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Sample records for functional il-2 receptor

  1. The expression of functional IL-2 receptor on activated macrophages depends on the stimulus applied.

    PubMed Central

    Valitutti, S; Carbone, A; Castellino, F; Maggiano, N; Ricci, R; Larocca, L M; Musiani, P

    1989-01-01

    Human peripheral blood monocytes (Mo) synthesize prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) when activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This production is strongly enhanced by the addition of supernatant from phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-activated T cells. To evaluate the factor(s) responsible for this enhancement we studied the effect of several cytokines on the PGE2 metabolism. Recombinant interleukin-1 (IL-1) or recombinant IL-2 strongly enhanced PGE2 synthesis in LPS-stimulated Mo cultures, whereas recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) partially inhibited its production. To see whether the effect of IL-2 on Mo was due to the presence of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) on the cell surface, flow cytometric analysis and electron microscopy were used to investigate IL-2R expression in unstimulated and stimulated Mo. Stimulated, but not resting, Mo displayed the p55 IL-2R chain on their cellular surface and associated with the polyribosomes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum in the cytoplasm. This finding strongly suggested that the p55 chain of the IL-2R was synthesized by activated Mo. To confirm this result, 125I-labelled IL-2 was bound under high- and low-affinity conditions and cross-linked to Mo cultured in the presence of LPS, IFN-gamma or IL-1. The cross-linked 125I-IL-2/IL-2R complexes were analysed by SDS-PAGE. Mo cultured with LPS, IFN-gamma and IL-1 expressed the p55 protein detected by low-affinity cross-linking, whereas only LPS-stimulated Mo displayed a barely detectable band with an apparent MW of 70,000 under high-affinity binding conditions. In addition, stimulated Mo were found capable of producing the soluble form of IL-2R. Finally, LPS-activated Mo only responded to the addition of IL-2 by an increase in PGE2 production, suggesting that the function of IL-2R on activated Mo is linked to the stimulus applied. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2661416

  2. A biophysical approach to IL-2 and IL-15 receptor function: localization, conformation and interactions.

    PubMed

    Bodnár, Andrea; Nizsalóczki, Eniko; Mocsár, Gábor; Szalóki, Nikoletta; Waldmann, Thomas A; Damjanovich, Sándor; Vámosi, György

    2008-03-15

    Interleukin-2 and interleukin-15 (IL-2, IL-15) are key participants in T and NK cell activation and function. Sharing the beta and gamma receptor subunits results in several common functions: e.g. the promotion of T cell proliferation. On the other hand, due to their distinct alpha receptor subunits, they also play opposing roles in immune processes such as activation induced cell death and immunological memory. Divergence of signaling pathways must ensue already at the plasma membrane where the cytokines interact with their receptors. Therefore understanding molecular details of receptor organization and mapping interactions with other membrane proteins that might influence receptor conformation and function, are of key importance. Biophysical/advanced microscopic methods (fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), fluorescence crosscorrelation spectroscopy (FCCS), near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, NMR spectroscopy) have been instrumental in clarifying the details of receptor structure and organization from the atomic level to the assembly and dynamics of supramolecular clusters. In this short review some important contributions shaping our current view of IL-2 and IL-15 receptors are presented. PMID:18280585

  3. IL-2 regulation of soluble IL-2 receptor levels following thermal injury.

    PubMed Central

    Teodorczyk-Injeyan, J A; Sparkes, B G; Lalani, S; Peters, W J; Mills, G B

    1992-01-01

    In the immunosuppressed burn patient serum levels of both IL-2 and a soluble form of IL-2 receptor alpha (sIL-2R alpha) are significantly elevated. Strikingly, the production of these markers by the in vitro activated patients' cells is decreased. This study examines the role of IL-2 in the decreased production of the sIL-2R alpha in vitro in patients with major burns (n = 18, 30 to greater than 70% total body surface area). Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures from patients with highly elevated serum sIL-2R alpha, and from healthy controls (n = 12) were activated with concanavalin A (Con A) at initiation. In patients' cultures mitogen-induced increments of sIL-2R alpha levels were significantly lower. There was a significant negative correlation (r = 0.64, P less than 0.001) between a high serum sIL-2R alpha level and a decreased lectin-induced sIL-2R alpha release in vitro. Low levels of sIL-2R alpha in patients' samples were not normalized by increasing the number of T lymphocytes. Also exogenous rIL-1 was without effect, whereas rIL-3 increased sIL-2R alpha release in some cultures. However, sIL-2R alpha levels were significantly increased in patients' cultures by (i) addition of exogenous IL-2; (ii) removal of adherent cells; (iii) addition of cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin; (iv) bypassing cell surface activation by the combination of the calcium ionophore A23187 and the phorbol ester 12-o-tetradecanoyl acetate. The cyclic AMP-elevating drug, forskolin, abrogated the ability of exogenous IL-2 to increase sIL-2R alpha production. Thus, in the burn patient, the reduced in vitro sIL-2R alpha release appears to relate to abnormalities in IL-2 production and action mediated through its functional surface receptor. Elevated levels of sIL-2R alpha in vivo may, therefore, reflect systemic activation of T lymphocytes in response to biologically active IL-2. PMID:1382903

  4. Role of alpha chain-IL-2 complex in the formation of the ternary complex of IL-2 and high-affinity IL-2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Kamio, M; Uchiyama, T; Arima, N; Itoh, K; Ishikawa, T; Hori, T; Uchino, H

    1990-01-01

    Using anti-Tac (anti-alpha chain) and 2R-B (anti-beta chain) antibodies, we studied the roles of IL-2 receptor subunits (alpha and beta chains) in the formation of IL-2 and high-affinity IL-2 receptor complex, which is the initial event of IL-2 induced T cell growth. High-affinity IL-2 binding which was undetectable in the presence of 2R-B antibody at 4 degrees C became fully detectable when examined at 37 degrees C, which explained the lack of inhibition by 2R-B antibody of IL-2-induced proliferation of the cells expressing high-affinity IL-2 receptor. We further studied the mechanism of the 'reappearance' of high-affinity IL-2 binding in the presence of 2R-B antibody. The addition of IL-2 to the cells preincubated with radiolabeled or fluorescence-labeled 2R-B antibody resulted in a marked decrease in the antibody bound to the cells expressing high-affinity IL-2 receptor at 37 degrees C. This decrease was blocked by the presence of anti-Tac antibody, which inhibited IL-2 binding to alpha chain, but not by 7G7/B6 antibody, which recognized a non-IL-2 binding site of its chain. Furthermore, the decrease in cell-bound 2R-B antibody was not due to the internalization of beta chain-2R-B antibody complex, because the amount of cell-bound Mik-beta3 antibody recognizing a non-IL-2 binding epitope of beta chain remained unchanged, nor to the inhibition by simple competitive binding of IL-2 molecules to beta chain as judged from comparative studies of competitive binding inhibition. Taking these data together, the reappearance of high-affinity IL-2 binding was considered to be caused by the replacement of 2R-B antibody at the IL-2 binding site of beta chain by alpha chain-mediated IL-2, and it was strongly suggested that alpha chain-IL-2 complex has a key role in the formation of the ternary complex of IL-2 and high-affinity IL-2 receptor. alpha chain may function as a dimension converter of IL-2 to effectively deliver IL-2 molecules to a relatively small number of beta

  5. Curcumin blocks interleukin (IL)-2 signaling in T-lymphocytes by inhibiting IL-2 synthesis, CD25 expression, and IL-2 receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Forward, Nicholas A.; Conrad, David M.; Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Doucette, Carolyn D.; Furlong, Suzanne J.; Lin, Tong-Jun; Hoskin, David W.

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Curcumin inhibits CD4{sup +} T-lymphocyte proliferation. {yields} Curcumin inhibits interleukin-2 (IL-2) synthesis and CD25 expression by CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes. {yields} Curcumin interferes with IL-2 receptor signaling by inhibiting JAK3 and STAT5 phosphorylation. {yields} IL-2-dependent regulatory T-lymphocyte function and Foxp3 expression is downregulated by curcumin. -- Abstract: Curcumin (diferulomethane) is the principal curcuminoid in the spice tumeric and a potent inhibitor of activation-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation; however, the molecular basis of this immunosuppressive effect has not been well studied. Here we show that micromolar concentrations of curcumin inhibited DNA synthesis by mouse CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes, as well as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 ({alpha} chain of the high affinity IL-2 receptor) expression in response to antibody-mediated cross-linking of CD3 and CD28. Curcumin acted downstream of protein kinase C activation and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release to inhibit I{kappa}B phosphorylation, which is required for nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF{kappa}B. In addition, IL-2-dependent DNA synthesis by mouse CTLL-2 cells, but not constitutive CD25 expression, was impaired in the presence of curcumin, which demonstrated an inhibitory effect on IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling. IL-2-induced phosphorylation of STAT5A and JAK3, but not JAK1, was diminished in the presence of curcumin, indicating inhibition of critical proximal events in IL-2R signaling. In line with the inhibitory action of curcumin on IL-2R signaling, pretreatment of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T-cells with curcumin downregulated suppressor function, as well as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression. We conclude that curcumin inhibits IL-2 signaling by reducing available IL-2 and high affinity IL-2R, as well as interfering with IL-2R signaling.

  6. Early immune response and regulation of IL-2 receptor subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie; Sugano, Eiko; Schopper, Thomas; Li, Chai-Fei; Boonyaratanakornkit, J. B.; Cogoli, Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays were used to monitor expression of 8796 genes and probe sets in activated T-cells; analysis revealed that 217 genes were significantly upregulated within 4 h. Induced genes included transcription factors, cytokines and their receptor genes. Analysis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the significant induction of IL-2, IL-2R(gamma) and IL-2R(alpha). Forty-eight of the 217 induced genes are known to or predicted to be regulated by a CRE promoter/enhancer. We found that T-cell activation caused a significant increase in CREB phosphorylation furthermore, inhibition of the PKC pathway by GF109203 reduced CREB activation by 50% and inhibition of the PKA pathway caused a total block of CREB phosphorylation and significantly reduced IFN(gamma), IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha) gene expression by approximately 40% (p<0.001). PKC(theta) plays a major role in T-cell activation: inhibition of PKC significantly reduced the expression of IFN(gamma), IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha). Since PKC blocked activation of CREB, we studied potential cross-talk between the PKC and the PKA/MAPK pathways, PMA-stimulated Jurkat cells were studied with specific signal pathway inhibitors. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 (ERK2) pathway was found to be significantly activated greater than seven-fold within 30 min; however, there was little activation of ERK-1 and no activation of JNK or p38 MAPK. Inhibition of the PKA pathway, but not the PKC pathway, resulted in inhibition of ERK1/2 activation at all time points, inhibition of MEK1 and 2 significantly blocked expression of IL-2 and IL-2R(alpha). Gene expression of IL-2R(alpha) and IFN(gamma) was dependent on PKA in S49 wt cells but not in kin- mutants. Using gel shift analysis, we found that forskolin activation of T-cells resulted in activation of AP1 sites; this increase in nuclear extract AP1 was significantly blocked by MEK1 inhibitor U0126. Taken together, these results suggest that the PKA in addition to PKC and

  7. Interleukin 2 (IL2) PE40 is cytotoxic to cells displaying either the p55 or p70 subunit of the IL2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Lorberboum-Galski, H; Kozak, R W; Waldmann, T A; Bailon, P; FitzGerald, D J; Pastan, I

    1988-12-15

    IL2-PE40 is a chimeric protein composed of human interleukin 2 (IL2) genetically fused to the amino terminus of a modified form of pseudomonas exotoxin (PE). Internalization of IL2 via the individual p55 and p70 subunits of the IL2 receptor was studied using IL2-PE40 on several mouse and human cell lines expressing either the p55, the p70, or both IL2 receptor subunits. Internalization was assessed by measuring inhibition of protein synthesis caused by the toxin moiety of IL2-PE40. The results demonstrate that IL2 internalization is mediated by either the p55 receptor subunit or by the p70 subunit but is much more efficient when high affinity receptors composed of both subunits are present. IL2-PE40 is a powerful reagent for studying IL2 receptor interactions and for analyzing pathways of the immune response and its regulation. PMID:3143716

  8. Evidence for enhanced interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion and IL-2 receptor presentation by synovial fluid lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lemm, G; Warnatz, H

    1986-01-01

    Synovial fluid lymphocytes (SFL) and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and reactive oligoarthritis were investigated for activated T cells (Ia+SIg-), IL-2 receptor bearing cells (Tac+) and IL-2 production in vivo and in vitro. In contrast to negative results with blood, the synovial fluid of the arthritic joints contains considerable amounts of IL-2 activity (median: 11.8 mu/ml), elevated proportions of Ia+SIg- activated T cells (median: 12.5%) and of IL-2 receptor bearing cells (median: 2.5%). In vitro, after stimulation with several Concanavalin A (Con A) doses, SFL develop proportions of IL-2 receptor cells comparable to PBL. Furthermore, they produce higher values of IL-2 activity than comparable PBL cultures. The proportions of Ia+SIg- activated T cells increase only moderately after Con A stimulation compared to in vivo data, indicating different activated T cell subsets in the synovial fluid (Ia+SIg-, Tac+). The findings are discussed as an expression of an acute hyperactivation of lymphocytes in an inflamed joint. PMID:3089651

  9. In-vitro characterization of novel and functional regulatory SNPs in the promoter region of IL2 and IL2R alpha in a Gabonese population

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The selection pressure imposed by the parasite has a functional consequence on the immune genes, leading to altered immune function in which regulatory T cells (Tregs) induced by parasites during infectious challenges modulate or thwart T effector cell mechanism. Methods We identified and investigated regulatory polymorphisms in the immune gene IL2 and its receptor IL2R alpha (also known as CD25) in Gabonese individuals exposed to plentiful parasitic infections. Results We identified two reported variants each for IL2 and its receptor IL2R alpha gene loci. Also identified were two novel variants, -83 /-84 CT deletions (ss410961576) for IL2 and -409C/T (ss410961577) for IL2R alpha. We further validated all identified promoter variants for their allelic gene expression using transient transfection assays. Three promoter variants of the IL2 locus revealed no significant expression of the reporter gene. The identified novel variant (ss410961577C/T) of the IL2R alpha revealed a significant higher expression of the reporter gene in comparison to the major allele (P<0.05). In addition, the rs12722616C/T variant of the IL2R alpha locus altered the transcription factor binding site TBP (TATA box binding protein) and C/EBP beta (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta) that are believed to regulate the Treg function. Conclusions The identification and validation of such regulatory polymorphisms in the immune genes may provide a basis for future studies on parasite susceptibility in a population where T cell functions are compromised. PMID:23217119

  10. Functional NK cell repertoires are maintained through IL-2Rα and FasL

    PubMed Central

    Felices, Martin; Lenvik, Todd R.; Ankarlo, Dave E.M.; Foley, Bree; Curtsinger, Julie; Luo, Xianghua; Blazar, Bruce R.; Anderson, Stephen K.; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Acquisition of a functional natural killer (NK) cell repertoire, known as education or licensing, is a complex process mediated through inhibitory receptors that recognize self. We found that NK cells containing self-killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) for cognate HLA-ligand in vivo were less susceptible to apoptosis. In vitro IL-15 withdrawal showed that uneducated NK cells upregulated Bim and Fas. Conversely, educated NK cells upregulated FasL under these conditions. Induction of cell death and Bim expression on uneducated cells correlated with increased IL-2Rα expression. Overexpression and knockdown studies showed that higher IL-2Rα limits NK cell survival in a novel manner that is independent from the role of IL-2 in activation induced cell death (AICD). To study the role of FasL in induction of IL-2Rαhi NK cell death, a co-culture assay with FasL blocking antibodies was used. IL-15 withdrawal led to FasL dependent killing of IL-2Rαhi NK cells by more educated IL-2Rαlo NK cells. Finally, CMV reactivation induces a potent long-lasting population of licensed NK cells with enhanced survival. These findings show education dependent NK cell survival advantages and killing of uneducated NK result in the maintenance of a functional repertoire, which may be manipulated to exploit NK cells for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24634493

  11. Cloning of a type I cytokine receptor most related to the IL-2 receptor β chain

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Katsutoshi; Kikly, Kristine; Michalovich, David; Young, Peter R.; Leonard, Warren J.

    2000-01-01

    We have identified a type I cytokine receptor, which we have termed novel interleukin receptor (NILR), that is most related to the IL-2 receptor β chain (IL-2Rβ) and physically adjacent to the IL-4 receptor α chain gene on chromosome 16. NILR mRNA is most highly expressed in thymus and spleen, and is induced by phytohemagglutinin in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. NILR protein was detected on human T cell lymphotropic virus type I-transformed T cell lines, Raji B cells, and YT natural killer-like cells. Artificial homodimerization of the NILR cytoplasmic domain confers proliferation to Ba/F3 murine pro-B cells but not to 32D myeloid progenitor cells or CTLL-2 murine helper T cells. In these latter cells, heterodimerization of IL-2Rβ and the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) cytoplasmic domains allows potent proliferation, whereas such heterodimerization of NILR with γc does not. This finding suggests that NILR has signaling potential but that a full understanding of its signaling partner(s) is not yet clear. Like IL-2Rβ, NILR associates with Jak1 and mediates Stat5 activation. PMID:11016959

  12. Green tea EGCG suppresses T cell proliferation through impairment of IL-2/IL-2 receptor signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have suggested a benefit of consuming green tea in promoting general health and reducing the risk of certain diseases. However, little is known about the effect of green tea on immune function. In this study we determined the effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major active comp...

  13. Association study of schizophrenia and IL-2 receptor {beta} chain gene

    SciTech Connect

    Nimgaonkar, V.L.; Yang, Z.W.; Zhang, X.R.; Brar, J.S.

    1995-10-09

    A case-control association study was conducted in Caucasian patients with schizophrenia (DSM-III-R, n = 42) and unaffected controls (n = 47) matched for ethnicity and area of residence. Serum interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) concentrations, as well as a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in the IL-2RP chain gene, were examined in both groups. No significant differences in IL-2R concentrations or in the distribution of the polymorphism were noted. This study does not support an association between schizophrenia and the IL-2RP gene locus, contrary to the suggestive evidence from linkage analysis in multicase families. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Increased production of interleukin-2 and IL-2 receptor in primary IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Schena, F P; Mastrolitti, G; Jirillo, E; Munno, I; Pellegrino, N; Fracasso, A R; Aventaggiato, L

    1989-03-01

    The production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in 13 patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and 9 patients with chronic glomerulonephritis was investigated. Moreover, the distribution of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) expression was studied in the purified T cell population versus the non-T cell population of IgAN patients. The results show a spontaneous significant production of IL-2 in cultures of PBMC from patients with IgAN (P less than 0.025) that increased after PHA stimulation. IgAN patients also had a significantly higher expression of IL-2R on the surface of PBMC than did patients with chronic glomerulonephritis (P less than 0.05). IL-2R was usually detected on unstimulated purified T cells that expressed the activation DR antigen. Moreover, a high number of DR helper T cells was associated to a reduced number of suppressor T cells (OKT8+M1+). These findings suggest that the increased production of IL-2 in patients with IgAN may be responsible for the increased activity of helper T cells. The high number of IL-2R expressed by freshly separated PBMC implies an in vivo continuous stimulation of these cells, and this finding is in agreement with the demonstrated spontaneous hyperproduction of IL-2. Moreover, the low number of suppressor T cells may contribute to the overactivity of helper T cells bearing IL-2R in IgAN patients. PMID:2785227

  15. Interleukin-2 (IL-2, Proleukin) and immune function.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    IL-2 is an immune-based therapy that results in dramatic increases in CD4+ cell counts when used in conjunction with anti-HIV therapy. Although IL-2 has been discussed in previous issues of PI Perspective, new information warrants a further look at the product. PMID:12647677

  16. Effects of histamine type-2 receptor antagonists on indomethacin and IL-2 immunotherapy of metastasis.

    PubMed

    Saarloos, M N; Khoo, N K; Lala, P K

    1993-05-01

    Histamine type-2 receptor antagonists (H-2RA) have been used chronically to prevent dyspepsia in cancer patients subjected to immunotherapy with chronic indomethacin (Indo) and intermittent IL-2 in our cancer centre. We tested the effects of these agents during immunotherapy of C3H/HeJ mice transplanted s.c. with 5 x 10(5) C3L5 mammary adenocarcinoma cells. Tumor-transplanted mice were divided into groups receiving: (1) Indo (14 micrograms/ml); (2) H-2RA, i.e. (a) ranitidine at 28.6 micrograms/ml (Ran-lo) or 143 micrograms/ml (Ran-hi), or (b) famotidine (Fam) at 4.3 micrograms/ml, or (c) cimetidine (Cim) at 107 micrograms/ml, all in the drinking water on days 5-24; (3) IL-2 (1.5 x 10(3) Cetus U i.p. every 8 h on days 10-14 and 20-24); (4) combinations of H-2RA + Indo; or (5) combinations of H-2RA + Indo + IL-2. Animals were killed on day 24 for examination of primary s.c. tumor growth, secondary lung metastasis and splenocyte cytotoxicity against YAC-1 lymphoma cells (51Cr release assay). Results revealed: (1) primary tumor growth was reduced in mice treated with Fam + Indo, Indo + IL-2 and any of the H-2RA + Indo + IL-2 (no difference observed within the last two groups); (2) lung metastases decreased in mice treated with IL-2 alone, Indo + IL-2, and Indo + IL-2 + Ran-hi; (3) splenic cytotoxicity was suppressed in tumor-bearing controls, with partial restoration seen in Ran (both doses), Ran-lo + Indo, Ran-lo + Indo + IL-2, and Cim + Indo + IL-2 treated groups. Nearly complete restoration was seen in Cim, Cim + Indo, Indo + IL-2, Ran-hi + Indo + IL-2, and Fam + Indo + IL-2 groups. Thus, addition of H-2RA did not alter the overall therapeutic efficacy of the standard Indo + IL-2 tumor immunotherapy. PMID:8097142

  17. Clathrin-independent endocytosis used by the IL-2 receptor is regulated by Rac1, Pak1 and Pak2

    PubMed Central

    Grassart, Alexandre; Dujeancourt, Annick; Lazarow, Paul B; Dautry-Varsat, Alice; Sauvonnet, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    There are several endocytic pathways, which are either dependent on or independent of clathrin. This study focuses on a poorly characterized mechanism—clathrin- and caveolae-independent endocytosis—used by the interleukin-2 receptor β (IL-2Rβ). We address the question of its regulation in comparison with the clathrin-dependent pathway. First, we show that Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) is specifically required for IL-2Rβ entry, and we identify p21-activated kinases (Paks) as downstream targets. By RNA interference, we show that Pak1 and Pak2 are both necessary for IL-2Rβ uptake, in contrast to the clathrin-dependent route. We observe that cortactin, a partner of actin and dynamin—two essential endocytic factors—is required for IL-2Rβ uptake. Furthermore, we find that cortactin acts downstream from Paks, suggesting control of its function by these kinases. Thus, we describe a cascade composed of Rac1, Paks and cortactin specifically regulating IL-2Rβ internalization. This study indicates Paks as the first specific regulators of the clathrin-independent endocytosis pathway. PMID:18344974

  18. Clathrin-independent endocytosis used by the IL-2 receptor is regulated by Rac1, Pak1 and Pak2.

    PubMed

    Grassart, Alexandre; Dujeancourt, Annick; Lazarow, Paul B; Dautry-Varsat, Alice; Sauvonnet, Nathalie

    2008-04-01

    There are several endocytic pathways, which are either dependent on or independent of clathrin. This study focuses on a poorly characterized mechanism-clathrin- and caveolae-independent endocytosis-used by the interleukin-2 receptor beta (IL-2R beta). We address the question of its regulation in comparison with the clathrin-dependent pathway. First, we show that Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) is specifically required for IL-2R beta entry, and we identify p21-activated kinases (Paks) as downstream targets. By RNA interference, we show that Pak1 and Pak2 are both necessary for IL-2R beta uptake, in contrast to the clathrin-dependent route. We observe that cortactin, a partner of actin and dynamin-two essential endocytic factors-is required for IL-2R beta uptake. Furthermore, we find that cortactin acts downstream from Paks, suggesting control of its function by these kinases. Thus, we describe a cascade composed of Rac1, Paks and cortactin specifically regulating IL-2R beta internalization. This study indicates Paks as the first specific regulators of the clathrin-independent endocytosis pathway. PMID:18344974

  19. Placenta-specific Expression of the Interleukin-2 (IL-2) Receptor β Subunit from an Endogenous Retroviral Promoter*

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Carla J.; Rebollo, Rita; Babovic, Sonja; Dai, Elizabeth L.; Robinson, Wendy P.; Mager, Dixie L.

    2011-01-01

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences of endogenous retroviruses and retroelements contain promoter elements and are known to form chimeric transcripts with nearby cellular genes. Here we show that an LTR of the THE1D retroelement family has been domesticated as an alternative promoter of human IL2RB, the gene encoding the β subunit of the IL-2 receptor. The LTR promoter confers expression specifically in the placental trophoblast as opposed to its native transcription in the hematopoietic system. Rather than sequence-specific determinants, DNA methylation was found to regulate transcription initiation and splicing efficiency in a tissue-specific manner. Furthermore, we detected the cytoplasmic signaling domain of the IL-2Rβ protein in the placenta, suggesting that IL-2Rβ undergoes preferential proteolytic cleavage in this tissue. These findings implicate novel functions for this cytokine receptor subunit in the villous trophoblast and reveal an intriguing example of ancient LTR exaptation to drive tissue-specific gene expression. PMID:21865161

  20. Soluble interleukin-2 receptors (sIL-2R) in Hodgkin's disease: outcome and clinical implications.

    PubMed Central

    Viviani, S.; Camerini, E.; Bonfante, V.; Santoro, A.; Balzarotti, M.; Fornier, M.; Devizzi, L.; Verderio, P.; Valagussa, P.; Bonadonna, G.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic role of soluble interleukin-2 receptors (sIL-2R) in Hodgkin's disease (HD) both in the achievement of complete remission (CR) and in predicting disease relapse. Between August 1988 and June 1993 sIL-2R serum levels were measured in 174 untreated patients; in 137 of them evaluation was repeated at the end of treatment and in 132 also during the follow-up. Baseline sIL-2R levels (mean+/-standard error) were significantly higher in patients than in 65 healthy control subjects (1842+/-129 U ml(-1) vs 420+/-10 U ml(-10, P< 0.0001). At the end of treatment 135 out of 137 evaluated patients achieved complete response (CR) and their mean sIL-2R serum levels were significantly lower than those at diagnosis (635+/-19 U ml(-1) vs 1795+/-122 U ml(-1), P=0.0001). After a median follow-up of 5 years, sIL-2R remained low in 114 patients in continuous CR, while they increased in 9 out of 12 patients (75%) who relapsed. However, a temporary increase was also observed in six patients (5%) still in CR. Treatment outcome in terms of freedom from progression was linearly related to sIL-2R levels. Our study confirms that patients with untreated HD have increased baseline levels of sIL-2R compared with healthy subjects and that their pretreatment values may be an indication of disease outcome similar to other conventional prognostic factors, such as number of involved sites, presence of B symptoms and extranodal extent. PMID:9528846

  1. Quantitative Contribution of IL2Rγ to the Dynamic Formation of IL2-IL2R Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Luis F.; García-Martínez, Karina; León, Kalet

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL2) is a growth factor for several immune cells and its function depends on its binding to IL2Rs in the cell membrane. The most accepted model for the assembling of IL2-IL2R complexes in the cell membrane is the Affinity Conversion Model (ACM). This model postulates that IL2R receptor association is sequential and dependent on ligand binding. Most likely free IL2 binds first to IL2Rα, and then this complex binds to IL2Rβ, and finally to IL2Rγ (γc). However, in previous mathematical models representing this process, the binding of γc has not been taken into account. In this work, the quantitative contribution of the number of IL2Rγ chain to the IL2-IL2R apparent binding affinity and signaling is studied. A mathematical model of the affinity conversion process including the γ chain in the dynamic, has been formulated. The model was calibrated by fitting it to experimental data, specifically, Scatchard plots obtained using human cell lines. This paper demonstrates how the model correctly explains available experimental observations. It was estimated, for the first time, the value of the kinetic coefficients of IL2-IL2R complexes interaction in the cell membrane. Moreover, the number of IL2R components in different cell lines was also estimated. It was obtained a variable distribution in the number of IL2R components depending on the cell type and the activation state. Of most significance, the study predicts that not only the number of IL2Rα and IL2Rβ, but also the number of γc determine the capacity of the cell to capture and retain IL2 in signalling complexes. Moreover, it is also showed that different cells might use different pathways to bind IL2 as consequence of its IL2R components distribution in the membrane. PMID:27195783

  2. Activation of the IL-2 Receptor in Podocytes: A Potential Mechanism for Podocyte Injury in Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Zea, Arnold H.; Stewart, Tyrus; Ascani, Jeannine; Tate, David J.; Finkel-Jimenez, Beatriz; Wilk, Anna; Reiss, Krzysztof; Smoyer, William E.; Aviles, Diego H.

    2016-01-01

    The renal podocyte plays an important role in maintaining the structural integrity of the glomerular basement membrane. We have previously reported that patients with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) have increased IL-2 production. We hypothesized that podocytes express an IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) and signaling through this receptor can result in podocyte injury. To confirm the presence of the IL-2R, we tested a conditionally immortalized murine podocyte cell line by flow cytometry, qPCR, and Western blot. To test for the presence of the IL-2R in vivo, immunohistochemical staining was performed on human renal biopsies in children with FSGS and control. Podocytes were stimulated with IL-2 in vitro, to study signaling events via the JAK/STAT pathway. The results showed that stimulation with IL-2 resulted in increased mRNA and protein expression of STAT 5a, phosphorylated STAT 5, JAK 3, and phosphorylated JAK 3. We then investigated for signs of cellular injury and the data showed that pro-apoptotic markers Bax and cFLIP were significantly increased following IL-2 exposure, whereas LC3 II was decreased. Furthermore, mitochondrial depolarization and apoptosis were both significantly increased following activation of the IL-2R. We used a paracellular permeability assay to monitor the structural integrity of a podocyte monolayer following IL-2 exposure. The results showed that podocytes exposed to IL-2 have increased albumin leakage across the monolayer. We conclude that murine podocytes express the IL-2R, and that activation through the IL-2R results in podocyte injury. PMID:27389192

  3. Essential biphasic role for JAK3 catalytic activity in IL-2 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geoffrey A; Uchida, Kenji; Weiss, Arthur; Taunton, Jack

    2016-05-01

    To drive lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation, common γ-chain (γc) cytokine receptors require hours to days of sustained stimulation. JAK1 and JAK3 kinases are found together in all γc-receptor complexes, but how their respective catalytic activities contribute to signaling over time is not known. Here we dissect the temporal requirements for JAK3 kinase activity with a selective covalent inhibitor (JAK3i). By monitoring phosphorylation of the transcription factor STAT5 over 20 h in CD4(+) T cells stimulated with interleukin 2 (IL-2), we document a second wave of signaling that is much more sensitive to JAK3i than the first wave. Selective inhibition of this second wave is sufficient to block cyclin expression and entry to S phase. An inhibitor-resistant JAK3 mutant (C905S) rescued all effects of JAK3i in isolated T cells and in mice. Our chemical genetic toolkit elucidates a biphasic requirement for JAK3 kinase activity in IL-2-driven T cell proliferation and will find broad utility in studies of γc-receptor signaling. PMID:27018889

  4. Effect of IL-2-Bax, a novel interleukin-2-receptor-targeted chimeric protein, on bleomycin lung injury1

    PubMed Central

    Segel, Michael J; Aqeilan, Rami; Zilka, Keren; Lorberboum-Galski, Haya; Wallach-Dayan, Shulamit B; Conner, Michael W; Christensen, Thomas G; Breuer, Raphael

    2005-01-01

    The role of lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis is not clear, but the weight of the evidence supports a pro-fibrotic effect for lymphocytes. The high-affinity interleukin-2 receptor (haIL-2R) is expressed on activated, but not quiescent, T lymphocytes. This selective expression of haIL-2R provides the basis for therapeutic strategies that target IL-2R-expressing cells. We hypothesized that elimination of activated lymphocytes by IL-2R-targeted chimeric proteins might ameliorate lung fibrosis. We investigated the effects of IL-2-Bax, a novel apoptosis-inducing IL-2R-targeted chimeric protein, on bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice. Treatment groups included (i) a single intratracheal instillation of bleomycin and twice-daily intraperitoneal injections of IL-2-Bax; (ii) intratracheal bleomycin and intraperitoneal IL-2-PE664Glu, an older-generation chimeric protein; (iii) intratracheal bleomycin/intraperitoneal PBS; (iv) intratracheal saline/intraperitoneal PBS. Lung injury was evaluated 14 days after intratracheal instillation by cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, semi-quantitative and quantitative histomorphological measurements and by biochemical analysis of lung hydroxyproline. Bleomycin induced a BAL lymphocytosis that was significantly attenuated by IL-2-Bax and IL-2-PE664Glu. However, morphometric parameters and lung hydroxyproline were unaffected by the chimeric proteins. These results show that IL-2-Bax reduces the lymphocytic infiltration of the lungs in response to bleomycin, but this effect is not accompanied by a decrease in lung fibrosis. PMID:16191100

  5. Anticancer immunotherapy by CTLA-4 blockade: obligatory contribution of IL-2 receptors and negative prognostic impact of soluble CD25

    PubMed Central

    Hannani, Dalil; Vétizou, Marie; Enot, David; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Chaput, Nathalie; Klatzmann, David; Desbois, Melanie; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Vimond, Nadège; Chouaib, Salem; Mateus, Christine; Allison, James P; Ribas, Antoni; Wolchok, Jedd D; Yuan, Jianda; Wong, Philip; Postow, Michael; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Schadendorff, Dirk; Jaeger, Dirk; Korman, Alan J; Bahjat, Keith; Maio, Michele; Calabro, Luana; Teng, Michele WL; Smyth, Mark J; Eggermont, Alexander; Robert, Caroline; Kroemer, Guido; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4)-blocking antibody ipilimumab induces immune-mediated long-term control of metastatic melanoma in a fraction of patients. Although ipilimumab undoubtedly exerts its therapeutic effects via immunostimulation, thus far clinically useful, immunologically relevant biomarkers that predict treatment efficiency have been elusive. Here, we show that neutralization of IL-2 or blocking the α and β subunits of the IL-2 receptor (CD25 and CD122, respectively) abolished the antitumor effects and the accompanying improvement of the ratio of intratumoral T effector versus regulatory cells (Tregs), which were otherwise induced by CTLA-4 blockade in preclinical mouse models. CTLA-4 blockade led to the reduction of a suppressive CD4+ T cell subset expressing Lag3, ICOS, IL-10 and Egr2 with a concomitant rise in IL-2-producing effector cells that lost FoxP3 expression and accumulated in regressing tumors. While recombinant IL-2 improved the therapeutic efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade, the decoy IL-2 receptor α (IL-2Rα, sCD25) inhibited the anticancer effects of CTLA-4 blockade. In 262 metastatic melanoma patients receiving ipilimumab, baseline serum concentrations of sCD25 represented an independent indicator of overall survival, with high levels predicting resistance to therapy. Altogether, these results unravel a role for IL-2 and IL-2 receptors in the anticancer activity of CTLA-4 blockade. Importantly, our study provides the first immunologically relevant biomarker, namely elevated serum sCD25, that predicts resistance to CTLA-4 blockade in patients with melanoma. PMID:25582080

  6. Anticancer immunotherapy by CTLA-4 blockade: obligatory contribution of IL-2 receptors and negative prognostic impact of soluble CD25.

    PubMed

    Hannani, Dalil; Vétizou, Marie; Enot, David; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Chaput, Nathalie; Klatzmann, David; Desbois, Melanie; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Vimond, Nadège; Chouaib, Salem; Mateus, Christine; Allison, James P; Ribas, Antoni; Wolchok, Jedd D; Yuan, Jianda; Wong, Philip; Postow, Michael; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Schadendorff, Dirk; Jaeger, Dirk; Zörnig, Inka; Hassel, Jessica; Korman, Alan J; Bahjat, Keith; Maio, Michele; Calabro, Luana; Teng, Michele Wl; Smyth, Mark J; Eggermont, Alexander; Robert, Caroline; Kroemer, Guido; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2015-02-01

    The cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4)-blocking antibody ipilimumab induces immune-mediated long-term control of metastatic melanoma in a fraction of patients. Although ipilimumab undoubtedly exerts its therapeutic effects via immunostimulation, thus far clinically useful, immunologically relevant biomarkers that predict treatment efficiency have been elusive. Here, we show that neutralization of IL-2 or blocking the α and β subunits of the IL-2 receptor (CD25 and CD122, respectively) abolished the antitumor effects and the accompanying improvement of the ratio of intratumoral T effector versus regulatory cells (Tregs), which were otherwise induced by CTLA-4 blockade in preclinical mouse models. CTLA-4 blockade led to the reduction of a suppressive CD4(+) T cell subset expressing Lag3, ICOS, IL-10 and Egr2 with a concomitant rise in IL-2-producing effector cells that lost FoxP3 expression and accumulated in regressing tumors. While recombinant IL-2 improved the therapeutic efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade, the decoy IL-2 receptor α (IL-2Rα, sCD25) inhibited the anticancer effects of CTLA-4 blockade. In 262 metastatic melanoma patients receiving ipilimumab, baseline serum concentrations of sCD25 represented an independent indicator of overall survival, with high levels predicting resistance to therapy. Altogether, these results unravel a role for IL-2 and IL-2 receptors in the anticancer activity of CTLA-4 blockade. Importantly, our study provides the first immunologically relevant biomarker, namely elevated serum sCD25, that predicts resistance to CTLA-4 blockade in patients with melanoma. PMID:25582080

  7. PKCα and PKCβ cooperate functionally in CD3-induced de novo IL-2 mRNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Lutz-Nicoladoni, Christina; Christina, Lutz-Nicoladoni; Thuille, Nikolaus; Nikolaus, Thuille; Wachowicz, Katarzyna; Katarzyna, Wachowicz; Gruber, Thomas; Thomas, Gruber; Leitges, Michael; Michael, Leitges; Baier, Gottfried; Gottfried, Baier

    2013-03-01

    The physiological functions of PKCα and PKCθ isotypes downstream of the antigen receptor have been defined in CD3(+) T cells. In contrast, no function of the second conventional PKC member, PKCβ, has been described yet in T cell antigen receptor signalling. To investigate the hypothesis that both conventional PKCα and PKCβ isotypes may have overlapping functions in T cell activation signalling, we generated mice that lacked the genes for both isotypes. We found that PKCα(-/-)/β(-/-) animals are viable, live normal life spans and display normal T cell development. However, these animals possess additive defects in T cell responses in comparison to animals that carry single mutations in these genes. Our studies demonstrate that the activities of PKCα and PKCβ converge to regulate IL-2 cytokine responses in anti-CD3 stimulated primary mouse T cells. Here, we present genetic evidence that PKCα and PKCβ cooperate in IL-2 transcriptional transactivation in primary mouse T cells independently of the actions of PKCθ. PMID:23439007

  8. PKCα and PKCβ cooperate functionally in CD3-induced de novo IL-2 mRNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Christina, Lutz-Nicoladoni; Nikolaus, Thuille; Katarzyna, Wachowicz; Thomas, Gruber; Michael, Leitges; Gottfried, Baier

    2013-01-01

    The physiological functions of PKCα and PKCθ isotypes downstream of the antigen receptor have been defined in CD3+ T cells. In contrast, no function of the second conventional PKC member, PKCβ, has been described yet in T cell antigen receptor signalling. To investigate the hypothesis that both conventional PKCα and PKCβ isotypes may have overlapping functions in T cell activation signalling, we generated mice that lacked the genes for both isotypes. We found that PKCα−/−/β−/− animals are viable, live normal life spans and display normal T cell development. However, these animals possess additive defects in T cell responses in comparison to animals that carry single mutations in these genes. Our studies demonstrate that the activities of PKCα and PKCβ converge to regulate IL-2 cytokine responses in anti-CD3 stimulated primary mouse T cells. Here, we present genetic evidence that PKCα and PKCβ cooperate in IL-2 transcriptional transactivation in primary mouse T cells independently of the actions of PKCθ. PMID:23439007

  9. Mutual enhancement of IL-2 and IL-7 on DNA vaccine immunogenicity mainly involves regulations on their receptor expression and receptor-expressing lymphocyte generation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Liang, Shuang; Li, Xiujin; Wang, Liyue; Zhang, Jianlou; Xu, Jian; Huo, Shanshan; Cao, Xuebin; Zhong, Zhenyu; Zhong, Fei

    2015-07-01

    Our previous study showed that IL-2 and IL-7 could mutually enhance the immunogenicity of canine parvovirus VP2 DNA vaccine, although the underlying mechanism remained unknown. Here, we used the OVA gene as a DNA vaccine in a mouse model to test their enhancement on DNA vaccine immunogenicity and to explore the molecular mechanism. Results showed that both IL-2 and IL-7 genes significantly increased the immunogenicity of OVA DNA vaccine in mice. Co-administration of IL-2 and IL-7 genes with OVA DNA significantly increased OVA-specific antibody titers, T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production compared with IL-2 or IL-7 alone, confirming that IL-2 and IL-7 mutually enhanced DNA vaccine immunogenicity. Mechanistically, we have shown that IL-2 significantly stimulated generation of IL-7 receptor-expressing lymphocytes, and that IL-7 significantly induced IL-2 receptor expression. These results contribute to an explanation of the mechanism of the mutual effects of IL-2 and IL-7 on enhancing DNA vaccine immunogenicity and provided a basis for further investigation on their mutual effects on adjuvant activity and immune regulation. PMID:26055295

  10. Impaired NK-mediated regulation of T-cell activity in multiple sclerosis is reconstituted by IL-2 receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Gross, Catharina C; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Rünzi, Anna; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Posevitz-Fejfár, Anita; Schwab, Nicholas; Schneider-Hohendorf, Tilman; Herich, Sebastian; Held, Kathrin; Konjević, Matea; Hartwig, Marvin; Dornmair, Klaus; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Klotz, Luisa; Meuth, Sven G; Wiendl, Heinz

    2016-05-24

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) resulting from a breakdown in peripheral immune tolerance. Although a beneficial role of natural killer (NK)-cell immune-regulatory function has been proposed, it still needs to be elucidated whether NK cells are functionally impaired as part of the disease. We observed NK cells in active MS lesions in close proximity to T cells. In accordance with a higher migratory capacity across the blood-brain barrier, CD56(bright) NK cells represent the major intrathecal NK-cell subset in both MS patients and healthy individuals. Investigating the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients treated with natalizumab revealed that transmigration of this subset depends on the α4β1 integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4. Although no MS-related changes in the migratory capacity of NK cells were observed, NK cells derived from patients with MS exhibit a reduced cytolytic activity in response to antigen-activated CD4(+) T cells. Defective NK-mediated immune regulation in MS is mainly attributable to a CD4(+) T-cell evasion caused by an impaired DNAX accessory molecule (DNAM)-1/CD155 interaction. Both the expression of the activating NK-cell receptor DNAM-1, a genetic alteration consistently found in MS-association studies, and up-regulation of the receptor's ligand CD155 on CD4(+) T cells are reduced in MS. Therapeutic immune modulation of IL-2 receptor restores impaired immune regulation in MS by increasing the proportion of CD155-expressing CD4(+) T cells and the cytolytic activity of NK cells. PMID:27162345

  11. Celecoxib offsets the negative renal influences of cyclosporine via modulation of the TGF-β1/IL-2/COX-2/endothelin ET{sub B} receptor cascade

    SciTech Connect

    El-Gowelli, Hanan M.; Helmy, Maged W.; Ali, Rabab M.; El-Mas, Mahmoud M.

    2014-03-01

    Endothelin (ET) signaling provokes nephrotoxicity induced by the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporine A (CSA). We tested the hypotheses that (i): celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, counterbalances renal derangements caused by CSA in rats and (ii) the COX-2/endothelin ET{sub B} receptor signaling mediates the CSA-celecoxib interaction. Ten-day treatment with CSA (20 mg/kg/day) significantly increased biochemical indices of renal function (serum urea, creatinine), inflammation (interleukin-2, IL-2) and fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β{sub 1}, TGF-β{sub 1}). Histologically, CSA caused renal tubular atrophy along with interstitial fibrosis. These detrimental renal effects of CSA were largely reduced in rats treated concurrently with celecoxib (10 mg/kg/day). We also report that cortical glomerular and medullary tubular protein expressions of COX-2 and ET{sub B} receptors were reduced by CSA and restored to near-control values in rats treated simultaneously with celecoxib. The importance of ET{sub B} receptors in renal control and in the CSA-celecoxib interaction was further verified by the findings (i) most of the adverse biochemical, inflammatory, and histopathological profiles of CSA were replicated in rats treated with the endothelin ET{sub B} receptor antagonist BQ788 (0.1 mg/kg/day, 10 days), and (ii) the BQ788 effects, like those of CSA, were alleviated in rats treated concurrently with celecoxib. Together, the data suggest that the facilitation of the interplay between the TGF-β1/IL-2/COX-2 pathway and the endothelin ET{sub B} receptors constitutes the cellular mechanism by which celecoxib ameliorates the nephrotoxic manifestations of CSA in rats. - Highlights: • Celecoxib abolishes nephrotoxic manifestations of CSA in rats. • Blockade of ETB receptors by BQ788 mimicked the nephrotoxic effects of CSA. • CSA or BQ788 reduces renal protein expression of COX-2 and endothelin ETB receptors. • Enhanced TGFβ1/IL-2/COX2/ETB

  12. Expression of low-, intermediate-, and high-affinity IL-2 receptors on B cell lines derived from patients with undifferentiated lymphoma of Burkitt's and non-Burkitt's types

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, D.; Rosolen, A.; Wormsley, S.B.; DeBault, L.E.; Colamonici, O.R. )

    1990-08-01

    IL-2 receptors on T cells exist in at least three forms which differ in their ligand-binding affinity. The low-affinity IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) consists of the 55-kDa Tac protein (p55 alpha), the intermediate-affinity site corresponds to the 70-kDa molecule (p70 beta), and the high-affinity IL-2R consists of a noncovalent heterodimeric structure involving both p55 alpha and p70 beta. We studied 24 B cell lines (8 EBV-negative and 16 EBV-positive) for IL-2R expression in the presence or absence of the tumor promoter, teleocidin. 125I-IL-2 radioreceptor binding assays and crosslinking studies demonstrated the sole expression of p55 alpha in EBV-negative cell lines only, whereas p55 alpha present in EBV-positive cell lines was always associated with p70 beta to construct high-affinity IL-2R. p70 beta was not detected in any of the EBV-negative cell lines, but was expressed on most of the EBV-positive cell lines (13 of 16). Our data also indicate that the expression of p55 alpha and p70 beta by radiolabeling correlates with their expression in flow cytometry, and that a large excess of p55 alpha is required to construct high-affinity IL-2R. Coexpression of p55 alpha and p70 beta on human B cells contributed to constructing high-affinity IL-2R hybrid complex as shown by rapid association rate contributed by p55 alpha and slow dissociation rate by p70 beta; teleocidin's ability to induce p55 alpha on cell lines which express p70 beta only, resulting in appearance of high-affinity IL-2R; and blocking p55 alpha by anti-Tac mAb in cell lines which constitutively express high-affinity IL-2R eliminated both high- and low-affinity components. The existence of low, intermediate, and high IL-2R on human B cells bears important future implications for understanding the mechanism of IL-2 signaling and the role of IL-2 in B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation.

  13. Combined Stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB Receptors Augments the Antitumor Activity of E7 DNA Vaccines by Increasing Ag-Specific CTL Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha; Kwon, Byungsuk; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a major cause of cervical cancer. Here, we investigate whether concurrent therapy using HPV E7 DNA vaccines (pE7) plus IL-2 vs. IL-15 cDNA and anti-4-1BB Abs might augment antitumor activity against established tumors. IL-2 cDNA was slightly better than IL-15 cDNA as a pE7 adjuvant. Co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA increased tumor cure rates from 7% to 27%, whereas co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA with anti-4-1BB Abs increased tumor cure rates from 27% to 67% and elicited long-term memory responses. This increased activity was concomitant with increased induction of Ag-specific CTL activity and IFN-γ responses, but not with Ag-specific IgG production. Moreover, the combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors with rIL-2 and anti-4-1BB Abs resulted in enhanced production of IFN-γ from Ag-specific CD8+ T cells. However, this effect was abolished by treatment with anti-IL-2 Abs and 4-1BB-Fc, suggesting that the observed effect was IL-2- and anti-4-1BB Ab-specific. A similar result was also obtained for Ag-specific CTL activity. Thus, these studies demonstrate that combined stimulation through the IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the Ag-specific CD8+ CTL responses induced by pE7, increasing tumor cure rates and long-term antitumor immune memory. These findings may have implications for the design of DNA-based therapeutic vaccines against cancer. PMID:24391824

  14. Combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the antitumor activity of E7 DNA vaccines by increasing Ag-specific CTL responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha; Kwon, Byungsuk; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a major cause of cervical cancer. Here, we investigate whether concurrent therapy using HPV E7 DNA vaccines (pE7) plus IL-2 vs. IL-15 cDNA and anti-4-1BB Abs might augment antitumor activity against established tumors. IL-2 cDNA was slightly better than IL-15 cDNA as a pE7 adjuvant. Co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA increased tumor cure rates from 7% to 27%, whereas co-delivery of pE7+IL-2 cDNA with anti-4-1BB Abs increased tumor cure rates from 27% to 67% and elicited long-term memory responses. This increased activity was concomitant with increased induction of Ag-specific CTL activity and IFN-γ responses, but not with Ag-specific IgG production. Moreover, the combined stimulation of IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors with rIL-2 and anti-4-1BB Abs resulted in enhanced production of IFN-γ from Ag-specific CD8+ T cells. However, this effect was abolished by treatment with anti-IL-2 Abs and 4-1BB-Fc, suggesting that the observed effect was IL-2- and anti-4-1BB Ab-specific. A similar result was also obtained for Ag-specific CTL activity. Thus, these studies demonstrate that combined stimulation through the IL-2 and 4-1BB receptors augments the Ag-specific CD8+ CTL responses induced by pE7, increasing tumor cure rates and long-term antitumor immune memory. These findings may have implications for the design of DNA-based therapeutic vaccines against cancer. PMID:24391824

  15. Natural variation in IL-2 sensitivity influences regulatory T cell frequency and function in individuals with long-standing type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jennie H.M.; Cutler, Antony J.; Ferreira, Ricardo C.; Reading, James L.; Cooper, Nicholas J.; Wallace, Chris; Clarke, Pamela; Smyth, Deborah J.; Boyce, Christopher S.; Gao, Guo-Jian; Todd, John A.; Wicker, Linda S.; Tree, Timothy I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Defective immune homeostasis in the balance between FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and effector T cells is a likely contributing factor in the loss of self-tolerance observed in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Given the importance of interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling in the generation and function of Tregs, observations that polymorphisms in genes in the IL-2 pathway associate with T1D and that some individuals with T1D exhibit reduced IL-2 signaling, indicate that impairment of this pathway may play a role in Treg dysfunction and the pathogenesis of T1D. Here, we have examined IL-2 sensitivity in CD4+ T-cell subsets in 70 individuals with long-standing T1D allowing us to investigate the impact of low IL-2 sensitivity on Treg frequency and function. IL-2 responsiveness, measured by STAT5a phosphorylation, was found to be a very stable phenotype within individuals, but exhibited considerable inter-individual variation and was influenced by T1D-associated PTPN2 gene polymorphisms. Tregs from individuals with lower IL-2 signaling were reduced in frequency, were less able to maintain expression of FOXP3 under limiting concentrations of IL-2 and displayed reduced suppressor function. These results suggest that reduced IL-2 signaling may be used to identify patients with highest Treg dysfunction who may benefit most from IL-2 immunotherapy. PMID:26224887

  16. New Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Tolerance: Tolerogenic Actions of IL-2.

    PubMed

    Pérol, Louis; Piaggio, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is an old molecule with brand new functions. Indeed, IL-2 has been first described as a T-cell growth factor but recent data pointed out that its main function in vivo is the maintenance of immune tolerance. Mechanistically, IL-2 is essential for the development and function of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) that are essential players in the control of immune responded to self, tumors, microbes and grafts. Treg cells are exquisitely sensitive to IL-2 due to their constitutive expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) and the new paradigm suggests that low-doses of IL-2 could selectively boost Treg cells in vivo. Consequently, a growing body of clinical research is aiming at using IL-2 at low doses as a tolerogenic drug to boost endogenous Treg cells in patients suffering from autoimmune or inflammatory conditions. In this manuscript, we briefly review IL-2/IL-2R biology and the role of IL-2 in the development, maintenance, and function of Treg cells; and also its effects on other immune cell populations such as CD4(+) T helper cells and CD8(+) memory T cells. Then, focusing on type 1 diabetes, we review the preclinical studies and clinical trials supporting the use of low-doses IL-2 as a tolerogenic immunotherapy. Finally, we discuss the limitations and future directions for IL-2 based immunotherapy. PMID:26530792

  17. Pleiotropic Effects of IL-2 on Cancer: Its Role in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valle-Mendiola, Arturo; Gutiérrez-Hoya, Adriana; Lagunas-Cruz, María del Carmen; Weiss-Steider, Benny; Soto-Cruz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signalling is critical for normal lymphocyte proliferation, but its role in cervical cancer is not fully understood. The receptor is composed of three chains: IL-2α, IL-2β, and IL-2γ. Intracellular signalling is initiated by ligand-induced heterodimerization of the IL-2β and IL-2γ chains, resulting in the activation of multiple intracellular kinases. Recently, IL-2R was shown to be expressed on nonhaematopoietic cells, especially on several types of tumour cells. However, the function of this receptor on malignant cells has not been clearly defined. The expression of IL-2R and the production of IL-2 in cervical cancer cells have been documented as well as expression of molecules of the JAK-STAT pathway. In the current review we have highlighted the differences in the responses of molecules downstream from the IL-2R in normal lymphocytes and tumour cells that could explain the presence of tumour cells in an environment in which cytotoxic lymphocytes also exist and compete and also the effect of different concentrations of IL-2 that could activate effector cells of the immune system cells, which favour the elimination of tumour cells, or concentrations that may promote a regulatory microenvironment in which tumour cells can easily grow. PMID:27293315

  18. A Bg1I polymorphism for the interleukin-2 receptor gene (IL2R) on chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Ardinger, R.H.; Murray, J.C. )

    1988-08-25

    pIL2R2 is a cDNA for IL2R cloned into the EcoRI site of pBR322 and encoding from the 5{prime} flanking region to exon 7. Bg1I identifies a two allele polymorphism with 17 kb and 16 kb alleles. Co-dominant inheritance was demonstrated in 6 CEPH families. SpeI shows a possible RFLP with I12R2.

  19. The functional synergy between IL-12 and IL-2 involves p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and is associated with the augmentation of STAT serine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Gollob, J A; Schnipper, C P; Murphy, E A; Ritz, J; Frank, D A

    1999-04-15

    IL-12 and IL-2 can stimulate mitogen- or CD3-activated T cells to proliferate, produce IFN-gamma, and kill tumor cells. The magnitude of these functional responses is greatly augmented when T cells are activated by the combination of IL-12 and IL-2. Although peripheral blood T cells are largely unresponsive to these cytokines without prior activation, a small subset of CD8+ T cells (CD8+CD18bright) is strongly activated by the combination of IL-12 and IL-2. In this report we show that the functional synergy between IL-12 and IL-2 in CD8+CD18bright T cells correlates with the activation of the stress kinases, p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)/Jun N-terminal kinase, but not with the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases. The functional synergy between IL-2 and IL-12 is also associated with a prominent increase in STAT1 and STAT3 serine phosphorylation over that observed with IL-12 or IL-2 alone. By contrast, STAT tyrosine phosphorylation is not augmented over that seen with either cytokine alone. A specific inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase completely inhibits the serine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 induced by IL-12 and IL-2 and abrogates the functional synergy between IL-12 and IL-2 without affecting STAT tyrosine phosphorylation. This suggests that p38 MAP kinase may play an important role in regulating STAT serine phosphorylation in response to the combination of IL-12 and IL-2. Furthermore, these findings indicate that the optimal activation of T cells by IL-12 and IL-2 may depend on an interaction between the p38 MAP kinase and Janus kinase/STAT signaling pathways. PMID:10201984

  20. A systemic defect in Toll-like receptor 4 signaling increases lipopolysaccharide-induced suppression of IL-2-dependent T-cell proliferation in COPD.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Chikosi, Sarah-Jane; Yanik, Sarah; Rupp, Jan; Jungck, David; Koch, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The susceptibility to bacterial infections is increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This promotes exacerbations. IL-2 triggers CD4(+)/Th1-cell proliferation, which is important for infection defense. Bacterial endotoxin (LPS) activates MyD88/IRAK and TRIF/IKKε/TBK1 pathways via Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) in Th1 cells. Systemic defects in TLR pathways in CD4(+)/Th1 cells cause an impairment of IL-2-dependent immune responses to bacterial infections in COPD. Peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells of never smokers, smokers without COPD, and smokers with COPD (each n = 10) were ex vivo activated towards Th1 and stimulated with LPS. IL-2, MyD88, and TRIF expression, and cell proliferation was analyzed by ELISA, quantitative RT-PCR, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and trypan blue staining comparative among the cohorts. IL-2 release from activated T cells was increased in COPD vs. smokers and never smokers. LPS reduced IL-2 expression and T-cell proliferation. These effects were increased in COPD vs. never smokers and inversely correlated with FEV1 (%predicted). The MyD88/TRIF ratio was decreased in Th1 cells of COPD. The suppression of IL-2 by LPS was abolished by MyD88/IRAK blockade in never smokers but by TRIF/IKKε/TBK1 blockade in COPD. Moxifloxacin restored IL-2 expression and T-cell proliferation in the presence of LPS by blocking p38 MAPK. The increased IL-2 release from Th1 cells in COPD might contribute to airway inflammation in disease exacerbations. A switch from MyD88/IRAK to TRIF/IKKε/TBK1 signaling amplifies the suppression of IL-2-dependent proliferation of CD4(+) T cells by LPS in COPD. This molecular pathology is of systemic origin, might impair adaptive immune responses, and could explain the increased susceptibility to bacterial infections in COPD. Targeting TLR4-downstream signaling, for example, with moxifloxacin, might reduce exacerbation rates. PMID:26498252

  1. Genotypes of NK cell KIR Receptors, Their Ligands, and Fcγ Receptors in the Response of Neuroblastoma Patients to Hu14.18-IL2 Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, DC; Hank, JA; Kolesar, J; Lorentzen, D; Gan, J; Seo, S; Kim, KM; Shusterman, S; Gillies, SD; Reisfeld, RA; Yang, R; Gadbaw, B; DeSantes, KD; London, WB; Seeger, RC; Maris, JM; Sondel, PM

    2010-01-01

    Response to immunocytokine (IC) therapy is dependent on natural killer (NK) cells in murine neuroblastoma (NBL) models. Furthermore, killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) / KIR-ligand mismatch is associated with improved outcome to autologous stem cell transplant for NBL. Additionally, clinical anti-tumor response to monoclonal antibodies has been associated with specific polymorphic-FcγR alleles. Relapsed/refractory NBL patients received the hu14.18-IL2 IC (humanized anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody linked to human IL2) in a Children’s Oncology Group (COG) Phase II trial. In this report, these patients were genotyped for KIR, HLA and FcR alleles to determine if KIR receptor-ligand mismatch or specific FcγR alleles were associated with anti-tumor response. Thirty-eight of 39 patients enrolled had DNA available for analysis; 24 were found to have autologous KIR/KIR -ligand mismatch; 14 were matched. Seven of 24 mismatched patients experienced either complete response or improvement of their disease after IC therapy. There was no response or comparable improvement of disease in patients who were matched. Thus KIR/KIR-ligand mismatch was associated with response/improvement to IC (p = 0.03). There was a trend towards patients with the FcγR2A 131-H/H genotype showing a higher response rate compared to other FcγR2A genotypes (p = 0.06). These analyses indicate that response or improvement of relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma patients after IC treatment is associated with autologous KIR/KIR-ligand mismatch, consistent with a role for NK cells in this clinical response. PMID:20935224

  2. The IL-2/IL-2R system: from basic science to therapeutic applications to enhance immune regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Allison L.; Pugliese, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    IL-2 plays a critical role in the normal function of the immune system. A trophic factor for lymphocytes, IL-2 is required for mounting and sustaining adaptive T cell responses; however, IL-2 is also critical for immune regulation via its effects on regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Over the years, we have contributed to the understanding of the biology of IL-2 and its signaling through the IL-2 receptor and helped define the key role played by IL-2 in Treg development and function. Our data show that Treg cells have a heightened sensitivity to IL-2, which may create a therapeutic window to promote immune regulation by selective stimulation of Treg cells. We are now developing new efforts to translate this knowledge to the clinical arena, through our focused interest in Type 1 diabetes as a prototypic autoimmune disease. Specifically, we aim at developing IL-2-based therapeutic regimens and incorporate means to enhance antigen-specific Treg responses, for improved and more selective regulation of islet autoimmunity. In parallel, we are pursuing studies in preclinical models of autoimmunity and transplantation to define critical factors for successful adoptive Treg therapy and develop clinically applicable therapeutic protocols. PMID:24214027

  3. CD8+ T Cell Fate and Function Influenced by Antigen-Specific Virus-Like Nanoparticles Co-Expressing Membrane Tethered IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Wojta-Stremayr, Daniela; Neunkirchner, Alina; Srinivasan, Bharani; Trapin, Doris; Schmetterer, Klaus G.; Pickl, Winfried F.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of adjuvants fostering humoral immunity are known as of today. However, there is a lack of adjuvants or adjuvant strategies, which directly target T cellular effector functions and memory. We here determined whether systemically toxic cytokines such as IL-2 can be restricted to the site of antigen presentation and used as ‘natural adjuvants’. Therefore, we devised antigen-presenting virus-like nanoparticles (VNP) co-expressing IL-2 attached to different membrane-anchors and assessed their potency to modulate CD8+ T cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Efficient targeting of IL-2 to lipid rafts and ultimately VNP was achieved by fusing IL-2 at its C-terminus to a minimal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor acceptor sequence. To identify optimal membrane-anchor dimensions we inserted one (1Ig), two (2Ig) or four (4Ig) immunoglobulin(Ig)-like domains of CD16b between IL-2 and the minimal GPI-anchor acceptor sequence of CD16b (GPI). We found that the 2IgGPI version was superior to all other evaluated IL-2 variants (IL-2v) in terms of its i) degree of targeting to lipid rafts and to the VNP surface, ii) biological activity, iii) co-stimulation of cognate T cells in the absence of bystander activation and iv) potency to induce differentiation and acquisition of CD8+ T cell effector functions in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, the GPI version rather favored memory precursor cell formation. These results exemplify novel beneficial features of membrane-bound IL-2, which in addition to its mere T cell stimulatory capacity include the induction of differential effector and memory functions in CD8+ T lymphocytes. PMID:25946103

  4. Identification of contact and respiratory sensitizers according to IL-4 receptor α expression and IL-2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Goutet, Michèle Pépin, Elsa; Langonné, Isabelle; Huguet, Nelly; Ban, Masarin

    2012-04-15

    Identification of allergenic chemicals is an important occupational safety issue. While several methods exist to identify contact sensitizers, there is currently no validated model to predict the potential of chemicals to act as respiratory sensitizers. Previously, we reported that cytometry analysis of the local immune responses induced in mice dermally exposed to the respiratory sensitizer trimellitic anhydride (TMA 10%) and contact sensitizer dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB 1%) could identify divergent expression of several immune parameters. The present study confirms, first, that IgE-positive B cells, MHC class II molecules, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4 and IL-4Rα can differentiate the allergic reactions caused by high doses of strong respiratory (TMA, phthalic anhydride and toluene diisocyanate) and contact sensitizers (DNCB, dinitrofluorobenzene and oxazolone). The second part of the study was designed to test the robustness of these markers when classing the weakly immunogenic chemicals most often encountered. Six respiratory allergens, including TMA (2.5%), five contact allergens, including DNCB (0.25%), and two irritants were compared at doses of equivalent immunogenicity. The results indicated that IL-4Rα and IL-2 can be reliably used to discriminate sensitizers. Respiratory sensitizers induced markedly higher IL-4Rα levels than contact allergens, while irritants had no effect on this parameter. Inversely, contact allergens tended to induce higher percentages of IL-2{sup +}CD8{sup +} cells than respiratory allergens. In contrast, the markers MHC-II, IgE and IL-4 were not able to classify chemicals with low immunogenic potential. In conclusion, IL-4Rα and IL-2 have the potential to be used in classifying a variety of chemical allergens. -- Highlights: ► Identification of chemical allergens is an important occupational safety issue. ► There is currently no model to predict the potential of chemicals to induce asthma. ► We analyze immune responses induced

  5. Conserved IL-2Rγc Signaling Mediates Lymphopoiesis in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sertori, Robert; Liongue, Clifford; Basheer, Faiza; Lewis, Kanako L; Rasighaemi, Parisa; de Coninck, Dennis; Traver, David; Ward, Alister C

    2016-01-01

    The IL-2 receptor γ common (IL-2Rγc) chain is the shared subunit of the receptors for the IL-2 family of cytokines, which mediate signaling through JAK3 and various downstream pathways to regulate lymphopoiesis. Inactivating mutations in human IL-2Rγc result in SCID, a primary immunodeficiency characterized by greatly reduced numbers of lymphocytes. This study used bioinformatics, expression analysis, gene ablation, and specific pharmacologic inhibitors to investigate the function of two putative zebrafish IL-2Rγc paralogs, il-2rγc.a and il-2rγc.b, and downstream signaling components during early lymphopoiesis. Expression of il-2rγc.a commenced at 16 h post fertilization (hpf) and rose steadily from 4-6 d postfertilization (dpf) in the developing thymus, with il-2rγc.a expression also confirmed in adult T and B lymphocytes. Transcripts of il-2rγc.b were first observed from 8 hpf, but waned from 16 hpf before reaching maximal expression at 6 dpf, but this was not evident in the thymus. Knockdown of il-2rγc.a, but not il-2rγc.b, substantially reduced embryonic lymphopoiesis without affecting other aspects of hematopoiesis. Specific targeting of zebrafish Jak3 exerted a similar effect on lymphopoiesis, whereas ablation of zebrafish Stat5.1 and pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K and MEK also produced significant but smaller effects. Ablation of il-2rγc.a was further demonstrated to lead to an absence of mature T cells, but not B cells in juvenile fish. These results indicate that conserved IL-2Rγc signaling via JAK3 plays a key role during early zebrafish lymphopoiesis, which can be potentially targeted to generate a zebrafish model of human SCID. PMID:26590317

  6. Competing feedback loops shape IL-2 signaling between helper and regulatory T lymphocytes in cellular microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Dorothea; de la Rosa, Maurus; Hobiger, Kirstin; Thurley, Kevin; Flossdorf, Michael; Scheffold, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Cytokines are pleiotropic and readily diffusible messenger molecules, raising the question of how their action can be confined to specific target cells. The T cell cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) is essential for the homeostasis of regulatory T (Treg) cells that suppress (auto)immunity and stimulates immune responses mediated by conventional T cells. We combined mathematical modeling and experiments to dissect the dynamics of the IL-2 signaling network that links the prototypical IL-2 producers, conventional T helper (Th) cells, and Treg cells. We show how the IL-2-induced upregulation of high-affinity IL-2 receptors (IL-2R) establishes a positive feedback loop of IL-2 signaling. This feedback mediates a digital switch for the proliferation of Th cells and functions as an analog amplifier for the IL-2 uptake capacity of Treg cells. Unlike other positive feedbacks in cell signaling that augment signal propagation, the IL-2/IL-2R loop enhances the capture of the signal molecule and its degradation. Thus Treg and Th cells can compete for IL-2 and restrict its range of action through efficient cellular uptake. Depending on activation status and spatial localization of the cells, IL-2 may be consumed exclusively by Treg or Th cells, or be shared between them. In particular, a Treg cell can deprive a stimulated Th cell of its IL-2, but only when the cells are located in close proximity, within a few tens of micrometers. The present findings explain how IL-2 can play two disctinct roles in immune regulation and point to a hitherto largely unexplored spatiotemporal complexity of cytokine signaling. PMID:20133667

  7. Ectodomain Shedding of Interleukin-2 Receptor β and Generation of an Intracellular Functional Fragment*

    PubMed Central

    de Oca B., Pavel Montes; Malardé, Valerie; Proust, Richard; Dautry-Varsat, Alice; Gesbert, Franck

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) regulates different functions of various lymphoid cell subsets. These are mediated by its binding to the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) composed of three subunits (IL2-Rα, -β, and -γc). IL-2Rβ is responsible for the activation of several signaling pathways. Ectodomain shedding of membrane receptors is thought to be an important mechanism for down-regulation of cell surface receptor abundance but is also emerging as a mechanism that cell membrane-associated molecules require for proper action in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that IL-2Rβ is cleaved in cell lines of different origin, including T cells, generating an intracellular 37-kDa fragment (37βic) that comprises the full intracellular C-terminal and transmembrane domains. Ectodomain shedding of IL-2Rβ decreases in a mutant deleted of the juxtamembrane region, where cleavage is predicted to occur, and is inhibited by tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases-3. 37βic is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associates with STAT-5, a canonic signal transducer of IL-2R. Finally, lymphoid cell transfection with a truncated form of IL-2Rβ mimicking 37βic increases their proliferation. These data indicate that IL-2Rβ is subject to ectodomain shedding generating an intracellular fragment biologically functional, because (i) it is phosphorylated, (ii) it associates with STAT5A, and (iii) it increases cell proliferation. PMID:20495002

  8. Impact of protective IL-2 allelic variants on CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cell function in situ and resistance to autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Sgouroudis, Evridiki; Albanese, Alexandre; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A

    2008-11-01

    Type I diabetes (T1D) susceptibility is inherited through multiple insulin-dependent diabetes (Idd) genes. NOD.B6 Idd3 congenic mice, introgressed with an Idd3 allele from T1D-resistant C57BL/6 mice (Idd3(B6)), show a marked resistance to T1D compared with control NOD mice. The protective function of the Idd3 locus is confined to the Il2 gene, whose expression is critical for naturally occurring CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (nT(reg)) cell development and function. In this study, we asked whether Idd3(B6) protective alleles in the NOD mouse model confer T1D resistance by promoting the cellular frequency, function, or homeostasis of nT(reg) cells in vivo. We show that resistance to T1D in NOD.B6 Idd3 congenic mice correlates with increased levels of IL-2 mRNA and protein production in Ag-activated diabetogenic CD4(+) T cells. We also observe that protective IL2 allelic variants (Idd3(B6) resistance allele) also favor the expansion and suppressive functions of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) nT(reg) cells in vitro, as well as restrain the proliferation, IL-17 production, and pathogenicity of diabetogenic CD4(+) T cells in vivo more efficiently than control do nT(reg) cells. Lastly, the resistance to T1D in Idd3 congenic mice does not correlate with an augmented systemic frequency of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) nT(reg) cells but more so with the ability of protective IL2 allelic variants to promote the expansion of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) nT(reg) cells directly in the target organ undergoing autoimmune attack. Thus, protective, IL2 allelic variants impinge the development of organ-specific autoimmunity by bolstering the IL-2 producing capacity of self-reactive CD4(+) T cells and, in turn, favor the function and homeostasis of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) nT(reg) cells in vivo. PMID:18941219

  9. Cell-autonomous role of TGFβ and IL-2 receptors in CD4+ and CD8+ inducible regulatory T-cell generation during GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Sawamukai, Norifumi; Satake, Atsushi; Schmidt, Amanda M.; Lamborn, Ian T.; Ojha, Priti; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2012-01-01

    FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress GVHD while preserving graft-versus-tumor effects, making them an attractive target for GVHD therapy. The donor-derived Treg pool can potentially be derived from the expansion of preexisting natural Tregs (nTregs) or from de novo generation of inducible Tregs (iTregs) from donor Tconvs in the transplantation recipient. Using an MHC-mismatched model of acute GVHD, in the present study we found that the Treg pool was comprised equally of donor-derived nTregs and iTregs. Experiments using various combinations of T cells from wild-type and FoxP3-deficient mice suggested that both preexisting donor nTregs and the generation of iTregs in the recipient mice contribute to protection against GVHD. Surprisingly, CD8+FoxP3+ T cells represented approximately 70% of the iTreg pool. These CD8+FoxP3+ T cells shared phenotypic markers with their CD4+ counterparts and displayed suppressive activity, suggesting that they were bona fide iTregs. Both CD4+ and CD8+ Tregs appeared to be protective against GVHD-induced lethality and required IL-2 and TGFβ receptor expression for their generation. These data illustrate the complex makeup of the donor-derived FoxP3+ Treg pool in allogeneic recipients and their potential role in protection against GVHD. PMID:22496155

  10. Cell-autonomous role of TGFβ and IL-2 receptors in CD4+ and CD8+ inducible regulatory T-cell generation during GVHD.

    PubMed

    Sawamukai, Norifumi; Satake, Atsushi; Schmidt, Amanda M; Lamborn, Ian T; Ojha, Priti; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Kambayashi, Taku

    2012-06-01

    FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress GVHD while preserving graft-versus-tumor effects, making them an attractive target for GVHD therapy. The donor-derived Treg pool can potentially be derived from the expansion of preexisting natural Tregs (nTregs) or from de novo generation of inducible Tregs (iTregs) from donor Tconvs in the transplantation recipient. Using an MHC-mismatched model of acute GVHD, in the present study we found that the Treg pool was comprised equally of donor-derived nTregs and iTregs. Experiments using various combinations of T cells from wild-type and FoxP3-deficient mice suggested that both preexisting donor nTregs and the generation of iTregs in the recipient mice contribute to protection against GVHD. Surprisingly, CD8(+)FoxP3(+) T cells represented approximately 70% of the iTreg pool. These CD8(+)FoxP3(+) T cells shared phenotypic markers with their CD4(+) counterparts and displayed suppressive activity, suggesting that they were bona fide iTregs. Both CD4(+) and CD8(+) Tregs appeared to be protective against GVHD-induced lethality and required IL-2 and TGFβ receptor expression for their generation. These data illustrate the complex makeup of the donor-derived FoxP3(+) Treg pool in allogeneic recipients and their potential role in protection against GVHD. PMID:22496155

  11. Influence of in vitro IL-2 or IL-15 alone or in combination with Hsp-70-derived 14-mer peptide (TKD) on the expression of NK cell activatory and inhibitory receptors.

    PubMed

    Hromadnikova, Ilona; Pirkova, Petra; Sedlackova, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    NK cells represent a potential tool for adoptive immunotherapy against tumors. Membrane-bound Hsp70 acts as a tumor-specific marker enhancing NK cell activity. Using flow cytometry the effect of in vitro stimulation with IL-2 or IL-15 alone or in combination with Hsp70-derived 14-mer peptide (TKD) on cell surface expression of NK activatory receptors (CD16, NKG2D, NKG2C, NKp46, NKp44, NKp30, KIR2DL4, DNAM-1, and LAMP1) and NK inhibitory receptors (NKG2A, KIR2DL2/L3, LIR1/ILT-2, and NKR-P1A) in healthy individuals was studied. Results were expressed as the percentage of receptor expressing cells and the amount of receptor expressed by CD3(-)CD56(+) cellular population. CD94, NKG2D, NKp44, NKp30, KIR2DL4, DNAM-1, LAMP1, NKG2A, and NKR-P1A were upregulated after the stimulation with IL-2 or IL-15 alone or in combination with TKD. KIR2DL2/L3 was upregulated only by IL-15 and IL-15/TKD. Concurrently, an increase in a number of NK cells positive for CD94, NKp44, NKp30, KIR2DL4, and LAMP1 was observed. IL-15 and IL-15/TKD caused also cell number rise positive for KIR2DL2/L3 and NKR-P1A. Cell number positive for NKG2C and NKG2A was increased only by IL-2 and IL-2/TKD. The diverse effect of IL-2 or IL-15 w or w/o TKD on cell surface expression was observed in CD16, NKp46, and LIR1/ILT-2. PMID:23476104

  12. Diphtheria toxin-based bivalent human IL-2 fusion toxin with improved efficacy for targeting human CD25(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Peraino, Jaclyn Stromp; Zhang, Huiping; Rajasekera, Priyani V; Wei, Min; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Wang, Zhirui

    2014-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) constitute a major inhibitory cell population which suppresses immune responses. Thus, Treg have proven to be key players in the induction of transplantation tolerance, protection from autoimmune disease and prevention of the development of effective anti-tumor immune reactions. Treg express high levels of the high affinity interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) consisting of IL-2Rα (CD25) together with IL-2Rβ (CD122) and the common γ-chain (CD132). An effective reagent capable of depleting Treg in vivo would facilitate better cancer treatment and allow mechanistic studies of the role of Treg in transplantation tolerance and the development of autoimmune disease. In this study, we have developed a novel bivalent human IL-2 fusion toxin along with an Ontak®-like monovalent human IL-2 fusion toxin and compared the functional ability of these reagents in vitro. Here we show that genetically linking two human IL-2 domains in tandem, thereby generating a bivalent fusion toxin, results in significantly improved capacity in targeting human CD25(+) cells in vitro. Binding analysis by flow cytometry showed that the bivalent human IL-2 fusion toxin has notably increased affinity for human CD25(+) cells. In vitro functional analysis demonstrated that the bivalent isoform has an increased potency of approximately 2 logs in inhibiting cellular proliferation and protein synthesis in human CD25(+) cells compared to the monovalent human IL-2 fusion toxin. Additionally, we performed two inhibition assays in order to verify that the fusion toxins target the cells specifically through binding of the human IL-2 domain of the fusion toxin to the human IL-2 receptor on the cell surface. These results demonstrated that 1) both monovalent and bivalent human IL-2 fusion toxins are capable of blocking the binding of biotinylated human IL-2 to human CD25 by flow cytometry; and 2) human IL-2 blocked the fusion toxins from inhibiting protein synthesis and cellular

  13. Systemic radioimmunotherapy using a monoclonal antibody, anti-Tac directed toward the alpha subunit of the IL-2 receptor armed with the alpha-emitting radionuclides (212)Bi or (211)At.

    PubMed

    Wesley, Jon N; McGee, Edwin C; Garmestani, Kayhan; Brechbiel, Martin W; Yordanov, Alexander T; Wu, Chuanchu; Gansow, Otto A; Eckelman, William C; Bacher, John D; Flynn, Michael; Goldman, Carolyn K; MacLin, Melvin; Schwartz, Uwe P; Jackson-White, Terri; Phillip, Celeste M; Decker, Jean; Waldmann, Thomas A

    2004-04-01

    To exploit the fact that IL-2 receptors are expressed by T-cells responding to foreign antigens but not by resting T-cells, humanized anti-Tac (HAT) armed with alpha-emitting radionuclides (212)Bi and (211)At was evaluated in a cynomolgus cardiac allograft model. Control graft survival was 8.2+/- 0.5 days compared with 14.0+/-1.3 days (p<0.01) survival for monkeys treated with (212)Bi labeled HAT and 26.7+/-2.4 days survival (p<0.001 versus controls) with (211)At labeled HAT. Thus, (211)At labeled HAT may have application in organ transplantation and in treatment of IL-2 receptor expressing T-cell leukemia. PMID:15028248

  14. Immunosuppressive effect of the anti-IL-2-receptor monoclonal antibody, AMT-13, on organ-cultured fetal pancreas allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, K.; Loughnan, M.S.; Diamantstein, T.; Mandel, T.E.

    1988-11-01

    Recently, prolongation of cardiac allograft survival in mice was reported using a rat anti-IL-2R mAb (AMT-13). However, its immunosuppressive action in vivo, alone and in combination with other immunosuppressants, and its effect on other organ transplants has not been extensively studied. We grafted cultured fetal pancreas from CBA (H-2k) donors to Balb/c (H-2d) mice. Recipients were treated with 10 consecutive daily injections each of 20 micrograms AMT-13 only, or with an additional mild immunosuppression of 350 rads irradiation. Control groups received rat immunoglobulin or 350 rads irradiation. Graft survival and the phenotype of infiltrating cells were assessed histologically and immunocytochemically on days 12, 17, and 21, and soluble IL-2R levels were measured in the serum with a quantitative ELISA in all recipients. Two of five grafts in the AMT-13-treated group had islets on day 12 posttransplantation despite lymphocytic infiltration in all grafts, while at this time all grafts of rat Ig treated control mice were completely rejected with only scar tissue and a few lymphocytes remaining. Additional immunosuppression with 350 rads irradiation had a marked additive effect with AMT-13. Soluble IL-2R levels in the serum of untreated recipients were not elevated compared with normal serum levels, but recipients injected with AMT-13 had multifold increased soluble IL-2R levels. The percentage of IL-2R+ cells in the grafts of AMT-13-treated animals was either normal (less than 5%) or increased (20%) in the additionally irradiated mice, providing strong evidence that the immunosuppressive effect of AMT-13 is not due to a depletion of activated IL-2R+ lymphocytes.

  15. A novel intronic splice site deletion of the IL-2 receptor common gamma chain results in expression of a dysfunctional protein and T-cell-positive X-linked Severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Gray, P E A; Logan, G J; Alexander, I E; Poulton, S; Roscioli, T; Ziegler, J

    2015-02-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency is caused by mutations in the IL-2 receptor common gamma chain and classically presents in the first 6 months of life with predisposition to bacterial, viral and fungal infections. In most instances, affected individuals are lymphopenic with near complete absence of T cells and NK cells. We report a boy who presented at 12 months of age with Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and a family history consistent with X-linked recessive inheritance. He had a normal lymphocyte count including the presence of T cells and a broad T-cell-receptor diversity, as well as normal surface expression of the common gamma chain (CD132) protein. He however had profound hypogammaglobulinaemia, and IL-2-induced STAT5 phosphorylation was absent. Sequencing of IL-2RG demonstrated a 12-base pair intronic deletion close to the canonical splice site of exon 5, which resulted in a variety of truncated IL2RG mRNA species. A review of the literature identified 4 other patients with T-cell-positive X-SCID, with the current patient being the first associated with an mRNA splicing defect. This case raises the question of how a dysfunctional protein incapable of mediating STAT5 phosphorylation might nonetheless support T-cell development. Possible explanations are that STAT5-mediated signal transduction may be less relevant to IL7-receptor-mediated T-cell development than are other IL7R-induced intracellular transduction pathways or that a low level of STAT5 phosphorylation, undetectable in the laboratory, may be sufficient to support some T-cell development. PMID:25443657

  16. Therapeutic enhancement of IL-2 through molecular design.

    PubMed

    Cassell, Delanie J; Choudhri, Shurjeel; Humphrey, Rachel; Martell, Robert E; Reynolds, Theresa; Shanafelt, Armen B

    2002-01-01

    A recombinant human IL-2 analog (rIL-2, Proleukin) is currently being evaluated for clinical benefit in HIV infected patients. It is approved for therapy of patients with metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. Treatment of cancer patients with rIL-2 results in durable responses but is associated with life-threatening toxicity, which limits its use to patients in relatively good health. Antitumor efficacy associated with rIL-2 therapy are hypothesized to be mediated by distinct types of cells that express structurally different forms of the IL-2 receptor. This hypothesis suggests that it might be possible to engineer an IL-2 variant addressing the risks associated with the therapeutic use of IL-2. In this article, we review the clinical experience with IL-2 and its analogs, the evidence that different IL-2 receptors may dissociate efficacy and toxicity, and describe the generation of a novel IL-2 variant with the potential for a superior therapeutic index. PMID:12369861

  17. PD-L1 blockade synergizes with IL-2 therapy in reinvigorating exhausted T cells

    PubMed Central

    West, Erin E.; Jin, Hyun-Tak; Rasheed, Ata-Ur; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Ha, Sang-Jun; Tan, Wendy G.; Youngblood, Ben; Freeman, Gordon J.; Smith, Kendall A.; Ahmed, Rafi

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory receptor programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) plays a major role in functional exhaustion of T cells during chronic infections and cancer, and recent clinical data suggest that blockade of the PD-1 pathway is an effective immunotherapy in treating certain cancers. Thus, it is important to define combinatorial approaches that increase the efficacy of PD-1 blockade. To address this issue, we examined the effect of IL-2 and PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) blockade in the mouse model of chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection. We found that low-dose IL-2 administration alone enhanced CD8+ T cell responses in chronically infected mice. IL-2 treatment also decreased inhibitory receptor levels on virus-specific CD8+ T cells and increased expression of CD127 and CD44, resulting in a phenotype resembling that of memory T cells. Surprisingly, IL-2 therapy had only a minimal effect on reducing viral load. However, combining IL-2 treatment with blockade of the PD-1 inhibitory pathway had striking synergistic effects in enhancing virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses and decreasing viral load. Interestingly, this reduction in viral load occurred despite increased numbers of Tregs. These results suggest that combined IL-2 therapy and PD-L1 blockade merits consideration as a regimen for treating human chronic infections and cancer. PMID:23676462

  18. Dendritic cell derived IL-2 inhibits survival of terminally mature cells via an autocrine signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Balachander, Akhila; Nabti, Sabrina; Sobota, Radoslaw M; Foo, Shihui; Zolezzi, Francesca; Lee, Bernett T K; Poidinger, Michael; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2015-05-01

    DCs are crucial for sensing pathogens and triggering immune response. Upon activation by pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) ligands, GM-CSF myeloid DCs (GM-DCs) secrete several cytokines, including IL-2. DC IL-2 has been shown to be important for innate and adaptive immune responses; however, IL-2 importance in DC physiology has never been demonstrated. Here, we show that autocrine IL-2 signaling is functional in murine GM-DCs in an early time window after PAMPs stimulation. IL-2 signaling selectively activates the JAK/STAT5 pathway by assembling holo-receptor complexes at the cell surface. Using the sensitivity of targeted mass spectrometry, we show conclusively that GM-DCs express CD122, the IL-2 receptor β-chain, at steady state. In myeloid DCs, this cytokine pathway inhibits survival of PAMP-matured GM-DCs which is crucial for maintaining immune tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. Our findings suggest that immune regulation by this novel autocrine signaling pathway can potentially be used in DC immunotherapy. PMID:25652593

  19. Lack of correlation between phenotype activation markers of CD8 lymphocytes and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) function in HIV-1 infection: evidence for rescue with rIL-2.

    PubMed

    Chia, W K; Nisbet-Brown, E; Li, X; Salit, I; Joshi, S; Read, S E

    1994-01-01

    CTL activity against HIV-1 antigens expressed on HLA-A-matched EBV-transformed B target cells was detected in 33% (6/18) of freshly isolated PBMC (FPBMC) from patients in the early stages of HIV-1 infection (CDCII). No CTL activity was detected in FPMBC in patients with AIDS (CDCIV). However, the presence of CTL activity did not correlate with the expression of CTL activation markers. A dual-color flow cytometric examination revealed that the CD8+ lymphocytes bearing the memory (CD29) and activation (S6F1) surface molecules increased in number as the HIV-1 infection progressed. This functional and phenotypic discrepancy in memory CD8+ lymphocytes suggests that the memory CD8+ lymphocytes have lost cytotoxic function and become "paralyzed" as the HIV disease progresses. Incubation of PBMC of HIV(+) patients with rIL-2 reactivated predominantly HIV-specific CTL. However, rIL-2 stimulation also activated a "polyclonal or polyreactive" cytotoxic function. The reactivation of CTL function is rIL-2 dosage dependent and the amount of rIL-2 required for reactivation is associated with the severity of the disease. HIV antigen specific CTL in HIV(+) patients can be selectively expanded by HIV antigen stimulation in the presence of rIL-2. These results suggest that the in vivo IL-2 deficiency occurring in HIV-1 infection may be responsible in part for the "paralysis" of HIV specific CTL activity. Such activity can be rescued nonspecifically by exogenous rIL-2 stimulation and expanded specifically by HIV-1 antigen stimulation. PMID:7848511

  20. Clinical Significance of sIL-2R Levels in B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Oda, Miyo; Kuroda, Yoshiaki; Katayama, Yuta; Okikawa, Yoshiko; Masunari, Taro; Fujiwara, Megumu; Nishisaka, Takashi; Sasaki, Naomi; Sadahira, Yoshito; Mihara, Keichiro; Asaoku, Hideki; Matsui, Hirotaka; Seto, Masao; Kimura, Akiro; Arihiro, Koji; Sakai, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Elevated soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) in sera is observed in patients with malignant lymphoma (ML). Therefore, sIL-2R is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for ML, but the mechanisms responsible for the increase in sIL-2R levels in patients with B-cell lymphomas have not yet been elucidated. We first hypothesized that lymphoma cells expressing IL-2R and some proteinases such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the tumor microenvironment can give rise to increased sIL-2R in sera. However, flow cytometric studies revealed that few lymphoma cells expressed IL-2R α chain (CD25) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL), and most CD25-expressing cells in the tumor were T-cells. Distinct correlations between CD25 expression on B-lymphoma cells and sIL-2R levels were not observed. We then confirmed that MMP-9 plays an important role in producing sIL-2R in functional studies. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis also revealed that MMP-9 is mainly derived from tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). We therefore evaluated the number of CD68 and CD163 positive macrophages in the tumor microenvironment using IHC analysis. A positive correlation between the levels of sIL-2R in sera and the numbers of CD68 positive macrophages in the tumor microenvironment was confirmed in FL and extranodal DLBCL. These results may be useful in understanding the pathophysiology of B-cell lymphomas. PMID:24236041

  1. Eos is redundant for T regulatory cell function, but plays an important role in IL-2 and Th17 production by CD4+ T conventional cells

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Metidji, Amina; Glass, Deborah Dacek; Thornton, Angela M.; Ikeda, Tohru; Morgan, Bruce A.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Eos is a transcription factor that belongs to the Ikaros family of transcription factors. Eos has been reported to be a T regulatory cell (Treg) signature gene, to play a critical role in Treg suppressor functions, and to maintain Treg stability. We have utilized mice with a global deficiency of Eos to re-examine the role of Eos expression in both Treg and T conventional (Tconv) cells. Treg from Eos deficient (Eos−/−) mice developed normally, displayed a normal Treg phenotype, and exhibited normal suppressor function in vitro. Eos−/− Treg were as effective as Treg from wild type (WT) mice in suppression of inflammation in a model of inflammatory bowel disease. Bone marrow (BM) from Eos−/− mice was as effective as BM from WT mice in controlling T cell activation when used to reconstitute immunodeficient mice in the presence of Scurfy fetal liver cells. Surprisingly, Eos was expressed in activated Tconv cells and was required for IL-2 production, CD25 expression and proliferation in vitro by CD4+ Tconv cells. Eos−/− mice developed more severe Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis than WT mice, displayed increased numbers of effector T cells in the periphery and CNS, and amplified IL-17 production. In conclusion, our studies are not consistent with a role for Eos in Treg development and function, but demonstrate that Eos plays an important role in the activation and differentiation of Tconv cells. PMID:26062998

  2. Differential expression of proteins in naïve and IL-2 stimulated primary human NK cells identified by global proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Di; Felder, Mildred; Scarlett, Cameron O.; Patankar, Manish S.; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells efficiently cytolyse tumors and virally infected cells. Despite the important role that interleukin (IL)-2 plays in stimulating the proliferation of NK cells and increasing NK cell activity, little is known about the alterations in the global NK cell proteome following IL-2 activation. To compare the proteomes of naïve and IL-2-activated primary NK cells and identify key cellular pathways involved in IL-2 signaling, we isolated proteins from naïve and IL-2-activated NK cells from healthy donors, the proteins were trypsinized and the resulting peptides were analyzed by 2D LC ESI-MS/MS followed by label-free quantification. In total, more than 2000 proteins were identified from naïve and IL-2-activated NK cells where 383 proteins were found to be differentially expressed following IL-2 activation. Functional annotation of IL-2 regulated proteins revealed potential targets for future investigation of IL-2 signaling in human primary NK cells. A pathway analysis was performed and revealed several pathways that were not previously known to be involved in IL-2 response, including ubiquitin proteasome pathway, integrin signaling pathway, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling pathway, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway and Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:23806757

  3. IL-2: a two-faced master regulator of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Fu, Shu Man; Ju, Shyr-Te

    2011-03-01

    CD4(+) T-cell (Th) cytokines provide important regulatory and effector functions of T-cells. Among them, IL-2 plays a unique role. IL-2 is required for the generation and maintenance of regulatory T-cells (Treg) to provide lifelong protection from autoimmune disease. Whether IL-2 is also required for autoimmune disease development is less clear as Il2(-/)(-) mice themselves spontaneously develop multi-organ inflammation (MOI). In this communication, we discuss evidence that support the thesis that IL-2 is required for the development of autoimmune response, although some aspects of autoimmune response are not regulated by IL-2. Potential IL-2-dependent mechanisms operating at specific stages of the inflammation process are presented. The interplays among Treg, IL-2, autoimmune response and adaptive immunity are discussed. Overall, available information indicates that IL-2 is a two-faced master regulator of autoimmunity: one to prevent autoimmunity while the other promotes autoimmune response. The latter is an unfortunate consequence of IL-2 function that is used to promote the adaptive immune response against foreign antigens and pathogens. PMID:21282039

  4. Development of a diphtheria toxin-based recombinant porcine IL-2 fusion toxin for depleting porcine CD25+ cells.

    PubMed

    Peraino, Jaclyn Stromp; Schenk, Marian; Li, Guoying; Zhang, Huiping; Farkash, Evan A; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Wang, Zhirui

    2013-12-15

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been widely recognized as crucial players in controlling immune responses. Because their major role is to ensure that the immune system is not over reactive, Tregs have been the focus of multiple research studies including those investigating transplantation tolerance, autoimmunity and cancer treatment. On their surface Tregs constitutively express CD25, a high affinity receptor for the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). The reagents constructed in this study were generated by genetically linking porcine IL-2 to the truncated diphtheria toxin (DT390). This reagent functions by first binding to the cell surface via the porcine IL-2/porcine CD25 interaction then the DT390 domain facilitates internalization followed by inhibition of protein synthesis resulting in cell death. Four versions of the porcine IL-2 fusion toxin were designed in an interest to find the most effective isoform: 1) monovalent glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Gly); 2) monovalent non-N-glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (NonGly); 3) bivalent glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Bi-Gly); 4) bivalent non-N-glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Bi-NonGly). Using a porcine CD25(+) B cell lymphoma cell line (LCL13271) in vitro analysis of the fusion toxins' ability to inhibit protein synthesis demonstrated that the Bi-NonGly fusion toxin is the most efficient reagent. These in vitro results are consistent with binding affinity as the Bi-NonGly fusion toxin binds strongest to CD25 on the same LCL13271 cells. The Bi-Gly fusion toxin significantly prolonged the survival (p=0.028) of tumor-bearing NOD/SCID IL-2 receptor γ(-/-) (NSG) mice injected with LCL13271 cells compared with untreated controls. This recombinant protein has great potential to function as a useful tool for in vivo depletion of porcine CD25(+) cells for studying immune regulation. PMID:24055128

  5. Development of a Diphtheria Toxin-Based Recombinant Porcine IL-2 Fusion Toxin for Depleting Porcine CD25+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peraino, Jaclyn Stromp; Schenk, Marian; Li, Guoying; Zhang, Huiping; Farkash, Evan A.; Sachs, David H.; Huang, Christene A.; Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Wang, Zhirui

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been widely recognized as crucial players in controlling immune responses. Because their major role is to ensure that the immune system is not over reactive, Tregs have been the focus of multiple research studies including those investigating transplantation tolerance, autoimmunity and cancer treatment. On their surface Tregs constitutively express CD25, a high affinity receptor for the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). The reagents constructed in this study were generated by genetically linking porcine IL-2 to the truncated diphtheria toxin (DT390). This reagent functions by first binding to the cell surface via the porcine IL-2/porcine CD25 interaction then the DT390 domain facilitates internalization followed by inhibition of protein synthesis resulting in cell death. Four versions of the porcine IL-2 fusion toxin were designed in an interest to find the most effective isoform: 1) monovalent glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Gly); 2) monovalent non-N-glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (NonGly); 3) bivalent glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Bi-Gly); 4) bivalent non-N-glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Bi-NonGly). Using a porcine CD25+ B cell lymphoma cell line (LCL13271) in vitro analysis of the fusion toxins’ ability to inhibit protein synthesis demonstrated that the Bi-NonGly fusion toxin is the most efficient reagent. These in vitro results are consistent with binding affinity as the Bi-NonGly fusion toxin binds strongest to CD25 on the same LCL13271 cells. The Bi-Gly fusion toxin significantly prolonged the survival (p=0.028) of tumor-bearing NOD/SCID IL-2 receptor γ−/− (NSG) mice injected with LCL13271 cells compared with untreated controls. This recombinant protein has great potential to function as a useful tool for in vivo depletion of porcine CD25+ cells for studying immune regulation. PMID:24055128

  6. In vivo Expansion of Naïve CD4+CD25high FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Colorectal Carcinoma after IL-2 Administration

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Marc; Schumak, Beatrix; Weihrauch, Martin R.; Andres, Bettina; Giese, Thomas; Endl, Elmar; Knolle, Percy A.; Classen, Sabine; Limmer, Andreas; Schultze, Joachim L.

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are increased in context of malignancies and their expansion can be correlated with higher disease burden and decreased survival. Initially, interleukin 2 (IL-2) has been used as T-cell growth factor in clinical vaccination trials. In murine models, however, a role of IL-2 in development, differentiation, homeostasis, and function of Treg cells was established. In IL-2 treated cancer patients a further Treg-cell expansion was described, yet, the mechanism of expansion is still elusive. Here we report that functional Treg cells of a naïve phenotype - as determined by CCR7 and CD45RA expression - are significantly expanded in colorectal cancer patients. Treatment of 15 UICC stage IV colorectal cancer patients with IL-2 in a phase I/II peptide vaccination trial further enlarges the already increased naïve Treg-cell pool. Higher frequencies of T-cell receptor excision circles in naïve Treg cells indicate IL-2 dependent thymic generation of naïve Treg cells as a mechanism leading to increased frequencies of Treg cells post IL-2 treatment in cancer patients. This finding could be confirmed in naïve murine Treg cells after IL-2 administration. These results point to a more complex regulation of Treg cells in context of IL-2 administration. Future strategies therefore might aim at combining IL-2 therapy with novel strategies to circumvent expansion and differentiation of naïve Treg cells. PMID:22276195

  7. Tracking human multiple myeloma xenografts in NOD-Rag-1/IL-2 receptor gamma chain-null mice with the novel biomarker AKAP-4

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma (MM) is a fatal malignancy ranking second in prevalence among hematological tumors. Continuous efforts are being made to develop innovative and more effective treatments. The preclinical evaluation of new therapies relies on the use of murine models of the disease. Methods Here we describe a new MM animal model in NOD-Rag1null IL2rgnull (NRG) mice that supports the engraftment of cell lines and primary MM cells that can be tracked with the tumor antigen, AKAP-4. Results Human MM cell lines, U266 and H929, and primary MM cells were successfully engrafted in NRG mice after intravenous administration, and were found in the bone marrow, blood and spleen of tumor-challenged animals. The AKAP-4 expression pattern was similar to that of known MM markers, such as paraproteins, CD38 and CD45. Conclusions We developed for the first time a murine model allowing for the growth of both MM cell lines and primary cells in multifocal sites, thus mimicking the disease seen in patients. Additionally, we validated the use of AKAP-4 antigen to track tumor growth in vivo and to specifically identify MM cells in mouse tissues. We expect that our model will significantly improve the pre-clinical evaluation of new anti-myeloma therapies. PMID:21923911

  8. NKG2D is a Key Receptor for Recognition of Bladder Cancer Cells by IL-2-Activated NK Cells and BCG Promotes NK Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    García-Cuesta, Eva María; López-Cobo, Sheila; Álvarez-Maestro, Mario; Esteso, Gloria; Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; Rey, Mercedes; Cassady-Cain, Robin L.; Linares, Ana; Valés-Gómez, Alejandro; Reyburn, Hugh Thomson; Martínez-Piñeiro, Luis; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2015-01-01

    Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) is used to treat superficial bladder cancer, either papillary tumors (after transurethral resection) or high-grade flat carcinomas (carcinoma in situ), reducing recurrence in about 70% of patients. Initially, BCG was proposed to work through an inflammatory response, mediated by phagocytic uptake of mycobacterial antigens and cytokine release. More recently, other immune effectors such as monocytes, natural killer (NK), and NKT cells have been suggested to play a role in this immune response. Here, we provide a comprehensive study of multiple bladder cancer cell lines as putative targets for immune cells and evaluated their recognition by NK cells in the presence and absence of BCG. We describe that different bladder cancer cells can express multiple activating and inhibitory ligands for NK cells. Recognition of bladder cancer cells depended mainly on NKG2D, with a contribution from NKp46. Surprisingly, exposure to BCG did not affect the immune phenotype of bladder cells nor increased NK cell recognition of purified IL-2-activated cell lines. However, NK cells were activated efficiently when BCG was included in mixed lymphocyte cultures, suggesting that NK activation after mycobacteria treatment requires the collaboration of various immune cells. We also analyzed the percentage of NK cells in peripheral blood of a cohort of bladder cancer patients treated with BCG. The total numbers of NK cells did not vary during treatment, indicating that a more detailed study of NK cell activation in the tumor site will be required to evaluate the response in each patient. PMID:26106390

  9. Mutation analysis of IL2RG in human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Puck, J M; Pepper, A E; Henthorn, P S; Candotti, F; Isakov, J; Whitwam, T; Conley, M E; Fischer, R E; Rosenblatt, H M; Small, T N; Buckley, R H

    1997-03-15

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a syndrome of profoundly impaired cellular and humoral immunity. In humans, SCID is most commonly caused by mutations in the X-linked gene IL2RG, which encodes the common gamma chain, gamma c, of the leukocyte receptors for interleukin-2 and multiple other cytokines. To investigate the frequency and variety of IL2RG mutations that cause SCID, we analyzed DNA, RNA, and B-cell lines from a total of 103 unrelated SCID-affected males and their relatives using a combination of molecular and immunologic techniques. Sixty-two different mutations spanning all eight IL2RG exons were found in 87 cases, making possible correlations between mutation type and functional consequences. Although skewed maternal X chromosome inactivation, single-strand conformation polymorphism, mRNA expression, and cell surface staining with anti-gamma c antibodies were all helpful in establishing IL2RG defects as the cause of SCID, only dideoxy fingerprinting and DNA sequence determination each detected 100% of the IL2RG mutations in our series. Abnormal gamma c chains may be expressed in the lymphocytes of as many as two thirds of patients with X-linked SCID. Specific mutation diagnosis thus remains technically challenging, but it is important for genetic counseling and perhaps for helping to select appropriate subjects for retroviral gene therapy trials, This is a US government work. There are no restrictions on its use. PMID:9058718

  10. Juxtacrine function of interleukin-15/interleukin-15 receptor system in tumour derived human B-cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, K; Huang, Y C; Dorsey, W C; Carns, B; Sharma, V

    2006-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a cytokine that induces proliferation and promotes cell survival of human T, B and NK cells. IL-15 and interleukin-2 (IL-2) exhibit a similar spectrum of immune effects and share the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) subunits IL-2Rβ and IL-2Rγc for signalling in haematopoietic cells. Furthermore, each cytokine has a private α receptor, namely IL-2Rα for IL-2 and IL-15Rα for IL-15, that functions in ligand binding. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods, the expression and secretion of IL-15 and IL-15Rα in tumour-derived B-cell lines were studied. The results as presented in this study identify that IL-15 mRNA is predominantly expressed in EBV positive (EBV+) B-cell lines, although IL-15Rα is ubiquitously and constitutively expressed in all these B-cell lines. Although no detectable levels of IL-15 protein secretion were observed in any of these cell lines, we were able to detect membrane-bound expression of IL-15 protein by FACS analysis in some cell lines. These data imply that the IL-15/IL-15R system requires complex regulatory mechanisms for protein secretion. Taken together, we speculate that these results suggest a juxtacrine, intracrine function for IL-15/IL-15R. PMID:17100778

  11. Does thalidomide affect IL-2 response and production?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, L P; Schlegel, P G; Baker, J; Chen, Y; Chao, N J

    1995-08-01

    The exact mechanism of immunosuppression by thalidomide is poorly understood. A common denominator in the pathogenesis of graft-vs.-host disease, graft rejection, reactional lepromatous leprosy, and autoimmune disorders modulated by thalidomide is the activation of T lymphocytes culminating in the synthesis of interleukin-2 (IL-2), the expression of high-affinity IL-2 receptors, and the induction of proliferation. We investigated the effect of thalidomide on the production of IL-2 by the human leukemia cell line Jurkat through induction of IL-2 gene enhancer activity and through the presence of IL-2 in supernatants. beta-galactosidase activity, encoded by a reporter lac z construct and controlled by a transcription factor in thalidomide-treated PMA- and ionomycin-stimulated Jurkat cells, was similar (97 +/- 1.33%; p > 0.1) to non-thalidomide-treated controls at all drug concentrations tested. IL-2 enhancer-driven beta-galactose activity of thalidomide-treated and stimulated cells was also similar to that of untreated controls (p > 0.2). The IL-2 production of activated nontransfected Jurkat cells was gauged by using the IL-2-dependent cell line HT-2 as a readout and by ELISA. Jurkat cells were subcloned by limiting dilution. Bulk cultures and three subclones (J.5.2.5., J.5.2.9., and J.5.3.8.) were assayed at 6, 12, and 24 hours after PHA/PMA-induced stimulation. No inhibitory effect on the IL-2 production by thalidomide could be detected at any of the drug concentrations tested (5-30 micrograms/mL), whereas 10 to 100 ng/mL of cyclosporine inhibited the IL-2 production by 95 to 100%. In addition, we observed neither inhibition of IL-2-dependent proliferation of HT-2 nor inhibition of PHA-induced proliferation of peripheral mononuclear cells by thalidomide at all drug concentrations used (5-30 micrograms/mL). These results do not support the possibility of a modulatory effect on the immune response by thalidomide via IL-2 production and IL-2 response. PMID:7635184

  12. Intermediate- and high-affinity interleukin-2 receptors expressed in an IL-4-dependent T-cell line induce different signals.

    PubMed Central

    Rebollo, A; Silva, A

    1993-01-01

    In order to understand the respective roles of IL-2R alpha and IL-2R beta subunits in transmission of the interleukin-2 (IL-2)-mediated growth signals, we have established two IL-4-dependent murine T-cell clones stably expressing the human IL-2R beta chain and three clones stably expressing the human IL-2R alpha chain. Whereas parental LD8 cells (which express only the murine IL-2R beta chain) do not proliferate in response to IL-2, cell lines stably expressing human IL-2R beta or the chimeric IL-2R alpha beta complex proliferate in response to IL-2. Stably transfected cells expressing the chimeric high-affinity receptor (human IL-2R alpha and murine IL-2R beta) expressed de novo endogenous murine IL-2R alpha when cultured in the presence of IL-2 but not IL-4. Both chimeric and endogenous receptors are functional in response to IL-2, since only addition of both anti-human and anti-murine IL-2R alpha monoclonal antibodies (mAb) inhibited IL-2-induced proliferation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that human and murine IL-2R beta molecules are different since interaction of IL-2 with human p70 IL-2R is sufficient for transduction of proliferative signals in the absence of p55 IL-2R or, alternatively, that over-expression of the IL-2R beta chain renders cells responsive to IL-2. In addition, IL-2 stimulation of T cells through different forms of IL-2R results in the induction of distinct cellular responses. PMID:8262551

  13. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells, Th1 (CCR5, IL-2, IFN-γ) and Th2 (CCR4, IL-4, Il-13) type chemokine receptors and intracellular cytokines in children with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Kutukculer, Necil; Azarsiz, Elif; Aksu, Guzide; Karaca, Neslihan Edeer

    2016-06-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous group of primary antibody deficiencies characterized by decreased serum immunoglobulin G along with a decrease in serum IgA and/or IgM, defective specific antibody production, and recurrent bacterial infections. Abnormal lymphocyte trafficking, dysregulated cellular responses to chemokines, and uncontrolled T cell polarization may be involved in the pathogenesis and may help to understand the clinical complications. We evaluated T helper cell subsets (chemokine receptors CCR4, CCR5, and CCR7), expressions on T lymphocytes, intracellular cytokines - IL-2, IL-4, IL-13, IFN- γ-on CD4(+) T cells, and expression of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells of 20 CVID patients and 26 healthy controls. Autoimmune clinical findings and other complications were also determined. Percentages and absolute numbers of CD4(+)CD25(+) Foxp3(+) cells did not show any significant difference between CVID cases and healthy controls nor between severe and moderate disease patients. The only significant difference regarding Th1 and Th2 type intracellular cytokines was the decreased absolute numbers of CD3(+)CD4(+)IL4(+) cells in CVID cases. There were some findings about T helper cell type dominance in CVID patients such as positive correlation between hepatomegaly and high IL-2 and IFN-γ in CD3(+)CD4(+) cells and very high expression of CCR5 (Th1) on CD3(+)CD4(+) cells in patients with granuloma. Th1 (CCR5) and Th2 (CCR4) type chemokine receptors did not show any dominance in CVID cases. However, frequencies of CCR7 expressing CD3(+) T cells, CD3(+)CD4(+) T helper cells and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cytotoxic cells were significantly lower in severe CVID patients. In addition, presence of autoimmune clinical findings was negatively correlated with CCR7(+) cells. As CCR7 is a key mediator balancing immunity and tolerance in the immune system, the abnormality of this mediator may contribute to the profound immune dysregulation seen in CVID

  14. EBI2 augments Tfh cell fate by promoting interaction with IL-2-quenching dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Lu, Erick; Yi, Tangsheng; Cyster, Jason G

    2016-05-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a subset of T cells carrying the CD4 antigen; they are important in supporting plasma cell and germinal centre responses. The initial induction of Tfh cell properties occurs within the first few days after activation by antigen recognition on dendritic cells, although how dendritic cells promote this cell-fate decision is not fully understood. Moreover, although Tfh cells are uniquely defined by expression of the follicle-homing receptor CXCR5 (refs 1, 2), the guidance receptor promoting the earlier localization of activated T cells at the interface of the B-cell follicle and T zone has been unclear. Here we show that the G-protein-coupled receptor EBI2 (GPR183) and its ligand 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol mediate positioning of activated CD4 T cells at the interface of the follicle and T zone. In this location they interact with activated dendritic cells and are exposed to Tfh-cell-promoting inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) ligand. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a cytokine that has multiple influences on T-cell fate, including negative regulation of Tfh cell differentiation. We demonstrate that activated dendritic cells in the outer T zone further augment Tfh cell differentiation by producing membrane and soluble forms of CD25, the IL-2 receptor α-chain, and quenching T-cell-derived IL-2. Mice lacking EBI2 in T cells or CD25 in dendritic cells have reduced Tfh cells and mount defective T-cell-dependent plasma cell and germinal centre responses. These findings demonstrate that distinct niches within the lymphoid organ T zone support distinct cell fate decisions, and they establish a function for dendritic-cell-derived CD25 in controlling IL-2 availability and T-cell differentiation. PMID:27147029

  15. [Biological properties and therapeutic use of interleukin 2 (IL-2)].

    PubMed

    Robak, T

    1995-01-01

    A cytokine produced by the subpopulation of activated helper lymphocytes T has been called interleukin-2 (IL-2). The obtaining of recombinant cytokine has facilitated the study of its biological properties and its application in the treatment of certain neoplastic and infectious diseases. IL-2 affects the target cells by means of a receptor of great affinity consisting of three independent chains: alpha, beta, gamma. The cytokine is the most important growth factor of lymphocytes T, conditioning their clonal expansion. Antigen stimulation is the condition for the expression of IL-2 does not, however, affect resting lymphocytes T. The expression of the receptor for this cytokine on NK cells is, however, continuous in character but only a very small percentage of these cells has receptors of great affinity. IL-2 plays a great role in adoptive immunotherapy consisting in intravenous administration of cells with cytotoxic properties. Cells obtained from peripheral blood and grown in vitro are called LAK cells (lymphocyte activated killer cells), while cells obtained from neoplasms and grown in similar conditions are named TIL cells (tumor infiltrated lymphocytes). LAK and TIL cells reveal a similar antineoplastic activity in vivo. At present, however, recombinant IL-2 alone is used more often, either intravenously or subcutaneously. The cytokine is effective in the treatment of patients with disseminate cancer of the kidney and melanoma, and in adjuvant therapy of acute myeloid leukemia. Attempts have been made to apply it in the treatment of AIDS and leprosy. The toxic effect of IL-2 depends on the dose and the mode of administration. In the majority of patients parainfluenza symptoms appear. Most undesirable effects are connected with multisystemic syndrome of capillary vessels hyperpermeability leading to the increased fluid retention into extravascular spaces, oedema, hypotonia and oliguria. PMID:8657637

  16. Polymorphisms in the IL2, IL2RA and IL2RB genes in multiple sclerosis risk

    PubMed Central

    Cavanillas, María L; Alcina, Antonio; Núñez, Concepción; de las Heras, Virginia; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Bartolomé, Manuel; de la Concha, Emilio G; Fernández, Oscar; Arroyo, Rafael; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Urcelay, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-2/IL-2R signalling promotes proliferation and survival of activated T cells and has an essential non-redundant role in the production of regulatory T cells. Associations with different autoimmune diseases of polymorphisms in a linkage disequilibrium block in which the IL2/IL21 genes map (4q27), and also in genes encoding the IL2RA and IL2RB subunits (located in 10p15 and 22q13, respectively), were identified through genome-wide studies. Polymorphisms in these three genes were studied in 430 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and in 550 ethnically matched controls from Madrid (Spain). Replication and meta-analysis with results from an independent cohort of 771 MS patients and 759 controls from Andalucía (Spain) confirmed the association of polymorphisms in the IL2RA gene (PMantel–Haenszel, odds ratio (OR)M–H (95% confidence interval, CI) for rs2104286: 0.0001, 0.75 (0.65–0.87); for rs11594656/rs35285258: 0.004, 1.19 (1.06–1.34); for rs41295061: 0.03, 0.77 (0.60–0.98)); showed a trend for association of the IL2/IL21 rs6822844 (PM–H=0.07, ORM–H (95% CI)=0.86 (0.73–1.01)), but did not corroborate the association for IL2RB. Regression analyses of the combined Spanish cohort revealed the independence of two IL2RA association signals: rs2104286 and rs11594656/rs35285258. The relevant role of the IL2RA gene on MS susceptibility adds support to its common effect on autoimmune risk and the suggestive association of IL2/IL21 warrants further investigation. PMID:20179739

  17. Single-cell quantification of IL-2 response by effector and regulatory T cells reveals critical plasticity in immune response

    PubMed Central

    Feinerman, Ofer; Jentsch, Garrit; Tkach, Karen E; Coward, Jesse W; Hathorn, Matthew M; Sneddon, Michael W; Emonet, Thierry; Smith, Kendall A; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how the immune system decides between tolerance and activation by antigens requires addressing cytokine regulation as a highly dynamic process. We quantified the dynamics of interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling in a population of T cells during an immune response by combining in silico modeling and single-cell measurements in vitro. We demonstrate that IL-2 receptor expression levels vary widely among T cells creating a large variability in the ability of the individual cells to consume, produce and participate in IL-2 signaling within the population. Our model reveals that at the population level, these heterogeneous cells are engaged in a tug-of-war for IL-2 between regulatory (Treg) and effector (Teff) T cells, whereby access to IL-2 can either increase the survival of Teff cells or the suppressive capacity of Treg cells. This tug-of-war is the mechanism enforcing, at the systems level, a core function of Treg cells, namely the specific suppression of survival signals for weakly activated Teff cells but not for strongly activated cells. Our integrated model yields quantitative, experimentally validated predictions for the manipulation of Treg suppression. PMID:21119631

  18. Neuroendocrine changes in colon of mice with a disrupted IL-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Qian, B F; El-Salhy, M; Melgar, S; Hammarström, M L; Danielsson, A

    2000-06-01

    Neuroendocrine peptides have a variety of physiological functions in the gastrointestinal tract. This study was carried out to investigate the impact of IL-2 deficiency on the neuroendocrine system in normal colon, and the neuroendocrine changes during colonic inflammation. Mice with homozygous disrupted IL-2 gene (IL-2-/-) spontaneously developed a bowel disease with similarities to human ulcerative colitis. Different types of colonic endocrine cells and myenteric nerves were analysed in the IL-2-/- mice using immunomorphometry. The neuropeptide contents in the colonic tissues were determined by radioimmunoassay. Age-matched healthy IL-2+/- and IL-2+/+ mice served as controls and the colonic IL-2 levels were compared between these two groups of mice by ELISA. Our data showed that less than half the amount of IL-2 was synthesized in the colon of IL-2+/- mice compared with the IL-2+/+ wild-type mice. Two major differences in the neuroendocrine colon were found between the mice with an intact and disrupted IL-2 gene. One was age-related. The frequencies of various endocrine cells and myenteric nerves increased with age in the IL-2+/+ mice. However, no such increases were seen in the mice with a disrupted IL-2 gene. Instead, the volume densities of enteroglucagon, serotonin cells and substance P (SP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and total myenteric nerves were lower in the older IL-2+/- and IL-2-/- mice compared with the wild type. The other was disease-related. Polypeptide YY (PYY) cells and tissue levels of PYY, SP and VIP were significantly decreased in the IL-2-/- mice during the course of bowel inflammation compared with the healthy IL-2+/- and IL-2+/+ controls. These findings indicate that colonic neuroendocrine alterations did occur in the mice with a disrupted IL-2 gene and diminished local IL-2 level, suggesting a role of IL-2 in the regulation of the neuroendocrine system and a prevalent interaction between the immune and neuroendocrine systems

  19. Human IL-2 mutein with higher antitumor efficacy than wild type IL-2.

    PubMed

    Carmenate, Tania; Pacios, Anabel; Enamorado, Michel; Moreno, Ernesto; Garcia-Martínez, Karina; Fuente, Dasha; León, Kalet

    2013-06-15

    IL-2 has been used for the treatment of melanoma and renal cell carcinoma, but this therapy has limited efficacy and severe toxicity. Currently, it is assumed that part of the limited efficacy is due to the IL-2-driven preferential expansion of regulatory T cells, which dampen the antitumor immunity. In this study, we characterize a human IL-2 mutant with higher antitumor efficacy and lower toxicity than wild type human IL-2 (wtIL-2). The mutant differs from wtIL-2 by four mutations at the interface with the α subunit of IL-2R. The IL-2 mutant induces in vitro proliferation of CD8(+)CD44(hi) and NK1.1 cells as efficiently as does wtIL-2, but it shows a reduced capacity to induce proliferation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. The IL-2 mutant shows a higher antimetastatic effect than does wtIL-2 in several transplantable tumor models: the experimental metastasis model of MB16F0 melanoma and the experimental and spontaneous metastasis models for the mouse pulmonary carcinoma 3LL-D1222. Relevantly, the IL-2 mutant also exhibits lower lung and liver toxicity than does wtIL-2 when used at high doses in mice. In silico simulations, using a calibrated mathematical model, predict that the properties of IL-2 mutein are a consequence of the reduction, of at least two orders of magnitude, in its affinity for the α subunit of IL-2R (CD25). The human IL-2 mutant described in the present work could be a good candidate for improving cancer therapy based on IL-2. PMID:23677467

  20. Analysis of IL-2-like factor in lymphocyte culture supernatant of olive flounder, Paralichthys oliveaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Riqin; Zhang, Peijun; Li, Jun; Xu, Yongli

    2005-03-01

    To study immune mechanism of fish lymphocyte we performed a proliferation assay and ELISA using monoclonal antibody against human IL-2. The result showed that an interleukin-2 (IL-2)-like factor was detected in the supernatant of plant haemoglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocyte culture from peripheral blood, spleen and head kidney of olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. The quantities of IL-2-like factor in the supernatant from different lymphoid tissues were quite different. The IL-2 like factor in the supernatant from cultured head kidney lymphocytes was much higher than those of peripheral blood lymphocytes and spleen lymphocytes ( P<0.01). The IL-2 activity was found in either mouse thymocyte proliferation assay or flounder head kidney lymphocyte proliferation assay and shown to have obvious enhancing effect on proliferation of the above two types of cell. The recombinant human IL-2, (rhIL-2) was able to stimulate flounder thymocyte proliferation and used to detect the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) on the surface of flounder lymphocyte. The cross-reaction between the lymphocytes of flounder peripheral blood and CD25(IL-2R) was detected with flow cytometry and shown that the percentage of CD25-positive cell in peripheral blood was 7.74±0.67%.

  1. Influence of In Vitro IL-2 or IL-15 Alone or in Combination with Hsp 70 Derived 14-Mer Peptide (TKD) on the Expression of NK Cell Activatory and Inhibitory Receptors on Peripheral Blood T Cells, B Cells and NKT Cells.

    PubMed

    Hromadnikova, Ilona; Li, Shuang; Kotlabova, Katerina; Dickinson, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies from Multhoff and colleagues reported that plasma membrane Hsp70 acts as a tumour-specific recognition structure for activated NK cells, and that the incubation of NK cells with Hsp70 and/or a 14-mer peptide derived from the N-terminal sequence of Hsp70 (TKDNNLLGRFELSG, TKD, aa 450-463) plus a low dose of IL-2 triggers NK cell proliferation and migration, and their capacity to kill cancer cells expressing membrane Hsp70. Herein, we have used flow cytometry to determine the influence of in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals with IL-2 or IL-15, either alone or in combination with TKD peptide on the cell surface expression of CD94, NK cell activatory receptors (CD16, NK2D, NKG2C, NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, NKp80, KIR2DL4, DNAM-1 and LAMP1) and NK cell inhibitory receptors (NKG2A, KIR2DL2/L3, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKR-P1A) by CD3+CD56+ (NKT), CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD19+ populations. NKG2D, DNAM-1, LAMP1 and NKR-P1A expression was upregulated after the stimulation with IL-2 or IL-15 alone or in combination with TKD in NKT, CD8+ T cells and B cells. CD94 was upregulated in NKT and CD8+ T cells. Concurrently, an increase in a number of CD8+ T cells expressing LIR1/ILT-2 and CD4+ T cells positive for NKR-P1A was observed. The proportion of CD8+ T cells that expressed NKG2D was higher after IL-2/TKD treatment, when compared with IL-2 treatment alone. In comparison with IL-15 alone, IL-15/TKD treatment increased the proportion of NKT cells that were positive for CD94, LAMP1 and NKRP-1A. The more potent effect of IL-15/TKD on cell surface expression of NKG2D, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKRP-1A was observed in B cells compared with IL-15 alone. However, this increase was not of statistical significance. IL-2/TKD induced significant upregulation of LAMP1 in CD8+ T cells compared with IL-2 alone. Besides NK cells, other immunocompetent cells present within the fraction of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were influenced by the treatment

  2. Influence of In Vitro IL-2 or IL-15 Alone or in Combination with Hsp 70 Derived 14-Mer Peptide (TKD) on the Expression of NK Cell Activatory and Inhibitory Receptors on Peripheral Blood T Cells, B Cells and NKT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hromadnikova, Ilona; Li, Shuang; Kotlabova, Katerina; Dickinson, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies from Multhoff and colleagues reported that plasma membrane Hsp70 acts as a tumour-specific recognition structure for activated NK cells, and that the incubation of NK cells with Hsp70 and/or a 14-mer peptide derived from the N-terminal sequence of Hsp70 (TKDNNLLGRFELSG, TKD, aa 450–463) plus a low dose of IL-2 triggers NK cell proliferation and migration, and their capacity to kill cancer cells expressing membrane Hsp70. Herein, we have used flow cytometry to determine the influence of in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals with IL-2 or IL-15, either alone or in combination with TKD peptide on the cell surface expression of CD94, NK cell activatory receptors (CD16, NK2D, NKG2C, NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, NKp80, KIR2DL4, DNAM-1 and LAMP1) and NK cell inhibitory receptors (NKG2A, KIR2DL2/L3, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKR-P1A) by CD3+CD56+ (NKT), CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD19+ populations. NKG2D, DNAM-1, LAMP1 and NKR-P1A expression was upregulated after the stimulation with IL-2 or IL-15 alone or in combination with TKD in NKT, CD8+ T cells and B cells. CD94 was upregulated in NKT and CD8+ T cells. Concurrently, an increase in a number of CD8+ T cells expressing LIR1/ILT-2 and CD4+ T cells positive for NKR-P1A was observed. The proportion of CD8+ T cells that expressed NKG2D was higher after IL-2/TKD treatment, when compared with IL-2 treatment alone. In comparison with IL-15 alone, IL-15/TKD treatment increased the proportion of NKT cells that were positive for CD94, LAMP1 and NKRP-1A. The more potent effect of IL-15/TKD on cell surface expression of NKG2D, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKRP-1A was observed in B cells compared with IL-15 alone. However, this increase was not of statistical significance. IL-2/TKD induced significant upregulation of LAMP1 in CD8+ T cells compared with IL-2 alone. Besides NK cells, other immunocompetent cells present within the fraction of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were influenced by the treatment

  3. Role of IL-2 in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Caicun; Ren, Shengxiang

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is one of the key cytokines with pleiotropic effects on immune system. It has been approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma and metastatic melanoma. Recent progress has been made in our understanding of IL-2 in regulating lymphocytes that has led to exciting new directions for cancer immunotherapy. While improved IL-2 formulations might be used as monotherapies, their combination with other anticancer immunotherapies, such as adoptive cell transfer regimens, antigen-specific vaccination, and blockade of immune checkpoint inhibitory molecules, for example cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) mono-antibodies, would held the promise of treating metastatic cancer. Despite the comprehensive studies of IL-2 on immune system have established the application of IL-2 for cancer immunotherapy, a number of poignant obstacles remain for future research. In the present review, we will focus on the key biological features of IL-2, current applications, limitations, and future directions of IL-2 in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27471638

  4. Antitumor effect of murine dendritic and tumor cells transduced with IL-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Wojas-Turek, Justyna; Pajtasz-Piasecka, Elżbieta; Rossowska, Joanna; Piasecki, Egbert; Duś, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin (IL-) 2 acts on a number of types of immune cells promoting their effector functions. To replace systemic administration of recombinant form of this cytokine, various genetically modified cells have been used indifferent preclinical models for tumor growth inhibition. In this study, dendritic or tumor cells transduced with retroviral vector carrying IL-2 gene (JAWS II/IL-2, X63/IL-2, MC38/IL-2 cells) alone or combined with tumor antigen-stimulated dendritic cells (JAWS II/TAg) were exploited to treat colon carcinoma MC38-bearing mice. After the peritumoral injection of vaccine cells, the tumor growth delay and the increase in the number of tumor infiltrating CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T lymphocytes were noted. A considerable increase in CD4⁺ cell influx into tumor tissue was observed when JAWS II/IL-2 cells or JAWS II/TAg with syngeneic MC38/IL-2 cells were applied. The increase in intensity of CD8⁺ cell infiltration was associated with immune reaction triggered by the same combination of applied cells or JAWS II/TAg with allogeneic X63/IL-2 cells. The effect observed in vivo was accompanied by MC38/0 cell specific cytotoxic activity of spleen cells in vitro. Thus, the application of vaccines, including IL-2-secreting cells of various origins, was able to induce different antitumor responses polarized by exogenous IL-2 and the encountered tumor antigen. PMID:23042272

  5. A role for the intermediate affinity IL-2R in the protection against glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rebollo, A; Pitton, C; García, A; Gómez, J; Silva, A

    1995-01-01

    Recent work has shown that T lymphocytes undergo apoptosis upon treatment with the glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone. These cells can be protected from the effect of dexamethasone by interleukin-2 (IL-2) or IL-4. We were interested in analysing whether a transfected cell dependent on three different lymphokines could be protected by them from the effect of dexamethasone. In addition, we took advantage of our cellular system, in which we expressed intermediate- or high-affinity IL-2R independently, to analyse the role of these receptors in the protection from glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. In this report we show that IL-2 rescues murine T cells expressing exogenous intermediate- (TS1 beta) or high-affinity (TS1 alpha beta) IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) from dexamethasone-induced apoptosis. This result suggests that intermediate-affinity IL-2R alone can replace high-affinity IL-2R for the protection from the effect of dexamethasone. In addition, IL-4 and IL-9 are rescue-factors, as well as IL-2, of glucocorticoid-treated TS1 beta and TS1 alpha beta cells. Our data suggest that the presence of the alpha-chain of the IL-2R is not required for rescue by IL-2 from the effect of dexamethasone. In addition, we show that proliferation is not required for preventing glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. This result implies a new role for the intermediate-affinity IL-2R. Images Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:7751021

  6. Inflammation Enhances IL-2 Driven Differentiation of Cytolytic CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Aspen M.; Jacobs, Ashley K.; Vogel, Alexander J.; Condon, Shirley; Brown, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Cytolytic CD4 T cells (CD4 CTL) have been identified in vivo in response to viral infections; however, the factors necessary for driving the cytolytic phenotype have not been fully elucidated. Our previously published work suggests IL-2 may be the master regulator of perforin-mediated cytotoxicity in CD4 effectors. To further dissect the role of IL-2 in CD4 CTL generation, T cell receptor transgenic mice deficient in the ability to produce IL-2 or the high affinity IL-2 receptor (IL-2Rα, CD25) were used. Increasing concentrations of IL-2 were necessary to drive perforin (Prf) expression and maximal cytotoxicity. Granzyme B (GrB) expression and killing correlated with STAT5 activation and CD25 expression in vitro, suggesting that signaling through the high affinity IL-2R is critical for full cytotoxicity. IL-2 signaling was also necessary in vivo for inducing the Th1 phenotype and IFN-γ expression in CD4 T cells during influenza A (IAV) infection. In addition, GrB expression, as measured by mean fluorescent intensity, was decreased in CD25 deficient cells; however, the frequency of CD4 cells expressing GrB was unchanged. Similarly, analysis of cytolytic markers such as CD107a/b and Eomesodermin indicate high IL-2Rα expression is not necessary to drive the CD4 CTL phenotype during IAV infection. Thus, inflammatory signals induced by viral infection may overcome the need for strong IL-2 signals in driving cytotoxicity in CD4 cells. PMID:24586481

  7. Inhibition of Gαs/cAMP Signaling Decreases TCR-Stimulated IL-2 transcription in CD4+ T Helper Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Thomas R.; Yost, Evan A.; Yost, Stacy M.; Hartle, Cassandra M.; Ott, Braden J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of cAMP in regulating T cell activation and function has been controversial. cAMP is generally known as an immunosuppressant, but it is also required for generating optimal immune responses. As the effect of cAMP is likely to depend on its cellular context, the current study investigated whether the mechanism of activation of Gαs and adenylyl cyclase influences their effect on T cell receptor (TCR)-stimulated interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA levels. Methods: The effect of blocking Gs-coupled receptor (GsPCR)-mediated Gs activation on TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells was compared with that of knocking down Gαs expression or inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity. The effect of knocking down Gαs expression on TCR-stimulated cAMP accumulation was compared with that of blocking GsPCR signaling. Results: ZM-241385, an antagonist to the Gs-coupled A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR), enhanced TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels in primary human CD4+ T helper cells and in Jurkat T cells. A dominant negative Gαs construct, GαsDN3, also enhanced TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels. Similar to GsPCR antagonists, GαsDN3 blocked GsPCR-dependent activation of both Gαs and Gβγ. In contrast, Gαs siRNA and 2’,5’-dideoxyadenosine (ddA), an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, decreased TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels. Gαs siRNA, but not GαsDN3, decreased TCR-stimulated cAMP synthesis. Potentiation of IL-2 mRNA levels by ZM-241385 required at least two days of TCR stimulation, and addition of ddA after three days of TCR stimulation enhanced IL-2 mRNA levels. Conclusions: GsPCRs play an inhibitory role in the regulation of TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels whereas Gαs and cAMP can play a stimulatory one. Additionally, TCR-dependent activation of Gαs does not appear to involve GsPCRs. These results suggest that the context of Gαs/cAMP activation and the stage of T cell activation and differentiation determine the effect on TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels. PMID

  8. Influence of macrophages on HSV-1 induced IL 2 production by human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Clouse, K.A.; Orosz, C.G.; Sheridan, J.F.

    1986-03-05

    Previous work has demonstrated that human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HSV-1 seropositive individuals produce interleukin 2 (IL 2) following stimulation in vitro with uv-inactivated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV antigen). This study investigated the accessory macrophage (MO) and monokine requirements for IL 2 production by enriched T lymphocytes from HSV-1 seropositive individuals. Following removal of accessory MO populations, enriched T lymphocytes did not secrete IL 2 in response to HSV antigen. However, IL 2 production was restored by the addition of autologous, ..gamma..-irradiated (5000R) MO. HSV antigen-pulsed MO also induced IL 2 production by enriched T lymphocytes. Furthermore, when HSV-pulsed macrophages were treated with paraformaldehyde they no longer caused T lymphocytes to produce IL 2 unless exogenous monokines were provided. Neither exogenous monokines nor purified human IL 1 could support HSV antigen induced IL 2 production in the absence of MO. These studies demonstrated that MO are required for HSV-induced IL 2 production by T lymphocytes from HSV-1 seropositive individuals. Furthermore, these MO appear to provide two functions required for IL 2 production: viral antigen display and monokine production.

  9. Large-scale genetic fine mapping and genotype-phenotype associations implicate polymorphism in the IL2RA region in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Christopher E; Cooper, Jason D; Brusko, Todd; Walker, Neil M; Smyth, Deborah J; Bailey, Rebecca; Bourget, Kirsi; Plagnol, Vincent; Field, Sarah; Atkinson, Mark; Clayton, David G; Wicker, Linda S; Todd, John A

    2007-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies are now identifying disease-associated chromosome regions. However, even after convincing replication, the localization of the causal variant(s) requires comprehensive resequencing, extensive genotyping and statistical analyses in large sample sets leading to targeted functional studies. Here, we have localized the type 1 diabetes (T1D) association in the interleukin 2 receptor alpha (IL2RA) gene region to two independent groups of SNPs, spanning overlapping regions of 14 and 40 kb, encompassing IL2RA intron 1 and the 5' regions of IL2RA and RBM17 (odds ratio = 2.04, 95% confidence interval = 1.70-2.45; P = 1.92 x 10(-28); control frequency = 0.635). Furthermore, we have associated IL2RA T1D susceptibility genotypes with lower circulating levels of the biomarker, soluble IL-2RA (P = 6.28 x 10(-28)), suggesting that an inherited lower immune responsiveness predisposes to T1D. PMID:17676041

  10. IL-2/IL-2 Ab Therapy Induces Target Organ NK Cells that Inhibit CNS Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Junwei; Campagnolo, Denise; Liu, Ruolan; Piao, Wenhua; Shi, Samuel; Hu, Baoyong; Xiang, Rong; Zhou, Qinghua; Vollmer, Timothy; Van Kaer, Luc; La Cava, Antonio; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    Objective The role of natural killer (NK) cells in regulating multiple sclerosis (MS) is not well understood. Additional studies with NK cells might provide insight into the mechanism of action of MS therapies such as daclizumab, an antibody against the IL-2R α-chain, which induces expansion of CD56bright NK cells. Methods In a relapsing-remitting form of the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS induced in SJL mice, we expanded NK cells with IL-2 coupled with an anti-IL-2 mAb and evaluated the effects of these NK cells on EAE. Further, we investigated the effect of the human version of IL-2/IL-2 mAb on NK cells from MS patients and its effect on CNS inflammation and pathology in a human-mouse chimera model and assessed the underlying mechanisms. Results IL-2/IL-2 mAb dramatically expands NK cells both in the peripheral lymphoid organs and in the central nervous system (CNS), and attenuates CNS inflammation and neurological deficits. Disease protection is conferred by CNS-resident NK cells. Importantly, the human version of IL-2/IL-2 mAb restored the defective CD56+ NK cells from MS patients in a human-mouse chimera model. Both the CD56bright and CD56dim subpopulations were required to attenuate disease in this model. Interpretation These findings unveil the immunotherapeutic potential of NK cells, which can act as critical suppressor cells in target organs of autoimmunity. These results also have implications to better understand the mechanism of action of daclizumab in MS. PMID:21425186

  11. Association of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 with the multichain high-affinity interleukin 2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Burton, J; Goldman, C K; Rao, P; Moos, M; Waldmann, T A

    1990-01-01

    Previously, using flow cytometric resonance energy transfer and lateral diffusion measurements, we demonstrated that a 95-kDa protein identified by two monoclonal antibodies (OKT27 and OKT27b) interacts physically with the 55-kDa alpha protein of the high-affinity interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor. In the present study, this 95-kDa protein (p95) was purified and amino acid sequence data were obtained that showed strong homology to the human intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). The identity of the p95 protein with ICAM-1 was confirmed by sequential immunoprecipitations using OKT27 and an antibody, WEHI-CAM-1, that is directed toward ICAM-1. We confirmed the physical proximity of p95/ICAM-1 to the IL-2 receptor alpha subunit by demonstrating that radiolabeled IL-2 could be cross-linked to this protein expressed on activated T cells. In functional studies, the antibodies OKT27 and OKT27b inhibited T-cell proliferative responses to OKT3, to soluble antigen, and to heterologous cells (mixed lymphocyte reaction). However, these antibodies did not inhibit IL-2-induced proliferation of an IL-2-dependent T-cell line. Taken together with our previous observations, the present studies suggest that ICAM-1 is in proximity and interacts physically with the high-affinity IL-2 receptor. The association of ICAM-1 with the IL-2 receptor may facilitate the paracrine IL-2-mediated stimulation of T cells expressing IL-2 receptors by augmenting homotypic T-T-cell interaction, by receptor-directed focusing of IL-2 release by helper T cells, and by focusing IL-2 receptors of the physically linked cells to the site of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1-ICAM-1-IL-2 receptor interaction. Images PMID:1976256

  12. Immunotherapy of murine sarcomas with interleukin 2. I. Local administration of human recombinant IL-2 preparations.

    PubMed

    Bubeník, J; Indrová, M; Toulcová, A

    1986-01-01

    The immunotherapeutic effect of human recombinant interleukin 2 was examined with a panel of MC-induced murine sarcomas carrying individual tumour-specific transplantation antigens. Repeated peritumoral injections of RIL-2 inhibited growth of five (MC11, MC13, MC14, MC15, MC16) out of six sarcomas in syngeneic mice. The sixth murine sarcoma (MC12) was resistant to the tumour-inhibitory effect of human recombinant IL-2 as well as to the tumour-inhibitory effect of murine and rat lymphoid IL-2 preparations. Since the IL-2-sensitive and IL-2-resistant sarcomas were induced with MC in mice of identical genotype and share most of their characteristics, they represent a useful model for investigation of structural target cell determinants and functional target cell properties responsible for the sensitivity of tumours to the immunotherapeutic effects of IL-2. PMID:3492396

  13. IL-2 / α-IL-2 Complex Treatment Cannot Be Substituted for the Adoptive Transfer of Regulatory T cells to Promote Bone Marrow Engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Mahr, Benedikt; Unger, Lukas; Hock, Karin; Pilat, Nina; Baranyi, Ulrike; Schwarz, Christoph; Maschke, Svenja; Farkas, Andreas Michael; Wekerle, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cell therapy with recipient Tregs achieves engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow (BM) without the need for cytoreductive conditioning (i.e., without irradiation or cytotoxic drugs). Thereby mixed chimerism and transplantation tolerance are established in recipients conditioned solely with costimulation blockade and rapamycin. However, clinical translation would be substantially facilitated if Treg-stimulating pharmaceutical agents could be used instead of individualized cell therapy. Recently, it was shown that interleukin-2 (IL-2) complexed with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (clone JES6-1A12) against IL-2 (IL-2 complexes) potently expands and activates Tregs in vivo. Therefore, we investigated whether IL-2 complexes can replace Treg therapy in a costimulation blockade-based and irradiation-free BM transplantation (BMT) model. Unexpectedly, the administration of IL-2 complexes at the time of BMT (instead of Tregs) failed to induce BM engraftment in non-irradiated recipients (0/6 with IL-2 complexes vs. 3/4 with Tregs, p<0.05). Adding IL-2 complexes to an otherwise effective regimen involving recipient irradiation (1Gy) but no Treg transfer indeed actively triggered donor BM rejection at higher doses (0/8 with IL-2 complexes vs. 9/11 without, p<0.01) and had no detectable effect at two lower doses (3/5 vs. 9/11, p>0.05). CD8 T cells and NK cells of IL-2 complex-treated naïve mice showed an enhanced proliferative response towards donor antigens in vitro despite the marked expansion of Tregs. However, IL-2 complexes also expanded conventional CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, NK cells, NKT cells and notably even B cells, albeit to a lesser extent. Notably, IL-2 complex expanded Tregs featured less potent suppressive functions than in vitro activated Tregs in terms of T cell suppression in vitro and BM engraftment in vivo. In conclusion, these data suggest that IL-2 complexes are less effective than recipient Tregs in promoting BM engraftment and in contrast actually trigger BM

  14. IL-2/α-IL-2 Complex Treatment Cannot Be Substituted for the Adoptive Transfer of Regulatory T cells to Promote Bone Marrow Engraftment.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Benedikt; Unger, Lukas; Hock, Karin; Pilat, Nina; Baranyi, Ulrike; Schwarz, Christoph; Maschke, Svenja; Farkas, Andreas Michael; Wekerle, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cell therapy with recipient Tregs achieves engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow (BM) without the need for cytoreductive conditioning (i.e., without irradiation or cytotoxic drugs). Thereby mixed chimerism and transplantation tolerance are established in recipients conditioned solely with costimulation blockade and rapamycin. However, clinical translation would be substantially facilitated if Treg-stimulating pharmaceutical agents could be used instead of individualized cell therapy. Recently, it was shown that interleukin-2 (IL-2) complexed with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (clone JES6-1A12) against IL-2 (IL-2 complexes) potently expands and activates Tregs in vivo. Therefore, we investigated whether IL-2 complexes can replace Treg therapy in a costimulation blockade-based and irradiation-free BM transplantation (BMT) model. Unexpectedly, the administration of IL-2 complexes at the time of BMT (instead of Tregs) failed to induce BM engraftment in non-irradiated recipients (0/6 with IL-2 complexes vs. 3/4 with Tregs, p<0.05). Adding IL-2 complexes to an otherwise effective regimen involving recipient irradiation (1Gy) but no Treg transfer indeed actively triggered donor BM rejection at higher doses (0/8 with IL-2 complexes vs. 9/11 without, p<0.01) and had no detectable effect at two lower doses (3/5 vs. 9/11, p>0.05). CD8 T cells and NK cells of IL-2 complex-treated naïve mice showed an enhanced proliferative response towards donor antigens in vitro despite the marked expansion of Tregs. However, IL-2 complexes also expanded conventional CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, NK cells, NKT cells and notably even B cells, albeit to a lesser extent. Notably, IL-2 complex expanded Tregs featured less potent suppressive functions than in vitro activated Tregs in terms of T cell suppression in vitro and BM engraftment in vivo. In conclusion, these data suggest that IL-2 complexes are less effective than recipient Tregs in promoting BM engraftment and in contrast actually trigger BM

  15. Evaluation of the IL2/IL21, IL2RA and IL2RB genetic variants influence on the endogenous non-anterior uveitis genetic predisposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, different genetic variants located within the IL2/IL21 genetic region as well as within both IL2RA and IL2RB loci have been associated to multiple autoimmune disorders. We aimed to investigate for the first time the potential influence of the IL2/IL21, IL2RA and IL2RB most associated polymorphisms with autoimmunity on the endogenous non-anterior uveitis genetic predisposition. Methods A total of 196 patients with endogenous non-anterior uveitis and 760 healthy controls, all of them from Caucasian population, were included in the current study. The IL2/IL21 (rs2069762, rs6822844 and rs907715), IL2RA (2104286, rs11594656 and rs12722495) and IL2RB (rs743777) genetic variants were genotyped using TaqMan® allelic discrimination assays. Results A statistically significant difference was found for the rs6822844 (IL2/IL21 region) minor allele frequency in the group of uveitis patients compared with controls (P-value=0.02, OR=0.64 CI 95%=0.43-0.94) although the significance was lost after multiple testing correction. Furthermore, no evidence of association with uveitis was detected for the analyzed genetic variants of the IL2RA or IL2RB loci. Conclusion Our results indicate that analyzed IL2/IL21, IL2RA and IL2RB polymorphisms do not seem to play a significant role on the non-anterior uveitis genetic predisposition although further studies are needed in order to clear up the influence of these loci on the non-anterior uveitis susceptibility. PMID:23676143

  16. In vitro ozone exposure inhibits mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, S.; Jordan, R.L.; Orlando, G.S.; Koren, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Human blood mononuclear cells were exposed to ozone in vitro and thereafter analyzed for competence in mitogen-induced proliferation as well as IL-1 and IL-2 production. Proliferative responses induced by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) were all depressed in lymphocytes exposed to an ozone concentration of 1 ppm for 4-6 h. The response to PWM was most sensitive to the ozone effect (38% suppression); responses to Con A and PHA were suppressed to a lesser extent, 23% and 18%, respectively, and were not significantly different from each other. PWM responses were affected at an ozone concentration as low as 0.1 ppm; however, no suppression of Con A-induced proliferation was seen below 0.18 ppm or of PHA-induced proliferation below 0.5 ppm. When lymphocytes and monocytes were exposed separately to ozone and then mixed back with control air-exposed monocytes or lymphocytes, both cell types appeared to be affected and the functional defects caused by the pollutant were additive. Monocyte IL-1 production induced by endotoxin was not affected by ozone exposure, while surface expression of HLA-DR on exposed monocytes was reduced by 40% 24 h after exposure. Moreover, lymphocytes exposed to ozone produced 46% less IL-2 while expressing similar surface density of IL-2 receptors. Taken together, these results show that exposure to ozone has distinct adverse effects on lymphocytes and monocytes, both of which are important in local immune defenses in the lung.

  17. IL-4 acts as a homeostatic regulator of IL-2-induced TNF and IFN-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Bello-Fernandez, C; Oblakowski, P; Meager, A; Duncombe, A S; Rill, D M; Hoffbrand, A V; Brenner, M K

    1991-01-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is a cytokine secreted by interleukin-2 (IL-2)-activated lymphocytes. IL-2-stimulated lymphocytes also secrete two cytokines, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and gamma-interferon (IFN-gamma), which contribute to effector function and which may themselves recruit fresh, cytokine-secreting effector cells. We have now investigated whether the IL-4 induced is able to homeostatically regulate secretion of the TNF and IFN-gamma. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells or lymphocytes from normal donors and from patients with neoplastic disease were cultured in the presence of IL-2 alone, IL-4 alone or with both cytokines. IL-2 induced high levels of TNF and IFN-gamma secretion in both groups. The addition of recombinant IL-4 to these IL-2-stimulated cultures lead to significant inhibition of IFN-gamma and TNF production. IFN-gamma secretion was reduced by 50-99% in normal donors and by between 11% and 99% in patients (P less than 0.001). TNF levels induced by IL-2 were similarly reduced by IL-4 both in normal donors (P less than 0.003) and in patients (P less than 0.01). These inhibitory effects were produced by IL-4 at doses of IL-2 attainable in vivo. Inhibition appears to represent a homeostatic regulatory mechanism which may limit recruitment of fresh activated killer (AK) cells. When endogenous IL-4 activity in IL-2-activated lymphocytes was blocked by anti-IL-4 antibody, significantly higher levels of IFN-gamma and TNF were secreted (P less than 0.05). Since both TNF and IFN-gamma may contribute to the anti-neoplastic action of IL-2, manipulating the level of IL-4 activity in vivo could augment the benefits of IL-2 immunotherapy. PMID:1901829

  18. Phase I clinical trial combining imatinib mesylate and IL-2 in refractory cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Pautier, Patricia; Locher, Clara; Robert, Caroline; Deroussent, Alain; Flament, Caroline; Le Cesne, Axel; Rey, Annie; Bahleda, Ratislav; Ribrag, Vincent; Soria, Jean-Charles; Vassal, Gilles; Eggermont, Alexander; Zitvogel, Laurence; Chaput, Nathalie; Paci, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) is a small molecule inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases. In addition to its direct effect on malignant cells, it has been suggested IM may activate of natural killer (NK) cells, hence exerting immunomodulatory functions. In preclinical settings, improved antitumor responses have been observed when IM and interleukin-2 (IL-2), a cytokine that enhances NK cells functions, were combined. The goals of this study were to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of IL-2 combined with IM at a constant dose of 400 mg, the pharmacokinetics of IM and IL-2, as well as toxicity and clinical efficacy of this immunotherapeutic regimen in patients affected by advanced tumors. The treatment consisted in 50 mg/day cyclophosphamide from 21 d before the initiation of IM throughout the first IM cycle (from D-21 to D14), 400 mg/day IM for 14 d (D1 to D14) combined with escalating doses of IL-2 (3, 6, 9 and 12 MIU/day) from days 10 to 14. This treatment was administered at three week intervals to 17 patients. Common side effects of the combination were mild to moderate, including fever, chills, fatigue, nausea and hepatic enzyme elevation. IL-2 dose level II, 6 MIU/day, was determined as the MTD with the following dose-limiting toxicities: systemic capillary leak syndrome, fatigue and anorexia. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the area under the curve and the maximum concentration of IM and its main metabolite CGP74588 increased significantly when IM was concomitantly administered with IL-2. In contrast, IM did not modulate IL-2 pharmacokinetics. No objective responses were observed. The best response obtained was stable disease in 8/17 (median duration: 12 weeks). Finally, IL-2 augmented the impregnation of IM and its metabolite. The combination of IM (400 mg/day) and IL-2 (6 MIU/day) in tumors that express IM targets warrants further investigation. PMID:23525192

  19. A Pilot Study of IL2 in Drug-Resistant Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bonanni, Alice; Bertelli, Roberta; Rossi, Roberta; Bruschi, Maurizio; Di Donato, Armando; Ravani, Pietro; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2015-01-01

    Tregs infusion reverts proteinuria and reduces renal lesions in most animal models of nephrotic syndrome (i.e. Buffalo/Mna, Adriamycin, Promycin, LPS). IL2 up-regulates Tregs and may be an alternative to cell-therapy in this setting. To evaluate a potential role of IL2 as Tregs inducer and proteinuria lowering agent in human nephrotic syndrome we treated 5 nephrotic patients with 6 monthly cycles of low-dose IL2 (1x106 U/m2 first month, 1.5x106 U/m2 following months). The study cohort consisted of 5 children (all boys, 11–17 years) resistant to all the available treatments (i.e. steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, mycophenolate, Rituximab). Participants had Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (3 cases) or Minimal Change Nephropathy (2 cases). IL2 was safe in all but one patient who had an acute asthma attack after the first IL2 dose and did not receive further doses. Circulating Tregs were stably increased (>10%) during the whole study period in 2 cases while were only partially modified in the other two children who started with very low levels and partially responded to single IL2 Proteinuria and renal function were not modified by IL2 at any phase of the study. We concluded that low-dose IL2 given in monthly pulses is safe and modifies the levels of circulating Tregs. This drug may not be able to lower proteinuria or affect renal function in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. We were unable to reproduce in humans the effects of IL2 described in rats and mice reducing de facto the interest on this drug in nephrotic syndrome. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02455908 PMID:26413873

  20. Low-Dose IL-2 Induces Regulatory T Cell-Mediated Control of Experimental Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Benjamin; Vigneron, James; Levacher, Béatrice; Vazquez, Thomas; Pitoiset, Fabien; Brimaud, Faustine; Churlaud, Guillaume; Klatzmann, David; Bellier, Bertrand

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are pivotal for maintenance of immune self-tolerance and also regulate immune responses to exogenous Ags, including allergens. Both decreased Treg number and function have been reported in allergic patients, offering new therapeutic perspectives. We previously demonstrated that Tregs can be selectively expanded and activated by low doses of IL-2 (ld-IL-2) inducing immunoregulation without immunosuppression and established its protective effect in autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the ability of ld-IL-2 to control allergy in an experimental model of food allergy. Ld-IL-2 induced Treg expansion and activation that elicited protection against clinical manifestations of food allergy in two mouse models with OVA and peanut. This clinical effect was lost in Treg-depleted mice, demonstrating the major contribution of Tregs in ld-IL-2 efficacy. Mechanistic studies further indicated that protection from allergy could be explained by a Treg-dependent local modification of the Th1/Th2 balance and an inhibition of mast cell recruitment and activation. Preventive and therapeutic effects of ld-IL-2 were observed over a 7-mo-period, highlighting its long-term efficacy. This study demonstrated that ld-IL-2 is efficient to prevent and to treat allergic immune responses, and thus represents a promising therapeutic strategy for managing allergic diseases. PMID:27259854

  1. Nuclear Phosphoproteomic Screen Uncovers ACLY as Mediator of IL-2-induced Proliferation of CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Osinalde, Nerea; Mitxelena, Jone; Sánchez-Quiles, Virginia; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Aloria, Kerman; Arizmendi, Jesus M; Zubiaga, Ana M; Blagoev, Blagoy; Kratchmarova, Irina

    2016-06-01

    Anti-cancer immunotherapies commonly rely on the use of interleukin-2 (IL-2) to promote the expansion of T lymphocytes. IL-2- dependent proliferation is the culmination of a complex network of phosphorylation-driven signaling events that impact on gene transcription through mechanisms that are not clearly understood. To study the role of IL-2 in the regulation of nuclear protein function we have performed an unbiased mass spectrometry-based study of the nuclear phosphoproteome of resting and IL-2-treated CD4(+) T lymphocytes. We detected 8521distinct phosphosites including many that are not yet reported in curated phosphorylation databases. Although most phosphorylation sites remained unaffected upon IL-2 treatment, 391 sites corresponding to 288 gene products showed robust IL-2-dependent regulation. Importantly, we show that ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY) is a key phosphoprotein effector of IL-2-mediated T-cell responses. ACLY becomes phosphorylated on serine 455 in T lymphocytes upon IL-2-driven activation of AKT, and depletion or inactivation of ACLY compromises IL-2-promoted T-cell growth. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that ACLY is required for enhancing histone acetylation levels and inducing the expression of cell cycle regulating genes in response to IL-2. Thus, the metabolic enzyme ACLY emerges as a bridge between cytokine signaling and proliferation of T lymphocytes, and may be an attractive candidate target for the development of more efficient anti-cancer immunotherapies. PMID:27067055

  2. Inhibition of CD25 (IL-2R alpha) expression and T-cell proliferation by polyclonal anti-thymocyte globulins.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefoy-Berard, N; Verrier, B; Vincent, C; Revillard, J P

    1992-01-01

    Anti-lymphocyte and anti-thymocyte globulins (ATG) are currently used as immunosuppressive agents in organ transplantation. Their administration in vivo may induce not only lymphocyte depletion but also functional effects which were investigated in the present study. In vitro ATG inhibited T-cell proliferation induced by monocyte-dependent T-cell mitogens, like CD3 antibodies, phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A), by monocyte-independent mitogens, like CD2 antibodies, or by protein kinase C activators (phorbol esters) associated with a calcium ionophore. The inhibitory effect of ATG was therefore not solely accounted for by a suppression of co-stimulatory signals delivered by monocytes, but rather implied a direct action on T cells. Addition of recombinant human interleukin-2 (rIL-2) did not overcome the inhibition. Suppression of T-cell proliferation by ATG was characterized by normal RNA synthesis and IL-2 secretion contrasting with markedly reduced expression of the CD25 protein [p55, the alpha-chain of interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R)] both in cytoplasm and on T-cell membrane, as well as a decreased secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Northern blot analysis revealed increased levels of CD25 and IFN-gamma mRNA, suggesting a post-transcriptional inhibition of these molecules, whereas IL-2 mRNA levels were unchanged. These data demonstrate that inhibition of T-cell proliferation by ATG can be attributed primarily to a post-transcriptional defect of CD25 expression, implying a novel mechanism different from those described with other immunosuppressive agents. Blocking of T-cell proliferation in the late G1 phase of the cell cycle may contribute to the immunosuppressive activity of ATG in prophylactic treatment of allograft rejection. Images Figure 2 PMID:1398765

  3. Neurosteroids and GABA-A Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingde

    2011-01-01

    Neurosteroids represent a class of endogenous steroids that are synthesized in the brain, the adrenals, and the gonads and have potent and selective effects on the GABAA-receptor. 3α-hydroxy A-ring reduced metabolites of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, and testosterone are positive modulators of GABAA-receptor in a non-genomic manner. Allopregnanolone (3α-OH-5α-pregnan-20-one), 5α-androstane-3α, 17α-diol (Adiol), and 3α5α-tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (3α5α-THDOC) enhance the GABA-mediated Cl- currents acting on a site (or sites) distinct from the GABA, benzodiazepine, barbiturate, and picrotoxin binding sites. 3α5α-P and 3α5α-THDOC potentiate synaptic GABAA-receptor function and activate δ-subunit containing extrasynaptic receptors that mediate tonic currents. On the contrary, 3β-OH pregnane steroids and pregnenolone sulfate (PS) are GABAA-receptor antagonists and induce activation-dependent inhibition of the receptor. The activities of neurosteroid are dependent on brain regions and types of neurons. In addition to the slow genomic action of the parent steroids, the non-genomic, and rapid actions of neurosteroids play a significant role in the GABAA-receptor function and shift in mood and memory function. This review describes molecular mechanisms underlying neurosteroid action on the GABAA-receptor, mood changes, and cognitive functions. PMID:22654809

  4. Conditional IL-2 Gene Deletion: Consequences for T Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Popmihajlov, Zoran; Xu, Dong; Morgan, Heather; Milligan, Zoie; Smith, Kendall A.

    2012-01-01

    To explore the role of interleukin-2 (IL-2) in T cell proliferation, and to circumvent the IL-2 deficiency autoimmune syndrome of conventional il2 gene deletion, mice were created to allow conditional il2 gene deletion when treated with the estrogen analog, tamoxifen (TAM) as adults. Splenocytes from four different mouse strains, C57Bl/6 wild type (WT), conventional IL-2(−/−), TAM-treated Cre recombinase-negative (Cre−)/IL2fl/fl, and Cre recombinase-positive (Cre+)/IL2fl/fl, were activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, and monitored for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lymphocyte blastogenesis, aerobic glycolysis, BrdU incorporation into newly synthesized DNA, and CFSE dye dilution to monitor cell division. IL-2 production was monitored by quantitative ELISA and multiple additional cytokines were monitored by quantitative protein-bead arrays. Splenocytes from conventional IL-2(−/−) and TAM-treated Cre+ mice resulted in undetectable IL-2 production by ELISA, so that both strains were IL-2-deficient. As monitored by flow cytometry, activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from WT, Cre+, and Cre− mice all underwent blastogenesis, whereas far fewer cells from conventional IL-2(−/−) mice did so. By comparison, only cells from IL-2 sufficient WT and Cre− mice switched to aerobic glycolysis as evidenced by a drop in media pH. Blastogenesis was mirrored by BrdU incorporation and CFSE dye dilution by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from WT, Cre+, and Cre− mice, which were all equivalent, while proliferation of cells from conventional IL-2(−/−) mice was compromised. Splenocytes from IL-2 deficient conventional IL-2(−/−) mice produced low or undetectable other γc-chain cytokines (IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-13, IL-15, and IL-21), whereas production of these γc-chain cytokines from IL-2-deficient conditional IL-2(−/−) Cre+ mice were comparable with WT and Cre− mice. These results indicate that CD4+ and CD8+ T cell blastogenesis cannot be attributable to IL-2 alone, but a switch

  5. 4-1BB Signaling in Conventional T Cells Drives IL-2 Production That Overcomes CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T Regulatory Cell Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Barsoumian, Hampartsoum B.

    2016-01-01

    Costimulation with the recombinant SA-4-1BBL agonist of 4-1BB receptor on conventional CD4+ T cells (Tconvs) overcomes the suppression mediated by naturally occurring CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory cells (Tregs). The mechanistic basis of this observation has remained largely unknown. Herein we show that Tconvs, but not Tregs, are the direct target of SA-4-1BBL-mediated evasion of Treg suppression. IL-2 produced by Tconvs in response to 4-1BB signaling is both necessary and sufficient for overcoming Treg suppression. Supernatant from Tconvs stimulated with SA-4-1BBL contains high levels of IL-2 and overcomes Treg suppression in ex vivo Tconv:Treg cocultures. Removal of IL-2 from such supernatant restores Treg suppression and repletion of Tconv:Treg cocultures with exogenous recombinant IL-2 overcomes suppression. This study establishes 4-1BB signaling as a key circuit that regulates physical and functional equilibrium between Tregs and Tconvs with important implications for immunotherapy for indications where a fine balance between Tregs and Teffs plays a decisive role. PMID:27049955

  6. Preferential loss of IL-2-secreting CD4+ T helper cells in chronic HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Semmo, Nasser; Day, Cheryl L; Ward, Scott M; Lucas, Michaela; Harcourt, Gillian; Loughry, Andrew; Klenerman, Paul

    2005-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) becomes persistent in the majority of infected individuals. In doing so, the virus evades host adaptive immune responses, although the mechanisms responsible in this evasion are not clear. Several groups have demonstrated weak or absent HCV-specific CD4+ T cell responses during chronic HCV infection using proliferation assays and, more recently, class II tetramers. However, the functional status of HCV-specific CD4+ T cells in resolved and persistent infection is poorly understood. Using interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) enzyme-linked immunospot assays, we analyzed cytokine secretion patterns in chronically infected patients and compared them with those with resolved infection. In the spontaneous resolver group, strong IL-2 secretion in relation to IFN-gamma secretion was observed. However, in the persistently infected group, a consistent and significant loss of IL-2-secreting cells, compared with IFN-gamma-secreting cells, was identified. In vitro addition of IL-2 had a substantial effect in restoring CD4+ T cell activity. In conclusion, failure of IL-2 secretion, as opposed to physical deletion or complete functional unresponsiveness, appears to be an important determinant of the status of CD4+ T cell populations in chronic HCV infection. Loss of IL-2 secretory capacity may lead to disruption of IFN-gamma and proliferative function in vivo-a status that characterizes the cellular immune response in both CD4+ and CD8+ compartments in chronic disease. PMID:15841456

  7. IL-2 induces STAT4 activation in primary NK cells and NK cell lines, but not in T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, K S; Ritz, J; Frank, D A

    1999-01-01

    IL-2 exerts potent but distinct functional effects on two critical cell populations of the immune system, T cells and NK cells. Whereas IL-2 leads to proliferation in both cell types, it enhances cytotoxicity primarily in NK cells. In both T cells and NK cells, IL-2 induces the activation of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5. Given this similarity in intracellular signaling, the mechanism underlying the distinct response to IL-2 in T cells and NK cells is not clear. In this study, we show that in primary NK cells and NK cell lines, in addition to the activation of STAT1 and STAT5, IL-2 induces tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT4, a STAT previously reported to be activated only in response to IL-12 and IFN-alpha. This activation of STAT4 in response to IL-2 is not due to the autocrine production of IL-12 or IFN-alpha. STAT4 activated in response to IL-2 is able to bind to a STAT-binding DNA sequence, suggesting that in NK cells IL-2 is capable of activating target genes through phosphorylation of STAT4. IL-2 induces the activation of Jak2 uniquely in NK cells, which may underlie the ability of IL-2 to activate STAT4 only in these cells. Although the activation of STAT4 in response to IL-2 occurs in primary resting and activated NK cells, it does not occur in primary resting T cells or mitogen-activated T cells. The unique activation of the STAT4-signaling pathway in NK cells may underlie the distinct functional effect of IL-2 on this cell population. PMID:9886399

  8. P2 receptors and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Following vessel wall injury, platelets adhere to the exposed subendothelium, become activated and release mediators such as TXA(2) and nucleotides stored at very high concentration in the so-called dense granules. Released nucleotides and other soluble agents act in a positive feedback mechanism to cause further platelet activation and amplify platelet responses induced by agents such as thrombin or collagen. Adenine nucleotides act on platelets through three distinct P2 receptors: two are G protein-coupled ADP receptors, namely the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) receptor subtypes, while the P2X(1) receptor ligand-gated cation channel is activated by ATP. The P2Y(1) receptor initiates platelet aggregation but is not sufficient for a full platelet aggregation in response to ADP, while the P2Y(12) receptor is responsible for completion of the aggregation to ADP. The latter receptor, the molecular target of the antithrombotic drugs clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor, is responsible for most of the potentiating effects of ADP when platelets are stimulated by agents such as thrombin, collagen or immune complexes. The P2X(1) receptor is involved in platelet shape change and in activation by collagen under shear conditions. Each of these receptors is coupled to specific signal transduction pathways in response to ADP or ATP and is differentially involved in all the sequential events involved in platelet function and haemostasis. As such, they represent potential targets for antithrombotic drugs. PMID:21792575

  9. IL-2 in the tumor microenvironment is necessary for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein deficient NK cells to respond to tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kritikou, Joanna S; Dahlberg, Carin I M; Baptista, Marisa A P; Wagner, Arnika K; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Gwalani, Lavesh Amar; Poli, Cecilia; Panda, Sudeepta K; Kärre, Klas; Kaech, Susan M; Wermeling, Fredrik; Andersson, John; Orange, Jordan S; Brauner, Hanna; Westerberg, Lisa S

    2016-01-01

    To kill target cells, natural killer (NK) cells organize signaling from activating and inhibitory receptors to form a lytic synapse. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) patients have loss-of-function mutations in the actin regulator WASp and suffer from immunodeficiency with increased risk to develop lymphoreticular malignancies. NK cells from WAS patients fail to form lytic synapses, however, the functional outcome in vivo remains unknown. Here, we show that WASp KO NK cells had decreased capacity to degranulate and produce IFNγ upon NKp46 stimulation and this was associated with reduced capacity to kill MHC class I-deficient hematopoietic grafts. Pre-treatment of WASp KO NK cells with IL-2 ex vivo restored degranulation, IFNγ production, and killing of MHC class I negative hematopoietic grafts. Moreover, WASp KO mice controlled growth of A20 lymphoma cells that naturally produced IL-2. WASp KO NK cells showed increased expression of DNAM-1, LAG-3, and KLRG1, all receptors associated with cellular exhaustion and NK cell memory. NK cells isolated from WAS patient spleen cells showed increased expression of DNAM-1 and had low to negative expression of CD56, a phenotype associated with NK cells exhaustion. Finally, in a cohort of neuroblastoma patients we identified a strong correlation between WASp, IL-2, and patient survival. PMID:27477778

  10. IL-2 in the tumor microenvironment is necessary for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein deficient NK cells to respond to tumors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kritikou, Joanna S.; Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Baptista, Marisa A. P.; Wagner, Arnika K.; Banerjee, Pinaki P.; Gwalani, Lavesh Amar; Poli, Cecilia; Panda, Sudeepta K.; Kärre, Klas; Kaech, Susan M.; Wermeling, Fredrik; Andersson, John; Orange, Jordan S.; Brauner, Hanna; Westerberg, Lisa S.

    2016-01-01

    To kill target cells, natural killer (NK) cells organize signaling from activating and inhibitory receptors to form a lytic synapse. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) patients have loss-of-function mutations in the actin regulator WASp and suffer from immunodeficiency with increased risk to develop lymphoreticular malignancies. NK cells from WAS patients fail to form lytic synapses, however, the functional outcome in vivo remains unknown. Here, we show that WASp KO NK cells had decreased capacity to degranulate and produce IFNγ upon NKp46 stimulation and this was associated with reduced capacity to kill MHC class I-deficient hematopoietic grafts. Pre-treatment of WASp KO NK cells with IL-2 ex vivo restored degranulation, IFNγ production, and killing of MHC class I negative hematopoietic grafts. Moreover, WASp KO mice controlled growth of A20 lymphoma cells that naturally produced IL-2. WASp KO NK cells showed increased expression of DNAM-1, LAG-3, and KLRG1, all receptors associated with cellular exhaustion and NK cell memory. NK cells isolated from WAS patient spleen cells showed increased expression of DNAM-1 and had low to negative expression of CD56, a phenotype associated with NK cells exhaustion. Finally, in a cohort of neuroblastoma patients we identified a strong correlation between WASp, IL-2, and patient survival. PMID:27477778

  11. Soluble interleukin 2 receptors are released from activated human lymphoid cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, L.A.; Kurman, C.C.; Fritz, M.E.; Biddison, W.E.; Boutin, B.; Yarchoan, R.; Nelson, D.L.

    1985-11-01

    With the use of an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay to measure soluble human interleukin 2 receptors (IL 2R), certain human T cell leukemia virus I (HTLV I)-positive T cell lines were found to spontaneously release large quantities of IL 2R into culture supernatants. This was not found with HTLV I-negative and IL 2 independent T cell lines, and only one of seven B cell-derived lines examined produced small amounts of IL 2R. In addition to this constitutive production of soluble IL 2R by certain cell lines, normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) could be induced to release soluble IL 2R by plant lectins, the murine monoclonal antibody OKT3, tetanus toxoid, and allogeneic cells. Such activated cells also expressed cellular IL 2R measurable in detergent solubilized cell extracts. The generation of cellular and supernatant IL 2R was: dependent on cellular activation, rapid, radioresistant (3000 rad), and inhibited by cycloheximide treatment. NaDodSO4-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of soluble IL 2R demonstrated molecules of apparent Mr = 35,000 to 40,000, and 45,000 to 50,000, respectively, somewhat smaller than the mature surface receptor on these cells. The release of soluble IL 2R appears to be a characteristic marker of T lymphocyte activation and might serve an immunoregulatory function during both normal and abnormal cell growth and differentiation.

  12. Rac1 Protein Regulates Glycogen Phosphorylase Activation and Controls Interleukin (IL)-2-dependent T Cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Arrizabalaga, Onetsine; Lacerda, Hadriano M.; Zubiaga, Ana M.; Zugaza, José L.

    2012-01-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family have been implicated in important cellular processes such as cell migration and adhesion, protein secretion, and/or gene transcription. In the lymphoid system, these GTPases participate in the signaling cascades that are activated after engagement of antigen receptors. However, little is known about the role that Rho GTPases play in IL-2-mediated responses. Here, we show that IL-2 induces Rac1 activation in Kit 225 T cells. We identified by mass spectrometry the muscle isoform of glycogen phosphorylase (PYGM) as a novel Rac1 effector molecule in IL-2-stimulated cells. The interaction between the active form of Rac1 (Rac1-GTP) and PYGM was established directly through a domain comprising amino acids 191–270 of PYGM that exhibits significant homology with the Rac binding domain of PAK1. The integrity of this region was crucial for PYGM activation. Importantly, IL-2-dependent cellular proliferation was inhibited upon blocking both the activation of Rac1 and the activity of PYGM. These results reveal a new role for Rac1 in cell signaling, showing that this GTPase triggers T cell proliferation upon IL-2 stimulation by associating with PYGM and modulating its enzymatic activity. PMID:22337875

  13. Functional properties of Drosophila inositol trisphosphate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Swatton, J E; Morris, S A; Wissing, F; Taylor, C W

    2001-01-01

    The functional properties of the only inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor subtype expressed in Drosophila were examined in permeabilized S2 cells. The IP(3) receptors of S2 cells bound (1,4,5)IP(3) with high affinity (K(d)=8.5+/-1.1 nM), mediated positively co-operative Ca(2+) release from a thapsigargin-sensitive Ca(2+) store (EC(50)=75+/-4 nM, Hill coefficient=2.1+/-0.2), and they were recognized by an antiserum to a peptide conserved in all IP(3) receptor subtypes in the same way as mammalian IP(3) receptors. As with mammalian IP(3) receptors, (2,4,5)IP(3) (EC(50)=2.3+/-0.3 microM) and (4,5)IP(2) (EC(50) approx. 10 microM) were approx. 20- and 100-fold less potent than (1,4,5)IP(3). Adenophostin A, which is typically approx. 10-fold more potent than IP(3) at mammalian IP(3) receptors, was 46-fold more potent than IP(3) in S2 cells (EC(50)=1.67+/-0.07 nM). Responses to submaximal concentrations of IP(3) were quantal and IP(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release was biphasically regulated by cytosolic Ca(2+). Using rapid superfusion to examine the kinetics of IP(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release from S2 cells, we established that IP(3) (10 microM) maximally activated Drosophila IP(3) receptors within 400 ms. The activity of the receptors then slowly decayed (t(1/2)=2.03+/-0.07 s) to a stable state which had 47+/-1% of the activity of the maximally active state. We conclude that the single subtype of IP(3) receptor expressed in Drosophila has similar functional properties to mammalian IP(3) receptors and that analyses of IP(3) receptor function in this genetically tractable organism are therefore likely to contribute to understanding the roles of mammalian IP(3) receptors. PMID:11583592

  14. Autophagy is required for IL-2-mediated fibroblast growth

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh III, Herbert J.

    2013-02-15

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for delivery of cytoplasmic material into the lysosomal degradation pathway to enable vesicular exocytosis. Interleukin (IL)-2 is produced by T-cells and its activity is important for immunoregulation. Fibroblasts are an immune competent cell type, playing a critical role in wound healing, chronic inflammation, and tumor development. Although autophagy plays an important role in each of these processes, whether it regulates IL-2 activity in fibroblasts is unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is required for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts. IL-2 significantly induced autophagy in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary lung fibroblasts. Autophagy inhibitors (e.g., 3-methylamphetamine and bafilomycin A1) or knockdown of ATG5 and beclin 1 blocked clinical grade IL-2-induced autophagy. Moreover, IL-2 induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation in MEFs and promoted interaction between HMGB1 and beclin1, which is required for autophagy induction. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy inhibited IL-2-induced cell proliferation and enhanced IL-2-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that autophagy is an important pro-survival regulator for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts.

  15. Cholesterol modulates bitter taste receptor function.

    PubMed

    Pydi, Sai Prasad; Jafurulla, Md; Wai, Lisa; Bhullar, Rajinder P; Chelikani, Prashen; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-09-01

    Bitter taste perception in humans is believed to act as a defense mechanism against ingestion of potential toxic substances. Bitter taste is perceived by 25 distinct bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) which belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the overall context of the role of membrane lipids in GPCR function, we show here that T2R4, a representative member of the bitter taste receptor family, displays cholesterol sensitivity in its signaling function. In order to gain further insight into cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4, we mutated two residues Tyr114(3.59) and Lys117(3.62) present in the cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif in T2R4 with alanines. We carried out functional characterization of the mutants by calcium mobilization, followed by cholesterol depletion and replenishment. CRAC motifs in GPCRs have previously been implicated in preferential cholesterol association. Our analysis shows that the CRAC motif represents an intrinsic feature of bitter taste receptors and is conserved in 22 out of 25 human T2Rs. We further demonstrate that Lys117, an important CRAC residue, is crucial in the reported cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4. Interestingly, cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4 was observed at quinine concentrations in the lower mM range. To the best of our knowledge, our results represent the first report addressing the molecular basis of cholesterol sensitivity in the function of taste receptors. PMID:27288892

  16. Local therapy of cancer with free IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, John J. L.; Battermann, Jan J.; Hordijk, Gerrit Jan; Krastev, Zachary; Moiseeva, Ekaterina V.; Stewart, Rachel J. E.; Ziekman, Paul G. P. M.; Koten, Jan Willem

    2008-01-01

    This is a position paper about the therapeutic effects of locally applied free IL-2 in the treatment of cancer. Local therapy: IL-2 therapy of cancer was originally introduced as a systemic therapy. This therapy led to about 20% objective responses. Systemic therapy however was very toxic due to the vascular leakage syndrome. Nevertheless, this treatment was a break-through in cancer immunotherapy and stimulated some interesting questions: Supposing that the mechanism of IL-2 treatment is both proliferation and tumoricidal activity of the tumor infiltrating cells, then locally applied IL-2 should result in a much higher local IL-2 concentration than systemic IL-2 application. Consequently a greater beneficial effect could be expected after local IL-2 application (peritumoral = juxtatumoral, intratumoral, intra-arterial, intracavitary, or intratracheal = inhalation). Free IL-2: Many groups have tried to prepare a more effective IL-2 formulation than free IL-2. Examples are slow release systems, insertion of the IL-2 gene into a tumor cell causing prolonged IL-2 release. However, logistically free IL-2 is much easier to apply; hence we concentrated in this review and in most of our experiments on the use of free IL-2. Local therapy with free IL-2 may be effective against transplanted tumors in experimental animals, and against various spontaneous carcinomas, sarcomas, and melanoma in veterinary and human cancer patients. It may induce rejection of very large, metastasized tumor loads, for instance advanced clinical tumors. The effects of even a single IL-2 application may be impressive. Not each tumor or tumor type is sensitive to local IL-2 application. For instance transplanted EL4 lymphoma or TLX9 lymphoma were not sensitive in our hands. Also the extent of sensitivity differs: In Bovine Ocular Squamous Cell Carcinoma (BOSCC) often a complete regression is obtained, whereas with the Bovine Vulval Papilloma and Carcinoma Complex (BVPCC) mainly stable disease is

  17. Production of an active anti-CD20-hIL-2 immunocytokine in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Marusic, Carla; Novelli, Flavia; Salzano, Anna M; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Pioli, Claudio; Donini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 murine or chimeric antibodies (Abs) have been used to treat non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) and other diseases characterized by overactive or dysfunctional B cells. Anti-CD20 Abs demonstrated to be effective in inducing regression of B-cell lymphomas, although in many cases patients relapse following treatment. A promising approach to improve the outcome of mAb therapy is the use of anti-CD20 antibodies to deliver cytokines to the tumour microenvironment. In particular, IL-2-based immunocytokines have shown enhanced antitumour activity in several preclinical studies. Here, we report on the engineering of an anti-CD20-human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) immunocytokine (2B8-Fc-hIL2) based on the C2B8 mAb (Rituximab) and the resulting ectopic expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The scFv-Fc-engineered immunocytokine is fully assembled in plants with minor degradation products as assessed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Purification yields using protein-A affinity chromatography were in the range of 15-20 mg/kg of fresh leaf weight (FW). Glycopeptide analysis confirmed the presence of a highly homogeneous plant-type glycosylation. 2B8-Fc-hIL2 and the cognate 2B8-Fc antibody, devoid of hIL-2, were assayed by flow cytometry on Daudi cells revealing a CD20 binding activity comparable to that of Rituximab and were effective in eliciting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of human PBMC versus Daudi cells, demonstrating their functional integrity. In 2B8-Fc-hIL2, IL-2 accessibility and biological activity were verified by flow cytometry and cell proliferation assay. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a recombinant immunocytokine based on the therapeutic Rituximab antibody scaffold, whose expression in plants may be a valuable tool for NHLs treatment. PMID:25879373

  18. Subunit Arrangement and Function in NMDA Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa,H.; Singh, S.; Mancusso, R.; Gouaux, E.

    2005-01-01

    Excitatory neurotransmission mediated by NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors is fundamental to the physiology of the mammalian central nervous system. These receptors are heteromeric ion channels that for activation require binding of glycine and glutamate to the NR1 and NR2 subunits, respectively. NMDA receptor function is characterized by slow channel opening and deactivation, and the resulting influx of cations initiates signal transduction cascades that are crucial to higher functions including learning and memory. Here we report crystal structures of the ligand-binding core of NR2A with glutamate and that of the NR1-NR2A heterodimer with glutamate and glycine. The NR2A-glutamate complex defines the determinants of glutamate and NMDA recognition, and the NR1-NR2A heterodimer suggests a mechanism for ligand-induced ion channel opening. Analysis of the heterodimer interface, together with biochemical and electrophysiological experiments, confirms that the NR1-NR2A heterodimer is the functional unit in tetrameric NMDA receptors and that tyrosine 535 of NR1, located in the subunit interface, modulates the rate of ion channel deactivation.

  19. Functional Significance of Serotonin Receptor Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Herrick-Davis, Katharine

    2013-01-01

    The original model of G protein activation by a single G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) is giving way to a new model wherein two protomers of a GPCR dimer interact with a single G protein. This article will review the evidence suggesting that 5-HT receptors form dimers/oligomers and will compare the findings with results obtained from studies with other biogenic amine receptors. Topics to be covered include the origin or biogenesis of dimer formation, potential dimer interface(s), and oligomer size (dimer versus tetramer or higher order). The functional significance will be discussed in terms of G-protein activation following ligand binding to one or two protomers in a dimeric structure, the formation of heterodimers and the development of bivalent ligands. PMID:23811735

  20. Pharmacological modulation of chemokine receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, DJ; Canals, M; Maussang, D; Roumen, L; Smit, MJ; Wijtmans, M; de Graaf, C; Vischer, HF; Leurs, R

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and their peptidergic ligands are interesting therapeutic targets due to their involvement in various immune-related diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV-1 infection and cancer. To tackle these diseases, a lot of effort has been focused on discovery and development of small-molecule chemokine receptor antagonists. This has been rewarded by the market approval of two novel chemokine receptor inhibitors, AMD3100 (CXCR4) and Maraviroc (CCR5) for stem cell mobilization and treatment of HIV-1 infection respectively. The recent GPCR crystal structures together with mutagenesis and pharmacological studies have aided in understanding how small-molecule ligands interact with chemokine receptors. Many of these ligands display behaviour deviating from simple competition and do not interact with the chemokine binding site, providing evidence for an allosteric mode of action. This review aims to give an overview of the evidence supporting modulation of this intriguing receptor family by a range of ligands, including small molecules, peptides and antibodies. Moreover, the computer-assisted modelling of chemokine receptor–ligand interactions is discussed in view of GPCR crystal structures. Finally, the implications of concepts such as functional selectivity and chemokine receptor dimerization are considered. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-6. To view the 2010 themed section on the same topic visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.2010.159.issue-5/issuetoc PMID:21699506

  1. IFN-β Selectively Inhibits IL-2 Production through CREM-Mediated Chromatin Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Otero, Dennis C; Fares-Frederickson, Nancy J; Xiao, Menghong; Baker, Darren P; David, Michael

    2015-06-01

    IFN-β is widely used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis, yet the mechanism facilitating its efficacy remains unclear. IL-2 production by activated T cells, including those mediating autoimmunity, and subsequent autocrine stimulation is vital for T cell expansion and function. In this study, we demonstrate that in mouse and human T cells, IFN-β specifically inhibits the production of IL-2 upon TCR engagement without affecting other cytokines or activation markers. Rather than disrupting TCR signaling, IFN-β alters histone modifications in the IL-2 promoter to retain the locus in an inaccessible configuration. This in turn is mediated through the upregulation of the transcriptional suppressor CREM by IFN-β and consequent recruitment of histone deacetylases to the IL-2 promoter. In accordance, ablation of CREM expression or inhibition of histone deacetylases activity eliminates the suppressive effects of IFN-β on IL-2 production. Collectively, these findings provide a molecular basis by which IFN-β limits T cell responses. PMID:25888642

  2. Qualitative Immune Modulation by Interleukin-2 (IL-2) Adjuvant Therapy in Immunological Non Responder HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sabbatini, Francesca; Bandera, Alessandra; Ferrario, Giulio; Trabattoni, Daria; Marchetti, Giulia; Franzetti, Fabio; Clerici, Mario; Gori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment of HIV-infected patients with interleukin-2 (IL-2) produces significant increases in CD4 T cell counts; however an associated qualitative improvement in cells function has yet to be conclusively demonstrated. By measuring mycobacterial killing activity, we evaluated IL-2-mediated functional immune enhancement ex vivo in immunological non-responders (INRs). Methods and Findings PBMC from 12 immunological non-responders (INRs) (CD4+<200/µl, HIV-RNA<50 cp/ml) on combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) were collected at baseline, and after 3 IL-2 cycles. Eight INRs receiving only cART were studied as controls. After 21 days of PBMC incubation with a virulent M. avium suspension, counts of residual colony forming units (CFUs) and concentrations of TNF-α, IL-10 and IFN-γ were determined. In IL-2 treated patients, a significant reduction in mean residual CFUs of PBMC cultures was observed (p<0.01). Moreover, following IL-2 treatment, significant increases in PBMC's IFNγ production (p = 0.02) and substantial reductions in IL-10 levels were observed. Conclusions IL-2 therapy restores the ability of the lympho-monocyte system in eliciting an effective response against mycobacterial infections. Our data indicate the possibility of a clinical role held by IL-2 in enhancing the immune function of subjects unable to achieve immune competence through cART alone. PMID:21124762

  3. Itk is required for Th9 differentiation via TCR-mediated induction of IL-2 and IRF4.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; Meylan, Françoise; Handon, Robin; Hayes, Erika T; Anderson, Stacie M; Kirby, Martha R; Siegel, Richard M; Schwartzberg, Pamela L

    2016-01-01

    Th9 cells produce interleukin (IL)-9, a cytokine implicated in allergic asthma and autoimmunity. Here we show that Itk, a mediator of T cell receptor signalling required for Th2 immune responses and the development of asthma, is a positive regulator of Th9 differentiation. In a model of allergic lung disease, Itk-deficient mice show reduced pulmonary inflammation and IL-9 production by T cells and innate lymphoid type 2 cells (ILC2), despite normal early induction of ILC2s. In vitro, Itk(-/-) CD4(+) T cells do not produce IL-9 and have reduced levels of IRF4 (Interferon Regulator Factor 4), a critical transcription factor for effector T cell function. Both IL-9 and IRF4 expression are rescued by either IL-2 or constitutively active STAT5, but not NFATc1. STAT5 binds the Irf4 promoter, demonstrating one mechanism by which IL-2 rescues weakly activated T cells. Itk inhibition also reduces IL-9 expression by human T cells, implicating ITK as a key regulator of Th9 induction. PMID:26936133

  4. Itk is required for Th9 differentiation via TCR-mediated induction of IL-2 and IRF4

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; Meylan, Françoise; Handon, Robin; Hayes, Erika T.; Anderson, Stacie M.; Kirby, Martha R.; Siegel, Richard M.; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.

    2016-01-01

    Th9 cells produce interleukin (IL)-9, a cytokine implicated in allergic asthma and autoimmunity. Here we show that Itk, a mediator of T cell receptor signalling required for Th2 immune responses and the development of asthma, is a positive regulator of Th9 differentiation. In a model of allergic lung disease, Itk-deficient mice show reduced pulmonary inflammation and IL-9 production by T cells and innate lymphoid type 2 cells (ILC2), despite normal early induction of ILC2s. In vitro, Itk−/− CD4+ T cells do not produce IL-9 and have reduced levels of IRF4 (Interferon Regulator Factor 4), a critical transcription factor for effector T cell function. Both IL-9 and IRF4 expression are rescued by either IL-2 or constitutively active STAT5, but not NFATc1. STAT5 binds the Irf4 promoter, demonstrating one mechanism by which IL-2 rescues weakly activated T cells. Itk inhibition also reduces IL-9 expression by human T cells, implicating ITK as a key regulator of Th9 induction. PMID:26936133

  5. Sustained in vivo signaling by long-lived IL-2 induces prolonged increases of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Charles J.M.; Sun, Yongliang; Nowak, Urszula M.; Clark, Jan; Howlett, Sarah; Pekalski, Marcin L.; Yang, Xin; Ast, Oliver; Waldhauer, Inja; Freimoser-Grundschober, Anne; Moessner, Ekkehard; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian; Hosse, Ralf J.; Wicker, Linda S.; Peterson, Laurence B.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing FOXP3 are essential for the maintenance of self-tolerance and are deficient in many common autoimmune diseases. Immune tolerance is maintained in part by IL-2 and deficiencies in the IL-2 pathway cause reduced Treg function and an increased risk of autoimmunity. Recent studies expanding Tregs in vivo with low-dose IL-2 achieved major clinical successes highlighting the potential to optimize this pleiotropic cytokine for inflammatory and autoimmune disease indications. Here we compare the clinically approved IL-2 molecule, Proleukin, with two engineered IL-2 molecules with long half-lives owing to their fusion in monovalent and bivalent stoichiometry to a non-FcRγ binding human IgG1. Using nonhuman primates, we demonstrate that single ultra-low doses of IL-2 fusion proteins induce a prolonged state of in vivo activation that increases Tregs for an extended period of time similar to multiple-dose Proleukin. One of the common pleiotropic effects of high dose IL-2 treatment, eosinophilia, is eliminated at doses of the IL-2 fusion proteins that greatly expand Tregs. The long half-lives of the IL-2 fusion proteins facilitated a detailed characterization of an IL-2 dose response driving Treg expansion that correlates with increasingly sustained, suprathreshold pSTAT5a induction and subsequent sustained increases in the expression of CD25, FOXP3 and Ki-67 with retention of Treg-specific epigenetic signatures at FOXP3 and CTLA4. PMID:25457307

  6. Sustained in vivo signaling by long-lived IL-2 induces prolonged increases of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Bell, Charles J M; Sun, Yongliang; Nowak, Urszula M; Clark, Jan; Howlett, Sarah; Pekalski, Marcin L; Yang, Xin; Ast, Oliver; Waldhauer, Inja; Freimoser-Grundschober, Anne; Moessner, Ekkehard; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian; Hosse, Ralf J; Wicker, Linda S; Peterson, Laurence B

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing FOXP3 are essential for the maintenance of self-tolerance and are deficient in many common autoimmune diseases. Immune tolerance is maintained in part by IL-2 and deficiencies in the IL-2 pathway cause reduced Treg function and an increased risk of autoimmunity. Recent studies expanding Tregs in vivo with low-dose IL-2 achieved major clinical successes highlighting the potential to optimize this pleiotropic cytokine for inflammatory and autoimmune disease indications. Here we compare the clinically approved IL-2 molecule, Proleukin, with two engineered IL-2 molecules with long half-lives owing to their fusion in monovalent and bivalent stoichiometry to a non-FcRγ binding human IgG1. Using nonhuman primates, we demonstrate that single ultra-low doses of IL-2 fusion proteins induce a prolonged state of in vivo activation that increases Tregs for an extended period of time similar to multiple-dose Proleukin. One of the common pleiotropic effects of high dose IL-2 treatment, eosinophilia, is eliminated at doses of the IL-2 fusion proteins that greatly expand Tregs. The long half-lives of the IL-2 fusion proteins facilitated a detailed characterization of an IL-2 dose response driving Treg expansion that correlates with increasingly sustained, suprathreshold pSTAT5a induction and subsequent sustained increases in the expression of CD25, FOXP3 and Ki-67 with retention of Treg-specific epigenetic signatures at FOXP3 and CTLA4. PMID:25457307

  7. Elevation in liver enzymes is associated with increased IL-2 and predicts severe outcomes in clinically apparent dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Senaratne, Thamarasi; Carr, Jillian; Noordeen, Faseeha

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the circulating TNF-α and IL-2 levels in dengue virus (DENV) infected patients and to correlate these with clinical severity of DENV infections. A single analyte quantitative immunoassay was used to detect TNF-α and IL-2 in 24 dengue fever (DF) and 43 dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) patients, 15 healthy adults and 6 typhoid patients. The mean TNF-α and IL-2 levels of DENV- infected patients were higher than that of healthy adults and typhoid patients. No significant difference in TNF-α levels was noted between DF and DHF patients (p=0.5) but a significant increase in IL-2 levels was observed in DHF compared with DF patients (mean of DF=59.7pg/mL, mean of DHF=166.9pg/mL; p=0.02). No significant association of TNF-α or IL-2 levels was noted with packed cell volume (>45), thrombocytopenia, leucopenia or the presence of viraemia. The liver function tests measuring AST (aspartate aminotransferase) (p=0.01) and ALT (alanine aminotransferase) (p=0.02) levels were significantly elevated in DENV-infected patients. AST:ALT was significantly elevated in DHF/DSS (dengue shock syndrome) compared with DF patients. A significant positive linear correlation was noted between AST and IL-2 (r=0.31; p=0.01) and ALT and IL-2 elevations (r=0.2; p=0.02). Thus, AST and ALT levels correlate with both disease severity and circulating IL-2 levels. We suggest a role for circulating IL-2 in liver dysfunction and propose that a combined assessment of AST/ALT in conjunction with IL-2 at the early stages of symptomatic DENV infection may be useful to predict the severe forms of dengue. PMID:27155816

  8. [Peritumoral administered IL-2-induced tumor regression in melanoma. Pilot study].

    PubMed

    Gutwald, J; Groth, W; Mahrle, G

    1994-08-01

    Since the immune system plays an important role in the rejection of tumours, current tumour therapy includes immunostimulation. This can be done by interleukin 2 (IL-2), which activates T and killer cells and induces lysis of the tumour. Because the intravenous application of IL-2 may have serious side effects, we treated two patients with peritumoral injections in a pilot study. Both patients suffered from multiple cutaneous metastases of melanoma. A total of 31 and 39 x 10(6) IU recombinant IL-2 (Proleukin) respectively was injected in increasing concentrations in one metastasis of each patient. Histologically, almost complete necrosis of the tumour was induced. In comparison with the control specimen, the T-cell-rich infiltrate increased intra- and, in particular, peritumorally. While the ratio of helper to suppressor T cells remained unchanged, the proportions of NK cells, monocytes/macrophages and IL-2-receptor-bearing cells increased. This reaction was restricted to treated metastases. No clinical side effects or laboratory changes were registered apart from local erythema and swelling. PMID:7960753

  9. IL2Rβ-dependent signals drive terminal exhaustion and suppress memory development during chronic viral infection.

    PubMed

    Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Bourbonnais, Sara; Bédard, Nathalie; Charpentier, Tania; Boulangé, Moana; Michaud, Eva; Boufaied, Ines; Bruneau, Julie; Shoukry, Naglaa H; Lamarre, Alain; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2016-09-13

    Exhaustion of CD8(+) T cells severely impedes the adaptive immune response to chronic viral infections. Despite major advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of exhaustion, the cytokines that directly control this process during chronicity remain unknown. We demonstrate a direct impact of IL-2 and IL-15, two common gamma-chain-dependent cytokines, on CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion. Common to both cytokine receptors, the IL-2 receptor β (IL2Rβ) chain is selectively maintained on CD8(+) T cells during chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and hepatitis C virus infections. Its expression correlates with exhaustion severity and identifies terminally exhausted CD8(+) T cells both in mice and humans. Genetic ablation of the IL2Rβ chain on CD8(+) T cells restrains inhibitory receptor induction, in particular 2B4 and Tim-3; precludes terminal differentiation of highly defective PD-1(hi) effectors; and rescues memory T-cell development and responsiveness to IL-7-dependent signals. Together, we ascribe a previously unexpected role to IL-2 and IL-15 as instigators of CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion during chronic viral infection. PMID:27573835

  10. Posttranslational regulation of AMPA receptor trafficking and function

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Roche, Katherine W.

    2011-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, the majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission is mediated by glutamate acting on AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. The abundance of AMPA receptors at the synapse can be modulated through receptor trafficking, which dynamically regulates many fundamental brain functions, including learning and memory. Reversible posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, palmitoylation and ubiquitination of AMPA receptor subunits are important regulatory mechanisms for controlling synaptic AMPA receptor expression and function. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the study of AMPA receptor posttranslational modifications and discuss how these modifications regulate AMPA receptor trafficking and function at synapses. PMID:22000952

  11. Intrathymic radioresistant stem cells follow an IL-2/IL-2R pathway during thymic regeneration after sublethal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zuniga-Pfluecker, J.C.K.; Kruisbeek, A.M. )

    1990-05-15

    Sublethally irradiated mice undergo thymic regeneration which follows a phenotypic pattern of events similar to that observed during normal fetal development. Thymic regeneration after irradiation is the product of a limited pool of intrathymic radioresistant stem cells undergoing simultaneous differentiation. We show that in this model of T cell development, thymic regeneration follows a pathway in which the IL-2R is transiently expressed on CD4-/CD8- cells. IL-2R expression occurred during the exponential growth period of thymic regeneration, and IL-2R blocking prevented this explosive growth. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the IL-2R blockade affected primarily the development of the immature CD3-/CD4-/CD8- (triple negative) cells and their ability to generate CD3+/CD4+/CD8+ or CD3+/CD4+/CD8- and CD3+/CD4-/CD8+ thymocytes. Thus, our findings demonstrate that blocking of the IL-2R resulted in an arrest in proliferation and differentiation by intrathymic radioresistant stem cells, indicating that the IL-2/IL-2R pathway is necessary for the expansion of immature triple negative T cells.

  12. Only high-affinity receptors for interleukin 2 mediate internalization of ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, A.M.; Harford, J.B.; Svetlik, P.B.; Leonard, W.L.; Depper, J.M.; Waldmann, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Klausner, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors are expressed on activated T cells and in select T-cell leukemias. Recently, it has been demonstrated that at least two classes of receptor for IL-2 exist with markedly different affinities for ligand. All known biological actions of IL-2 have been correlated with occupancy of high-affinity sites; the function of the low-affinity sites remains unknown. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the primary means of internalization of cell-surface receptors and their ligands. The internalization of IL-2 bound to high- and low-affinity receptor sites was studied in a human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected human T-cell leukemia cell line and in a cloned murine cytotoxic T-cell line (CTLL). Internalization of IL-2 occurred only when bound to high-affinity sites. In addition, an anti-receptor antibody (anti-Tac), which binds equally well to high- and low-affinity sites, demonstrated no detectable internalization. The implications of these findings as they relate to IL-2 receptor structure and function are discussed.

  13. Progesterone Receptors: Form and Function in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Thompson, Richard F.; Foy, Michael R.; Baudry, Michel; Wang, JunMing; Finch, Caleb E; Morgan, Todd E.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Pike, Christian J.; Nilsen, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Emerging data indicate that progesterone has multiple non-reproductive functions in the central nervous system to regulate cognition, mood, inflammation, mitochondrial function, neurogenesis and regeneration, myelination and recovery from traumatic brain injury. Progesterone-regulated neural responses are mediated by an array of progesterone receptors (PR) that include the classic nuclear PRA and PRB receptors and splice variants of each, the seven transmembrane domain 7TMPRβ and the membrane-associated 25-Dx PR (PGRMC1). These PRs induce classic regulation of gene expression while also transducing signaling cascades that originate at the cell membrane and ultimately activate transcription factors. Remarkably, PRs are broadly expressed throughout the brain and can be detected in every neural cell type. The distribution of PRs beyond hypothalamic borders, suggests a much broader role of progesterone in regulating neural function. Despite the large body of evidence regarding progesterone regulation of reproductive behaviors and estrogen-inducible responses as well as effects of progesterone metabolite neurosteroids, much remains to be discovered regarding the functional outcomes resulting from activation of the complex array of PRs in brain by gonadally and / or glial derived progesterone. Moreover, the impact of clinically used progestogens and developing selective PR modulators for targeted outcomes in brain is a critical avenue of investigation as the non-reproductive functions of PRs have far-reaching implications for hormone therapy to maintain neurological health and function throughout menopausal aging. PMID:18374402

  14. Diphtheria toxin-based recombinant murine IL-2 fusion toxin for depleting murine regulatory T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Marino, Jose; Trowell, Aaron; Zhang, Huiping; Stromp Peraino, Jaclyn; Rajasekera, Priyani V; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Benichou, Gilles; Wang, Zhirui

    2014-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells which suppress immune responses of effector cells and are known to play a very important role in protection against autoimmune disease development, induction of transplantation tolerance and suppression of effective immune response against tumor cells. An effective in vivo Treg depletion agent would facilitate Treg-associated studies across many research areas. In this study, we have developed diphtheria toxin-based monovalent and bivalent murine IL-2 fusion toxins for depleting murine IL-2 receptor positive cells including CD25(+) Treg in vivo. Their potencies were assessed by in vitro protein synthesis inhibition and cell proliferation inhibition assays using a murine CD25(+) CTLL-2 cell line. Surprisingly, in contrast to our previously developed recombinant fusion toxins, the monovalent isoform (DT390-mIL-2) was approximately 4-fold more potent than its bivalent counterpart (DT390-bi-mIL-2). Binding analysis by flow cytometry demonstrated that the monovalent isoform bound stronger than the bivalent version. In vivo Treg depletion with the monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin was performed using C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Spleen Treg were significantly depleted with a maximum reduction of ∼70% and detectable as early as 12 h after the last injection. The spleen Treg numbers were reduced until Day 3 and returned to control levels by Day 7. We believe that this monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin will be an effective in vivo murine Treg depleter. PMID:25147093

  15. Brain immune interactions and air pollution: macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF), prion cellular protein (PrPC), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) in cerebrospinal fluid and MIF in serum differentiate urban children exposed to severe vs. low air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Cross, Janet V.; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Kavanaugh, Michael; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Chao, Chih-kai; Thompson, Charles; Chang, Jing; Zhu, Hongtu; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Mexico City Metropolitan Area children chronically exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants exhibit an early brain imbalance in genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, innate and adaptive immune responses along with accumulation of misfolded proteins observed in the early stages of Alzheimer and Parkinson's diseases. A complex modulation of serum cytokines and chemokines influences children's brain structural and gray/white matter volumetric responses to air pollution. The search for biomarkers associating systemic and CNS inflammation to brain growth and cognitive deficits in the short term and neurodegeneration in the long-term is our principal aim. We explored and compared a profile of cytokines, chemokines (Multiplexing LASER Bead Technology) and Cellular prion protein (PrPC) in normal cerebro-spinal-fluid (CSF) of urban children with high vs. low air pollution exposures. PrPC and macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF) were also measured in serum. Samples from 139 children ages 11.91 ± 4.2 years were measured. Highly exposed children exhibited significant increases in CSF MIF (p = 0.002), IL6 (p = 0.006), IL1ra (p = 0.014), IL-2 (p = 0.04), and PrPC (p = 0.039) vs. controls. MIF serum concentrations were higher in exposed children (p = 0.009). Our results suggest CSF as a MIF, IL6, IL1Ra, IL-2, and PrPC compartment that can possibly differentiate air pollution exposures in children. MIF, a key neuro-immune mediator, is a potential biomarker bridge to identify children with CNS inflammation. Fine tuning of immune-to-brain communication is crucial to neural networks appropriate functioning, thus the short and long term effects of systemic inflammation and dysregulated neural immune responses are of deep concern for millions of exposed children. Defining the linkage and the health consequences of the brain / immune system interactions in the developing brain chronically exposed to air pollutants ought to be of pressing importance for public health

  16. Dopamine receptor heteromeric complexes and their emerging functions.

    PubMed

    George, Susan R; Kern, Andras; Smith, Roy G; Franco, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission is traditionally accepted as occurring through the five dopamine receptors that transduce its signal. Recent evidence has demonstrated that the range of physiologically relevant dopamine signaling complexes is greatly expanded by the ability of dopamine receptors to interact with other dopamine receptors and with receptors of other endogenous signaling ligands. These novel heteromeric complexes have functional properties distinct from the component receptors or are able to modulate the canonical signaling and function of the cognate receptors. These dopamine receptor heteromers provide new insight into physiological mechanisms and pathophysiological processes involving dopamine. PMID:24968781

  17. Functional evolution of the pregnane X receptor

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Manisha; Reschly, Erica J.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2008-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR; NR1I2) is a nuclear hormone receptor (NR) that transcriptionally regulates genes encoding transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver and intestine. PXR activation leads to enhanced metabolism and elimination of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds such as hormones and bile salts. Relative to other vertebrate NRs, PXR has the broadest specificity for ligand activators by virtue of a large, flexible ligand-binding cavity. In addition, PXR has the most extensive sequence diversity across vertebrate species in the ligand-binding domain of any NR, with significant pharmacologic differences between humans and rodent PXRs and especially marked divergence between mammalian and non-mammalian PXRs. The unusual properties of PXR complicate the use of in silico and animal models to predict in vivo human PXR pharmacology. Research into the evolutionary history of the PXR gene has also provided insight into the function of PXR in humans and other animals. PMID:16863441

  18. Requirement of dual stimulation by homologous recombinant IL-2 and recombinant IL-12 for the in vitro production of interferon gamma by canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Very few studies have been carried out so far aiming at modulating cellular immune responses in dogs. In this study, we evaluated the ability of recombinant canine IL-2 (rcaIL-2) and IL-12, in the form of a single-chain fusion protein (rsccaIL-12), to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of healthy mongrel dogs. Results Recombinant canine IL-2 purified from Escherichia coli or present in the supernatant of COS-7 cells transfected with pcDNA3.1-caIL-2 (COS-7 caIL-2 supernatant) was able to induce proliferation of CTLL-2 cells, thus showing their functional activity. In addition, purified rcaIL-2 and COS-7 caIL-2 supernatant stimulated resting canine PBMC proliferation to a level higher than baseline level. Neither COS-7 sccaIL-12 supernatant nor COS-7 caIL-2 supernatant alone was able to induce significant production of interferon gamma by resting PBMC. However, COS-7 sccaIL-12 supernatant in combination with COS-7 caIL-2 supernatant induced production of IFN-γ by those cells. Conclusions The data shown herein suggest that the combination of canine recombinant IL-12 and IL-2 can be useful to promote cellular immune responses in dogs. PMID:25037233

  19. Human IL2RA null mutation mediates immunodeficiency with lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Goudy, Kevin; Aydin, Didem; Barzaghi, Federica; Gambineri, Eleonora; Vignoli, Marina; Mannurita, Sara Ciullini; Doglioni, Claudio; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Assanelli, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto; Brigida, Immacolata; Dellepiane, Rosa Maria; Martino, Silvana; Olek, Sven; Aiuti, Alessandro; Ciceri, Fabio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Cell-surface CD25 expression is critical for maintaining immune function and homeostasis. As in few reported cases, CD25 deficiency manifests with severe autoimmune enteritis and viral infections. To dissect the underlying immunological mechanisms driving these symptoms, we analyzed the regulatory and effector T cell functions in a CD25 deficient patient harboring a novel IL2RA mutation. Pronounced lymphoproliferation, mainly of the CD8+ T cells, was detected together with an increase in T cell activation markers and elevated serum cytokines. However, Ag-specific responses were impaired in vivo and in vitro. Activated CD8+STAT5+ T cells with lytic potential infiltrated the skin, even though FOXP3+ Tregs were present and maintained a higher capacity to respond to IL-2 compared to other T-cell subsets. Thus, the complex pathogenesis of CD25 deficiency provides invaluable insight into the role of IL2/IL-2RA-dependent regulation in autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases. PMID:23416241

  20. Phase I clinical trial combining imatinib mesylate and IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Nathalie; Flament, Caroline; Locher, Clara; Desbois, Mélanie; Rey, Annie; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Pautier, Patricia; Le Cesne, Axel; Soria, Jean-Charles; Paci, Angelo; Rosenzwajg, Michelle; Klatzmann, David; Eggermont, Alexander; Robert, Caroline; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    We performed a Phase I clinical trial from October 2007 to October 2009, enrolling patients affected by refractory solid tumors, to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of interleukin (IL)-2 combined with low dose cyclophosphamide (CTX) and imatinib mesylate (IM). In a companion paper published in this issue of OncoImmunology, we show that the MTD of IL-2 is 6 MIU/day for 5 consecutive days, and that IL-2 increases the impregnation of both IM and of its main metabolite, CGP74588. Among the secondary objectives, we wanted to determine immunological markers that might be associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and/or overall survival (OS). The combination therapy markedly reduced the absolute counts of B, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells in a manner that was proportional to IL-2 dose. There was a slight (less than 2-fold) increase in the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) among CD4+ T cells in response to IM plus IL-2. The natural killer (NK)-cell compartment was activated, exhibiting a significant upregulation of HLA-DR, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and CD56. The abundance of HLA-DR+ NK cells after one course of combination therapy positively correlated with both PFS and OS. The IL-2-induced rise of the CD4+:CD8+ T-cell ratio calculated after the first cycle of treatment was also positively associated with OS. Overall, the combination of IM and IL-2 promoted the rapid expansion of HLA-DR+ NK cells and increased the CD4+:CD8+ T-cell ratio, both being associated with clinical benefits. This combinatorial regimen warrants further investigation in Phase II clinical trials, possibly in patients affected by gastrointestinal stromal tumors, a setting in which T and NK cells may play an important therapeutic role. PMID:23525357

  1. Melanocortin 1 Receptor: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wolf Horrell, Erin M.; Boulanger, Mary C.; D’Orazio, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is a melanocytic Gs protein coupled receptor that regulates skin pigmentation, UV responses, and melanoma risk. It is a highly polymorphic gene, and loss of function correlates with a fair, UV-sensitive, and melanoma-prone phenotype due to defective epidermal melanization and sub-optimal DNA repair. MC1R signaling, achieved through adenylyl cyclase activation and generation of the second messenger cAMP, is hormonally controlled by the positive agonist melanocortin, the negative agonist agouti signaling protein, and the neutral antagonist β-defensin 3. Activation of cAMP signaling up-regulates melanin production and deposition in the epidermis which functions to limit UV penetration into the skin and enhances nucleotide excision repair (NER), the genomic stability pathway responsible for clearing UV photolesions from DNA to avoid mutagenesis. Herein we review MC1R structure and function and summarize our laboratory’s findings on the molecular mechanisms by which MC1R signaling impacts NER. PMID:27303435

  2. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism has been associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality, in part, by ameliorating the adverse effects of aldosterone on vascular function. Although spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly utilized in patients with cardiovascular disease, widespread clinical use is limited by the development of gynecomastia with spironolactone and hyperkalemia with both agents. This suggests that the development of newer agents with favorable side effect profiles is warranted. PMID:18729003

  3. PGC-1α-Dependent Mitochondrial Adaptation Is Necessary to Sustain IL-2-Induced Activities in Human NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Claudia; Ibañez, Jorge; Ahumada, Viviana; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Martin, Adrian; Córdova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Human Natural Killer (NK) cells are a specialized heterogeneous subpopulation of lymphocytes involved in antitumor defense reactions. NK cell effector functions are critically dependent on cytokines and metabolic activity. Among various cytokines modulating NK cell function, interleukin-2 (IL-2) can induce a more potent cytotoxic activity defined as lymphokine activated killer activity (LAK). Our aim was to determine if IL-2 induces changes at the mitochondrial level in NK cells to support the bioenergetic demand for performing this enhanced cytotoxic activity more efficiently. Purified human NK cells were cultured with high IL-2 concentrations to develop LAK activity, which was assessed by the ability of NK cells to lyse NK-resistant Daudi cells. Here we show that, after 72 h of culture of purified human NK cells with enough IL-2 to induce LAK activity, both the mitochondrial mass and the mitochondrial membrane potential increased in a PGC-1α-dependent manner. In addition, oligomycin, an inhibitor of ATP synthase, inhibited IL-2-induced LAK activity at 48 and 72 h of culture. Moreover, the secretion of IFN-γ from NK cells with LAK activity was also partially dependent on PGC-1α expression. These results indicate that PGC-1α plays a crucial role in regulating mitochondrial function involved in the maintenance of LAK activity in human NK cells stimulated with IL-2. PMID:27413259

  4. PGC-1α-Dependent Mitochondrial Adaptation Is Necessary to Sustain IL-2-Induced Activities in Human NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Dante; Jara, Claudia; Ibañez, Jorge; Ahumada, Viviana; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Martin, Adrian; Córdova, Alexandra; Montoya, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Human Natural Killer (NK) cells are a specialized heterogeneous subpopulation of lymphocytes involved in antitumor defense reactions. NK cell effector functions are critically dependent on cytokines and metabolic activity. Among various cytokines modulating NK cell function, interleukin-2 (IL-2) can induce a more potent cytotoxic activity defined as lymphokine activated killer activity (LAK). Our aim was to determine if IL-2 induces changes at the mitochondrial level in NK cells to support the bioenergetic demand for performing this enhanced cytotoxic activity more efficiently. Purified human NK cells were cultured with high IL-2 concentrations to develop LAK activity, which was assessed by the ability of NK cells to lyse NK-resistant Daudi cells. Here we show that, after 72 h of culture of purified human NK cells with enough IL-2 to induce LAK activity, both the mitochondrial mass and the mitochondrial membrane potential increased in a PGC-1α-dependent manner. In addition, oligomycin, an inhibitor of ATP synthase, inhibited IL-2-induced LAK activity at 48 and 72 h of culture. Moreover, the secretion of IFN-γ from NK cells with LAK activity was also partially dependent on PGC-1α expression. These results indicate that PGC-1α plays a crucial role in regulating mitochondrial function involved in the maintenance of LAK activity in human NK cells stimulated with IL-2. PMID:27413259

  5. Implication of IL-2/IL-21 region in systemic sclerosis genetic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela; Simeon, Carmen P; Broen, Jasper C; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Beretta, Lorenzo; Vonk, Madelon C; Carreira, Patricia E; Vargas, Sofia; Román-Ivorra, José Andrés; González-Gay, Miguel A; Tolosa, Carlos; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Espinosa, Gerard; Vicente, Esther F; Hesselstrand, Roger; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Distler, Jörg H W; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Schuerwegh, Annemie J; Shiels, Paul G; Nordin, Annika; Padyukov, Leonid; Hoffmann-Vold, Anna-Maria; Scorza, Raffaella; Lunardi, Claudio; Airo, Paolo; van Laar, Jacob M; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Gathof, Birgit S; Kreuter, Alexander; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher P; Zhou, Xiaodong; Arnett, Frank C; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Assasi, Shervin; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Mayes, Maureen D; Martín, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Objective The interleukin 2 (IL-2) and interleukin 21 (IL-21) locus at chromosome 4q27 has been associated with several autoimmune diseases, and both genes are related to immune system functions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the IL-2/IL-21 locus in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Patients and methods The case control study included 4493 SSc Caucasian patients and 5856 healthy controls from eight Caucasian populations (Spain, Germany, The Netherlands, USA, Italy, Sweden, UK and Norway). Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs2069762, rs6822844, rs6835457 and rs907715) were genotyped using TaqMan allelic discrimination assays. Results We observed evidence of association of the rs6822844 and rs907715 variants with global SSc (pc=6.6E-4 and pc=7.2E-3, respectively). Similar statistically significant associations were observed for the limited cutaneous form of the disease. The conditional regression analysis suggested that the most likely genetic variation responsible for the association was the rs6822844 polymorphism. Consistently, the rs2069762A-rs6822844T-rs6835457G-rs907715T allelic combination showed evidence of association with SSc and limited cutaneous SSc subtype (pc=1.7E-03 and pc=8E-4, respectively). Conclusions These results suggested that the IL-2/IL-21 locus influences the genetic susceptibility to SSc. Moreover, this study provided further support for the IL-2/IL-21 locus as a common genetic factor in autoimmune diseases. PMID:23172754

  6. TIM-3 Suppresses Anti-CD3/CD28-Induced TCR Activation and IL-2 Expression through the NFAT Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tomkowicz, Brian; Walsh, Eileen; Cotty, Adam; Verona, Raluca; Sabins, Nina; Kaplan, Fred; Santulli-Marotto, Sandy; Chin, Chen-Ni; Mooney, Jill; Lingham, Russell B.; Naso, Michael; McCabe, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    TIM-3 (T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain containing protein 3) is a member of the TIM family of proteins that is preferentially expressed on Th1 polarized CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Recent studies indicate that TIM-3 serves as a negative regulator of T cell function (i.e. T cell dependent immune responses, proliferation, tolerance, and exhaustion). Despite having no recognizable inhibitory signaling motifs, the intracellular tail of TIM-3 is apparently indispensable for function. Specifically, the conserved residues Y265/Y272 and surrounding amino acids appear to be critical for function. Mechanistically, several studies suggest that TIM-3 can associate with interleukin inducible T cell kinase (ITK), the Src kinases Fyn and Lck, and the p85 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) adaptor protein to positively or negatively regulate IL-2 production via NF-κB/NFAT signaling pathways. To begin to address this discrepancy, we examined the effect of TIM-3 in two model systems. First, we generated several Jurkat T cell lines stably expressing human TIM-3 or murine CD28-ECD/human TIM-3 intracellular tail chimeras and examined the effects that TIM-3 exerts on T cell Receptor (TCR)-mediated activation, cytokine secretion, promoter activity, and protein kinase association. In this model, our results demonstrate that TIM-3 inhibits several TCR-mediated phenotypes: i) NF-kB/NFAT activation, ii) CD69 expression, and iii) suppression of IL-2 secretion. To confirm our Jurkat cell observations we developed a primary human CD8+ cell system that expresses endogenous levels of TIM-3. Upon TCR ligation, we observed the loss of NFAT reporter activity and IL-2 secretion, and identified the association of Src kinase Lck, and PLC-γ with TIM-3. Taken together, our results support the conclusion that TIM-3 is a negative regulator of TCR-function by attenuating activation signals mediated by CD3/CD28 co-stimulation. PMID:26492563

  7. [Glutamate Metabotropic Receptors: Structure, Localisation, Functions].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Tyurenkov, I N

    2016-01-01

    The data on the structure, location and functions of the metabotropic glutamate receptor is shown. The family consists of 8 mGluRs subtypes and is divided into three groups: I group--mGluRs1/mGluRs5, II group--mGluRs2/mGluRs3, III group--mGluRs4/mGluRs6/mGluRs7/mGluRs8. They are associated with G-protein; signaling in the cells is carried out by IP3 or adenylate cyclase signaling pathways, in the result of which, mGluRs modify glial and neuronal excitability. Receptors are localized in the CNS and periphery in non-neuronal tissues: bone, heart, kidney, pancreas pod and platelets, the gastrointestinal tract, immune system. Their participation in the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, mental and cognitive disorders, autoimmune processes, etc. is displayed. Agonists, antagonists, allosteric modulators of mGluRs are considered as potential medicines for treatment of mental diseases, including depression, fragile X syndrome, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders, Parkinson's disease, etc. PMID:27530046

  8. Antigen-Specific Regulatory T Cells and Low Dose of IL-2 in Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Minh N.; von Herrath, Matthias G.; Vela, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in preventing effector T-cell (Teff) targeting of self-antigens that can lead to tissue destruction in autoimmune settings, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Autoimmunity is caused in part by an imbalance between Teff and Tregs. Early attempts to treat with immunosuppressive agents have led to serious side effects, thus requiring a more targeted approach. Low-dose IL-2 (LD IL-2) can provide immunoregulation with few side effects by preferentially acting on Tregs to drive tolerance. The concept of LD IL-2 as a therapeutic approach is supported by data in mouse models where autoimmunity is cured and further strengthened by success in human clinical studies in hepatitis C virus-induced vasculitis, chronic graft-versus-host disease, and Alopecia areata. Treatment will require identification of a safe therapeutic window, which is a difficult task given that patients are reported to have deficient or defective IL-2 production or signaling and have experienced mild activation of NK cells and eosinophils with LD IL-2 therapy. In T1D, an LD IL-2 clinical trial concluded that Tregs can be safely expanded in humans; however, the study was not designed to address efficacy. Antigen-specific therapies have also aimed at regulation of the autoimmune response but have been filled with disappointment despite an extensive list of diverse islet antigens tested in humans. This approach could be enhanced through the addition of LD IL-2 to the antigenic treatment regimen to improve the frequency and function of antigen-specific Tregs, without global immunosuppression. Here, we will discuss the use of LD IL-2 and islet antigen to enhance antigen-specific Tregs in T1D and focus on what is known about their immunological impact, their safety, and potential efficacy, and need for better methods to identify therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:26793191

  9. Antigen-Specific Regulatory T Cells and Low Dose of IL-2 in Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh N; von Herrath, Matthias G; Vela, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in preventing effector T-cell (Teff) targeting of self-antigens that can lead to tissue destruction in autoimmune settings, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Autoimmunity is caused in part by an imbalance between Teff and Tregs. Early attempts to treat with immunosuppressive agents have led to serious side effects, thus requiring a more targeted approach. Low-dose IL-2 (LD IL-2) can provide immunoregulation with few side effects by preferentially acting on Tregs to drive tolerance. The concept of LD IL-2 as a therapeutic approach is supported by data in mouse models where autoimmunity is cured and further strengthened by success in human clinical studies in hepatitis C virus-induced vasculitis, chronic graft-versus-host disease, and Alopecia areata. Treatment will require identification of a safe therapeutic window, which is a difficult task given that patients are reported to have deficient or defective IL-2 production or signaling and have experienced mild activation of NK cells and eosinophils with LD IL-2 therapy. In T1D, an LD IL-2 clinical trial concluded that Tregs can be safely expanded in humans; however, the study was not designed to address efficacy. Antigen-specific therapies have also aimed at regulation of the autoimmune response but have been filled with disappointment despite an extensive list of diverse islet antigens tested in humans. This approach could be enhanced through the addition of LD IL-2 to the antigenic treatment regimen to improve the frequency and function of antigen-specific Tregs, without global immunosuppression. Here, we will discuss the use of LD IL-2 and islet antigen to enhance antigen-specific Tregs in T1D and focus on what is known about their immunological impact, their safety, and potential efficacy, and need for better methods to identify therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:26793191

  10. Sweet Taste Receptor Signaling Network: Possible Implication for Cognitive Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Welcome, Menizibeya O.; Mastorakis, Nikos E.; Pereverzev, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    Sweet taste receptors are transmembrane protein network specialized in the transmission of information from special “sweet” molecules into the intracellular domain. These receptors can sense the taste of a range of molecules and transmit the information downstream to several acceptors, modulate cell specific functions and metabolism, and mediate cell-to-cell coupling through paracrine mechanism. Recent reports indicate that sweet taste receptors are widely distributed in the body and serves specific function relative to their localization. Due to their pleiotropic signaling properties and multisubstrate ligand affinity, sweet taste receptors are able to cooperatively bind multiple substances and mediate signaling by other receptors. Based on increasing evidence about the role of these receptors in the initiation and control of absorption and metabolism, and the pivotal role of metabolic (glucose) regulation in the central nervous system functioning, we propose a possible implication of sweet taste receptor signaling in modulating cognitive functioning. PMID:25653876

  11. In vitro assessment of choline dihydrogen phosphate (CDHP) as a vehicle for recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2)

    PubMed Central

    Foureau, David M.; Vrikkis, Regina M.; Jones, Chase P.; Weaver, Katherine D.; MacFarlane, Douglas R.; Salo, Jonathan C.; McKillop, Iain H.; Elliott, Gloria D.

    2013-01-01

    Choline dihydrogen phosphate (CDHP) is an ionic liquid reported to increase thermal stability of model proteins. The current work investigated CDHP effect on structural integrity and biological activity of recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2), a therapeutic protein used for treating advanced melanoma. In vitro CDHP biocompatibility was also evaluated using primary cell cultures, or B16-F10 cell line, chronically exposed to the ionic liquid. Formulation of rhIL-2 in an aqueous 680mM CDHP pH 7.4 solution resulted in a 12.5°C increase in the Tm of rhIL-2 compared to a basic buffer formulation, and provided conformational rhIL-2 stabilization when the solution was heated to 23.3°C above the Tm. CDHP solutions (≤80mM), exhibited no cytotoxic activity toward primary splenocytes or B16-F10 cells in culture. However, a 10-fold loss in biological activity was observed when rhIL-2 was used in a 30mM CDHP aqueous solution with NaHCO3 (pH≥7.2) compared to controls without CDHP. While increased Tm is associated with a diminished rhIL-2 biological activity, the therapeutic protein remains structurally intact and functional. PMID:24504148

  12. Nonresponsive lymphocytes from bone marrow transplant patients proliferate in vitro following exposure to rIL-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hank, J.A.; Sondel, P.M.; Flynn, B.; Hong, R.; Kohler, P.C.

    1986-03-01

    In vitro T-cell responses are depressed following bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Normal proliferative responses to mitogens, alloantigens and soluble antigens do not return for many months. Despite poor T-cell responses following EMT, peripheral blood lymphocytes respond readily to human rIL-2 as measured by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation. Lymphocytes from 8 patients have been studied following BMT. Six received whole marrow and 2 received marrow depleted of T-cells. While these patients were still unable to respond to mitogens, soluble antigens or in MLC following engraftment, their responses to rIL-2 were remarkable. These responses were often greater than the responses of the patients own cryopreserved remission cells, donor cells, or lymphocytes from healthy controls to either rIL-2 or antigens. Whether these IL-2 responsive cells are lymphocytes that have been activated in vivo by alloantigens, and thus express their IL-2 receptor, or are lymphokine activated killer (LAK) precursors, or are a primitive regenerating cell remains to be determined. Preliminary results indicate that these cells mediate nonspecific cytotoxicity.

  13. Novel lysophosphoplipid receptors: their structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Makide, Kumiko; Uwamizu, Akiharu; Shinjo, Yuji; Ishiguro, Jun; Okutani, Michiyo; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken

    2014-01-01

    It is now accepted that lysophospholipids (LysoGPs) have a wide variety of functions as lipid mediators that are exerted through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) specific to each lysophospholipid. While the roles of some LysoGPs, such as lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine 1-phosphate, have been thoroughly examined, little is known about the roles of several other LysoGPs, such as lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), lysophosphatidylthreonine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylglycerol. Recently, a GPCR was found for LPI (GPR55) and three GPCRs (GPR34/LPS1, P2Y10/LPS2, and GPR174/LPS3) were found for LysoPS. In this review, we focus on these newly identified GPCRs and summarize the actions of LysoPS and LPI as lipid mediators. PMID:24891334

  14. Novel lysophosphoplipid receptors: their structure and function.

    PubMed

    Makide, Kumiko; Uwamizu, Akiharu; Shinjo, Yuji; Ishiguro, Jun; Okutani, Michiyo; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken

    2014-10-01

    It is now accepted that lysophospholipids (LysoGPs) have a wide variety of functions as lipid mediators that are exerted through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) specific to each lysophospholipid. While the roles of some LysoGPs, such as lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine 1-phosphate, have been thoroughly examined, little is known about the roles of several other LysoGPs, such as lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), lysophosphatidylthreonine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine, lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylglycerol. Recently, a GPCR was found for LPI (GPR55) and three GPCRs (GPR34/LPS1, P2Y10/LPS2, and GPR174/LPS3) were found for LysoPS. In this review, we focus on these newly identified GPCRs and summarize the actions of LysoPS and LPI as lipid mediators. PMID:24891334

  15. The effect of peripheral blood lymphocyte stimulation on zeta chain expression and IL-2 production in Hodgkin's disease

    PubMed Central

    Frydecka, I; Boćko, D; Kosmaczewska, A; Ciszak, L; Morilla, R

    2001-01-01

    It has been reported that peripheral blood T cells and NK cells express reduced levels of the T-cell receptor signal-transducing zeta chain in Hodgkin's disease (HD). The zeta chain has emerged as a key subunit of the T-cell antigen receptor, which plays a central role in the signal-transducing events leading to T and NK-cell activation. We were interested in determining whether the low zeta chain expression in HD could be corrected by anti-CD3, anti-CD3-rIL-2 ex vivo stimulation. Zeta chain expression was analysed by dual immunofluorescence on permeabilized cells before and after 72 hours of culture. The IL-2 concentration in the culture supernatants was measured by ELISA. Zeta chain was significantly reduced on unstimulated CD4+, CD8+ and CD56+ cells from patients in active disease compared with normal subjects. In patients in complete remission, the values were normal except for CD8+ cells, on which zeta expression remained significantly reduced. Stimulation with anti-CD3 did not change zeta expression. Co-stimulation with rIL-2 increased but did not normalize the proportions of CD4+/zeta+, CD8+/zeta+and CD56+/zeta+cells and IL-2 production in active disease. Stimulation of cells from patients in clinical remission with anti-CD3+rIL-2 increased the proportion of CD8+zeta+cells and normalized IL-2 production levels. Considering the pivotal role of CD3-zeta in immune response, our data suggest that successful immunotherapy approaches in active HD should consider inclusion of other potent cytokines, as well as genetically engineered tumour vaccines. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign www.bjcancer.com PMID:11355944

  16. Functional identification of a goldfish odorant receptor.

    PubMed

    Speca, D J; Lin, D M; Sorensen, P W; Isacoff, E Y; Ngai, J; Dittman, A H

    1999-07-01

    The vertebrate olfactory system utilizes odorant receptors to receive and discriminate thousands of different chemical stimuli. An understanding of how these receptors encode information about an odorant's molecular structure requires a characterization of their ligand specificities. We employed an expression cloning strategy to identify a goldfish odorant receptor that is activated by amino acids-potent odorants for fish. Structure-activity analysis indicates that the receptor is preferentially tuned to recognize basic amino acids. The receptor is a member of a multigene family of G protein-coupled receptors, sharing sequence similarities with the calcium sensing, metabotropic glutamate, and V2R class of vomeronasal receptors. The ligand tuning properties of the goldfish amino acid odorant receptor provide information for unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying olfactory coding. PMID:10433261

  17. A second trigeminal CGRP receptor: function and expression of the AMY1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher S; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Bower, Rebekah L; Wilderman, Andrea; Insel, Paul A; Edvinsson, Lars; Waldvogel, Henry J; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A; Russo, Andrew F; Hay, Debbie L

    2015-01-01

    Objective The trigeminovascular system plays a central role in migraine, a condition in need of new treatments. The neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is proposed as causative in migraine and is the subject of intensive drug discovery efforts. This study explores the expression and functionality of two CGRP receptor candidates in the sensory trigeminal system. Methods Receptor expression was determined using Taqman G protein-coupled receptor arrays and immunohistochemistry in trigeminal ganglia (TG) and the spinal trigeminal complex of the brainstem in rat and human. Receptor pharmacology was quantified using sensitive signaling assays in primary rat TG neurons. Results mRNA and histological expression analysis in rat and human samples revealed the presence of two CGRP-responsive receptors (AMY1: calcitonin receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein 1 [RAMP1]) and the CGRP receptor (calcitonin receptor-like receptor/RAMP1). In support of this finding, quantification of agonist and antagonist potencies revealed a dual population of functional CGRP-responsive receptors in primary rat TG neurons. Interpretation The unexpected presence of a functional non-canonical CGRP receptor (AMY1) at neural sites important for craniofacial pain has important implications for targeting the CGRP axis in migraine. PMID:26125036

  18. Functional analysis of a mammalian odorant receptor subfamily

    PubMed Central

    Abaffy, Tatjana; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Luetje, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis groups mammalian odorant receptors into two broad classes and numerous subfamilies. These subfamilies are proposed to reflect functional organization. Testing this idea requires an assay allowing detailed functional characterization of odorant receptors. Here we show that a variety of Class I and Class II mouse odorant receptors can be functionally expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Receptor constructs included the N-terminal 20 residues of human rhodopsin and were coexpressed with Gαolf and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator to allow electrophysiological measurement of receptor responses. For most mouse odorant receptors tested, these conditions were sufficient for functional expression. Co-expression of accessory proteins was required to allow functional surface expression of some mouse odorant receptors. We used this assay to examine the receptive ranges of all members of the MOR42 subfamily. MOR42-1 responded to dicarboxylic acids, preferring a 10–12 carbon chain length. MOR42-2 responded to monocarboxylic acids (7–10 carbons). MOR42-3 responded to dicarboxylic acids (8–10 carbons) and monocarboxylic acids (10–12 carbons). Thus, the receptive range of each receptor was unique. However, overlap between the individual receptive ranges suggests that the members of this subfamily form one contiguous subfamily receptive range, suggesting that odorant receptor subfamilies do constitute functional units. PMID:16606354

  19. Angiotensin Receptors: Structure, Function, Signaling and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Khuraijam Dhanachandra; Karnik, Sadashiva S

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensinogen – a serpin family protein predominantly produced by the liver is systematically processed by proteases of the Renin Angiotensin system (RAS) generating hormone peptides. Specific cell surface receptors for at least three distinct angiotensin peptides produce distinct cellular signals that regulate system-wide physiological response to RAS. Two well characterized receptors are angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1 receptor) and type 2 receptor (AT2 receptor). They respond to the octapeptide hormone angiotensin II. The oncogene product MAS is a putative receptor for Ang (1–7). While these are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), the in vivo angiotensin IV binding sites may be type 2 transmembrane proteins. These four receptors together regulate cardiovascular, hemodynamic, neurological, renal, and endothelial functions; as well as cell proliferation, survival, matrix-cell interactions and inflammation. Angiotensin receptors are important therapeutic targets for several diseases. Thus, researchers and pharmaceutical companies are focusing on drugs targeting AT1 receptor than AT2 receptor, MAS and AngIV binding sites. AT1 receptor blockers are the cornerstone of current treatment for hypertension, heart failure, renal failure and many types of vascular diseases including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurism and Marfan syndrome. PMID:27512731

  20. Hedgehog receptor function during craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Guilherme M; Seppala, Maisa; Barrell, William; Birjandi, Anahid A; Geoghegan, Finn; Cobourne, Martyn T

    2016-07-15

    The Hedgehog signalling pathway plays a fundamental role in orchestrating normal craniofacial development in vertebrates. In particular, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is produced in three key domains during the early formation of the head; neuroectoderm of the ventral forebrain, facial ectoderm and the pharyngeal endoderm; with signal transduction evident in both ectodermal and mesenchymal tissue compartments. Shh signalling from the prechordal plate and ventral midline of the diencephalon is required for appropriate division of the eyefield and forebrain, with mutation in a number of pathway components associated with Holoprosencephaly, a clinically heterogeneous developmental defect characterized by a failure of the early forebrain vesicle to divide into distinct halves. In addition, signalling from the pharyngeal endoderm and facial ectoderm plays an essential role during development of the face, influencing cranial neural crest cells that migrate into the early facial processes. In recent years, the complexity of Shh signalling has been highlighted by the identification of multiple novel proteins that are involved in regulating both the release and reception of this protein. Here, we review the contributions of Shh signalling during early craniofacial development, focusing on Hedgehog receptor function and describing the consequences of disruption for inherited anomalies of this region in both mouse models and human populations. PMID:26875496

  1. NMDA Receptor Function During Senescence: Implication on Cognitive Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, a family of L-glutamate receptors, play an important role in learning and memory, and are critical for spatial memory. These receptors are tetrameric ion channels composed of a family of related subunits. One of the hallmarks of the aging human population is a decline in cognitive function; studies in the past couple of years have demonstrated deterioration in NMDA receptor subunit expression and function with advancing age. However, a direct relationship between impaired memory function and a decline in NMDA receptors is still ambiguous. Recent studies indicate a link between an age-associated NMDA receptor hypofunction and memory impairment and provide evidence that age-associated enhanced oxidative stress might be contributing to the alterations associated with senescence. However, clear evidence is still deficient in demonstrating the underlying mechanisms and a relationship between age-associated impaired cognitive faculties and NMDA receptor hypofunction. The current review intends to present an overview of the research findings regarding changes in expression of various NMDA receptor subunits and deficits in NMDA receptor function during senescence and its implication in age-associated impaired hippocampal-dependent memory function. PMID:26732087

  2. HIV-1 Infection-Induced Suppression of the Let-7i/IL-2 Axis Contributes to CD4+ T Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijun; Yin, Yue; Zhang, Shaoying; Luo, Haihua; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying HIV-1-mediated CD4+ T cell depletion are highly complicated. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a key cytokine that maintains the survival and proliferation of activated CD4+ T cells. IL-2 levels are disturbed during HIV-1 infection, but the underlying mechanism(s) requires further investigation. We have reported that cellular microRNA (miRNA) let-7i upregulates IL-2 expression by targeting the promoter TATA-box region, which functions as a positive regulator. In this study, we found that HIV-1 infection decreases the expression of let-7i in CD4+ T cells by attenuating its promoter activity. The reduced let-7i miRNA expression led to a decline in IL-2 levels. A let-7i mimic increased IL-2 expression and subsequently enhanced the resistance of CD4+ T cells to HIV-1-induced apoptosis. By contrast, the blockage of let-7i with a specific inhibitor resulted in elevated CD4+ T cell apoptosis during HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, by knocking down the expression of IL-2, we found that the let-7i-mediated CD4+ T cell resistance to apoptosis during HIV-1 infection was dependent on IL-2 signaling rather than an alternative CD95-mediated cell-death pathway. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel pathway for HIV-1-induced dysregulation of IL-2 cytokines and depletion of CD4+ T-lymphocytes. PMID:27145859

  3. Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes bear the 75 kDa tumour necrosis factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Trentin, L.; Zambello, R.; Bulian, P.; Cerutti, A.; Enthammer, C.; Cassatella, M.; Nitti, D.; Lise, M.; Agostini, C.; Semenzato, G.

    1995-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a cytokine with a variety of immunological properties. The identification of two receptors for this molecule, i.e. the 75 kDa and the 55 kDa TNF receptors (TNF-R), recently clarified the mechanisms through which this cytokine provides its wide range of immunomodulatory activities. In this study we have investigated the expression and the functional properties of these receptors on tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) recovered from 17 patients with solid cancers (melanoma, colorectal carcinoma and lung cancer). To this end, TIL lines and freshly isolated TILs were evaluated for (a) the expression and the functional role of TNF receptors following culture in the presence of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and (b) the production of TNF-alpha following culture with IL-2 and the role of this cytokine in IL-2-driven TIL proliferation. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that TILs bear the 75 kDa TNF-R. Moreover, TIL lines express detectable messages for TNF-alpha and release this cytokine. Functional in vitro studies have shown that anti-TNF-alpha, as well as anti-75 kDa TNF-R antibodies, are able to inhibit the IL-2-induced TIL proliferation. These data demonstrate that TILs are equipped with a fully functional TNF-R system and suggest a putative role for this receptor and its ligand in the activation and expression of TILs following immunotherapy with IL-2. Images Figure 2 PMID:7841036

  4. Emerging structural insights into the function of ionotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karakas, Erkan; Regan, Michael C.; Furukawa, Hiro

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory neurotransmission crucial for brain development and function including learning and memory formation. Recently a wealth of structural studies on iGluRs, including AMPA receptors (AMPARs), kainate receptors, and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) became available.. These studies showed structures of non-NMDARs including AMPAR and kainate receptor in various functional states, thereby providing the first visual sense of how non-NMDAR iGluRs may function in the context of homotetramers. Furthermore, they provided the first view of heterotetrameric NMDAR ion channels, which illuminated the similarities with and differences from non-NMDARs, thus raising a mechanistic distinction between the two groups of iGluRs. Here we review mechanistic insights into iGluR functions gained through structural studies of multiple groups. PMID:25941168

  5. Cellular Functions of Transient Receptor Potential channels

    PubMed Central

    Dadon, Daniela; Minke, Baruch

    2010-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential channels are polymodal cellular sensors involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, mainly by increasing cellular Ca2+. In this review we focus on the roles of these channels in: i) cell death ii) proliferation and differentiation and iii) synaptic vesicle release. Cell death Ca2+ influx participates in apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The Ca2+ permeability and high sensitivity of part of these channels to oxidative/metabolic stress make them important participants in cell death. Several examples are given. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 is activated by H2O2, inducing cell death through an increase in cellular Ca2+ and activation of Poly ADP-Ribose Polymerase. Exposure of cultured cortical neurons to oxygen-glucose deprivation, in vitro, causes cell death via cation influx, mediated by Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7. Metabolic stress constitutively activates the Ca2+ permeable Transient Receptor Potential channels of Drosophila photoreceptor in the dark, potentially leading to retinal degeneration. Similar sensitivity to metabolic stress characterizes several mammalian Transient Receptor Potential Canonical channels. Proliferation and differentiation The rise in cytosolic Ca2+ induces cell growth, differentiation and proliferation via activation of several transcription factors. Activation a variety of store operated and Transient Receptor Potential channels cause a rise in cytosolic Ca2+, making these channels components involved in proliferation and differentiation. Synaptic vesicle release Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 channels reside in synaptic vesicles and regulate neurotransmitter release by a mechanism that is not entirely clear. All the above features of Transient Receptor Potential channels make them crucial components in important, sometimes conflicting, cellular processes that still need to be explored. PMID:20399884

  6. INVOLVEMENT OF KRAS G12A MUTATION IN THE IL-2-INDEPENDENT GROWTH OF A HUMAN T-LGL LEUKEMIA CELL LINE, PLT-2

    PubMed Central

    MIZUTANI, NAOKI; ITO, HIROMI; HAGIWARA, KAZUMI; KOBAYASHI, MISA; HOSHIKAWA, ASUKA; NISHIDA, YAYOI; TAKAGI, AKIRA; KOJIMA, TETSUHITO; SUZUKI, MOTOSHI; OSAWA, YOSUKE; OHNISHI, KAZUNORI; DAIBATA, MASANORI; MURATE, TAKASHI

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytokine-dependent cell lines have been used to analyze the cytokine-induced cellular signaling and the mechanism of oncogenesis. In the current study, we analyzed MOTN-1 and PLT-2 cell lines established from different stages of a T-cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia patient (Daibata et al. 2004). MOTN-1 is IL-2-dependent derived from the chronic phase, whereas IL-2-independent PLT-2 is from the aggressive and terminal stage. They shared considerable chromosome abnormalities and the pattern of T-cell receptor rearrangement, presuming that the cytokine independence of PLT-2 was due to the additive genetic abnormality. Besides IL-2, IL-15 supported MOTN-1 cell growth, because these receptors share β- and γ-subunits. IL-2 activated ERK, AKT and STAT pathway of MOTN-1. STAT3 pathway of PLT-2 was also activated by IL-2, suggesting intact IL-2 induces signal transduction of PLT-2. However, ERK1/2 but not AKT, was continuously activated in PLT-2, consistent with the increased Ras-activity of PLT-2. Sequence analysis revealed KRAS G12A mutation but not NRAS and HRAS mutation of PLT-2 but not MOTN-1. Another signaling molecule affecting Ras-signaling pathway, SHP2, which has been frequently mutated in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), did not show mutation. Moreover, MEK inhibitor, PD98059, as well as farnesylation inhibitor inhibited PLT-2 cell growth. Using NIH3T3 and MOTN-1, ERK activation, increased cell proliferation and survival by KRAS G12A were shown, suggesting the important role of KRAS G12A in IL-2-independent growth of PLT-2. Taken together, KRAS G12A is important for IL-2-independent growth of PLT-2 cells and suggests the possibility of involvement of KRAS mutation with disease progression. PMID:23092099

  7. IL-21 signalling via STAT3 primes human naive B cells to respond to IL-2 to enhance their differentiation into plasmablasts.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Lucinda J; Avery, Danielle T; Ma, Cindy S; Moens, Leen; Deenick, Elissa K; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Arkwright, Peter D; Bacchetta, Rosa; Bezrodnik, Liliana; Dadi, Harjit; Roifman, Chaim M; Fulcher, David A; Ziegler, John B; Smart, Joanne M; Kobayashi, Masao; Picard, Capucine; Durandy, Anne; Cook, Matthew C; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Uzel, Gulbu; Tangye, Stuart G

    2013-12-01

    B-cell responses are guided by the integration of signals through the B-cell receptor (BCR), CD40, and cytokine receptors. The common γ chain (γc)-binding cytokine interleukin (IL)-21 drives humoral immune responses via STAT3-dependent induction of transcription factors required for plasma cell generation. We investigated additional mechanisms by which IL-21/STAT3 signaling modulates human B-cell responses by studying patients with STAT3 mutations. IL-21 strongly induced CD25 (IL-2Rα) in normal, but not STAT3-deficient, CD40L-stimulated naïve B cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed IL2RA as a direct target of STAT3. IL-21-induced CD25 expression was also impaired on B cells from patients with IL2RG or IL21R mutations, confirming a requirement for intact IL-21R signaling in this process. IL-2 increased plasmablast generation and immunoglobulin secretion from normal, but not CD25-deficient, naïve B cells stimulated with CD40L/IL-21. IL-2 and IL-21 were produced by T follicular helper cells, and neutralizing both cytokines abolished the B-cell helper capacity of these cells. Our results demonstrate that IL-21, via STAT3, sensitizes B cells to the stimulatory effects of IL-2. Thus, IL-2 may play an adjunctive role in IL-21-induced B-cell differentiation. Lack of this secondary effect of IL-21 may amplify the humoral immunodeficiency in patients with mutations in STAT3, IL2RG, or IL21R due to impaired responsiveness to IL-21. PMID:24159173

  8. Steroid receptor RNA activator: Biologic function and role in disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chan; Wu, Hong-Tao; Zhu, Neng; Shi, Ya-Ning; Liu, Zheng; Ao, Bao-Xue; Liao, Duan-Fang; Zheng, Xi-Long; Qin, Li

    2016-08-01

    Steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) is a type of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) which coordinates the functions of various transcription factors, enhances steroid receptor-dependent gene expression, and also serves as a distinct scaffold. The novel, profound and expanded roles of SRA are emerging in critical aspects of coactivation of nuclear receptors (NRs). As a nuclear receptor coactivator, SRA can coactivate androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor α (ERα), ERβ, progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thyroid hormone receptor and retinoic acid receptor (RAR). Although SRA is one of the least well-understood molecules, increasing studies have revealed that SRA plays a key role in both biological processes, such as myogenesis and steroidogenesis, and pathological changes, including obesity, cardiomyopathy, and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the SRA-related signaling pathways, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), Notch and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) pathways, play critical roles in the pathogenesis of estrogen-dependent breast cancers. In addition, the most recent data demonstrates that SRA expression may serve as a new prognostic marker in patients with ER-positive breast cancer. Thus, elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying SRA-mediated functions is important to develop proper novel strategies to target SRA in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. PMID:27282881

  9. Functional role, structure, and evolution of the melanocortin-4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Schiöth, Helgi B; Lagerström, Malin C; Watanobe, Hajime; Jonsson, Logi; Vergoni, Anna Valeria; Ringholm, Aneta; Skarphedinsson, Jon O; Skuladottir, Gudrun V; Klovins, Janis; Fredriksson, Robert

    2003-06-01

    The melanocortin (MC)-4 receptor participates in regulating body weight homeostasis. We demonstrated early that acute blockage of the MC-4 receptor increases food intake and relieves anorexic conditions in rats. Our recent studies show that 4-week chronic blockage of the MC-4 receptor leads to robust increases in food intake and development of obesity, whereas stimulation of the receptor leads to anorexia. Interestingly, the food conversion ratio was clearly increased by MC-4 receptor blockage, whereas it was decreased in agonist-treated rats in a transient manner. Chronic infusion of an agonist caused a transient increase in oxygen consumption. Our studies also show that the MC-4 receptor plays a role in luteinizing hormone and prolactin surges in female rats. The MC-4 receptor has a role in mediating the effects of leptin on these surges. The phylogenetic relation of the MC-4 receptor to other GPCRs in the human genome was determined. The three-dimensional structure of the protein was studied by construction of a high-affinity zinc binding site between the helices, using two histidine residues facing each other. We also cloned the MC-4 receptor from evolutionary important species and showed by chromosomal mapping a conserved synteny between humans and zebrafish. The MC-4 receptor has been remarkably conserved in structure and pharmacology for more than 400 million years, implying that the receptor participated in vital physiological functions early in vertebrate evolution. PMID:12851300

  10. Modulation of opioid receptor function by protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Alfaras-Melainis, Konstantinos; Gomes, Ivone; Rozenfeld, Raphael; Zachariou, Venetia; Devi, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Opioid receptors, MORP, DORP and KORP, belong to the family A of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR), and have been found to modulate a large number of physiological functions, including mood, stress, appetite, nociception and immune responses. Exogenously applied opioid alkaloids produce analgesia, hedonia and addiction. Addiction is linked to alterations in function and responsiveness of all three opioid receptors in the brain. Over the last few years, a large number of studies identified protein-protein interactions that play an essential role in opioid receptor function and responsiveness. Here, we summarize interactions shown to affect receptor biogenesis and trafficking, as well as those affecting signal transduction events following receptor activation. This article also examines protein interactions modulating the rate of receptor endocytosis and degradation, events that play a major role in opiate analgesia. Like several other GPCRs, opioid receptors may form homo or heterodimers. The last part of this review summarizes recent knowledge on proteins known to affect opioid receptor dimerization. PMID:19273296

  11. Human T lymphocytes express N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors functionally active in controlling T cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Miglio, Gianluca; Varsaldi, Federica; Lombardi, Grazia . E-mail: lombardi@pharm.unipmn.it

    2005-12-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and the functional role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in human T cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that human resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and Jurkat T cells express genes encoding for both NR1 and NR2B subunits: phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated PBL also expresses both these genes and the NR2A and NR2D genes. Cytofluorimetric analysis showed that NR1 expression increases as a consequence of PHA (10 {mu}g/ml) treatment. D-(-)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5), and (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine [(+)-MK 801], competitive and non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists, respectively, inhibited PHA-induced T cell proliferation, whereas they did not affect IL-2 (10 U/ml)-induced proliferation of PHA blasts. These effects were due to the prevention of T cell activation (inhibition of cell aggregate formation and CD25 expression), but not to cell cycle arrest or death. These results demonstrate that human T lymphocytes express NMDA receptors, which are functionally active in controlling cell activation.

  12. Protocol of the adaptive study of IL-2 dose frequency on regulatory T cells in type 1 diabetes (DILfrequency): a mechanistic, non-randomised, repeat dose, open-label, response-adaptive study

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Lucy A; Pekalski, Marcin L; Kareclas, Paula; Evangelou, Marina; Walker, Neil M; Howlett, James; Mander, Adrian P; Kennet, Jane; Wicker, Linda S; Bond, Simon; Todd, John A; Waldron-Lynch, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β cells in the pancreatic islets, leading to insulinopenia and hyperglycaemia. Genetic analyses indicate that alterations of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) pathway mediating immune activation and tolerance predispose to T1D, specifically the polymorphic expression of the IL-2 receptor-α chain (CD25) on T lymphocytes. Replacement of physiological doses of IL-2 could restore self-tolerance and prevent further autoimmunity by enhancing the function of CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) to limit the activation of auto reactive T effector cells (Teffs). In this experimental medicine study, we use an adaptive trial design to determine the optimal dosing regimen for IL-2 to improve Treg function while limiting activation of Teffs in participants with T1D. Methods and analysis The Adaptive study of IL-2 dose frequency on Tregs in type 1 diabetes(DILfrequency) is a mechanistic, non-randomised, repeat dose open-label, response-adaptive study of 36 participants with T1D. The objective is to establish the optimal dose and frequency of ultra-low dose IL-2: to increase Treg frequency within the physiological range, to increase CD25 expression on Tregs, without increasing CD4+ Teffs. DILfrequency has an initial learning phase where 12 participants are allocated to six different doses and frequencies followed by an interim statistical analysis. After analysis of the learning phase, the Dose and Frequency Committee will select the optimal targets for Treg frequency, Treg CD25 expression and Teff frequency. Three groups of eight participants will be treated consecutively in the confirming phase. Each dose and frequency selected will be based on statistical analysis of all data collected from the previous groups. Ethics Ethical approval for DILfrequency was granted on 12 August 2014. Results The results of this study will be reported, through peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and

  13. Intracellular trafficking of a tagged and functional mammalian olfactory receptor.

    PubMed

    Ivic, Lidija; Zhang, Cen; Zhang, Xinmin; Yoon, Sung Ok; Firestein, Stuart

    2002-01-01

    Tagged G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been used to facilitate intracellular visualization of these receptors. We have used a combination of adenoviral vector gene transfer and tagged olfactory receptors to help visualize mammalian olfactory receptor proteins in the normal olfactory epithelium of rats, and in cell culture. Three recombinant adenoviral vectors were generated carrying variously tagged versions of rat olfactory receptor I7. The constructs include an N-terminal Flag epitope tag (Flag:I7), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion protein (EGFP:I7), and a C-terminal EGFP fusion (I7:EGFP). These receptor constructs were assayed in rat olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and in a heterologous system (HEK 293 cell line) for protein localization and functional expression. Functional expression of the tagged receptor proteins was tested by electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings in the infected rat olfactory epithelium, and by calcium imaging in single cells. Our results demonstrate that the I7:EGFP fusion protein and Flag:I7 are functionally expressed in OSNs while the EGFP:I7 fusion is not, probably due to inappropriate processing of the protein in the cells. These data suggest that a small epitope tag (Flag) at the N-terminus, or EGFP located at the C-terminus of the receptor, does not affect ligand binding or downstream signaling. In addition, both functional fusion proteins (Flag:I7 and I7:EGFP) are properly targeted to the plasma membrane of HEK 293 cells. PMID:11748633

  14. Antigen receptor signaling: integration of protein tyrosine kinase functions.

    PubMed

    Tamir, I; Cambier, J C

    1998-09-17

    Antigen receptors on T and B cells function to transduce signals leading to a variety of biologic responses minimally including antigen receptor editing, apoptotic death, developmental progression, cell activation, proliferation and survival. The response to antigen depends upon antigen affinity and valence, involvement of coreceptors in signaling and differentiative stage of the responding cell. The requirement that these receptors integrate signals that drive an array of responses may explain their evolved structural complexity. Antigen receptors are composed of multiple subunits compartmentalized to provide antigen recognition and signal transduction function. In lieu of on-board enzymatic activity these receptors rely on associated Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) for their signaling function. By aggregating the receptors, and hence their appended PTKs, antigens induce PTK transphosphorylation, activating them to phosphorylate the receptor within conserved motifs termed Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motifs (ITAMs) found in transducer subunits. The tyrosyl phosphorylated ITAMs then interact with Src Homology 2 (SH2) domains within the PTKs leading to their further activation. As receptor phosphorylation is amplified, other effectors, such as Shc, dock by virtue of SH2 binding, and serve, in-turn, as substrates for these PTKs. This sequence of events not only provides a signal amplification mechanism by combining multiple consecutive steps with positive feedback, but also allows for signal diversification by differential recruitment of effectors that provide access to distinct parallel downstream signaling pathways. The subject of antigen receptor signaling has been recently reviewed in depth (DeFranco, 1997; Kurosaki, 1997). Here we discuss the biochemical basis of antigen receptor signal transduction, using the B cell receptor (BCR) as a paradigm, with specific emphasis on the involved PTKs. We review several specific mechanisms by which responses

  15. Effects of p56lck deficiency on the growth and cytolytic effector function of an interleukin-2-dependent cytotoxic T-cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Karnitz, L; Sutor, S L; Torigoe, T; Reed, J C; Bell, M P; McKean, D J; Leibson, P J; Abraham, R T

    1992-01-01

    The growth, differentiation, and functional activities of antigen-stimulated T lymphocytes are regulated by the interaction of the T-cell-derived cytokine, interleukin-2 (IL-2), with the high-affinity IL-2 receptor (IL-2R). IL-2R occupancy initiates a rapid increase in intracellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting that a receptor-coupled protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) serves as a proximal signaling element for the IL-2R. Previous studies implicated the src-family kinase, p56lck, as a potential IL-2R-linked signal transducer. In this study, we have characterized a spontaneous variant of the IL-2-dependent cytotoxic T-cell line, CTLL-2, which contains no detectable lck-derived mRNA transcripts, protein, or PTK activity. The p56lck-deficient CTLL-2 cells retained strict dependence on IL-2 for both viability and growth, indicating that p56lck activity was not required for the transduction of IL-2-mediated mitogenic signals. However, the p56lck-deficient cells exhibited a moderate decrease in their rate of IL-2-dependent proliferation. In contrast to this relatively modest proliferative defect, the p56lck-deficient cell line displayed a profound reduction in T-cell antigen receptor-dependent cytolytic effector functions. Both the proliferative and the cytolytic defects observed in the p56lck-deficient cells were completely reversed by transfection of these cells with a wild-type lck expression vector. These results indicate that p56lck expression is not obligatory for IL-2-mediated T-cell growth stimulation; however, this PTK plays a central role in the generation T-cell-mediated cytotoxic responses. Images PMID:1406641

  16. Topological and Functional Characterization of an Insect Gustatory Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui-Jie; Anderson, Alisha R.; Trowell, Stephen C.; Luo, A-Rong; Xiang, Zhong-Huai; Xia, Qing-You

    2011-01-01

    Insect gustatory receptors are predicted to have a seven-transmembrane structure and are distantly related to insect olfactory receptors, which have an inverted topology compared with G-protein coupled receptors, including mammalian olfactory receptors. In contrast, the topology of insect gustatory receptors remains unknown. Except for a few examples from Drosophila, the specificity of individual insect gustatory receptors is also unknown. In this study, the total number of identified gustatory receptors in Bombyx mori was expanded from 65 to 69. BmGr8, a silkmoth gustatory receptor from the sugar receptor subfamily, was expressed in insect cells. Membrane topology studies on BmGr8 indicate that, like insect olfactory receptors, it has an inverted topology relative to G protein-coupled receptors. An orphan GR from the bitter receptor family, BmGr53, yielded similar results. We infer, from the finding that two distantly related BmGrs have an intracellular N-terminus and an odd number of transmembrane spans, that this is likely to be a general topology for all insect gustatory receptors. We also show that BmGr8 functions independently in Sf9 cells and responds in a concentration-dependent manner to the polyalcohols myo-inositol and epi-inositol but not to a range of mono- and di-saccharides. BmGr8 is the first chemoreceptor shown to respond specifically to inositol, an important or essential nutrient for some Lepidoptera. The selectivity of BmGr8 responses is consistent with the known responses of one of the gustatory receptor neurons in the lateral styloconic sensilla of B. mori, which responds to myo-inositol and epi-inositol but not to allo-inositol. PMID:21912618

  17. Expression and function of ryanodine receptors in nonexcitable cells.

    PubMed

    Bennett, D L; Cheek, T R; Berridge, M J; De Smedt, H; Parys, J B; Missiaen, L; Bootman, M D

    1996-03-15

    We have used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to investigate the expression of ryanodine receptors in several excitable and nonexcitable cell types. Consistent with previous reports, we detected ryanodine receptor expression in brain, heart, and skeletal muscle. In addition, we detected ryanodine receptor expression in various other excitable cells including PC 12 and A7r5 cells. Several muscle cell lines (BC3H1, C2C12, L6, and Sol8) weakly expressed ryanodine receptor when undifferentiated but strongly expressed type 1 and type 3 ryanodine receptor isoforms when differentiated into a muscle phenotype. Only 2 (HeLa and LLC-PK1 cells) out of 11 nonexcitable cell types examined expressed ryanodine receptors. Expression of ryanodine receptors at the protein level in these cells was confirmed using [3H]ryanodine binding. We also investigated the function of ryanodine receptors in Ca2+ signaling in HeLa cells using single-cell Fura-2 imaging. Neither caffeine nor ryanodine caused a detectable elevation of cytoplasmic Ca2+ in single HeLa cells. However, ryanodine caused a significant decrease in the amplitude of Ca 2+ signals evoked by repetitive stimulation with ATP. These studies show that ryanodine receptors are expressed in some nonexcitable cell types and furthermore suggest that the ryanodine receptors may be involved in a subtle regulation of intracellular Ca2+ responses. PMID:8626432

  18. Steroid receptors and their ligands: Effects on male gamete functions

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, Saveria; De Amicis, Francesca

    2014-11-01

    In recent years a new picture of human sperm biology is emerging. It is now widely recognized that sperm contain nuclear encoded mRNA, mitochondrial encoded RNA and different transcription factors including steroid receptors, while in the past sperm were considered incapable of transcription and translation. One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. Expression studies on Progesterone Receptor, estrogen receptor, androgen receptor and their specific ligands, demonstrate the presence of these systems in mature spermatozoa as surface but also as nuclear conventional receptors, suggesting that both systemic and local steroid hormones, through sperm receptors, may influence male reproduction. However, the relationship between the signaling events modulated by steroid hormones and sperm fertilization potential as well as the possible involvement of the specific receptors are still controversial issues. The main line of this review highlights the current research in human sperm biology examining new molecular systems of response to the hormones as well as specific regulatory pathways controlling sperm cell fate and biological functions. Most significant studies regarding the identification of steroid receptors are reported and the mechanistic insights relative to signaling pathways, together with the change in sperm metabolism energy influenced by steroid hormones are discussed.The reviewed evidences suggest important effects of Progesterone, Estrogen and Testosterone and their receptors on spermatozoa and implicate the involvement of both systemic and local steroid action in the regulation of male fertility potential. - Highlights: • One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. • Pg/PR co-work to stimulate enzymatic activities to sustain a capacitation process. • E2/ERs regulate sperm motility, capacitation and acrosome reaction and act as survival factors. • Androgens

  19. Interleukin-2 enhances the response of natural killer cells to interleukin-12 through up-regulation of the interleukin-12 receptor and STAT4.

    PubMed

    Wang, K S; Frank, D A; Ritz, J

    2000-05-15

    Interleukin (IL)-12 plays a critical role in modulating the activities of natural killer (NK) cells and T lymphocytes. In animal models, IL-12 has potent antitumor effects that are likely mediated by its ability to enhance the cytotoxic activity of NK cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and to induce the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma by NK and T cells. In addition to IL-12, NK cells are responsive to IL-2, and may mediate some of the antitumor effects of IL-2. In this study, we examine the interaction between IL-2 and the signaling events induced by IL-12 in NK cells. We find that IL-2 not only up-regulates the expression of IL-12Rbeta1 and IL-12Rbeta2, it also plays an important role in up-regulating and maintaining the expression of STAT4, a critical STAT protein involved in IL-12 signaling in NK cells. In contrast to the effects of IL-2 alone, expression of IL-12 receptors and STAT4 are unaffected or decreased by IL-12 or the combination of IL-2 and IL-12. Through expression of high levels of IL-12 receptors and STAT4, IL-2-primed NK cells show enhanced functional responses to IL-12 as measured by IFN-gamma production and the killing of target cells. NK cells from cancer patients who received low-dose IL-2 treatment also exhibited increased expression of IL-12 receptor chains, suggesting that IL-2 may enhance the response to IL-12 in vivo. These findings provide a molecular framework to understand the interaction between IL-2 and IL-12 in NK cells, and suggest strategies for improving the effectiveness of these cytokines in the immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:10807786

  20. Immunotherapy of cancer using local administration of lymphoid cells transformed by IL-2 cDNA and constitutively producing IL-2.

    PubMed

    Bubeník, J; Símová, J; Jandlová, T

    1990-02-01

    Peritumoral administration of X63-m-IL-2 cells transformed by IL-2 cDNA and constitutively producing large quantities of recombinant IL-2 mediated regression of X63-Ag8.653 plasmocytoma and MC14 sarcoma transplanted in syngeneic mice. Injections of the IL-2-producing cells containing an inserted, modified IL-2 gene effectively inhibited tumour growth also in allogeneic recipients. Activation of murine spleen cells in vitro by co-cultivation with X63-m-IL-2 cells gave rise to lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell populations cytotoxic for the X63-Ag8.653 plasmocytoma and MC14 sarcoma. The results suggest that peritumoral administration of lymphoid cells transformed with IL-2 cDNA and constitutively producing IL-2 in the immediate tumour vicinity is sufficient for the effective activation of local IL-2-dependent tumour defence mechanisms and, therefore, can be considered a novel, genetic approach to the immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:2347603

  1. IL2RA/CD25 Gene Polymorphisms: Uneven Association with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)

    PubMed Central

    Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, María; Ndagire, Dorothy; Fernández, Oscar; Leyva, Laura; Guerrero, Miguel; Abad-Grau, María M.; Arnal, Carmen; Delgado, Concepción; Lucas, Miguel; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Matesanz, Fuencisla

    2009-01-01

    Background IL-2 receptor (IL2R) alpha is the specific component of the high affinity IL2R system involved in the immune response and in the control of autoimmunity. Methods and Results Here we perform a replication and fine mapping of the IL2RA gene region analyzing 3 SNPs previously associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 5 SNPs associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in a collection of 798 MS patients and 927 matched Caucasian controls from the south of Spain. We observed association with MS in 6 of 8 SNPs. The rs1570538, at the 3′- UTR extreme of the gene, previously reported to have a weak association with MS, is replicated here (P = 0.032). The most associated T1D SNP (rs41295061) was not associated with MS in the present study. However, the rs35285258, belonging to another independent group of SNPs associated with T1D, showed the maximal association in this study but different risk allele. We replicated the association of only one (rs2104286) of the two IL2RA SNPs identified in the recently performed genome-wide association study of MS. Conclusions These findings confirm and extend the association of this gene with MS and reveal a genetic heterogeneity of the associated polymorphisms and risk alleles between MS and T1D suggesting different immunopathological roles of IL2RA in these two diseases. PMID:19125193

  2. Structural features for functional selectivity at serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Chong; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Huang, Xi-Ping; Vardy, Eyal; McCorvy, John D; Jiang, Yi; Chu, Meihua; Siu, Fai Yiu; Liu, Wei; Xu, H Eric; Cherezov, Vadim; Roth, Bryan L; Stevens, Raymond C

    2013-05-01

    Drugs active at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can differentially modulate either canonical or noncanonical signaling pathways via a phenomenon known as functional selectivity or biased signaling. We report biochemical studies showing that the hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide, its precursor ergotamine (ERG), and related ergolines display strong functional selectivity for β-arrestin signaling at the 5-HT2B 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor, whereas they are relatively unbiased at the 5-HT1B receptor. To investigate the structural basis for biased signaling, we determined the crystal structure of the human 5-HT2B receptor bound to ERG and compared it with the 5-HT1B/ERG structure. Given the relatively poor understanding of GPCR structure and function to date, insight into different GPCR signaling pathways is important to better understand both adverse and favorable therapeutic activities. PMID:23519215

  3. Functions of the extracellular histidine residues of receptor activity-modifying proteins vary within adrenomedullin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Kato, Johji

    2008-12-05

    Receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP)-2 and -3 chaperone calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to the plasma membrane, where together they form heterodimeric adrenomedullin (AM) receptors. We investigated the contributions made by His residues situated in the RAMP extracellular domain to AM receptor trafficking and receptor signaling by co-expressing hCRLR and V5-tagged-hRAMP2 or -3 mutants in which a His residue was substituted with Ala in HEK-293 cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that hRAMP2-H71A mediated normal hCRLR surface delivery, but the resultant heterodimers showed significantly diminished [{sup 125}I]AM binding and AM-evoked cAMP production. Expression of hRAMP2-H124A and -H127A impaired surface delivery of hCRLR, which impaired or abolishing AM binding and receptor signaling. Although hRAMP3-H97A mediated full surface delivery of hCRLR, the resultant heterodimers showed impaired AM binding and signaling. Other His residues appeared uninvolved in hCRLR-related functions. Thus, the His residues of hRAMP2 and -3 differentially govern AM receptor function.

  4. Functional Insights from Glutamate Receptor Ion Channel Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Janesh; Mayer, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystal structures for the soluble amino terminal and ligand binding domains of glutamate receptor ion channels, combined with a 3.6 Å resolution structure of the full length AMPA receptor GluA2 homotetramer, provide unique insights into the mechanisms of iGluR assembly and function. Increasingly sophisticated biochemical, computational and electrophysiological experiments are beginning to reveal the mechanism of action of partial agonists, and yield new models for the mechanism of action of allosteric modulators. Newly identified NMDA receptor ligands acting at novel sites offer hope for development of subtype selective modulators. Many issues remain unsolved, including the role of the ATD in AMPA receptor signaling, and the mechanisms by which auxiliary proteins regulate receptor activity. The structural basis for ion permeation and ion channel block also remain areas of uncertainty, and despite substantial progress, molecular dynamics simulations have yet to reveal how binding of glutamate opens the ion channel pore. PMID:22974439

  5. The shared and contrasting roles of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-15 in the life and death of normal and neoplastic lymphocytes: implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Waldmann, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL2) and IL15, members of the 4α-helix bundle family of cytokines, play pivotal roles in the control of the life and death of lymphocytes. Although their heterotrimeric receptors have two receptor subunits in common these two cytokines have contrasting roles in adaptive immune responses. The unique role of IL2 through maintenance of fitness of regulatory T cells (Treg) and activation-induced cell death (AICD) is the elimination of self-reactive T cells to prevent autoimmunity. In contrast to IL2, IL15 is dedicated to the prolonged maintenance of memory T-cell responses to invading pathogens. Blockade of IL2 and IL15 using monoclonal antibodies has been reported to be of value in the treatment of patients with leukemia, autoimmune disorders and in the prevention of allograft rejection. IL2 has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of patients with malignant renal cell cancer and metastatic malignant melanoma. Clinical trials involving recombinant human IL15 given by bolus infusions have been completed, and by subcutaneous and continuous intravenous infusions are underway in patients with metastatic malignancy. Furthermore, clinical trials are being initiated that employ the combination of IL15 with IL15Rα+/− IgFc. PMID:25736261

  6. Beyond the cell surface: new mechanisms of receptor function.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2010-05-21

    The text book view of cell surface receptors depicts them at the top of a vertical chain of command that starts with ligand binding and proceeds in a lineal fashion towards the cell nucleus. Although pedagogically useful, this view is incomplete and recent findings suggest that the extracellular domain of cell surface receptors can be a transmitter as much as a receiver in intercellular communication. GFRalpha1 is a GPI-anchored receptor for GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor), a neuronal growth factor with widespread functions in the developing and adult nervous system. GFRalpha1 partners with transmembrane proteins, such as the receptor tyrosine kinase RET or the cell adhesion molecule NCAM, for intracellular transmission of the GDNF signal. In addition to this canonical role, GFRalpha1 can also engage in horizontal interactions and thereby modify the function of other cell surface components. GFRalpha1 can also function as a ligand-induced adhesion cell molecule, mediating homophilic cell-cell interactions in response to GDNF. Finally, GFRalpha1 can also be released from the cell surface and act at a distance as a soluble factor together with its ligand. This plethora of unconventional mechanisms is likely to be a feature common to several other receptors and considerably expands our view of cell surface receptor function. PMID:20494105

  7. Modulation of ionotropic glutamate receptor function by vertebrate galectins

    PubMed Central

    Copits, Bryan A; Vernon, Claire G; Sakai, Ryuichi; Swanson, Geoffrey T

    2014-01-01

    AMPA and kainate receptors are glutamate-gated ion channels whose function is known to be altered by a variety of plant oligosaccharide-binding proteins, or lectins, but the physiological relevance of this activity has been uncertain because no lectins with analogous allosteric modulatory effects have been identified in animals. We report here that members of the prototype galectin family, which are β-galactoside-binding lectins, exhibit subunit-specific allosteric modulation of desensitization of recombinant homomeric and heteromeric AMPA and kainate receptors. Galectin modulation of GluK2 kainate receptors was dependent upon complex oligosaccharide processing of N-glycosylation sites in the amino-terminal domain and downstream linker region. The sensitivity of GluA4 AMPA receptors to human galectin-1 could be enhanced by supplementation of culture media with uridine and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), precursors for the hexosamine pathway that supplies UDP-GlcNAc for synthesis of complex oligosaccharides. Neuronal kainate receptors in dorsal root ganglia were sensitive to galectin modulation, whereas AMPA receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons were insensitive, which could be a reflection of differential N-glycan processing or receptor subunit selectivity. Because glycan content of integral proteins can be modified dynamically, we postulate that physiological or pathological conditions in the CNS could arise in which galectins alter excitatory neurotransmission or neuronal excitability through their actions on AMPA or kainate receptors. PMID:24614744

  8. Functional Profiling of 2-Aminopyrimidine Histamine H4 Receptor Modulators.

    PubMed

    Tichenor, Mark S; Thurmond, Robin L; Venable, Jennifer D; Savall, Brad M

    2015-09-24

    Histamine is an important endogenous signaling molecule that is involved in a number of physiological processes including allergic reactions, gastric acid secretion, neurotransmitter release, and inflammation. The biological effects of histamine are mediated by four histamine receptors with distinct functions and distribution profiles (H1-H4). The most recently discovered histamine receptor (H4) has emerged as a promising drug target for treating inflammatory diseases. A detailed understanding of the role of the H4 receptor in human disease remains elusive, in part because low sequence similarity between the human and rodent H4 receptors complicates the translation of preclinical pharmacology to humans. This review provides an overview of H4 drug discovery programs that have studied cross-species structure-activity relationships, with a focus on the functional profiling of the 2-aminopyrimidine chemotype that has advanced to the clinic for allergy, atopic dermatitis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25993395

  9. Hairless is a nuclear receptor corepressor essential for skin function

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    The activity of nuclear receptors is modulated by numerous coregulatory factors. Corepressors can either mediate the ability of nuclear receptors to repress transcription, or can inhibit transactivation by nuclear receptors. As we learn more about the mechanisms of transcriptional repression, the importance of repression by nuclear receptors in development and disease has become clear. The protein encoded by the mammalian Hairless (Hr) gene was shown to be a corepressor by virtue of its functional similarity to the well-established corepressors N-CoR and SMRT. Mutation of the Hr gene results in congenital hair loss in both mice and men. Investigation of Hairless function both in vitro and in mouse models in vivo has revealed a critical role in maintaining skin and hair by regulating the differentiation of epithelial stem cells, as well as a putative role in regulating gene expression via chromatin remodeling. PMID:20087431

  10. Functional somatostatin receptors on a rat pancreatic acinar cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Viguerie, N.; Tahiri-Jouti, N.; Esteve, J.P.; Clerc, P.; Logsdon, C.; Svoboda, M.; Susini, C.; Vaysse, N.; Ribet, A. Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, San Francisco, CA Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels )

    1988-07-01

    Somatostatin receptors from a rat pancreatic acinar cell line, AR4-2J, were characterized biochemically, structurally, and functionally. Binding of {sup 125}I-(Tyr{sup 11})Somatostatin to AR4-2J cells was saturable, exhibiting a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a maximal binding capacity of 258 {plus minus} 20 fmol/10{sup 6} cells. Somatostatin receptor structure was analyzed by covalently cross-linking {sup 125}I-(Tyr{sup 11})somatostatin to its plasma membrane receptors. Gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of cross-linked proteins revealed a peptide containing the somatostatin receptor. Somatostatin inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-stimulated adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) formation in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of somatostatin that caused half-maximal inhibition of cAMP formation was close to the receptor affinity for somatostatin. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of AR4-2J cells prevented somatostatin inhibition of VIP-stimulated cAMP formation as well as somatostatin binding. The authors conclude that AR4-2J cells exhibit functional somatostatin receptors that retain both specificity and affinity of the pancreatic acinar cell somatostatin receptors and act via the pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein N{sub i} to inhibit adenylate cyclase.

  11. Nuclear receptors CAR and PXR: Molecular, functional, and biomedical aspects.

    PubMed

    di Masi, Alessandra; De Marinis, Elisabetta; Ascenzi, Paolo; Marino, Maria

    2009-10-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors sharing a common evolutionary history and having similar sequence features at the protein level. Selective ligand(s) for some NRs is not known, therefore these NRs have been named "orphan receptors". Whenever ligands have been recognized for any of the orphan receptor, it has been categorized and grouped as "adopted" orphan receptor. This group includes the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR). They function as sensors of toxic byproducts derived from endogenous metabolites and of exogenous chemicals, in order to enhance their elimination. This unique function of CAR and PXR sets them apart from the steroid hormone receptors. The broad response profile has established that CAR and PXR are xenobiotic sensors that coordinately regulate xenobiotic clearance in the liver and intestine via induction of genes involved in drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In the past few years, research has revealed new and mostly unsuspected roles for CAR and PXR in modulating hormone, lipid, and energy homeostasis as well as cancer and liver steatosis. The purpose of this review is to highlight the structural and molecular bases of CAR and PXR impact on human health, providing information on mechanisms through which diet, chemical exposure, and environment ultimately impact health and disease. PMID:19427329

  12. Insights from the Study of Animals Lacking Functional Estrogen Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korach, Kenneth S.

    1994-12-01

    Estrogen hormones produce physiological actions within a variety of target sites in the body and during development by activating a specific receptor protein. Hormone responsiveness for the estrogen receptor protein was investigated at different stages of development with the use of gene knockout techniques because no natural genetic mutants have been described. A mutant mouse line without a functional estrogen receptor was created and is being used to assess estrogen responsiveness. Both sexes of these mutant animals are infertile and show a variety of phenotypic changes, some of which are associated with the gonads, mammary glands, reproductive tracts, and skeletal tissues.

  13. Functional expression of purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential channels by the human urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Shabir, Saqib; Cross, William; Kirkwood, Lisa A.; Pearson, Joanna F.; Appleby, Peter A.; Walker, Dawn; Eardley, Ian

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its role as a physical barrier, the urothelium is considered to play an active role in mechanosensation. A key mechanism is the release of transient mediators that activate purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to effect changes in intracellular Ca2+. Despite the implied importance of these receptors and channels in urothelial tissue homeostasis and dysfunctional bladder disease, little is known about their functional expression by the human urothelium. To evaluate the expression and function of P2X and P2Y receptors and TRP channels, the human ureter and bladder were used to separate urothelial and stromal tissues for RNA isolation and cell culture. RT-PCR using stringently designed primer sets was used to establish which P2 and TRP species were expressed at the transcript level, and selective agonists/antagonists were used to confirm functional expression by monitoring changes in intracellular Ca2+ and in a scratch repair assay. The results confirmed the functional expression of P2Y4 receptors and excluded nonexpressed receptors/channels (P2X1, P2X3, P2X6, P2Y6, P2Y11, TRPV5, and TRPM8), while a dearth of specific agonists confounded the functional validation of expressed P2X2, P2X4, P2Y1, P2Y2, TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV6 and TRPM7 receptors/channels. Although a conventional response was elicited in control stromal-derived cells, the urothelial cell response to well-characterized TRPV1 and TRPV4 agonists/antagonists revealed unexpected anomalies. In addition, agonists that invoked an increase in intracellular Ca2+ promoted urothelial scratch repair, presumably through the release of ATP. The study raises important questions about the ligand selectivity of receptor/channel targets expressed by the urothelium. These pathways are important in urothelial tissue homeostasis, and this opens the possibility of selective drug targeting. PMID:23720349

  14. Effect of A-63162 on lymphocyte proliferation, IL-2 production, mRNA for Il-2 and LTB sub 4 production from human mononuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Atluru, D.; Atluru, S. ); Woloschak, G.E. )

    1991-03-15

    Lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid have diversified effects on human lymphocytes. In the present investigation, the authors measured the effects of A-63162, a specific 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor on lymphocyte proliferation, IL-2 production, mRNA for IL-2 and LTB{sub 4} synthesis from peripheral blood human mononuclear cells. A-63162 inhibited the {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation from PHA or PMA plus A23187 stimulated cultures. The synthesis of IL-2 was also inhibited from PHA plus PMA or PMA plus A23187 stimulated cultures. Further, they found A-63162 also inhibited the accumulation of IL-2 mRNA. And, A-63162 at that above concentration also inhibited the LTB{sub 4} synthesis from A23187 stimulated cultures. The results suggest that endogenous LTB{sub 4} may play an important role in regulating IL-2 production at the message level.

  15. Diverse voltage-sensitive dyes modulate GABAA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Mennerick, Steven; Chisari, Mariangela; Shu, Hong-Jin; Taylor, Amanda; Vasek, Michael; Eisenman, Lawrence N.; Zorumski, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs) are important tools for assessing network and single-cell excitability, but an untested premise in most cases is that the dyes do not interfere with the parameters (membrane potential, excitability) that they are designed to measure. We found that popular members of several different families of voltage-sensitive dyes modulate GABAA receptor with maximum efficacy and potency similar to clinically used GABAA receptor modulators. Di-4-ANEPPS and DiBAC4(3) potentiated GABA function with micromolar and high nanomolar potency respectively and yielded strong maximum effects similar to barbiturates and neurosteroids. Newer blue oxonols had biphasic effects on GABAA receptor function at nanomolar and micromolar concentrations, with maximum potentiation comparable to that of saturating benzodiazepine effects. ANNINE 6 and ANNINE 6plus had no detectable effect on GABAA receptor function. Even dyes with no activity on GABAA receptors at baseline induced photodynamic enhancement of GABAA receptors. The basal effects of dyes were sufficient to prolong IPSCs and to dampen network activity in multielectrode array recordings. Therefore, the dual effects of voltage-sensitive dyes on GABAergic inhibition require caution in dye use for studies of excitability and network activity. PMID:20181584

  16. Desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors and neuronal functions.

    PubMed

    Gainetdinov, Raul R; Premont, Richard T; Bohn, Laura M; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Caron, Marc G

    2004-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have proven to be the most highly favorable class of drug targets in modern pharmacology. Over 90% of nonsensory GPCRs are expressed in the brain, where they play important roles in numerous neuronal functions. GPCRs can be desensitized following activation by agonists by becoming phosphorylated by members of the family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Phosphorylated receptors are then bound by arrestins, which prevent further stimulation of G proteins and downstream signaling pathways. Discussed in this review are recent progress in understanding basics of GPCR desensitization, novel functional roles, patterns of brain expression, and receptor specificity of GRKs and beta arrestins in major brain functions. In particular, screening of genetically modified mice lacking individual GRKs or beta arrestins for alterations in behavioral and biochemical responses to cocaine and morphine has revealed a functional specificity in dopamine and mu-opioid receptor regulation of locomotion and analgesia. An important and specific role of GRKs and beta arrestins in regulating physiological responsiveness to psychostimulants and morphine suggests potential involvement of these molecules in certain brain disorders, such as addiction, Parkinson's disease, mood disorders, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, the utility of a pharmacological strategy aimed at targeting this GPCR desensitization machinery to regulate brain functions can be envisaged. PMID:15217328

  17. The immune system during the pre-cancer and the early cancer period. IL-2 production by PBL from post-menopausal women with and without endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yron, I; Schickler, M; Fisch, B; Pinkas, H; Ovadia, J; Witz, I P

    1986-09-15

    We report on alterations in IL-2 production and cell proliferation following PHA stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from stage-I endometrial carcinoma (EC) patients, and on mechanisms involved in these alterations. Our study includes 3 groups: EC patients, post-menopausal women at high risk of developing EC, and age-matched healthy women. IL-2 production was markedly lower in most EC patients than in healthy controls. Varying levels of IL-2 were produced by PBL from women in the high-risk group. The proliferative response of PBL to PHA appeared to correlate with levels of IL-2 production. Our results suggest that macrophages are involved, in part, in the modulation of T-cell functions of EC patients. PMID:3488968

  18. Heteromeric MT1/MT2 Melatonin Receptors Modulate Photoreceptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Kenkichi; Benleulmi-Chaachoua, Abla; Journé, Anne-Sophie; Kamal, Maud; Guillaume, Jean-Luc; Dussaud, Sébastien; Gbahou, Florence; Yettou, Katia; Liu, Cuimei; Contreras-Alcantara, Susana; Jockers, Ralf; Tosini, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    The formation of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromers elicits signaling diversification and holds great promise for improved drug selectivity. Most studies have been conducted in heterologous expression systems; however, in vivo validation is missing from most cases thus questioning the physiological significance of GPCR heteromerization. Melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors have been shown to exist as homo- and heteromers in vitro. We show here that the effect of melatonin on rod photoreceptor light sensitivity is mediated by melatonin MT1/MT2 receptor heteromers. This effect involves activation of the heteromer-specific PLC/PKC pathway and is abolished in MT1−/− and MT2−/− mice as well as in mice overexpressing a non-functional MT2 receptor mutant that competes with the formation of functional MT1/MT2 heteromers in photoreceptor cells. This study establishes the essential role of melatonin receptor heteromers in retinal function and supports the physiological importance of GPCR heteromerization. Finally, our work may have important therapeutic implications, as the heteromer complex may provide a unique pharmacological target to improve photoreceptor functioning and to extend the viability of photoreceptors during aging. PMID:24106342

  19. Nuclear receptor corepressor complexes in cancer: mechanism, function and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Madeline M; Guo, Chun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) and silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) function as corepressors for diverse transcription factors including nuclear receptors such as estrogen receptors and androgen receptors. Deregulated functions of NCoR and SMRT have been observed in many types of cancers and leukemias. NCoR and SMRT directly bind to transcription factors and nucleate the formation of stable complexes that include histone deacetylase 3, transducin b-like protein 1/TBL1-related protein 1, and G-protein pathway suppressor 2. These NCoR/SMRT-interacting proteins also show deregulated functions in cancers. In this review, we summarize the literature on the mechanism, regulation, and function of the core components of NCoR/SMRT complexes in the context of their involvement in cancers and leukemias. While the current studies support the view that the corepressors are promising targets for cancer treatment, elucidation of the mechanisms of corepressors involved in individual types of cancers is likely required for effective therapy. PMID:25374920

  20. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  1. Roles of subunit phosphorylation in regulating glutamate receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, John Q.; Guo, Ming-Lei; Jin, Dao-Zhong; Xue, Bing; Fibuch, Eugene E.; Mao, Li-Min

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important mechanism for regulating ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). Early studies have established that major iGluR subtypes, including α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, are subject to phosphorylation. Multiple serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues predominantly within the C-terminal regions of AMPA receptor and NMDA receptor subunits have been identified as sensitive phosphorylation sites. These distinct sites undergo either constitutive phosphorylation or activity-dependent phosphorylation induced by changing cellular and synaptic inputs as reversible events. An increasing number of synapse-enriched protein kinases have been found to phosphorylate iGluR. The common kinases include protein kinase A, protein kinase C, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, Src/Fyn non-receptor tyrosine kinases, and cyclin dependent kinase-5. Regulated phosphorylation plays a well-documented role in modulating the biochemical, biophysical, and functional properties of the receptor. In the future, identifying the precise mechanisms how phosphorylation regulates iGluR activities and finding the link between iGluR phosphorylation and the pathogenesis of various brain diseases, including psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, chronic pain, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and substance addiction, will be hot topics and could contribute to the development of novel pharmacotherapies, by targeting the defined phosphorylation process, for suppressing iGluR-related disorders. PMID:24291102

  2. Regulation of Vascular and Renal Function by Metabolite Receptors.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kishore, Bellamkonda K; Pluznick, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    To maintain metabolic homeostasis, the body must be able to monitor the concentration of a large number of substances, including metabolites, in real time and to use that information to regulate the activities of different metabolic pathways. Such regulation is achieved by the presence of sensors, termed metabolite receptors, in various tissues and cells of the body, which in turn convey the information to appropriate regulatory or positive or negative feedback systems. In this review, we cover the unique roles of metabolite receptors in renal and vascular function. These receptors play a wide variety of important roles in maintaining various aspects of homeostasis-from salt and water balance to metabolism-by sensing metabolites from a wide variety of sources. We discuss the role of metabolite sensors in sensing metabolites generated locally, metabolites generated at distant tissues or organs, or even metabolites generated by resident microbes. Metabolite receptors are also involved in various pathophysiological conditions and are being recognized as potential targets for new drugs. By highlighting three receptor families-(a) citric acid cycle intermediate receptors, (b) purinergic receptors, and PMID:26667077

  3. Functional CB1 cannabinoid receptors in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Gao, B; Mirshahi, F; Sanyal, A J; Khanolkar, A D; Makriyannis, A; Kunos, G

    2000-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA was detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in endothelial cells from human aorta and hepatic artery and in the ECV304 cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CB1 receptor-binding sites were detected by the high-affinity antagonist radioligand [(125)I]AM-251. In ECV304 cells, both the highly potent synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU-210 and the endogenous ligand anandamide induce activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and the effect of HU-210 was completely blocked, whereas the effect of anandamide was partially inhibited by SR141716A, a selective CB1 receptor antagonist. Transfection of ECV304 cells with CB1 receptor antisense, but not sense, oligonucleotides caused the same pattern of inhibition as SR141716A. This provides more definitive evidence for the involvement of CB1 receptors in MAP kinase activation and suggests that anandamide may also activate MAP kinase via an additional, CB1 receptor-independent, SR141716A-resistant mechanism. The MAP kinase activation by anandamide in ECV304 cells requires genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C (PKC), and anandamide also activates p38 kinase and c-Jun kinase. These findings indicate that CB1 receptors located in human vascular endothelium are functionally coupled to the MAP kinase cascade. Activation of protein kinase cascades by anandamide may be involved in the modulation of endothelial cell growth and proliferation. PMID:10698714

  4. The D3 dopamine receptor: From structural interactions to function.

    PubMed

    Fiorentini, Chiara; Savoia, Paola; Bono, Federica; Tallarico, Paola; Missale, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Novel structural and functional aspects of the dopamine (DA) D3 receptors (D3R) have been recently described. D3R expressed in dopaminergic neurons have been classically considered to play the role of autoreceptors inhibiting, as the D2R, DA release. However, evidence for D3R-mediated neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects on DA neurons suggests their involvement in preventing pathological alterations leading to neurodegeneration. On the other hand, given its localization and functional role at postsynaptic striatal levels, the D3R may also be involved in the pathogenesis of movement disorders and psychiatric diseases. Functional interactions of D3R with other receptor systems are crucial for the modulation of several physiological events. On this line, the discovery that the D3R can form heteromers with other receptors has opened the possibility of uncover novel molecular mechanisms of brain functions and dysfunctions. This paper summarizes the functional and physical interactions of D3R with other receptors both at pre-synaptic sites, where it is co-expressed with the D2R and nicotinic receptors, and at post-synaptic sites where it interacts with the DA D1 receptors (D1R). The biochemical and functional properties of the D1R-D3R heteromer will be especially discussed. Both D1R and D3R have been in fact implicated in several disorders, including schizophrenia and motor dysfunctions. Therefore, the D1R-D3R heteromer may represent a potential drug target for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:25532864

  5. Evidence of the importance of the first intracellular loop of prokineticin receptor 2 in receptor function.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Ana Paula; Noel, Sekoni D; Xu, Shuyun; Carroll, Rona S; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2012-08-01

    Prokineticin receptors (PROKR) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) that regulate diverse biological processes, including olfactory bulb neurogenesis and GnRH neuronal migration. Mutations in PROKR2 have been described in patients with varying degrees of GnRH deficiency and are located in diverse functional domains of the receptor. Our goal was to determine whether variants in the first intracellular loop (ICL1) of PROKR2 (R80C, R85C, and R85H) identified in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism interfere with receptor function and to elucidate the mechanisms of these effects. Because of structural homology among GPCR, clarification of the role of ICL1 in PROKR2 activity may contribute to a better understanding of this domain across other GPCR. The effects of the ICL1 PROKR2 mutations on activation of signal transduction pathways, ligand binding, and receptor expression were evaluated. Our results indicated that the R85C and R85H PROKR2 mutations interfere only modestly with receptor function, whereas the R80C PROKR2 mutation leads to a marked reduction in receptor activity. Cotransfection of wild-type (WT) and R80C PROKR2 showed that the R80C mutant could exert a dominant negative effect on WT PROKR2 in vitro by interfering with WT receptor expression. In summary, we have shown the importance of Arg80 in ICL1 for PROKR2 expression and demonstrate that R80C PROKR2 exerts a dominant negative effect on WT PROKR2. PMID:22745195

  6. Evidence of the Importance of the First Intracellular Loop of Prokineticin Receptor 2 in Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Ana Paula; Noel, Sekoni D.; Xu, Shuyun; Carroll, Rona S.; Latronico, Ana Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Prokineticin receptors (PROKR) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) that regulate diverse biological processes, including olfactory bulb neurogenesis and GnRH neuronal migration. Mutations in PROKR2 have been described in patients with varying degrees of GnRH deficiency and are located in diverse functional domains of the receptor. Our goal was to determine whether variants in the first intracellular loop (ICL1) of PROKR2 (R80C, R85C, and R85H) identified in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism interfere with receptor function and to elucidate the mechanisms of these effects. Because of structural homology among GPCR, clarification of the role of ICL1 in PROKR2 activity may contribute to a better understanding of this domain across other GPCR. The effects of the ICL1 PROKR2 mutations on activation of signal transduction pathways, ligand binding, and receptor expression were evaluated. Our results indicated that the R85C and R85H PROKR2 mutations interfere only modestly with receptor function, whereas the R80C PROKR2 mutation leads to a marked reduction in receptor activity. Cotransfection of wild-type (WT) and R80C PROKR2 showed that the R80C mutant could exert a dominant negative effect on WT PROKR2 in vitro by interfering with WT receptor expression. In summary, we have shown the importance of Arg80 in ICL1 for PROKR2 expression and demonstrate that R80C PROKR2 exerts a dominant negative effect on WT PROKR2. PMID:22745195

  7. Dynamic Regulation of the GABAA Receptor Function by Redox Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Daniel J; González, Andrea N Beltrán

    2016-09-01

    Oxidizing and reducing agents, which are currently involved in cell metabolism and signaling pathways, can regulate fast inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by GABA receptors in the nervous system. A number of in vitro studies have shown that diverse redox compounds, including redox metabolites and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, modulate phasic and tonic responses mediated by neuronal GABAA receptors through both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. We review experimental data showing that many redox agents, which are normally present in neurons and glia or are endogenously generated in these cells under physiologic states or during oxidative stress (e.g., hydrogen peroxide, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, nitric oxide, ascorbic acid, and glutathione), induce potentiating or inhibiting actions on different native and recombinant GABAA receptor subtypes. Based on these results, it is thought that redox signaling might represent a homeostatic mechanism that regulates the function of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in physiologic and pathologic conditions. PMID:27439531

  8. Cell-free expression of functional receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Scharadin, Tiffany M.; Saldana, Matthew; Gellner, Candice; Hoang-Phou, Steven; Takanishi, Christina; Hura, Gregory L.; Tainer, John A; Carraway III, Kermit L.; Henderson, Paul T.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play critical roles in physiological and pathological processes, and are important anticancer drug targets. In vitro mechanistic and drug discovery studies of full-length RTKs require protein that is both fully functional and free from contaminating proteins. Here we describe a rapid cell-free and detergent-free co-translation method for producing full-length and functional ERBB2 and EGFR receptor tyrosine kinases supported by water-soluble apolipoprotein A-I based nanolipoprotein particles. PMID:26274523

  9. Multiple human D sub 5 dopamine receptor genes: A functional receptor and two pseudogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Grandy, D.K.; Yuan Zhang; Bouvier, C.; Qunyong Zhou; Johnson, R.A.; Allen, L.; Buck, K.; Bunzow, J.R.; Salon, J.; Civelli, O. )

    1991-10-15

    Three genes closely related to the D{sub 1} dopamine receptor were identified in the human genome. One of the genes lacks introns and encodes a functional human dopamine receptor, D{sub 5}, whose deduced amino acid sequence is 49% identical to that of the human D{sub 1} receptor. Compared with the human D{sub 1} dopamine receptor, the D{sub 5} receptor displayed a higher affinity for dopamine and was able to stimulate a biphasic rather than a monophasic intracellular accumulation of cAMP. Neither of the other two genes was able to direct the synthesis of a receptor. nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that these two genes are 98% identical to each other and 95% identical to the D{sub 5} sequence. Relative to the D{sub 5} sequence, both contain insertions and deletions that result in several in-frame termination codons. Premature termination of translation is the most likely explanation for the failure of these genes to produce receptors in COS-7 and 293 cells even though their messages are transcribed. The authors conclude that the two are pseudogenes. Blot hybridization experiments performed on rat genomic DNA suggest that there is one D{sub 5} gene in this species and that the pseudogenes may be the result of a relatively recent evolutionary event.

  10. Linking Functional Domains of the Human Insulin Receptor with the Bacterial Aspartate Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Leland; Morgan, David O.; Koshland, Daniel E.; Clauser, Eric; Moe, Gregory R.; Bollag, Gideon; Roth, Richard A.; Rutter, William J.

    1986-11-01

    A hybrid receptor has been constructed that is composed of the extracellular domain of the human insulin receptor fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the bacterial aspartate chemoreceptor. This hybrid protein can be expressed in rodent (CHO) cells and displays several functional features comparable to wild-type insulin receptor. It is localized to the cell surface, binds insulin with high affinity, forms oligomers, and is recognized by conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies. Although most of the expressed protein accumulates as a 180-kDa proreceptor, some processed 135-kDa receptor can be detected on the cell surface by covalent cross-linking. Expression of the hybrid receptor inhibits the insulin-activated uptake of 2-deoxyglucose by CHO cells. Thus, this hybrid is partially functional and can be processed; however, it is incapable of native transmembrane signaling. The results indicate that the intact domains of different types of receptors can retain some of the native features in a hybrid molecule but specific requirements will need to be satisfied for transmembrane signaling.

  11. In vitro evaluation of the effects of perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on IL-2 production in human T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Midgett, Kristin; Peden-Adams, Margie M.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds, such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), have been shown to alter various immune functions suggesting they are immunotoxic. This study assessed the effects of PFOS and PFOA on interleukin (IL)-2 production in the human Jurkat T-cell line and PFOS in healthy human primary T cells. Jurkat cells were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA)/phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), anti CD-3/anti CD-28, or anti CD-3, and dosed with 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 50, 75, or 100 μg ml−1 PFOS or 0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, or 10 μg ml−1 PFOA. Jurkat cells stimulated with PHA/PMA or anti CD-3 exhibited decreased IL-2 production beginning at 50 μg PFOS ml−1 and 5 μg PFOS ml−1 respectively, but stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 resulted in no changes compared with the control. Addition of the PPAR-alpha antagonist GW6471 to PFOS-dosed cells stimulated with PHA/PMA resulted in decreases in IL-2 production starting at 50 μg PFOS ml−1, which suggests PFOS affected T-cell IL-2 production via PPAR-alpha-independent mechanisms. Exposure to PFOA, PFOA + GW6471, or PFOS + PFOA in Jurkat cells resulted in no significant differences in IL-2 production. In vitro dosing studies using healthy primary human CD4+ T cells were consistent with the Jurkat results. These data demonstrated that PFOA did not impact IL-2 production, but PFOS suppressed IL-2 production in both a human cell line and human primary cells at dose levels within the high end of the human exposure range. A decrease in IL-2 production is characteristic of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and should be further investigated. PMID:25056757

  12. Scavenger Receptor Structure and Function in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Zani, Izma; Stephen, Sam L.; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Russell, David; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptors (SRs) are a ‘superfamily’ of membrane-bound receptors that were initially thought to bind and internalize modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL), though it is currently known to bind to a variety of ligands including endogenous proteins and pathogens. New family of SRs and their properties have been identified in recent years, and have now been classified into 10 eukaryote families, defined as Classes A-J. These receptors are classified according to their sequences, although in each class they are further classified based in the variations of the sequence. Their ability to bind a range of ligands is reflected on the biological functions such as clearance of modified lipoproteins and pathogens. SR members regulate pathophysiological states including atherosclerosis, pathogen infections, immune surveillance, and cancer. Here, we review our current understanding of SR structure and function implicated in health and disease. PMID:26010753

  13. Challenges and developing solutions for increasing the benefits of IL-2 treatment in tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Skrombolas, Denise; Frelinger, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a cytokine with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Systemic IL-2 treatment has produced durable responses in melanoma and renal cancer patients, but unfortunately this is effective only in a fraction of patients. Moreover, IL-2 treatment also engenders serious side effects, which limit its clinical utility. It is now appreciated that IL-2 not only stimulates NK and effector T cells but also has a critical role in the generation and maintenance of regulatory T cells, which act to dampen immune responses. Thus, successful immunotherapy of cancers using IL-2 has to address two fundamentally important issues: (1) how to limit side effects yet be active where it is needed, and (2) how to preferentially activate effector T cells while limiting the stimulation of Tregs. Strategies are now being developed to address these critical obstacles that may lead to a renaissance of IL-2 therapy. PMID:24410537

  14. Functional characterization of muscarinic receptors in murine airways.

    PubMed Central

    Garssen, J.; Van Loveren, H.; Gierveld, C. M.; Van der Vliet, H.; Nijkamp, F. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists considered to be selective for M1 receptors (pirenzepine; PZ), M2 receptors (AFDX-116), and for M3 receptors (4-diphenyl acetoxy N-methyl-piperidine (4-DAMP)) were used to investigate the existence of muscarinic receptors subtypes in murine airways. Atropine was used as a nonselective antagonist. The effects of these antagonists were studied upon tracheal contractions induced either by EFS (electric field stimulation) or by application of an exogenous cholinoceptor agonist (arecoline). 2. The muscarinic receptor antagonists tested inhibited arecoline-induced tracheal contractions with the following rank order of potency: 4-DAMP = atropine > pirenzepine = AFDX-116. The rank order of potency of the muscarinic antagonists used in inhibiting EFS-induced tracheal contractions was: 4-DAMP = atropine > PZ > AFDX-116. The pA2 values for these antagonists were similar when compared to the pA2 values determined in guinea-pig and bovine airway smooth muscle. 3. In addition to in vitro studies, the effects of inhalation of the different muscarinic antagonists on lung function parameters in vivo were investigated. Inhalation of 4-DAMP induced a decrease in airway resistance and an increase in lung compliance. In contrast, inhalation of AFDX-116 induced an increase in airway resistance and almost no change in lung compliance. Apart from some minor effects of atropine on airway resistance, atropine, PZ, and pilocarpine failed to induce changes in lung mechanics as determined by in vivo lung function measurements. 4. The results provide evidence for the existence of M3 receptors on murine tracheae that are involved in the contraction of tracheal smooth muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8495246

  15. Structure and function of serotonin G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    McCorvy, John D; Roth, Bryan L

    2015-06-01

    Serotonin receptors are prevalent throughout the nervous system and the periphery, and remain one of the most lucrative and promising drug discovery targets for disorders ranging from migraine headaches to neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. There are 14 distinct serotonin receptors, of which 13 are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are targets for approximately 40% of the approved medicines. Recent crystallographic and biochemical evidence has provided a converging understanding of the basic structure and functional mechanics of GPCR activation. Currently, two GPCR crystal structures exist for the serotonin family, the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptor, with the antimigraine and valvulopathic drug ergotamine bound. The first serotonin crystal structures not only provide the first evidence of serotonin receptor topography but also provide mechanistic explanations into functional selectivity or biased agonism. This review will detail the findings of these crystal structures from a molecular and mutagenesis perspective for driving rational drug design for novel therapeutics incorporating biased signaling. PMID:25601315

  16. Structural and Functional Diversity of Estrogen Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Amjad

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptors, comprised of ERα and ERβ isoforms in mammals, act as ligand-modulated transcription factors and orchestrate a plethora of cellular functions from sexual development and reproduction to metabolic homeostasis. Herein, I revisit the structural basis of the binding of ERα to DNA and estradiol in light of the recent discoveries and emerging trends in the field of nuclear receptors. A particular emphasis of this review is on the chemical and structural diversity of an ever-increasing repertoire of physiological, environmental and synthetic ligands of estrogen receptors that ultimately modulate their interactions with cognate DNA located within the promoters of estrogen-responsive genes. In particular, modulation of estrogen receptors by small molecule ligands represents an important therapeutic goal toward the treatment of a wide variety of human pathologies including breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and obesity. Collectively, this article provides an overview of a wide array of small organic and inorganic molecules that can fine-tune the physiological function of estrogen receptors, thereby bearing a direct impact on human health and disease. PMID:25866274

  17. Structure and Function of Serotonin G protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McCorvy, John D.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin receptors are prevalent throughout the nervous system and the periphery, and remain one of the most lucrative and promising drug discovery targets for disorders ranging from migraine headaches to neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. There are 14 distinct serotonin receptors, of which 13 are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are targets for approximately 40% of the approved medicines. Recent crystallographic and biochemical evidence has provided a converging understanding of the basic structure and functional mechanics of GPCR activation. Currently, two GPCR crystal structures exist for the serotonin family, the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptor, with the antimigraine and valvulopathic drug ergotamine bound. The first serotonin crystal structures not only provide the first evidence of serotonin receptor topography but also provide mechanistic explanations into functional selectivity or biased agonism. This review will detail the findings of these crystal structures from a molecular and mutagenesis perspective for driving rational drug design for novel therapeutics incorporating biased signaling. PMID:25601315

  18. Inhibition of Anopheles gambiae odorant receptor function by mosquito repellents.

    PubMed

    Tsitoura, Panagiota; Koussis, Konstantinos; Iatrou, Kostas

    2015-03-20

    The identification of molecular targets of insect repellents has been a challenging task, with their effects on odorant receptors (ORs) remaining a debatable issue. Here, we describe a study on the effects of selected mosquito repellents, including the widely used repellent N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), on the function of specific ORs of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. This study, which has been based on quantitative measurements of a Ca(2+)-activated photoprotein biosensor of recombinant OR function in an insect cell-based expression platform and a sequential compound addition protocol, revealed that heteromeric OR (ORx/Orco) function was susceptible to strong inhibition by all tested mosquito repellents except DEET. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the observed inhibition was due to efficient blocking of Orco (olfactory receptor coreceptor) function. This mechanism of repellent action, which is reported for the first time, is distinct from the mode of action of other characterized insect repellents including DEET. PMID:25657000

  19. Inhibition of Anopheles gambiae Odorant Receptor Function by Mosquito Repellents*

    PubMed Central

    Tsitoura, Panagiota; Koussis, Konstantinos; Iatrou, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    The identification of molecular targets of insect repellents has been a challenging task, with their effects on odorant receptors (ORs) remaining a debatable issue. Here, we describe a study on the effects of selected mosquito repellents, including the widely used repellent N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), on the function of specific ORs of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. This study, which has been based on quantitative measurements of a Ca2+-activated photoprotein biosensor of recombinant OR function in an insect cell-based expression platform and a sequential compound addition protocol, revealed that heteromeric OR (ORx/Orco) function was susceptible to strong inhibition by all tested mosquito repellents except DEET. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the observed inhibition was due to efficient blocking of Orco (olfactory receptor coreceptor) function. This mechanism of repellent action, which is reported for the first time, is distinct from the mode of action of other characterized insect repellents including DEET. PMID:25657000

  20. Functionalized Congeners of P2Y1 Receptor Antagonists:

    SciTech Connect

    de Castro, Sonia; Maruoka, Hiroshi; Hong, Kunlun; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Costanzi, Stefano; Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    The P2Y{sub 1} receptor is a prothrombotic G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by ADP. Preference for the North (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of adenine nucleotide 3',5'-bisphosphate antagonists of the P2Y{sub 1} receptor was established by using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring as a ribose substitute. A series of covalently linkable N{sup 6}-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2'-deoxyadenosine-3',5'-bisphosphates containing extended 2-alkynyl chains was designed, and binding affinity at the human (h) P2Y{sub 1} receptor determined. The chain of these functionalized congeners contained hydrophilic moieties, a reactive substituent, or biotin, linked via an amide. Variation of the chain length and position of an intermediate amide group revealed high affinity of carboxylic congener 8 (K{sub i} 23 nM) and extended amine congener 15 (K{sub i} 132 nM), both having a 2-(1-pentynoyl) group. A biotin conjugate 18 containing an extended {epsilon}-aminocaproyl spacer chain exhibited higher affinity than a shorter biotinylated analogue. Alternatively, click coupling of terminal alkynes of homologous 2-dialkynyl nucleotide derivatives to alkyl azido groups produced triazole derivatives that bound to the P2Y{sub 1} receptor following deprotection of the bisphosphate groups. The preservation of receptor affinity of the functionalized congeners was consistent with new P2Y{sub 1} receptor modeling and ligand docking. Attempted P2Y{sub 1} antagonist conjugation to PAMAM dendrimer carriers by amide formation or palladium-catalyzed reaction between an alkyne on the dendrimer and a 2-iodopurine-derivatized nucleotide was unsuccessful. A dialkynyl intermediate containing the chain length favored in receptor binding was conjugated to an azide-derivatized dendrimer, and the conjugate inhibited ADP-promoted human platelet aggregation. This is the first example of attaching a strategically functionalized P2Y receptor antagonist to a PAMAM dendrimer to

  1. Phase I trial with recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2): immune activation by rIL-2 alone or following pretreatment with recombinant interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Farace, F; Mathiot, C; Brandely, M; Tursz, T; Dorval, T; Pouillart, P; Triebel, F; Hercend, T; Fridman, W H

    1990-01-01

    Alterations of immunological parameters were analysed in patients with advanced malignancies during a phase I trial with rIL-2. Five-day infusions of rIL-2 at doses from 1 x 10(6) to 24 x 10(6) biological response modifiers program (BRMP) U/m2 per day were given to 29 patients, with a minimum of three patients per dose. The dose of 24 x 10(6) U/m2 per day was the maximal tolerated dose (MTD). Immunological parameters were analyzed at days 0, 8 and 11 of the rIL-2 courses. Following a leucopenia during rIL-2 infusion, a lymphocytosis was found in all patients except one. The lymphocytosis peaked at day 8 and was detected at doses of rIL-2 as low as 1 x 10(6) U/m2 per day, reaching a plateau at a dose of 16 x 10(6) U/m2 per day. Although all lymphocyte subsets were increased in patients receiving rIL-2, some patients had predominant T cells (CD3+, NKH1(CD56)-), others had predominant natural killer (NK) cells (CD3-, NKH1 (CD56)+), and yet others showed a mixed profile. A strong induction of cells cytotoxic for K562 targets was found in all patients at days 8 and 11. Eighteen patients received, 1 month later, a second treatment in which infusion of rIL-2 was preceded by a course of 5 days infusion of 2 x 10(6) U/m2 per day recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma). The infusion of rIFN-gamma prior to rIL-2 had no effect on the rIL-2-induced alterations of immunological parameters. Taken together, our results suggest that immune stimulation by rIL-2 occurs even at low doses and is maximal at a dose below the MTD; and that pretreatment with low-dose rIFN-gamma does not modify the immune stimulation by rIL-2. PMID:2122928

  2. [Persistent inflammatory reaction at the injection site of Il-2 with lymphoma-like inflammatory infiltrates].

    PubMed

    Assmann, K; Nashan, D; Grabbe, S; Luger, T A; Metze, D

    2002-08-01

    Interleukin-2 (Il-2) is widely used for treatment of carcinomas, leukemia, and melanoma. Adverse drug effects of Il-2 include various systemic and generalized cutaneous drug reactions. In the following we report on a persistent inflammatory reaction at the injection site of Il-2. A patient received chemoimmuno-therapy for treatment of metastasizing melanoma, including subcutaneous application of recombinant interleukin-2 (Proleukin((R))). Within a few days reddish nodules developed at the injection sites that persisted after cessation of Il-2 injections for two years until final lethal outcome. Histologic examination revealed a lobular panniculitis expressing atypical lymphocytes and multinucleated histiocytes. PMID:12221472

  3. Solution assembly of cytokine receptor ectodomain complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zining; Ciardelli, T.L.; Johnson, K.W.

    1995-09-01

    For the majority of single transmembrane-spanning cell surface receptors, signal transmission across the lipid bilayer barrier involves several discrete components of molecular recognition. The interaction between ligand and the extracellular segment of its cognate receptor (ectodomain) initiates either homomeric or heteromeric association of receptor subunits. Specific recognition among these subunits may then occur between ectodomain regions, within the membrane by interhelical contact or inside the cell between cytoplasmic domains. Any or all of these interactions may contribute to the stability of the signaling complex. It is the characteristics of ligand binding by the ectodomains of these receptors that controls the heteromeric or homomeric nature and the stoichiometry of the complex. Cytokines and their receptors belong to a growing family of macromolecular systems that exhibit these functional features and share many structural similarities as well. Interleukin-2 is a multifunctional cytokine that represents, perhaps, the most complex example to date of ligand recognition among the hematopoietin receptor family. It is the cooperative binding of IL-2 by all three proteins on the surface of activated T-lymphocytes, however, that ultimately results in crosslinking of the {beta}- and {gamma}-subunits and signaling via association of their cytoplasmic domains. Although the high-affinity IL-2R functions as a heterotrimer, heterodimers of the receptor subunits are also physiologically important. The {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer or {open_quotes}pseudo-high affinity{close_quotes} receptor captures IL-2 as a preformed cell surface complex while the {beta}/{gamma} intermediate affinity site exists, in the absence of the {alpha} subunit, on the majority of natural killer cells. We have begun to study stable complexes of cytokine receptor ectodomains of defined composition and that mimic the ligand binding characteristics of the equivalent cell surface receptor sites.

  4. The human prostacyclin receptor from structure function to disease.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kathleen A; Gleim, Scott; Elderon, Larkin; Fetalvero, Kristina; Hwa, John

    2009-01-01

    Thirty years have passed since Vane and colleagues first described a substance, prostanoid X, from microsomal fractions (later called prostacyclin) that relaxed rather than contracted mesenteric arteries. The critical role of prostacyclin in many pathophysiological conditions, such as atherothrombosis, has only recently become appreciated (through receptor knockout mice studies, selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition clinical trials, and the discovery of dysfunctional prostacyclin receptor genetic variants). Additionally, important roles in such diverse areas as pain and inflammation, and parturition are being uncovered. Prostacyclin-based therapies, currently used for pulmonary hypertension, are accordingly emerging as possible treatments for such diseases, fueling interests in structure function studies for the receptor and signal transduction pathways in native cells. The coming decade is likely to yield many further exciting advances. PMID:20374736

  5. Dysregulation of Human Toll-like Receptor Function in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Albert C.; Panda, Alexander; Joshi, Samit R.; Qian, Feng; Allore, Heather G.; Montgomery, Ruth R.

    2010-01-01

    Studies addressing immunosenescence in the immune system have expanded to focus on the innate as well as the adaptive responses. In particular, aging results in alterations in the function of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), the first described pattern recognition receptor family of the innate immune system. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the consequences of aging on TLR function in human cohorts and add to existing findings performed in animal models. In general, these studies show that human TLR function is impaired in the context of aging, and in addition there is evidence for inappropriate persistence of TLR activation in specific systems. These findings are consistent with an overarching theme of age-associated dysregulation of TLR signaling that likely contributes to the increased morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases found in geriatric patients. PMID:21074638

  6. Alcohol Related Changes in Regulation of NMDA Receptor Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, József

    2008-01-01

    Long-term alcohol exposure may lead to development of alcohol dependence in consequence of altered neurotransmitter functions. Accumulating evidence suggests that the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type of glutamate receptors is a particularly important site of ethanol’s action. Several studies showed that ethanol potently inhibits NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and prolonged ethanol exposition leads to a compensatory “up-regulation” of NMDAR mediated functions. Therefore, alterations in NMDAR function are supposed to contribute to the development of ethanol tolerance, dependence as well as to the acute and late signs of ethanol withdrawal. A number of publications report alterations in the expression and phosphorylation states of NMDAR subunits, in their interaction with scaffolding proteins or other receptors in consequence of chronic ethanol treatment. Our knowledge on the regulatory processes, which modulate NMDAR functions including factors altering transcription, protein expression and post-translational modifications of NMDAR subunits, as well as those influencing their interactions with different regulatory proteins or other downstream signaling elements are incessantly increasing. The aim of this review is to summarize the complex chain of events supposedly playing a role in the up-regulation of NMDAR functions in consequence of chronic ethanol exposure. PMID:19305787

  7. N-glycans of growth factor receptors: their role in receptor function and disease implications.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Motoko; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Gao, Congxiao; Kuroki, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Numerous signal-transduction-related molecules are secreted proteins or membrane proteins, and the mechanism by which these molecules are regulated by glycan chains is a very important issue for developing an understanding of the cellular events that transpire. This review covers the functional regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), ErbB3 and the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor by N-glycans. This review shows that the N-glycans play important roles in regulating protein conformation and interactions with carbohydrate recognition molecules. These results point to the possibility of a novel strategy for controlling cell signalling and developing novel glycan-based therapeutics. PMID:27612953

  8. From IL-2 to IL-37: the expanding spectrum of anti-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Banchereau, Jacques; Pascual, Virginia; O'Garra, Anne

    2012-10-01

    Feedback regulatory circuits provided by regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) and suppressive cytokines are an intrinsic part of the immune system, along with effector functions. Here we discuss some of the regulatory cytokines that have evolved to permit tolerance to components of self as well as the eradication of pathogens with minimal collateral damage to the host. Interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) are well characterized, whereas IL-27, IL-35 and IL-37 represent newcomers to the spectrum of anti-inflammatory cytokines. We also emphasize how information accumulated through in vitro as well as in vivo studies of genetically engineered mice can help in the understanding and treatment of human diseases. PMID:22990890

  9. Anticancer Cytokines: Biology and Clinical Effects of IFN-α2, IL-2, IL-15, IL-21, and IL-12

    PubMed Central

    Floros, Theofanis; Tarhini, Ahmad A.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts over nearly four decades have focused on ways to use cytokines to manipulate the host immune response towards cancer cell recognition and eradication. Significant advances were achieved with interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-α (IFN-α), primarily in the treatment of patients with melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. However, the utility of other cytokines showing promise in the preclinical setting has not been established largely because of toxicity, the complex functionality of each cytokine and the difficulty mimicking in preclinical models the human environment. In this paper we will review the basic biology and the clinical experiences with IFN-α, IL-2, IL-15, IL-21 and IL-12. We will also review ongoing clinical trials and discuss future directions including potential use of cytokines in combination with other effective immunotherapy approaches which have come of age in recent years. PMID:26320059

  10. Selective modulation of wild type receptor functions by mutants of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Le Gouill, C; Parent, J L; Caron, C A; Gaudreau, R; Volkov, L; Rola-Pleszczynski, M; Stanková, J

    1999-04-30

    Members of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family are involved in most aspects of higher eukaryote biology, and mutations in their coding sequence have been linked to several diseases. In the present study, we report that mutant GPCR can affect the functional properties of the co-expressed wild type (WT) receptor. Mutants of the human platelet-activating factor receptor that fail to show any detectable ligand binding (N285I and K298stop) or coupling to a G-protein (D63N, D289A, and Y293A) were co-expressed with the WT receptor in Chinese hamster ovary and COS-7 cells. In this context, N285I and K298stop mutant receptors inhibited 3H-WEB2086 binding and surface expression. Co-transfection with D63N resulted in a constitutively active receptor phenotype. Platelet-activating factor-induced inositol phosphate production in cells transfected with a 1:1 ratio of WT:D63N was higher than with the WT cDNA alone but was abolished with a 1:3 ratio. We confirmed that these findings could be extended to other GPCRs by showing that co-expression of the WT C-C chemokine receptor 2b with a carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant (K311stop), resulted in a decreased affinity and responsiveness to MCP-1. A better understanding of this phenomenon could lead to important tools for the prevention or treatment of certain diseases. PMID:10212233

  11. Structural and Functional Attributes of the Interleukin-36 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guanghui; Ybe, Joel A; Saha, Siddhartha S; Caviness, Gary; Raymond, Ernest; Ganesan, Rajkumar; Mbow, M Lamine; Kao, C Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Signal transduction by the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R) is linked to several human diseases. However, the structure and function of the IL-36R is not well understood. A molecular model of the IL-36R complex was generated and a cell-based reporter assay was established to assess the signal transduction of recombinant subunits of the IL-36R. Mutational analyses and functional assays have identified residues of the receptor subunit IL-1Rrp2 needed for cytokine recognition, stable protein expression, disulfide bond formation and glycosylation that are critical for signal transduction. We also observed that, overexpression of ectodomain (ECD) of Il-1Rrp2 or IL-1RAcP exhibited dominant-negative effect on IL-36R signaling. The presence of IL-36 cytokine significantly increased the interaction of IL-1Rrp2 ECD with the co-receptor IL-1RAcP. Finally, we found that single nucleotide polymorphism A471T in the Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain (TIR) of the IL-1Rrp2 that is present in ∼2% of the human population, down-regulated IL-36R signaling by a decrease of interaction with IL-1RAcP. PMID:27307043

  12. Proteolytic cleavage, trafficking, and functions of nuclear receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Kuang; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-10-01

    Intracellular localization has been reported for over three-quarters of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) families in response to environmental stimuli. Internalized RTK may bind to non-canonical substrates and affect various cellular processes. Many of the intracellular RTKs exist as fragmented forms that are generated by γ-secretase cleavage of the full-length receptor, shedding, alternative splicing, or alternative translation initiation. Soluble RTK fragments are stabilized and intracellularly transported into subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, by binding to chaperone or transcription factors, while membrane-bound RTKs (full-length or truncated) are transported from the plasma membrane to the ER through the well-established Rab- or clathrin adaptor protein-coated vesicle retrograde trafficking pathways. Subsequent nuclear transport of membrane-bound RTK may occur via two pathways, INFS or INTERNET, with the former characterized by release of receptors from the ER into the cytosol and the latter characterized by release of membrane-bound receptor from the ER into the nucleoplasm through the inner nuclear membrane. Although most non-canonical intracellular RTK signaling is related to transcriptional regulation, there may be other functions that have yet to be discovered. In this review, we summarize the proteolytic processing, intracellular trafficking and nuclear functions of RTKs, and discuss how they promote cancer progression, and their clinical implications. PMID:26096795

  13. Endogenous retinoid X receptors can function as hormone receptors in pituitary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, K D; Berrodin, T J; Stelmach, J E; Winkler, J D; Lazar, M A

    1994-01-01

    Retinoids regulate gene transcription by interacting with both retinoic acid (RA) receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Since unliganded RXRs can act as heterodimerization partners for RARs and other nuclear hormone receptors, it is unclear whether ligand binding by RXRs actually regulates the expression of naturally occurring genes. To address this issue, we synthesized the RXR-selective retinoid SR11237 and confirmed its specificity in transient transfection and proteolytic susceptibility assays before using it to assess the contribution of ligand-activated RXRs to retinoid action. Unlike RAR ligands, SR11237 did not increase endogenous RAR beta mRNA levels in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, even though it activated transcription of an RXR-responsive reporter gene in these cells. Thus, it is likely that RARs mediate the induction of RAR beta gene expression by RA. In contrast, the RXR-specific ligand induced rat growth hormone mRNA in GH3 pituitary cells, indicating that the effects of RA on growth hormone gene expression at least in part involve ligand binding to endogenous RXRs in vivo. Our results indicate that in addition to serving as cofactors for other nuclear hormone receptors, endogenous RXRs can function as ligand-dependent regulators of gene expression, i.e., classical nuclear hormone receptors. Images PMID:7935425

  14. IL-2 therapy promotes suppressive ICOS+ Treg expansion in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Geok Choo; Martin-Orozco, Natalia; Jin, Lei; Yang, Yan; Wu, Sheng; Washington, Edwina; Sanders, Deborah; Lacey, Carol; Wang, Yijun; Vence, Luis; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2013-01-01

    High-dose (HD) IL-2 therapy in patients with cancer increases the general population of Tregs, which are positive for CD4, CD25, and the Treg-specific marker Foxp3. It is unknown whether specific subsets of Tregs are activated and expanded during HD IL-2 therapy or whether activation of any particular Treg subset correlates with clinical outcome. Here, we evaluated Treg population subsets that were induced in patients with melanoma following HD IL-2 therapy. We identified a Treg population that was positive for CD4, CD25, Foxp3, and the inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS). This Treg population increased more than any other lymphocyte subset during HD IL-2 therapy and had an activated Treg phenotype, as indicated by high levels of CD39, CD73, and TGF-β. ICOS+ Tregs were the most proliferative lymphocyte population in the blood after IL-2 therapy. Patients with melanoma with enhanced expansion of ICOS+ Tregs in blood following the first cycle of HD IL-2 therapy had worse clinical outcomes than patients with fewer ICOS+ Tregs. However, there was no difference in total Treg expansion between HD IL-2 responders and nonresponders. These data suggest that increased expansion of the ICOS+ Treg population following the first cycle of HD IL-2 therapy may be predictive of clinical outcome. PMID:24292706

  15. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B. Alex; Jetten, Anton M.; Austin, Christopher, P.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR. PMID:23562765

  16. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR. PMID:23562765

  17. The orexin 1 receptor modulates kappa opioid receptor function via a JNK-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James D; McDonald, Patricia H

    2015-07-01

    The orexin 1 receptor (OX1R) and the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) are two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) previously demonstrated to play important roles in modulating the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine. Using cells heterologously expressing both receptors, we investigated whether OX1R can regulate the function of KOR and vice versa. Activation of OX1R was found to attenuate agonist-activated KOR-mediated inhibition of cAMP production. In contrast, agonist-activated KOR-mediated β-arrestin recruitment and p38 activation were enhanced in the presence of activated OX1R. These effects are independent of OX1R internalization but are blocked in the presence of the JNK inhibitor SP-600125. OX1R signaling does not affect ligand binding by KOR. Taken together, these data suggest that OX1R signaling can modulate KOR function in a JNK-dependent manner, promoting preferential signaling of KOR via β-arrestin/p38 rather than Gαi. Conversely, Gαq coupling of OX1R is unaffected by activation of KOR, suggesting that this crosstalk is unidirectional. Given that KOR Gαi-mediated signaling events and β-arrestin-mediated signaling events are thought to promote distinct cellular responses and physiological outcomes downstream of KOR activation, this mechanism may have important implications on the behavioral effects of KOR activity. PMID:25857454

  18. Structural and Functional Similarity of Amphibian Constitutive Androstane Receptor with Mammalian Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mathäs, Marianne; Burk, Oliver; Gödtel-Armbrust, Ute; Herlyn, Holger; Wojnowski, Leszek; Windshügel, Björn

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptors and xenosensors constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) and pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) induce the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters, which also affects various endobiotics. While human and mouse CAR feature a high basal activity and low induction upon ligand exposure, we recently identified two constitutive androstane receptors in Xenopus laevis (xlCARα and β) that possess PXR-like characteristics such as low basal activity and activation in response to structurally diverse compounds. Using a set of complementary computational and biochemical approaches we provide evidence for xlCARα being the structural and functional counterpart of mammalian PXR. A three-dimensional model of the xlCARα ligand-binding domain (LBD) reveals a human PXR-like L-shaped ligand binding pocket with a larger volume than the binding pockets in human and murine CAR. The shape and amino acid composition of the ligand-binding pocket of xlCAR suggests PXR-like binding of chemically diverse ligands which was confirmed by biochemical methods. Similarly to PXR, xlCARα possesses a flexible helix 11’. Modest increase in the recruitment of coactivator PGC-1α may contribute to the enhanced basal activity of three gain-of-function xlCARα mutants humanizing key LBD amino acid residues. xlCARα and PXR appear to constitute an example of convergent evolution. PMID:24797902

  19. The Emergence of NMDA Receptor Metabotropic Function: Insights from Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dore, Kim; Aow, Jonathan; Malinow, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The NMDA receptor (R) participates in many important physiological and pathological processes. For example, its activation is required for both long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission, cellular models of learning and memory. Furthermore, it may play a role in the actions of amyloid-beta on synapses as well as in the signaling leading to cell death following stroke. Until recently, these processes were thought to be mediated by ion-flux through the receptor. Using a combination of imaging and electrophysiological approaches, ion-flux independent functions of the NMDAR were recently examined. In this review, we will discuss the role of metabotropic NMDAR function in LTD and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:27516738

  20. The Emergence of NMDA Receptor Metabotropic Function: Insights from Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dore, Kim; Aow, Jonathan; Malinow, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The NMDA receptor (R) participates in many important physiological and pathological processes. For example, its activation is required for both long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission, cellular models of learning and memory. Furthermore, it may play a role in the actions of amyloid-beta on synapses as well as in the signaling leading to cell death following stroke. Until recently, these processes were thought to be mediated by ion-flux through the receptor. Using a combination of imaging and electrophysiological approaches, ion-flux independent functions of the NMDAR were recently examined. In this review, we will discuss the role of metabotropic NMDAR function in LTD and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:27516738

  1. Assembly and Function of the Precursor B-Cell Receptor.

    PubMed

    Übelhart, Rudolf; Werner, Markus; Jumaa, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    During early stages of development, precursor B lymphocytes express a characteristic type of antigen receptor known as the pre-B-cell receptor (pre-BCR). This receptor differs from conventional BCRs in that it possesses a germ line-encoded surrogate light chain (SLC), which is associated with the signal transduction machinery via heavy chain (HC) proteins that have been generated by productive rearrangement of the immunoglobulin HC genes. The pre-BCR marks a key step of B-cell commitment, as it activates the B-cell-specific signaling cascade and mediates the selection, expansion, and differentiation of cells expressing a productively rearranged HC protein. Another difference between the pre-BCR and conventional BCR might be the initial event that triggers receptor activation, as the pre-BCR is activated in the absence of external ligands, while conventional BCRs require antigen for activation. Nonetheless, the pre-BCR downstream signaling cascade is largely similar to that of the BCR suggesting that the characteristic LC of the pre-BCR mediates important receptor interactions thereby providing distinctive, germ line-encoded features to the pre-BCR. In fact, the SLC enables the pre-BCR to act as a surrogate autoreactive receptor. Here, we outline the structure and function of the pre-BCR and how the autonomous signaling capacity might be a direct consequence of pre-BCR assembly. In addition to its role in early B-cell development, we discuss how the ordered activation of downstream signaling cascades enables the pre-BCR to activate seemingly opposing cellular programs such as proliferation and differentiation. PMID:26415650

  2. Alcohol- and alcohol antagonist-sensitive human GABAA receptors: tracking δ subunit incorporation into functional receptors.

    PubMed

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W; Otis, Thomas S; Wallner, Martin

    2010-11-01

    GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) have long been a focus as targets for alcohol actions. Recent work suggests that tonic GABAergic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic δ subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs is uniquely sensitive to ethanol and enhanced at concentrations relevant for human alcohol consumption. Ethanol enhancement of recombinant α4β3δ receptors is blocked by the behavioral alcohol antagonist 8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (Ro15-4513), suggesting that EtOH/Ro15-4513-sensitive receptors mediate important behavioral alcohol actions. Here we confirm alcohol/alcohol antagonist sensitivity of α4β3δ receptors using human clones expressed in a human cell line and test the hypothesis that discrepant findings concerning the high alcohol sensitivity of these receptors are due to difficulties incorporating δ subunits into functional receptors. To track δ subunit incorporation, we used a functional tag, a single amino acid change (H68A) in a benzodiazepine binding residue in which a histidine in the δ subunit is replaced by an alanine residue found at the homologous position in γ subunits. We demonstrate that the δH68A substitution confers diazepam sensitivity to otherwise diazepam-insensitive α4β3δ receptors. The extent of enhancement of α4β3δH68A receptors by 1 μM diazepam, 30 mM EtOH, and 1 μM β-carboline-3-carboxy ethyl ester (but not 1 μM Zn(2+) block) is correlated in individual recordings, suggesting that δ subunit incorporation into recombinant GABA(A)Rs varies from cell to cell and that this variation accounts for the variable pharmacological profile. These data are consistent with the notion that δ subunit-incorporation is often incomplete in recombinant systems yet is necessary for high ethanol sensitivity, one of the features of native δ subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs. PMID:20699325

  3. Alcohol- and Alcohol Antagonist-Sensitive Human GABAA Receptors: Tracking δ Subunit Incorporation into Functional Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W.; Otis, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAARs) have long been a focus as targets for alcohol actions. Recent work suggests that tonic GABAergic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic δ subunit-containing GABAARs is uniquely sensitive to ethanol and enhanced at concentrations relevant for human alcohol consumption. Ethanol enhancement of recombinant α4β3δ receptors is blocked by the behavioral alcohol antagonist 8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (Ro15-4513), suggesting that EtOH/Ro15-4513-sensitive receptors mediate important behavioral alcohol actions. Here we confirm alcohol/alcohol antagonist sensitivity of α4β3δ receptors using human clones expressed in a human cell line and test the hypothesis that discrepant findings concerning the high alcohol sensitivity of these receptors are due to difficulties incorporating δ subunits into functional receptors. To track δ subunit incorporation, we used a functional tag, a single amino acid change (H68A) in a benzodiazepine binding residue in which a histidine in the δ subunit is replaced by an alanine residue found at the homologous position in γ subunits. We demonstrate that the δH68A substitution confers diazepam sensitivity to otherwise diazepam-insensitive α4β3δ receptors. The extent of enhancement of α4β3δH68A receptors by 1 μM diazepam, 30 mM EtOH, and 1 μM β-carboline-3-carboxy ethyl ester (but not 1 μM Zn2+ block) is correlated in individual recordings, suggesting that δ subunit incorporation into recombinant GABAARs varies from cell to cell and that this variation accounts for the variable pharmacological profile. These data are consistent with the notion that δ subunit-incorporation is often incomplete in recombinant systems yet is necessary for high ethanol sensitivity, one of the features of native δ subunit-containing GABAARs. PMID:20699325

  4. Design of chimeric antigen receptors with integrated controllable transient functions.

    PubMed

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Marechal, Alan; Filhol, Jean-Marie; Valton, Julien; Duclert, Aymeric; Poirot, Laurent; Duchateau, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The ability to control T cells engineered to permanently express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a key feature to improve safety. Here, we describe the development of a new CAR architecture with an integrated switch-on system that permits to control the CAR T-cell function. This system offers the advantage of a transient CAR T-cell for safety while letting open the possibility of multiple cytotoxicity cycles using a small molecule drug. PMID:26750734

  5. IL-2 production by intestinal lamina propria cells in normal inflamed and cancer-bearing colons.

    PubMed Central

    Pullman, W E; Doe, W F

    1992-01-01

    Biologically significant levels of IL-2 activity were produced by isolated lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) from normal intestine (n = 12), cancer-bearing colons (n = 35) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affected tissue (n = 12). The levels of IL-2 produced were similar for all three sources of LPMC (normal 252 +/- 48 U/ml, IBD-affected mucosa 197 +/- 42 U/ml and colon cancer 285 +/- 43 U/ml). These levels were significantly greater than those produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (20 +/- 5 U/ml, P less than 0.01) on a per cell basis. In mucosa from cancer-bearing colons the amount of IL-2 produced by LPMC was unaffected by the invasiveness of the colon cancer. LPMC IL-2 production was markedly suppressed by drugs used in IBD therapy. 5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) reduced activity in a dose-dependent fashion. At a dose equivalent to the faecal therapeutic level of 0.5 mg/ml activity, IL-2 production by LPMC was suppressed to 3.4% of controls. Similarly, exposure of LPMC to cyclosporin A (CyA) and hydrocortisone (HC) at therapeutic levels reduced IL-2 activity to less than 1% of controls. The major producers of IL-2 activity were shown to be CD3+ T lymphocytes and those bearing the activation markers IL-2R and TFR. Suppression of mucosal IL-2 production represents an important therapeutic mechanism of drugs used in the management of IBD including HC, 5-ASA and CyA. These results suggest that mucosal T cells produce appreciable levels of IL-2 activity that may be important in maintaining immune homeostasis in the normal intestine, provide anti-neoplastic cytotoxic activity and contribute to the inflammatory events that characterize the mucosal lesions of IBD. PMID:1563100

  6. IL-2 activated NK cell immunotherapy of three children after haploidentical stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koehl, Ulrike; Sörensen, Jan; Esser, Ruth; Zimmermann, Stefanie; Grüttner, Hans Peter; Tonn, Torsten; Seidl, Christian; Seifried, Erhard; Klingebiel, Thomas; Schwabe, Dirk

    2004-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are thought to be of benefit in HLA-mismatched hematopoietic transplantation (H-SCT). Therefore, we developed a protocol for clinical-use expansion of highly enriched and IL-2-stimulated NK cells. Purification of unstimulated leukaphereses by a two-step T cell depletion with a final CD56 enrichment procedure leads to a mean purity of 95% CD56(+)CD3- NK cells with a four- to five-log depletion of T cells. So far, three pediatric patients with multiply relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were treated with repeated transfusions post-H-SCT. Directed killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) mismatches were demonstrated in all three cases. Although all patients showed blast persistence at the time of transplant, they reached complete remission and complete donor chimerism within 1 month post-H-SCT. NK cell therapy was tolerated well without graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) induction or other adverse events. The AML patient died of early relapse on day +80, while the ALL patients died of thrombotic-thrombocytopenic purpura and atypical viral pneumonia on days +45 and +152, respectively. This initial trial showed the feasibility of good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant NK cell isolation and expansion for clinical applications. We now launch a clinical phase I trial with activated NK cells post-H-SCT. PMID:15528141

  7. Histone demethylation and steroid receptor function in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stratmann, Antje; Haendler, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Steroid receptors recruit various cofactors to form multi-protein complexes which locally alter chromatin structure and control DNA accessibility in order to regulate gene transcription. Some of these factors are enzymes that add or remove histone marks in the vicinity of regulatory regions of target genes. Numerous histone modifications added by specific writer enzymes and removed by eraser enzymes have been identified. Histone methylation is a modification with a complex outcome, as it can lead to gene activation or repression, depending on the modified residue and the context. Methylation marks are added by different enzyme families displaying exquisite substrate specificity. Lysine methylation is reversible and two different demethylase families have been identified in humans, the Jumonji C and the lysine-specific demethylase families. A regulatory role of histone demethylases in fine-tuning the function of steroid receptors, especially the androgen receptor and estrogen receptor, has emerged in recent years. This is mostly inferred from in vitro studies, but more recently first in vivo data have further supported this concept. This and the deregulated expression observed for several histone demethylases suggest a role in tumours such as prostate and breast cancer. PMID:21958694

  8. Integrating TRPV1 Receptor Function with Capsaicin Psychophysics

    PubMed Central

    Smutzer, Gregory; Devassy, Roni K.

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is a naturally occurring vanilloid that causes a hot, pungent sensation in the human oral cavity. This trigeminal stimulus activates TRPV1 receptors and stimulates an influx of cations into sensory cells. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers that also respond to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 leads to increased sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism that results in receptor dephosphorylation. Human psychophysical studies have shown that capsaicin is detected at nanomole amounts and causes desensitization in the oral cavity. Psychophysical studies further indicate that desensitization can be temporarily reversed in the oral cavity if stimulation with capsaicin is resumed at short interstimulus intervals. Pretreatment of lingual epithelium with capsaicin modulates the perception of several primary taste qualities. Also, sweet taste stimuli may decrease the intensity of capsaicin perception in the oral cavity. In addition, capsaicin perception and hedonic responses may be modified by diet. Psychophysical studies with capsaicin are consistent with recent findings that have identified TRPV1 channel modulation by phosphorylation and interactions with membrane inositol phospholipids. Future studies will further clarify the importance of capsaicin and its receptor in human health and nutrition. PMID:26884754

  9. Transcription regulation of nuclear receptor PXR: Role of SUMO-1 modification and NDSM in receptor function.

    PubMed

    Priyanka; Kotiya, Deepak; Rana, Manjul; Subbarao, N; Puri, Niti; Tyagi, Rakesh K

    2016-01-15

    Pregnane & Xenobiotic Receptor (PXR) is one of the 48 members of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-modulated transcription factors. PXR plays an important role in metabolism and elimination of diverse noxious endobiotics and xenobiotics. Like in case of some nuclear receptors its function may also be differentially altered, positively or negatively, by various post-translational modifications. In this context, regulation of PXR function by SUMOylation is the subject of present investigation. Here, we report that human PXR is modified by SUMO-1 resulting in its enhanced transcriptional activity. RT-PCR analysis showed that PXR SUMOylation in presence of rifampicin also enhances the endogenous expression levels of key PXR-regulated genes like CYP3A4, CYP2C9, MDR1 and UGT1A1. In addition, mammalian two-hybrid assay exhibited enhanced interaction between PXR and co-activator SRC-1. EMSA results revealed that SUMOylation has no influence on the DNA binding ability of PXR. In silico analysis suggested that PXR protein contains four putative SUMOylation sites, centered at K108, K129, K160 and K170. In addition to this, we identified the presence of NDSM (Negative charge amino acid Dependent SUMOylation Motif) in PXR. Substitution of all its four putative lysine residues along with NDSM abolished the effect of SUMO-1-mediated transactivation function of PXR. Furthermore, we show that interaction between PXR and E2-conjugation enzyme UBCh9, an important step for implementation of SUMOylation event, was reduced in case of NDSM mutant PXRD115A. Overall, our results suggest that SUMOylation at specific sites on PXR protein are involved in enhancement of transcription function of this receptor. PMID:26549688

  10. Memory regulatory T cells require IL-7 and not IL-2 for their maintenance in peripheral tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Iris K.; Truong, Hong-An; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Maurano, Megan M.; Lee, Karim; Abbas, Abul K.; Rosenblum, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Thymic Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells are activated by peripheral self antigen to increase their suppressive function, and a fraction of these cells survive as memory Tregs (mTregs). Memory Tregs persist in non-lymphoid tissue after cessation of antigen expression and have enhanced capacity to suppress tissue-specific autoimmunity. Here, we show that murine mTregs express specific effector memory T cell markers and localize preferentially to hair follicles in skin. Memory Tregs express high levels of both IL-2Rα and IL-7Rα. Using a genetic deletion approach, we show that IL-2 is required to generate mTregs from naive CD4+ T cell precursors in vivo. However, IL-2 is not required to maintain these cells in the skin and skin-draining lymph nodes. Conversely, IL-7 is essential for maintaining mTregs in skin in the steady state. These results elucidate the fundamental biology of mTregs and show that IL-7 plays an important role in their survival in skin. PMID:23543753

  11. Determination of the real effect of genes identified in GWAS: the example of IL2RA in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Babron, Marie-Claude; Perdry, Hervé; Handel, Adam E; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V; Damotte, Vincent; Fontaine, Bertrand; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Ebers, George C; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise

    2012-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS), although efficient to detect genes involved in complex diseases, are not designed to measure the real effect of the genes. This is illustrated here by the example of IL2RA in multiple sclerosis (MS). Association between IL2RA and MS is clearly established, although the functional variation is still unknown: the effect of IL2RA might be better described by several SNPs than by a single one. This study investigates whether a pair of SNPs better explains the observed linkage and association data than a single SNP. In total, 522 trio families and 244 affected sib-pairs were typed for 26 IL2RA SNPs. For each SNP and pairs of SNPs, the phased genotypes of patients and controls were compared to determine the SNP set offering the best risk discrimination. Consistency between the genotype risks provided by the retained set and the identical by descent allele sharing in affected sib-pairs was assessed. After controlling for multiple testing, the set of SNPs rs2256774 and rs3118470, provides the best discrimination between the case and control genotype distributions (P-corrected=0.009). The relative risk between the least and most at-risk genotypes is 3.54 with a 95% confidence interval of [2.14-5.94]. Furthermore, the linkage information provided by the allele sharing between affected sibs is consistent with the retained set (P=0.80) but rejects the SNP reported in the literature (P=0.006). Establishing a valid modeling of a disease gene is essential to test its potential interaction with other genes and to reconstruct the pathophysiological pathways. PMID:22085902

  12. Molecular and Physiological Mechanisms of Membrane Receptor Systems Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Severin, E.S.; Savvateeva, M.V.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular physiology is a new interdisciplinary field of knowledge that looks into how complicated biological systems function. The living cell is a relatively simple, but at the same time very sophisticated biological system. After the sequencing of the human genome, molecular physiology has endeavored to investigate the systems of cellular interactions at a completely new level based on knowledge of the spatial organization and functions of receptors, their ligands, and protein-protein interactions. In recent years, the achievements in molecular physiology have centered on the study of sensor reception mechanisms and intercellular data transfer, as well as the immune system physiology, amongst other processes. PMID:22649671

  13. Chemokine (C-X-C Motif) Receptor 4 and Atypical Chemokine Receptor 3 Regulate Vascular α1-Adrenergic Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Harold H; Wong, Yee M; Tripathi, Abhishek; Nevins, Amanda M; Gamelli, Richard L; Volkman, Brian F; Byron, Kenneth L; Majetschak, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor (CXCR) 4 and atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR) 3 ligands have been reported to modulate cardiovascular function in various disease models. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain unknown. Thus, it was the aim of the present study to determine how pharmacological modulation of CXCR4 and ACKR3 regulate cardiovascular function. In vivo administration of TC14012, a CXCR4 antagonist and ACKR3 agonist, caused cardiovascular collapse in normal animals. During the cardiovascular stress response to hemorrhagic shock, ubiquitin, a CXCR4 agonist, stabilized blood pressure, whereas coactivation of CXCR4 and ACKR3 with CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12), or blockade of CXCR4 with AMD3100 showed opposite effects. While CXCR4 and ACKR3 ligands did not affect myocardial function, they selectively altered vascular reactivity upon α1-adrenergic receptor (AR) activation in pressure myography experiments. CXCR4 activation with ubiquitin enhanced α1-AR-mediated vasoconstriction, whereas ACKR3 activation with various natural and synthetic ligands antagonized α1-AR-mediated vasoconstriction. The opposing effects of CXCR4 and ACKR3 activation by CXCL12 could be dissected pharmacologically. CXCR4 and ACKR3 ligands did not affect vasoconstriction upon activation of voltage-operated Ca2+ channels or endothelin receptors. Effects of CXCR4 and ACKR3 agonists on vascular α1-AR responsiveness were independent of the endothelium. These findings suggest that CXCR4 and ACKR3 modulate α1-AR reactivity in vascular smooth muscle and regulate hemodynamics in normal and pathological conditions. Our observations point toward CXCR4 and ACKR3 as new pharmacological targets to control vasoreactivity and blood pressure. PMID:25032954

  14. Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor αPIX Leads to Activation of the Rac 1 GTPase/Glycogen Phosphorylase Pathway in Interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Llavero, Francisco; Urzelai, Bakarne; Osinalde, Nerea; Gálvez, Patricia; Lacerda, Hadriano M.; Parada, Luis A.; Zugaza, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have reported that the active form of Rac 1 GTPase binds to the glycogen phosphorylase muscle isoform (PYGM) and modulates its enzymatic activity leading to T cell proliferation. In the lymphoid system, Rac 1 and in general other small GTPases of the Rho family participate in the signaling cascades that are activated after engagement of the T cell antigen receptor. However, little is known about the IL-2-dependent Rac 1 activator molecules. For the first time, a signaling pathway leading to the activation of Rac 1/PYGM in response to IL-2-stimulated T cell proliferation is described. More specifically, αPIX, a known guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPases of the Rho family, preferentially Rac 1, mediates PYGM activation in Kit 225 T cells stimulated with IL-2. Using directed mutagenesis, phosphorylation of αPIX Rho-GEF serines 225 and 488 is required for activation of the Rac 1/PYGM pathway. IL-2-stimulated serine phosphorylation was corroborated in Kit 225 T cells cultures. A parallel pharmacological and genetic approach identified PKCθ as the serine/threonine kinase responsible for αPIX serine phosphorylation. The phosphorylated state of αPIX was required to activate first Rac 1 and subsequently PYGM. These results demonstrate that the IL-2 receptor activation, among other early events, leads to activation of PKCθ. To activate Rac 1 and consequently PYGM, PKCθ phosphorylates αPIX in T cells. The biological significance of this PKCθ/αPIX/Rac 1 GTPase/PYGM signaling pathway seems to be the control of different cellular responses such as migration and proliferation. PMID:25694429

  15. Effects of pharmacological and genetic disruption of CXCR4 chemokine receptor function in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Shubhchintan; Cho, Byung S; Ghosh, Dipanjan; Sivina, Mariela; Koehrer, Stefan; Müschen, Markus; Peled, Amnon; Davis, Richard E; Konopleva, Marina; Burger, Jan A

    2016-08-01

    B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL) cells express high levels of CXCR4 chemokine receptors for homing and retention within the marrow microenvironment. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) secrete CXCL12, the ligand for CXCR4, and protect B-ALL cells from cytotoxic drugs. Therefore, the therapeutic use of CXCR4 antagonists has been proposed to disrupt cross talk between B-ALL cells and the protective stroma. Because CXCR4 antagonists can have activating agonistic function, we compared the genetic and pharmacological deletion of CXCR4 in B-ALL cells, using CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing and CXCR4 antagonists that are in clinical use (plerixafor, BKT140). Both genetic and pharmacological CXCR4 inhibition significantly reduced B-ALL cell migration to CXCL12 gradients and beneath BMSC, and restored drug sensitivity to dexamethasone, vincristine and cyclophosphamide. NOD/SCID/IL-2rγnull mice injected with CXCR4 gene-deleted B-ALL cells had significant delay in disease progression and superior survival when compared to control mice injected with CXCR4 wild-type B-ALL cells. These findings indicate that anti-leukaemia activity of CXCR4 antagonists is primarily due to CXCR4 inhibition, rather than agonistic activity, and corroborate that CXCR4 is an important target to overcome stroma-mediated drug resistance in B-ALL. PMID:27071778

  16. Loss of olfactory receptor function in hominin evolution.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Graham M; Teeling, Emma C; Higgins, Desmond G

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian sense of smell is governed by the largest gene family, which encodes the olfactory receptors (ORs). The gain and loss of OR genes is typically correlated with adaptations to various ecological niches. Modern humans have 853 OR genes but 55% of these have lost their function. Here we show evidence of additional OR loss of function in the Neanderthal and Denisovan hominin genomes using comparative genomic methodologies. Ten Neanderthal and 8 Denisovan ORs show evidence of loss of function that differ from the reference modern human OR genome. Some of these losses are also present in a subset of modern humans, while some are unique to each lineage. Morphological changes in the cranium of Neanderthals suggest different sensory arrangements to that of modern humans. We identify differences in functional olfactory receptor genes among modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans, suggesting varied loss of function across all three taxa and we highlight the utility of using genomic information to elucidate the sensory niches of extinct species. PMID:24392153

  17. Loss of Olfactory Receptor Function in Hominin Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Graham M.; Teeling, Emma C.; Higgins, Desmond G.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian sense of smell is governed by the largest gene family, which encodes the olfactory receptors (ORs). The gain and loss of OR genes is typically correlated with adaptations to various ecological niches. Modern humans have 853 OR genes but 55% of these have lost their function. Here we show evidence of additional OR loss of function in the Neanderthal and Denisovan hominin genomes using comparative genomic methodologies. Ten Neanderthal and 8 Denisovan ORs show evidence of loss of function that differ from the reference modern human OR genome. Some of these losses are also present in a subset of modern humans, while some are unique to each lineage. Morphological changes in the cranium of Neanderthals suggest different sensory arrangements to that of modern humans. We identify differences in functional olfactory receptor genes among modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans, suggesting varied loss of function across all three taxa and we highlight the utility of using genomic information to elucidate the sensory niches of extinct species. PMID:24392153

  18. Functional interaction of nuclear receptor coactivator 4 with aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kollara, Alexandra; Brown, Theodore J. . E-mail: brown@mshri.on.ca

    2006-07-28

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcriptional activity is enhanced by interaction with p160 coactivators. We demonstrate here that NcoA4, a nuclear receptor coactivator, interacts with and amplifies AhR action. NcoA4-AhR and NcoA4-ARNT interactions were demonstrated by immunoprecipitation in T47D breast cancer and COS cells and was independent of ligand. Overexpression of NcoA4 enhanced AhR transcriptional activity 3.2-fold in the presence of dioxin, whereas overexpression of a splice variant, NcoA4{beta}, as well as a variant lacking the C-terminal region enhanced AhR transcriptional activity by only 1.6-fold. Enhanced AhR signaling by NcoA4 was independent of the LXXLL and FXXLF motifs or of the activation domain. NcoA4 protein localized to cytoplasm in the absence of dioxin and in both the cytoplasm and nucleus following dioxin treatment. NcoA4-facilitation of AhR activity was abolished by overexpression of androgen receptor, suggesting a potential competition of AhR and androgen receptor for NcoA4. These findings thus demonstrate a functional interaction between NcoA4 and AhR that may alter AhR activity to affect disease development and progression.

  19. Glycophorin and the concanavalin A receptor of human erythrocytes: their receptor function in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Sharom, F J; Barratt, D G; Grant, C W

    1977-01-01

    Two integral glycoproteins from the human erythrocyte have been studied after their incorporation into lipid bilayer systems. Glycophorin (which is the M/N blood group determinant) and the concanavalin A receptor were isolated and purified prior to incorporation into model membranes by dialytic removal of detergent from lipid/protein solutions. Under the conditions described, glycoprotein receptors maintain their function in that they bind external agents specific for them, such as concanavalin A and immunoglobulins. So-called intramembranous particles are a feature of freeze-fractured preparations of lipid bilayers containing either (or both) glycoprotein(s), and to some extent each has a characteristic particle appearance. Liposomes containing the concanavalin A receptor (with or without glycophorin) are agglutinable by concanavalin A, whereas human erythrocytes are normally considered to be nonagglutinable by this lectin. Liposomes containing glycophorin alone are readily agglutinable by the appropriate glycophorin-directed M/N antiserum, as are human erythrocytes. The added presence of concanavalin A receptor in the liposomes can markedly inhibit agglutination by M/N antiserum without preventing immunoglobulin binding. Images PMID:268624

  20. Orphan nuclear receptor NR2F6 acts as an essential gatekeeper of Th17 CD4+ T cell effector functions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Members of the evolutionarily conserved family of the chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor NR2F/COUP-TF orphan receptors have been implicated in lymphocyte biology, ranging from activation to differentiation and elicitation of immune effector functions. In particular, a CD4+ T cell intrinsic and non-redundant function of NR2F6 as a potent and selective repressor of the transcription of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (Il) 2, interferon y (ifng) and consequently of T helper (Th)17 CD4+ T cell-mediated autoimmune disorders has been discovered. NR2F6 serves as an antigen receptor signaling threshold-regulated barrier against autoimmunity where NR2F6 is part of a negative feedback loop that limits inflammatory tissue damage induced by weakly immunogenic antigens such as self-antigens. Under such low affinity antigen receptor stimulation, NR2F6 appears as a prototypical repressor that functions to “lock out” harmful Th17 lineage effector transcription. Mechanistically, only sustained high affinity antigen receptor-induced protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated phosphorylation has been shown to inactivate NR2F6, thereby displacing pre-bound NR2F6 from the DNA and, subsequently, allowing for robust NFAT/AP-1- and RORγt-mediated cytokine transcription. The NR2F6 target gene repertoire thus identifies a general anti-inflammatory gatekeeper role for this orphan receptor. Investigating these signaling pathway(s) will enable a greater knowledge of the genetic, immune, and environmental mechanisms that lead to chronic inflammation and of certain autoimmune disorders in a given individual. PMID:24919548

  1. Glutamate Receptor Homologs in Plants: Functions and Evolutionary Origins

    PubMed Central

    Price, Michelle Beth; Jelesko, John; Okumoto, Sakiko

    2012-01-01

    The plant glutamate-like receptor homologs (GLRs) are homologs of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) which were discovered more than 10 years ago, and are hypothesized to be potential amino acid sensors in plants. Although initial progress on this gene family has been hampered by gene redundancy and technical issues such as gene toxicity; genetic, pharmacological, and electrophysiological approaches are starting to uncover the functions of this protein family. In parallel, there has been tremendous progress in elucidating the structure of animal glutamate receptors (iGluRs), which in turn will help understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant GLR functions. In this review, we will summarize recent progress on the plant GLRs. Emerging evidence implicates plant GLRs in various biological processes in and beyond N sensing, and implies that there is some overlap in the signaling mechanisms of amino acids between plants and animals. Phylogenetic analysis using iGluRs from metazoans, plants, and bacteria showed that the plant GLRs are no more closely related to metazoan iGluRs as they are to bacterial iGluRs, indicating the separation of plant, other eukaryotic, and bacterial GLRs might have happened as early on as the last universal common ancestor. Structural similarities and differences with animal iGluRs, and the implication thereof, are also discussed. PMID:23115559

  2. Genetic Models for the Study of Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Prema

    2015-01-01

    The luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) is essential for fertility in men and women. LHCGR binds luteinizing hormone (LH) as well as the highly homologous chorionic gonadotropin. Signaling from LHCGR is required for steroidogenesis and gametogenesis in males and females and for sexual differentiation in the male. The importance of LHCGR in reproductive physiology is underscored by the large number of naturally occurring inactivating and activating mutations in the receptor that result in reproductive disorders. Consequently, several genetically modified mouse models have been developed for the study of LHCGR function. They include targeted deletion of LH and LHCGR that mimic inactivating mutations in hormone and receptor, expression of a constitutively active mutant in LHCGR that mimics activating mutations associated with familial male-limited precocious puberty and transgenic models of LH and hCG overexpression. This review summarizes the salient findings from these models and their utility in understanding the physiological and pathological consequences of loss and gain of function in LHCGR signaling. PMID:26483755

  3. Comprehensive mapping of receptor-functioning domains in feline leukemia virus subgroup C receptor FLVCR1.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer K; Fung, Claire; Tailor, Chetankumar S

    2006-02-01

    Infection of cells by the highly anemogenic feline leukemia virus subgroup C (FeLV-C) is mediated by the heme exporter FLVCR1, a cell surface protein containing 12 potential transmembrane segments with six presumptive extracellular loops (ECLs). To identify FLVCR1 residues critical for mediating FeLV-C infection, we first independently isolated a human cDNA encoding the FLVCR2 protein that shares 52% identity to human FLVCR1, and we show that FLVCR2 does not function as a receptor for FeLV-C. Then, by generating specific hybrids between FLVCR1 and FLVCR2 and testing susceptibility of mouse cells expressing these hybrids to beta-galactosidase encoding FeLV-C, we identify FLVCR1 ECLs 1 and 6 as critical for mediating FeLV-C infection. Mouse cells expressing a hybrid protein containing FLVCR2 backbone with the ECL6 sequence from FLVCR1 were highly susceptible to FeLV-C infection. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that a single mutation of Asn463 in FLVCR2 ECL6 to an acidic Asp residue (a residue present in the corresponding position 487 in FLVCR1 ECL6) is sufficient to render FLVCR2 functional as an FeLV-C receptor. However, an Asp487Asn mutation in FLVCR1 ECL6 or substitution of the entire FLVCR1 ECL6 sequence for FLVCR2 ECL6 sequence does not disrupt receptor function. Subsequent substitutions show that residues within FLVCR1 ECL1 also contribute to mediating FeLV-C infection. Furthermore, our results suggest that FLVCR1 regions that mediate FeLV-C surface unit binding are distinct from ECL1 and ECL6. Our results are consistent with previous conclusions that infection of cells by gammaretroviruses involves interaction of virus with multiple receptor regions. PMID:16439531

  4. Comprehensive Mapping of Receptor-Functioning Domains in Feline Leukemia Virus Subgroup C Receptor FLVCR1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jennifer K.; Fung, Claire; Tailor, Chetankumar S.

    2006-01-01

    Infection of cells by the highly anemogenic feline leukemia virus subgroup C (FeLV-C) is mediated by the heme exporter FLVCR1, a cell surface protein containing 12 potential transmembrane segments with six presumptive extracellular loops (ECLs). To identify FLVCR1 residues critical for mediating FeLV-C infection, we first independently isolated a human cDNA encoding the FLVCR2 protein that shares 52% identity to human FLVCR1, and we show that FLVCR2 does not function as a receptor for FeLV-C. Then, by generating specific hybrids between FLVCR1 and FLVCR2 and testing susceptibility of mouse cells expressing these hybrids to β-galactosidase encoding FeLV-C, we identify FLVCR1 ECLs 1 and 6 as critical for mediating FeLV-C infection. Mouse cells expressing a hybrid protein containing FLVCR2 backbone with the ECL6 sequence from FLVCR1 were highly susceptible to FeLV-C infection. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that a single mutation of Asn463 in FLVCR2 ECL6 to an acidic Asp residue (a residue present in the corresponding position 487 in FLVCR1 ECL6) is sufficient to render FLVCR2 functional as an FeLV-C receptor. However, an Asp487Asn mutation in FLVCR1 ECL6 or substitution of the entire FLVCR1 ECL6 sequence for FLVCR2 ECL6 sequence does not disrupt receptor function. Subsequent substitutions show that residues within FLVCR1 ECL1 also contribute to mediating FeLV-C infection. Furthermore, our results suggest that FLVCR1 regions that mediate FeLV-C surface unit binding are distinct from ECL1 and ECL6. Our results are consistent with previous conclusions that infection of cells by gammaretroviruses involves interaction of virus with multiple receptor regions. PMID:16439531

  5. Generation of antitumor response by IL-2-transduced JAWS II dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rossowska, Joanna; Pajtasz-Piasecka, Elżbieta; Ryśnik, Oliwia; Wojas, Justyna; Krawczenko, Agnieszka; Szyda, Anna; Duś, Danuta

    2011-10-01

    Antigen-loaded dendritic cells (DCs) are a promising tool for inducing a tumor-specific immune response. It seems probable that co-administration of those cells together with cytokine-transduced DCs can further increase effectiveness of the antitumor vaccine. The local production of IL-2 by genetically modified DCs may result in alteration of the unfavorable tumor environment causing immune response dysfunction. In the presented study murine DCs of an established JAWS II cell line were transduced with a retroviral vector carrying murine IL-2 gene (JAWS II/IL-2). JAWS II/IL-2 cells demonstrated slightly decreased tumor antigen (TAg) uptake capacities. However, this modification resulted in enhanced ability of the cells to migrate in vivo. The multiple injection of vaccines containing JAWS II/IL-2 cells caused MC38 tumor growth delay and prolonged mice survival. The immunological response was manifested as cytotoxic natural killer (NK) and T cell activation and tumor tissue infiltration by CD8(+) and CD4(+) cells, accompanied by increased IFN-γ production by spleen cells. These observations suggest that repeated peritumoral administration of IL-2-producing dendritic cells can inhibit tumor growth by intensification of CD8(+) and CD4(+) cells' influx into tumor tissue and further activation of the systemic antitumor response. It can be concluded that IL-2 transduced dendritic cells may be used as a potent adjuvant in antitumor immunotherapy. PMID:21676487

  6. Manipulating Memory CD8 T Cell Numbers by Timed Enhancement of IL-2 Signals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Marie T; Kurup, Samarchith P; Starbeck-Miller, Gabriel R; Harty, John T

    2016-09-01

    As a result of the growing burden of tumors and chronic infections, manipulating CD8 T cell responses for clinical use has become an important goal for immunologists. In this article, we show that dendritic cell (DC) immunization coupled with relatively early (days 1-3) or late (days 4-6) administration of enhanced IL-2 signals increase peak effector CD8 T cell numbers, but only early IL-2 signals enhance memory numbers. IL-2 signals delivered at relatively late time points drive terminal differentiation and marked Bim-mediated contraction and do not increase memory T cell numbers. In contrast, early IL-2 signals induce effector cell metabolic profiles that are more conducive to memory formation. Of note, downregulation of CD80 and CD86 was observed on DCs in vivo following early IL-2 treatment. Mechanistically, early IL-2 treatment enhanced CTLA-4 expression on regulatory T cells, and CTLA-4 blockade alongside IL-2 treatment in vivo prevented the decrease in CD80 and CD86, supporting a cell-extrinsic role for CTLA-4 in downregulating B7 ligand expression on DCs. Finally, DC immunization followed by early IL-2 treatment and anti-CTLA-4 blockade resulted in lower memory CD8 T cell numbers compared with the DC+early IL-2 treatment group. These data suggest that curtailed signaling through the B7-CD28 costimulatory axis during CD8 T cell activation limits terminal differentiation and preserves memory CD8 T cell formation; thus, it should be considered in future T cell-vaccination strategies. PMID:27439516

  7. The androgen receptor mediates antiapoptotic function in myometrial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Li, Y; Morin, D; Plymate, S; Lye, S; Dong, X

    2014-01-01

    During pregnancy, myometrial phenotype is programmed into three characteristic stages referred to as the early proliferative, the midterm hypertrophic, and the late contractile stage. Increased myometrial growth in the early and midterm of pregnancy involves a complex process of cell proliferation, antiapoptosis and differentiation. We have previously demonstrated that the androgen receptor (AR) is required for myometrial cell proliferation by modulating IGF-1 signaling during early pregnancy. Here, we report that AR also exerts its antiapoptotic function in human myometrial cells. Enhanced AR expression protects, whereas AR silencing sensitizes myometrial cells to both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic stimuli. AR agonist inhibits, whereas AR antagonist induces myometrial cells to undergo apoptotic cell death. Gene microarray analysis confirms that the central functions of AR in myometrial cells are to regulate cell cycling and apoptosis through three major gene groups involving the epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling, RNA splicing and DNA repair processes. AR mediates its antiapoptotic function through two distinct pathways. In the receptor-dependent pathway, AR is required for the expression of several protein factors within the EGF signaling pathway. Through the PI3K/Akt pathway, AR enhances the expression of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1. In the ligand-dependent pathway, AR agonist triggers the activation of Src kinase, which in turn phosphorylates STAT3 to increase Mcl-1 expression. We conclude from these results that the AR signaling exerts antiapoptotic function in myometrial cells, further supporting its key role in programming of myometrial phenotype. PMID:25032861

  8. [Regulatory T-cells in systemic lupus erythematosus. IL-2 is decisive for loss of tolerance].

    PubMed

    Ohl, K; Tenbrock, K

    2016-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) results from loss of immunological tolerance. Regulatory T‑cells (Treg) are major gatekeepers of peripheral tolerance by suppression of autoreactive lymphocytes. Defects in Treg function are therefore possible pathogenetic mechanisms of SLE. Despite this fact published work about numbers and functions of Tregs in SLE are contradictory and the definitive role of Treg in SLE remains unclear. In this review we summarize the current literature about Treg subtypes and the phenotypic markers in human SLE. We also discuss data from mouse models and ex vivo experiments, which provide indications for possible mechanisms that contribute to loss of tolerance. We also discuss the role of interleukin 2 (IL-2), which is decisive for the function of Treg and has been used therapeutically in preliminary trials in human SLE. The identification of novel Treg markers and the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which restore the balance between Treg and autoreactive T‑cells are future goals for research in SLE. PMID:26975190

  9. Structural and Functional Profiling of Environmental Ligands for Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Grimaldi, Marina; Cavaillès, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background: Individuals are exposed daily to environmental pollutants that may act as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), causing a range of developmental, reproductive, metabolic, or neoplastic diseases. With their mostly hydrophobic pocket that serves as a docking site for endogenous and exogenous ligands, nuclear receptors (NRs) can be primary targets of small molecule environmental contaminants. However, most of these compounds are chemically unrelated to natural hormones, so their binding modes and associated hormonal activities are hardly predictable. Objectives: We conducted a correlative analysis of structural and functional data to gain insight into the mechanisms by which 12 members of representative families of pollutants bind to and activate the estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ. Methods: We used a battery of biochemical, structural, biophysical, and cell-based approaches to characterize the interaction between ERs and their environmental ligands. Results: Our study revealed that the chemically diverse compounds bound to ERs via varied sets of protein–ligand interactions, reflecting their differential activities, binding affinities, and specificities. We observed xenoestrogens binding to both ERs—with affinities ranging from subnanomolar to micromolar values—and acting in a subtype-dependent fashion as full agonists or partial agonists/antagonists by using different combinations of the activation functions 1 and 2 of ERα and ERβ. Conclusions: The precise characterization of the interactions between major environmental pollutants and two of their primary biological targets provides rational guidelines for the design of safer chemicals, and will increase the accuracy and usefulness of structure-based computational methods, allowing for activity prediction of chemicals in risk assessment. Citation: Delfosse V, Grimaldi M, Cavaillès V, Balaguer P, Bourguet W. 2014. Structural and functional profiling of environmental ligands for estrogen

  10. The Memory Function of the B Cell Antigen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Activated B lymphocytes preserve their antigen experience by differentiating into long-lived pools of antibody-secreting plasma cells or various types of memory B cells (MBCs). The former population constantly produces serum immunoglobulins with sufficient specificity and affinity to thwart infections with recurrent pathogens. By contrast, memory B cell populations retain their antigen receptors on the cell surface and hence need pathogen-induced differentiation steps before they can actively contribute to host defense. The terminal differentiation of MBCs into antibody-secreting plasma cells is hallmarked by the absence of the lag phase characteristic for primary antibody responses. Moreover, secondary antibody responses are predominantly driven by MBCs that bear an antigen receptor of the IgG class on their surface although IgM-positive memory populations exist as well. These fundamental principles of B cell memory were enigmatic for decades. Only recently, we have begun to understand the underlying mechanisms. This review summarizes our current understanding of how different subpopulations of MBCs are generated during primary immune responses and how their functional heterogeneity on antigen recall is controlled by different signaling capabilities of B cell antigen receptor (BCR) isotypes and by the nature of the antigen. PMID:26362935

  11. Functional characterization of intracellular Dictyostelium discoideum P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Melanie J; Durai, Latha; Ennion, Steven J

    2009-12-11

    Indicative of cell surface P2X ion channel activation, extracellular ATP evokes a rapid and transient calcium influx in the model eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum. Five P2X-like proteins (dP2XA-E) are present in this organism. However, their roles in purinergic signaling are unclear, because dP2XA proved to have an intracellular localization on the contractile vacuole where it is thought to be required for osmoregulation. To determine functional properties of the remaining four dP2X-like proteins and to assess their cellular roles, we recorded membrane currents from expressed cloned receptors and generated a quintuple knock-out Dictyostelium strain devoid of dP2X receptors. ATP evoked inward currents at dP2XB and dP2XE receptors but not at dP2XC or dP2XD. beta,gamma-Imido-ATP was more potent than ATP at dP2XB but a weak partial agonist at dP2XE. Currents in dP2XB and dP2XE were strongly inhibited by Na(+) but insensitive to copper and the P2 receptor antagonists pyridoxal phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid and suramin. Unusual for P2X channels, dP2XA and dP2XB were also Cl(-)-permeable. The extracellular purinergic response to ATP persisted in p2xA/B/C/D/E quintuple knock-out Dictyostelium demonstrating that dP2X channels are not responsible. dP2XB, -C, -D, and -E were found to be intracellularly localized to the contractile vacuole with the ligand binding domain facing the lumen. However, quintuple p2xA/B/C/D/E null cells were still capable of regulating cell volume in water demonstrating that, contrary to previous findings, dP2X receptors are not required for osmoregulation. Responses to the calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium, however, were reduced in p2xA/B/C/D/E null cells suggesting that dP2X receptors play a role in intracellular calcium signaling. PMID:19833731

  12. Localization and function of the renal calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Daniela; Valenti, Giovanna

    2016-07-01

    The ability to monitor changes in the ionic composition of the extracellular environment is a crucial feature that has evolved in all living organisms. The cloning and characterization of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) from the mammalian parathyroid gland in the early 1990s provided the first description of a cellular, ion-sensing mechanism. This finding demonstrated how cells can detect small, physiological variations in free ionized calcium (Ca(2+)) in the extracellular fluid and subsequently evoke an appropriate biological response by altering the secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) that acts on PTH receptors expressed in target tissues, including the kidney, intestine, and bone. Aberrant Ca(2+) sensing by the parathyroid glands, as a result of altered CaSR expression or function, is associated with impaired divalent cation homeostasis. CaSR activators that mimic the effects of Ca(2+) (calcimimetics) have been designed to treat hyperparathyroidism, and CaSR antagonists (calcilytics) are in development for the treatment of hypercalciuric disorders. The kidney expresses a CaSR that might directly contribute to the regulation of many aspects of renal function in a PTH-independent manner. This Review discusses the roles of the renal CaSR and the potential impact of pharmacological modulation of the CaSR on renal function. PMID:27157444

  13. Dopamine receptor expression and function in corticotroph pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Pivonello, Rosario; Ferone, Diego; de Herder, Wouter W; Kros, Johan M; De Caro, Maria Laura Del Basso; Arvigo, Marica; Annunziato, Lucio; Lombardi, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria; Hofland, Leo J; Lamberts, Steven W J

    2004-05-01

    The role of dopamine agonist treatment in corticotroph pituitary tumors is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate D(2) receptor expression in 20 corticotroph pituitary tumors and to correlate it to the in vitro effect of dopamine agonists on ACTH secretion and the in vivo effect of short-term cabergoline treatment on cortisol secretion. D(2) expression was evaluated by receptor-ligand binding, immunohistochemistry, and RT-PCR. A 50% or more decrease in daily urinary cortisol levels was considered a significant clinical response. At receptor-ligand binding, specific binding of [(125)I]epidepride was found in 80% of cases. At immunohistochemistry, specific D(2) immunostaining was found in 75% of cases. D(2) expression was found in 83.3% of cases (D(2long) in 40%, D(2short) in 20%, and both in 40%) by RT-PCR. Significant in vitro inhibition of ACTH secretion was found in 100% of D(2)-positive cases, but not in 100% of D(2)-negative cases by either bromocriptine or cabergoline. A significant in vivo inhibition of cortisol secretion after 3-month cabergoline treatment was found in 60%, although a normalization of cortisol secretion was found in 40% of cases. All cabergoline-responsive cases were associated with D(2) expression, whereas all noncabergoline-responsive cases but one were not associated with D(2) expression. In conclusion, functional D(2) receptors were expressed in approximately 80% of corticotroph pituitary tumors. The effectiveness of cabergoline in normalizing cortisol secretion in 40% of cases supports its therapeutic use in the management of Cushing's disease. PMID:15126577

  14. Kappa-opioid receptor signaling and brain reward function

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.

    2009-01-01

    The dynorphin-like peptides have profound effects on the state of the brain reward system and human and animal behavior. The dynorphin-like peptides affect locomotor activity, food intake, sexual behavior, anxiety-like behavior, and drug intake. Stimulation of kappa-opioid receptors, the endogenous receptor for the dynorphin-like peptides, inhibits dopamine release in the striatum (nucleus accumbens and caudate putamen) and induces a negative mood state in humans and animals. The administration of drugs of abuse increases the release of dopamine in the striatum and mediates the concomitant release of dynorphin-like peptides in this brain region. The reviewed studies suggest that chronic drug intake leads to an upregulation of the brain dynorphin system in the striatum and in particular in the dorsal part of the striatum/caudate putamen. This might inhibit drug-induced dopamine release and provide protection against the neurotoxic effects of high dopamine levels. After the discontinuation of chronic drug intake these neuroadaptations remain unopposed which has been suggested to contribute to the negative emotional state associated with drug withdrawal and increased drug intake. Kappa-opioid receptor agonists have also been shown to inhibit calcium channels. Calcium channel inhibitors have antidepressant-like effects and inhibit the release of norepinephrine. This might explain that in some studies kappa-opioid receptor agonists attenuate nicotine and opioid withdrawal symptomatology. A better understanding of the role of dynorphins in the regulation of brain reward function might contribute to the development of novel treatments for mood disorders and other disorders that stem from a dysregulation of the brain reward system. PMID:19804796

  15. Chronic hypoxia in pregnancy affects thymus development in Balb/c mouse offspring via IL2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Xiuwen; Li, Lingjun; Sun, Miao; Gao, Qingqing; Zhang, Pengjie; Tang, Jiaqi; He, Yu; Zhu, Di; Xu, Zhice

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia during pregnancy can adversely affect development. This study, addressed the impact of prenatal hypoxia on thymus development in the rodent offspring. Pregnant Balb/c mice were exposed to hypoxia or normoxia during pregnancy, and the thymuses of their offspring were tested. Chronic hypoxia during pregnancy resulted in significantly decreased fetal body weight, with an increased thymus-to-body weight ratio. Histological analysis revealed a smaller cortical zone in the thymus of the offspring exposed to hypoxia. A reduction in the cortical T lymphocyte population corresponded to increased mRNA abundance of caspase 3 (Casp3) and decreased expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 (Mki67). Differences in T lymphocyte sub-populations in the thymus further indicate that thymus development in offspring was retarded or stagnated by prenatal hypoxia. The abundance of IL2 and its receptor was reduced in the thymus following prenatal hypoxia. This was accompanied by an increase in thymus HIF1A and IKKβ and a decrease in phosphorylated NFKB, MAP2K1, and MAPK1/3 compared to control pregnancies. Together, these results implicate deficiencies in IL2-mediated signaling as one source of prenatal-hypoxia-impaired thymus development. PMID:26918321

  16. Hrs recognizes a hydrophobic amino acid cluster in cytokine receptors during ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting.

    PubMed

    Amano, Yuji; Yamashita, Yuki; Kojima, Katsuhiko; Yoshino, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Takeshita, Toshikazu

    2011-04-29

    Hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a component of the ESCRT-0 protein complex that captures ubiquitylated cargo proteins and sorts them to the lysosomal pathway. Although Hrs acts as a key transporter for ubiquitin-dependent endosomal sorting, we previously reported that Hrs is also involved in ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting of interleukin-2 receptor β (IL-2Rβ). Here, we show direct interactions between bacterially expressed Hrs and interleukin-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα), indicating that their binding is not required for ubiquitylation of the receptors, similar to the case for IL-2Rβ. Examinations of the Hrs binding regions of the receptors reveal that a hydrophobic amino acid cluster in both IL-2Rβ and IL-4Rα is essential for the binding. Whereas the wild-type receptors are delivered to LAMP1-positive late endosomes, mutant receptors lacking the hydrophobic amino acid cluster are sorted to lysobisphosphatidic acid-positive late endosomes rather than LAMP1-positive late endosomes. We also show that the degradation of these mutant receptors is attenuated. Accordingly, Hrs functions during ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting of the receptors by recognizing the hydrophobic amino acid cluster. These findings suggest the existence of a group of cargo proteins that have this hydrophobic amino acid cluster as a ubiquitin-independent sorting signal. PMID:21362618

  17. Toll-like receptor 2 functions as a pattern recognition receptor for diverse bacterial products.

    PubMed

    Lien, E; Sellati, T J; Yoshimura, A; Flo, T H; Rawadi, G; Finberg, R W; Carroll, J D; Espevik, T; Ingalls, R R; Radolf, J D; Golenbock, D T

    1999-11-19

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4 are signal transducers for lipopolysaccharide, the major proinflammatory constituent in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. We observed that membrane lipoproteins/lipopeptides from Borrelia burgdorferi, Treponema pallidum, and Mycoplasma fermentans activated cells heterologously expressing TLR2 but not those expressing TLR1 or TLR4. These TLR2-expressing cells were also stimulated by living motile B. burgdorferi, suggesting that TLR2 recognition of lipoproteins is relevant to natural Borrelia infection. Importantly, a TLR2 antibody inhibited bacterial lipoprotein/lipopeptide-induced tumor necrosis factor release from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and TLR2-null Chinese hamster macrophages were insensitive to lipoprotein/lipopeptide challenge. The data suggest a role for the native protein in cellular activation by these ligands. In addition, TLR2-dependent responses were seen using whole Mycobacterium avium and Staphylococcus aureus, demonstrating that this receptor can function as a signal transducer for a wide spectrum of bacterial products. We conclude that diverse pathogens activate cells through TLR2 and propose that this molecule is a central pattern recognition receptor in host immune responses to microbial invasion. PMID:10559223

  18. Functional role of lipoprotein receptors in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Sebastian; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2008-02-01

    The LDL receptor gene family constitutes a class of structurally closely related cell surface receptors fulfilling diverse functions in different organs, tissues, and cell types. The LDL receptor is the prototype of this family, which also includes the VLDLR, ApoER2/LRP8, LRP1 and LRP1B, as well as Megalin/GP330, SorLA/LR11, LRP5, LRP6 and MEGF7. Recently several lines of evidence have positioned the LDL receptor gene family as one of the key players in Alzheimer's disease (AD) research. Initially this receptor family was of high interest due to its key function in cholesterol/apolipoprotein E (ApoE) uptake, with the epsilon4 allele of ApoE as the strongest genetic risk factor for late-onset AD. It has been established that the cholesterol metabolism of the cell has a strong impact on the production of Abeta, the major component of the plaques found in the brain of AD-patients. The original report that soluble amyloid precursor protein (APP) containing the kunitz proteinase inhibitor (KPI) domain might act as a ligand for LRP1 led to a complex investigation of the interaction of both proteins and their potential function in AD development. Meanwhile, it has been demonstrated that LRP1 might bind to APP independent of the KPI domain in APP. This APP - LRP1 interaction is facilitated through a trimeric complex of APP-FE65-LRP1, which has a functional role in APP processing. Along with LRP1, APP is transported from the early secretory compartments to the cell surface and subsequently internalised into the endosomal / lysosomal compartments. Recent investigations indicate that ApoER2 and SorLA fulfil a similar role in shifting APP localisation in the cell, which affects APP processing and the production of the APP derived amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta). In addition to the effect of lipoprotein receptors on APP processing and Abeta production, LRP1 has been shown to bind Abeta directly or indirectly through Abeta-lactoferrin, Abeta-alpha2M and Abeta-ApoE complexes in

  19. Minocycline attenuates HIV-1 infection and suppresses chronic immune activation in humanized NOD/LtsZ-scidIL-2Rγnull mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Maneesh; Singh, Pratibha; Vaira, Dolores; Amand, Mathieu; Rahmouni, Souad; Moutschen, Michel

    2014-01-01

    More than a quarter of a century of research has established chronic immune activation and dysfunctional T cells as central features of chronic HIV infection and subsequent immunodeficiency. Consequently, the search for a new immunomodulatory therapy that could reduce immune activation and improve T-cell function has been increased. However, the lack of small animal models for in vivo HIV study has hampered progress. In the current study, we have investigated a model of cord blood haematopoietic progenitor cells (CB-HPCs) -transplanted humanized NOD/LtsZ-scidIL-2Rγnull mice in which progression of HIV infection is associated with widespread chronic immune activation and inflammation. Indeed, HIV infection in humanized NSG mice caused up-regulation of several T-cell immune activation markers such as CD38, HLA-DR, CD69 and co-receptor CCR5. T-cell exhaustion markers PD-1 and CTLA-4 were found to be significantly up-regulated on T cells. Moreover, increased plasmatic levels of lipopolysaccharide, sCD14 and interleukin-10 were also observed in infected mice. Treatment with minocycline resulted in a significant decrease of expression of cellular and plasma immune activation markers, inhibition of HIV replication and improved T-cell counts in HIV-infected humanized NSG mice. The study demonstrates that minocycline could be an effective, low-cost adjunctive treatment to regulate chronic immune activation and replication of HIV. PMID:24409837

  20. Function and regulation of endothelin type A receptor-operated transient receptor potential canonical channels.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Takahiro; Terada, Koji; Higa, Tsunaki; Aoyagi, Hiroyuki; Nishiya, Tadashi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Soichi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels responsible for receptor-operated Ca(2+) entry (ROCE) triggered by activation of endothelin type A receptor (ET(A)R) and to clarify the importance of calmodulin (CaM) / inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor binding (CIRB) domain at the C terminus of TRPC channels in ET(A)R-activated channel regulation. In HEK293 cells coexpressing ET(A)R and one of seven TRPC isoforms, ET(A)R stimulation induced ROCE through TRPC3, TRPC5, TRPC6, and TRPC7. The TRPC3- and TRPC6-mediated ROCE was inhibited by selective inhibitors of G(q) protein, phospholipase C (PLC), and CaM. The CIRB domain deletion mutants of TRPC3 and TRPC6 failed to induce ET(A)R-mediated ROCE. Either deletion of the CIRB domain or pharmacological inhibition of CaM did not inhibit the targeting of these channels to the plasma membrane. These results suggest that 1) TRPC3, TRPC5, TRPC6, and TRPC7 can function as ET(A)R-operated Ca(2+) channels; 2) G(q) protein, PLC, and CaM are involved in TRPC3- and TRPC6-mediated ROCE; 3) ET(A)R-mediated activation of TRPC3 and TRPC6 requires the CIRB domain; and 4) abolition of ET(A)R-induced ROCE by CIRB domain deletion and CaM inhibition is due to loss of CaM binding to the channels but not loss of cell surface TRPC3 and TRPC6. PMID:22129540

  1. TAS2R bitter taste receptors regulate thyroid function

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Adam A.; Dotson, Cedrick D.; Elson, Amanda E. T.; Voigt, Anja; Boehm, Ulrich; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Steinle, Nanette I.; Munger, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of thyroid hormones triiodothyronine and thyroxine (T3/T4) can impact metabolism, body composition, and development. Thus, it is critical to identify novel mechanisms that impact T3/T4 production. We found that type 2 taste receptors (TAS2Rs), which are activated by bitter-tasting compounds such as those found in many foods and pharmaceuticals, negatively regulate thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-dependent Ca2+ increases and TSH-dependent iodide efflux in thyrocytes. Immunohistochemical Tas2r-dependent reporter expression and real-time PCR analyses reveal that human and mouse thyrocytes and the Nthy-Ori 3-1 human thyrocyte line express several TAS2Rs. Five different agonists for thyrocyte-expressed TAS2Rs reduced TSH-dependent Ca2+ release in Nthy-Ori 3-1 cells, but not basal Ca2+ levels, in a dose-dependent manner. Ca2+ responses were unaffected by 6-n-propylthiouracil, consistent with the expression of an unresponsive variant of its cognate receptor, TAS2R38, in these cells. TAS2R agonists also inhibited basal and TSH-dependent iodide efflux. Furthermore, a common TAS2R42 polymorphism is associated with increased serum T4 levels in a human cohort. Our findings indicate that TAS2Rs couple the detection of bitter-tasting compounds to changes in thyrocyte function and T3/T4 production. Thus, TAS2Rs may mediate a protective response to overingestion of toxic materials and could serve as new druggable targets for therapeutic treatment of hypo- or hyperthyroidism.—Clark, A. A., Dotson, C. D., Elson, A. E. T., Voigt, A., Boehm, U., Meyerhof, W., Steinle, N. I., Munger, S. D. TAS2R bitter taste receptors regulate thyroid function. PMID:25342133

  2. New Functional Aspects of the Extracellular Calcium-Sensing Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Toka, Hakan R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Variations in extracellular calcium level have a large impact on kidney function. Most of the effects seen are attributed to the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a widely expressed G-protein-coupled cell surface protein with important function in bone mineral homeostasis. The purpose of this review is to recapitulate novel functional aspects of CaSR. Recent findings Results from mouse models surmise important functions for CaSR in various tissues. In the kidney, the main role of CaSR is the regulation of calcium reabsorption in the thick ascending limb, independently of its role on parathyroid hormone secretion. CaSR modulates claudin 14, the gatekeeper of paracellular ion transport in the thick ascending limb that is associated with urinary calcium excretion. One intracellular signaling pathway by which CaSR alters tight junction permeability is the calcineurin-NFAT1c-microRNA-claudin14 axis. Summary The main function of CaSR in the kidney is the regulation of calcium excretion in the thick ascending limb, independently of parathyroid hormone. CaSR modulates paracellular cation transport by altering expression of the tight junction protein claudin 14. Still more work is needed to fully understand all functions of CaSR in the kidney. Alternative pathways of calcium “sensing” in the kidney need to be investigated. PMID:24867673

  3. Functions of NOD-Like Receptors in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yifei; Kinio, Anna; Saleh, Maya

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are highly conserved cytosolic pattern recognition receptors that perform critical functions in surveying the intracellular environment for the presence of infection, noxious substances, and metabolic perturbations. Sensing of these danger signals by NLRs leads to their oligomerization into large macromolecular scaffolds and the rapid deployment of effector signaling cascades to restore homeostasis. While some NLRs operate by recruiting and activating inflammatory caspases into inflammasomes, others trigger inflammation via alternative routes including the nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and regulatory factor pathways. The critical role of NLRs in development and physiology is demonstrated by their clear implications in human diseases. Mutations in the genes encoding NLRP3 or NLRP12 lead to hereditary periodic fever syndromes, while mutations in CARD15 that encodes NOD2 are linked to Crohn’s disease or Blau’s syndrome. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified a number of risk alleles encompassing NLR genes in a host of diseases including allergic rhinitis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, multi-bacillary leprosy, vitiligo, early-onset menopause, and bone density loss in elderly women. Animal models have allowed the characterization of underlying effector mechanisms in a number of cases. In this review, we highlight the functions of NLRs in health and disease and discuss how the characterization of their molecular mechanisms provides new insights into therapeutic strategies for the management of inflammatory pathologies. PMID:24137163

  4. DIP2A functions as a FSTL1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Noriyuki; Asaumi, Yasuhide; Ohashi, Koji; Higuchi, Akiko; Sono-Romanelli, Saki; Oshima, Yuichi; Walsh, Kenneth

    2010-03-01

    FSTL1 is an extracellular glycoprotein whose functional significance in physiological and pathological processes is incompletely understood. Recently, we have shown that FSTL1 acts as a muscle-derived secreted factor that is up-regulated by Akt activation and ischemic stress and that FSTL1 exerts favorable actions on the heart and vasculature. Here, we sought to identify the receptor that mediates the cellular actions of FSTL1. We identified DIP2A as a novel FSTL1-binding partner from the membrane fraction of endothelial cells. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed a direct physical interaction between FSTL1 and DIP2A. DIP2A was present on the cell surface of endothelial cells, and knockdown of DIP2A by small interfering RNA reduced the binding of FSTL1 to cells. In cultured endothelial cells, knockdown of DIP2A by small interfering RNA diminished FSTL1-stimulated survival, migration, and differentiation into network structures and inhibited FSTL1-induced Akt phosphorylation. In cultured cardiac myocytes, ablation of DIP2A reduced the protective actions of FSTL1 on hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis and suppressed FSTL1-induced Akt phosphorylation. These data indicate that DIP2A functions as a novel receptor that mediates the cardiovascular protective effects of FSTL1. PMID:20054002

  5. First evidence for functional vomeronasal 2 receptor genes in primates.

    PubMed

    Hohenbrink, Philipp; Mundy, Nicholas I; Zimmermann, Elke; Radespiel, Ute

    2013-02-23

    Two classes of vomeronasal receptor genes, V1R and V2R, occur in vertebrates. Whereas, V1R loci are found in a wide variety of mammals, including primates, intact V2R genes have thus far only been described in rodents and marsupials. In primates, the V2R repertoire has been considered degenerate. Here, we identify for the first time two intact V2R loci in a strepsirrhine primate, the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), and demonstrate their expression in the vomeronasal organ. Putatively functional orthologues are present in two other strepsirrhines, whereas, both loci are pseudogenes in a range of anthropoid species. The functional significance of the loci is unknown, but positive selection on one of them is consistent with an adaptive role in pheromone detection. Finally, conservation of V2R loci in strepsirrhines is notable, given their high diversity and role in MUP and MHC detection in rodents. PMID:23269843

  6. Flow cytometric analysis of expression of interleukin-2 receptor beta chain (p70-75) on various leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, S.; Oshimi, K.; Tsudo, M.; Miyasaka, M.; Teramura, M.; Masuda, M.; Motoji, T.; Mizoguchi, H. )

    1990-08-15

    We analyzed the expression of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) beta chain (p70-75) on various leukemic cells from 44 patients by flow cytometric analysis using the IL-2R beta chain-specific monoclonal antibody, designated Mik-beta 1. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the expression of the IL-2R beta chain on granular lymphocytes (GLs) from all eight patients with granular lymphocyte proliferative disorders (GLPDs), on adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells from all three patients with ATL, and on T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells from one of three patients with T-ALL. Although GLs from all the GLPD patients expressed the IL-2R beta chain alone and not the IL-2R alpha chain (Tac-antigen: p55), ATL and T-ALL cells expressing the beta chain coexpressed the alpha chain. In two of seven patients with common ALL (cALL) and in both patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the leukemic cells expressed the alpha chain alone. Neither the alpha chain nor the beta chain was expressed on leukemic cells from the remaining 28 patients, including all 18 patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, five of seven patients with cALL, all three patients with multiple myeloma, and two of three patients with T-ALL. These results indicate that three different forms of IL-2R chain expression exist on leukemic cells: the alpha chain alone; the beta chain alone; and both the alpha and beta chains. To examine whether the results obtained by flow cytometric analysis actually reflect functional aspects of the expressed IL-2Rs, we studied the specific binding of 125I-labeled IL-2 (125I-IL-2) to leukemic cells in 18 of the 44 patients. In addition, we performed 125I-IL-2 crosslinking studies in seven patients. The results of IL-2R expression of both 125I-IL-2 binding assay and crosslinking studies were in agreement with those obtained by flow cytometric analysis.

  7. Failure of low-dose recombinant human IL-2 to support the survival of virus-specific CTL clones infused into severe combined immunodeficient foals: lack of correlation between in vitro activity and in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Robert H; Littke, Matt H; Leib, Steven R; Davis, William C; McGuire, Travis C

    2008-01-15

    Although CTL are important for control of lentiviruses, including equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), it is not known if CTL can limit lentiviral replication in the absence of CD4 help and neutralizing antibody. Adoptive transfer of EIAV-specific CTL clones into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) foals could resolve this issue, but it is not known whether exogenous IL-2 administration is sufficient to support the engraftment and proliferation of CTL clones infused into immunodeficient horses. To address this question we adoptively transferred EIAV Rev-specific CTL clones into four EIAV-challenged SCID foals, concurrent with low-dose aldesleukin (180,000U/m2), a modified recombinant human IL-2 (rhuIL-2) product. The dose was calculated based on the specific activity on equine PBMC in vitro, and resulted in plasma concentrations considered sufficient to saturate high affinity IL-2 receptors in humans. Despite specific activity on equine PBMC that was equivalent to recombinant equine IL-2 and another form of rhuIL-2, aldesleukin did not support the engraftment and expansion of infused CTL clones, and control of viral load and clinical disease did not occur. It was concluded that survival of Rev-specific CTL clones infused into EIAV-challenged SCID foals was not enhanced by aldesleukin at the doses used in this study, and that in vitro specific activity did not correlate with in vivo efficacy. Successful adoptive immunotherapy with CTL clones in immunodeficient horses will likely require higher doses of rhuIL-2, co-infusion of CD4+ T lymphocytes, or administration of equine IL-2. PMID:17727961

  8. Functional interaction between Lypd6 and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M; Soni, Neeraj; Wang, Hong; Klein, Anders B; Thiriet, Nathalie; Pinborg, Lars H; Muldoon, Pretal P; Wienecke, Jacob; Imad Damaj, M; Kohlmeier, Kristi A; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Thomsen, Morten S

    2016-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) affect multiple physiological functions in the brain and their functions are modulated by regulatory proteins of the Lynx family. Here, we report for the first time a direct interaction of the Lynx protein LY6/PLAUR domain-containing 6 (Lypd6) with nAChRs in human brain extracts, identifying Lypd6 as a novel regulator of nAChR function. Using protein cross-linking and affinity purification from human temporal cortical extracts, we demonstrate that Lypd6 is a synaptically enriched membrane-bound protein that binds to multiple nAChR subtypes in the human brain. Additionally, soluble recombinant Lypd6 protein attenuates nicotine-induced hippocampal inward currents in rat brain slices and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells, suggesting that binding of Lypd6 is sufficient to inhibit nAChR-mediated intracellular signaling. We further show that perinatal nicotine exposure in rats (4 mg/kg/day through minipumps to dams from embryonic day 7 to post-natal day 21) significantly increases Lypd6 protein levels in the hippocampus in adulthood, which did not occur after exposure to nicotine in adulthood only. Our findings suggest that Lypd6 is a versatile inhibitor of cholinergic signaling in the brain, and that Lypd6 is dysregulated by nicotine exposure during early development. Regulatory proteins of the Lynx family modulate the function of nicotinic receptors (nAChRs). We report for the first time that the Lynx protein Lypd6 binds to nAChRs in human brain extracts, and that recombinant Lypd6 decreases nicotine-induced ERK phosphorylation and attenuates nicotine-induced hippocampal inward currents. Our findings suggest that Lypd6 is a versatile inhibitor of cholinergic signaling in the brain. PMID:27344019

  9. Structural and functional characterisation of ferret interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Ren, Bin; McKinstry, William J; Pham, Tam; Newman, Janet; Layton, Daniel S; Bean, Andrew G; Chen, Zhenjun; Laurie, Karen L; Borg, Kathryn; Barr, Ian G; Adams, Timothy E

    2016-02-01

    While the ferret is a valuable animal model for a number of human viral infections, such as influenza, Hendra and Nipah, evaluating the cellular immune response following infection has been hampered by the lack of a number of species-specific immunological reagents. Interleukin 2 (IL-2) is one such key cytokine. Ferret recombinant IL-2 incorporating a C-terminal histidine tag was expressed and purified and the three-dimensional structure solved and refined at 1.89 Å by X-ray crystallography, which represents the highest resolution and first non-human IL-2 structure. While ferret IL-2 displays the classic cytokine fold of the four-helix bundle structure, conformational flexibility was observed at the second helix and its neighbouring region in the bundle, which may result in the disruption of the spatial arrangement of residues involved in receptor binding interactions, implicating subtle differences between ferret and human IL-2 when initiating biological functions. Ferret recombinant IL-2 stimulated the proliferation of ferret lymph node cells and induced the expression of mRNA for IFN-γ and Granzyme A. PMID:26472619

  10. Differential Expression of Functional Fc-Receptors and Additional Immune Complex Receptors on Mouse Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suwanichkul, Adisak; Wenderfer, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    The precise mechanisms by which circulating immune complexes accumulate in the kidney to form deposits in glomerulonephritis are not well understood. In particular, the role of resident cells within glomeruli of the kidney has been widely debated. Immune complexes have been shown to bind one glomerular cell type (mesangial cells) leading to functional responses such as pro-inflammatory cytokine production. To further assess the presence of functional immunoreceptors on resident glomerular cells, cultured mouse renal epithelial, endothelial, and mesangial cells were treated with heat-aggregated mouse IgG or preformed murine immune complexes. Mesangial and renal endothelial cells were found to bind IgG complexes, whereas glomerular epithelial cell binding was minimal. A blocking antibody for Fc-gamma receptors reduced binding to mesangial cells but not renal endothelial cells, suggesting differential immunoreceptor utilization. RT-PCR and immunostaining based screening of cultured renal endothelial cells showed limited low-level expression of known Fc-receptors and Igbinding proteins. The interaction between mesangial cells and renal endothelial cells and immune complexes resulted in distinct, cell-specific patterns of chemokine and cytokine production. This novel pathway involving renal endothelial cells likely contributes to the predilection of circulating immune complex accumulation within the kidney and to the inflammatory responses that drive kidney injury. PMID:23911392

  11. Lysis of pig endothelium by IL-2 activated human natural killer cells is inhibited by swine and human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I gene products.

    PubMed

    Itescu, S; Artrip, J H; Kwiatkowski, P A; Wang, S F; Minanov, O P; Morgenthau, A S; Michler, R E

    1997-01-01

    We have previously described a form of xenograft rejection, mediated by natural killer (NK) cells, occurring in pig-to-primate organ transplants beyond the period of antibody-mediated hyperacute rejection. In this study, two distinct NK activation pathways were identified as mechanisms of pig aortic endotheliual cell (PAEC) lysis by human NK cells. Using an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, a progressive increase in human NK lysis of PAEC was observed following incubation with human IgG at increasing serum titer. In the absence of IgG, a second mechanism of PAEC lysis by human NK cells was observed following activation with IL-2. IL-2 activation of human NK cells increased lysis of PAEC by over 3-fold compared with ADCC. These results indicate that IL-2 activation of human NK cells induces significantly higher levels of lytic activity than does conventional ADCC involving IgG and FcRIII. We next investigated the role of MHC class I molecules in the regulation of NK lysis following IL-2 activation. PAEC expression of SLA class I molecules was increased by up to 75% by treatment with human TNFa. Following treatment with TNFa at 1 u/ml, IL-2 activated human NK lysis of PAEC was inhibited at every effector:target (E:T) ratio tested. Maximal effect occurred at an E:T ratio of 10:1, with TNFa inhibiting specific lysis by 59% (p < 0.01). Incubation with an anti-SLA class I Mab, but not IgG isotype control, abrogated the protective effects of TNFa on NK lysis of PAEC, suggesting direct inhibitory effects of SLA class I molecules on human NK function. To investigate whether human MHC class I molecules might have similar effects on human NK lysis of PAEC, further experiments were performed using a soluble peptide derived from the alpha-helical region of HLA-B7. Incubation with the HLA-B7 derived peptide significantly reduced the IL-2 activated NK lytic activity against PAEC in a dose-dependent fashion. Maximal effect occurred at a concentration of 10 mg

  12. REEP2 Enhances Sweet Receptor Function by Recruitment to Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Ilegems, Erwin; Iwatsuki, Ken; Kokrashvili, Zaza; Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Margolskee, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    Heterologously expressed sensory receptors generally do not achieve the ligand sensitivity observed in vivo, and may require specific accessory proteins to ensure optimal function. We searched for taste cell-expressed receptor transporting protein (RTP) and receptor expression enhancing protein (REEP) family members that might serve as accessory molecules to enhance gustatory receptor function. We determined that REEP2 is an integral membrane protein expressed in taste cells, physically associates with both subunits of the type 1 taste receptor 2 and type 1 taste receptor 3 sweet receptor and specifically enhances responses to tastants of heterologously expressed sweet and bitter taste receptors. Downregulation of endogenously expressed REEP2 in the chemosensory enteroendocrine GLUTag cell line dramatically reduced sensitivity of endogenous sweet receptors. In contrast to the observation that RTP1, RTP2, and REEP1 enhance function of olfactory receptors by promoting their transit to the cell surface, we found that REEP2 does not increase cell surface expression of sweet receptors but instead alters their spatial organization. REEP2 recruits sweet receptors into lipid raft microdomains localized near the taste cell’s apical region, thereby improving G-protein-coupled receptor signaling and promoting receptor access to tastants arriving through the apical taste pore. PMID:20943918

  13. Functional Characterization of Three Mouse Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui-Qiong; Liao, Dan; Wang, Zhen-Guo; Wang, Zhong-Li; Zhou, Hu-Chen; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary relationship and functional correlation between human formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) and their mouse counterparts remain incompletely understood. We examined three members of the mouse formyl peptide receptor subfamily (mFprs) and found that they differ in agonist preference and cellular distributions. When stably expressed in transfected rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells, mFpr1 was readily activated by N-formylated peptides derived from Listeria monocytogenes (fMIVTLF), Staphylococcus aureus (fMIFL), and mitochondria (fMMYALF). In contrast, the Escherichia coli–derived fMLF was 1000-fold less potent. The aforementioned peptides were much less efficacious at mFpr2, which responded better to the synthetic hexapeptide WKYMVm, the synthetic agonists Quin-C1 (a substituted quinazolinone), and compound 43 (a nitrosylated pyrazolone derivative). Saturation binding assays showed that mFpr1 and mFpr2 were expressed at similar levels on the cell surface, although their affinity for N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-Ile-Ile-Lys-fluorescein isothiocyanate varied by more than 1000-fold [dissociation constant (Kd) values of 2.8 nM for mFpr1 and 4.8 μM for mFpr2]). Contrary to these receptors, mFpr-rs1 responded poorly to all the previously mentioned peptides that were tested. Fluorescent microscopy revealed an intracellular distribution pattern of mFpr-rs1. On the basis of these results, we conclude that mFpr1 is an ortholog of human FPR1 with certain pharmacologic properties of human FPR2/ALX, whereas mFpr2 has much lower affinity for formyl peptides. The intracellular distribution of mFpr-rs1 suggests an evolutionary correlation with human FPR3. PMID:23160941

  14. Human natural killer cells: origin, receptors, function, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Moretta, Lorenzo; Montaldo, Elisa; Vacca, Paola; Del Zotto, Genny; Moretta, Francesca; Merli, Pietro; Locatelli, Franco; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important effectors playing a relevant role in innate immunity, primarily in tumor surveillance and in defenses against viruses. Human NK cells recognize HLA class I molecules through surface receptors (KIR and NKG2A) that inhibit NK cell function and kill target cells that have lost (or underexpress) HLA class I molecules as it occurs in tumors or virus-infected cells. NK cell activation is mediated by an array of activating receptors and co-receptors that recognize ligands expressed primarily on tumors or virus-infected cells. In vivo anti-tumor NK cell activity may be suppressed by tumor or tumor-associated cells. Alloreactive NK cells (i.e. those that are not inhibited by the HLA class I alleles of the patient) derived from HSC of haploidentical donors play a major role in the cure of high-risk leukemia, by killing leukemia blasts and patient's DC, thus preventing tumor relapses and graft-versus-host disease. The expression of the HLA-C2-specific activating KIR2DS1 may also contribute to NK alloreactivity in patients expressing C2 alleles. A clear correlation has been proven between the size of the alloreactive NK cell population and the clinical outcome. Recently, haplo-HSCT has been further improved with the direct infusion, together with HSC, of donor-derived, mature alloreactive NK cells and TCRγδ(+) T cells - both contributing to a prompt anti-leukemia effect together with an efficient defense against pathogens during the 6- to 8-week interval required for the generation of alloreactive NK cells from HSC. PMID:25323661

  15. Functional dopamine D2 receptors on rat vagal afferent neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, A J; Krstew, E; Jarrott, B

    1995-01-01

    1. In the present study in vitro electrophysiology and receptor autoradiography were used to determine whether rat vagal afferent neurones possess dopamine D2 receptors. 2. Dopamine (10-300 microM) elicited a temperature- and concentration-dependent depolarization of the rat isolated nodose ganglion preparation. When applied to the tissue 15 min prior to agonist, raclopride (10 microM), clozapine (10 microM) or a mixture of raclopride and clozapine (10 microM each) all produced a threefold parallel shift to the right of the dopamine concentration-response curve. In contrast, SCH 23390 (100 nM), phentolamine and propranolol (1 microM each) failed to antagonize the dopamine-mediated depolarization. 3. [125I]-NCQ 298 (0.5 nM), a D2 selective radioligand, bound topographically to sections of rat brainstem. Densitometric quantification of autoradiograms revealed 93.8 +/- 0.5% specific binding of this salicylamide radioligand, as determined by raclopride (10 microM, n = 10 animals). Binding was highest in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), particularly the medial and gelatinous subnuclei. In addition, specific binding was also observed in the interpolar spinal trigeminal nucleus and the inferior olive. 4. Unilateral nodose ganglionectomy caused a 36.6 +/- 3.0% reduction in specific binding in the denervated NTS compared to the contralateral NTS. Furthermore, the loss of binding was confined to the dorsal aspect of the medial subnucleus of the NTS. Sham surgery had no effect on the binding of [125I]-NCQ 298 in rat brainstem. 5. The present data provide evidence for the presence of functionally relevant dopamine D2 receptors on both the soma and central terminals of rat vagal afferent neurones.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 3 PMID:7606337

  16. Third generation antipsychotic drugs: partial agonism or receptor functional selectivity?

    PubMed Central

    Mailman, Richard B.; Murthy, Vishakantha

    2010-01-01

    Functional selectivity is the term that describes drugs that cause markedly different signaling through a single receptor (e.g., full agonist at one pathway and antagonist at a second). It has been widely recognized recently that this phenomenon impacts the understanding of mechanism of action of some drugs, and has relevance to drug discovery. One of the clinical areas where this mechanism has particular importance is in the treatment of schizophrenia. Antipsychotic drugs have been grouped according to both pattern of clinical action and mechanism of action. The original antipsychotic drugs such as chlorpromazine and haloperidol have been called typical or first generation. They cause both antipsychotic actions and many side effects (extrapyramidal and endocrine) that are ascribed to their high affinity dopamine D2 receptor antagonism. Drugs such as clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone and others were then developed that avoided the neurological side effects (atypical or second generation antipsychotics). These compounds are divided mechanistically into those that are high affinity D2 and 5-HT2A antagonists, and those that also bind with modest affinity to D2, 5-HT2A, and many other neuroreceptors. There is one approved third generation drug, aripiprazole, whose actions have been ascribed alternately to either D2 partial agonism or D2 functional selectivity. Although partial agonism has been the more widely accepted mechanism, the available data are inconsistent with this mechanism. Conversely, the D2 functional selectivity hypothesis can accommodate all current data for aripiprazole, and also impacts on discovery compounds that are not pure D2 antagonists. PMID:19909227

  17. Functional Analyses of Bitter Taste Receptors in Domestic Cats (Felis catus).

    PubMed

    Lei, Weiwei; Ravoninjohary, Aurore; Li, Xia; Margolskee, Robert F; Reed, Danielle R; Beauchamp, Gary K; Jiang, Peihua

    2015-01-01

    Cats are obligate carnivores and under most circumstances eat only animal products. Owing to the pseudogenization of one of two subunits of the sweet receptor gene, they are indifferent to sweeteners, presumably having no need to detect plant-based sugars in their diet. Following this reasoning and a recent report of a positive correlation between the proportion of dietary plants and the number of Tas2r (bitter receptor) genes in vertebrate species, we tested the hypothesis that if bitter perception exists primarily to protect animals from poisonous plant compounds, the genome of the domestic cat (Felis catus) should have lost functional bitter receptors and they should also have reduced bitter receptor function. To test functionality of cat bitter receptors, we expressed cat Tas2R receptors in cell-based assays. We found that they have at least 7 functional receptors with distinct receptive ranges, showing many similarities, along with some differences, with human bitter receptors. To provide a comparative perspective, we compared the cat repertoire of intact receptors with those of a restricted number of members of the order Carnivora, with a range of dietary habits as reported in the literature. The numbers of functional bitter receptors in the terrestrial Carnivora we examined, including omnivorous and herbivorous species, were roughly comparable to that of cats thereby providing no strong support for the hypothesis that a strict meat diet influences bitter receptor number or function. Maintenance of bitter receptor function in terrestrial obligate carnivores may be due to the presence of bitter compounds in vertebrate and invertebrate prey, to the necessary role these receptors play in non-oral perception, or to other unknown factors. We also found that the two aquatic Carnivora species examined had fewer intact bitter receptors. Further comparative studies of factors driving numbers and functions of bitter taste receptors will aid in understanding the forces

  18. Functional Analyses of Bitter Taste Receptors in Domestic Cats (Felis catus)

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Weiwei; Ravoninjohary, Aurore; Li, Xia; Margolskee, Robert F.; Reed, Danielle R.; Beauchamp, Gary K.; Jiang, Peihua

    2015-01-01

    Cats are obligate carnivores and under most circumstances eat only animal products. Owing to the pseudogenization of one of two subunits of the sweet receptor gene, they are indifferent to sweeteners, presumably having no need to detect plant-based sugars in their diet. Following this reasoning and a recent report of a positive correlation between the proportion of dietary plants and the number of Tas2r (bitter receptor) genes in vertebrate species, we tested the hypothesis that if bitter perception exists primarily to protect animals from poisonous plant compounds, the genome of the domestic cat (Felis catus) should have lost functional bitter receptors and they should also have reduced bitter receptor function. To test functionality of cat bitter receptors, we expressed cat Tas2R receptors in cell-based assays. We found that they have at least 7 functional receptors with distinct receptive ranges, showing many similarities, along with some differences, with human bitter receptors. To provide a comparative perspective, we compared the cat repertoire of intact receptors with those of a restricted number of members of the order Carnivora, with a range of dietary habits as reported in the literature. The numbers of functional bitter receptors in the terrestrial Carnivora we examined, including omnivorous and herbivorous species, were roughly comparable to that of cats thereby providing no strong support for the hypothesis that a strict meat diet influences bitter receptor number or function. Maintenance of bitter receptor function in terrestrial obligate carnivores may be due to the presence of bitter compounds in vertebrate and invertebrate prey, to the necessary role these receptors play in non-oral perception, or to other unknown factors. We also found that the two aquatic Carnivora species examined had fewer intact bitter receptors. Further comparative studies of factors driving numbers and functions of bitter taste receptors will aid in understanding the forces

  19. Combination of temozolomide with immunocytokine F16–IL2 for the treatment of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pedretti, M; Verpelli, C; Mårlind, J; Bertani, G; Sala, C; Neri, D; Bello, L

    2010-01-01

    Background: Glioblastoma patients are still not cured by the treatments available at the moment. We investigated the therapeutic properties of temozolomide in combination with F16–IL2, a clinical-stage immunocytokine consisting of human interleukin (IL)-2 fused to the human antibody F16, specific to the A1 domain of tenascin-C. Methods: We conducted three preclinical therapy studies, using subcutaneous and intracranial U87MG glioblastoma tumours xenografted in BALB/c nude mice. The same therapeutic schedule was used, consisting of five total administrations every third day, of 0.525 mg temozolomide, 20 μg F16–IL2, the combination, or the control solution. Results: Immunohistochemical analysis of U87MG xenografts and of human glioblastoma specimens showed selective tumour staining of F16. A quantitative biodistribution confirmed the preferential tumour accumulation of radiolabelled F16–IL2. In the study with subcutaneous xenografts, the combination of F16–IL2 with temozolomide induced complete remission of the animals, which remained tumour free for over 160 days. The same treatment led to a consistent size reduction of intracranial xenografts and to a longer survival of animals. The immunocytokine promoted the recruitment of leukocytes into tumours of both models. Conclusion: The combined use of temozolomide with F16–IL2 deserves clinical investigations, which will be facilitated by the excellent safety profile in cynomolgus monkeys, and by the fact that F16–IL2 is in clinical trials in patients with cancer. PMID:20736949

  20. Identification and function of adenosine A3 receptor in afferent arterioles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Rui; Ge, Ying; Carlstrom, Mattias; Wang, Shaohui; Fu, Yiling; Cheng, Liang; Wei, Jin; Roman, Richard J; Wang, Lei; Gao, Xichun; Liu, Ruisheng

    2015-05-01

    Adenosine plays an important role in regulation of renal microcirculation. All receptors of adenosine, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3, have been found in the kidney. However, little is known about the location and function of the A3 receptor in the kidney. The present study determined the expression and role of A3 receptors in mediating the afferent arteriole (Af-Art) response and studied the interaction of A3 receptors with angiotensin II (ANG II), A1 and A2 receptors on the Af-Art. We found that the A3 receptor expressed in microdissected isolated Af-Art and the mRNA levels of A3 receptor were 59% of A1. In the isolated microperfused Af-Art, A3 receptor agonist IB-MECA did not have a constrictive effect. Activation of A3 receptor dilated the preconstricted Af-Art by norepinephrine and blunted the vasoconstrictive effect of both adenosine A1 receptor activation and ANG II on the Af-Art, respectively. Selective A2 receptor antagonist (both A2A and A2B) had no effect on A3 receptor agonist-induced vasodilation, indicating that the dilatory effect of A3 receptor activation is not mediated by activation of A2 receptor. We conclude that the A3 receptor is expressed in the Af-Art, and activation of the A3 receptor dilates the Af-Art. PMID:25608966

  1. Moesin Functions as a Lipopolysaccharide Receptor on Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Ziad N.; Amar, Salomon; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]), a glycolipid found in the outer membranes of gram-negative bacteria, induces the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 by monocytes/macrophages. The secretion of these biologically active compounds leads to multiple pathological conditions, such as septic shock. There is substantial evidence that chronic exposure to LPS mediates, at least in part, the tissue destruction associated with gram-negative infection. CD14, a 55-kDa protein, has been identified as an LPS receptor. In conjunction with a serum protein, LPS binding protein (LBP), LPS-CD14 interactions mediate many LPS functions in the inflammatory response. However, CD14 lacks a cytoplasmic domain, or any known signal transduction sequence motif, suggesting the existence of another cell surface domain capable of transducing signals. In this paper, we report a second, CD14-independent LPS binding site, which, based on biological activity, appears to be a functional LPS receptor. Cross-linking experiments were performed to identify LPS binding sites. Two molecules were identified: a 55-kDa protein (CD14) and a second, 78-kDa band. Sequencing of the 78-kDa protein by mass spectroscopic analysis revealed 100% homology with moesin (membrane-organizing extension spike protein). Antibody to CD14 induced partial blocking of the LPS response. However, antimoesin monoclonal antibody completely blocked the LPS-induced TNF-α response in human monocytes, without blocking CD14 binding of LPS. Irrelevant isotype controls had no effect. Additional experiments were performed to evaluate the specificity of the antimoesin blocking. Separate experiments evaluated antimoesin effects on monocyte chemotaxis, IL-1 production in response to IL-1 stimulation, and TNF-α secretion in response to Staphylococcus aureus stimulation. Antimoesin blocked only LPS-mediated events. The data suggest that moesin

  2. The Vitamin D Receptor and T Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Kongsbak, Martin; Levring, Trine B.; Geisler, Carsten; von Essen, Marina Rode

    2013-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a nuclear, ligand-dependent transcription factor that in complex with hormonally active vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, regulates the expression of more than 900 genes involved in a wide array of physiological functions. The impact of 1,25(OH)2D3-VDR signaling on immune function has been the focus of many recent studies as a link between 1,25(OH)2D3 and susceptibility to various infections and to development of a variety of inflammatory diseases has been suggested. It is also becoming increasingly clear that microbes slow down immune reactivity by dysregulating the VDR ultimately to increase their chance of survival. Immune modulatory therapies that enhance VDR expression and activity are therefore considered in the clinic today to a greater extent. As T cells are of great importance for both protective immunity and development of inflammatory diseases a variety of studies have been engaged investigating the impact of VDR expression in T cells and found that VDR expression and activity plays an important role in both T cell development, differentiation and effector function. In this review we will analyze current knowledge of VDR regulation and function in T cells and discuss its importance for immune activity. PMID:23785369

  3. Genetic Reconstitution of Functional Acetylcholine Receptor Channels in Mouse Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudio, Toni; Green, W. N.; Hartman, Deborah S.; Hayden, Deborah; Paulson, Henry L.; Sigworth, F. J.; Sine, Steven M.; Swedlund, Anne

    1987-12-01

    Foreign genes can be stably integrated into the genome of a cell by means of DNA-mediated gene transfer techniques, and large quantities of homogenous cells that continuously express these gene products can then be isolated. Such an expression system can be used to study the functional consequences of introducing specific mutations into genes and to study the expressed protein in the absence of cellular components with which it is normally in contact. All four Torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunit complementary DNA's were introduced into the genome of a mouse fibroblast cell by DNA-mediated gene transfer. A clonal cell line that stably produced high concentrations of correctly assembled cell surface AChR's and formed proper ligand-gated ion channels was isolated. With this new expression system, recombinant DNA, biochemical, pharmacological, and electrophysiological techniques were combined to study Torpedo AChR's in a single intact system. The physiological and pharmacological profiles of Torpedo AChR's expressed in mouse fibroblast cells differ in some details from those described earlier, and may provide a more accurate reflection of the properties of this receptor in its natural environment.

  4. Androgen Receptor Structure, Function and Biology: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Rachel A; Grossmann, Mathis

    2016-01-01

    The actions of androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated via the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factor and member of the steroid hormone nuclear receptor family. Given its widespread expression in many cells and tissues, the AR has a diverse range of biological actions including important roles in the development and maintenance of the reproductive, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, immune, neural and haemopoietic systems. AR signalling may also be involved in the development of tumours in the prostate, bladder, liver, kidney and lung. Androgens can exert their actions via the AR in a DNA binding-dependent manner to regulate target gene transcription, or in a non-DNA binding-dependent manner to initiate rapid, cellular events such as the phosphorylation of 2nd messenger signalling cascades. More recently, ligand-independent actions of the AR have also been identified. Given the large volume of studies relating to androgens and the AR, this review is not intended as an extensive review of all studies investigating the AR, but rather as an overview of the structure, function, signalling pathways and biology of the AR as well as its important role in clinical medicine, with emphasis on recent developments in this field. PMID:27057074

  5. Toll-like receptor 2 ligands regulate monocyte Fcγ receptor expression and function.

    PubMed

    Shah, Prexy; Fatehchand, Kavin; Patel, Hemal; Fang, Huiqing; Justiniano, Steven E; Mo, Xiaokui; Jarjoura, David; Tridandapani, Susheela; Butchar, Jonathan P

    2013-04-26

    Fcγ receptor (FcγR) clustering on monocytes/macrophages results in phagocytosis and inflammatory cytokine production, which serve to eliminate antibody-opsonized targets and activate neighboring immune cells. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), which recognizes a range of both bacterial and fungal components, elicits strong proinflammatory responses in these cells when stimulated by ligands, either natural or synthetic. Thus, we explored the possibility that TLR2 agonists could strengthen FcγR activity within the context of antibody therapy. Human peripheral blood monocytes treated with the TLR2 agonist Pam2CSK4 showed significantly enhanced FcγR-mediated cytokine production as well as phagocytic ability. An examination of the molecular mechanism behind this enhancement revealed increased expression of both FcγRIIa and the common γ subunit following Pam2CSK4 treatment. Interestingly however, expression of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb was also modestly increased. Further investigation revealed that Pam2CSK4 also dramatically decreased the expression of SHIP, the major mediator of FcγRIIb inhibitory activity. Using a murine Her2/neu solid tumor model of antibody therapy, we found that Pam2CSK4 significantly enhanced the ability of anti-Her2 antibody to reduce the rate of tumor growth. To verify that the FcγR enhancement was not unique to the diacylated Pam2CSK4, we also tested Pam3CSK4, a related triacylated TLR2 agonist. Results showed significant enhancement in FcγR function and expression. Taken together, these findings indicate that TLR2 activation can positively modulate FcγR and suggest that TLR2 agonists should be considered for testing as adjuvants for antitumor antibody therapy. PMID:23504312

  6. 3′-Functionalized Adamantyl Cannabinoid Receptor Probes

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Go; Tius, Marcus A.; Zhou, Han; Nikas, Spyros P.; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Mallipeddi, Srikrishnan; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    The aliphatic side chain plays a pivotal role in determining the cannabinergic potency of tricyclic classical cannabinoids, and we have previously shown that this chain could be substituted successfully by adamantyl or other polycyclic groups. In an effort to explore the pharmacophoric features of these conformationally fixed groups, we have synthesized a series of analogues in which the C3 position is substituted directly with an adamantyl group bearing functionality at one of the tertiary carbon atoms. These substituents included the electrophilic isothiocyanate and photoactivatable azido groups, both of which are capable of covalent attachment with the target protein. Our results show that substitution at the 3′-adamantyl position can lead to ligands with improved affinities and CB1/CB2 selectivities. Our work has also led to the development of two successful covalent probes with high affinities for both cannabinoid receptors, namely, the electrophilic isothiocyanate AM994 and the photoactivatable aliphatic azido AM993 analogues. PMID:25760146

  7. Functional effects of the muscarinic receptor agonist, xanomeline, at 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Watson, J; Brough, S; Coldwell, M C; Gager, T; Ho, M; Hunter, A J; Jerman, J; Middlemiss, D N; Riley, G J; Brown, A M

    1998-01-01

    Xanomeline [3(3-hexyloxy-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1-methylpyridine] has been reported to act as a functionally selective muscarinic partial agonist with potential use in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. This study examined the functional activity of xanomeline at 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors in native tissue and/or human cloned receptors.Xanomeline had affinity for muscarinic receptors in rat cortical membranes where the ratio of the displacement affinity of [3H]-Quinuclidinyl benzilate vs that of [3H]-Oxotremorine-M was 16, indicative of partial agonist activity. Radioligand binding studies on human cloned receptors confirmed that xanomeline had substantial affinity for M1, M2, M3, M4, M5 receptors and also for 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptor subtypes.Carbachol and xanomeline stimulated basal [35S]-GTPγS binding in rat cortical membranes with micromolar affinity. The response to carbachol was attenuated by himbacine and pirenzepine with pA2 of 8.2, 6.9 respectively consistent with the response being mediated, predominantly, via M2 and M4 receptors. Xanomeline-induced stimulation of [35S]-GTPγS binding was inhibited by himbacine with an apparent pKb of 6.3, was not attenuated by pirenzepine up to 3 μM and was inhibited by the selective 5-HT1A antagonist WAY100635 with an apparent pKb of 9.4. These data suggest the agonist effect of xanomeline in this tissue is, in part, via 5-HT1A receptors. Similar studies on human cloned receptors confirmed that xanomeline is an agonist at human cloned 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors.In studies using the fluorescent cytoplasmic Ca2+ indicator FLUO-3AM, xanomeline induced an increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration in SH-SY5Y cells expressing recombinant human 5-HT2C receptors. Atropine antagonized this response, consistent with mediation via endogenously-expressed muscarinic receptors. In the presence of atropine, xanomeline antagonized 5-HT-induced cytoplasmic changes in Ca2+ concentration in cells expressing h5

  8. Functional co-operation between the subunits in heterodimeric platelet-derived growth factor receptor complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Emaduddin, M; Ekman, S; Rönnstrand, L; Heldin, C H

    1999-01-01

    To determine the importance of the phosphorylation capacity of receptor kinase as well as the ability to serve as docking sites for SH2-domain-containing signal transduction molecules, we established pig aortic endothelial cell lines stably expressing kinase-active platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) alpha-receptors together with kinase-inactive beta-receptors, and vice versa. After stimulation with PDGF-AB, heterodimeric receptor complexes were formed in which the kinase-inactive receptor was phosphorylated by the kinase-active receptor, although less efficiently than in heterodimers of wild-type receptors. The kinase-active receptor was only minimally phosphorylated. Thus the phosphorylation within the receptor dimer occurred in trans between the components. Analyses of the abilities of heterodimeric receptor complexes of one kinase-active and one kinase-inactive receptor to mediate mitogenicity, chemotaxis and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase revealed less efficient effects than those of heterodimers of wild-type receptors. Importantly, however, the fact that signalling capacities were retained illustrates a functional co-operation between the two receptor molecules in the dimer, where one receptor provides a functional kinase and the other acts as a substrate and provides docking sites for downstream signalling molecules. PMID:10417313

  9. Pharmacologic neuroimaging of the ontogeny of dopamine receptor function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y Iris; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Xu, Haibo; Ren, Jiaqian; Andersen, Susan L; Jenkins, Bruce G

    2010-07-01

    Characterization of the ontogeny of the cerebral dopaminergic system is crucial for gaining a greater understanding of normal brain development and its alterations in response to drugs of abuse or conditions such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Pharmacological MRI (phMRI) was used to determine the response to dopamine transporter (DAT) blockers cocaine and methylphenidate (MPH), the dopamine releaser D-amphetamine (AMPH), the selective D1 agonist dihydrexidine, and the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole in young (<30 days old) and adult (>60 days old) rats. In adult rats, cocaine (0.5 mg/kg i.v.) or MPH (2 mg/kg) induced primarily positive cerebral blood volume (rCBV) changes in the dopaminergic circuitry, but negative rCBV changes in the young animals. Microdialysis measurements in the striatum showed that young rats have a smaller increase in extracellular dopamine in response to cocaine than adults. The young rats showed little rCBV response to the selective D1 agonist dihydrexidine in contrast to robust rCBV increases observed in the adults, whereas there was a similar negative rCBV response in the young and adult rats to the D2 agonist quinpirole. We also performed a meta-analysis of literature data on the development of D1 and D2 receptors and the DAT. These data suggest a predominance of D2-like over D1-like function between 20 and 30 days of age. These combined results suggested that the dopamine D1 receptor is functionally inhibited at young age. PMID:20523024

  10. Roles for Oestrogen Receptor β in Adult Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Handa, R. J.; Ogawa, S.; Wang, J. M.; Herbison, A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Oestradiol exerts a profound influence upon multiple brain circuits. For the most part, these effects are mediated by oestrogen receptor (ER)α. We review here the roles of ERβ, the other ER isoform, in mediating rodent oestradiol-regulated anxiety, aggressive and sexual behaviours, the control of gonadotrophin secretion, and adult neurogenesis. Evidence exists for: (i) ERβ located in the paraventricular nucleus underpinning the suppressive influence of oestradiol on the stress axis and anxiety-like behaviour; (ii) ERβ expressed in gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neurones contributing to oestrogen negative-feedback control of gonadotrophin secretion; (iii) ERβ controlling the offset of lordosis behaviour; (iv) ERβ suppressing aggressive behaviour in males; (v) ERβ modulating responses to social stimuli; and (vi) ERβ in controlling adult neurogenesis. This review highlights two major themes; first, ERβ and ERα are usually tightly inter-related in the oestradiol-dependent control of a particular brain function. For example, even though oestradiol feedback to control reproduction occurs principally through ERα-dependent mechanisms, modulatory roles for ERβ also exist. Second, the roles of ERα and ERβ within a particular neural network may be synergistic or antagonistic. Examples of the latter include the role of ERα to enhance, and ERβ to suppress, anxiety-like and aggressive behaviours. Splice variants such as ERβ2, acting as dominant negative receptors, are of further particular interest because their expression levels may reflect preceeding oestradiol exposure of relevance to oestradiol replacement therapy. Together, this review highlights the predominant modulatory, but nonetheless important, roles of ERβ in mediating the many effects of oestradiol upon adult brain function. PMID:21851428

  11. Human native kappa opioid receptor functions not predicted by recombinant receptors: Implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Broad, John; Maurel, Damien; Kung, Victor W S; Hicks, Gareth A; Schemann, Michael; Barnes, Michael R; Kenakin, Terrence P; Granier, Sébastien; Sanger, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    If activation of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors in host cells (by drugs or other ligands) has predictive value, similar data must be obtained with native receptors naturally expressed in tissues. Using mouse and human recombinant κ opioid receptors transfected into a host cell, two selectively-acting compounds (ICI204448, asimadoline) equi-effectively activated both receptors, assessed by measuring two different cell signalling pathways which were equally affected without evidence of bias. In mouse intestine, naturally expressing κ receptors within its nervous system, both compounds also equi-effectively activated the receptor, inhibiting nerve-mediated muscle contraction. However, whereas ICI204448 acted similarly in human intestine, where κ receptors are again expressed within its nervous system, asimadoline was inhibitory only at very high concentrations; instead, low concentrations of asimadoline reduced the activity of ICI204448. This demonstration of species-dependence in activation of native, not recombinant κ receptors may be explained by different mouse/human receptor structures affecting receptor expression and/or interactions with intracellular signalling pathways in native environments, to reveal differences in intrinsic efficacy between receptor agonists. These results have profound implications in drug design for κ and perhaps other receptors, in terms of recombinant-to-native receptor translation, species-dependency and possibly, a need to use human, therapeutically-relevant, not surrogate tissues. PMID:27492592

  12. Human native kappa opioid receptor functions not predicted by recombinant receptors: Implications for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Broad, John; Maurel, Damien; Kung, Victor W. S.; Hicks, Gareth A.; Schemann, Michael; Barnes, Michael R.; Kenakin, Terrence P.; Granier, Sébastien; Sanger, Gareth J.

    2016-01-01

    If activation of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors in host cells (by drugs or other ligands) has predictive value, similar data must be obtained with native receptors naturally expressed in tissues. Using mouse and human recombinant κ opioid receptors transfected into a host cell, two selectively-acting compounds (ICI204448, asimadoline) equi-effectively activated both receptors, assessed by measuring two different cell signalling pathways which were equally affected without evidence of bias. In mouse intestine, naturally expressing κ receptors within its nervous system, both compounds also equi-effectively activated the receptor, inhibiting nerve-mediated muscle contraction. However, whereas ICI204448 acted similarly in human intestine, where κ receptors are again expressed within its nervous system, asimadoline was inhibitory only at very high concentrations; instead, low concentrations of asimadoline reduced the activity of ICI204448. This demonstration of species-dependence in activation of native, not recombinant κ receptors may be explained by different mouse/human receptor structures affecting receptor expression and/or interactions with intracellular signalling pathways in native environments, to reveal differences in intrinsic efficacy between receptor agonists. These results have profound implications in drug design for κ and perhaps other receptors, in terms of recombinant-to-native receptor translation, species-dependency and possibly, a need to use human, therapeutically-relevant, not surrogate tissues. PMID:27492592

  13. Functionalized Congener Approach to the Design of Ligands for G Protein–Coupled Receptors (GPCRs)

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Functionalized congeners, in which a chemically functionalized chain is incorporated at an insensitive site on a pharmacophore, have been designed from the agonist and antagonist ligands of various G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). These chain extensions enable a conjugation strategy for detecting and characterizing GPCR structure and function and pharmacological modulation. The focus in many studies of functionalized congeners has been on two families of GPCRs: those responding to extracellular purines and pyrimidines—i.e., adenosine receptors (ARs) and P2Y nucleotide receptors. Functionalized congeners of small-molecule as ligands for other GPCRs and non-G protein coupled receptors have also been designed. For example, among biogenic amine neurotransmitter receptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists and adrenergic receptor ligands have been studied with a functionalized congener approach. Adenosine A1, A2A, and A3 receptor functionalized congeners have yielded macromolecular conjugates, irreversibly binding AR ligands for receptor inactivation and crosslinking, radioactive probes that use prosthetic groups, immobilized ligands for affinity chromatography, and dual-acting ligands that function as binary drugs. Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers have served as nanocarriers for covalently conjugated AR functionalized congeners. Rational methods of ligand design derived from molecular modeling and templates have been included in these studies. Thus, the design of novel ligands, both small molecules and macromolecular conjugates, for studying the chemical and biological properties of GPCRs have been developed with this approach, has provided researchers with a strategy that is more versatile than the classical medicinal chemical approaches. PMID:19405524

  14. Mineralocorticoid Receptors Modulate Vascular Endothelial Function in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Segal, Mark S.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity increases linearly with age and is associated with impaired vascular endothelial function and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) contribute to impaired vascular endothelial function in cardiovascular disease; however, their role in uncomplicated human obesity is unknown. Because plasma aldosterone levels are elevated in obesity and adipocytes may be a source of aldosterone, we hypothesized that MR modulate vascular endothelial function in older adults in an adiposity-dependent manner. To test this hypothesis, we administered MR blockade (Eplerenone; 100 mg/day) for 1 month in a balanced, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to 22 older adults (10 men, 55–79 years) varying widely in adiposity (body mass index: 20–45 kg/m2) but who were free from overt cardiovascular disease. We evaluated vascular endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD] via ultrasonography) and oxidative stress (plasma F2-isoprostanes and vascular endothelial cell protein expression of nitrotyrosine and NADPH oxidase p47phox) during placebo and MR blockade. In the whole group, oxidative stress (P>0.05) and FMD did not change with MR blockade (6.39±0.67 vs. 6.23±0.73 %, P=0.7, placebo vs. Eplerenone). However, individual improvements in FMD in response to Eplerenone were associated with higher total body fat (body mass index: r=0.45, P=0.02 and DXA-derived % body fat: r=0.50, P=0.009) and abdominal fat (total: r=0.61, P=0.005, visceral: r=0.67, P=0.002 and subcutaneous: r=0.48, P=0.03). In addition, greater improvements in FMD with Eplerenone were related with higher baseline fasting glucose (r=0.53, P=0.01). MR influence vascular endothelial function in an adiposity-dependent manner in healthy older adults. PMID:23786536

  15. Functionally biased signalling properties of 7TM receptors – opportunities for drug development for the ghrelin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sivertsen, B; Holliday, N; Madsen, A N; Holst, B

    2013-01-01

    The ghrelin receptor is a 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptor involved in a variety of physiological functions including growth hormone secretion, increased food intake and fat accumulation as well as modulation of reward and cognitive functions. Because of its important role in metabolism and energy expenditure, the ghrelin receptor has become an important therapeutic target for drug design and the development of anti-obesity compounds. However, none of the compounds developed so far have been approved for commercial use. Interestingly, the ghrelin receptor is able to signal through several different signalling pathways including Gαq, Gαi/o, Gα12/13 and arrestin recruitment. These multiple signalling pathways allow for functionally biased signalling, where one signalling pathway may be favoured over another either by selective ligands or through mutations in the receptor. In the present review, we have described how ligands and mutations in the 7TM receptor may bias the receptors to favour either one G-protein over another or to promote G-protein independent signalling pathways rather than G–protein-dependent pathways. For the ghrelin receptor, both agonist and inverse agonists have been demonstrated to signal more strongly through the Gαq-coupled pathway than the Gα12/13-coupled pathway. Similarly a ligand that promotes Gαq coupling over Gαi coupling has been described and it has been suggested that several different active conformations of the receptor may exist dependent on the properties of the agonist. Importantly, ligands with such biased signalling properties may allow the development of drugs that selectively modulate only the therapeutically relevant physiological functions, thereby decreasing the risk of side effects. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Neuropeptides. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-7 PMID:24032557

  16. Functional expression of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors in neonatal rat trigeminal ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Aya; Sato, Masaki; Kimura, Maki; Yamazaki, Takaki; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Tazaki, Masakazu; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Bradykinin (BK) and its receptors (B1 and B2 receptors) play important roles in inflammatory nociception. However, the patterns of expression and physiological/pathological functions of B1 and B2 receptors in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons remain to be fully elucidated. We investigated the functional expression of BK receptors in rat TG neurons. We observed intense immunoreactivity of B2 receptors in TG neurons, while B1 receptors showed weak immunoreactivity. Expression of the B2 receptor colocalized with immunoreactivities against the pan-neuronal marker, neurofilament H, substance P, isolectin B4, and tropomyosin receptor kinase A antibodies. Both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]o), BK application increased the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). The amplitudes of BK-induced [Ca2+]i increase in the absence of [Ca2+]o were significantly smaller than those in the presence of Ca2+. In the absence of [Ca2+]o, BK-induced [Ca2+]i increases were sensitive to B2 receptor antagonists, but not to a B1 receptor antagonist. However, B1 receptor agonist, Lys-[Des-Arg9]BK, transiently increased [Ca2+]i in primary cultured TG neurons, and these increases were sensitive to a B1 receptor antagonist in the presence of [Ca2+]o. These results indicated that B2 receptors were constitutively expressed and their activation induced the mobilization of [Ca2+]i from intracellular stores with partial Ca2+ influx by BK. Although constitutive B1 receptor expression could not be clearly observed immunohistochemically in the TG cryosection, cultured TG neurons functionally expressed B1 receptors, suggesting that both B1 and B2 receptors involve pathological and physiological nociceptive functions. PMID:26124706

  17. Estrogen Receptor Beta in the Brain: From Form to Function

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Michael J.; Foradori, Chad D.; Handa, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Estrogens have numerous effects on the brain, both in adulthood and during development. These actions of estrogen are mediated by two distinct estrogen receptor (ER) systems, ER alpha (ERα) and ER beta (ERβ). In brain, ERα plays a critical role in regulating reproductive neuroendocrine function and behavior, however, a definitive role for ERβ in any neurobiological function has been slow in forthcoming. Clues to the function of ERβ in the central nervous system can be gleaned from the neuroanatomical distribution of ERβ and the phenotypes of neurons that express ERβ. ERβ immunoreactivity has been found in populations of GnRH, CRH, vasopressin, oxytocin and prolactin containing neurons in the hypothalamus. Utilizing subtype-selective estrogen receptor agonists can help determine the roles for ERβ in non-reproductive behaviors in rat models. ERβ selective agonists exert potent anxiolytic activity when animals were tested in a number of behavioral paradigms. Consistent with this, ERβ selective agonists also inhibited the ACTH and corticosterone response to stress. In contrast, ERα selective agonists were found to be anxiogenic and correspondingly increased the hormonal stress response. Taken together, our studies implicate ERβ as an important modulator of some non-reproductive neurobiological systems. The molecular and neuroanatomical targets of estrogen that are mediated by ERβ remain to be determined. A number of splice variants of ERβ mRNA have been reported in brain tissue. Imaging of eGFP labeled chimeric receptor proteins transfected into cell lines show that ERβ splice variation can alter trafficking patterns and function. The originally described ERβ (herein termed ER-β1) is characterized by possessing a high affinity for estradiol. Similar to ERα, it is localized in the nucleus and is trafficked to nuclear sites termed “hyperspeckles” following ligand binding. In contrast, ER-β2 contains an 18 amino acid insert within the ligand

  18. The counterbalance theory for evolution and function of paired receptors.

    PubMed

    Barclay, A Neil; Hatherley, Deborah

    2008-11-14

    Paired receptors are families of membrane proteins containing similar extracellular regions but differing in their potential for signaling with one type able to give inhibitory signals and the other activating. Inhibitory receptors could be good targets for pathogens to restrict immune responses against them. Here we suggest that activating members may have evolved to counterbalance pathogens utilizing the inhibitory pathway. Thus, if a pathogen utilizes any part of the inhibitory receptor to downregulate responses against itself, it may, because of similarities in structure, also bind the activating receptor and give an opposing signal. We evaluate recent structural data on SIRPalpha (signal regulatory protein) and LILRB1 (leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily B member 1) showing evidence of pathogen pressure in nonligand-binding regions of these receptors together with data on pathogen binding to PIRs (paired Ig-like receptors) to provide support for this theory. PMID:19006692

  19. Potential Role for IL-2 ELISpot in Differentiating Recent and Remote Infection in Tuberculosis Contact Tracing

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Martin; Reiling, Norbert; Eker, Barbara; Rath, Heidrun; Hoerster, Robert; Wappler, Waltraud; Glaewe, Andrea; Schoellhorn, Volker; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Lange, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ release assays (IGRA) have improved tuberculosis contact tracing, but discrimination of recent from remote Mycobacterium tuberculosis contacts is not possible by IGRA alone. We present results of a tuberculosis contact investigation with a new early-secretory-antigenic-target (ESAT)-6 and culture-filtrate-protein (CFP)-10 specific interleukin (IL)-2 ELISpot in addition to ESAT-6 and CFP-10 specific IFN-γ ELISpot and tuberculin skin testing (TST). Results of the TST, IFN-γ ELISpot and IL-2 ELISpot were positive in 6/172 (3.4%), 7/167 (4.2%) and 6/196 (3.1%) of contacts, respectively. Close contact (≥100 hours) to the index case increased the risk of positive results in the IFN-γ ELISpot, TST, and IL-2 ELISpot by 40.8, 19.3, and 2.5 times, respectively. Individuals with a positive IFN-γ ELISpot/negative IL-2 ELISpot result had a median (IQR) duration of index case exposure of 568 hours (133_1000) compared to individuals with a positive IFN-γ ELISpot/positive IL-2 ELISpot result (median = 24 hours; 20_130; p-value = 0.047). Combination of a M. tuberculosis specific IFN-γ ELISpot with a M. tuberculosis specific IL-2 ELISpot significantly improved the identification of individuals with the highest risk of recent M. tuberculosis infection and is a promising method that should be explored to target tuberculosis preventive chemotherapy. PMID:20652022

  20. Expression of functional leptin receptors in rodent Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Caprio, M; Isidori, A M; Carta, A R; Moretti, C; Dufau, M L; Fabbri, A

    1999-11-01

    Several studies indicate that the size of body fat stores and the circulating levels of the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin are able to influence the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The leptin-hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal interactions have been mainly studied at the level of the central nervous system. In this study, we investigated the possibility that leptin may have direct effects on the rodent Leydig cell function. To probe this hypothesis, we first analyzed the expression of leptin receptors (OB-R) in rodent Leydig cells in culture. RT-PCR studies showed that rat Leydig cells express both the long (OB-Rb) and short isoform (OB-Ra) of leptin receptor, whereas MLTC-1 cells (a murine Leydig tumor cell line) express only the long isoform. Short-term (30-90 min) incubation of rat Leydig cells with increasing concentrations ofleptin (2-500 ng/ml) led to a significant and dose-dependent inhibition of human (h)CG-stimulated testosterone (T) production (approximately 60% reduction, IC50 = 20 ng/ml) but no change in basal androgen release. Also, leptin (150 ng/ml) amplified hCG-induced intracellular cAMP formation (1- to 2-fold) without modifying basal cAMP levels. Subsequent experiments showed that leptin inhibited 8Br-cAMP-stimulated T production, indicating that leptin's effect is exerted beyond cAMP. The inhibitory effect of leptin on hCG-induced T secretion was accompanied by a significant reduction of androstenedione and a concomitant rise of the precursor metabolites pregnenolone, progesterone, and 17-OH-progesterone, conceivable with a leptin-induced lesion of 17,20 lyase activity. Separate experiments performed with the MLTC-1 cells (not expressing cytochrome P450-17alpha) showed that leptin, though amplifying hCG-stimulated cAMP production, did not modify hCG-stimulated pregnenolone and progesterone release. These results further indicate that leptin action on steroidogenesis occurs downstream of progesterone synthesis. Northern Blot

  1. The structure and function of cutaneous sensory receptors.

    PubMed

    Munger, B L; Ide, C

    1988-03-01

    The present review of cutaneous sensory receptors begins with a consideration of free nerve endings (FNEs) that can be considered as sensory terminals evidencing the least structural specialization of the axon and associated cells. Using the criteria established by Kruger et al (1981), FNEs of both A delta and C fibers can be identified on the basis of ultrastructural characteristics that include an intimate relationship between axons and the associated epithelium, the lack of a complete Schwann cell investment, the accumulation of numerous vesicles and other cytoplasmic organelles, and for A delta terminals a 1:1 relationship between axon and investing Schwann cell. Using these criteria, the so-called genital end bulbs of the human glans penis are merely a skein of FNEs based on the ultrastructural study of Halata and Munger (1986). Hair follicles of most species studied to date (the exception being the rabbit and to some extent the guinea pig) are multiply innervated with lanceolate, Ruffini and FNEs. The lanceolate terminals are the rapidly adapting terminals that are numerous in guard hairs. Ruffini terminals of hairs resemble those of the periodontal ligament or joint capsules and both are remarkably similar to Golgi tendon organs in terms of ultrastructural characteristics. The key ultrastructural characteristic is the encircling of collagen bundles by axons and associated Schwann and connective tissue cells. Axons frequently enter the epidermis either to terminate as FNEs or become associated with Merkel cells in glabrous skin at the base of the papillary ridges or in clusters of Merkel cells in hairy skin in touch domes or Haarscheiben. Merkel cells have clusters of apparent secretory granules polarized toward the axon and the axon is typically a slowly adapting mechanoreceptor. The function of the granules is not known. Pacinian corpuscles are the largest of the corpuscular receptors of the dermis and are characterized by an elaborate inner core of stacks

  2. Functional differences between neurotransmitter binding sites of muscle acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Tapan K.; Bruhova, Iva; Chakraborty, Srirupa; Gupta, Shaweta; Zheng, Wenjun; Auerbach, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    A muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) has two neurotransmitter binding sites located in the extracellular domain, at αδ and either αε (adult) or αγ (fetal) subunit interfaces. We used single-channel electrophysiology to measure the effects of mutations of five conserved aromatic residues at each site with regard to their contribution to the difference in free energy of agonist binding to active versus resting receptors (ΔGB1). The two binding sites behave independently in both adult and fetal AChRs. For four different agonists, including ACh and choline, ΔGB1 is ∼−2 kcal/mol more favorable at αγ compared with at αε and αδ. Only three of the aromatics contribute significantly to ΔGB1 at the adult sites (αY190, αY198, and αW149), but all five do so at αγ (as well as αY93 and γW55). γW55 makes a particularly large contribution only at αγ that is coupled energetically to those contributions of some of the α-subunit aromatics. The hydroxyl and benzene groups of loop C residues αY190 and αY198 behave similarly with regard to ΔGB1 at all three kinds of site. ACh binding energies estimated from molecular dynamics simulations are consistent with experimental values from electrophysiology and suggest that the αγ site is more compact, better organized, and less dynamic than αε and αδ. We speculate that the different sensitivities of the fetal αγ site versus the adult αε and αδ sites to choline and ACh are important for the proper maturation and function of the neuromuscular synapse. PMID:25422413

  3. TAS2R bitter taste receptors regulate thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Clark, Adam A; Dotson, Cedrick D; Elson, Amanda E T; Voigt, Anja; Boehm, Ulrich; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Steinle, Nanette I; Munger, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of thyroid hormones triiodothyronine and thyroxine (T3/T4) can impact metabolism, body composition, and development. Thus, it is critical to identify novel mechanisms that impact T3/T4 production. We found that type 2 taste receptors (TAS2Rs), which are activated by bitter-tasting compounds such as those found in many foods and pharmaceuticals, negatively regulate thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-dependent Ca(2+) increases and TSH-dependent iodide efflux in thyrocytes. Immunohistochemical Tas2r-dependent reporter expression and real-time PCR analyses reveal that human and mouse thyrocytes and the Nthy-Ori 3-1 human thyrocyte line express several TAS2Rs. Five different agonists for thyrocyte-expressed TAS2Rs reduced TSH-dependent Ca(2+) release in Nthy-Ori 3-1 cells, but not basal Ca(2+) levels, in a dose-dependent manner. Ca(2+) responses were unaffected by 6-n-propylthiouracil, consistent with the expression of an unresponsive variant of its cognate receptor, TAS2R38, in these cells. TAS2R agonists also inhibited basal and TSH-dependent iodide efflux. Furthermore, a common TAS2R42 polymorphism is associated with increased serum T4 levels in a human cohort. Our findings indicate that TAS2Rs couple the detection of bitter-tasting compounds to changes in thyrocyte function and T3/T4 production. Thus, TAS2Rs may mediate a protective response to overingestion of toxic materials and could serve as new druggable targets for therapeutic treatment of hypo- or hyperthyroidism. PMID:25342133

  4. Functional associations among G protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The activity of neurons is controlled by groups of neurotransmitter receptors rather than by individual receptors. Experimental studies have investigated some receptor interactions, but currently little information is available about transcriptional associations among receptors at the whole-brain level. Results A total of 4950 correlations between 100 G protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors were examined across 169 brain regions in the human brain using expression data published in the Allen Human Brain Atlas. A large number of highly significant correlations were found, many of which have not been investigated in hypothesis-driven studies. The highest positive and negative correlations of each receptor are reported, which can facilitate the construction of receptor sets likely to be affected by altered transcription of one receptor (such sets always exist, but their members are difficult to predict). A graph analysis isolated two large receptor communities, within each of which receptor mRNA levels were strongly cross-correlated. Conclusions The presented systematic analysis shows that the mRNA levels of many G protein-coupled receptors are interdependent. This finding is not unexpected, since the brain is a highly integrated complex system. However, the analysis also revealed two novel properties of global brain structure. First, receptor correlations are described by a simple statistical distribution, which suggests that receptor interactions may be guided by qualitatively similar processes. Second, receptors appear to form two large functional communities, which might be differentially affected in brain disorders. PMID:24438157

  5. Growth hormone receptor/binding protein: Physiology and function

    SciTech Connect

    Herington, A.C.; Ymer, S.I.; Stevenson, J.L.; Roupas, P.

    1994-12-31

    Soluble truncated forms of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) are present in the circulation of many species and are also produced by many tissues/cell types. The major high-affinity forms of these GH-binding proteins (GHBP) are derived by alternative splicing of GHR mRNA in rodents, but probably by proteolytic cleavage in other species. Questions still remain with respect to the origins, native molecular forms(s), physiology, and function of the GHBPs, however. The observation that GH induces dimerization of the soluble GHBP and a membrane GHR, and that dimerization of GHR appears to be critical for GH bioactivity suggests that the presentation of GH to target cells, in an unbound form or as a monomeric or dimeric complex with GHBP, may have significant implications for the ability of GH to activate specific postreceptor signaling pathways (tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, G-protein pathways) known to be utilized by GH for its diverse biological effects. This minireview addresses some of these aspects and highlights several new questions which have arisen as a result of recent advances in our understanding of the structure, function, and signaling mechanisms of the membrane bound GHR. 43 refs.

  6. Functional Asymmetries in Cockroach ON and OFF Olfactory Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Burgstaller, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The ON and OFF olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) on the antenna of the American cockroach respond to the same changes in the concentration of the odor of lemon oil, but in the opposite direction. The same jump in concentration raises impulse frequency in the ON and lowers it in the OFF ORN and, conversely, the same concentration drop raises impulse frequency in the OFF and lowers it in the ON ORN. When the new concentration level is maintained, it becomes a background concentration and affects the responses of the ON and OFF ORNs to superimposed changes. Raising the background concentration decreases both the ON-ORN's response to concentration jumps and the OFF-ORN's response to concentration drops. In addition, the slopes of the functions approximating the relationship of impulse frequency to concentration changes become flatter for both types of ORNs as the background concentration rises. The progressively compressed scaling optimizes the detection of concentration changes in the low concentration range. The loss of information caused by the lower differential sensitivity in the high concentration range is partially compensated by the higher discharge rates of the OFF ORNs. The functional asymmetry of the ON and OFF ORNs, which reflects nonlinearity in the detection of changes in the concentration of the lemon oil odor, improves information transfer for decrements in the high concentration range. PMID:21160009

  7. Functional asymmetries in cockroach ON and OFF olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Maria; Tichy, Harald

    2011-02-01

    The ON and OFF olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) on the antenna of the American cockroach respond to the same changes in the concentration of the odor of lemon oil, but in the opposite direction. The same jump in concentration raises impulse frequency in the ON and lowers it in the OFF ORN and, conversely, the same concentration drop raises impulse frequency in the OFF and lowers it in the ON ORN. When the new concentration level is maintained, it becomes a background concentration and affects the responses of the ON and OFF ORNs to superimposed changes. Raising the background concentration decreases both the ON-ORN's response to concentration jumps and the OFF-ORN's response to concentration drops. In addition, the slopes of the functions approximating the relationship of impulse frequency to concentration changes become flatter for both types of ORNs as the background concentration rises. The progressively compressed scaling optimizes the detection of concentration changes in the low concentration range. The loss of information caused by the lower differential sensitivity in the high concentration range is partially compensated by the higher discharge rates of the OFF ORNs. The functional asymmetry of the ON and OFF ORNs, which reflects nonlinearity in the detection of changes in the concentration of the lemon oil odor, improves information transfer for decrements in the high concentration range. PMID:21160009

  8. Regulation of the human interleukin-2/interleukin-2 receptor system: A role for immunosuppression

    SciTech Connect

    Kaempfer, R.

    1994-12-31

    The strength of the cellular immune response is regulated to a large extent by the amount of interleukin-2 (IL-2) produced in response to a stimulus. The ability of lymphocytes and other cells to respond to IL-2 depends upon the expression of cell surface IL-2 receptors. Formation of a high-affinity IL-2 receptor is regulated primarily through induction of its {alpha} subunit, IL-2R{alpha}. Once formed, the IL-2R{alpha} chain turns over rapidly, rendering expression of high-affinity IL-2 receptors during the immune response dependent upon continuous activity of the IL-2R{alpha} gene. The induced expression of both human IL-2 and IL-2R{alpha} chains is sensitive to cell-mediated suppression by CD8 cells; depletion of CD8 cells leads to extensive superinduction. This coupled suppression of IL-2 and IL-2R{alpha} genes greatly increases the extend of control, and strongly limits the strength, of the signal transduced by this ligand/receptor system during an immune response. 29 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Selexipag: a selective prostacyclin receptor agonist that does not affect rat gastric function.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Keith; Ernst, Roland; Hess, Patrick; Studer, Rolf; Clozel, Martine

    2010-10-01

    Selexipag [2-{4-[(5,6-diphenylpyrazin-2-yl)(isopropyl)amino]butoxy}-N-(methylsulfonyl)acetamide] is an orally available prostacyclin (PGI(2)) receptor (IP receptor) agonist that is chemically distinct from PGI(2) and is in clinical development for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Selexipag is highly selective for the human IP receptor in vitro, whereas analogs of PGI(2) can activate prostanoid receptors other than the IP receptor. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of selectivity for the IP receptor on gastric function by measuring 1) contraction of rat gastric fundus ex vivo and 2) the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal transport in response to selexipag in comparison with other PGI(2) analogs. The rat gastric fundus expresses mRNA encoding multiple prostanoid receptors to different levels: prostaglandin E receptor 1 (EP(1)) > prostaglandin E receptor 3 (EP(3)), IP receptor > prostaglandin D(2) receptor 1, thromboxane receptor. Selexipag and metabolite {4-[(5,6-diphenylpyrazin-2-yl)(isopropyl)amino]butoxy}acetic acid (ACT-333679) did not contract gastric fundus at concentrations up to 10(-3) M. In contrast, the PGI(2) analogs iloprost and beraprost evoked concentration-dependent contraction of gastric fundus. Contraction to treprostinil was observed at high concentration (10(-4) M). Contraction to all PGI(2) analogs was mediated via activation of EP(3) receptors, although EP(1) receptors also contributed to the contraction of gastric fundus to iloprost and beraprost. Antagonism of IP receptors did not affect responses. Oral selexipag did not significantly alter gastric function in vivo, as measured by rates of stomach emptying and intestinal transport, whereas beraprost slowed gastrointestinal transport. The high functional selectivity of selexipag and ACT-333679 for the IP receptor precludes a stimulatory action on gastric smooth muscle and may help minimize gastric side effects such as nausea and vomiting. PMID:20660124

  10. Localization of a type 1 diabetes locus in the IL2RA/CD25 region by use of tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Vella, Adrian; Cooper, Jason D; Lowe, Christopher E; Walker, Neil; Nutland, Sarah; Widmer, Barry; Jones, Richard; Ring, Susan M; McArdle, Wendy; Pembrey, Marcus E; Strachan, David P; Dunger, David B; Twells, Rebecca C J; Clayton, David G; Todd, John A

    2005-05-01

    As part of an ongoing search for genes associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D), a common autoimmune disease, we tested the biological candidate gene IL2RA (CD25), which encodes a subunit (IL-2R alpha) of the high-affinity interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor complex. We employed a tag single-nucleotide polymorphism (tag SNP) approach in large T1D sample collections consisting of 7,457 cases and controls and 725 multiplex families. Tag SNPs were analyzed using a multilocus test to provide a regional test for association. We found strong statistical evidence in the case-control collection (P=6.5x10(-8)) for a T1D locus in the CD25 region of chromosome 10p15 and replicated the association in the family collection (P=7.3x10(-3); combined P=1.3x10(-10)). These results illustrate the utility of tag SNPs in a chromosome-regional test of disease association and justify future fine mapping of the causal variant in the region. PMID:15776395

  11. Molecular insights on the peripheral and intra-tumoral effects of systemic high dose rIL-2 (Aldesleukin) administration for the treatment of metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Geoffrey R.; Grosh, William W.; Chianese-Bullock, Kimberly A.; Zhao, Yingdong; Liu, Hui; Slingluff, Craig L.; Marincola, Francesco M; Wang, Ena

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We have previously shown that within tumors, recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2, Aldesleukin) consistently activates tumor-associated macrophages and up-regulates interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) while inducing minimal migration, activation or proliferation of T-cells. These effects are independent of tumor response to treatment. Here, we prospectively evaluated transcriptional alterations induced by rIL-2 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and within melanoma metastases. Experimental Design We evaluated gene expression changes by serially comparing pre- to post-treatment samples in 14 patients and also compared transcriptional differences among lesions displaying different responsiveness to therapy, focusing on 2 lesions decreasing in size and 2 remaining stable (responding lesions) compared to non-responding ones. Results As previously described, the effects of rIL-2 were dramatic within PBMC, while effects within the tumor microenvironment were lesion-specific and limited. However, distinct signatures specific to response could be observed in responding lesions pre-treatment that were amplified following rIL-2 administration. These signatures match the functional profile observed in other human or experimental models in which immune-mediated tissue-specific destruction (TSD) occurs underlying a common pathways leading to rejection. Moreover, the signatures observed in pre-treatment lesions were qualitatively similar to those associated with TSD underlining a determinism to immune responsiveness that depends upon the genetic background of the host or the intrinsic genetic makeup of individual tumors. Conclusions This is the first prospectively collected insight on global transcriptional events occurring during high-dose rIL-2 therapy in melanoma metastases responding to treatment. PMID:21976537

  12. Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptor Structure, Signaling, Ligands, Functions, and Interactions with Opioid Systems.

    PubMed

    Toll, Lawrence; Bruchas, Michael R; Calo', Girolamo; Cox, Brian M; Zaveri, Nurulain T

    2016-04-01

    The NOP receptor (nociceptin/orphanin FQ opioid peptide receptor) is the most recently discovered member of the opioid receptor family and, together with its endogenous ligand, N/OFQ, make up the fourth members of the opioid receptor and opioid peptide family. Because of its more recent discovery, an understanding of the cellular and behavioral actions induced by NOP receptor activation are less well developed than for the other members of the opioid receptor family. All of these factors are important because NOP receptor activation has a clear modulatory role on mu opioid receptor-mediated actions and thereby affects opioid analgesia, tolerance development, and reward. In addition to opioid modulatory actions, NOP receptor activation has important effects on motor function and other physiologic processes. This review discusses how NOP pharmacology intersects, contrasts, and interacts with the mu opioid receptor in terms of tertiary structure and mechanism of receptor activation; location of receptors in the central nervous system; mechanisms of desensitization and downregulation; cellular actions; intracellular signal transduction pathways; and behavioral actions with respect to analgesia, tolerance, dependence, and reward. This is followed by a discussion of the agonists and antagonists that have most contributed to our current knowledge. Because NOP receptors are highly expressed in brain and spinal cord and NOP receptor activation sometimes synergizes with mu receptor-mediated actions and sometimes opposes them, an understanding of NOP receptor pharmacology in the context of these interactions with the opioid receptors will be crucial to the development of novel therapeutics that engage the NOP receptor. PMID:26956246

  13. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional erythropoietin receptor: Potential therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    PONIEWIERSKA-BARAN, AGATA; SUSZYNSKA, MALWINA; SUN, WENYUE; ABDELBASET-ISMAIL, AHMED; SCHNEIDER, GABRIELA; BARR, FREDERIC G.; RATAJCZAK, MARIUSZ Z.

    2015-01-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed by cells from the erythroid lineage; however, evidence has accumulated that it is also expressed by some solid tumors. This is an important observation, because recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is employed in cancer patients to treat anemia related to chemo/radiotherapy. In our studies we employed eight rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines (three alveolar-type RMS cell lines and five embrional-type RMS cell lines), and mRNA samples obtained from positive, PAX7-FOXO1-positive, and fusion-negative RMS patient samples. Expression of EpoR was evaluated by RT-PCR, gene array and FACS. The functionality of EpoR in RMS cell lines was evaluated by chemotaxis, adhesion, and direct cell proliferation assays. In some of the experiments, RMS cells were exposed to vincristine (VCR) in the presence or absence of EPO to test whether EPO may impair the therapeutic effect of VCR. We report for a first time that functional EpoR is expressed in human RMS cell lines as well as by primary tumors from RMS patients. Furthermore, EpoR is detectably expressed in both embryonal and alveolar RMS subtypes. At the functional level, several human RMS cell lines responded to EPO stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. Moreover, RMS cells became more resistant to VCR treatment in the presence of EPO. Our findings have important potential clinical implications, indicating that EPO supplementation in RMS patients may have the unwanted side effect of tumor progression. PMID:26412593

  14. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional erythropoietin receptor: Potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Poniewierska-Baran, Agata; Suszynska, Malwina; Sun, Wenyue; Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Schneider, Gabriela; Barr, Frederic G; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2015-11-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed by cells from the erythroid lineage; however, evidence has accumulated that it is also expressed by some solid tumors. This is an important observation, because recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is employed in cancer patients to treat anemia related to chemo/radiotherapy. In our studies we employed eight rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines (three alveolar-type RMS cell lines and five embrional-type RMS cell lines), and mRNA samples obtained from positive, PAX7-FOXO1-positive, and fusion-negative RMS patient samples. Expression of EpoR was evaluated by RT-PCR, gene array and FACS. The functionality of EpoR in RMS cell lines was evaluated by chemotaxis, adhesion, and direct cell proliferation assays. In some of the experiments, RMS cells were exposed to vincristine (VCR) in the presence or absence of EPO to test whether EPO may impair the therapeutic effect of VCR. We report for a first time that functional EpoR is expressed in human RMS cell lines as well as by primary tumors from RMS patients. Furthermore, EpoR is detectably expressed in both embryonal and alveolar RMS subtypes. At the functional level, several human RMS cell lines responded to EPO stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. Moreover, RMS cells became more resistant to VCR treatment in the presence of EPO. Our findings have important potential clinical implications, indicating that EPO supplementation in RMS patients may have the unwanted side effect of tumor progression. PMID:26412593

  15. Presence and functional significance of presynaptic ryanodine receptors.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Ron; Pattarini, Roberto; Geiger, Jonathan D

    2003-04-01

    Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) mediated by sarcoplasmic reticulum resident ryanodine receptors (RyRs) has been well described in cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle. In brain, RyRs are localised primarily to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and have been demonstrated in postsynaptic entities, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes where they regulate intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), membrane potential and the activity of a variety of second messenger systems. Recently, the contribution of presynaptic RyRs and CICR to functions of central and peripheral presynaptic terminals, including neurotransmitter release, has received increased attention. However, there is no general agreement that RyRs are localised to presynaptic terminals, nor is it clear that RyRs regulate a large enough pool of intracellular Ca(2+) to be physiologically significant. Here, we review direct and indirect evidence that on balance favours the notion that ER and RyRs are found in presynaptic terminals and are physiologically significant. In so doing, it became obvious that some of the controversy originates from issues related to (i) the ability to demonstrate conclusively the physical presence of ER and RyRs, (ii) whether the biophysical properties of RyRs are such that they can contribute physiologically to regulation of presynaptic [Ca(2+)](i), (iii) how ER Ca(2+) load and feedback gain of CICR contributes to the ability to detect functionally relevant RyRs, (iv) the distance that Ca(2+) diffuses from plasma membranes to RyRs to trigger CICR and from RyRs to the Active Zone to enhance vesicle release, and (v) the experimental conditions used. The recognition that ER Ca(2+) stores are able to modulate local Ca(2+) levels and neurotransmitter release in presynaptic terminals will aid in the understanding of the cellular mechanisms controlling neuronal function. PMID:12880633

  16. The Neuroendocrine Functions of the Parathyroid Hormone 2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Dimitrov, Eugene; Palkovits, Miklós; Usdin, Ted B.

    2012-01-01

    The G-protein coupled parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2R) is concentrated in endocrine and limbic regions in the forebrain. Its endogenous ligand, tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39), is synthesized in only two brain regions, within the posterior thalamus and the lateral pons. TIP39-expressing neurons have a widespread projection pattern, which matches the PTH2R distribution in the brain. Neuroendocrine centers including the preoptic area, the periventricular, paraventricular, and arcuate nuclei contain the highest density of PTH2R-positive networks. The administration of TIP39 and an antagonist of the PTH2R as well as the investigation of mice that lack functional TIP39 and PTH2R revealed the involvement of the PTH2R in a variety of neural and neuroendocrine functions. TIP39 acting via the PTH2R modulates several aspects of the stress response. It evokes corticosterone release by activating corticotropin-releasing hormone-containing neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Block of TIP39 signaling elevates the anxiety state of animals and their fear response, and increases stress-induced analgesia. TIP39 has also been suggested to affect the release of additional pituitary hormones including arginine-vasopressin and growth hormone. A role of the TIP39-PTH2R system in thermoregulation was also identified. TIP39 may play a role in maintaining body temperature in a cold environment via descending excitatory pathways from the preoptic area. Anatomical and functional studies also implicated the TIP39-PTH2R system in nociceptive information processing. Finally, TIP39 induced in postpartum dams may play a role in the release of prolactin during lactation. Potential mechanisms leading to the activation of TIP39 neurons and how they influence the neuroendocrine system are also described. The unique TIP39-PTH2R neuromodulator system provides the possibility for developing drugs with a novel mechanism of action to control neuroendocrine disorders

  17. The function of histamine receptor H4R in the brain revealed by interaction partners.

    PubMed

    Moya-Garcia, Aurelio A; Rodriguez, Carlos E; Morilla, Ian; Sanchez-Jimenez, Francisca; Ranea, Juan A G

    2011-01-01

    The histamine H4 receptor is mainly expressed in haematopoietic cells, hence is linked to inflammatory and immune system conditions. It has been recently discovered that the receptor is expressed also in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), but its role in the brain remains unclear. We address the potential functions of the histamine H4 receptor in the human brain using a 'guilty by association' logic, by close examination of protein-protein functional associations networks in the human proteome. PMID:21622255

  18. Giant vesicles functionally expressing membrane receptors for an insect pheromone.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Satoshi; Tabuchi, Masashi; Toyota, Taro; Sakurai, Takeshi; Hosoi, Tomohiro; Nomoto, Tomonori; Nakatani, Kei; Fujinami, Masanori; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2014-03-18

    To date, biochemical approaches to membrane receptors have been limited to the following methods: knockout or overexpression of membrane receptors by gene introduction and genome engineering or extraction of membrane receptor-surfactant complexes from innate cells and their introduction into model biomembranes. Here, we describe the development of a third method involving gene expression using cell-free in situ protein synthesis inside model biomembrane capsules. We verified this method by synthesizing olfactory receptors from the silkmoth Bombyx mori inside giant vesicles and found that they were excited in the presence of their ligand the Bombyx mori sex pheromone. PMID:24509495

  19. Lag-3, Tim-3, and TIGIT: Co-inhibitory Receptors with Specialized Functions in Immune Regulation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ana C; Joller, Nicole; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2016-05-17

    Co-inhibitory receptors, such as CTLA-4 and PD-1, have an important role in regulating T cell responses and have proven to be effective targets in the setting of chronic diseases where constitutive co-inhibitory receptor expression on T cells dampens effector T cell responses. Unfortunately, many patients still fail to respond to therapies that target CTLA-4 and PD-1. The next wave of co-inhibitory receptor targets that are being explored in clinical trials include Lag-3, Tim-3, and TIGIT. These receptors, although they belong to the same class of receptors as PD-1 and CTLA-4, exhibit unique functions, especially at tissue sites where they regulate distinct aspects of immunity. Increased understanding of the specialized functions of these receptors will inform the rational application of therapies that target these receptors to the clinic. PMID:27192565

  20. Influence of the beta-adrenergic receptor concentration on functional coupling to the adenylate cyclase system.

    PubMed Central

    Severne, Y; Coppens, D; Bottari, S; Riviere, M; Kram, R; Vauquelin, G

    1984-01-01

    Only part of the beta-adrenergic receptors can undergo functional coupling to the adenylate cyclase regulatory unit. This receptor subpopulation shows an increased affinity for agonists in the presence of Mg2+ and undergoes rapid "inactivation" (locking-in of the agonist) by the alkylating reagent N-ethylmaleimide in the presence of agonists. Several experimental conditions, known to modify the total receptor concentration without alteration of the other components of the adenylate cyclase system, do not affect the percentage of receptors that can undergo functional coupling: (i) homologous regulation of beta 1 receptors in rat brain by noradrenaline (through antidepressive drug or reserpine injections); (ii) up- and down-regulation of the beta 2 receptors in Friend erythroleukemia cells by, respectively, sodium butyrate and cinnarizine treatment; and (iii) dithiothreitol-mediated inactivation of receptors in turkey erythrocytes, Friend erythroleukemia cells, and rat brain. Our findings argue against a stoichiometric limitation in the number of regulatory components, genetically different receptor subpopulations, bound guanine nucleotides, or reduced accessibility of part of the receptors to the agonists as the cause for functional receptor heterogeneity. Differences in either the receptor conformation or its membrane microenvironment are more plausible explanations. PMID:6087337

  1. Rising stars: modulation of brain functions by astroglial type-1 cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Metna-Laurent, Mathilde; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The type-1-cannabinoid (CB1 ) receptor is amongst the most widely expressed G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. In few decades, CB1 receptors have been shown to regulate a large array of functions from brain cell development and survival to complex cognitive processes. Understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying these functions of CB1 is complex due to the heterogeneity of the brain cell types on which the receptor is expressed. Although the large majority of CB1 receptors act on neurons, early studies pointed to a direct control of CB1 receptors over astroglial functions including brain energy supply and neuroprotection. In line with the growing concept of the tripartite synapse highlighting astrocytes as direct players in synaptic plasticity, astroglial CB1 receptor signaling recently emerged as the mediator of several forms of synaptic plasticity associated to important cognitive functions. Here, we shortly review the current knowledge on CB1 receptor-mediated astroglial functions. This functional spectrum is large and most of the mechanisms by which CB1 receptors control astrocytes, as well as their consequences in vivo, are still unknown, requiring innovative approaches to improve this new cannabinoid research field. PMID:25452006

  2. Intratumoral hu14.18-IL-2 (IC) induces local and systemic antitumor effects that involve both activated T and NK cells as well as enhanced IC retention.

    PubMed

    Yang, Richard K; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas A; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L; Ranheim, Erik A; Seo, Songwon; Kim, Kyungmann; Alderson, Kory L; Gan, Jacek; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Gillies, Stephen D; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Sondel, Paul M

    2012-09-01

    hu14.18-IL-2 (IC) is an immunocytokine consisting of human IL-2 linked to hu14.18 mAb, which recognizes the GD2 disialoganglioside. Phase 2 clinical trials of i.v. hu14.18-IL-2 (i.v.-IC) in neuroblastoma and melanoma are underway and have already demonstrated activity in neuroblastoma. We showed previously that intratumoral hu14.18-IL-2 (IT-IC) results in enhanced antitumor activity in mouse models compared with i.v.-IC. The studies presented in this article were designed to determine the mechanisms involved in this enhanced activity and to support the future clinical testing of intratumoral administration of immunocytokines. Improved survival and inhibition of growth of both local and distant tumors were observed in A/J mice bearing s.c. NXS2 neuroblastomas treated with IT-IC compared with those treated with i.v.-IC or control mice. The local and systemic antitumor effects of IT-IC were inhibited by depletion of NK cells or T cells. IT-IC resulted in increased NKG2D receptors on intratumoral NKG2A/C/E⁺ NKp46⁺ NK cells and NKG2A/C/E⁺ CD8⁺ T cells compared with control mice or mice treated with i.v.-IC. NKG2D levels were augmented more in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes compared with splenocytes, supporting the localized nature of the intratumoral changes induced by IT-IC treatment. Prolonged retention of IC at the tumor site was seen with IT-IC compared with i.v.-IC. Overall, IT-IC resulted in increased numbers of activated T and NK cells within tumors, better IC retention in the tumor, enhanced inhibition of tumor growth, and improved survival compared with i.v.-IC. PMID:22844125

  3. A reversion of an IL2RG mutation in combined immunodeficiency providing competitive advantage to the majority of CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuijpers, Taco W.; van Leeuwen, Ester M.M.; Barendregt, Barbara H.; Klarenbeek, Paul; aan de Kerk, Daan J.; Baars, Paul A.; Jansen, Machiel H.; de Vries, Niek; van Lier, René A.W.; van der Burg, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the common gamma chain (γc, CD132, encoded by the IL2RG gene) can lead to B+T−NK− X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, as a consequence of unresponsiveness to γc-cytokines such as interleukins-2, -7 and -15. Hypomorphic mutations in CD132 may cause combined immunodeficiencies with a variety of clinical presentations. We analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a 6-year-old boy with normal lymphocyte counts, who suffered from recurrent pneumonia and disseminated mollusca contagiosa. Since proliferative responses of T cells and NK cells to γc -cytokines were severely impaired, we performed IL2RG gene analysis, showing a heterozygous mutation in the presence of a single X-chromosome. Interestingly, an IL2RG reversion to normal predominated in both naïve and antigen-primed CD8+ T cells and increased over time. Only the revertant CD8+ T cells showed normal expression of CD132 and the various CD8+ T cell populations had a different T-cell receptor repertoire. Finally, a fraction of γδ+ T cells and differentiated CD4+CD27− effector-memory T cells carried the reversion, whereas NK or B cells were repeatedly negative. In conclusion, in a patient with a novel IL2RG mutation, gene-reverted CD8+ T cells accumulated over time. Our data indicate that selective outgrowth of particular T-cell subsets may occur following reversion at the level of committed T progenitor cells. PMID:23403317

  4. Neto2 Influences on Kainate Receptor Pharmacology and Function.

    PubMed

    Han, Liwei; Howe, James R; Pickering, Darryl S

    2016-08-01

    Neuropilin tolloid-like protein 2 (Neto2) is an auxiliary subunit of kainate receptors (KARs). It specifically regulates KARs, for example slows desensitization and deactivation, increases the rate of recovery from desensitization, promotes modal gating and increases agonist sensitivity. Although the mechanism of Neto2 modulation is still unclear, gain-of-function results from the characterization of GluK1-GluA2 chimeras indicate that the GluK1 sequences included in these chimeras (part or all of the TMD and part of the linkers between the TMDs and LBD) play a key role in Neto2 modulation of KAR. In addition, GluK2 M3-S2 linkers and the D1-D1 dimer interface were also recently identified to be important for Neto2 modulation, and some studies suggested that Neto2's N-terminal regions, LDLa domain and the C-terminal regions are important for its modulation of KARs. Although more studies are needed to confirm the roles of these domains and to identify all the domains and residues essential for KAR modulation, these results facilitate our understanding of Neto2 modulation at the structural level, which could potentially aid the development of novel therapies for the treatment of diseases that are associated with KARs, for example epilepsies, non-syndromic autosomal recessive mental retardation, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. PMID:26928870

  5. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-04-30

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a K(d) value of 2.6 µM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases. PMID:24742982

  6. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-01-01

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a Kd value of 2.6 μM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases. PMID:24742982

  7. Metabolic functions of glucocorticoid receptor in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Taiyi; Harris, Charles A.; Wang, Jen-Chywan

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) exert key metabolic influences on skeletal muscle. GCs increase protein degradation and decrease protein synthesis. The released amino acids are mobilized from skeletal muscle to liver, where they serve as substrates for hepatic gluconeogenesis. This metabolic response is critical for mammals’ survival under stressful conditions, such as fasting and starvation. GCs suppress insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and utilization and glycogen synthesis, and play a permissive role for catecholamine-induced glycogenolysis, thus preserving the level of circulating glucose, the major energy source for the brain. However, chronic or excess exposure of GCs can induce muscle atrophy and insulin resistance. GCs convey their signal mainly through the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR). While GR can act through different mechanisms, one of its major actions is to regulate the transcription of its primary target genes through genomic glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) by directly binding to DNA or tethering onto other DNA-binding transcription factors. These GR primary targets trigger physiological and pathological responses of GCs. Much progress has been made to understand how GCs regulate protein and glucose metabolism. In this review, we will discuss how GR primary target genes confer metabolic functions of GCs, and the mechanisms governing the transcriptional regulation of these targets. Comprehending these processes not only contributes to the fundamental understanding of mammalian physiology, but also will provide invaluable insight for improved GC therapeutics. PMID:23523565

  8. Vascular Effects of Endothelin Receptor Antagonists Depends on Their Selectivity for ETA Versus ETB Receptors and on the Functionality of Endothelial ETB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Pauline; Wanner, Daniel; Rey, Markus; Hess, Patrick; Clozel, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The goal of this study was to characterize the role of Endothelin (ET) type B receptors (ETB) on vascular function in healthy and diseased conditions and demonstrate how it affects the pharmacological activity of ET receptor antagonists (ERAs). Methods: The contribution of the ETB receptor to vascular relaxation or constriction was characterized in isolated arteries from healthy and diseased rats with systemic (Dahl-S) or pulmonary hypertension (monocrotaline). Because the role of ETB receptors is different in pathological vis-à-vis normal conditions, we compared the efficacy of ETA-selective and dual ETA/ETB ERAs on blood pressure in hypertensive rats equipped with telemetry. Results: In healthy vessels, ETB receptors stimulation with sarafotoxin S6c induced vasorelaxation and no vasoconstriction. In contrast, in arteries of rats with systemic or pulmonary hypertension, endothelial ETB-mediated relaxation was lost while vasoconstriction on stimulation by sarafotoxin S6c was observed. In hypertensive rats, administration of the dual ETA/ETB ERA macitentan on top of a maximal effective dose of the ETA-selective ERA ambrisentan further reduced blood pressure, indicating that ETB receptors blockade provides additional benefit. Conclusions: Taken together, these data suggest that in pathology, dual ETA/ETB receptor antagonism can provide superior vascular effects compared with ETA-selective receptor blockade. PMID:25992919

  9. Bombesin-Like Receptor 3: Physiology of a Functional Orphan.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Cuiying; Reitman, Marc L

    2016-09-01

    Bombesin-like receptor 3 (BRS-3) is an X-linked orphan Gq-coupled receptor that regulates food intake, metabolic rate, body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, and insulin secretion. Most BRS-3 actions occur via the brain, through mechanisms including regulating sympathetic outflow. Ablation of Brs3 causes obesity, while synthetic agonists produce weight loss. PMID:27055378

  10. The role of Eph receptors in lens function and disease

    PubMed Central

    SON, Alexander I.; PARK, Jeong Eun; ZHOU, RenPing

    2014-01-01

    Cataract is the single largest contributor to blindness in the world, with the disease having a strong genetic component. In recent years the Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases has been identified as a key regulator in lens clarity. In this review we discuss the roles of the Eph receptors in lens biology and cataract development. PMID:22645087

  11. Expression and function of P2 receptors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wenli; Wang, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotides have unambiguously emerged as a family of mediators of intercellular communication, which bind to a class of plasma membrane receptors, P2 receptors, to trigger intercellular signaling. P2 receptors can be further divided into P2X and P2Y subfamilies based on structure and function. Different hematopoietic cells express diverse spectrums of P2 receptors at different levels, including hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) exerts different effects on HSPCs, regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and chemotaxis, release of cytokines or lysosomal constituents, and generation of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. The relationship between abnormal P2 receptor function and human diseases attracts more and more attention. This review summarizes the expression and function of P2 receptors in HSPCs and the relationship to hematopoietic diseases.

  12. Role(s) of IL-2 inducible T cell kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase in mast cell response to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weishan; August, Avery

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells play critical roles during immune responses to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that can lead to fatal septic hypothermia [1], [2], [3]. IL-2 inducible T cell kinase (ITK) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) are non-receptor tyrosine kinases that act downstream of numerous receptors, and have been shown to modulate mast cell responses downstream of FcεRIα [4], however, their roles in regulating mast cell responses to endotoxic stimuli were unclear. We found that the absence of ITK and BTK alters the mast cell response to LPS, and leads to enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by mast cells and more severe LPS-induced hypothermia in mice [5]. Here, we detail our investigation using microarray analysis to study the transcriptomic profiles of mast cell responses to LPS, and the roles of ITK and/or BTK expression in this process. Mouse whole genome array data of WT, Itk (-/-) , Btk (-/-) , and Itk (-/-)  Btk (-/-) bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) stimulated by PBS (control) or LPS for 1 h were used in our latest research article [5] and is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE64287. PMID:27081634

  13. Functional Development of the T Cell Receptor for Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Peter J.R.; Li, Qi-Jing; Huppa, Johannes B.; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    For over three decades now, the T cell receptor (TCR) for antigen has not ceased to challenge the imaginations of cellular and molecular immunologists alike. T cell antigen recognition transcends every aspect of adaptive immunity: it shapes the T cell repertoire in the thymus and directs T cell-mediated effector functions in the periphery, where it is also central to the induction of peripheral tolerance. Yet, despite its central position, there remain many questions unresolved: how can one TCR be specific for one particular peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligand while also binding other pMHC ligands with an immunologically relevant affinity? And how can a T cell’s extreme specificity (alterations of single methyl groups in their ligand can abrogate a response) and sensitivity (single agonist ligands on a cell surface are sufficient to trigger a measurable response) emerge from TCR–ligand interactions that are so low in affinity? Solving these questions is intimately tied to a fundamental understanding of molecular recognition dynamics within the many different contexts of various T cell–antigen presenting cell (APC) contacts: from the thymic APCs that shape the TCR repertoire and guide functional differentiation of developing T cells to the peripheral APCs that support homeostasis and provoke antigen responses in naïve, effector, memory, and regulatory T cells. Here, we discuss our recent findings relating to T cell antigen recognition and how this leads to the thymic development of foreign-antigen-responsive αβT cells. PMID:20800817

  14. Serotoninergic dorsal raphe neurons possess functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Charles, Luis; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Bargas, José; Garduño, Julieta; Frías-Dominguez, Carmen; Drucker-Colin, René; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2008-08-01

    Very few neurons in the telencephalon have been shown to express functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), among them, the noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons. However, there is no evidence for postsynaptic nAChRs on serotonergic neurons. In this study, we asked if functional nAChRs are present in serotonergic (5-HT) and nonserotonergic (non-5-HT) neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In rat midbrain slices, field stimulation at the tegmental pedunculopontine (PPT) nucleus evoked postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) with different components in DRN neurons. After blocking the glutamatergic and GABAergic components, the remaining eEPSCs were blocked by mecamylamine and reduced by either the selective alpha7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) or the selective alpha4beta2 nAChR antagonist dihydro-beta-eritroidine (DHbetaE). Simultaneous addition of MLA and DHbetaE blocked all eEPSCs. Integrity of the PPT-DRN pathway was assessed by both anterograde biocytin tracing and antidromic stimulation from the DRN. Inward currents evoked by the direct application of acetylcholine (ACh), in the presence of atropine and tetrodotoxin, consisted of two kinetically different currents: one was blocked by MLA and the other by DHbetaE; in both 5-HT and non-5-HT DR neurons. Analysis of spontaneous (sEPSCs) and evoked (eEPSCs) synaptic events led to the conclusion that nAChRs were located at the postsynaptic membrane. The possible implications of these newly described nAChRs in various physiological processes and behavioral events, such as the wake-sleep cycle, are discussed. PMID:18512214

  15. Stress physiology functions of the Arabidopsis histidine kinase cytokinin receptors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Nagaraj; Verslues, Paul E

    2015-07-01

    Cytokinin signaling has complex effects on abiotic stress responses that remain to be fully elucidated. The Arabidopsis histidine kinases (AHKs), AHK2, AHK3 and CRE1 (cytokinin response1/AHK4) are the principle cytokinin receptors of Arabidopsis. Using a set of ahk mutants, we found dramatic differences in response to low water potential and salt stress among the AHKs. ahk3-3 mutants had increased root elongation after transfer to low water potential media. Conversely ahk2-2 was hypersensitive to salt stress in terms of root growth and fresh weight and accumulated higher than wild-type levels of proline specifically under salt stress. Strongly reduced proline accumulation in ahk double mutants after low water potential treatment indicated a more general role of cytokinin signaling in proline metabolism. Reduced P5CS1 (Δ(1) -pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase1) gene expression may have contributed to this reduced proline accumulation. Low water potential phenotypes of ahk mutants were not caused by altered abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation as all ahk mutants had wild-type ABA levels, despite the observation that ahk double mutants had reduced NCED3 (9-cis-epoxycartenoid dioxygenase3) expression when exposed to low water potential. No difference in osmoregulatory solute accumulation was detected in any of the ahk mutants indicating that they do not affect drought responsive osmotic adjustment. Overall, our examination of ahk mutants found specific phenotypes associated with AHK2 and AHK3 as well as a general function of cytokinin signaling in proline accumulation and low water potential induction of P5CS1 and NCED3 expression. These results show the stress physiology function of AHKs at a new level of detail. PMID:25263537

  16. The multiple facets of opioid receptor function: implications for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2013-01-01

    Addiction is characterized by altered reward processing, disrupted emotional responses and poor decision-making. Beyond a central role in drug reward, increasing evidence indicate that opioid receptors are more generally involved in all these processes. Recent studies establish the mu opioid receptor as a main player in social reward, which attracts increasing attention in psychiatric research. There is growing interest in blocking the kappa opioid receptor to prevent relapse, and alleviate the negative affect of withdrawal. The delta opioid receptor emerges as a potent mood enhancer, whose involvement in addiction is less clear. All three opioid receptors are likely implicated in addiction-depression comorbidity, and understanding of their roles in cognitive deficits associated to drug abuse is only beginning. PMID:23453713

  17. Structural and functional evolution of the P2Y12-like receptor group

    PubMed Central

    Hermsdorf, Thomas; Engemaier, Eva; Engel, Kathrin; Liebscher, Ines; Thor, Doreen; Zierau, Klaas; Römpler, Holger; Schulz, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Metabotropic pyrimidine and purine nucleotide receptors (P2Y receptors) belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). They are distinguishable from adenosine receptors (P1) as they bind adenine and/or uracil nucleotide triphosphates or diphosphates depending on the subtype. Over the past decade, P2Y receptors have been cloned from a variety of tissues and species, and as many as eight functional subtypes have been characterized. Most recently, several members of the P2Y12-like receptor group, which includes the clopidogrel-sensitive ADP receptor P2Y12, have been deorphanized. The P2Y12-like receptor group comprises several structurally related GPCR which, however, display heterogeneous agonist specificity including nucleotides, their derivatives, and lipids. Besides the established function of P2Y12 in platelet activation, expression in macrophages, neuronal and glial cells as well as recent results from functional studies implicate that several members of this group may have specific functions in neurotransmission, inflammation, chemotaxis, and response to tissue injury. This review focuses specifically on the structure-function relation and shortly summarizes some aspects of the physiological relevance of P2Y12-like receptor members. PMID:18404440

  18. Roles of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor β subunits in function of human α4-containing nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Liu, Qiang; Yu, Kewei; Hu, Jun; Kuo, Yen-Ping; Segerberg, Marsha; St John, Paul A; Lukas, Ronald J

    2006-01-01

    Naturally expressed nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) containing α4 subunits (α4*-nAChR) in combination with β2 subunits (α4β2-nAChR) are among the most abundant, high-affinity nicotine binding sites in the mammalian brain. β4 subunits are also richly expressed and colocalize with α4 subunits in several brain regions implicated in behavioural responses to nicotine and nicotine dependence. Thus, α4β4-nAChR also may exist and play important functional roles. In this study, properties were determined of human α4β2- and α4β4-nAChR heterologously expressed de novo in human SH-EP1 epithelial cells. Whole-cell currents mediated via human α4β4-nAChR have ∼4-fold higher amplitude than those mediated via human α4β2-nAChR and exhibit much slower acute desensitization and functional rundown. Nicotinic agonists induce peak whole-cell current responses typically with higher functional potency at α4β4-nAChR than at α4β2-nAChR. Cytisine and lobeline serve as full agonists at α4β4-nAChR but are only partial agonists at α4β2-nAChR. However, nicotinic antagonists, except hexamethonium, have comparable affinities for functional α4β2- and α4β4-nAChR. Whole-cell current responses show stronger inward rectification for α4β2-nAChR than for α4β4-nAChR at a positive holding potential. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that human nAChR β2 or β4 subunits can combine with α4 subunits to generate two forms of α4*-nAChR with distinctive physiological and pharmacological features. Diversity in α4*-nAChR is of potential relevance to nervous system function, disease, and nicotine dependence. PMID:16825297

  19. Understanding Functional Residues of the Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Joong-Youn

    2010-01-01

    The brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptor that mediates numerous physiological processes in response to marijuana and other psychoactive compounds is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and shares common structural features with many rhodopsin class GPCRs. For the rational development of therapeutic agents targeting the CB1 receptor, understanding of the ligand-specific CB1 receptor interactions responsible for unique G protein signals is crucial. For a more than a decade, a combination of mutagenesis and computational modeling approaches has been successfully employed to study the ligand-specific CB1 receptor interactions. In this review, after a brief discussion about recent advances in understanding of some structural and functional features of GPCRs commonly applicable to the CB1 receptor, the CB1 receptor functional residues reported from mutational studies are divided into three different types, ligand binding (B), receptor stabilization (S) and receptor activation (A) residues, to delineate the nature of the binding pockets of anandamide, CP55940, WIN55212-2 and SR141716A and to describe the molecular events of the ligand-specific CB1 receptor activation from ligand binding to G protein signaling. Taken these CB1 receptor functional residues, some of which are unique to the CB1 receptor, together with the biophysical knowledge accumulated for the GPCR active state, it is possible to propose the early stages of the CB1 receptor activation process that not only provide some insights into understanding molecular mechanisms of receptor activation but also are applicable for identifying new therapeutic agents by applying the validated structure-based approaches, such as virtual high throughput screening (HTS) and fragment-based approach (FBA). PMID:20370713

  20. Functional Phylogenetics Reveals Contributions of Pleiotropic Peptide Action to Ligand-Receptor Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongbo; Wei, Zhaojun; Nachman, Ronald J.; Adams, Michael E.; Park, Yoonseong

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of peptidergic signaling has been accompanied by a significant degree of ligand-receptor coevolution. Closely related clusters of peptide signaling molecules are observed to activate related groups of receptors, implying that genes encoding these ligands may orchestrate an array of functions, a phenomenon known as pleiotropy. Here we examine whether pleiotropic actions of peptide genes might influence ligand-receptor coevolution. Four test groups of neuropeptides characterized by conserved C-terminal amino acid sequence motifs and their cognate receptors were examined in the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum): 1) cardioacceleratory peptide 2b (CAPA); CAPAr, 2) pyrokinin/diapause hormone (PK1/DH); PKr-A, -B, 3) pyrokinin/pheromone biosynthesis activating hormone (PK2/PBAN); PKr-C, and 4) ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH); ETHr-b. Ligand-receptor specificities were established through heterologous expression of receptors in cell-based assays for 9 endogenous ligands. Based on ligand-receptor specificity analysis, we found positive pleiotropism exhibited by ETH on ETHR-b and CAPAr, whereas PK1/DH and CAPA are more highly selective for their respective authentic receptors than would be predicted by phylogenetic analysis. Disparities between evolutionary trees deduced from receptor sequences vs. functional ligand-receptor specificities lead to the conclusion that pleiotropy exhibited by peptide genes influences ligand-receptor coevolution. PMID:25348027

  1. Transcriptional and Functional Characterization of the G Protein-Coupled Receptor Repertoire of Gastric Somatostatin Cells.

    PubMed

    Egerod, Kristoffer L; Engelstoft, Maja S; Lund, Mari L; Grunddal, Kaare V; Zhao, Mirabella; Barir-Jensen, Dominique; Nygaard, Eva B; Petersen, Natalia; Holst, Jens J; Schwartz, Thue W

    2015-11-01

    In the stomach, somatostatin (SST) acts as a general paracrine negative regulator of exocrine secretion of gastric acid and pepsinogen and endocrine secretion of gastrin, ghrelin, and histamine. Using reporter mice expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) under control of the SST promotor, we have characterized the G protein-coupled receptors expressed in gastric Sst-RFP-positive cells and probed their effects on SST secretion in primary cell cultures. Surprisingly, besides SST, amylin and PYY were also highly enriched in the SST cells. Several receptors found to regulate SST secretion were highly expressed and/or enriched. 1) The metabolite receptors calcium-sensing receptor and free fatty acid receptor 4 (GPR120) functioned as positive and negative regulators, respectively. 2) Among the neurotransmitter receptors, adrenergic receptors α1a, α2a, α2b, and β1 were all highly expressed, with norepinephrine and isoproterenol acting as positive regulators. The muscarinic receptor M3 acted as a positive regulator, whereas M4 was conceivably a negative regulator. 3) Of the hormone receptors, the GLP-1 and GIP receptors, CCKb (stimulated by both CCK and gastrin) and surprisingly the melanocortin MC1 receptor were all positive regulators. 4) The neuropeptide receptors for calcitonin gene-related peptide, adrenomedullin, and vasoactive intestinal peptide acted as positive regulators, no effect was observed using galanin and nociceptin although transcripts for the corresponding receptors appeared highly expressed. 5) The SST receptors 1 and 2 functioned in an autocrine negative feedback loop. Thus, the article provides a comprehensive map of receptors through which SST secretion is regulated by hormones, neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and metabolites that act directly on the SST cells in the gastric mucosa. PMID:26181106

  2. Effects of antihistamines on the function of human α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Khanian, Seyedeh Soha; Ashoor, Abrar; Prytkova, Tatiana; Ghattas, Mohammad A; Atatreh, Noor; Nurulain, Syed M; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Oz, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the histamine H₁ receptor (H1R) antagonists (antihistamines), promethazine (PMZ), orphenadrine (ORP), chlorpheniramine (CLP), pyrilamine (PYR), diphenhydramine (DPH), citerizine (CTZ), and triprolidine (TRP) on the functional properties of the cloned α7 subunit of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes were investigated. Antihistamines inhibited the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the order PYR>CLP>TRP>PMZ>ORP≥DPH≥CTZ. Among the antihistamines, PYR showed the highest reversible inhibition of acetylcholine (100 µM)-induced responses with IC₅₀ of 6.2 µM. PYR-induced inhibition was independent of the membrane potential and could not be reversed by increasing the concentration of acetylcholine. Specific binding of [¹²⁵I] α-bungarotoxin, a selective antagonist for α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, was not changed in the presence of PYR suggesting a non-competitive inhibition of nicotinic receptors. In line with functional experiments, docking studies indicated that PYR can potentially bind allosterically with the α7 transmembrane domain. Our results indicate that the H₂-H₄ receptor antagonists tested in this study (10 µM) showed negligible inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. On the other hand, H₁ receptor antagonists inhibited the function of human α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, with varying potencies. These results emphasize the importance of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor for future pharmacological/toxicological profiling. PMID:25445036

  3. Renal Function Assessment During Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Erbas, Belkis; Tuncel, Murat

    2016-09-01

    Theranostics labeled with Y-90 or Lu-177 are highly efficient therapeutic approaches for the systemic treatment of various cancers including neuroendocrine tumors and prostate cancer. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been used for many years for metastatic or inoperable neuroendocrine tumors. However, renal and hematopoietic toxicities are the major limitations for this therapeutic approach. Kidneys have been considered as the "critical organ" because of the predominant glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption by the proximal tubules, and interstitial retention of the tracers. Severe nephrotoxity, which has been classified as grade 4-5 based on the "Common Terminology Criteria on Adverse Events," was reported in the range from 0%-14%. There are several risk factors for renal toxicity; patient-related risk factors include older age, preexisting renal disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, previous nephrotoxic chemotherapy, metastatic lesions close to renal parenchyma, and single kidney. There are also treatment-related issues, such as choice of radionuclide, cumulative radiation dose to kidneys, renal radiation dose per cycle, activity administered, number of cycles, and time interval between cycles. In the literature, nephrotoxicity caused by PRRT was documented using different criteria and renal function tests, from serum creatinine level to more accurate and sophisticated methods. Generally, serum creatinine level was used as a measure of kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimation based on serum creatinine was preferred by several authors. Most commonly used formulas for estimation of GFR are "Modifications of Diet in Renal Disease" (MDRD) equation and "Cockcroft-Gault" formulas. However, more precise methods than creatinine or creatinine clearance are recommended to assess renal function, such as GFR measurements using Tc-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), Cr-51-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), or

  4. Modulation of pre- and postsynaptic dopamine D2 receptor function by the selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593.

    PubMed

    Acri, J B; Thompson, A C; Shippenberg, T

    2001-03-15

    The repeated administration of selective kappa-opioid receptor agonists prevents the locomotor activation produced by acute cocaine administration and the development of cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization. Previous studies have shown that dopamine (DA) D2 autoreceptors modulate the synthesis and release of DA in the striatum. Evidence that kappa agonist treatment downregulates DA D2 receptors in this same brain region has recently been obtained. Accordingly, the present studies were undertaken to examine the influence of repeated kappa-opioid receptor agonist administration on pre- and postsynaptic DA D2 receptor function in the dorsal striatum using pre- and postsynaptic receptor-selective doses of quinpirole. Rats were injected once daily with the selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 (0.16-0.32 mg/kg s.c.) or vehicle for 3 days. Microdialysis studies assessing basal and quinpirole-evoked (0.05 mg/kg s.c.) DA levels were conducted 2 days later. Basal and quinpirole-stimulated locomotor activity were assessed in a parallel group of animals. The no-net flux method of quantitative microdialysis revealed no effect of U69593 on basal DA dynamics, in that extracellular DA concentration and extraction fraction did not differ in control and U69593-treated animals. Acute administration of quinpirole significantly decreased striatal DA levels in control animals, but in animals treated with U69593, the inhibitory effects of quinpirole were significantly reduced. Quinpirole produced a dose-related increase in locomotor activity in control animals, and this effect was significantly attenuated in U69593-treated animals. These data reveal that prior repeated administration of a selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist attenuates quinpirole-induced alterations in DA neurotransmission and locomotor activity. These results suggest that both pre- and postsynaptic striatal DA D2 receptors may be downregulated following repeated kappa-opioid receptor agonist

  5. Orexin/hypocretin receptor signalling: a functional perspective

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, C S; Kukkonen, J P

    2014-01-01

    Multiple homeostatic systems are regulated by orexin (hypocretin) peptides and their two known GPCRs. Activation of orexin receptors promotes waking and is essential for expression of normal sleep and waking behaviour, with the sleep disorder narcolepsy resulting from the absence of orexin signalling. Orexin receptors also influence systems regulating appetite/metabolism, stress and reward, and are found in several peripheral tissues. Nevertheless, much remains unknown about the signalling pathways and targets engaged by native receptors. In this review, we integrate knowledge about the orexin receptor signalling capabilities obtained from studies in expression systems and various native cell types (as presented in Kukkonen and Leonard, this issue of British Journal of Pharmacology) with knowledge of orexin signalling in different tissues. The tissues reviewed include the CNS, the gastrointestinal tract, the pituitary gland, pancreas, adrenal gland, adipose tissue and the male reproductive system. We also summarize the findings in different native and recombinant cell lines, especially focusing on the different cascades in CHO cells, which is the most investigated cell line. This reveals that while a substantial gap exists between what is known about orexin receptor signalling and effectors in recombinant systems and native systems, mounting evidence suggests that orexin receptor signalling is more diverse than originally thought. Moreover, rather than being restricted to orexin receptor ‘overexpressing’ cells, this signalling diversity may be utilized by native receptors in a site-specific manner. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Orexin Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-2 PMID:23848055

  6. Downregulation of kinin B1 receptor function by B2 receptor heterodimerization and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianming; Brovkovych, Viktor; Zhang, Yongkang; Tan, Fulong; Skidgel, Randal A.

    2014-01-01

    Signaling through the G protein-coupled kinin receptors B1 (kB1R) and B2 (kB2R) plays a critical role in inflammatory responses mediated by activation of the kallikrein-kinin system. The kB2R is constitutively expressed and rapidly desensitized in response to agonist whereas kB1R expression is upregulated by inflammatory stimuli and it is resistant to internalization and desensitization. Here we show that the kB1R heterodimerizes with kB2Rs in co-transfected HEK293 cells and natively expressing endothelial cells, resulting in significant internalization and desensitization of the kB1R response in cells pre-treated with kB2R agonist. However, pre-treatment of cells with kB1R agonist did not affect subsequent kB2R responses. Agonists of other G protein-coupled receptors (thrombin, lysophosphatidic acid) had no effect on a subsequent kB1R response. The loss of kB1R response after pretreatment with kB2R agonist was partially reversed with kB2R mutant Y129S, which blocks kB2R signaling without affecting endocytosis, or T342A, which signals like wild type but is not endocytosed. Co-endocytosis of the kB1R with kB2R was dependent on β-arrestin and clathrin-coated pits but not caveolae. The sorting pathway of kB1R and kB2R after endocytosis differed as recycling of kB1R to the cell surface was much slower than that of kB2R. In cytokine-treated human lung microvascular endothelial cells, pre-treatment with kB2R agonist inhibited kB1R-mediated increase in transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) caused by kB1R stimulation (to generate nitric oxide) and blocked the profound drop in TER caused by kB1R activation in the presence of pyrogallol (a superoxide generator). Thus, kB1R function can be downregulated by kB2R co-endocytosis and signaling, suggesting new approaches to control kB1R signaling in pathological conditions. PMID:25289859

  7. Selective Actions of Novel Allosteric Modulators Reveal Functional Heteromers of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shen; Noetzel, Meredith J.; Johnson, Kari A.; Zamorano, Rocio; Jalan-Sakrikar, Nidhi; Gregory, Karen J.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors play important roles in regulating CNS function and are known to function as obligatory dimers. Although recent studies have suggested heterodimeric assembly of mGlu receptors in vitro, the demonstration that distinct mGlu receptor proteins can form heterodimers or hetero-complexes with other mGlu subunits in native tissues, such as neurons, has not been shown. Using biochemical and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate here that mGlu2 and mGlu4 form a hetero-complex in native rat and mouse tissues which exhibits a distinct pharmacological profile. These data greatly extend our current understanding of mGlu receptor interaction and function and provide compelling evidence that mGlu receptors can function as heteromers in intact brain circuits. PMID:24381270

  8. Who’s in charge? Nuclear receptor coactivator and corepressor function in brain and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Tetel, Marc J.; Auger, Anthony P.; Charlier, Thierry D.

    2009-01-01

    Steroid hormones act in brain and throughout the body to regulate a variety of functions, including development, reproduction, stress and behavior. Many of these effects of steroid hormones are mediated by their respective receptors, which are members of the steroid/nuclear receptor superfamily of transcriptional activators. A variety of studies in cell lines reveal that nuclear receptor coregulators are critical in modulating steroid receptor-dependent transcription. Thus, in addition to the availability of the hormone and the expression of its receptor, nuclear receptor coregulators are essential for efficient steroid-dependent transactivation of genes. This review will highlight the importance of nuclear receptor coregulators in modulating steroid-dependent gene expression in brain and the regulation of behavior. PMID:19401208

  9. Characterization of Human CD8(+)TCR(-) Facilitating Cells In Vitro and In Vivo in a NOD/SCID/IL2rγ(null) Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Elliott, M J; Yolcu, E S; Miller, T O; Ratajczak, J; Bozulic, L D; Wen, Y; Xu, H; Ratajczak, M Z; Ildstad, S T

    2016-02-01

    CD8(+)/TCR(-) facilitating cells (FCs) in mouse bone marrow (BM) significantly enhance engraftment of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). Human FC phenotype and mechanism of action remain to be defined. We report, for the first time, the phenotypic characterization of human FCs and correlation of phenotype with function. Approximately half of human FCs are CD8(+)/TCR(-)/CD56 negative (CD56(neg)); the remainder are CD8(+)/TCR(-)/CD56 bright (CD56(bright)). The CD56(neg) FC subpopulation significantly promotes homing of HSPCs to BM in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency/IL-2 receptor γ-chain knockout mouse recipients and enhances hematopoietic colony formation in vitro. The CD56(neg) FC subpopulation promotes rapid reconstitution of donor HSPCs without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD); recipients of CD56(bright) FCs plus HSPCs exhibit low donor chimerism early after transplantation, but the level of chimerism significantly increases with time. Recipients of HSPCs plus CD56(neg) or CD56(bright) FCs showed durable donor chimerism at significantly higher levels in BM. The majority of both FC subpopulations express CXCR4. Coculture of CD56(bright) FCs with HSPCs upregulates cathelicidin and β-defensin 2, factors that prime responsiveness of HSPCs to stromal cell-derived factor 1. Both FC subpopulations significantly upregulated mRNA expression of the HSPC growth factors and Flt3 ligand. These results indicate that human FCs exert a direct effect on HSPCs to enhance engraftment. Human FCs offer a potential regulatory cell-based therapy for enhancement of engraftment and prevention of GVHD. PMID:26550777

  10. Role of heteromer formation in GABAB receptor function.

    PubMed

    Kuner, R; Köhr, G; Grünewald, S; Eisenhardt, G; Bach, A; Kornau, H C

    1999-01-01

    Recently, GBR1, a seven-transmembrane domain protein with high affinity for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor antagonists, was identified. Here, a GBR1-related protein, GBR2, was shown to be coexpressed with GBR1 in many brain regions and to interact with it through a short domain in the carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic tail. Heterologously expressed GBR2 mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase; however, inwardly rectifying potassium channels were activated by GABAB receptor agonists only upon coexpression with GBR1 and GBR2. Thus, the interaction of these receptors appears to be crucial for important physiological effects of GABA and provides a mechanism in receptor signaling pathways that involve a heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein. PMID:9872744

  11. PKCε and allopregnanolone: functional cross-talk at the GABAA receptor level

    PubMed Central

    Puia, Giulia; Ravazzini, Federica; Castelnovo, Luca Franco; Magnaghi, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Changes in GABAergic inhibition occur during physiological processes, during response to drugs and in various pathologies. These changes can be achieved through direct allosteric modifications at the γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) type A (GABAA) receptor protein level, or by altering the synthesis, trafficking and stability of the receptor. Neurosteroids (NSs) and protein kinase C (PKC) are potent modulators of GABAA receptors and their effects are presumably intermingled, even though evidence for this hypothesis is only partially explored. However, several PKC isoforms are able to phosphorylate the GABAA receptor, producing different functional effects. We focused on the ε isoform, that has been correlated to the sensitivity of the GABAA receptor to allosteric modulators and whose expression may be regulated in peripheral sensory neurons by NSs. The cross-talk between PKC-ε and NSs, leading to changes in GABAA receptor functionality, is considered and discussed in this perspective. PMID:25852476

  12. Regulation of μ and δ opioid receptor functions: involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, H; Mercier-Blais, A-A; Delaygue, C; Lavoie, C; Parent, J-L; Neugebauer, W; Gendron, L

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Phosphorylation of δ opioid receptors (DOP receptors) by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) was shown to regulate the trafficking of this receptor. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of CDK5 in regulating DOP receptors in rats treated with morphine or with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). As μ (MOP) and DOP receptors are known to be co-regulated, we also sought to determine if CDK5-mediated regulation of DOP receptors also affects MOP receptor functions. Experimental Approach The role of CDK5 in regulating opioid receptors in CFA- and morphine-treated rats was studied using roscovitine as a CDK inhibitor and a cell-penetrant peptide mimicking the second intracellular loop of DOP receptors (C11-DOPri2). Opioid receptor functions were assessed in vivo in a series of behavioural experiments and correlated by measuring ERK1/2 activity in dorsal root ganglia homogenates. Key Results Chronic roscovitine treatment reduced the antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effects of deltorphin II (Dlt II) in morphine- and CFA-treated rats respectively. Repeated administrations of C11-DOPri2 also robustly decreased Dlt II-induced analgesia. Interestingly, DAMGO-induced analgesia was significantly increased by roscovitine and C11-DOPri2. Concomitantly, in roscovitine-treated rats the Dlt II-induced ERK1/2 activation was decreased, whereas the DAMGO-induced ERK1/2 activation was increased. An acute roscovitine treatment had no effect on Dlt II- or DAMGO-induced analgesia. Conclusions and Implications Together, our results demonstrate that CDK5 is a key player in the regulation of DOP receptors in morphine- and CFA-treated rats and that the regulation of DOP receptors by CDK5 is sufficient to modulate MOP receptor functions through an indirect process. PMID:25598508

  13. Breast cancer gene therapy using an adenovirus encoding human IL-2 under control of mammaglobin promoter/enhancer sequences.

    PubMed

    Chaurasiya, S; Hew, P; Crosley, P; Sharon, D; Potts, K; Agopsowicz, K; Long, M; Shi, C; Hitt, M M

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) has been used clinically for the treatment of some malignancies, but the toxicities associated with systemic IL-2 therapy are a major challenge. Here we have determined whether transcriptional targeting of IL-2 to breast cancer (BrCa) using an engineered human mammaglobin promoter/enhancer (MPE2) is a feasible option for reducing IL-2-associated toxicities while still achieving a meaningful antitumor effect. We have constructed nonreplicating adenovirus vectors encoding either a reporter gene (luciferase) or human IL-2 (hIL-2) complementary DNA under control of the MPE2 sequence, the murine cytomegalovirus immediate early (MCMV) promoter or the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter. Luciferase and hIL-2 complementary DNAs under the control of the MPE2 sequence in adenovirus vectors were expressed at high levels in BrCa cells and at lower levels in normal cells of human and murine origin. Cancer specificity of the hTERT promoter was found to be similar to that of the MPE2 promoter in cells of human origin, but reduced specificity in murine cells. The MPE2 regulatory sequence demonstrated excellent tissue specificity in a mouse tumor model. Whereas the MCMV promoter-controlled IL-2 vector generated high liver toxicity in mice, the MPE2-controlled IL-2 vector generated little or no liver toxicity. Both IL-2 vectors exerted significant tumor growth delay; however, attempts to further enhance antitumor activity of the IL-2 vectors by combining with the proapoptotic drug procaspase activating compound 1 (PAC1) were unsuccessful. PMID:27151235

  14. Presynaptic TRPV1 vanilloid receptor function is age- but not CB1 cannabinoid receptor-dependent in the rodent forebrain.

    PubMed

    Köles, László; Garção, Pedro; Zádori, Zoltán S; Ferreira, Samira G; Pinheiro, Bárbara S; da Silva-Santos, Carla S; Ledent, Catherine; Köfalvi, Attila

    2013-08-01

    Neocortical and striatal TRPV1 (vanilloid or capsaicin) receptors (TRPV1Rs) are excitatory ligand-gated ion channels, and are implicated in psychiatric disorders. However, the purported presynaptic neuromodulator role of TRPV1Rs in glutamatergic, serotonergic or dopaminergic terminals of the rodent forebrain remains little understood. With the help of patch-clamp electrophysiology and neurochemical approaches, we mapped the age-dependence of presynaptic TRPV1R function, and furthermore, we aimed at exploring whether the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) influences the function of the TRPV1Rs, as both receptor types share endogenous ligands. We found that the major factor which affects presynaptic TRPV1R function is age: by post-natal day 13, the amplitude of capsaicin-induced release of dopamine and glutamate is halved in the rat striatum, and two weeks later, capsaicin already loses its effect. However, TRPV1R receptor function is not enhanced by chemical or genetic ablation of the CB1Rs in dopaminergic, glutamatergic and serotonergic terminals of the mouse brain. Altogether, our data indicate a possible neurodevelopmental role for presynaptic TRPV1Rs in the rodent brain, but we found no cross-talk between TRPV1Rs and CB1Rs in the same nerve terminal. PMID:23831917

  15. Increased anti-tumor effects using IL2 with anti-TGFβ reveals competition between mouse NK and CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Maite; Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Sungur, Can M.; Chen, Mingyi; Murphy, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Due to increasing interest in the removal of immunosuppressive pathways in cancer, the combination of IL2 with antibodies to neutralize TGFβ, a potent immunosuppressive cytokine, was assessed. Combination immunotherapy resulted in significantly greater anti-tumor effects. These were correlated with significant increases in the numbers and functionality of NK cells, NK progenitors and activated CD8 T cells resulting in the observed anti-tumor effects. Combination immunotherapy was also accompanied with lesser toxicities than IL2 therapy alone. Additionally, we observed a dual competition between NK and activated CD8 T cells such that after immunotherapy, the depletion of either effector population resulted in the increased total expansion of the other population and compensatory anti-tumor effects. This study demonstrates the efficacy of this combination immunotherapeutic regimen as a promising cancer therapy and illustrates the existence of potent competitive regulatory pathways between NK and CD8 T cells in response to systemic activation. PMID:25000978

  16. High potency olfactory receptor agonists discovered by virtual high-throughput screening: molecular probes for receptor structure and olfactory function

    PubMed Central

    Triballeau, Nicolas; Van Name, Eric; Laslier, Guillaume; Cai, Diana; Paillard, Guillaume; Sorensen, Peter W.; Hoffmann, Rémy; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Ngai, John; Acher, Francine C.

    2008-01-01

    The detection and discrimination of diverse chemical structures by the vertebrate olfactory system is accomplished by the recognition of odorous ligands by their cognate receptors. In the present study we used a computational high-throughput screening strategy to discover novel high affinity agonists of an olfactory G protein-coupled receptor tuned to recognize amino acid ligands. Functional testing of the top candidates validated several agonists with potencies higher than any of the receptor’s known natural ligands. Computational modeling revealed molecular interactions involved in ligand recognition by this receptor, and further highlighted interactions that have been conserved in evolutionarily divergent amino acid receptors. Significantly, the top compounds display robust activities as odorants in vivo, and include a natural product that may be used to signal the presence of bacteria in the aquatic environment. Our virtual screening approach should be applicable to the identification of new bioactive molecules for probing the structure of chemosensory receptors and the function of chemosensory systems in vivo. PMID:19081373

  17. Toll-Like Receptors and Dectin-1, a C-Type Lectin Receptor, Trigger Divergent Functions in CNS Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Guan, Zhen; Beckwith, Kyle A.; Braun, Kaitlyn J.; Wei, Ping; McTigue, Dana M.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) activates macrophages, endowing them with both reparative and pathological functions. The mechanisms responsible for these divergent functions are unknown but are likely controlled through stochastic activation of different macrophage receptor subtypes. Various danger-associated molecular patterns released from dying cells in the injured spinal cord likely activate distinct subtypes of macrophage pattern recognition receptors, including bacterial toll-like receptors (TLRs) and fungal C-type lectin receptors (e.g., dectin-1). To determine the in vivo consequences of activating these receptors, ligands specific for TLR2 or dectin-1 were microinjected, alone or in combination, into intact spinal cord. Both ligands elicit a florid macrophage reaction; however, only dectin-1 activation causes macrophage-mediated demyelination and axonal injury. Coactivating TLR2 reduced the injurious effects of dectin-1 activation. When injected into traumatically injured spinal cord, TLR2 agonists enhance the endogenous macrophage reaction while conferring neuroprotection. Indeed, dieback of axons was reduced, leading to smaller lesion volumes at the peak of the macrophage response. Moreover, the density of NG2+ cells expressing vimentin increased in and near lesions that were enriched with TLR2-activated macrophages. In dectin-1-null mutant (knock-out) mice, dieback of corticospinal tract axons also is reduced after SCI. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that the ability of macrophages to create an axon growth-permissive microenvironment or cause neurotoxicity is receptor dependent and it may be possible to exploit this functional dichotomy to enhance CNS repair. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT There is a growing appreciation that macrophages exert diverse functions in the injured and diseased CNS. Indeed, both macrophage-mediated repair and macrophage-mediated injury occur, and often these effector functions are elicited simultaneously. Understanding the

  18. Functional Characterization of Soybean Glyma04g39610 as a Brassinosteroid Receptor Gene and Evolutionary Analysis of Soybean Brassinosteroid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Suna; Tao, Ping; Xu, Feng; Wu, Aiping; Huo, Weige; Wang, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BR) play important roles in plant growth and development. Although BR receptors have been intensively studied in Arabidopsis, the BR receptors in soybean remain largely unknown. Here, in addition to the known receptor gene Glyma06g15270 (GmBRI1a), we identified five putative BR receptor genes in the soybean genome: GmBRI1b, GmBRL1a, GmBRL1b, GmBRL2a, and GmBRL2b. Analysis of their expression patterns by quantitative real-time PCR showed that they are ubiquitously expressed in primary roots, lateral roots, stems, leaves, and hypocotyls. We used rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to clone GmBRI1b (Glyma04g39160), and found that the predicted amino acid sequence of GmBRI1b showed high similarity to those of AtBRI1 and pea PsBRI1. Structural modeling of the ectodomain also demonstrated similarities between the BR receptors of soybean and Arabidopsis. GFP-fusion experiments verified that GmBRI1b localizes to the cell membrane. We also explored GmBRI1b function in Arabidopsis through complementation experiments. Ectopic over-expression of GmBRI1b in Arabidopsis BR receptor loss-of-function mutant (bri1-5 bak1-1D) restored hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings; increased the growth of stems, leaves, and siliques in light; and rescued the developmental defects in leaves of the bri1-6 mutant, and complemented the responses of BR biosynthesis-related genes in the bri1-5 bak1-D mutant grown in light. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that the six BR receptor genes in soybean resulted from three gene duplication events during evolution. Phylogenetic analysis classified the BR receptors in dicots and monocots into three subclades. Estimation of the synonymous (Ks) and the nonsynonymous substitution rate (Ka) and selection pressure (Ka/Ks) revealed that the Ka/Ks of BR receptor genes from dicots and monocots were less than 1.0, indicating that BR receptor genes in plants experienced purifying selection during evolution. PMID:27338344

  19. Functional Characterization of Soybean Glyma04g39610 as a Brassinosteroid Receptor Gene and Evolutionary Analysis of Soybean Brassinosteroid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Suna; Tao, Ping; Xu, Feng; Wu, Aiping; Huo, Weige; Wang, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BR) play important roles in plant growth and development. Although BR receptors have been intensively studied in Arabidopsis, the BR receptors in soybean remain largely unknown. Here, in addition to the known receptor gene Glyma06g15270 (GmBRI1a), we identified five putative BR receptor genes in the soybean genome: GmBRI1b, GmBRL1a, GmBRL1b, GmBRL2a, and GmBRL2b. Analysis of their expression patterns by quantitative real-time PCR showed that they are ubiquitously expressed in primary roots, lateral roots, stems, leaves, and hypocotyls. We used rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to clone GmBRI1b (Glyma04g39160), and found that the predicted amino acid sequence of GmBRI1b showed high similarity to those of AtBRI1 and pea PsBRI1. Structural modeling of the ectodomain also demonstrated similarities between the BR receptors of soybean and Arabidopsis. GFP-fusion experiments verified that GmBRI1b localizes to the cell membrane. We also explored GmBRI1b function in Arabidopsis through complementation experiments. Ectopic over-expression of GmBRI1b in Arabidopsis BR receptor loss-of-function mutant (bri1-5 bak1-1D) restored hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings; increased the growth of stems, leaves, and siliques in light; and rescued the developmental defects in leaves of the bri1-6 mutant, and complemented the responses of BR biosynthesis-related genes in the bri1-5 bak1-D mutant grown in light. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that the six BR receptor genes in soybean resulted from three gene duplication events during evolution. Phylogenetic analysis classified the BR receptors in dicots and monocots into three subclades. Estimation of the synonymous (Ks) and the nonsynonymous substitution rate (Ka) and selection pressure (Ka/Ks) revealed that the Ka/Ks of BR receptor genes from dicots and monocots were less than 1.0, indicating that BR receptor genes in plants experienced purifying selection during evolution. PMID:27338344

  20. The βc receptor family - Structural insights and their functional implications.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Sophie E; Nero, Tracy L; Dhagat, Urmi; Kan, Winnie L; Hercus, Timothy R; Tvorogov, Denis; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W

    2015-08-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-3 (IL-3) and IL-5 are members of a small family of cytokines that share a beta receptor subunit (βc). These cytokines regulate the growth, differentiation, migration and effector function activities of many hematopoietic cells in bone marrow, blood and sites of inflammation. Excessive or aberrant signaling can result in chronic inflammatory conditions and myeloid leukemias. The crystal structures of the GM-CSF ternary complex, the IL-5 binary complex and the very recent IL-3 receptor alpha subunit build upon decades of structure-function studies, giving new insights into cytokine-receptor specificity and signal transduction. Selective modulation of receptor function is now a real possibility and the structures of the βc receptor family are being used to discover novel and disease-specific therapeutics. PMID:25982846

  1. Toll-6 and Toll-7 function as neurotrophin receptors in the Drosophila central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    McIlroy, Graham; Foldi, Istvan; Aurikko, Jukka; Wentzell, Jill S.; Lim, Mei Ann; Fenton, Janine C.; Gay, Nicholas J.; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophin receptors corresponding to vertebrate Trk, p75NTR or Sortilin have not been identified in Drosophila, thus it is unknown how neurotrophism may be implemented in insects. Two Drosophila neurotrophins, DNT1 and DNT2, have nervous system functions, but their receptors are unknown. The Toll receptor superfamily has ancient evolutionary origins and a universal function in innate immunity. Here we show that Toll paralogues unrelated to the mammalian neurotrophin receptors function as neurotrophin receptors in fruit-flies. Toll-6 and Toll-7 are expressed in the central nervous system throughout development, and regulate locomotion, motoraxon targeting and neuronal survival. DNT1 and 2 interact genetically with Toll-6 and 7, bind to Toll-7 and 6 promiscuously, and are distributed in vivo in complementary or overlapping domains. We conclude that in fruit-flies, Tolls are not only involved in development and immunity but also in neurotrophism, revealing an unforeseen relationship between the neurotrophin and Toll protein families. PMID:23892553

  2. The role of lipoprotein receptors on the physiological function of APP.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Timo; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2012-04-01

    In this review, we will primarily focus on the role of members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) family that are involved in trafficking and processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). We will discuss the role of the LDL-receptor family members, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), LRP1b, apolipoprotein E receptor 2, sortilin-related receptor (SorLA/LR11) and megalin/LRP2 on the physiological function of APP and its cellular localization. Additionally, we will focus on adaptor proteins that have been shown to influence the physiological function of LDL-R family members in combination with APP processing. The results in this review emphasize that the physiological function of APP cannot be explained by the focus on the APP protein alone but rather in combination with various direct or indirect interaction partners within the cellular environment. PMID:21947084

  3. 5-HT2 receptors mediate functional modulation of GABAa receptors and inhibitory synaptic transmissions in human iPS-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haitao; Hu, Lingli; Liu, Chunhua; Su, Zhenghui; Wang, Lihui; Pan, Guangjin; Guo, Yiping; He, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Neural progenitors differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) hold potentials for treating neurological diseases. Serotonin has potent effects on neuronal functions through multiple receptors, underlying a variety of neural disorders. Glutamate and GABA receptors have been proven functional in neurons differentiated from iPS, however, little is known about 5-HT receptor-mediated modulation in such neuronal networks. In the present study, human iPS were differentiated into cells possessing featured physiological properties of cortical neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to examine the involvement of 5-HT2 receptors in functional modulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission. We found that serotonin and DOI (a selective agonist of 5-HT2A/C receptor) reversibly reduced GABA-activated currents, and this 5-HT2A/C receptor mediated inhibition required G protein, PLC, PKC, and Ca2+ signaling. Serotonin increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), which could be mimicked by α-methylserotonin, a 5-HT2 receptor agonist. In contrast, DOI reduced both frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs. These findings suggested that in iPS-derived human neurons serotonin postsynaptically reduced GABAa receptor function through 5-HT2A/C receptors, but presynaptically other 5-HT2 receptors counteracted the action of 5-HT2A/C receptors. Functional expression of serotonin receptors in human iPS-derived neurons provides a pre-requisite for their normal behaviors after grafting. PMID:26837719

  4. Serum concentrations of sIL-2R, IL-6, TGF-beta1, neopterin, and zinc in chronic hepatitis C patients treated with interferon-alpha.

    PubMed

    Grüngreiff, K; Reinhold, D; Ansorge, S

    1999-12-01

    T lymphocytes and immunoregulatory cytokines play an important role in the host response to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Zinc is required for a wide spectrum of immune functions, including T-cell activity. To determine the clinical significance of the cytokines sIL-2R, IL-6, TGF-beta1, neopterin, and of zinc in chronic heptatitis C virus (HCV) infection, we investigated their concentrations in the serum of 16 patients with chronic HCV infection before, during and at the end of therapy with interferon (IFN) alpha (Roferon A), and after 6 months follow-up. Elevated concentrations of sIL-2R, IL-6, TGF-beta1, and neopterin were found in the serum of all patients prior to therapy, as compared to healthy controls. sIL-2R patterns differed in responders and non-responders. While the mean concentration of sIL-2R (335.75 pg/ml) before therapy was about 40% higher in complete responders (n=4) than in controls (272.20 pg/ml), the mean concentration in non-responders (n=6) was 4-fold higher than in controls (1153.33 pg/ml). During therapy, sIL-2R levels in responders decreased by about 40%. Mean IL-6 concentrations in both complete and partial responders (n=6) decreased continuously during treatment, while mean concentrations in non-responders decreased for only a short time, and increased again after cessation of therapy. Mean levels of TGF-beta1 behaved similarly to those of IL-6. Only negligible differences in mean neopterin levels were found between responders and non-responders over the entire observation time. The mean serum zinc concentrations slightly decreased in all 3 patient groups, the greatest reduction occurring in 3 of the 4 responders. The present findings underscore the importance of the immune system in the pathogenesis of chronic HCV infection. Serum sIL-2R levels may be used as a serological marker of outcome following IFN-alpha treatment. PMID:10623433

  5. The effect of IL-2 expression by recombinant Newcastle disease virus on host immune response, viral replication and pathogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) is a soluble cytokine that stimulates the cell-mediated immune response. Virus constructs, such as recombinant vaccinia virus, expressing chicken IL-2 have been shown to improve viral clearance by natural killer cells in mice. We have inserted the open-reading frame of the chi...

  6. Evaluation in mice of the capillary leak syndrome (CLS) mediated by the systemic administration of recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Ettinghausen, S.E.; Rosenstein, M.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1986-03-01

    Since a CLS with interstitial pulmonary edema has been the major toxicity of IL-2 administration in humans, the authors studied this CLS in mice by quantitating the IL-2 mediated, tissue extravasation (Ex) of intravenously injected /sup 125/I-bovine serum albumin (BSA). Mice received saline (HBSS) or 200,000 U of IL-2 intraperitoneally thrice daily from day 0-6 before tissues were counted. A permeability index (PI) was calculated by dividing the mean counts per minute (CPM) from tissues of treated mice by those from controls. In a representative experiment, increased BSA Ex was noted in the lungs of mice treated with IL-2 when compared with HBSS (6187 +/- 141 and 638 +/- 64 CPM +/- SEM, respectively; p2 < .001; PI = 9.7). Other tissues with increased BSA Ex included the liver, spleen, kidneys and mesenteric lymph nodes (PI = 6.7, 10.0, 6.3, 6.0, respectively). BSA Ex, which did not occur with the excipient control, was dependent upon the dose and the duration of IL-2. Serial lung weights showed dramatic increases in water weight induced by IL-2. Treatment of mice with radiation (500R), cyclophosphamide, or cortisone acetate significantly reduced IL-2 mediated BSA Ex. Thus, IL-2 induced a generalized CLS which is mediated directly or indirectly by cellular mechanisms.

  7. Looking for the role of cannabinoid receptor heteromers in striatal function.

    PubMed

    Ferré, Sergi; Goldberg, Steven R; Lluis, Carme; Franco, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of two concepts, "local module" and "receptor heteromer", facilitates the understanding of the role of interactions between different neurotransmitters in the brain. In artificial cell systems, cannabinoid CB(1) receptors form receptor heteromers with dopamine D2, adenosine A2A and mu opioid receptors. There is indirect but compelling evidence for the existence of the same CB1 receptor heteromers in striatal local modules centered in the dendritic spines of striatal GABAergic efferent neurons, particularly at a postsynaptic location. Their analysis provides new clues for the role of endocannabinoids in striatal function, which cannot only be considered as retrograde signals that inhibit neurotransmitter release. Recent studies using a new method to detect heteromerization of more than two proteins, which consists of sequential BRET-FRET (SRET) analysis, has demonstrated that CB1, D2 and A2A receptors can form heterotrimers in transfected cells. It is likely that functional CB1-A2A-D2 receptor heteromers can be found where they are highly co-expressed, in the dendritic spines of GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons. The functional properties of these multiple receptor heteromers and their role in striatal function need to be determined. PMID:18691604

  8. Phase II trial of hu14.18-IL2 for patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Mark R; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Gadbaw, Brian; Kostlevy, Jordan; Haldeman, Jennifer; Schalch, Heidi; Gan, Jacek; Kim, KyungMann; Eickhoff, Jens; Gillies, Stephen D; Sondel, Paul M

    2012-12-01

    Phase I testing of the hu14.18-IL2 immunocytokine in melanoma patients showed immune activation, reversible toxicities, and a maximal tolerated dose of 7.5 mg/m(2)/day. In this phase II study, 14 patients with measurable metastatic melanoma were scheduled to receive hu14.18-IL2 at 6 mg/m(2)/day as 4-h intravenous infusions on Days 1, 2, and 3 of each 28 day cycle. Patients with stable disease (SD) or regression following cycle 2 could receive two additional treatment cycles. The primary objective was to evaluate antitumor activity and response duration. Secondary objectives evaluated adverse events and immunologic activation. All patients received two cycles of treatment. One patient had a partial response (PR) [1 PR of 14 patients = response rate of 7.1 %; confidence interval, 0.2-33.9 %], and 4 patients had SD and received cycles 3 and 4. The PR and SD responses lasted 3-4 months. All toxicities were reversible and those resulting in dose reduction included grade 3 hypotension (2 patients) and grade 2 renal insufficiency with oliguria (1 patient). Patients had a peripheral blood lymphocytosis on Day 8 and increased C-reactive protein. While one PR in 14 patients met protocol criteria to proceed to stage 2 and enter 16 additional patients, we suspended stage 2 due to limited availability of hu14.18-IL2 at that time and the brief duration of PR and SD. We conclude that subsequent testing of hu14.18-IL2 should involve melanoma patients with minimal residual disease based on compelling preclinical data and the confirmed immune activation with some antitumor activity in this study. PMID:22678096

  9. Inhibition of leukocyte function and interleukin-2 gene expression by 2-methylarachidonyl-(2'-fluoroethyl)amide, a stable congener of the endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand anandamide

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Barbara L.F.; Ouyang Yanli; Herring, Amy; Yea, Sung Su; Razdan, Raj; Kaminski, Norbert E. . E-mail: kamins11@msu.edu

    2005-06-01

    Arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA) has been identified as an endogenous ligand for cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Characterization of the direct cannabimimetic actions of anandamide has been hampered by its short duration of action and rapid degradation in in vivo and in vitro systems to arachidonic acid, a precursor in the biosynthesis of a broad range of biologically active molecules. In the present studies, we utilized 2-methylarachidonyl-(2'-fluoroethyl)amide (F-Me-AEA), an analog of anandamide resistant to enzymatic degradation, to determine whether F-Me-AEA modulated T cell function similar to that of plant-derived cannabinoids. Indeed, F-Me-AEA at low micromolar concentrations exhibited a marked inhibition of phorbol ester plus calcium ionophore (PMA/Io)-induced IL-2 protein secretion and steady state mRNA expression. Likewise, a modest suppression of the mixed lymphocyte response was observed in the presence of F-Me-AEA indicating an alteration in T cell responsiveness to allogeneic MHC class II antigens. F-Me-AEA was also found to modestly inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in thymocytes and splenocytes, a hallmark of cannabinoid receptor agonists. Further characterization of the influence of F-Me-AEA on the cAMP signaling cascade revealed an inhibition of CREB-1/ATF-1 phosphorylation and subsequently, an inhibition of CRE DNA binding activity. Characterization of nuclear binding proteins further revealed that NF-AT and, to a lesser extent, NF-{kappa}B DNA binding activities were also suppressed. These studies demonstrate that F-Me-AEA modulates T cell function in a similar manner to plant-derived and endogenous cannabinoids and therefore can be utilized as an amidase- and hydrolysis-resistant endogenous cannabinoid.

  10. Function and Distribution of 5-HT2 Receptors in the Honeybee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Thamm, Markus; Rolke, Daniel; Jordan, Nadine; Balfanz, Sabine; Schiffer, Christian; Baumann, Arnd; Blenau, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background Serotonin plays a pivotal role in regulating and modulating physiological and behavioral processes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the honeybee (Apis mellifera), serotonin has been implicated in division of labor, visual processing, and learning processes. Here, we present the cloning, heterologous expression, and detailed functional and pharmacological characterization of two honeybee 5-HT2 receptors. Methods Honeybee 5-HT2 receptor cDNAs were amplified from brain cDNA. Recombinant cell lines were established constitutively expressing receptor variants. Pharmacological properties of the receptors were investigated by Ca2+ imaging experiments. Quantitative PCR was applied to explore the expression patterns of receptor mRNAs. Results The honeybee 5-HT2 receptor class consists of two subtypes, Am5-HT2α and Am5-HT2β. Each receptor gene also gives rise to alternatively spliced mRNAs that possibly code for truncated receptors. Only activation of the full-length receptors with serotonin caused an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. The effect was mimicked by the agonists 5-methoxytryptamine and 8-OH-DPAT at low micromolar concentrations. Receptor activities were blocked by established 5-HT receptor antagonists such as clozapine, methiothepin, or mianserin. High transcript numbers were detected in exocrine glands suggesting that 5-HT2 receptors participate in secretory processes in the honeybee. Conclusions This study marks the first molecular and pharmacological characterization of two 5-HT2 receptor subtypes in the same insect species. The results presented should facilitate further attempts to unravel central and peripheral effects of serotonin mediated by these receptors. PMID:24324783

  11. Differential effects of mercury, lead, and cadmium on IL-2 production by Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Myrian; Hamelin, Claudine; Kouassi, Edouard; Fournier, Michel; Bernier, Jacques

    2004-06-01

    Mercury, lead, and cadmium are widespread and highly toxic pollutants. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of sublethal doses of CH(3)HgCl, CdCl(2), and PbCl(2) on IL-2 production by T lymphocytes. Jurkat T cells were stimulated by triggering CD3 and CD28 molecules before, in conjunction with, or following heavy metal exposure. Heavy metals, individually or mixed together at equimolar concentrations, were used. Results demonstrated that low, noncytotoxic doses of metals induce tyrosine phosphorylation. Mercury and lead (1 microM) inhibit IL-2 production regardless of the state of T cell activation. Cadmium stimulated IL-2 production only in preactivated T cells. Surprisingly, a mixture of these three metals had no effect. We subsequently determined the effects of heavy metals on NFAT (nuclear factors of activated T cells) activity. When cells were stimulated by potent stimulation involving the CD3 and CD28 molecules, an increased NFAT activation was noted when the cells were exposed to mercury and to the metal mixture. Activation with PMA/calcium ionophores indicated that the target of heavy metals is located downstream from PKC and calcium mobilization. These results suggest that the state and mode of T cell activation are important parameters to consider in heavy metal toxicity. PMID:15183152

  12. Silent IL2RG Gene Editing in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Li B; Ma, Chao; Awong, Geneve; Kennedy, Marion; Gornalusse, German; Keller, Gordon; Kaufman, Dan S; Russell, David W

    2016-03-01

    Many applications of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) require efficient editing of silent chromosomal genes. Here, we show that a major limitation in isolating edited clones is silencing of the selectable marker cassette after homologous recombination and that this can be overcome by using a ubiquitous chromatin opening element (UCOE) promoter-driven transgene. We use this strategy to edit the silent IL2RG locus in human PSCs with a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-targeting vector in the absence of potentially genotoxic, site-specific nucleases and show that IL2RG is required for natural killer and T-cell differentiation of human PSCs. Insertion of an active UCOE promoter into a silent locus altered the histone modification and cytosine methylation pattern of surrounding chromatin, but these changes resolved when the UCOE promoter was removed. This same approach could be used to correct IL2RG mutations in X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency patient-derived induced PSCs (iPSCs), to prevent graft versus host disease in regenerative medicine applications, or to edit other silent genes. PMID:26444081

  13. The Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor in Brain Functions: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, Marie-Odile; Gallo-Payet, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the main active product of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), mediating its action via two major receptors, namely, the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor and the type 2 (AT2) receptor. Recent results also implicate several other members of the renin-angiotensin system in various aspects of brain functions. The first aim of this paper is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the properties and signaling of the AT2 receptor, its expression in the brain, and its well-established effects. Secondly, we will highlight the potential role of the AT2 receptor in cognitive function, neurological disorders and in the regulation of appetite and the possible link with development of metabolic disorders. The potential utility of novel nonpeptide selective AT2 receptor ligands in clarifying potential roles of this receptor in physiology will also be discussed. If confirmed, these new pharmacological tools should help to improve impaired cognitive performance, not only through its action on brain microcirculation and inflammation, but also through more specific effects on neurons. However, the overall physiological relevance of the AT2 receptor in the brain must also consider the Ang IV/AT4 receptor. PMID:23320146

  14. A search for functional histamine H4 receptors in the human, guinea pig and mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Feliszek, Monika; Speckmann, Valerie; Schacht, Daniel; von Lehe, Marec; Stark, Holger; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    Histamine H4 receptors are expressed in immune cells, but their potential role in the brain is less clear. Although H4 transcripts have been identified in human and rat brain, the presence of H4 receptors on the protein level has so far not been proven since appropriate antibodies fulfilling the strict criteria for G protein-coupled receptors are missing. Here, we searched for functional H4 receptors in human, guinea pig and mouse cortex. We studied whether H4 receptor activation is associated with increased GTPγS binding and reduced noradrenaline release. The latter two effects have been previously shown for H3 receptors, which, like the H4 receptors, are coupled to G i/o protein. G protein activation was studied using (35)S-GTPγS binding in cortical membranes. The electrically induced (3)H-noradrenaline release was determined in superfused cortical slices. The H4 agonist 4-methylhistamine failed to affect (35)S-GTPγS binding and/or noradrenaline release in human, guinea pig and mouse cortex although an H 3 receptor-mediated increase in (35)S-GTPγS binding and inhibition of noradrenaline release occurred in parallel experiments. In conclusion, functional H4 receptors increasing (35)S-GTPγS binding and/or decreasing noradrenaline release are not found in human, guinea pig and mouse cortex. PMID:25300787

  15. Functional roles of the sweet taste receptor in oral and extraoral tissues

    PubMed Central

    Laffitte, Anni; Neiers, Fabrice; Briand, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes and discusses the current knowledge about the physiological roles of the sweet taste receptor in oral and extraoral tissues. Recent findings The expression of a functional sweet taste receptor has been reported in numerous extragustatory tissues, including the gut, pancreas, bladder, brain and, more recently, bone and adipose tissues. In the gut, this receptor has been suggested to be involved in luminal glucose sensing, the release of some satiety hormones, the expression of glucose transporters, and the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. More recently, the sweet taste receptor was proposed to regulate adipogenesis and bone biology. Summary The perception of sweet taste is mediated by the T1R2/T1R3 receptor, which is expressed in the oral cavity, wherein it provides input on the caloric and macronutrient contents of ingested food. This receptor recognizes all the chemically diverse compounds perceived as sweet by human beings, including natural sugars and sweeteners. Importantly, the expression of a functional sweet taste receptor has been reported in numerous extragustatory tissues, wherein it has been proposed to regulate metabolic processes. This newly recognized role of the sweet taste receptor makes this receptor a potential novel therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic dysfunctions, such as diabetes and hyperlipidemia. PMID:24763065

  16. Function of the cytoplasmic tail of human calcitonin receptor-like receptor in complex with receptor activity-modifying protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Hikosaka, Tomomi; Kato, Johji

    2010-02-12

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to form an adrenomedullin (AM)-specific receptor. Here we investigated the function of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of human (h)CRLR by co-transfecting its C-terminal mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hRAMP2. Deleting the C-tail from CRLR disrupted AM-evoked cAMP production or receptor internalization, but did not affect [{sup 125}I]AM binding. We found that CRLR residues 428-439 are required for AM-evoked cAMP production, though deleting this region had little effect on receptor internalization. Moreover, pretreatment with pertussis toxin (100 ng/mL) led to significant increases in AM-induced cAMP production via wild-type CRLR/RAMP2 complexes. This effect was canceled by deleting CRLR residues 454-457, suggesting Gi couples to this region. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that CRLR truncation mutants lacking residues in the Ser/Thr-rich region extending from Ser{sup 449} to Ser{sup 467} were unable to undergo AM-induced receptor internalization and, in contrast to the effect on wild-type CRLR, overexpression of GPCR kinases-2, -3 and -4 failed to promote internalization of CRLR mutants lacking residues 449-467. Thus, the hCRLR C-tail is crucial for AM-evoked cAMP production and internalization of the CRLR/RAMP2, while the receptor internalization is dependent on the aforementioned GPCR kinases, but not Gs coupling.

  17. Interleukin-2 and interleukin-2 receptor expression in human corticotrophic adenoma and murine pituitary cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Arzt, E; Stelzer, G; Renner, U; Lange, M; Müller, O A; Stalla, G K

    1992-01-01

    The production of IL-1 and IL-6 by pituitary cells has recently been demonstrated. In this study we investigated the expression of IL-2 and its receptor (IL-2R) by pituitary cells of different species. In Northern blots, a single hybridizing band of 1 kb, identical to that in normal stimulated lymphocytes, was obtained with specific IL-2 probes. In the mouse AT-20 pituitary tumor cell line, IL-2 mRNA expression was detected after stimulation with corticotropin-releasing hormone or phorbol myristate acetate. In human corticotrophic adenoma cells, basal IL-2 mRNA expression as well as IL-2 secretion were further stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate. Both adenoma and AtT-20 cells showed detectable amounts of IL-2R mRNA and by immunofluorescence, IL-2R membrane expression. In addition, dual immunofluorescence studies in rat anterior pituitary cells demonstrated colocalization of IL-2R with ACTH-positive cells and other cell types expressing the receptor. In addition to the action of lymphocyte-produced IL-2, this cytokine may have a paracrine or autocrine regulatory role within the pituitary. It remains to be established whether IL-2 production occurs in the normal pituitary or is intrinsic to the process of tumor development of these cells. IL-2 may be involved in the growth control of pituitary cells. Images PMID:1331177

  18. Expression and functional study of estrogen receptor-related receptors in human prostatic cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Cheung, C P; Yu, Shan; Wong, K B; Chan, L W; Lai, Fernand M M; Wang, Xianghong; Suetsugi, Masatomo; Chen, Shiuan; Chan, Franky L

    2005-03-01

    Estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs; alpha, beta, gamma) are orphan nuclear receptors and constitutively active without binding to estrogen. Like estrogen receptors (ERs), ERRs bind to estrogen receptor elements and estrogen receptor element-related repeats. Growing evidence suggests that ERRs can cross-talk with ERs in different cell types via competition for DNA sites and coactivators. We hypothesize that ERRs might play regulatory roles in normal and neoplastic prostatic cells by sharing similar ER-mediated pathways or acting independently. In this study, we investigated mRNA and protein expression patterns of three ERR members in normal human prostate epithelial cells, established cell lines, cancer xenografts, and prostatic tissues. Additionally, effects of transient transfection of ERRs on prostatic cell proliferation and ER expression were also examined. RT-PCR showed that ERRalpha and ERRgamma transcripts were detected in most cell lines and xenografts, whereas ERRbeta was detected in normal epithelial cells and few immortalized cell lines but not in most cancer lines. Similar results were demonstrated in clinical prostatic specimens. Western blottings and immunohistochemistry confirmed similar expression patterns that ERR proteins were detected as nuclear proteins in epithelial cells, whereas their expressions became reduced or undetected in neoplastic prostatic cells. Transient transfection confirmed that ERRs were expressed in prostatic cells as nuclear proteins and transcriptionally active in the absence of estradiol. Transfection results showed that overexpression of ERRs inhibited cell proliferation and repressed ERalpha transcription in PC-3 cells. Our study shows that ERRs, which are coexpressed with ERs in prostatic cells, could regulate cell growth and modulate ER-mediated pathways via interference on ERalpha transcription in prostatic cells. PMID:15598686

  19. Regulation and Functional Implications of Opioid Receptor Splicing in Opioid Pharmacology and HIV Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Regan, Patrick M; Langford, Dianne; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-05-01

    Despite the identification and characterization of four opioid receptor subtypes and the genes from which they are encoded, pharmacological data does not conform to the predications of a four opioid receptor model. Instead, current studies of opioid pharmacology suggest the existence of additional receptor subtypes; however, no additional opioid receptor subtype has been identified to date. It is now understood that this discrepancy is due to the generation of multiple isoforms of opioid receptor subtypes. While several mechanisms are utilized to generate these isoforms, the primary mechanism involves alternative splicing of the pre-mRNA transcript. Extensive alternative splicing patterns for opioid receptors have since been identified and discrepancies in opioid pharmacology are now partially attributed to variable expression of these isoforms. Recent studies have been successful in characterizing the localization of these isoforms as well as their specificity in ligand binding; however, the regulation of opioid receptor splicing specificity is poorly characterized. Furthermore, the functional significance of individual receptor isoforms and the extent to which opioid- and/or HIV-mediated changes in the opioid receptor isoform profile contributes to altered opioid pharmacology or the well-known physiological role of opioids in the exacerbation of HIV neurocognitive dysfunction is unknown. As such, the current review details constitutive splicing mechanisms as well as the specific architecture of opioid receptor genes, transcripts, and receptors in order to highlight the current understanding of opioid receptor isoforms, potential mechanisms of their regulation and signaling, and their functional significance in both opioid pharmacology and HIV-associated neuropathology. PMID:26529364

  20. EphB3 receptors function as dependence receptors to mediate oligodendrocyte cell death following contusive spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsenkina, Y; Ricard, J; Runko, E; Quiala- Acosta, M M; Mier, J; Liebl, D J

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that EphB3 receptors mediate oligodendrocyte (OL) cell death in the injured spinal cord through dependence receptor mechanism. OLs in the adult spinal cord express EphB3 as well as other members of the Eph receptor family. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with tissue damage, cellular loss and disturbances in EphB3-ephrinB3 protein balance acutely (days) after the initial impact creating an environment for a dependence receptor-mediated cell death to occur. Genetic ablation of EphB3 promotes OL survival associated with increased expression of myelin basic protein and improved locomotor function in mice after SCI. Moreover, administration of its ephrinB3 ligand to the spinal cord after injury also promotes OL survival. Our in vivo findings are supported by in vitro studies showing that ephrinB3 administration promotes the survival of both oligodendroglial progenitor cells and mature OLs cultured under pro-apoptotic conditions. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates a novel dependence receptor role of EphB3 in OL cell death after SCI, and supports further development of ephrinB3-based therapies to promote recovery. PMID:26469970

  1. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  2. GABAA receptor modulating steroid antagonists (GAMSA) are functional in vivo.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Maja; Strömberg, Jessica; Ragagnin, Gianna; Doverskog, Magnus; Bäckström, Torbjörn

    2016-06-01

    GABAA receptor modulating steroid antagonists (GAMSA) selectively inhibit neurosteroid-mediated enhancement of GABA-evoked currents at the GABAA receptor. 3α-hydroxy-neurosteroids, notably allopregnanolone and tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC), potentiate GABAA receptor-mediated currents. On the contrary, various 3β-hydroxy-steroids antagonize this positive neurosteroid-mediated modulation. Importantly, GAMSAs are specific antagonists of the positive neurosteroid-modulation of the receptor and do not inhibit GABA-evoked currents. Allopregnanolone and THDOC have both negative and positive actions. Allopregnanolone can impair encoding/consolidation and retrieval of memories. Chronic administration of a physiological allopregnanolone concentration reduces cognition in mice models of Alzheimer's disease. In humans an allopregnanolone challenge impairs episodic memory and in hepatic encephalopathy cognitive deficits are accompanied by increased brain ammonia and allopregnanolone. Hippocampal slices react in vitro to ammonia by allopregnanolone synthesis in CA1 neurons, which blocks long-term potentiation (LTP). Thus, allopregnanolone may impair learning and memory by interfering with hippocampal LTP. Contrary, pharmacological treatment with allopregnanolone can promote neurogenesis and positively influence learning and memory of trace eye-blink conditioning in mice. In rat the GAMSA UC1011 inhibits an allopregnanolone-induced learning impairment and the GAMSA GR3027 restores learning and motor coordination in rats with hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, the GAMSA isoallopregnanolone antagonizes allopregnanolone-induced anesthesia in rats, and in humans it antagonizes allopregnanolone-induced sedation and reductions in saccadic eye velocity. 17PA is also an effective GAMSA in vivo, as it antagonizes allopregnanolone-induced anesthesia and spinal analgesia in rats. In vitro the allopregnanolone/THDOC-increased GABA-mediated GABAA receptor activity is antagonized

  3. Role of the Extracellular and Intracellular Loops of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Its Function

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Antara A.; Mahale, Smita D.

    2015-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) is a leucine-rich repeat containing class A G-protein coupled receptor belonging to the subfamily of glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHRs), which includes luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LH/CGR) and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. Its cognate ligand, follicle-stimulating hormone binds to, and activates FSHR expressed on the surface of granulosa cells of the ovary, in females, and Sertoli cells of the testis, in males, to bring about folliculogenesis and spermatogenesis, respectively. FSHR contains a large extracellular domain (ECD) consisting of leucine-rich repeats at the N-terminal end and a hinge region at the C-terminus that connects the ECD to the membrane spanning transmembrane domain (TMD). The TMD consists of seven α-helices that are connected to each other by means of three extracellular loops (ELs) and three intracellular loops (ILs) and ends in a short-cytoplasmic tail. It is well established that the ECD is the primary hormone binding domain, whereas the TMD is the signal transducing domain. However, several studies on the ELs and ILs employing site directed mutagenesis, generation of chimeric receptors and in vitro characterization of naturally occurring mutations have proven their indispensable role in FSHR function. Their role in every phase of the life cycle of the receptor like post translational modifications, cell surface trafficking, hormone binding, activation of downstream signaling, receptor phosphorylation, hormone–receptor internalization, and recycling of hormone–receptor complex have been documented. Mutations in the loops causing dysregulation of these processes lead to pathophysiological conditions. In other GPHRs as well, the loops have been convincingly shown to contribute to various aspects of receptor function. This review article attempts to summarize the extensive contributions of FSHR loops and C-terminal tail to its function. PMID:26236283

  4. Distinct roles for protein kinase C isoforms in regulating platelet purinergic receptor function.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart J; Jones, Matthew L; Hardy, Adam R; Barton, Johanna F; Beaucourt, Stephanie M; Conley, Pamela B; Poole, Alastair W

    2006-09-01

    ADP is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), P2Y1 and P2Y12. We have shown previously that the receptors are functionally desensitized, in a homologous manner, by distinct kinase-dependent mechanisms in which P2Y1 is regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) and P2Y12 by G protein-coupled receptor kinases. In this study, we addressed whether different PKC isoforms play different roles in regulating the trafficking and activity of these two GPCRs. Expression of PKCalpha and PKCdelta dominant-negative mutants in 1321N1 cells revealed that both isoforms regulated P2Y1 receptor signaling and trafficking, although only PKCdelta was capable of regulating P2Y12, in experiments in which PKC was directly activated by the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). These results were paralleled in human platelets, in which PMA reduced subsequent ADP-induced P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptor signaling. PKC isoform-selective inhibitors revealed that novel, but not conventional, isoforms of PKC regulate P2Y12 function, whereas both novel and classic isoforms regulate P2Y1 activity. It is also noteworthy that we studied receptor internalization in platelets by a radioligand binding approach showing that both receptors internalize rapidly in these cells. ADP-induced P2Y1 receptor internalization is attenuated by PKC inhibitors, whereas that of the P2Y12 receptor is unaffected. Both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors can also undergo PMA-stimulated internalization, and here again, novel but not classic PKCs regulate P2Y12, whereas both novel and classic isoforms regulate P2Y1 internalization. This study therefore is the first to reveal distinct roles for PKC isoforms in the regulation of platelet P2Y receptor function and trafficking. PMID:16804093

  5. Functional antagonistic properties of clozapine at the 5-HT3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Hermann, B; Wetzel, C H; Pestel, E; Zieglgänsberger, W; Holsboer, F; Rupprecht, R

    1996-08-23

    The atypical neuroleptic clozapine is thought to exert its psychopharmacological actions through a variety of neurotransmitter receptors. It binds preferentially to D4 and 5-HT2 receptors; however, little is known on it's interaction with the 5-HT3 receptor. Using a cell line stably expressing the 5-HT3 receptor, whole-cell voltage-clamp analysis revealed functional antagonistic properties of clozapine at low nanomolar concentrations in view of a binding affinity in the upper nanomolar range. Because the concentration of clozapine required for an interaction with the 5-HT3 receptor can be achieved with therapeutical doses, functional antagonistic properties at this ligand-gated ion channel may contribute to its unique psychopharmacological profile. PMID:8780717

  6. Single-Cell Characterization of in vitro Migration and Interaction Dynamics of T Cells Expanded with IL-2 and IL-7.

    PubMed

    Tauriainen, Johanna; Gustafsson, Karin; Göthlin, Mårten; Gertow, Jens; Buggert, Marcus; Frisk, Thomas W; Karlsson, Annika C; Uhlin, Michael; Önfelt, Björn

    2015-01-01

    T cells are pivotal in the immune defense against cancers and infectious agents. To mount an effector response against cancer cells, T cells need to migrate to the cancer-site, engage in contacts with cancer cells, and perform their effector functions. Adoptive T cell therapy is an effective strategy as treatment of complications such as relapse or opportunistic infections after hematopoietic stem cell transplantations. This requires a sufficient amount of cells that are able to expand and respond to tumor or viral antigens. The cytokines interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-7 drive T cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival and are commonly used to expand T cells ex vivo. Here, we have used microchip-based live-cell imaging to follow the migration of individual T cells, their interactions with allogeneic monocytes, cell division, and apoptosis for extended periods of time; something that cannot be achieved by commonly used methods. Our data indicate that cells grown in IL-7 + IL-2 had similar migration and contact dynamics as cells grown in IL-2 alone. However, the addition of IL-7 decreased cell death creating a more viable cell population, which should be beneficial when preparing cells for immunotherapy. PMID:25972868

  7. Functional pharmacology of H1 histamine receptors expressed in mouse preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tabarean, I V

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Histamine H1 receptors are highly expressed in hypothalamic neurons and mediate histaminergic modulation of several brain-controlled physiological functions, such as sleep, feeding and thermoregulation. In spite of the fact that the mouse is used as an experimental model for studying histaminergic signalling, the pharmacological characteristics of mouse H1 receptors have not been studied. In particular, selective and potent H1 receptor agonists have not been identified. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Ca2+ imaging using fura-2 fluorescence signals and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were carried out in mouse preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons in culture. KEY RESULTS The H1 receptor antagonists mepyramine and trans-triprolidine potently antagonized the activation by histamine of these receptors with IC50 values of 0.02 and 0.2 μM respectively. All H1 receptor agonists studied had relatively low potency at the H1 receptors expressed by these neurons. Methylhistaprodifen and 2-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)histamine had full-agonist activity with potencies similar to that of histamine. In contrast, 2-pyridylethylamine and betahistine showed only partial agonist activity and lower potency than histamine. The histamine receptor agonist, 6-[2-(4-imidazolyl)ethylamino]-N-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)heptanecarboxamide (HTMT) had no agonist activity at the H1 receptors H1 receptors expressed by mouse preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons but displayed antagonist activity. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Methylhistaprodifen and 2-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)histamine were identified as full agonists of mouse H1 receptors. These results also indicated that histamine H1 receptors in mice exhibited a pharmacological profile in terms of agonism, significantly different from those of H1 receptors expressed in other species. PMID:23808378

  8. More Than Cholesterol Transporters: Lipoprotein Receptors in CNS Function and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Donovan, Courtney E.; Philips, Gary T.; Herz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Members of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family have a diverse set of biological functions that transcend lipid metabolism. Lipoprotein receptors have broad effects in both the developing and adult brain and participate in synapse development, cargo trafficking, and signal transduction. In addition, several family members play key roles in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis and neurodegeneration. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role lipoprotein receptors play in CNS function and AD pathology, with a special emphasis on amyloid-independent roles in endocytosis and synaptic dysfunction. PMID:25144875

  9. Functions of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in the central nervous system and its regulation by μ-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nash, Bradley; Meucci, Olimpia

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4 by its chemokine ligand CXCL12 regulates a number of physiopathological functions in the central nervous system, during development as well as later in life. In addition to the more classical roles of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in the recruitment of immune cells or migration and proliferation of neural precursor cells, recent studies suggest that CXCR4 signaling also modulates synaptic function and neuronal survival in the mature brain, through direct and indirect effects on neurons and glia. These effects, which include regulation of glutamate receptors and uptake, and of dendritic spine density, can significantly alter the ability of neurons to face excitotoxic insults. Therefore, they are particularly relevant to neurodegenerative diseases featuring alterations of glutamate neurotransmission, such as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Importantly, CXCR4 signaling can be dysregulated by HIV viral proteins, host HIV-induced factors, and opioids. Potential mechanisms of opioid regulation of CXCR4 include heterologous desensitization, transcriptional regulation and changes in receptor expression levels, opioid-chemokine receptor dimer or heteromer formation, and the newly described modulation by the protein ferritin heavy chain-all leading to inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. After reviewing major effects of chemokines and opioids in the CNS, this chapter discusses chemokine-opioid interactions in neuronal and immune cells, focusing on their potential contribution to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:25175863

  10. Functions of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 in the Central Nervous System and Its Regulation by μ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Bradley; Meucci, Olimpia

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4 by its chemokine ligand CXCL12 regulates a number of physiopathological functions in the central nervous system, during development as well as later in life. In addition to the more classical roles of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in the recruitment of immune cells or migration and proliferation of neural precursor cells, recent studies suggest that CXCR4 signaling also modulates synaptic function and neuronal survival in the mature brain, through direct and indirect effects on neurons and glia. These effects, which include regulation of glutamate receptors and uptake, and of dendritic spine density, can significantly alter the ability of neurons to face excitotoxic insults. Therefore, they are particularly relevant to neurodegenerative diseases featuring alterations of glutamate neurotransmission, such as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Importantly, CXCR4 signaling can be dysregulated by HIV viral proteins, host HIV-induced factors, and opioids. Potential mechanisms of opioid regulation of CXCR4 include heterologous desensitization, transcriptional regulation and changes in receptor expression levels, opioid–chemokine receptor dimer or heteromer formation, and the newly described modulation by the protein ferritin heavy chain—all leading to inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. After reviewing major effects of chemokines and opioids in the CNS, this chapter discusses chemokine–opioid interactions in neuronal and immune cells, focusing on their potential contribution to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:25175863

  11. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W.; Kaplan, David L.; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities. PMID:26702058

  12. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W; Kaplan, David L; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-26

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities. PMID:26702058

  13. Functional properties of a cloned 5-hydroxytryptamine ionotropic receptor subunit: comparison with native mouse receptors.

    PubMed

    Hussy, N; Lukas, W; Jones, K A

    1994-12-01

    1. A comparative study of the whole-cell and single-channel properties of cloned and native mouse 5-hydroxytryptamine ionotropic receptors (5-HT3) was undertaken using mammalian cell lines expressing the cloned 5-HT3 receptor subunit A (5-HT3R-A), superior cervical ganglia (SCG) neurones and N1E-115 cells. 2. No pharmacological difference was found in the sensitivity to the agonists 5-HT and 2-methyl-5-HT, or to the antagonists d-tubocurare and 3-tropanyl-3,5-dichlorobenzoate (MDL-72222). 3. Current-voltage (I-V) relationships of whole-cell currents showed inward rectification in the three preparations. Rectification was stronger both in cells expressing the 5-HT3R-A subunit and in N1E-115 cells when compared with SCG neurones. 4. No clear openings could be resolved in 5-HT-activated currents in patches excised from cells expressing the 5-HT3R-A subunit or N1E-115 cells. Current fluctuation analysis of whole-cell and excised-patch records revealed a slope conductance of 0.4-0.6 pS in both preparations. Current-voltage relationships of these channels showed strong rectification that fully accounted for the whole-cell voltage dependence. 5. In contrast, single channels of about 10 pS were activated by 5-HT in patches excised from SCG neurones. The weak voltage dependence of their conductance did not account completely for the rectification of whole-cell currents. A lower unitary conductance (3.4 pS) was inferred from whole-cell noise analysis. 6. We conclude that the receptor expressed from the cloned cDNA is indistinguishable from the 5-HT3 receptor of N1E-115 cells, suggesting an identical structure for these two receptors. The higher conductance and different voltage dependence of the 5-HT3 receptor in SCG neurones might indicate the participation of an additional subunit in the structure of native ganglionic 5-HT3 receptors. Homo-oligomeric 5-HT3R-A channels may also be present as suggested by the lower conductance estimated by whole-cell noise analysis. PMID

  14. The orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1 functions as a potent corepressor of the constitutive androstane receptor (NR1I3).

    PubMed

    Laurenzana, Elizabeth M; Chen, Tao; Kannuswamy, Malavika; Sell, Brian E; Strom, Stephen C; Li, Yong; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2012-11-01

    Regulation of gene transcription is controlled in part by nuclear receptors that function coordinately with coregulator proteins. The human constitutive androstane receptor (CAR; NR1I3) is expressed primarily in liver and regulates the expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism as well as hormone, energy, and lipid homeostasis. In this report, DAX-1, a nuclear receptor family member with corepressor properties, was identified as a potent CAR regulator. Results of transaction and mutational studies demonstrated that both DAX-1's downstream LXXLL and its PCFQVLP motifs were critical contributors to DAX-1's corepression activities, although two other LXXM/LL motifs located nearer the N terminus had no impact on the CAR functional interaction. Deletion of DAX-1's C-terminal transcription silencing domain restored CAR1 transactivation activity in reporter assays to approximately 90% of control, demonstrating its critical function in mediating the CAR repression activities. Furthermore, results obtained from mammalian two-hybrid experiments assessing various domain configurations of the respective receptors showed that full-length DAX-1 inhibited the CAR-SRC1 interaction by approximately 50%, whereas the same interaction was restored to 90% of control when the DAX-1 transcription silencing domain was deleted. Direct interaction between CAR and DAX-1 was demonstrated with both alpha-screen and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, and this interaction was enhanced in the presence of the CAR activator 6-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime (CITCO). Results obtained in primary human hepatocytes further demonstrated DAX-1 inhibition of CAR-mediated CITCO induction of the CYP2B6 target gene. The results of this investigation identify DAX-1 as a novel and potent CAR corepressor and suggest that DAX-1 functions as a coordinate hepatic regulator of CAR's biological function. PMID:22896671

  15. Functions of outer membrane receptors in mitochondrial protein import.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toshiya; Kohda, Daisuke

    2002-09-01

    Most mitochondrial proteins are synthesized in the cytosol as precursor proteins and are imported into mitochondria. The targeting signals for mitochondria are encoded in the presequences or in the mature parts of the precursor proteins, and are decoded by the receptor sites in the translocator complex in the mitochondrial outer membrane. The recently determined NMR structure of the general import receptor Tom20 in a complex with a presequence peptide reveals that, although the amphiphilicity and positive charges of the presequence is essential for the import ability of the presequence, Tom20 recognizes only the amphiphilicity, but not the positive charges. This leads to a new model that different features associated with the mitochondrial targeting sequence of the precursor protein can be recognized by the mitochondrial protein import system in different steps during the import. PMID:12191763

  16. Three amino acids in the D2 dopamine receptor regulate selective ligand function and affinity

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, David F.; Ericksen, Spencer S.; Schetz, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The D2 dopamine receptor is an important therapeutic target for the treatment of psychotic, agitated, and abnormal behavioral states. To better understand the specific interactions of subtype-selective ligands with dopamine receptor subtypes, seven ligands with high selectivity (>120-fold) for the D4 subtype of dopamine receptor were tested on wild-type and mutant D2 receptors. Five of the selective ligands were observed to have 21-fold to 293-fold increases in D2 receptor affinity when three non-conserved amino acids in TM2 and TM3 were mutated to the corresponding D4 amino acids. The two ligands with the greatest improvement in affinity for the D2 mutant receptor [i.e., 3-{[4-(4-iodophenyl) piperazin-1-yl]methyl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (L-750,667) and 1-[4-iodobenzyl]-4-[N-(3-isopropoxy-2-pyridinyl)-N-methyl]-aminopiperidine (RBI-257)] were investigated in functional assays. Consistent with their higher affinity for the mutant than for the wild-type receptor, concentrations of L-750,667 or RBI-257 that produced large reductions in the potency of quinpirole’s functional response in the mutant did not significantly reduce quinpirole’s functional response in the wild-type D2 receptor. In contrast to RBI-257 which is an antagonist at all receptors, L-750,667 is a partial agonist at the wild-type D2 but an antagonist at both the mutant D2 and wild-type D4 receptors. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the TM2/3 microdomain of the D2 dopamine receptor not only regulates the selective affinity of ligands, but in selected cases can also regulate their function. Utilizing a new docking technique that incorporates receptor backbone flexibility, the three non-conserved amino acids that encompass the TM2/3 microdomain were found to account in large part for the differences in intermolecular steric contacts between the ligands and receptors. Consistent with the experimental data, this model illustrates the interactions between a variety of subtype

  17. Long-term IL-2 therapy after transplantation of T cell depleted stem cells from alternative donors in children.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Patrick; Teltschik, Heiko-Manuel; Pfeiffer, Matthias; Handgretinger, Rupert; Schumm, Michael; Koscielniak, Ewa; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Schlegel, Paul-Gerhard; Greil, Johann; Lang, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of long-term subcutaneous application of low-dose IL-2 in children with malignancies at very high risk of relapse who underwent highly T cell and B cell depleted HLA-identical (MUD) or full haplotype mismatched related hematopoetic stem cell transplantation. We studied 11 patients with acute leukemias / myelodysplastic syndrome and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (active disease and/or second stem cell transplantation, n = 8; ≥CR 2, n = 2) and relapsed or progressive Ewing's sarcoma (n = 2) who received prophylactic IL-2 treatment for a high probability of disease recurrence after allo-HSCT. Toxicities from IL-2 were transient fever, fatigue and local inflammation. In one patient GvHD grade III with no clear association to IL-2 administration occurred. IL-2 administration was started at median day 57 (range 13-154) post-transplant for a mean duration of 28 days (range 15-250). IL-2 administration clearly increased NK cell activity. 3 of 11 patients (ALL, AML, multifocal Ewings sarcoma) survived with a follow-up of ten years. In conclusion, long-term low-dose IL-2 subcutaneous application is feasible in children due to a low side effect profile even after HLA mismatched transplantation and may be a strategy to prevent relapse in pediatric malignancies with extremely high risk of relapse. PMID:21925097

  18. Correlations between IL-2 enhancing activity and clinical parameters in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus.