    2015-04-01

    Although Hispanics have a documented high risk of limited health literacy, there is a scarcity of research with this population group, and particularly with Hispanic immigrants who generally confront language barriers that have been related to low health literacy. The National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy identified community-based English-language instruction as a strategy that can facilitate a health literate society. However, the literature lacks discussion on this type of intervention. This randomized control trial aimed to test the feasibility of using conventional English-as-a-second-language (ESL) instruction for improving health literacy among Spanish-speaking adults. Objectives included the development, implementation, and evaluation of a health literacy/ESL curriculum. The Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) in English was used to assess health literacy levels. Analyses included independent sample t test, chi-square, and multiple linear regression. A total of 155 people participated. Results showed a significantly higher increase in the TOFHLA posttest score in the intervention group (p = .01), and noticeable differences in health literacy levels between groups. Results indicate that ESL constitutes a promising venue for improving health literacy among Spanish-speaking adults. Incorporating health literacy-related content may provide additional benefits. PMID:25602615

  2. The Health Literacy and ESL Study: A Community-Based Intervention for Spanish-Speaking Adults

    PubMed Central

    MAS, FRANCISCO SOTO; JI, MING; FUENTES, BRENDA O.; TINAJERO, JOSEFINA

    2015-01-01

    Although Hispanics have a documented high risk of limited health literacy, there is a scarcity of research with this population group, and particularly with Hispanic immigrants who generally confront language barriers that have been related to low health literacy. The National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy identified community-based English-language instruction as a strategy that can facilitate a health literate society. However, the literature lacks discussion on this type of intervention. This randomized control trial aimed to test the feasibility of using conventional English-as-a-second-language (ESL) instruction for improving health literacy among Spanish-speaking adults. Objectives included the development, implementation, and evaluation of a health literacy/ESL curriculum. The Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) in English was used to assess health literacy levels. Analyses included independent sample t test, chi-square, and multiple linear regression. A total of 155 people participated. Results showed a significantly higher increase in the TOFHLA posttest score in the intervention group (p = .01), and noticeable differences in health literacy levels between groups. Results indicate that ESL constitutes a promising venue for improving health literacy among Spanish-speaking adults. Incorporating health literacy-related content may provide additional benefits. PMID:25602615

  3. Health Literacy: An Educationally Sensitive Patient Outcome.

    PubMed

    Yin, H Shonna; Jay, Melanie; Maness, Leslie; Zabar, Sondra; Kalet, Adina

    2015-09-01

    We have previously proposed that by identifying a set of Educationally Sensitive Patient Outcomes (ESPOs), medical education outcomes research becomes more feasible and likely to provide meaningful guidance for medical education policy and practice. ESPOs are proximal outcomes that are sensitive to provider education, measurable, and linked to more distal health outcomes. Our previous model included Patient Activation and Clinical Microsystem Activation as ESPOs. In this paper, we discuss how Health Literacy, defined as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions," is another important ESPO. Between one-third and one-half of all US adults have limited health literacy skills. Providers can be trained to adopt a "universal precautions approach" to addressing patient health literacy, through the acquisition of specific skills (e.g., teachback, "chunking" information, use of plain language written materials) and by learning how to take action to improve the "health literacy environment." While there are several ways to measure health literacy, identifying which measurement tools are most sensitive to provider education is important, but challenging and complex. Further research is needed to test this model and identify additional ESPOs. PMID:26173523

  4. Health Literacy Skills in Rural and Urban Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahnd, Whitney E.; Scaife, Steven L.; Francis, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether health literacy is lower in rural populations. Method: We analyzed health, prose, document, and quantitative literacy from the National Assessment of Adult Literacy study. Metropolitan Statistical Area designated participants as rural or urban. Results: Rural populations had lower literacy levels for all literacy…

  5. Correlates of Health Literacy in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Dan; Clark, Dan; Tu, Wanzhu; Wu, Jingwei; Weiner, Michael; Steinley, Douglas; Murray, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Many older adults have inadequate health-related literacy, which is associated with poor health outcomes. Thus, it is important to identify determinants of health literacy. We investigated relationships between health literacy and general cognitive and sensory abilities, as well as education, health, and demographic variables, in a…

  6. Functional literacy of Young Guyanese Adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Zellyne

    2000-05-01

    Functional literacy is interpreted as the ability of the individual to apply skills in reading, writing, calculation and basic problem-solving in those activities in which literacy is required for effective functioning in his/her own group and community. The paper describes the rationale, development and administration of the test used for measuring levels (high, moderate, low) of achievement in functional literacy in three domains (document, prose and quantitative). An assumption of the study was that a high level of functional literacy was required for the individual to function effectively in his/her own group and community. The context of the study is Guyana the most underdeveloped and impoverished country in the English-speaking Caribbean. The subjects are out of school youth in Guyana aged 14-25. Amongst the main findings are: only approximately 11% of the young people show a high level of functional literacy; females tend to have a higher level of functional literacy than males: and most of those at the low level never went beyond primary and low status secondary schools and usually end up unemployed or in semi- or unskilled jobs. Attention is drawn to the difficulty of attracting funding for literacy programmes from international aid agencies, given the inflated adult literacy rate which is reported for Guyana in international statistics. While they credit Guyana with an adult literacy rate of 97.5%, the study suggests that a more realistic figure is in the 70s. The importance of adult and continuing education is underscored in view of the need to help those who are out of school to meet the ever-changing demands of society for improved skills in literacy and numeracy.

  7. Farmers' Functional Literacy Project (Bhimili Study).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, D. S.

    1979-01-01

    As part of a farmers' functional literacy project, the Department of Adult and Continuing Education, Andhra University, Waltair (India), investigated a sampling of participant characteristics and their relation to progress in improving literacy skills and learning such aspects of agriculture as animal husbandry, poultry, dairying, and so on. (MF)

  8. Development and Validation of the Assessment of Health Literacy in Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hae-Ra; Huh, Boyun; Kim, Miyong T.; Kim, Jiyun; Nguyen, Tam

    2016-01-01

    For many people limited health literacy is a major barrier to effective preventive health behavior such as cancer screening, yet a comprehensive health literacy measure that is specific to breast and cervical cancer screening is not readily available. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and testing of a new instrument to measure health literacy in the context of breast and cervical cancer screening, the Assessment of Health Literacy in Cancer Screening (AHL-C). The AHL-C is based on Baker’s conceptualization of health literacy and modeled from the two most popular health literacy tests, the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine and the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. The AHL-C consists of four subscales; print literacy, numeracy, comprehension, and familiarity. We used baseline data from 560 Korean American immigrant women who participated in a community-based randomized trial designed to test the effect of a health literacy-focused intervention to promote breast and cervical cancer screening. Rigorous psychometric testing supports that the AHL-C is reliable, valid, and significantly correlated with theoretically selected variables. Future research is needed to test the utility of the AHL-C in predicting cancer screening outcomes. PMID:25315598

  9. Using Health Literacy in School to Overcome Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flecha, Ainhoa; Garcia, Rocio; Rudd, Rima

    2011-01-01

    Health literacy has firmly established the links between literacy skills and health outcomes and is subsequently considered a key strategy for improving the health of disadvantaged populations and addressing social inequality. However, current research findings for improving health literacy have primarily focused on adults and actions within…

  10. Amplifying the Health Literacy of Migrant Farmworkers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Paul J.; Donahue, Veronica

    A study was undertaken to identify and describe some of the obstacles, especially sociolinguistic, that stand between Hispanic communities in rural Nelson County, Virginia and appropriate health care, so the barriers can be minimized through provision of culturally sensitive outreach services and health-literacy programming. The target population…

  11. Health Care Industry. Workforce & Workplace Literacy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCEL Brief, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This brief gives an overview of the topic of workplace literacy in the health care industry and lists program contacts. The following 35 organizations operate basic skills upgrading programs for health care workers: American Hospital Association; Chinese American Civic Association; Massachusetts Department of Employment and Training; BostonWorks;…

  12. Health Literacy for Individuals with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medlen, Joan Guthrie

    2009-01-01

    For those with disabilities, issues of health are often treated in a reactionary way. This article encourages health literacy, education, and awareness targeted towards those with disabilities in helping them take ownership of their plan for staying healthy, with a focus on weight management. Weight management challenges for people with…

  13. Health Communication and Literacy: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beveridge, Jennifer

    This annotated bibliography lists publications and World Wide Web sites dealing with health communication and literacy. The 51 publications, which were all published between 1982 and 1998, contain information about and/or for use in the following areas: assessment, assessment tools, elderly adults, empowerment, maternal and child health, patient…

  14. Relationship Between Parental and Adolescent eHealth Literacy and Online Health Information Seeking in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fong-Ching; Chiu, Chiung-Hui; Chen, Ping-Hung; Miao, Nae-Fang; Lee, Ching-Mei; Chiang, Jeng-Tung; Pan, Ying-Chun

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between parental and adolescent eHealth literacy and its impact on online health information seeking. Data were obtained from 1,869 junior high school students and 1,365 parents in Taiwan in 2013. Multivariate analysis results showed that higher levels of parental Internet skill and eHealth literacy were associated with an increase in parental online health information seeking. Parental eHealth literacy, parental active use Internet mediation, adolescent Internet literacy, and health information literacy were all related to adolescent eHealth literacy. Similarly, adolescent Internet/health information literacy, eHealth literacy, and parental active use Internet mediation, and parental online health information seeking were associated with an increase in adolescent online health information seeking. The incorporation of eHealth literacy courses into parenting programs and school education curricula is crucial to promote the eHealth literacy of parents and adolescents. PMID:26375050

  15. Does Numeracy Correlate with Measures of Health Literacy in the Emergency Department?

    PubMed Central

    Griffey, Richard T.; Melson, Andrew T.; Lin, Margaret J.; Carpenter, Christopher R.; Goodman, Melody S.; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To quantify the correlation between general numeracy and health literacy in an emergency department (ED) setting. Methods This was a prospective cross-sectional convenience sample study of adult patients in an urban, academic ED with 97,000 annual visits. General numeracy was evaluated using four validated questions; and health literacy using three commonly used validated screening tools (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults [S-TOFHLA], Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine-Revised [REALM-R], and the Newest Vital Sign [NVS]). Scores were dichotomized for health literacy tests to limited (low or marginal) vs. adequate health literacy, and the proportion of patients answering all numeracy questions correctly were calculated with the mean proportion of correct responses in these groups. The correlation between numeracy scores and scores on the health literacy screening tools was evaluated using Spearman's correlation. Results Four hundred forty-six patients were enrolled. Performance on questions evaluating general numeracy was universally poor. Only 18 patients (4%) answered all numeracy questions correctly, 88 patients (20%) answered zero questions correctly, and overall the median number of correct answers was one (IQR 1 to 2). Among patients with limited health literacy by any of the three screening tools used, the mean number of correct numeracy answers was approximately half that of patients with adequate health literacy. However, even among those with adequate health literacy, the average number of correct answers to numeracy questions ranged from 1.6 to 2.4 depending on the screening test used. When dichotomized into those who answered ≤50% vs. >50% of numeracy questions correctly, there was a significant difference between those with limited health literacy and those who scored ≤50% on numeracy. Health literacy screening results were correlated with general numeracy in the low to moderate range: S-TOFHLA rs = 0.428 (p < 0

  16. The Association between Cognitive Ability across the Lifespan and Health Literacy in Old Age: The Lothian Birth Cohort 1936

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Catherine; Johnson, Wendy; Wolf, Michael S.; Deary, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    Three hundred and four participants in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 study took a validated IQ-type test at age 11 years and a battery of cognitive tests at age 70 years. Three tests of health literacy were completed at age 72 years; the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults…

  17. Teaching Medical Students about Health Literacy: 2 Chicago Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, William; Cook, Sandy; Makoul, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To develop medical students' skills in interacting with individuals who have limited health literacy. Methods: Described are 2 novel approaches to health literacy curriculum design. Efforts at both schools have been implemented to improve medical student awareness of health literacy, as well as specific skills in clear communication and…

  18. Health Literacy among Adults: A Study from Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdemir, H.; Alper, Z.; Uncu, Y.; Bilgel, N.

    2010-01-01

    Patients' health literacy is increasingly recognized as a critical factor affecting health communication and outcomes. We performed this study to assess the levels of health literacy by using Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) and Newest Vital Sign (NVS) instruments. Patients (n = 456) at a family medicine clinic completed…

  19. Immigration, Generational Status and Health Literacy in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Edward; Omariba, D. Walter R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Immigrants, a fast-growing population in Canada, score below the national average in health literacy, but the reasons behind the low scores are largely unknown. Also, there is a need to understand the long-term impact of immigration by examining health literacy by generational status. Objective: To examine health literacy differentials…

  20. Detecting limited health literacy in Brazil: development of a multidimensional screening tool.

    PubMed

    Apolinario, Daniel; Mansur, Leticia Lessa; Carthery-Goulart, Maria Teresa; Brucki, Sonia Maria Dozzi; Nitrini, Ricardo

    2014-03-01

    Screening questions have been proposed as practical tools for detecting limited functional health literacy, but have achieved only moderate accuracy in previous studies. We hypothesized that a combination of screening questions and demographic characteristics could better predict a patient's functional health literacy. Three hundred and twenty-two hospital users from São Paulo, Brazil, were interviewed for demographic information and answered questions about literacy habits and perceived difficulties. The Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults was used to classify individuals as having adequate or limited functional health literacy. Of the 322 participants, 102 (31.7%) presented limited functional health literacy. The final logistic model included six predictors. The three demographic variables were educational attainment, mother's educational attainment and major lifetime occupation (manual or non-manual). The three questions concerned 'frequency of use of computers', 'difficulty with writing that have precluded the individual from getting a better job' and 'difficulty reading the subtitles while watching a foreign movie'. A simple score was derived to constitute a practical tool we named the Multidimensional Screener of Functional Health Literacy (MSFHL). The sensitivity of the MSFHL in detecting limited functional health literacy was 81.4% and the specificity was 87.7%, with an area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.93 (95% CI 0.89-0.95). The MSFHL was better than educational attainment in accurately classifying functional health literacy status (p = 0.0018). We have developed a screening tool based on three demographic characteristics and three simple questions which provides an accurate prediction of a patient's functional health literacy level. PMID:24179154

  1. Mental health literacy in secondary schools: a Canadian approach.

    PubMed

    Kutcher, Stan; Bagnell, Alexa; Wei, Yifeng

    2015-04-01

    "Mental health literacy is an integral component of health literacy and has been gaining increasing attention as an important focus globally for mental health interventions. In Canada, youth mental health is increasingly recognized as a key national health concern and has received more focused attention than ever before within our health system. This article outlines 2 unique homegrown initiatives to address youth mental health literacy within Canadian secondary schools." PMID:25773321

  2. Health Literacy Innovations in California Community College Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenia, Joanne Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Limited health literacy is a national public health problem contributing to adverse health outcomes and increasing healthcare costs. Both health and educational systems are intervention points for improvement; however, there is paucity in empirical research regarding the role of educational systems. This needs assessment study explored health…

  3. Critical Health Literacy Health Promotion and People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Health literacy research and scholarship has largely overlooked the experiences of people with intellectual disabilities (ID), though growing concern about the health inequalities they face has increasingly given rise to health promotion interventions for this group. However, these interventions reference a rather limited vision of health literacy…

  4. Health Literacy: Critical Opportunities for Social Work Leadership in Health Care and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liechty, Janet M.

    2011-01-01

    One-third of U. S. adults do not have adequate health literacy to manage their health care needs; and low health literacy is a major concern due to its association with poor health outcomes, high health care costs, and health communication problems. Low health literacy is a potential driver of health disparities, and its alleviation is central to…

  5. Cognitive decline impairs financial and health literacy among community-based older persons without dementia

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Patricia A.; Yu, Lei; Wilson, Robert S.; Segawa, Eisuke; Buchman, Aron S.; Bennett, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Literacy is an important determinant of health and well-being across the lifespan but is critical in aging, when many influential health and financial decisions are made. Prior studies suggest that older persons exhibit lower literacy than younger persons, particularly in the domains of financial and health literacy, but the reasons why remain unknown. The objectives of this study were to: a) examine pathways linking diverse resources (i.e., education, word knowledge, cognitive function, and decision making style) to health and financial literacy among older persons and determine the extent to which the relation of age with literacy represents a direct effect versus an indirect effect due to decrements in specific cognitive functions (i.e., executive functions and episodic memory), and b) test the hypothesis that declines in executive function and episodic memory are associated with lower literacy among older persons without dementia. 645 community-based older persons without dementia underwent detailed assessments of diverse resources, including education, word knowledge, cognitive function (i.e., executive function, episodic memory) and decision making style (i.e., risk aversion), and completed a measure of literacy that included items similar to those assessed in the Health and Retirement Study, such as numeracy, financial concepts such as compound inflation and knowledge of stocks and bonds, and important health concepts such as understanding of drug risk and Medicare Part D. Path analysis revealed a strong effect of age on literacy, with about half of the effect of age on literacy due to decrements in executive functions and episodic memory. In addition, executive function had an indirect effect on literacy via decision making style (i.e., risk aversion), and education and word knowledge had independent effects on literacy. Finally, among (n=447) persons with repeated cognitive assessments available for up to 14 years, regression analysis supported the

  6. Health Literacy Public Health Forums: Partners for Action. A "How-To" Guide on Designing and Implementing Health Literacy Forums at Departments of Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Rima E.; Zobel, Emily K.

    2004-01-01

    This guide provides suggestions and materials for the development and implementation of a Health Literacy Forum to be coordinated by a local, county, or state Department of Public Health. Health Literacy Forums, already implemented in several cities and states, have increased awareness about literacy skills of U.S. adults and health implications.…

  7. Development and Validation of the Comprehensive Health Activities Scale: A New Approach to Health Literacy Measurement

    PubMed Central

    CURTIS, LAURA M.; REVELLE, WILLIAM; AND, KATHERINE WAITE; WILSON, ELIZABETH A. H.; CONDON, DAVID M.; BOJARSKI, ELIZABETH; PARK, DENISE C.; AND, DAVID W. BAKER; WOLF, MICHAEL S.

    2014-01-01

    Current health literacy measures have been criticized for solely measuring reading and numeracy skills when a broader set of skills is necessary for making informed health decisions, especially when information is often conveyed verbally and through multimedia video. We devised nine health tasks and a corresponding 190 item assessment to more comprehensively measure health literacy skills. A sample of 826 participants age 55-74 recruited from an academic General Internal Medicine practice and three Federally Qualified Health Centers in Chicago, Illinois completed the assessment. Items were reduced using hierarchical factor analysis and item response theory resulting in the 45-item Comprehensive Health Activities Scale (CHAS). All 45 items loaded on one general latent trait and the resulting scale demonstrated high reliability and strong construct validity using measures of health literacy and global cognitive functioning. The predictive validity of the CHAS using self-reported general, physical, and mental health status was comparable to or better than widely used measures of health literacy, depending on the outcome. Despite comprehensively measuring health literacy skills, items in the CHAS supported one primary construct. With similar psychometric properties, current measures may be adequate, depending on the purpose of the assessment. PMID:25375025

  8. Gender Differences in Health Literacy Among Korean Adults: Do Women Have a Higher Level of Health Literacy Than Men?

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Yun; Lee, Jiwoo; Kim, Nam Keol

    2015-09-01

    The role of gender in determining the level of health literacy in Korean adults is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the level of health literacy in Korean adults and identify factors associated with health literacy by gender. This study employed a cross-sectional survey design with a convenient sample of 585 community-dwelling Korean adults age19 years and older. Health literacy was measured by using eight items selected from Chew et al.'s 16-question self-reported health literacy measure. In accordance with Andersen's health behavior model, predisposing, enabling, and need factors were included in the multiple regression model. Women indicated a higher level of health literacy than men in understanding medical forms, directions on medication bottles, and written information offered by health care providers. Additionally, for Korean women, a higher level of health literacy was associated with attaining a higher education level and having a consistent place to receive care. Unmarried men and men who had higher self-rated health reported a higher level of health literacy compared with their counterparts. Lower level of depression and higher monthly income were significantly linked to a higher level of health literacy in both men and women. This study has established the importance of gender differences in health literacy and suggests gender-specific intervention may be warranted to reduce the existing gap in health literacy in both Korean men and women. Future research should replicate this study to confirm whether or not our finding is an international phenomenon. PMID:25122719

  9. Advancing health literacy measurement: a pathway to better health and health system performance.

    PubMed

    Pleasant, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    The concept of health literacy initially emerged and continues to gain strength as an approach to improving health status and the performance of health systems. Numerous studies clearly link low levels of education, literacy, and health literacy with poor health, poor health care utilization, increased barriers to care, and early death. However, theoretical understandings and methods of measuring the complex social construct of health literacy have experienced a continual evolution that remains incomplete. As a result, the seemingly most-cited definition of health literacy proposed in the now-decade-old Institute of Medicine report on health literacy is long overdue for updating. Such an effort should engage a broad and diverse set of health literacy researchers, practitioners, and members of the public in creating a definition that can earn broad consensus through validation testing in a rigorous scientific approach. That effort also could produce the basis for a new universally applicable measure of health literacy. Funders, health systems, and policymakers should reconsider their timid approach to health literacy. Although the field and corresponding evidence base are not perfect, health literacy-especially when combined with a focus on prevention and integrative health-is one of the most promising approaches to advancing public health. PMID:25491583

  10. Picture Stories for ESL Health Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Kate

    These picture stories help English as a Second Language teachers address topics affecting their students' health and wellbeing. They are useful for beginner and low-literacy students, offering a safe, impromptu way to discuss difficult topics, ask questions, and obtain information. As the stories are about cartoon characters, students are not…

  11. Building mental health literacy: opportunities and resources for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Bagnell, Alexa L; Santor, Darcy A

    2012-01-01

    Youth mental health is increasingly recognized as a key concern with significant impact on youth and society. School is the one setting where professionals are consistently available to monitor how children are functioning and learning and intervene and support. School psychiatry has expanded beyond individual mental health problems to school-wide and community issues including school violence, sexual harassment, bullying, substance abuse, discrimination, and discipline. This article describes the importance of mental health literacy in health outcomes and research in school-based mental health programs to better position the clinician to advocate at the individual and/or system level. PMID:22137807

  12. Abilities, skills and knowledge in measures of health literacy

    PubMed Central

    Ownby, Raymond L.; Acevedo, Amarilis; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Jacobs, Robin J.; Caballero, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Objective Health literacy has been recognized as an important factor in patients' health status and outcomes, but the relative contribution of demographic variables, cognitive abilities, academic skills, and health knowledge to performance on tests of health literacy has not been as extensively explored. The purpose of this paper is to propose a model of health literacy as a composite of cognitive abilities, academic skills, and health knowledge (ASK model) and test its relation to measures of health literacy in a model that first takes demographic variables into account. Methods A battery of cognitive, academic achievement, health knowledge and health literacy measures was administered to 359 Spanish- and English-speaking community-dwelling volunteers. The relations of health literacy tests to the model were evaluated using regression models. Results Each health literacy test was related to elements of the model but variability existed across measures. Conclusion Analyses partially support the ASK model defining health literacy as a composite of abilities, skills, and knowledge, although the relations of commonly used health literacy measures to each element of the model varied widely. Practice implications Results suggest that clinicians and researchers should be aware of the abilities and skills assessed by health literacy measures when choosing a measure. PMID:24637163

  13. Considering children and health literacy: a theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Borzekowski, Dina L G

    2009-11-01

    The theoretical approaches of Paulo Freire, Jean Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky frame the consideration of children and health literacy. This article includes a general discussion of literacy from the Freirian perspective. A definition of health literacy is then presented; first, the established meaning is introduced, but then a Freirian extension is proposed. Next, the theories of cognitive development by Piaget and Vygotsky are discussed, and examples related to children's health literacy are given. Finally, there is a discussion of why it is important to encourage and enable health literacy among children and adolescents. PMID:19861482

  14. Health Literacy: Impact on the Health of HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzyniak, Andrew J.; Ownby, Raymond L.; McCoy, Katryna; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna

    2014-01-01

    Health literacy is known to affect vulnerable communities such as persons living with HIV/AIDS. The purpose of this review was to provide a current summary of research on the impact of health literacy on the health of persons living with HIV/AIDS and to address future areas of need. Contemporary studies focused on expanding the reach of health literacy in HIV/AIDS to retention in HIV care, use of technology for assessing and intervening to improve health literacy, and health literacy across the globe, for example. A number of studies did not find health literacy to explain health behaviors whereas other studies supported such a relationship. Future issues relevant to health literacy in HIV/AIDS include the aging of the HIV population and associated comorbidities, studies to understand the role of health literacy in specific populations affected by HIV/AIDS, and the continued need to refine the definition and measurement of health literacy. PMID:24222474

  15. The Many Health Literacies: Advancing Research or Fragmentation?

    PubMed

    Mackert, Michael; Champlin, Sara; Su, Zhaohui; Guadagno, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Health literacy is the degree to which individuals can obtain, process, understand, and communicate about health-related information needed to make informed health decisions and is an important factor in patient health outcomes and resulting health care costs. Because of its importance across many areas of health, specific attention has been given to studying and measuring health literacy in recent years; however, the field lacks consensus on how health literacy should be defined and measured. As a result, numerous definitions and measures of health literacy exist. This fragmentation and inconsistency creates a barrier to conceptualizing, measuring, and understanding health literacy across health domains and fields. A directed literature search reveals a substantial body of work on health literacy; however, findings from studies often emphasize health literacy within specific health domains, populations, contexts, and languages, which makes the comparison of findings across studies difficult. While there is recognition that the measurement of health literacy should be improved, it is important to take into consideration what can be gained from a general health literacy focus and how this could be applied across domains. PMID:26372026

  16. Health Literacy and Social Capital: What Role for Adult Literacy Partnerships and Pedagogy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Stephen; Balatti, Jo; Falk, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This paper makes the case for adult literacy (including numeracy) practitioners to play a greater role in health literacy initiatives in Australia. The paper draws on data from a national research project that investigated adult literacy partnerships and pedagogy viewed from a social capital perspective. The primary purpose of the project was to…

  17. Association of Parental Health Literacy with Oral Health of Navajo Nation Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brega, A. G.; Thomas, J. F.; Henderson, W. G.; Batliner, T. S.; Quissell, D. O.; Braun, P. A.; Wilson, A.; Bryant, L. L.; Nadeau, K. J.; Albino, J.

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy is "the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions". Although numerous studies show a link between health literacy and clinical outcomes, little research has examined the association of health literacy with oral health. No large-scale…

  18. Defining and measuring health literacy: how can we profit from other literacy domains?

    PubMed

    Frisch, Anne-Linda; Camerini, Luca; Diviani, Nicola; Schulz, Peter J

    2012-03-01

    When the antecedents of health-promoting behavior are explored, the concept of health literacy is deemed a factor of major influence. Originally defined as reading, writing and numeracy skills in the health domain, health literacy is now considered a multidimensional concept. The ongoing discussion on health literacy reveals that no agreement exists about which dimensions to include in the concept. To contribute to the development of a consistent and parsimonious concept of health literacy, we conducted a critical review of concepts in other literacy domains. Our review was guided by two research questions: (i) Which dimensions are included in the concepts of other literacy domains? (ii) How can health literacy research profit from other literacy domains? Based on articles collected from PubMed, PsycINFO, Communication & Mass Media Complete, CINAHL, SAGE Full-Text Collection, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar as well as selected monographs and editions, we identified seven distinct dimensions. Some of the dimensions recur across all reviewed literacy domains and first attempts have been made to operationalize the dimensions. Expanding upon these dimensions, the paper discusses how they can prove useful for elaborating a consistent and parsimonious concept of health literacy and foster the development of a more holistic measure. PMID:21724626

  19. Advancing Health Literacy Measurement: A Pathway to Better Health and Health System Performance

    PubMed Central

    Pleasant, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The concept of health literacy initially emerged and continues to gain strength as an approach to improving health status and the performance of health systems. Numerous studies clearly link low levels of education, literacy, and health literacy with poor health, poor health care utilization, increased barriers to care, and early death. However, theoretical understandings and methods of measuring the complex social construct of health literacy have experienced a continual evolution that remains incomplete. As a result, the seemingly most-cited definition of health literacy proposed in the now-decade-old Institute of Medicine report on health literacy is long overdue for updating. Such an effort should engage a broad and diverse set of health literacy researchers, practitioners, and members of the public in creating a definition that can earn broad consensus through validation testing in a rigorous scientific approach. That effort also could produce the basis for a new universally applicable measure of health literacy. Funders, health systems, and policymakers should reconsider their timid approach to health literacy. Although the field and corresponding evidence base are not perfect, health literacy—especially when combined with a focus on prevention and integrative health—is one of the most promising approaches to advancing public health. PMID:25491583

  20. Understanding health literacy for strategic health marketing: eHealth literacy, health disparities, and the digital divide.

    PubMed

    Bodie, Graham D; Dutta, Mohan Jyoti

    2008-01-01

    Even despite policy efforts aimed at reducing health-related disparities, evidence mounts that population-level gaps in literacy and healthcare quality are increasing. This widening of disparities in American culture is likely to worsen over the coming years due, in part, to our increasing reliance on Internet-based technologies to disseminate health information and services. The purpose of the current article is to incorporate health literacy into an Integrative Model of eHealth Use. We argue for this theoretical understanding of eHealth literacy and propose that macro-level disparities in social structures are connected to health disparities through the micro-level conduits of eHealth literacy, motivation, and ability. In other words, structural inequities reinforce themselves and continue to contribute to healthcare disparities through the differential distribution of technologies that simultaneously enhance and impede literacy, motivation, and ability of different groups (and individuals) in the population. We conclude the article by suggesting pragmatic implications of our analysis. PMID:18935884

  1. Health Literacy: A Pathway to Better Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Henrietta L.; Dodd, Virginia J.; Muller, Keith E.; Marks, John G.; Riley, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether health literacy was associated with self-rated oral health status and whether the relationship was mediated by patient–dentist communication and dental care patterns. Methods. We tested a path model with data collected from 2 waves of telephone surveys (baseline, 2009–2010; follow-up, 2011) of individuals residing in 36 rural census tracts in northern Florida (final sample size n = 1799). Results. Higher levels of health literacy were associated with better self-rated oral health status (B = 0.091; P < .001). In addition, higher levels of health literacy were associated with better patient–dentist communication, which in turn corresponded with patterns of regular dental care and better self-rated oral health (B = 0.003; P = .01). Conclusions. Our study showed that, beyond the often-reported effects of gender, race, education, financial status, and access to dental care, it is also important to consider the influence of health literacy and quality of patient–dentist communication on oral health status. Improved patient–dentist communication is needed as an initial step in improving the population’s oral health. PMID:24832423

  2. Health Literacy and Education as Mediators of Racial Disparities in Patient Activation Within an Elderly Patient Cohort.

    PubMed

    Eneanya, Nwamaka D; Winter, Michael; Cabral, Howard; Waite, Katherine; Henault, Lori; Bickmore, Timothy; Hanchate, Amresh; Wolf, Michael; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    The Patient Activation Measure (PAM) assesses facets of patient engagement to identify proactive health behaviors and is an important predictor of health outcomes. Health literacy and education are also important for patient participation and successful navigation of the health care system. Because health literacy, education, and patient activation are associated with racial disparities, we sought to investigate whether health literacy and education would mediate racial differences in patient activation. Participants were 265 older adults who participated in a computer-based exercise interventional study. Health literacy was assessed using the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA). Of 210 eligible participants, 72% self-identified as Black and 28% as White. In adjusted analyses, education and health literacy each significantly reduced racial differences in patient activation. These findings are especially important when considering emerging data on the significance of patient activation and new strategies to increase patient engagement. PMID:27524777

  3. Transitions: A Mental Health Literacy Program for Postsecondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potvin-Boucher, Jacqueline; Szumilas, Magdalena; Sheikh, Tabinda; Kutcher, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of mental health literacy is a mental health promotion strategy that may be effective at destigmatizing mental illness and increasing self-seeking behavior. Transitions is a mental health literacy program intended to heighten students' awareness and discussion of mental health problems and promote help-seeking behaviors. Transitions…

  4. Developing Effective Educational Materials Using Best Practices in Health Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niebaum, Kelly; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie; Bellows, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Health literacy is emerging as a leading issue affecting U.S. consumers' health. It has been shown to be a stronger predictor of a person's health than age, income, employment status, education level, or race. To best meet the health literacy needs of consumers, Extension educators can use best practice guidelines for improved health…

  5. Functional Literacy and Continuing Education by Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paiva e Souza, Alfredina de

    1970-01-01

    As a result of a pilot project (in Rio de Janeiro) of functional literacy for adolescents and adults by television, 90 percent of the students in experimental tele-classes" became literate with 36 broadcasts of 20 minutes each, distributed over three months three times each week, supported by 50 minutes of discussion and other activities carried…

  6. Making Evaluation "Operational" in Functional Literacy Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhola, H. S.

    Steps to be taken to "operationalize" evaluation, i.e., to make evaluation work, are discussed and applied to the Unesco program of functional literacy. Evaluation is seen as an important social concern, as well as a field of study and an area of competence. Four types of evaluation applied to the Unesco program are context evaluation, input…

  7. Farmers' Functional Literacy Program in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauhan, Malikhan S.

    The Farmers' Functional Literacy Program has been conducted in conjunction with an intensive agricultural development program in the villages of India since 1968. A recent innovation of significance to developing countries, the program incorporates the concept of linking education to development. This joint venture of three governmental ministries…

  8. Health literacy and 30-day hospital readmission after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Stacy Cooper; Fang, Gang; Annis, Izabela E; O'Conor, Rachel; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the validity of a predictive model of health literacy, and to examine the relationship between derived health literacy estimates and 30-day hospital readmissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting and participants A National Institute of Aging (NIA) study cohort of 696 adult, English-speaking primary care patients, aged 55–74 years, was used to assess the validity of derived health literacy estimates. Claims from 7733 Medicare beneficiaries hospitalised for AMI in 2008 in North Carolina and Illinois were used to investigate the association between health literacy estimates and 30-day hospital readmissions. Measures The NIA cohort was administered 3 common health literacy assessments (Newest Vital Sign, Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults, and Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine). Health literacy estimates at the census block group level were derived via a predictive model. 30-day readmissions were measured from Medicare claims data using a validated algorithm. Results Fair agreement was found between derived estimates and in-person literacy assessments (Pearson Correlation coefficients: 0.38–0.51; κ scores: 0.38–0.40). Medicare enrollees with above basic literacy according to derived health literacy estimates had an 18% lower risk of a 30-day readmission (RR=0.82, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.92) and 21% lower incidence rate of 30-day readmission (IRR=0.79, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.87) than patients with basic or below basic literacy. After adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics, the risk of 30-day readmission was 12% lower (p=0.03), and the incidence rate 16% lower (p<0.01) for patients with above basic literacy. Conclusions Health literacy, as measured by a predictive model, was found to be a significant, independent predictor of 30-day readmissions. As a modifiable risk factor with evidence-based solutions, health literacy should be considered in readmission reduction

  9. Discussing the Effects of Poor Health Literacy on Patients Facing HIV: A Narrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scholars describe poor health literacy as a "silent epidemic," which is challenging the functioning of healthcare systems all over the world. Health literacy is mainly meant as an individual trait which concerns the ability to obtain, process, and understand basic health information in order to effectively navigate the health system. Low health literate patients perceive poor self-efficacy dealing with their health conditions, are not willing to be involved in the provision of care, show larger risks of hospitalization and mortality, and are not aware about the determinants of well-being. Hence, limited health literacy has been associated with inadequate management of long-term conditions; nonetheless, several authors argue that health literacy has been an overlooked factor dealing with HIV. Methods: This study is aimed at discussing the effects of poor health literacy on people living with HIV, drawing from the findings of a narrative literature review which involved 41 papers retrieved from the databases "Scopus-Elsevier" and "PubMed." Results: The scientific literature is not consistent dealing with the relationship between health literacy and HIV treatment. For example, health literate patients seem to better understand their health conditions; on the other hand, people living with poor health literacy are likely to report higher compliance with providers’ prescriptions, blindly trusting healthcare professionals. Conclusions: Poor health literacy is a social barrier to access healthcare services and to appropriate health treatment among patients living with HIV. Tailored interventions should be aimed at enhancing the health skills of patients affected by HIV infection to improve their ability to navigate the health system. PMID:26188806

  10. Understanding cultural and linguistic barriers to health literacy.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Kate; Krause, Elizabeth M S

    2010-01-01

    Nurses today are providing care, education, and case management to an increasingly diverse patient population that is challenged with a triad of cultural, linguistic, and health literacy barriers. For these patients, culture and language set the context for the acquisition and application of health literacy skills. Yet the nursing literature offers minimal help in integrating cultural and linguistic considerations into nursing efforts to address patient health literacy. Nurses are in an ideal position to facilitate the interconnections between patient culture, language, and health literacy in order to improve health outcomes for culturally diverse patients. In this article the authors begin by describing key terms that serve as background for the ensuing discussion explaining how culture and language need to be considered in any interaction designed to address health literacy for culturally diverse patients. The authors then discuss the interrelationships between health literacy, culture, and language. Next relevant cultural constructs are introduced as additional background. This is followed by a description of how literacy skills are affected by culture and language, a note about culturally diverse, native-born patients, and a presentation of case examples illustrating how culture and language barriers are seen in patients' healthcare experiences. The authors conclude by offering recommendations for promoting health literacy in the presence of cultural and language barriers and noting the need for nursing interventions that fully integrate health literacy, culture, and language. PMID:21053716

  11. Health Literacy Measure for Adolescents (HELMA): Development and Psychometric Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Shahla; Ramezankhani, Ali; Montazeri, Ali; Mehrabi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    18 and can be used to evaluate different levels of functional, interactive, and critical health literacy in adolescents. PMID:26881933

  12. ESL Participation as a Mechanism for Advancing Health Literacy in Immigrant Communities

    PubMed Central

    SANTOS, MARICEL G.; HANDLEY, MARGARET A.; OMARK, KARIN; SCHILLINGER, DEAN

    2014-01-01

    A reliance on the conceptualization of health literacy as functional skill has limited our views of the adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) context as a site for health literacy interventions. To explore the contributions of alternative views of literacy as social practice to health literacy research, we examined teacher survey data and learner outcomes data collected as part of a multi-year collaboration involving The California Diabetes Program (CDP), university researchers, and adult ESL teachers. The survey results (n=144 teachers) indicated that ESL teachers frequently model effective pedagogical practices that mediate social interaction around health content, the basis for acquiring new literacy skills and practices. In the classroom pilot, (n=116 learners), the majority of learners reported they had learned about diabetes risk factors and prevention strategies, which affirmed existing healthy behaviors or prompted revision of unhealthy ones. About two-thirds of the learners reported sharing preventive health content with members of out-of-school social networks. This study represents a first-step in research efforts to account more fully for the mechanisms by which social interaction and social support facilitate health literacy outcomes in ESL contexts, which should complement what we already know about the development of health literacy as functional skill. PMID:25315586

  13. ESL participation as a mechanism for advancing health literacy in immigrant communities.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maricel G; Handley, Margaret A; Omark, Karin; Schillinger, Dean

    2014-01-01

    A reliance on the conceptualization of health literacy as functional skill has limited researchers' views of the adult English-as-a-second-language (ESL) context as a site for health literacy interventions. To explore the contributions of alternative views of literacy as social practice to health literacy research, the authors examined teacher survey data and learner outcomes data collected as part of a multiyear collaboration involving the California Diabetes Program, university researchers, and adult ESL teachers. The survey results (n=144 teachers) indicated that ESL teachers frequently model effective pedagogical practices that mediate social interaction around health content, the basis for acquiring new literacy skills and practices. In the classroom pilot (n=116 learners), the majority of learners reported they had learned about diabetes risk factors and prevention strategies, which affirmed existing healthy behaviors or prompted revision of unhealthy ones. About two thirds of the learners reported sharing preventive health content with members of out-of-school social networks. This study represents a first step in research efforts to account more fully for the mechanisms by which social interaction and social support facilitate health literacy outcomes in ESL contexts, which should complement what is already known about the development of health literacy as functional skill. PMID:25315586

  14. Listenability as a tool for advancing health literacy.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Donald L

    2012-01-01

    Health literacy research and practice has focused mainly on the readability of written documents. Yet oral communication plays at least as important a role in the interpersonal ecology in which people make real decisions about their health. Moreover, the single-minded quest for short sentences and simple vocabulary inherent in the readability paradigm can subvert the effort to engage in patient- or consumer-centered communication. Listenability is the quality of discourse that eases the cognitive burden that aural processing imposes. Listenability is a function of oral-based language plus "considerate" rhetorical structures. The Listenability Style Guide presented in this article offers evidence-based recommendations for producing listenable discourse. A study testing the applicability of the Listenability Style Guide to postsurgical discharge instructions was conducted. College students either heard or read discharge instructions composed in either high or moderate listenability. Comprehension was higher for this population in reading than in listening. Across modalities, the high listenability version was easiest to comprehend. Incorporating listenability concerns in research and practice is consistent with emerging, broad conceptions of health literacy and with the dictates of the National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy. PMID:23030569

  15. [Health literacy: what can doctors contribute? The doctor's practice as an educational institution].

    PubMed

    Zeyer, Albert

    2015-02-01

    In medicine, there is growing awareness about the crucial role health literacy can play in the health system. Generally, the focus lies on functional health literacy, which is closely linked to the common understanding of literacy as being able to read and write. Useful rules of communication are available for fostering patients' literacy. However, critical literacy is a much more demanding concept. Here the hermeneutics of biomedical knowledge plays is important, and so far rather neglected. The physician--and in particular the general practitioner--has an important part in this process, as a guide and a teacher. For this, it is necessary to have educational professionalism that goes beyond applying communication rules. It is important to know that the process of teaching and learning is not transmissive but constructive. Educational reconstruction is a useful instrument for taking this into account. PMID:25658412

  16. Health Literacy and Medication Understanding among Hospitalized Adults

    PubMed Central

    Marvanova, Marketa; Roumie, Christianne L.; Eden, Svetlana K.; Cawthon, Courtney; Schnipper J., Jeffrey L.; Kripalani, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients’ ability to accurately report their pre-admission medications is a vital aspect of medication reconciliation and may affect subsequent medication adherence and safety. Little is known about predictors of pre-admission medication understanding. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of patients at 2 hospitals using a novel Medication Understanding Questionnaire (MUQ). MUQ scores range from 0 to 3 and test knowledge of the medication purpose, dose, and frequency. We used multivariable ordinal regression to determine predictors of higher MUQ scores. Results Among the 790 eligible patients, the median age was 61 (interquartile range [IQR] 52, 71), 21% had marginal or inadequate health literacy, and the median number of medications was 8 (IQR 5, 11). Median MUQ score was 2.5 (IQR 2.2, 2.8). Patients with marginal or inadequate health literacy had a lower odds of understanding their medications (odds ratio [OR]=0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34 to 0.84; p=0.0001; and OR=0.49; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.78; p=0.0001; respectively), compared to patients with adequate health literacy. Higher number of prescription medications was associated with lower MUQ scores (OR=0.52; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.75; for those using 6 medications vs 1; p=0.0019), as was impaired cognitive function (OR=0.57; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.86; p=0.001). Conclusions Lower health literacy, lower cognitive function, and higher number of medications each were independently associated with less understanding of the pre-admission medication regimen. Clinicians should be aware of these factors when considering the accuracy of patient-reported medication regimens and counseling patients about safe and effective medication use. PMID:22042745

  17. A taxonomy characterizing complexity of consumer eHealth Literacy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Connie V; Matthews, Lisa A; Kaufman, David R

    2009-01-01

    There are a range of barriers precluding patients from fully engaging in and benefiting from the spectrum of eHealth interventions developed to support patient access to health information, disease self-management efforts, and patient-provider communication. Consumers with low eHealth literacy skills often stand to gain the greatest benefit from the use of eHealth tools. eHealth skills are comprised of reading/writing/numeracy skills, health literacy, computer literacy, information literacy, media literacy, and scientific literacy [1]. We aim to develop an approach to characterize dimensions of complexity and to reveal knowledge and skill-related barriers to eHealth engagement. We use Bloom's Taxonomy to guide development of an eHealth literacy taxonomy that categorizes and describes each type of literacy by complexity level. Illustrative examples demonstrate the utility of the taxonomy in characterizing dimensions of complexity of eHealth skills used and associated with each step in completing an eHealth task. PMID:20351828

  18. Determinants of health literacy and health behavior regarding infectious respiratory diseases: a pathway model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health literacy has been defined as the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand the basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions. Currently, few studies have validated the causal pathways of determinants of health literacy through the use of statistical modeling. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate a health literacy model at an individual level that could best explain the determinants of health literacy and the associations between health literacy and health behaviors even health status. Methods Skill-based health literacy test and a self-administrated questionnaire survey were conducted among 3222 Chinese adult residents. Path analysis was applied to validate the model. Results The model explained 38.6% of variance for health literacy, 11.7% for health behavior and 2.3% for health status: (GFI = 0.9990; RMR = 0.0521; χ2 = 10.2151, P = 0.1159). Education has positive and direct effect on prior knowledge (β = 0.324) and health literacy (β = 0.346). Health literacy is also affected by prior knowledge (β = 0.245) and age (β = -0.361). Health literacy is a direct influencing factor of health behavior (β = 0.101). The most important factor of health status is age (β = 0.107). Health behavior and health status have a positive interaction effect. Conclusion This model explains the determinants of health literacy and the associations between health literacy and health behaviors well. It could be applied to develop intervention strategies to increase individual health literacy, and then to promote health behavior and health status. PMID:23521806

  19. Development of an Easy-to-Use Spanish Health Literacy Test

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shoou-Yih D; Bender, Deborah E; Ruiz, Rafael E; Cho, Young Ik

    2006-01-01

    Objective The study was intended to develop and validate a health literacy test, termed the Short Assessment of Health Literacy for Spanish-speaking Adults (SAHLSA), for the Spanish-speaking population. Study Design The design of SAHLSA was based on the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), known as the most easily administered tool for assessing health literacy in English. In addition to the word recognition test in REALM, SAHLSA incorporates a comprehension test using multiple-choice questions designed by an expert panel. Data Collection Validation of SAHLSA involved testing and comparing the tool with other health literacy instruments in a sample of 201 Spanish-speaking and 202 English-speaking subjects recruited from the Ambulatory Care Center at UNC Health Care. Principal Findings With only the word recognition test, REALM could not differentiate the level of health literacy in Spanish. The SAHLSA significantly improved the differentiation. Item response theory analysis was performed to calibrate the SAHLSA and reduce the instrument to 50 items. The resulting instrument, SAHLSA-50, was correlated with the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults, another health literacy instrument, at r = 0.65. The SAHLSA-50 score was significantly and positively associated with the physical health status of Spanish-speaking subjects (p < .05), holding constant age and years of education. The instrument displayed good internal reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.92) and test–retest reliability (Pearson's r = 0.86). Conclusions The new instrument, SAHLSA-50, has good reliability and validity. It could be used in the clinical or community setting to screen for low health literacy among Spanish speakers. PMID:16899014

  20. Health literacy: applying current concepts to improve health services and reduce health inequalities.

    PubMed

    Batterham, R W; Hawkins, M; Collins, P A; Buchbinder, R; Osborne, R H

    2016-03-01

    The concept of 'health literacy' refers to the personal and relational factors that affect a person's ability to acquire, understand and use information about health and health services. For many years, efforts in the development of the concept of health literacy exceeded the development of measurement tools and interventions. Furthermore, the discourse about and development of health literacy in public health and in clinical settings were often substantially different. This paper provides an update about recently developed approaches to measurement that assess health literacy strengths and limitations of individuals and of groups across multiple aspects of health literacy. This advancement in measurement now allows diagnostic and problem-solving approaches to developing responses to identified strengths and limitations. In this paper, we consider how such an approach can be applied across the diverse range of settings in which health literacy has been applied. In particular, we consider some approaches to applying health literacy in the daily practice of health-service providers in many settings, and how new insights and tools--including approaches based on an understanding of diversity of health literacy needs in a target community--can contribute to improvements in practice. Finally, we present a model that attempts to integrate the concept of health literacy with concepts that are often considered to overlap with it. With careful consideration of the distinctions between prevailing concepts, health literacy can be used to complement many fields from individual patient care to community-level development, and from improving compliance to empowering individuals and communities. PMID:26872738

  1. Assessing health literacy in safety net primary care practices.

    PubMed

    McCune, Renée L; Lee, Hyunhwa; Pohl, Joanne M

    2016-02-01

    Health literacy is now recognized as a crucial element of patient safety. Measuring health literacy in busy primary care practices can be challenging. This article presents findings from a study in which a relatively recent tool, the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) was used in seven safety net primary care practices, five of which were nurse managed health centers. The NVS is a promising tool that could be used extensively in most primary care practices. Providers and staff felt the use of the NVS would be beneficial in identifying low health literacy patients. This study supported previous research on low health literacy as well as the predictors of health literacy. The study also confirmed the NVS as a tool that is efficient to administer while maintaining work flow. PMID:26856512

  2. Promoting Health Literacy in the Nonsurgical Cosmetic Patient.

    PubMed

    Warren, Hermine

    2016-01-01

    Significant numbers of adults, when presented with basic health care information, have been shown to struggle with their abilities to comprehend and integrate materials presented to them. This lack of perception underscores the essence of health literacy. Even though health literacy is a newer concept, its impact is gathering momentum, as politicians, health care providers, researchers, and the media become more aware of the extent this disparity is seen within the health care system and how it affects patient care. This article explores how nursing philosophy and knowledge development have the capacity to provide a solid infrastructure that may promote increased health literacy among patients within the nonsurgical cosmetic arena. PMID:27254238

  3. The Position as Regards Functional Literacy Pilot Projects. Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    A comparative analysis was made of Experimental World Literacy Program projects in 17 nations (Algeria, Brazil, Chile, Equador, Ethiopia, Guinea, India, Iran, Mali, Jamaica, Madagascar, Nigeria, Sudan, Syria, Tanzania, Tunisia, and Venezuela) after 18 months of operation. Included were functional literacy projects in 10 nations, literacy programs…

  4. Health Literacy Predicts Cardiac Knowledge Gains in Cardiac Rehabilitation Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Colleen C.; Rawson, Katherine; Hughes, Joel W.; Waechter, Donna; Rosneck, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Health literacy is increasingly recognised as a potentially important patient characteristic related to patient education efforts. We evaluated whether health literacy would predict gains in knowledge after completion of patient education in cardiac rehabilitation. Method: This was a re-post observational analysis study design based on…

  5. Assessing Health Literacy in Diverse Primary Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Renee L.

    2010-01-01

    Patient health literacy skills are critical to effective healthcare communication and safe care delivery in primary care settings. Methods and strategies to identify patient health literacy (HL) capabilities and provider/staff knowledge, attitudes and beliefs (KAB) regarding HL must be known before addressing provider/staff communication skills.…

  6. Health Literacy and Happiness: A Community-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angner, Erik; Miller, Michael J.; Ray, Midge N.; Saag, Kenneth G.; Allison, Jeroan J.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between health literacy and happiness was explored using a cross-sectional survey of community-dwelling older primary-care patients. Health literacy status was estimated with the following previously validated question: "How confident are you in filling out medical forms by yourself?" Happiness was measured using an adapted…

  7. Family Health and Financial Literacy--Forging the Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Bonnie; Kim, Jinhee; Anderson, Elaine A.

    2009-01-01

    Families are at-risk of or experiencing a diminished quality of living and life in current economic times and difficult decisions are required. Health and financial literacy are the basis for wise personal and public decision making. Family and consumer sciences (FCS) professionals can forge connections between health and financial literacy to…

  8. Health literacy, alcohol expectancies, and alcohol use behaviors in teens

    PubMed Central

    Chisolm, Deena J.; Manganello, Jennifer A.; Kelleher, Kelly J.; Marshal, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Alcohol expectancies are developed, in part, through exposure to health messages, the understanding of which may be influenced by health literacy. This study explores the relationships among health literacy, alcohol expectancies, and alcohol use behaviors in teens. Methods We studied alcohol use behaviors in the past six months in youths aged 14–19 recruited from two adolescent medicine clinics. We assessed covariate-adjusted bivariate relationships between HL, expectancies, and four measures of alcohol use and tested health literacy as a moderator of the relationship between expectancies and use. Results Of the 293 study teens, 45 percent reported use of alcohol in the past six months. Use behaviors were positively associated with higher health literacy and positive expectancies. Our moderation model suggested that health literacy moderates the relationship between expectancies and use, with the expectancy/use relationship being significantly stronger in higher literacy teens. Conclusion Findings suggest that health literacy can influence alcohol expectancies and behaviors. Practice implications: Health literacy should be explicitly considered in the design of alcohol prevention messages. PMID:25085549

  9. Health Literacy and the Millennium Development Goals in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evawoma-Enuku, Usiwoma; Oyitso, Mabel; Enuku, Christie Akpoigho

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the authors examined health related challenges facing Nigeria. They argued that the relationship between literacy and health in today's knowledge-based economy further puts pressure on countries like Nigeria to raise its literacy rates if it is to compete in the global market. This line of thought is based on the fact that in…

  10. Health Literacy and Cancer Screening: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Oldach, Benjamin R.; Katz, Mira L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate published evidence about health literacy and cancer screening. Methods Seven databases were searched for English language articles measuring health literacy and cancer screening published in 1990-2011. Articles meeting inclusion criteria were independently reviewed by two investigators using a standardized data abstraction form. Abstracts (n=932) were reviewed and full text retrieved for 83 articles. Ten articles with 14 comparisons of health literacy and cancer screening according to recommended medical guidelines were included in the analysis. Results Most articles measured health literacy using the S-TOFHLA instrument and documented cancer screening by self-report. There is a trend for an association of inadequate health literacy and lower cancer screening rates, however, the evidence is mixed and limited by study design and measurement issues. Conclusion A patient's health literacy may be a contributing factor to being within recommended cancer screening guidelines. Practice Implications Future research should: be conducted using validated health literacy instruments; describe the population included in the study; document cancer screening test completion according to recommended guidelines; verify the completion of cancer screening tests by medical record review; adjust for confounding factors; and report effect size of the association of health literacy and cancer screening. PMID:24207115

  11. The influence of maternal health literacy and child's age on participation in social welfare programs.

    PubMed

    Pati, Susmita; Siewert, Elizabeth; Wong, Angie T; Bhatt, Suraj K; Calixte, Rose E; Cnaan, Avital

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the influence of maternal health literacy and child's age on participation in social welfare programs benefiting children. In a longitudinal prospective cohort study of 560 Medicaid-eligible mother-infant dyads recruited in Philadelphia, maternal health literacy was assessed using the test of functional health literacy in adults (short version). Participation in social welfare programs [Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), child care subsidy, and public housing] was self-reported at child's birth, and at the 6, 12, 18, 24 month follow-up interviews. Generalized estimating equations quantified the strength of maternal health literacy as an estimator of program participation. The mothers were primarily African-Americans (83%), single (87%), with multiple children (62%). Nearly 24% of the mothers had inadequate or marginal health literacy. Children whose mothers had inadequate health literacy were less likely to receive child care subsidy (adjusted OR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.34-0.85) than children whose mothers had adequate health literacy. Health literacy was not a significant predictor for TANF, SNAP, WIC or housing assistance. The predicted probability for participation in all programs decreased from birth to 24 months. Most notably, predicted WIC participation declined rapidly after age one. During the first 24 months, mothers with inadequate health literacy could benefit from simplified or facilitated child care subsidy application processes. Targeted outreach and enrollment efforts conducted by social welfare programs need to take into account the changing needs of families as children age. PMID:23990157

  12. Health literacy among schoolteachers in Çorum, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yilmazel, G; Cetinkaya, F

    2015-08-01

    Teachers' health literacy is an important part of school health promotion programmes. This study in 2013 assessed health literacy and related factors in schoolteachers in Çorum, Turkey. In a cross-sectional study, 500 primary and secondary teachers answered a questionnaire about self-reported health behaviours and completed the 6-item Newest Vital Sign tool. The mean score on the health literacy scale was 2.12 (SD 1.82). Overall, 44.0% of the teachers had very limited, 29.8% limited and 26.2% adequate health literacy. Adequate health literacy levels were significantly higher among those without chronic disease, non-smokers, non-alcohol users and those interested in healthy lifestyle topics in the media. In binary logistic regression analysis, the risk of limited health literacy was significantly greater in the older age groups, in men and in those whose partner was an educator or a housewife. In view of the low health literacy levels, we suggest that teacher candidates could benefit from health education programmes after graduation. PMID:26446532

  13. An Overview of Self-Administered Health Literacy Instruments

    PubMed Central

    O′Neill, Braden; Gonçalves, Daniela; Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio; Ziebland, Sue; Valderas, Jose

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing recognition of health literacy as a worldwide research priority, the development and refinement of indices to measure the construct is an important area of inquiry. Furthermore, the proliferation of online resources and research means that there is a growing need for self-administered instruments. We undertook a systematic overview to identify all published self-administered health literacy assessment indices to report their content and considerations associated with their administration. A primary aim of this study was to assist those seeking to employ a self-reported health literacy index to select one that has been developed and validated for an appropriate context, as well as with desired administration characteristics. Systematic searches were carried out in four electronic databases, and studies were included if they reported the development and/or validation of a novel health literacy assessment measure. Data were systematically extracted on key characteristics of the instruments: breadth of construct (“generic” vs. “content- or context- specific” health literacy), whether it was an original instrument or a derivative, country of origin, administration characteristics, age of target population (adult vs. pediatric), and evidence for validity. 35 articles met the inclusion criteria. There were 27 original instruments (27/35; 77.1%) and 8 derivative instruments (8/35; 22.9%). 22 indices measured “general” health literacy (22/35; 62.9%) while the remainder measured condition- or context- specific health literacy (13/35; 37.1%). Most health literacy measures were developed in the United States (22/35; 62.9%), and about half had adequate face, content, and construct validity (16/35; 45.7%). Given the number of measures available for many specific conditions and contexts, and that several have acceptable validity, our findings suggest that the research agenda should shift towards the investigation and elaboration of health literacy

  14. Health literacy and beliefs among a community cohort with and without chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Andrew M; Jordan, Joanne E; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Burnett, Angus F; O'Sullivan, Peter B; Chua, Jason Y Y; Osborne, Richard H; Straker, Leon M

    2010-08-01

    Health literacy, the ability to seek, understand and utilise health information, is important for good health. Suboptimal health literacy has been associated with poorer health outcomes in many chronic conditions although this has not been studied in chronic low back pain (CLBP). We examined the health literacy of individuals with CLBP using a mixed methods approach. One-hundred and seventeen adults, comprising 61 with no history of CLBP and 56 with CLBP (28 with low and high disability, respectively, as determined by a median split in Oswestry scores) participated. Data regarding severity of pain, LBP-related disability, fear avoidance, beliefs about LBP and pain catastrophizing were collected using questionnaires. Health literacy was measured using the Short-form Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA). A sub-sample of 36 participants with CLBP also participated in in-depth interviews to qualitatively explore their beliefs about LBP and experiences in seeking, understanding and using information related to LBP. LBP-related beliefs and behaviours, rather than pain intensity and health literacy skills, were found to be important correlates of disability related to LBP. Individuals with CLBP-high disability had poorer back pain beliefs and increased fear avoidance behaviours relating to physical activity. Health literacy (S-TOFHLA) was not related to LBP beliefs and attitudes. Qualitatively, individuals with CLBP-high disability adopted a more passive coping style and had a pathoanatomic view of their disorder compared to individuals with CLBP-low disability. While all participants with CLBP had adequate health literacy scores (S-TOFHLA), qualitative data highlighted difficulties in seeking, understanding and utilising LBP information. PMID:20603025

  15. Requesting help to understand medical information among people living with HIV and poor health literacy.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth; Pellowski, Jennifer; Chen, Yiyun

    2013-06-01

    Health literacy is known to influence medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS. People who experience difficulty reading health information may benefit from asking others to assist them with reading, interpreting, and understanding medical information. We examined medical chart-abstracted HIV viral load, medication adherence assessed by unannounced pill counts, and adherence improvement strategies among 245 individuals with lower-health literacy who do not request assistance, and 229 who do request assistance with reading and understanding health information. Participants were people living with HIV who were taking antiretroviral therapy and scored below 90% correct on a standardized test of functional health literacy. After controlling for health literacy scores, requesting informational assistance was associated with strategies used to improve adherence; individuals who asked for assistance were significantly more likely to use multiple adherence strategies. However, despite requesting informational assistance and using more adherence strategies, participants who requested informational assistance evidenced poorer treatment adherence and poorer suppression of HIV replication. Requesting assistance was more common among those with the poorest health literacy and therefore greatest challenges to adherence. People living with HIV who have poor health literacy skills may benefit from medication adherence programs and requests for assistance afford opportunities for social interventions. PMID:23701199

  16. Complementary and alternative therapies and health literacy in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dişsiz, Gülçin; Yilmaz, Medine

    2016-05-01

    The aim was to determine health literacy and the use of complementary and alternative therapies (CATs) in patients with cancer and to investigate the relationship between CAT usage and health literacy. The study cohort consisted of 250 oncology patients. The Patient Interview Form and the Adult Literacy in Medicine Scale were used for collecting data. The use of at least one CAT was reported by 24% of the patients surveyed. Herbal therapies (32.6%) constituted the most popular method, and the most popular herbal therapy was Nigella sativa (54.6%). A total of 29.8% of the patients using CATs reported using herbal therapies for an enhanced immune system. Illiterate patients and those who live in rural areas/towns displayed low levels of health literacy. Healthcare professionals should investigate patients' use of complementary and alternative approaches, and health literacy should be improved so that patients can be informed regarding the possible benefits and disadvantages of CATs. PMID:27157956

  17. Assessing Health Literacy in Deaf American Sign Language Users.

    PubMed

    McKee, Michael M; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Winters, Paul C; Fiscella, Kevin; Zazove, Philip; Sen, Ananda; Pearson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Communication and language barriers isolate Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users from mass media, health care messages, and health care communication, which, when coupled with social marginalization, places them at a high risk for inadequate health literacy. Our objectives were to translate, adapt, and develop an accessible health literacy instrument in ASL and to assess the prevalence and correlates of inadequate health literacy among Deaf ASL users and hearing English speakers using a cross-sectional design. A total of 405 participants (166 Deaf and 239 hearing) were enrolled in the study. The Newest Vital Sign was adapted, translated, and developed into an ASL version (ASL-NVS). We found that 48% of Deaf participants had inadequate health literacy, and Deaf individuals were 6.9 times more likely than hearing participants to have inadequate health literacy. The new ASL-NVS, available on a self-administered computer platform, demonstrated good correlation with reading literacy. The prevalence of Deaf ASL users with inadequate health literacy is substantial, warranting further interventions and research. PMID:26513036

  18. The Effect of Individual Factors on Health Behaviors Among College Students: The Mediating Effects of eHealth Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, ChiaHsun

    2014-01-01

    Background College students’ health behavior is a topic that deserves attention. Individual factors and eHealth literacy may affect an individual’s health behaviors. The integrative model of eHealth use (IMeHU) provides a parsimonious account of the connections among the digital divide, health care disparities, and the unequal distribution and use of communication technologies. However, few studies have explored the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors, and IMeHU has not been empirically investigated. Objective This study examines the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors using IMeHU. Methods The Health Behavior Scale is a 12-item instrument developed to measure college students’ eating, exercise, and sleep behaviors. The eHealth Literacy Scale is a 12-item instrument designed to measure college students’ functional, interactive, and critical eHealth literacy. A nationally representative sample of 525 valid college students in Taiwan was surveyed. A questionnaire was administered to collect background information about participants’ health status, degree of health concern, major, and the frequency with which they engaged in health-related discussions. This study used Amos 6.0 to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to identify the best measurement models for the eHealth Literacy Scale and the Health Behavior Scale. We then conducted a multiple regression analysis to examine the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors. Additionally, causal steps approach was used to explore indirect (mediating) effects and Sobel tests were used to test the significance of the mediating effects. Results The study found that perceptions of better health status (t520=2.14-6.12, P<.001-.03) and greater concern for health (t520=2.58-6.95, P<.001-.003) influenced college students’ development of 3 dimensions of eHealth literacy and adoption of healthy eating

  19. Relationship between Health Literacy, Health-Related Behaviors and Health Status: A Survey of Elderly Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Bing; Liu, Liu; Li, Yan-Fei; Chen, Yan-Li

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the large volume of research dedicated to health-related behavior change, chronic disease costs continue to rise, thus creating a major public health burden. Health literacy, the ability to seek, understand, and utilize health information, has been identified as an important factor in the course of chronic conditions. Little research has been conducted on the relationship between health literacy and health-related behaviors and health status in elderly Chinese. The aim of this study was to elucidate the relationship between health literacy and health-related behaviors and health status in China. Methods: The subjects enrolled in this study were selected based on a stratified cluster random sampling design. Information involving >4500 older adults in 44 pension institutions in Urumqi, Changji, Karamay, and Shihezi of Xinjiang between September 2011 and June 2012 was collected. The Chinese Citizen Health Literacy Questionnaire (China Health Education Centre, 2008) and a Scale of the General Status were administered and the information was obtained through face-to-face inquiries by investigators. A total of 1452 respondents met the inclusion criteria. A total of 1452 questionnaires were issued and the valid response rate was 96.14% (1396 of 1452). Factors affecting health literacy and the relationship to health literacy were identified by one-way ANOVA and a multiple linear regression model. Results: The average health literacy level of the elderly in nursing homes was relatively low (71.74 ± 28.35 points). There were significant differences in the health literacy score among the factors of age, gender, race, education level, household income, marital conditions, and former occupation (p < 0.001). The health literacy score was significantly associated with smoking, drinking, physical exercise, and health examination (p < 0.001). The elderly with higher health literacy scores were significantly less likely to have risky behaviors (smoking, regular

  20. Health Literacy and the Role of the Speech-Language Pathologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Eva Jackson; Stevens-Ratchford, Regena

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews concepts of health literacy and discusses the role of speech-language pathologists in improving the health literacy of individuals with and without communication disorders. Method: A literature review was completed of health literacy definitions, concepts, and health literacy assessment and intervention studies with…

  1. Associations between Self-medication, Health Literacy, and Self-perceived Health Status: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Aziz; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Shafaeei, Yousef; Mohebi, Siamak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although the frequency of self-medication has been well-documented in the public health literature, but no study has examined the relationship between health literacy and self-medication yet. This study was aimed to investigating the relationship between health literacy and self-medication in a community-based study. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 924 adults to survey association between health literacy and self-medication among peoples in Ardabil city in 2014 who were selected using a multi-stage random sampling method. Health literacy was measured by the test of functional health literacy in adults and general health status was measured by the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, and self-reported self-medication (overall, sedative, antibiotic and herbal) in last 3 months was assessed. All statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS version 18 and a P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The mean age and weight of respondents were 37 years and 74.7 kg, respectively. The prevalence of self-medication was 61.6%, and the percentage of self-administering antibiotics, sedative, and herbal medicines were 40%, 54.4%, and 59.1% in the last 3 months, respectively. Significant relationship was found between of total health literacy and general health status with self-medication. The prevalence of self-medication among participants with poor and very poor self-rated physical and mental health was significantly higher than other participants (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Self-medication had a significant relationship with health literacy and health status. Therefore, the design and implementation of training programs are necessary to increase the perception on the risk of self-medication. PMID:26288710

  2. Assessing Health Literacy in Deaf American Sign Language Users

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Michael M.; Paasche-Orlow, Michael; Winters, Paul C.; Fiscella, Kevin; Zazove, Philip; Sen, Ananda; Pearson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Communication and language barriers isolate Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users from mass media, healthcare messages, and health care communication, which when coupled with social marginalization, places them at a high risk for inadequate health literacy. Our objectives were to translate, adapt, and develop an accessible health literacy instrument in ASL and to assess the prevalence and correlates of inadequate health literacy among Deaf ASL users and hearing English speakers using a cross-sectional design. A total of 405 participants (166 Deaf and 239 hearing) were enrolled in the study. The Newest Vital Sign was adapted, translated, and developed into an ASL version of the NVS (ASL-NVS). Forty-eight percent of Deaf participants had inadequate health literacy, and Deaf individuals were 6.9 times more likely than hearing participants to have inadequate health literacy. The new ASL-NVS, available on a self-administered computer platform, demonstrated good correlation with reading literacy. The prevalence of Deaf ASL users with inadequate health literacy is substantial, warranting further interventions and research. PMID:26513036

  3. Association of parental health literacy with oral health of Navajo Nation preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Brega, A G; Thomas, J F; Henderson, W G; Batliner, T S; Quissell, D O; Braun, P A; Wilson, A; Bryant, L L; Nadeau, K J; Albino, J

    2016-02-01

    Health literacy is 'the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions'. Although numerous studies show a link between health literacy and clinical outcomes, little research has examined the association of health literacy with oral health. No large-scale studies have assessed these relationships among American Indians, a population at risk for limited health literacy and oral health problems. This analysis was conducted as part of a clinical trial aimed at reducing dental decay among preschoolers in the Navajo Nation Head Start program. Using baseline data for 1016 parent-child dyads, we examined the association of parental health literacy with parents' oral health knowledge, attitudes, and behavior, as well as indicators of parental and pediatric oral health. More limited health literacy was associated with lower levels of oral health knowledge, more negative oral health attitudes, and lower levels of adherence to recommended oral health behavior. Parents with more limited health literacy also had significantly worse oral health status (OHS) and reported their children to have significantly worse oral health-related quality of life. These results highlight the importance of oral health promotion interventions that are sensitive to the needs of participants with limited health literacy. PMID:26612050

  4. Assessing Health Literacy: A New Domain for Collaboration between Language Testers and Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, Catherine; Barber, Melissa; Staples, Margaret; Osborne, Richard H.; Clerehan, Rosemary; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2012-01-01

    Health literacy, defined as an individual's capacity to process health information in order to make appropriate health decisions, is the focus of increasing attention in medical fields due to growing awareness that suboptimal health literacy is associated with poorer health outcomes. To explore this issue, a number of instruments, reported to have…

  5. Memory Performance, Health Literacy, and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living of Community Residing Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Graham J.; Mackert, Michael; Becker, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Background Health literacy is associated with cognitive function across multiple domains in older adults, and these older adults may face special memory and cognitive challenges that can limit their health literacy and, in turn, their ability to live independently. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate if an association existed among health literacy, memory performance, and performance-based functional ability in community-residing older adults. Methods Forty-five adults participated in this study. Designed to reflect everyday memory, the Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test (RBMT) bridges laboratory-based measures of memory and assessments obtained by self-report and observation. The RBMT classifies individuals into four categories of memory performance: normal, poor, mildly impaired, and severely impaired. The participants were recruited in the two categories of normal (≥22) or impaired (≤16) category on the RBMT. The sample consisted of 14 who were in the impaired category and 31 in the normal group. Their average age was 77.11 years, and their average number of years of education was 15.33 years. Health literacy scores measured with the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine. Results Health literacy scores were high (M = 65.09, SD = 2.80). Thirty-four participants or 76% of the sample scored a 66 out of a possible score of 80. Pearson correlations were calculated for the study variables. Health literacy scores with education and cognition (.30), memory performance groups (normal vs. poor; .25), and performance-based instrumental activities (.50) were associated significantly. Discussion The development of a broader assortment of health literacy instruments would improve the ability of researchers to both compare studies and build on the knowledge and results of others. PMID:22166912

  6. Health literacy: critical opportunities for social work leadership in health care and research.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Janet M

    2011-05-01

    One-third of U.S. adults do not have adequate health literacy to manage their health care needs; and low health literacy is a major concern due to its association with poor health outcomes, high health care costs, and health communication problems. Low health literacy is a potential driver of health disparities, and its alleviation is central to the values and concerns of the social work profession. Despite the extensive knowledge and skills that social workers can bring to bear to assist patients with low health literacy, the concept of health literacy is underused in social work scholarship.This gap reflects missed opportunities for social workers to contribute their expertise to the evolving field of health literacy and to strategically align their work with organizational and national priorities.To address this gap, this article provides an overview of health literacy, its relevance to social work, and its representation in disciplinary literature; and it outlines opportunities for health social workers to systematically incorporate health literacy concepts and tools into their practices with patients and families. Implications for a social work research and practice agenda in health literacy are discussed. PMID:21661299

  7. The Health Literacy of America's Adults: Results from the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy. NCES 2006-483

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutner, Mark; Greenburg, Elizabeth; Jin, Ying; Paulsen, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the health literacy of America's adults is important because so many aspects of finding health care and health information, and maintaining health, depend on understanding written information. Many reports have suggested that low health literacy is associated with poor communication between patients and health care providers and with…

  8. Predictors of English Health Literacy among U.S. Hispanic Immigrants: The importance of language, bilingualism and sociolinguistic environment

    PubMed Central

    Hund, Lauren; Soto Mas, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, data confirm that Spanish-speaking immigrants are particularly affected by the negative health outcomes associated with low health literacy. Although the literature points to variables such as age, educational background and language, only a few studies have investigated the factors that may influence health literacy in this group. Similarly, the role that bilingualism and/or multilingualism play in health literacy assessment continues to be an issue in need of further research. The purpose of this study was to examine the predictors of English health literacy among adult Hispanic immigrants whose self-reported primary language is Spanish, but who live and function in a bilingual community. It also explored issues related to the language of the instrument. An analysis of data collected through a randomized controlled study was conducted. Results identified English proficiency as the strongest predictor of health literacy (p < 0.001). The results further point to the importance of primary and secondary language in the assessment of heath literacy level. This study raises many questions in need of further investigation to clarify how language proficiency and sociolinguistic environment affect health literacy in language minority adults; proposes language approaches that may be more appropriate for measuring health literacy in these populations; and recommends further place-based research to determine whether the connection between language proficiency and health is generalizable to border communities. PMID:27127416

  9. Health literacy interventions and outcomes: an updated systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    Berkman, Nancy D; Sheridan, Stacey L; Donahue, Katrina E; Halpern, David J; Viera, Anthony; Crotty, Karen; Holland, Audrey; Brasure, Michelle; Lohr, Kathleen N; Harden, Elizabeth; Tant, Elizabeth; Wallace, Ina; Viswanathan, Meera

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To update a 2004 systematic review of health care service use and health outcomes related to differences in health literacy level and interventions designed to improve these outcomes for individuals with low health literacy. Disparities in health outcomes and effectiveness of interventions among different sociodemographic groups were also examined. DATA SOURCES We searched MEDLINE®, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, the Cochrane Library, PsychINFO, and the Educational Resources Information Center. For health literacy, we searched using a variety of terms, limited to English and studies published from 2003 to May 25, 2010. For numeracy, we searched from 1966 to May 25, 2010. REVIEW METHODS We used standard Evidence-based Practice Center methods of dual review of abstracts, full-text articles, abstractions, quality ratings, and strength of evidence grading. We resolved disagreements by consensus. We evaluated whether newer literature was available for answering key questions, so we broadened our definition of health literacy to include numeracy and oral (spoken) health literacy. We excluded intervention studies that did not measure health literacy directly and updated our approach to evaluate individual study risk of bias and to grade strength of evidence. RESULTS We included good- and fair-quality studies: 81 studies addressing health outcomes (reported in 95 articles including 86 measuring health literacy and 16 measuring numeracy, of which 7 measure both) and 42 studies (reported in 45 articles) addressing interventions. Differences in health literacy level were consistently associated with increased hospitalizations, greater emergency care use, lower use of mammography, lower receipt of influenza vaccine, poorer ability to demonstrate taking medications appropriately, poorer ability to interpret labels and health messages, and, among seniors, poorer overall health status and higher mortality. Health literacy level

  10. The Effectiveness of Health Animations in Audiences With Different Health Literacy Levels: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    van Weert, Julia CM; Haven, Carola J; Smit, Edith G

    2015-01-01

    Background Processing Web-based health information can be difficult, especially for people with low health literacy. Presenting health information in an audiovisual format, such as animation, is expected to improve understanding among low health literate audiences. Objective The aim of this paper is to investigate what features of spoken health animations improve information recall and attitudes and whether there are differences between health literacy groups. Methods We conducted an online experiment among 231 participants aged 55 years or older with either low or high health literacy. A 2 (spoken vs written text) x 2 (illustration vs animation) design was used. Participants were randomly exposed to one of the four experimental messages, all providing the same information on colorectal cancer screening. Results The results showed that, among people with low health literacy, spoken messages about colorectal cancer screening improved recall (P=.03) and attitudes (P=.02) compared to written messages. Animations alone did not improve recall, but when combined with spoken text, they significantly improved recall in this group (P=.02). When exposed to spoken animations, people with low health literacy recalled the same amount of information as their high health literate counterparts (P=.12), whereas in all other conditions people with high health literacy recalled more information compared to low health literate individuals. For people with low health literacy, positive attitudes mediated the relationship between spoken text and the intention to have a colorectal cancer screening (b=.12; 95% CI 0.02-0.25). Conclusions We conclude that spoken animation is the best way to communicate complex health information to people with low health literacy. This format can even bridge the information processing gap between audiences with low and high health literacy as the recall differences between the two groups are eliminated. As animations do not negatively influence high health

  11. A health literacy assessment of the epilepsy.com website.

    PubMed

    Elliott, John O; Shneker, Bassel F

    2009-07-01

    Current healthcare guidelines identify low health literacy as a major barrier to optimal health communication. Health literacy is defined as the degree to which individuals can obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions. An estimated 90 million people in the U.S. have marginal health literacy. The Institute of Medicine and the U.S. Department of Education recommend that health related information be written at the 6th-8th grade level to address low health literacy. Epidemiological studies demonstrate that persons with epilepsy have significantly lower educational attainment and lower incomes placing them at risk for low health literacy and limited Internet access. While Internet users tend to have higher educational attainment, previous research indicates even good readers prefer simpler rather than more complex medical information. Health educational content that could be printed and given to patients addresses an important need in clinical epilepsy care. Previous reviews of health websites found they exceed recommended readability levels. Two online programs were used to assess the reading level of 1327 web pages on the www.epilepsy.com website using established readability formulas. Based on the Flesch Reading Ease assessment, only 3% of epilepsy.com web pages are written for a 6th grade reading level or below. If 8th grade level or below is used as the standard, only 15% are adequate. Recommendations and examples are provided for improving the readability of epilepsy-specific health education content. PMID:19419887

  12. Adolescent Health Literacy: The Importance of Credible Sources for Online Health Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaddar, Suad F.; Valerio, Melissa A.; Garcia, Carolyn M.; Hansen, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Little research has examined adolescent health literacy and its relationship with online health information sources. The purpose of this study is to explore health literacy among a predominantly Hispanic adolescent population and to investigate whether exposure to a credible source of online health information, MedlinePlus[R], is…

  13. “The Vagina is a Very Tricky Little Thing Down There”: Cervical Health Literacy among Incarcerated Women

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Megha; Kelly, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand factors associated with women’s ability to engage in cervical cancer prevention and follow-up care given ongoing criminal justice involvement. We conducted four focus groups with 45 incarcerated women to assess barriers to cervical health promotion, and used a grounded theory method to analyze data. We administered the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults to assess general health literacy as a standalone factor related to cervical health promotion. Ninety-one percent of participants had adequate health literacy scores. However, we found that the women had varying levels of cervical health literacy, which we operationalized as knowledge, beliefs, and self-efficacy related to cervical health promotion. Practitioners should establish broader interventions to empower women with criminal justice histories to take control of their own cervical health and focus on communicating updated recommendations to improve cervical health understanding, beliefs, and practices among high-risk women. PMID:26548678

  14. Caregiver word reading literacy and health outcomes among children treated in a pediatric nephrology practice

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Eniko C.; Hooper, Stephen R.; Belsante, Michael J.; Burnett, Otis; Layton, Bradley; Tauer, David; Mantoo, Bradley; DeWalt, Darren; Ferris, Maria E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Caregivers play a major role in the healthcare of pediatric patients, particularly during childhood and adolescence. This study examined the impact of caregivers' functional literacy on the health outcomes of adolescents with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Methods Caregiver–child dyads in a Southeastern US pediatric nephrology clinic participated in this cross-sectional study. We collected demographic information, data on caregivers' functional literacy skills (Wechsler Individual Achievement Test Word Reading Subtest) and child health outcomes (healthcare utilization and adherence). Negative binomial regression analyses were used to test the relationships. Results A total of 98 pediatric patients and their caregivers participated. Caregivers' word reading literacy was associated with their children's healthcare utilization. Patients whose caregivers had lower word reading literacy skills (<7th grade) had greater incidence of emergency room (ER) visits (adjusted incidence rate ratio = 2.05, 95% confidence interval: 1.007, 4.177, P < 0.05) after adjusting for major demographic factors. Patients' hospitalization rates and adherence to medication/diet/appointments were comparable in the two groups. Conclusions Low caregiver functional word reading literacy was negatively related to health outcomes of adolescents with CKD/ESKD as reflected by greater ER visits. Educational materials and teaching strategies (dialysis training protocols, patient education materials) adjusted for low literacy levels may contribute to better outcomes. PMID:27274841

  15. Landscapes of Literacy: An Ethnographic Study of Functional Literacy in Marginal Philippine Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canieso-Doronila, Maria Luisa

    Thirteen marginal Philippine communities were examined in an ethnographic study of the meaning of functional literacy and whether literacy invariably promotes development. The 13 sites were purposely selected to provide a broad sampling from three standpoints: (1) major livelihood and form of economic activity (farming, fishing, urban poor,…

  16. Functional Literacy: Theoretical Issues and Educational Implications. Studies in Written Language and Literacy, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoeven, Ludo, Ed.

    Opening up new perspectives in the study of literacy, this book presents 25 essays that bring together current research findings from linguistics, psychology, sociology, and anthropology. Essays in the book discuss theoretical questions related to the definition and modeling of the construct of functional literacy; the notion of literacy…

  17. An Analysis of Schooling, Literacy and Functional Literacy of Urban and Suburban Eighth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathen, Levi

    Through the administration of standardized tests, questionnaires, and an inventory of educational progress designed to assess the application of skills, an effort is made to analyze the literacy, functional literacy, and factors related to achievement in a population of 181 eighth-grade students selected from an inner-city population and a…

  18. Functional Literacy in Schoolchildren. Definition and Criteria of Test Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessemer, David W.; Spencer, Mary L.

    As part of the development of a functional literacy test for fourth through eigth grade children in Title I compensatory education programs, this report defines functional literacy for children and enumerates criteria for evaluating existing tests. Criteria for selection of a test include: (1) content, empirical, and construct validity; (2)…

  19. Role of Health Literacy in Self-Reported Musculoskeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Catherine L.; Appleton, Sarah L.; Black, Julie; Hoon, Elizabeth; Rudd, Rima E.; Adams, Robert J.; Gill, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Self-report of musculoskeletal conditions is often used to estimate population prevalence and to determine disease burden and influence policy. However, self-report of certain musculoskeletal conditions is frequently inaccurate, suggesting inadequate communication to the patient of their diagnosis. The aim of this study is to determine the association between functional health literacy (FHL) and self-reported musculoskeletal conditions in a representative population survey. FHL was measured using Newest Vital Sign in 2824 randomly selected adults. Participants also self-reported medically diagnosed arthritis, gout, and osteoporosis. Multiple logistic regression was adjusted for age and sex. The prevalence of self-reported arthritis, gout, and osteoporosis was 25.2%, 4.9%, and 5.6%, respectively. The prevalence of those at risk for inadequate FHL was 24.0% and high likelihood of inadequate FHL was 21.0%. However, over 50% of respondents with arthritis or gout had at risk/inadequate FHL, increasing to 70% of those self-reporting osteoporosis. After adjustment for age and sex, respondents in the arthritis subgroup of “don't know” and self-reported osteoporosis were significantly more likely to have inadequate FHL than the general population. This study indicates a substantial burden of low health literacy amongst people with musculoskeletal disease. This has implications for provider-patient communication, individual healthcare, population estimates of musculoskeletal disease, and impact of public health messages. PMID:26357571

  20. The Nursing Informatician's Role in Mediating Technology Related Health Literacies.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Ramona; Carter-Templeton, Heather D

    2016-01-01

    The advent of computer based technology and the internet have not changed nurses' responsibility for patient education; but they are rapidly changing what we teach and how we teach. The challenge for nursing informaticians is to create innovative patient education models and applications with the goal of achieving literate, engaged, empowered and informed patients as well as preparing health professionals to maximize the advantages offered by digital media and other new technology based tools. This paper explores the interrelationship of basic literacy, health literacy and technology related literacies that provide the foundation for achieving these goals. PMID:27332198

  1. Do health literacy and patient empowerment affect self-care behaviour? A survey study among Turkish patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Eyüboğlu, Ezgi; Schulz, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the impact of health literacy and patient empowerment on diabetes self-care behaviour in patients in metropolitan Turkish diabetes centres. The conceptual background is provided by the psychological health empowerment model, which holds that health literacy without patient empowerment comes down to wasting health resources, while empowerment without health literacy can lead to dangerous or suboptimal health behaviour. Design, setting and participants A cross-sectional study was conducted with 167 patients over the age of 18 from one of two diabetes clinics in a major Turkish City. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to eligible outpatients who had an appointment in one of the clinics. Health literacy was measured by a newly translated Turkish version of the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) and the Chew self-report scale. Patient empowerment was measured by a 12-item scale based on Spreitzer's conceptualisation of psychological empowerment in the workplace. Self-care behaviour was measured by the Self-care behaviours were measured by the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Measure (SDSCA). Level of diabetes knowledge was measured by Diabetes Knowledge Test. Results Two subscales of empowerment, impact and self-determination, predicted self-reported frequency of self-care behaviours. Neither health literacy nor diabetes knowledge had an effect on self-care behaviours. Conclusions Health literacy might be more effective in clinical decisions while empowerment might exert a stronger influence on habitual health behaviours. PMID:26975936

  2. eHealth Literacy: Essential Skills for Consumer Health in a Networked World

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Harvey A

    2006-01-01

    Electronic health tools provide little value if the intended users lack the skills to effectively engage them. With nearly half the adult population in the United States and Canada having literacy levels below what is needed to fully engage in an information-rich society, the implications for using information technology to promote health and aid in health care, or for eHealth, are considerable. Engaging with eHealth requires a skill set, or literacy, of its own. The concept of eHealth literacy is introduced and defined as the ability to seek, find, understand, and appraise health information from electronic sources and apply the knowledge gained to addressing or solving a health problem. In this paper, a model of eHealth literacy is introduced, comprised of multiple literacy types, including an outline of a set of fundamental skills consumers require to derive direct benefits from eHealth. A profile of each literacy type with examples of the problems patient-clients might present is provided along with a resource list to aid health practitioners in supporting literacy improvement with their patient-clients across each domain. Facets of the model are illustrated through a set of clinical cases to demonstrate how health practitioners can address eHealth literacy issues in clinical or public health practice. Potential future applications of the model are discussed. PMID:16867972

  3. Quality of Life, Health Status, and Health Service Utilization Related to a New Measure of Health Literacy FLIGHT/VIDAS

    PubMed Central

    Ownby, Raymond L; Acevedo, Amarilis; Jacobs, Robin J.; Caballero, Joshua; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna

    2014-01-01

    Objective Researchers have identified significant limitations in some currently-used measures of health literacy. The purpose of this paper is to present data on the relation of health-related quality of life, health status, and health service utilization to performance on a new measure of health literacy in a nonpatient population. Methods The new measure was administered to 475 English- and Spanish-speaking community-dwelling volunteers along with existing measures of health literacy and assessments of health-related quality of life, health status, and healthcare service utilization. Relations among measures were assessed via correlations and health status and utilization was tested across levels of health literacy using ANCOVA models. Results The new health literacy measure is significantly related to existing measures of health literacy as well as to participants’ health-related quality of life. Persons with lower levels of health literacy reported more health conditions, more frequent physical symptoms, and greater healthcare service utilization. Conclusion The new measure of health literacy is valid and shows relations to measures of conceptually-related constructs such as quality of life and health behaviors. Practice Implications: FLIGHT/VIDAS may be useful to researchers and clinicians interested in a computer administered and scored measure of health literacy. PMID:24856447

  4. Health Literacy and Disease Understanding among Aging Women with Pelvic Floor Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Anger, Jennifer T.; Lee, Una; Mittal, Brita M.; Pollard, Matthew; Tarnay, Christopher; Maliski, Sally; Rogers, Rebecca G

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Few studies on health literacy and disease understanding among women with pelvic floor disorders have been published. We conducted a pilot study to explore the relationship between disease understanding and health literacy, age, and diagnosis type among women with urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. METHODS Study subjects were recruited from urology and urogynecology specialty clinics based on a chief complaint suggestive of urinary incontinence or pelvic prolapse. Subjects completed questionnaires to assess symptom severity and health literacy was measured using the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Patient-physician interactions were audiotaped during the office visit. Immediately afterwards, patients were asked to describe diagnoses and treatments discussed by the physician and record them on a checklist, with follow-up phone call where the same checklist was administered 2–3 days later. RESULTS A total of 36 women with pelvic floor disorders, aged 42–94, were enrolled. We found that health literacy scores decreased with increasing age; however, all patients had low percentage recall of their pelvic floor diagnoses and poor understanding of their pelvic floor condition despite high health literacy scores. Patients with pelvic prolapse appeared to have worse recall and disease understanding than patients with urinary incontinence. CONCLUSIONS High health literacy as assessed by the TOFHLA may not correlate with patients' ability to comprehend complex functional conditions such as pelvic floor disorders. Lack of understanding may lead to unrealistic treatment expectations, inability to give informed consent for treatment, and dissatisfaction with care. Better methods to improve disease understanding are needed. PMID:23143427

  5. Evaluation of a health literacy screening tool in primary care patients: evidence from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Jović-Vraneš, Aleksandra; Bjegović-Mikanović, Vesna; Marinković, Jelena; Vuković, Dejana

    2014-12-01

    Improving health literacy skills is important for patient comprehension of health-related topics and their ability to attend to their medical problems. Promoting health literacy is a pivotal policy for maintaining and promoting health. The objective of the present study was to translate the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA; long and short versions) into Serbian and evaluate the translated and cross-culturally adapted questionnaires in Serbian primary care patients. The translated TOFHLA questionnaires were administered to 120 patients. Additionally, a self-completed questionnaire was used. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were measured. The mean score for the TOFHLA was 73.49 (median, 78; SD = 17.94; range, 0-100) and the mean score for the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (STOFHLA) was 29.28 (median, 32; SD = 6.16; range, 0-36). Sex, age, education, self-perceived health and presence of any chronic disease were associated with health literacy scores. The internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was 0.73 for the TOFHLA numeracy subset, 0.95 for reading comprehension, 0.94 for the TOFHLA and 0.90 for the STOFHLA. The Pearson correlation between the TOFHLA and STOFHLA was 0.89. The area under the curve of these two tests was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.602-0.817). The Serbian translated versions of the TOHFLA questionnaires offer valid measures of functional health literacy. There were no differences between the reliability and validity of the short and long TOFHLA forms. PMID:23445940

  6. The Mental Health Literacy Scale (MHLS): A new scale-based measure of mental health literacy.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Matt; Casey, Leanne

    2015-09-30

    Although Mental Health Literacy (MHL) has been a topic of substantial interest, measurement of this concept using a scale-based measure has been limited, including a lack of psychometric and methodologically robust scale-based measures of MHL. This study developed a new scale-based measure of MHL, the Mental Health Literacy Scale (MHLS), which assesses all attributes of MHL. Construction of the MHLS was done over three key stages, including measure development, pilot testing and assessment of psychometrics and methodological quality. The resulting measure is a 35 item, univariate scale that is easily administered and scored. Results showed significant differences in scores between mental health professionals and a community sample, as well as individuals with greater experience with mental health, and a significant positive relationship with help-seeking intentions. The MHLS also demonstrated good internal and test-retest reliability. Evaluation of the methodological quality of the MHLS indicated that it has substantial methodological advantages in comparison to existing scale-based measures of MHL. The MHLS can be used in assessing individual and population level differences in MHL and in determining the impact of programmes designed to improve MHL. PMID:26228163

  7. The Health Literacy Environment of Hospitals and Health Centers. Partners for Action: Making Your Healthcare Facility Literacy-Friendly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Rima E.; Anderson, Jennie E.

    2006-01-01

    The "health literacy environment" of a healthcare facility represents the expectations, preferences, and skills of those providing health information and services. Some of these demands are in the form of physical aspects of the hospital or health center, such as signs and postings. At the same time, access to and navigation of health services…

  8. Health Literacy, Smoking, and Health Indicators in African American Adults.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Diana Stewart; Vidrine, Jennifer I; Shete, Sanjay; Spears, Claire A; Cano, Miguel A; Correa-Fernández, Virmarie; Wetter, David W; McNeill, Lorna H

    2015-01-01

    We examined cross-sectional associations of health literacy (HL) with smoking and other established health indicators among 1,467 African American adults. Data emanated from a longitudinal cohort study designed to investigate cancer risk factors among church-going African American adults. We conducted linear and logistic regression analyses to assess associations between HL and health indicators. HL was assessed using an established single-item screening question. Outcomes included indicators of poor physical health (cigarette smoking, self-rated general and physical health) and mental health (self-rated mental health, depressive symptoms, perceived stress). Nearly 19% of participants had low HL. Low HL was significantly associated with current smoking, poorer self-rated general and physical health, and higher perceived stress (ps < .05) even after we controlled for demographic variables (i.e., age, gender, relationship status) and indicators of socioeconomic status (i.e., education, income, insurance status). Low HL appears to be an independent risk factor for smoking and other indicators of poor physical and mental health in a large sample of African American adults. Future directions and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:26513028

  9. Adult Education and Public Health Partner to Address Health Literacy Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Rima E.

    2004-01-01

    The 1993 publication of findings from the first National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS) drew the attention of the nation. Among health researchers, the realization that almost half of U.S. adults have difficulty using common texts to complete everyday tasks spurred interest in health-related consequences, and improving health literacy was listed…

  10. Overcoming health literacy barriers: a model for action.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    A large influx of Indonesian immigrants seeking asylum from racial and religious persecution into our hospital service area alerted providers to the need for specific cultural knowledge about this ethnic group, and to develop new skill sets to effectively care for this population. Health education programs that provide knowledge and tools to overcome misunderstandings that arise from differences between provider and client expectations for behavior will be most effective in overcoming the health literacy barriers that so often contribute to health disparities. A framework to understand factors that affect health literacy for local Indonesian asylum seekers guided community health education, while the written educational materials for programs informed providers about health literacy barriers for this population. Community outreach engaged local pastors and interpreters as cultural brokers to collaborate with nurses to develop and implement culturally sensitive programs that are socially sensitive to the local Indonesian refugee population. PMID:21744676

  11. Health Literacy, Education Levels, and Patient Portal Usage During Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sharon E.; Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kripalani, Sunil; Goggins, Kathryn M.; Jackson, Gretchen Purcell

    2015-01-01

    Patient portal adoption has rapidly increased, and portal usage has been associated with patients’ sociodemographics, health literacy, and education. Research on patient portals has primarily focused on the outpatient setting. We explored whether health literacy and education were associated with portal usage in an inpatient population. Among 60,159 admissions in 2012–2013, 23.3% of patients reported limited health literacy; 50.4% reported some post-secondary education; 34.4% were registered for the portal; and 23.4% of registered patients used the portal during hospitalization. Probability of registration and inpatient portal use increased with educational attainment. Health literacy was associated with registration but not inpatient use. Among admissions with inpatient use, educational attainment was associated with viewing health record data, and health literacy was associated use of appointment and health education tools. The inpatient setting may provide an opportunity to overcome barriers to patient portal adoption and reduce disparities in use of health information technologies. PMID:26958286

  12. Health literacy, smoking, and health indicators in African American adults

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Diana W.; Vidrine, Jennifer I.; Shete, Sanjay; Spears, Claire A.; Cano, Miguel A.; Correa-Fernández, Virmarie; Wetter, David W.; McNeill, Lorna H.

    2015-01-01

    We examined cross-sectional associations of health literacy (HL) with smoking and other established health indicators among 1,467 African American adults. Data emanated from a longitudinal cohort study designed to investigate cancer risk factors among church-going African American adults. We conducted linear and logistic regression analyses to assess associations between HL and health indicators. HL was assessed using an established single-item screening question. Outcomes included indicators of poor physical (cigarette smoking, self-rated general and physical health) and mental health (self-rated mental health, depressive symptoms, perceived stress). Nearly 19% of participants had low HL. Low HL was significantly associated with current smoking, poorer self-rated general and physical health, and higher perceived stress (ps < .05) even after controlling for demographic variables (i.e., age, gender, relationship status) and indicators of socioeconomic status (i.e., education, income, insurance status). Low HL appears to be an independent risk factor for smoking and other indicators of poor physical and mental health in a large sample of African American adults. Future directions and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:26513028

  13. Health Literacy Screening Instruments for eHealth Applications: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sarah A.; Currie, Leanne M.; Bakken, Suzanne; Vawdrey, David K.; Stone, Patricia W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To systematically review current health literacy (HL) instruments for use in consumer-facing and mobile health information technology screening and evaluation tools. Design The databases, PubMed, OVID, Google Scholar, Cochrane Library and Science Citation Index, were searched for health literacy assessment instruments using the terms “health”, “literacy”, “computer-based,” and “psychometrics”. All instruments identified by this method were critically appraised according to their reported psychometric properties and clinical feasibility. Results Eleven different health literacy instruments were found. Screening questions, such as asking a patient about his/her need for assistance in navigating health information, were evaluated in 7 different studies and are promising for use as a valid, reliable, and feasible computer-based approach to identify patients that struggle with low health literacy. However, there was a lack of consistency in the types of screening questions proposed. There is also a lack of information regarding the psychometric properties of computer-based health literacy instruments. Limitations Only English language health literacy assessment instruments were reviewed and analyzed. Conclusions Current health literacy screening tools demonstrate varying benefits depending on the context of their use. In many cases, it seems that a single screening question may be a reliable, valid, and feasible means for establishing health literacy. A combination of screening questions that assess health literacy and technological literacy may enable tailoring eHealth applications to user needs. Further research should determine the best screening question(s) and the best synthesis of various instruments’ content and methodologies for computer-based health literacy screening and assessment. PMID:22521719

  14. A systematic review of eHealth interventions to improve health literacy.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Robin J; Lou, Jennie Q; Ownby, Raymond L; Caballero, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    Implementation of eHealth is now considered an effective way to address concerns about the health status of health care consumers. The purpose of this study was to review empirically based eHealth intervention strategies designed to improve health literacy among consumers in a variety of settings. A computerized search of 16 databases of abstracts (e.g. Biomedical Reference Collection, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Computers & Applied Sciences Complete, Health Technology Assessments, MEDLINE) were explored in a systematic fashion to assess the presence of eHealth applications targeting health literacy. Compared to control interventions, the interventions using technology reported significant outcomes or showed promise for future positive outcomes regarding health literacy in a variety of settings, for different diseases, and with diverse samples. This review has indicated that it is feasible to deliver eHealth interventions specifically designed to improve health literacy skills for people with different health conditions, risk factors, and socioeconomic backgrounds. PMID:24916567

  15. Learning Wellness: How Ageing Australians Experience Health Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Christine; Partridge, Helen; Bruce, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Given identified synergies between information use and health status greater understanding is needed about how people use information to learn about their health. This paper presents the findings of preliminary research into health information literacy. Analysis of data from semi-structured interviews revealed six different ways ageing Australians…

  16. Poorer Financial and Health Literacy Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Han, S. Duke; Boyle, Patricia A.; James, Bryan D.; Yu, Lei; Bennett, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Literacy is an important determinant of financial and health outcomes in old age, and cognitive decline has been linked with lower literacy. We tested the hypothesis that mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is associated with poorer financial and health literacy. Method Participants (n = 730) from the Rush Memory and Aging Project were given a clinical evaluation and an assessment of total, financial, and health literacy. Regression was used to examine whether MCI was associated with lower literacy. In secondary analyses, we investigated the association of particular cognitive systems with literacy. Results MCI was associated with lower total, financial, and health literacy. An interaction was observed such that higher education reduced the effect of MCI on total and financial literacy. Multiple cognitive systems were associated with literacy in participants with MCI, and semantic memory accounted for the most variance. Discussion Persons with MCI exhibit poorer financial and health literacy, and education mitigates this effect. PMID:25903976

  17. Development of a conceptual model of cancer caregiver health literacy.

    PubMed

    Yuen, E Y N; Dodson, S; Batterham, R W; Knight, T; Chirgwin, J; Livingston, P M

    2016-03-01

    Caregivers play a vital role in caring for people diagnosed with cancer. However, little is understood about caregivers' capacity to find, understand, appraise and use information to improve health outcomes. The study aimed to develop a conceptual model that describes the elements of cancer caregiver health literacy. Six concept mapping workshops were conducted with 13 caregivers, 13 people with cancer and 11 healthcare providers/policymakers. An iterative, mixed methods approach was used to analyse and synthesise workshop data and to generate the conceptual model. Six major themes and 17 subthemes were identified from 279 statements generated by participants during concept mapping workshops. Major themes included: access to information, understanding of information, relationship with healthcare providers, relationship with the care recipient, managing challenges of caregiving and support systems. The study extends conceptualisations of health literacy by identifying factors specific to caregiving within the cancer context. The findings demonstrate that caregiver health literacy is multidimensional, includes a broad range of individual and interpersonal elements, and is influenced by broader healthcare system and community factors. These results provide guidance for the development of: caregiver health literacy measurement tools; strategies for improving health service delivery, and; interventions to improve caregiver health literacy. PMID:25630765

  18. Information Literacy for Health Professionals: Teaching Essential Information Skills with the Big6 Information Literacy Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santana Arroyo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals frequently do not possess the necessary information-seeking abilities to conduct an effective search in databases and Internet sources. Reference librarians may teach health professionals these information and technology skills through the Big6 information literacy model (Big6). This article aims to address this issue. It also…

  19. Why Is Health Literacy Related to Health? An Exploration among U.S. National Assessment of Adult Literacy Participants 40 Years of Age and Older

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ownby, Raymond L.; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Taha, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Health literacy has emerged as an important factor related to health in older persons. The reason for the link between health literacy and health outcomes is not clear. Possible explanations include common relations among income, education, access to health care, health-promotion behaviors, frequency of reading, and perceptual impairments. In this…

  20. Readability of online health information: implications for health literacy.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Nicholas; Haglund, Bo J A

    2011-12-01

    Accessibility is one of six quality criteria articulated by the European Commission in its code of conduct for health websites. Readability plays an integral part in determining a website's accessibility. Health information that is hard to read may remain inaccessible to people with low health literacy. This study aimed to calculate the readability of websites on various causes of disease. The names of 22 health conditions were entered into five search engines, and the readability of the first 10 results for each search were evaluated using Gunning FOG, SMOG, Flesch-Kincaid and Flesch Reading Ease tests (n=352). Readability was stratified and assessed by search term, search term complexity, top-level domain and paragraph position. The mean reading grade was 12.30, and the mean FRE was 46.08, scores considered 'difficult'. Websites on certain topics were found to be even harder to read than average. Where conditions had multiple names, searching for the simplest one led to the most readable results. Websites with .gov and .nhs TLDs were the most readable while .edu sites were the least. Within texts, a trend of increasing difficulty was found with concluding paragraphs being the hardest to read. It was also found that some of the most frequent search results (such as Wikipedia pages) were amongst the hardest to read. Health professionals, with the help of public and specialised libraries, need to create and direct patients towards high-quality, plain language health information in multiple languages. PMID:21332302

  1. Relationship between Child Health Literacy and Body Mass Index in Overweight Children1

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Iman; Blank, Arthur E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test the relationship between child health literacy and body mass index (BMI) -z score in overweight children. Methods Cross-sectional survey of overweight children and parents. Parent and child health literacy was measured by the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy (STOFHLA). Linear regression tested for predictors of childhood BMI z-score, adjusting for confounders. Results Of 171 total children, 107(62%) participated, of whom 78 (73%) had complete data for analysis. Mean child BMI Z-score (SD) was 2.3(0.40); median child age (Inter-quartile range) was 11.5(10–16); 53% were female; 80% were Medicaid recipients. Mean child STOFHLA was 22.9(9.0); mean parental STOFHLA was 29.1(8.6). Child STOFHLA correlated negatively with BMI Z-score (r=−0.37, p=0.0009) and positively with child eating self-efficacy (r=0.40, p<0.0001). After adjusting for confounders, child STOFHLA was independently associated with child BMI Z-score (standardized B=−0.43, p<0.0001). Overall adjusted r-squared for the regression model was 38%. Child STOFHLA contributed 13% to the overall model. Conclusions Child health literacy was negatively correlated with BMI Z-scores in overweight children, suggesting the need to consider health literacy in the intersection between self-efficacy and behavior change when planning interventions that aim to improve child BMI. PMID:19716255

  2. Measuring Health Literacy: A Challenge to Curriculum Design and Evaluation. Research Briefs on Adult Literacy. Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pleasant, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    There is a growing interest in health literacy and in developing curricula for health care providers and for the general public. However, developing curriculum without accompanying evaluation plans is like starting a race without a finish line, and current measures of health literacy are not up to the task of evaluating curriculum. This research…

  3. Maternal health literacy progression among rural perinatal women.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Sandra C; Thomas, Suzanne Dixson; Sutherland, Donald E; Hudgins, Jodi; Ange, Brittany L; Johnson, Maribeth H

    2014-10-01

    This research examined changes in maternal health literacy progression among 106 low income, high risk, rural perinatal African American and White women who received home visits by Registered Nurse Case Managers through the Enterprise Community Healthy Start Program. Maternal health literacy progression would enable women to better address intermediate factors in their lives that impacted birth outcomes, and ultimately infant mortality (Lu and Halfon in Mater Child Health J 7(1):13-30, 2003; Sharma et al. in J Natl Med Assoc 86(11):857-860, 1994). The Life Skills Progression Instrument (LSP) (Wollesen and Peifer, in Life skills progression. An outcome and intervention planning instrument for use with families at risk. Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., Baltimore, 2006) measured changes in behaviors that represented intermediate factors in birth outcomes. Maternal Health Care Literacy (LSP/M-HCL) was a woman's use of information, critical thinking and health care services; Maternal Self Care Literacy (LSP/M-SCL) was a woman's management of personal and child health at home (Smith and Moore in Health literacy and depression in the context of home visitation. Mater Child Health J, 2011). Adequacy was set at a score of (≥4). Among 106 women in the study initial scores were inadequate (<4) on LSP/M-HCL (83 %), and on LSP/M-SCL (30 %). Significant positive changes were noted in maternal health literacy progression from the initial prenatal assessment to the first (p < .01) postpartum assessment and to the final (p < .01) postpartum assessment using McNemar's test of gain scores. Numeric comparison of first and last gain scores indicated women's scores progressed (LSP/M-HCL; p < .0001) and (LSP/M-SCL; p < .0001). Elevated depression scores were most frequent among women with <4 LSP/M-HCL and/or <4 LSP/M-SCL. Visit notes indicated lack or loss of relationship with the father of the baby and intimate partner discord contributed to higher depression scores. PMID:24469358

  4. Top Down versus Bottom Up: The Social Construction of the Health Literacy Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Jeffrey T.; Shapiro, Robert M., II; Gillaspy, Mary L.

    2012-01-01

    The health literacy movement has been socially constructed over time. Unlike the consumer health information movement, which developed with broad public support, the health literacy movement has been fashioned primarily from the top down, initiated by policy makers and imposed on targeted populations. Interest in the health literacy movement has…

  5. Health literacy in kidney disease: Review of the literature and implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepika; Green, Jamie Alton

    2016-03-01

    Health literacy is the capacity of an individual to understand information related to a disease in order to make an informed decision. In patients with kidney diseases, studies have reported increasing impact of limited health literacy on health outcomes. Our paper discusses current literature on health literacy in kidney diseases. PMID:26981438

  6. Health literacy in kidney disease: Review of the literature and implications for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepika; Green, Jamie Alton

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy is the capacity of an individual to understand information related to a disease in order to make an informed decision. In patients with kidney diseases, studies have reported increasing impact of limited health literacy on health outcomes. Our paper discusses current literature on health literacy in kidney diseases. PMID:26981438

  7. Health care librarians and information literacy: an investigation.

    PubMed

    Kelham, Charlotte

    2014-09-01

    Until relatively recently, the concept of information literacy, and teaching the skills to enable it, was mainly a concern of academic libraries. Now, it is also seen to be of high importance within the context of health care libraries. Health care libraries and librarians can provide crucial support towards the implementation of evidence-based practice in patient care through both information literacy skills training and by conducting mediated searches on behalf of health care practitioners. This article reports the findings from an investigation conducted by Charlotte Kelham as part of her MA in Librarianship from the University of Sheffield. Her dissertation investigated how health care librarians understand the concept of information literacy, the implications of this for their role and their perceptions around how their role is valued. Charlotte graduated from Sheffield in 2013 and is currently job hunting. AM. PMID:25155981

  8. Health literacy and usability of clinical trial search engines.

    PubMed

    Utami, Dina; Bickmore, Timothy W; Barry, Barbara; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Several web-based search engines have been developed to assist individuals to find clinical trials for which they may be interested in volunteering. However, these search engines may be difficult for individuals with low health and computer literacy to navigate. The authors present findings from a usability evaluation of clinical trial search tools with 41 participants across the health and computer literacy spectrum. The study consisted of 3 parts: (a) a usability study of an existing web-based clinical trial search tool; (b) a usability study of a keyword-based clinical trial search tool; and (c) an exploratory study investigating users' information needs when deciding among 2 or more candidate clinical trials. From the first 2 studies, the authors found that users with low health literacy have difficulty forming queries using keywords and have significantly more difficulty using a standard web-based clinical trial search tool compared with users with adequate health literacy. From the third study, the authors identified the search factors most important to individuals searching for clinical trials and how these varied by health literacy level. PMID:25315593

  9. Health Literacy and Patient Empowerment: Separating Con-joined Twins in the Context of Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Camerini, Anne-Linda; Schulz, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives While health literacy has been widely considered key to patient empowerment, an alternative approach separates both concepts and distinguishes between dif-ferent types of patients according to their levels of health literacy and empowerment. These types are deemed to vary in their health-related actions and outcomes. In this study, we exam-ine the relationship between health literacy and patient empowerment and compare socio-demographic characteristics, health-related activities, and health outcomes in four types of pa-tients suffering from chronic low back pain (cLBP). Methods In a cross-sectional study, 273 cLBP patients from four Swiss can-tons (Vaud, Geneva, Fribourg, Ticino) and Lombardy (Italy) were invited by their healthcare providers to complete a self-administered paper-and-pencil questionnaire which assessed pa-tients’ health literacy, empowerment, involvement in the medical encounter, medication non-adherence, and perceived pain and functionality as a measure of health outcomes. Results Health literacy and patient empowerment were not significantly correlated with each other, r(271) = .09, p > .05, allowing to differentiate be-tween four types of patients based on their levels of health literacy and patient empowerment. Subsequent chi-square tests and analyses of variances revealed significant differences among patients that could, however, only be attributed to health literacy, as in the case of age and ed-ucational attainment, or patient empowerment, as in the case of patients’ involvement in the medical encounter. No significant differences were evident for gender, medication non-adherence, and health outcomes. Conclusion The study provides empirical evidence for the need to consider health literacy and patient empowerment as independent concepts in the context of cLBP but calls for further studies to be able to conclude on how the two concepts interact and determine health-related activities and outcomes. PMID:25680195

  10. Short Assessment of Health Literacy—Spanish and English: A Comparable Test of Health Literacy for Spanish and English Speakers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shoou-Yih Daniel; Stucky, Brian D; Lee, Jessica Y; Rozier, R Gary; Bender, Deborah E

    2010-01-01

    Objective The intent of the study was to develop and validate a comparable health literacy test for Spanish-speaking and English-speaking populations. Study Design The design of the instrument, named the Short Assessment of Health Literacy—Spanish and English (SAHL-S&E), combined a word recognition test, as appearing in the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), and a comprehension test using multiple-choice questions designed by an expert panel. We used the item response theory (IRT) in developing and validating the instrument. Data Collection Validation of SAHL-S&E involved testing and comparing the instrument with other health literacy instruments in a sample of 201 Spanish-speaking and 202 English-speaking subjects recruited from the Ambulatory Care Center at the University of North Carolina Healthcare System. Principal Findings Based on IRT analysis, 18 items were retained in the comparable test. The Spanish version of the test, SAHL-S, was highly correlated with other Spanish health literacy instruments, Short Assessment of Health Literacy for Spanish-Speaking Adults (r=0.88, p<.05) and the Spanish Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) (r=0.62, p<.05). The English version, SAHL-E, had high correlations with REALM (r=0.94, p<.05) and the English TOFHLA (r=0.68, p<.05). Significant correlations were found between SAHL-S&E and years of schooling in both Spanish- and English-speaking samples (r=0.15 and 0.39, respectively). SAHL-S&E displayed satisfactory reliability of 0.80 and 0.89 in the Spanish- and English-speaking samples, respectively. IRT analysis indicated that the SAHL-S&E score was highly reliable for individuals with a low level of health literacy. Conclusions The new instrument, SAHL-S&E, has good reliability and validity. It is particularly useful for identifying individuals with low health literacy and could be used to screen for low health literacy among Spanish and English speakers. PMID:20500222

  11. Literacy and Health in America. Policy Information Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Rima; Kirsch, Irwin; Yamamoto, Kentaro

    2004-01-01

    Researchers have long been interested in the relationship between literacy and health. Over the past several decades, many studies have been conducted to analyze the difficulty of health-related print materials, evaluate patients' ability to read these types of materials and to recognize common medical terms, and determine whether patients'…

  12. The Association of Health Literacy with Illness and Medication Beliefs among Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Minal S.; Federman, Alex D.; Krauskopf, Katherine; Wolf, Michael; O’Conor, Rachel; Martynenko, Melissa; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low health literacy is associated with low adherence to self-management in many chronic diseases. Additionally, health beliefs are thought to be determinants of self-management behaviors. In this study we sought to determine the association, if any, of health literacy and health beliefs among elderly individuals with COPD. Methods We enrolled a cohort of patients with COPD from two academic urban settings in New York, NY and Chicago, IL. Health literacy was measured using the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Using the framework of the Self-Regulation Model, illness and medication beliefs were measured with the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire (BMQ). Unadjusted analyses, with corresponding Cohen’s d effect sizes, and multiple logistic regression were used to assess the relationships between HL and illness and medication beliefs. Results We enrolled 235 participants, 29% of whom had low health literacy. Patients with low health literacy were more likely to belong to a racial minority group (p<0.001), not be married (p = 0.006), and to have lower income (p<0.001) or education (p<0.001). In unadjusted analyses, patients with low health literacy were less likely to believe they will always have COPD (p = 0.003, Cohen’s d = 0.42), and were more likely to be concerned about their illness ((p = 0.04, Cohen’s d = 0.17). In analyses adjusted for sociodemographic factors and other health beliefs, patients with low health literacy were less likely to believe that they will always have COPD (odds ratio [OR]: 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.65–0.94). In addition, the association of low health literacy with expressed concern about medications remained significant (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.05–1.37) though the association of low health literacy with belief in the necessity of medications was no longer significant (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.82–1.04). Conclusions In this cohort of urban

  13. A social ecological conceptual framework for understanding adolescent health literacy in the health education classroom.

    PubMed

    Wharf Higgins, Joan; Begoray, Deborah; MacDonald, Marjorie

    2009-12-01

    With the rising concern over chronic health conditions and their prevention and management, health literacy is emerging as an important public health issue. As with the development of other forms of literacy, the ability for students to be able to access, understand, evaluate and communicate health information is a skill best developed during their years of public schooling. Health education curricula offer one approach to develop health literacy, yet little is known about its influence on neither students nor their experiences within an educational context. In this article, we describe our experience applying a social ecological model to investigating the implementation of a health education curriculum in four high schools in British Columbia, Canada. We used the model to guide a conceptual understanding of health literacy, develop research questions, select data collection strategies, and interpret the findings. Reflections and recommendations for using the model are offered. PMID:19838790

  14. Addressing the "other" health literacy competencies--knowledge, dispositions, and oral/aural communication: development of TALKDOC, an intervention assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Helitzer, Deborah; Hollis, Christine; Sanders, Margaret; Roybal, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Most health literacy assessments evaluate literacy skills including reading, writing; numeracy and interpretation of tables, graphs, diagrams and charts. Some assess understanding of health systems, and the ability to adequately apply one's skills to specific health-related tasks or demands in health situations. However, to achieve functional health literacy, the ability to "obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions," other health literacy dimensions should be assessed: a person's knowledge and attitudes about a health issue affects his or her ability to and interest in participating in his or her own care. In patient care settings, the abilities to listen, ask questions and check one's understanding are crucial to making appropriate decisions and carrying out instructions. Although literacy is a skill associated with educational attainment and therefore difficult to change in a short time, health education interventions can address health literacy domains such as knowledge, attitudes and oral communication skills. For this reason, an instrument that can assess these constructs is a valuable part of a health educator's toolbox. The authors describe the development and process and outcomes of testing a novel instrument targeted to assess HPV and cervical cancer health literacy competencies, TALKDOC, including its validation with the Health Activities Literacy Scale. PMID:23030568

  15. Effect of Health Literacy on Research Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Leak, Cardella; Goggins, Kathryn; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Theobald, Cecelia; Donato, Katharine M; Bell, Susan P; Schnelle, John; Kripalani, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has not examined the effect of health literacy on research subjects' completion of scheduled research follow-up. This article evaluates patient factors associated with incomplete research follow-up at three time points after enrollment in a large, hospital-based prospective cohort study. Predictor variables included health literacy, age, race, gender, education, employment status, difficulty paying bills, hospital diagnosis, length of stay, self-reported global health status, depression, perceived health competence, medication adherence, and health care system distrust. In a sample of 2,042 patients, multivariable models demonstrated that lower health literacy and younger age were significantly associated with a lower likelihood of completing research follow-up interviews at 2-3 days, 30 days, and 90 days after hospital discharge. In addition, patients who had less education, were currently employed, and had moderate financial stress were less likely to complete 90-day follow-up. This study is the first to demonstrate that lower health literacy is a significant predictor of incomplete research follow-up. PMID:26513035

  16. Health Literacy Impact on National Healthcare Utilization and Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Rasu, Rafia S.; Bawa, Walter Agbor; Suminski, Richard; Snella, Kathleen; Warady, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health literacy presents an enormous challenge in the delivery of effective healthcare and quality outcomes. We evaluated the impact of low health literacy (LHL) on healthcare utilization and healthcare expenditure. Methods: Database analysis used Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) from 2005-2008 which provides nationally representative estimates of healthcare utilization and expenditure. Health literacy scores (HLSs) were calculated based on a validated, predictive model and were scored according to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL). HLS ranged from 0-500. Health literacy level (HLL) and categorized in 2 groups: Below basic or basic (HLS <226) and above basic (HLS ≥226). Healthcare utilization expressed as a physician, nonphysician, or emergency room (ER) visits and healthcare spending. Expenditures were adjusted to 2010 rates using the Consumer Price Index (CPI). A P value of 0.05 or less was the criterion for statistical significance in all analyses. Multivariate regression models assessed the impact of the predicted HLLs on outpatient healthcare utilization and expenditures. All analyses were performed with SAS and STATA® 11.0 statistical software. Results: The study evaluated 22 599 samples representing 503 374 648 weighted individuals nationally from 2005-2008. The cohort had an average age of 49 years and included more females (57%). Caucasian were the predominant racial ethnic group (83%) and 37% of the cohort were from the South region of the United States of America. The proportion of the cohort with basic or below basic health literacy was 22.4%. Annual predicted values of physician visits, nonphysician visits, and ER visits were 6.6, 4.8, and 0.2, respectively, for basic or below basic compared to 4.4, 2.6, and 0.1 for above basic. Predicted values of office and ER visits expenditures were $1284 and $151, respectively, for basic or below basic and $719 and $100 for above basic (P < .05). The extrapolated national

  17. Adult Literacy in the Commonwealth Caribbean with Special Reference to a Study of the Functional Literacy of Young Guyanese Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Zellynne

    2000-01-01

    A test measuring document, prose, and quantitative literacy of out-of-school youth in Guyana found that only 11% had high levels of functional literacy, a literacy rate much lower than usually reported. Failure to represent the situation accurately prolongs the lack of political will to deal with the issue. (SK)

  18. Health literacy practices and educational competencies for health professionals: a consensus study.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Clifford A; Hudson, Stan; Maine, Lucinda L

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals often lack adequate knowledge about health literacy and the skills needed to address low health literacy among patients and their caregivers. Many promising practices for mitigating the effects of low health literacy are not used consistently. Improving health literacy training for health care professionals has received increasing emphasis in recent years. The development and evaluation of curricula for health professionals has been limited by the lack of agreed-upon educational competencies in this area. This study aimed to identify a set of health literacy educational competencies and target behaviors, or practices, relevant to the training of all health care professionals. The authors conducted a thorough literature review to identify a comprehensive list of potential health literacy competencies and practices, which they categorized into 1 or more educational domains (i.e., knowledge, skills, attitudes) or a practice domain. The authors stated each item in operationalized language following Bloom's Taxonomy. The authors then used a modified Delphi method to identify consensus among a group of 23 health professions education experts representing 11 fields in the health professions. Participants rated their level of agreement as to whether a competency or practice was both appropriate and important for all health professions students. A predetermined threshold of 70% agreement was used to define consensus. After 4 rounds of ratings and modifications, consensus agreement was reached on 62 out of 64 potential educational competencies (24 knowledge items, 27 skill items, and 11 attitude items), and 32 out of 33 potential practices. This study is the first known attempt to develop consensus on a list of health literacy practices and to translate recommended health literacy practices into an agreed-upon set of measurable educational competencies for health professionals. Further work is needed to prioritize the competencies and practices in

  19. Social and Cultural Barriers: Understanding Musculoskeletal Health Literacy: AOA Critical Issues.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Andrew J; Uhl, Richard L; Rankin, E Anthony; Mulligan, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    The Institute of Medicine considers limited health literacy a "silent epidemic," as approximately half of Americans lack the competencies necessary for making informed decisions regarding their health. Limited health literacy substantially impedes the effective dissemination and comprehension of relevant health information, and also complicates communication, compromises care, and leads to worse patient outcomes. Poor health, early death, and worse control of chronic conditions have also been associated with limited health literacy. Unfortunately, physicians often struggle to identify those with limited health literacy, which can have adverse effects on the physician-patient relationship. In this article, we discuss the meaning of health literacy,the risk factors for and consequences of limited health literacy, orthopaedic-specific implications and investigations, and the strategies orthopaedic surgeons can utilize to improve health literacy and communication. PMID:27053590

  20. Online, Tuned In, Turned On: Multimedia Approaches to Fostering Critical Media Health Literacy for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begoray, Deborah L.; Banister, Elizabeth M.; Wharf Higgins, Joan; Wilmot, Robin

    2014-01-01

    The commercial media is an influential sociocultural force and transmitter of health information especially for adolescents. Instruction in critical media health literacy, a combination of concepts from critical health literacy and critical media literacy, is a potentially effective means of raising adolescents' awareness about commercial…

  1. Health Literacy INDEX: development, reliability, and validity of a new tool for evaluating the health literacy demands of health information materials.

    PubMed

    Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Kreuter, Matthew W; Casey, Chris; Leme, Luisa; Thompson, Tess; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Jacobsen, Heather; Sterling, Ryan; Oguntimein, Joy; Filler, Carl; Culbert, Arthur; Rooney, Megan; Lapka, Christy

    2012-01-01

    There is no consensus on how best to assess the health literacy demands of health information materials. Comprehensive, reliable, and valid assessment tools are needed. The authors report on the development, refinement, and testing of Health Literacy INDEX, a new tool reflecting empirical evidence and best practices. INDEX is comprised of 63 indicators organized into 10 criteria: plain language, clear purpose, supporting graphics, user involvement, skill-based learning, audience appropriateness, user instruction, development details, evaluation methods, and strength of evidence. In a sample of 100 materials, intercoder agreement was high: 90% or better for 52% of indicators, and above 80% for nearly all others. Overall scores generated by INDEX were highly correlated with average ratings from 12 health literacy experts (r = 0.89, p < .0001). Additional research is warranted to examine the association between evaluation ratings generated by INDEX and individual understanding, behaviors, and improved health. Health Literacy INDEX is a comprehensive tool with evidence for reliability and validity that can be used to evaluate the health literacy demands of health information materials. Although improvement in health information materials is just one aspect of mitigating the effects of limited health literacy on health outcomes, it is an essential step toward a more health literate public. PMID:23030571

  2. Which providers can bridge the health literacy gap in lifestyle risk factor modification education: a systematic review and narrative synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background People with low health literacy may not have the capacity to self-manage their health and prevent the development of chronic disease through lifestyle risk factor modification. The aim of this narrative synthesis is to determine the effectiveness of primary healthcare providers in developing health literacy of patients to make SNAPW (smoking, nutrition, alcohol, physical activity and weight) lifestyle changes. Methods Studies were identified by searching Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Joanna Briggs Institute, Psychinfo, Web of Science, Scopus, APAIS, Australian Medical Index, Community of Science and Google Scholar from 1 January 1985 to 30 April 2009. Health literacy and related concepts are poorly indexed in the databases so a list of text words were developed and tested for use. Hand searches were also conducted of four key journals. Studies published in English and included males and females aged 18 years and over with at least one SNAPW risk factor for the development of a chronic disease. The interventions had to be implemented within primary health care, with an aim to influence the health literacy of patients to make SNAPW lifestyle changes. The studies had to report an outcome measure associated with health literacy (knowledge, skills, attitudes, self efficacy, stages of change, motivation and patient activation) and SNAPW risk factor. The definition of health literacy in terms of functional, communicative and critical health literacy provided the guiding framework for the review. Results 52 papers were included that described interventions to address health literacy and lifestyle risk factor modification provided by different health professionals. Most of the studies (71%, 37/52) demonstrated an improvement in health literacy, in particular interventions of a moderate to high intensity. Non medical health care providers were effective in improving health literacy. However this was confounded by intensity of intervention. Provider

  3. Application of the health literacy framework to diet-related cancer prevention conversations of older immigrant women to Canada.

    PubMed

    Thomson, M D; Hoffman-Goetz, L

    2012-03-01

    Health literacy, conceptualized as a framework involving basic (functional), interactive and critical skill sets, is a key determinant of health. Application of the health literacy framework (HLF) to immigrant populations has been limited. Our objective was to apply the HLF to discourses about diet-related colon cancer prevention among English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) immigrant women. We also explored whether these discussions could inform the development of culturally appropriate information and potentially increase health literacy. Interviews were conducted with 64 older Spanish-speaking ESL immigrant women. Directed content analysis guided by the HLF was used to identify themes. Diet-related conversations were initiated by 43 (67%) participants. Four themes were identified: general information requests-low functional health literacy (FHL) (n = 23/43), specific nutrition inquiries-high FHL (n = 17/43), actions for healthy eating-low interactive health literacy (IHL) (n = 8/43) and community communication issues-high IHL (n = 3/43). No conversations representing critical health literacy were identified. Five women discussed both FHL and IHL themes. Women's diet-related conversations followed a continuum of increasing information needs supporting the HLF. PMID:21421578

  4. Low Health Literacy and Evaluation of Online Health Information: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    van den Putte, Bas; Giani, Stefano; van Weert, Julia CM

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in consumer online health information seeking. The quality of online health information, however, remains questionable. The issue of information evaluation has become a hot topic, leading to the development of guidelines and checklists to design high-quality online health information. However, little attention has been devoted to how consumers, in particular people with low health literacy, evaluate online health information. Objective The main aim of this study was to review existing evidence on the association between low health literacy and (1) people’s ability to evaluate online health information, (2) perceived quality of online health information, (3) trust in online health information, and (4) use of evaluation criteria for online health information. Methods Five academic databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Communication and Mass-media Complete) were systematically searched. We included peer-reviewed publications investigating differences in the evaluation of online information between people with different health literacy levels. Results After abstract and full-text screening, 38 articles were included in the review. Only four studies investigated the specific role of low health literacy in the evaluation of online health information. The other studies examined the association between educational level or other skills-based proxies for health literacy, such as general literacy, and outcomes. Results indicate that low health literacy (and related skills) are negatively related to the ability to evaluate online health information and trust in online health information. Evidence on the association with perceived quality of online health information and use of evaluation criteria is inconclusive. Conclusions The findings indicate that low health literacy (and related skills) play a role in the evaluation of online health information. This topic is therefore worth more scholarly

  5. Health literacy and parent attitudes about weight control for children.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Janet M; Saltzman, Jaclyn A; Musaad, Salma M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine associations between parental health literacy and parent attitudes about weight control strategies for young children. Parental low health literacy has been associated with poor child health outcomes, yet little is known about its relationship to child weight control and weight-related health information-seeking preferences. Data were drawn from the STRONG Kids Study, a Midwest panel survey among parents of preschool aged children (n = 497). Parents endorsed an average of 4.3 (SD =2.8) weight loss strategies, 53% endorsed all three recommended weight loss strategies for children, and fewer than 1% of parents endorsed any unsafe strategies. Parents were most likely to seek child weight loss information from healthcare professionals but those with low (vs. adequate) health literacy were significantly less likely to use the Internet or books and more likely to use minister/clergy as sources. Poisson and logistic regressions showed that higher health literacy was associated with endorsement of more strategies overall, more recommended strategies, and greater odds of endorsing each specific recommended strategy for child weight control, after adjusting for parent age, education, race/ethnicity, income, marital status, weight concern, and child BMI percentile. Findings suggest that health literacy impacts parental views about child weight loss strategies and health information-seeking preferences. Pediatric weight loss advice to parents should include assessment of parent attitudes and prior knowledge about child weight control and facilitate parent access to reliable sources of evidence-informed child weight control information. PMID:25868552

  6. Targeting low literacy patients pays off for health system.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    Ochsner Health, with headquarters in New Orleans, targets patients with low health literacy, along with other readmission reduction programs. When patients are readmitted, the case managers administer the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) tool, developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to identify patients who need extra help in understanding their discharge instructions. When case managers make post-discharge follow-up calls to at-risk patients, they ask a series of questions that determine if the patient can understand written instructions. - The staff uses pictographs and videos to educate patients identified as having low literacy and make sure the caregivers understand the discharge instructions. PMID:26521642

  7. The OPtimising HEalth LIterAcy (Ophelia) process: study protocol for using health literacy profiling and community engagement to create and implement health reform

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health literacy is a multi-dimensional concept comprising a range of cognitive, affective, social, and personal skills and attributes. This paper describes the research and development protocol for a large communities-based collaborative project in Victoria, Australia that aims to identify and respond to health literacy issues for people with chronic conditions. The project, called Ophelia (OPtimising HEalth LIterAcy) Victoria, is a partnership between two universities, eight service organisations and the Victorian Government. Based on the identified issues, it will develop and pilot health literacy interventions across eight disparate health services to inform the creation of a health literacy response framework to improve health outcomes and reduce health inequalities. Methods/Design The protocol draws on many inputs including the experience of the partners in previous co-creation and roll-out of large-scale health-promotion initiatives. Three key conceptual models/discourses inform the protocol: intervention mapping; quality improvement collaboratives, and realist synthesis. The protocol is outcomes-oriented and focuses on two key questions: ‘What are the health literacy strengths and weaknesses of clients of participating sites?’, and ‘How do sites interpret and respond to these in order to achieve positive health and equity outcomes for their clients?’. The process has six steps in three main phases. The first phase is a needs assessment that uses the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ), a multi-dimensional measure of health literacy, to identify common health literacy needs among clients. The second phase involves front-line staff and management within each service organisation in co-creating intervention plans to strategically respond to the identified local needs. The third phase will trial the interventions within each site to determine if the site can improve identified limitations to service access and/or health outcomes. Discussion

  8. [Health Literacy and patient education in medical rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Bitzer, Eva Maria; Spörhase, U

    2015-09-01

    Medical rehabilitation in Germany has a long tradition. It is covered by the statutory sickness funds and pension schemes, and is aimed at the prevention of work disability and need for nursing care due to chronic conditions. Chronically ill but health-literate patients - patients capable of making good health-related decisions, or of participating strongly in this decision making - have better health outcomes. To enhance health literacy and participation, medical rehabilitation relies heavily on patient education. This article describes health literacy from the perspective of educational research, outlines the basics of learning principles, and draws conclusions for developing patient education programmes in medical rehabilitation. Implementing a constructivist learning paradigm promotes changes within the trainer team and within the rehabilitation institution - turning it into a health-literate health care organisation. Health literacy in medical rehabilitation is aimed at neither turning the patient into a physician nor replacing evidence-based recommendations through subjective preferences. Medical rehabilitation reaches patients best by using modern health education programmes based on findings from education research, theoretically founded and directed towards building competencies. Furthermore, an educationally qualified training team and a rehabilitation institution are essential in enabling formal and informal learning processes. PMID:26153473

  9. [Photo stories instead of leaflets: support for people with low health literacy].

    PubMed

    Koops van 't Jagt, R; de Winter, A F; Jansen, C J M

    2016-01-01

    In the Netherlands, almost 30 percent of adults have limited levels of health literacy. They have difficulties finding, understanding and using health information. Comprehensible health information is extra important for people with low health literacy. A systematic review revealed that narrative health communication is a promising strategy to increase comprehension. We have investigated which interventions may improve comprehensibility of health-related documents for older adults with different levels of health literacy. We are currently exploring if and how photo stories on care and health topics can support people with low health literacy. PMID:27484423

  10. English-Spanish equivalence of the Health Literacy Assessment Using Talking Touchscreen Technology (Health LiTT).

    PubMed

    Hahn, Elizabeth A; Kallen, Michael A; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Ganschow, Pamela S; Garcia, Sofia F; Burns, James L

    2014-01-01

    Unbiased measurement instruments are needed to reliably estimate health literacy in diverse populations. The study aimed (a) to evaluate measurement equivalence of Health Literacy Assessment Using Talking Touchscreen Technology (Health LiTT) and (b) to compare Health LiTT scores between English- and Spanish-speaking individuals. Health LiTT and several patient-reported outcome instruments were completed by adult patients receiving care for type 2 diabetes at a safety net clinic. English-Spanish measurement equivalence was evaluated with an item response theory approach to differential item functioning (DIF) detection and impact. Health LiTT scores were compared by language using multivariable linear regression. Approximately equal numbers of English-speaking patients (n=146) and Spanish-speaking patients (n=149) with type 2 diabetes were enrolled. English participants were primarily non-Hispanic Black (65%); all Spanish participants were Hispanic. Six Health LiTT items were flagged for DIF. The Pearson correlation between unadjusted and DIF adjusted scores was 0.995; the mean difference of individual difference scores was 0.0005 (SD=0.0888). After adjusting for predisposing characteristics, enabling resources and need for care, Health LiTT scores were comparable for Spanish-speaking individuals versus English-speaking individuals. The effect of DIF items on Health LiTT scores appeared to be trivial. English-Spanish equivalence of Health LiTT will permit researchers to determine the independent effects of limited English proficiency and limited literacy. PMID:25315599

  11. Health Literacy in Schools: Prioritising Health and Well-Being Issues through the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgour, Lindsey; Matthews, Nic; Christian, Polly; Shire, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Health literacy (HL) is a relatively new concept in health promotion and is concerned with empowering people through enhancing their knowledge of health issues and improving their ability to make choices about their health and well-being. Schools are seen increasingly as key settings for the dissemination of health messages through curricula and…

  12. Health literacy among young adults: a short survey tool for public health and health promotion research.

    PubMed

    Abel, Thomas; Hofmann, Karen; Ackermann, Sabine; Bucher, Sabine; Sakarya, Sibel

    2015-09-01

    Health literacy (HL) is context-specific. In public health and health promotion, HL in the private realm refers to individuals' knowledge and skills to prevent disease and to promote health in everyday life. However, there is a scarcity of measurement tools explicitly geared to private realm contexts. Our aim was to develop and test a short survey tool that captures different dimensions of HL in the context of family and friends. We used cross-sectional data from the Swiss Federal Surveys of Adolescents from 2010 to 2011, comprising 7983 males and 366 females between 18 and 25 years. HL was assessed through a set of eight items (self-reports). We used principal component analysis to explore the underlying factor structure among these items in the male sample and confirmatory factor analysis to verify the factor structure in the female sample. The results showed that the tested item set represented dimensions of functional, interactive and critical HL. Two sub-dimensions, understanding versus finding health-relevant information, denoted functional HL. Interactive and critical HL were each represented with two items. A sum score based on all eight items (Cronbach's α: 0.64) showed expected positive associations with own and parental education among males and females (p < 0.05). The short item set appears to be a feasible measurement tool to assess HL in the private realm. Its broader application in survey studies may help to improve our understanding of how this form of HL is distributed in the general population. PMID:24482542

  13. The ACRL framework for information literacy in higher education: implications for health sciences librarianship.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Maureen; Brower, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    The Association of College and Research Libraries is developing a new framework of information literacy concepts that will revise and replace the previously adopted standards. This framework consists of six threshold concepts that are more flexible than the original standards, and that work to identify both the function and the feelings behind information literacy education practices. This column outlines the new tentative framework with an eye toward its implications for health sciences libraries, and suggests ways the medical library community might work with this new document. PMID:25316079

  14. Health Literacy Instruction and Evaluation among Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Betty; Rainey, Jacquie

    2007-01-01

    Background: Tobacco use, poor eating habits, and physical inactivity are the modifiable risk behaviors most associated with the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Because these risk behaviors are established during adolescence, the nation's schools are uniquely positioned to develop health literacy in students.…

  15. The Potential for Literacy to Shape Lifelong Cognitive Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A. L.; Hussey, Erika K.; Ng, Shukhan

    2015-01-01

    In light of population aging, an understanding of factors that promote lifelong cognitive resilience is urgent. There is considerable evidence that education early in the life span, which promotes the development of literacy skills, leads to cognitive health and longevity, but the ways in which activity engagement in later adulthood affects…

  16. Foundations of Life-Long Sexual Health Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Allyson Stella; Patrick, Julie Hicks

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Sexual education in adolescence may represent the only formal sexual information individuals ever receive. It is unclear whether this early educational experience is sufficient to promote lifelong sexual health literacy. The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of the timing and source of sexual knowledge on current safe sex…

  17. Science for Health Literacy: It's Never Been so Important

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Marcus; Woods-Townsend, Kathryn; Griffiths, Janice; Christodoulou, Andri; Byrne, Jenny; Bay, Jacquie; Godfrey, Keith; Inskip, Hazel; Hanson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines a project called "LifeLab," developed by researchers at the Education School, Faculty of Medicine and the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at the University of Southampton (UK), to promote a science-oriented approach to health literacy among teenagers. The main purposes of "LifeLab" are: (1) to improve…

  18. The Nurse's Role in Health Literacy of Patients With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Deborah; Hill, Jill

    2016-06-01

    Patients with cancer are often faced with complex diagnoses that require decision making in a highly stressful environment. The role of the healthcare team is to ensure that patients have the information, tools, and resources needed to make informed decisions. However, low health literacy is a common and undervalued factor in the outcomes of patients, particularly those with cancer. PMID:27206288

  19. Adult Basic Education and Health Literacy: Program Efforts and Perceived Student Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackert, Michael; Poag, Meg

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This project examined health literacy efforts among adult basic education providers in Central Texas. Methods: A survey was conducted with all adult literacy providers in Central Texas (N = 58). Results: Most programs provide health-related information. Literacy programs see needs for helping students communicate with doctors, filling…

  20. Measuring health literacy in populations: illuminating the design and development process of the European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire (HLS-EU-Q)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several measurement tools have been developed to measure health literacy. The tools vary in their approach and design, but few have focused on comprehensive health literacy in populations. This paper describes the design and development of the European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire (HLS-EU-Q), an innovative, comprehensive tool to measure health literacy in populations. Methods Based on a conceptual model and definition, the process involved item development, pre-testing, field-testing, external consultation, plain language check, and translation from English to Bulgarian, Dutch, German, Greek, Polish, and Spanish. Results The development process resulted in the HLS-EU-Q, which entailed two sections, a core health literacy section and a section on determinants and outcomes associated to health literacy. The health literacy section included 47 items addressing self-reported difficulties in accessing, understanding, appraising and applying information in tasks concerning decisions making in healthcare, disease prevention, and health promotion. The second section included items related to, health behaviour, health status, health service use, community participation, socio-demographic and socio-economic factors. Conclusions By illuminating the detailed steps in the design and development process of the HLS-EU-Q, it is the aim to provide a deeper understanding of its purpose, its capability and its limitations for others using the tool. By stimulating a wide application it is the vision that HLS-EU-Q will be validated in more countries to enhance the understanding of health literacy in different populations. PMID:24112855

  1. Functional Literacy in India: A Progress Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhargava, Alka

    2008-01-01

    Literacy has been a priority for the leaders of India since before Independence. Since the independence of the country in 1947, eradication of illiteracy has been a major concern of the national Government. The nation's constitution includes specific articles and amendments to guarantee the advancement of education. During the country's first Five…

  2. Media Literacy Function in Critical Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander; Levitskaya, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    The Internet is widely recognized as playing an important role in facilitating education on a range of issues, including media literacy. Analyzing the media critical activity of contemporary Russian bloggers, the authors of the article reveal the following reasons for popularity or, on the contrary, unpopularity of blogger's media criticism:…

  3. Low parent health literacy is associated with 'obesogenic' infant care behaviours.

    PubMed

    Cha, EunSeok; Besse, Jennifer Lee

    2015-04-01

    Implications for practice and research: Obesogenic infant care behaviours may increase childhood obesity, and predict obesity and related health risks in adulthood. Poor parent health literacy predicts poor child health outcomes including childhood obesity. Nurses should assess parent health literacy and provide appropriate support to prevent obesogenic infant care behaviours. Future research could focus on evaluating parent educational programmes tailored to health literacy level and effectiveness on reducing obesogenic care behaviours. PMID:25079221

  4. Health literacy and child health promotion: implications for research, clinical care, and public policy.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Lee M; Shaw, Judith S; Guez, Ghislaine; Baur, Cynthia; Rudd, Rima

    2009-11-01

    The nation's leading sources of morbidity and health disparities (eg, preterm birth, obesity, chronic lung disease, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, mental health disorders, and cancer) require an evidence-based approach to the delivery of effective preventive care across the life course (eg, prenatal care, primary preventive care, immunizations, physical activity, nutrition, smoking cessation, and early diagnostic screening). Health literacy may be a critical and modifiable factor for improving preventive care and reducing health disparities. Recent studies among adults have established an independent association between lower health literacy and poorer understanding of preventive care information and poor access to preventive care services. Children of parents with higher literacy skills are more likely to have better outcomes in child health promotion and disease prevention. Adult studies in disease prevention have suggested that addressing health literacy would be an efficacious strategy for reducing health disparities. Future initiatives to reduce child health inequities should include health-promotion strategies that meet the health literacy needs of children, adolescents, and their caregivers. PMID:19861485

  5. Health Literacy Screening of Geriatric Monolingual Spanish-Speaking Patients Using Single-Item Literacy Screening Questions and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordasco, Kristina M.; Homeier, Diana C.; Franco, Idalid; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Sarkisian, Catherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We describe the performance of Single Item Literacy Screener (SILS) questions, and educational attainment, as screening for inadequate health literacy (IHL) in older monolingual Spanish speakers. Design: We used a cross-sectional design, interviewing participants once at the time of their arrival for a clinic appointment. Setting: We…

  6. Health Literacy, Acculturation, and the Use of Preventive Oral Health Care by Somali Refugees Living in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Hunter Adams, Jo; Penrose, Katherine L.; Cochran, Jennifer; Rybin, Denis; Doros, Gheorghe; Henshaw, Michelle; Paasche-Orlow, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the impact of English health literacy and spoken proficiency and acculturation on preventive dental care use among Somali refugees in Massachusetts. Methods 439 adult Somalis in the U.S. ≤ 10 years ago were interviewed. English functional health literacy, dental word recognition, and spoken proficiency were measured using STOFHLA, REALD, and BEST Plus. Logistic regression tested associations of language measures with preventive dental care use. Results Without controlling for acculturation, participants with higher health literacy were 2.0 times more likely to have had preventive care (p=0.02). Subjects with higher word recognition were 1.8 times as likely to have had preventive care (p=0.04). Controlling for acculturation, these were no longer significant, and spoken proficiency was not associated with increased preventive care use. Discussion English health literacy and spoken proficiency were not associated with preventive dental care. Other factors, like acculturation, were more predictive of care use than language skills. PMID:23748902

  7. Enhancing Teacher Health Literacy in School Health Promotion: A Vision for the New Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Fred L.; Cooper, Randy J.; Laird, Justin M.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews a traditional model for school health teacher preparation, presenting an alternative model for enhancing health literacy in teacher education which offers an innovative instructional paradigm, the Child and Adolescent Health (CAH) Logic Framework. This model emphasizes links between child and adolescent health research and theory, CAH…

  8. Contextualizing an Expanded Definition of Health Literacy among Adolescents in the Health Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Philip M.; Prelip, Michael; Calimlim, Brian M.; Quiter, Elaine S.; Glik, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    The current emphasis on preventive health care and wellness services suggests that measures of skills and competencies needed to effectively navigate the health care system need to be better defined. We take an expanded perspective of health literacy and define it as a set of skills used to organize and apply health knowledge, attitudes and…

  9. Health literacy, socioeconomic status and self-rated health in Japan.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yoko; Kondo, Naoki; Yamagata, Zentaro; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2015-09-01

    Health literacy (HL) is a key determinant of health in a contemporary society characterized by abundant information. Previous studies have suggested that basic or functional HL is positively associated with health, whereas evidences on the association between health and communicative/critical HL are scarce. Furthermore, confounding by socioeconomic status on HL-health association has been poorly tested. Using cross-sectional data from a nationally representative community-based survey in Japan, we investigated whether communicative/critical HL is associated with self-rated health independent of socioeconomic status. A total of 1237 subjects participated in this study; the response rate was 62%. To measure communicative/critical HL, we used three questions assessing the respondents' ability to select, to communicate to others and to evaluate specific health-related information. Potential confounders included demographic factors, household income, employment status, and educational attainment. A multivariate model revealed that good self-reported health was significantly associated with younger age [odds ratio (OR), 0.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.97-0.99], employment (OR, 2.89; 95% CI, 1.06-7.88) and higher communicative/critical HL scores (OR 2.75; 95%CI, 1.93-3.90). Respondents with lower education were likely to have poorer communicative/critical HL. These results imply that to close the health gap, policy interventions should focus on the promotion of HL among deprived sociodemographic groups. PMID:24131729

  10. Health Literacy and Adolescents: A Framework and Agenda for Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manganello, Jennifer A.

    2008-01-01

    Health literacy is an important issue in public health today, especially as patients are taking a greater role in obtaining information about their health. Health literacy is commonly defined as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate…