Science.gov

Sample records for functional modules revealed

  1. Remote Synchronization Reveals Network Symmetries and Functional Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Valencia, Miguel; Chavez, Mario; Díaz-Guilera, Albert; Latora, Vito

    2013-04-01

    We study a Kuramoto model in which the oscillators are associated with the nodes of a complex network and the interactions include a phase frustration, thus preventing full synchronization. The system organizes into a regime of remote synchronization where pairs of nodes with the same network symmetry are fully synchronized, despite their distance on the graph. We provide analytical arguments to explain this result, and we show how the frustration parameter affects the distribution of phases. An application to brain networks suggests that anatomical symmetry plays a role in neural synchronization by determining correlated functional modules across distant locations.

  2. Predicting invasive species impacts: a community module functional response approach reveals context dependencies.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Rachel A; Dick, Jaimie T A; Pritchard, Daniel W; Ennis, Marilyn; Hatcher, Melanie J; Dunn, Alison M

    2015-03-01

    Predatory functional responses play integral roles in predator-prey dynamics, and their assessment promises greater understanding and prediction of the predatory impacts of invasive species. Other interspecific interactions, however, such as parasitism and higher-order predation, have the potential to modify predator-prey interactions and thus the predictive capability of the comparative functional response approach. We used a four-species community module (higher-order predator; focal native or invasive predators; parasites of focal predators; native prey) to compare the predatory functional responses of native Gammarus duebeni celticus and invasive Gammarus pulex amphipods towards three invertebrate prey species (Asellus aquaticus, Simulium spp., Baetis rhodani), thus, quantifying the context dependencies of parasitism and a higher-order fish predator on these functional responses. Our functional response experiments demonstrated that the invasive amphipod had a higher predatory impact (lower handling time) on two of three prey species, which reflects patterns of impact observed in the field. The community module also revealed that parasitism had context-dependent influences, for one prey species, with the potential to further reduce the predatory impact of the invasive amphipod or increase the predatory impact of the native amphipod in the presence of a higher-order fish predator. Partial consumption of prey was similar for both predators and occurred increasingly in the order A. aquaticus, Simulium spp. and B. rhodani. This was associated with increasing prey densities, but showed no context dependencies with parasitism or higher-order fish predator. This study supports the applicability of comparative functional responses as a tool to predict and assess invasive species impacts incorporating multiple context dependencies. PMID:25265905

  3. Predicting invasive species impacts: a community module functional response approach reveals context dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Rachel A; Dick, Jaimie T A; Pritchard, Daniel W; Ennis, Marilyn; Hatcher, Melanie J; Dunn, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Predatory functional responses play integral roles in predator–prey dynamics, and their assessment promises greater understanding and prediction of the predatory impacts of invasive species. Other interspecific interactions, however, such as parasitism and higher-order predation, have the potential to modify predator–prey interactions and thus the predictive capability of the comparative functional response approach. We used a four-species community module (higher-order predator; focal native or invasive predators; parasites of focal predators; native prey) to compare the predatory functional responses of native Gammarus duebeni celticus and invasive Gammarus pulex amphipods towards three invertebrate prey species (Asellus aquaticus, Simulium spp., Baetis rhodani), thus, quantifying the context dependencies of parasitism and a higher-order fish predator on these functional responses. Our functional response experiments demonstrated that the invasive amphipod had a higher predatory impact (lower handling time) on two of three prey species, which reflects patterns of impact observed in the field. The community module also revealed that parasitism had context-dependent influences, for one prey species, with the potential to further reduce the predatory impact of the invasive amphipod or increase the predatory impact of the native amphipod in the presence of a higher-order fish predator. Partial consumption of prey was similar for both predators and occurred increasingly in the order A. aquaticus, Simulium spp. and B. rhodani. This was associated with increasing prey densities, but showed no context dependencies with parasitism or higher-order fish predator. This study supports the applicability of comparative functional responses as a tool to predict and assess invasive species impacts incorporating multiple context dependencies. PMID:25265905

  4. Validation of Skeletal Muscle cis-Regulatory Module Predictions Reveals Nucleotide Composition Bias in Functional Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Andrew T.; Chou, Alice Yi; Arenillas, David J.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide scan for muscle-specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) using three computational prediction programs. Based on the predictions, 339 candidate CRMs were tested in cell culture with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and C2C12 myoblasts for capacity to direct selective reporter gene expression to differentiated C2C12 myotubes. A subset of 19 CRMs validated as functional in the assay. The rate of predictive success reveals striking limitations of computational regulatory sequence analysis methods for CRM discovery. Motif-based methods performed no better than predictions based only on sequence conservation. Analysis of the properties of the functional sequences relative to inactive sequences identifies nucleotide sequence composition can be an important characteristic to incorporate in future methods for improved predictive specificity. Muscle-related TFBSs predicted within the functional sequences display greater sequence conservation than non-TFBS flanking regions. Comparison with recent MyoD and histone modification ChIP-Seq data supports the validity of the functional regions. PMID:22144875

  5. Proteomic Profiling in the Brain of CLN1 Disease Model Reveals Affected Functional Modules.

    PubMed

    Tikka, Saara; Monogioudi, Evanthia; Gotsopoulos, Athanasios; Soliymani, Rabah; Pezzini, Francesco; Scifo, Enzo; Uusi-Rauva, Kristiina; Tyynelä, Jaana; Baumann, Marc; Jalanko, Anu; Simonati, Alessandro; Lalowski, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are the most commonly inherited progressive encephalopathies of childhood. Pathologically, they are characterized by endolysosomal storage with different ultrastructural features and biochemical compositions. The molecular mechanisms causing progressive neurodegeneration and common molecular pathways linking expression of different NCL genes are largely unknown. We analyzed proteome alterations in the brains of a mouse model of human infantile CLN1 disease-palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1 (Ppt1) gene knockout and its wild-type age-matched counterpart at different stages: pre-symptomatic, symptomatic and advanced. For this purpose, we utilized a combination of laser capture microdissection-based quantitative liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS imaging to quantify/visualize the changes in protein expression in disease-affected brain thalamus and cerebral cortex tissue slices, respectively. Proteomic profiling of the pre-symptomatic stage thalamus revealed alterations mostly in metabolic processes and inhibition of various neuronal functions, i.e., neuritogenesis. Down-regulation in dynamics associated with growth of plasma projections and cellular protrusions was further corroborated by findings from RNA sequencing of CLN1 patients' fibroblasts. Changes detected at the symptomatic stage included: mitochondrial functions, synaptic vesicle transport, myelin proteome and signaling cascades, such as RhoA signaling. Considerable dysregulation of processes related to mitochondrial cell death, RhoA/Huntington's disease signaling and myelin sheath breakdown were observed at the advanced stage of the disease. The identified changes in protein levels were further substantiated by bioinformatics and network approaches, immunohistochemistry on brain tissues and literature knowledge, thus identifying various functional modules affected in the CLN1 childhood

  6. A Novel Flow Cytometric HTS Assay Reveals Functional Modulators of ATP Binding Cassette Transporter ABCB6

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Hemantkumar; Young, Susan; Ma, Xiaochao; Waller, Anna; Garcia, Matthew; Perez, Dominique; Chavez, Stephanie; Strouse, Jacob J.; Haynes, Mark K.; Bologa, Cristian G.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Tegos, George P.; Sklar, Larry A.; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2012-01-01

    ABCB6 is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette family of transporter proteins that is increasingly recognized as a relevant physiological and therapeutic target. Evaluation of modulators of ABCB6 activity would pave the way toward a more complete understanding of the significance of this transport process in tumor cell growth, proliferation and therapy-related drug resistance. In addition, this effort would improve our understanding of the function of ABCB6 in normal physiology with respect to heme biosynthesis, and cellular adaptation to metabolic demand and stress responses. To search for modulators of ABCB6, we developed a novel cell-based approach that, in combination with flow cytometric high-throughput screening (HTS), can be used to identify functional modulators of ABCB6. Accumulation of protoporphyrin, a fluorescent molecule, in wild-type ABCB6 expressing K562 cells, forms the basis of the HTS assay. Screening the Prestwick Chemical Library employing the HTS assay identified four compounds, benzethonium chloride, verteporfin, tomatine hydrochloride and piperlongumine, that reduced ABCB6 mediated cellular porphyrin levels. Validation of the identified compounds employing the hemin-agarose affinity chromatography and mitochondrial transport assays demonstrated that three out of the four compounds were capable of inhibiting ABCB6 mediated hemin transport into isolated mitochondria. However, only verteporfin and tomatine hydrochloride inhibited ABCB6’s ability to compete with hemin as an ABCB6 substrate. This assay is therefore sensitive, robust, and suitable for automation in a high-throughput environment as demonstrated by our identification of selective functional modulators of ABCB6. Application of this assay to other libraries of synthetic compounds and natural products is expected to identify novel modulators of ABCB6 activity. PMID:22808084

  7. Zinc modulation of water permeability reveals that aquaporin 0 functions as a cooperative tetramer.

    PubMed

    Németh-Cahalan, Karin L; Kalman, Katalin; Froger, Alexandrine; Hall, James E

    2007-11-01

    We previously showed that the water permeability of AQP0, the water channel of the lens, increases with acid pH and that His40 is required (Németh-Cahalan, K.L., and J.E. Hall. 2000. J. Biol. Chem. 275:6777-6782; Németh-Cahalan, K.L., K. Kalman, and J.E. Hall. 2004. J. Gen. Physiol. 123:573-580). We have now investigated the effect of zinc (and other transition metals) on the water permeability of AQP0 expressed in Xenopus oocytes and determined the amino acid residues that facilitate zinc modulation. Zinc (1 mM) increased AQP0 water permeability by a factor of two and prevented any additional increase induced by acid pH. Zinc had no effect on water permeability of AQP1, AQP4 or MIPfun (AQP0 from killifish), or on mutants of AQP1 and MIPfun with added external histidines. Nickel, but not copper, had the same effect on AQP0 water permeability as zinc. A fit of the concentration dependence of the zinc effect to the Hill equation gives a coefficient greater than three, suggesting that binding of more than one zinc ion is necessary to enhance water permeability. His40 and His122 are necessary for zinc modulation of AQP0 water permeability, implying structural constraints for zinc binding and functional modulation. The change in water permeability was highly sensitive to a coinjected zinc-insensitive mutant and a single insensitive monomer completely abolished zinc modulation. Our results suggest a model in which positive cooperativity among subunits of the AQP0 tetramer is required for zinc modulation, implying that the tetramer is the functional unit. The results also offer the possibility of a pharmacological approach to manipulate the water permeability and transparency of the lens. PMID:17938229

  8. Selective Actions of Novel Allosteric Modulators Reveal Functional Heteromers of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shen; Noetzel, Meredith J.; Johnson, Kari A.; Zamorano, Rocio; Jalan-Sakrikar, Nidhi; Gregory, Karen J.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors play important roles in regulating CNS function and are known to function as obligatory dimers. Although recent studies have suggested heterodimeric assembly of mGlu receptors in vitro, the demonstration that distinct mGlu receptor proteins can form heterodimers or hetero-complexes with other mGlu subunits in native tissues, such as neurons, has not been shown. Using biochemical and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate here that mGlu2 and mGlu4 form a hetero-complex in native rat and mouse tissues which exhibits a distinct pharmacological profile. These data greatly extend our current understanding of mGlu receptor interaction and function and provide compelling evidence that mGlu receptors can function as heteromers in intact brain circuits. PMID:24381270

  9. Community Structure Reveals Biologically Functional Modules in MEF2C Transcriptional Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Alcalá-Corona, Sergio A.; Velázquez-Caldelas, Tadeo E.; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks are useful to understand the activity behind the complex mechanisms in transcriptional regulation. A main goal in contemporary biology is using such networks to understand the systemic regulation of gene expression. In this work, we carried out a systematic study of a transcriptional regulatory network derived from a comprehensive selection of all potential transcription factor interactions downstream from MEF2C, a human transcription factor master regulator. By analyzing the connectivity structure of such network, we were able to find different biologically functional processes and specific biochemical pathways statistically enriched in communities of genes into the network, such processes are related to cell signaling, cell cycle and metabolism. In this way we further support the hypothesis that structural properties of biological networks encode an important part of their functional behavior in eukaryotic cells. PMID:27252657

  10. Single-Cell Co-expression Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Modules, Co-regulation Mechanisms and Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Xia, Shuli; Arand, Brian; Zhu, Heng; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Ji, Hongkai; Qian, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Co-expression analysis has been employed to predict gene function, identify functional modules, and determine tumor subtypes. Previous co-expression analysis was mainly conducted at bulk tissue level. It is unclear whether co-expression analysis at the single-cell level will provide novel insights into transcriptional regulation. Here we developed a computational approach to compare glioblastoma expression profiles at the single-cell level with those obtained from bulk tumors. We found that the co-expressed genes observed in single cells and bulk tumors have little overlap and show distinct characteristics. The co-expressed genes identified in bulk tumors tend to have similar biological functions, and are enriched for intrachromosomal interactions with synchronized promoter activity. In contrast, single-cell co-expressed genes are enriched for known protein-protein interactions, and are regulated through interchromosomal interactions. Moreover, gene members of some protein complexes are co-expressed only at the bulk level, while those of other complexes are co-expressed at both single-cell and bulk levels. Finally, we identified a set of co-expressed genes that can predict the survival of glioblastoma patients. Our study highlights that comparative analyses of single-cell and bulk gene expression profiles enable us to identify functional modules that are regulated at different levels and hold great translational potential. PMID:27100869

  11. In Vitro Assessment Reveals Parameters-Dependent Modulation on Excitability and Functional Connectivity of Cerebellar Slice by Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rongyu; Zhang, Guanghao; Weng, Xiechuan; Han, Yao; Lang, Yiran; Zhao, Yuwei; Zhao, Xiaobo; Wang, Kun; Lin, Qiuxia; Wang, Changyong

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an increasingly common technique used to selectively modify neural excitability and plasticity. There is still controversy concerning the cortical response to rTMS of different frequencies. In this study, a novel in vitro paradigm utilizing the Multi-Electrodes Array (MEA) system and acute cerebellar slicing is described. In a controllable environment that comprises perfusion, incubation, recording and stimulation modules, the spontaneous single-unit spiking activity in response to rTMS of different frequencies and powers was directly measured and analyzed. Investigation using this in vitro paradigm revealed frequency-dependent modulation upon the excitability and functional connectivity of cerebellar slices. The 1-Hz rTMS sessions induced short-term inhibition or lagged inhibition, whereas 20-Hz sessions induced excitation. The level of modulation is influenced by the value of power. However the long-term response fluctuated without persistent direction. The choice of evaluation method may also interfere with the interpretation of modulation direction. Furthermore, both short-term and long-term functional connectivity was strengthened by 1-Hz rTMS and weakened by 20-Hz rTMS. PMID:27000527

  12. Structural and Functional Studies of the Modulator NS9283 Reveal Agonist-like Mechanism of Action at α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Jeppe A.; Ahring, Philip K.; Kastrup, Jette S.; Gajhede, Michael; Balle, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of Cys loop receptor ion channels is a proven drug discovery strategy, but many underlying mechanisms of the mode of action are poorly understood. We report the x-ray structure of the acetylcholine-binding protein from Lymnaea stagnalis with NS9283, a stoichiometry selective positive modulator that targets the α4-α4 interface of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Together with homology modeling, mutational data, quantum mechanical calculations, and pharmacological studies on α4β2 nAChRs, the structure reveals a modulator binding mode that overlaps the α4-α4 interface agonist (acetylcholine)-binding site. Analysis of contacts to residues known to govern agonist binding and function suggests that modulation occurs by an agonist-like mechanism. Selectivity for α4-α4 over α4-β2 interfaces is determined mainly by steric restrictions from Val-136 on the β2-subunit and favorable interactions between NS9283 and His-142 at the complementary side of α4. In the concentration ranges where modulation is observed, its selectivity prevents NS9283 from directly activating nAChRs because activation requires coordinated action from more than one interface. However, we demonstrate that in a mutant receptor with one natural and two engineered α4-α4 interfaces, NS9283 is an agonist. Modulation via extracellular binding sites is well known for benzodiazepines acting at γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors. Like NS9283, benzodiazepines increase the apparent agonist potency with a minimal effect on efficacy. The shared modulatory profile along with a binding site located in an extracellular subunit interface suggest that modulation via an agonist-like mechanism may be a common mechanism of action that potentially could apply to Cys loop receptors beyond the α4β2 nAChRs. PMID:24982426

  13. Structure-Function Analyses of a Staphylococcus epidermidis Autoinducing Peptide Reveals Motifs Critical for AgrC-type Receptor Modulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tian; Tal-Gan, Yftah; Paharik, Alexandra E; Horswill, Alexander R; Blackwell, Helen E

    2016-07-15

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is frequently implicated in human infections associated with indwelling medical devices due to its ubiquity in the skin flora and formation of robust biofilms. The accessory gene regulator (agr) quorum sensing (QS) system plays a prominent role in the establishment of biofilms and infection by this bacterium. Agr activation is mediated by the binding of a peptide signal (or autoinducing peptide, AIP) to its cognate AgrC receptor. Many questions remain about the role of QS in S. epidermidis infections, as well as in mixed-microbial populations on a host, and chemical modulators of its agr system could provide novel insights into this signaling network. The AIP ligand provides an initial scaffold for the development of such probes; however, the structure-activity relationships (SARs) for activation of S. epidermidis AgrC receptors by AIPs are largely unknown. Herein, we report the first SAR analyses of an S. epidermidis AIP by performing systematic alanine and d-amino acid scans of the S. epidermidis AIP-I. On the basis of these results, we designed and identified potent, pan-group inhibitors of the AgrC receptors in the three S. epidermidis agr groups, as well as a set of AIP-I analogs capable of selective AgrC inhibition in either specific S. epidermidis agr groups or in another common staphylococcal species, S. aureus. In addition, we uncovered a non-native peptide agonist of AgrC-I that can strongly inhibit S. epidermidis biofilm growth. Together, these synthetic analogs represent new and readily accessible probes for investigating the roles of QS in S. epidermidis colonization and infections. PMID:27159024

  14. Histamine modulates microglia function

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Histamine is commonly acknowledged as an inflammatory mediator in peripheral tissues, leaving its role in brain immune responses scarcely studied. Therefore, our aim was to uncover the cellular and molecular mechanisms elicited by this molecule and its receptors in microglia-induced inflammation by evaluating cell migration and inflammatory mediator release. Methods Firstly, we detected the expression of all known histamine receptor subtypes (H1R, H2R, H3R and H4R), using a murine microglial cell line and primary microglia cell cultures from rat cortex, by real-time PCR analysis, immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. Then, we evaluated the role of histamine in microglial cell motility by performing scratch wound assays. Results were further confirmed using murine cortex explants. Finally, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels were evaluated by ELISA measurements to determine the role of histamine on the release of these inflammatory mediators. Results After 12 h of treatment, 100 μM histamine and 10 μg/ml histamine-loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles significantly stimulated microglia motility via H4R activation. In addition, migration involves α5β1 integrins, and p38 and Akt signaling pathways. Migration of microglial cells was also enhanced in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/ml), used as a positive control. Importantly, histamine inhibited LPS-stimulated migration via H4R activation. Histamine or H4R agonist also inhibited LPS-induced IL-1β release in both N9 microglia cell line and hippocampal organotypic slice cultures. Conclusions To our knowledge, we are the first to show a dual role of histamine in the modulation of microglial inflammatory responses. Altogether, our data suggest that histamine per se triggers microglia motility, whereas histamine impedes LPS-induced microglia migration and IL-1β release. This last datum assigns a new putative anti-inflammatory role for

  15. 3D structure/function analysis of PilX reveals how minor pilins can modulate the virulence properties of type IV pili

    PubMed Central

    Helaine, Sophie; Dyer, David H.; Nassif, Xavier; Pelicic, Vladimir; Forest, Katrina T.

    2007-01-01

    Type IV pili (Tfp) are widespread filamentous bacterial organelles that mediate multiple virulence-related phenotypes. They are composed mainly of pilin subunits, which are processed before filament assembly by dedicated prepilin peptidases. Other proteins processed by these peptidases, whose molecular nature and mode of action remain enigmatic, play critical roles in Tfp biology. We have performed a detailed structure/function analysis of one such protein, PilX from Neisseria meningitidis, which is crucial for formation of bacterial aggregates and adhesion to human cells. The x-ray crystal structure of PilX reveals the α/β roll fold shared by all pilins, and we show that this protein colocalizes with Tfp. These observations suggest that PilX is a minor, or low abundance, pilin that assembles within the filaments in a similar way to pilin. Deletion of a PilX distinctive structural element, which is predicted to be exposed on the filament surface, abolishes aggregation and adhesion. Our results support a model in which surface-exposed motifs in PilX subunits stabilize bacterial aggregates against the disruptive force of pilus retraction and illustrate how a minor pilus component can enhance the functional properties of pili of rather simple composition and structure. PMID:17893339

  16. [Photodynamic modulation of cellular functions].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Jiang, Hong-Ning; Cui, Zong-Jie

    2016-08-25

    Photodynamic action, due to the rather limited lifetime (1 μs) and effective reactive distance of singlet oxygen (< 10 nm), could subcellular-specifically regulate different cellular functions. Photodynamic action could activate permanently cholecystokinin (CCK) 1 receptors, and sensitize or desensitize other G protein-coupled receptors. The emergence in recent years of genetically- encoded protein photosensitisers has enabled more precisely-targeted photodynamic modulation of subcellular organelles and functional proteins. Protein photosensitisers (such as KillerRed, miniSOG or SOPP) expressed on the plasma membrane, mitochondria, lysosomes or endoplasmic reticulum can modulate photodynamically subcellular functions and fine-tune protein activity by targeted photooxidation. With the newly emerged active illumination technique, simultaneous photodynamic action localized at multiple sites is now possible, and the contribution of subcellular regions to the whole cell or individual cells to a cell cluster could be quantitated. Photodynamic action with protein photosensitiser will be a powerful tool for nano-manipulation in cell physiology research. PMID:27546513

  17. Natural Compounds Modulating Mitochondrial Functions

    PubMed Central

    Gibellini, Lara; Bianchini, Elena; De Biasi, Sara; Nasi, Milena; Cossarizza, Andrea; Pinti, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are organelles responsible for several crucial cell functions, including respiration, oxidative phosphorylation, and regulation of apoptosis; they are also the main intracellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the last years, a particular interest has been devoted to studying the effects on mitochondria of natural compounds of vegetal origin, quercetin (Qu), resveratrol (RSV), and curcumin (Cur) being the most studied molecules. All these natural compounds modulate mitochondrial functions by inhibiting organelle enzymes or metabolic pathways (such as oxidative phosphorylation), by altering the production of mitochondrial ROS and by modulating the activity of transcription factors which regulate the expression of mitochondrial proteins. While Qu displays both pro- and antioxidant activities, RSV and Cur are strong antioxidant, as they efficiently scavenge mitochondrial ROS and upregulate antioxidant transcriptional programmes in cells. All the three compounds display a proapoptotic activity, mediated by the capability to directly cause the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria or indirectly by upregulating the expression of proapoptotic proteins of Bcl-2 family and downregulating antiapoptotic proteins. Interestingly, these effects are particularly evident on proliferating cancer cells and can have important therapeutic implications. PMID:26167193

  18. A Reduced-Function Allele Reveals That EARLY FLOWERING3 Repressive Action on the Circadian Clock Is Modulated by Phytochrome Signals in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kolmos, Elsebeth; Herrero, Eva; Bujdoso, Nora; Millar, Andrew J.; Tóth, Réka; Gyula, Peter; Nagy, Ferenc; Davis, Seth J.

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) is essential for the generation of circadian rhythms. ELF3 has been proposed to restrict light signals to the oscillator through phytochrome photoreceptors, but that has not been explicitly shown. Furthermore, the genetic action of ELF3 within the clock had remained elusive. Here, we report a functional characterization of ELF3 through the analysis of the elf3-12 allele, which encodes an amino acid replacement in a conserved domain. Circadian oscillations persisted, and unlike elf3 null alleles, elf3-12 resulted in a short circadian period only under ambient light. The period shortening effect of elf3-12 was enhanced by the overexpression of phytochromes phyA and phyB. We found that elf3-12 was only modestly perturbed in resetting of the oscillator and in gating light-regulated gene expression. Furthermore, elf3-12 essentially displayed wild-type development. We identified targets of ELF3 transcriptional repression in the oscillator, highlighting the action at the morning gene PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR9. Taken together, we identified two separable roles for ELF3, one affecting the circadian network and the other affecting light input to the oscillator. This is consistent with a dual function of ELF3 as both an integrator of phytochrome signals and a repressor component of the core oscillator. PMID:21908721

  19. The Modulation Transfer Function for Speech Intelligibility

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Taffeta M.; Theunissen, Frédéric E.

    2009-01-01

    We systematically determined which spectrotemporal modulations in speech are necessary for comprehension by human listeners. Speech comprehension has been shown to be robust to spectral and temporal degradations, but the specific relevance of particular degradations is arguable due to the complexity of the joint spectral and temporal information in the speech signal. We applied a novel modulation filtering technique to recorded sentences to restrict acoustic information quantitatively and to obtain a joint spectrotemporal modulation transfer function for speech comprehension, the speech MTF. For American English, the speech MTF showed the criticality of low modulation frequencies in both time and frequency. Comprehension was significantly impaired when temporal modulations <12 Hz or spectral modulations <4 cycles/kHz were removed. More specifically, the MTF was bandpass in temporal modulations and low-pass in spectral modulations: temporal modulations from 1 to 7 Hz and spectral modulations <1 cycles/kHz were the most important. We evaluated the importance of spectrotemporal modulations for vocal gender identification and found a different region of interest: removing spectral modulations between 3 and 7 cycles/kHz significantly increases gender misidentifications of female speakers. The determination of the speech MTF furnishes an additional method for producing speech signals with reduced bandwidth but high intelligibility. Such compression could be used for audio applications such as file compression or noise removal and for clinical applications such as signal processing for cochlear implants. PMID:19266016

  20. Arabidopsis gene co-expression network and its functional modules

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Linyong; Van Hemert, John L; Dash, Sudhansu; Dickerson, Julie A

    2009-01-01

    Background Biological networks characterize the interactions of biomolecules at a systems-level. One important property of biological networks is the modular structure, in which nodes are densely connected with each other, but between which there are only sparse connections. In this report, we attempted to find the relationship between the network topology and formation of modular structure by comparing gene co-expression networks with random networks. The organization of gene functional modules was also investigated. Results We constructed a genome-wide Arabidopsis gene co-expression network (AGCN) by using 1094 microarrays. We then analyzed the topological properties of AGCN and partitioned the network into modules by using an efficient graph clustering algorithm. In the AGCN, 382 hub genes formed a clique, and they were densely connected only to a small subset of the network. At the module level, the network clustering results provide a systems-level understanding of the gene modules that coordinate multiple biological processes to carry out specific biological functions. For instance, the photosynthesis module in AGCN involves a very large number (> 1000) of genes which participate in various biological processes including photosynthesis, electron transport, pigment metabolism, chloroplast organization and biogenesis, cofactor metabolism, protein biosynthesis, and vitamin metabolism. The cell cycle module orchestrated the coordinated expression of hundreds of genes involved in cell cycle, DNA metabolism, and cytoskeleton organization and biogenesis. We also compared the AGCN constructed in this study with a graphical Gaussian model (GGM) based Arabidopsis gene network. The photosynthesis, protein biosynthesis, and cell cycle modules identified from the GGM network had much smaller module sizes compared with the modules found in the AGCN, respectively. Conclusion This study reveals new insight into the topological properties of biological networks. The

  1. Carrier Modulation Via Waveform Probability Density Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.

    2004-01-01

    Beyond the classic modes of carrier modulation by varying amplitude (AM), phase (PM), or frequency (FM), we extend the modulation domain of an analog carrier signal to include a class of general modulations which are distinguished by their probability density function histogram. Separate waveform states are easily created by varying the pdf of the transmitted waveform. Individual waveform states are assignable as proxies for digital ONEs or ZEROs. At the receiver, these states are easily detected by accumulating sampled waveform statistics and performing periodic pattern matching, correlation, or statistical filtering. No fundamental natural laws are broken in the detection process. We show how a typical modulation scheme would work in the digital domain and suggest how to build an analog version. We propose that clever variations of the modulating waveform (and thus the histogram) can provide simple steganographic encoding.

  2. Carrier Modulation Via Waveform Probability Density Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.

    2006-01-01

    Beyond the classic modes of carrier modulation by varying amplitude (AM), phase (PM), or frequency (FM), we extend the modulation domain of an analog carrier signal to include a class of general modulations which are distinguished by their probability density function histogram. Separate waveform states are easily created by varying the pdf of the transmitted waveform. Individual waveform states are assignable as proxies for digital one's or zero's. At the receiver, these states are easily detected by accumulating sampled waveform statistics and performing periodic pattern matching, correlation, or statistical filtering. No fundamental physical laws are broken in the detection process. We show how a typical modulation scheme would work in the digital domain and suggest how to build an analog version. We propose that clever variations of the modulating waveform (and thus the histogram) can provide simple steganographic encoding.

  3. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Vera, Daniel L.; Bass, Hank W.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular processes mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. Chromatin structural assays can efficiently integrate information across diverse regulatory elements, revealing the functional noncoding genome. In this study, we use a differential nuclease sensitivity assay based on micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion to discover open chromatin regions in the maize genome. We find that maize MNase-hypersensitive (MNase HS) regions localize around active genes and within recombination hotspots, focusing biased gene conversion at their flanks. Although MNase HS regions map to less than 1% of the genome, they consistently explain a remarkably large amount (∼40%) of heritable phenotypic variance in diverse complex traits. MNase HS regions are therefore on par with coding sequences as annotations that demarcate the functional parts of the maize genome. These results imply that less than 3% of the maize genome (coding and MNase HS regions) may give rise to the overwhelming majority of phenotypic variation, greatly narrowing the scope of the functional genome. PMID:27185945

  4. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome.

    PubMed

    Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Vera, Daniel L; Bass, Hank W; Buckler, Edward S

    2016-05-31

    Cellular processes mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. Chromatin structural assays can efficiently integrate information across diverse regulatory elements, revealing the functional noncoding genome. In this study, we use a differential nuclease sensitivity assay based on micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion to discover open chromatin regions in the maize genome. We find that maize MNase-hypersensitive (MNase HS) regions localize around active genes and within recombination hotspots, focusing biased gene conversion at their flanks. Although MNase HS regions map to less than 1% of the genome, they consistently explain a remarkably large amount (∼40%) of heritable phenotypic variance in diverse complex traits. MNase HS regions are therefore on par with coding sequences as annotations that demarcate the functional parts of the maize genome. These results imply that less than 3% of the maize genome (coding and MNase HS regions) may give rise to the overwhelming majority of phenotypic variation, greatly narrowing the scope of the functional genome. PMID:27185945

  5. Caffeine Modulates Attention Network Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Lieberman, Harris R.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigated the effects of caffeine (0 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg) on a flanker task designed to test Posner's three visual attention network functions: alerting, orienting, and executive control [Posner, M. I. (2004). "Cognitive neuroscience of attention". New York, NY: Guilford Press]. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind…

  6. Co-modulation analysis of gene regulation in breast cancer reveals complex interplay between ESR1 and ERBB2 genes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Gene regulation is dynamic across cellular conditions and disease subtypes. From the aspect of regulation under modulation, regulation strength between a pair of genes can be modulated by (dependent on) expression abundance of another gene (modulator gene). Previous studies have demonstrated the involvement of genes modulated by single modulator genes in cancers, including breast cancer. However, analysis of multi-modulator co-modulation that can further delineate the landscape of complex gene regulation is, to our knowledge, unexplored previously. In the present study we aim to explore the joint effects of multiple modulator genes in modulating global gene regulation and dissect the biological functions in breast cancer. Results To carry out the analysis, we proposed the Covariability-based Multiple Regression (CoMRe) method. The method is mainly built on a multiple regression model that takes expression levels of multiple modulators as inputs and regulation strength between genes as output. Pairs of genes were divided into groups based on their co-modulation patterns. Analyzing gene expression profiles from 286 breast cancer patients, CoMRe investigated ten candidate modulator genes that interacted and jointly determined global gene regulation. Among the candidate modulators, ESR1, ERBB2, and ADAM12 were found modulating the most numbers of gene pairs. The largest group of gene pairs was composed of ones that were modulated by merely ESR1. Functional annotation revealed that the group was significantly related to tumorigenesis and estrogen signaling in breast cancer. ESR1−ERBB2 co-modulation was the largest group modulated by more than one modulators. Similarly, the group was functionally associated with hormone stimulus, suggesting that functions of the two modulators are performed, at least partially, through modulation. The findings were validated in majorities of patients (> 99%) of two independent breast cancer datasets. Conclusions We have

  7. Modulation transfer function for infrared reflectarrays.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pedrero, Jose Antonio; Ginn, James; Alda, Javier; Boreman, Glenn

    2011-09-20

    The quality of the image produced by optical reflectarrays as a function of the F/#, polarization, and wavelength is analyzed in this paper. The results are expressed as monochromatic and polychromatic modulation transfer functions. They show that large aperture multilevel reflectarrays perform quite close to the diffraction-limited case. The chromatic aberrations make these elements highly wavelength-selective. PMID:21947056

  8. A Walsh Function Module Users' Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) with Walsh functions offers new opportunities to simulate many challenging problems in mathematical physics. The approach was developed to better simulate hypersonic flows with shocks on unstructured grids. It is unique in that integrals and derivatives are computed using simple matrix multiplication of series representations of functions without the need for divided differences. The product of any two Walsh functions is another Walsh function - a feature that radically changes an algorithm for solving PDEs. A FORTRAN module for supporting Walsh function simulations is documented. A FORTRAN code is also documented with options for solving time-dependent problems: an advection equation, a Burgers equation, and a Riemann problem. The sample problems demonstrate the usage of the Walsh function module including such features as operator overloading, Fast Walsh Transforms in multi-dimensions, and a Fast Walsh reciprocal.

  9. Network analysis reveals that bacteria and fungi form modules that correlate independently with soil parameters.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Alexandre B; Prendergast-Miller, Miranda T; Richardson, Alan E; Toscas, Peter; Farrell, Mark; Macdonald, Lynne M; Baker, Geoff; Wark, Tim; Thrall, Peter H

    2015-08-01

    Network and multivariate statistical analyses were performed to determine interactions between bacterial and fungal community terminal restriction length polymorphisms as well as soil properties in paired woodland and pasture sites. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed that shifts in woodland community composition correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon, while changes in pasture community composition correlated with moisture, nitrogen and phosphorus. Weighted correlation network analysis detected two distinct microbial modules per land use. Bacterial and fungal ribotypes did not group separately, rather all modules comprised of both bacterial and fungal ribotypes. Woodland modules had a similar fungal : bacterial ribotype ratio, while in the pasture, one module was fungal dominated. There was no correspondence between pasture and woodland modules in their ribotype composition. The modules had different relationships to soil variables, and these contrasts were not detected without the use of network analysis. This study demonstrated that fungi and bacteria, components of the soil microbial communities usually treated as separate functional groups as in a CCA approach, were co-correlated and formed distinct associations in these adjacent habitats. Understanding these distinct modular associations may shed more light on their niche space in the soil environment, and allow a more realistic description of soil microbial ecology and function. PMID:25040229

  10. Nucleosome competition reveals processive acetylation by the SAGA HAT module.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Alison E; Cieniewicz, Anne M; Taverna, Sean D; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    The Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) coactivator complex hyperacetylates histone tails in vivo in a manner that depends upon histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), a histone mark enriched at promoters of actively transcribed genes. SAGA contains a separable subcomplex known as the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) module that contains the HAT, Gcn5, bound to Sgf29, Ada2, and Ada3. Sgf29 contains a tandem Tudor domain that recognizes H3K4me3-containing peptides and is required for histone hyperacetylation in vivo. However, the mechanism by which H3K4me3 recognition leads to lysine hyperacetylation is unknown, as in vitro studies show no effect of the H3K4me3 modification on histone peptide acetylation by Gcn5. To determine how H3K4me3 binding by Sgf29 leads to histone hyperacetylation by Gcn5, we used differential fluorescent labeling of histones to monitor acetylation of individual subpopulations of methylated and unmodified nucleosomes in a mixture. We find that the SAGA HAT module preferentially acetylates H3K4me3 nucleosomes in a mixture containing excess unmodified nucleosomes and that this effect requires the Tudor domain of Sgf29. The H3K4me3 mark promotes processive, multisite acetylation of histone H3 by Gcn5 that can account for the different acetylation patterns established by SAGA at promoters versus coding regions. Our results establish a model for Sgf29 function at gene promoters and define a mechanism governing crosstalk between histone modifications. PMID:26401015

  11. Modulation transfer function of bar code scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong; Milster, Tom D.

    1998-09-01

    Bar code scanners are ubiquitous in supermarkets. As a bar code is passed over a scanner, a laser beam scans across the bar code. The scattered light is modulated by the reflectivity of the bars and spaces of the bar code. The bar code scanning process can be described as a 1D convolution of the scanning laser profile and the bar code reflectivity function. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of bar code scanning is the Fourier transform of the marginal profile of the laser beam. The properties of the MTF of bar code scanning is similar to that of an incoherent imaging system. Measurements of the MTF of bar code scanning at one focus position are presented. The experimental results are then discussed.

  12. Multifunctional ferromagnetic disks for modulating cell function

    PubMed Central

    Vitol, Elina A.; Novosad, Valentyn; Rozhkova, Elena A.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we focus on the methods for controlling cell function with ferromagnetic disk-shaped particles. We will first review the history of magnetically assisted modulation of cell behavior and applications of magnetic particles for studying physical properties of a cell. Then, we consider the biological applications of the microdisks such as the method for induction of cancer cell apoptosis, controlled drug release, hyperthermia and MRI imaging. PMID:23766544

  13. Aerosol modulation transfer function: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeika, Norman S.

    1997-09-01

    The aerosol modulation transfer function (MTF) describes blurring deriving from light scatter caused by aerosols. Little scintillations or image dancing are involved. When overall atmospheric point spread function (PSF) is analyzed for its turbulence component deriving from angle-of-arrival fluctuations or scintillations, a significant portion of the PSF is left over. This is the aerosol component. This overview describes the basic physical mechanisms for aerosol MTF and its wavelength, weather, and time exposure dependences, as well as a comparison to turbulence MiT.

  14. On functional module detection in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Koch, Ina; Ackermann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes) and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models. PMID:24958145

  15. On Functional Module Detection in Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Ina; Ackermann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes) and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models. PMID:24958145

  16. Elements and modulation of functional dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Alan C

    2014-10-01

    The existing structure-function paradigm of drug discovery has been evolving toward the essential incorporation of dynamics data. This new functional dynamics paradigm emphasizes conformational entropy as a driving force of protein function and intermolecular recognition. Conformational dynamics (a proxy of conformational entropy) impacts the degree of protein (dis)order and the constitution of the conformational ensemble, the mechanisms of allostery and drug resistance, and the free energy of ligand binding. Specific protein and ligand conformations facilitate favorable, reciprocal interactions. The number of protein and ligand conformers that exhibit favorable binding interactions will vary from system to system. All binding scenarios can modulate protein dynamics by various levels of enthalpic and entropic contribution, with significant influence on the functional dynamics of the system. Analysis and consideration of resulting changes of activity, signaling, catalysis, and subsequent phenotypic outcome are powerful motivations in the drug design process. PMID:24913411

  17. Cholinergic modulation of hippocampal network function

    PubMed Central

    Teles-Grilo Ruivo, Leonor M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic septohippocampal projections from the medial septal area to the hippocampus are proposed to have important roles in cognition by modulating properties of the hippocampal network. However, the precise spatial and temporal profile of acetylcholine release in the hippocampus remains unclear making it difficult to define specific roles for cholinergic transmission in hippocampal dependent behaviors. This is partly due to a lack of tools enabling specific intervention in, and recording of, cholinergic transmission. Here, we review the organization of septohippocampal cholinergic projections and hippocampal acetylcholine receptors as well as the role of cholinergic transmission in modulating cellular excitability, synaptic plasticity, and rhythmic network oscillations. We point to a number of open questions that remain unanswered and discuss the potential for recently developed techniques to provide a radical reappraisal of the function of cholinergic inputs to the hippocampus. PMID:23908628

  18. Modulating Brain Oscillations to Drive Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Thut, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Do neuronal oscillations play a causal role in brain function? In a study in this issue of PLOS Biology, Helfrich and colleagues address this long-standing question by attempting to drive brain oscillations using transcranial electrical current stimulation. Remarkably, they were able to manipulate visual perception by forcing brain oscillations of the left and right visual hemispheres into synchrony using oscillatory currents over both hemispheres. Under this condition, human observers more often perceived an inherently ambiguous visual stimulus in one of its perceptual instantiations. These findings shed light on the mechanisms underlying neuronal computation. They show that it is the neuronal oscillations that drive the visual experience, not the experience driving the oscillations. And they indicate that synchronized oscillatory activity groups brain areas into functional networks. This points to new ways for controlled experimental and possibly also clinical interventions for the study and modulation of brain oscillations and associated functions. PMID:25549340

  19. Modulation Based on Probability Density Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.

    2009-01-01

    A proposed method of modulating a sinusoidal carrier signal to convey digital information involves the use of histograms representing probability density functions (PDFs) that characterize samples of the signal waveform. The method is based partly on the observation that when a waveform is sampled (whether by analog or digital means) over a time interval at least as long as one half cycle of the waveform, the samples can be sorted by frequency of occurrence, thereby constructing a histogram representing a PDF of the waveform during that time interval.

  20. Function and modulation of bacterial porins: insights from electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Delcour, A H

    1997-06-15

    Electrophysiological techniques provide a wealth of information regarding the molecular mechanisms that underlie the function and modulation of ion channels. They have revealed that bacterial porins do not behave as static, permanently open pores but display a much more complex and dynamic behavior than anticipated from non-electrophysiological studies. The channels switch between short-lived open and closed conformations (gating activity), and can also remain in an inactivated, non-ion conducting state for prolonged periods of time. Thus the role of porins is not limited to that of a molecular filter, but is extended to the control of outer membrane permeability through the regulation of their activity. Electrophysiological studies have indeed demonstrated that both gating and inactivation are modulated by a variety of physical and chemical parameters and are highly cooperative phenomena, often involving numerous channels working in concert. Cooperativity acts as an amplification mechanism that grants a large population of porins, such as found in the outer membrane, with sensitivity to modulation by external or internal factors. By conferring permeability properties to the outer membrane, porins play a crucial role in the bacterium's antibiotic susceptibility and survival in various environmental conditions. The detailed information that electrophysiology only can provide on porin function and modulation promises to yield a more accurate description of how porin properties can be used by cells to adapt to a changing environment, and to offer mechanisms that might optimize the drug sensitivity of the microorganism. PMID:9228742

  1. Reveal genes functionally associated with ACADS by a network study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yulong; Su, Zhiguang

    2015-09-15

    Establishing a systematic network is aimed at finding essential human gene-gene/gene-disease pathway by means of network inter-connecting patterns and functional annotation analysis. In the present study, we have analyzed functional gene interactions of short-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase gene (ACADS). ACADS plays a vital role in free fatty acid β-oxidation and regulates energy homeostasis. Modules of highly inter-connected genes in disease-specific ACADS network are derived by integrating gene function and protein interaction data. Among the 8 genes in ACADS web retrieved from both STRING and GeneMANIA, ACADS is effectively conjoined with 4 genes including HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1. The functional analysis is done via ontological briefing and candidate disease identification. We observed that the highly efficient-interlinked genes connected with ACADS are HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1. Interestingly, the ontological aspect of genes in the ACADS network reveals that ACADS, HAHDA and HADHB play equally vital roles in fatty acid metabolism. The gene ACAT1 together with ACADS indulges in ketone metabolism. Our computational gene web analysis also predicts potential candidate disease recognition, thus indicating the involvement of ACADS, HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1 not only with lipid metabolism but also with infant death syndrome, skeletal myopathy, acute hepatic encephalopathy, Reye-like syndrome, episodic ketosis, and metabolic acidosis. The current study presents a comprehensible layout of ACADS network, its functional strategies and candidate disease approach associated with ACADS network. PMID:26045367

  2. Inflammatory stimuli acutely modulate peripheral taste function.

    PubMed

    Kumarhia, Devaki; He, Lianying; McCluskey, Lynnette Phillips

    2016-06-01

    Inflammation-mediated changes in taste perception can affect health outcomes in patients, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In the present work, we hypothesized that proinflammatory cytokines directly modulate Na(+) transport in taste buds. To test this, we measured acute changes in Na(+) flux in polarized fungiform taste buds loaded with a Na(+) indicator dye. IL-1β elicited an amiloride-sensitive increase in Na(+) transport in taste buds. In contrast, TNF-α dramatically and reversibly decreased Na(+) flux in polarized taste buds via amiloride-sensitive and amiloride-insensitive Na(+) transport systems. The speed and partial amiloride sensitivity of these changes in Na(+) flux indicate that IL-1β and TNF-α modulate epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) function. A portion of the TNF-mediated decrease in Na(+) flux is also blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine, although TNF-α further reduced Na(+) transport independently of both amiloride and capsazepine. We also assessed taste function in vivo in a model of infection and inflammation that elevates these and additional cytokines. In rats administered systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS), CT responses to Na(+) were significantly elevated between 1 and 2 h after LPS treatment. Low, normally preferred concentrations of NaCl and sodium acetate elicited high response magnitudes. Consistent with this outcome, codelivery of IL-1β and TNF-α enhanced Na(+) flux in polarized taste buds. These results demonstrate that inflammation elicits swift changes in Na(+) taste function, which may limit salt consumption during illness. PMID:27009163

  3. Knock-out models reveal new aquaporin functions.

    PubMed

    Verkman, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    Knockout mice have been informative in the discovery of unexpected biological functions of aquaporins. Knockout mice have confirmed the predicted roles of aquaporins in transepithelial fluid transport, as in the urinary concentrating mechanism and glandular fluid secretion. A less obvious, though predictable role of aquaporins is in tissue swelling under stress, as in the brain in stroke, tumor and infection. Phenotype analysis of aquaporin knockout mice has revealed several unexpected cellular roles of aquaporins whose mechanisms are being elucidated. Aquaporins facilitate cell migration, as seen in aquaporin-dependent tumor angiogenesis and tumor metastasis, by a mechanism that may involve facilitated water transport in lamellipodia of migrating cells. The ' aquaglyceroporins', aquaporins that transport both glycerol and water, regulate glycerol content in epidermis, fat and other tissues, and lead to a multiplicity of interesting consequences of gene disruption including dry skin, resistance to skin carcinogenesis, impaired cell proliferation and altered fat metabolism. An even more surprising role of a mammalian aquaporin is in neural signal transduction in the central nervous system. The many roles of aquaporins might be exploited for clinical benefit by modulation of aquaporin expression/function - as diuretics, and in the treatment of brain swelling, glaucoma, epilepsy, obesity and cancer. PMID:19096787

  4. Protein complexes and functional modules in molecular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirin, Victor; Mirny, Leonid A.

    2003-10-01

    Proteins, nucleic acids, and small molecules form a dense network of molecular interactions in a cell. Molecules are nodes of this network, and the interactions between them are edges. The architecture of molecular networks can reveal important principles of cellular organization and function, similarly to the way that protein structure tells us about the function and organization of a protein. Computational analysis of molecular networks has been primarily concerned with node degree [Wagner, A. & Fell, D. A. (2001) Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. B 268, 1803-1810; Jeong, H., Tombor, B., Albert, R., Oltvai, Z. N. & Barabasi, A. L. (2000) Nature 407, 651-654] or degree correlation [Maslov, S. & Sneppen, K. (2002) Science 296, 910-913], and hence focused on single/two-body properties of these networks. Here, by analyzing the multibody structure of the network of protein-protein interactions, we discovered molecular modules that are densely connected within themselves but sparsely connected with the rest of the network. Comparison with experimental data and functional annotation of genes showed two types of modules: (i) protein complexes (splicing machinery, transcription factors, etc.) and (ii) dynamic functional units (signaling cascades, cell-cycle regulation, etc.). Discovered modules are highly statistically significant, as is evident from comparison with random graphs, and are robust to noise in the data. Our results provide strong support for the network modularity principle introduced by Hartwell et al. [Hartwell, L. H., Hopfield, J. J., Leibler, S. & Murray, A. W. (1999) Nature 402, C47-C52], suggesting that found modules constitute the "building blocks" of molecular networks.

  5. Revealing neuronal function through microelectrode array recordings

    PubMed Central

    Obien, Marie Engelene J.; Deligkaris, Kosmas; Bullmann, Torsten; Bakkum, Douglas J.; Frey, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays and microprobes have been widely utilized to measure neuronal activity, both in vitro and in vivo. The key advantage is the capability to record and stimulate neurons at multiple sites simultaneously. However, unlike the single-cell or single-channel resolution of intracellular recording, microelectrodes detect signals from all possible sources around every sensor. Here, we review the current understanding of microelectrode signals and the techniques for analyzing them. We introduce the ongoing advancements in microelectrode technology, with focus on achieving higher resolution and quality of recordings by means of monolithic integration with on-chip circuitry. We show how recent advanced microelectrode array measurement methods facilitate the understanding of single neurons as well as network function. PMID:25610364

  6. Revealing remodeler function: Varied and unique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastlund, Allen

    Chromatin remodelers perform a necessary and required function for the successful expression of our genetic code. By modifying, shifting, or ejecting nucleosomes from the chromatin structure they allow access to the underlying DNA to the rest of the cell's machinery. This research has focused on two major remodeler motors from major families of chromatin remodelers: the trimeric motor domain of RSC and the motor domain of the ISWI family, ISWI. Using primarily stopped-flow spectrofluorometry, I have categorized the time-dependent motions of these motor domains along their preferred substrate, double-stranded DNA. Combined with collected ATP utilization data, I present the subsequent analysis and associated conclusions that stem from the underlying assumptions and models. Interestingly, there is little in common between the investigated proteins aside from their favored medium. While RSC exhibits modest translocation characteristics and highly effective motion with the ability for large molecular forces, ISWI is not only structurally different but highly inefficient in its motion leading to difficulties in determining its specific translocation mechanics. While chromatin remodeling is a ubiquitous facet of eukaryotic life, there remains much to be understood about their general mechanisms.

  7. Functional modules of sigma factor regulons guarantee adaptability and evolvability.

    PubMed

    Binder, Sebastian C; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Schulz, Sebastian; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Franke, Raimo; Häussler, Susanne; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The focus of modern molecular biology turns from assigning functions to individual genes towards understanding the expression and regulation of complex sets of molecules. Here, we provide evidence that alternative sigma factor regulons in the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa largely represent insulated functional modules which provide a critical level of biological organization involved in general adaptation and survival processes. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network revealed that transcription factors functionally couple the sigma factor regulons and significantly modulate the transcription levels in the face of challenging environments. The threshold quality of newly evolved transcription factors was reached faster and more robustly in in silico testing when the structural organization of sigma factor networks was taken into account. These results indicate that the modular structures of alternative sigma factor regulons provide P. aeruginosa with a robust framework to function adequately in its environment and at the same time facilitate evolutionary change. Our data support the view that widespread modularity guarantees robustness of biological networks and is a key driver of evolvability. PMID:26915971

  8. Functional modules of sigma factor regulons guarantee adaptability and evolvability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Sebastian C.; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Schulz, Sebastian; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Franke, Raimo; Häussler, Susanne; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The focus of modern molecular biology turns from assigning functions to individual genes towards understanding the expression and regulation of complex sets of molecules. Here, we provide evidence that alternative sigma factor regulons in the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa largely represent insulated functional modules which provide a critical level of biological organization involved in general adaptation and survival processes. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network revealed that transcription factors functionally couple the sigma factor regulons and significantly modulate the transcription levels in the face of challenging environments. The threshold quality of newly evolved transcription factors was reached faster and more robustly in in silico testing when the structural organization of sigma factor networks was taken into account. These results indicate that the modular structures of alternative sigma factor regulons provide P. aeruginosa with a robust framework to function adequately in its environment and at the same time facilitate evolutionary change. Our data support the view that widespread modularity guarantees robustness of biological networks and is a key driver of evolvability.

  9. Functional modules of sigma factor regulons guarantee adaptability and evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Sebastian C.; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Schulz, Sebastian; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Franke, Raimo; Häussler, Susanne; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The focus of modern molecular biology turns from assigning functions to individual genes towards understanding the expression and regulation of complex sets of molecules. Here, we provide evidence that alternative sigma factor regulons in the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa largely represent insulated functional modules which provide a critical level of biological organization involved in general adaptation and survival processes. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network revealed that transcription factors functionally couple the sigma factor regulons and significantly modulate the transcription levels in the face of challenging environments. The threshold quality of newly evolved transcription factors was reached faster and more robustly in in silico testing when the structural organization of sigma factor networks was taken into account. These results indicate that the modular structures of alternative sigma factor regulons provide P. aeruginosa with a robust framework to function adequately in its environment and at the same time facilitate evolutionary change. Our data support the view that widespread modularity guarantees robustness of biological networks and is a key driver of evolvability. PMID:26915971

  10. Multiple Differential Networks Strategy Reveals Carboplatin and Melphalan-Induced Dynamic Module Changes in Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cui; Ma, Feng-Wei; Du, Cui-Yun; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common malignant tumor of the eye in childhood. The objective of this paper was to investigate carboplatin (CAR)- and melphalan (MEL)-induced dynamic module changes in RB based on multiple (M) differential networks, and to generate systems-level insights into RB progression. MATERIAL AND METHODS To achieve this goal, we constructed M-differential co-expression networks (DCNs), assigned a weight to each edge, and identified seed genes in M DCNs by ranking genes based on their topological features. Starting with seed genes, a module search was performed to explore candidate modules in CAR and MEL condition. M-DMs were detected according to significance evaluations of M-modules, which originated from refinement of candidate modules. Further, we revealed dynamic changes in M-DM activity and connectivity on the basis of significance of Module Connectivity Dynamic Score (MCDS). RESULTS In the present study, M=2, a total of 21 seed genes were obtained. By assessing module search, refinement, and evaluation, we gained 18 2-DMs. Moreover, 3 significant 2-DMs (Module 1, Module 2, and Module 3) with dynamic changes across CAR and MEL condition were determined, and we denoted them as dynamic modules. Module 1 had 27 nodes of which 6 were seed genes and 56 edges. Module 2 was composed of 28 nodes and 54 edges. A total of 28 nodes interacted with 45 edges presented in Module 3. CONCLUSIONS We have identified 3 dynamic modules with changes induced by CAR and MEL in RB, which might give insights in revealing molecular mechanism for RB therapy. PMID:27144687

  11. Atmospheric modulation transfer function in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Buskila, Kobi; Towito, Shay; Shmuel, Elad; Levi, Ran; Kopeika, Natan; Krapels, Keith; Driggers, Ronald G; Vollmerhausen, Richard H; Halford, Carl E

    2004-01-10

    In high-resolution ultranarrow field-of-view thermal imagers, image quality over relatively long path lengths is typically limited by atmospheric degradation, especially atmospheric blur. We report our results and analyses of infrared images from two sites, Fort A. P. Hill and Aberdeen Proving Ground. The images are influenced by the various atmospheric phenomena: scattering, absorption, and turbulence. A series of experiments with high-resolution equipment in both the 3-5- and 8-13-microm regions at the two locations indicate that, as in the visible, image quality is limited much more by atmosphere than by the instrumentation for ranges even of the order of only a few kilometers. For paths close to the ground, turbulence is more dominant, whereas for paths involving higher average elevation, aerosol modulation transfer function (MTF) is dominant. As wavelength increases, turbulence MTF also increases, thus permitting aerosol MTF to become more dominant. A critical role in aerosol MTF in the thermal infrared is attributed to absorption, which noticeably decreases atmospheric transmission much more than in the visible, thereby reducing high-spatial-frequency aerosol MTF. These measurements indicate that atmospheric MTF should be a basic component in imaging system design and analysis even in the infrared, especially as higher-resolution hardware becomes available. PMID:14735966

  12. Interaural attention modulates outer hair cell function.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sridhar; Keil, Andreas; Stratis, Kyle; Osborne, Aaron F; Cerwonka, Colin; Wong, Jennifer; Rieger, Brenda L; Polcz, Valerie; Smith, David W

    2014-12-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that auditory attention tasks may modulate the sensitivity of the cochlea by way of the corticofugal and the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent pathways. Here, we studied the extent to which a separate efferent tract, the 'uncrossed' MOC, which functionally connects the two ears, mediates inter-aural selective attention. We compared distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) in one ear with binaurally presented primaries, using an intermodal target detection task in which participants were instructed to report the occurrence of brief target events (visual changes, tones). Three tasks were compared under identical physical stimulation: (i) report brief tones in the ear in which DPOAE responses were recorded; (ii) report brief tones presented to the contralateral, non-recorded ear; and (iii) report brief phase shifts of a visual grating at fixation. Effects of attention were observed as parallel shifts in overall DPOAE contour level, with DPOAEs relatively higher in overall level when subjects ignored the auditory stimuli and attended to the visual stimulus, compared with both of the auditory-attending conditions. Importantly, DPOAE levels were statistically lowest when attention was directed to the ipsilateral ear in which the DPOAE recordings were made. These data corroborate notions that top-down mechanisms, via the corticofugal and medial efferent pathways, mediate cochlear responses during intermodal attention. New findings show attending to one ear can significantly alter the physiological response of the contralateral, unattended ear, probably through the uncrossed-medial olivocochlear efferent fibers connecting the two ears. PMID:25302959

  13. [Hunger-driven modulation in brain functions].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yukinori; Saitoe, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    \\All organisms must obtain nutrition in order to survive and produce their progeny. In the natural environment, however, adequate nutrition or food is not always available. Thus, all organisms are equipped with mechanisms by which their nutritional condition alters their internal activities. In animals, the loss of nutritional intake (fasting) alters not only metabolism, but also behavior in a manner dependent on hormones such as insulin, glucagon, leptin, and ghrelin. As a result, animals are able to maintain their blood sugar level, and are motivated to crave food upon fasting. Moreover, our recent study revealed a novel role of hunger, which facilitates long-term memory (LTM) formation, and its molecular mechanism in the fruit fly, Drosophila. Here, we review the overall effect of fasting, and how fasting affects brain function. I then introduce our finding in which mild fasting facilitates LTM formation, and discuss its biological significance. PMID:24371130

  14. Pharmacological modulation of chemokine receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, DJ; Canals, M; Maussang, D; Roumen, L; Smit, MJ; Wijtmans, M; de Graaf, C; Vischer, HF; Leurs, R

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and their peptidergic ligands are interesting therapeutic targets due to their involvement in various immune-related diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV-1 infection and cancer. To tackle these diseases, a lot of effort has been focused on discovery and development of small-molecule chemokine receptor antagonists. This has been rewarded by the market approval of two novel chemokine receptor inhibitors, AMD3100 (CXCR4) and Maraviroc (CCR5) for stem cell mobilization and treatment of HIV-1 infection respectively. The recent GPCR crystal structures together with mutagenesis and pharmacological studies have aided in understanding how small-molecule ligands interact with chemokine receptors. Many of these ligands display behaviour deviating from simple competition and do not interact with the chemokine binding site, providing evidence for an allosteric mode of action. This review aims to give an overview of the evidence supporting modulation of this intriguing receptor family by a range of ligands, including small molecules, peptides and antibodies. Moreover, the computer-assisted modelling of chemokine receptor–ligand interactions is discussed in view of GPCR crystal structures. Finally, the implications of concepts such as functional selectivity and chemokine receptor dimerization are considered. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-6. To view the 2010 themed section on the same topic visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.2010.159.issue-5/issuetoc PMID:21699506

  15. Functional organization of the fusiform gyrus revealed with connectivity profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Wang, Jiaojian; Fan, Lingzhong; Zhang, Yuanchao; Fox, Peter T; Eickhoff, Simon B; Yu, Chunshui; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-08-01

    Within the object recognition-related ventral visual stream, the human fusiform gyrus (FG), which topographically connects the striate cortex to the inferior temporal lobe, plays a pivotal role in high-level visual/cognitive functions. However, though there are many previous investigations of distinct functional modules within the FG, the functional organization of the whole FG in its full functional heterogeneity has not yet been established. In the current study, a replicable functional organization of the FG based on distinct anatomical connectivity patterns was identified. The FG was parcellated into medial (FGm), lateral (FGl), and anterior (FGa) regions using diffusion tensor imaging. We validated the reasonability of such an organizational scheme from the perspective of resting-state whole brain functional connectivity patterns and the involvement of functional subnetworks. We found corroborating support for these three distinct modules, and suggest that the FGm serves as a transition region that combines multiple stimuli, the FGl is responsible for categorical recognition, and the FGa is involved in semantic understanding. These findings support two organizational functional transitions of the ventral temporal gyrus, a posterior/anterior direction of visual/semantic processing, and a media/lateral direction of high-level visual processing. Our results may facilitate a more detailed study of the human FG in the future. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3003-3016, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27132874

  16. Ribozymes and Riboswitches: Modulation of RNA Function by Small Molecules†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinwei; Lau, Matthew W.; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R.

    2010-01-01

    Diverse small molecules interact with catalytic RNAs (ribozymes) as substrates and cofactors, and their intracellular concentrations are sensed by gene-regulatory mRNA domains (riboswitches) that modulate transcription, splicing, translation, or RNA stability. Although recognition mechanisms vary from RNA to RNA, structural analyses reveal recurring strategies that arise from the intrinsic properties of RNA such as base pairing and stacking with conjugated heterocycles, and cation-dependent recognition of anionic functional groups. These studies also suggest that, to a first approximation, the magnitude of ligand-induced reorganization of an RNA is inversely proportional to the complexity of the riboswitch or ribozyme. How these small molecule binding-induced changes in RNA lead to alteration in gene expression is less well understood. While different riboswitches have been proposed to be under either kinetic or thermodynamic control, the biochemical and structural mechanisms that give rise to regulatory consequences downstream of small molecule recognition by RNAs mostly remain to be elucidated. PMID:20931966

  17. Modulation-transfer-function analysis for sampled image systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, S. K.; Kaczynski, M.-A.; Schowengerdt, R.

    1984-01-01

    Sampling generally causes the response of a digital imaging system to be locally shift-variant and not directly amenable to Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) analysis. However, this paper demonstrates that a meaningful system response can be calculated by averaging over an ensemble of point-source system inputs to yield an MTF which accounts for the combined effects of image formation, sampling, and image reconstruction. As an illustration, the MTF of the Landsat MSS system is analyzed to reveal an average effective instantaneous field of view which is significantly larger than the commonly accepted value, particularly in the along-track direction where undersampling contributes markedly to an MTF reduction and resultant increase in image blur.

  18. Engineering and Assembly of Protein Modules into Functional Molecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Hirschi, Stephan; Stauffer, Mirko; Harder, Daniel; Müller, Daniel J; Meier, Wolfgang; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology approaches range from the introduction of unique features into organisms to the assembly of isolated biomacromolecules or synthetic building blocks into artificial biological systems with biomimetic or completely novel functionalities. Simple molecular systems can be based on containers on the nanoscale that are equipped with tailored functional modules for various applications in healthcare, industry or biological and medical research. The concept, or vision, of assembling native or engineered proteins and/or synthetic components as functional modules into molecular systems is discussed. The main focus is laid on the engineering of energizing modules generating chemical energy, transport modules using this energy to translocate molecules between compartments of a molecular system, and catalytic modules (bio-)chemically processing the molecules. Further key aspects of this discourse are possible approaches for the assembly of simple nanofactories and their applications in biotechnology and medical health. PMID:27363367

  19. From Highly Crystalline to Outer Surface-Functionalized Covalent Organic Frameworks—A Modulation Approach

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Crystallinity and porosity are of central importance for many properties of covalent organic frameworks (COFs), including adsorption, diffusion, and electronic transport. We have developed a new method for strongly enhancing both aspects through the introduction of a modulating agent in the synthesis. This modulator competes with one of the building blocks during the solvothermal COF growth, resulting in highly crystalline frameworks with greatly increased domain sizes reaching several hundreds of nanometers. The obtained materials feature fully accessible pores with an internal surface area of over 2000 m2 g–1. Compositional analysis via NMR spectroscopy revealed that the COF-5 structure can form over a wide range of boronic acid-to-catechol ratios, thus producing frameworks with compositions ranging from highly boronic acid-deficient to networks with catechol voids. Visualization of an −SH-functionalized modulating agent via iridium staining revealed that the COF domains are terminated by the modulator. Using functionalized modulators, this synthetic approach thus also provides a new and facile method for the external surface functionalization of COF domains, providing accessible sites for post-synthetic modification reactions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this concept by covalently attaching fluorescent dyes and hydrophilic polymers to the COF surface. We anticipate that the realization of highly crystalline COFs with the option of additional surface functionality will render the modulation concept beneficial for a range of applications, including gas separations, catalysis, and optoelectronics. PMID:26694214

  20. From Highly Crystalline to Outer Surface-Functionalized Covalent Organic Frameworks--A Modulation Approach.

    PubMed

    Calik, Mona; Sick, Torben; Dogru, Mirjam; Döblinger, Markus; Datz, Stefan; Budde, Harald; Hartschuh, Achim; Auras, Florian; Bein, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Crystallinity and porosity are of central importance for many properties of covalent organic frameworks (COFs), including adsorption, diffusion, and electronic transport. We have developed a new method for strongly enhancing both aspects through the introduction of a modulating agent in the synthesis. This modulator competes with one of the building blocks during the solvothermal COF growth, resulting in highly crystalline frameworks with greatly increased domain sizes reaching several hundreds of nanometers. The obtained materials feature fully accessible pores with an internal surface area of over 2000 m(2) g(-1). Compositional analysis via NMR spectroscopy revealed that the COF-5 structure can form over a wide range of boronic acid-to-catechol ratios, thus producing frameworks with compositions ranging from highly boronic acid-deficient to networks with catechol voids. Visualization of an -SH-functionalized modulating agent via iridium staining revealed that the COF domains are terminated by the modulator. Using functionalized modulators, this synthetic approach thus also provides a new and facile method for the external surface functionalization of COF domains, providing accessible sites for post-synthetic modification reactions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this concept by covalently attaching fluorescent dyes and hydrophilic polymers to the COF surface. We anticipate that the realization of highly crystalline COFs with the option of additional surface functionality will render the modulation concept beneficial for a range of applications, including gas separations, catalysis, and optoelectronics. PMID:26694214

  1. Ferrocene Functionalized Endocrine Modulators as Anticancer Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillard, Elizabeth A.; Vessières, Anne; Jaouen, Gerard

    We present here some of our studies on the synthesis and behaviour of ferrocenyl selective endocrine receptor modulators against cancer cells, particularly breast and prostate cancers. The proliferative/anti-proliferative effects of compounds based on steroidal and non-steroidal endocrine modulators have been extensively explored in vitro. Structure-activity relationship studies of such molecules, particularly the hydroxyferrocifens and ferrocene phenols, have shown the effect of (1) the presence and the length of the N,N-dimethylamino side chain, (2) the presence and position of the phenol group, (3) the role of the ferrocenyl moiety, (4) that of conjugation, (5) phenyl functionalisation and (6) the placement of the phenyl group. Compounds possessing a ferrocene moiety linked to a p-phenol by a conjugated π-system are among the most potent of the series, with IC50 values ranging from 0.090 to 0.6µM on hormone independent breast cancer cells. Based on the SAR data and electrochemical studies, we have proposed an original mechanism to explain the unusual behaviour of these bioorganometallic species and coin the term "kronatropic" to qualify this effect, involving ROS production and bio-oxidation. In addition, the importance of formulation is underlined. We also discuss the behaviour of ferrocenyl androgens and anti-androgens for possible use against prostate cancers. In sum, ferrocene has proven to be a fascinating substituent due to its vast potential for oncology.

  2. General mechanism for modulating immunoglobulin effector function

    PubMed Central

    Sondermann, Peter; Pincetic, Andrew; Maamary, Jad; Lammens, Katja; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulins recognize and clear microbial pathogens and toxins through the coupling of variable region specificity to Fc-triggered cellular activation. These proinflammatory activities are regulated, thus avoiding the pathogenic sequelae of uncontrolled inflammation by modulating the composition of the Fc-linked glycan. Upon sialylation, the affinities for Fcγ receptors are reduced, whereas those for alternative cellular receptors, such as dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN)/CD23, are increased. We demonstrate that sialylation induces significant structural alterations in the Cγ2 domain and propose a model that explains the observed changes in ligand specificity and biological activity. By analogy to related complexes formed by IgE and its evolutionarily related Fc receptors, we conclude that this mechanism is general for the modulation of antibody-triggered immune responses, characterized by a shift between an “open” activating conformation and a “closed” anti-inflammatory state of antibody Fc fragments. This common mechanism has been targeted by pathogens to avoid host defense and offers targets for therapeutic intervention in allergic and autoimmune disorders. PMID:23697368

  3. Differential network analysis reveals the genome-wide landscape of estrogen receptor modulation in hormonal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Hsu, Pei-Yin; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Huang, Tim H.-M.; Chuang, Eric Y.; Chen, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Several mutual information (MI)-based algorithms have been developed to identify dynamic gene-gene and function-function interactions governed by key modulators (genes, proteins, etc.). Due to intensive computation, however, these methods rely heavily on prior knowledge and are limited in genome-wide analysis. We present the modulated gene/gene set interaction (MAGIC) analysis to systematically identify genome-wide modulation of interaction networks. Based on a novel statistical test employing conjugate Fisher transformations of correlation coefficients, MAGIC features fast computation and adaption to variations of clinical cohorts. In simulated datasets MAGIC achieved greatly improved computation efficiency and overall superior performance than the MI-based method. We applied MAGIC to construct the estrogen receptor (ER) modulated gene and gene set (representing biological function) interaction networks in breast cancer. Several novel interaction hubs and functional interactions were discovered. ER+ dependent interaction between TGFβ and NFκB was further shown to be associated with patient survival. The findings were verified in independent datasets. Using MAGIC, we also assessed the essential roles of ER modulation in another hormonal cancer, ovarian cancer. Overall, MAGIC is a systematic framework for comprehensively identifying and constructing the modulated interaction networks in a whole-genome landscape. MATLAB implementation of MAGIC is available for academic uses at https://github.com/chiuyc/MAGIC. PMID:26972162

  4. Differential network analysis reveals the genome-wide landscape of estrogen receptor modulation in hormonal cancers.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Hsu, Pei-Yin; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Huang, Tim H-M; Chuang, Eric Y; Chen, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Several mutual information (MI)-based algorithms have been developed to identify dynamic gene-gene and function-function interactions governed by key modulators (genes, proteins, etc.). Due to intensive computation, however, these methods rely heavily on prior knowledge and are limited in genome-wide analysis. We present the modulated gene/gene set interaction (MAGIC) analysis to systematically identify genome-wide modulation of interaction networks. Based on a novel statistical test employing conjugate Fisher transformations of correlation coefficients, MAGIC features fast computation and adaption to variations of clinical cohorts. In simulated datasets MAGIC achieved greatly improved computation efficiency and overall superior performance than the MI-based method. We applied MAGIC to construct the estrogen receptor (ER) modulated gene and gene set (representing biological function) interaction networks in breast cancer. Several novel interaction hubs and functional interactions were discovered. ER+ dependent interaction between TGFβ and NFκB was further shown to be associated with patient survival. The findings were verified in independent datasets. Using MAGIC, we also assessed the essential roles of ER modulation in another hormonal cancer, ovarian cancer. Overall, MAGIC is a systematic framework for comprehensively identifying and constructing the modulated interaction networks in a whole-genome landscape. MATLAB implementation of MAGIC is available for academic uses at https://github.com/chiuyc/MAGIC. PMID:26972162

  5. Key herbivores reveal limited functional redundancy on inshore coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, C. L.; van de Leemput, I. A.; Depczynski, M.; Hoey, A. S.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Marine ecosystems are facing increasing exposure to a range of stressors and declines in critical ecological functions. The likelihood of further loss of functions and resilience is dependent, in part, on the extent of functional redundancy (i.e. the capacity of one species to functionally compensate for the loss of another species) within critical functional groups. We used multiple metrics; species richness, generic richness, abundance and reserve capacity (i.e. the relative number of individuals available to fulfil the function if the numerically dominant species is lost), as indicators to assess the potential functional redundancy of four functional groups of herbivorous fishes (browsers, excavators, grazers and scrapers) in two of the worlds' most intact coral reef ecosystems: the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia. We found marked variations in potential redundancy among habitats within each reef system and functional groups. Despite negligible fishing of herbivorous fishes, coastal habitats in both reef systems had lower functional redundancy compared to offshore locations for all herbivorous fishes collectively and the four functional groups independently. This pattern was consistent in all four indicators of redundancy. The potential vulnerability of these coastal habitats is highlighted by recent shifts from coral to macroalgal dominance on several coastal reefs of the GBR. Our approach provides a simple yet revealing evaluation of potential functional redundancy. Moreover, it highlights the spatial variation in potential vulnerability and resilience of reef systems.

  6. Functional module identification in protein interaction networks by interaction patterns

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yijie; Qian, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying functional modules in protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks may shed light on cellular functional organization and thereafter underlying cellular mechanisms. Many existing module identification algorithms aim to detect densely connected groups of proteins as potential modules. However, based on this simple topological criterion of ‘higher than expected connectivity’, those algorithms may miss biologically meaningful modules of functional significance, in which proteins have similar interaction patterns to other proteins in networks but may not be densely connected to each other. A few blockmodel module identification algorithms have been proposed to address the problem but the lack of global optimum guarantee and the prohibitive computational complexity have been the bottleneck of their applications in real-world large-scale PPI networks. Results: In this article, we propose a novel optimization formulation LCP2 (low two-hop conductance sets) using the concept of Markov random walk on graphs, which enables simultaneous identification of both dense and sparse modules based on protein interaction patterns in given networks through searching for LCP2 by random walk. A spectral approximate algorithm SLCP2 is derived to identify non-overlapping functional modules. Based on a bottom-up greedy strategy, we further extend LCP2 to a new algorithm (greedy algorithm for LCP2) GLCP2 to identify overlapping functional modules. We compare SLCP2 and GLCP2 with a range of state-of-the-art algorithms on synthetic networks and real-world PPI networks. The performance evaluation based on several criteria with respect to protein complex prediction, high level Gene Ontology term prediction and especially sparse module detection, has demonstrated that our algorithms based on searching for LCP2 outperform all other compared algorithms. Availability and implementation: All data and code are available at http://www.cse.usf.edu/∼xqian/fmi/slcp2hop

  7. Revealing quantum correlation by negativity of the Wigner function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghiabadi, Razieh; Akhtarshenas, Seyed Javad; Sarbishaei, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    We analyze two two-mode continuous variable separable states with the same marginal states. We adopt the definition of classicality in the form of well-defined positive Wigner function describing the state and find that although the states possess positive local Wigner functions, they exhibit negative Wigner functions for the global states. Using the negativity of Wigner function as an indicator of nonclassicality, we show that despite these states possess different negativities of the Wigner function, they do not reveal this difference as phase space nonclassicalities such as negativity of the Mandel Q parameter or quadrature squeezing. We then concentrate on quantum correlation of these states and show that quantum discord and local quantum uncertainty, as two well-defined measures of quantum correlation, manifest the difference between negativity of the Wigner functions. The non-Gaussianity of these states is also examined and show that the difference in behavior of their non-Gaussianity is the same as the difference between negativity of their Wigner functions. We also investigate the influence of correlation rank criterion and find that when the states can be produced locally from classical states, the Wigner functions cannot reveal their quantum correlations.

  8. Nanoscale periodic modulations on sodium chloride surface revealed by tuning fork atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kendal W; Qin, Shengyong; Zhang, X-G; Li, An-Ping

    2012-05-11

    The sodium chloride surface is one of the most common platforms for the study of catalysts, thin film growth, and atmospheric aerosols. Here we report a nanoscale periodic modulation pattern on the surface of a cleaved NaCl single crystal, revealed by non-contact atomic force microscopy with a tuning fork sensor. The surface pattern shows two orthogonal domains, extending over the entire cleavage surface. The spatial modulations exhibit a characteristic period of 5.4 nm, along <110> crystallographic directions of the NaCl. The modulations are robust in vacuum, not affected by the tip-induced electric field or gentle annealing (<300 °C); however, they are eliminated after exposure to water and an atomically flat surface can be recovered by subsequent thermal annealing after water exposure. A strong electrostatic charging is revealed on the cleavage surface which may facilitate the formation of the observed metastable surface reconstruction. PMID:22513484

  9. Nanoscale periodic modulations on sodium chloride surface revealed by tuning fork atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Kendal W.; Qin, Shengyong; Zhang, X.-G.; Li, An-Ping

    2012-05-01

    The sodium chloride surface is one of the most common platforms for the study of catalysts, thin film growth, and atmospheric aerosols. Here we report a nanoscale periodic modulation pattern on the surface of a cleaved NaCl single crystal, revealed by non-contact atomic force microscopy with a tuning fork sensor. The surface pattern shows two orthogonal domains, extending over the entire cleavage surface. The spatial modulations exhibit a characteristic period of 5.4 nm, along <110> crystallographic directions of the NaCl. The modulations are robust in vacuum, not affected by the tip-induced electric field or gentle annealing (<300 °C) however, they are eliminated after exposure to water and an atomically flat surface can be recovered by subsequent thermal annealing after water exposure. A strong electrostatic charging is revealed on the cleavage surface which may facilitate the formation of the observed metastable surface reconstruction.

  10. Endothelial microparticles: Sophisticated vesicles modulating vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Anne M; Edelberg, Jay; Jonas, Rebecca; Rogers, Wade T; Moore, Jonni S; Syed, Wajihuddin; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles (EMPs) belong to a family of extracellular vesicles that are dynamic, mobile, biological effectors capable of mediating vascular physiology and function. The release of EMPs can impart autocrine and paracrine effects on target cells through surface interaction, cellular fusion, and, possibly, the delivery of intra-vesicular cargo. A greater understanding of the formation, composition, and function of EMPs will broaden our understanding of endothelial communication and may expose new pathways amenable for therapeutic manipulation. PMID:23892447

  11. Functionalities of expressed messenger RNAs revealed from mutant phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ben-Yang; Weng, Meng-Pin

    2016-07-01

    Total messenger RNAs mRNAs that are produced from a given gene under a certain set of conditions include both functional and nonfunctional transcripts. The high prevalence of nonfunctional mRNAs that have been detected in cells has raised questions regarding the functional implications of mRNA expression patterns and divergences. Phenotypes that result from the mutagenesis of protein-coding genes have provided the most straightforward descriptions of gene functions, and such data obtained from model organisms have facilitated investigations of the functionalities of expressed mRNAs. Mutant phenotype data from mouse tissues have revealed various attributes of functional mRNAs, including tissue-specificity, strength of expression, and evolutionary conservation. In addition, the role that mRNA expression evolution plays in driving morphological evolution has been revealed from studies designed to exploit morphological and physiological phenotypes of mouse mutants. Investigations into yeast essential genes (defined by an absence of colony growth after gene deletion) have further described gene regulatory strategies that reduce protein expression noise by mediating the rates of transcription and translation. In addition to the functional significance of expressed mRNAs as described in the abovementioned findings, the functionalities of other type of RNAs (i.e., noncoding RNAs) remain to be characterized with systematic mutations and phenotyping of the DNA regions that encode these RNA molecules. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:416-427. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1329 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26748449

  12. A Genome-Wide Screen Reveals that the Vibrio cholerae Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Modulates Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Yves A.; Chao, Michael C.; Sasabe, Jumpei; Davis, Brigid M.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse environmental stimuli and a complex network of regulatory factors are known to modulate expression of Vibrio cholerae's principal virulence factors. However, there is relatively little known about how metabolic factors impinge upon the pathogen's well-characterized cascade of transcription factors that induce expression of cholera toxin and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). Here, we used a transposon insertion site (TIS) sequencing-based strategy to identify new factors required for expression of tcpA, which encodes the major subunit of TCP, the organism's chief intestinal colonization factor. Besides identifying most of the genes known to modulate tcpA expression, the screen yielded ptsI and ptsH, which encode the enzyme I (EI) and Hpr components of the V. cholerae phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS). In addition to reduced expression of TcpA, strains lacking EI, Hpr, or the associated EIIAGlc protein produced less cholera toxin (CT) and had a diminished capacity to colonize the infant mouse intestine. The PTS modulates virulence gene expression by regulating expression of tcpPH and aphAB, which themselves control expression of toxT, the central activator of virulence gene expression. One mechanism by which PTS promotes virulence gene expression appears to be by modulating the amounts of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP). Our findings reveal that the V. cholerae PTS is an additional modulator of the ToxT regulon and demonstrate the potency of loss-of-function TIS sequencing screens for defining regulatory networks. PMID:26056384

  13. Modeling development and quantitative trait mapping reveal independent genetic modules for leaf size and shape.

    PubMed

    Baker, Robert L; Leong, Wen Fung; Brock, Marcus T; Markelz, R J Cody; Covington, Michael F; Devisetty, Upendra K; Edwards, Christine E; Maloof, Julin; Welch, Stephen; Weinig, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    Improved predictions of fitness and yield may be obtained by characterizing the genetic controls and environmental dependencies of organismal ontogeny. Elucidating the shape of growth curves may reveal novel genetic controls that single-time-point (STP) analyses do not because, in theory, infinite numbers of growth curves can result in the same final measurement. We measured leaf lengths and widths in Brassica rapa recombinant inbred lines (RILs) throughout ontogeny. We modeled leaf growth and allometry as function valued traits (FVT), and examined genetic correlations between these traits and aspects of phenology, physiology, circadian rhythms and fitness. We used RNA-seq to construct a SNP linkage map and mapped trait quantitative trait loci (QTL). We found genetic trade-offs between leaf size and growth rate FVT and uncovered differences in genotypic and QTL correlations involving FVT vs STPs. We identified leaf shape (allometry) as a genetic module independent of length and width and identified selection on FVT parameters of development. Leaf shape is associated with venation features that affect desiccation resistance. The genetic independence of leaf shape from other leaf traits may therefore enable crop optimization in leaf shape without negative effects on traits such as size, growth rate, duration or gas exchange. PMID:26083847

  14. Cholesterol modulates bitter taste receptor function.

    PubMed

    Pydi, Sai Prasad; Jafurulla, Md; Wai, Lisa; Bhullar, Rajinder P; Chelikani, Prashen; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-09-01

    Bitter taste perception in humans is believed to act as a defense mechanism against ingestion of potential toxic substances. Bitter taste is perceived by 25 distinct bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) which belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the overall context of the role of membrane lipids in GPCR function, we show here that T2R4, a representative member of the bitter taste receptor family, displays cholesterol sensitivity in its signaling function. In order to gain further insight into cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4, we mutated two residues Tyr114(3.59) and Lys117(3.62) present in the cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif in T2R4 with alanines. We carried out functional characterization of the mutants by calcium mobilization, followed by cholesterol depletion and replenishment. CRAC motifs in GPCRs have previously been implicated in preferential cholesterol association. Our analysis shows that the CRAC motif represents an intrinsic feature of bitter taste receptors and is conserved in 22 out of 25 human T2Rs. We further demonstrate that Lys117, an important CRAC residue, is crucial in the reported cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4. Interestingly, cholesterol sensitivity of T2R4 was observed at quinine concentrations in the lower mM range. To the best of our knowledge, our results represent the first report addressing the molecular basis of cholesterol sensitivity in the function of taste receptors. PMID:27288892

  15. Spontaneous physiological variability modulates dynamic functional connectivity in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, F; Orphanidou, C; Papakyriakou, P; Murphy, K; Wise, R G; Mitsis, G D

    2016-05-13

    It is well known that the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is influenced-in addition to neuronal activity-by fluctuations in physiological signals, including arterial CO2, respiration and heart rate/heart rate variability (HR/HRV). Even spontaneous fluctuations of the aforementioned physiological signals have been shown to influence the BOLD fMRI signal in a regionally specific manner. Related to this, estimates of functional connectivity between different brain regions, performed when the subject is at rest, may be confounded by the effects of physiological signal fluctuations. Moreover, resting functional connectivity has been shown to vary with respect to time (dynamic functional connectivity), with the sources of this variation not fully elucidated. In this context, we examine the relation between dynamic functional connectivity patterns and the time-varying properties of simultaneously recorded physiological signals (end-tidal CO2 and HR/HRV) using resting-state fMRI measurements from 12 healthy subjects. The results reveal a modulatory effect of the aforementioned physiological signals on the dynamic resting functional connectivity patterns for a number of resting-state networks (default mode network, somatosensory, visual). By using discrete wavelet decomposition, we also show that these modulation effects are more pronounced in specific frequency bands. PMID:27044987

  16. Glycosylation modulates arenavirus glycoprotein expression and function

    SciTech Connect

    Bonhomme, Cyrille J. Capul, Althea A. Lauron, Elvin J. Bederka, Lydia H. Knopp, Kristeene A. Buchmeier, Michael J.

    2011-01-20

    The glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) contains nine potential N-linked glycosylation sites. We investigated the function of these N-glycosylations by using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. All the available sites were occupied on GP1 and two of three on GP2. N-linked glycan mutations at positions 87 and 97 on GP1 resulted in reduction of expression and absence of cleavage and were necessary for downstream functions, as confirmed by the loss of GP-mediated fusion activity with T87A and S97A mutants. In contrast, T234A and E379N/A381T mutants impaired GP-mediated cell fusion without altered expression or processing. Infectivity via virus-like particles required glycans and a cleaved glycoprotein. Glycosylation at the first site within GP2, not normally utilized by LCMV, exhibited increased VLP infectivity. We also confirmed the role of the N-linked glycan at position 173 in the masking of the neutralizing epitope GP-1D. Taken together, our results indicated a strong relationship between fusion and infectivity.

  17. Integrating phosphorylation network with transcriptional network reveals novel functional relationships.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Hou, Lin; Qian, Minping; Deng, Minghua

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation and transcriptional regulation events are critical for cells to transmit and respond to signals. In spite of its importance, systems-level strategies that couple these two networks have yet to be presented. Here we introduce a novel approach that integrates the physical and functional aspects of phosphorylation network together with the transcription network in S.cerevisiae, and demonstrate that different network motifs are involved in these networks, which should be considered in interpreting and integrating large scale datasets. Based on this understanding, we introduce a HeRS score (hetero-regulatory similarity score) to systematically characterize the functional relevance of kinase/phosphatase involvement with transcription factor, and present an algorithm that predicts hetero-regulatory modules. When extended to signaling network, this approach confirmed the structure and cross talk of MAPK pathways, inferred a novel functional transcription factor Sok2 in high osmolarity glycerol pathway, and explained the mechanism of reduced mating efficiency upon Fus3 deletion. This strategy is applicable to other organisms as large-scale datasets become available, providing a means to identify the functional relationships between kinases/phosphatases and transcription factors. PMID:22432002

  18. Diffraction pattern of modulated structures described by Bessel functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolny, Janusz; Buganski, Ireneusz; Strzalka, Radoslaw

    2016-05-01

    We performed detailed analysis of 1D modulated structure (MS) with harmonic modulation within the statistical approach. By applying two-mode Fourier transform, we were able to derive analytically the structure factor for MS with single harmonic modulation component. We confirmed in a very smooth way that ordinary Bessel functions of the first kind define envelopes tuning the intensities of the diffraction peaks. This applies not only to main reflections of the diffraction pattern but also to all satellites. In the second part, we discussed in details the similarities between harmonically modulated structures with multiple modulations and 1D model quasicrystal. The Fourier expansion of the nodes' positions in the Fibonacci chain gives direct numerical definition of the atomic arrangement in MS. In that sense, we can define 1D quasicrystal as a MS with infinite number of harmonic modulations. We prove that characteristic measures (like v(u) relation typical for statistical approach and diffraction pattern) calculated for MS asymptotically approach their counterparts for 1D quasicrystal as large enough number of modulation terms is taken into account.

  19. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the ribosome at high resolution and how aminoglycosides might induce misreading of the genetic code. In addition to inhibiting prokaryotic translation, aminoglycosides inhibit several catalytic RNAs such as self-splicing group I introns, RNase P and small ribozymes in vitro. Furthermore, these antibiotics interfere with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by disrupting essential RNA-protein contacts. Most exciting is the potential of many RNA-binding antibiotics to stimulate RNA activities, conceiving small-molecule partners for the hypothesis of an ancient RNA world. SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) has been used in this evolutionary game leading to small synthetic RNAs, whose NMR structures gave valuable information on how aminoglycosides interact with RNA, which could possibly be used in applied science. PMID:10619838

  20. Synthetic protein interactions reveal a functional map of the cell

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Lisa K; Ólafsson, Guðjón; Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    To understand the function of eukaryotic cells, it is critical to understand the role of protein-protein interactions and protein localization. Currently, we do not know the importance of global protein localization nor do we understand to what extent the cell is permissive for new protein associations – a key requirement for the evolution of new protein functions. To answer this question, we fused every protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a partner from each of the major cellular compartments and quantitatively assessed the effects upon growth. This analysis reveals that cells have a remarkable and unanticipated tolerance for forced protein associations, even if these associations lead to a proportion of the protein moving compartments within the cell. Furthermore, the interactions that do perturb growth provide a functional map of spatial protein regulation, identifying key regulatory complexes for the normal homeostasis of eukaryotic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13053.001 PMID:27098839

  1. KCC2 function modulates in vitro ictogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Shabnam; Avoli, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition is active and may contribute to epileptiform synchronization. The efficacy of inhibition relies on low levels of intracellular Cl(-), which are controlled by KCC2 activity. This evidence has led us to analyze with field potential recordings the effects induced by the KCC2 blockers VU0240551 (10 μM) or bumetanide (50 μM) and by the KCC2 enhancer CLP257 (100 μM) on the epileptiform discharges generated by piriform and entorhinal cortices (PC and EC, respectively) in an in vitro brain slice preparation. Ictal- and interictal-like discharges along with high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, ripples: 80-200 Hz, fast ripples: 250-500 Hz) were recorded from these two regions during application of 4-aminopyridine (4AP, 50 μM). Blocking KCC2 activity with either VU024055 or high doses of bumetanide abolished ictal discharge in both PC and EC; in addition, these experimental procedures decreased the interval of occurrence and duration of interictal discharges. In contrast, enhancing KCC2 activity with CLP257 increased ictal discharge duration in both regions. Finally, blocking KCC2 activity decreased the duration and amplitude of pharmacologically isolated synchronous GABAergic events whereas enhancing KCC2 activity led to an increase in their duration. Our data demonstrate that in vitro ictogenesis is abolished or facilitated by inhibiting or enhancing KCC2 activity, respectively. We propose that these effects may result from the reduction of GABAA receptor-dependent increases in extracellular K(+) that are known to rest on KCC2 function. PMID:25926348

  2. Ion channels modulating mouse dendritic cell functions.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Nicole; Zemtsova, Irina M; Nguyen, Thi Xuan; Duszenko, Michael; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Lang, Florian

    2008-11-15

    Ca(2+)-mediated signal transduction pathways play a central regulatory role in dendritic cell (DC) responses to diverse Ags. However, the mechanisms leading to increased [Ca(2+)](i) upon DC activation remained ill-defined. In the present study, LPS treatment (100 ng/ml) of mouse DCs resulted in a rapid increase in [Ca(2+)](i), which was due to Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores and influx of extracellular Ca(2+) across the cell membrane. In whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments, LPS-induced currents exhibited properties similar to the currents through the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channels (CRAC). These currents were highly selective for Ca(2+), exhibited a prominent inward rectification of the current-voltage relationship, and showed an anomalous mole fraction and a fast Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation. In addition, the LPS-induced increase of [Ca(2+)](i) was sensitive to margatoxin and ICAGEN-4, both inhibitors of voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels Kv1.3 and Kv1.5, respectively. MHC class II expression, CCL21-dependent migration, and TNF-alpha and IL-6 production decreased, whereas phagocytic capacity increased in LPS-stimulated DCs in the presence of both Kv channel inhibitors as well as the I(CRAC) inhibitor SKF-96365. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Ca(2+) influx in LPS-stimulated DCs occurs via Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channels, is sensitive to Kv channel activity, and is in turn critically important for DC maturation and functions. PMID:18981098

  3. Aerodynamic parameter estimation via Fourier modulating function techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Parameter estimation algorithms are developed in the frequency domain for systems modeled by input/output ordinary differential equations. The approach is based on Shinbrot's method of moment functionals utilizing Fourier based modulating functions. Assuming white measurement noises for linear multivariable system models, an adaptive weighted least squares algorithm is developed which approximates a maximum likelihood estimate and cannot be biased by unknown initial or boundary conditions in the data owing to a special property attending Shinbrot-type modulating functions. Application is made to perturbation equation modeling of the longitudinal and lateral dynamics of a high performance aircraft using flight-test data. Comparative studies are included which demonstrate potential advantages of the algorithm relative to some well established techniques for parameter identification. Deterministic least squares extensions of the approach are made to the frequency transfer function identification problem for linear systems and to the parameter identification problem for a class of nonlinear-time-varying differential system models.

  4. Modulation transfer function measurement using spatial noise targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreman, Glenn D.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the measurement of modulation transfer function (MTF) by means of spatially random, noise-like targets. We begin our discussion with the concept of shift- invariance and the measurement of MTF in pixelated systems. We then proceed to the methods for generation of these noise targets, using both laser speckle and transparency-based techniques.

  5. Transcriptome analyses reveal molecular mechanisms underlying functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongmei; Ge, Weihong; Zhang, Aifeng; Xi, Yue; Chen, Zhihua; Luo, Dandan; Cheng, Yin; Fan, Kevin S; Horvath, Steve; Sofroniew, Michael V; Cheng, Liming; Yang, Zhaoyang; Sun, Yi E; Li, Xiaoguang

    2015-10-27

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is considered incurable because axonal regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is extremely challenging, due to harsh CNS injury environment and weak intrinsic regeneration capability of CNS neurons. We discovered that neurotrophin-3 (NT3)-loaded chitosan provided an excellent microenvironment to facilitate nerve growth, new neurogenesis, and functional recovery of completely transected spinal cord in rats. To acquire mechanistic insight, we conducted a series of comprehensive transcriptome analyses of spinal cord segments at the lesion site, as well as regions immediately rostral and caudal to the lesion, over a period of 90 days after SCI. Using weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA), we established gene modules/programs corresponding to various pathological events at different times after SCI. These objective measures of gene module expression also revealed that enhanced new neurogenesis and angiogenesis, and reduced inflammatory responses were keys to conferring the effect of NT3-chitosan on regeneration. PMID:26460053

  6. Transcriptome analyses reveal molecular mechanisms underlying functional recovery after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Hongmei; Ge, Weihong; Zhang, Aifeng; Xi, Yue; Chen, Zhihua; Luo, Dandan; Cheng, Yin; Fan, Kevin S.; Horvath, Steve; Sofroniew, Michael V.; Cheng, Liming; Yang, Zhaoyang; Sun, Yi E.; Li, Xiaoguang

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is considered incurable because axonal regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is extremely challenging, due to harsh CNS injury environment and weak intrinsic regeneration capability of CNS neurons. We discovered that neurotrophin-3 (NT3)-loaded chitosan provided an excellent microenvironment to facilitate nerve growth, new neurogenesis, and functional recovery of completely transected spinal cord in rats. To acquire mechanistic insight, we conducted a series of comprehensive transcriptome analyses of spinal cord segments at the lesion site, as well as regions immediately rostral and caudal to the lesion, over a period of 90 days after SCI. Using weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA), we established gene modules/programs corresponding to various pathological events at different times after SCI. These objective measures of gene module expression also revealed that enhanced new neurogenesis and angiogenesis, and reduced inflammatory responses were keys to conferring the effect of NT3-chitosan on regeneration. PMID:26460053

  7. Multi-functional Electric Module for a Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluethmann, William J. (Inventor); Waligora, Thomas M. (Inventor); Fraser-Chanpong, Nathan (Inventor); Reed, Ryan (Inventor); Akinyode, Akinjide Akinniyi (Inventor); Spain, Ivan (Inventor); Dawson, Andrew D. (Inventor); Figuered, Joshua M. (Inventor); Herrera, Eduardo (Inventor); Markee, Mason M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A multi-functional electric module (eModule) is provided for a vehicle having a chassis, a master controller, and a drive wheel having a propulsion-braking module. The eModule includes a steering control assembly, mounting bracket, propulsion control assembly, brake controller, housing, and control arm. The steering control assembly includes a steering motor controlled by steering controllers in response to control signals from the master controller. A mounting feature of the bracket connects to the chassis. The propulsion control assembly and brake controller are in communication with the propulsion-braking module. The control arm connects to the lower portion and contains elements of a suspension system, with the control arm being connectable to the drive wheel via a wheel input/output block. The controllers are responsive to the master controller to control a respective steering, propulsion, and braking function. The steering motor may have a dual-wound stator with windings controlled via the respective steering controllers.

  8. A systems biology approach using metabolomic data reveals genes and pathways interacting to modulate divergent growth in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Systems biology enables the identification of gene networks that modulate complex traits. Comprehensive metabolomic analyses provide innovative phenotypes that are intermediate between the initiator of genetic variability, the genome, and raw phenotypes that are influenced by a large number of environmental effects. The present study combines two concepts, systems biology and metabolic analyses, in an approach without prior functional hypothesis in order to dissect genes and molecular pathways that modulate differential growth at the onset of puberty in male cattle. Furthermore, this integrative strategy was applied to specifically explore distinctive gene interactions of non-SMC condensin I complex, subunit G (NCAPG) and myostatin (GDF8), known modulators of pre- and postnatal growth that are only partially understood for their molecular pathways affecting differential body weight. Results Our study successfully established gene networks and interacting partners affecting growth at the onset of puberty in cattle. We demonstrated the biological relevance of the created networks by comparison to randomly created networks. Our data showed that GnRH (Gonadotropin-releasing hormone) signaling is associated with divergent growth at the onset of puberty and revealed two highly connected hubs, BTC and DGKH, within the network. Both genes are known to directly interact with the GnRH signaling pathway. Furthermore, a gene interaction network for NCAPG containing 14 densely connected genes revealed novel information concerning the functional role of NCAPG in divergent growth. Conclusions Merging both concepts, systems biology and metabolomic analyses, successfully yielded new insights into gene networks and interacting partners affecting growth at the onset of puberty in cattle. Genetic modulation in GnRH signaling was identified as key modifier of differential cattle growth at the onset of puberty. In addition, the benefit of our innovative concept without prior

  9. M2 tidal parameter modulation revealed by superconducting gravimeter time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurers, Bruno; Van Camp, Michel; Francis, Olivier; Pálinkáš, Vojtech

    2016-04-01

    Analyzing consecutive and independent 1-yr data sets of 10 European superconducting gravimeters (SG) reveals statistically significant temporal variations of M2 tidal parameters. Both common short-term (< 2 yr) and long-term (> 2 yr) features are identified in all SG time series but one. The averaged variations of the amplitude factor are about 0.2 per mille. The path of load vector variations equivalent to the temporal changes of tidal parameters suggests the presence of an 8.85 yr modulation (lunar perigee). The tidal waves having the potential to modulate M2 with this period belong to the 3rd degree constituents. Their amplitude factors turn out to be much closer to body tide model predictions than that of the main 2nd degree M2, which indicates ocean loading for 3rd degree waves to be less prominent than for 2nd degree waves within the M2 group. These two different responses to the loading suggest that the observed long-term modulation is more due to insufficient frequency resolution of limited time series rather than to time variable loading. Presently, SG gravity time series are still too short to prove if time variable loading processes are involved too as in case of the annual M2 modulation known to appear for analysis intervals of less than 1 yr. The observed variations provide an upper accuracy limit for Earth model validation and permit estimating the temporal stability of SG scale factors and assessing the quality of gravity time series.

  10. Mining functional modules in genetic networks with decomposable graphical models.

    PubMed

    Dejori, Mathäus; Schwaighofer, Anton; Tresp, Volker; Stetter, Martin

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, graphical models have become an increasingly important tool for the structural analysis of genome-wide expression profiles at the systems level. Here we present a new graphical modelling technique, which is based on decomposable graphical models, and apply it to a set of gene expression profiles from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The new method explains probabilistic dependencies of expression levels in terms of the concerted action of underlying genetic functional modules, which are represented as so-called "cliques" in the graph. In addition, the method uses continuous-valued (instead of discretized) expression levels, and makes no particular assumption about their probability distribution. We show that the method successfully groups members of known functional modules to cliques. Our method allows the evaluation of the importance of genes for global cellular functions based on both link count and the clique membership count. PMID:15268775

  11. Nanomaterial-modulated autophagy: underlying mechanisms and functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Wei, Min; Li, Song; Le, Weidong

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is an essential lysosome-dependent process that controls the quality of the cytoplasm and maintains cellular homeostasis, and dysfunction of this protein degradation system is correlated with various disorders. A growing body of evidence suggests that nanomaterials (NMs) have autophagy-modulating effects, thus predicting a valuable and promising application potential of NMs in the diagnosis and treatment of autophagy-related diseases. NMs exhibit unique physical, chemical and biofunctional properties, which may endow NMs with capabilities to modulate autophagy via various mechanisms. The present review highlights the impacts of various NMs on autophagy and their functional consequences. The possible underlying mechanisms for NM-modulated autophagy are also discussed. PMID:27193191

  12. Proteomic profiling reveals insights into Triticeae stigma development and function.

    PubMed

    Nazemof, Nazila; Couroux, Philippe; Rampitsch, Christof; Xing, Tim; Robert, Laurian S

    2014-11-01

    To our knowledge, this study represents the first high-throughput characterization of a stigma proteome in the Triticeae. A total of 2184 triticale mature stigma proteins were identified using three different gel-based approaches combined with mass spectrometry. The great majority of these proteins are described in a Triticeae stigma for the first time. These results revealed many proteins likely to play important roles in stigma development and pollen-stigma interactions, as well as protection against biotic and abiotic stresses. Quantitative comparison of the triticale stigma transcriptome and proteome showed poor correlation, highlighting the importance of having both types of analysis. This work makes a significant contribution towards the elucidation of the Triticeae stigma proteome and provides novel insights into its role in stigma development and function. PMID:25170101

  13. Proteomic profiling reveals insights into Triticeae stigma development and function

    PubMed Central

    Nazemof, Nazila; Couroux, Philippe; Rampitsch, Christof; Xing, Tim; Robert, Laurian S.

    2014-01-01

    To our knowledge, this study represents the first high-throughput characterization of a stigma proteome in the Triticeae. A total of 2184 triticale mature stigma proteins were identified using three different gel-based approaches combined with mass spectrometry. The great majority of these proteins are described in a Triticeae stigma for the first time. These results revealed many proteins likely to play important roles in stigma development and pollen–stigma interactions, as well as protection against biotic and abiotic stresses. Quantitative comparison of the triticale stigma transcriptome and proteome showed poor correlation, highlighting the importance of having both types of analysis. This work makes a significant contribution towards the elucidation of the Triticeae stigma proteome and provides novel insights into its role in stigma development and function. PMID:25170101

  14. Band gap modulation of functionalized metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Musho, Terence; Li, Jiangtan; Wu, Nianqiang

    2014-11-21

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been envisioned as alternatives to planar metallic catalysts for solar-to-fuel conversion. This is a direct result of their porous structure and the ability to tailor their optical absorption properties. This study investigates the band gap modulation of Zr-UiO-66 MOFs from both the computational and experimental points of view for three linker designs that include benzenedicarboxylate (BDC), BDC-NO2, and BDC-NH2. Emphasis in this study was aimed at understanding the influence of the bonding between the aromatic ring and the functional group. A ground state density functional theory (DFT) calculation was carried out to investigate the projected density of states and the origins of the modulation. A time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculation of the hydrogen terminated linkers confirmed the modulation and accounted for the electron charge transfer providing comparable optical band gap predictions to experimental results. Computational results confirmed the hybridization of the carbon-nitrogen bond in conjunction with the donor state resulting from the NH2 functionalization. The NO2 functionalization resulted in an acceptor configuration with marginal modification to the valence band maximum. The largest modulation was BDC-NH2 with a band gap of 2.75 eV, followed by BDC-NO2 with a band gap of 2.93 eV and BDC with a band gap of 3.76 eV. The electron effective mass was predicted from the band structure to be 8.9 me for all MOF designs. PMID:25269595

  15. Amplitude-modulated stimuli reveal auditory-visual interactions in brain activity and brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Mark; Rees, Adrian; Vuong, Quoc C.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal congruence between auditory and visual signals coming from the same source can be a powerful means by which the brain integrates information from different senses. To investigate how the brain uses temporal information to integrate auditory and visual information from continuous yet unfamiliar stimuli, we used amplitude-modulated tones and size-modulated shapes with which we could manipulate the temporal congruence between the sensory signals. These signals were independently modulated at a slow or a fast rate. Participants were presented with auditory-only, visual-only, or auditory-visual (AV) trials in the fMRI scanner. On AV trials, the auditory and visual signal could have the same (AV congruent) or different modulation rates (AV incongruent). Using psychophysiological interaction analyses, we found that auditory regions showed increased functional connectivity predominantly with frontal regions for AV incongruent relative to AV congruent stimuli. We further found that superior temporal regions, shown previously to integrate auditory and visual signals, showed increased connectivity with frontal and parietal regions for the same contrast. Our findings provide evidence that both activity in a network of brain regions and their connectivity are important for AV integration, and help to bridge the gap between transient and familiar AV stimuli used in previous studies. PMID:26483710

  16. Systematic Identification of Functional Plant Modules through the Integration of Complementary Data Sources1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Heyndrickx, Ken S.; Vandepoele, Klaas

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge is to unravel how genes interact and are regulated to exert specific biological functions. The integration of genome-wide functional genomics data, followed by the construction of gene networks, provides a powerful approach to identify functional gene modules. Large-scale expression data, functional gene annotations, experimental protein-protein interactions, and transcription factor-target interactions were integrated to delineate modules in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The different experimental input data sets showed little overlap, demonstrating the advantage of combining multiple data types to study gene function and regulation. In the set of 1,563 modules covering 13,142 genes, most modules displayed strong coexpression, but functional and cis-regulatory coherence was less prevalent. Highly connected hub genes showed a significant enrichment toward embryo lethality and evidence for cross talk between different biological processes. Comparative analysis revealed that 58% of the modules showed conserved coexpression across multiple plants. Using module-based functional predictions, 5,562 genes were annotated, and an evaluation experiment disclosed that, based on 197 recently experimentally characterized genes, 38.1% of these functions could be inferred through the module context. Examples of confirmed genes of unknown function related to cell wall biogenesis, xylem and phloem pattern formation, cell cycle, hormone stimulus, and circadian rhythm highlight the potential to identify new gene functions. The module-based predictions offer new biological hypotheses for functionally unknown genes in Arabidopsis (1,701 genes) and six other plant species (43,621 genes). Furthermore, the inferred modules provide new insights into the conservation of coexpression and coregulation as well as a starting point for comparative functional annotation. PMID:22589469

  17. Functional Connectivity Modulation by Acupuncture in Patients with Bell's Palsy

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaoxuan; Hu, Sheng; Li, Chuanfu; Xu, Chunsheng; Kan, Hongxing; Xue, Qiuju; Qiu, Bensheng

    2016-01-01

    Bell's palsy (BP), an acute unilateral facial paralysis, is frequently treated with acupuncture in many countries. However, the mechanism of treatment is not clear so far. In order to explore the potential mechanism, 22 healthy volunteers and 17 BP patients with different clinical duration were recruited. The resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were conducted before and after acupuncture at LI4 (Hegu), respectively. By comparing BP-induced functional connectivity (FC) changes with acupuncture-induced FC changes in the patients, the abnormal increased FC that could be reduced by acupuncture was selected. The FC strength of the selected FC at various stages was analyzed subsequently. Our results show that FC modulation of acupuncture is specific and consistent with the tendency of recovery. Therefore, we propose that FC modulation by acupuncture may be beneficial to recovery from the disease. PMID:27293461

  18. Modulation transfer function of QWIP and superlattice focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Rafol, S. B.; Ting, D. Z.; Soibel, A.; Liu, J. K.; Khoshakhlagh, A.; Keo, S. A.; Mumolo, J. M.; Nguyen, J.

    2013-07-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) is the ability of an imaging system to faithfully image a given object. The MTF of an imaging system quantifies the ability of the system to resolve or transfer spatial frequencies. In this paper we will discuss the detail MTF measurements of a 1024 × 1024 pixel multi-band quantum well infrared photodetector and 320 × 256 pixel long-wavelength InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared focal plane arrays.

  19. Human skin hypoxia modulates cerebrovascular and autonomic functions.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Olivia; Qualls, Clifford; Battisti-Charbonney, Anne; Balaban, Dahlia Y; Fisher, Joe A; Duffin, Jim; Appenzeller, Otto

    2012-01-01

    Because the skin is an oxygen sensor in amphibians and mice, we thought to confirm this function also in humans. The human upright posture, however, introduces additional functional demands for the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis in which cerebral blood flow and autonomic nervous system (ANS) function may also be involved. We examined nine males and three females. While subjects were breathing ambient air, at sea level, we changed gases in a plastic body-bag during two conditions of the experiment such as to induce skin hypoxia (with pure nitrogen) or skin normoxia (with air). The subjects performed a test of hypoxic ventilatory drive during each condition of the experiment. We found no differences in the hypoxic ventilatory drive tests. However, ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities were modulated by skin hypoxia and the effect was significantly greater on the left than right middle cerebral arteries. We conclude that skin hypoxia modulates ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities and this might impact life styles and tolerance to ambient hypoxia at altitude. Thus the skin in normal humans, in addition to its numerous other functions, is also an oxygen sensor. PMID:23056597

  20. Human Skin Hypoxia Modulates Cerebrovascular and Autonomic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Olivia; Qualls, Clifford; Battisti-Charbonney, Anne; Balaban, Dahlia Y.; Fisher, Joe A.; Duffin, Jim; Appenzeller, Otto

    2012-01-01

    Because the skin is an oxygen sensor in amphibians and mice, we thought to confirm this function also in humans. The human upright posture, however, introduces additional functional demands for the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis in which cerebral blood flow and autonomic nervous system (ANS) function may also be involved. We examined nine males and three females. While subjects were breathing ambient air, at sea level, we changed gases in a plastic body-bag during two conditions of the experiment such as to induce skin hypoxia (with pure nitrogen) or skin normoxia (with air). The subjects performed a test of hypoxic ventilatory drive during each condition of the experiment. We found no differences in the hypoxic ventilatory drive tests. However, ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities were modulated by skin hypoxia and the effect was significantly greater on the left than right middle cerebral arteries. We conclude that skin hypoxia modulates ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities and this might impact life styles and tolerance to ambient hypoxia at altitude. Thus the skin in normal humans, in addition to its numerous other functions, is also an oxygen sensor. PMID:23056597

  1. Parametric dependence of ocean wave-radar modulation transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Cross, A.

    1983-01-01

    Microwave techniques at X and L band were used to determine the dependence of ocean-wave radar modulation transfer functions (MTFs) on various environmental and radar parameters during the Marine Remote Sensing experiment of 1979 (MARSEN 79). These MIF are presented, as are coherence functions between the AM and FM parts of the backscattered microwave signal. It is shown that they both depend on several of these parameters. Besides confirming many of the properties of transfer functions reported by previous authors, indications are found that MTFs decrease with increasing angle between wave propagation and antenna-look directions but are essentially independent of small changes in air-sea temperature difference. However, coherence functions are much smaller when the antennas are pointed perpendicular to long waves. It is found that X band transfer functions measured with horizontally polarized microwave radiation have larger magnitudes than those obtained by using vertical polarization.

  2. Nucleotide substitutions revealing specific functions of Polycomb group genes.

    PubMed

    Bajusz, Izabella; Sipos, László; Pirity, Melinda K

    2015-04-01

    POLYCOMB group (PCG) proteins belong to the family of epigenetic regulators of genes playing important roles in differentiation and development. Mutants of PcG genes were isolated first in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, resulting in spectacular segmental transformations due to the ectopic expression of homeotic genes. Homologs of Drosophila PcG genes were also identified in plants and in vertebrates and subsequent experiments revealed the general role of PCG proteins in the maintenance of the repressed state of chromatin through cell divisions. The past decades of gene targeting experiments have allowed us to make significant strides towards understanding how the network of PCG proteins influences multiple aspects of cellular fate determination during development. Being involved in the transmission of specific expression profiles of different cell lineages, PCG proteins were found to control wide spectra of unrelated epigenetic processes in vertebrates, such as stem cell plasticity and renewal, genomic imprinting and inactivation of X-chromosome. PCG proteins also affect regulation of metabolic genes being important for switching programs between pluripotency and differentiation. Insight into the precise roles of PCG proteins in normal physiological processes has emerged from studies employing cell culture-based systems and genetically modified animals. Here we summarize the findings obtained from PcG mutant fruit flies and mice generated to date with a focus on PRC1 and PRC2 members altered by nucleotide substitutions resulting in specific alleles. We also include a compilation of lessons learned from these models about the in vivo functions of this complex protein family. With multiple knockout lines, sophisticated approaches to study the consequences of peculiar missense point mutations, and insights from complementary gain-of-function systems in hand, we are now in a unique position to significantly advance our understanding of the molecular basis of

  3. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Overlapping Functions of Clustered Protocadherins*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Meng-Hsuan; Lin, Chengyi; Meng, Shuxia; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2010-01-01

    The three tandem-arrayed protocadherin (Pcdh) gene clusters, namely Pcdh-α, Pcdh-β, and Pcdh-γ, play important roles in the development of the vertebrate central nervous system. To gain insight into the molecular action of PCDHs, we performed a systematic proteomics analysis of PCDH-γ-associated protein complexes. We identified a list of 154 non-redundant proteins in the PCDH-γ complexes. This list includes nearly 30 members of clustered Pcdh-α, -β, and -γ families as core components of the complexes and additionally over 120 putative PCDH-associated proteins. We validated a selected subset of PCDH-γ-associated proteins using specific antibodies. Analysis of the identities of PCDH-associated proteins showed that the majority of them overlap with the proteomic profile of postsynaptic density preparations. Further analysis of membrane protein complexes revealed that several validated PCDH-γ-associated proteins exhibit reduced levels in Pcdh-γ-deficient brain tissues. Therefore, PCDH-γs are required for the integrity of the complexes. However, the size of the overall complexes and the abundance of many other proteins remained unchanged, raising a possibility that PCDH-αs and PCDH-βs might compensate for PCDH-γ function in complex formation. As a test of this idea, RNA interference knockdown of both PCDH-αs and PCDH-γs showed that PCDHs have redundant functions in regulating neuronal survival in the chicken spinal cord. Taken together, our data provide evidence that clustered PCDHs coexist in large protein complexes and have overlapping functions during vertebrate neural development. PMID:19843561

  4. KCNQ1 subdomains involved in KCNE modulation revealed by an invertebrate KCNQ1 orthologue

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Atsuo; Okamura, Yasushi; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    KCNQ1 channels are voltage-gated potassium channels that are widely expressed in various non-neuronal tissues, such as the heart, pancreas, and intestine. KCNE proteins are known as the auxiliary subunits for KCNQ1 channels. The effects and functions of the different KCNE proteins on KCNQ1 modulation are various; the KCNQ1–KCNE1 ion channel complex produces a slowly activating potassium channel that is crucial for heartbeat regulation, while the KCNE3 protein makes KCNQ1 channels constitutively active, which is important for K+ and Cl− transport in the intestine. The mechanisms by which KCNE proteins modulate KCNQ1 channels have long been studied and discussed; however, it is not well understood how different KCNE proteins exert considerably different effects on KCNQ1 channels. Here, we approached this point by taking advantage of the recently isolated Ci-KCNQ1, a KCNQ1 homologue from marine invertebrate Ciona intestinalis. We found that Ci-KCNQ1 alone could be expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and produced a voltage-dependent potassium current, but that Ci-KCNQ1 was not properly modulated by KCNE1 and totally unaffected by coexpression of KCNE3. By making chimeras of Ci-KCNQ1 and human KCNQ1, we determined several amino acid residues located in the pore region of human KCNQ1 involved in KCNE1 modulation. Interestingly, though, these amino acid residues of the pore region are not important for KCNE3 modulation, and we subsequently found that the S1 segment plays an important role in making KCNQ1 channels constitutively active by KCNE3. Our findings indicate that different KCNE proteins use different domains of KCNQ1 channels, and that may explain why different KCNE proteins give quite different outcomes by forming a complex with KCNQ1 channels. PMID:22042987

  5. Modulation transfer function measurement technique for small-pixel detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchywka, Mike; Socker, Dennis G.

    1992-01-01

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) measurement technique suitable for large-format, small-pixel detector characterization has been investigated. A volume interference grating is used as a test image instead of the bar or sine wave target images normally used. This technique permits a high-contrast, large-area, sinusoidal intensity distribution to illuminate the device being tested, avoiding the need to deconvolve raw data with imaging system characteristics. A high-confidence MTF result at spatial frequencies near 200 cycles/mm is obtained. We present results at several visible light wavelengths with a 6.8-micron-pixel CCD. Pixel response functions are derived from the MTF results.

  6. Functional Relations of Cerebellar Modules of the Cat

    PubMed Central

    Pong, Milton; Gibson, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    The cerebellum consists of parasagittal zones that define fundamental modules of neural processing. Each zone receives input from a distinct subdivision of the inferior olive (IO)—activity in one olivary subdivision will affect activity in one cerebellar module. To define functions of the cerebellar modules, we inactivated specific olivary subdivisions in six male cats with a glutamate receptor blocker. Olivary inactivation eliminates Purkinje cell complex spikes, which results in a high rate of Purkinje cell simple spike discharge. The increased simple spike discharge inhibits output from connected regions of the cerebellar nuclei. After inactivation, behavior was evaluated during a reach-to-grasp task and during locomotion. Inactivation of each subdivision produced unique behavioral deficits. Performance of the reach-to-grasp task was affected by inactivation of the rostral dorsal accessory olive (rDAO) and the rostral medial accessory olive (rMAO) and, possibly, the principal olive. rDAO inactivation produced paw drag during locomotion and a deficit in grasping the handle during the reach-to-grasp task. rMAO inactivation caused the cats to reach under the handle and produced severe limb drag during locomotion. Inactivation of the dorsal medial cell column, cell group β, or caudal medial accessory olive produced little deficit in the reach-to-grasp task, but each produced a different deficit during locomotion. In all cases, the cats appeared to have intact sensation, good spatial awareness, and no change of affect. Normal cerebellar function requires low rates of IO discharge, and each cerebellar module has a specific and unique function in sensory–motor integration. PMID:20631170

  7. Functional Genomics Reveals Linkers Critical for Influenza Virus Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lulan; Wu, Aiping; Wang, Yao E.; Quanquin, Natalie; Li, Chunfeng; Wang, Jingfeng; Chen, Hsiang-Wen; Liu, Suyang; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Hong; Qin, F. Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus mRNA synthesis by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase involves binding and cleavage of capped cellular mRNA by the PB2 and PA subunits, respectively, and extension of viral mRNA by PB1. However, the mechanism for such a dynamic process is unclear. Using high-throughput mutagenesis and sequencing analysis, we have not only generated a comprehensive functional map for the microdomains of individual subunits but also have revealed the PA linker to be critical for polymerase activity. This PA linker binds to PB1 and also forms ionic interactions with the PA C-terminal channel. Nearly all mutants with five-amino-acid insertions in the linker were nonviable. Our model further suggests that the PA linker plays an important role in the conformational changes that occur between stages that favor capped mRNA binding and cleavage and those associated with viral mRNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza virus consists of the PB1, PB2, and PA subunits. By combining genome-wide mutagenesis analysis with the recently discovered crystal structure of the influenza polymerase heterotrimer, we generated a comprehensive functional map of the entire influenza polymerase complex. We identified the microdomains of individual subunits, including the catalytic domains, the interaction interfaces between subunits, and nine linkers interconnecting different domains. Interestingly, we found that mutants with five-amino-acid insertions in individual linkers were nonviable, suggesting the critical roles these linkers play in coordinating spatial relationships between the subunits. We further identified an extended PA linker that binds to PB1 and also forms ionic interactions with the PA C-terminal channel. PMID:26719244

  8. The response function of modulated grid Faraday cup plasma instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, A.; Olbert, S.

    1986-01-01

    Modulated grid Faraday cup plasma analyzers are a very useful tool for making in situ measurements of space plasmas. One of their great attributes is that their simplicity permits their angular response function to be calculated theoretically. An expression is derived for this response function by computing the trajectories of the charged particles inside the cup. The Voyager Plasma Science (PLS) experiment is used as a specific example. Two approximations to the rigorous response function useful for data analysis are discussed. The theoretical formulas were tested by multi-sensor analysis of solar wind data. The tests indicate that the formulas represent the true cup response function for all angles of incidence with a maximum error of only a few percent.

  9. Opioid System Modulates the Immune Function: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xuan; Liu, Renyu; Chen, Chunhua; Ji, Fang; Li, Tianzuo

    2016-01-01

    Opioid receptors and their ligands produce powerful analgesia that is effective in perioperative period and chronic pain managements accompanied with various side effects including respiratory depression, constipation and addiction etc. Opioids can also interfere with the immune system, not only participating in the function of the immune cells, but also modulating innate and acquired immune responses. The traditional notion of opioids is immunosuppressive. Recent studies indicate that the role of opioid receptors on immune function is complicated, working through various different mechanisms. Different opioids or opioids administrations show various effects on the immune system: immunosuppressive, immunostimulatory, or dual effect. It is important to elucidate the relationship between opioids and immune function, since immune system plays critical role in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including the inflammation, tumor growth and metastasis, drug abuse, and so on. This review article tends to have an overview of the recent work and perspectives on opioids and the immune function. PMID:26985446

  10. Postnatal Experience Modulates Functional Properties of Mouse Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiwei; Tian, Huikai; Lee, Anderson C.; Ma, Minghong

    2012-01-01

    Early experience considerably modulates the organization and function of all sensory systems. In the mammalian olfactory system, deprivation of the sensory inputs via neonatal, unilateral naris closure has been shown to induce structural, molecular, and functional changes from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb and cortex. However, it remains unknown how early experience shapes functional properties of individual olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the primary odor detectors in the nose. To address this question, we examined odorant response properties of mouse OSNs in both the closed and open nostril after four weeks of unilateral naris closure with age-matched untreated animals as control. Using patch-clamp technique on genetically-tagged OSNs with defined odorant receptors (ORs), we found that sensory deprivation increased the sensitivity of MOR23 neurons in the closed side while overexposure caused the opposite effect in the open side. We next analyzed the response properties including rise time, decay time, and adaptation induced by repeated stimulation in MOR23 and M71 neurons. Even though these two types of neurons showed distinct properties in dynamic range and response kinetics, sensory deprivation significantly slowed down the decay phase of odorant-induced transduction events in both types. Using western blotting and antibody staining, we confirmed upregulation of several signaling proteins in the closed side as compared with the open side. This study suggests that early experience modulates functional properties of OSNs, probably via modifying the signal transduction cascade. PMID:22703547

  11. Functional Consequences of GPCR Heterodimerization: GPCRs as Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Karla K.V.; McCarty, Nael A.

    2011-01-01

    G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome, are the targets of approximately 25% of all marketed pharmaceuticals, and the focus of intensive research worldwide given that this superfamily of receptors is as varied in function as it is ubiquitously expressed among all cell types. Increasing evidence has shown that the classical two part model of GPCR signaling (one GPCR, one type of heterotrimeric G protein) is grossly oversimplified as many GPCRs can couple to more than one type of G protein, each subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein can activate different downstream effectors, and, surprisingly, other GPCRs can affect receptor behavior in G protein-independent ways. The concept of GPCR heterodimerization, or the physical association of two different types of GPCRs, presents an unexpected mechanism for GPCR regulation and function, and provides a novel target for pharmaceuticals. Here we present a synopsis of the functional consequences of GPCR heterodimerization in both in vitro and in vivo studies, focusing on the concept of GPCRs as allosteric modulators. Typically, an allosteric modulator is a ligand or molecule that alters a receptor's innate functional properties, but here we propose that in the case of GPCR heterodimers, it is the physical coupling of two receptors that leads to changes in cognate receptor signaling.

  12. Nanotopographical Modulation of Cell Function through Nuclear Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Bruce, Allison; Mezan, Ryan; Kadiyala, Anand; Wang, Liying; Dawson, Jeremy; Rojanasakul, Yon; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Although nanotopography has been shown to be a potent modulator of cell behavior, it is unclear how the nanotopographical cue, through focal adhesions, affects the nucleus, eventually influencing cell phenotype and function. Thus, current methods to apply nanotopography to regulate cell behavior are basically empirical. We, herein, engineered nanotopographies of various shapes (gratings and pillars) and dimensions (feature size, spacing and height), and thoroughly investigated cell spreading, focal adhesion organization and nuclear deformation of human primary fibroblasts as the model cell grown on the nanotopographies. We examined the correlation between nuclear deformation and cell functions such as cell proliferation, transfection and extracellular matrix protein type I collagen production. It was found that the nanoscale gratings and pillars could facilitate focal adhesion elongation by providing anchoring sites, and the nanogratings could orient focal adhesions and nuclei along the nanograting direction, depending on not only the feature size but also the spacing of the nanogratings. Compared with continuous nanogratings, discrete nanopillars tended to disrupt the formation and growth of focal adhesions and thus had less profound effects on nuclear deformation. Notably, nuclear volume could be effectively modulated by the height of nanotopography. Further, we demonstrated that cell proliferation, transfection, and type I collagen production were strongly associated with the nuclear volume, indicating that the nucleus serves as a critical mechanosensor for cell regulation. Our study delineated the relationships between focal adhesions, nucleus and cell function and highlighted that the nanotopography could regulate cell phenotype and function by modulating nuclear deformation. This study provides insight into the rational design of nanotopography for new biomaterials and the cell–substrate interfaces of implants and medical devices. PMID:26844365

  13. Secretory protein profiling reveals TNFα inactivation by selective and promiscuous Sec61 modulators

    PubMed Central

    Maifeld, Sarah V.; MacKinnon, Andrew L.; Garrison, Jennifer L.; Sharma, Ajay; Kunkel, Eric J.; Hegde, Ramanujan S.; Taunton, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cotransins are cyclic heptadepsipeptides that bind the Sec61 translocon to inhibit cotranslational translocation of a subset of secreted and type I transmembrane proteins. The few known cotransin-sensitive substrates are all targeted to the translocon by a cleavable signal sequence, previously shown to be a critical determinant of cotransin sensitivity. By profiling two cotransin variants against a panel of secreted and transmembrane proteins, we demonstrate that cotransin side-chain differences profoundly affect substrate selectivity. Among the most sensitive substrates we identified is the pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Like all type II transmembrane proteins, TNFα is targeted to the translocon by its membrane-spanning domain, indicating that a cleavable signal sequence is not strictly required for cotransin sensitivity. Our results thus reveal an unanticipated breadth of translocon substrates whose expression is inhibited by Sec61 modulators. PMID:21944747

  14. Modulators of Stomatal Lineage Signal Transduction Alter Membrane Contact Sites and Reveal Specialization among ERECTA Kinases.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chin-Min Kimmy; Paciorek, Tomasz; Abrash, Emily; Bergmann, Dominique C

    2016-08-22

    Signal transduction from a cell's surface to its interior requires dedicated signaling elements and a cellular environment conducive to signal propagation. Plant development, defense, and homeostasis rely on plasma membrane receptor-like kinases to perceive endogenous and environmental signals, but little is known about their immediate downstream targets and signaling modifiers. Using genetics, biochemistry, and live-cell imaging, we show that the VAP-RELATED SUPPRESSOR OF TMM (VST) family is required for ERECTA-mediated signaling in growth and cell-fate determination and reveal a role for ERECTA-LIKE2 in modulating signaling by its sister kinases. We show that VSTs are peripheral plasma membrane proteins that can form complexes with integral ER-membrane proteins, thereby potentially influencing the organization of the membrane milieu to promote efficient and differential signaling from the ERECTA-family members to their downstream intracellular targets. PMID:27554856

  15. Modulating executive functioning: trait motivational reactivity and resting HRV.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Rachel L; Potter, Robert F; Lang, Annie; Pisoni, David B

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed relationships among individual differences in trait motivational reactivity, executive functioning, and neurovisceral regulation of emotion and attention indexed via resting heart rate variability (rHRV). We derived predictions regarding these relationships according to neurovisceral neural network theory. Because lower rHRV has been suggested as an endophenotype of less adaptive behaviour, low rHRV individuals were predicted to have high aversive and low appetitive trait motivational reactivity, while high rHRV individuals were predicted to have high reactivity in both appetitive and aversive motivational systems. These predictions were supported. Motivational reactivity also was related to executive functioning deficits, although the pattern of results was not in the predicted direction. Results suggest that trait motivational reactivity scores are related to visceral responses proposed in the neurovisceral integration circuit as well as in the modulation of these responses by higher-order cognitive control systems related to executive function. PMID:24606341

  16. Dissociable Modulation of Overt Visual Attention in Valence and Arousal Revealed by Topology of Scan Path

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jianguang; Jiang, Huihui; Jin, Yixiang; Chen, Nanhui; Wang, Jianhong; Wang, Zhengbo; Luo, Yuejia; Ma, Yuanye; Hu, Xintian

    2011-01-01

    Emotional stimuli have evolutionary significance for the survival of organisms; therefore, they are attention-grabbing and are processed preferentially. The neural underpinnings of two principle emotional dimensions in affective space, valence (degree of pleasantness) and arousal (intensity of evoked emotion), have been shown to be dissociable in the olfactory, gustatory and memory systems. However, the separable roles of valence and arousal in scene perception are poorly understood. In this study, we asked how these two emotional dimensions modulate overt visual attention. Twenty-two healthy volunteers freely viewed images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) that were graded for affective levels of valence and arousal (high, medium, and low). Subjects' heads were immobilized and eye movements were recorded by camera to track overt shifts of visual attention. Algebraic graph-based approaches were introduced to model scan paths as weighted undirected path graphs, generating global topology metrics that characterize the algebraic connectivity of scan paths. Our data suggest that human subjects show different scanning patterns to stimuli with different affective ratings. Valence salient stimuli (with neutral arousal) elicited faster and larger shifts of attention, while arousal salient stimuli (with neutral valence) elicited local scanning, dense attention allocation and deep processing. Furthermore, our model revealed that the modulatory effect of valence was linearly related to the valence level, whereas the relation between the modulatory effect and the level of arousal was nonlinear. Hence, visual attention seems to be modulated by mechanisms that are separate for valence and arousal. PMID:21494331

  17. System-wide assembly of pathways and modules hierarchically reveal metabolic mechanism of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Guo, Zhili; Zhang, Liangxiao; Zhang, Yingying; Chen, Yinying; Nan, Jingyi; Zhao, Buchang; Xiao, Hongbin; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Yongyan

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between cerebral ischemia and metabolic disorders is poorly understood, which is partly due to the lack of comparative fusing data for larger complete systems and to the complexity of metabolic cascade reactions. Based on the fusing maps of comprehensive serum metabolome, fatty acid and amino acid profiling, we identified 35 potential metabolic biomarkers for ischemic stroke. Our analyses revealed 8 significantly altered pathways by MetPA (Metabolomics Pathway Analysis, impact score >0.10) and 15 significantly rewired modules in a complex ischemic network using the Markov clustering (MCL) method; all of these pathways became more homologous as the number of overlapping nodes was increased. We then detected 24 extensive pathways based on the total modular nodes from the network analysis, 12 of which were new discovery pathways. We provided a new perspective from the viewpoint of abnormal metabolites for the overall study of ischemic stroke as well as a new method to simplify the network analysis by selecting the more closely connected edges and nodes to build a module map of stroke. PMID:26621314

  18. Functional specification of the Performance Measurement (PM) module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berliner, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The design of the Performance Measurement Module is described with emphasis on what the PM Module would do, and what it would look like to the user. The PM Module as described could take several man-years to develop. An evolutionary approach to the implementation of the PM Module is presented which would provide an operational baseline PM Module within a few months.

  19. Towards the identification of protein complexes and functional modules by integrating PPI network and gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Identification of protein complexes and functional modules from protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks is crucial to understanding the principles of cellular organization and predicting protein functions. In the past few years, many computational methods have been proposed. However, most of them considered the PPI networks as static graphs and overlooked the dynamics inherent within these networks. Moreover, few of them can distinguish between protein complexes and functional modules. Results In this paper, a new framework is proposed to distinguish between protein complexes and functional modules by integrating gene expression data into protein-protein interaction (PPI) data. A series of time-sequenced subnetworks (TSNs) is constructed according to the time that the interactions were activated. The algorithm TSN-PCD was then developed to identify protein complexes from these TSNs. As protein complexes are significantly related to functional modules, a new algorithm DFM-CIN is proposed to discover functional modules based on the identified complexes. The experimental results show that the combination of temporal gene expression data with PPI data contributes to identifying protein complexes more precisely. A quantitative comparison based on f-measure reveals that our algorithm TSN-PCD outperforms the other previous protein complex discovery algorithms. Furthermore, we evaluate the identified functional modules by using “Biological Process” annotated in GO (Gene Ontology). The validation shows that the identified functional modules are statistically significant in terms of “Biological Process”. More importantly, the relationship between protein complexes and functional modules are studied. Conclusions The proposed framework based on the integration of PPI data and gene expression data makes it possible to identify protein complexes and functional modules more effectively. Moveover, the proposed new framework and algorithms can distinguish

  20. Challenges and achievements in the therapeutic modulation of aquaporin functionality.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Eric; Golldack, André; Rothert, Monja; von Bülow, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) water and solute channels have basic physiological functions throughout the human body. AQP-facilitated water permeability across cell membranes is required for rapid reabsorption of water from pre-urine in the kidneys and for sustained near isosmolar water fluxes e.g. in the brain, eyes, inner ear, and lungs. Cellular water permeability is further connected to cell motility. AQPs of the aquaglyceroporin subfamily are necessary for lipid degradation in adipocytes and glycerol uptake into the liver, as well as for skin moistening. Modulation of AQP function is desirable in several pathophysiological situations, such as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, Sjögren's syndrome, Menière's disease, heart failure, or tumors to name a few. Attempts to design or to find effective small molecule AQP inhibitors have yielded only a few hits. Challenges reside in the high copy number of AQP proteins in the cell membranes, and spatial restrictions in the protein structure. This review gives an overview on selected physiological and pathophysiological conditions in which modulation of AQP functions appears beneficial and discusses first achievements in the search of drug-like AQP inhibitors. PMID:26277280

  1. Modulation of opioid receptor function by protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Alfaras-Melainis, Konstantinos; Gomes, Ivone; Rozenfeld, Raphael; Zachariou, Venetia; Devi, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Opioid receptors, MORP, DORP and KORP, belong to the family A of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR), and have been found to modulate a large number of physiological functions, including mood, stress, appetite, nociception and immune responses. Exogenously applied opioid alkaloids produce analgesia, hedonia and addiction. Addiction is linked to alterations in function and responsiveness of all three opioid receptors in the brain. Over the last few years, a large number of studies identified protein-protein interactions that play an essential role in opioid receptor function and responsiveness. Here, we summarize interactions shown to affect receptor biogenesis and trafficking, as well as those affecting signal transduction events following receptor activation. This article also examines protein interactions modulating the rate of receptor endocytosis and degradation, events that play a major role in opiate analgesia. Like several other GPCRs, opioid receptors may form homo or heterodimers. The last part of this review summarizes recent knowledge on proteins known to affect opioid receptor dimerization. PMID:19273296

  2. Cytokine Signaling Modulates Blood-Brain Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weihong; Stone, Kirsten P.; Hsuchou, Hung; Manda, Vamshi K.; Zhang, Yan; Kastin, Abba J.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) provides a vast interface for cytokines to affect CNS function. The BBB is a target for therapeutic intervention. It is essential, therefore, to understand how cytokines interact with each other at the level of the BBB and how secondary signals modulate CNS functions beyond the BBB. The interactions between cytokines and lipids, however, have not been fully addressed at the level of the BBB. Here, we summarize current understanding of the localization of cytokine receptors and transporters in specific membrane microdomains, particularly lipid rafts, on the luminal (apical) surface of the microvascular endothelial cells composing the BBB. We then illustrate the clinical context of cytokine effects on the BBB by neuroendocrine regulation and amplification of inflammatory signals. Two unusual aspects discussed are signaling crosstalk by different classes of cytokines and genetic regulation of drug efflux transporters. We also introduce a novel area of focus on how cytokines may act through nuclear hormone receptors to modulate efflux transporters and other targets. A specific example discussed is the ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 (ABCA-1) that regulates lipid metabolism. Overall, cytokine signaling at the level of the BBB is a crucial feature of the dynamic regulation that can rapidly change BBB function and affect brain health and disease. PMID:21834767

  3. Diverse voltage-sensitive dyes modulate GABAA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Mennerick, Steven; Chisari, Mariangela; Shu, Hong-Jin; Taylor, Amanda; Vasek, Michael; Eisenman, Lawrence N.; Zorumski, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs) are important tools for assessing network and single-cell excitability, but an untested premise in most cases is that the dyes do not interfere with the parameters (membrane potential, excitability) that they are designed to measure. We found that popular members of several different families of voltage-sensitive dyes modulate GABAA receptor with maximum efficacy and potency similar to clinically used GABAA receptor modulators. Di-4-ANEPPS and DiBAC4(3) potentiated GABA function with micromolar and high nanomolar potency respectively and yielded strong maximum effects similar to barbiturates and neurosteroids. Newer blue oxonols had biphasic effects on GABAA receptor function at nanomolar and micromolar concentrations, with maximum potentiation comparable to that of saturating benzodiazepine effects. ANNINE 6 and ANNINE 6plus had no detectable effect on GABAA receptor function. Even dyes with no activity on GABAA receptors at baseline induced photodynamic enhancement of GABAA receptors. The basal effects of dyes were sufficient to prolong IPSCs and to dampen network activity in multielectrode array recordings. Therefore, the dual effects of voltage-sensitive dyes on GABAergic inhibition require caution in dye use for studies of excitability and network activity. PMID:20181584

  4. Modulation transfer function of a trapezoidal pixel array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Guo, Rongli; Ni, Jinping; Dong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is the tool most commonly used for quantifying the performance of an electro-optical imaging system. Recently, trapezoid-shaped pixels were designed and used in a retina-like sensor in place of rectangular-shaped pixels. The MTF of a detector with a trapezoidal pixel array is determined according to its definition. Additionally, the MTFs of detectors with differently shaped pixels, but the same pixel areas, are compared. The results show that the MTF values of the trapezoidal pixel array detector are obviously larger than those of rectangular and triangular pixel array detectors at the same frequencies.

  5. Two-dimensional modulation transfer function: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Marom, Emanuel; Milgrom, Benjamin; Konforti, Naim

    2010-12-10

    One-dimensional templates, such as the U.S. Air Force resolution target or the circular spoke target, are commonly used for the characterization of imaging systems via the modulation transfer function response. It is shown in this paper that one needs a new family of templates for a true characterization of imaging systems that acquire two-dimensional (2D) high-density images or handle 2D information, such as 2D bar code detection and identification. The contrast provided by the newly defined 2D templates is the "true" contrast of the acquired image that the electronic processors are challenged with. PMID:21151231

  6. Two-dimensional modulation transfer functions of image scanning systems.

    PubMed

    Simonds, R M

    1981-02-15

    Image data processing based on optical scanning and digital reconstruction frequently ignores artifacts produced by the scanning process itself. Characterization of these artifacts by measurement of system modulation transfer function (MTF) using the traditional knife-edge scan technique produces only one section of the 2-D MTF, and interpretation of this as representative of the complete MTF may yield misleading re A theoretical analysis is presented which allows reconstruction of the complete 2-D MTF from a sequence of knife-edge measurements, and an experimental example is shown for the case of a vidicon camera based scanning system. PMID:20309166

  7. Modulation transfer function measurement technique for image sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hui; Jiang, Huilin; Zhang, XiaoHui

    2010-08-01

    A new technique is demonstrated for measurement of modulation transfer function (MTF) on image sensor arrays. Fourier analysis of a low frequency bar target pattern is used to extract MTF at odd harmonics of a target pattern frequency up to and beyond Nyquist. The technique is particularly useful for linear image arrays (either conventional linescan or time-delay- integration devices) where conventional slanted-edge technique is not always applicable. The technique is well suited to simple implementation and can provide live presentation of the MTF curve, which helps to ensure optimal alignment conditions are achieved. Detailed analysis of the technique and demonstration of experimental results are presented.

  8. Gap junction modulation and its implications for heart function

    PubMed Central

    Kurtenbach, Stefan; Kurtenbach, Sarah; Zoidl, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction communication (GJC) mediated by connexins is critical for heart function. To gain insight into the causal relationship of molecular mechanisms of disease pathology, it is important to understand which mechanisms contribute to impairment of gap junctional communication. Here, we present an update on the known modulators of connexins, including various interaction partners, kinases, and signaling cascades. This gap junction network (GJN) can serve as a blueprint for data mining approaches exploring the growing number of publicly available data sets from experimental and clinical studies. PMID:24578694

  9. Modulation of ionotropic glutamate receptor function by vertebrate galectins

    PubMed Central

    Copits, Bryan A; Vernon, Claire G; Sakai, Ryuichi; Swanson, Geoffrey T

    2014-01-01

    AMPA and kainate receptors are glutamate-gated ion channels whose function is known to be altered by a variety of plant oligosaccharide-binding proteins, or lectins, but the physiological relevance of this activity has been uncertain because no lectins with analogous allosteric modulatory effects have been identified in animals. We report here that members of the prototype galectin family, which are β-galactoside-binding lectins, exhibit subunit-specific allosteric modulation of desensitization of recombinant homomeric and heteromeric AMPA and kainate receptors. Galectin modulation of GluK2 kainate receptors was dependent upon complex oligosaccharide processing of N-glycosylation sites in the amino-terminal domain and downstream linker region. The sensitivity of GluA4 AMPA receptors to human galectin-1 could be enhanced by supplementation of culture media with uridine and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), precursors for the hexosamine pathway that supplies UDP-GlcNAc for synthesis of complex oligosaccharides. Neuronal kainate receptors in dorsal root ganglia were sensitive to galectin modulation, whereas AMPA receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons were insensitive, which could be a reflection of differential N-glycan processing or receptor subunit selectivity. Because glycan content of integral proteins can be modified dynamically, we postulate that physiological or pathological conditions in the CNS could arise in which galectins alter excitatory neurotransmission or neuronal excitability through their actions on AMPA or kainate receptors. PMID:24614744

  10. An Improved High Frequency Modulating Fusion Method Based on Modulation Transfer Function Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Wu, M.; Zhang, X.

    2012-07-01

    GeoEye-1 is the most advanced and highest resolution commercial earth imaging satellite in the world today. It provides multispectral images (MS) and Panchromatic image (PAN) with spatial resolutions of 2.0 m and 0.5 m respectively. Image fusion is very important for mapping and image interpretation because it can take advantage of the complementary spatial/spectral resolution characteristics of remote sensing imagery. So an improved high frequency modulation fusion method based on MTF is proposed. Modulation transfer functions (MTF) are firstly measured from GeoEye-1 images, and then the degraded images based on MTF filters are obtained. Secondly, modulating parameter is obtained based on Minimum Mean Square Error, and image fusion is performed and measured in the degraded version. Finally, fused images with the high spatial resolution are produced by using the proposed method. Compared with fusion methods of weighted high passing filtering(w-HPF) in ERDAS IMAGINE and general image fusion based on MTF( MTF-GIF), The results of fused GeoEye-1 images show that the proposed method is an efficient way for GeoEye-1 image fusion, which can keep spectral information with the high spatial resolution.

  11. Molecular force modulation spectroscopy revealing the dynamic response of single bacteriorhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Janovjak, Harald; Müller, Daniel J; Humphris, Andrew D L

    2005-02-01

    Recent advances in atomic force microscopy allowed globular and membrane proteins to be mechanically unfolded on a single-molecule level. Presented is an extension to the existing force spectroscopy experiments. While unfolding single bacteriorhodopsins from native purple membranes, small oscillation amplitudes (6-9 nm) were supplied to the vertical displacement of the cantilever at a frequency of 3 kHz. The phase and amplitude response of the cantilever-protein system was converted to reveal the elastic (conservative) and viscous (dissipative) contributions to the unfolding process. The elastic response (stiffness) of the extended parts of the protein were in the range of a few tens pN/nm and could be well described by the derivative of the wormlike chain model. Discrete events in the viscous response coincided with the unfolding of single secondary structure elements and were in the range of 1 microNs/m. In addition, these force modulation spectroscopy experiments revealed novel mechanical unfolding intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin. We found that kinks result in a loss of unfolding cooperativity in transmembrane helices. Reconstructing force-distance spectra by the integration of amplitude-distance spectra verified their position, offering a novel approach to detect intermediates during the forced unfolding of single proteins. PMID:15574708

  12. LANDSAT-4 thematic mapper Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schowengerdt, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    A power spectrum (PS) analysis technique was used to compare thematic mapper (TM) A and P-tape data for a Washington, DC scene in two orthogonal directions, along scan and along track. The resulting effective modulation transfer functions (MTF) between the A and P data are repeatable from area to area and consistent with theoretical expectations. The average x-direction (along scan) MTF calculated with the PS technique is compared to the MTF of the cubic convolution resampling function used to create P data from A data. The two curves are nearly identical, indicating that the major factor affecting the image quality of P data relative to A data is the cubic convolution resampling.

  13. Modulation transfer function measurement technique for small-pixel detectors.

    PubMed

    Marchywka, M; Socker, D G

    1992-12-01

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) measurement technique suitable for large-format, small-pixel detector characterization has been investigated. A volume interference grating is used as a test image instead of the bar or sine wave target images normally used. This technique permits a high-contrast, large-area, sinusoidal intensity distribution to illuminate the device being tested, avoiding the need to deconvolve raw data with imaging system characteristics. A high-confidence MTF result at spatial frequencies near 200 cycles/mm is obtained. We present results at several visible light wavelengths with a 6.8-microm-pixel CCD. Pixel response functions are derived from the MTF results. PMID:20802584

  14. Characterization of the modulation transfer function of discrete filtered backprojection.

    PubMed

    Glick, S J; King, M A; Penney, B C

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical expression for the modulation transfer function (MTF) of image reconstruction by discrete filtered backprojection (DFBP) is derived. A simulation study is used to investigate the dependence of the MTF of DFBP on: (1) the number of projection views; (2) the type of ramp filter used; (3) the interpolation method used during backprojection; and (4) the position of the object. These results were compared to MTFs calculated from point-source single-photon-emission computed tomographic (SPECT) acquisitions in air. The experimentally obtained MTFs contained much of the same structure as the MTFs of DFBP obtained through simulation. It is shown that the discretization of the filtered backprojection process can cause the tomographic transfer function to be anisotropic and nonstationary. However, through proper selection of the methods used in reconstruction, a nearly isotropic and stationary MTF can be obtained. PMID:18230518

  15. Measurement of the modulation transfer function of infrared cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzannes, Alexis P.; Mooney, Jonathan M.

    1995-06-01

    The performance of starting PtSi infrared cameras is characterized based on estimating their spatial frequency response. Applying a modified knife-edge technique, we arrive at an estimate of the edge spread function (ESF), which is used to obtain a profile through the center of the 2-D modulation transfer function (MTF). Using this technique, the complete system MTF in the horizontal and vertical direction is measured for various imaging systems. The influence of charge transfer efficiency (CTE) on the knife-edge measurement and resulting MTF is also modeled and discussed. An estimate of the CTE can actually be obtained from the shape of the ESF in the horizontal direction. In addition, we demonstrate that this technique can be used as a filed measurement. By applying the technique at long range, the MTF of the atmosphere can be measured.

  16. Fatty acids as modulators of neutrophil recruitment, function and survival.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Hosana G; Takeo Sato, Fabio; Curi, Rui; Vinolo, Marco A R

    2016-08-15

    Neutrophils are well-known to act in the destruction of invading microorganisms. They have also been implicated in the activation of other immune cells including B- and T-lymphocytes and in the resolution of inflammation and tissue regeneration. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the circulation from where they migrate to tissues to perform their effector functions. Neutrophils are in constant contact with fatty acids that can modulate their function, activation and fate (survival or cell death) through different mechanisms. In this review, the effects of fatty acids pertaining to five classes, namely, long-chain saturated fatty acids (LCSFAs), short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and omega-3 (n-3), omega-6 (n-6) and omega-9 (n-9) unsaturated fatty acids, on neutrophils and the relevance of these effects for disease development are discussed. PMID:25987417

  17. Changes in macrophage function modulated by the lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael R; Cauvi, David M; Rivera, Isabel; Hawisher, Dennis; De Maio, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages (Mφs) play a critical role in the defense against pathogens, orchestrating the inflammatory response during injury and maintaining tissue homeostasis. During these processes, macrophages encounter a variety of environmental conditions that are likely to change their gene expression pattern, which modulates their function. In this study, we found that murine Mφs displayed two different subpopulations characterized by differences in morphologies, expression of surface markers and phagocytic capacity under non-stimulated conditions. These two subpopulations could be recapitulated by changes in the culture conditions. Thus, Mφs grown in suspension in the presence of serum were highly phagocytic, whereas subtraction of serum resulted in rapid attachment and reduced phagocytic activity. The difference in phagocytosis between these subpopulations was correlated with the expression levels of FcγR. These two cell subpopulations also differed in their responses to LPS and the expression of surface markers, including CD14, CD86, scavenger receptor A1, TLR4 and low-density lipoprotein receptor. Moreover, we found that the lipid/cholesterol content in the culture medium mediated the differences between these two cell subpopulations. Thus, we described a mechanism that modulatesfunction depending on the exposure to lipids within their surrounding microenvironment. PMID:26951856

  18. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis Reveals the Min System of Escherichia coli Modulates Reversible Protein Association with the Inner Membrane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiao-Lin; Chiang, I-Chen; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Lee, Der-Yen; Chang, Geen-Dong; Wang, Kwan-Yu; Lin, Shu-Yu; Shih, Yu-Ling

    2016-05-01

    The Min system of Escherichia coli mediates placement of the division septum at the midcell. It oscillates from pole to pole to establish a concentration gradient of the division inhibition that is high at the poles but low at the midcell; the cell middle thereby becomes the most favorable site for division. Although Min oscillation is well studied from molecular and biophysical perspectives, it is still an enigma as to whether such a continuous, energy-consuming, and organized movement of the Min proteins would affect cellular processes other than the division site selection. To tackle this question, we compared the inner membrane proteome of the wild-type and Δmin strains using a quantitative approach. Forty proteins that showed differential abundance on the inner membrane of the mutant cells were identified and defined as proteins of interest (POIs). More than half of the POIs were peripheral membrane proteins, suggesting that the Min system affects mainly reversible protein association with the inner membrane. In addition, 6 out of 10 selected POIs directly interacted with at least one of the Min proteins, confirming the correlation between POIs and the Min system.Further analysis revealed a functional relationship between metabolism and the Min system. Metabolic enzymes accounted for 45% of the POIs, and there was a change of metabolites in the related reactions. We hypothesize that the Min system could alter the membrane location of proteins to modulate their enzymatic activity. Thus, the metabolic modulation in the Δmin mutant is likely an adaptive phenotype in cells of abnormal size and chromosome number due to an imbalanced abundance of proteins on the inner membrane. Taken together, the current work reports novel interactions of the Min system and reveals a global physiological impact of the Min system in addition to the division site placement. PMID:26889046

  19. Functional Evolution of cis-Regulatory Modules at a Homeotic Gene in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Benjamin J.; Bae, Esther; Tran, Diana A.; Shur, Andrey S.; Allen, John M.; Rau, Christoph; Bender, Welcome; Fisher, William W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Drewell, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    It is a long-held belief in evolutionary biology that the rate of molecular evolution for a given DNA sequence is inversely related to the level of functional constraint. This belief holds true for the protein-coding homeotic (Hox) genes originally discovered in Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of the Hox genes in Drosophila embryos is essential for body patterning and is controlled by an extensive array of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). How the regulatory modules functionally evolve in different species is not clear. A comparison of the CRMs for the Abdominal-B gene from different Drosophila species reveals relatively low levels of overall sequence conservation. However, embryonic enhancer CRMs from other Drosophila species direct transgenic reporter gene expression in the same spatial and temporal patterns during development as their D. melanogaster orthologs. Bioinformatic analysis reveals the presence of short conserved sequences within defined CRMs, representing gap and pair-rule transcription factor binding sites. One predicted binding site for the gap transcription factor KRUPPEL in the IAB5 CRM was found to be altered in Superabdominal (Sab) mutations. In Sab mutant flies, the third abdominal segment is transformed into a copy of the fifth abdominal segment. A model for KRUPPEL-mediated repression at this binding site is presented. These findings challenge our current understanding of the relationship between sequence evolution at the molecular level and functional activity of a CRM. While the overall sequence conservation at Drosophila CRMs is not distinctive from neighboring genomic regions, functionally critical transcription factor binding sites within embryonic enhancer CRMs are highly conserved. These results have implications for understanding mechanisms of gene expression during embryonic development, enhancer function, and the molecular evolution of eukaryotic regulatory modules. PMID:19893611

  20. Virus-induced gene complementation reveals a transcription factor network in modulation of tomato fruit ripening

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Hang; Lai, Tongfei; Qin, Cheng; Shi, Nongnong; Wang, Huizhong; Jin, Mingfei; Zhong, Silin; Fan, Zaifeng; Liu, Yule; Wu, Zirong; Jackson, Stephen; Giovannoni, James J.; Rolin, Dominique; Gallusci, Philippe; Hong, Yiguo

    2012-01-01

    Plant virus technology, in particular virus-induced gene silencing, is a widely used reverse- and forward-genetics tool in plant functional genomics. However the potential of virus technology to express genes to induce phenotypes or to complement mutants in order to understand the function of plant genes is not well documented. Here we exploit Potato virus X as a tool for virus-induced gene complementation (VIGC). Using VIGC in tomato, we demonstrated that ectopic viral expression of LeMADS-RIN, which encodes a MADS-box transcription factor (TF), resulted in functional complementation of the non-ripening rin mutant phenotype and caused fruits to ripen. Comparative gene expression analysis indicated that LeMADS-RIN up-regulated expression of the SBP-box (SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein-like) gene LeSPL-CNR, but down-regulated the expression of LeHB-1, an HD-Zip homeobox TF gene. Our data support the hypothesis that a transcriptional network may exist among key TFs in the modulation of fruit ripening in tomato. PMID:23150786

  1. Circuit multiplies pulse width modulation, exhibits linear transfer function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. W.; Furciniti, A.

    1967-01-01

    Modulation multiplier provides a simple means of multiplying the width modulation of a pulse train by a constant factor. It operates directly on a pulse width modulated input signal to generate an output pulse train having a greater degree of width modulation than the input signal.

  2. System identification and model reduction using modulating function techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Yan

    1993-01-01

    Weighted least squares (WLS) and adaptive weighted least squares (AWLS) algorithms are initiated for continuous-time system identification using Fourier type modulating function techniques. Two stochastic signal models are examined using the mean square properties of the stochastic calculus: an equation error signal model with white noise residuals, and a more realistic white measurement noise signal model. The covariance matrices in each model are shown to be banded and sparse, and a joint likelihood cost function is developed which links the real and imaginary parts of the modulated quantities. The superior performance of above algorithms is demonstrated by comparing them with the LS/MFT and popular predicting error method (PEM) through 200 Monte Carlo simulations. A model reduction problem is formulated with the AWLS/MFT algorithm, and comparisons are made via six examples with a variety of model reduction techniques, including the well-known balanced realization method. Here the AWLS/MFT algorithm manifests higher accuracy in almost all cases, and exhibits its unique flexibility and versatility. Armed with this model reduction, the AWLS/MFT algorithm is extended into MIMO transfer function system identification problems. The impact due to the discrepancy in bandwidths and gains among subsystem is explored through five examples. Finally, as a comprehensive application, the stability derivatives of the longitudinal and lateral dynamics of an F-18 aircraft are identified using physical flight data provided by NASA. A pole-constrained SIMO and MIMO AWLS/MFT algorithm is devised and analyzed. Monte Carlo simulations illustrate its high-noise rejecting properties. Utilizing the flight data, comparisons among different MFT algorithms are tabulated and the AWLS is found to be strongly favored in almost all facets.

  3. Satellite modulation transfer function estimation from natural scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiyang, Zhi; Wei, Zhang; Xuan, Sun; Dawei, Wang

    2015-11-01

    We propose an in-orbit modulation transfer function (MTF) statistical estimation algorithm based on natural scene, called SeMTF. The algorithm can estimate the in-orbit MTF of a sensor from an image without specialized targets. First, the power spectrum of a satellite image is analyzed, then a two-dimensional (2-D) fractal Brownian motion model is adopted to represent the natural scene. The in-orbit MTF is modeled by a parametric exponential function. Subsequently, the statistical model of satellite imaging is established. Second, the model is solved by the improved profile-likelihood function method. In order to handle the nuisance parameter in the profile-likelihood function, we divided the estimation problem into two minimization problems for the parameters of the MTF model and nuisance parameters, respectively. By alternating the two iterative minimizations, the result will converge to the optimal MTF parameters. Then the SeMTF algorithm is proposed. Finally, the algorithm is tested using real satellite images. Experimental results indicate that the estimation of MTF is highly accurate.

  4. The Bilingual Brain as Revealed by Functional Neuroimaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abutalebi, Jubin; Cappa, Stefano F.; Perani, Daniela

    2001-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging of bilinguals and monolinguals used in conjunction with experimental cognitive tasks has been successful in establishing functional specialization as a principle of brain organization in humans. Consistent results show that attained proficiency and possibly language exposure are more important than age of acquisition as a…

  5. Effects of the modulation of microbiota on the gastrointestinal immune system and bowel function.

    PubMed

    Kanauchi, Osamu; Andoh, Akira; Mitsuyama, Keiichi

    2013-10-23

    The gastrointestinal tract harbors a tremendous number and variety of commensal microbiota. The intestinal mucosa simultaneously absorbs essential nutrients and protects against detrimental antigens or pathogenic microbiota as the first line of defense. Beneficial interactions between the host and microbiota are key requirements for host health. Although the gut microbiota has been previously studied in the context of inflammatory diseases, it has recently become clear that this microbial environment has a beneficial role during normal homeostasis, by modulating the immune system or bowel motor function. Recent studies revealed that microbiota, including their metabolites, modulate key signaling pathways involved in the inflammation of the mucosa or the neurotransmitter system in the gut-brain axis. The underlying molecular mechanisms of host-microbiota interactions are still unclear; however, manipulation of microbiota by probiotics or prebiotics is becoming increasingly recognized as an important therapeutic option, especially for the treatment of the dysfunction or inflammation of the intestinal tract. PMID:24070265

  6. Modulation of Rab GTPase function by a protein phosphocholine transferase.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shaeri; Liu, Xiaoyun; Arasaki, Kohei; McDonough, Justin; Galán, Jorge E; Roy, Craig R

    2011-09-01

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila modulates the activity of host GTPases to direct the transport and assembly of the membrane-bound compartment in which it resides. In vitro studies have indicated that the Legionella protein DrrA post-translationally modifies the GTPase Rab1 by a process called AMPylation. Here we used mass spectrometry to investigate post-translational modifications to Rab1 that occur during infection of host cells by Legionella. Consistent with in vitro studies, DrrA-mediated AMPylation of a conserved tyrosine residue in the switch II region of Rab1 was detected during infection. In addition, a modification to an adjacent serine residue in Rab1 was discovered, which was independent of DrrA. The Legionella effector protein AnkX was required for this modification. Biochemical studies determined that AnkX directly mediates the covalent attachment of a phosphocholine moiety to Rab1. This phosphocholine transferase activity used CDP-choline as a substrate and required a conserved histidine residue located in the FIC domain of the AnkX protein. During infection, AnkX modified both Rab1 and Rab35, which explains how this protein modulates membrane transport through both the endocytic and exocytic pathways of the host cell. Thus, phosphocholination of Rab GTPases represents a mechanism by which bacterial FIC-domain-containing proteins can alter host-cell functions. PMID:21822290

  7. Cannabinoid modulation of functional connectivity within regions processing attentional salience.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Falkenberg, Irina; Martin-Santos, Rocio; Atakan, Zerrin; Crippa, Jose A; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Mick; McGuire, Philip

    2015-05-01

    There is now considerable evidence to support the hypothesis that psychotic symptoms are the result of abnormal salience attribution, and that the attribution of salience is largely mediated through the prefrontal cortex, the striatum, and the hippocampus. Although these areas show differential activation under the influence of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), the two major derivatives of cannabis sativa, little is known about the effects of these cannabinoids on the functional connectivity between these regions. We investigated this in healthy occasional cannabis users by employing event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) following oral administration of delta-9-THC, CBD, or a placebo capsule. Employing a seed cluster-based functional connectivity analysis that involved using the average time series from each seed cluster for a whole-brain correlational analysis, we investigated the effect of drug condition on functional connectivity between the seed clusters and the rest of the brain during an oddball salience processing task. Relative to the placebo condition, delta-9-THC and CBD had opposite effects on the functional connectivity between the dorsal striatum, the prefrontal cortex, and the hippocampus. Delta-9-THC reduced fronto-striatal connectivity, which was related to its effect on task performance, whereas this connection was enhanced by CBD. Conversely, mediotemporal-prefrontal connectivity was enhanced by delta-9-THC and reduced by CBD. Our results suggest that the functional integration of brain regions involved in salience processing is differentially modulated by single doses of delta-9-THC and CBD and that this relates to the processing of salient stimuli. PMID:25249057

  8. Cannabinoid Modulation of Functional Connectivity within Regions Processing Attentional Salience

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Falkenberg, Irina; Martin-Santos, Rocio; Atakan, Zerrin; Crippa, Jose A; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Mick; McGuire, Philip

    2015-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence to support the hypothesis that psychotic symptoms are the result of abnormal salience attribution, and that the attribution of salience is largely mediated through the prefrontal cortex, the striatum, and the hippocampus. Although these areas show differential activation under the influence of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), the two major derivatives of cannabis sativa, little is known about the effects of these cannabinoids on the functional connectivity between these regions. We investigated this in healthy occasional cannabis users by employing event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) following oral administration of delta-9-THC, CBD, or a placebo capsule. Employing a seed cluster-based functional connectivity analysis that involved using the average time series from each seed cluster for a whole-brain correlational analysis, we investigated the effect of drug condition on functional connectivity between the seed clusters and the rest of the brain during an oddball salience processing task. Relative to the placebo condition, delta-9-THC and CBD had opposite effects on the functional connectivity between the dorsal striatum, the prefrontal cortex, and the hippocampus. Delta-9-THC reduced fronto-striatal connectivity, which was related to its effect on task performance, whereas this connection was enhanced by CBD. Conversely, mediotemporal-prefrontal connectivity was enhanced by delta-9-THC and reduced by CBD. Our results suggest that the functional integration of brain regions involved in salience processing is differentially modulated by single doses of delta-9-THC and CBD and that this relates to the processing of salient stimuli. PMID:25249057

  9. Modulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity by surface functionalized quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srabanti; Ray, Manju; Das, Mahua Rani; Chakrabarti, Adrita; Khan, Ali Hossain; Sarma, D D; Acharya, Somobrata

    2014-03-21

    Enzymatic regulation is a fast and reliable diagnosis tool via identification and design of inhibitors for modulation of enzyme function. Previous reports on quantum dots (QDs)-enzyme interactions reveal a protein-surface recognition ability leading to promising applications in protein stabilization, protein delivery, bio-sensing and detection. However, the direct use of QDs to control enzyme inhibition has never been revealed to date. Here we show that a series of biocompatible surface-functionalized metal-chalcogenide QDs can be used as potent inhibitors for malignant cells through the modulation of enzyme activity, while normal cells remain unaffected. The in vitro activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), an enzyme involved critically in the glycolysis of cancer cells, is inactivated selectively in a controlled way by the QDs at a significantly low concentration (nM). Cumulative kinetic studies delineate that the QDs undergo both reversible and irreversible inhibition mechanisms owing to the site-specific interactions, enabling control over the inhibition kinetics. These complementary loss-of-function probes may offer a novel route for rapid clinical diagnosis of malignant cells and biomedical applications. PMID:24496476

  10. A systematic method to identify modulation of transcriptional regulation via chromatin activity reveals regulatory network during mESC differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Duren, Zhana; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin regulators (CRs) are crucial for connecting the chromatin level and transcriptome level by modulating chromatin structures, establishing, and maintaining epigenetic modifications. We present a systematic method to identify MOdulation of transcriptional regulation via CHromatin Activity (MOCHA) from gene expression data and demonstrate its advantage in associating CRs to their chromatin localization and understand CRs’ function. We first re-construct the CRs modulation network by integrating the correlation and conditional correlation concepts. Then we quantify the chromatin activity as hidden variable in network by integrating the upstream and downstream information. We applied MOCHA to systematically explore the interplay of CRs, TFs, and target genes in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC). As a result, MOCHA identified 420 chromatin regulators with modulation preference, including Pou5f1 and Eed. We found that BAF complex, NuRD complex, and polycomb-group proteins, regulate the delicate balance between pluripotency and differentiation by modulating key TFs including Klf4, Tcf3, and Max; NuRD complex members Mbd3 and Hdac1 may modulate Klf4 to achieve its dual functional roles in pluripotent and differentiation stages;Imprinted gene H19 and Igf2 are modulated by DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and insulator CTCF. Finally, we analyzed CR’s combinational modulation pattern by constructing a CR-CR interaction network. PMID:26949222

  11. A systematic method to identify modulation of transcriptional regulation via chromatin activity reveals regulatory network during mESC differentiation.

    PubMed

    Duren, Zhana; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin regulators (CRs) are crucial for connecting the chromatin level and transcriptome level by modulating chromatin structures, establishing, and maintaining epigenetic modifications. We present a systematic method to identify MOdulation of transcriptional regulation via CHromatin Activity (MOCHA) from gene expression data and demonstrate its advantage in associating CRs to their chromatin localization and understand CRs' function. We first re-construct the CRs modulation network by integrating the correlation and conditional correlation concepts. Then we quantify the chromatin activity as hidden variable in network by integrating the upstream and downstream information. We applied MOCHA to systematically explore the interplay of CRs, TFs, and target genes in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC). As a result, MOCHA identified 420 chromatin regulators with modulation preference, including Pou5f1 and Eed. We found that BAF complex, NuRD complex, and polycomb-group proteins, regulate the delicate balance between pluripotency and differentiation by modulating key TFs including Klf4, Tcf3, and Max; NuRD complex members Mbd3 and Hdac1 may modulate Klf4 to achieve its dual functional roles in pluripotent and differentiation stages;Imprinted gene H19 and Igf2 are modulated by DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and insulator CTCF. Finally, we analyzed CR's combinational modulation pattern by constructing a CR-CR interaction network. PMID:26949222

  12. Proteome-wide light/dark modulation of thiol oxidation in cyanobacteria revealed by quantitative site-specific redox proteomics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Nguyen, Amelia Y; Dai, Ziyu; Su, Dian; Gaffrey, Matthew J; Moore, Ronald J; Jacobs, Jon M; Monroe, Matthew E; Smith, Richard D; Koppenaal, David W; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2014-12-01

    Reversible protein thiol oxidation is an essential regulatory mechanism of photosynthesis, metabolism, and gene expression in photosynthetic organisms. Herein, we present proteome-wide quantitative and site-specific profiling of in vivo thiol oxidation modulated by light/dark in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, an oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryote, using a resin-assisted thiol enrichment approach. Our proteomic approach integrates resin-assisted enrichment with isobaric tandem mass tag labeling to enable site-specific and quantitative measurements of reversibly oxidized thiols. The redox dynamics of ∼2,100 Cys-sites from 1,060 proteins under light, dark, and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (a photosystem II inhibitor) conditions were quantified. In addition to relative quantification, the stoichiometry or percentage of oxidation (reversibly oxidized/total thiols) for ∼1,350 Cys-sites was also quantified. The overall results revealed broad changes in thiol oxidation in many key biological processes, including photosynthetic electron transport, carbon fixation, and glycolysis. Moreover, the redox sensitivity along with the stoichiometric data enabled prediction of potential functional Cys-sites for proteins of interest. The functional significance of redox-sensitive Cys-sites in NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, peroxiredoxin (AhpC/TSA family protein Sll1621), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase was further confirmed with site-specific mutagenesis and biochemical studies. Together, our findings provide significant insights into the broad redox regulation of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25118246

  13. Proteome-wide Light/Dark Modulation of Thiol Oxidation in Cyanobacteria Revealed by Quantitative Site-specific Redox Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Dai, Ziyu; Su, Dian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein thiol oxidation is an essential regulatory mechanism of photosynthesis, metabolism, and gene expression in photosynthetic organisms. Herein, we present proteome-wide quantitative and site-specific profiling of in vivo thiol oxidation modulated by light/dark in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, an oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryote, using a resin-assisted thiol enrichment approach. Our proteomic approach integrates resin-assisted enrichment with isobaric tandem mass tag labeling to enable site-specific and quantitative measurements of reversibly oxidized thiols. The redox dynamics of ∼2,100 Cys-sites from 1,060 proteins under light, dark, and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (a photosystem II inhibitor) conditions were quantified. In addition to relative quantification, the stoichiometry or percentage of oxidation (reversibly oxidized/total thiols) for ∼1,350 Cys-sites was also quantified. The overall results revealed broad changes in thiol oxidation in many key biological processes, including photosynthetic electron transport, carbon fixation, and glycolysis. Moreover, the redox sensitivity along with the stoichiometric data enabled prediction of potential functional Cys-sites for proteins of interest. The functional significance of redox-sensitive Cys-sites in NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, peroxiredoxin (AhpC/TSA family protein Sll1621), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase was further confirmed with site-specific mutagenesis and biochemical studies. Together, our findings provide significant insights into the broad redox regulation of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25118246

  14. Network analysis reveals common host protein/s modulating pathogenesis of neurotropic viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sourish; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Sengupta, Nabonita; Roy, Arunava; Dey, Dhritiman; Chakraborty, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Arpan; Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Network analysis through graph theory provides a quantitative approach to characterize specific proteins and their constituent assemblies that underlie host-pathogen interactions. In the present study, graph theory was used to analyze the interactome designed out of 50 differentially expressing proteins from proteomic analysis of Chandipura Virus (CHPV, Family: Rhabdoviridae) infected mouse brain tissue to identify the primary candidates for intervention. Using the measure of degree centrality, that quantifies the connectedness of a single protein within a milieu of several other interacting proteins, DJ-1 was selected for further molecular validation. To elucidate the generality of DJ-1’s role in propagating infection its role was also monitored in another RNA virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, Family: Flaviviridae) infection. Concurrently, DJ-1 got over-expressed in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation following viral infection which in the early phase of infection migrated to mitochondria to remove dysfunctional mitochondria through the process of mitophagy. DJ-1 was also observed to modulate the viral replication and interferon responses along with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in neurons. Collectively these evidences reveal a comprehensive role for DJ-1 in neurotropic virus infection in the brain. PMID:27581498

  15. Network analysis reveals common host protein/s modulating pathogenesis of neurotropic viruses.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sourish; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Sengupta, Nabonita; Roy, Arunava; Dey, Dhritiman; Chakraborty, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Arpan; Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Network analysis through graph theory provides a quantitative approach to characterize specific proteins and their constituent assemblies that underlie host-pathogen interactions. In the present study, graph theory was used to analyze the interactome designed out of 50 differentially expressing proteins from proteomic analysis of Chandipura Virus (CHPV, Family: Rhabdoviridae) infected mouse brain tissue to identify the primary candidates for intervention. Using the measure of degree centrality, that quantifies the connectedness of a single protein within a milieu of several other interacting proteins, DJ-1 was selected for further molecular validation. To elucidate the generality of DJ-1's role in propagating infection its role was also monitored in another RNA virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, Family: Flaviviridae) infection. Concurrently, DJ-1 got over-expressed in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation following viral infection which in the early phase of infection migrated to mitochondria to remove dysfunctional mitochondria through the process of mitophagy. DJ-1 was also observed to modulate the viral replication and interferon responses along with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in neurons. Collectively these evidences reveal a comprehensive role for DJ-1 in neurotropic virus infection in the brain. PMID:27581498

  16. Distinct hippocampal functional networks revealed by tractography-based parcellation.

    PubMed

    Adnan, Areeba; Barnett, Alexander; Moayedi, Massieh; McCormick, Cornelia; Cohn, Melanie; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2016-07-01

    Recent research suggests the anterior and posterior hippocampus form part of two distinct functional neural networks. Here we investigate the structural underpinnings of this functional connectivity difference using diffusion-weighted imaging-based parcellation. Using this technique, we substantiated that the hippocampus can be parcellated into distinct anterior and posterior segments. These structurally defined segments did indeed show different patterns of resting state functional connectivity, in that the anterior segment showed greater connectivity with temporal and orbitofrontal cortex, whereas the posterior segment was more highly connected to medial and lateral parietal cortex. Furthermore, we showed that the posterior hippocampal connectivity to memory processing regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, parahippocampal, inferior temporal and fusiform gyri and the precuneus, predicted interindividual relational memory performance. These findings provide important support for the integration of structural and functional connectivity in understanding the brain networks underlying episodic memory. PMID:26206251

  17. Beta function measurement in the Tevatron using quadrupole gradient modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, A.; Lebrun, P.; Volk, J.T.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Early in Run2, there was an effort to compare the different emittance measurements in the Tevatron (flying wires and synchrotron light) and understand the origin of the observed differences. To measure the beta function at a few key locations near the instruments, air-core quadrupoles were installed. By modulating the gradient of these magnets and measuring the effect on the tune, the lattice parameters can be extracted. Initially, the results seem to disagree with other methods. At the time, the lattice was strongly coupled due to a skew component in the main dipoles, caused by sagging of the cryostat. After a large fraction of the superconducting magnets were shimmed to remove a strong skew quadrupole component, the results now agree with the theoretical values to within 20%.

  18. LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schowengerdt, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for thematic mapping (TM) bands 3, 4, 5 and 7 is reliably estimated with the San Mateo Bridge target in the 12/31/82 scene. These results are to be compared with those from the 8/12/83 scene. Bands 1, 2 and 6 are to be analyzed with a different target possessing greater contrast. This may be possible with the underflight data comparison currently underway. The registration of this data to the TM image of 8/12/83 for a region arround the Stockton sewage pond east of San Francisco has begun. This particular approach has the advantage that the full two-dimensional MFT will be measured instead of the MFT in only one azimuth as reported.

  19. Modulation transfer function of antenna-coupled infrared detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Boreman, G D; Dogariu, A; Christodoulou, C; Kotter, D

    1996-11-01

    Individual antenna-coupled IR bolometers have recently been demonstrated at wavelengths near 10 μm. If focal-plane arrays (FPA's) of antenna-coupled detectors can be fabricated, enhancement of IR-imager performance is possible. A first step in the design process is to analyze the image-quality potential of antenna-coupled, FPA-based imagers in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF). The key step in our analysis is development of a cross-talk MTF that accounts for the electromagnetic coupling between adjacent antennas in the FPA. We find that electromagnetic cross talk will not be a significant image-quality factor in antenna-coupled IR FPA's. PMID:21127627

  20. Modulation transfer function technique for real time radioscopic system characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, K.W. ); Brenizer, J.S. ); Mait, J.N. )

    1989-12-01

    At the University of Virginia neutron radiography facility, a modulation transfer function technique has been developed that can easily predict and compare the resolving characteristics of the real time system and the individual system components. We desired a simple method by which new system components could be analyzed to determine their image transfer characteristics and to estimate how they would affect the composite system during data acquisition. The method employed measures a small set of constant system parameters related to data collected across a cadmium cut-edge aperture. The effects of system noise and spatial variance on the measured data are reduced so that a representation of the true signal can be obtained for analysis. Resolution parameters for the total neutron radiography system and for the individual system components are reported.

  1. Modulation transfer function technique for real time radioscopic system characterization.

    PubMed

    Tobin, K W; Brenizer, J S; Mait, J N

    1989-12-01

    At the University of Virginia neutron radiography facility, a modulation transfer function technique has been developed that can easily predict and compare the resolving characteristics of the real time system and the individual system components. We desired a simple method by which new system components could be analyzed to determine their image transfer characteristics and to estimate how they would affect the composite system during data acquisition. The method employed measures a small set of constant system parameters related to data collected across a cadmium cut-edge aperture. The effects of system noise and spatial variance on the measured data are reduced so that a representation of the true signal can be obtained for analysis. Resolution parameters for the total neutron radiography system and for the individual system components are reported. PMID:20555991

  2. Modulation transfer function of antenna-coupled infrared detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreman, Glenn D.; Dogariu, Aristide; Christodoulou, Christos; Kotter, Dale

    1996-11-01

    Individual antenna-coupled IR bolometers have recently been demonstrated at wavelengths near 10 mu m. If focal-plane arrays (FPA's) of antenna-coupled detectors can be fabricated, enhancement of IR-imager performance is possible. A first step in the design process is to analyze the image-quality potential of antenna-coupled, FPA-based imagers in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF). The key step in our analysis is development of a cross-talk MTF that accounts for the electromagnetic coupling between adjacent antennas in the FPA. We find that electromagnetic cross talk will not be a significant image-quality factor in antenna-coupled IR FPA's.

  3. Dabigatran and Argatroban Diametrically Modulate Thrombin Exosite Function

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Calvin H.; Stafford, Alan R.; Leslie, Beverly A.; Fredenburgh, James C.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombin is a highly plastic molecule whose activity and specificity are regulated by exosites 1 and 2, positively-charged domains that flank the active site. Exosite binding by substrates and cofactors regulates thrombin activity by localizing thrombin, guiding substrates, and by inducing allosteric changes at the active site. Although inter-exosite and exosite-to-active-site allostery have been demonstrated, the impact of active site ligation on exosite function has not been examined. To address this gap, we used surface plasmon resonance to determine the effects of dabigatran and argatroban, active site-directed inhibitors, on thrombin binding to immobilized γA/γA-fibrin or glycoprotein Ibα peptide via exosite 1 and 2, respectively, and thrombin binding to γA/γ′-fibrin or factor Va, which is mediated by both exosites. Whereas dabigatran attenuated binding, argatroban increased thrombin binding to γA/γA- and γA/γ′-fibrin and to factor Va. The results with immobilized fibrin were confirmed by examining the binding of radiolabeled thrombin to fibrin clots. Thus, dabigatran modestly accelerated the dissociation of thrombin from γA/γA-fibrin clots, whereas argatroban attenuated dissociation. Dabigatran had no effect on thrombin binding to glycoprotein Ibα peptide, whereas argatroban promoted binding. These findings not only highlight functional effects of thrombin allostery, but also suggest that individual active site-directed thrombin inhibitors uniquely modulate exosite function, thereby identifying potential novel mechanisms of action. PMID:27305147

  4. Evolution of the class C GPCR Venus flytrap modules involved positive selected functional divergence

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianhua; Huang, Siluo; Qian, Ji; Huang, Jinlin; Jin, Li; Su, Zhixi; Yang, Ji; Liu, Jianfeng

    2009-01-01

    Background Class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a distinct group of the GPCR family, which structurally possess a characteristically distinct extracellular domain inclusive of the Venus flytrap module (VFTM). The VFTMs of the class C GPCRs is responsible for ligand recognition and binding, and share sequence similarity with bacterial periplasmic amino acid binding proteins (PBPs). An extensive phylogenetic investigation of the VFTMs was conducted by analyzing for functional divergence and testing for positive selection for five typical groups of the class C GPCRs. The altered selective constraints were determined to identify the sites that had undergone functional divergence via positive selection. In order to structurally demonstrate the pattern changes during the evolutionary process, three-dimensional (3D) structures of the GPCR VFTMs were modelled and reconstructed from ancestral VFTMs. Results Our results show that the altered selective constraints in the VFTMs of class C GPCRs are statistically significant. This implies that functional divergence played a key role in characterizing the functions of the VFTMs after gene duplication events. Meanwhile, positive selection is involved in the evolutionary process and drove the functional divergence of the VFTMs. Our results also reveal that three continuous duplication events occurred in order to shape the evolutionary topology of class C GPCRs. The five groups of the class C GPCRs have essentially different sites involved in functional divergence, which would have shaped the specific structures and functions of the VFTMs. Conclusion Taken together, our results show that functional divergence involved positive selection and is partially responsible for the evolutionary patterns of the class C GPCR VFTMs. The sites involved in functional divergence will provide more clues and candidates for further research on structural-function relationships of these modules as well as shedding light on the

  5. Mineralocorticoid Receptors Modulate Vascular Endothelial Function in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Segal, Mark S.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity increases linearly with age and is associated with impaired vascular endothelial function and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) contribute to impaired vascular endothelial function in cardiovascular disease; however, their role in uncomplicated human obesity is unknown. Because plasma aldosterone levels are elevated in obesity and adipocytes may be a source of aldosterone, we hypothesized that MR modulate vascular endothelial function in older adults in an adiposity-dependent manner. To test this hypothesis, we administered MR blockade (Eplerenone; 100 mg/day) for 1 month in a balanced, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to 22 older adults (10 men, 55–79 years) varying widely in adiposity (body mass index: 20–45 kg/m2) but who were free from overt cardiovascular disease. We evaluated vascular endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD] via ultrasonography) and oxidative stress (plasma F2-isoprostanes and vascular endothelial cell protein expression of nitrotyrosine and NADPH oxidase p47phox) during placebo and MR blockade. In the whole group, oxidative stress (P>0.05) and FMD did not change with MR blockade (6.39±0.67 vs. 6.23±0.73 %, P=0.7, placebo vs. Eplerenone). However, individual improvements in FMD in response to Eplerenone were associated with higher total body fat (body mass index: r=0.45, P=0.02 and DXA-derived % body fat: r=0.50, P=0.009) and abdominal fat (total: r=0.61, P=0.005, visceral: r=0.67, P=0.002 and subcutaneous: r=0.48, P=0.03). In addition, greater improvements in FMD with Eplerenone were related with higher baseline fasting glucose (r=0.53, P=0.01). MR influence vascular endothelial function in an adiposity-dependent manner in healthy older adults. PMID:23786536

  6. Attentional networks reveal executive function deficits in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Leskin, Lorraine P; White, Patricia M

    2007-05-01

    Executive function was assessed with the Trail Making Test (Army Individual Test Battery; M. D. Lezak, 1983), the Comprehensive Trail Making Test (C. Reynolds, 2002), and a neurocognitive measure of executive control (Attentional Network Task [ANT]; J. I. Fan, B. D. McCandliss, T. Somer, A. Raz, & M. I. Posner, 2002) in 19 undergraduates with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Scale-Self-Report version; E. B. Foa, D. S. Riggs, C. V. Dancu, & B. O. Rothbaum, 1993), 15 high trauma participants without PTSD, and 18 low trauma control participants. Although groups did not differ on any trail making task or on the ANT measures of alerting or orienting, PTSD participants were significantly more impaired on the ANT executive network index than were high or low trauma control participants, even when level of depressive symptoms was covaried. Previous animal research identified a relationship between dopamine and the ANT measure of executive function. Elevated PTSD symptom severity and levels of hyperarousal, reexperiencing, and avoidance-numbing were associated significantly with executive function deficits indexed by the ANT. These results indicate a potentially subtle but specific deficit in executive function and a possible relationship between PTSD symptoms and irregularities in dopamine function. PMID:17484590

  7. Modular expression analysis reveals functional conservation between human Langerhans cells and mouse cross-priming dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Artyomov, Maxim N.; Munk, Adiel; Gorvel, Laurent; Korenfeld, Daniel; Cella, Marina; Tung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of functionally distinct dendritic cell (DC) subsets in mice has fueled interest in whether analogous counterparts exist in humans. Transcriptional modules of coordinately expressed genes were used for defining shared functions between the species. Comparing modules derived from four human skin DC subsets and modules derived from the Immunological Genome Project database for all mouse DC subsets revealed that human Langerhans cells (LCs) and the mouse XCR1+CD8α+CD103+ DCs shared the class I–mediated antigen processing and cross-presentation transcriptional modules that were not seen in mouse LCs. Furthermore, human LCs were enriched in a transcriptional signature specific to the blood cross-presenting CD141/BDCA-3+ DCs, the proposed equivalent to mouse CD8α+ DCs. Consistent with our analysis, LCs were highly adept at inducing primary CTL responses. Thus, our study suggests that the function of LCs may not be conserved between mouse and human and supports human LCs as an especially relevant therapeutic target. PMID:25918340

  8. Apolipoprotein E ε4 modulates functional brain connectome in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhui; Wang, Xiao; He, Yi; Yu, Xin; Wang, Huali; He, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4 allele is a well-established genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent research has demonstrated an APOE ɛ4-mediated modulation of intrinsic functional brain networks in cognitively normal individuals. However, it remains largely unknown whether and how APOE ɛ4 affects the brain's functional network architecture in patients with AD. Using resting-state functional MRI and graph-theory approaches, we systematically investigated the topological organization of whole-brain functional networks in 16 APOE ɛ4 carriers and 26 matched noncarriers with AD at three levels: global whole-brain, intermediate module, and regional node/connection. Neuropsychological analysis showed that the APOE ɛ4 carriers performed worse on delayed memory but better on a late item generation of a verbal fluency task (associated with executive function) than noncarriers. Whole-brain graph analyses revealed that APOE ɛ4 significantly disrupted whole-brain topological organization as characterized by (i) reduced parallel information transformation efficiency; (ii) decreased intramodular connectivity within the posterior default mode network (pDMN) and intermodular connectivity of the pDMN and executive control network (ECN) with other neuroanatomical systems; and (iii) impaired functional hubs and their rich-club connectivities that primarily involve the pDMN, ECN, and sensorimotor systems. Further simulation analysis indicated that these altered connectivity profiles of the pDMN and ECN largely accounted for the abnormal global network topology. Finally, the changes in network topology exhibited significant correlations with the patients' cognitive performances. Together, our findings suggest that the APOE genotype modulates large-scale brain networks in AD and shed new light on the gene-connectome interaction in this disease. PMID:25619771

  9. Rhythmic Components in Extracranial Brain Signals Reveal Multifaceted Task Modulation of Overlapping Neuronal Activity.

    PubMed

    van der Meij, Roemer; van Ede, Freek; Maris, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory neuronal activity is implicated in many cognitive functions, and its phase coupling between sensors may reflect networks of communicating neuronal populations. Oscillatory activity is often studied using extracranial recordings and compared between experimental conditions. This is challenging, because there is overlap between sensor-level activity generated by different sources, and this can obscure differential experimental modulations of these sources. Additionally, in extracranial data, sensor-level phase coupling not only reflects communicating populations, but can also be generated by a current dipole, whose sensor-level phase coupling does not reflect source-level interactions. We present a novel method, which is capable of separating and characterizing sources on the basis of their phase coupling patterns as a function of space, frequency and time (trials). Importantly, this method depends on a plausible model of a neurobiological rhythm. We present this model and an accompanying analysis pipeline. Next, we demonstrate our approach, using magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings during a cued tactile detection task as a case study. We show that the extracted components have overlapping spatial maps and frequency content, which are difficult to resolve using conventional pairwise measures. Because our decomposition also provides trial loadings, components can be readily contrasted between experimental conditions. Strikingly, we observed heterogeneity in alpha and beta sources with respect to whether their activity was suppressed or enhanced as a function of attention and performance, and this happened both in task relevant and irrelevant regions. This heterogeneity contrasts with the common view that alpha and beta amplitude over sensory areas are always negatively related to attention and performance. PMID:27336159

  10. Rhythmic Components in Extracranial Brain Signals Reveal Multifaceted Task Modulation of Overlapping Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    van Ede, Freek; Maris, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory neuronal activity is implicated in many cognitive functions, and its phase coupling between sensors may reflect networks of communicating neuronal populations. Oscillatory activity is often studied using extracranial recordings and compared between experimental conditions. This is challenging, because there is overlap between sensor-level activity generated by different sources, and this can obscure differential experimental modulations of these sources. Additionally, in extracranial data, sensor-level phase coupling not only reflects communicating populations, but can also be generated by a current dipole, whose sensor-level phase coupling does not reflect source-level interactions. We present a novel method, which is capable of separating and characterizing sources on the basis of their phase coupling patterns as a function of space, frequency and time (trials). Importantly, this method depends on a plausible model of a neurobiological rhythm. We present this model and an accompanying analysis pipeline. Next, we demonstrate our approach, using magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings during a cued tactile detection task as a case study. We show that the extracted components have overlapping spatial maps and frequency content, which are difficult to resolve using conventional pairwise measures. Because our decomposition also provides trial loadings, components can be readily contrasted between experimental conditions. Strikingly, we observed heterogeneity in alpha and beta sources with respect to whether their activity was suppressed or enhanced as a function of attention and performance, and this happened both in task relevant and irrelevant regions. This heterogeneity contrasts with the common view that alpha and beta amplitude over sensory areas are always negatively related to attention and performance. PMID:27336159

  11. Genome-Wide Association and Functional Follow-Up Reveals New Loci for Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Feitosa, Mary; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Chouraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank B.; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Kolcic, Ivana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Endlich, Karlhans; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Giulianini, Franco; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Metzger, Marie; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K.; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem with a genetic component. We performed genome-wide association studies in up to 130,600 European ancestry participants overall, and stratified for key CKD risk factors. We uncovered 6 new loci in association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the primary clinical measure of CKD, in or near MPPED2, DDX1, SLC47A1, CDK12, CASP9, and INO80. Morpholino knockdown of mpped2 and casp9 in zebrafish embryos revealed podocyte and tubular abnormalities with altered dextran clearance, suggesting a role for these genes in renal function. By providing new insights into genes that regulate renal function, these results could further our understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD. PMID:22479191

  12. Unsuspected functional disparity in Devonian fishes revealed by tooth morphometrics?

    PubMed

    Gauchey, Samuel; Girard, Catherine; Adnet, Sylvain; Renaud, Sabrina

    2014-09-01

    The shape of features involved in key biological functions, such as teeth in nutrition, can provide insights into ecological processes even in ancient time, by linking the occupation of the morphological space (disparity) to the occupation of the ecological space. Investigating disparity in radiating groups may provide insights into the ecological diversification underlying evolution of morphological diversity. Actinopterygian fishes initiated their radiation in the Devonian, a period characterized by the diversification of marine ecosystem. Although a former morpho-functional analysis of jaw shape concluded to conservative and poorly diversified morphologies in this early part of their history, fish tooth disparity evidenced here an unsuspected diversity of possible functional significance in the pivotal period of the Late Devonian (Famennian). All teeth being caniniforms, some were stocky and robust, in agreement with expectations for active generalist predators. More surprisingly, elongated teeth also occurred at the beginning of Famennian. Their needle-like shape challenges morpho-functional interpretations by making them fragile in response to bending or torsion. The occurrence of both types of fish teeth during the beginning of the Famennian points to a discrete but real increase in disparity, thus testifying a first burst of feeding specialization despite overall conservative jaw morphology. The disappearance of these needle-like teeth in the Late Famennian might have been related to a relay in dental diversity with abundant co-occurring groups, namely conodonts and chondrichthyans (sharks). PMID:25078254

  13. Revealing the density of encoded functions in a viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikesh; Dykeman, Eric C.; Coutts, Robert H. A.; Lomonossoff, George P.; Rowlands, David J.; Phillips, Simon E. V.; Ranson, Neil; Twarock, Reidun; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    We present direct experimental evidence that assembly of a single-stranded RNA virus occurs via a packaging signal-mediated mechanism. We show that the sequences of coat protein recognition motifs within multiple, dispersed, putative RNA packaging signals, as well as their relative spacing within a genomic fragment, act collectively to influence the fidelity and yield of capsid self-assembly in vitro. These experiments confirm that the selective advantages for viral yield and encapsidation specificity, predicted from previous modeling of packaging signal-mediated assembly, are found in Nature. Regions of the genome that act as packaging signals also function in translational and transcriptional enhancement, as well as directly coding for the coat protein, highlighting the density of encoded functions within the viral RNA. Assembly and gene expression are therefore direct molecular competitors for different functional folds of the same RNA sequence. The strongest packaging signal in the test fragment, encodes a region of the coat protein that undergoes a conformational change upon contact with packaging signals. A similar phenomenon occurs in other RNA viruses for which packaging signals are known. These contacts hint at an even deeper density of encoded functions in viral RNA, which if confirmed, would have profound consequences for the evolution of this class of pathogens. PMID:25646435

  14. Unsuspected functional disparity in Devonian fishes revealed by tooth morphometrics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchey, Samuel; Girard, Catherine; Adnet, Sylvain; Renaud, Sabrina

    2014-07-01

    The shape of features involved in key biological functions, such as teeth in nutrition, can provide insights into ecological processes even in ancient time, by linking the occupation of the morphological space (disparity) to the occupation of the ecological space. Investigating disparity in radiating groups may provide insights into the ecological diversification underlying evolution of morphological diversity. Actinopterygian fishes initiated their radiation in the Devonian, a period characterized by the diversification of marine ecosystem. Although a former morpho-functional analysis of jaw shape concluded to conservative and poorly diversified morphologies in this early part of their history, fish tooth disparity evidenced here an unsuspected diversity of possible functional significance in the pivotal period of the Late Devonian (Famennian). All teeth being caniniforms, some were stocky and robust, in agreement with expectations for active generalist predators. More surprisingly, elongated teeth also occurred at the beginning of Famennian. Their needle-like shape challenges morpho-functional interpretations by making them fragile in response to bending or torsion. The occurrence of both types of fish teeth during the beginning of the Famennian points to a discrete but real increase in disparity, thus testifying a first burst of feeding specialization despite overall conservative jaw morphology. The disappearance of these needle-like teeth in the Late Famennian might have been related to a relay in dental diversity with abundant co-occurring groups, namely conodonts and chondrichthyans (sharks).

  15. Unsuspected functional disparity in Devonian fishes revealed by tooth morphometrics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchey, Samuel; Girard, Catherine; Adnet, Sylvain; Renaud, Sabrina

    2014-09-01

    The shape of features involved in key biological functions, such as teeth in nutrition, can provide insights into ecological processes even in ancient time, by linking the occupation of the morphological space (disparity) to the occupation of the ecological space. Investigating disparity in radiating groups may provide insights into the ecological diversification underlying evolution of morphological diversity. Actinopterygian fishes initiated their radiation in the Devonian, a period characterized by the diversification of marine ecosystem. Although a former morpho-functional analysis of jaw shape concluded to conservative and poorly diversified morphologies in this early part of their history, fish tooth disparity evidenced here an unsuspected diversity of possible functional significance in the pivotal period of the Late Devonian (Famennian). All teeth being caniniforms, some were stocky and robust, in agreement with expectations for active generalist predators. More surprisingly, elongated teeth also occurred at the beginning of Famennian. Their needle-like shape challenges morpho-functional interpretations by making them fragile in response to bending or torsion. The occurrence of both types of fish teeth during the beginning of the Famennian points to a discrete but real increase in disparity, thus testifying a first burst of feeding specialization despite overall conservative jaw morphology. The disappearance of these needle-like teeth in the Late Famennian might have been related to a relay in dental diversity with abundant co-occurring groups, namely conodonts and chondrichthyans (sharks).

  16. Modulation of Chloride Channel Functions by the Plant Lignan Compounds Kobusin and Eudesmin

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Fang, Fang; Cao, Huanhuan; Ma, Tonghui; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Plant lignans are diphenolic compounds widely present in vegetables, fruits, and grains. These compounds have been demonstrated to have protective effect against cancer, hypertension and diabetes. In the present study, we showed that two lignan compounds, kobusin and eudesmin, isolated from Magnoliae Flos, could modulate intestinal chloride transport mediated by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs). The compounds activated CFTR channel function in both FRT cells and in HT-29 cells. The modulating effects of kobusin and eudesmin on the activity of CaCCgie (CaCC expressed in gastrointestinal epithelial cells) were also investigated, and the result showed that both compounds could stimulate CaCCgie-mediated short-circuit currents and the stimulation was synergistic with ATP. In ex vivo studies, both compounds activated CFTR and CaCCgie chloride channel activities in mouse colonic epithelia. Remarkably, the compounds showed inhibitory effects toward ANO1/CaCC-mediated short-circuit currents in ANO1/CaCC-expressing FRT cells, with IC50 values of 100 μM for kobusin and 200 μM for eudesmin. In charcoal transit study, both compounds mildly reduced gastrointestinal motility in mice. Taken together, these results revealed a new kind of activity displayed by the lignan compounds, one that is concerned with the modulation of chloride channel function. PMID:26635857

  17. A DEK Domain-Containing Protein Modulates Chromatin Structure and Function in Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Waidmann, Sascha; Kusenda, Branislav; Mayerhofer, Juliane; Mechtler, Karl; Jonak, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a major determinant in the regulation of virtually all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin architectural proteins interact with nucleosomes to modulate chromatin accessibility and higher-order chromatin structure. The evolutionarily conserved DEK domain-containing protein is implicated in important chromatin-related processes in animals, but little is known about its DNA targets and protein interaction partners. In plants, the role of DEK has remained elusive. In this work, we identified DEK3 as a chromatin-associated protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. DEK3 specifically binds histones H3 and H4. Purification of other proteins associated with nuclear DEK3 also established DNA topoisomerase 1α and proteins of the cohesion complex as in vivo interaction partners. Genome-wide mapping of DEK3 binding sites by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing revealed enrichment of DEK3 at protein-coding genes throughout the genome. Using DEK3 knockout and overexpressor lines, we show that DEK3 affects nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility and modulates the expression of DEK3 target genes. Furthermore, functional levels of DEK3 are crucial for stress tolerance. Overall, data indicate that DEK3 contributes to modulation of Arabidopsis chromatin structure and function. PMID:25387881

  18. The brain's functional network architecture reveals human motives.

    PubMed

    Hein, Grit; Morishima, Yosuke; Leiberg, Susanne; Sul, Sunhae; Fehr, Ernst

    2016-03-01

    Goal-directed human behaviors are driven by motives. Motives are, however, purely mental constructs that are not directly observable. Here, we show that the brain's functional network architecture captures information that predicts different motives behind the same altruistic act with high accuracy. In contrast, mere activity in these regions contains no information about motives. Empathy-based altruism is primarily characterized by a positive connectivity from the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to the anterior insula (AI), whereas reciprocity-based altruism additionally invokes strong positive connectivity from the AI to the ACC and even stronger positive connectivity from the AI to the ventral striatum. Moreover, predominantly selfish individuals show distinct functional architectures compared to altruists, and they only increase altruistic behavior in response to empathy inductions, but not reciprocity inductions. PMID:26941317

  19. Yeast studies reveal moonlighting functions of the ancient actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Chernova, Tatiana A; Gogoi, Neeku M; Pillai, Indu V; Chernoff, Yury O; Munn, Alan L

    2014-08-01

    Classic functions of the actin cytoskeleton include control of cell size and shape and the internal organization of cells. These functions are manifest in cellular processes of fundamental importance throughout biology such as the generation of cell polarity, cell migration, cell adhesion, and cell division. However, studies in the unicellular model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) are giving insights into other functions in which the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role. These include endocytosis, control of protein translation, and determination of protein 3-dimensional shape (especially conversion of normal cellular proteins into prions). Here, we present a concise overview of these new "moonlighting" roles for the actin cytoskeleton and how some of these roles might lie at the heart of important molecular switches. This is an exciting time for researchers interested in the actin cytoskeleton. We show here how studies of actin are leading us into many new and exciting realms at the interface of genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology. While many of the pioneering studies have been conducted using yeast, the conservation of the actin cytoskeleton and its component proteins throughout eukaryotes suggests that these new roles for the actin cytoskeleton may not be restricted to yeast cells but rather may reflect new roles for the actin cytoskeleton of all eukaryotes. PMID:25138357

  20. Yeast studies reveal moonlighting functions of the ancient actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Chernova, Tatiana A.; Gogoi, Neeku M.; Pillai, Indu V.; Chernoff, Yury O.; Munn, Alan L.

    2014-01-01

    Classic functions of the actin cytoskeleton include control of cell size and shape and the internal organisation of cells. These functions are manifest in cellular processes of fundamental importance throughout biology such as the generation of cell polarity, cell migration, cell adhesion and cell division. However, studies in the unicellular model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) are giving insights into other functions in which the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role. These include endocytosis, control of protein translation and determination of protein 3-dimensional shape (especially conversion of normal cellular proteins into prions). Here we present a concise overview of these new "moonlighting" roles for the actin cytoskeleton and how some of these roles might lie at the heart of important molecular switches. This is an exciting time for researchers interested in the actin cytoskeleton. We show here how studies of actin are leading us into many new and exciting realms at the interface of genetics, biochemistry and cell biology. While many of the pioneering studies have been conducted using yeast, the conservation of the actin cytoskeleton and its component proteins throughout eukaryotes suggests that these new roles for the actin cytoskeleton may not be restricted to yeast cells but rather may reflect new roles for the actin cytoskeleton of all eukaryotes. PMID:25138357

  1. The small GTPase Arf1 modulates mitochondrial morphology and function

    PubMed Central

    Ackema, Karin B; Hench, Jürgen; Böckler, Stefan; Wang, Shyi Chyi; Sauder, Ursula; Mergentaler, Heidi; Westermann, Benedikt; Bard, Frédéric; Frank, Stephan; Spang, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The small GTPase Arf1 plays critical roles in membrane traffic by initiating the recruitment of coat proteins and by modulating the activity of lipid-modifying enzymes. Here, we report an unexpected but evolutionarily conserved role for Arf1 and the ArfGEF GBF1 at mitochondria. Loss of function of ARF-1 or GBF-1 impaired mitochondrial morphology and activity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similarly, mitochondrial defects were observed in mammalian and yeast cells. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aberrant clusters of the mitofusin Fzo1 accumulated in arf1-11 mutants and were resolved by overexpression of Cdc48, an AAA-ATPase involved in ER and mitochondria-associated degradation processes. Yeast Arf1 co-fractionated with ER and mitochondrial membranes and interacted genetically with the contact site component Gem1. Furthermore, similar mitochondrial abnormalities resulted from knockdown of either GBF-1 or contact site components in worms, suggesting that the role of Arf1 in mitochondrial functioning is linked to ER–mitochondrial contacts. Thus, Arf1 is involved in mitochondrial homeostasis and dynamics, independent of its role in vesicular traffic. PMID:25190516

  2. Probiotic modulation of dendritic cell function is influenced by ageing.

    PubMed

    You, Jialu; Dong, Honglin; Mann, Elizabeth R; Knight, Stella C; Yaqoob, Parveen

    2014-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical for the generation of T-cell responses. DC function may be modulated by probiotics, which confer health benefits in immunocompromised individuals, such as the elderly. This study investigated the effects of four probiotics, Bifidobacterium longum bv. infantis CCUG 52486, B. longum SP 07/3, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (L.GG) and L. casei Shirota (LcS), on DC function in an allogeneic mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR) model, using DCs and T-cells from young and older donors in different combinations. All four probiotics enhanced expression of CD40, CD80 and CCR7 on both young and older DCs, but enhanced cytokine production (TGF-β, TNF-α) by old DCs only. LcS induced IL-12 and IFNγ production by DC to a greater degree than other strains, while B. longum bv. infantis CCUG 52486 favoured IL-10 production. Stimulation of young T cells in an allogeneic MLR with DC was enhanced by probiotic pretreatment of old DCs, which demonstrated greater activation (CD25) than untreated controls. However, pretreatment of young or old DCs with LPS or probiotics failed to enhance the proliferation of T-cells derived from older donors. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that ageing increases the responsiveness of DCs to probiotics, but this is not sufficient to overcome the impact of immunosenescence in the MLR. PMID:24094416

  3. Effects of LDL Receptor Modulation on Lymphatic Function

    PubMed Central

    Milasan, Andreea; Dallaire, François; Mayer, Gaétan; Martel, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is driven by the accumulation of immune cells and cholesterol in the arterial wall. Although recent studies have shown that lymphatic vessels play an important role in macrophage reverse cholesterol transport, the specific underlying mechanisms of this physiological feature remain unknown. In the current report, we sought to better characterize the lymphatic dysfunction that is associated with atherosclerosis by studying the physiological and temporal origins of this impairment. First, we assessed that athero-protected Pcsk9−/− mice exhibited improved collecting lymphatic vessel function throughout age when compared to WT mice for up to six months, while displaying enhanced expression of LDLR on lymphatic endothelial cells. Lymphatic dysfunction was present before the atherosclerotic lesion formation in a mouse model that is predisposed to develop atherosclerosis (Ldlr−/−; hApoB100+/+). This dysfunction was presumably associated with a defect in the collecting lymphatic vessels in a non-specific cholesterol- but LDLR-dependent manner. Treatment with a selective VEGFR-3 agonist rescued this impairment observed early in the onset of this arterial disease. We suggest that LDLR modulation is associated with early atherosclerosis-related lymphatic dysfunction, and bring forth a pleiotropic role for PCSK9 in lymphatic function. Our study unveils new potential therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27279328

  4. Acute Modulations in Permeability Barrier Function Regulate Epidermal Cornification

    PubMed Central

    Demerjian, Marianne; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Tschachler, Erwin; Denecker, Geertrui; Declercq, Wim; Vandenabeele, Peter; Mauro, Theodora; Hupe, Melanie; Crumrine, Debra; Roelandt, Truus; Houben, Evi; Elias, Peter M.; Feingold, Kenneth R.

    2008-01-01

    Stratum corneum comprises corneocytes, derived from outer stratum granulosum during terminal differentiation, embedded in a lipid-enriched extracellular matrix, secreted from epidermal lamellar bodies. Permeability barrier insults stimulate rapid secretion of preformed lamellar bodies from the outer stratum granulosum, regulated through modulations in ionic gradients and serine protease (SP)/protease-activated receptor type 2 (PAR2) signaling. Because corneocytes are also required for barrier function, we hypothesized that corneocyte formation could also be regulated by barrier function. Barrier abrogation by two unrelated methods initiated a wave of cornification, assessed as TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling-positive cells in stratum granulosum and newly cornified cells by electron microscopy. Because cornification was blocked by occlusion, corneocytes formed specifically in response to barrier, rather than injury or cell replacement, requirements. SP inhibitors and hyperacidification (which decreases SP activity) blocked cornification after barrier disruption. Similarly, cornification was delayed in PAR2−/− mice. Although classical markers of apoptosis [poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase and caspase (Casp)-3] remained unchanged, barrier disruption activated Casp-14. Moreover, the pan-Casp inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK delayed cornification, and corneocytes were structurally aberrant in Casp14−/− mice. Thus, permeability barrier requirements coordinately drive both the generation of the stratum corneum lipid-enriched extracellular matrix and the transformation of granular cells into corneocytes, in an SP- and Casp-14-dependent manner, signaled by PAR2. PMID:18156206

  5. Genome-wide analysis reveals mechanisms modulating autophagy in normal brain aging and in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Marta M.; Zheng, Bin; Lu, Tao; Yan, Zhenyu; Py, Bénédicte F.; Ng, Aylwin; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Li, Cheng; Yankner, Bruce A.; Scherzer, Clemens R.; Yuan, Junying

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulation of autophagy, a cellular catabolic mechanism essential for degradation of misfolded proteins, has been implicated in multiple neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms that lead to the autophagy dysfunction are still not clear. Based on the results of a genome-wide screen, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as common mediators upstream of the activation of the type III PI3 kinase, which is critical for the initiation of autophagy. Furthermore, ROS play an essential function in the induction of the type III PI3 kinase and autophagy in response to amyloid β peptide, the main pathogenic mediator of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, lysosomal blockage also caused by Aβ is independent of ROS. In addition, we demonstrate that autophagy is transcriptionally down-regulated during normal aging in the human brain. Strikingly, in contrast to normal aging, we observe transcriptional up-regulation of autophagy in the brains of AD patients, suggesting that there might be a compensatory regulation of autophagy. Interestingly, we show that an AD drug and an AD drug candidate have inhibitory effects on autophagy, raising the possibility that decreasing input into the lysosomal system may help to reduce cellular stress in AD. Finally, we provide a list of candidate drug targets that can be used to safely modulate levels of autophagy without causing cell death. PMID:20660724

  6. Electrical brain stimulation improves cognitive performance by modulating functional connectivity and task-specific activation.

    PubMed

    Meinzer, Marcus; Antonenko, Daria; Lindenberg, Robert; Hetzer, Stefan; Ulm, Lena; Avirame, Keren; Flaisch, Tobias; Flöel, Agnes

    2012-02-01

    Excitatory anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (atDCS) can improve human cognitive functions, but neural underpinnings of its mode of action remain elusive. In a cross-over placebo ("sham") controlled study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate neurofunctional correlates of improved language functions induced by atDCS over a core language area, the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Intrascanner transcranial direct current stimulation-induced changes in overt semantic word generation assessed behavioral modulation; task-related and task-independent (resting-state) fMRI characterized language network changes. Improved word-retrieval during atDCS was paralleled by selectively reduced task-related activation in the left ventral IFG, an area specifically implicated in semantic retrieval processes. Under atDCS, resting-state fMRI revealed increased connectivity of the left IFG and additional major hubs overlapping with the language network. In conclusion, atDCS modulates endogenous low-frequency oscillations in a distributed set of functionally connected brain areas, possibly inducing more efficient processing in critical task-relevant areas and improved behavioral performance. PMID:22302824

  7. PLEKHA7 modulates epithelial tight junction barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Paschoud, Serge; Jond, Lionel; Guerrera, Diego; Citi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    PLEKHA7 is a recently identified protein of the epithelial zonula adhaerens (ZA), and is part of a protein complex that stabilizes the ZA, by linking it to microtubules. Since the ZA is important in the assembly and disassembly of tight junctions (TJ), we asked whether PLEKHA7 is involved in modulating epithelial TJ barrier function. We generated clonal MDCK cell lines in which one of four different constructs of PLEKHA7 was inducibly expressed. All constructs were localized at junctions, but constructs lacking the C-terminal region were also distributed diffusely in the cytoplasm. Inducible expression of PLEKHA7 constructs did not affect the expression and localization of TJ proteins, the steady-state value of transepithelial resistance (TER), the development of TER during the calcium switch, and the flux of large molecules across confluent monolayers. In contrast, expression of three out of four constructs resulted both in enhanced recruitment of E-cadherin and associated proteins at the apical ZA and at lateral puncta adherentia (PA), a decreased TER at 18 h after assembly at normal calcium, and an attenuation in the fall in TER after extracellular calcium removal. This latter effect was inhibited when cells were treated with nocodazole. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed that PLEKHA7 forms a complex with the cytoplasmic TJ proteins ZO-1 and cingulin, and this association does not depend on the integrity of microtubules. These results suggest that PLEKHA7 modulates the dynamics of assembly and disassembly of the TJ barrier, through E-cadherin protein complex- and microtubule-dependent mechanisms. PMID:24843844

  8. Synthetic Nucleosomes Reveal that GlcNAcylation Modulates Direct Interaction with the FACT Complex.

    PubMed

    Raj, Ritu; Lercher, Lukas; Mohammed, Shabaz; Davis, Benjamin G

    2016-07-25

    Transcriptional regulation can be established by various post-translational modifications (PTMs) on histone proteins in the nucleosome and by nucleobase modifications on chromosomal DNA. Functional consequences of histone O-GlcNAcylation (O-GlcNAc=O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine) are largely unexplored. Herein, we generate homogeneously GlcNAcylated histones and nucleosomes by chemical post-translational modification. Mass-spectrometry-based quantitative interaction proteomics reveals a direct interaction between GlcNAcylated nucleosomes and the "facilitates chromatin transcription" (FACT) complex. Preferential binding of FACT to GlcNAcylated nucleosomes may point towards O-GlcNAcylation as one of the triggers for FACT-driven transcriptional control. PMID:27272618

  9. Network analysis reveals a stress-affected common gene module among seven stress-related diseases/systems which provides potential targets for mechanism research

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liyuan; Du, Yang; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress (CS) was reported to associate with many complex diseases and stress-related diseases show strong comorbidity; however, molecular analyses have not been performed to date to evaluate common stress-induced biological processes across these diseases. We utilized networks constructed by genes from seven genetic databases of stress-related diseases or systems to explore the common mechanisms. Genes were connected based on the interaction information of proteins they encode. A common sub-network constructed by 561 overlapping genes and 8863 overlapping edges among seven networks was identified and it provides a common gene module among seven stress-related diseases/systems. This module is significantly overlapped with network that constructed by genes from the CS gene database. 36 genes with high connectivity (hub genes) were identified from seven networks as potential key genes in those diseases/systems, 33 of hub genes were included in the common module. Genes in the common module were enriched in 190 interactive gene ontology (GO) functional clusters which provide potential disease mechanism. In conclusion, by analyzing gene networks we revealed a stress-affected common gene module among seven stress-related diseases/systems which provides insight into the process of stress induction of disease and suggests potential gene and pathway candidates for further research. PMID:26245528

  10. Statistical universals reveal the structures and functions of human music.

    PubMed

    Savage, Patrick E; Brown, Steven; Sakai, Emi; Currie, Thomas E

    2015-07-21

    Music has been called "the universal language of mankind." Although contemporary theories of music evolution often invoke various musical universals, the existence of such universals has been disputed for decades and has never been empirically demonstrated. Here we combine a music-classification scheme with statistical analyses, including phylogenetic comparative methods, to examine a well-sampled global set of 304 music recordings. Our analyses reveal no absolute universals but strong support for many statistical universals that are consistent across all nine geographic regions sampled. These universals include 18 musical features that are common individually as well as a network of 10 features that are commonly associated with one another. They span not only features related to pitch and rhythm that are often cited as putative universals but also rarely cited domains including performance style and social context. These cross-cultural structural regularities of human music may relate to roles in facilitating group coordination and cohesion, as exemplified by the universal tendency to sing, play percussion instruments, and dance to simple, repetitive music in groups. Our findings highlight the need for scientists studying music evolution to expand the range of musical cultures and musical features under consideration. The statistical universals we identified represent important candidates for future investigation. PMID:26124105

  11. Statistical universals reveal the structures and functions of human music

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Patrick E.; Brown, Steven; Sakai, Emi; Currie, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Music has been called “the universal language of mankind.” Although contemporary theories of music evolution often invoke various musical universals, the existence of such universals has been disputed for decades and has never been empirically demonstrated. Here we combine a music-classification scheme with statistical analyses, including phylogenetic comparative methods, to examine a well-sampled global set of 304 music recordings. Our analyses reveal no absolute universals but strong support for many statistical universals that are consistent across all nine geographic regions sampled. These universals include 18 musical features that are common individually as well as a network of 10 features that are commonly associated with one another. They span not only features related to pitch and rhythm that are often cited as putative universals but also rarely cited domains including performance style and social context. These cross-cultural structural regularities of human music may relate to roles in facilitating group coordination and cohesion, as exemplified by the universal tendency to sing, play percussion instruments, and dance to simple, repetitive music in groups. Our findings highlight the need for scientists studying music evolution to expand the range of musical cultures and musical features under consideration. The statistical universals we identified represent important candidates for future investigation. PMID:26124105

  12. Functional Connectivity during Modulation of Tinnitus with Orofacial Maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Megan H.; Solowski, Nancy; Wineland, Andre; Okuyemi, Oluwafunmilola; Nicklaus, Joyce; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Burton, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine changes in cortical neural networks as defined by resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging during voluntary modulation of tinnitus with orofacial maneuvers. Study Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Academic medical center. Subjects and Methods Participants were scanned during the maneuver and also at baseline to serve as their own control. The authors chose, a priori, 58 seed regions to evaluate previously described cortical neural networks by computing temporal correlations between all seed region pairs. Seed regions whose correlations significantly differed between rest and maneuver (P < .05, uncorrected) entered into a second-stage analysis of computing the correlation coefficient between the seed region and time courses in each of the remaining brain voxels. A threshold-free cluster enhancement permutation analysis evaluated the distribution of these correlation coefficients after transformation to Fisher z scores and registration to a surface-based reconstruction using Freesurfer. Results The median age for the 16 subjects was 54 years (range, 27–72 years), and all had subjective, unilateral or bilateral, nonpulsatile tinnitus for 6 months or longer. In 9 subjects who could voluntarily increase the loudness of their tinnitus, there were no significant differences in functional connectivity in any cortical networks. A separate analysis evaluated results from 3 patients who decreased the loudness of their tinnitus. Four subjects were excluded because of excessive motion in the scanner. Conclusion The absence of significant differences in functional connectivity due to voluntary orofacial maneuvers that increased tinnitus loudness failed to confirm prior reports of altered cerebral blood flows during somatomotor behaviors. PMID:22675003

  13. Quetiapine modulates functional connectivity in brain aggression networks.

    PubMed

    Klasen, Martin; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Schwenzer, Michael; Mathiak, Krystyna A; Sarkheil, Pegah; Weber, René; Mathiak, Klaus

    2013-07-15

    Aggressive behavior is associated with dysfunctions in an affective regulation network encompassing amygdala and prefrontal areas such as orbitofrontal (OFC), anterior cingulate (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In particular, prefrontal regions have been postulated to control amygdala activity by inhibitory projections, and this process may be disrupted in aggressive individuals. The atypical antipsychotic quetiapine successfully attenuates aggressive behavior in various disorders; the underlying neural processes, however, are unknown. A strengthened functional coupling in the prefrontal-amygdala system may account for these anti-aggressive effects. An inhibition of this network has been reported for virtual aggression in violent video games as well. However, there have been so far no in-vivo observations of pharmacological influences on corticolimbic projections during human aggressive behavior. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, quetiapine and placebo were administered for three successive days prior to an fMRI experiment. In this experiment, functional brain connectivity was assessed during virtual aggressive behavior in a violent video game and an aggression-free control task in a non-violent modification. Quetiapine increased the functional connectivity of ACC and DLPFC with the amygdala during virtual aggression, whereas OFC-amygdala coupling was attenuated. These effects were observed neither for placebo nor for the non-violent control. These results demonstrate for the first time a pharmacological modification of aggression-related human brain networks in a naturalistic setting. The violence-specific modulation of prefrontal-amygdala networks appears to control aggressive behavior and provides a neurobiological model for the anti-aggressive effects of quetiapine. PMID:23501053

  14. Functional metagenomic screen reveals new and diverse microbial rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Pushkarev, Alina; Béjà, Oded

    2016-01-01

    Ion-translocating retinylidene rhodopsins are widely distributed among marine and freshwater microbes. The translocation is light-driven, contributing to the production of biochemical energy in diverse microbes. Until today, most microbial rhodopsins had been detected using bioinformatics based on homology to other rhodopsins. In the past decade, there has been increased interest in microbial rhodopsins in the field of optogenetics since microbial rhodopsins were found to be most useful in vertebrate neuronal systems. Here we report on a functional metagenomic assay for detecting microbial rhodopsins. Using an array of narrow pH electrodes and light-emitting diode illumination, we were able to screen a metagenomic fosmid library to detect diverse marine proteorhodopsins and an actinorhodopsin based solely on proton-pumping activity. Our assay therefore provides a rather simple phenotypic means to enrich our understanding of microbial rhodopsins without any prior knowledge of the genomic content of the environmental entities screened. PMID:26894445

  15. Functional metagenomic screen reveals new and diverse microbial rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Pushkarev, Alina; Béjà, Oded

    2016-09-01

    Ion-translocating retinylidene rhodopsins are widely distributed among marine and freshwater microbes. The translocation is light-driven, contributing to the production of biochemical energy in diverse microbes. Until today, most microbial rhodopsins had been detected using bioinformatics based on homology to other rhodopsins. In the past decade, there has been increased interest in microbial rhodopsins in the field of optogenetics since microbial rhodopsins were found to be most useful in vertebrate neuronal systems. Here we report on a functional metagenomic assay for detecting microbial rhodopsins. Using an array of narrow pH electrodes and light-emitting diode illumination, we were able to screen a metagenomic fosmid library to detect diverse marine proteorhodopsins and an actinorhodopsin based solely on proton-pumping activity. Our assay therefore provides a rather simple phenotypic means to enrich our understanding of microbial rhodopsins without any prior knowledge of the genomic content of the environmental entities screened. PMID:26894445

  16. Scalable Semisupervised Functional Neurocartography Reveals Canonical Neurons in Behavioral Networks.

    PubMed

    Frady, E Paxon; Kapoor, Ashish; Horvitz, Eric; Kristan, William B

    2016-08-01

    Large-scale data collection efforts to map the brain are underway at multiple spatial and temporal scales, but all face fundamental problems posed by high-dimensional data and intersubject variability. Even seemingly simple problems, such as identifying a neuron/brain region across animals/subjects, become exponentially more difficult in high dimensions, such as recognizing dozens of neurons/brain regions simultaneously. We present a framework and tools for functional neurocartography-the large-scale mapping of neural activity during behavioral states. Using a voltage-sensitive dye (VSD), we imaged the multifunctional responses of hundreds of leech neurons during several behaviors to identify and functionally map homologous neurons. We extracted simple features from each of these behaviors and combined them with anatomical features to create a rich medium-dimensional feature space. This enabled us to use machine learning techniques and visualizations to characterize and account for intersubject variability, piece together a canonical atlas of neural activity, and identify two behavioral networks. We identified 39 neurons (18 pairs, 3 unpaired) as part of a canonical swim network and 17 neurons (8 pairs, 1 unpaired) involved in a partially overlapping preparatory network. All neurons in the preparatory network rapidly depolarized at the onsets of each behavior, suggesting that it is part of a dedicated rapid-response network. This network is likely mediated by the S cell, and we referenced VSD recordings to an activity atlas to identify multiple cells of interest simultaneously in real time for further experiments. We targeted and electrophysiologically verified several neurons in the swim network and further showed that the S cell is presynaptic to multiple neurons in the preparatory network. This study illustrates the basic framework to map neural activity in high dimensions with large-scale recordings and how to extract the rich information necessary to perform

  17. Structural and Functional Studies of the Rap1 C-Terminus Reveal Novel Separation-of-Function Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Feeser, Elizabeth A.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2010-02-19

    The yeast Rap1 protein plays an important role in transcriptional silencing and in telomere length homeostasis. Rap1 mediates silencing at the HM loci and at telomeres by recruiting the Sir3 and Sir4 proteins to chromatin via a Rap1 C-terminal domain, which also recruits the telomere length regulators, Rif1 and Rif2. We report the 1.85 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the Rap1 C-terminus, which adopts an all-helical fold with no structural homologues. The structure was used to engineer surface mutations in Rap1, and the effects of these mutations on silencing and telomere length regulation were assayed in vivo. Our surprising finding was that there is no overlap between mutations affecting mating-type and telomeric silencing, suggesting that Rap1 plays distinct roles in silencing at the silent mating-type loci and telomeres. We also found novel Rap1 phenotypes and new separation-of-function mutants, which provide new tools for studying Rap1 function. Yeast two-hybrid studies were used to determine how specific mutations affect recruitment of Sir3, Rif1, and Rif2. A comparison of the yeast two-hybrid and functional data reveals patterns of protein interactions that correlate with each Rap1 phenotype. We find that Sir3 interactions are important for telomeric silencing, but not mating type silencing, and that Rif1 and Rif2 interactions are important in different subsets of telomeric length mutants. Our results show that the role of Rap1 in silencing differs between the HM loci and the telomeres and offer insight into the interplay between HM silencing, telomeric silencing, and telomere length regulation. These findings suggest a model in which competition and multiple recruitment events modulate silencing and telomere length regulation.

  18. A Simple Approach of Presampled Modulation Transfer Function Measurement Tested on the Phoenix Nanotom Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashkov, D.; Batranin, A.; Mamyrbayev, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper presampled modulation transfer function of the 2D images obtained on the Phoenix Nanotom scanner was investigated with different measurement set-ups. Three parameters were chosen to investigate their influence on modulation transfer function: source- detector distance, tube current and binning mode. A simple method for modulation transfer function determination of digital imaging detectors from edge images was applied. The following results were achieved and briefly discussed: modulation transfer function improves with increase of the source-detector distance, slightly improves with increase of the current and remains constant for different binning modes. All measurements were carried out in University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria at Wels campus.

  19. Akting up in the GABA hypothesis of schizophrenia: Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic functions and hippocampus-dependent functions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implies that both AKT1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunit genes are involved in schizophrenia pathogenesis. Activated Akt promotes GABAergic neuron differentiation and increases GABAAR expression on the plasma membrane. To elucidate the role of Akt1 in modulating GABAergic functions and schizophrenia-related cognitive deficits, a set of 6 in vitro and in vivo experiments was conducted. First, an Akt1/2 inhibitor was applied to evaluate its effect on GABAergic neuron-like cell formation from P19 cells. Inhibiting Akt resulted in a reduction in parvalbumin-positive neuron-like cells. In Akt1(-/-) and wild-type mice, seizures induced using pentylenetetrazol (a GABAAR antagonist) were measured, and GABAAR expression and GABAergic interneuron abundance in the brain were examined. Female Akt1(-/-) mice, but not male Akt1(-/-) mice, exhibited less pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsive activity than their corresponding wild-type controls. Reduced parvalbumin-positive interneuron abundance and GABAAR subunit expression, especially in the hippocampus, were also observed in female Akt1(-/-) mice compared to female wild-type mice. Neuromorphometric analyses revealed significantly reduced neurite complexity in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Additionally, female Akt1(-/-) mice displayed increased hippocampal oscillation power and impaired spatial memory compared to female wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that Akt1 deficiency modulates GABAergic interneurons and GABAAR expression, contributing to hippocampus-dependent cognitive functional impairment. PMID:27615800

  20. A Modularity-Based Method Reveals Mixed Modules from Chemical-Gene Heterogeneous Network

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jianglong; Tang, Shihuan; Liu, Xi; Gao, Yibo; Yang, Hongjun; Lu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    For a multicomponent therapy, molecular network is essential to uncover its specific mode of action from a holistic perspective. The molecular system of a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formula can be represented by a 2-class heterogeneous network (2-HN), which typically includes chemical similarities, chemical-target interactions and gene interactions. An important premise of uncovering the molecular mechanism is to identify mixed modules from complex chemical-gene heterogeneous network of a TCM formula. We thus proposed a novel method (MixMod) based on mixed modularity to detect accurate mixed modules from 2-HNs. At first, we compared MixMod with Clauset-Newman-Moore algorithm (CNM), Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL), Infomap and Louvain on benchmark 2-HNs with known module structure. Results showed that MixMod was superior to other methods when 2-HNs had promiscuous module structure. Then these methods were tested on a real drug-target network, in which 88 disease clusters were regarded as real modules. MixMod could identify the most accurate mixed modules from the drug-target 2-HN (normalized mutual information 0.62 and classification accuracy 0.4524). In the end, MixMod was applied to the 2-HN of Buchang naoxintong capsule (BNC) and detected 49 mixed modules. By using enrichment analysis, we investigated five mixed modules that contained primary constituents of BNC intestinal absorption liquid. As a matter of fact, the findings of in vitro experiments using BNC intestinal absorption liquid were found to highly accord with previous analysis. Therefore, MixMod is an effective method to detect accurate mixed modules from chemical-gene heterogeneous networks and further uncover the molecular mechanism of multicomponent therapies, especially TCM formulae. PMID:25927435

  1. Differentiation-Inducing Factor-1 and -2 Function also as Modulators for Dictyostelium Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Kuwayama, Hidekazu; Kubohara, Yuzuru

    2009-01-01

    Background In the early stages of development of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, chemotaxis toward cAMP plays a pivotal role in organizing discrete cells into a multicellular structure. In this process, a series of signaling molecules, such as G-protein-coupled cell surface receptors for cAMP, phosphatidylinositol metabolites, and cyclic nucleotides, function as the signal transducers for controlling dynamics of cytoskeleton. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 and -2 (DIF-1 and DIF-2) were originally identified as the factors (chlorinated alkylphenones) that induce Dictyostelium stalk cell differentiation, but it remained unknown whether the DIFs had any other physiologic functions. Methodology/Principal Findings To further elucidate the functions of DIFs, in the present study we investigated their effects on chemotaxis under various conditions. Quite interestingly, in shallow cAMP gradients, DIF-1 suppressed chemotaxis whereas DIF-2 promoted it greatly. Analyses with various mutants revealed that DIF-1 may inhibit chemotaxis, at least in part, via GbpB (a phosphodiesterase) and a decrease in the intracellular cGMP concentration ([cGMP]i). DIF-2, by contrast, may enhance chemotaxis, at least in part, via RegA (another phosphodiesterase) and an increase in [cGMP]i. Using null mutants for DimA and DimB, the transcription factors that are required for DIF-dependent prestalk differentiation, we also showed that the mechanisms for the modulation of chemotaxis by DIFs differ from those for the induction of cell differentiation by DIFs, at least in part. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that DIF-1 and DIF-2 function as negative and positive modulators for Dictyostelium chemotaxis, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report in any organism of physiologic modulators (small molecules) for chemotaxis having differentiation-inducing activity. PMID:19684855

  2. ADAMTS proteins as modulators of microfibril formation and function

    PubMed Central

    Hubmacher, Dirk; Apte, Suneel S.

    2016-01-01

    The ADAMTS (a disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase domain with thrombospondin-type 1 motifs) protein superfamily includes 19 secreted metalloproteases and 7 secreted ADAMTS-like (ADAMTSL) glycoproteins. The possibility of functional linkage between ADAMTS proteins and fibrillin microfibrils was first revealed by a human genetic consilience, in which mutations in ADAMTS10, ADAMTS17, ADAMTSL2 and ADAMTSL4 were found to phenocopy rare genetic disorders caused by mutations affecting fibrillin-1 (FBN1), the major microfibril component in adults. The manifestations of these ADAMTS gene disorders in humans and animals suggested that they participated in the structural and regulatory roles of microfibrils. Whereas two such disorders, Weill–Marchesani syndrome 1 and Weill–Marchesani-like syndrome involve proteases (ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS17, respectively), geleophysic dysplasia and isolated ectopia lentis in humans involve ADAMTSL2 and ADAMTSL4, respectively, which are not proteases. In addition to broadly similar dysmorphology, individuals affected by Weill–Marchesani syndrome 1, Weill–Marchesani-like syndrome or geleophysic dysplasia each show characteristic anomalies suggesting molecule-, tissue-, or context-specific functions for the respective ADAMTS proteins. Ectopia lentis occurs in each of these conditions except geleophysic dysplasia, and is due to a defect in the ciliary zonule, which is predominantly composed of FBN1 microfibrils. Together, this strongly suggests that ADAMTS proteins are involved either in microfibril assembly, stability, and anchorage, or the formation of function-specific supramolecular networks having microfibrils as their foundation. Here, the genetics and molecular biology of this subset of ADAMTS proteins is discussed from the perspective of how they might contribute to fully functional or function-specific microfibrils. PMID:25957949

  3. Dolphin whistles: a functional misnomer revealed by heliox breathing.

    PubMed

    Madsen, P T; Jensen, F H; Carder, D; Ridgway, S

    2012-04-23

    Delphinids produce tonal whistles shaped by vocal learning for acoustic communication. Unlike terrestrial mammals, delphinid sound production is driven by pressurized air within a complex nasal system. It is unclear how fundamental whistle contours can be maintained across a large range of hydrostatic pressures and air sac volumes. Two opposing hypotheses propose that tonal sounds arise either from tissue vibrations or through actual whistle production from vortices stabilized by resonating nasal air volumes. Here, we use a trained bottlenose dolphin whistling in air and in heliox to test these hypotheses. The fundamental frequency contours of stereotyped whistles were unaffected by the higher sound speed in heliox. Therefore, the term whistle is a functional misnomer as dolphins actually do not whistle, but form the fundamental frequency contour of their tonal calls by pneumatically induced tissue vibrations analogous to the operation of vocal folds in terrestrial mammals and the syrinx in birds. This form of tonal sound production by nasal tissue vibrations has probably evolved in delphinids to enable impedance matching to the water, and to maintain tonal signature contours across changes in hydrostatic pressures, air density and relative nasal air volumes during dives. PMID:21900314

  4. Revealing humans' sensorimotor functions with electrical cortical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Desmurget, Michel; Sirigu, Angela

    2015-09-19

    Direct electrical stimulation (DES) of the human brain has been used by neurosurgeons for almost a century. Although this procedure serves only clinical purposes, it generates data that have a great scientific interest. Had DES not been employed, our comprehension of the organization of the sensorimotor systems involved in movement execution, language production, the emergence of action intentionality or the subjective feeling of movement awareness would have been greatly undermined. This does not mean, of course, that DES is a gold standard devoid of limitations and that other approaches are not of primary importance, including electrophysiology, modelling, neuroimaging or psychophysics in patients and healthy subjects. Rather, this indicates that the contribution of DES cannot be restricted, in humans, to the ubiquitous concepts of homunculus and somatotopy. DES is a fundamental tool in our attempt to understand the human brain because it represents a unique method for mapping sensorimotor pathways and interfering with the functioning of localized neural populations during the performance of well-defined behavioural tasks. PMID:26240422

  5. Selection on soil microbiomes reveals reproducible impacts on plant function.

    PubMed

    Panke-Buisse, Kevin; Poole, Angela C; Goodrich, Julia K; Ley, Ruth E; Kao-Kniffin, Jenny

    2015-04-01

    Soil microorganisms found in the root zone impact plant growth and development, but the potential to harness these benefits is hampered by the sheer abundance and diversity of the players influencing desirable plant traits. Here, we report a high level of reproducibility of soil microbiomes in altering plant flowering time and soil functions when partnered within and between plant hosts. We used a multi-generation experimental system using Arabidopsis thaliana Col to select for soil microbiomes inducing earlier or later flowering times of their hosts. We then inoculated the selected microbiomes from the tenth generation of plantings into the soils of three additional A. thaliana genotypes (Ler, Be, RLD) and a related crucifer (Brassica rapa). With the exception of Ler, all other plant hosts showed a shift in flowering time corresponding with the inoculation of early- or late-flowering microbiomes. Analysis of the soil microbial community using 16 S rRNA gene sequencing showed distinct microbiota profiles assembling by flowering time treatment. Plant hosts grown with the late-flowering-associated microbiomes showed consequent increases in inflorescence biomass for three A. thaliana genotypes and an increase in total biomass for B. rapa. The increase in biomass was correlated with two- to five-fold enhancement of microbial extracellular enzyme activities associated with nitrogen mineralization in soils. The reproducibility of the flowering phenotype across plant hosts suggests that microbiomes can be selected to modify plant traits and coordinate changes in soil resource pools. PMID:25350154

  6. Enantiomers of 3-methylspermidine selectively modulate deoxyhypusine synthesis and reveal important determinants for spermidine transport.

    PubMed

    Hyvönen, Mervi T; Khomutov, Maxim; Petit, Marine; Weisell, Janne; Kochetkov, Sergey N; Alhonen, Leena; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Khomutov, Alex R; Keinänen, Tuomo A

    2015-06-19

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is essential for cell proliferation, becoming functionally active only after post-translational conversion of a specific Lys to hypusine [N(ε)-(4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl)lysine]. Deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) is the rate-limiting enzyme of this two-step process, and the polyamine spermidine is the only natural donor of the butylamine group for this reaction, which is very conserved-hypusine biosynthesis suffers last when the intracellular spermidine pool is depleted. DHS has a very strict substrate specificity, and only a few spermidine analogs are substrates of the enzyme and can support long-term growth of spermidine-depleted cells. Herein, we compared the biological properties of earlier unknown enantiomers of 3-methylspermidine (3-MeSpd) in deoxyhypusine synthesis, in supporting cell growth and in polyamine transport. Long-term treatment of DU145 cells with α-difluoromethylornithine (inhibitor of polyamine biosynthesis) and (R)-3-MeSpd did not cause depletion of hypusinated eIF5A, and the cells were still able to grow, whereas the combination of α-difluoromethylornithine with a racemate or (S)-3-MeSpd caused cessation of cell growth. Noticeably, DHS preferred the (R)- over the (S)-enantiomer as a substrate. (R)-3-MeSpd competed with [(14)C]-labeled spermidine for cellular uptake less efficiently than the (S)-3-MeSpd (Ki = 141 μM vs 19 μM, respectively). The cells treated with racemic 3-MeSpd accumulated intracellularly mainly (S)-3-MeSpd, but not DHS substrate (R)-3-MeSpd, explaining the inability of the racemate to support long-term growth. The distinct properties of 3-MeSpd enantiomers can be exploited in designing polyamine uptake inhibitors, facilitating drug delivery and modulating deoxyhypusine synthesis. PMID:25689365

  7. Vitamin C modulates TET1 function during somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiekai; Guo, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Haoyu; Yang, Jiaqi; Liu, He; Wang, Xiaoshan; Hu, Xiao; Gu, Tianpeng; Zhou, Zhiwei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Jiadong; Wu, Hongling; Mao, Shi-Qing; Mo, Kunlun; Li, Yingying; Lai, Keyu; Qi, Jing; Yao, Hongjie; Pan, Guangjin; Xu, Guo-Liang; Pei, Duanqing

    2013-12-01

    Vitamin C, a micronutrient known for its anti-scurvy activity in humans, promotes the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) through the activity of histone demethylating dioxygenases. TET hydroxylases are also dioxygenases implicated in active DNA demethylation. Here we report that TET1 either positively or negatively regulates somatic cell reprogramming depending on the absence or presence of vitamin C. TET1 deficiency enhances reprogramming, and its overexpression impairs reprogramming in the context of vitamin C by modulating the obligatory mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). In the absence of vitamin C, TET1 promotes somatic cell reprogramming independent of MET. Consistently, TET1 regulates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) formation at loci critical for MET in a vitamin C-dependent fashion. Our findings suggest that vitamin C has a vital role in determining the biological outcome of TET1 function at the cellular level. Given its benefit to human health, vitamin C should be investigated further for its role in epigenetic regulation. PMID:24162740

  8. Tumor-derived factors modulating dendritic cell function.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jinbao; Keskinov, Anton A; Shurin, Galina V; Shurin, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play unique and diverse roles in the tumor occurrence, development, progression and response to therapy. First of all, DC can actively uptake tumor-associated antigens, process them and present antigenic peptides to T cells inducing and maintaining tumor-specific T cell responses. DC interaction with different immune effector cells may also support innate antitumor immunity, as well as humoral responses also known to inhibit tumor development in certain cases. On the other hand, DC are recruited to the tumor site by specific tumor-derived and stroma-derived factors, which may also impair DC maturation, differentiation and function, thus resulting in the deficient formation of antitumor immune response or development of DC-mediated tolerance and immune suppression. Identification of DC-stimulating and DC-suppressing/polarizing factors in the tumor environment and the mechanism of DC modulation are important for designing effective DC-based vaccines and for recovery of immunodeficient resident DC responsible for maintenance of clinically relevant antitumor immunity in patients with cancer. DC-targeting tumor-derived factors and their effects on resident and administered DC in the tumor milieu are described and discussed in this review. PMID:26984847

  9. A Product of Heme Catabolism Modulates Bacterial Function and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Nobles, Christopher L.; Green, Sabrina I.; Maresso, Anthony W.

    2013-01-01

    Bilirubin is the terminal metabolite in heme catabolism in mammals. After deposition into bile, bilirubin is released in large quantities into the mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We hypothesized that intestinal bilirubin may modulate the function of enteric bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of bilirubin on two enteric pathogens; enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), a Gram-negative that causes life-threatening intestinal infections, and E. faecalis, a Gram-positive human commensal bacterium known to be an opportunistic pathogen with broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance. We demonstrate that bilirubin can protect EHEC from exogenous and host-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the absorption of free radicals. In contrast, E. faecalis was highly susceptible to bilirubin, which causes significant membrane disruption and uncoupling of respiratory metabolism in this bacterium. Interestingly, similar results were observed for other Gram-positive bacteria, including B. cereus and S. aureus. A model is proposed whereby bilirubin places distinct selective pressure on enteric bacteria, with Gram-negative bacteria being protected from ROS (positive outcome) and Gram-positive bacteria being susceptible to membrane disruption (negative outcome). This work suggests bilirubin has differential but biologically relevant effects on bacteria and justifies additional efforts to determine the role of this neglected waste catabolite in disease processes, including animal models. PMID:23935485

  10. Modulation transfer function of infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Rafol, S. B.; Ting, D. Z.; Soibel, A.; Hill, C. J.; Khoshakhlagh, A.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Keo, S. A.; Höglund, L.; Luong, E. M.

    2015-09-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) is the ability of an imaging system to faithfully image a given object. The MTF of an imaging system quantifies the ability of the system to resolve or transfer spatial frequencies. In this presentation we will discuss the detail MTF measurements of 1024x1024 pixels mid-wavelength and long-wavelength quantum well infrared photodetector, and 320x256 pixels long-wavelength InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs). Long wavelength Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) based on InAs/GaSb superlattice material is hybridized to recently designed and fabricated 320x256 pixel format ROIC. The n-type CBIRD was characterized in terms of performance and thermal stability. The experimentally measured NEΔT of the 8.8μm cutoff n-CBIRD FPA was 18.6 mK with 300 K background and f/2 cold stop at 78K FPA operating temperature. The horizontal and vertical MTFs of this pixel fully delineated CBIRD FPA at Nyquist frequency are 49% and 52%, respectively.

  11. Selective Modulation of Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity by HD-tACS Shapes Perception

    PubMed Central

    Helfrich, Randolph F.; Knepper, Hannah; Nolte, Guido; Strüber, Daniel; Rach, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory neuronal synchronization between cortical areas has been suggested to constitute a flexible mechanism to coordinate information flow in the human cerebral cortex. However, it remains unclear whether synchronized neuronal activity merely represents an epiphenomenon or whether it is causally involved in the selective gating of information. Here, we combined bilateral high-density transcranial alternating current stimulation (HD-tACS) at 40 Hz with simultaneous electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings to study immediate electrophysiological effects during the selective entrainment of oscillatory gamma-band signatures. We found that interhemispheric functional connectivity was modulated in a predictable, phase-specific way: In-phase stimulation enhanced synchronization, anti-phase stimulation impaired functional coupling. Perceptual correlates of these connectivity changes were found in an ambiguous motion task, which strongly support the functional relevance of long-range neuronal coupling. Additionally, our results revealed a decrease in oscillatory alpha power in response to the entrainment of gamma band signatures. This finding provides causal evidence for the antagonistic role of alpha and gamma oscillations in the parieto-occipital cortex and confirms that the observed gamma band modulations were physiological in nature. Our results demonstrate that synchronized cortical network activity across several spatiotemporal scales is essential for conscious perception and cognition. PMID:25549264

  12. Mfn2 modulates the UPR and mitochondrial function via repression of PERK

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Juan Pablo; Ivanova, Saška; Sánchez-Wandelmer, Jana; Martínez-Cristóbal, Paula; Noguera, Eduard; Sancho, Ana; Díaz-Ramos, Angels; Hernández-Alvarez, María Isabel; Sebastián, David; Mauvezin, Caroline; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) is a key protein in mitochondrial fusion and it participates in the bridging of mitochondria to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Recent data indicate that Mfn2 ablation leads to ER stress. Here we report on the mechanisms by which Mfn2 modulates cellular responses to ER stress. Induction of ER stress in Mfn2-deficient cells caused massive ER expansion and excessive activation of all three Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) branches (PERK, XBP-1, and ATF6). In spite of an enhanced UPR, these cells showed reduced activation of apoptosis and autophagy during ER stress. Silencing of PERK increased the apoptosis of Mfn2-ablated cells in response to ER stress. XBP-1 loss-of-function ameliorated autophagic activity of these cells upon ER stress. Mfn2 physically interacts with PERK, and Mfn2-ablated cells showed sustained activation of this protein kinase under basal conditions. Unexpectedly, PERK silencing in these cells reduced ROS production, normalized mitochondrial calcium, and improved mitochondrial morphology. In summary, our data indicate that Mfn2 is an upstream modulator of PERK. Furthermore, Mfn2 loss-of-function reveals that PERK is a key regulator of mitochondrial morphology and function. PMID:23921556

  13. Structure and Function of the SWIRM Domain, a Conserved Protein Module Found in Chromatin Regulatory Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Da,G.; Lenkart, J.; Zhao, K.; Shiekhattar, R.; Cairns, B.; Marmorstein, R.

    2006-01-01

    The SWIRM domain is a module found in the Swi3 and Rsc8 subunits of SWI/SNF-family chromatin remodeling complexes, and the Ada2 and BHC110/LSD1 subunits of chromatin modification complexes. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the SWIRM domain from Swi3 and characterize the in vitro and in vivo function of the SWIRM domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi3 and Rsc8. The Swi3 SWIRM forms a four-helix bundle containing a pseudo 2-fold axis and a helix-turn-helix motif commonly found in DNA-binding proteins. We show that the Swi3 SWIRM binds free DNA and mononucleosomes with high and comparable affinity and that a subset of Swi3 substitution mutants that display growth defects in vivo also show impaired DNA-binding activity in vitro, consistent with a nucleosome targeting function of this domain. Genetic and biochemical studies also reveal that the Rsc8 and Swi3 SWIRM domains are essential for the proper assembly and in vivo functions of their respective complexes. Together, these studies identify the SWIRM domain as an essential multifunctional module for the regulation of gene expression.

  14. Measurement of the modulation transfer function of paper.

    PubMed

    Rogers, G L

    1998-11-01

    In recent years there has been a renewed interest in modeling the halftone microstructure to better control the colors produced in a halftone image. Diffusion of light within the paper has a significant effect on the halftone color; this effect is known as optical dot gain or the Yule-Neilsen effect. Because of diffusion, a photon may exit the paper from a different region of the halftone microstructure than that into which it entered the paper. To account rigorously for this effect requires knowledge of the paper's point-spread function or, equivalently, the paper's modulation transfer function (MTF). A new technique for measuring the MTF of paper-the series-expansion bar-target technique-is introduced. The method uses a bar target, but the analysis more closely resembles that of the edge-gradient technique. In the series-expansion method, bar-target image data are expanded into a Fourier series, and the paper's MTF is given by the series-expansion coefficients. It differs from the typical bar-target analysis in that the typical method plots the amplitude of the fundamental frequency component for several targets of varying frequency, whereas the series-expansion method plots the amplitude of the fundamental and its harmonics for a single target. Two possible techniques for measuring the MTF with the bar-target series-expansion method are considered. In the first, the image of the bar target is projected onto the paper, and in the second, the bar target is placed directly on the paper, in close contact. PMID:18301552

  15. Large Work Function Modulation of Monolayer MoS2 by Ambient Gases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Young; Kim, Un Jeong; Chung, JaeGwan; Nam, Honggi; Jeong, Hye Yun; Han, Gang Hee; Kim, Hyun; Oh, Hye Min; Lee, Hyangsook; Kim, Hyochul; Roh, Young-Geun; Kim, Jineun; Hwang, Sung Woo; Park, Yeonsang; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-06-28

    Although two-dimensional monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides reveal numerous unique features that are inaccessible in bulk materials, their intrinsic properties are often obscured by environmental effects. Among them, work function, which is the energy required to extract an electron from a material to vacuum, is one critical parameter in electronic/optoelectronic devices. Here, we report a large work function modulation in MoS2 via ambient gases. The work function was measured by an in situ Kelvin probe technique and further confirmed by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. A measured work function of 4.04 eV in vacuum was converted to 4.47 eV with O2 exposure, which is comparable with a large variation in graphene. The homojunction diode by partially passivating a transistor reveals an ideal junction with an ideality factor of almost one and perfect electrical reversibility. The estimated depletion width obtained from photocurrent mapping was ∼200 nm, which is much narrower than bulk semiconductors. PMID:27232340

  16. Analysis and measurement of the modulation transfer function of harmonic shear wave induced phase encoding imaging.

    PubMed

    McAleavey, Stephen A

    2014-05-01

    Shear wave induced phase encoding (SWIPE) imaging generates ultrasound backscatter images of tissue-like elastic materials by using traveling shear waves to encode the lateral position of the scatters in the phase of the received echo. In contrast to conventional ultrasound B-scan imaging, SWIPE offers the potential advantages of image formation without beam focusing or steering from a single transducer element, lateral resolution independent of aperture size, and the potential to achieve relatively high lateral resolution with low frequency ultrasound. Here a Fourier series description of the phase modulated echo signal is developed, demonstrating that echo harmonics at multiples of the shear wave frequency reveal target k-space data at identical multiples of the shear wavenumber. Modulation transfer functions of SWIPE imaging systems are calculated for maximum shear wave acceleration and maximum shear constraints, and compared with a conventionally focused aperture. The relative signal-to-noise ratio of the SWIPE method versus a conventionally focused aperture is found through these calculations. Reconstructions of wire targets in a gelatin phantom using 1 and 3.5 MHz ultrasound and a cylindrical shear wave source are presented, generated from the fundamental and second harmonic of the shear wave modulation frequency, demonstrating weak dependence of lateral resolution with ultrasound frequency. PMID:24815265

  17. Analysis and measurement of the modulation transfer function of harmonic shear wave induced phase encoding imaging

    PubMed Central

    McAleavey, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Shear wave induced phase encoding (SWIPE) imaging generates ultrasound backscatter images of tissue-like elastic materials by using traveling shear waves to encode the lateral position of the scatters in the phase of the received echo. In contrast to conventional ultrasound B-scan imaging, SWIPE offers the potential advantages of image formation without beam focusing or steering from a single transducer element, lateral resolution independent of aperture size, and the potential to achieve relatively high lateral resolution with low frequency ultrasound. Here a Fourier series description of the phase modulated echo signal is developed, demonstrating that echo harmonics at multiples of the shear wave frequency reveal target k-space data at identical multiples of the shear wavenumber. Modulation transfer functions of SWIPE imaging systems are calculated for maximum shear wave acceleration and maximum shear constraints, and compared with a conventionally focused aperture. The relative signal-to-noise ratio of the SWIPE method versus a conventionally focused aperture is found through these calculations. Reconstructions of wire targets in a gelatin phantom using 1 and 3.5 MHz ultrasound and a cylindrical shear wave source are presented, generated from the fundamental and second harmonic of the shear wave modulation frequency, demonstrating weak dependence of lateral resolution with ultrasound frequency. PMID:24815265

  18. Structural and functional roles of the N- and C-terminal extended modules in channelrhodopsin-1.

    PubMed

    Doi, Satoko; Mori, Arisa; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Reissig, Louisa; Ihara, Kunio; Sudo, Yuki

    2015-09-26

    Channelrhodopsins have become a focus of interest because of their ability to control neural activity by light, used in a technology called optogenetics. The channelrhodopsin in the eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR-1) is a light-gated cation channel responsible for motility changes upon photo-illumination and a member of the membrane-embedded retinal protein family. Recent crystal structure analysis revealed that CrChR-1 has unique extended modules both at its N- and C-termini compared to other microbial retinal proteins. This study reports the first successful expression of a ChR-1 variant in Escherichia coli as a holoprotein: the ChR-1 variant lacking both the N- and C-termini (CrChR-1_82-308). However, compared to ChR-1 having the extended modules (CrChR-1_1-357), truncation of the termini greatly altered the absorption maximum and photochemical properties, including the pKa values of its charged residues around the chromophore, the reaction rates in the photocycle and the photo-induced ion channeling activity. The results of some experiments regarding ion transport activity suggest that CrChR-1_82-308 has a proton channeling activity even in the dark. On the basis of these results, we discuss the structural and functional roles of the N- and C-terminal extended modules in CrChR-1. PMID:26098533

  19. Form and Function: An Organic Chemistry Module. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Bruce; Mazzocchi, Paul; Hearle, Robert

    This teacher's guide is designed to provide science teachers with the necessary guidance and suggestions for teaching organic chemistry. In this book, the diverse field of organic chemistry modules is introduced. The material in this book can be integrated with the other modules in a sequence that helps students to see that chemistry is a unified…

  20. Intrinsic functional network architecture of human semantic processing: Modules and hubs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yangwen; Lin, Qixiang; Han, Zaizhu; He, Yong; Bi, Yanchao

    2016-05-15

    Semantic processing entails the activation of widely distributed brain areas across the temporal, parietal, and frontal lobes. To understand the functional structure of this semantic system, we examined its intrinsic functional connectivity pattern using a database of 146 participants. Focusing on areas consistently activated during semantic processing generated from a meta-analysis of 120 neuroimaging studies (Binder et al., 2009), we found that these regions were organized into three stable modules corresponding to the default mode network (Module DMN), the left perisylvian network (Module PSN), and the left frontoparietal network (Module FPN). These three dissociable modules were integrated by multiple connector hubs-the left angular gyrus (AG) and the left superior/middle frontal gyrus linking all three modules, the left anterior temporal lobe linking Modules DMN and PSN, the left posterior portion of dorsal intraparietal sulcus (IPS) linking Modules DMN and FPN, and the left posterior middle temporal gyrus (MTG) linking Modules PSN and FPN. Provincial hubs, which converge local information within each system, were also identified: the bilateral posterior cingulate cortices/precuneus, the bilateral border area of the posterior AG and the superior lateral occipital gyrus for Module DMN; the left supramarginal gyrus, the middle part of the left MTG and the left orbital inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) for Module FPN; and the left triangular IFG and the left IPS for Module FPN. A neuro-functional model for semantic processing was derived based on these findings, incorporating the interactions of memory, language, and control. PMID:26973170

  1. Combination therapy with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators augment the airway functional microanatomy.

    PubMed

    Birket, Susan E; Chu, Kengyeh K; Houser, Grace H; Liu, Linbo; Fernandez, Courtney M; Solomon, George M; Lin, Vivian; Shastry, Suresh; Mazur, Marina; Sloane, Peter A; Hanes, Justin; Grizzle, William E; Sorscher, Eric J; Tearney, Guillermo J; Rowe, Steven M

    2016-05-15

    Recently approved therapies that modulate CFTR function have shown significant clinical benefit, but recent investigations regarding their molecular mechanism when used in combination have not been consistent with clinical results. We employed micro-optical coherence tomography as a novel means to assess the mechanism of action of CFTR modulators, focusing on the effects on mucociliary clearance. Primary human airway monolayers from patients with a G551D mutation responded to ivacaftor treatment with increased ion transport, airway surface liquid depth, ciliary beat frequency, and mucociliary transport rate, in addition to decreased effective viscosity of the mucus layer, a unique mechanism established by our findings. These endpoints are consistent with the benefit observed in G551D patients treated with ivacaftor, and identify a novel mechanism involving mucus viscosity. In monolayers derived from F508del patients, the situation is more complicated, compounded by disparate effects on CFTR expression and function. However, by combining ion transport measurements with functional imaging, we establish a crucial link between in vitro data and clinical benefit, a finding not explained by ion transport studies alone. We establish that F508del cells exhibit increased mucociliary transport and decreased mucus effective viscosity, but only when ivacaftor is added to the regimen. We further show that improvement in the functional microanatomy in vitro corresponds with lung function benefit observed in the clinical trials, whereas ion transport in vitro corresponds to changes in sweat chloride. Functional imaging reveals insights into clinical efficacy and CFTR biology that significantly impact our understanding of novel therapies. PMID:26968770

  2. Modulation of Apoptotic Pathways of Macrophages by Surface-Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuanqin; Zhang, Honggang; Wang, Yange; Chen, Min; Ye, Shefang; Hou, Zhenqing; Ren, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) often involve improving their hydrophilicity and dispersion in biological media by modifying them through noncovalent or covalent functionalization. However, the potential adverse effects of surface-functionalized CNTs have not been well characterized. In this study, we functionalized multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) via carboxylation, to produce MWCNTs-COOH, and via poly (ethylene glycol) linking, to produce MWCNTs-PEG. We used these functionalized MWCNTs to study the effect of surface functionalization on MWCNTs-induced toxicity to macrophages, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action. Our results revealed that MWCNTs-PEG were less cytotoxic and were associated with less apoptotic cell death of macrophages than MWCNTs-COOH. Additionally, MWCNTs-PEG induced less generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) involving less activation of NADPH oxidase compared with MWCNTs-COOH, as evidenced by membrane translocation of p47phox and p67phox in macrophages. The less cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of MWCNTs-PEG compared with MWCNTs-COOH resulted from the lower cellular uptake of MWCNTs-PEG, which resulted in less activation of oxidative stress-responsive pathways, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. These results demonstrate that surface functionalization of CNTs may alter ROS-mediated cytotoxic and apoptotic response by modulating apoptotic signaling pathways. Our study thus provides new insights into the molecular basis for the surface properties affecting CNTs toxicity. PMID:23755279

  3. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylproteome analysis reveals diverse functions of lysine acetylation in common wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumei; Song, Limin; Liang, Wenxing; Mu, Ping; Wang, Shu; Lin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation of proteins, a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification, plays a critical regulatory role in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Several researches have been carried out on acetylproteome in plants. However, until now, there have been no data on common wheat, the major cereal crop in the world. In this study, we performed a global acetylproteome analysis of common wheat variety (Triticum aestivum L.), Chinese Spring. In total, 416 lysine modification sites were identified on 277 proteins, which are involved in a wide variety of biological processes. Consistent with previous studies, a large proportion of the acetylated proteins are involved in metabolic process. Interestingly, according to the functional enrichment analysis, 26 acetylated proteins are involved in photosynthesis and Calvin cycle, suggesting an important role of lysine acetylation in these processes. Moreover, protein interaction network analysis reveals that diverse interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. These data represent the first report of acetylome in common wheat and serve as an important resource for exploring the physiological role of lysine acetylation in this organism and likely in all plants. PMID:26875666

  4. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylproteome analysis reveals diverse functions of lysine acetylation in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumei; Song, Limin; Liang, Wenxing; Mu, Ping; Wang, Shu; Lin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation of proteins, a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification, plays a critical regulatory role in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Several researches have been carried out on acetylproteome in plants. However, until now, there have been no data on common wheat, the major cereal crop in the world. In this study, we performed a global acetylproteome analysis of common wheat variety (Triticum aestivum L.), Chinese Spring. In total, 416 lysine modification sites were identified on 277 proteins, which are involved in a wide variety of biological processes. Consistent with previous studies, a large proportion of the acetylated proteins are involved in metabolic process. Interestingly, according to the functional enrichment analysis, 26 acetylated proteins are involved in photosynthesis and Calvin cycle, suggesting an important role of lysine acetylation in these processes. Moreover, protein interaction network analysis reveals that diverse interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. These data represent the first report of acetylome in common wheat and serve as an important resource for exploring the physiological role of lysine acetylation in this organism and likely in all plants. PMID:26875666

  5. Modeling Single-Trial ERP Reveals Modulation of Bottom-Up Face Visual Processing by Top-Down Task Constraints (in Some Subjects)

    PubMed Central

    Rousselet, Guillaume A.; Gaspar, Carl M.; Wieczorek, Kacper P.; Pernet, Cyril R.

    2011-01-01

    We studied how task constraints modulate the relationship between single-trial event-related potentials (ERPs) and image noise. Thirteen subjects performed two interleaved tasks: on different blocks, they saw the same stimuli, but they discriminated either between two faces or between two colors. Stimuli were two pictures of red or green faces that contained from 10 to 80% of phase noise, with 10% increments. Behavioral accuracy followed a noise dependent sigmoid in the identity task but was high and independent of noise level in the color task. EEG data recorded concurrently were analyzed using a single-trial ANCOVA: we assessed how changes in task constraints modulated ERP noise sensitivity while regressing out the main ERP differences due to identity, color, and task. Single-trial ERP sensitivity to image phase noise started at about 95–110 ms post-stimulus onset. Group analyses showed a significant reduction in noise sensitivity in the color task compared to the identity task from about 140 ms to 300 ms post-stimulus onset. However, statistical analyses in every subject revealed different results: significant task modulation occurred in 8/13 subjects, one showing an increase and seven showing a decrease in noise sensitivity in the color task. Onsets and durations of effects also differed between group and single-trial analyses: at any time point only a maximum of four subjects (31%) showed results consistent with group analyses. We provide detailed results for all 13 subjects, including a shift function analysis that revealed asymmetric task modulations of single-trial ERP distributions. We conclude that, during face processing, bottom-up sensitivity to phase noise can be modulated by top-down task constraints, in a broad window around the P2, at least in some subjects. PMID:21886627

  6. Motif module map reveals enforcement of aging by continual NF-κB activity

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Adam S.; Sinha, Saurabh; Kawahara, Tiara L.A.; Zhang, Jennifer Y.; Segal, Eran; Chang, Howard Y.

    2007-01-01

    Aging is characterized by specific alterations in gene expression, but their underlying mechanisms and functional consequences are not well understood. Here we develop a systematic approach to identify combinatorial cis-regulatory motifs that drive age-dependent gene expression across different tissues and organisms. Integrated analysis of 365 microarrays spanning nine tissue types predicted fourteen motifs as major regulators of age-dependent gene expression in human and mouse. The motif most strongly associated with aging was that of the transcription factor NF-κB. Inducible genetic blockade of NF-κB for 2 wk in the epidermis of chronologically aged mice reverted the tissue characteristics and global gene expression programs to those of young mice. Age-specific NF-κB blockade and orthogonal cell cycle interventions revealed that NF-κB controls cell cycle exit and gene expression signature of aging in parallel but not sequential pathways. These results identify a conserved network of regulatory pathways underlying mammalian aging and show that NF-κB is continually required to enforce many features of aging in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:18055696

  7. The DAVID Gene Functional Classification Tool: a novel biological module-centric algorithm to functionally analyze large gene lists

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Da Wei; Sherman, Brad T; Tan, Qina; Collins, Jack R; Alvord, W Gregory; Roayaei, Jean; Stephens, Robert; Baseler, Michael W; Lane, H Clifford; Lempicki, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    The DAVID Gene Functional Classification Tool uses a novel agglomeration algorithm to condense a list of genes or associated biological terms into organized classes of related genes or biology, called biological modules. This organization is accomplished by mining the complex biological co-occurrences found in multiple sources of functional annotation. It is a powerful method to group functionally related genes and terms into a manageable number of biological modules for efficient interpretation of gene lists in a network context. PMID:17784955

  8. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Modulates Skeletal Myoblast Function

    PubMed Central

    Germani, Antonia; Di Carlo, Anna; Mangoni, Antonella; Straino, Stefania; Giacinti, Cristina; Turrini, Paolo; Biglioli, Paolo; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression is enhanced in ischemic skeletal muscle and is thought to play a key role in the angiogenic response to ischemia. However, it is still unknown whether, in addition to new blood vessel growth, VEGF modulates skeletal muscle cell function. In the present study immunohistochemical analysis showed that, in normoperfused mouse hindlimb, VEGF and its receptors Flk-1 and Flt-1 were expressed mostly in quiescent satellite cells. Unilateral hindlimb ischemia was induced by left femoral artery ligation. At day 3 and day 7 after the induction of ischemia, Flk-1 and Flt-1 were expressed in regenerating muscle fibers and VEGF expression by these fibers was markedly enhanced. Additional in vitro experiments showed that in growing medium both cultured satellite cells and myoblast cell line C2C12 expressed VEGF and its receptors. Under these conditions, Flk-1 receptor exhibited constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation that was increased by VEGF treatment. During myogenic differentiation Flk-1 and Flt-1 were down-regulated. In a modified Boyden Chamber assay, VEGF enhanced C2C12 myoblasts migration approximately fivefold. Moreover, VEGF administration to differentiating C2C12 myoblasts prevented apoptosis, while inhibition of VEGF signaling either with selective VEGF receptor inhibitors (SU1498 and CB676475) or a neutralizing Flk-1 antibody, enhanced cell death approximately 3.5-fold. Finally, adenovirus-mediated VEGF165 gene transfer inhibited ischemia-induced apoptosis in skeletal muscle. These results support a role for VEGF in myoblast migration and survival, and suggest a novel autocrine role of VEGF in skeletal muscle repair during ischemia. PMID:14507649

  9. Family and Community Services. Module XII: The Family: Functions and Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrich, Beatrice

    This twelfth of 14 curriculum modules in the Family and Community Services Occupational Education Modules series deals with functions and structure of the family. Definitions of the family are compared, and students are helped to understand various forms, functions, and structures of families. The developmental stages of the family life cycle and…

  10. Discovering Distinct Functional Modules of Specific Cancer Types Using Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ru; Wang, Xiaosheng; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Background. The molecular profiles exhibited in different cancer types are very different; hence, discovering distinct functional modules associated with specific cancer types is very important to understand the distinct functions associated with them. Protein-protein interaction networks carry vital information about molecular interactions in cellular systems, and identification of functional modules (subgraphs) in these networks is one of the most important applications of biological network analysis. Results. In this study, we developed a new graph theory based method to identify distinct functional modules from nine different cancer protein-protein interaction networks. The method is composed of three major steps: (i) extracting modules from protein-protein interaction networks using network clustering algorithms; (ii) identifying distinct subgraphs from the derived modules; and (iii) identifying distinct subgraph patterns from distinct subgraphs. The subgraph patterns were evaluated using experimentally determined cancer-specific protein-protein interaction data from the Ingenuity knowledgebase, to identify distinct functional modules that are specific to each cancer type. Conclusion. We identified cancer-type specific subgraph patterns that may represent the functional modules involved in the molecular pathogenesis of different cancer types. Our method can serve as an effective tool to discover cancer-type specific functional modules from large protein-protein interaction networks. PMID:26495282

  11. Functional malignant cell heterogeneity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors revealed by targeting of PDGF-DD

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Eliane; Gladh, Hanna; Braun, Sebastian; Bocci, Matteo; Cordero, Eugenia; Björkström, Niklas K.; Miyazaki, Hideki; Michael, Iacovos P.; Eriksson, Ulf; Folestad, Erika; Pietras, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is an inherent feature of most human cancers and has profound implications for cancer therapy. As a result, there is an emergent need to explore previously unmapped mechanisms regulating distinct subpopulations of tumor cells and to understand their contribution to tumor progression and treatment response. Aberrant platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) signaling in cancer has motivated the development of several antagonists currently in clinical use, including imatinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib. The discovery of a novel ligand for PDGFRβ, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-DD, opened the possibility of a previously unidentified signaling pathway involved in tumor development. However, the precise function of PDGF-DD in tumor growth and invasion remains elusive. Here, making use of a newly generated Pdgfd knockout mouse, we reveal a functionally important malignant cell heterogeneity modulated by PDGF-DD signaling in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET). Our analyses demonstrate that tumor growth was delayed in the absence of signaling by PDGF-DD. Surprisingly, ablation of PDGF-DD did not affect the vasculature or stroma of PanNET; instead, we found that PDGF-DD stimulated bulk tumor cell proliferation by induction of paracrine mitogenic signaling between heterogeneous malignant cell clones, some of which expressed PDGFRβ. The presence of a subclonal population of tumor cells characterized by PDGFRβ expression was further validated in a cohort of human PanNET. In conclusion, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized heterogeneity in PanNET characterized by signaling through the PDGF-DD/PDGFRβ axis. PMID:26831065

  12. Stimulation of Glia Reveals Modulation of Mammalian Spinal Motor Networks by Adenosine.

    PubMed

    Acton, David; Miles, Gareth B

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence that glia can release modulators to influence the excitability of neighbouring neurons, the importance of gliotransmission for the operation of neural networks and in shaping behaviour remains controversial. Here we characterise the contribution of glia to the modulation of the mammalian spinal central pattern generator for locomotion, the output of which is directly relatable to a defined behaviour. Glia were stimulated by specific activation of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), an endogenous G-protein coupled receptor preferentially expressed by spinal glia during ongoing activity of the spinal central pattern generator for locomotion. Selective activation of PAR1 by the agonist TFLLR resulted in a reversible reduction in the frequency of locomotor-related bursting recorded from ventral roots of spinal cord preparations isolated from neonatal mice. In the presence of the gliotoxins methionine sulfoximine or fluoroacetate, TFLLR had no effect, confirming the specificity of PAR1 activation to glia. The modulation of burst frequency upon PAR1 activation was blocked by the non-selective adenosine-receptor antagonist theophylline and by the A1-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, but not by the A2A-receptor antagonist SCH5826, indicating production of extracellular adenosine upon glial stimulation, followed by A1-receptor mediated inhibition of neuronal activity. Modulation of network output following glial stimulation was also blocked by the ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL67156, indicating glial release of ATP and its subsequent degradation to adenosine rather than direct release of adenosine. Glial stimulation had no effect on rhythmic activity recorded following blockade of inhibitory transmission, suggesting that glial cell-derived adenosine acts via inhibitory circuit components to modulate locomotor-related output. Finally, the modulation of network output by endogenous adenosine was found to scale with the

  13. Stimulation of Glia Reveals Modulation of Mammalian Spinal Motor Networks by Adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Acton, David; Miles, Gareth B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence that glia can release modulators to influence the excitability of neighbouring neurons, the importance of gliotransmission for the operation of neural networks and in shaping behaviour remains controversial. Here we characterise the contribution of glia to the modulation of the mammalian spinal central pattern generator for locomotion, the output of which is directly relatable to a defined behaviour. Glia were stimulated by specific activation of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), an endogenous G-protein coupled receptor preferentially expressed by spinal glia during ongoing activity of the spinal central pattern generator for locomotion. Selective activation of PAR1 by the agonist TFLLR resulted in a reversible reduction in the frequency of locomotor-related bursting recorded from ventral roots of spinal cord preparations isolated from neonatal mice. In the presence of the gliotoxins methionine sulfoximine or fluoroacetate, TFLLR had no effect, confirming the specificity of PAR1 activation to glia. The modulation of burst frequency upon PAR1 activation was blocked by the non-selective adenosine-receptor antagonist theophylline and by the A1-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, but not by the A2A-receptor antagonist SCH5826, indicating production of extracellular adenosine upon glial stimulation, followed by A1-receptor mediated inhibition of neuronal activity. Modulation of network output following glial stimulation was also blocked by the ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL67156, indicating glial release of ATP and its subsequent degradation to adenosine rather than direct release of adenosine. Glial stimulation had no effect on rhythmic activity recorded following blockade of inhibitory transmission, suggesting that glial cell-derived adenosine acts via inhibitory circuit components to modulate locomotor-related output. Finally, the modulation of network output by endogenous adenosine was found to scale with the

  14. Membrane proteins bind lipids selectively to modulate their structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Timothy M.; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Baldwin, Andrew J.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have established that the folding, structure and function of membrane proteins are influenced by their lipid environments1-7 and that lipids can bind to specific sites, for example in potassium channels8. Fundamental questions remain however regarding the extent of membrane protein selectivity toward lipids. Here we report a mass spectrometry (MS) approach designed to determine the selectivity of lipid binding to membrane protein complexes. We investigate the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL), aquaporin Z (AqpZ), and the ammonia channel (AmtB) using ion mobility MS (IM-MS), which reports gas-phase collision cross sections. We demonstrate that folded conformations of membrane protein complexes can exist in the gas-phase. By resolving lipid-bound states we then rank bound lipids based on their ability to resist gas phase unfolding and thereby stabilize membrane protein structure. Results show that lipids bind non-selectively and with high avidity to MscL, all imparting comparable stability, the highest-ranking lipid however is phosphatidylinositol phosphate, in line with its proposed functional role in mechanosensation9. AqpZ is also stabilized by many lipids with cardiolipin imparting the most significant resistance to unfolding. Subsequently, through functional assays, we discover that cardiolipin modulates AqpZ function. Analogous experiments identify AmtB as being highly selective for phosphatidylglycerol prompting us to obtain an X-ray structure in this lipid membrane-like environment. The 2.3Å resolution structure, when compared with others obtained without lipid bound, reveals distinct conformational changes that reposition AmtB residues to interact with the lipid bilayer. Overall our results demonstrate that resistance to unfolding correlates with specific lipid-binding events enabling distinction of lipids that merely bind from those that modulate membrane protein structure and/or function. We anticipate that these

  15. Modulation of human eosinophil polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration and function.

    PubMed Central

    Goetzl, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    Eosinophil migration toward a concentration gradient of a chemotactic factor is regulated at four levels. Diverse immunologic pathways generate stimuli with eosinophil chemotactic activity, including the complement products C5a and a fragment of C3a and the peptide products of mast cells and basophils activated by IgE-mediated reactions, such as eosinophil chemotactic factor of anaphylaxis (ECF-A) and other oligopeptides. The intrinsic preferential leukocyte activity of the chemotactic stimuli represents the second level of modulation, with ECF-A and other mast cell-derived peptides exhibiting the most selective action on eosinophils. The third level of control of eosinophil chemotaxis is composed of inactivators and inhibitors of chemotactic stimuli and is exemplified by degradation of C5a by anaphylatoxin inactivator or chemotactic factor inactivator and of ECF-A by carboxypeptidase-A or aminopeptidases. The activity of ECF-A is uniquely suppressed by equimolar quantities of its NH2- terminal tripeptide substituent, presumably by eosinophil membrane receptor competition. Factors comprising the fourth level of regulation, which alter eosinophil responsiveness to chemotactic stimuli, include the chemotactic factors themselves, through deactivation; nonchemotactic inhibitors such as the COOH-terminal tripeptide substituent of ECF-A, the neutrophil-immobilizing factor (NIF), the phagocytosis-enhancing factor Thr-Lys-Pro-Arg, and histamine at concentrations greater than 400 ng/ml; and nonchemotactic enhancing principles represented by ascorbate and by histamine at concentrations of 30 ng/ml or less. Local concentrations of eosinophils called to and immobilized at the site of a hypersenitivity reaction may express their regulatory functions by degrading the chemical mediators elaborated including histamine, slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A), and platelet-activating factor (PAF) by way of their content of histaminase, arylsulfatase B, and phospholipase D

  16. Mining Functional Modules in Heterogeneous Biological Networks Using Multiplex PageRank Approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Patrick X

    2016-01-01

    Identification of functional modules/sub-networks in large-scale biological networks is one of the important research challenges in current bioinformatics and systems biology. Approaches have been developed to identify functional modules in single-class biological networks; however, methods for systematically and interactively mining multiple classes of heterogeneous biological networks are lacking. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm (called mPageRank) that utilizes the Multiplex PageRank approach to mine functional modules from two classes of biological networks. We demonstrate the capabilities of our approach by successfully mining functional biological modules through integrating expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks. We first compared the performance of our method with that of other methods using simulated data. We then applied our method to identify the cell division cycle related functional module and plant signaling defense-related functional module in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results demonstrated that the mPageRank method is effective for mining sub-networks in both expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks, and has the potential to be adapted for the discovery of functional modules/sub-networks in other heterogeneous biological networks. The mPageRank executable program, source code, the datasets and results of the presented two case studies are publicly and freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/MPageRank/. PMID:27446133

  17. Mining Functional Modules in Heterogeneous Biological Networks Using Multiplex PageRank Approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Patrick X.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of functional modules/sub-networks in large-scale biological networks is one of the important research challenges in current bioinformatics and systems biology. Approaches have been developed to identify functional modules in single-class biological networks; however, methods for systematically and interactively mining multiple classes of heterogeneous biological networks are lacking. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm (called mPageRank) that utilizes the Multiplex PageRank approach to mine functional modules from two classes of biological networks. We demonstrate the capabilities of our approach by successfully mining functional biological modules through integrating expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks. We first compared the performance of our method with that of other methods using simulated data. We then applied our method to identify the cell division cycle related functional module and plant signaling defense-related functional module in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results demonstrated that the mPageRank method is effective for mining sub-networks in both expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks, and has the potential to be adapted for the discovery of functional modules/sub-networks in other heterogeneous biological networks. The mPageRank executable program, source code, the datasets and results of the presented two case studies are publicly and freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/MPageRank/. PMID:27446133

  18. Imaging performance of annular apertures. III - Apodization and modulation transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschunko, H. F. A.

    1979-01-01

    Apodization functions with decreasing transmission and their opposite, functions with increasing transmission, are investigated for various central obstruction ratios. The resultant modulation transfer functions are presented for various transmission functions and central obstruction ratios. Conclusions applicable to the improvement of imaging performance are discussed.

  19. Facilitating Structure-Function Studies of CFTR Modulator Sites with Efficiencies in Mutagenesis and Functional Screening.

    PubMed

    Molinski, Steven V; Ahmadi, Saumel; Hung, Maurita; Bear, Christine E

    2015-12-01

    There are nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene associated with cystic fibrosis disease, and to date, the only approved drug, Kalydeco, has been effective in rescuing the functional expression of a small subset of these mutant proteins with defects in channel activation. However, there is currently an urgent need to assess other mutations for possible rescue by Kalydeco, and further, definition of the binding site of such modulators on CFTR would enhance our understanding of the mechanism of action of such therapeutics. Here, we describe a simple and rapid one-step PCR-based site-directed mutagenesis method to generate mutations in the CFTR gene. This method was used to generate CFTR mutants bearing deletions (p.Gln2_Trp846del, p.Ser700_Asp835del, p.Ile1234_Arg1239del) and truncation with polyhistidine tag insertion (p.Glu1172-3Gly-6-His*), which either recapitulate a disease phenotype or render tools for modulator binding site identification, with subsequent evaluation of drug responses using a high-throughput (384-well) membrane potential-sensitive fluorescence assay of CFTR channel activity within a 1 wk time frame. This proof-of-concept study shows that these methods enable rapid and quantitative comparison of multiple CFTR mutants to emerging drugs, facilitating future large-scale efforts to stratify mutants according to their "theratype" or most promising targeted therapy. PMID:26385858

  20. Functional studies of Drosophila zinc transporters reveal the mechanism for dietary zinc absorption and regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Zinc is key to the function of many proteins, but the process of dietary zinc absorption is not well clarified. Current knowledge about dietary zinc absorption is fragmented, and mostly derives from incomplete mammalian studies. To gain a comprehensive picture of this process, we systematically characterized all zinc transporters (that is, the Zip and ZnT family members) for their possible roles in dietary zinc absorption in a genetically amenable model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. Results A set of plasma membrane-resident zinc transporters was identified to be responsible for absorbing zinc from the lumen into the enterocyte and the subsequent exit of zinc to the circulation. dZip1 and dZip2, two functionally overlapping zinc importers, are responsible for absorbing zinc from the lumen into the enterocyte. Exit of zinc to the circulation is mediated through another two functionally overlapping zinc exporters, dZnT1, and its homolog CG5130 (dZnT77C). Somewhat surprisingly, it appears that the array of intracellular ZnT proteins, including the Golgi-resident dZnT7, is not directly involved in dietary zinc absorption. By modulating zinc status in different parts of the body, we found that regulation of dietary zinc absorption, in contrast to that of iron, is unresponsive to bodily needs or zinc status outside the gut. The zinc transporters that are involved in dietary zinc absorption, including the importers dZip1 and dZip2, and the exporter dZnT1, are respectively regulated at the RNA and protein levels by zinc in the enterocyte. Conclusions Our study using the model organism Drosophila thus starts to reveal a comprehensive sketch of dietary zinc absorption and its regulatory control, a process that is still incompletely understood in mammalian organisms. The knowledge gained will act as a reference for future mammalian studies, and also enable an appreciation of this important process from an evolutionary perspective. PMID:24063361

  1. Methodology for fast curve fitting to modulated Voigt dispersion lineshape functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westberg, Jonas; Wang, Junyang; Axner, Ove

    2014-01-01

    Faraday rotation spectroscopy (FAMOS) as well as other modulated techniques that rely on dispersion produce lock-in signals that are proportional to various Fourier coefficients of modulated dispersion lineshape functions of the molecular transition targeted. In order to enable real-time curve fitting to such signals a fast methodology for calculating the Fourier coefficients of modulated lineshape functions is needed. Although there exist an analytical expression for such Fourier coefficients of modulated Lorentzian absorption and dispersion lineshape functions, there is no corresponding expression for a modulated Voigt dispersion function. The conventional computational route of such Fourier coefficients has therefore so far either consisted of using various approximations to the modulated Voigt lineshape function or solving time-consuming integrals, which has precluded accurate real-time curve fitting. Here we present a new methodology to calculate Fourier coefficients of modulated Voigt dispersion lineshape functions that is significantly faster (several orders of magnitude) and more accurate than previous approximative calculation procedures, which allows for real-time curve fitting to FAMOS signals also in the Voigt regime.

  2. Network integration of parallel metabolic and transcriptional data reveals metabolic modules that regulate macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Jha, Abhishek K; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; Sergushichev, Alexey; Lampropoulou, Vicky; Ivanova, Yulia; Loginicheva, Ekaterina; Chmielewski, Karina; Stewart, Kelly M; Ashall, Juliet; Everts, Bart; Pearce, Edward J; Driggers, Edward M; Artyomov, Maxim N

    2015-03-17

    Macrophage polarization involves a coordinated metabolic and transcriptional rewiring that is only partially understood. By using an integrated high-throughput transcriptional-metabolic profiling and analysis pipeline, we characterized systemic changes during murine macrophage M1 and M2 polarization. M2 polarization was found to activate glutamine catabolism and UDP-GlcNAc-associated modules. Correspondingly, glutamine deprivation or inhibition of N-glycosylation decreased M2 polarization and production of chemokine CCL22. In M1 macrophages, we identified a metabolic break at Idh, the enzyme that converts isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate, providing mechanistic explanation for TCA cycle fragmentation. (13)C-tracer studies suggested the presence of an active variant of the aspartate-arginosuccinate shunt that compensated for this break. Consistently, inhibition of aspartate-aminotransferase, a key enzyme of the shunt, inhibited nitric oxide and interleukin-6 production in M1 macrophages, while promoting mitochondrial respiration. This systems approach provides a highly integrated picture of the physiological modules supporting macrophage polarization, identifying potential pharmacologic control points for both macrophage phenotypes. PMID:25786174

  3. Finite-element modelling reveals force modulation of jaw adductors in stag beetles

    PubMed Central

    Goyens, J.; Soons, J.; Aerts, P.; Dirckx, J.

    2014-01-01

    Male stag beetles carry large and heavy mandibles that arose through sexual selection over mating rights. Although the mandibles of Cyclommatus metallifer males are used in pugnacious fights, they are surprisingly slender. Our bite force measurements show a muscle force reduction of 18% for tip biting when compared with bites with the teeth located halfway along the mandibles. This suggests a behavioural adaptation to prevent failure. We confirmed this by constructing finite-element (FE) models that mimic both natural bite situations as well as the hypothetical situation of tip biting without muscle force modulation. These models, based on micro-CT images, investigate the material stresses in the mandibles for different combinations of bite location and muscle force. Young's modulus of the cuticle was experimentally determined to be 5.1 GPa with the double indentation method, and the model was validated by digital image correlation on living beetles. FE analysis proves to be a valuable tool in the investigation of the trade-offs of (animal) weapon morphology and usage. Furthermore, the demonstrated bite force modulation in male stag beetles suggests the presence of mechanosensors inside the armature. PMID:25297317

  4. Nuclear Technology. Course 30: Mechanical Inspection. Module 30-2, Pump Functional Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasel, Ed; Espy, John

    This second in a series of eight modules for a course titled Mechanical Inspection describes typical pump functional tests which are performed after pump installation and prior to release of the plant for unrestricted power operation. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module…

  5. The aging memory: Modulating epigenetic modifications to improve cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Rosalina

    2016-09-01

    Age-related cognitive decline is a major concern in society. Here, I discuss recent evidence that shows an age-related modulation of gene transcription by epigenetic modifications. Epigenetic modifications, such as histone acetylation, is unbalanced in aging, with an increase in histone deacetylation, that limits the expression of plasticity-related genes. By modifying the balance towards histone acetylation, histone deacetylase inhibitors present a new pharmacological approach to ameliorate age-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27390098

  6. Impact of Lipid Raft Integrity on 5-HT3 Receptor Function and its Modulation by Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Nothdurfter, Caroline; Tanasic, Sascha; Di Benedetto, Barbara; Rammes, Gerhard; Wagner, Eva-Maria; Kirmeier, Thomas; Ganal, Vanessa; Kessler, Julia S; Rein, Theo; Holsboer, Florian; Rupprecht, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Because of the biochemical colocalization of the 5-HT3 receptor and antidepressants within raft-like domains and their antagonistic effects at this ligand-gated ion channel, we investigated the impact of lipid raft integrity for 5-HT3 receptor function and its modulation by antidepressants. Treatment with methyl-β-cyclodextrine (MβCD) markedly reduced membrane cholesterol levels and caused a more diffuse membrane distribution of the lipid raft marker protein flotillin-1 indicating lipid raft impairment. Both amplitude and charge of serotonin evoked cation currents were diminished following cholesterol depletion by either MβCD or simvastatin (Sim), whereas the functional antagonistic properties of the antidepressants desipramine (DMI) and fluoxetine (Fluox) at the 5-HT3 receptor were retained. Although both the 5-HT3 receptor and flotillin-1 were predominantly found in raft-like domains in western blots following sucrose density gradient centrifugation, immunocytochemistry revealed only a coincidental degree of colocalization of these two proteins. These findings and the persistence of the antagonistic effects of DMI and Fluox against 5-HT3 receptors after lipid raft impairment indicate that their modulatory effects are likely mediated through non-raft 5-HT3 receptors, which are not sufficiently detected by means of sucrose density gradient centrifugation. In conclusion, lipid raft integrity appears to be important for 5-HT3 receptor function in general, whereas it is not a prerequisite for the antagonistic properties of antidepressants such as DMI and Fluox at this ligand-gated ion channel. PMID:20200506

  7. Fat Modulates the Relationship between Sarcopenia and Physical Function in Nonobese Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Robin L.; Brixner, Diana I.; Ghate, Sameer; LaStayo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    It is intuitive to think that sarcopenia should be associated with declines in physical function though recent evidence questions this assertion. This study investigated the relationship between absolute and relative sarcopenia, with physical performance in 202 nonobese (mean BMI = 26.6 kg/ht2) community-dwelling older (mean age = 73.8 ± 5.9 years) adults. While absolute sarcopenia (appendicular skeletal mass (ASM)/ht2) was either not associated, or weakly associated with physical performance, relative sarcopenia (ASM/kg) demonstrated moderate (r = 0.31 to r = 0.51, P < 0.01) relationships with performance outcomes in both males and females. Knee extension strength (r = 0.27) and leg extension power (r = 0.41) were both related to absolute sarcopenia (P < 0.001) in females and not in males. Strength and power were associated with relative sarcopenia in both sexes (from r = 0.47 to r = 0.67, P < 0.001). The ratio of lean mass to total body mass, that is, relative sarcopenia, is an important consideration relative to physical function in older adults even in the absence of obesity. Stratifying these individuals into equal tertiles of total body fat revealed a trend of diminished regression coefficients across each incrementally higher fat grouping for performance measures, providing further evidence that total body fat modulates the relationship between sarcopenia and physical function. PMID:22312329

  8. Network analysis of S. aureus response to ramoplanin reveals modules for virulence factors and resistance mechanisms and characteristic novel genes.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Devika; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2015-12-10

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and ramoplanin is an antimicrobial attributed for effective treatment. The goal of this study was to examine the transcriptomic profiles of ramoplanin sensitive and resistant S. aureus to identify putative modules responsible for virulence and resistance-mechanisms and its characteristic novel genes. The dysregulated genes were used to reconstruct protein functional association networks for virulence-factors and resistance-mechanisms individually. Strong link between metabolic-pathways and development of virulence/resistance is suggested. We identified 15 putative modules of virulence factors. Six hypothetical genes were annotated with novel virulence activity among which SACOL0281 was discovered to be an essential virulence factor EsaD. The roles of MazEF toxin-antitoxin system, SACOL0202/SACOL0201 two-component system and that of amino-sugar and nucleotide-sugar metabolism in virulence are also suggested. In addition, 14 putative modules of resistance mechanisms including modules of ribosomal protein-coding genes and metabolic pathways such as biotin-synthesis, TCA-cycle, riboflavin-biosynthesis, peptidoglycan-biosynthesis etc. are also indicated. PMID:26255091

  9. A functional module-based exploration between inflammation and cancer in esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nannan; Li, Chunhua; Huang, Yan; Yi, Ying; Bo, Wanlan; Li, Chunmiao; Li, Yue; Hu, Yongfei; Li, Kongning; Wang, Hong; Zhuang, Liwei; Fan, Huihui; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation contributing to the underlying progression of diverse human cancers has been generally appreciated, however, explorations into the molecular links between inflammation and cancer in esophagus are still at its early stage. In our study, we presented a functional module-based approach, in combination with multiple data resource (gene expression, protein-protein interactions (PPI), transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations) to decipher the underlying links. Via mapping differentially expressed disease genes, functional disease modules were identified. As indicated, those common genes and interactions tended to play important roles in linking inflammation and cancer. Based on crosstalk analysis, we demonstrated that, although most disease genes were not shared by both kinds of modules, they might act through participating in the same or similar functions to complete the molecular links. Additionally, we applied pivot analysis to extract significant regulators for per significant crosstalk module pair. As shown, pivot regulators might manipulate vital parts of the module subnetworks, and then work together to bridge inflammation and cancer in esophagus. Collectively, based on our functional module analysis, we demonstrated that shared genes or interactions, significant crosstalk modules, and those significant pivot regulators were served as different functional parts underlying the molecular links between inflammation and cancer in esophagus. PMID:26489668

  10. Abstinence duration modulates striatal functioning during monetary reward processing in cocaine patients.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Juan-Carlos; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso; Costumero, Víctor; Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Llopis, Juan-José; Ávila, César

    2014-09-01

    Pre-clinical and clinical studies in cocaine addiction highlight alterations in the striatal dopaminergic reward system that subserve maintenance of cocaine use. Using an instrumental conditioning paradigm with monetary reinforcement, we studied striatal functional alterations in long-term abstinent cocaine-dependent patients and striatal functioning as a function of abstinence and treatment duration. Eighteen patients and 20 controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during a Monetary Incentive Delay task. Region of interest analyses based on masks of the dorsal and ventral striatum were conducted to test between-group differences and the functional effects in the cocaine group of time (in months) with no more than two lapses from the first time patients visited the clinical service to seek treatment at the scanning time (duration of treatment), and the functional effects of the number of months with no lapses or relapses at the scanning session time (length of abstinence). We applied a voxel-wise and a cluster-wise FWE-corrected level (pFWE) at a threshold of P < 0.05. The patient group showed lower activation in the right caudate during reward anticipation than the control group. The regression analyses in the patients group revealed a positive correlation between duration of treatment and brain activity in the left caudate during reward anticipation. Likewise, length of abstinence negatively correlated with brain activity in the bilateral nucleus accumbens during monetary outcome processing. In conclusion, caudate and nucleus accumbens show a different brain response pattern to non-drug rewards during cocaine addiction, which can be modulated by treatment success. PMID:23445167