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Sample records for functional ischemic mitral

  1. Surgical treatment of functional ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Henrik

    2015-03-01

    literature, including three randomized studies and a meta analysis, indicate that combined CABG and mitral valve ring annuloplasty has no late survival difference compared with CABG alone, and early mortality might even be higher. Meanwhile, adding a mitral valve ring annuloplasty results in a lower NYHA functional class, most likely as a consequence of a lower incidence of persistent or recurrent FIMR. More randomized studies are being conducted to further address this topic. Mitral valve ring annuloplasty vs. mitral valve replacement. The early survival may be higher after repair compared with replacement, meanwhile, the literature is more ambiguous in terms of late survival advantages, and recent reports find no late survival advantage from repair over replacement. The recurrence rates after ring annuloplasty addressed above were also present in this subset of patients, whereas the incidence of recurrent FIMR after valve replacement is scarcely reported. There was an overall tendency of slightly higher incidence of reoperations after ring annuloplasty. The mitral valve annulus: Innovations in mitral valve ring annuloplasty: The latest innovation in mitral valve ring annuloplasty design includes adjustable rings, allowing adjustment of septo-lateral dimensions intra- or postoperatively. Minimally invasive ring annuloplasty using indirect coronary sinus devices, has been introduced, but so far have produced suboptimal results in terms of safety and efficacy. Also, first in man testing of direct percutaneous catheter based mitral annuloplasty techniques have been conducted. Leaflets and chordae: Direct repair techniques: Surgical methods have been developed to directly address the mitral valve leaflets and chordae tendineae to correct leaflet tethering in FIMR. Both the Alfieri stich and the minimally invasive MitraClip attaches the anterior and posterior leaflets, typically the A2-P2 region, to correct incomplete leaflet coaptation. Patch augmentation of the posterior

  2. Mitral valve function following ischemic cardiomyopathy: a biomechanical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Yonghoon; McPherson, David D.; Kim, Hyunggun

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic mitral valve (MV) is a common complication of pathologic remodeling of the left ventricle due to acute and chronic coronary artery diseases. It frequently represents the pathologic consequences of increased tethering forces and reduced coaptation of the MV leaflets. Ischemic MV function has been investigated from a biomechanical perspective using finite element-based computational MV evaluation techniques. A virtual 3D MV model was created utilizing 3D echocardiographic data in a patient with normal MV. Two types of ischemic MVs containing asymmetric medial-dominant or symmetric leaflet tenting were modeled by altering the configuration of the normal papillary muscle (PM) locations. Computational simulations of MV function were performed using dynamic finite element methods, and biomechanical information across the MV apparatus was evaluated. The ischemic MV with medial-dominant leaflet tenting demonstrated distinct large stress distributions in the posteromedial commissural region due to the medial PM displacement toward the apical-medial direction resulting in a lack of leaflet coaptation. In the ischemic MV with balanced leaflet tenting, mitral incompetency with incomplete leaflet coaptation was clearly identified all around the paracommissural regions. This computational MV evaluation strategy has the potential for improving diagnosis of ischemic mitral regurgitation and treatment of ischemic MVs. PMID:24211876

  3. Quantification of mitral apparatus dynamics in functional and ischemic mitral regurgitation using real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Federico; Corsi, Cristiana; Sugeng, Lissa; Caiani, Enrico G; Weinert, Lynn; Mor-Avi, Victor; Cerutti, Sergio; Lamberti, Claudio; Lang, Roberto M

    2008-04-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM-MR) and MR in ischemic cardiomyopathy (ISC-MR) usually occurs as a result of mitral annulus (MA) dilatation and papillary muscle displacement secondary to global left ventricle remodelling. We propose a method to determine MA area and motion throughout the cardiac cycle and to define papillary muscle position in 3-dimensional space using real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography. Real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography was performed in 24 healthy individuals, and in 30 patients with DCM-MR (n = 15) or ISC-MR (n = 15). Significant intergroup differences were noted in MA surface area (control: 6.4 +/- 1.7 cm(2); DCM-MR: 11.1 +/- 2.6 cm(2); ISC-MR: 9.0 +/- 2.0 cm(2)) and in peak MA motion (control: 8.7 +/- 3.0 mm; DCM-MR: 3.4 +/- 1.7 mm; ISC-MR: 4.9 +/- 1.5 mm). In patients with DCM-MR, papillary muscle symmetry was preserved, whereas in patients with ISC-MR, papillary tethering lengths were unequal as a result of wall-motion abnormalities. Our methodology for dynamic volumetric measurements of the mitral apparatus allows better understanding of MR mechanisms. PMID:17681731

  4. Surgical Treatment of Moderate Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P.K.; Puskas, J.D.; Ascheim, D.D.; Voisine, P.; Gelijns, A.C.; Moskowitz, A.J.; Hung, J.W.; Parides, M.K.; Ailawadi, G.; Perrault, L.P.; Acker, M.A.; Argenziano, M.; Thourani, V.; Gammie, J.S.; Miller, M.A.; Pagé, P.; Overbey, J.R.; Bagiella, E.; Dagenais, F.; Blackstone, E.H.; Kron, I.L.; J., D.; Rose, E.A.; Moquete, E.G.; Jeffries, N.; Gardner, T.J.; O’Gara, P.T.; Alexander, J.H.; Michler, R.E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ischemic mitral regurgitation is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. For surgical patients with moderate regurgitation, the benefits of adding mitral-valve repair to coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) are uncertain. METHODS We randomly assigned 301 patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation to CABG alone or CABG plus mitral-valve repair (combined procedure). The primary end point was the left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LVESVI), a measure of left ventricular remodeling, at 1 year. This end point was assessed with the use of a Wilcoxon rank-sum test in which deaths were categorized as the lowest LVESVI rank. RESULTS At 1 year, the mean LVESVI among surviving patients was 46.1±22.4 ml per square meter of body-surface area in the CABG-alone group and 49.6±31.5 ml per square meter in the combined-procedure group (mean change from baseline, −9.4 and −9.3 ml per square meter, respectively). The rate of death was 6.7% in the combined-procedure group and 7.3% in the CABG-alone group (hazard ratio with mitral-valve repair, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.38 to 2.12; P = 0.81). The rank-based assessment of LVESVI at 1 year (incorporating deaths) showed no significant between-group difference (z score, 0.50; P = 0.61). The addition of mitral-valve repair was associated with a longer bypass time (P<0.001), a longer hospital stay after surgery (P = 0.002), and more neurologic events (P = 0.03). Moderate or severe mitral regurgitation was less common in the combined-procedure group than in the CABG-alone group (11.2% vs. 31.0%, P<0.001). There were no significant between-group differences in major adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events, deaths, readmissions, functional status, or quality of life at 1 year. CONCLUSIONS In patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation, the addition of mitral-valve repair to CABG did not result in a higher degree of left ventricular reverse remodeling. Mitral-valve repair was

  5. Human Cardiac Function Simulator for the Optimal Design of a Novel Annuloplasty Ring with a Sub-valvular Element for Correction of Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Baillargeon, Brian; Costa, Ivan; Leach, Joseph R; Lee, Lik Chuan; Genet, Martin; Toutain, Arnaud; Wenk, Jonathan F; Rausch, Manuel K; Rebelo, Nuno; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Kuhl, Ellen; Navia, Jose L; Guccione, Julius M

    2015-06-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation is associated with substantial risk of death. We sought to: (1) detail significant recent improvements to the Dassault Systèmes human cardiac function simulator (HCFS); (2) use the HCFS to simulate normal cardiac function as well as pathologic function in the setting of posterior left ventricular (LV) papillary muscle infarction; and (3) debut our novel device for correction of ischemic mitral regurgitation. We synthesized two recent studies of human myocardial mechanics. The first study presented the robust and integrative finite element HCFS. Its primary limitation was its poor diastolic performance with an LV ejection fraction below 20% caused by overly stiff ex vivo porcine tissue parameters. The second study derived improved diastolic myocardial material parameters using in vivo MRI data from five normal human subjects. We combined these models to simulate ischemic mitral regurgitation by computationally infarcting an LV region including the posterior papillary muscle. Contact between our novel device and the mitral valve apparatus was simulated using Dassault Systèmes SIMULIA software. Incorporating improved cardiac geometry and diastolic myocardial material properties in the HCFS resulted in a realistic LV ejection fraction of 55%. Simulating infarction of posterior papillary muscle caused regurgitant mitral valve mechanics. Implementation of our novel device corrected valve dysfunction. Improvements in the current study to the HCFS permit increasingly accurate study of myocardial mechanics. The first application of this simulator to abnormal human cardiac function suggests that our novel annuloplasty ring with a sub-valvular element will correct ischemic mitral regurgitation. PMID:25984248

  6. Mechanisms of Functional Mitral Regurgitation in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy Determined by Transesophageal Echocardiography (From the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure [STICH] Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Golba, Krzysztof; Mokrzycki, Krzysztof; Drozdz, Jaroslaw; Cherniavsky, Alexander; Wrobel, Krzysztof; Roberts, Bradley J.; Haddad, Haissam; Maurer, Gerald; Yii, Michael; Asch, Federico M.; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Holly, Thomas A.; Przybylski, Roman; Kron, Irving; Schaff, Hartzell; Aston, Susan; Horton, John; Lee, Kerry L.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Grayburn, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying functional mitral regurgitation (MR), and the relation between mechanism and severity of MR have not been evaluated in a large multicenter randomized controlled trial. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was performed in 215 patients at 17 centers in the Surgical Treatment of Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trial. Both two-dimensional (2D, n=215) and three-dimensional (3D, n=81) TEE were used to assess multiple quantitative measures of the mechanism and severity of MR. By 2D TEE, leaflet tenting area, anterior and posterior leaflet angles, mitral annulus diameter, left ventricular (LV) end-systolic volume index, LV ejection fraction (LVEF), and sphericity index (p<0.05 for all) were significantly different across MR grades. By 3D TEE, mitral annulus area, leaflet tenting area, LV end-systolic volume index, LVEF, and sphericity index (p<0.05 for all) were significantly different across MR grades. A multivariable analysis showed a trend for annulus area (p=0.069) and LV end-systolic volume index (p=0.071) to predict effective regurgitant orifice area (EROA) and for annulus area (p=0.018) and LV end-systolic volume index (p=0.073) to predict vena contracta area. In the STICH trial, multiple quantitative parameters of the mechanism of functional MR are related to MR severity. The mechanism of functional MR in ischemic cardiomyopathy is heterogeneous but no single variable stands out as a strong predictor of quantitative severity of MR. PMID:24035166

  7. Percutaneous Mitral Annuloplasty for Functional Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Schofer, Joachim; Siminiak, Tomasz; Haude, Michael; Herrman, Jean P.; Vainer, Jindra; Wu, Justina C.; Levy, Wayne C.; Mauri, Laura; Feldman, Ted; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Kaye, David M.; Duffy, Stephen J.; Tübler, Thilo; Degen, Hubertus; Brandt, Mathias C.; Van Bibber, Rich; Goldberg, Steve; Reuter, David G.; Hoppe, Uta C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR), a well-recognized component of left ventricular remodeling, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure patients. Percutaneous mitral annuloplasty has the potential to serve as a therapeutic adjunct to standard medical care. Methods and Results Patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, moderate to severe FMR, an ejection fraction <40%, and a 6-minute walk distance between 150 and 450 m were enrolled in the CARILLON Mitral Annuloplasty Device European Union Study (AMADEUS). Percutaneous mitral annuloplasty was achieved through the coronary sinus with the CARILLON Mitral Contour System. Echocardiographic FMR grade, exercise tolerance, New York Heart Association class, and quality of life were assessed at baseline and 1 and 6 months. Of the 48 patients enrolled in the trial, 30 received the CARILLON device. Eighteen patients did not receive a device because of access issues, insufficient acute FMR reduction, or coronary artery compromise. The major adverse event rate was 13% at 30 days. At 6 months, the degree of FMR reduction among 5 different quantitative echocardiographic measures ranged from 22% to 32%. Six-minute walk distance improved from 307±87 m at baseline to 403±137 m at 6 months (P<0.001). Quality of life, measured by the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire, improved from 47±16 points at baseline to 69±15 points at 6 months (P<0.001). Conclusions Percutaneous reduction in FMR with a novel coronary sinus–based mitral annuloplasty device is feasible in patients with heart failure, is associated with a low rate of major adverse events, and is associated with improvement in quality of life and exercise tolerance. PMID:19597051

  8. New method of posterior scallop augmentation for ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masakazu; Ito, Toshiaki

    2015-03-01

    We report a new method of posterior middle scallop (P2) augmentation for ischemic mitral regurgitation to achieve deep coaptation. First, P2 was divided straight at the center and partially detached from the annulus in a reverse T shape. A narrow pentagon-shaped section of pericardium was sutured to the divided P2 and annular defect. The tip of the pentagon was attached directly to the papillary muscle, thus creating a very large P2 scallop. A standard-sized ring was placed. We adopted this technique in 2 patients with advanced ischemic cardiomyopathy, and no mitral regurgitation was observed during a 1-year follow-up. PMID:25742844

  9. Optimal Surgical Management of Severe Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation: To Repair or to Replace?

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Louis P.; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Kron, Irving L.; Acker, Michael A.; Miller, Marissa A.; Horvath, Keith A.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Argenziano, Michael; D'Alessandro, David A.; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Moy, Claudia S.; Mathew, Joseph P.; Hung, Judy; Gardner, Timothy J.; Parides, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR), a complication of myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease more generally, is associated with a high mortality rate and estimated to affect 2.8 million Americans. With 1-year mortality rates as high as 40%, recent practice guidelines of professional societies recommend repair or replacement, but there remains a lack of conclusive evidence supporting either intervention. The choice between therapeutic options is characterized by the trade-off between reduced operative morbidity and mortality with repair versus a better long-term correction of mitral insufficiency with replacement. The long-term benefits of repair versus replacement remain unknown, which has led to significant variation in surgical practice. Methods and Results This paper describes the design of a prospective randomized clinical trial to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of mitral valve repair and replacement in patients with severe ischemic mitral regurgitation. This trial is being conducted as part of the Cardiothoracic (CT) Surgical Trials Network. This paper addresses challenges in selecting a feasible primary endpoint, characterizing the target population (including the degree of MR), and analytical challenges in this high mortality disease. Conclusions The paper concludes by discussing the importance of information on functional status, survival, neurocognition, quality of life and cardiac physiology in therapeutic decision-making. PMID:22054660

  10. Clinical Implications of Preserving Subvalvular Apparatus During Mitral Valve Replacement for Acute Ischemic Papillary Muscle Rupture.

    PubMed

    de Cannière, Didier; Vandenbossche, Jean-Luc; Nouar, Elias; Faict, Sebastian; Falchetti, Alessandro; Unger, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    We report the case of a patient who presented with sequential rupture of two papillary muscle bellies after emergent mitral valve replacement with subvalvular apparatus preservation for acute severe mitral regurgitation and cardiogenic shock during acute myocardial infarction. We discuss the possibility that the remaining chordae may have meanwhile contributed to muscle avulsion by exerting traction on ischemic myocardium and prevented embolization of the secondarily detached papillary muscle heads. PMID:27343501

  11. Pathogenesis of acute ischemic mitral regurgitation in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Gorman, R C; McCaughan, J S; Ratcliffe, M B; Gupta, K B; Streicher, J T; Ferrari, V A; St John-Sutton, M G; Bogen, D K; Edmunds, L H

    1995-04-01

    Changes in the geometric and intravalvular relationships between subunits of the ovine mitral valve were measured before and after acute posterior wall myocardial infarction in three dimensions by means of sonomicrometry array localization. In 13 sheep, nine sonomicrometer transducers were attached around the mitral anulus and to the tip and base of each papillary muscle. Five additional transducers were placed on the epicardium. Snares were placed around three branches of the circumflex coronary artery. One to 2 weeks later, echocardiograms, dimension measurements, and left ventricular pressures were obtained before and after the coronary arteries were occluded. Data were obtained from seven sheep. Coronary occlusion infarcted 32% of the posterior left ventricle and produced 2 to 3+ mitral regurgitation by Doppler color flow mapping. Multidimensional scaling of dimension measurements obtained from sonomicrometry transducers produced three-dimensional spatial coordinates of each transducer location throughout the cardiac cycle before and after infarction and onset of mitral regurgitation. After posterior infarction, the mitral anulus enlarges asymmetrically along the posterior anulus, and the tip of the posterior papillary muscle moves 1.5 +/- 0.3 mm closer to the posterior commissure at end-systole. The posterior papillary muscle also elongates 1.9 +/- 0.3 mm at end-systole. The left ventricle enlarges asymmetrically and ventricular torsion along the long axis changes. The development of postinfarction mitral regurgitation appears to be the consequence of multiple small changes in ventricular shape and contractile deformation and in the spatial relationship of mitral valvular subunits. PMID:7715215

  12. Geometric differences of the mitral apparatus between ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy with significant mitral regurgitation: real-time three-dimensional echocardiography study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, Jun; Shiota, Takahiro; Agler, Deborah A.; Popovic, Zoran B.; Qin, Jian Xin; Gillinov, Marc A.; Stewart, William J.; Cosgrove, Delos M.; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was conducted to elucidate the geometric differences of the mitral apparatus in patients with significant mitral regurgitation caused by ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM-MR) and by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM-MR) by use of real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE). METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-six patients with ICM-MR caused by posterior infarction, 18 patients with DCM-MR, and 8 control subjects were studied. With the 3D software, commissure-commissure plane and 3 perpendicular anteroposterior (AP) planes were generated for imaging the medial, central, and lateral sides of the mitral valve (MV) during mid systole. In 3 AP planes, the angles between the annular plane and each leaflet (anterior, Aalpha; posterior, Palpha) were measured. In ICM-MR, Aalpha measured in the medial and central planes was significantly larger than that in the lateral plane (39+/-5 degrees, 34+/-6 degrees, and 27+/-5 degrees, respectively; P<0.01), whereas Palpha showed no significant difference in any of the 3 AP planes (61+/-7 degrees, 57+/-7 degrees, and 56+/-7 degrees, P>0.05). In DCM-MR, both Aalpha (38+/-8 degrees, 37+/-9 degrees, and 36+/-7 degrees, P>0.05) and Palpha (59+/-6 degrees, 58+/-5 degrees, and 57+/-6 degrees, P>0.05) revealed no significant differences in the 3 planes. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of MV deformation from the medial to the lateral side was asymmetrical in ICM-MR, whereas it was symmetrical in DCM-MR. RT3DE is a helpful tool for differentiating the geometry of the mitral apparatus between these 2 different types of functional mitral regurgitation.

  13. Transcatheter direct mitral valve annuloplasty with the Cardioband system for the treatment of functional mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Taramasso, Maurizio; Inderbitzin, Devdas T; Guidotti, Andrea; Nietlispach, Fabian; Gaemperli, Oliver; Zuber, Michel; Maisano, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Direct mitral valve annuloplasty is a transcatheter mitral valve repair approach that mimics the conventional surgical approach to treat functional mitral regurgitation. The Cardioband system (Valtech Cardio, Inc., Or-Yehuda, Israel) is delivered by a trans-septal approach and the implant is performed on the atrial side of the mitral annulus, under live echo and fluoroscopic guidance using multiple anchor elements. The Cardioband system obtained CE mark approval in October 2015, and initial clinical experiences are promising with regard to feasibility, safety and efficacy. PMID:27247326

  14. Transcatheter mitral valve repair for functional mitral regurgitation: coronary sinus approach.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Nicolo; Bonan, Raoul

    2007-12-01

    Mitral regurgitation has become recognized as an important health problem. More specifically, functional mitral regurgitation is associated with worse outcomes in heart failure, postmyocardial infarction, and perioperative coronary artery bypass surgery patients. Many patients with severe mitral regurgitation are denied or refused mitral valve surgery. A less invasive procedure with possibly fewer potential complications may thus be attractive for patients with severe mitral regurgitation. Devices used for coronary sinus (CS) mitral annuloplasty are directed toward patients with functional mitral regurgitation. Because of its easy accessibility and close relationship to the posterior mitral annulus (MA), alterations of the CS geometry with percutaneous devices may translate to displacement of the posterior annulus and correct mitral leaflet coaptation. This review will focus on the contemporary CS annuloplasty devices: (1) Edwards MONARC system; (2) Cardiac Dimensions CARILLON; and (3) Viacor Shape Changing Rods system. In addition, important information obtained from recent imaging studies describing the relationship between the CS, MA, and coronary arteries will be reviewed. PMID:18042055

  15. Comprehensive Annular and Subvalvular Repair of Chronic Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation Improves Long-Term Results With the Least Ventricular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, Catherine; Bel, Alain; Cohen, Iris; Touchot, Bernard; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Desnos, Michel; Carpentier, Alain; Menasché, Philippe; Hagège, Albert A.; Levine, Robert A.; Messas, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Background Undersized ring annuloplasty for ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) is associated with variable results and >30% MR recurrence. We tested whether subvalvular repair by severing second-order mitral chordae can improve annuloplasty by reducing papillary muscle tethering. Methods and Results Posterolateral myocardial infarction known to produce chronic remodeling and MR was created in 28 sheep. At 3 months, sheep were randomized to sham surgery versus isolated undersized annuloplasty versus isolated bileaflet chordal cutting versus the combined therapy (n=7 each). At baseline, chronic myocardial infarction (3 months), and euthanasia (6.6 months), we measured left ventricular (LV) volumes and ejection fraction, wall motion score index, MR regurgitation fraction and vena contracta, mitral annulus area, and posterior leaflet restriction angle (posterior leaflet to mitral annulus area) by 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional echocardiography. All groups were comparable at baseline and chronic myocardial infarction, with mild to moderate MR (MR vena contracta, 4.6±0.1 mm; MR regurgitation fraction, 24.2±2.9%) and mitral annulus dilatation (P<0.01). At euthanasia, MR progressed to moderate to severe in controls but decreased to trace with ring plus chordal cutting versus trace to mild with chordal cutting alone versus mild to moderate with ring alone (MR vena contracta, 5.9±1.1 mm in controls, 0.5±0.08 with both, 1.0±0.9 with chordal cutting alone, 2.0±0.7 with ring alone; P<0.01). In addition, LV end-systolic volume increased by 108% in controls versus 28% with ring plus chordal cutting, less than with each intervention alone (P<0.01). In multivariate analysis, LV end-systolic volume and mitral annulus area most strongly predicted MR (r2=0.82, P<0.01). Conclusions Comprehensive annular and subvalvular repair improves long-term reduction of both chronic ischemic MR and LV remodeling without decreasing global or segmental LV function at follow-up. PMID:23139296

  16. Comparison of Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair Versus Conservative Treatment in Severe Functional Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Cristina; Fiorelli, Francesca; De Carlo, Marco; Guarracino, Fabio; Faggioni, Michela; Giordano, Paolo; Spontoni, Paolo; Pieroni, Andrea; Petronio, Anna Sonia

    2016-01-15

    Percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR) using the MitraClip System is feasible and entails clinical improvement even in patients with high surgical risk and severe functional mitral regurgitation (MR). The aim of this study was to assess survival rates and clinical outcome of patients with severe, functional MR treated with optimal medical therapy (OMT) compared with those who received MitraClip device. Sixty patients treated with OMT were compared with a propensity-matched cohort of 60 patients who underwent PMVR. Baseline demographics and echocardiographic variables were similar between the 2 groups. The mean age of patients was 75 years, and 67% were men. The median logistic EuroSCORE and EuroSCORE II were 17% and 6%, respectively, because of the presence of several co-morbidities. The mechanism of MR was functional in all cases with an ischemic etiology in 52% of patients. Median left ventricle ejection fraction was 34%. All the patients were symptomatic for dyspnea with 63% and 12% in the New York Heart Association class III and IV, respectively. In PMVR group, the procedure was associated with safety and very low incidence of procedural complications with no occurrence of procedural and inhospital mortality. After a median follow-up of 515 days (248 to 828 days), patients treated with PMVR demonstrated overall survival, survival freedom from cardiac death and survival free of readmission due to cardiac disease curves higher than patients treated conservatively (log-rank test p = 0.007, p = 0.002, and p = 0.04, respectively). In conclusion, PMVR offers a valid option for selected patients with high surgical risk and severe, functional MR and entails better survival outcomes compared with OMT. PMID:26651454

  17. Cardiac resynchronisation therapy after percutaneous mitral annuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Swampillai, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous approaches to reduce mitral regurgitation in ischemic cardiomyopathy have stirred interest recently. Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and functional mitral regurgitation often meet criteria for cardiac resynchronisation therapy to improve left ventricular function as well as mitral regurgitation, and alleviate symptoms. This case shows that implantation of a pacing lead in the coronary sinus to restore synchronous left and right ventricular contraction is feasible, despite the presence of a remodeling device in the coronary sinus. PMID:27182527

  18. Cardiogenic shock: A look at acute functional mitral incompetence.

    PubMed

    Steyn, F A; Vosloo, J; Naude, H; Steyn, A J

    2016-08-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with cardiogenic shock secondary to acute functional mitral incompetence as well as septic shock related to pneumonia. The patient deteriorated haemodynamically despite adequate medical therapy. An echocardiogram revealed a massive mitral incompetence and an ejection fraction of 32%. An intra-aortic balloon pump was placed and the patient improved dramatically. On day 6 after admission the echocardiogram was repeated, revealing a mild mitral incompetence and an ejection fraction of 58%. PMID:27499404

  19. Dynamic changes in the ischemic mitral annulus: Implications for ring sizing

    PubMed Central

    Owais, Khurram; Montealegre-Gallegos, Mario; Jeganathan, Jelliffe; Matyal, Robina; Khabbaz, Kamal R.; Mahmood, Feroze

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Contrary to the rest of the mitral annulus, inter-trigonal distance is known to be relatively less dynamic during the cardiac cycle. Therefore, intertrigonal distance is considered a suitable benchmark for annuloplasty ring sizing during mitral valve (MV) surgery. The entire mitral annulus dilates and flattens in patients with ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR). It is assumed that the fibrous trigone of the heart and the intertrigonal distance does not dilate. In this study, we sought to demonstrate the changes in mitral annular geometry in patients with IMR and specifically analyze the changes in intertrigonal distance during the cardiac cycle. Methods: Intraoperative three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiographic data obtained from 26 patients with normal MVs undergoing nonvalvular cardiac surgery and 36 patients with IMR undergoing valve repair were dynamically analyzed using Philips Qlab® software. Results: Overall, regurgitant valves were larger in area and less dynamic than normal valves. Both normal and regurgitant groups displayed a significant change in annular area (AA) during the cardiac cycle (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). Anteroposterior and anterolateral-posteromedial diameters and inter-trigonal distance increased through systole (P < 0.05 for all) in accordance with the AAs in both groups. However, inter-trigonal distance showed the least percentage change across the cardiac cycle and its reduced dynamism was validated in both cohorts (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Annular dimensions in regurgitant valves are dynamic and can be measured feasibly and accurately using echocardiography. The echocardiographically identified inter-trigonal distance does not change significantly during the cardiac cycle. PMID:26750668

  20. Mechanical dyssynchrony and deformation imaging in patients with functional mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Isabella; Marini, Claudia; Stella, Stefano; Ancona, Francesco; Spartera, Marco; Margonato, Alberto; Agricola, Eustachio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) is a frequent finding of ischemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), associated with unfavourable prognosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms are involved in FMR, such as annular dilatation and dysfunction, left ventricle (LV) remodeling, dysfunction and dyssynchrony, papillary muscles displacement and dyssynchrony. The best therapeutic choice for FMR is still debated. When optimal medical treatment has already been set, a further option for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and/or surgical correction should be considered. CRT is able to contrast most of the pathophysiologic determinants of FMR by minimizing LV dyssynchrony through different mechanisms: Increasing closing forces, reducing tethering forces, reshaping annular geometry and function, correcting diastolic MR. Deformation imaging in terms of two-dimensional speckle tracking has been validated for LV dyssynchrony assessment. Radial speckle tracking and three-dimensional strain analysis appear to be the best methods to quantify intraventricular delay and to predict CRT-responders. Speckle-tracking echocardiography in patients with mitral valve regurgitation has been usually proposed for the assessment of LV and left atrial function. However it has also revealed a fundamental role of intraventricular dyssynchrony in determining FMR especially in DCM, rather than in ischemic cardiomyopathy in which MR severity seems to be more related to mitral valve deformation indexes. Furthermore speckle tracking allows the assessment of papillary muscle dyssynchrony. Therefore this technique can help to identify optimal candidates to CRT that will probably demonstrate a reduction in FMR degree and thus will experience a better outcome. PMID:26981211

  1. Percutaneous and off-pump treatments for functional mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2008-01-01

    A new era in the treatment of functional mitral regurgitation is emerging with new devices that can be placed percutaneously or minimally invasively without cardiopulmonary bypass. These devices are categorized into three groups: annuloplasty, edge-to-edge repair, and ventricular reshaping. Percutaneous annuloplasty devices, implanted via the coronary sinus, mimic surgical annuloplasty by reducing the mitral annular anterior-posterior (or septal-lateral) dimension. Several devices, such as the PTMA, CARILLON, Monarch, and PS3 systems, are in clinical trials. Percutaneous edge-to-edge repair devices mimic the surgical Alfieri edge-to-edge repair technique, creating a double-orifice mitral valve; of these, MitraClip is in clinical trials. Ventricular reshaping devices treat both mitral annular dilatation and papillary muscle displacement (and thus leaflet tethering). The surgical Coapsys device is currently in clinical trials, and its percutaneous "interventional" version, iCoapsys, is being prepared for a clinical trial. Numerous issues need to be addressed before these devices can become standard therapies for functional mitral regurgitation. Device safety and efficacy must be demonstrated in carefully designed clinical trials with the goal of achieving outcomes equal to or better than those of surgical repair. PMID:18414987

  2. [Percutaneous mitral valve annuloplasty with the carillon mitral contour system by cardiac dimensions. A minimally invasive therapeutic option for the treatment of severe functional mitral valve regurgitation].

    PubMed

    Degen, Hubertus; Lickfeld, Thomas; Stoepel, Carsten; Haude, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Morbidity in patients with systolic heart failure is significantly increased by functional mitral valve regurgitation. In addition to pharmaceutical treatment or surgical reconstruction of the impaired valve, minimally invasive procedures have continuously advanced into the focus of interest. The Carillon Mitral Contour System (Cardiac Dimensions) is a new catheter-based method to converge dehiscent mitral valve leaflets with implantation of a nitinol clip into the coronary sinus, leading to a closer approach of the valve leaflets with subsequent decrease in mitral regurgitation. The device is implanted via a central venous catheter, using a special delivery system under fluoroscopy. The immediate success of minimizing mitral valve regurgitation is verified by online transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), device-related impairment of perfusion of contiguous coronary vessels is ruled out by coronary angiography performed simultaneously during deployment of the device. As soon as reduction of the mitral valve regurgitation is demonstrated in TEE, the Carillon System is disconnected from the delivery system, before, however, the Carillon device can be withdrawn into the delivery system as necessary. Following the successful implantation of the Carillon Mitral Contour System, a left ventricular lead for cardiac resynchronization therapy can still be successfully placed alongside through the coronary sinus. PMID:19784563

  3. Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair in Mitral Regurgitation Reduces Cell-Free Hemoglobin and Improves Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Rammos, Christos; Zeus, Tobias; Balzer, Jan; Kubatz, Laura; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Veulemans, Verena; Hellhammer, Katharina; Totzeck, Matthias; Luedike, Peter; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Endothelial dysfunction is predictive for cardiovascular events and may be caused by decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO). NO is scavenged by cell-free hemoglobin with reduction of bioavailable NO up to 70% subsequently deteriorating vascular function. While patients with mitral regurgitation (MR) suffer from an impaired prognosis, mechanisms relating to coexistent vascular dysfunctions have not been described yet. Therapy of MR using a percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR) approach has been shown to lead to significant clinical benefits. We here sought to investigate the role of endothelial function in MR and the potential impact of PMVR. Methods and Results Twenty-seven patients with moderate-to-severe MR treated with the MitraClip® device were enrolled in an open-label single-center observational study. Patients underwent clinical assessment, conventional echocardiography, and determination of endothelial function by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery using high-resolution ultrasound at baseline and at 3-month follow-up. Patients with MR demonstrated decompartmentalized hemoglobin and reduced endothelial function (cell-free plasma hemoglobin in heme 28.9±3.8 μM, FMD 3.9±0.9%). Three months post-procedure, PMVR improved ejection fraction (from 41±3% to 46±3%, p = 0.03) and NYHA functional class (from 3.0±0.1 to 1.9±1.7, p<0.001). PMVR was associated with a decrease in cell free plasma hemoglobin (22.3±2.4 μM, p = 0.02) and improved endothelial functions (FMD 4.8±1.0%, p<0.0001). Conclusion We demonstrate here that plasma from patients with MR contains significant amounts of cell-free hemoglobin, which is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. PMVR therapy is associated with an improved hemoglobin decompartmentalization and vascular function. PMID:26986059

  4. Surgical Revascularization is Associated with Maximal Survival in Patients with Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation: A 20-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Castleberry, Anthony W.; Williams, Judson B.; Daneshmand, Mani A.; Honeycutt, Emily; Shaw, Linda K.; Samad, Zainab; Lopes, Renato D.; Alexander, John H.; Mathew, Joseph P.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Milano, Carmelo A.; Smith, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The optimal treatment for ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) remains actively debated. Our objective was to evaluate the relationship between IMR treatment strategy and survival. Methods and Results We retrospectively reviewed patients at our institution diagnosed with significant coronary artery disease and moderate or severe IMR from 1990–2009, categorized by medical treatment alone (MED), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), or CABG + mitral valve repair or replacement (MVRR). Kaplan-Meier methods and multivariable Cox proportional hazard analyses were performed to assess the relationship between treatment strategy and survival, using propensity scores to account for nonrandom treatment assignment. A total of 4,989 patients were included: MED = 36%, PCI = 26%, CABG = 33%, and CABG+MVRR = 5%. Median follow-up was 5.37 years. Compared to MED, significantly lower mortality was observed in patients treated with PCI [adjusted hazard ratio (AHR): 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76 – 0.92, p=0.0002], CABG (AHR: 0.56, CI: 0.51 – 0.62, p<0.0001), and CABG+MVRR (AHR: 0.69, CI: 0.57 – 0.82, p<0.0001). There was no significant difference in these results based on MR severity. Conclusions Patients with significant coronary artery disease and moderate or severe IMR undergoing CABG alone demonstrated the lowest risk of death. CABG with or without mitral valve surgery was associated with lower mortality than either PCI or MED. PMID:24744275

  5. A novel coaptation plate device for functional mitral regurgitation: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    He, Zhaoming; Zhang, Kailiang; Gao, Bo

    2014-10-01

    A novel mitral valve repair device, coaptation plate (CP), was proposed to treat functional mitral regurgitation. The objective of this study was to test efficacy of the CP in an in vitro model of functional mitral regurgitation. Ten fresh porcine mitral valves were mounted in a left heart simulator, Mitral regurgitation was emulated by means of annular dilatation, and the asymmetrical or symmetrical papillary muscles (PM) displacement. A rigid and an elastic CPs were fabricated and mounted in the orifice of regurgitant mitral valves. Steady flow leakage in a hydrostatic condition and regurgitant volume in a pulsatile flow were measured before and after implantation of the CPs. The rigid and elastic CPs reduced mitral valve regurgitant volume fraction from 60.5 ± 11.4 to 35 ± 11.6 and 36.5 ± 9.9%, respectively, in the asymmetric PM displacement. Mitral regurgitation was much lower in the symmetric PM displacement than in the asymmetric PM displacement, and was not significantly reduced after implantation of either CP. In conclusion, both the rigid and elastic CPs are effective and have no difference in reduction of functional mitral regurgitation. The CP does not aggravate mitral valve coaptation and may be used as a preventive way. PMID:25015132

  6. Importance of mitral valve repair associated with left ventricular reconstruction for patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy: a real-time three-dimensional echocardiographic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, Jian Xin; Shiota, Takahiro; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Asher, Craig R.; Hail, Melanie; Agler, Deborah A.; Popovic, Zoran B.; Greenberg, Neil L.; Smedira, Nicholas G.; Starling, Randall C.; Young, James B.; Thomas, James D.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Left ventricular (LV) reconstruction surgery leads to early improvement in LV function in ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) patients. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of mitral valve (MV) repair associated with LV reconstruction on LV function 1-year after surgery in ICM patients assessed by real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE). METHODS AND RESULTS: Sixty ICM patients who underwent the combination surgery (LV reconstruction in 60, MV repair in 30, and revascularization in 52 patients) were studied. Real-time 3DE was performed and LV volumes were obtained at baseline, discharge, 6-month and >or=12-month follow-up. Reduction in end-diastolic volumes (EDV) by 29% and in end-systolic volumes by 38% were demonstrated immediately after surgery and remained at subsequent follow-up (P<0.0001). The LV ejection fraction significantly increased by about 10% at discharge and was maintained >or=12-month (P<0.0001). Although the LV volumes were significantly larger in patients with MV repair before surgery (EDV, 235+/-87 mL versus 193+/-67 mL, P<0.05), they were similar to LV volumes of the patients without MV repair at subsequent follow-ups. However, the EDV increased from 139+/-24 mL to 227+/-79 mL (P<0.01) in 7 patients with recurrent mitral regurgitation (MR). Improvement in New York Heart Association functional class occurred in 81% patients during late follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Real-time 3DE demonstrates that LV reconstruction provides significant reduction in LV volumes and improvement in LV function which is sustained throughout the 1-year follow-up with 84% cardiac event free survival. If successful, MV repair may prevent LV redilation, while recurrent MR is associated with increased LV volumes.

  7. Mitral Valve Replacement After Failed Mitral Ring Insertion With or Without Leaflet/Chordal Repair for Pure Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, William C; Moore, Meagan; Ko, Jong Mi; Hamman, Baron L

    2016-06-01

    Mitral repair operations for correction of pure mitral regurgitation (MR) are generally quite successful. Occasionally, however, the reparative procedure incompletely corrects the MR or the MR recurs. From March 1993 to January 2016, twenty nine patients had mitral valve replacement after the initial mitral repair operation, and observations in them were analyzed. All 29 patients at the repair operation had an annular ring inserted and later (<1 year in 6 and >1 year in 21) mitral valve replacement. The cause of the MR before the repair operation appears to have been prolapse in 16 patients (55%), secondary (functional) in 12 (41%) (ischemic in 5), and infective endocarditis which healed in 1 (3%). At the replacement operation the excised anterior mitral leaflet was thickened in all 29 patients. Some degree of stenosis appeared to have been present in 16 of the 29 patients before the replacement operation, although only 10 had an echocardiographic or hemodynamic recording of a transvalvular gradient; at least 11 patients had restricted motion of the posterior mitral leaflet; 10, ring dehiscence; 2, severe hemolysis; and 2, left ventricular outflow obstruction. In conclusion, there are multiple reasons for valve replacement after earlier mitral repair. Uniformly, at the time of the replacement, the mitral leaflets were thickened by fibrous tissue. Measurement of the area enclosed by the 360° rings and study of the excised leaflet suggest that the ring itself may have contributed to the leaflet scarring and development of some transmitral stenosis. PMID:27087174

  8. Mitral valve repair versus replacement

    PubMed Central

    Keshavamurthy, Suresh; Gillinov, A. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative, ischemic, rheumatic and infectious (endocarditis) processes are responsible for mitral valve disease in adults. Mitral valve repair has been widely regarded as the optimal surgical procedure to treat mitral valve dysfunction of all etiologies. The supporting evidence for repair over replacement is strongest in degenerative mitral regurgitation. The aim of the present review is to summarize the data in each category of mitral insufficiency and to provide recommendations based upon this data. PMID:26309824

  9. Use of four MitraClip devices in a patient with ischemic cardiomyopathy and mitral regurgitation: "zipping by clipping".

    PubMed

    Kische, Stephan; Nienaber, Christoph; Ince, Hüseyin

    2012-11-15

    Severe mitral regurgitation (MR) as a consequence of underlying left ventricular dysfunction substantially contributes to morbidity and mortality. A variety of percutaneous treatment options for mitral valve repair have been developed; however, most of these techniques are still at an early stage of clinical evaluation. Today, percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral valve repair using the MitraClip® system is the only endovascular approach that demonstrated noninferiority when compared with standard surgical repair in a randomized trial. However, a considerable number of patients with functional MR will present with extensive annulus dilatation and minimal vertical leaflet coaptation that potentially preclude them from this beneficial technology for anatomical reasons. In this report, we portray a 72-year-old man presenting with end-stage systolic heart failure and severe functional MR as a consequence of long-standing coronary artery disease. Recently, his clinical course was complicated by intractable hemodynamic instability and recurrent pulmonary edema. High predicted mortality and progressive physical decay rendered this moribund patient a candidate for salvage percutaneous mitral valve repair. During the endovascular procedure, a central systolic coaptation gap of 7 mm proved to be too wide for adequate simultaneous grasping of both leaflets. Consideration was given to an alternative approach by means of our novel "zipping technique." Through the trans-septal route, medial to lateral approximation of the tethered leaflets was successfully achieved by intentional deployment of four MitraClip® devices. With the first in-human application of four mechanical implants, a profound reduction of MR grade has been accomplished by the creation of a lateral neo-orifice with apparent acute clinical success. However, it needs to be determined whether successful application of the zipping technique leads to sustained reverse ventricular remodeling and will translate into an

  10. Dynamic heart phantom with functional mitral and aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannelli, Claire; Moore, John; McLeod, Jonathan; Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac valvular stenosis, prolapse and regurgitation are increasingly common conditions, particularly in an elderly population with limited potential for on-pump cardiac surgery. NeoChord©, MitraClipand numerous stent-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices provide an alternative to intrusive cardiac operations; performed while the heart is beating, these procedures require surgeons and cardiologists to learn new image-guidance based techniques. Developing these visual aids and protocols is a challenging task that benefits from sophisticated simulators. Existing models lack features needed to simulate off-pump valvular procedures: functional, dynamic valves, apical and vascular access, and user flexibility for different activation patterns such as variable heart rates and rapid pacing. We present a left ventricle phantom with these characteristics. The phantom can be used to simulate valvular repair and replacement procedures with magnetic tracking, augmented reality, fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance. This tool serves as a platform to develop image-guidance and image processing techniques required for a range of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. The phantom mimics in vivo mitral and aortic valve motion, permitting realistic ultrasound images of these components to be acquired. It also has a physiological realistic left ventricular ejection fraction of 50%. Given its realistic imaging properties and non-biodegradable composition—silicone for tissue, water for blood—the system promises to reduce the number of animal trials required to develop image guidance applications for valvular repair and replacement. The phantom has been used in validation studies for both TAVI image-guidance techniques1, and image-based mitral valve tracking algorithms2.

  11. Depressed contractile function due to canine mitral regurgitation improves after correction of the volume overload.

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, K; Swindle, M M; Spinale, F; Ishihara, K; Kanazawa, S; Smith, A; Biederman, R W; Clamp, L; Hamada, Y; Zile, M R

    1991-01-01

    It is known that long-standing volume overload on the left ventricle due to mitral regurgitation eventually leads to contractile dysfunction. However, it is unknown whether or not correction of the volume overload can lead to recovery of contractility. In this study we tested the hypothesis that depressed contractile function due to volume overload in mitral regurgitation could return toward normal after mitral valve replacement. Using a canine model of mitral regurgitation which is known to produce contractile dysfunction, we examined contractile function longitudinally in seven dogs at baseline, after 3 mo of mitral regurgitation, 1 mo after mitral valve replacement, and 3 mo after mitral valve replacement. After 3 mo of mitral regurgitation (regurgitant fraction 0.62 +/- 0.04), end-diastolic volume had nearly doubled from 68 +/- 6.8 to 123 +/- 12.1 ml (P less than 0.05). All five indices of contractile function which we examined were depressed. For instance, maximum fiber elastance (EmaxF) obtained by assessment of time-varying elastance decreased from 5.95 +/- 0.71 to 2.25 +/- 0.18 (P less than 0.05). The end-systolic stiffness constant (k) was also depressed from 4.2 +/- 0.4 to 2.1 +/- 0.3. 3 mo after mitral valve replacement all indexes of contractile function had returned to or toward normal (e.g., EmaxF 3.65 +/- 0.21 and k 4.2 +/- 0.3). We conclude that previously depressed contractile function due to volume overload can improve after correction of the overload. PMID:1828252

  12. [Coronary sinus devices for treatment of functional mitral valve regurgitation. Solution or dead end?].

    PubMed

    Degen, H; Schneider, T; Wilke, J; Haude, M

    2013-08-01

    In this article we review the currently available data on percutaneous mitral valve annulorrhaphy devices using the coronary sinus in patients with functional mitral valve regurgitation (MR). Of these devices the greatest clinical experience exists for the Carillon mitral contour system which has gained increasing application also outside trials in the last 2 years. The advantages include the ease of use with an effective reduction in functional MR and a subsequent improvement of echocardiographic and clinical parameters. A limitation is the compromise of flow in the circumflex artery in some patients especially with a crossing of the coronary sinus with this artery. Future investigations need to focus on the evaluation of this coronary sinus-based technology versus mitral valve clipping technology for the treatment of functional MR. PMID:23836012

  13. FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION MODELS OF THE MITRAL VALVE: FUNCTION IN NORMAL AND PATHOLOGIC STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Kunzelman, K. S.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Cochran, R. P.

    2007-08-29

    Successful mitral valve repair is dependent upon a full understanding of normal and abnormal mitral valve anatomy and function. Computational analysis is one such method that can be applied to simulate mitral valve function in order to analyze the roles of individual components, and evaluate proposed surgical repair. We developed the first three-dimensional, finite element (FE) computer model of the mitral valve including leaflets and chordae tendineae, however, one critical aspect that has been missing until the last few years was the evaluation of fluid flow, as coupled to the function of the mitral valve structure. We present here our latest results for normal function and specific pathologic changes using a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model. Normal valve function was first assessed, followed by pathologic material changes in collagen fiber volume fraction, fiber stiffness, fiber splay, and isotropic stiffness. Leaflet and chordal stress and strain, and papillary muscle force was determined. In addition, transmitral flow, time to leaflet closure, and heart valve sound were assessed. Model predictions in the normal state agreed well with a wide range of available in-vivo and in-vitro data. Further, pathologic material changes that preserved the anisotropy of the valve leaflets were found to preserve valve function. By contrast, material changes that altered the anisotropy of the valve were found to profoundly alter valve function. The addition of blood flow and an experimentally driven microstructural description of mitral tissue represent significant advances in computational studies of the mitral valve, which allow further insight to be gained. This work is another building block in the foundation of a computational framework to aid in the refinement and development of a truly noninvasive diagnostic evaluation of the mitral valve. Ultimately, it represents the basis for simulation of surgical repair of pathologic valves in a clinical and educational

  14. Percutaenous mitral valve: A non-stented coronary sinus device for the treatment of functional mitral regurgitation in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Sack, Stefan; Kahlert, Philipp; Erbel, Raimund

    2009-01-01

    Functional mitral regurgitation in heart failure limits survival in a severity-graded fashion. Even mild mitral regurgitation doubles mortality risk. We report the use of a non-stented coronary sinus device to reduce mitral annulus dimension in order to re-establish mitral valve competence. The device (PTMA, Viacor, Inc., Wilmington, MA, USA) consists of a multi-lumen PTFE (Teflon) PTMA catheter in which Nitinol (nickel-titanium alloy) treatment rods are advanced. For individual use up to three rods of different length and stiffness can be used. Therefore dimension reduction can be performed in an incremental fashion. Fluoroscopy and 3 D echocardiography are performed throughout the procedure to visiualize the positioning and confirm maximum treatment effect. The case describes the use and the effect of PTMA treatment. Safety and efficacy of the PTMA device will be investigated in the upcoming PTOLEMY 2 trial. PMID:19431068

  15. Population diversity and function of hyperpolarization-activated current in olfactory bulb mitral cells

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Kamilla; Margrie, Troy W.

    2011-01-01

    Although neurons are known to exhibit a broad array of intrinsic properties that impact critically on the computations they perform, very few studies have quantified such biophysical diversity and its functional consequences. Using in vivo and in vitro whole-cell recordings here we show that mitral cells are extremely heterogeneous in their expression of a rebound depolarization (sag) at hyperpolarized potentials that is mediated by a ZD7288-sensitive current with properties typical of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN) channels. The variability in sag expression reflects a functionally diverse population of mitral cells. For example, those cells with large amplitude sag exhibit more membrane noise, a lower rheobase and fire action potentials more regularly than cells where sag is absent. Thus, cell-to-cell variability in sag potential amplitude reflects diversity in the integrative properties of mitral cells that ensures a broad dynamic range for odor representation across these principal neurons. PMID:22355569

  16. Response of Functional Mitral Regurgitation during Dobutamine Infusion in Relation to Changes in Left Ventricular Dyssynchrony and Mitral Valve Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woong Gil; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kim, Soo Han; Park, Sang Don; Baek, Young Soo; Shin, Sung Hee; Woo, Sung Il; Kim, Dae Hyeok; Park, Keum Soo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) and myocardial dyssynchrony commonly occur in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The aim of this study was to elucidate changes in FMR in relation to those in left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony as well as geometric parameters of the mitral valve (MV) in DCM patients during dobutamine infusion. Materials and Methods Twenty-nine DCM patients (M:F=15:14; age: 62±15 yrs) with FMR underwent echocardiography at baseline and during peak dose (30 or 40 ug/min) of dobutamine infusion. Using 2D echocardiography, LV end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume (LVESV), ejection fraction (EF), and effective regurgitant orifice area (ERO) were estimated. Dyssynchrony indices (DIs), defined as the standard deviation of time interval-to-peak myocardial systolic contraction of eight LV segments, were measured. Using the multi-planar reconstructive mode from commercially available 3D image analysis software, MV tenting area (MVTa) was measured. All geometrical measurements were corrected (c) by the height of each patient. Results During dobutamine infusion, EF (28±8% vs. 39±11%, p=0.001) improved along with significant decrease in cLVESV (80.1±35.2 mm3/m vs. 60.4±31.1 mm3/m, p=0.001); cMVTa (1.28±0.48 cm2/m vs. 0.79±0.33 cm2/m, p=0.001) was significantly reduced; and DI (1.31±0.51 vs. 1.58±0.68, p=0.025) showed significant increase. Despite significant deterioration of LV dyssynchrony during dobutamine infusion, ERO (0.16±0.09 cm2 vs. 0.09±0.08 cm2, p=0.001) significantly improved. On multivariate analysis, ΔcMVTa and ΔEF were found to be the strongest independent determinants of ΔERO (R2=0.443, p=0.001). Conclusion Rather than LV dyssynchrony, MV geometry determined by LV geometry and systolic pressure, which represents the MV closing force, may be the primary determinant of MR severity. PMID:24719124

  17. Floppy mitral valve/mitral valve prolapse/mitral valvular regurgitation: effects on the circulation.

    PubMed

    Boudoulas, H; Wooley, C F

    2001-01-01

    The floppy mitral valve prolapses into the left atrium in such a dynamic manner that the prolapsing floppy mitral valve becomes a space-occupying lesion within the left atrium. A significant result of the floppy mitral valve prolapsing into the left atrium during left ventricular systole is the development of a "third chamber" located between the mitral annulus and the prolapsing mitral valve leaflets. Since the blood in the third chamber does not contribute to forward stroke volume, the third chamber may have significant effects on stroke volume and cardiac output. The floppy mitral valve/mitral valve prolapse dynamics also affect left ventricular papillary muscle tension and traction, altering the patterns of left ventricular contraction and relaxation, activating papillary muscle and left ventricular stretch receptors, and contributing to the production of cardiac arrhythmias. Floppy mitral valve innervation patterns with distinct nerve terminals provide a neural basis for brain-heart interactions, augmented by mechanical stimuli from the prolapsing floppy mitral valve. With the onset of mitral valvular regurgitation, and gradual progression of the mitral valve regurgitation from mild, to moderate, to severe, alterations in left atrial and left ventricular chamber size and performance occur, resulting in left atrial and left ventricular myopathy. As a connective tissue disorder, floppy mitral valve/mitral valve prolapse may be associated with abnormal structural and elastic properties of the aorta, with resultant changes in aortic function. Progression of mitral valve regurgitation and the aging process also affect aortic function indices in an adverse manner. The phenomena associated with floppy mitral valve dysfunction, with prolapse of the mitral valve into the left atrium and the unique, resultant forms of mitral valve regurgitation, are dynamic in nature. As the long-term natural history of these interrelated phenomena is being clarified, it is apparent

  18. Mitral stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    Mitral valve obstruction ... left side of your heart is called the mitral valve. It opens up enough so that blood can ... adults. These include: Calcium deposits forming around the mitral valve Radiation treatment to the chest Some medications Children ...

  19. Moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation after postero-lateral myocardial infarction in sheep alters left ventricular shear but not normal strain in the infarct and infarct borderzone

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Liang; Wu, Yife; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Khazalpour, Michael; Takaba, Kiyoaki; Tartibi, Mehrzad; Zhang, Zhihong; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Saloner, David A.; Wallace, Arthur W.; Mishra, Rakesh; Grossi, Eugene A.; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation (CIMR: MR) is associated with poor outcome. Left ventricular (LV) strain after postero-lateral myocardial infarction (MI) may drive LV remodeling. Although moderate CIMR has been previously shown to effect LV remodeling, the effect of CIMR on LV strain after postero-lateral MI remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that moderate CIMR alters LV strain after postero-lateral MI. Methods/Results Postero-lateral MI was created in 10 sheep. Cardiac MRI with tags was performed 2 weeks before and 2, 8 and 16 weeks after MI. LV and right ventricular (RV) volumes were measured and regurgitant volume indexed to body surface area (BSA; RegurgVolume Index) calculated as the difference between LV and RV stroke volumes / BSA. Three-dimensional strain was calculated. Circumferential (Ecc)and longitudinal (Ell) strains were reduced in the infarct proper, MI borderzone (BZ) and remote myocardium 16 weeks after MI. In addition, radial circumferential (Erc) and radial longitudinal (Erl) shear strains were reduced in remote myocardium but increased in the infarct and BZ 16 weeks after MI. Of all strain components, however, only Erc was effected by RegurgVolume Index (p=0.0005). There was no statistically significant effect of RegurgVolume Index on Ecc, Ell, Erl, or circumferential longitudinal shear strain (Ecl). Conclusions Moderate CIMR alters radial circumferential shear strain after postero-lateral MI in the sheep. Further studies are needed to determine the effect of shear strain on myocyte hypertrophy and the effect of mitral repair on myocardial strain. PMID:26857634

  20. Quantitative histologic analysis of the mitral valve anterior leaflet: ischemic alterations and implications for valve replacement design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, David W.; Kunzelman, Karyn S.; Cochran, Richard P.

    1999-06-01

    There is a current trend to design innovative mitral valve replacements that mimic the native mitral valve (MV). A prerequisite for these new designs is the characterization of MV structure. This study was conducted to determine the distribution of MV collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAGs) in MV anterior leaflets. Methods: Specimens from the mid-line of eight sheep MV anterior leaflets were stained with aniline blue (collagen) and alcian blue (GAGs). These specimens were analyzed using an image analysis system running Optimas software. Based on the luminance of stains within individual valve layers, the distribution of valvular collagen and GAGs from leaflet annulus to free-edge were determined. Results: Near the annulus, 100% of MV thickness is fibrosa (collagen dominated layer). Moving towards the free-edge, fibrosa prominence decreases and there is a transition to spongiosa (GAG dominated layer). Near the free-edge 100% of MV thickness is dominated by the spongiosa. Conclusions: Valvular collagen dominates MV structure near the annulus to support the stresses of bending and pressurization. Valvular GAGs dominate the MV near the free-edge to absorb the impact of leaflet coaptation. Image analysis has proven to be an effective tool to evaluate MV structure and facilitate the design of valve replacements.

  1. Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Ischemic Stroke: Functional and Vascular Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hong-Kyun; Kim, Beom Joon; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Yang, Mi Hwa; Han, Moon-Ku; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction, developed in relation to myocardial dysfunction and remodeling, is documented in 15%-25% of the population. However, its role in functional recovery and recurrent vascular events after acute ischemic stroke has not been thoroughly investigated. Methods In this retrospective observational study, we identified 2,827 ischemic stroke cases with adequate echocardiographic evaluations to assess LV diastolic dysfunction within 1 month after the index stroke. The peak transmitral filling velocity/mean mitral annular velocity during early diastole (E/e’) was used to estimate LV diastolic dysfunction. We divided patients into 3 groups according to E/e’ as follows: <8, 8-15, and ≥15. Recurrent vascular events and functional recovery were prospectively collected at 3 months and 1 year. Results Among included patients, E/e’ was 10.6±6.4: E/e’ <8 in 993 (35%), 8-15 in 1,444 (51%), and ≥15 in 378 (13%) cases. Functional dependency or death (modified Rankin Scale score ≥2) and composite vascular events were documented in 1,298 (46%) and 187 (7%) patients, respectively, at 3 months. In multivariable analyses, ischemic stroke cases with E/e’ ≥15 had increased odds of functional dependence or death at 3 months (adjusted OR [95% CI]: 1.73 [1.27-2.35]) or 1 year (1.47 [1.06-2.06]) and vascular events within 1 year (1.65 [1.08-2.51]). Subgroups with normal ejection fraction or sinus rhythm exhibited a similar overall pattern and direction. Conclusions LV diastolic dysfunction was associated with poor functional outcomes and composite vascular events up to 1 year. PMID:27283279

  2. Coronary sinus-based percutaneous annuloplasty as treatment for functional mitral regurgitation: the TITAN II trial

    PubMed Central

    Lipiecki, Janusz; Siminiak, Tomasz; Sievert, Horst; Müller-Ehmsen, Jochen; Degen, Hubertus; Wu, Justina C; Schandrin, Christian; Kalmucki, Piotr; Hofmann, Ilona; Reuter, David; Goldberg, Steven L; Haude, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective Functional (or secondary) mitral regurgitation (FMR) is associated with greater morbidity and worse outcomes in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) and cardiomyopathy. The Carillon® Mitral Contour System® is a coronary sinus-based percutaneous therapy to reduce FMR. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of a modified version of the Carillon device in the treatment of patients with cardiomyopathy and FMR. Methods 36 patients with CHF, depressed left ventricular function (ejection fraction <40%) and at least moderate FMR underwent the Carillon device implant. Results There was 1 major adverse event within 30 days—a death (not device related)—occurring 17 days after the implant. Reductions in FMR and improvements in functional class and 6 min walk tests were seen, similar to prior studies. Device fractures in the high strain region of the proximal anchor (seen in prior studies) were not seen in this study. Conclusions The modified Carillon device was associated with improvements in clinical and echocardiographic parameters in treating patients with FMR, while successfully addressing the issue of anchor fracture. This version of the Carillon device will be used in a blinded randomised trial of symptomatic patients with FMR. PMID:27493761

  3. Treatment of functional mitral regurgitation by percutaneous annuloplasty: results of the TITAN Trial

    PubMed Central

    Siminiak, Tomasz; Wu, Justina C.; Haude, Michael; Hoppe, Uta C.; Sadowski, Jerzy; Lipiecki, Janusz; Fajadet, Jean; Shah, Amil M.; Feldman, Ted; Kaye, David M.; Goldberg, Steven L.; Levy, Wayne C.; Solomon, Scott D.; Reuter, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) contributes to morbidity and mortality in heart failure (HF) patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether percutaneous mitral annuloplasty could safely and effectively reduce FMR and yield durable long-term clinical benefit. Methods and results The impact of mitral annuloplasty (Carillon Mitral Contour System) was evaluated in HF patients with at least moderate FMR. Patients in whom the device was placed then acutely recaptured for clinical reasons served as a comparator group. Quantitative measures of FMR, left ventricular (LV) dimensions, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, 6 min walk distance (6MWD), and quality of life were assessed in both groups up to 12 months. Safety and key functional data were assessed in the implanted cohort up to 24 months. Thirty-six patients received a permanent implant; 17 had the device recaptured. The 30-day major adverse event rate was 1.9%. In contrast to the comparison group, the implanted cohort demonstrated significant reductions in FMR as represented by regurgitant volume [baseline 34.5 ±11.5 mL to 17.4 ±12.4 mL at 12 months (P < 0.001)]. There was a corresponding reduction in LV diastolic volume [baseline 208.5 ±62.0 mL to 178.9 ±48.0 mL at 12 months (P =0.015)] and systolic volume [baseline 151.8 ±57.1 mL to 120.7 ±43.2 mL at 12 months (P =0.015)], compared with progressive LV dilation in the comparator. The 6MWD markedly improved for the implanted patients by 102.5 ±164 m at 12 months (P =0.014) and 131.9 ±80 m at 24 months (P < 0.001). Conclusion Percutaneous reduction of FMR using a coronary sinus approach is associated with reverse LV remodelling. Significant clinical improvements persisted up to 24 months. PMID:22613584

  4. In vitro assessment of mitral valve function in cyclically pressurized porcine hearts.

    PubMed

    Vismara, Riccardo; Leopaldi, Alberto M; Piola, Marco; Asselta, Chiara; Lemma, Massimo; Antona, Carlo; Redaelli, Alberto; van de Vosse, Frans; Rutten, Marcel; Fiore, Gianfranco B

    2016-04-01

    Recent approaches to the in vitro experimental study of cardiac fluid mechanics involve the use of whole biological structures to investigate in the lab novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of heart pathologies. To enhance reliability and repeatability, the influence of the actuation strategy of the experimental apparatuses on the biomechanics of biological structures needs to be assessed. Using echography and intracardiac high-speed imaging, we compared the mitral valve (MV) anatomo-functional features (coaptation areas/lengths, papillary muscles-valvular plane distances) in two passive-beating-heart mock loops with internal (IPML) or external (EPML) pressurization of the ventricular chamber. Both apparatuses showed fluid dynamic conditions that closely resembled the physiology. The MVs analyzed in the EPML presented coaptation areas and lengths that were systematically higher, and exhibited greater variability from early-to peak-systole, as compared to those in the IPML. Moreover, in the EPML, the MV leaflets exhibited a convexity with high curvature toward the atrium. With the IPML, MV coaptation lengths ranged similar to available clinical data and the papillary muscles-valve plane distances were more stable throughout systole. In conclusion, both the apparatuses allow for reproducing in vitro the left heart hemodynamics, in terms of flow rates and pressures, with proper mitral valve continence. Results suggest that the IPML is more suitable for replicating the physiological MV functioning, while the EPML may have more potential as a model for the study of MV pathologies. PMID:26908180

  5. Mitral valve repair

    PubMed Central

    Pozzoli, Alberto; De Bonis, Michele; Alfieri, Ottavio

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is the most common valvular heart disease in the Western world. The MR can be either organic (mainly degenerative in Western countries) or functional (secondary to left ventricular remodeling in the context of ischemic or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy). Degenerative and functional MR are completely different disease entities that pose specific decision-making problems and require different management. The natural history of severe degenerative MR is clearly unfavorable. However, timely and effective correction of degenerative MR is associated with a normalization of life expectancy. By contrast, the prognostic impact of the correction of functional MR is still debated and controversial. In this review, we discuss the optimal treatment of both degenerative and functional MR, taking into account current surgical and percutaneous options. In addition, since a clear understanding of the etiology and mechanisms of valvular dysfunction is important to guide the timing and choice of treatment, the role of the heart team and of echo imaging in the management of MR is addressed as well. PMID:27347389

  6. Ischemic preconditioning attenuates functional, metabolic, and morphologic injury from ischemic acute renal failure in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, J; Williams, B T; Banerjee, A; Harken, A H; Burke, T J; Cairns, C B; Shapiro, J I

    1999-03-01

    Ischemic preconditioning has been shown to ameliorate injury due to subsequent ischemia in several organs. However, relatively little is known about preconditioning and the kidney. To address this, rats were randomized to control (C, N = 14), 2 min of ischemic preconditioning (P2 N = 10), 3 periods of 2 min of ischemia separated by 5 min periods of reflow (P2,3 N = 7), or three 5 min periods of ischemia separated by 5 min of reflow (P5,3 N = 6) prior to 45 min of bilateral renal ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. We observed a lower serum creatinine after 24 hours of reflow in P2, P2, 3 but not P5, 3 rats compared with C. Histology was examined in the C and P2, 3 groups and demonstrated less severe injury in the P2, 3 group. To gain insight into the mechanism by which preconditioning ameliorated ischemic injury, we performed near IR spectroscopy and 31P NMR spectroscopy. Based on near IR spectroscopy, the P2, 3 group had closer coupling of cytochrome aa3 redox state with that of hemoglobin during reflow. In the 31P NMR studies, the changes in ATP and pHi were similar during ischemia, but the P2, 3 group recovered ATP and pHi faster than C. These data suggest that ischemic preconditioning may ameliorate ischemic renal injury as assessed by functional, metabolic and morphological methods. The mechanism(s) by which this occurs requires additional study. PMID:10088174

  7. Functional effect of new atrial septal defect after percutaneous mitral valve repair using the MitraClip device.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Rainer; Altiok, Ertunc; Reith, Sebastian; Brehmer, Kathrin; Almalla, Mohammad

    2014-04-01

    Percutaneous mitral valve repair using the MitraClip device has become a therapeutic alternative for high surgical risk patients with symptomatic mitral regurgitation. The procedure involves transseptal puncture and results in a new atrial septal defect (ASD) after withdrawal of the 22Fr guiding catheter. The functional effect of the new ASD is not defined. In 28 patients with symptomatic mitral regurgitation undergoing percutaneous mitral valve repair using the MitraClip device, 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography was used to measure by direct en face imaging the area of the new ASD. Analysis of the velocity-time integral (VTI) across the ASD after withdrawal of the guiding catheter allowed calculation of the shunt volume. Diastolic VTI of the mitral flow was determined before and after withdrawal of the guiding catheter to determine left ventricular inflow changes. Invasive left atrial pressure measurements were obtained during withdrawal of the guiding catheter. Regurgitant volume was reduced from 86±21 ml/beat before intervention to 43±22 ml/beat after intervention. The new ASD had an area of 0.19 cm2, 44% of the area of the 22Fr guiding catheter. Considering the VTI across the septal defect of 72±26 cm/s, the left-to-right atrial shunt volume was calculated to be 14±6 ml/beat. The diastolic forward flow across the mitral valve was reduced by 13±6 ml/beat immediately after withdrawal of the MitraClip guiding catheter. Mean left atrial pressure was reduced from 17±8 mm Hg with the guiding catheter still in the left atrium to 15±8 mm Hg after withdrawal of the guiding catheter. In conclusion, the creation of a new ASD as consequence of the large-diameter MitraClip guiding catheter results in volume and pressure relief of the left atrium. This contributes to the immediate hemodynamic changes implemented by the MitraClip procedure. PMID:24513477

  8. [Mitral valve replacement after previous coronary artrey bypass grafting( CABG) with functioning left internal thoracic artery( LITA) grafts in an elderly patient; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiroshi; Aono, Hitoshi; Samukawa, Masanobu; Ohkado, Akihiko

    2012-09-01

    An 85-year-old woman had a history of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) performed 7 years ago, and dyspnea on effort had been worsening recently. Since echocardiography showed severe mitral valve regurgitation( MR), mitral valve repair was suggested. Preoperative enhanced computed tomography (CT) showed the patent functioning left internal thoracic artery (LITA) graft. Mitral valve replacement (MVR) using a 25 mm CEP bioprosthesis was performed successfully via resternotomy without any intraoperative injury of the heart. Myocardial protection without clamping of functioning LITA was done by both antegrade and retrograde continuous coronary perfusion (RCCP) under mild hypothermia. The postoperative clinical course was uneventful without any hemodynamic compromise. She was discharged on postoperative day 21 without any cardiac events following early introduction of cardiac rehabilitation. From these results, mitral valve reoperation by RCCP under mild hypothermia without control of functioning internal thoracic artery( ITA) grafts could be a safe option in some cases. PMID:22940664

  9. ECHO-PHONOCARDIOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE NORMALLY FUNCTIONING COOLEY-CUTTER MITRAL VALVE PROSTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Pechacek, Leonard W.; Zarrabi, Ali; Massumkhani, Ali; Garcia, Efrain; De Castro, Carlos M.; Hall, Robert J.

    1979-01-01

    Echocardiographic and phonocardiographic records of 19 patients with a normally functioning Cooley-Cutter mitral valve were analyzed in order to provide quantitative baseline values for this prosthesis. The average duration between the second heart sound and peak opening of the valve (A2-OC interval) was 83 ± 4 (standard error of the mean) msec. The Q-CC interval (from the electrocardiographic Q wave to closure of the valve) was 71 ± 2 msec. Mean opening and closing velocities of the disc were similar (396 ± 11 mm/sec and 393 ± 12 mm/sec, respectively). Amplitude of disc excursion ranged from 6 to 9 mm, but this measurement was not possible in all patients due to the presence of spurious echoes. Early onset of prosthetic valve closure was a relatively common finding in patients with atrial fibrillation or with various forms of atrioventricular block, and frequently resulted in a variety of phonocardiographic alterations. Except for the A2-OC interval and amplitude of disc excursion, there was no significant correlation between valve size and echo-phonocardiographic measurements. Results of this study are compared with values previously reported for other types of caged disc valves, and the usefulness and limitations of echo-phonocardiographic assessment of prosthetic valve function are briefly discussed. Images PMID:15216292

  10. Mitral Annuloplasty Using a Cardiac Resynchronization Device

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor Ali, Andrabi Syed; Iqbal, Khurshid; Trambu, Nisar Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous Transvenous Mitral Annuloplasty for mitral regurgitation is in early stages of development and involves a complex intervention which can not be done in patients with left ventricular leads. Since functional mitral regurgitation is common in low ejection fraction states, we propose a device which can serve for annuloplasty in addition to cardiac resynchronization therapy and simplifying the intervention. PMID:20680109

  11. Mitral stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... may then collect in the lung tissue (pulmonary edema), making it hard to breathe. In adults, mitral ... kidneys, or other areas Congestive heart failure Pulmonary edema Pulmonary hypertension When to Contact a Medical Professional ...

  12. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Connective tissue variations in skin biopsy and mitral valve function.

    PubMed

    Westling, L; Holm, S; Wallentin, I

    1992-12-01

    Ten women with temporomandibular joint dysfunction and general joint hypermobility (score, 4 to 8) and 10 symptom-free female volunteers without systemic laxity (score, 0 to 2) were selected for the study. A biopsy of connective tissue from arm skin found that the total collagen concentrations were lower and the proteoglycan values were higher in the hypermobile TMJ patients than in the control subjects. The mitral region of the heart was inspected by echocardiography. Eight patients and four controls had slightly abnormal echocardiographic findings. Two patients fulfilled the criteria for mitral valve prolapse. The patients had significantly more musculoskeletal complaints than did the controls. The study suggests an association between joint hypermobility, abnormal skin connective tissue composition, mitral valve malfunction, and musculoskeletal disorders in young women with TMJ dysfunction, especially internal derangement. PMID:1488224

  13. Real‐Time 3‐Dimensional Dynamics of Functional Mitral Regurgitation: A Prospective Quantitative and Mechanistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Topilsky, Yan; Vaturi, Ori; Watanabe, Nozomi; Bichara, Valentina; Nkomo, Vuyisile T.; Michelena, Hector; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Mankad, Sunil V.; Park, Soon; Capps, Mary Ann; Suri, Rakesh; Pislaru, Sorin V.; Maalouf, Joseph; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Enriquez‐Sarano, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Background Three‐dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (3D‐TTE) with dedicated software permits quantification of mitral annulus dynamics and papillary muscle motion throughout the cardiac cycle. Methods and Results Mitral apparatus 3D‐TTE was acquired in controls (n=42), patients with left ventricle dysfunction and functional mitral regurgitation (LVD‐FMR; n=43) or without FMR (LVD‐noMR, n=35). Annulus in both normal and LVD‐noMR subjects displayed saddle shape accentuation in early‐systole (ratio of height to intercommissural diameter, 10.6±3.7 to 13.5±4.0 in normal and 9.1±4.3 to 12.6±3.6 in LVD‐noMR; P<0.001 for diastole to early‐systole motion, P=NS between those groups). In contrast, saddle shape was unchanged from diastole in FMR patients (10.0±6.4 to 8.0±5.2; P=NS, P<0.05 compared to both other groups). Papillary tips moved symmetrically towards to the midanterior annulus in control and LVD‐noMR subjects, maintaining constant ratio of the distances between both tips to midannulus (PtAR) throughout systole. In LVD‐FMR patients midsystolic posterior papillary tip to anterior annulus distance was increased, resulting in higher PtAR (P=0.05 compared to both other groups). Mechanisms of early‐ and midsystolic FMR differed between different etiologies of LV dysfunction. In patients with anterior MI and global dysfunction annular function and dilatation were the dominant parameters, while papillary muscle motion was the predominant determinant of FMR in patients with inferior MI. Conclusions Inadequate early‐systolic annular contraction and saddle‐shape accentuation in patients with impaired LV contribute to early–mitral incompetency. Asymmetric papillary tip movement towards the midanterior annulus is a major determinant of mid‐ and late‐systolic functional mitral regurgitation. PMID:23727698

  14. Effect of varying ventricular function by extrasystolic potentiation on closure of the mitral valve.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, R. A.; Williams, J. C. P.; Sturm, R. E.; Wood , E. H.

    1971-01-01

    Mitral regurgitant indexes were measured by roentgen videodensitometry in anesthetized dogs without thoracotomy before, during and after extrasystolic potentiation of ventricular contraction while the atria and ventricles were driven in normal temporal sequence simultaneously or in such a way as to induce atrial fibrillation. Small amounts of mitral reflux were observed with simultaneous atrial and ventricular driving and with atrial fibrillation in the control measurements before initiation of extrasystolic potentiation. Reflux became negligible during extrasystolic potentiation and increased beyond control levels after termination of extrasystolic potentiation.

  15. Dynamics of Concomitant Functional Mitral Regurgitation in Patients with Aortic Stenosis Undergoing TAVI

    PubMed Central

    Sahinarslan, Asife; Vecchio, Francesco; MacCarthy, Philip; Dworakowski, Rafal; Deshpande, Ranjit; Wendler, Olaf; Monaghan, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the echocardiographic features of functional mitral regurgitation (MR) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) pre- and post-trans catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods The study subjects consisted of 79 patients with severe AS, who underwent TAVI. The echocardiographic parameters related to MR severity prior to TAVI and the change in these parameters and MR severity within one month after implantation were retrospectively evaluated. Results The mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 53 ± 12%, and the mean MR severity was 1.2 ± 0.7. Among the baseline parameters, age (p = 0.019, r = 0.264), LV mass (p = 0.017, r = 0.269), deceleration time (DT) (p = 0.019, r = -0.266), left atrial diameter (p = 0.003, r = 0.325), were related to pre-procedure MR severity. After TAVI, the grade of MR (1.2 ± 0.7 vs. 0.8 ± 0.6, p < 0.001) and MR duration (43 ± 19% vs. 31 ± 23%, p < 0.001) were significantly decreased. The grade of pre-procedural MR (p < 0.001) was a predictor of residual MR after TAVI. However, there was not a significant change in the left ventricular echocardiographic parameters after TAVI [LVEF (53 ± 12 vs. 52 ± 11, p = 0.285), and LV mass (302 ± 84 vs. 306 ± 76 g, p = 0.495)]. Conclusions In patients with severe AS, functional MR is related to age, LV mass, DT and left atrial diameter. TAVI improves MR in these patients, even before LV remodelling occurs. PMID:27471361

  16. HypoxamiR Regulation and Function in Ischemic Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Simona; Gaetano, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are deregulated and play a causal role in numerous cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease, hypertension, heart failure, stroke, peripheral artery disease, kidney ischemia–reperfusion. Recent Advances: One crucial component of ischemic cardiovascular diseases is represented by hypoxia. Indeed, hypoxia is a powerful stimulus regulating the expression of a specific subset of miRNAs, named hypoxia-induced miRNAs (hypoxamiR). These miRNAs are fundamental regulators of the cell responses to decreased oxygen tension. Certain hypoxamiRs seem to have a particularly pervasive role, such as miR-210 that is virtually induced in all ischemic diseases tested so far. However, its specific function may change according to the physiopathological context. Critical Issues: The discovery of HypoxamiR dates back 6 years. Thus, despite a rapid growth in knowledge and attention, a deeper insight of the molecular mechanisms underpinning hypoxamiR regulation and function is needed. Future Directions: An extended understanding of the function of hypoxamiR in gene regulatory networks associated with cardiovascular diseases will allow the identification of novel molecular mechanisms of disease and indicate the development of innovative therapeutic approaches. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1202–1219. PMID:24053126

  17. Endogenous Erythropoietin Protects Neuroretinal Function in Ischemic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mowat, Freya M.; Gonzalez, Francisco; Luhmann, Ulrich F.O.; Lange, Clemens A.; Duran, Yanai; Smith, Alexander J.; Maxwell, Patrick H.; Ali, Robin R.; Bainbridge, James W.B.

    2012-01-01

    Because retinal ischemia is a common cause of vision loss, we sought to determine the effects of ischemia on neuroretinal function and survival in murine oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) and to define the role of endogenous erythropoietin (EPO) in this model. OIR is a reproducible model of ischemia-induced retinal neovascularization; it is used commonly to develop antiangiogenic strategies. We investigated the effects of ischemia in murine OIR on retinal function and neurodegeneration by electroretinography and detailed morphology. OIR was associated with significant neuroretinal dysfunction, with reduced photopic and scotopic ERG responses and reduced b-wave/a-wave ratios consistent with specific inner-retinal dysfunction. OIR resulted in significantly increased apoptosis and atrophy of the inner retina in areas of ischemia. EPO deficiency in heterozygous Epo-Tag transgenic mice was associated with more profound retinal dysfunction after OIR, indicated by a significantly greater suppression of ERG amplitudes, but had no measurable effect on the extent of retinal ischemia, preretinal neovascularization, or neuroretinal degeneration in OIR. Systemic administration of recombinant EPO protected EPO-deficient mice against this additional suppression, but EPO supplementation in wild-type animals with OIR did not rescue neuroretinal dysfunction or degeneration. Murine OIR offers a valuable model of ischemic neuroretinal dysfunction and degeneration in which to investigate adaptive tissue responses and evaluate novel therapeutic approaches. Endogenous EPO can protect neuroretinal function in ischemic retinopathy. PMID:22342523

  18. Mitral Transcatheter Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Maisano, Francesco; Buzzatti, Nicola; Taramasso, Maurizio; Alfieri, Ottavio

    2013-01-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR) is often diagnosed in patients with heart failure and is associated with worsening of symptoms and reduced survival. While surgery remains the gold standard treatment in low-risk patients with degenerative MR, in high-risk patients and in those with functional MR, transcatheter procedures are emerging as an alternative therapeutic option. MitraClip® is the device with which the largest clinical experience has been gained to date, as it offers sustained clinical benefit in selected patients. Further to MitraClip implantation, several additional approaches are developing, to better match with the extreme variability of mitral valve disease. Not only repair is evolving, initial steps towards percutaneous mitral valve implantation have already been undertaken, and initial clinical experience has just started. PMID:23908865

  19. Anterior mitral annulus caseoma: as benign as posterior counterparts?

    PubMed

    Mazzucco, Alessandro; Abbasciano, Riccardo; Onorati, Francesco; Brognoli, Gabriele; Fanti, Diego; Gottin, Leonardo; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Mitral annular caseoma is a common incidental finding involving the posterior annulus. It has an innocent nature, with the exception of its endocarditic degeneration and/or a stenotic functional effect when exophytic. We report an exceptionally rare isolated anterior mitral annular caseoma involving also the anterior mitral leaflet and affecting its physiologic systolic movement, thus resulting in a restricting anterior leaflet motion responsible for mitral insufficiency. The case was successfully treated by complex mitral valve repair. PMID:26522681

  20. Failure of interventions to maintain mitochondrial function in ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Clements, I P; Dewey, J D; Harrison, C E

    1980-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pyruvate (2.5 mmol/kg), the combination of glucose (3.9 mmol/kg) and insulin (0.13 unit/kg) with potassium (9.27 meq/kg), or sodium dichloroacetate (120 mg/kg) infused for 15 minutes before and 20 minutes after ligation of the left anterior descending coronary arterv in anesthetized dogs restricted the depression in mitochondrial respiratory function induced by ischemia. Myocardial blood flow after ligation in the three groups was o.2 ml/min per gram or less in ischemic subendocardium and was similar to that in saline-infused controls that had also undergone coronary artery ligation. The depressions induced in mitochondrial respiratory control index and state 3 respiration by ischemia in the subendocardium and subepicardium of the three treatment groups, when compared with corresponding nonischemic tissue, were not significantly improved from the control values. It was concluded that these three interventions fail to preserve mitochondrial respiration in ischemic myocardium. PMID:6997645

  1. Remote ischemic preconditioning improves post resuscitation cerebral function via overexpressing neuroglobin after cardiac arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ran; Yu, Tao; Lin, Jia-Li; Ren, Guang-Dong; Li, Yi; Liao, Xiao-Xing; Huang, Zi-Tong; Jiang, Chong-Hui

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of remote ischemic preconditioning on post resuscitation cerebral function in a rat model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation. The animals were randomized into six groups: 1) sham operation, 2) lateral ventricle injection and sham operation, 3) cardiac arrest induced by ventricular fibrillation, 4) lateral ventricle injection and cardiac arrest, 5) remote ischemic preconditioning initiated 90min before induction of ventricular fibrillation, and 6) lateral ventricle injection and remote ischemic preconditioning before cardiac arrest. Reagent of Lateral ventricle injection is neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides which initiated 24h before sham operation, cardiac arrest or remote ischemic preconditioning. Remote ischemic preconditioning was induced by four cycles of 5min of limb ischemia, followed by 5min of reperfusion. Ventricular fibrillation was induced by current and lasted for 6min. Defibrillation was attempted after 6min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The animals were then monitored for 2h and observed for an additionally maximum 70h. Post resuscitation cerebral function was evaluated by neurologic deficit score at 72h after return of spontaneous circulation. Results showed that remote ischemic preconditioning increased neurologic deficit scores. To investigate the neuroprotective effects of remote ischemic preconditioning, we observed neuronal injury at 48 and 72h after return of spontaneous circulation and found that remote ischemic preconditioning significantly decreased the occurrence of neuronal apoptosis and necrosis. To further comprehend mechanism of neuroprotection induced by remote ischemic preconditioning, we found expression of neuroglobin at 24h after return of spontaneous circulation was enhanced. Furthermore, administration of neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides before induction of remote ischemic preconditioning showed that the level of neuroglobin was decreased then partly abrogated

  2. [Pulmonary uptake of thallium-201 at rest and diastolic function in patients with ischemic cardiopathy and left ventricular dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Marcassa, C; Galli, M; Imparato, A; Temporelli, P L; Giannuzzi, P

    1998-09-01

    An elevated thallium-201 lung uptake after stress is currently considered a marker of severe coronary artery involvement and related to adverse prognosis. The meaning of this scintigraphic finding on rest thallium-201 images is yet poorly investigated. We compared the thallium-201 lung uptake and the left ventricular diastolic function from mitral Doppler in 24 patients (64 +/- 10 years) with ischemic heart disease and severe left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction 28 +/- 10%). All patients underwent a 3-view planar rest-redistribution thallium-201 and 2D-echo studies within 6 days, while clinically stable. The amount of thallium-201 lung uptake was quantified as the ratio (L/H) between the activity in a left lung region of interest (L) and that observed in the left ventricle (H). From mitral Doppler, early (E) and late (A) filling velocities, the E/A ratio and the deceleration time of early filling (DecT) were calculated. An elevated L/H (> or = 0.54) was observed in 9 patients (37%). They showed a lower ejection fraction (20 +/- 4% vs 33 +/- 10% in patients with normal L/H; p < 0.01) and a higher wall motion score index (2.5 +/- 0.4 vs 2.1 +/- 0.4, p < 0.05). A significant inverse linear relation was observed between L/H and the left ventricular ejection fraction (r = -0.70); no significant relation was observed between L/H and left ventricular end-diastolic volumes or wall motion score index. A significant linear relation was also observed between L/H and E/A (r = 0.74; p < 0.001) as well as L/H and DecT (r = -0.61; p < 0.001); an even stronger, inverse, relation was found between L/H and A (r = -0.81; p < 0.001). An abnormal L/H identified 80% of patients with a restrictive filling pattern (specificity 93% and accuracy 88%, respectively). In conclusion, in stable patients with ischemic heart disease and ventricular dysfunction, L/H on rest thallium-201 images is closely correlated with Doppler indexes of left ventricular diastolic filling dynamic; an

  3. Mitral valve repair for traumatic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Taro; Kogure, Shuhei; Muro, Takashi; Okada, Yukikatsu

    2016-06-01

    Mitral valve injury after blunt chest trauma is a rare clinical condition. We describe a case of mitral valve repair for severe mitral regurgitation due to blunt chest trauma 5 years previously. A 22-year-old man was referred to our hospital for surgical correction of severe mitral regurgitation. Echocardiography demonstrated a partial tear of the anterolateral papillary muscle which lacerated to the apex. The entire anterolateral part of the mitral valve including the anterior commissure and posterior leaflets had prolapsed. Reimplantation of the papillary muscle to the posterior left ventricular wall and ring annuloplasty were successfully performed without residual regurgitation. PMID:25737589

  4. Hyperinsulinemia improves ischemic LV function in insulin resistant subjects

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucose is a more efficient substrate for ATP production than free fatty acid (FFA). Insulin resistance (IR) results in higher FFA concentrations and impaired myocardial glucose use, potentially worsening ischemia. We hypothesized that metabolic manipulation with a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (HEC) would affect a greater improvement in left ventricular (LV) performance during dobutamine stress echo (DSE) in subjects with IR. Methods 24 subjects with normal LV function and coronary disease (CAD) awaiting revascularization underwent 2 DSEs. Prior to one DSEs they underwent an HEC, where a primed infusion of insulin (rate 43 mU/m 2/min) was co-administered with 20% dextrose at variable rates to maintain euglycemia. At steady-state the DSE was performed and images of the LV were acquired with tissue Doppler at each stage for offline analysis. Segmental peak systolic velocities (Vs) were recorded, as well as LV ejection fraction (EF). Subjects were then divided into two groups based on their insulin sensitivity during the HEC. Results HEC changed the metabolic environment, suppressing FFAs and thereby increasing glucose use. This resulted in improved LV performance at peak stress, measured by EF (IS group mean difference 5.3 (95% CI 2.5-8) %, p = 0.002; IR group mean difference 8.7 (95% CI 5.8-11.6) %, p < 0.0001) and peak V s in ischemic segments (IS group mean improvement 0.7(95% CI 0.07-1.58) cm/s, p = 0.07; IR group mean improvement 1.0 (95% CI 0.54-1.5) cm/s, p < 0.0001) , that was greater in the subjects with IR. Conclusions Increased myocardial glucose use induced by HEC improves LV function under stress in subjects with CAD and IR. Cardiac metabolic manipulation in subjects with IR is a promising target for future therapy. PMID:20576156

  5. Predictors of mitral annulus early diastolic velocity: impact of long-axis function, ventricular filling pattern, and relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Popović, Zoran B.; Desai, Milind Y.; Buakhamsri, Adisai; Puntawagkoon, Chirapa; Borowski, Allen; Levine, Benjamin D.; Tang, Wilson W.H.; Thomas, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Although left ventricular (LV) relaxation is well recognized as a predictor of mitral annulus (MA) early diastolic (E′) velocity, its significance relative to other predictors of E′ is less well understood. Methods and results We assessed 40 healthy volunteers, 43 patients with acutely decompensated chronic systolic heart failure (HF), and 36 patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) using echocardiography and right or left heart catheterization. Data were obtained at baseline. In addition, in healthy volunteers haemodynamics were varied by graded saline infusion and low body negative pressure, while in HF patients it was varied by vasoactive drug treatment. E- and A-wave velocity (E/A) ratio of the mitral valve inflow, systolic MA velocity integral (s′ integral) and E′ and late velocity (A′) of lateral and septal MA pulsed wave velocities were assessed by echocardiography. Time constant of isovolumic pressure decay τ0) was calculated from isovolumic relaxation time/[ln(aortic dicrotic notch pressure) – ln(LV filling pressure)]. In all three groups, s′ integral was the strongest predictor of E′ (partial r= 0.53–0.79; 0.81 for three groups combined), followed by E/A ratio (partial r= 0.10–0.78; 0.26 for all groups combined) and τ0 (partial r= −0.1 to 0.023; −0.21 for all groups combined). Conclusion In healthy adults, patients with systolic HF, or patients with HOCM, E′ is related to LV long-axis function and E/A ratio, a global marker of LV filling. E′ appears less sensitive to LV relaxation. PMID:21865226

  6. Does remote ischemic conditioning salvage left ventricular function after successful primary PCI?

    PubMed

    Hoole, Stephen P; Dutka, David P

    2011-05-01

    The translation of ischemic preconditioning to a viable therapy that benefits patients has been slow. This has been largely due to the difficultly in preempting when ischemia will occur. Recent advances in the field have demonstrated that cardioprotection from brief episodes of ischemia is possible when applied immediately after reperfusion (ischemic postconditioning) or remotely in another tissue during myocardial ischemia, prior to reperfusion (remote ischemic conditioning). This has facilitated the therapeutic application to patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction. In this article, we will discuss the results of a recent study published by Munk et al., concerning the application of remote ischemic conditioning during primary percutaneous coronary intervention to salvage myocardial function following ST-elevation myocardial infarction. PMID:21615317

  7. Gait improvement after treadmill training in ischemic stroke survivors: A critical review of functional MRI studies☆

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Huang, Dongfeng; O’Young, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Stroke survivors often present with abnormal gait, movement training can improve the walking performance post-stroke, and functional MRI can objectively evaluate the brain functions before and after movement training. This paper analyzes the functional MRI changes in patients with ischemic stroke after treadmill training with voluntary and passive ankle dorsiflexion. Functional MRI showed that there are some changes in some regions of patients with ischemic stroke including primary sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area and cingulate motor area after treadmill training. These findings suggest that treadmill training likely improves ischemic stroke patients’ lower limb functions and gait performance and promotes stroke recovery by changing patients’ brain plasticity; meanwhile, the novel treadmill training methods can better training effects. PMID:25337096

  8. Mitral valve prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Systolic click-murmur syndrome; Prolapsing mitral leaflet syndrome; Chest pain - mitral valve prolapse ... often affects thin women who may have minor chest wall deformities, scoliosis, or other disorders. Some forms ...

  9. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Long Q-T Syndrome Marfan Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse Myocardial Bridge Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis ... Stroke Sudden Cardiac Arrest Valve Disease Vulnerable Plaque Mitral Valve Prolapse | Share Related terms: MVP, disease of the ...

  10. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) occurs when one of your heart's valves doesn't work properly. The flaps of ... Migraine headaches Chest discomfort Most people who have mitral valve prolapse (MVP) don't need treatment because they ...

  11. Mitral Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease occurs when the mitral valve doesn’t work properly. Types of Mitral Valve Disease Types of ... until you are able to go back to work, depending on your job. Everyday activities such as ...

  12. Robotic Excision of a Papillary Fibroelastoma of the Mitral Chordae.

    PubMed

    Arsalan, Mani; Smith, Robert L; Squiers, John J; Wang, Alex; DiMaio, J Michael; Mack, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Papillary fibroelastomas of the mitral chordae tendineae are rare, primary benign tumors. They are either incidentally diagnosed during echocardiography or discovered after transient ischemic attack, stroke, or myocardial infarction. Removal of papillary fibroelastomas should be considered, given the increased risk for embolization causing cerebrovascular accident or mortality in patients with echocardiographic evidence of papillary fibroelastoma not undergoing surgical procedures. Although fibroelastoma removal can be performed in most cases without disrupting mitral valve competency, sternotomy and minithoracotomy are the typical approaches for excision. Herein, we report the first robotic excision of a mitral chord papillary fibroelastoma. PMID:27211977

  13. Catheter-based or surgical repair of the highest risk secondary mitral regurgitation patients

    PubMed Central

    Arsalan, Mani; Squiers, John J.; DiMaio, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Surgical mitral valve repair (MVR) remains the standard of care for patients with severe valve incompetence with clear, proven benefit for patients with primary mitral regurgitation (MR). Secondary MR is a primary disease of the left ventricular (LV) myocardium. Up to 50% of patients develop secondary MR after an acute myocardial infarction (ischemic MR), with approximately 10% of these having severe MR. It is controversial as to whether surgical MVR is beneficial for these patients because valve repair or replacement does not correct the underlying disease. The increased perioperative risk due to decreased LV function makes clinical decision-making even more complex. The recently introduced less-invasive, catheter-based therapies are potential promising solutions for this dilemma. While the MitraClip device is already in widespread clinical use as a viable therapeutic option in higher-risk patients with primary MR and currently in investigational trials for secondary MR, several other devices for both repair and replacement are currently undergoing feasibility trials. Due to the complex structure of the mitral valve, the development of transcatheter mitral valve replacement has been much slower than that of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, but this approach may be an attractive therapeutic option in the future. Currently, the role of surgical therapy in comparison to transcatheter techniques in secondary MR is not well defined. PMID:26309831

  14. Palliative Mitral Valve Repair During Infancy for Neonatal Marfan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Hiroto; Aeba, Ryo; Takaki, Hidenobu; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2016-05-01

    An infant with neonatal Marfan syndrome (nMFS), a condition that is nearly always lethal during infancy, was referred to our hospital with symptoms of congestive heart failure resulting from severe mitral valve insufficiency. During mitral valve repair, the use of an annuloplasty ring was waived until annular dilatation was achieved after 2 palliative mitral valvuloplasty procedures. After the definitive operation, the patient's mitral valve function remained within normal limits until the last follow-up when the patient was 11 years old. To the best of our knowledge, this patient has the longest recorded survival after mitral valve repair. PMID:27106438

  15. Mitral annular disjunction in myxomatous mitral valve disease: a relevant abnormality recognizable by transthoracic echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mitral annular disjunction (MAD) consists of an altered spatial relation between the left atrial wall, the attachment of the mitral leaflets, and the top of the left ventricular (LV) free wall, manifested as a wide separation between the atrial wall-mitral valve junction and the top of the LV free wall. Originally described in association with myxomatous mitral valve disease, this abnormality was recently revisited by a surgical group that pointed its relevance for mitral valve reparability. The aims of this study were to investigate the echocardiographic prevalence of mitral annular disjunction in patients with myxomatous mitral valve disease, and to characterize the clinical profile and echocardiographic features of these patients. Methods We evaluated 38 patients with myxomatous mitral valve disease (mean age 57 ± 15 years; 18 females) and used standard transthoracic echocardiography for measuring the MAD. Mitral annular function, assessed by end-diastolic and end-systolic annular diameters, was compared between patients with and without MAD. We compared the incidence of arrhythmias in a subset of 21 patients studied with 24-hour Holter monitoring. Results MAD was present in 21 (55%) patients (mean length: 7.4 ± 8.7 mm), and was more common in women (61% vs 38% in men; p = 0.047). MAD patients more frequently presented chest pain (43% vs 12% in the absence of MAD; p = 0.07). Mitral annular function was significantly impaired in patients with MAD in whom the mitral annular diameter was paradoxically larger in systole than in diastole: the diastolic-to-systolic mitral annular diameter difference was -4,6 ± 4,7 mm in these patients vs 3,4 ± 1,1 mm in those without MAD (p < 0.001). The severity of MAD significantly correlated with the occurrence of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) on Holter monitoring: MAD›8.5 mm was a strong predictor for (NSVT), (area under ROC curve = 0.74 (95% CI, 0.5-0.9); sensitivity 67%, specificity 83%). There

  16. Mitral Subvalvular Aneurysm in a Patient with Chagas Disease and Recurrent Episodes of Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Grillo, Tereza Augusta; Athayde, Guilherme Rafael S.; Belfort, Ana Flávia L.; Miranda, Reynaldo C.; Beaton, Andrea Z.; Nascimento, Bruno R.

    2015-01-01

    Subvalvular left ventricular aneurysm is a rare disease of obscure origin suggesting unique causes such as congenital, traumatic, and inflammatory or infectious diseases. Its mortality is closely related to heart failure, mitral insufficiency, thromboembolic phenomena, and cardiac arrhythmias. Although association with coronary artery disease is not described, the compression of epicardial vessels by the aneurysm may lead to ischemic manifestations. We report here a case of mitral subvalvular left ventricular aneurysm of probable chagasic origin, in a patient with normal left ventricular function evolving with repeated episodes of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia, despite noninducible electrophysiological testing and the use of optimal medical treatment, including amiodarone. The indication for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy and segmental wall motion abnormalities but without global systolic dysfunction remains unclear in literature, even in the presence of complex ventricular arrhythmias. A brief review of the literature on morphological features, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment will be also discussed. PMID:26634158

  17. Mitral Valve Stenosis after Open Repair Surgery for Non-rheumatic Mitral Valve Regurgitation: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shabsigh, Muhammad; Lawrence, Cassidy; Rosero-Britton, Byron R.; Kumar, Nicolas; Kimura, Satoshi; Durda, Michael Andrew; Essandoh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mitral stenosis (MS) after mitral valve (MV) repair is a slowly progressive condition, usually detected many years after the index MV surgery. It is defined as a mean transmitral pressure gradient (TMPG) >5 mmHg or a mitral valve area (MVA) <1.5 cm2. Pannus formation around the mitral annulus or extending to the mitral leaflets is suggested as the main mechanism for developing delayed MS after MV repair. On the other hand, early stenosis is thought to be a direct result of an undersized annuloplasty ring. Furthermore, in MS following ischemic mitral regurgitation (MR) repair, subvalvular tethering is the hypothesized pathophysiology. MS after MV repair has an incidence of 9–54%. Several factors have been associated with a higher risk for developing MS after MV repair, including the use of flexible Duran annuloplasty rings versus rigid Carpentier–Edwards rings, complete annuloplasty rings versus partial bands, small versus large anterior leaflet opening angle, and anterior leaflet tip opening length. Intraoperative echocardiography can measure the anterior leaflet opening angle, the anterior leaflet tip opening dimension, the MVA and the mean TMPG, and may help identify patients at risk for developing MS after MV repair. PMID:27148540

  18. Recommended transoesophageal echocardiographic evaluation of mitral valve regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Hokken, R.B.; ten Cate, F.J.; van Herwerden, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    Valve replacement in patients with mitral valve regurgitation is indicated when symptoms occur or left ventricular function becomes impaired. Using different surgical techniques, mitral valve reconstruction has lead to earlier interventions with good clinical results. In order to determine the possibility of a mitral valve reconstruction, echocardiographic parameters are necessary. With transoesophageal echocardiography a segmental analysis of the entire mitral valve can be performed; mitral valve motion abnormalities and severity and direction of the regurgitation jet can be judged. From this analysis clues for underlying pathology can be derived as well as the eligibility of a successful mitral valve reconstruction. This article focuses on transoesophageal examination with segmental analysis in patients with mitral valve regurgitation. PMID:25696623

  19. Mitral Valve Clip for Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammed T.; Ahmadzai, Nadera; Coyle, Kathryn; Coyle, Doug; Moher, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Many of the 500,000 North American patients with chronic mitral regurgitation may be poor candidates for mitral valve surgery. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the comparative effectiveness, harms, and cost-effectiveness of percutaneous mitral valve repair using mitral valve clips in candidates at prohibitive risk for surgery. Data Sources We searched articles in MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library published from 1994 to February 2014 for evidence of effectiveness and harms; for economic literature we also searched NHS EED and Tufts CEA registry. Grey literature was also searched. Review Methods Primary studies were sought from existing systematic reviews that had employed reliable search and screening methods. Newer studies were sought by searching the period subsequent to the last search date of the review. Two reviewers screened records and assessed study validity. We used the Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized, generic assessment for non-randomized studies, and the Phillips checklist for economic studies. Results Ten studies including 1 randomized trial were included. The majority of the direct comparative evidence compared the mitral valve clip repair with surgery in patients not particularly at prohibitive surgical risk. Irrespective of degenerative or functional chronic mitral regurgitation etiology, evidence of effectiveness and harms is inconclusive and of very low quality. Very-low-quality evidence indicates that percutaneous mitral valve clip repair may provide a survival advantage, at least during the first 1 to 2 years, particularly in medically managed chronic functional mitral regurgitation. Because of limitations in the design of studies, the cost-effectiveness of mitral valve clips in patients at prohibitive risk for surgery also could not be established. Limitations Because of serious concerns of risk of bias, indirectness, and imprecision, evidence is of very low quality. Conclusions No meaningful

  20. Modulation of mitochondrial function and autophagy mediates carnosine neuroprotection against ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeong-A; Akram, Muhammad; Shin, Young-Jun; Kim, Eun-Sun; Yu, Seong Woon; Majid, Arshad; Bae, Ok-Nam

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Despite the rapidly increasing global burden of ischemic stroke, no therapeutic options for neuroprotection against stroke currently exist. Recent studies have shown that autophagy plays a key role in ischemic neuronal death and treatments that target autophagy may represent a novel strategy in neuroprotection. We investigated whether autophagy is regulated by carnosine, an endogenous pleiotropic dipeptide which has robust neuroprotective activity against ischemic brain damage. Methods We examined the effect of carnosine on mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic processes in rat focal ischemia and in neuronal cultures. Results Autophagic pathways such as reduction of phosphorylated mTOR/p70S6K and the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II were enhanced in the ischemic brain. However, treatment with carnosine significantly attenuated autophagic signaling in the ischemic brain, with improvement of brain mitochondrial function and mitophagy signaling. The protective effect of carnosine against autophagy was also confirmed in primary cortical neurons. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of carnosine is at least partially mediated by mitochondrial protection, and attenuation of deleterious autophagic processes. Our findings shed new light on the mechanistic pathways that this exciting neuroprotective agent influences. PMID:24938837

  1. Effect of QRS Narrowing After Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy on Functional Mitral Regurgitation in Patients With Systolic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Oguz; Omaygenc, Mehmet Onur; Cakal, Beytullah; Cakal, Sinem Deniz; Gunes, Haci Murat; Barutcu, Irfan; Boztosun, Bilal; Kilicaslan, Fethi

    2016-02-01

    The determinants of improvement in functional mitral regurgitation (FMR) after cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) remain unclear. We evaluated the predictors of FMR improvement and hypothesized that CRT-induced change in QRS duration (ΔQRS) might have an impact on FMR response after CRT. One hundred ten CRT recipients were enrolled. CRT response (≥ 15 reduction in left ventricular end-systolic volume) and FMR response (absolute reduction in FMR volume) were assessed with echocardiography before and 6 months after CRT. The study end points included all-cause death or hospitalization assessed in 12 ± 3 months (range 1 to 18). A total of 71 patients (65%) responded to CRT at 6 months. FMR response was observed in 49 (69%) of the CRT responders and 8 (20%) of the CRT nonresponders (p <0.001). Although the baseline QRS durations were similar, the paced QRS durations were shorter (p = 0.012) and the ΔQRS values were greater (p = 0.003) in FMR responders compared with FMR nonresponders. There was a linear correlation between ΔQRS and change in regurgitant volume (r = 0.49, p <0.001). At multivariate analysis, baseline tenting area (p = 0.012) and ΔQRS (p = 0.028) independently predicted FMR response. A ΔQRS ≥ 20 ms was related to CRT response, FMR improvement, and lower rates of death or hospitalization during follow-up (p values <0.05). In conclusion, QRS narrowing after CRT independently predicts FMR response. A ΔQRS ≥ 20 ms after CRT is associated with a favorable outcome in all clinical end points. PMID:26721652

  2. Real-time three-dimensional echocardiographic study of left ventricular function after infarct exclusion surgery for ischemic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, J. X.; Shiota, T.; McCarthy, P. M.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Tsujino, H.; Bauer, F.; Travaglini, A.; Hoercher, K. J.; Buda, T.; Smedira, N. G.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infarct exclusion (IE) surgery, a technique of left ventricular (LV) reconstruction for dyskinetic or akinetic LV segments in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, requires accurate volume quantification to determine the impact of surgery due to complicated geometric changes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty patients who underwent IE (mean age 61+/-8 years, 73% men) had epicardial real-time 3-dimensional echocardiographic (RT3DE) studies performed before and after IE. RT3DE follow-up was performed transthoracically 42+/-67 days after surgery in 22 patients. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare the values before and after IE surgery and at follow-up. Significant decreases in LV end-diastolic (EDVI) and end-systolic (ESVI) volume indices were apparent immediately after IE and in follow-up (EDVI 99+/-40, 67+/-26, and 71+/-31 mL/m(2), respectively; ESVI 72+/-37, 40+/-21, and 42+/-22 mL/m(2), respectively; P:<0.05). LV ejection fraction increased significantly and remained higher (0.29+/-0.11, 0.43+/-0.13, and 0.42+/-0.09, respectively, P:<0.05). Forward stroke volume in 16 patients with preoperative mitral regurgitation significantly improved after IE and in follow-up (22+/-12, 53+/-24, and 58+/-21 mL, respectively, P:<0.005). New York Heart Association functional class at an average 285+/-144 days of clinical follow-up significantly improved from 3.0+/-0.8 to 1.8+/-0.8 (P:<0.0001). Smaller end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes measured with RT3DE immediately after IE were closely related to improvement in New York Heart Association functional class at clinical follow-up (Spearman's rho=0.58 and 0.60, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: RT3DE can be used to quantitatively assess changes in LV volume and function after complicated LV reconstruction. Decreased LV volume and increased ejection fraction imply a reduction in LV wall stress after IE surgery and are predictive of symptomatic improvement.

  3. [Modern mitral valve surgery].

    PubMed

    Bothe, W; Beyersdorf, F

    2016-04-01

    At the beginning of the 20th century, Cutler and Levine performed the first successful surgical treatment of a stenotic mitral valve, which was the only treatable heart valve defect at that time. Mitral valve surgery has evolved significantly since then. The introduction of the heart-lung machine in 1954 not only reduced the surgical risk, but also allowed the treatment of different mitral valve pathologies. Nowadays, mitral valve insufficiency has become the most common underlying pathomechanism of mitral valve disease and can be classified into primary and secondary mitral insufficiency. Primary mitral valve insufficiency is mainly caused by alterations of the valve (leaflets and primary order chords) itself, whereas left ventricular dilatation leading to papillary muscle displacement and leaflet tethering via second order chords is the main underlying pathomechanism for secondary mitral valve regurgitation. Valve reconstruction using the "loop technique" plus annuloplasty is the surgical strategy of choice and normalizes life expectancy in patients with primary mitral regurgitation. In patients with secondary mitral regurgitation, implanting an annuloplasty is not superior to valve replacement and results in high rates of valve re-insufficiency (up to 30 % after 3 months) due to ongoing ventricular dilatation. In order to improve repair results in these patients, we add a novel subvalvular technique (ring-noose-string) to the annuloplasty that aims to prevent ongoing ventricular remodeling and re-insufficiency. In modern mitral surgery, a right lateral thoracotomy is the approach of choice with excellent repair and cosmetic results. PMID:26907868

  4. Role of Imaging Techniques in Percutaneous Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi-Hion; Arzamendi, Dabit; Carreras, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Mitral regurgitation is the most prevalent valvular heart disease in the United States and the second most prevalent in Europe. Patients with severe mitral regurgitation have a poor prognosis with medical therapy once they become symptomatic or develop signs of significant cardiac dysfunction. However, as many as half of these patients are inoperable because of advanced age, ventricular dysfunction, or other comorbidities. Studies have shown that surgery increases survival in patients with organic mitral regurgitation due to valve prolapse but has no clinical benefit in those with functional mitral regurgitation. In this scenario, percutaneous repair for mitral regurgitation in native valves provides alternative management of valvular heart disease in patients at high surgical risk. Percutaneous repair for mitral regurgitation is a growing field that relies heavily on imaging techniques to diagnose functional anatomy and guide repair procedures. PMID:26926991

  5. Fluid-Structure Interactions of the Mitral Valve and Left Heart: Comprehensive Strategies, Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Daniel R.; Del Pin, Facundo; Jiao, Xiangmin; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Kunzelman, Karyn S.; Cochran, Richard P.; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The remodeling that occurs after a posterolateral myocardial infarction can alter mitral valve function by creating conformational abnormalities in the mitral annulus and in the posteromedial papillary muscle, leading to mitral regurgitation (MR). It is generally assumed that this remodeling is caused by a volume load and is mediated by an increase in diastolic wall stress. Thus, mitral regurgitation can be both the cause and effect of an abnormal cardiac stress environment. Computational modeling of ischemic MR and its surgical correction is attractive because it enables an examination of whether a given intervention addresses the correction of regurgitation (fluid-flow) at the cost of abnormal tissue stress. This is significant because the negative effects of an increased wall stress due to the intervention will only be evident over time. However, a meaningful fluid-structure interaction model of the left heart is not trivial; it requires a careful characterization of the in-vivo cardiac geometry, tissue parameterization though inverse analysis, a robust coupled solver that handles collapsing Lagrangian interfaces, automatic grid-generation algorithms that are capable of accurately discretizing the cardiac geometry, innovations in image analysis, competent and efficient constitutive models and an understanding of the spatial organization of tissue microstructure. In this manuscript, we profile our work toward a comprehensive fluid-structure interaction model of the left heart by reviewing our early work, presenting our current work and laying out our future work in four broad categories: data collection, geometry, fluid-structure interaction and validation. PMID:20454531

  6. Mitral valve dysfunction and repair following orthotopic heart transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wigfield, C H; Lewis, A; Parry, G; Dark, J H

    2008-06-01

    Mitral valve dysfunction after orthotopic heart transplantation may cause symptoms refractory to medical therapy. In this report, we present a patient who underwent mitral annuloplasty for severe symptomatic mitral valve insufficiency 9 years after heart transplantation, and we critically appraise the literature available for mitral valve dysfunction in this setting. Mitral valve repair, when feasible, should be considered for mitral insufficiency after transplantation to improve functional status and reduce the risk of retransplantation--this is particularly prudent in view of chronic donor shortage. PMID:18589200

  7. Lidocaine Enhances Contractile Function of Ischemic Myocardial Regions in Mouse Model of Sustained Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kania, Gabriela; Osto, Elena; Jakob, Philipp; Krasniqi, Nazmi; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Eriksson, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Perioperative myocardial ischemia is common in high-risk patients. The use of interventional revascularisation or even thrombolysis is limited in this patient subset due to exceedingly high bleeding risks. Blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) with lidocaine had been suggested to reduce infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death in ischemia/reperfusion models. However, the impact of lidocaine on cardiac function during sustained ischemia still remains unclear. Methods Sustained myocardial ischemia was induced by ligation of the left anterior descending artery in 12–16 weeks old male BALB/c mice. Subcutaneous lidocaine (30 mg/kg) was used to block VGSC. Cardiac function was quantified at baseline and at 72h by conventional and speckle-tracking based echocardiography to allow high-sensitivity in vivo phenotyping. Infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death were assessed post mortem histologically and indirectly using troponin measurements. Results Ischemia strongly impaired both, global systolic and diastolic function, which were partially rescued in lidocaine treated in mice. No differences regarding infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death were observed. Mechanistically, and as shown with speckle-tracking analysis, lidocaine specifically improves residual contractility in the ischemic but not in the remote, non-ischemic myocardium. Conclusion VGSC blockade with lidocaine rescues function of ischemic myocardium as a potential bridging to revascularisation in the setting of perioperative myocardial ischemia. PMID:27140425

  8. Citalopram Enhances Neurovascular Regeneration and Sensorimotor Functional Recovery after Ischemic Stroke in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Espinera, Alyssa R.; Ogle, Molly E.; Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) after stroke enhances motor functional recovery; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. We hypothesized that daily administration of the clinical drug citalopram would produce these functional benefits via enhancing neurovascular repair in the ischemic peri-infarct region. To test this hypothesis, focal ischemic stroke was induced in male C57/B6 mice by permanent ligation of distal branches of the middle cerebral artery to the barrel cortex and 7-min occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries. Citalopram (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 24 hrs after stroke and daily thereafter. To label proliferating cells, bromo-deoxyuridine was injected daily beginning 3 days after stroke. Immunohistochemical and functional assays were performed to elucidate citalopram-mediated cellular and sensorimotor changes after stroke. Citalopram treatment had no significant effect on infarct formation or edema 3 days after stroke; however, citalopram-treated mice had better functional recovery than saline-treated controls 3 and 14 days after stroke in the adhesive removal test. Increased expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor was detected in the peri-infarct region 7 days after stroke in citalopram-treated animals. The number of proliferating neural progenitor cells and the distance of neuroblast migration from the sub-ventricular zone towards the ischemic cortex were significantly greater in citalopram-treated mice at 7 days after stroke. Immunohistochemical staining and co-localization analysis showed that citalopram-treated animals generated more new neurons and microvessels in the peri-infarct region 21 and 28 days after stroke. Taken together, these results suggest that citalopram promotes post-stroke sensorimotor recovery likely via enhancing neurogenesis, neural cell migration and the microvessel support in the peri-infarct region of

  9. The Ischemic Environment Drives Microglia and Macrophage Function

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Perego, Carlo; Pischiutta, Francesca; Zanier, Elisa R.; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Cells of myeloid origin, such as microglia and macrophages, act at the crossroads of several inflammatory mechanisms during pathophysiology. Besides pro-inflammatory activity (M1 polarization), myeloid cells acquire protective functions (M2) and participate in the neuroprotective innate mechanisms after brain injury. Experimental research is making considerable efforts to understand the rules that regulate the balance between toxic and protective brain innate immunity. Environmental changes affect microglia/macrophage functions. Hypoxia can affect myeloid cell distribution, activity, and phenotype. With their intrinsic differences, microglia and macrophages respond differently to hypoxia, the former depending on ATP to activate and the latter switching to anaerobic metabolism and adapting to hypoxia. Myeloid cell functions include homeostasis control, damage-sensing activity, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis, all distinctive features of these cells. Specific markers and morphologies enable to recognize each functional state. To ensure homeostasis and activate when needed, microglia/macrophage physiology is finely tuned. Microglia are controlled by several neuron-derived components, including contact-dependent inhibitory signals and soluble molecules. Changes in this control can cause chronic activation or priming with specific functional consequences. Strategies, such as stem cell treatment, may enhance microglia protective polarization. This review presents data from the literature that has greatly advanced our understanding of myeloid cell action in brain injury. We discuss the selective responses of microglia and macrophages to hypoxia after stroke and review relevant markers with the aim of defining the different subpopulations of myeloid cells that are recruited to the injured site. We also cover the functional consequences of chronically active microglia and review pivotal works on microglia regulation that offer new therapeutic possibilities for acute brain

  10. Peri-procedural imaging for transcatheter mitral valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Navin; Patel, Parag; Bartel, Thomas; Kapadia, Samir; Navia, Jose; Stewart, William; Tuzcu, E. Murat

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) has a high prevalence in older patient populations of industrialized nations. Common etiologies are structural, degenerative MR and functional MR secondary to myocardial remodeling. Because of co-morbidities and associated high surgical risk, open surgical mitral repair/replacement is deferred in a significant percentage of patients. For these patients transcatheter repair/replacement are emerging as treatment options. Because of the lack of direct visualization, pre- and intra-procedural imaging is critical for these procedures. In this review, we summarize mitral valve anatomy, trans-catheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) options, and imaging in the context of TMVR. PMID:27054104

  11. Effect of the mitral valve on diastolic flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; Abraham, Theodore; Lardo, Albert C.; Dawoud, Fady; Luo, Hongchang; Mittal, Rajat

    2014-12-01

    The leaflets of the mitral valve interact with the mitral jet and significantly impact diastolic flow patterns, but the effect of mitral valve morphology and kinematics on diastolic flow and its implications for left ventricular function have not been clearly delineated. In the present study, we employ computational hemodynamic simulations to understand the effect of mitral valve leaflets on diastolic flow. A computational model of the left ventricle is constructed based on a high-resolution contrast computed-tomography scan, and a physiological inspired model of the mitral valve leaflets is synthesized from morphological and echocardiographic data. Simulations are performed with a diode type valve model as well as the physiological mitral valve model in order to delineate the effect of mitral-valve leaflets on the intraventricular flow. The study suggests that a normal physiological mitral valve promotes the formation of a circulatory (or "looped") flow pattern in the ventricle. The mitral valve leaflets also increase the strength of the apical flow, thereby enhancing apical washout and mixing of ventricular blood. The implications of these findings on ventricular function as well as ventricular flow models are discussed.

  12. Effect of the mitral valve on diastolic flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore; Dawoud, Fady; Luo, Hongchang; Lardo, Albert C.

    2014-12-15

    The leaflets of the mitral valve interact with the mitral jet and significantly impact diastolic flow patterns, but the effect of mitral valve morphology and kinematics on diastolic flow and its implications for left ventricular function have not been clearly delineated. In the present study, we employ computational hemodynamic simulations to understand the effect of mitral valve leaflets on diastolic flow. A computational model of the left ventricle is constructed based on a high-resolution contrast computed-tomography scan, and a physiological inspired model of the mitral valve leaflets is synthesized from morphological and echocardiographic data. Simulations are performed with a diode type valve model as well as the physiological mitral valve model in order to delineate the effect of mitral-valve leaflets on the intraventricular flow. The study suggests that a normal physiological mitral valve promotes the formation of a circulatory (or “looped”) flow pattern in the ventricle. The mitral valve leaflets also increase the strength of the apical flow, thereby enhancing apical washout and mixing of ventricular blood. The implications of these findings on ventricular function as well as ventricular flow models are discussed.

  13. Functional genomics indicate that schizophrenia may be an adult vascular-ischemic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Moises, H W; Wollschläger, D; Binder, H

    2015-01-01

    In search for the elusive schizophrenia pathway, candidate genes for the disorder from a discovery sample were localized within the energy-delivering and ischemia protection pathway. To test the adult vascular-ischemic (AVIH) and the competing neurodevelopmental hypothesis (NDH), functional genomic analyses of practically all available schizophrenia-associated genes from candidate gene, genome-wide association and postmortem expression studies were performed. Our results indicate a significant overrepresentation of genes involved in vascular function (P<0.001), vasoregulation (that is, perivascular (P<0.001) and shear stress (P<0.01), cerebral ischemia (P<0.001), neurodevelopment (P<0.001) and postischemic repair (P<0.001) among schizophrenia-associated genes from genetic association studies. These findings support both the NDH and the AVIH. The genes from postmortem studies showed an upregulation of vascular-ischemic genes (P=0.020) combined with downregulated synaptic (P=0.005) genes, and ND/repair (P=0.003) genes. Evidence for the AVIH and the NDH is critically discussed. We conclude that schizophrenia is probably a mild adult vascular-ischemic and postischemic repair disorder. Adult postischemic repair involves ND genes for adult neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, glutamate and increased long-term potentiation of excitatory neurotransmission (i-LTP). Schizophrenia might be caused by the cerebral analog of microvascular angina. PMID:26261884

  14. Associations of functional alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 gene variants with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Ilkka; Kleber, Marcus E; Bevan, Steve; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Oksala, Niku; Hernesniemi, Jussi A; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Dichgans, Martin; Mononen, Nina; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Sinisalo, Juha; Delgado, Graciela E; Laaksonen, Reijo; Koskinen, Tuomas; Scharnagl, Hubert; Kähönen, Mika; Markus, Hugh S; März, Winfried; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginines (ADMA and SDMA) impair nitric oxide bioavailability and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF). Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2) is the only enzyme capable of metabolizing both of the dimethylarginines. We hypothesized that two functional AGXT2 missense variants (rs37369, V140I; rs16899974, V498L) are associated with AF and its cardioembolic complications. Association analyses were conducted using 1,834 individulas with AF and 7,159 unaffected individuals from two coronary angiography cohorts and a cohort comprising patients undergoing clinical exercise testing. In coronary angiography patients without structural heart disease, the minor A allele of rs16899974 was associated with any AF (OR = 2.07, 95% CI 1.59-2.68), and with paroxysmal AF (OR = 1.98, 95% CI 1.44-2.74) and chronic AF (OR = 2.03, 95% CI 1.35-3.06) separately. We could not replicate the association with AF in the other two cohorts. However, the A allele of rs16899974 was nominally associated with ischemic stroke risk in the meta-analysis of WTCCC2 ischemic stroke cohorts (3,548 cases, 5,972 controls) and with earlier onset of first-ever ischemic stroke (360 cases) in the cohort of clinical exercise test patients. In conclusion, AGXT2 variations may be involved in the pathogenesis of AF and its age-related thromboembolic complications. PMID:26984639

  15. Mitral Valve Prolapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergy, Gordon G.

    1980-01-01

    Mitral valve prolapse is the most common heart disease seen in college and university health services. It underlies most arrhythmia and many chest complaints. Activity and exercise restrictions are usually unnecessary. (Author/CJ)

  16. Mitral stenosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... that flows forward to the body. The main risk factor for mitral stenosis is a history of rheumatic fever but it may also be triggered by pregnancy or other stress on the body such as a respiratory infection, ...

  17. Mitral valve surgery - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... place. There are two types of mitral valves: Mechanical, made of man-made (synthetic) materials, such as ... Mechanical heart valves do not fail often. They last from 12 to 20 years. However, blood clots ...

  18. Standard transthoracic echocardiography and transesophageal echocardiography views of mitral pathology that every surgeon should know

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    The mitral valve is the most commonly diseased heart valve and the prevalence of mitral valve disease increases proportionally with age. Echocardiography is the primary diagnostic imaging modality used in the assessment of patients with mitral valve disease. It is a noninvasive method which provides accurate anatomic and functional information regarding the mitral valve and can identify the mechanism of mitral valve pathology. This is especially useful as it may guide surgical repair. This is increasingly relevant given the growing trend of patients undergoing mitral valve repair. Collaboration between cardiac surgeons and echocardiographers is critical in the evaluation of mitral valve disease and for identification of complex valvular lesions that require advanced surgical skill to repair. This article will provide an overview of transthoracic and transesophageal assessment of common mitral valve pathology that aims to aid surgical decision making. PMID:26539350

  19. CITED4 induces physiologic hypertrophy and promotes functional recovery after ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Bezzerides, Vassilios J.; Platt, Colin; Lerchenmüller, Carolin; Paruchuri, Kaavya; Oh, Nul Loren; Xiao, Chunyang; Cao, Yunshan; Mann, Nina; Spiegelman, Bruce M.; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which exercise mediates its multiple cardiac benefits are only partly understood. Prior comprehensive analyses of the cardiac transcriptional components and microRNAs dynamically regulated by exercise suggest that the CBP/p300-interacting protein CITED4 is a downstream effector in both networks. While CITED4 has documented functional consequences in neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro, nothing is known about its effects in the adult heart. To investigate the impact of cardiac CITED4 expression in adult animals, we generated transgenic mice with regulated, cardiomyocyte-specific CITED4 expression. Cardiac CITED4 expression in adult mice was sufficient to induce an increase in heart weight and cardiomyocyte size with normal systolic function, similar to the effects of endurance exercise training. After ischemia-reperfusion, CITED4 expression did not change initial infarct size but mediated substantial functional recovery while reducing ventricular dilation and fibrosis. Forced cardiac expression of CITED4 also induced robust activation of the mTORC1 pathway after ischemic injury. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 abrogated CITED4’s effects in vitro and in vivo. Together, these data establish CITED4 as a regulator of mTOR signaling that is sufficient to induce physiologic hypertrophy at baseline and mitigate adverse ventricular remodeling after ischemic injury. PMID:27430023

  20. Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction with mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yan; Zeng, Qing-Chun; Huang, Ying; Li, Jian-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is a common complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Current evidences suggest that revascularization of the culprit vessels with percutaneous coronary artery intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting can be beneficial for relieving IMR. A 2.5-year follow-up data of a 61-year-old male patient with ST-segment elevation AMI complicated with IMR showed that mitral regurgitation area increased five days after PCI, and decreased to lower steady level three months after PCI. This finding suggest that three months after PCI might be a suitable time point for evaluating the possibility of IMR recovery and the necessity of surgical intervention of the mitral valve for AMI patient. PMID:27582769

  1. Percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction with mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yan; Zeng, Qing-Chun; Huang, Ying; Li, Jian-Yong

    2016-09-01

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation (IMR) is a common complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Current evidences suggest that revascularization of the culprit vessels with percutaneous coronary artery intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting can be beneficial for relieving IMR. A 2.5-year follow-up data of a 61-year-old male patient with ST-segment elevation AMI complicated with IMR showed that mitral regurgitation area increased five days after PCI, and decreased to lower steady level three months after PCI. This finding suggest that three months after PCI might be a suitable time point for evaluating the possibility of IMR recovery and the necessity of surgical intervention of the mitral valve for AMI patient. PMID:27582769

  2. Abnormal functional connectivity density in patients with ischemic white matter lesions: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ju-Rong; Ding, Xin; Hua, Bo; Xiong, Xingzhong; Wang, Qingsong; Chen, Huafu

    2016-09-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs) are frequently detected in elderly people. Previous structural and functional studies have demonstrated that WMLs are associated with cognitive and motor decline. However, the underlying mechanism of how WMLs lead to cognitive decline and motor disturbance remains unclear. We used functional connectivity density mapping (FCDM) to investigate changes in brain functional connectivity in 16 patients with ischemic WMLs and 13 controls. Both short- and long-range FCD maps were computed, and group comparisons were performed between the 2 groups. A correlation analysis was further performed between regions with altered FCD and cognitive test scores (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] and Montreal Cognitive Assessment [MoCA]) in the patient group. We found that patients with ischemic WMLs showed reduced short-range FCD in the temporal cortex, primary motor cortex, and subcortical region, which may account for inadequate top-down attention, impaired motor, memory, and executive function associated with WMLs. The positive correlation between primary motor cortex and MoCA scores may provide evidence for the influences of cognitive function on behavioral performance. The inferior parietal cortex exhibited increased short-range FCD, reflecting a hyper bottom-up attention to compensate for the inadequate top-down attention for language comprehension and information retrieval in patients with WMLs. Moreover, the prefrontal and primary motor cortex showed increased long-range FCD and the former positively correlated with MoCA scores, which may suggest a strategy of cortical functional reorganization to compensate for motor and executive deficits. Our findings provide new insights into how WMLs cause cognitive and motor decline from cortical functional connectivity perspective. PMID:27603353

  3. Rat olfactory bulb mitral cells receive sparse glomerular inputs.

    PubMed

    Fantana, Antoniu L; Soucy, Edward R; Meister, Markus

    2008-09-11

    Center-surround receptive fields are a fundamental unit of brain organization. It has been proposed that olfactory bulb mitral cells exhibit this functional circuitry, with excitation from one glomerulus and inhibition from a broad field of glomeruli within reach of the lateral dendrites. We investigated this hypothesis using a combination of in vivo intrinsic imaging, single-unit recording, and a large panel of odors. Assuming a broad inhibitory field, a mitral cell would be influenced by >100 contiguous glomeruli and should respond to many odors. Instead, the observed response rate was an order of magnitude lower. A quantitative model indicates that mitral cell responses can be explained by just a handful of glomeruli. These glomeruli are spatially dispersed on the bulb and represent a broad range of odor sensitivities. We conclude that mitral cells do not have center-surround receptive fields. Instead, each mitral cell performs a specific computation combining a small and diverse set of glomerular inputs. PMID:18786363

  4. Abnormal EEG Complexity and Functional Connectivity of Brain in Patients with Acute Thalamic Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Guo, Jie; Meng, Jiayuan; Wang, Zhijun; Yao, Yang; Yang, Jiajia; Qi, Hongzhi; Ming, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic thalamus stroke has become a serious cardiovascular and cerebral disease in recent years. To date the existing researches mostly concentrated on the power spectral density (PSD) in several frequency bands. In this paper, we investigated the nonlinear features of EEG and brain functional connectivity in patients with acute thalamic ischemic stroke and healthy subjects. Electroencephalography (EEG) in resting condition with eyes closed was recorded for 12 stroke patients and 11 healthy subjects as control group. Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC), Sample Entropy (SampEn), and brain network using partial directed coherence (PDC) were calculated for feature extraction. Results showed that patients had increased mean LZC and SampEn than the controls, which implied the stroke group has higher EEG complexity. For the brain network, the stroke group displayed a trend of weaker cortical connectivity, which suggests a functional impairment of information transmission in cortical connections in stroke patients. These findings suggest that nonlinear analysis and brain network could provide essential information for better understanding the brain dysfunction in the stroke and assisting monitoring or prognostication of stroke evolution. PMID:27403202

  5. Associations of functional alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 gene variants with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Seppälä, Ilkka; Kleber, Marcus E.; Bevan, Steve; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Oksala, Niku; Hernesniemi, Jussi A.; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Rothwell, Peter M.; Sudlow, Cathie; Dichgans, Martin; Mononen, Nina; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Sinisalo, Juha; Delgado, Graciela E.; Laaksonen, Reijo; Koskinen, Tuomas; Scharnagl, Hubert; Kähönen, Mika; Markus, Hugh S.; März, Winfried; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginines (ADMA and SDMA) impair nitric oxide bioavailability and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF). Alanine–glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2) is the only enzyme capable of metabolizing both of the dimethylarginines. We hypothesized that two functional AGXT2 missense variants (rs37369, V140I; rs16899974, V498L) are associated with AF and its cardioembolic complications. Association analyses were conducted using 1,834 individulas with AF and 7,159 unaffected individuals from two coronary angiography cohorts and a cohort comprising patients undergoing clinical exercise testing. In coronary angiography patients without structural heart disease, the minor A allele of rs16899974 was associated with any AF (OR = 2.07, 95% CI 1.59-2.68), and with paroxysmal AF (OR = 1.98, 95% CI 1.44–2.74) and chronic AF (OR = 2.03, 95% CI 1.35–3.06) separately. We could not replicate the association with AF in the other two cohorts. However, the A allele of rs16899974 was nominally associated with ischemic stroke risk in the meta-analysis of WTCCC2 ischemic stroke cohorts (3,548 cases, 5,972 controls) and with earlier onset of first-ever ischemic stroke (360 cases) in the cohort of clinical exercise test patients. In conclusion, AGXT2 variations may be involved in the pathogenesis of AF and its age-related thromboembolic complications. PMID:26984639

  6. Relationship between systolic and diastolic function with improvements in forward stroke volume following reduction in mitral regurgitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; McCarthy, P. M.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Efforts to improve mitral regurgitation (MR) are often performed in conjunction with coronary revascularization. However, the independent effects of a reduced MR area (MRa) are difficult to quantify. Using a previously developed cardiovascular model, ventricular contractility (elastance 1-8 mmHg/ml) and relaxation (tau: 40-150 msec) were independently adjusted for four grades of MR orifice areas (0.0 to 0.8 cm2). Improvements in forward stroke volume (fSV) were determined for the permutations of reduced MRa. For all conditions, LV end-diastolic pressure and volumes ranged from 7.3-24.2 mmHg and 64.8-174.3 ml, respectively. Overall, fSV ranged from 36.0-89.4 (mean: 64.2 +/- 12.8) ml, improved between 6.4 and 35.3% (mean: 15.6 +/- 8.1%), and was best predicted by (r=0.97, p<0.01) %delta(fSV)[correction of fVS]=34[MRa initial] - 46[MRa final] -0.5[elastance]. Reduced MRa, independent of relaxation and minimally influence by contractility, yield improved fSVs.

  7. Surgery for congenital mitral valve disease in the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Uva, M S; Galletti, L; Gayet, F L; Piot, D; Serraf, A; Bruniaux, J; Comas, J; Roussin, R; Touchot, A; Binet, J P

    1995-01-01

    incompetence of greater than moderate degree in one patient and no significant residual mitral stenosis. Overall, six patients have mitral prosthetic valves with a mean transprosthetic gradient of 6.2 +/- 3.7 mm Hg. These results show that surgical treatment for congenital mitral valve disease in the first year of life can be performed with low mortality. Valve repair is a realistic goal in about 70% of patients and possibly more with increased experience. Reoperation rate is still high and is related to complexity of mitral lesions and associated anomalies, but late functional results are encouraging. PMID:7815793

  8. First-ever ischemic stroke in elderly patients: predictors of functional outcome following carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Chang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Age is an important risk factor for stroke, and carotid artery stenosis is the primary cause of first-ever ischemic stroke. Timely intervention with stenting procedures can effectively prevent secondary stroke; however, the impact of stenting on various periprocedural physical functionalities has never been thoroughly investigated. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether prestenting characteristics were associated with long-term functional outcomes in patients presenting with first-ever ischemic stroke. The secondary aim was to investigate whether patient age was an important factor in outcomes following stenting, measured by the modified Rankin scale (mRS). In total, 144 consecutive patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who underwent carotid artery stenting from January 2010 to November 2014 were included. Clinical data were obtained by review of medical records. The Barthel index (BI) and mRS were used to assess disability before stenting and at 12-month follow-up. In total, 72/144 patients showed improvement (mRS[+]), 71 showed stationary and one showed deterioration in condition (mRS[-]). The prestenting parameters, ratio of cerebral blood volume (1.41 vs 1.2 for mRS[-] vs mRS[+]), BI (75 vs 85), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP 5.0 vs 3.99), differed significantly between the two outcome groups (P<0.05). The internal carotid artery/common carotid artery ratio (P=0.011), BI (P=0.019), ipsilateral internal carotid artery resistance index (P=0.003), and HbA1c (P=0.039) were all factors significantly associated with patient age group. There was no significant association between age and poststenting outcome measured by mRS with 57% of patients in the ≥75 years age group showing mRS(-) and 43% showing mRS(+) (P=0.371). Our findings indicate that in our elderly patient series, carotid artery stenting may benefit a significant proportion of carotid stenotic patients regardless of age. Ratio of cerebral blood volume, BI, and

  9. First-ever ischemic stroke in elderly patients: predictors of functional outcome following carotid artery stenting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Chang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Age is an important risk factor for stroke, and carotid artery stenosis is the primary cause of first-ever ischemic stroke. Timely intervention with stenting procedures can effectively prevent secondary stroke; however, the impact of stenting on various periprocedural physical functionalities has never been thoroughly investigated. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether prestenting characteristics were associated with long-term functional outcomes in patients presenting with first-ever ischemic stroke. The secondary aim was to investigate whether patient age was an important factor in outcomes following stenting, measured by the modified Rankin scale (mRS). In total, 144 consecutive patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who underwent carotid artery stenting from January 2010 to November 2014 were included. Clinical data were obtained by review of medical records. The Barthel index (BI) and mRS were used to assess disability before stenting and at 12-month follow-up. In total, 72/144 patients showed improvement (mRS[+]), 71 showed stationary and one showed deterioration in condition (mRS[−]). The prestenting parameters, ratio of cerebral blood volume (1.41 vs 1.2 for mRS[−] vs mRS[+]), BI (75 vs 85), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP 5.0 vs 3.99), differed significantly between the two outcome groups (P<0.05). The internal carotid artery/common carotid artery ratio (P=0.011), BI (P=0.019), ipsilateral internal carotid artery resistance index (P=0.003), and HbA1c (P=0.039) were all factors significantly associated with patient age group. There was no significant association between age and poststenting outcome measured by mRS with 57% of patients in the ≥75 years age group showing mRS(−) and 43% showing mRS(+) (P=0.371). Our findings indicate that in our elderly patient series, carotid artery stenting may benefit a significant proportion of carotid stenotic patients regardless of age. Ratio of cerebral blood volume, BI, and

  10. Early effects of high-fat diet on neurovascular function and focal ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiguo; Prakash, Roshini; Chawla, Dhruv; Du, Wenting; Didion, Sean P; Filosa, Jessica A; Zhang, Quanguang; Brann, Darrell W; Lima, Victor V; Tostes, Rita C; Ergul, Adviye

    2013-06-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for stroke, but the early effects of high-fat diet (HFD) on neurovascular function and ischemic stroke outcomes remain unclear. The goal of this study was to test the hypotheses that HFD beginning early in life 1) impairs neurovascular coupling, 2) causes cerebrovascular dysfunction, and 3) worsens short-term outcomes after cerebral ischemia. Functional hyperemia and parenchymal arteriole (PA) reactivity were measured in rats after 8 wk of HFD. The effect of HFD on basilar artery function after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and associated O-GlcNAcylation were assessed. Neuronal cell death, infarct size, hemorrhagic transformation (HT) frequency/severity, and neurological deficit were evaluated after global ischemia and transient MCAO. HFD caused a 10% increase in body weight and doubled adiposity without a change in lipid profile, blood glucose, and blood pressure. Functional hyperemia and PA relaxation were decreased with HFD. Basilar arteries from stroked HFD rats were more sensitive to contractile factors, and acetylcholine-mediated relaxation was impaired. Vascular O-GlcNAcylated protein content was increased with HFD. This group also showed greater mortality rate, infarct volume, HT occurrence rate, and HT severity and poor functional outcome compared with the control diet group. These results indicate that HFD negatively affects neurovascular coupling and cerebrovascular function even in the absence of dyslipidemia. These early cerebrovascular changes may be the cause of greater cerebral injury and poor outcomes of stroke in these animals. PMID:23576615

  11. Early effects of high-fat diet on neurovascular function and focal ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiguo; Prakash, Roshini; Chawla, Dhruv; Du, Wenting; Didion, Sean P.; Filosa, Jessica A.; Zhang, Quanguang; Brann, Darrell W.; Lima, Victor V.; Tostes, Rita C.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for stroke, but the early effects of high-fat diet (HFD) on neurovascular function and ischemic stroke outcomes remain unclear. The goal of this study was to test the hypotheses that HFD beginning early in life 1) impairs neurovascular coupling, 2) causes cerebrovascular dysfunction, and 3) worsens short-term outcomes after cerebral ischemia. Functional hyperemia and parenchymal arteriole (PA) reactivity were measured in rats after 8 wk of HFD. The effect of HFD on basilar artery function after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and associated O-GlcNAcylation were assessed. Neuronal cell death, infarct size, hemorrhagic transformation (HT) frequency/severity, and neurological deficit were evaluated after global ischemia and transient MCAO. HFD caused a 10% increase in body weight and doubled adiposity without a change in lipid profile, blood glucose, and blood pressure. Functional hyperemia and PA relaxation were decreased with HFD. Basilar arteries from stroked HFD rats were more sensitive to contractile factors, and acetylcholine-mediated relaxation was impaired. Vascular O-GlcNAcylated protein content was increased with HFD. This group also showed greater mortality rate, infarct volume, HT occurrence rate, and HT severity and poor functional outcome compared with the control diet group. These results indicate that HFD negatively affects neurovascular coupling and cerebrovascular function even in the absence of dyslipidemia. These early cerebrovascular changes may be the cause of greater cerebral injury and poor outcomes of stroke in these animals. PMID:23576615

  12. Cardiac Function and Short-Term Outcome in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Tiffany L.; Albright, Karen C.; Boehme, Amelia K; George, Alexander J.; Monlezun, Dominique; Jones, Erica; Beasley, T. Mark; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the relationship between left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and functional outcome in ischemic stroke patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if a low LVEF in ischemic stroke was associated with functional outcome. A cross-sectional study was performed on ischemic stroke patients admitted to a single academic stroke center from June 2008 to December 2010. LVEF was determined using transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography. Patients were categorized into three LVEF groups: severely low (<30%), moderately low (30-49%), and normal (>50%). Baseline demographics, in-hospital complications, and early outcomes were compared among LVEF groups using Chi-square, Wilcoxon rank sum, and logistic regression.590 patients met inclusion criteria (median age 65, 74% African American, 48% female). LVEF was normal in 79.8%, moderately low in 10.8%, and severely low in 9.3%. A smaller proportion of patients with severely low LVEF appeared to have good functional outcome compared to other groups (26% vs. 40% vs. 45%, p=0.028); however, this relationship was not significant after adjusting for age, baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score and admission glucose (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.3-1.3, p=0.216). Low LVEF was not an independent, significant predictor of short-term functional outcomes in ischemic stroke patients. PMID:24563872

  13. Transvalvular mitral regurgitation following mitral valve replacement a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, U. S. Dinesh; Nareppa, Umesh; Shetty, Shyam Prasad; Wali, Murugesh

    2015-01-01

    After mitral valve replacement with a prosthetic valve, the valve should be competent and there should not be any residual prosthetic valve regurgitation. Transvalvular residual prosthetic valve regurgitation are difficult to diagnose and quantify. we are reporting interesting TEE images as a diagnostic dilemma in a case of transvalvular mitral regurgitation following mitral valve replacement secondary to entrapment of sub-valvular apparatus in a Chitra mechanical heart valve. PMID:26440249

  14. How Is Mitral Valve Prolapse Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Mitral Valve Prolapse Diagnosed? Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) most often is detected during a ... a clicking sound as they shut. If the mitral valve is leaking blood back into the left atrium, ...

  15. Mitral Valve Surgery: Current Minimally Invasive and Transcatheter Options

    PubMed Central

    Ramlawi, Basel; Gammie, James S.

    2016-01-01

    The mitral valve is a highly complex structure, the competency and function of which relies on the harmonious action of its component parts. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS) for mitral valve repair or replacement (MVR/r) has been performed successfully with incremental improvements in techniques over the past decade. These minimally invasive procedures, while attractive to patients and referring physicians, should meet the same high bar for optimal clinical outcomes and long-term durability of valve repair as traditional sternotomy procedures. The majority of MICS MVR/r procedures are performed via a right minithoracotomy approach with direct or camera-assisted visualization, with a minority of centers performing robotic MVR/r. Outcomes with MICS MVR/r have been shown to have similar morbidity and mortality rates as traditional sternotomy MV procedures but with the advantage of reduced transfusions, postoperative atrial fibrillation, and time to recovery. More recently, transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement (TMVR/r) has become a reality. Percutaneous MV repair technology is currently FDA approved for patients with nonsurgical high-risk degenerative mitral regurgitation. Other TMVR/r technology is at various levels of preclinical and clinical investigation, although these devices are proving to be more challenging compared to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) due to the significantly more complex mitral anatomy and the greater heterogeneity of mitral disease requiring treatment. In this article, we review current techniques for MICS MVR/r and upcoming catheter-based therapies for the mitral valve. PMID:27127558

  16. Decompressive hemicraniectomy: predictors of functional outcome in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Daou, Badih; Kent, Anthony P; Montano, Maria; Chalouhi, Nohra; Starke, Robert M; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Jabbour, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Patients presenting with large-territory ischemic strokes may develop intractable cerebral edema that puts them at risk of death unless intervention is performed. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of outcome for decompressive hemicraniectomy (DH) in ischemic stroke. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective electronic medical record review of 1624 patients from 2006 to 2014. Subjects were screened for DH secondary to ischemic stroke involving the middle cerebral artery, internal carotid artery, or both. Ninety-five individuals were identified. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed for an array of clinical variables in relationship to functional outcome according to the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Clinical outcome was assessed at 90 days and at the latest follow-up (mean duration 16.5 months). RESULTS The mean mRS score at 90 days and at the latest follow-up post-DH was 4. Good functional outcome was observed in 40% of patients at 90 days and in 48% of patient at the latest follow-up. The mortality rate at 90 days was 18% and at the last follow-up 20%. Univariate analysis identified a greater likelihood of poor functional outcome (mRS scores of 4-6) in patients with a history of stroke (OR 6.54 [95% CI1.39-30.66]; p = 0.017), peak midline shift (MLS) > 10 mm (OR 3.35 [95% CI 1.33-8.47]; p = 0.011), or a history of myocardial infarction (OR 8.95 [95% CI1.10-72.76]; p = 0.04). Multivariate analysis demonstrated elevated odds of poor functional outcome associated with a history of stroke (OR 9.14 [95% CI 1.78-47.05]; p = 0.008), MLS > 10 mm (OR 5.15 [95% CI 1.58-16.79; p = 0.007), a history of diabetes (OR 5.63 [95% CI 1.52-20.88]; p = 0.01), delayed time from onset of stroke to DH (OR 1.32 [95% CI 1.02-1.72]; p = 0.037), and evidence of pupillary dilation prior to DH (OR 4.19 [95% CI 1.06-16.51]; p = 0.04). Patients with infarction involving the dominant hemisphere had higher odds of unfavorable functional outcome at 90

  17. Mitral valve disease: a cardiologic-surgical interaction.

    PubMed

    Barlow, J B

    1996-10-01

    The respective roles of cardiologist and cardiac surgeon in the operative management of any specific case of mitral valve disease are variable. The range from the prevalent complete predominance of the surgeon through meaningful interaction between the two, concerning the timing and type of surgery, to predominance of the cardiologist when the surgeon accepts a role of technician. There are a number of scenarios in mitral valve surgery in which a reduced risk of postoperative hospital mortality and morbidity, by performing the simplest and shortest procedure, have to be balanced against enhanced peri-operative problems when other aspects are addressed that improve, sometimes markedly, the long-term prognosis. It is argued that a mildly stenotic aortic valve should often be replaced at the time of mitral valve surgery; that despite technical difficulties and a variable long-term postoperative course, surgeons should continue to repair rather than replace the mitral valves of young patients with severe mitral regurgitation despite the invariable presence of active rheumatic carditis; and that excess leaflet tissue and lax chordae in cases of degenerative mitral regurgitation are casually related to multifocal and potentially fatal ventricular ectopy. The crucial but neglected role of an organically abnormal tricuspid anulus in allowing dilatation and hence tricuspid regurgitation in patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease is considered in some detail. Such dilatation may occur late after mitral valve surgery for rheumatic disease, has generally and incorrectly been regarded as "functional" tricuspid regurgitation, contributes importantly to the postoperative "restriction-dilatation syndrome" and can be effectively prevented, or when once established then surgically managed, by a modified De Vega anuloplasty. Finally it is believed that, unlike mitral balloon valvuloplasty in selected instances, successful tricuspid balloon valvuloplasty can never be accomplished

  18. Morphofunctional Abnormalities of Mitral Annulus and Arrhythmic Mitral Valve Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Cristina; De Lazzari, Manuel; Rizzo, Stefania; Cipriani, Alberto; Giorgi, Benedetta; Lacognata, Carmelo; Rigato, Ilaria; Migliore, Federico; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Cacciavillani, Luisa; Bertaglia, Emanuele; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Bauce, Barbara; Corrado, Domenico; Thiene, Gaetano; Iliceto, Sabino

    2016-01-01

    Background— Arrhythmic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is characterized by myxomatous leaflets and left ventricular (LV) fibrosis of papillary muscles and inferobasal wall. We searched for morphofunctional abnormalities of the mitral valve that could explain a regional mechanical myocardial stretch. Methods and Results— Thirty-six (27 female patients; median age: 44 years) arrhythmic MVP patients with LV late gadolinium enhancement on cardiac magnetic resonance and no or trivial mitral regurgitation, and 16 (6 female patients; median age: 40 years) MVP patients without LV late gadolinium enhancement were investigated by morphofunctional cardiac magnetic resonance. Mitral annulus disjunction (median: 4.8 versus 1.8 mm; P<0.001), end-systolic mitral annular diameters (median: 41.2 versus 31.5; P=0.004) and end-diastolic mitral annular diameters (median: 35.5 versus 31.5; P=0.042), prevalence of posterior systolic curling (34 [94%] versus 3 [19%]; P<0.001), and basal to mid LV wall thickness ratio >1.5 (22 [61%] versus 4 [25%]; P=0.016) were higher in MVP patients with late gadolinium enhancement than in those without. A linear correlation was found between mitral annulus disjunction and curling (R=0.85). A higher prevalence of auscultatory midsystolic click (26 [72%] versus 6 [38%]; P=0.018) was also noted. Histology of the mitral annulus showed a longer mitral annulus disjunction in 50 sudden death patients with MVP and LV fibrosis than in 20 patients without MVP (median: 3 versus 1.5 mm; P<0.001). Conclusions— Mitral annulus disjunction is a constant feature of arrhythmic MVP with LV fibrosis. The excessive mobility of the leaflets caused by posterior systolic curling accounts for a mechanical stretch of the inferobasal wall and papillary muscles, eventually leading to myocardial hypertrophy and scarring. These mitral annulus abnormalities, together with auscultatory midsystolic click, may identify MVP patients who would need arrhythmic risk stratification. PMID

  19. In vivo functional human imaging using photoacoustic microscopy: response to ischemic and thermal stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favazza, Christopher; Maslov, Konstantin; Cornelius, Lynn; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    We report results of two in vivo functional human imaging experiments using photoacoustic microscopy. In Experiment 1, the hemodynamic response to an ischemic event was measured. The palm of a volunteer was imaged and a single cross-section was monitored while periodic arterial occlusions were administered using a blood pressure cuff wrapped around the upper arm and inflated to ~280 mmHg. Significant relative decreases in oxygen saturation (sO2) and total hemoglobin (HbT) were observed during periods of ischemia. Upon release of the occlusion, significant relative increases in sO2 and HbT due to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia were recorded. Experiment 2 explored the vascular response to a local, external thermal stimulus. Thermal hyperemia is a common physiological phenomenon and thermoregulation function in which blood flow to the skin is increased to more efficiently exchange heat with the ambient environment. The forearm of a volunteer was imaged and a single cross-section was monitored while the imaged surface was exposed to an elevated temperature of ~46°C. Due to thermal hyperemia, relative increases in sO2 and HbT were measured as the temperature of the surface was raised. These results may contribute as clinically relevant measures of vascular functioning for detection and assessment of vascular related diseases.

  20. Clinical Correlates of Hachinski Ischemic Score and Vascular Factors in Cognitive Function of Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn Ho

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between Hachinski ischemic score (HIS) and vascular factors as well as between HIS and the cognitive function in elderly community. Demographic characteristics, such as sex, age, education, history of drinking and smoking, family history of dementia and stroke, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and dementia, were surveyed. Neurological examination was administered to every subject and HIS was checked by a neurologist. From a total of 392 participants aged 65 and over in a rural community, 348 completed the survey and were finally enrolled. Among the vascular factors, history of hypertension (P = 0.008), history of stroke (P < 0.001), family history of dementia (P = 0.01), and history of cardiac diseases (P = 0.012) showed a significant relationship with HIS. In the cognitive function tests, both Korean version of the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Clinical Dementia Rating (Global and Sum of Boxes) had a significant relationship with HIS. Our study suggested HIS may have an association with some vascular factors and cognitive scales in community dwelling elderly. In this study, the HIS seemed to contribute to the evaluation of the quantity of vascular factors and to the prediction of status of cognitive function. PMID:25247189

  1. Improvement in Myocardial Function and Coronary Blood Flow in Ischemic Myocardium after Mannitol

    PubMed Central

    Willerson, James T.; Powell, Wm. John; Guiney, Timothy E.; Stark, James J.; Sanders, Charles A.; Leaf, Alexander

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hyperosmolality on the performance of, and the collateral blood flow to, ischemic myocardium. The myocardial response to mannitol, a hyperosmolar agent which remains extracellular, was evaluated in anesthetized dogs. Mannitol was infused into the aortic roots of 31 isovolumic hearts and of 15 dogs on right heart bypass, before and during ischemia. Myocardial ischemia was produced by temporary ligation of either the proximal or mid-left anterior descending coronary artery. Mannitol significantly improved the depressed ventricular function curves which occurred with left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion. Mannitol also significantly lessened the S-T segment elevation (epicardial electrocardiogram) occurring during myocardial ischemia in the isovolumic hearts and this reduction was associated with significant increases in total coronary blood flow (P < 0.005) and with increased collateral coronary blood flow to the ischemia area (P < 0.005). Thus, increases in serum osmolality produced by mannitol result in the following beneficial changes during myocardial ischemia: (a) improved myocardial function, (b) reduced S-T segment elevation, (c) increased total coronary blood flow, and (d) increased collateral coronary blood flow. PMID:4640943

  2. Ischemic Postconditioning and Subanesthetic S(+)-Ketamine Infusion: Effects on Renal Function and Histology in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Resende, Marco A. C.; Pantoja, Alberto V.; Barcellos, Bruno M.; Reis, Eduardo P.; Consolo, Thays D.; Módolo, Renata P.; Domingues, Maria A. C.; Assad, Alexandra R.; Cavalcanti, Ismar L.; Castiglia, Yara M. M.; Módolo, Norma S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Ischemic postconditioning (IP) in renal Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) models improves renal function after IRI. Ketamine affords significant benefits against IRI-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). The present study investigated the effects of IP and IP associated with subanesthetic S(+)-ketamine in ischemia-reperfusion-induced AKI. Methods. Forty-one Wistar rats were randomized into four groups: CG (10), control; KG (10), S(+)-ketamine infusion; IPG (10), IP; and KIPG (11), S(+)-ketamine infusion + IP. All rats underwent right nephrectomy. IRI and IP were induced only in IPG and KIPG by left kidney arterial occlusion for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h. Complete reperfusion was preceded by three cycles of 2 min of reocclusion followed by 2 min of reperfusion. Renal function was assessed by measuring serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Tubular damage was evaluated by renal histology. Results. Creatinine and BUN were significantly increased. Severe tubular injury was only observed in the groups with IRI (IPG and KIPG), whereas no injury was observed in CG or KG. No significant differences were detected between IPG and KIPG. Conclusions. No synergic effect of the use of subanesthetic S(+)-ketamine and IP on AKI was observed in this rat model. PMID:26413552

  3. Optical imaging of disrupted functional connectivity following ischemic stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Adam Q; Kraft, Andrew W; Wright, Patrick W; Snyder, Abraham Z; Lee, Jin-Moo; Culver, Joseph P

    2014-10-01

    Recent human neuroimaging studies indicate that spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity, as measured by functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI), are significantly affected following stroke. Disrupted functional connectivity is associated with behavioral deficits and has been linked to long-term recovery potential. FcMRI studies of stroke in rats have generally produced similar findings, although subacute cortical reorganization following focal ischemia appears to be more rapid than in humans. Similar studies in mice have not been published, most likely because fMRI in the small mouse brain is technically challenging. Extending functional connectivity methods to mouse models of stroke could provide a valuable tool for understanding the link between molecular mechanisms of stroke repair and human fcMRI findings at the system level. We applied functional connectivity optical intrinsic signal imaging (fcOIS) to mice before and 72 h after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) to examine how graded ischemic injury affects the relationship between functional connectivity and infarct volume, stimulus-induced response, and behavior. Regional changes in functional connectivity within the MCA territory were largely proportional to infarct volume. However, subcortical damage affected functional connectivity in the somatosensory cortex as much as larger infarcts of cortex and subcortex. The extent of injury correlated with cortical activations following electrical stimulation of the affected forelimb and with functional connectivity in the somatosensory cortex. Regional homotopic functional connectivity in motor cortex correlated with behavioral deficits measured using an adhesive patch removal test. Spontaneous hemodynamic activity within the infarct exhibited altered temporal and spectral features in comparison to intact tissue; failing to account for these regional differences significantly affected apparent post-stroke functional

  4. Dissection of the atrial wall after mitral valve replacement.

    PubMed Central

    Lukács, L; Kassai, I; Lengyel, M

    1996-01-01

    We describe an unusual sequela of mitral valve replacement in a 50-year-old woman who had undergone a closed mitral commissurotomy in 1975. She was admitted to our hospital because of mitral restenosis in November 1993, at which time her mitral valve was replaced with a mechanical prosthesis. On the 8th postoperative day, the patient developed symptoms of heart failure; transesophageal echocardiography revealed dissection and rupture of the left atrial wall. At prompt reoperation, we found an interlayer dissection and rupture of the atrial wall into the left atrium. We repaired the ruptured atrial wall with a prosthetic patch. The postoperative course was uneventful, and postoperative transesophageal echocardiography showed normal prosthetic valve function and no dissection. Images PMID:8680278

  5. Catheter Ablation Related Mitral Valve Injury: The Importance of Early Recognition and Rescue Mitral Valve Repair

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, Christopher V.; Hu, Tiffany; Ebrille, Elisa; Syed, Faisal F.; Vaidya, Vaibhav R.; Cha, Yong-Mei; Valverde, Arturo M.; Friedman, Paul A.; Suri, Rakesh M.; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction An increasing number of catheter ablations involve the mitral annular region and valve apparatus, increasing the risk of catheter interaction with the mitral valve (MV) complex. We review our experience with catheter ablation-related MV injury resulting in severe mitral regurgitation (MR) to delineate mechanisms of injury and outcomes. Methods We searched the Mayo Clinic mitral valve surgical database over a 19-year period (1993–2012) and the electrophysiologic procedures database over a 23-year period (1990–2013) and identified 9 patients with catheter ablation related MV injury requiring clinical intervention. Results Indications for ablation included atrial fibrillation (AF) [n=4], ventricular tachycardia (VT) [n =3], and left-sided accessory pathways [n=2]. In all 4 AF patients, a circular mapping catheter entrapped in the MV apparatus was responsible for severe mitral regurgitation. In all 3 VT patients, radiofrequency energy delivery led to direct injury to the MV apparatus. In the 2 patients with accessory pathways, both mechanisms were involved (1 per patient). Six patients required surgical intervention (5 MV repair, 1 catheter removal). One patient developed severe functional MR upon successful endovascular catheter disentanglement that improved spontaneously. Two VT patients with persistent severe post-ablation MR were managed non-surgically, one of whom died 3 months post-procedure. Conclusion Circular mapping catheter entrapment and ablation at the mitral annulus are the most common etiologies of MV injury during catheter ablation. Close surveillance of the MV is needed during such procedures and early surgical repair is important for successful salvage if significant injury occurs. PMID:24758402

  6. Intramyocardial stem cell injection in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy: Functional recovery and reverse remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Adam R.; Trachtenberg, Barry; Velazquez, Darcy L.; McNiece, Ian; Altman, Peter; Rouy, Didier; Mendizabal, Adam M.; Pattany, Pradip M.; Lopera, Gustavo A.; Fishman, Joel; Zambrano, Juan P.; Heldman, Alan W.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Transcatheter, intramyocardial injections of bone marrow derived cell therapy produces reverse remodeling in large animal models of ischemic cardiomyopathy. Objective We used cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients with LV dysfunction related to remote myocardial infarction (MI) to test the hypothesis that bone marrow progenitor cell injection cause functional recovery of scarred myocardium and reverse remodeling. Methods and Results Eight patients (age 57.2±13.3) received transendocardial, intramyocardial injection of autologous bone marrow progenitor cells (mononuclear or mesenchymal stem cells) in LV scar and border zone. All patients tolerated the procedure with no serious adverse events. CMR at 1-year demonstrated a decrease in end-diastolic volume (208.7±20.4 vs. 167.4±7.32mL; p=0.03), a trend towards decreased end-systolic volume (142.4±16.5 vs. 107.6±7.4mL; p=0.06), decreased infarct size (p<0.05), and improved regional LV function by peak Ecc in the treated infarct zone (-8.1±1.0 vs. -11.4±1.3; p=0.04). Improvements in regional function were evident at 3 months, while the changes in chamber dimensions were not significant until 6 months. Improved regional function in the infarct zone strongly correlated with reduction of EDV (r2=0.69, p=0.04) and ESV (r2=0.83, p=0.01). Conclusions These data suggest that transcatheter, intramyocardial injections of autologous bone marrow progenitor cells improve regional contractility of a chronic myocardial scar and these changes predict subsequent reverse remodeling. The findings support the potential clinical benefits of this new treatment strategy and ongoing randomized clinical trials. PMID:21415390

  7. The Role of Mitochondrial Functional Proteins in ROS Production in Ischemic Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Haifeng; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Heng; Li, Xiuchuan; Yang, Dachun; Li, De; Yang, Yongjian

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic heart diseases (IHD) have become the leading cause of death around the world, killing more than 7 million people annually. In IHD, the blockage of coronary vessels will cause irreversible cell injury and even death. As the “powerhouse” and “apoptosis center” in cardiomyocytes, mitochondria play critical roles in IHD. Ischemia insult can reduce myocardial ATP content, resulting in energy stress and overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, mitochondrial abnormality has been identified as a hallmark of multiple cardiovascular disorders. To date, many studies have suggested that these mitochondrial proteins, such as electron transport chain (ETC) complexes, uncoupling proteins (UCPs), mitochondrial dynamic proteins, translocases of outer membrane (Tom) complex, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), can directly or indirectly influence mitochondria-originated ROS production, consequently determining the degree of mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial impairment. Here, the focus of this review is to summarize the present understanding of the relationship between some mitochondrial functional proteins and ROS production in IHD. PMID:27119006

  8. Optical Spectroscopy Approach for the Predictive Assessment of Kidney Functional Recovery Following Ischemic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R N; Pivetti, C D; Rubenchik, A M; Matthews, D L; Troppmann, C; Demos, S G

    2010-02-11

    Tissue that has undergone significant yet unknown amount of ischemic injury is frequently encountered in organ transplantation and trauma clinics. With no reliable real-time method of assessing the degree of injury incurred in tissue, surgeons generally rely on visual observation which is subjective. In this work, we investigate the use of optical spectroscopy methods as a potentially more reliable approach. Previous work by various groups was strongly suggestive that tissue autofluorescence from NADH obtained under UV excitation is sensitive to metabolic response changes. To test and expand upon this concept, we monitored autofluorescence and light scattering intensities of injured vs. uninjured rat kidneys via multimodal imaging under 355 nm, 325 nm, and 266 nm excitation as well as scattering under 500 nm illumination. 355 nm excitation was used to probe mainly NADH, a metabolite, while 266 nm excitation was used to probe mainly tryptophan to correct for non-metabolic signal artifacts. The ratio of autofluorescence intensities derived under these two excitation wavelengths was calculated and its temporal profile was fit to a relaxation model. Time constants were extracted, and longer time constants were associated with kidney dysfunction. Analysis of both the autofluorescence and light scattering images suggests that changes in microstructure tissue morphology, blood absorption spectral characteristics, and pH contribute to the behavior of the observed signal which may be used to obtain tissue functional information and offer predictive capability.

  9. The TNFα-Transgenic Rat: Hippocampal Synaptic Integrity, Cognition, Function, and Post-Ischemic Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Pettigrew, L. Creed; Kryscio, Richard J.; Norris, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The cytokine, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), is a key regulator of neuroinflammation linked to numerous neurodegenerative conditions and diseases. The present study used transgenic rats that overexpress a murine TNFα gene, under the control of its own promoter, to investigate the impact of chronically elevated TNFα on hippocampal synaptic function. Neuronal viability and cognitive recovery in TNFα Tg rats were also determined following an ischemic insult arising from reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Basal CA3-CA1 synaptic strength, recorded in acute brain slices, was not significantly different between eight-week-old TNFα Tg rats and non-Tg rats. In contrast, slices from TNFα Tg rats showed significantly greater levels of long-term potentiation (LTP) in response to 100 Hz stimulation, suggesting that synaptic networks may be hyperexcitable in the context of elevated TNFα. Cognitive and motor deficits (assessed on the Morris Water Maze and Rotarod task, respectively) were present in TNFα Tg rats in the absence of significant differences in the loss of cortical and hippocampal neurons. TNF overexpression exacerbated MCAO-dependent deficits on the rotarod, but ameliorated cortical neuron loss in response to MCAO. PMID:27144978

  10. Optical spectroscopy approach for the predictive assessment of kidney functional recovery following ischemic injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Rajesh N.; Pivetti, Christopher D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Troppmann, Christoph; Demos, Stavros G.

    2010-02-01

    Tissue that has undergone significant yet unknown amount of ischemic injury is frequently encountered in organ transplantation and trauma clinics. With no reliable real-time method of assessing the degree of injury incurred in tissue, surgeons generally rely on visual observation which is subjective. In this work, we investigate the use of optical spectroscopy methods as a potentially more reliable approach. Previous work by various groups was strongly suggestive that tissue autofluorescence from NADH obtained under UV excitation is sensitive to metabolic response changes. To test and expand upon this concept, we monitored autofluorescence and light scattering intensities of injured vs. uninjured rat kidneys via multimodal imaging under 355 nm, 325 nm, and 266 nm excitation as well as scattering under 500 nm illumination. 355 nm excitation was used to probe mainly NADH, a metabolite, while 266 nm excitation was used to probe mainly tryptophan to correct for non-metabolic signal artifacts. The ratio of autofluorescence intensities derived under these two excitation wavelengths was calculated and its temporal profile was fit to a relaxation model. Time constants were extracted, and longer time constants were associated with kidney dysfunction. Analysis of both the autofluorescence and light scattering images suggests that changes in microstructure tissue morphology, blood absorption spectral characteristics, and pH contribute to the behavior of the observed signal which may be used to obtain tissue functional information and offer predictive capability.

  11. Three-Dimensional Transesophageal Echocardiography in the Anatomical Assessment of Isolated Parachute Mitral Valve in an Adult Patient.

    PubMed

    López-Pardo, Francisco; Urbano-Moral, Jose Angel; González-Calle, Antonio; Laviana-Martinez, Fernando; Esteve-Ruiz, Iris; Lagos-Degrande, Oscar; López-Haldon, Jose E

    2015-11-01

    Parachute mitral valve (PMV) is a rare congenital anomaly of the mitral valve apparatus usually evidenced in infants and young children. Adult presentation is extremely rare and is generally mild in terms of mitral stenosis. A 73-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department due to progressive dyspnea, with NYHA functional class IV symptoms on presentation. The echocardiographic examination identified a PMV with moderate mitral stenosis and a secondary smaller subvalvular mitral orifice. The report shows the usefulness of three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in the detection and quantification of this rare anomaly. PMID:26096823

  12. The value of assessing pulmonary venous flow velocity for predicting severity of mitral regurgitation: A quantitative assessment integrating left ventricular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pu, M.; Griffin, B. P.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Stewart, W. J.; Fan, X.; Cosgrove, D. M.; Thomas, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Although alteration in pulmonary venous flow has been reported to relate to mitral regurgitant severity, it is also known to vary with left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic dysfunction. There are few data relating pulmonary venous flow to quantitative indexes of mitral regurgitation (MR). The object of this study was to assess quantitatively the accuracy of pulmonary venous flow for predicting MR severity by using transesophageal echocardiographic measurement in patients with variable LV dysfunction. This study consisted of 73 patients undergoing heart surgery with mild to severe MR. Regurgitant orifice area (ROA), regurgitant stroke volume (RSV), and regurgitant fraction (RF) were obtained by quantitative transesophageal echocardiography and proximal isovelocity surface area. Both left and right upper pulmonary venous flow velocities were recorded and their patterns classified by the ratio of systolic to diastolic velocity: normal (>/=1), blunted (<1), and systolic reversal (<0). Twenty-three percent of patients had discordant patterns between the left and right veins. When the most abnormal patterns either in the left or right vein were used for analysis, the ratio of peak systolic to diastolic flow velocity was negatively correlated with ROA (r = -0.74, P <.001), RSV (r = -0.70, P <.001), and RF (r = -0.66, P <.001) calculated by the Doppler thermodilution method; values were r = -0.70, r = -0.67, and r = -0.57, respectively (all P <.001), for indexes calculated by the proximal isovelocity surface area method. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the reversed pulmonary venous flow pattern for detecting a large ROA (>0.3 cm(2)) were 69%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the normal pulmonary venous flow pattern for detecting a small ROA (<0.3 cm(2)) were 60%, 96%, and 94%, respectively. However, the blunted pattern had low sensitivity (22%), specificity (61%), and predictive values (30

  13. Catheter interventions for mitral stenosis in children: results and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Anita

    2015-04-01

    Stenosis of the mitral valve most often occurs as a result of chronic rheumatic heart disease, causing thickening and fibrosis of the mitral valve apparatus. Rheumatic heart disease continues to be a major public health problem in several developing countries and mitral stenosis is also common in these regions. According to the reports from India and Africa, the disease tends to follow a rapidly progressive course in children. The treatment of choice is balloon dilatation of the mitral valve. Echocardiography is indispensable for this procedure. Before planning the procedure, it is essential to assess the suitability of balloon dilatation. Echocardiography performed during the procedure helps to decide whether the size of the balloon needs to be increased in case of inadequate relief of stenosis. Most published series have reported an immediate success rate of over 90% with balloon dilatation in children and young adults. With an increase in mitral valve area and improvement in functional class, the left atrial pressure and the transmitral gradients fall. These gratifying results are also reported from very young children of less than 12 years of age. It is recommended to start with a smaller balloon size and increase its size in a stepwise fashion to minimize complications. The complications, seen in about 1% to 2% of cases, include development of significant mitral regurgitation and hemopericardium, secondary to cardiac chamber perforation. The long-term results indicate slightly higher restenosis rates in children than in adults. Most children with restenosis can undergo successful repeat dilatation. PMID:25870344

  14. Long-term, regular remote ischemic preconditioning improves endothelial function in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liang, Y; Li, Y P; He, F; Liu, X Q; Zhang, J Y

    2015-06-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPre) can prevent myocardial injury. The purpose of this study was to assess the beneficial effects of long-term regular RIPre on human arteries. Forty patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were assigned randomly to a RIPre group (n=20) or coronary heart disease (CHD) group (n=20). Twenty patients scheduled for mastectomy were enrolled as a control group. RIPre was achieved by occluding arterial blood flow 5 min with a mercury sphygmomanometer followed by a 5-min reperfusion period, and this was repeated 4 times. The RIPre procedure was repeated 3 times a day for 20 days. In all patients, arterial fragments discarded during surgery were collected to evaluate endothelial function by flow-mediated dilation (FMD), CD34(+) monocyte count, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS expression). Phosphorylation levels of STAT-3 and Akt were also assayed to explore the underlying mechanisms. Compared with the CHD group, long-term regular RIPre significantly improved FMD after 20 days (8.5±2.4 vs 4.9±4.2%, P<0.05) and significantly reduced troponin after CABG surgery (0.72±0.31 and 1.64±0.19, P<0.05). RIPre activated STAT-3 and increased CD34(+) endothelial progenitor cell counts found in arteries. Long-term, regular RIPre improved endothelial function in patients with CHD, possibly due to STAT-3 activation, and this may have led to an increase in endothelial progenitor cells. PMID:25923462

  15. Association between High Endocardial Unipolar Voltage and Improved Left Ventricular Function in Patients with Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki; Lai, Dejian; Handberg, Eileen M.; Perin, Emerson C.; Pepine, Carl J.; Anderson, R. David

    2016-01-01

    We know that endocardial mapping reports left ventricular electrical activity (voltage) and that these data can predict outcomes in patients undergoing traditional revascularization. Because the mapping data from experimental models have also been linked with myocardial viability, we hypothesized an association between increased unipolar voltage in patients undergoing intramyocardial injections and their subsequent improvement in left ventricular performance. For this exploratory analysis, we evaluated 86 patients with left ventricular dysfunction, heart-failure symptoms, possible angina, and no revascularization options, who were undergoing endocardial mapping. Fifty-seven patients received bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMC) injections and 29 patients received cell-free injections of a placebo. The average mapping site voltage was 9.7 ± 2 mV, and sites with voltage of ≥6.9 mV were engaged by needle and injected (with BMC or placebo). For all patients, at 6 months, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) improved, and after covariate adjustment this improvement was best predicted by injection-site voltage. For every 2-mV increase in baseline voltage, we detected a 1.3 increase in absolute LVEF units for all patients (P=0.038). Multiple linear regression analyses confirmed that voltage and the CD34+ count present in bone marrow (but not treatment assignment) were associated with improved LVEF (P=0.03 and P=0.014, respectively). In an exploratory analysis, higher endocardial voltage and bone marrow CD34+ levels were associated with improved left ventricular function among ischemic cardiomyopathy patients. Intramyocardial needle injections, possibly through stimulation of angiogenesis, might serve as a future therapy in patients with reduced left ventricular function and warrants investigation. PMID:27547135

  16. Association between High Endocardial Unipolar Voltage and Improved Left Ventricular Function in Patients with Ischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki; Lai, Dejian; Handberg, Eileen M; Moyé, Lem; Perin, Emerson C; Pepine, Carl J; Anderson, R David

    2016-08-01

    We know that endocardial mapping reports left ventricular electrical activity (voltage) and that these data can predict outcomes in patients undergoing traditional revascularization. Because the mapping data from experimental models have also been linked with myocardial viability, we hypothesized an association between increased unipolar voltage in patients undergoing intramyocardial injections and their subsequent improvement in left ventricular performance. For this exploratory analysis, we evaluated 86 patients with left ventricular dysfunction, heart-failure symptoms, possible angina, and no revascularization options, who were undergoing endocardial mapping. Fifty-seven patients received bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMC) injections and 29 patients received cell-free injections of a placebo. The average mapping site voltage was 9.7 ± 2 mV, and sites with voltage of ≥6.9 mV were engaged by needle and injected (with BMC or placebo). For all patients, at 6 months, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) improved, and after covariate adjustment this improvement was best predicted by injection-site voltage. For every 2-mV increase in baseline voltage, we detected a 1.3 increase in absolute LVEF units for all patients (P=0.038). Multiple linear regression analyses confirmed that voltage and the CD34(+) count present in bone marrow (but not treatment assignment) were associated with improved LVEF (P=0.03 and P=0.014, respectively). In an exploratory analysis, higher endocardial voltage and bone marrow CD34(+) levels were associated with improved left ventricular function among ischemic cardiomyopathy patients. Intramyocardial needle injections, possibly through stimulation of angiogenesis, might serve as a future therapy in patients with reduced left ventricular function and warrants investigation. PMID:27547135

  17. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  18. Motor-Evoked Potential Confirmation of Functional Improvement by Transplanted Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell in the Ischemic Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dong-Kyu; Park, Sang-In; Han, Young-Min; Jang, Kyung-Sool; Park, Moon-Seo; Chung, Young-An; Kim, Min-Wook; Maeng, Lee-So; Huh, Pil-Woo; Yoo, Do-Sung; Jung, Seong-Whan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on the motor pathway in the transient ischemic rat brain that were transplanted through the carotid artery, measuring motor-evoked potential (MEP) in the four limbs muscle and the atlantooccipital membrane, which was elicited after monopolar and bipolar transcortical stimulation. After monopolar stimulation, the latency of MEP was significantly prolonged, and the amplitude was less reduced in the BMSC group in comparison with the control group (P < .05). MEPs induced by bipolar stimulation in the left forelimb could be measured in 40% of the BMSC group and the I wave that was not detected in the control group was also detected in 40% of the BMSC group. Our preliminary results imply that BMSCs transplanted to the ischemic rat brain mediate effects on the functional recovery of the cerebral motor cortex and the motor pathway. PMID:21772790

  19. Microvesicles from brain-extract-treated mesenchymal stem cells improve neurological functions in a rat model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yong; Kim, Eiru; Choi, Seong-Mi; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Lee, Insuk; Kim, Han-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was reported to improve functional outcomes in a rat model of ischemic stroke, and subsequent studies suggest that MSC-derived microvesicles (MVs) can replace the beneficial effects of MSCs. Here, we evaluated three different MSC-derived MVs, including MVs from untreated MSCs (MSC-MVs), MVs from MSCs treated with normal rat brain extract (NBE-MSC-MVs), and MVs from MSCs treated with stroke-injured rat brain extract (SBE-MSC-MVs), and tested their effects on ischemic brain injury induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in rats. NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs had significantly greater efficacy than MSC-MVs for ameliorating ischemic brain injury with improved functional recovery. We found similar profiles of key signalling proteins in NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs, which account for their similar therapeutic efficacies. Immunohistochemical analyses suggest that brain-extract-treated MSC-MVs reduce inflammation, enhance angiogenesis, and increase endogenous neurogenesis in the rat brain. We performed mass spectrometry proteomic analyses and found that the total proteomes of brain-extract-treated MSC-MVs are highly enriched for known vesicular proteins. Notably, MSC-MV proteins upregulated by brain extracts tend to be modular for tissue repair pathways. We suggest that MSC-MV proteins stimulated by the brain microenvironment are paracrine effectors that enhance MSC therapy for stroke injury. PMID:27609711

  20. Microvesicles from brain-extract—treated mesenchymal stem cells improve neurological functions in a rat model of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yong; Kim, Eiru; Choi, Seong-Mi; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Lee, Insuk; Kim, Han-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was reported to improve functional outcomes in a rat model of ischemic stroke, and subsequent studies suggest that MSC-derived microvesicles (MVs) can replace the beneficial effects of MSCs. Here, we evaluated three different MSC-derived MVs, including MVs from untreated MSCs (MSC-MVs), MVs from MSCs treated with normal rat brain extract (NBE-MSC-MVs), and MVs from MSCs treated with stroke-injured rat brain extract (SBE-MSC-MVs), and tested their effects on ischemic brain injury induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in rats. NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs had significantly greater efficacy than MSC-MVs for ameliorating ischemic brain injury with improved functional recovery. We found similar profiles of key signalling proteins in NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs, which account for their similar therapeutic efficacies. Immunohistochemical analyses suggest that brain-extract—treated MSC-MVs reduce inflammation, enhance angiogenesis, and increase endogenous neurogenesis in the rat brain. We performed mass spectrometry proteomic analyses and found that the total proteomes of brain-extract—treated MSC-MVs are highly enriched for known vesicular proteins. Notably, MSC-MV proteins upregulated by brain extracts tend to be modular for tissue repair pathways. We suggest that MSC-MV proteins stimulated by the brain microenvironment are paracrine effectors that enhance MSC therapy for stroke injury. PMID:27609711

  1. Mechanics of the mitral valve

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Manuel K.; Famaey, Nele; Shultz, Tyler O’Brien; Bothe, Wolfgang; Miller, D. Craig

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in mitral valve mechanics are classical indicators of valvular heart disease, such as mitral valve prolapse, mitral regurgitation, and mitral stenosis. Computational modeling is a powerful technique to quantify these alterations, to explore mitral valve physiology and pathology, and to classify the impact of novel treatment strategies. The selection of the appropriate constitutive model and the choice of its material parameters are paramount to the success of these models. However, the in vivo parameters values for these models are unknown. Here we identify the in vivo material parameters for three common hyperelastic models for mitral valve tissue, an isotropic one and two anisotropic ones, using an inverse finite element approach. We demonstrate that the two anisotropic models provide an excellent fit to the in vivo data, with local displacement errors in the sub-millimeter range. In a complementary sensitivity analysis, we show that the identified parameter values are highly sensitive to prestrain, with some parameters varying up to four orders of magnitude. For the coupled anisotropic model, the stiffness varied from 119,021kPa at 0% prestrain via 36kPa at 30% prestrain to 9kPa at 60% prestrain. These results may, at least in part, explain the discrepancy between previously reported ex vivo and in vivo measurements of mitral leaflet stiffness. We believe that our study provides valuable guidelines for modeling mitral valve mechanics, selecting appropriate constitutive models, and choosing physiologically meaningful parameter values. Future studies will be necessary to experimentally and computationally investigate prestrain, to verify its existence, to quantify its magnitude, and to clarify its role in mitral valve mechanics. PMID:23263365

  2. Changes in Mitral Valve Annular Geometry After Repair: Saddle-Shaped Versus Flat Annuloplasty Rings

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Feroze; Gorman, Joseph H.; Subramaniam, Balachundhar; Gorman, Robert C.; Panzica, Peter J.; Hagberg, Robert C.; Lerner, Adam B.; Hess, Philip E.; Maslow, Andrew; Khabbaz, Kamal R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Saddle-shaped annuloplasty rings are being increasingly used during mitral valve (MV) repair to conform the mitral annulus to a more nonplanar shape and possibly reduce leaflet stress. In this study utilizing three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography we compared the effects of rigid flat rings with those of the saddle rings on the mitral annular geometry. Specifically we measured the changes in nonplanarity angle (NPA) before and after MV repair. Methods Geometric analysis on 38 patients undergoing MV repair for myxomatous and ischemic mitral regurgitation with full flat rings (n = 18) and saddle rings (n = 18) were performed. The acquired three-dimensional volumetric data were analyzed utilizing the “Image Arena” software (TomTec GmBH, Munich, Germany). Specifically, the degree of change in the NPA was calculated and compared before and after repair for both types of rings. Results Both types of annuloplasty rings resulted in significant changes in the geometric structure of the MV after repair. However, saddle rings lead to a decrease in the NPA (7% for ischemic and 8% for myxomatous MV repairs) (ie, made the annulus more nonplanar), whereas flat rings increased the NPA (7.9% for ischemic and 11.8% for myxomatous MV repairs) (ie, made the annulus less nonplanar); p value 0.001 or less. Conclusions Implantation of saddle-shaped rings during MV repair surgery is associated with augmentation of the nonplanar shape of the mitral annulus (ie, decreases NPA). This favorable change in the mitral annular geometry could possibly confer a structural advantage to MV repairs with the saddle rings. PMID:20868816

  3. [Mitral valve replacement for congenital parachute mitral valve].

    PubMed

    Sasahashi, N; Ando, F; Okamoto, F; Yamanaka, K; Hanada, T; Makino, S

    1995-07-01

    A one-year-old boy was admitted with refractory congestive biventricular heart failure for medical treatment. On echocardiogram and cardiac catheterization revealed severe mitral stenosis from parachute deformity with pulmonary hypertension. During the operation, a single round orifice of 7 mm in diameter was detected in the mitral valve and adhered chordae were attached to a large single papillary muscle which was located at the posteromedial portion of the left ventricle. An isolated muscle band which was not attached to the mitral valve was observed at the anterolateral wall of the left ventricle. The mitral valve was replaced with 16 mm Carbo-Medicus prosthesis. Postoperative catheterization revealed residual pulmonary hypertension which was responsive to Imidarine infusion. He was discharged from the hospital without any sequelae, and has been on regimen including anticoaglant and vasodilator. PMID:7561327

  4. Functional versus Nonfunctional Rehabilitation in Chronic Ischemic Stroke: Evidences from a Randomized Functional MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Pelicioni, Maristela C. X.; Novaes, Morgana M.; Peres, Andre S. C.; Lino de Souza, Altay A.; Minelli, Cesar; Fabio, Soraia R. C.; Pontes-Neto, Octavio M.; Santos, Antonio C.; de Araujo, Draulio B.

    2016-01-01

    Motor rehabilitation of stroke survivors may include functional and/or nonfunctional strategy. The present study aimed to compare the effect of these two rehabilitation strategies by means of clinical scales and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Twelve hemiparetic chronic stroke patients were selected. Patients were randomly assigned a nonfunctional (NFS) or functional (FS) rehabilitation scheme. Clinical scales (Fugl-Meyer, ARA test, and modified Barthel) and fMRI were applied at four moments: before rehabilitation (P1) and immediately after (P2), 1 month after (P3), and three months after (P4) the end of rehabilitation. The NFS group improved significantly and exclusively their Fugl-Meyer scores at P2, P3, and P4, when compared to P1. On the other hand, the FS group increased significantly in Fugl-Meyer at P2, when compared to P1, and also in their ARA and Barthel scores. fMRI inspection at the individual level revealed that both rehabilitation schemes most often led to decreased activation sparseness, decreased activity of contralesional M1, increased asymmetry of M1 activity to the ipsilesional side, decreased perilesional activity, and decreased SMA activity. Increased M1 asymmetry with rehabilitation was also confirmed by Lateralization Indexes. Our clinical analysis revealed subtle differences between FS and NFS. PMID:26839716

  5. Deficiency in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp21) gene increases ischemic brain damage and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Mehta, Suresh L.; Lu, Baisong; Andy Li, P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in mediating ischemic brain damage. Immp2l is an inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase that processes mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 (Cyc1). Homozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove or Immp2l−/−) elevates mitochondrial membrane potential, increases superoxide (•O2−) production in the brain and impairs fertility. The objectives of this study are to explore the effects of heterozygous mutation of lmmp2l (Immp2l+/−) on ischemic outcome and to determine the influence of Immp2l deficiency on brain mitochondria after stroke. Male Immp2l+/− and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to 1-h focal cerebral ischemia. Their brains were harvested after 5 and 24-h of reperfusion. The results showed that infarct volume and DNA oxidative damage significantly increased in the Immp2l+/− mice. There were no obvious cerebral vasculature abnormalities between the two types of mice viewed by Indian ink perfusion. The increased damage in Immp2l+/− mice was associated with early increase in •O2− production. Mitochondrial respiratory rate, total mitochondrial respiratory capacity and mitochondrial respiratory complex activities were decreased at 5-h of recirculation in Immp2l+/− mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that lmmp2l deficiency increases ischemic brain damage by enhancing •O2− production and damaging mitochondrial functional performance. PMID:21824519

  6. Brief exposure to hyperoxia depletes the glial progenitor pool and impairs functional recovery after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Joshua D; Miles, Darryl K; Gilley, Jennifer A; Yang, Cui-Ping; Kernie, Steven G

    2009-01-01

    Patterns of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in infants and children suggest vulnerability in regions of white matter development, and injured patients develop defects in myelination resulting in cerebral palsy and motor deficits. Reperfusion exacerbates the oxidative stress that occurs after such injuries and may impair recovery. Resuscitation after hypoxic-ischemic injury is routinely performed using 100% oxygen, and this practice may increase the oxidative stress that occurs during reperfusion and further damage an already compromised brain. We show that brief exposure (30 mins) to 100% oxygen during reperfusion worsens the histologic injury in young mice after unilateral brain hypoxia–ischemia, causes an accumulation of the oxidative metabolite nitrotyrosine, and depletes preoligodendrocyte glial progenitors present in the cortex. This damage can be reversed with administration of the antioxidant ebselen, a glutathione peroxidase mimetic. Moreover, mice recovered in 100% oxygen have a more disrupted pattern of myelination and develop a static motor deficit that mimics cerebral palsy and manifests itself by significantly worse performance on wire hang and rotorod motor testing. We conclude that exposure to 100% oxygen during reperfusion after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury increases secondary neural injury, depletes developing glial progenitors, interferes with myelination, and ultimately impairs functional recovery. PMID:18334993

  7. Transient mitral regurgitation: An adjunctive sign of myocardial ischemia during dipyridamole-thallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lette, J.; Gagnon, A.; Lapointe, J.; Cerino, M.

    1989-07-01

    A patient developed transient exacerbation of a mitral insufficiency murmur and a reversible posterior wall perfusion defect during dipyridamole-thallium imaging. Coronary angiography showed significant stenoses of both the right and the circumflex coronary arteries that supply the posterior papillary muscle. Cardiac auscultation for transient mitral incompetence, a sign of reversible papillary muscle dysfunction, is a simple and practical adjunctive test for myocardial ischemia during dipyridamole-thallium imaging. It may confirm that an isolated reversible posterior wall myocardial perfusion defect is truly ischemic in nature as opposed to an artifact resulting from attenuation by the diaphragm.

  8. Innovations in minimally invasive mitral valve pair.

    PubMed

    Sündermann, Simon H; Seeburger, Joerg; Scherman, Jacques; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm; Falk, Volkmar

    2012-12-01

    Mitral valve (MV) insufficiency is the second most common heart valve disease represented in cardiac surgery. The gold standard therapy is surgical repair of the valve. Today, most centers prefer a minimally invasive approach through a right-sided mini-thoracotomy. Despite the small access, there is still the need to use cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and the operation has to be performed on the arrested heart. New devices have been developed to optimize the results of surgical repair by implementing mechanisms for post-implantation adjustment on the beating heart or the avoidance of CPB. Early attempts with adjustable mitral annuloplasty rings go back to the early 1990s. Only a few devices are available on the market. Recently, a mitral valve adjustable annuloplasty ring was CE-marked and is under further clinical investigation. In addition, a sutureless annuloplasty band to be implanted on the beating heart is under preclinical and initial clinical investigation for transatrial and transfemoral transcatheter implantation. Furthermore, new neochord systems are being developed, which allow for functional length adjustment on the beating heart after implantation. Some devices were developed for percutaneous MV repair implanted into the coronary sinus to reshape the posterior MV annulus. Other percutaneous devices are directly fixed to the posterior annulus to alter its shape. Several disadvantages have been observed preventing a broad clinical use of some of these devices. There is a continuous effort to develop innovative techniques to optimize MV repair and to decrease invasiveness. PMID:23315719

  9. Alteration of Thyroid-Related Hormones within Normal Ranges and Early Functional Outcomes in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-yan; Li, Wen-yu; Hu, Xing-yue

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the prognostic value of thyroid-related hormones within normal ranges after acute ischemic stroke. This was a retrospective study and we reviewed 1072 ischemic stroke patients consecutively admitted within 72 h after symptom onset. Total triiodothyronine (T3), total thyroxine (T4), free T3, free T4, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were assessed to determine their values for predicting functional outcome at the first follow-up clinic visits, which usually occurred 2 to 4 weeks after discharge from the hospital. 722 patients were finally included. On univariate analysis, poor functional outcome was associated with presence of atrial fibrillation as the index event. Furthermore, score of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), total T4, free T4, and C-reactive protein at admission were significantly higher in patients with poor functional outcome, whereas free T3 and total T3 were significantly lower. On multiple logistic regression analysis, lower total T3 concentrations remained independently associated with poor functional outcome [odds ratio (OR), 0.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.01–0.84; P = 0.035]. The only other variables independently associated with poor functional outcome were NIHSS scores. In sum, lower total T3 concentrations that were within the normal ranges were independently associated with poor short-term outcomes. PMID:27375741

  10. Alteration of Thyroid-Related Hormones within Normal Ranges and Early Functional Outcomes in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Yan; Li, Wen-Yu; Hu, Xing-Yue

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the prognostic value of thyroid-related hormones within normal ranges after acute ischemic stroke. This was a retrospective study and we reviewed 1072 ischemic stroke patients consecutively admitted within 72 h after symptom onset. Total triiodothyronine (T3), total thyroxine (T4), free T3, free T4, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were assessed to determine their values for predicting functional outcome at the first follow-up clinic visits, which usually occurred 2 to 4 weeks after discharge from the hospital. 722 patients were finally included. On univariate analysis, poor functional outcome was associated with presence of atrial fibrillation as the index event. Furthermore, score of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), total T4, free T4, and C-reactive protein at admission were significantly higher in patients with poor functional outcome, whereas free T3 and total T3 were significantly lower. On multiple logistic regression analysis, lower total T3 concentrations remained independently associated with poor functional outcome [odds ratio (OR), 0.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.01-0.84; P = 0.035]. The only other variables independently associated with poor functional outcome were NIHSS scores. In sum, lower total T3 concentrations that were within the normal ranges were independently associated with poor short-term outcomes. PMID:27375741

  11. Discharge patterning in rat olfactory bulb mitral cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Gareth; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Tsuji, Chiharu; Sabatier, Nancy; Ludwig, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Here we present a detailed statistical analysis of the discharge characteristics of mitral cells of the main olfactory bulb of urethane‐anesthetized rats. Neurons were recorded from the mitral cell layer, and antidromically identified by stimuli applied to the lateral olfactory tract. All mitral cells displayed repeated, prolonged bursts of action potentials typically lasting >100 sec and separated by similarly long intervals; about half were completely silent between bursts. No such bursting was observed in nonmitral cells recorded in close proximity to mitral cells. Bursts were asynchronous among even adjacent mitral cells. The intraburst activity of most mitral cells showed strong entrainment to the spontaneous respiratory rhythm; similar entrainment was seen in some, but not all nonmitral cells. All mitral cells displayed a peak of excitability at ~25 msec after spikes, as reflected by a peak in the interspike interval distribution and in the corresponding hazard function. About half also showed a peak at about 6 msec, reflecting the common occurrence of doublet spikes. Nonmitral cells showed no such doublet spikes. Bursts typically increased in intensity over the first 20–30 sec of a burst, during which time doublets were rare or absent. After 20–30 sec (in cells that exhibited doublets), doublets occurred frequently for as long as the burst persisted, in trains of up to 10 doublets. The last doublet was followed by an extended relative refractory period the duration of which was independent of train length. In cells that were excited by application of a particular odor, responsiveness was apparently greater during silent periods between bursts than during bursts. Conversely in cells that were inhibited by a particular odor, responsiveness was only apparent when cells were active. Extensive raw (event timing) data from the cells, together with details of those analyses, are provided as supplementary material, freely available for secondary use

  12. Discharge patterning in rat olfactory bulb mitral cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Leng, Gareth; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Tsuji, Chiharu; Sabatier, Nancy; Ludwig, Mike

    2014-10-01

    Here we present a detailed statistical analysis of the discharge characteristics of mitral cells of the main olfactory bulb of urethane-anesthetized rats. Neurons were recorded from the mitral cell layer, and antidromically identified by stimuli applied to the lateral olfactory tract. All mitral cells displayed repeated, prolonged bursts of action potentials typically lasting >100 sec and separated by similarly long intervals; about half were completely silent between bursts. No such bursting was observed in nonmitral cells recorded in close proximity to mitral cells. Bursts were asynchronous among even adjacent mitral cells. The intraburst activity of most mitral cells showed strong entrainment to the spontaneous respiratory rhythm; similar entrainment was seen in some, but not all nonmitral cells. All mitral cells displayed a peak of excitability at ~25 msec after spikes, as reflected by a peak in the interspike interval distribution and in the corresponding hazard function. About half also showed a peak at about 6 msec, reflecting the common occurrence of doublet spikes. Nonmitral cells showed no such doublet spikes. Bursts typically increased in intensity over the first 20-30 sec of a burst, during which time doublets were rare or absent. After 20-30 sec (in cells that exhibited doublets), doublets occurred frequently for as long as the burst persisted, in trains of up to 10 doublets. The last doublet was followed by an extended relative refractory period the duration of which was independent of train length. In cells that were excited by application of a particular odor, responsiveness was apparently greater during silent periods between bursts than during bursts. Conversely in cells that were inhibited by a particular odor, responsiveness was only apparent when cells were active. Extensive raw (event timing) data from the cells, together with details of those analyses, are provided as supplementary material, freely available for secondary use by others. PMID

  13. Mitral valve repair: an echocardiographic review: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Echocardiographic imaging of the mitral valve before and immediately after repair is crucial to the immediate and long-term outcome. Prior to mitral valve repair, echocardiographic imaging helps determine the feasibility and method of repair. After the repair, echocardiographic imaging displays the new baseline anatomy, assesses function, and determines whether or not further management is necessary. Three-dimensional imaging has improved the assessment of the mitral valve and facilitates communication with the surgeon by providing the surgeon with an image that he/she might see upon opening up the atrium. Further advancements in imaging will continue to improve the understanding of the function and dysfunction of the mitral valve both before and after repair. This information will improve treatment options, timing of invasive therapies, and advancements of repair techniques to yield better short- and long-term patient outcomes. The purpose of this review was to connect the echocardiographic evaluation with the surgical procedure. Bridging the pre- and post-CPB imaging with the surgical procedure allows a greater understanding of mitral valve repair. PMID:25440616

  14. Vagus nerve stimulation during rehabilitative training enhances recovery of forelimb function after ischemic stroke in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Hays, Seth A; Ruiz, Andrea; Bethea, Thelma; Khodaparast, Navid; Carmel, Jason B; Rennaker, Robert L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2016-07-01

    Advanced age is associated with a higher incidence of stroke and worse functional outcomes. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) paired with rehabilitative training has emerged as a potential method to improve recovery after brain injury but to date has only been evaluated in young rats. Here, we evaluated whether VNS paired with rehabilitative training would improve recovery of forelimb function after ischemic lesion of the motor cortex in rats 18 months of age. Rats were trained to perform the isometric pull task, an automated, quantitative measure of volitional forelimb strength. Once proficient, rats received an ischemic lesion of the motor cortex and underwent rehabilitative training paired with VNS for 6 weeks. VNS paired with rehabilitative training significantly enhances recovery of forelimb function after lesion. Rehabilitative training without VNS results in a 34% ± 19% recovery, whereas VNS paired with rehabilitative training yields a 98% ± 8% recovery of prelesion of forelimb function. VNS does not significantly reduce lesion size. These findings demonstrate that VNS paired with rehabilitative training enhances motor recovery in aged subjects in a model of stroke and may suggest that VNS therapy may effectively translate to elderly stroke patients. PMID:27255820

  15. FREEDOM, SYNTAX, FAME and FUNCTIONALITY: the future of surgical revascularization in stable ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, T Bruce; Chen, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    At the age of nearly 50 years, the procedure of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) now has the most solid evidence supporting its role in revascularization for stable ischemic heart disease in its history. In what is a relatively infrequent occurrence in medicine, the results from large-scale observational database analyses are now aligned with and supported by data from recent randomized trials, providing important contemporary evidence in support of CABG. However, even with strong evidence, the changing landscape of revascularization for stable ischemic heart disease threatens to make this evidence irrelevant in deciding which patients should be referred for CABG in the future. How the procedure of CABG could be modified and optimized for incorporation into this new landscape is discussed in this article. PMID:24344664

  16. [Effect of cerebrum compositum preparation on functional state of the central nervous system in elderly patients with ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, S M; Lukach, O I

    2004-01-01

    The article presents the results obtained after having treated patients with ischemic stroke during a rehabilitation period with cerebrum compositum. It has been also studied its influence on psychoemotional condition, bioelectrical activity of brain and cerebral hemodynamics. The results of the conducted trial prove cerebrum compositum remedy to have a harmonious influence on bioelectrical activity of brain and cerebral hemodynamics as well as it improves psychological state, alleviates anxiety and enhances initiative and physical activity of the treated patients. Positive complex influence on functional state of central nervous system of the medication ensure us to recommend cerebrum compositum during rehabilitation of patients having stroke positive anamnesis. PMID:15605833

  17. Measurement of mitral valve area in mitral stenosis by Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Robson, D J; Rodman, M; Flaxman, J C; Mayhew, F A

    1985-09-01

    The mitral valve area in mitral stenosis was determined from Doppler velocity recordings and by cross-sectional echocardiography. There was good agreement (r = 0.93) between the two methods in 18 adult patients with mitral stenosis. The results confirm that the non-invasive continuous wave Doppler ultrasound technique is of diagnostic value in the assessment of mitral stenosis. PMID:4076215

  18. Implantation of personalized, biocompatible mitral annuloplasty rings: feasibility study in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Sündermann, Simon H.; Gessat, Michael; Cesarovic, Nikola; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Biaggi, Patric; Bettex, Dominique; Falk, Volkmar; Jacobs, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Implantation of an annuloplasty ring is an essential component of a durable mitral valve repair. Currently available off-the-shelf rings still do not cover all the variations in mitral annulus anatomy and pathology from subject to subject. Computed tomography (CT) and echo imaging allow for 3-D segmentation of the mitral valve and mitral annulus. The concept of tailored annuloplasty rings has been proposed although, to date, no surgically applicable implementation of patient-specific annuloplasty rings has been seen. The objective of this trial was to prove the concept of surgical implantation of a model-guided, personalized mitral annuloplasty ring, manufactured based on individual CT-scan models. METHODS ECG-gated CT angiography was performed in six healthy pigs under general anaesthesia. Based on the individual shape of the mitral annulus in systole, a customized solid ring with integrated suturing holes was designed and manufactured from a biocompatible titanium alloy by a rapid process using laser melting. The ring was implanted three days later and valve function was assessed by intraoperative echocardiography. The macroscopic annulus–annuloplasty match was assessed after heart explantation. RESULTS CT angiography provided good enough image quality in all animals to allow for segmentation of the mitral annulus. The individually tailored mitral rings were manufactured and successfully implanted in all pigs. In 50%, a perfect matching of the implanted ring and the mitral annulus was achieved. In one animal, a slight deviation of the ring shape from the circumference was seen postoperatively. The rings implanted in the first two animals were significantly oversized but the deviation did not affect valve competence. CONCLUSIONS CT image quality and accuracy of the dimensions of the mitral annulus were sufficient for digital modelling and rapid manufacturing of mitral rings. Implantation of individually tailored annuloplasty rings is feasible. PMID

  19. Dynamics of mitral regurgitation during nitroglycerin therapy: a Doppler echocardiographic study.

    PubMed

    Keren, G; Bier, A; Strom, J A; Laniado, S; Sonnenblick, E H; LeJemtel, T H

    1986-09-01

    Seven patients with decompensated chronic heart failure and functional mitral regurgitation were studied before and during administration of nitroglycerin at a mean dose of 42 micrograms/min (range 20 to 90 micrograms/min). Forward aortic flow obtained by pulsed Doppler increased significantly from 35 +/- 8 to 45 +/- 9 ml/beat (p less than 0.001) and correlated well with the cardiac output measured by thermodilution technique (r = 0.8). Whereas regurgitant mitral volume calculated from the difference between echocardiographic total stroke volume and forward aortic flow decreased significantly from 19 +/- 9 to 3 +/- 3 ml/beat (p less than 0.001), peak velocity of mitral regurgitant flow increased from 4.1 +/- 0.9 to 4.4 +/- 1.0 m/sec (p less than 0.05). The decrease in effective mitral regurgitation area derived from a modified Gorlin formula average 80%. Accordingly, in patients with decompensated chronic heart failure and functional mitral regurgitation, nitroglycerin decreases mitral regurgitant area substantially, and thus almost abolishes mitral regurgitation despite an increase in systolic pressure gradient between left ventricle and atrium. Moreover, the increase in forward flow can be entirely accounted for by the reduction in mitral regurgitant flow. PMID:3092608

  20. Update on percutaneous mitral commissurotomy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Nascimento, Bruno Ramos; Lodi-Junqueira, Lucas; Tan, Timothy C; Athayde, Guilherme Rafael Sant'Anna; Hung, Judy

    2016-04-01

    Percutaneous mitral commissurotomy (PMC) is the first-line therapy for managing rheumatic mitral stenosis. Over the past two decades, the indications of the procedure have expanded to include patients with unfavourable valve anatomy as a consequence of epidemiological changes in patient population. The procedure is increasingly being performed in patients with increased age, more deformed valves and associated comorbidities. Echocardiography plays a crucial role in patient selection and to guide a more efficient procedure. The main echocardiographic predictors of immediate results after PMC are mitral valve area, subvalvular thickening and valve calcification, especially at the commissural level. However, procedural success rate is not only dependent on valve anatomy, but a number of other factors including patient characteristics, interventional management strategies and operator expertise. Severe mitral regurgitation continues to be the most common immediate procedural complication with unchanged incidence rates over time. The long-term outcome after PMC is mainly determined by the immediate procedural results. Postprocedural parameters associated with late adverse events include mitral valve area, mitral regurgitation severity, mean gradient and pulmonary artery pressure. Mitral restenosis is an important predictor of event-free survival rates after successful PMC, and repeat procedure can be considered in cases with commissural refusion. PMC can be performed in special situations, which include high-risk patients, during pregnancy and in the presence of left atrial thrombus, especially in centres with specialised expertise. Therefore, procedural decision-making should take into account the several determinant factors of PMC outcomes. This paper provides an overview and update of PMC techniques, complications, immediate and long-term results over time, and assessment of suitability for the procedure. PMID:26743926

  1. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  2. Emergency mitral valve replacement for traumatic mitral insufficiency following balloon mitral valvotomy: an early haemodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Tempe, D K; Mehta, N; Mohan, J C; Tandon, M S; Nigam, M

    1998-07-01

    Acute severe mitral insufficiency may occur during percutaneous transvenous balloon mitarl valvotomy. Urgent surgical intervention in the form of mitral valve repair or replacement may be necessary in these patients. The haemodynamic measurements at various stages in these patients were obtained and compared with those of patients undergoing elective mitral valve replacement for chronic mitral regurgitation. Between September 1995 and December 1947, urgent mitral valve replacement was performed in 14 patients out of a total of 1688 patients who underwent balloon mitral valvotomy. Haemodynamic measurements could be obtained in 7 of these patients and they constituted group I. Eight other patients undergoing elective mitral valve replacement during the same period for chronic mitral regurgitation constituted group II. Standard haemodynamic measurements were obtained at the following stages: (1) Baseline- 20-30 min after endotracheal intubation; (2) stage 1- 20-30 min after termination of the cardiopulmonary bypass: (3) stage 2- four hours after the patient was transferred to ICU and (4) stage 3-30 min after extubation. All the patients were suffering from severe pulmonary hypertension. However, the indices of pulmonary artery hypertension such as mean pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance as well as right ventricular systolic and end-diastolic pressures did not decrease after surgery in group I. In contrast, in group II, there was significant decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure (p<0.05), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (p<0.05), right ventricular systolic (p<0.001) and end-diastolic pressures (p<0.05) at stage 1. These changes persisted throughout the study period. Pulmonary vascular resistance showed a decreasing trend, but attained statistical significance at stage 1 only. Two patients died; one of intractable cardiac failure and another from septicaemia and multiple organ failure in group I, but

  3. Genetic association analyses highlight biological pathways underlying mitral valve prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Dina, Christian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Tucker, Nathan; Delling, Francesca N.; Toomer, Katelynn; Durst, Ronen; Perrocheau, Maelle; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Solis, Jorge; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Chen, Ming-Huei; Probst, Vincent; Bosse, Yohan; Pibarot, Philippe; Zelenika, Diana; Lathrop, Mark; Hercberg, Serge; Roussel, Ronan; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bonnet, Fabrice; Su Hao, LO; Dolmatova, Elena; Simonet, Floriane; Lecointe, Simon; Kyndt, Florence; Redon, Richard; Le Marec, Hervé; Froguel, Philippe; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Bruneval, Patrick; Norris, Russell A.; Milan, David J.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Levine, Robert A.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Hagege, Albert A.; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Non-syndromic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common degenerative cardiac valvulopathy of unknown aetiology that predisposes to mitral regurgitation, heart failure and sudden death1. Previous family and pathophysiological studies suggest a complex pattern of inheritance2–5. We performed a meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies in 1,442 cases and 2,439 controls. We identified and replicated in 1,422 cases and 6,779 controls six loci and provide functional evidence for candidate genes. We highlight LMCD1 encoding a transcription factor6, for which morpholino knockdown in zebrafish results in atrioventricular (AV) valve regurgitation. A similar zebrafish phenotype was obtained for tensin1 (TNS1), a focal adhesion protein involved in cytoskeleton organization. We also show the expression of tensin1 during valve morphogenesis and describe enlarged posterior mitral leaflets in Tns1−/− mice. This study identifies the first risk loci for MVP and suggests new mechanisms involved in mitral valve regurgitation, the most common indication for mitral valve repair7. PMID:26301497

  4. Genetic association analyses highlight biological pathways underlying mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Dina, Christian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Tucker, Nathan; Delling, Francesca N; Toomer, Katelynn; Durst, Ronen; Perrocheau, Maelle; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Solis, Jorge; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Chen, Ming-Huei; Probst, Vincent; Bosse, Yohan; Pibarot, Philippe; Zelenika, Diana; Lathrop, Mark; Hercberg, Serge; Roussel, Ronan; Benjamin, Emelia J; Bonnet, Fabrice; Lo, Su Hao; Dolmatova, Elena; Simonet, Floriane; Lecointe, Simon; Kyndt, Florence; Redon, Richard; Le Marec, Hervé; Froguel, Philippe; Ellinor, Patrick T; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Bruneval, Patrick; Markwald, Roger R; Norris, Russell A; Milan, David J; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Levine, Robert A; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Hagege, Albert A; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Nonsyndromic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common degenerative cardiac valvulopathy of unknown etiology that predisposes to mitral regurgitation, heart failure and sudden death. Previous family and pathophysiological studies suggest a complex pattern of inheritance. We performed a meta-analysis of 2 genome-wide association studies in 1,412 MVP cases and 2,439 controls. We identified 6 loci, which we replicated in 1,422 cases and 6,779 controls, and provide functional evidence for candidate genes. We highlight LMCD1 (LIM and cysteine-rich domains 1), which encodes a transcription factor and for which morpholino knockdown of the ortholog in zebrafish resulted in atrioventricular valve regurgitation. A similar zebrafish phenotype was obtained with knockdown of the ortholog of TNS1, which encodes tensin 1, a focal adhesion protein involved in cytoskeleton organization. We also showed expression of tensin 1 during valve morphogenesis and describe enlarged posterior mitral leaflets in Tns1(-/-) mice. This study identifies the first risk loci for MVP and suggests new mechanisms involved in mitral valve regurgitation, the most common indication for mitral valve repair. PMID:26301497

  5. [Fibrinolytic therapy in thrombosis of a mitral valve prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Viedt, C; Mereles, D; Kübler, W; Kreuzer, J

    2000-08-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented with progressive dyspnea due to thrombosis of a mitral valve prosthesis. The patient had undergone mitral valve replacement (St. Jude Medical) six years prior to admission because of mitral stenosis (Class III); three years later the prosthesis had to be replaced (St. Jude Medical) because of valve thrombosis. At admission, transesophageal echocardiography showed a thrombus on the atrial side of the fixed valve leaflet and a thrombus (2.4 x 1.6 cm) floating from the left atrial roof. Because of the previous thoracotomies, thrombolysis was initiated despite the mobile thrombus with the attendant risk of embolization. Urokinase was infused in a dose to maintain the fibrinogen level around 100 mg/dl. After 24 h, the mean pressure gradient across the prosthetic mitral valve (measured by doppler echocardiography) had decreased from 23 to 11 mmHg. After 13 days of this modified thrombolytic regimen, the clinical symptoms of the patient had resolved and echocardiography showed a normal function of the prosthetic mitral valve without evidence of residual thrombosis. This patient demonstrates that prolonged cautious thrombolysis can be effective for the treatment of prosthetic valve thrombosis in hemodynamically moderately compromised patients. PMID:11013975

  6. Current challenges in interventional mitral valve treatment

    PubMed Central

    Candreva, Alessandro; Pozzoli, Alberto; Guidotti, Andrea; Gaemperli, Oliver; Nietlispach, Fabian; Barthelmes, Jens; Emmert, Maximilian Y.; Weber, Alberto; Benussi, Stefano; Alfieri, Ottavio; Maisano, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter mitral valve therapies have emerged as an alternative option in high surgical risk or inoperable patients with severe and symptomatic mitral regurgitation (MR). As multiple technologies and different approaches will become available in the field of mitral valve interventions, different challenges are emerging, both patient- (clinical challenges) and procedure-related (technical challenges). This review will briefly explore the current open challenges in the evolving fields of interventional mitral valve treatment. PMID:26543599

  7. Modified Surgical Intervention for Extensive Mitral Valve Endocarditis and Posterior Mitral Annular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gwan Sic; Beom, Min Sun; Kim, Sung Ryong; Kim, Na Rae; Jang, Ji Wook; Jang, Mi Hee; Ryu, Sang Wan

    2016-01-01

    The concomitant presence of posterior mitral annular calcification and infectious mitral valve lesions poses a technical challenge with considerable perioperative risk when using previously proposed techniques for mitral valve surgery. Herein, we report a case of the use of a modified surgical technique to successfully treat a patient with mitral infective endocarditis complicated by a subendocardial abscess and extensive posterior mitral annular calcification. PMID:26889447

  8. Ecocardiografía tridimensional. Nuevas perspectivas sobre la caracterización de la válvula mitral

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Jorge; Sitges, Marta; Levine, Robert A.; Hung, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in three-dimensional echocardiography have made it possible to obtain images in real time, without the need for off-line reconstruction. These developments have enabled the technique to become an important tool for both research and daily clinical practice. A substantial proportion of the studies carried out using three-dimensional echocardiography have focused on the mitral valve, the pathophysiology of mitral valve disease and, in particular, functional mitral regurgitation. The aims of this article were to review the contribution of three-dimensional echocardiography to understanding of the functional anatomy of the mitral valve and to summarize the resulting clinical applications and therapeutic implications. PMID:19232192

  9. The effects of delayed reduction of tonic inhibition on ischemic lesion and sensorimotor function.

    PubMed

    Lake, Evelyn M R; Chaudhuri, Joydeep; Thomason, Lynsie; Janik, Rafal; Ganguly, Milan; Brown, Mary; McLaurin, JoAnne; Corbett, Dale; Stanisz, Greg J; Stefanovic, Bojana

    2015-10-01

    To aid in development of chronic stage treatments for sensorimotor deficits induced by ischemic stroke, we investigated the effects of GABA antagonism on brain structure and fine skilled reaching in a rat model of focal ischemia induced via cortical microinjections of endothelin-1 (ET-1). Beginning 7 days after stroke, animals were administered a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) inverse agonist, L-655,708, at a dose low enough to afford α5-GABAA receptor specificity. A week after stroke, the ischemic lesion comprised a small hypointense necrotic core (6±1 mm(3)) surrounded by a large (62±11 mm(3)) hyperintense perilesional region; the skilled reaching ability on the Montoya staircase test was decreased to 34%±2% of the animals' prestroke performance level. On L-655,708 treatment, animals showed a progressive decrease in total stroke volume (13±4 mm(3) per week), with no change in animals receiving placebo. Concomitantly, treated animals' skilled reaching progressively improved by 9%±1% per week, so that after 2 weeks of treatment, these animals performed at 65%±6% of their baseline ability, which was 25%±11% better than animals given placebo. These data indicate beneficial effects of delayed, sustained low-dose GABAA antagonism on neuroanatomic injury and skilled reaching in the chronic stage of stroke recovery in an ET-1 rat model of focal ischemia. PMID:25966952

  10. Copolymer-1 Promotes Neurogenesis and Improves Functional Recovery after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Yolanda; Lorea, Jonathan; Mestre, Humberto; Kim-Lee, Jennifer Hyuna; Herrera, Judith; Mellado, Raúl; Gálvez, Vanesa; Cuellar, Leopoldo; Musri, Carolina; Ibarra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stroke triggers a systemic inflammatory response that exacerbates the initial injury. Immunizing with peptides derived from CNS proteins can stimulate protective autoimmunity (PA). The most renowned of these peptides is copolymer-1 (Cop-1) also known as glatiramer acetate. This peptide has been approved for use in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Cop-1-specific T cells cross the blood-brain barrier and secrete neurotrophins and anti-inflammatory cytokines that could stimulate proliferation of neural precursor cells and recruit them to the injury site; making it an ideal therapy for acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of Cop-1 on neurogenesis and neurological recovery during the acute phase (7 days) and the chronic phase of stroke (60 days) in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). BDNF and NT-3 were quantified and infarct volumes were measured. We demonstrated that Cop-1 improves neurological deficit, enhances neurogenesis (at 7 and 60 days) in the SVZ, SGZ, and cerebral cortex through an increase in NT-3 production. It also decreased infarct volume even at the chronic phase of tMCAo. The present manuscript fortifies the support for the use of Cop-1 in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25821957

  11. Copolymer-1 promotes neurogenesis and improves functional recovery after acute ischemic stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Yolanda; Lorea, Jonathan; Mestre, Humberto; Kim-Lee, Jennifer Hyuna; Herrera, Judith; Mellado, Raúl; Gálvez, Vanesa; Cuellar, Leopoldo; Musri, Carolina; Ibarra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stroke triggers a systemic inflammatory response that exacerbates the initial injury. Immunizing with peptides derived from CNS proteins can stimulate protective autoimmunity (PA). The most renowned of these peptides is copolymer-1 (Cop-1) also known as glatiramer acetate. This peptide has been approved for use in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Cop-1-specific T cells cross the blood-brain barrier and secrete neurotrophins and anti-inflammatory cytokines that could stimulate proliferation of neural precursor cells and recruit them to the injury site; making it an ideal therapy for acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of Cop-1 on neurogenesis and neurological recovery during the acute phase (7 days) and the chronic phase of stroke (60 days) in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). BDNF and NT-3 were quantified and infarct volumes were measured. We demonstrated that Cop-1 improves neurological deficit, enhances neurogenesis (at 7 and 60 days) in the SVZ, SGZ, and cerebral cortex through an increase in NT-3 production. It also decreased infarct volume even at the chronic phase of tMCAo. The present manuscript fortifies the support for the use of Cop-1 in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25821957

  12. [Early bioprosthetic mitral valve thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Tkaczyszyn, Michał; Olbrycht, Tomasz; Kustrzycka Kratochwil, Dorota; Sokolski, Mateusz; Sukiennik Kujawa, Małgorzata; Skiba, Jacek; Gemel, Marek; Banasiak, Waldemar; Jankowska, Ewa A; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of a 70 year-old woman operated due to severe mitral regurgitation. Early after surgery transthoracic echocardiography revealed the decreased effective orifice area of the implanted bioprosthetic valve and the stenotic features of transvalvular flow. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) disclosed a thrombotic cause of heterograft dysfunction. Due to the clinical deterioration and the unclear cause of prosthesis stenosis, the patient was reoperated. Intra-operatively bioprosthetic mitral valve thrombosis was confirmed. Precipitating factors of this rare complication including cardiac device related infective endocarditis (CDRIE) and the diagnostic applicability of TEE in this clinical scenario are discussed. PMID:22427084

  13. Effect of Transcatheter Mitral Annuloplasty With the Cardioband Device on 3-Dimensional Geometry of the Mitral Annulus.

    PubMed

    Arsalan, Mani; Agricola, Eustachio; Alfieri, Ottavio; Baldus, Stephan; Colombo, Antonio; Filardo, Giovanni; Hammerstingl, Christophe; Huntgeburth, Michael; Kreidel, Felix; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; LaCanna, Giovanni; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Maisano, Francesco; Nickenig, Georg; Pollock, Benjamin D; Roberts, Bradley J; Vahanian, Alec; Grayburn, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    This study was performed to assess the acute intraprocedural effects of transcatheter direct mitral annuloplasty using the Cardioband device on 3-dimensional (3D) anatomy of the mitral annulus. Of 45 patients with functional mitral regurgitation (MR) enrolled in a single arm, multicenter, prospective trial, 22 had complete pre- and post-implant 3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) images stored in native data format that allowed off-line 3D reconstruction. Images with the highest volume rate and best image quality were selected for analysis. Multiple measurements of annular geometry were compared from baseline to post-implant using paired t tests with Bonferroni correction to account for multiple comparisons. The device was successfully implanted in all patients, and MR was reduced to moderate in 2 patients, mild in 17 patients, and trace in 3 patients after final device cinching. Compared with preprocedural TEE, postprocedural TEE showed statistically significantly reductions in annular circumference (137 ± 15 vs 128 ± 17 mm; p = 0.042), intercommissural distance (42.4 ± 4.3 vs 38.6 ± 4.4 mm; p = 0.029), anteroposterior distance (40.0 ± 5.4 vs 37.0 ± 5.7 mm; p = 0.025), and aortic-mitral angle (117 ± 8° vs 112 ± 8°; p = 0.032). This study demonstrates that transcatheter direct mitral annuloplasty with the Cardioband device results in acute remodeling of the mitral annulus with successful reduction of functional MR. PMID:27389565

  14. Development of mitral stenosis after single MitraClip insertion for severe mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, James; Fragkou, Paraskevi; Hildick-Smith, David

    2014-02-01

    We report the first case of mitral stenosis following Mitra-Clip insertion in a patient with symptomatic NYHA IV heart failure, secondary to severe mitral regurgitation (MR). A 79-year-old female with a history of prior aortic valve replacement underwent percutaneous mitral valve (MV) repair. A single clip was advanced coaxially down onto the MV under TOE guidance, with the anterior and posterior leaflets clipped together between A2 and P2. TOE confirmed a significant reduction in MR (grade 4 to grade 1). Despite initial symptomatic relief, she represented 3 months later with similar symptoms. Repeat TOE confirmed a well positioned Mitra-Clip with mild residual MR. However, the possibility of significant mitral stenosis was raised due to the presence of significant turbulence through the bi-orifice valve, with a peak gradient of 25 mm Hg. In addition there was evidence of severe functional tricuspid valve (TV) regurgitation with elevated pulmonary artery pressures (PAP 90 mm Hg), confirmed on subsequent right heart catheterization. After repeated heart team discussions and a failure of optimal medical therapy, and despite a logistic EuroScore of 35.5, minimally invasive surgical replacement of the MV and simultaneous TV repair was undertaken via a right thoracotomy. Despite procedural success and initial good postoperative response, the patient died subsequently from a combination of hospital-acquired pneumonia and significant gastrointestinal bleeding (post operative day 35). Mitra-Clip is a promising novel approach to MV repair. The establishment of further clinical and echocardiographic based selection criteria will help identify the correct patients for this treatment. PMID:23703973

  15. A Review of Mitral Isthmus Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin CK; Betts, Timothy R

    2012-01-01

    Mitral isthmus ablation forms part of the electrophysiologist’s armoury in the catheter ablation treatment of atrial fibrillation. It is well recognised however, that mitral isthmus ablation is technically challenging and incomplete ablation may be pro-arrhythmic, leading some to question its role. This article first reviews the evidence for the use of adjunctive mitral isthmus ablation and its association with the development of macroreentrant perimitral flutter. It then describes the practical techniques of mitral isthmus ablation, with particular emphasis on the assessment of bi-directional mitral isthmus block. The anatomy of the mitral isthmus is also discussed in order to understand the possible obstacles to successful ablation. Finally, novel techniques which may facilitate mitral isthmus ablation are reviewed. PMID:22912536

  16. Rare Case of Unileaflet Mitral Valve

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarun; Shah, Sunay; Mawri, Sagger; Ananthasubramaniam, Karthikeyan

    2016-01-01

    Unileaflet mitral valve is the rarest of the congenital mitral valve anomalies and is usually life threatening in infancy due to severe mitral regurgitation (MR). In most asymptomatic individuals, it is mostly due to hypoplastic posterior mitral leaflet. We present a 22-year-old male with palpitations, who was found to have an echocardiogram revealing an elongated anterior mitral valve leaflet with severely hypoplastic posterior mitral valve leaflet appearing as a unileaflet mitral valve without MR. Our case is one of the 11 reported cases in the literature so far. We hereby review those cases and conclude that these patients are likely to be at risk of developing worsening MR later in their lives. PMID:27358711

  17. Glial growth factor 2 promotes functional recovery with treatment initiated up to 7 days after permanent focal ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Iaci, Jennifer F; Ganguly, Anindita; Finklestein, Seth P; Parry, Tom J; Ren, Jingmei; Saha, Subhash; Sietsma, Dana K; Srinivas, Maya; Vecchione, Andrea M; Caggiano, Anthony O

    2010-12-01

    Neuregulins are a family of growth factors essential for normal cardiac and nervous system development. The EGF-like domain of neuregulins contains the active site which binds and activates signaling cascades through ErbB receptors. A neuregulin-1 gene EGF-like fragment demonstrated neuroprotection in the transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model and drastically reduced infarct volume (Xu et al., 2004). Here we use a permanent MCAO rat model to initially compare two products of the neuregulin-1 gene and also assess levels of recovery with acute versus delayed time to treatment. In the initial study full-length glial growth factor 2 (GGF2) and an EGF-like domain fragment were compared with acute intravenous delivery. In a second study GGF2 only was delivered starting at 24h, 3 days or 7 days after permanent ischemia was induced. In both studies daily intravenous administration continued for 10 days. Recovery of neurological function was assessed using limb placing and body swing tests. GGF2 had similar functional improvements compared to the EGF-like domain fragment at equimolar doses, and a higher dose of GGF2 demonstrated more robust functional improvements compared to a lower dose. GGF2 improved sensorimotor recovery with all treatment paradigms, even enhancing recovery of function with a delay of 7 days to treatment. Histological assessments did not show any associated reduction in infarct volume at either 48 h or 21 days post-ischemic event. Neurorestorative effects of this kind are of great potential clinical importance, given the difficulty of delivering neuroprotective therapies within a short time after an ischemic event in human patients. If confirmed by additional work including additional data on mechanism(s) of improved outcome with verification in other stroke models, one can make a compelling case to bring GGF2 to clinical trials as a neurorestorative approach to improving outcome following stroke injury. PMID:20691195

  18. Evaluation and follow-up of cognitive functions in patients with minor stroke and transient ischemic attack

    PubMed Central

    Deniz, Çiğdem; Çelik, Yahya; Özdemir Gültekin, Tuğçe; Baran, Gozde Eryiğit; Deniz, Çağla; Asil, Talip

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose We aimed to examine the incidence of cognitive impairment among patients with stroke, the associated risk factors, progression of the cognitive impairment, and the association between the localization of the lesion(s) as detected by magnetic resonance imaging and the affected areas of cognitive function. Methods A total of 40 patients over 18 years of age enduring a transient ischemic stroke or minor stroke within the past 3 months who had a minimum life expectancy of 1 year were included in this study. Same number, age-, and sex-matched individuals were included as controls. Patients were inquired on the presence of risk factors for stroke. A series of neuropsychological test batteries were administered in patient and control subjects for assessing cognitive functions. These tests were readministered at 6 and 12 months of follow-up to assess the progression of cognitive functions. Results In this study among the patients with stroke, a significant impairment was seen in multiple cognitive functional tests following ischemic stroke as compared to control groups. The most common risk factors for stroke included hypertension (72.5%), hyperlipidemia, and cigarette smoking. The number of cognitive domains with an impairment was highest (in four cognitive tests) among those with coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation, followed by those who had a >50% stenosis in Doppler (three cognitive tests). These findings suggest that the frequency of risk factors associated with stroke does not correlate with the frequency of risk factors associated with cognitive dysfunction. The stroke localizations were classified among the patients with stroke and reviewed in accordance with cognitive impairment. Conclusion Neuropsychological tests, clinical findings, and imaging studies should be used to document the poststroke cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27578977

  19. Percutaneous transvenous mitral commissurotomy in juvenile mitral stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Malla, Rabi; Rajbhandari, Rajib; Shakya, Urmila; Sharma, Poonam; Shrestha, Nagma; KC, Bishal; Limbu, Deepak; KC, Man Bahadur

    2016-01-01

    Background Percutaneous transvenous mitral commissurotomy (PTMC) is a valid alternative to surgical therapy in selected patients with mitral stenosis. Juvenile mitral stenosis (JMS) varies uniquely from adult rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of PTMC in JMS patients. Methods It was a single centre, retrospective study conducted between July 2013 to June 2015 in Shahid Gangalal National Heart Centre, Kathmandu, Nepal. Medical records of all consecutive patients aged less than 21 years who underwent PTMC were included. Mitral valve area (MVA), left atrial pressure and mitral regurgitation (MR) were compared pre and post procedure. Results During the study period 131 JMS patients underwent PTMC. Seventy (53.4%) were female and 61 (46.6%) were male. Among the 131 patients, 40 (30.5%) patients were below the age of 15 years. Patient age ranged between 9 to 20 years with the mean of 16.3±2.9 years. Electrocardiography (ECG) findings were normal sinus rhythm in 115 (87.7%) patients and atrial fibrillation in 16 (12.3%) patients. Left atrial size ranged from 2.9 to 6.1 cm with the mean of 4.5±0.6 cm. The mean MVA increased from 0.8±0.1 cm2 to 1.6±0.2 following PTMC. Mean left atrial pressure decreased from their pre-PTMC state of 27.5±8.6 to 14.1±5.8 mmHg. Successful results were observed in 115 (87.7%) patients. Suboptimal MVA <1.5 cm2 in 11 (8.4%) patients and post-procedure MR of more than moderate MR in 5 (3.8%) patients was the reason for unsuccessful PTMC. Conclusions PTMC in JMS is safe and effective. PMID:26885488

  20. Functional rescue of experimental ischemic optic neuropathy with αB-crystallin

    PubMed Central

    Pangratz-Fuehrer, S; Kaur, K; Ousman, S S; Steinman, L; Liao, Y J

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) is an important cause of acute vision loss in adults, and there is no effective treatment. We studied early changes following experimental AION and tested the benefit of a potential treatment. Materials and Methods We induced experimental AION in adult mice and tested the effects of short-term (daily for 3 days) and long-term (every other day for 3 weeks) αB-crystallin (αBC) treatment using histological and serial intracranial flash visual evoked potential recordings. Results One day after experimental AION, there was swelling at the optic nerve (ON) head and increased expression of αBC, a small heat shock protein important in ischemia and inflammation. This upregulation coincided with microglial and astrocytic activation. Our hypothesis was that αBC may be part of the endogenous protective mechanism against injury, thus we tested the effects of αBC on experimental AION. Daily intraveneous or intravitreal αBC injections did not improve visual evoked potential amplitude or latency at days 1–2. However, αBC treatment decreased swelling and dampened the microglial and astrocytic activation on day 3. Longer treatment with intravenous αBC led to acceleration of visual evoked potential latency over 3 weeks, without improving amplitude. This latency acceleration did not correlate with increased retinal ganglion cell survival but did correlate with complete rescue of the ON oligodendrocytes, which are important for myelination. Conclusions We identified αBC as an early marker following experimental AION. Treatment with αBC enhanced this endogenous, post-ischemic response by decreasing microglial activation and promoting ON oligodendrocyte survival. PMID:21475310

  1. Association of the Ratio of Early Mitral Inflow Velocity to the Global Diastolic Strain Rate with a Rapid Renal Function Decline in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Wen-Hsien; Hsu, Po-Chao; Lee, Chee-Siong; Lee, Meng-Kuang; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Su, Ho-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The ratio of early mitral inflow velocity (E) to the global diastolic strain rate (E’sr) has been correlated with left ventricular filling pressure and predicts adverse cardiac outcomes in atrial fibrillation (AF). The relationship between the E/E’sr ratio and renal outcomes in AF has not been evaluated. This study examined the ability of the E/E’sr ratio in predicting progression to the renal endpoint, which is defined as a ≥ 25% decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients with AF. Comprehensive echocardiography was performed on 149 patients with persistent AF, and E’sr was assessed from three standard apical views using the index beat method. During a median follow-up period of 2.3 years, 63 patients (42.3%) were reaching the renal endpoint. Multivariate analysis showed that an increased E/E’sr ratio (per 10 cm) (hazard ratio, 1.230; 95% confidence interval, 1.088 to 1.391; p = 0.001) was associated with an increased renal endpoint. In a direct comparison, the E/E’sr ratio outperformed the ratio of E to early diastolic mitral annular velocity (E’) in predicting progression to the renal endpoint in both univariate and multivariate models (p ≤ 0.039). Moreover, adding the E/E’sr ratio to a clinical model and echocardiographic parameters provided an additional benefit in the prediction of progression to the renal endpoint (p = 0.006). The E/E’sr ratio is a useful parameter and is stronger than the E/E’ ratio in predicting the progression to the renal endpoint, and it may offer an additional prognostic benefit over conventional clinical and echocardiographic parameters in patients with AF. PMID:26820304

  2. Three-Directional Evaluation of Mitral Flow in the Rat Heart by Phase-Contrast Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Skårdal, Kristine; Espe, Emil KS; Zhang, Lili; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Sjaastad, Ivar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Determination of mitral flow is an important aspect in assessment of cardiac function. Traditionally, mitral flow is measured by Doppler echocardiography which suffers from several challenges, particularly related to the direction and the spatial inhomogeneity of flow. These challenges are especially prominent in rodents. The purpose of this study was to establish a cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) protocol for evaluation of three-directional mitral flow in a rodent model of cardiac disease. Materials and Methods Three-directional mitral flow were evaluated by phase contrast CMR (PC-CMR) in rats with aortic banding (AB) (N = 7) and sham-operated controls (N = 7). Peak mitral flow and deceleration rate from PC-CMR was compared to conventional Doppler echocardiography. The accuracy of PC-CMR was investigated by comparison of spatiotemporally integrated mitral flow with left ventricular stroke volume assessed by cine CMR. Results PC-CMR portrayed the spatial distribution of mitral flow and flow direction in the atrioventricular plane throughout diastole. Both PC-CMR and echocardiography demonstrated increased peak mitral flow velocity and higher deceleration rate in AB compared to sham. Comparison with cine CMR revealed that PC-CMR measured mitral flow with excellent accuracy. Echocardiography presented significantly lower values of flow compared to PC-CMR. Conclusions For the first time, we show that PC-CMR offers accurate evaluation of three-directional mitral blood flow in rodents. The method successfully detects alterations in the mitral flow pattern in response to cardiac disease and provides novel insight into the characteristics of mitral flow. PMID:26930073

  3. Mitral valve disease in pregnancy: outcomes and management

    PubMed Central

    Tsiaras, Sarah; Poppas, Athena

    2009-01-01

    Young women may have asymptomatic mitral valve disease which becomes unmasked during the haemodynamic stress of pregnancy. Rheumatic mitral stenosis is the most common cardiac disease found in women during pregnancy. The typical increased volume and heart rate of pregnancy are not well tolerated in patients with more than mild stenosis. Maternal complications of atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure can occur, and are increased in patients with poor functional class and severe pulmonary artery hypertension. Patients can be diagnosed by echocardiography and symptoms treated with beta-1 antagonists and cautious diuresis. Patients with heart failure unresponsive to treatment can undergo percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty. Labour and delivery goals include reducing tachycardia by adequate pain control and minimized volume shifts. Mitral valve regurgitation, even when severe, is usually very well tolerated in pregnancy as the increase in volume is offset by a decrease in vascular resistance. On the other hand, patients with left ventricular dysfunction, moderate pulmonary hypertension or NYHA functional class III-IV are at increased risk for heart failure and arrhythmias. They may need cautious diuresis and limitations on physical activity during pregnancy, as well as invasive haemodynamic monitoring for labour and delivery. Vaginal delivery is preferred and caesarean section reserved for obstetric indications.

  4. Dynamic simulation of chorded mitral valve in a left ventricle using an immersed boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaoyu; Yin, Min; Liang, Chunlei; Wang, Tiejun; Watton, Paul

    2007-11-01

    We use an immersed boundary model to investigate the dynamic behaviour of a chorded mitral prosthesis placed within a left ventricle under physiological flow conditions. In vivo magnetic resonance images of the left ventricle are used to create a numerical ventricle model. The motion of the ventricle model is prescribed during a cardiac cycle. Fluid-structure interaction simulations are carried out to test the performance of the mitral valve in a more realistic physiological environment. These simulations enable us to assess the effect of the ventricle motion, especially its flow vortex structure, on the function of the chorded mitral valve.

  5. Cardiac resynchronisation therapy after percutaneous trans-coronary-venous mitral annuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Siminiak, Tomasz; Jerzykowska, Olga; Kalmucki, Piotr; Link, Rafał; Baszko, Artur

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 45-year-old man with symptomatic heart failure and ischaemic functional mitral regurgitation (FMR), who underwent a successful percutaneous trans-coronary venous mitral annuloplasty with the Carillon system. The procedure resulted in clinical improvement as well as in a decrease in the degree of MR as assessed by echocardiography. Fifteen months later, the patient underwent cardiac resynchronisation (CRT) device implantation, resulting in a further improvement in echocardiographic measures of FMR. This case not only confirms the feasibility of CRT after percutaneous trans-coronary-venous mitral annuloplasty, but also suggests a possible synergistic effect of both therapies, warranting future clinical trials. PMID:24399586

  6. The Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Training on Cardiopulmonary Function in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy With Reduced Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect and safety of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) exercise in ischemic cardiomyopathy and to compare the results between patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and reduced LVEF. Methods Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy with LVEF <50% were included as subjects. The patients were classified into the preserved LVEF (pLVEF; LVEF 41%–49%) group and the reduced LVEF (rLVEF; LVEF ≤40%) group. Patients underwent hourly aerobic exercise training sessions with an intensity of 60%–85% of heart rate reserve, three times a week for 6 weeks. Graded exercise test and transthoracic echocardiogram were performed in all study patients before and after completion of the CR exercise program. Results After completion of the CR exercise program, both groups (pLVEF, n=30; rLVEF, n=18) showed significant increases in LVEF and VO2max. In the pLVEF group, LVEF and VO2max increased from 45.1%±4.8% to 52.5%±9.6% (p<0.001) and from 24.1±6.3 to 28.1±8.8 mL/kg/min (p=0.002), respectively. In the rLVEF group, LVEF and VO2max increased from 29.7%±7.7% to 37.6%±10.3% (p<0.001) and from 17.6±4.7 to 21.2±5.1 mL/kg/min (p<0.001), respectively. Both groups completed their exercise program safely. Conclusion In both groups, patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy who completed a 6-week supervised CR exercise program demonstrated remarkable improvements in cardiopulmonary function. This result implies that neither of the two groups showed higher efficacy in comparison to each other, but we can conclude that CR exercise in the rLVEF group was as effective and safe as that in the pLVEF group. PMID:27606271

  7. Antiatherogenic and Anti-Ischemic Properties of Traditional Chinese Medicine Xinkeshu via Endothelial Protecting Function

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xu; Jing-bo, Peng; Wen-tong, Zhang; Xin, Zhao; Tao-tao, Zhang; Shi-jun, Yang; Lei, Fang; Zhong-mei, Zou; Da-yong, Cai

    2012-01-01

    Including herbal medicine, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is popular worldwide. The traditional Chinese medicine xinkeshu has been widely used to treat coronary heart disease in China. This study was designed to investigate the protective effect and probable mechanism of xinkeshu tablet to atherosclerotic myocardial ischemia rabbit. Rabbits were divided into four groups (n = 12 each) and fed with different diet for 12 weeks: Control (standard diet), Model (high-cholesterol diet), XKS (high-cholesterol diet with 184.8 mg/kg/d xinkeshu), and Atorvastatin (high-cholesterol diet with 5.0 mg/kg/d atorvastatin). Plasma lipoprotein, ECG, endothelium-dependent vessel relaxation, histomorphological study, and expressions of eNOS and VCAM-1 on coronary arteries were assessed. The findings showed that, similar to atorvastatin, xinkeshu presented significant effects on rescuing endothelium-dependent vessel relaxation, inhibiting atherosclerotic progress, preventing myocardial ischemia, and changing eNOS and VCAM-1 expression. However, xinkeshu showed no lipoprotein lowering effect in hypercholesterolemia rabbits. The results of the present study indicated that xinkeshu exerted potent antiatherogenic and anti-ischemic properties on atherosclerotic myocardial ischemia rabbit. An endothelial protecting effect may be involved in the mechanism other than antihyperlipidemic effect. PMID:22007259

  8. Supravalvar Mitral Ring: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Baharestani, Bahador; Sadat Afjehi, Reza; Givtaj, Nader; Sharifi, Mehrzad

    2012-01-01

    Supravalvar mitral ring is a rare congenital heart defect of surgical importance. The condition is characterized by an abnormal ridge of the connective tissue on the atrial side of the mitral valve. It often substantially obstructs the mitral valve inflow. We herein introduce a case of a supravalvar mitral ring in a 17-year-old male, who was admitted to our hospital with cardiac syncope. He had undergone a cardiac operation for ventricular septal defect (VSD) closure and mitral valve repair 15 years before. Transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography, and finally cardiac catheterization revealed a neglected supravalvular mitral ring. The ring was resected in a second operation, and the patient was discharged from the hospital symptom free. PMID:23074643

  9. Early High-dosage Atorvastatin Treatment Improved Serum Immune-inflammatory Markers and Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Strokes Classified as Large Artery Atherosclerotic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Maida, Carlo; Arnao, Valentina; Corte, Vittoriano Della; Simonetta, Irene; Corpora, Francesca; Di Bona, Danilo; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Statins have beneficial effects on cerebral circulation and brain parenchyma during ischemic stroke and reperfusion. The primary hypothesis of this randomized parallel trial was that treatment with 80 mg/day of atorvastatin administered early at admission after acute atherosclerotic ischemic stroke could reduce serum levels of markers of immune-inflammatory activation of the acute phase and that this immune-inflammatory modulation could have a possible effect on prognosis of ischemic stroke evaluated by some outcome indicators. We enrolled 42 patients with acute ischemic stroke classified as large arteries atherosclerosis stroke (LAAS) randomly assigned in a randomized parallel trial to the following groups: Group A, 22 patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg (once-daily) from admission day until discharge; Group B, 20 patients not treated with atorvastatin 80 mg until discharge, and after discharge, treatment with atorvastatin has been started. At 72 hours and at 7 days after acute ischemic stroke, subjects of group A showed significantly lower plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, whereas no significant difference with regard to plasma levels of IL-10, E-Selectin, and P-Selectin was observed between the 2 groups. At 72 hours and 7 days after admission, stroke patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg in comparison with stroke subjects not treated with atorvastatin showed a significantly lower mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and modified Rankin scores. Our findings provide the first evidence that atorvastatin acutely administered immediately after an atherosclerotic ischemic stroke exerts a lowering effect on immune-inflammatory activation of the acute phase of stroke and that its early use is associated to a better functional and prognostic profile. PMID:27043681

  10. Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF)-I Modulates Endothelial Blood-Brain Barrier Function in Ischemic Middle-Aged Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Bake, Shameena; Okoreeh, Andre K; Alaniz, Robert C; Sohrabji, Farida

    2016-01-01

    In comparison with young females, middle-aged female rats sustain greater cerebral infarction and worse functional recovery after stroke. These poorer stroke outcomes in middle-aged females are associated with an age-related reduction in IGF-I levels. Poststroke IGF-I treatment decreases infarct volume in older females and lowers the expression of cytokines in the ischemic hemisphere. IGF-I also reduces transfer of Evans blue dye to the brain, suggesting that this peptide may also promote blood-brain barrier function. To test the hypothesis that IGF-I may act at the blood-brain barrier in ischemic stroke, 2 approaches were used. In the first approach, middle-aged female rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion and treated with IGF-I after reperfusion. Mononuclear cells from the ischemic hemisphere were stained for CD4 or triple-labeled for CD4/CD25/FoxP3 and subjected to flow analyses. Both cohorts of cells were significantly reduced in IGF-I-treated animals compared with those in vehicle controls. Reduced trafficking of immune cells to the ischemic site suggests that blood-brain barrier integrity is better maintained in IGF-I-treated animals. The second approach directly tested the effect of IGF-I on barrier function of aging endothelial cells. Accordingly, brain microvascular endothelial cells from middle-aged female rats were cultured ex vivo and subjected to ischemic conditions (oxygen-glucose deprivation). IGF-I treatment significantly reduced the transfer of fluorescently labeled BSA across the endothelial monolayer as well as cellular internalization of fluorescein isothiocyanate-BSA compared with those in vehicle-treated cultures, Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that IGF-I improves blood-brain barrier function in middle-aged females. PMID:26556536

  11. Sex Differences in Neuroanatomy of the Human Mirror Neuron System: Impact on Functional Recovery of Ischemic Hemiparetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Motaqhey, Monireh; Ghanjal, Ali; Mastri Farahani, Reza; Ghabaee, Mojdeh; Kaka, Gholamreza; Noroziyan, Mohsen; Fadaee Fathabadi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering the higher activity of mirror neuron system in females, they frequently have better performance in empathy, interpersonal sensitivity, and emotional recognition compared to males. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess whether gender difference in neuroanatomy of the human mirror neuron system has any impact on functional recovery of ischemic hemiparetic patients. Patients and Methods: This single-blind clinical trial was conducted on 24 patients with cerebrovascular accident (CVA) in the age range of 45 - 60 years, referring at a rehabilitation center in Tehran, Iran, during 2013 - 2014. Sampling method was stratified random sampling. The subjects were assigned to 2 groups of 12 males and 12 females. Then, each group was randomly divided into 2 groups (totally 4 groups, n = 6 for each group): women watching functional movies, control women, men watching functional movies, and control men. Movies were shown to patients and then, they were evaluated by Timed Up and Go (TUG), Six-minute walk test (SMW), Barthel index (BI), and Berg balance scale (BBS). Results: Comparison of all variables related to functional activities of all groups before and after watching movies revealed significant differences. The highest percentage of change and improvement was observed in groups 1 and 3 watching the functional movies (P = 0.0001). Percentage of improvement in women of groups 1 and 2 was higher than men in groups 3 and 4 (P = 0.0003). The changes in group of females watching the functional movies (group 1) were significantly greater than in other groups (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The Sex differences in the neuroanatomy of the human mirror neuron system affect functional recovery of patients with hemiparesis. The improvement in studied women was found to be significantly greater than studied men. The results indicate a higher chance of recovery among hemiparetic women, especially those watching functional movies. PMID:26430528

  12. Effect of physiological overload on pregnancy in women with mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Vera T M; Matsubara, Beatriz B; Magalhães, Claudia G; Peraçoli, Jose C; Rudge, Marilza V C

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to evaluate the structural and functional heart abnormalities in women with mitral regurgitation during pregnancy. INTRODUCTION: Women with mitral regurgitation progress well during pregnancy. However, the effects on the heart of the association between pregnancy and mitral regurgitation are not well established. METHODS: This is a case–control, longitudinal prospective study. Echocardiograms were performed in 18 women with mitral regurgitation at the 12th and 36th week of pregnancy and on the 45th day of the puerperium. Twelve age‐matched healthy and pregnant women were included as controls and underwent the same evaluation as the study group. RESULTS: Compared with controls, women with mitral regurgitation presented increased left cardiac chambers in all evaluations. Increasing left atrium during pregnancy occurred only in the mitral regurgitation group. At the end of the puerperium, women with mitral regurgitation showed persistent enlargement of the left atrium compared with the beginning of pregnancy (5.0 ± 1.1 cm vs 4.6 ± 0.9 cm; p<0.05). Reduced left ventricular relative wall thickness (0.13 ± 0.02 vs 0.16 ± 0.02; p<0.05) and an increased peak of afterload (278 ± 55 g/cm2 vs 207 ± 28 g/cm2; p<0.05) was still observed on the 45th day after delivery in the mitral regurgitation group compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnancy causes unfavorable structural alterations in women with mitral regurgitation that are associated with an aggravation of the hemodynamic overload. PMID:21437435

  13. Mechanics of the mitral valve strut chordae insertion region.

    PubMed

    Padala, Muralidhar; Sacks, Michael S; Liou, Shasan W; Balachandran, Kartik; He, Zhaoming; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2010-08-01

    Interest in developing durable mitral valve repair methods is growing, underscoring the need to better understand the native mitral valve mechanics. In this study, the authors investigate the dynamic deformation of the mitral valve strut chordae-to-anterior leaflet transition zone using a novel stretch mapping method and report the complex mechanics of this region for the first time. Eight structurally normal porcine mitral valves were studied in a pulsatile left heart simulator under physiological hemodynamic conditions -120 mm peak transvalvular pressure, 5 l/min cardiac output at 70 bpm. The chordal insertion region was marked with a structured array of 31 miniature markers, and their motions throughout the cardiac cycle were tracked using two high speed cameras. 3D marker coordinates were calculated using direct linear transformation, and a second order continuous surface was fit to the marker cloud at each time frame. Average areal stretch, principal stretch magnitudes and directions, and stretch rates were computed, and temporal changes in each parameter were mapped over the insertion region. Stretch distribution was heterogeneous over the entire strut chordae insertion region, with the highest magnitudes along the edges of the chordal insertion region and the least along the axis of the strut chordae. At early systole, radial stretch was predominant, but by mid systole, significant stretch was observed in both radial and circumferential directions. The compressive stretches measured during systole indicate a strong coupling between the two principal directions, explaining the small magnitude of the systolic areal stretch. This study for the first time provides the dynamic kinematics of the strut chordae insertion region in the functioning mitral valve. A heterogeneous stretch pattern was measured, with the mechanics of this region governed by the complex underlying collagen architecture. The insertion region seemed to be under stretch during both systole and

  14. Novel MRI-derived quantitative biomarker for cardiac function applied to classifying ischemic cardiomyopathy within a Bayesian rule learning framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Prahlad G.; Morris, Lailonny; Staines, Mara; Lima, Joao; Lee, Daniel C.; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi

    2014-03-01

    Characterization of regional left ventricular (LV) function may have application in prognosticating timely response and informing choice therapy in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. The purpose of this study is to characterize LV function through a systematic analysis of 4D (3D + time) endocardial motion over the cardiac cycle in an effort to define objective, clinically useful metrics of pathological remodeling and declining cardiac performance, using standard cardiac MRI data for two distinct patient cohorts accessed from CardiacAtlas.org: a) MESA - a cohort of asymptomatic patients; and b) DETERMINE - a cohort of symptomatic patients with a history of ischemic heart disease (IHD) or myocardial infarction. The LV endocardium was segmented and a signed phase-to-phase Hausdorff distance (HD) was computed at 3D uniformly spaced points tracked on segmented endocardial surface contours, over the cardiac cycle. An LV-averaged index of phase-to-phase endocardial displacement (P2PD) time-histories was computed at each tracked point, using the HD computed between consecutive cardiac phases. Average and standard deviation in P2PD over the cardiac cycle was used to prepare characteristic curves for the asymptomatic and IHD cohort. A novel biomarker of RMS error between mean patient-specific characteristic P2PD over the cardiac cycle for each individual patient and the cumulative P2PD characteristic of a cohort of asymptomatic patients was established as the RMS-P2PD marker. The novel RMS-P2PD marker was tested as a cardiac function based feature for automatic patient classification using a Bayesian Rule Learning (BRL) framework. The RMS-P2PD biomarker indices were significantly different for the symptomatic patient and asymptomatic control cohorts (p<0.001). BRL accurately classified 83.8% of patients correctly from the patient and control populations, with leave-one-out cross validation, using standard indices of LV ejection fraction (LV-EF) and LV end-systolic volume

  15. Effects of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy and Whole-Body Hypothermia on Neonatal Auditory Function: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mietzsch, Ulrike; Parikh, Nehal A.; Williams, Amber L.; Shankaran, Seetha; Lasky, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the effects of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and whole-body hypothermia therapy on auditory brain stem evoked responses (ABRs) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). We performed serial assessments of ABRs and DPOAEs in newborns with moderate or severe HIE, randomized to hypothermia (n = 4) or usual care (n = 5). Participants were five boys and four girls with mean gestational age (standard deviation) of 38.9 (1.8) weeks. During the first week of life, peripheral auditory function, as measured by the DPOAEs, was disrupted in all nine subjects. ABRs were delayed but central transmission was intact, suggesting a peripheral rather than a central neural insult. By 3 weeks of age, peripheral auditory function normalized. Hypothermia temporarily prolonged the ABR, more so for waves generated higher in the brain stem but the effects reversed quickly on rewarming. Neonatal audiometric testing is feasible, noninvasive, and capable of enhancing our understanding of the effects of HIE and hypothermia on auditory function. PMID:18720323

  16. Mitral Stenosis Presenting as Asthma.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenjing; Jbeli, Aiham; Stys, Maria; Stys, Adam

    2016-02-01

    Although wheezing is one of the most common symptoms and physical findings in asthma, other causes of wheezing should be kept in mind: vocal cord dysfunction, postnasal drip syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, and non-pulmonary diseases, like heart failure and pulmonary edema. Here, we present a case of severe mitral stenosis with pulmonary edema treated for resistant asthma. If asthma is difficult to control, other etiologies of wheezing, including cardiac disease, should be taken into consideration during diagnosis. PMID:26999914

  17. Activation of cerebral sodium-glucose transporter type 1 function mediated by post-ischemic hyperglycemia exacerbates the development of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Y; Ogihara, S; Harada, S; Tokuyama, S

    2015-12-01

    The regulation of post-ischemic hyperglycemia plays an important role in suppressing neuronal damage in therapeutic strategies for cerebral ischemia. We previously reported that the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT) was involved in the post-ischemic hyperglycemia-induced exacerbation of cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. Cortical SGLT-1, one of the cerebral SGLT isoforms, is dramatically increased by focal cerebral ischemia. In this study, we focused on the involvement of cerebral SGLT-1 in the development of cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. It was previously reported that activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) increases SGLT-1 expression. Moreover, ischemic stress-induced activation of AMPK exacerbates cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. Therefore, we directly confirmed the relationship between cerebral SGLT-1 and cerebral AMPK activation using in vitro primary culture of mouse cortical neurons. An in vivo mouse model of focal cerebral ischemia was generated using a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The development of infarct volume and behavioral abnormalities on day 3 after MCAO were ameliorated in cerebral SGLT-1 knock down mice. Cortical and striatal SGLT-1 expression levels were significantly increased at 12h after MCAO. Immunofluorescence revealed that SGLT-1 and the neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN) were co-localized in the cortex and striatum of MCAO mice. In the in vitro study, primary cortical neurons were cultured for five days before each treatment with reagents. Concomitant treatment with hydrogen peroxide and glucose induced the elevation of SGLT-1 and phosphorylated AMPK/AMPK ratio, and this elevation was suppressed by compound C, an AMPK inhibitor in primary cortical neurons. Moreover, compound C suppressed neuronal cell death induced by concomitant hydrogen peroxide/glucose treatment in primary cortical neurons. Therefore, we concluded that enhanced cerebral SGLT-1 function mediated by post-ischemic

  18. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  19. [Color Doppler identification of early diastolic turbulence in the left atrium in patients with mitral valve insufficiency: persistence of regurgitation or inertia phenomenon?].

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, G; Moro, E; Nicolosi, G L; Dall'Aglio, V; Mimo, R; Mangano, S; Zanuttini, D

    1990-08-01

    Color Doppler flow mapping represents the most recent non invasive diagnostic tool for the visualization of intracardiac blood flow. By using the color Doppler flow mapping technique, two independent observers identified the persistence of turbulence in early diastole inside the left atrium in a selected group of 8 patients (3 F and 5 M) with mitral insufficiency. All the patients had moderate or severe mitral insufficiency, due to dilated cardiomyopathy and/or ischemic cardiomyopathy and/or valvular disease. The persistence of early diastolic turbulence inside the left atrium was documented and confirmed by using 30 degrees color sector images, which show the highest possible frame rate. The frame by frame analysis facilitated the identification of two simultaneous flow velocities during early diastole, after the mitral valve was open. The first flow was anterograde and was coded as a red signal; it flowed from the mitral valve into the left ventricle and represented early diastolic left ventricular filling. The second flow was retrograde, and was coded as a blue mosaic signal, due to turbulent aliased jet, extending from the mitral valve into the left atrium, away from the transducer. The interpretation of these two dimensional color Doppler findings is uncertain. We believe, however, that these turbulent velocity signals which persist in early diastole and flow from the mitral valve into the left atrium are probably caused by inertial blood flow due to the impact of regurgitant mitral jets during the previous systole. PMID:2272415

  20. Prolonged Ischemic Time, Delayed Graft Function, and Graft and Patient Outcomes in Live Donor Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, A R; Wong, G; Chapman, J R; Coates, P T; Russ, G R; Pleass, H; Russell, C; He, B; Lim, W H

    2016-09-01

    The association between prolonged cold ischemic time (CIT) and graft and patient outcomes in live donor kidney transplant recipients remains unclear. The aims of this study were to examine the association of CIT with delayed graft function and graft loss in live donor kidney transplant recipients and those who participated in the Australian Paired Kidney Exchange program using data from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant (ANZDATA) registry. Of 3717 live donor transplant recipients between 1997 and 2012 who were followed for a median of 6.6 years (25 977 person-years), 224 (25%) experienced CIT >4-8 h. Donor age was an effect modifier between CIT and graft outcomes. In recipients who received kidneys from older donors aged >50 years, every hour of increase in CIT was associated with adjusted odds of 1.28 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07-1.53, p = 0.007) for delayed graft function, whereas CIT >4-8 h was associated with adjusted hazards of 1.93 (95% CI 1.21-3.09, p = 0.006) and 1.91 (95% CI 1.05-3.49, p = 0.035) for overall and death-censored graft loss, respectively, compared with CIT of 1-2 h. Attempts to reduce CIT in live donor kidney transplants involving older donor kidneys may lead to improvement of graft outcomes. PMID:27037866

  1. The effect of polymer degradation time on functional outcomes of temporary elastic patch support in ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Ryotaro; Hong, Yi; Takanari, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Kazuro L; Tobita, Kimimasa; Wagner, William R

    2013-10-01

    Biodegradable polyurethane patches have been applied as temporary mechanical supports to positively alter the remodeling and functional loss following myocardial infarction. How long such materials need to remain in place is unclear. Our objective was to compare the efficacy of porous onlay support patches made from one of three types of biodegradable polyurethane with relatively fast (poly(ester urethane)urea; PEUU), moderate (poly(ester carbonate urethane)urea; PECUU), and slow (poly(carbonate urethane)urea; PCUU) degradation rates in a rat model of ischemic cardiomyopathy. Microporous PEUU, PECUU or PCUU (n = 10 each) patches were implanted over left ventricular lesions 2 wk following myocardial infarction in rat hearts. Infarcted rats without patching and age-matched healthy rats (n = 10 each) were controls. Echocardiography was performed every 4 wk up to 16 wk, at which time hemodynamic and histological assessments were performed. The end-diastolic area for the PEUU group at 12 and 16 wk was significantly larger than for the PECUU or PCUU groups. Histological analysis demonstrated greater vascular density in the infarct region for the PECUU or PCUU versus PEUU group at 16 wk. Improved left ventricular contractility and diastolic performance in the PECUU group was observed at 16 wk compared to infarction controls. The results indicate that the degradation rate of an applied elastic patch influences the functional benefits associated patch placement, with a moderately slow degrading PECUU patch providing improved outcomes. PMID:23827185

  2. Severe mitral regurgitation due to anterior mitral leaflet perforation after surgical treatment of discrete subaortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ozyuksel, Arda; Yildirim, Ozgur; Onsel, Ibrahim; Bilal, Mehmet Salih

    2014-01-01

    Congenital subvalvular aortic stenosis may be associated with anomalies of the mitral valve. In this case, we present a patient with severe mitral valve regurgitation due to a perforation in the anterior mitral leaflet detected 4 months after an operation for relief of subaortic stenosis. A 10-year-old male patient who was operated for subvalvular aortic stenosis in another clinic was admitted to our hospital, and transthoracic echocardiography revealed severe mitral valve regurgitation due to a defect that was demonstrated at the anterior valve leaflet. The perforated area at the mitral valve zone A1 was repaired with a PTFE patch. The patient was successfully operated for the mitral valve perforation and the postoperative course was uneventful. In our case, the perforation in the anterior mitral leaflet implies a possible implementation of inappropriate surgical technique which necessitated a second surgical intervention after the initial operation. PMID:24859561

  3. Severe mitral regurgitation due to anterior mitral leaflet perforation after surgical treatment of discrete subaortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Ozyuksel, Arda; Yildirim, Ozgur; Onsel, Ibrahim; Bilal, Mehmet Salih

    2014-01-01

    Congenital subvalvular aortic stenosis may be associated with anomalies of the mitral valve. In this case, we present a patient with severe mitral valve regurgitation due to a perforation in the anterior mitral leaflet detected 4 months after an operation for relief of subaortic stenosis. A 10-year-old male patient who was operated for subvalvular aortic stenosis in another clinic was admitted to our hospital, and transthoracic echocardiography revealed severe mitral valve regurgitation due to a defect that was demonstrated at the anterior valve leaflet. The perforated area at the mitral valve zone A1 was repaired with a PTFE patch. The patient was successfully operated for the mitral valve perforation and the postoperative course was uneventful. In our case, the perforation in the anterior mitral leaflet implies a possible implementation of inappropriate surgical technique which necessitated a second surgical intervention after the initial operation. PMID:24859561

  4. Isolated parachute mitral valve in a 29 years old female; a case report.

    PubMed

    Toufan, Mehrnoush; Mahmoudi, Seyed Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year old female patient was referred to our hospital for evaluation of dyspnea NYHA class I which begun from several months ago. The only abnormal sign found on physical examination was a grade 2/6 systolic murmur at the apex position without radiation. Echocardiography revealed normal left and right ventricular sizes and systolic function, and only one papillary muscle in left ventricular (LV) cavity which all chordae tendineae inserted into that muscle. The mitral valve orifice was eccentrically located at the lateral side with mild to moderate mitral regurgitation but without significant mitral stenosis. No other congenital heart anomalies were identified. Thus, the final diagnosis was isolated parachute mitral valve (IPMV). She was one of the very rare IPMV cases have ever been reported in adults. PMID:27069567

  5. Isolated parachute mitral valve in a 29 years old female; a case report

    PubMed Central

    Toufan, Mehrnoush; Mahmoudi, Seyed Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year old female patient was referred to our hospital for evaluation of dyspnea NYHA class I which begun from several months ago. The only abnormal sign found on physical examination was a grade 2/6 systolic murmur at the apex position without radiation. Echocardiography revealed normal left and right ventricular sizes and systolic function, and only one papillary muscle in left ventricular (LV) cavity which all chordae tendineae inserted into that muscle. The mitral valve orifice was eccentrically located at the lateral side with mild to moderate mitral regurgitation but without significant mitral stenosis. No other congenital heart anomalies were identified. Thus, the final diagnosis was isolated parachute mitral valve (IPMV). She was one of the very rare IPMV cases have ever been reported in adults PMID:27069567

  6. Mitral valve disease—morphology and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Robert A.; Hagége, Albert A.; Judge, Daniel P.; Padala, Muralidhar; Dal-Bianco, Jacob P.; Aikawa, Elena; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Bischoff, Joyce; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Bruneval, Patrick; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Carpentier, Alain; Chaput, Miguel; Chester, Adrian H.; Clusel, Catherine; Delling, Francesca N.; Dietz, Harry C.; Dina, Christian; Durst, Ronen; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Jensen, Morten O.; Jeunemaitre, Xavier P.; Le Marec, Hervé; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Markwald, Roger R.; Mérot, Jean; Messas, Emmanuel; Milan, David P.; Neri, Tui; Norris, Russell A.; Peal, David; Perrocheau, Maelle; Probst, Vincent; Pucéat, Michael; Rosenthal, Nadia; Solis, Jorge; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Schwammenthal, Ehud; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Song, Jae-Kwan; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve disease is a frequent cause of heart failure and death. Emerging evidence indicates that the mitral valve is not a passive structure, but—even in adult life—remains dynamic and accessible for treatment. This concept motivates efforts to reduce the clinical progression of mitral valve disease through early detection and modification of underlying mechanisms. Discoveries of genetic mutations causing mitral valve elongation and prolapse have revealed that growth factor signalling and cell migration pathways are regulated by structural molecules in ways that can be modified to limit progression from developmental defects to valve degeneration with clinical complications. Mitral valve enlargement can determine left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and might be stimulated by potentially modifiable biological valvular–ventricular interactions. Mitral valve plasticity also allows adaptive growth in response to ventricular remodelling. However, adverse cellular and mechanobiological processes create relative leaflet deficiency in the ischaemic setting, leading to mitral regurgitation with increased heart failure and mortality. Our approach, which bridges clinicians and basic scientists, enables the correlation of observed disease with cellular and molecular mechanisms, leading to the discovery of new opportunities for improving the natural history of mitral valve disease. PMID:26483167

  7. Parachute deformity of the mitral valve

    PubMed Central

    Bett, J. H. N.; Stovin, P. G. I.

    1969-01-01

    A case of parachute deformity of the mitral valve, a rare congenital form of mitral stenosis characterized by insertion of the chordae tendineae into a single posterior papillary muscle, is described in an 11-year-old girl. The eleven other cases in the English literature are reviewed. Images PMID:5348334

  8. Anatomical challenges for transcatheter mitral valve intervention.

    PubMed

    DE Backer, Ole; Luk, Ngai H; Søndergaard, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Following the success of transcatheter aortic and pulmonary valve implantation, there is a large interest in transcatheter mitral valve interventions to treat severe mitral regurgitation (MR). With the exception for the MitraClipTM (Abbott, Abbott Park, IL, USA) edge-to-edge leaflet plication system, most of these transcatheter mitral valve interventions are still in their early clinical or preclinical development phase. Challenges arising from the complex anatomy of the mitral valve and the interplay of the mitral apparatus with the left ventricle (LV) have contributed to a more difficult development process and mixed clinical results with these novel technologies. This review aims to discuss the several anatomical aspects and challenges related to transcatheter mitral valve intervention - the relevant anatomy will be reviewed in relation to specific requirements for device design and procedural aspects of transcatheter mitral valve interventions. To date, experience with these novel therapeutic modalities are still limited and resolution of many challenges are pending. Future studies have to evaluate for whom the transcatheter approach is a feasible and preferred treatment and which patients will benefit from either transcatheter mitral valve repair or replacement. Nevertheless, technological developments are anticipated to drive the transcatheter approach forward into a clinically feasible alternative to surgery for selected patients with severe MR. PMID:27028333

  9. Mitral valve disease--morphology and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Levine, Robert A; Hagége, Albert A; Judge, Daniel P; Padala, Muralidhar; Dal-Bianco, Jacob P; Aikawa, Elena; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Bischoff, Joyce; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Bruneval, Patrick; Butcher, Jonathan T; Carpentier, Alain; Chaput, Miguel; Chester, Adrian H; Clusel, Catherine; Delling, Francesca N; Dietz, Harry C; Dina, Christian; Durst, Ronen; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Handschumacher, Mark D; Jensen, Morten O; Jeunemaitre, Xavier P; Le Marec, Hervé; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Markwald, Roger R; Mérot, Jean; Messas, Emmanuel; Milan, David P; Neri, Tui; Norris, Russell A; Peal, David; Perrocheau, Maelle; Probst, Vincent; Pucéat, Michael; Rosenthal, Nadia; Solis, Jorge; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Schwammenthal, Ehud; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Song, Jae-Kwan; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2015-12-01

    Mitral valve disease is a frequent cause of heart failure and death. Emerging evidence indicates that the mitral valve is not a passive structure, but--even in adult life--remains dynamic and accessible for treatment. This concept motivates efforts to reduce the clinical progression of mitral valve disease through early detection and modification of underlying mechanisms. Discoveries of genetic mutations causing mitral valve elongation and prolapse have revealed that growth factor signalling and cell migration pathways are regulated by structural molecules in ways that can be modified to limit progression from developmental defects to valve degeneration with clinical complications. Mitral valve enlargement can determine left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and might be stimulated by potentially modifiable biological valvular-ventricular interactions. Mitral valve plasticity also allows adaptive growth in response to ventricular remodelling. However, adverse cellular and mechanobiological processes create relative leaflet deficiency in the ischaemic setting, leading to mitral regurgitation with increased heart failure and mortality. Our approach, which bridges clinicians and basic scientists, enables the correlation of observed disease with cellular and molecular mechanisms, leading to the discovery of new opportunities for improving the natural history of mitral valve disease. PMID:26483167

  10. Perturbation of Brain Oscillations after Ischemic Stroke: A Potential Biomarker for Post-Stroke Function and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rabiller, Gratianne; He, Ji-Wei; Nishijima, Yasuo; Wong, Aaron; Liu, Jialing

    2015-01-01

    Brain waves resonate from the generators of electrical current and propagate across brain regions with oscillation frequencies ranging from 0.05 to 500 Hz. The commonly observed oscillatory waves recorded by an electroencephalogram (EEG) in normal adult humans can be grouped into five main categories according to the frequency and amplitude, namely δ (1-4 Hz, 20-200 μV), θ (4-8 Hz, 10 μV), α (8-12 Hz, 20-200 μV), β (12-30 Hz, 5-10 μV), and γ (30-80 Hz, low amplitude). Emerging evidence from experimental and human studies suggests that groups of function and behavior seem to be specifically associated with the presence of each oscillation band, although the complex relationship between oscillation frequency and function, as well as the interaction between brain oscillations, are far from clear. Changes of brain oscillation patterns have long been implicated in the diseases of the central nervous system including ischemic stroke, in which the reduction of cerebral blood flow as well as the progression of tissue damage have direct spatiotemporal effects on the power of several oscillatory bands and their interactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge in behavior and function associated with each brain oscillation, and also in the specific changes in brain electrical activities that correspond to the molecular events and functional alterations observed after experimental and human stroke. We provide the basis of the generations of brain oscillations and potential cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying stroke-induced perturbation. We will also discuss the implications of using brain oscillation patterns as biomarkers for the prediction of stroke outcome and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26516838

  11. Perturbation of Brain Oscillations after Ischemic Stroke: A Potential Biomarker for Post-Stroke Function and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rabiller, Gratianne; He, Ji-Wei; Nishijima, Yasuo; Wong, Aaron; Liu, Jialing

    2015-01-01

    Brain waves resonate from the generators of electrical current and propagate across brain regions with oscillation frequencies ranging from 0.05 to 500 Hz. The commonly observed oscillatory waves recorded by an electroencephalogram (EEG) in normal adult humans can be grouped into five main categories according to the frequency and amplitude, namely δ (1–4 Hz, 20–200 μV), θ (4–8 Hz, 10 μV), α (8–12 Hz, 20–200 μV), β (12–30 Hz, 5–10 μV), and γ (30–80 Hz, low amplitude). Emerging evidence from experimental and human studies suggests that groups of function and behavior seem to be specifically associated with the presence of each oscillation band, although the complex relationship between oscillation frequency and function, as well as the interaction between brain oscillations, are far from clear. Changes of brain oscillation patterns have long been implicated in the diseases of the central nervous system including ischemic stroke, in which the reduction of cerebral blood flow as well as the progression of tissue damage have direct spatiotemporal effects on the power of several oscillatory bands and their interactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge in behavior and function associated with each brain oscillation, and also in the specific changes in brain electrical activities that correspond to the molecular events and functional alterations observed after experimental and human stroke. We provide the basis of the generations of brain oscillations and potential cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying stroke-induced perturbation. We will also discuss the implications of using brain oscillation patterns as biomarkers for the prediction of stroke outcome and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26516838

  12. Auricular vagus nerve stimulation promotes functional recovery and enhances the post-ischemic angiogenic response in an ischemia/reperfusion rat model.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Li, Longling; Ma, Jingxi; Zhang, Lina; Niu, Fei; Feng, Tao; Li, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, which has been used to treat epilepsy patients since 1997, also enhances long-term restoration after central nervous system (CNS) injury. Angiogenesis is a complex restorative mechanism that occurs in response to ischemic stroke, and it positively affects the recovery of neurological functions in a rat model of stroke. The aims of our study were to determine whether auricular vagus nerve stimulation (aVNS) promoted functional recovery and enhanced angiogenesis in the ischemic boundary following ischemia/reperfusion and to uncover the possible molecular mechanisms that are involved. Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats underwent transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) surgery and received repeated electrical stimulation of the left cavum concha starting 30 min after ischemia. For the following 21 days, we evaluated functional recovery at different time points using neurological deficit scores, the beam-walking test and the staircase test. The infarct volume was measured using TTC staining at 24 h post reperfusion, neuronal survival in the ischemic penumbra was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. Microvessel density and endothelial cell proliferation in the ischemic boundary were assessed using immunofluorescence. The expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the ischemic penumbra were also evaluated. Our results showed that aVNS had significant neuroprotective effects and enhanced angiogenesis, which was demonstrated by improvements in the behavioral scores and brain histopathology, including increased levels of microvessel density and endothelial cell proliferation surrounding the infarct area. Furthermore, BDNF, eNOS and VEGF were expressed at higher levels in the I/R + aVNS group than in the I/R group or the I/R + sham aVNS group (p < 0.05). Our findings suggest that repeated a

  13. Tongxinluo Enhances Neurogenesis and Angiogenesis in Peri-Infarct Area and Subventricular Zone and Promotes Functional Recovery after Focal Cerebral Ischemic Infarction in Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Wang, Xiaoting; Zhang, Jian; Dang, Chao; Liu, Gang; Liang, Zhijian; Huang, Gelun; Zhao, Weijia; Zeng, Jinsheng

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tongxinluo is a traditional Chinese medicine compound with the potential to promote the neuronal functional recovery in cerebral ischemic infarction. Objective. This study aimed to disclose whether tongxinluo promotes neurological functional recovery and neurogenesis and angiogenesis in the infarcted area and SVZ after cerebral ischemic infarction in hypertensive rats. Methods. The ischemic model was prepared by distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in hypertensive rats. Tongxinluo was administrated 24 h after MCAO and lasted for 3, 7, or 14 days. Behavioral tests were performed to evaluate the protection of tongxinluo. Immunochemical staining was applied on brain tissue to evaluate the effects of tongxinluo on neurogenesis and vascularization in the MCAO model rats. Results. Postinjury administration of tongxinluo ameliorated the neuronal function deficit in the MCAO model rats. As evidenced by the immunochemical staining, BrdU+/DCX+, BrdU+/nestin+, and BrdU+ vascular endothelial cells were promoted to proliferate in SVZ after tongxinluo administration. The matured neurons stained by NeuN and vascularization by laminin staining were observed after tongxinluo administration in the peri-infarct area. Conclusion. Tongxinluo postischemia administration could ameliorate the neurological function deficit in the model rats. Possible mechanisms are related to neurogenesis and angiogenesis in the peri-infarct area and SVZ. PMID:27069496

  14. Reduced exercise capacity in patients with tricuspid regurgitation after successful mitral valve replacement for rheumatic mitral valve disease.

    PubMed Central

    Groves, P H; Lewis, N P; Ikram, S; Maire, R; Hall, R J

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine how severe tricuspid regurgitation influences exercise capacity and functional state in patients who have undergone successful mitral valve replacement for rheumatic mitral valve disease. DESIGN--9 patients in whom clinically significant tricuspid regurgitation developed late after mitral valve replacement were compared with 9 patients with no clinical evidence of tricuspid regurgitation. The two groups were matched for preoperative clinical and haemodynamic variables. Patients were assessed by conventional echocardiography, Doppler echocardiography, and a maximal treadmill exercise test in which expired gas was monitored by mass spectrometry. SETTING--University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff. SUBJECTS--18 patients who had been reviewed regularly since mitral valve replacement. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Objective indices of exercise performance including exercise duration, maximal oxygen consumption, anaerobic threshold, and ventilatory response to exercise. RESULTS--Mitral valve prosthetic function was normal in all patients and estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure and left ventricular function were similar in the two groups. Right ventricular diameter (median (range) 5.0 (4.3-5.6) v 3.7 (3.0-5.4) cm, p less than 0.01) and the incidence of paradoxical septal motion (9/9 v 3/9, p less than 0.01) were greater in the group with severe tricuspid regurgitation. Exercise performance--assessed by exercise duration (6.3 (5.0-10.7) v 12.7 (7.2-16.0) min, p less than 0.01), maximum oxygen consumption (11.2 (7.3-17.8) v 17.7 (11.8-21.4) ml min-1 kg-1, p less than 0.01), and anaerobic threshold (8.3 (4.6-11.4) v 0.7 (7.3-15.5) ml min-1 kg-1, p less than 0.05)--was significantly reduced in the group with severe tricuspid regurgitation. The ventilatory response to exercise was greater in patients with tricuspid regurgitation (minute ventilation at the same minute carbon dioxide production (41.0 (29.9-59.5) v 33.6 (26.8-39.3) l/min, p less than 0

  15. Effect of remote ischemic preconditioning on cognitive function after off-pump coronary artery bypass graft: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Kyoung-Woon; Rhim, Jin-Ho; Chin, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Wook-Jong; Choi, Dae-Kee; Lee, Eun-Ho; Hahm, Kyung-Don; Sim, Ji-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown in animal models that remote ischemic preconditioning (rIPC) has a neuroprotective effect. However, a randomized controlled trial in human subjects to investigate the neuroprotective effect of rIPC after cardiac surgery has not yet been reported. Therefore, we performed this pilot study to determine whether rIPC reduced the occurrence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in patients who underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCAB) surgery. Methods Seventy patients who underwent OPCAB surgery were assigned to either the control or the rIPC group using a computer-generated randomization table. The application of rIPC consisted of four cycles of 5 min ischemia and 5 min reperfusion on an upper limb using a blood pressure cuff inflating 200 mmHg before coronary artery anastomosis. The cognitive function tests were performed one day before surgery and again on postoperative day 7. We defined postoperative cognitive dysfunction as decreased postoperative test values more than 20% of the baseline values in more than two of the six cognitive function tests that were performed. Results In the cognitive function tests, there were no significant differences in the results obtained during the preoperative and postoperative periods for all tests and there were no mean differences observed in the preoperative and postoperative scores. The incidences of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in the control and rIPC groups were 28.6% (10 patients) and 31.4% (11 patients), respectively. Conclusions rIPC did not reduce the incidence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction after OPCAB surgery during the immediate postoperative period. PMID:24363844

  16. ACID-FUNCTIONALIZED SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES ENHANCE CARDIAC ISCHEMIC/REPERFUSION INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanotubes are being intensively developed for biomedical applications such as gene and drug delivery. Because of their unique properties, nanotubes can impose some potentially toxic effects, particularly if they have been modified to express functionally reactive chem...

  17. ACID FUNCTIONALIZED SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES ENHANCE CARDIAC ISCHEMIC/REPERFUSIOIN INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered carbon nanotubes are being intensively developed for wide applications. Because of their unique light properties, nanotubes can impose some potentially toxic effects, particularly if they have been modified to express functionally reactive chemical groups on their sur...

  18. Balloon mitral valvotomy in youngest documented rheumatic mitral stenosis patient.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Achyut; Patil, Shailesh; Ahmed, Imran

    2015-11-01

    Juvenile rheumatic mitral stenosis (MS) is common in the Indian subcontinent. Early recognition and management is essential. Rarely rheumatic MS may occur in <5 years of age, wherein rapid hemodynamic progression and cardiac morbidity and mortality occurs. Severe/symptomatic MS in preschool age requires urgent and meticulous decision making. Condition of valve and wishes of parents may complicate management decisions. Percutaneous transmitral commissurotomy (PTMC) may, therefore, become the only life-saving intervention in these cases unless contraindicated, although the procedure entails considerable technical issues in this age group. Herein, we report a successful balloon mitral valvotomy in a 4-year-old child with severe rheumatic MS (documented since 2 years 6 months of age) presenting with repeated pulmonary edema. To the best of our knowledge, this child is the youngest documented case of established rheumatic heart disease and also one of the youngest PTMC procedure performed. This report supports the clinical usefulness of PTMC in childhood MS; however, pertinent technical issues are raised, which needs a proper consensus. PMID:26012486

  19. Ischemic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, James F.; Hernandez III, Luis O.

    2015-01-01

    Most clinicians associate ischemic colitis with elderly patients who have underlying cardiovascular comorbidities. While the majority of cases probably occur in this population, the disease can present in younger patients as a result of different risk factors, making the diagnosis challenging. While a majority of patients respond to medical management, surgery is required in approximately 20% of the cases and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. PMID:26034405

  20. Follistatin-like 1, a secreted muscle protein, promotes endothelial cell function and revascularization in ischemic tissue through a nitric-oxide synthase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Noriyuki; Oshima, Yuichi; Ohashi, Koji; Higuchi, Akiko; Ikegami, Chiaki; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Walsh, Kenneth

    2008-11-21

    Myogenic Akt signaling coordinates blood vessel recruitment with normal tissue growth. Here, we investigated the role of Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1) in the regulation of endothelial cell function and blood vessel growth in muscle. Transgenic Akt1 overexpression in skeletal muscle led to myofiber growth that was coupled to an increase in muscle capillary density. Myogenic Akt signaling or ischemic hind limb surgery led to the induction of Fstl1 in muscle and increased circulating levels of Fstl1. Intramuscular administration of an adenoviral vector expressing Fstl1 (Ad-Fstl1) accelerated flow recovery and increased capillary density in the ischemic hind limbs of wild-type mice, and this was associated with an increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation at residue Ser-1179. In cultured endothelial cells, Ad-Fstl1 stimulated migration and differentiation into network structures and inhibited apoptosis under conditions of serum deprivation. These cell responses were associated with the activating phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS. Conversely, transduction with dominant-negative Akt or LY294002 blocked Fstl1-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation and inhibited Fstl1-stimulated cellular responses. Treatment with the eNOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester also reduced endothelial cell migration and differentiation induced by Ad-Fstl1. The stimulatory effect of Ad-Fstl1 on ischemic limb reperfusion was abolished in mice lacking eNOS. These data indicate that Fstl1 is a secreted muscle protein or myokine that can function to promote endothelial cell function and stimulates revascularization in response to ischemic insult through its ability to activate Akt-eNOS signaling. PMID:18718903

  1. An uncommon case of isolated parachute-like asymmetric mitral valve in an adult.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yasuhide; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Fukuda, Yuko; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2014-09-01

    A 31-year-old asymptomatic male was referred to hospital for an examination of right bundle brunch block. Both, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography revealed normal left ventricular function, and two different-sized papillary muscles; the anterolateral muscle was more pronounced, with almost major chordae tendineae inserted into this dominant muscle, whereas the immature, flat posteromedial papillary muscle had very short chordae tendineae and was located higher in the left ventricle, inserted directly into the mitral annulus. The mitral valve orifice was eccentrically located at the lateral side, but no significant mitral stenosis or regurgitation was observed. No other congenital heart anomalies were identified. Thus, the final diagnosis was isolated parachute-like asymmetric mitral valve (PLAMV), without any other congenital heart anomalies. The patient was followed up closely with periodic echocardiographic examinations. Parachute mitral valve is a rare congenital cardiac defect characterized by focalized attachment of the chordae tendineae of both leaflets to a single papillary muscle. In contrast to true parachute mitral valve, PLAMV has two separate papillary muscles, one of which is more pronounced and into which all chordae are inserted. PLAMV was highly associated with other congenital heart anomalies, and the involved dominant muscle was most frequently a posteromedial papillary muscle. Isolated PLAMV in an adult is even more rare, while the presence of an immature posteromedial papillary muscle--as in the present case--is extremely rare. PMID:25799716

  2. Reduced severity of ischemic stroke and improvement of mitochondrial function after dietary treatment with the anaplerotic substance triheptanoin.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, T M; Koch, K; Klein, J

    2015-08-01

    Triheptanoin, an oily substance, consists of glycerol bound to three molecules of heptanoic acid, a C7 odd-chain fatty acid. A triheptanoin-rich diet has anaplerotic effects because heptanoate metabolism yields succinate which delivers substrates to the Krebs cycle. While previous studies on the effects of triheptanoin focused on metabolic disorders and epilepsy, we investigated triheptanoin's effect on ischemic stroke. Mice were fed a triheptanoin-enriched diet for 14days; controls received soybean oil. Only mice fed triheptanoin had measurable quantities of odd-numbered fatty acids in the plasma and brain. Transient ischemia was induced in the brain by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) for 60min. One day later, mice were tested for neurological function (chimney, rotarod and corner tests) which was found to be better preserved in the triheptanoin group. Microdialysis demonstrated that the strong, neurotoxic increase of extracellular glutamate, which was observed in the mouse striatum during MCAO, was strongly reduced in triheptanoin-fed mice while glucose levels were not affected. Triheptanoin diet reduced the infarct area in stroked mice by about 40%. In ex vivo-experiments with isolated mitochondria, ischemia was found to cause a reduction of mitochondrial respiratory activity. This reduction was attenuated by triheptanoin diet in complex II and IV. In parallel measurements, ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential were reduced in control animals but were preserved in triheptanoin-fed mice. We conclude that triheptanoin-fed mice which sustained an experimental stroke had a significantly improved neurological outcome. This beneficial effect is apparently due to an improvement of mitochondrial function and preservation of the cellular energy state. Our findings identify triheptanoin as a promising new dietary agent for neuroprotection. PMID:25982559

  3. [The effect of transvenous laser therapy on lipid peroxidation function in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Vakhliaev, V D; Smirnova, I E; Uchaĭkina, L V; Barsel', V A; Aksiutina, M S; Matveeva, S A; Paramonova, M A; Shchedrina, I S; Syrkin, A L

    1992-07-01

    The papers deals with changes in the levels of lipid peroxidation products in patients with stable angina of effort, which occurred with intravenous helium-neon blood irradiation. The therapy was highly effective in patients with lower functional classes and persons with normal circulation, resulting in a reduction in lipid peroxidation intensity. Predictors are recommended to determine the efficiency and expediency of laser therapy in patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:1487878

  4. Reduced Numbers and Impaired Function of Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood of Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnau, Johanna; Schulze, Juliane; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Heinrich, Marie; Langner, Sönke; Wilden, Anika; Kessler, Christof; Bröker, Barbara M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been suggested to modulate stroke-induced immune responses. However, analyses of Tregs in patients and in experimental stroke have yielded contradictory findings. We performed the current study to assess the regulation and function of Tregs in peripheral blood of stroke patients. Age dependent expression of CD39 on Tregs was quantified in mice and men. Methods. Total FoxP3+ Tregs and CD39+FoxP3+ Tregs were quantified by flow cytometry in controls and stroke patients on admission and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 thereafter. Treg function was assessed by quantifying the inhibition of activation-induced expression of CD69 and CD154 on T effector cells (Teffs). Results. Total Tregs accounted for 5.0% of CD4+ T cells in controls and <2.8% in stroke patients on admission. They remained below control values until day 7. CD39+ Tregs were most strongly reduced in stroke patients. On day 3 the Treg-mediated inhibition of CD154 upregulation on CD4+ Teff was impaired in stroke patients. CD39 expression on Treg increased with age in peripheral blood of mice and men. Conclusion. We demonstrate a loss of active FoxP3+CD39+ Tregs from stroke patient's peripheral blood. The suppressive Treg function of remaining Tregs is impaired after stroke. PMID:27073295

  5. Reduced Numbers and Impaired Function of Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood of Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Ruhnau, Johanna; Schulze, Juliane; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Heinrich, Marie; Langner, Sönke; Pötschke, Christian; Wilden, Anika; Kessler, Christof; Bröker, Barbara M; Vogelgesang, Antje; Dressel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been suggested to modulate stroke-induced immune responses. However, analyses of Tregs in patients and in experimental stroke have yielded contradictory findings. We performed the current study to assess the regulation and function of Tregs in peripheral blood of stroke patients. Age dependent expression of CD39 on Tregs was quantified in mice and men. Methods. Total FoxP3(+) Tregs and CD39(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs were quantified by flow cytometry in controls and stroke patients on admission and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 thereafter. Treg function was assessed by quantifying the inhibition of activation-induced expression of CD69 and CD154 on T effector cells (Teffs). Results. Total Tregs accounted for 5.0% of CD4(+) T cells in controls and <2.8% in stroke patients on admission. They remained below control values until day 7. CD39(+) Tregs were most strongly reduced in stroke patients. On day 3 the Treg-mediated inhibition of CD154 upregulation on CD4(+) Teff was impaired in stroke patients. CD39 expression on Treg increased with age in peripheral blood of mice and men. Conclusion. We demonstrate a loss of active FoxP3(+)CD39(+) Tregs from stroke patient's peripheral blood. The suppressive Treg function of remaining Tregs is impaired after stroke. PMID:27073295

  6. Adverse effects of AMP-activated protein kinase alpha2-subunit deletion and high-fat diet on heart function and ischemic tolerance in aged female mice.

    PubMed

    Slámová, K; Papoušek, F; Janovská, P; Kopecký, J; Kolář, F

    2016-03-14

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a role in metabolic regulation under stress conditions, and inadequate AMPK signaling may be also involved in aging process. The aim was to find out whether AMPK alpha2-subunit deletion affects heart function and ischemic tolerance of adult and aged mice. AMPK alpha2(-/-) (KO) and wild type (WT) female mice were compared at the age of 6 and 18 months. KO mice exhibited subtle myocardial AMPK alpha2-subunit protein level, but no difference in AMPK alpha1-subunit was detected between the strains. Both alpha1- and alpha2-subunits of AMPK and their phosphorylation decreased with advanced age. Left ventricular fractional shortening was lower in KO than in WT mice of both age groups and this difference was maintained after high-fat feeding. Infarct size induced by global ischemia/reperfusion of isolated hearts was similar in both strains at 6 months of age. Aged WT but not KO mice exhibited improved ischemic tolerance compared with the younger group. High-fat feeding for 6 months during aging abolished the infarct size-reduction in WT without affecting KO animals; nevertheless, the extent of injury remained larger in KO mice. The results demonstrate that adverse effects of AMPK alpha2-subunit deletion and high-fat feeding on heart function and myocardial ischemic tolerance in aged female mice are not additive. PMID:26596312

  7. Hemolysis and infective endocarditis in a mitral prosthetic valve.

    PubMed

    Koç, Fatih; Bekar, Lütfi; Kadı, Hasan; Ceyhan, Köksal

    2010-09-01

    Traumatic intravascular hemolysis after heart valve replacement can be a serious problem. It is commonly associated with either structural deterioration or paravalvular leaks. A 63-year-old woman with a six-year history of surgery for mitral stenosis presented with complaints of weakness and dyspnea. She received treatment at other centers three times in the past six months for dyspnea and anemia requiring transfusion of red blood cells. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a normally functioning mitral mechanic prosthesis. Laboratory findings were abnormal for hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, serum haptoglobin, and lactate dehydrogenase. Peripheral blood smear showed marked schistocytes, indicative of mechanical erythrocyte destruction. Transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated severe paravalvular leak and a large (9x13 mm) vegetation adhering to the prosthetic valve, protruding into the left atrium. Enterococcus faecalis was isolated from blood cultures. Surgery was planned because of large vegetation, repeated hemolysis, and severe paravalvular regurgitation, but the patient refused surgical treatment. PMID:21200125

  8. Inhibition of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Limits Mitochondrial Damage and Preserves Function Following Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Akhnokh, Maria K.; Yang, Feng Hua; Samokhvalov, Victor; Jamieson, Kristi L.; Cho, Woo Jung; Wagg, Cory; Takawale, Abhijit; Wang, Xiuhua; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Seubert, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Myocardial ischemia can result in marked mitochondrial damage leading to cardiac dysfunction, as such identifying novel mechanisms to limit mitochondrial injury is important. This study investigated the hypothesis that inhibiting soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), responsible for converting epoxyeicosatrienoic acids to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids protects mitochondrial from injury caused by myocardial infarction. Methods: sEH null and WT littermate mice were subjected to surgical occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery or sham operation. A parallel group of WT mice received an sEH inhibitor, trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-y1-ureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid (tAUCB; 10 mg/L) or vehicle in the drinking water 4 days prior and 7 days post-MI. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography prior- and 7-days post-surgery. Heart tissues were dissected into infarct, peri-, and non-infarct regions to assess ultrastructure by electron microscopy. Complexes I, II, IV, citrate synthase, PI3K activities, and mitochondrial respiration were assessed in non-infarct regions. Isolated working hearts were used to measure the rates of glucose and palmitate oxidation. Results: Echocardiography revealed that tAUCB treatment or sEH deficiency significantly improved systolic and diastolic function post-MI compared to controls. Reduced infarct expansion and less adverse cardiac remodeling were observed in tAUCB-treated and sEH null groups. EM data demonstrated mitochondrial ultrastructure damage occurred in infarct and peri-infarct regions but not in non-infarct regions. Inhibition of sEH resulted in significant improvements in mitochondrial respiration, ATP content, mitochondrial enzymatic activities and restored insulin sensitivity and PI3K activity. Conclusion: Inhibition or genetic deletion of sEH protects against long-term ischemia by preserving cardiac function and maintaining mitochondrial efficiency. PMID:27375480

  9. Effectiveness of Hospital Functions for Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment on In-Hospital Mortality: Results From a Nationwide Survey in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Hideki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Background Though evidence is limited in Japan, clinical controlled studies overseas have revealed that specialized care units are associated with better outcomes for acute stoke patients. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of hospital functions for acute care of ischemic stroke on in-hospital mortality, with statistical accounting for referral bias. Methods We derived data from a large Japanese claim-based inpatient database linked to the Survey of Medical Care Institutions and Hospital Report data. We compared the mortality of acute ischemic stroke patients (n = 41 476) in hospitals certified for acute stroke treatment with that in non-certified institutions. To adjust for potential referral bias, we used differential distance to hospitals from the patient’s residence as an instrumental variable and constructed bivariate probit models. Results With the ordinary probit regression model, in-hospital mortality in certified hospitals was not significantly different from that in non-certified institutions. Conversely, the model with the instrumental variable method showed that admission to certified hospitals reduced in-hospital mortality by 30.7% (P < 0.001). This difference remained after adjusting for hospital size, volume, staffing, and intravenous use of tissue plasminogen activator. Conclusions Comparison accounting for referral selection found that certified hospital function for acute ischemic stroke care was associated with significantly lower in-hospital mortality. Our results indicate that organized stroke care—with certified subspecialty physicians and around-the-clock availability of personnel, imaging equipment, and emergency neurosurgical procedures in an intensive stroke care unit—is effective in improving outcomes in acute ischemic stroke care. PMID:26165489

  10. CoQ₁₀ Function and Role in Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ayer, Anita; Macdonald, Peter; Stocker, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is an essential lipid of cells present in all cellular compartments. The functions of CoQ in mitochondrial respiration and as an antioxidant are established, although the lipid likely has additional, presently unknown, roles. While the therapeutic utility of CoQ10 supplements is recognized in the rare cases of primary CoQ10 deficiencies, a potential role for CoQ10 supplements in cardiovascular disease, particularly heart failure, has also been studied for over 40 years. This review summarizes our current knowledge in these areas derived from animal studies and human trials. Current evidence for a benefit of CoQ10 supplements in diseases other than primary CoQ10 deficiencies is insufficient. PMID:25974695

  11. Procedural learning as a measure of functional impairment in a mouse model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Linden, Jérôme; Van de Beeck, Lise; Plumier, Jean-Christophe; Ferrara, André

    2016-07-01

    Basal ganglia stroke is often associated with functional deficits in patients, including difficulties to learn and execute new motor skills (procedural learning). To measure procedural learning in a murine model of stroke (30min right MCAO), we submitted C57Bl/6J mice to various sensorimotor tests, then to an operant procedure (Serial Order Learning) specifically assessing the ability to learn a simple motor sequence. Results showed that MCAO affected the performance in some of the sensorimotor tests (accelerated rotating rod and amphetamine rotation test) and the way animals learned a motor sequence. The later finding seems to be caused by difficulties regarding the chunking of operant actions into a coherent motor sequence; the appeal for food rewards and ability to press levers appeared unaffected by MCAO. We conclude that assessment of motor learning in rodent models of stroke might improve the translational value of such models. PMID:27001455

  12. Administration of cells with thermosensitive hydrogel enhances the functional recovery in ischemic rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Satoshi; Forrester, James S; Li, Chuan; Sato, Mitsuru; Li, Zhengqing; Guo, Xiaolei; Guan, Jianjun; Amano, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The lack of cell retention clearly represents a potentially serious limitation for therapeutic efficacy of stem cells. To enhance the efficacy, we developed a novel hydrogel that is thermosensitive and biodegradable and possesses desirable stiffness in a solid form. Immediately after induction of myocardial infarction of male rat, cardiac outgrowth cells embedded in hydrogel (HG) or saline (CO) were injected directly into the peri-infarct area. Left ventricular ejection fraction, cell retention rate, and a spectrum of biochemical markers were measured to evaluate the effect of the treatment. Left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly higher in the cell-injected groups (HG and CO) than in the control group at 1 week after treatment. This functional benefit was continued only in the HG group, accompanied with more retained cells. Furthermore, the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 was significantly higher in the HG group with less progression of cell apoptosis. PMID:27213036

  13. Personalized Computational Modeling of Mitral Valve Prolapse: Virtual Leaflet Resection

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Yonghoon; Choi, Ahnryul; McPherson, David D.; Kim, Hyunggun

    2015-01-01

    Posterior leaflet prolapse following chordal elongation or rupture is one of the primary valvular diseases in patients with degenerative mitral valves (MVs). Quadrangular resection followed by ring annuloplasty is a reliable and reproducible surgical repair technique for treatment of posterior leaflet prolapse. Virtual MV repair simulation of leaflet resection in association with patient-specific 3D echocardiographic data can provide quantitative biomechanical and physiologic characteristics of pre- and post-resection MV function. We have developed a solid personalized computational simulation protocol to perform virtual MV repair using standard clinical guidelines of posterior leaflet resection with annuloplasty ring implantation. A virtual MV model was created using 3D echocardiographic data of a patient with posterior chordal rupture and severe mitral regurgitation. A quadrangle-shaped leaflet portion in the prolapsed posterior leaflet was removed, and virtual plication and suturing were performed. An annuloplasty ring of proper size was reconstructed and virtual ring annuloplasty was performed by superimposing the ring and the mitral annulus. Following the quadrangular resection and ring annuloplasty simulations, patient-specific annular motion and physiologic transvalvular pressure gradient were implemented and dynamic finite element simulation of MV function was performed. The pre-resection MV demonstrated a substantial lack of leaflet coaptation which directly correlated with the severe mitral regurgitation. Excessive stress concentration was found along the free marginal edge of the posterior leaflet involving the chordal rupture. Following the virtual resection and ring annuloplasty, the severity of the posterior leaflet prolapse markedly decreased. Excessive stress concentration disappeared over both anterior and posterior leaflets, and complete leaflet coaptation was effectively restored. This novel personalized virtual MV repair strategy has great

  14. Changes in gap junction expression and function following ischemic injury of spinal cord white matter

    PubMed Central

    Goncharenko, Karina; Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Velumian, Alexander A.; Carlen, Peter L.

    2014-01-01

    Gap junctions are widely present in spinal cord white matter; however, their role in modulating the dynamics of axonal dysfunction remains largely unexplored. We hypothesized that inhibition of gap junctions reduces the loss of axonal function during oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). The functional role of gap junctions was assessed by electrophysiological recordings of compound action potentials (CAPs) in Wistar rat spinal cord slices with the sucrose gap technique. The in vitro slices were subjected to 30-min OGD. Gap junction connexin (Cx) mRNA expression was determined by qPCR and normalized to β-actin. A 30-min OGD resulted in reduction of CAPs to 14.8 ± 4.6% of their pre-OGD amplitude (n = 5). In the presence of gap junction blockers carbenoxolone (Cbx; 100 μM) and 1-octanol (Oct; 300 μM), the CAP reduction in OGD was to only 35.7 ± 5.7% of pre-OGD amplitude in Cbx (n = 9) and to 37.4 ± 8.9% of pre-OGD amplitude in Oct (n = 10). Both drugs also noticeably prolonged the half-decline time of CAP amplitudes in OGD from 6.0 min in no-drug conditions to 9.6 min in the presence of Cbx and to 7.7 min in the presence of Oct, suggesting that blocking gap junctions reduces conduction loss during OGD. With application of Cbx and Oct in the setting of OGD, expression of Cx30 and Cx43 mRNA was downregulated. Our data provide new insights into the role of gap junctions in white matter ischemia and reveal the necessity of a cautious approach in determining detrimental or beneficial effects of gap junction blockade in white matter ischemia. PMID:25080569

  15. Mitochondria-targeted ROS scavenger improves post-ischemic recovery of cardiac function and attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Escobales, Nelson; Nuñez, Rebeca E.; Jang, Sehwan; Parodi-Rullan, Rebecca; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; Sacher, Joshua R.; Skoda, Erin M.; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter; Javadov, Sabzali

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of aging and age-associated diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of XJB-5-131 (XJB), a mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, on cardiac resistance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced oxidative stress in aged rats. Male adult (5-month old, n=17) and aged (29-month old, n=19) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: adult (A), adult+XJB (AX), aged (O), and aged+XJB (OX). XJB was administered 3 times per week (3 mg/kg body weight, IP) for four weeks. At the end of the treatment period, cardiac function was continuously monitored in excised hearts using the Langendorff technique for 30 min, followed by 20-min of global ischemia, and 60-min reperfusion. XJB improved post-ischemic recovery of aged hearts, as evidenced by greater left ventricular developed-pressures and rate-pressure products than the untreated, aged-matched group. The state 3 respiration rates at complexes I, II and IV of mitochondria isolated from XJB-treated aged hearts were 57% (P<0.05), 25% (P<0.05) and 28% (P<0.05), respectively, higher than controls. Ca2+-induced swelling, an indicator of permeability transition pore opening, was reduced in mitochondria of XJB-treated aged rats. In addition, XJB significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane as well as total and mitochondrial ROS levels in cultured cardiomyocytes. This study underlines the importance of mitochondrial ROS in aging-induced cardiac dysfunction and suggests that targeting mitochondrial ROS may be an effective therapeutic approach to protect the aged heart against IR injury. PMID:25451170

  16. Mitochondria-targeted ROS scavenger improves post-ischemic recovery of cardiac function and attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Escobales, Nelson; Nuñez, Rebeca E; Jang, Sehwan; Parodi-Rullan, Rebecca; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; Sacher, Joshua R; Skoda, Erin M; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter; Javadov, Sabzali

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of aging and age-associated diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of XJB-5-131 (XJB), a mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, on cardiac resistance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced oxidative stress in aged rats. Male adult (5-month old, n=17) and aged (29-month old, n=19) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: adult (A), adult+XJB (AX), aged (O), and aged+XJB (OX). XJB was administered 3 times per week (3mg/kg body weight, IP) for four weeks. At the end of the treatment period, cardiac function was continuously monitored in excised hearts using the Langendorff technique for 30 min, followed by 20 min of global ischemia, and 60-min reperfusion. XJB improved post-ischemic recovery of aged hearts, as evidenced by greater left ventricular developed-pressures and rate-pressure products than the untreated, aged-matched group. The state 3 respiration rates at complexes I, II and IV of mitochondria isolated from XJB-treated aged hearts were 57% (P<0.05), 25% (P<0.05) and 28% (P<0.05), respectively, higher than controls. Ca(2+)-induced swelling, an indicator of permeability transition pore opening, was reduced in the mitochondria of XJB-treated aged rats. In addition, XJB significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane as well as the total and mitochondrial ROS levels in cultured cardiomyocytes. This study underlines the importance of mitochondrial ROS in aging-induced cardiac dysfunction and suggests that targeting mitochondrial ROS may be an effective therapeutic approach to protect the aged heart against IR injury. PMID:25451170

  17. O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine modification of proteins is activated in post-ischemic brains of young but not aged mice: Implications for impaired functional recovery from ischemic stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Sheng, Huaxin; Yu, Zhui; Paschen, Wulf; Yang, Wei

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of age on the response of brains to an ischemic challenge, we subjected young and aged mice to transient forebrain ischemia, and analyzed the heat shock response and unfolded protein response, ubiquitin conjugation and SUMO conjugation, and O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine modification of proteins (O-GlcNAcylation). The most prominent age-related difference was an inability of aged mice to activate O-GlcNAcylation. Considering many reports on the protective role of O-GlcNAcylation in various stress conditions including myocardial ischemia, this pathway could be a promising target for therapeutic intervention to improve functional recovery of aged patients following brain ischemia. PMID:26661187

  18. Mitral Valve Replacement with Half-and-Half Technique for Recurrent Mitral Paravalvular Leakage.

    PubMed

    Morisaki, Akimasa; Kato, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Yosuke; Shibata, Toshihiko

    2015-05-01

    Reoperation for paravalvular leakage can cause recurrent paravalvular leakage through severe damage to the mitral annulus. Previously, mitral valve replacement using a half-and-half technique for extensive mitral annular calcification was reported; here, application of the technique to treat recurrent paravalvular leakage is described. A 78-year-old male with three prior mitral valve replacements developed recurrent paravalvular leakage, for which he had undergone his third mitral valve replacement at the age of 69 years. On this occasion, a mechanical valve with circumferential equine pericardial patch reinforcement of the annulus had been used. Five years later, the patient developed hemolytic anemia and congestive heart failure due to recurrent paravalvular leakage. Intraoperatively, broad dehiscence was seen between the prosthetic valve and mitral annulus at two sites, the anterior and posterior commissures, without infection. A fourth mitral valve replacement was performed with a St. Jude Medical valve, using a half-and-half technique. This entailed the use of non-everting mattress sutures on the anterior half of the annulus, and everting mattress sutures on the left atrial wall around the posterior half of the annulus. Extensive annular defects required reinforcement of the posterior mitral annulus with a bovine pericardial patch. Postoperative echocardiography showed no paravalvular leakage. The half-and-half technique may be useful in treating recurrent paravalvular leakage of the mitral valve. PMID:26901904

  19. Transapical Mitral Valve Replacement for Mixed Native Mitral Stenosis and Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Bedzra, Edo; Don, Creighton W; Reisman, Mark; Aldea, Gabriel S

    2016-08-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV heart failure. He had undergone transapical mitral valve replacement for mixed mitral stenosis and mitral regurgitation. At the 1 month follow-up, the patient reported symptom resolution. An echocardiogram revealed a low gradient and no regurgitation. Our case shows that with careful multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative planning, and patient selection, percutaneous mitral intervention can become an alternative therapy for high-risk patients who cannot undergo conventional surgical therapy. PMID:27449468

  20. Metabolic responses from rest to steady state determine contractile function in ischemic skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Timmons, J A; Poucher, S M; Constantin-Teodosiu, D; Macdonald, I A; Greenhaff, P L

    1997-08-01

    Skeletal muscle contraction during ischemia, such as that experienced by peripheral vascular disease patients, is characterized by rapid fatigue. Using a canine gracilis model, we tested the hypothesis that a critical factor determining force production during ischemia is the metabolic response during the transition from rest to steady state. Dichloroacetate (DCA) administration before gracilis muscle contraction increased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activation and resulted in acetylation of 80% of the free carnitine pool to acetylcarnitine. After 1 min of contraction, phosphocreatine (PCr) degradation in the DCA group was approximately 50% lower than in the control group (P < 0.05) during conditions of identical force production. After 6 min of contraction, steady-state force production was approximately 30% higher in the DCA group (P < 0.05), and muscle ATP, PCr, and glycogen degradation and lactate accumulation were lower (P < 0.05 in all cases). It appears, therefore, that an important determinant of contractile function during ischemia is the mechanisms by which ATP regeneration occurs during the period of rest to steady-state transition. PMID:9277374

  1. Allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells restore cardiac function in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy via trilineage differentiating capacity

    PubMed Central

    Quevedo, Henry C.; Hatzistergos, Konstantinos E.; Oskouei, Behzad N.; Feigenbaum, Gary S.; Rodriguez, Jose E.; Valdes, David; Pattany, Pradip M.; Zambrano, Juan P.; Hu, Qinghua; McNiece, Ian; Heldman, Alan W.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism(s) underlying cardiac reparative effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) remain highly controversial. Here we tested the hypothesis that MSCs regenerate chronically infarcted myocardium through mechanisms comprising long-term engraftment and trilineage differentiation. Twelve weeks after myocardial infarction, female swine received catheter-based transendocardial injections of either placebo (n = 4) or male allogeneic MSCs (200 million; n = 6). Animals underwent serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and in vivo cell fate was determined by co-localization of Y-chromosome (Ypos) cells with markers of cardiac, vascular muscle, and endothelial lineages. MSCs engrafted in infarct and border zones and differentiated into cardiomyocytes as ascertained by co-localization with GATA-4, Nkx2.5, and α-sarcomeric actin. In addition, Ypos MSCs exhibited vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell differentiation, contributing to large and small vessel formation. Infarct size was reduced from 19.3 ± 1.7% to 13.9 ± 2.0% (P < 0.001), and ejection fraction (EF) increased from 35.0 ± 1.7% to 41.3 ± 2.7% (P < 0.05) in MSC but not placebo pigs over 12 weeks. This was accompanied by increases in regional contractility and myocardial blood flow (MBF), particularly in the infarct border zone. Importantly, MSC engraftment correlated with functional recovery in contractility (R = 0.85, P < 0.05) and MBF (R = 0.76, P < 0.01). Together these findings demonstrate long-term MSC survival, engraftment, and trilineage differentiation following transplantation into chronically scarred myocardium. MSCs are an adult stem cell with the capacity for cardiomyogenesis and vasculogenesis which contribute, at least in part, to their ability to repair chronically scarred myocardium. PMID:19666564

  2. A novel finite element-based patient-specific mitral valve repair: virtual ring annuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ahnryul; Rim, Yonghoon; Mun, Jeffrey S.; Kim, Hyunggun

    2014-01-01

    Alterations of normal mitral valve (MV) function lead to mitral insufficiency, i.e., mitral regurgitation (MR). Mitral repair is the most popular and most efficient surgical intervention for MR treatment. An annuloplasty ring is implanted following complex reconstructive MV repairs to prevent potential reoccurrence of MR. We have developed a novel finite element (FE)-based simulation protocol to perform patient-specific virtual ring annuloplasty following the standard clinical guideline procedure. A virtual MV was created using 3D echocardiographic data in a patient with mitral annular dilation. Proper type and size of the ring were determined in consideration of the MV apparatus geometry. The ring was positioned over the patient MV model and annuloplasty was simulated. Dynamic simulation of MV function across the complete cardiac cycle was performed. Virtual patient-specific annuloplasty simulation well demonstrated morphologic information of the MV apparatus before and after ring implantation. Dynamic simulation of MV function following ring annuloplasty demonstrated markedly reduced stress distribution across the MV leaflets and annulus as well as restored leaflet coaptation compared to pre-annuloplasty. This novel FE-based patient-specific MV repair simulation technique provides quantitative information of functional improvement following ring annuloplasty. Virtual MV repair strategy may effectively evaluate and predict interventional treatment for MV pathology. PMID:24211915

  3. LACK OF EFFECT OF LOW LEVELS OF CARBOXYHEMOGLOBIN ON CARDIOVASCULAR FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirty patients 38-75 years of age who had ischemic heart disease were studied to assess the effect of acute elevation of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) concentration. After an initial familiarization and exercise session patients were exposed to air (carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) = 1.5 + 0...

  4. How Is Mitral Valve Prolapse Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Endocarditis Heart Valve Disease How the Heart Works Marfan ... underlying mitral valve problem, if necessary Preventing infective endocarditis , arrhythmias , and other complications Relieving symptoms Medicines Medicines ...

  5. Reversion of Severe Mitral Insufficiency in Peripartum Cardiomyopathy Using Levosimendan

    PubMed Central

    Nieto Estrada, Victor H.; Molano Franco, Daniel L.; Valencia Moreno, Albert Alexander; Rojas Gambasica, Jose A.; Jaller Bornacelli, Yamil E.; Martinez Del Valle, Anacaona

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic peripartum cardiomyopathy presenting with heart failure is a true diagnostic and treatment challenge. Goal oriented clinical management aims at the relapse of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. A 35-year-old patient on her 12th day post-delivery presents progressive signs of heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography showed severe mitral insufficiency, mild left ventricular dysfunction, mild tricuspid insufficiency, severe pulmonary hypertension, and right atrial enlargement. With wet and cold heart failure signs, the patient was a candidate for inodilator cardiovascular support and volume depletion therapy. As the patient presented a persistent tachycardia at rest, levosimendan was chosen over dobutamine. Levosimendan was administered at a dose of 0.2 µg/kg/min during a period of 24 hours. After inodilator therapy, the patient’s signs and symptoms of heart failure began to decrease, showing improvement of dyspnea, mitral murmur grade went from IV/IV to II/IV, filling pressures and systemic and pulmonary resistance indexes decreased, arterial blood gases improved, and an echocardiography performed 72 h later showed non-dilated cardiomyopathy, mild cardiac contractile dysfunction, mild mitral insufficiency, type I diastolic dysfunction and improvement of pulmonary hypertension. Cardiovascular function in peripartum cardiomyopathy tends to go back to normality in 23-41% of the cases, but in a large group of patients, severe ventricle dysfunction remains months after initial symptoms. This article describes the diagnostic process of a patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy and a successful reversion of a severe case of mitral insufficiency using levosimendan as a new therapeutic strategy in this clinical context. PMID:26566415

  6. Managing mitral regurgitation: focus on the MitraClip device

    PubMed Central

    Magruder, J Trent; Crawford, Todd C; Grimm, Joshua C; Fredi, Joseph L; Shah, Ashish S

    2016-01-01

    Based on the principle of surgical edge-to-edge mitral valve repair (MVR), the MitraClip percutaneous MVR technique has emerged as a minimally invasive option for MVR. This catheter-based system has been widely demonstrated to be safe, although inferior to surgical MVR. Studies examining patients with ≥3+ mitral regurgitation (MR) show that, for all patients treated, freedom from death, surgery, or MR ≥3+ is in the 75%–80% range 1 year following MitraClip implantation. Despite its inferiority to surgical therapy, in high-risk surgical patients, data suggest that the MitraClip system can be employed safely and that it can result in symptomatic improvement in the majority of patients, while not precluding future surgical options. MitraClip therapy also appears to reduce heart failure readmissions in the high-risk cohort, which may lead to an economic benefit. Ongoing study is needed to clarify the impact of percutaneous mitral valve clipping on long-term survival in high-risk populations, as well as its role in other patient populations, such as those with functional MR. PMID:27110142

  7. Percutaneous mitral heart valve repair--MitraClip.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Jay V; Agrawal, Sahil; Garg, Jalaj; Paudel, Rajiv; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Doshi, Tina V; Gotsis, William; Frishman, William H

    2014-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is the most common cardiac valvular disease in the United States. Approximately 4 million people have severe MR and roughly 250,000 new diagnoses of MR are made each year. Mitral valve surgery is the only treatment that prevents progression of heart failure and provides sustained symptomatic relief. Mitral valve repair is preferred over replacement for the treatment of MR because of freedom from anticoagulation, reduced long-term morbidity, reduced perioperative mortality, improved survival, and better preservation of left ventricular function compared with valve replacement. A large proportion of patients in need of valve repair or replacement do not undergo such procedures because of a perceived unacceptable perioperative risk. Percutaneous catheter-based methods for valvular pathology that parallel surgical principles for valve repair have been developed over the last few years and have been proposed as an alternate measure in high-risk patients. The MitraClip (Abbott Labs) device is one such therapy and is the subject of this review. PMID:25098200

  8. Tricuspid regurgitation after successful mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Raftopoulos, Leonidas; Aggeli, Constantina; Vlasseros, Ioannis; Felekos, Ioannis; Tousoulis, Dimitrios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Kallikazaros, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    The tricuspid valve (TV) is inseparably connected with the mitral valve (MV) in terms of function. Any pathophysiological condition concerning the MV is potentially a threat for the normal function of the TV as well. One of the most challenging cases is functional tricuspid regurgitation (TR) after surgical MV correction. In the past, TR was considered to progressively revert with time after left-sided valve restoration. Nevertheless, more recent studies showed that TR could develop and evolve postoperatively over time, as well as being closely associated with a poorer prognosis in terms of morbidity and mortality. Pressure and volume overload are usually the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms; structural alterations, like tricuspid annulus dilatation, increased leaflet tethering and right ventricular remodelling are almost always present when regurgitation develops. The most important risk factors associated with a higher probability of late TR development involve the elderly, female gender, larger left atrial size, atrial fibrillation, right chamber dilatation, higher pulmonary artery systolic pressures, longer times from the onset of MV disease to surgery, history of rheumatic heart disease, ischaemic heart disease and prosthetic valve malfunction. The time of TR manifestation can be up to 10 years or more after an MV surgery. Echocardiography, including the novel 3D Echo techniques, is crucial in the early diagnosis and prognosis of future TV disease development. Appropriate surgical technique and timing still need to be clarified. PMID:22457188

  9. Double-orifice mitral valve treated by percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Thomas George; Revankar, Vinod Raghunath; Papanna, Monica; Srinivasan, Harshini

    2016-07-01

    Double-orifice mitral valve is an rare anomaly characterized by a mitral valve with a single fibrous annulus and 2 orifices that open into the left ventricle. It is often associated with other congenital anomalies, most commonly atrioventricular canal defects, and rarely associated with a stenotic or regurgitant mitral valve. A patient who was diagnosed with congenital double-orifice mitral valve with severe mitral stenosis was treated successfully by percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy rather than the conventional open surgical approach, demonstrating the utility of percutaneous correction of this anomaly. PMID:26045488

  10. Adenosine and Ischemic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bruce T.; Swierkosz, Tomasz A.; Herrmann, Howard C.; Kimmel, Stephen; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine is released in large amounts during myocardial ischemia and is capable of exerting potent cardioprotective effects in the heart. Although these observations on adenosine have been known for a long time, how adenosine acts to achieve its anti-ischemic effect remains incompletely understood. However, recent advances on the chemistry and pharmacology of adenosine receptor ligands have provided important and novel information on the function of adenosine receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system. The development of model systems for the cardiac actions of adenosine has yielded important insights into its mechanism of action and have begun to elucidate the sequence of signalling events from receptor activation to the actual exertion of its cardioprotective effect. The present review will focus on the adenosine receptors that mediate the potent anti-ischemic effect of adenosine, new ligands at the receptors, potential molecular signalling mechanisms downstream of the receptor, mediators for cardioprotection, and possible clinical applications in cardiovascular disorders. PMID:10607860