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Sample records for functional modules revealed

  1. Predicting invasive species impacts: a community module functional response approach reveals context dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Rachel A; Dick, Jaimie T A; Pritchard, Daniel W; Ennis, Marilyn; Hatcher, Melanie J; Dunn, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Predatory functional responses play integral roles in predator–prey dynamics, and their assessment promises greater understanding and prediction of the predatory impacts of invasive species. Other interspecific interactions, however, such as parasitism and higher-order predation, have the potential to modify predator–prey interactions and thus the predictive capability of the comparative functional response approach. We used a four-species community module (higher-order predator; focal native or invasive predators; parasites of focal predators; native prey) to compare the predatory functional responses of native Gammarus duebeni celticus and invasive Gammarus pulex amphipods towards three invertebrate prey species (Asellus aquaticus, Simulium spp., Baetis rhodani), thus, quantifying the context dependencies of parasitism and a higher-order fish predator on these functional responses. Our functional response experiments demonstrated that the invasive amphipod had a higher predatory impact (lower handling time) on two of three prey species, which reflects patterns of impact observed in the field. The community module also revealed that parasitism had context-dependent influences, for one prey species, with the potential to further reduce the predatory impact of the invasive amphipod or increase the predatory impact of the native amphipod in the presence of a higher-order fish predator. Partial consumption of prey was similar for both predators and occurred increasingly in the order A. aquaticus, Simulium spp. and B. rhodani. This was associated with increasing prey densities, but showed no context dependencies with parasitism or higher-order fish predator. This study supports the applicability of comparative functional responses as a tool to predict and assess invasive species impacts incorporating multiple context dependencies. PMID:25265905

  2. Validation of skeletal muscle cis-regulatory module predictions reveals nucleotide composition bias in functional enhancers.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Andrew T; Chou, Alice Yi; Arenillas, David J; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2011-12-01

    We performed a genome-wide scan for muscle-specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) using three computational prediction programs. Based on the predictions, 339 candidate CRMs were tested in cell culture with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and C2C12 myoblasts for capacity to direct selective reporter gene expression to differentiated C2C12 myotubes. A subset of 19 CRMs validated as functional in the assay. The rate of predictive success reveals striking limitations of computational regulatory sequence analysis methods for CRM discovery. Motif-based methods performed no better than predictions based only on sequence conservation. Analysis of the properties of the functional sequences relative to inactive sequences identifies nucleotide sequence composition can be an important characteristic to incorporate in future methods for improved predictive specificity. Muscle-related TFBSs predicted within the functional sequences display greater sequence conservation than non-TFBS flanking regions. Comparison with recent MyoD and histone modification ChIP-Seq data supports the validity of the functional regions. PMID:22144875

  3. Validation of Skeletal Muscle cis-Regulatory Module Predictions Reveals Nucleotide Composition Bias in Functional Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Andrew T.; Chou, Alice Yi; Arenillas, David J.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide scan for muscle-specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) using three computational prediction programs. Based on the predictions, 339 candidate CRMs were tested in cell culture with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and C2C12 myoblasts for capacity to direct selective reporter gene expression to differentiated C2C12 myotubes. A subset of 19 CRMs validated as functional in the assay. The rate of predictive success reveals striking limitations of computational regulatory sequence analysis methods for CRM discovery. Motif-based methods performed no better than predictions based only on sequence conservation. Analysis of the properties of the functional sequences relative to inactive sequences identifies nucleotide sequence composition can be an important characteristic to incorporate in future methods for improved predictive specificity. Muscle-related TFBSs predicted within the functional sequences display greater sequence conservation than non-TFBS flanking regions. Comparison with recent MyoD and histone modification ChIP-Seq data supports the validity of the functional regions. PMID:22144875

  4. Evidence of functional connectivity between auditory cortical areas revealed by amplitude modulation sound processing.

    PubMed

    Guéguin, Marie; Le Bouquin-Jeannčs, Régine; Faucon, Gérard; Chauvel, Patrick; Liégeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2007-02-01

    The human auditory cortex includes several interconnected areas. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in auditory cortical functions requires a detailed knowledge of neuronal connectivity between functional cortical regions. In human, it is difficult to track in vivo neuronal connectivity. We investigated the interarea connection in vivo in the auditory cortex using a method of directed coherence (DCOH) applied to depth auditory evoked potentials (AEPs). This paper presents simultaneous AEPs recordings from insular gyrus (IG), primary and secondary cortices (Heschl's gyrus and planum temporale), and associative areas (Brodmann area [BA] 22) with multilead intracerebral electrodes in response to sinusoidal modulated white noises in 4 epileptic patients who underwent invasive monitoring with depth electrodes for epilepsy surgery. DCOH allowed estimation of the causality between 2 signals recorded from different cortical sites. The results showed 1) a predominant auditory stream within the primary auditory cortex from the most medial region to the most lateral one whatever the modulation frequency, 2) unidirectional functional connection from the primary to secondary auditory cortex, 3) a major auditory propagation from the posterior areas to the anterior ones, particularly at 8, 16, and 32 Hz, and 4) a particular role of Heschl's sulcus dispatching information to the different auditory areas. These findings suggest that cortical processing of auditory information is performed in serial and parallel streams. Our data showed that the auditory propagation could not be associated to a unidirectional traveling wave but to a constant interaction between these areas that could reflect the large adaptive and plastic capacities of auditory cortex. The role of the IG is discussed. PMID:16514106

  5. Hypoxia Modulates A431 Cellular Pathways Association to Tumor Radioresistance and Enhanced Migration Revealed by Comprehensive Proteomic and Functional Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yan; Hao, Piliang; Dutta, Bamaprasad; Cheow, Esther Sok Hwee; Sim, Kae Hwan; Gan, Chee Sian; Lim, Sai Kiang; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia induces cancer cell angiogenesis, invasiveness, treatment resistance, and contributes to poor clinical outcome. However, the molecular mechanism by which tumor hypoxia exerts a coordinated effect on different molecular pathways to enhance tumor growth and survival and lead to poor clinical outcome is not fully understood. In this study, we attempt to elucidate the global protein expression and functional changes in A431 epithelial carcinoma cells induced by hypoxia and reoxygenation using iTRAQ quantitative proteomics and biochemical functional assays. Quantitative proteomics results showed that 4316 proteins were quantified with FDR<1%, in which over 1200 proteins were modulated >1.2 fold, and DNA repair, glycolysis, integrin, glycoprotein turnover, and STAT1 pathways were perturbed by hypoxia and reoxygenation-induced oxidative stress. For the first time, hypoxia was shown to up-regulate the nonhomologous end-joining pathway, which plays a central role in DNA repair of irradiated cells, thereby potentially contributing to the radioresistance of hypoxic A431 cells. The up-regulation of Ku70/Ku80 dimer, a key molecular complex in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway, was confirmed by Western blot and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry-MRM methods. Functional studies confirmed that up-regulation of glycolysis, integrin, glycoprotein synthesis, and down-regulation of STAT1 pathways during hypoxia enhanced metastastic activity of A431 cells. Migration of A431 cells was dramatically repressed by glycolysis inhibitor (2-Deoxy-d-glucose), glycoprotein synthesis inhibitor (1-Deoxynojirimycin Hydrochloride), and STAT1? overexpression that enhanced the integrin-mediated cell adhesion. These results revealed that hypoxia induced several biological processes involved in tumor migration and radioresistance and provided potential new targets for tumor therapy. PMID:23204318

  6. A cross-cancer differential co-expression network reveals microRNA-regulated oncogenic functional modules.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen-Ching; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Cheng, Feixiong; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-11-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that can regulate their target gene expressions at the post-transcriptional level. Moreover, they have been reported as either oncomirs or tumor suppressors and possess therapeutic potential in cancer. In this study, we investigated differential co-expression of miRNAs across four cancer types. We observed that the loss of positive co-expressions among miRNAs frequently occurs in the studied cancer types. This observation suggests that the disruption of positive co-expressions among miRNAs may be prevalent during tumorigenesis. By systematically collecting these lost positive co-expressions among miRNAs in cancer, we constructed a cross-cancer miRNA differential co-expression network. We observed that the influential miRNAs in the proposed network, i.e. hubs or in larger cliques, tended to be involved in more cancer types than other miRNAs. Moreover, we found that miRNAs which lose their positive co-expressions in cancers might co-contribute to cancer development, and even could be used to predict the cancer types in which miRNAs were involved. Finally, we identified two potential miRNA-regulated onco-modules, mitosis and DNA replication, that are associated with poor survival outcomes in patients across multiple cancers. Collectively, our study suggested that the disruption of miRNA positive co-expression in cancer might contribute to cancer development. Our findings also form an important basis for identifying miRNAs with potential co-contribution to carcinogenesis. PMID:26448606

  7. Perilymph Osmolality Modulates Cochlear Function

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chul-Hee; Oghalai, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The cochlear amplifier is required for the exquisite sensitivity of mammalian hearing. Outer hair cells underlie the cochlear amplifier and they are unique in that they maintain an intracellular turgor pressure. Changing the turgor pressure of an isolated outer hair cells through osmotic challenge modulates its ability to produce electromotile force. We sought to determine the effect of osmotic challenge on cochlear function. Study Design In vivo animal study. Methods Hypotonic and hypertonic artificial perilymph was perfused through the scala tympani of anesthetized guinea pigs. Cochlear function was assessed by measuring the compound action potential, distortion product otoacoustic emissions, the cochlear microphonic, and the endocochlear potential. Results Hypotonic perilymph decreased and hypertonic perilymph increased compound action potential and distortion product otoacoustic emission thresholds in a dose-dependent and reversible manner. The cochlear microphonic quadratic distortion product magnitude increased after hypotonic perfusion and decreased with hypertonic perfusion. There were no changes in the stimulus intensity growth curve of the low-frequency cochlear microphonic. The endocochlear potential was not affected by perilymph osmolality. Conclusions These data demonstrate that perilymph osmolality can modulate cochlear function and are consistent with what would be expected if outer hair cells turgor pressure changes the gain of the cochlear amplifier in vivo. PMID:18607303

  8. Second-order temporal modulation transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, C; Soares, C; Vonner, T

    2001-08-01

    Detection thresholds were measured for a sinusoidal modulation applied to the modulation depth of a sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) white noise carrier as a function of the frequency of the modulation applied to the modulation depth (referred to as f'm). The SAM noise acted therefore as a "carrier" stimulus of frequency fm, and sinusoidal modulation of the SAM-noise modulation depth generated two additional components in the modulation spectrum: fm-f'm and fm+f'm. The tracking variable was the modulation depth of the sinusoidal variation applied to the "carrier" modulation depth. The resulting "second-order" temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) measured on four listeners for "carrier" modulation frequencies fm of 16, 64, and 256 Hz display a low-pass segment followed by a plateau. This indicates that sensitivity to fluctuations in the strength of amplitude modulation is best for fluctuation rates f'm below about 2-4 Hz when using broadband noise carriers. Measurements of masked modulation detection thresholds for the lower and upper modulation sideband suggest that this capacity is possibly related to the detection of a beat in the sound's temporal envelope. The results appear qualitatively consistent with the predictions of an envelope detector model consisting of a low-pass filtering stage followed by a decision stage. Unlike listeners' performance, a modulation filterbank model using Q values > or = 2 should predict that second-order modulation detection thresholds should decrease at high values of f'm due to the spectral resolution of the modulation sidebands (in the modulation domain). This suggests that, if such modulation filters do exist, their selectivity is poor. In the latter case, the Q value of modulation filters would have to be less than 2. This estimate of modulation filter selectivity is consistent with the results of a previous study using a modulation-masking paradigm [S. D. Ewert and T. Dau, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1181-1196 (2000)]. PMID:11519571

  9. Genome-Wide Survey and Expression Analysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii U-box E3 Ubiquitin Ligases (CrPUBs) Reveal a Functional Lipid Metabolism Module

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qiulan; Li, Yajun; Wang, Wenquan; Fei, Xiaowen; Deng, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases determine the substrate specificity of ubiquitination. Plant U-box (PUB) E3 ligases, with a typical 70-amino acid U-box domain, participate in plant developmental processes and environmental responses. Thus far, 64 PUB proteins have been identified in Arabidopsis and 77 PUB proteins have been identified in Oryza. However, detailed studies on U-box genes in the model microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are lacking. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the genes encoding U-box family proteins in C. reinhardtii. Following BLASTP analysis, 30 full-length U-box genes were identified in the C. reinhardtii genome sequence. Bioinformatics analyses of CrPUB genes were performed to characterize the phylogenetic relationships, chromosomal locations and gene structures of each member. The 30 identified CrPUB proteins are clustered into 3 distinct subfamilies, and the genes for these proteins are unevenly distributed among 14 chromosomes. Furthermore, the quantitative real-time RT-PCR or semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of 30 CrPUB mRNA abundances under nitrogen starvation showed that 18 CrPUB genes were induced by N starvation and that 7 genes were repressed in the N-poor environment. We selected five CrPUB genes exhibiting marked changes in expression under N-free conditions for further analysis in RNAi experiments and examined the oil content of these gene-silenced transgenic strains. The silencing of CrPUB5 and CrPUB14, which are typically down-regulated under N starvation, induced 9.8%-45.0% and 14.4%-61.8% lipid accumulation, respectively. In contrast, the silencing of CrPUB11, CrPUB23 and CrPUB28, which are markedly up-regulated under N-free conditions, decreased the lipid content by 5.5%-27.8%, 8.1%-27.3% and 6.6%-27.9%, respectively. These results provide a useful reference for the identification and functional analysis of this gene family and fundamental information for microalgae lipid metabolism research. PMID:25822994

  10. Sensitivity of human auditory cortex to rapid frequency modulation revealed by multivariate representational similarity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Joanisse, Marc F.; DeSouza, Diedre D.

    2014-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the extent, magnitude, and pattern of brain activity in response to rapid frequency-modulated sounds. We examined this by manipulating the direction (rise vs. fall) and the rate (fast vs. slow) of the apparent pitch of iterated rippled noise (IRN) bursts. Acoustic parameters were selected to capture features used in phoneme contrasts, however the stimuli themselves were not perceived as speech per se. Participants were scanned as they passively listened to sounds in an event-related paradigm. Univariate analyses revealed a greater level and extent of activation in bilateral auditory cortex in response to frequency-modulated sweeps compared to steady-state sounds. This effect was stronger in the left hemisphere. However, no regions showed selectivity for either rate or direction of frequency modulation. In contrast, multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) revealed feature-specific encoding for direction of modulation in auditory cortex bilaterally. Moreover, this effect was strongest when analyses were restricted to anatomical regions lying outside Heschl's gyrus. We found no support for feature-specific encoding of frequency modulation rate. Differential findings of modulation rate and direction of modulation are discussed with respect to their relevance to phonetic discrimination. PMID:25324713

  11. Network analysis reveals that bacteria and fungi form modules that correlate independently with soil parameters.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Alexandre B; Prendergast-Miller, Miranda T; Richardson, Alan E; Toscas, Peter; Farrell, Mark; Macdonald, Lynne M; Baker, Geoff; Wark, Tim; Thrall, Peter H

    2015-08-01

    Network and multivariate statistical analyses were performed to determine interactions between bacterial and fungal community terminal restriction length polymorphisms as well as soil properties in paired woodland and pasture sites. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed that shifts in woodland community composition correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon, while changes in pasture community composition correlated with moisture, nitrogen and phosphorus. Weighted correlation network analysis detected two distinct microbial modules per land use. Bacterial and fungal ribotypes did not group separately, rather all modules comprised of both bacterial and fungal ribotypes. Woodland modules had a similar fungal?:?bacterial ribotype ratio, while in the pasture, one module was fungal dominated. There was no correspondence between pasture and woodland modules in their ribotype composition. The modules had different relationships to soil variables, and these contrasts were not detected without the use of network analysis. This study demonstrated that fungi and bacteria, components of the soil microbial communities usually treated as separate functional groups as in a CCA approach, were co-correlated and formed distinct associations in these adjacent habitats. Understanding these distinct modular associations may shed more light on their niche space in the soil environment, and allow a more realistic description of soil microbial ecology and function. PMID:25040229

  12. Carrier Modulation Via Waveform Probability Density Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.

    2006-01-01

    Beyond the classic modes of carrier modulation by varying amplitude (AM), phase (PM), or frequency (FM), we extend the modulation domain of an analog carrier signal to include a class of general modulations which are distinguished by their probability density function histogram. Separate waveform states are easily created by varying the pdf of the transmitted waveform. Individual waveform states are assignable as proxies for digital one's or zero's. At the receiver, these states are easily detected by accumulating sampled waveform statistics and performing periodic pattern matching, correlation, or statistical filtering. No fundamental physical laws are broken in the detection process. We show how a typical modulation scheme would work in the digital domain and suggest how to build an analog version. We propose that clever variations of the modulating waveform (and thus the histogram) can provide simple steganographic encoding.

  13. A Walsh Function Module Users' Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) with Walsh functions offers new opportunities to simulate many challenging problems in mathematical physics. The approach was developed to better simulate hypersonic flows with shocks on unstructured grids. It is unique in that integrals and derivatives are computed using simple matrix multiplication of series representations of functions without the need for divided differences. The product of any two Walsh functions is another Walsh function - a feature that radically changes an algorithm for solving PDEs. A FORTRAN module for supporting Walsh function simulations is documented. A FORTRAN code is also documented with options for solving time-dependent problems: an advection equation, a Burgers equation, and a Riemann problem. The sample problems demonstrate the usage of the Walsh function module including such features as operator overloading, Fast Walsh Transforms in multi-dimensions, and a Fast Walsh reciprocal.

  14. Caffeine Modulates Attention Network Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Lieberman, Harris R.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigated the effects of caffeine (0 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg) on a flanker task designed to test Posner's three visual attention network functions: alerting, orienting, and executive control [Posner, M. I. (2004). "Cognitive neuroscience of attention". New York, NY: Guilford Press]. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind…

  15. Nucleosome competition reveals processive acetylation by the SAGA HAT module

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Alison E.; Cieniewicz, Anne M.; Taverna, Sean D.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    The Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) coactivator complex hyperacetylates histone tails in vivo in a manner that depends upon histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), a histone mark enriched at promoters of actively transcribed genes. SAGA contains a separable subcomplex known as the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) module that contains the HAT, Gcn5, bound to Sgf29, Ada2, and Ada3. Sgf29 contains a tandem Tudor domain that recognizes H3K4me3-containing peptides and is required for histone hyperacetylation in vivo. However, the mechanism by which H3K4me3 recognition leads to lysine hyperacetylation is unknown, as in vitro studies show no effect of the H3K4me3 modification on histone peptide acetylation by Gcn5. To determine how H3K4me3 binding by Sgf29 leads to histone hyperacetylation by Gcn5, we used differential fluorescent labeling of histones to monitor acetylation of individual subpopulations of methylated and unmodified nucleosomes in a mixture. We find that the SAGA HAT module preferentially acetylates H3K4me3 nucleosomes in a mixture containing excess unmodified nucleosomes and that this effect requires the Tudor domain of Sgf29. The H3K4me3 mark promotes processive, multisite acetylation of histone H3 by Gcn5 that can account for the different acetylation patterns established by SAGA at promoters versus coding regions. Our results establish a model for Sgf29 function at gene promoters and define a mechanism governing crosstalk between histone modifications. PMID:26401015

  16. Discovery of Novel Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Reveals Chemical and Functional Diversity and In Vivo Activity in Rat Behavioral Models of Anxiolytic and Antipsychotic ActivityS?

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alice L.; Grier, Mark D.; Jones, Carrie K.; Herman, Elizabeth J.; Kane, Alexander S.; Smith, Randy L.; Williams, Richard; Zhou, Ya; Marlo, Joy E.; Days, Emily L.; Blatt, Tasha N.; Jadhav, Satyawan; Menon, Usha N.; Vinson, Paige N.; Rook, Jerri M.; Stauffer, Shaun R.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Weaver, C. David

    2010-01-01

    Modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) may provide novel treatments for multiple central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including anxiety and schizophrenia. Although compounds have been developed to better understand the physiological roles of mGluR5 and potential usefulness for the treatment of these disorders, there are limitations in the tools available, including poor selectivity, low potency, and limited solubility. To address these issues, we developed an innovative assay that allows simultaneous screening for mGluR5 agonists, antagonists, and potentiators. We identified multiple scaffolds that possess diverse modes of activity at mGluR5, including both positive and negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively). 3-Fluoro-5-(3-(pyridine-2-yl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)benzonitrile (VU0285683) was developed as a novel selective mGluR5 NAM with high affinity for the 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP) binding site. VU0285683 had anxiolytic-like activity in two rodent models for anxiety but did not potentiate phencyclidine-induced hyperlocomotor activity. (4-Hydroxypiperidin-1-yl)(4-phenylethynyl)phenyl)methanone (VU0092273) was identified as a novel mGluR5 PAM that also binds to the MPEP site. VU0092273 was chemically optimized to an orally active analog, N-cyclobutyl-6-((3-fluorophenyl)ethynyl)nicotinamide hydrochloride (VU0360172), which is selective for mGluR5. This novel mGluR5 PAM produced a dose-dependent reversal of amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion, a rodent model predictive of antipsychotic activity. Discovery of structurally and functionally diverse allosteric modulators of mGluR5 that demonstrate in vivo efficacy in rodent models of anxiety and antipsychotic activity provide further support for the tremendous diversity of chemical scaffolds and modes of efficacy of mGluR5 ligands. In addition, these studies provide strong support for the hypothesis that multiple structurally distinct mGluR5 modulators have robust activity in animal models that predict efficacy in the treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:20923853

  17. Electrical neuroimaging reveals early generator modulation to emotional words.

    PubMed

    Ortigue, Stephanie; Michel, Christoph M; Murray, Micah M; Mohr, Christine; Carbonnel, Serge; Landis, Theodor

    2004-04-01

    Functional electrical neuroimaging investigated incidental emotional word processing. Previous research suggests that the brain may differentially respond to the emotional content of linguistic stimuli pre-lexically (i.e., before distinguishing that these stimuli are words). We investigated the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms of this apparent paradox and in particular whether the initial differentiation of emotional stimuli is marked by different brain generator configurations using high-density, event-related potentials. Such would support the existence of specific cerebral resources dedicated to emotional word processing. A related issue concerns the possibility of right-hemispheric specialization in the processing of emotional stimuli. Thirteen healthy men performed a go/no-go lexical decision task with bilateral word/non-word or non-word/non-word stimulus pairs. Words included equal numbers of neutral and emotional stimuli, but subjects made no explicit discrimination along this dimension. Emotional words appearing in the right visual field (ERVF) yielded the best overall performance, although the difference between emotional and neutral words was larger for left than for right visual field presentations. Electrophysiologically, ERVF presentations were distinguished from all other conditions over the 100-140 ms period by a distinct scalp topography, indicative of different intracranial generator configurations. A distributed linear source estimation (LAURA) of this distinct scalp potential field revealed bilateral lateral-occipital sources with a right hemisphere current density maximum. These data support the existence of a specialized brain network triggered by the emotional connotation of words at a very early processing stage. PMID:15050552

  18. Calmodulin Oxidation and Methionine to Glutamine Substitutions Reveal Methionine Residues Critical for Functional Interaction with

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    Calmodulin Oxidation and Methionine to Glutamine Substitutions Reveal Methionine Residues Critical residues abolished functional interac- tions of CaM with RyR1. Incomplete CaM oxidation, af- fecting 5­8 Met residues, increased the CaM concentra- tion required to modulate RyR1, having a greater effect

  19. Noise modulation function of a nonlinear amplitron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dergaus, V. I.

    1982-01-01

    A noise modulation function is derived for a nonlinear microwave amplitron amplifier. The function characterizes the parasitic modulation of signal amplitude and phase and, along with other parameters, determines signal transmission through a nonlinear amplitron amplifier. Coefficients of the function can be used to estimate the modulating noise and to choose optimal parameters for the amplifier.

  20. Hierarchical structure and modules in the Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory network revealed by a new top-down approach

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hong-Wu; Buer, Jan; Zeng, An-Ping

    2004-01-01

    Background Cellular functions are coordinately carried out by groups of genes forming functional modules. Identifying such modules in the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) of organisms is important for understanding the structure and function of these fundamental cellular networks and essential for the emerging modular biology. So far, the global connectivity structure of TRN has not been well studied and consequently not applied for the identification of functional modules. Moreover, network motifs such as feed forward loop are recently proposed to be basic building blocks of TRN. However, their relationship to functional modules is not clear. Results In this work we proposed a top-down approach to identify modules in the TRN of E. coli. By studying the global connectivity structure of the regulatory network, we first revealed a five-layer hierarchical structure in which all the regulatory relationships are downward. Based on this regulatory hierarchy, we developed a new method to decompose the regulatory network into functional modules and to identify global regulators governing multiple modules. As a result, 10 global regulators and 39 modules were identified and shown to have well defined functions. We then investigated the distribution and composition of the two basic network motifs (feed forward loop and bi-fan motif) in the hierarchical structure of TRN. We found that most of these network motifs include global regulators, indicating that these motifs are not basic building blocks of modules since modules should not contain global regulators. Conclusion The transcriptional regulatory network of E. coli possesses a multi-layer hierarchical modular structure without feedback regulation at transcription level. This hierarchical structure builds the basis for a new and simple decomposition method which is suitable for the identification of functional modules and global regulators in the transcriptional regulatory network of E. coli. Analysis of the distribution of feed forward loops and bi-fan motifs in the hierarchical structure suggests that these network motifs are not elementary building blocks of functional modules in the transcriptional regulatory network of E. coli. PMID:15603590

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Functional metagenomics reveals diverse

    E-print Network

    Handelsman, Jo

    to combat antibiotic resis- tance in human pathogens. Owing to its complex microbial community, the soil in the absence of selective pressure imposed by anthropogenic activity, the soil microbial community.2008.86; published online 9 October 2008 Subject Category: microbial ecology and functional diversity

  2. Modulating Brain Oscillations to Drive Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Thut, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Do neuronal oscillations play a causal role in brain function? In a study in this issue of PLOS Biology, Helfrich and colleagues address this long-standing question by attempting to drive brain oscillations using transcranial electrical current stimulation. Remarkably, they were able to manipulate visual perception by forcing brain oscillations of the left and right visual hemispheres into synchrony using oscillatory currents over both hemispheres. Under this condition, human observers more often perceived an inherently ambiguous visual stimulus in one of its perceptual instantiations. These findings shed light on the mechanisms underlying neuronal computation. They show that it is the neuronal oscillations that drive the visual experience, not the experience driving the oscillations. And they indicate that synchronized oscillatory activity groups brain areas into functional networks. This points to new ways for controlled experimental and possibly also clinical interventions for the study and modulation of brain oscillations and associated functions. PMID:25549340

  3. Modulation of granulocyte functions by bacterial exotoxin and endotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Bremm, K D; König, W; Thelestam, M; Alouf, J E

    1987-01-01

    The modulation of granulocyte functions by bacterial exotoxins (Streptolysin O, alveolysin, theta toxin) and endotoxins from salmonella and lipid A is described here. Incubation of polymorphonuclear granulocytes with thiol-activated toxins resulted in an increased leukotriene generation. Toxin-pretreated PMNs revealed an increased omega oxidation of LTB4, which may explain why toxin-stimulated cells release more LTC4 than LTB4. Furthermore, toxin-pretreated PMNs showed a decreased leukotriene generation on subsequent stimulation with the Ca-ionophore A 23187 or opsonized zymosan. PMID:2889665

  4. Modulation Based on Probability Density Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.

    2009-01-01

    A proposed method of modulating a sinusoidal carrier signal to convey digital information involves the use of histograms representing probability density functions (PDFs) that characterize samples of the signal waveform. The method is based partly on the observation that when a waveform is sampled (whether by analog or digital means) over a time interval at least as long as one half cycle of the waveform, the samples can be sorted by frequency of occurrence, thereby constructing a histogram representing a PDF of the waveform during that time interval.

  5. Functionalized carbon nanotubes for probing and modulating molecular functions.

    PubMed

    Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Kostarelos, Kostas; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto

    2010-02-26

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) entered the domain of biological research a few years ago, creating a significant amount of interest due to their extraordinary physicochemical properties. The integration of CNT-based strategies with biology necessitates a multidisciplinary approach that requires competences in the diverse fields of chemistry, physics, and life sciences. In the biomedical domain CNTs are extensively explored as novel drug delivery systems for therapy and diagnosis. Additionally, CNTs can also be designed as new tools for modulation of molecular functions, by directly affecting various biological processes or by interaction with bioactive molecules. The aim of this review is to discuss how CNTs can be exploited as new probes for molecular functions. The different sections illustrate various applications of CNTs, including gene silencing, surface cell interactions via glycoproteins, biosensing, intracellular drug delivery using an atomic force microscopy tip-based nanoinjector, modulation of antibody/antigen interaction and enzyme activity, and blocking of ion channels. PMID:20189101

  6. Revealing neuronal function through microelectrode array recordings

    PubMed Central

    Obien, Marie Engelene J.; Deligkaris, Kosmas; Bullmann, Torsten; Bakkum, Douglas J.; Frey, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays and microprobes have been widely utilized to measure neuronal activity, both in vitro and in vivo. The key advantage is the capability to record and stimulate neurons at multiple sites simultaneously. However, unlike the single-cell or single-channel resolution of intracellular recording, microelectrodes detect signals from all possible sources around every sensor. Here, we review the current understanding of microelectrode signals and the techniques for analyzing them. We introduce the ongoing advancements in microelectrode technology, with focus on achieving higher resolution and quality of recordings by means of monolithic integration with on-chip circuitry. We show how recent advanced microelectrode array measurement methods facilitate the understanding of single neurons as well as network function. PMID:25610364

  7. Protein complexes and functional modules in molecular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirin, Victor; Mirny, Leonid A.

    2003-10-01

    Proteins, nucleic acids, and small molecules form a dense network of molecular interactions in a cell. Molecules are nodes of this network, and the interactions between them are edges. The architecture of molecular networks can reveal important principles of cellular organization and function, similarly to the way that protein structure tells us about the function and organization of a protein. Computational analysis of molecular networks has been primarily concerned with node degree [Wagner, A. & Fell, D. A. (2001) Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. B 268, 1803-1810; Jeong, H., Tombor, B., Albert, R., Oltvai, Z. N. & Barabasi, A. L. (2000) Nature 407, 651-654] or degree correlation [Maslov, S. & Sneppen, K. (2002) Science 296, 910-913], and hence focused on single/two-body properties of these networks. Here, by analyzing the multibody structure of the network of protein-protein interactions, we discovered molecular modules that are densely connected within themselves but sparsely connected with the rest of the network. Comparison with experimental data and functional annotation of genes showed two types of modules: (i) protein complexes (splicing machinery, transcription factors, etc.) and (ii) dynamic functional units (signaling cascades, cell-cycle regulation, etc.). Discovered modules are highly statistically significant, as is evident from comparison with random graphs, and are robust to noise in the data. Our results provide strong support for the network modularity principle introduced by Hartwell et al. [Hartwell, L. H., Hopfield, J. J., Leibler, S. & Murray, A. W. (1999) Nature 402, C47-C52], suggesting that found modules constitute the "building blocks" of molecular networks.

  8. Madagascar corals reveal Pacific multidecadal modulation of rainfall since 1708

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, C. A.; Zinke, J.; Peeters, F.; Park, W.; Scheufen, T.; Kasper, S.; Randriamanantsoa, B.; McCulloch, M. T.; Brummer, G.-J. A.

    2012-03-01

    The Pacific Ocean modulates Australian and North American rainfall variability on multidecadal timescales, in concert with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). It has been suggested that Pacific decadal variability may also influence Indian Ocean surface temperature and rainfall in a far-field response, similar to the El Nińo Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on interannual timescales. However, instrumental records of rainfall are too short and too sparse to confidently assess such multidecadal climatic teleconnections. Here, we present four climate archives spanning the past 300 yr from giant Madagascar corals. We decouple 20th century human deforestation effects from rainfall induced soil erosion using spectral luminescence scanning and geochemistry. The corals provide the first evidence for Pacific decadal modulation of rainfall over the Western Indian Ocean. We find that positive PDO phases are associated with increased Indian Ocean temperatures and rainfall in Eastern Madagascar, while precipitation in Southern Africa and Eastern Australia declines. Consequently, the negative PDO phase that started in 1998 should lead to reduced rainfall over Eastern Madagascar and increased precipitation in Southern Africa and Eastern Australia. We conclude that the PDO has important implications for future multidecadal variability of African rainfall, where water resource management is increasingly important under the warming climate.

  9. Functional Association of Catalytic and Ancillary Modules Dictates Enzymatic Activity in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 43 ?-Xylosidase*

    PubMed Central

    Moraďs, Sarah; Salama-Alber, Orly; Barak, Yoav; Hadar, Yitzhak; Wilson, David B.; Lamed, Raphael; Shoham, Yuval; Bayer, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    ?-Xylosidases are hemicellulases that hydrolyze short xylo-oligosaccharides into xylose units, thus complementing endoxylanase degradation of the hemicellulose component of lignocellulosic substrates. Here, we describe the cloning, characterization, and kinetic analysis of a glycoside hydrolase family 43 ?-xylosidase (Xyl43A) from the aerobic cellulolytic bacterium, Thermobifida fusca. Temperature and pH optima of 55–60 °C and 5.5–6, respectively, were determined. The apparent Km value was 0.55 mm, using p-nitrophenyl xylopyranoside as substrate, and the catalytic constant (kcat) was 6.72 s?1. T. fusca Xyl43A contains a catalytic module at the N terminus and an ancillary module (termed herein as Module-A) of undefined function at the C terminus. We expressed the two recombinant modules independently in Escherichia coli and examined their remaining catalytic activity and binding properties. The separation of the two Xyl43A modules caused the complete loss of enzymatic activity, whereas potent binding to xylan was fully maintained in the catalytic module and partially in the ancillary Module-A. Nondenaturing gel electrophoresis revealed a specific noncovalent coupling of the two modules, thereby restoring enzymatic activity to 66.7% (relative to the wild-type enzyme). Module-A contributes a phenylalanine residue that functions as an essential part of the active site, and the two juxtaposed modules function as a single functional entity. PMID:22270362

  10. Fold modulating function: bacterial toxins to functional amyloids

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Adnan K.; Boles, Blaise R.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria produce cytolytic toxins that target host cells or other competing microbes. It is well known that environmental factors control toxin expression, however, recent work suggests that some bacteria manipulate the fold of these protein toxins to control their function. The ?-sheet rich amyloid fold is a highly stable ordered aggregate that many toxins form in response to specific environmental conditions. When in the amyloid state, toxins become inert, losing the cytolytic activity they display in the soluble form. Emerging evidence suggest that some amyloids function as toxin storage systems until they are again needed, while other bacteria utilize amyloids as a structural matrix component of biofilms. This amyloid matrix component facilitates resistance to biofilm disruptive challenges. The bacterial amyloids discussed in this review reveal an elegant system where changes in protein fold and solubility dictate the function of proteins in response to the environment. PMID:25136340

  11. Interaural attention modulates outer hair cell function

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sridhar; Keil, Andreas; Stratis, Kyle; Osborne, A. Fletcher; Cerwonka, Colin; Wong, Jennifer; Rieger, Brenda L.; Polcz, Valerie; Smith, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that auditory attention tasks may modulate the sensitivity of the cochlea by way of the corticofugal and the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent pathways. Here, we studied the extent to which a separate efferent tract, the “uncrossed” MOC, which functionally connects the two ears, mediates inter-aural selective attention. We compared distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) in one ear to binaurally-presented primaries, using an intermodal target detection task in which participants were instructed to report the occurrence of brief target events (visual changes, tones). Three tasks were compared under identical physical stimulation: (1) report brief tones in the ear in which DPOAE responses were recorded; (2) report brief tones presented to the contralateral, non-recorded ear; (3) report brief phase shifts of a visual grating at fixation. Effects of attention were observed as parallel shifts in overall DPOAE contour level, with DPOAEs relatively higher in overall level when subjects ignored the auditory stimuli and attended to the visual stimulus, compared with both of the auditory-attending conditions. Importantly, DPOAE levels were statistically lowest when attention was directed to the ipsilateral ear in which the DPOAE recordings were made. These data corroborate notions that top-down mechanisms, via the corticofugal and medial efferent pathways, mediate cochlear responses during intermodal attention. New findings show attending to one ear can significantly alter the physiological response of the contralateral, unattended ear, likely through the uncrossed-medial olivocochlear efferent fibers connecting the two ears. PMID:25302959

  12. Modulation transfer function measurement using nonspecific views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvit, Jean-Marc; Leger, Dominique; Roques, Sylvie; Valorge, Christophe

    2003-03-01

    The measurement of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) to quantify the quality of an imaging system proves to be very important in the context of Earth observation satellites. In particular, this measurement is essential to carry out the focusing of the telescope, or to implement a deconvolution filter whose goal is to enhance the image contrast or to reduce the noise. Its knowledge also allows us to compare the characteristics of different known and unknown satellites. In this paper, we suggest an univariant MTF measurement method using non specific views. First of all, the landscape has to be characterized in order to discriminate ground structure information from MTF information. Once this separation is carried out, landscape structure information can be extracted, allowing a classification between very uniform scenes and more structured ones. Then the MTF, which is described by a bidimensional analytical physical model, can be assessed using an artificial neural network. The principle is to use the artificial neural network to learn the MTF of simulated or perfectly known images, and then to use it to assess the MTF of totally unknown images. One can show that this method is robust even if the noise is taken into account. As a result, maximum MTF assessment errors are less than 10%. This enables us to suggest further developments including a general scheme of criteria assessment of image quality.

  13. Interaural attention modulates outer hair cell function.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sridhar; Keil, Andreas; Stratis, Kyle; Osborne, Aaron F; Cerwonka, Colin; Wong, Jennifer; Rieger, Brenda L; Polcz, Valerie; Smith, David W

    2014-12-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that auditory attention tasks may modulate the sensitivity of the cochlea by way of the corticofugal and the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent pathways. Here, we studied the extent to which a separate efferent tract, the 'uncrossed' MOC, which functionally connects the two ears, mediates inter-aural selective attention. We compared distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) in one ear with binaurally presented primaries, using an intermodal target detection task in which participants were instructed to report the occurrence of brief target events (visual changes, tones). Three tasks were compared under identical physical stimulation: (i) report brief tones in the ear in which DPOAE responses were recorded; (ii) report brief tones presented to the contralateral, non-recorded ear; and (iii) report brief phase shifts of a visual grating at fixation. Effects of attention were observed as parallel shifts in overall DPOAE contour level, with DPOAEs relatively higher in overall level when subjects ignored the auditory stimuli and attended to the visual stimulus, compared with both of the auditory-attending conditions. Importantly, DPOAE levels were statistically lowest when attention was directed to the ipsilateral ear in which the DPOAE recordings were made. These data corroborate notions that top-down mechanisms, via the corticofugal and medial efferent pathways, mediate cochlear responses during intermodal attention. New findings show attending to one ear can significantly alter the physiological response of the contralateral, unattended ear, probably through the uncrossed-medial olivocochlear efferent fibers connecting the two ears. PMID:25302959

  14. Revealing conformational substates of lipidated N-Ras protein by pressure modulation

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Shobhna; Triola, Gemma; Vetter, Ingrid R.; Erlkamp, Mirko; Waldmann, Herbert; Winter, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of protein function is often linked to a conformational switch triggered by chemical or physical signals. To evaluate such conformational changes and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of subsequent protein function, experimental identification of conformational substates and characterization of conformational equilibria are mandatory. We apply pressure modulation in combination with FTIR spectroscopy to reveal equilibria between spectroscopically resolved substates of the lipidated signaling protein N-Ras. Pressure has the advantage that its thermodynamic conjugate is volume, a parameter that is directly related to structure. The conformational dynamics of N-Ras in its different nucleotide binding states in the absence and presence of a model biomembrane was probed by pressure perturbation. We show that not only nucleotide binding but also the presence of the membrane has a drastic effect on the conformational dynamics and selection of conformational substates of the protein, and a new substate appearing upon membrane binding could be uncovered. Population of this new substate is accompanied by structural reorientations of the G domain, as also indicated by complementary ATR-FTIR and IRRAS measurements. These findings thus illustrate that the membrane controls signaling conformations by acting as an effective interaction partner, which has consequences for the G-domain orientation of membrane-associated N-Ras, which in turn is known to be critical for its effector and modulator interactions. Finally, these results provide insights into the influence of pressure on Ras-controlled signaling events in organisms living under extreme environmental conditions as they are encountered in the deep sea where pressures reach the kbar range. PMID:22203965

  15. Modulation of erosion on steep granitic slopes by boulder armoring, as revealed by cosmogenic 26

    E-print Network

    Kirchner, James W.

    Modulation of erosion on steep granitic slopes by boulder armoring, as revealed by cosmogenic 26 Al Fort Sage Mountains confirm that exposed granitic bedrock and boulders erode more slowly than; granitic rocks; weathering; boulders 1. Introduction Soil cover has long been recognized as impor- tant

  16. Key herbivores reveal limited functional redundancy on inshore coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, C. L.; van de Leemput, I. A.; Depczynski, M.; Hoey, A. S.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Marine ecosystems are facing increasing exposure to a range of stressors and declines in critical ecological functions. The likelihood of further loss of functions and resilience is dependent, in part, on the extent of functional redundancy (i.e. the capacity of one species to functionally compensate for the loss of another species) within critical functional groups. We used multiple metrics; species richness, generic richness, abundance and reserve capacity (i.e. the relative number of individuals available to fulfil the function if the numerically dominant species is lost), as indicators to assess the potential functional redundancy of four functional groups of herbivorous fishes (browsers, excavators, grazers and scrapers) in two of the worlds' most intact coral reef ecosystems: the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia. We found marked variations in potential redundancy among habitats within each reef system and functional groups. Despite negligible fishing of herbivorous fishes, coastal habitats in both reef systems had lower functional redundancy compared to offshore locations for all herbivorous fishes collectively and the four functional groups independently. This pattern was consistent in all four indicators of redundancy. The potential vulnerability of these coastal habitats is highlighted by recent shifts from coral to macroalgal dominance on several coastal reefs of the GBR. Our approach provides a simple yet revealing evaluation of potential functional redundancy. Moreover, it highlights the spatial variation in potential vulnerability and resilience of reef systems.

  17. Pharmacologic modulation of experimental postischemic hepatic function.

    PubMed Central

    Ontell, S J; Makowka, L; Trager, J; Mazzaferro, V; Ove, P; Starzl, T E

    1989-01-01

    The present study evaluated and compared the effects of SRI 63-441, a potent platelet activating factor antagonist, superoxide dismutase (SOD), an oxygen free radical scavenger, and ibuprofen, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor on hepatic function after 90 minutes of warm ischemia. After warm ischemia, livers were harvested and underwent 90 minutes of warm, oxygenated, sanguinous perfusion on an isolated liver perfusion apparatus. Pretreatment of donor animals with 20 mg/kg intravenous (I.V.) SRI 63-441 5 minutes before induction of total hepatic ischemia resulted in significantly increased bile production, a significant decrease in transaminase release, and a higher tissue adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content when compared with ischemic nontreated controls. SOD resulted in improved bile production and decreased transaminase liberation only when present in the perfusate at the time of in vitro reperfusion. Ibuprofen did not improve postischemic hepatic function in this model. Electron microscopy revealed patchy hepatocellular vacuolization with an intact sinusoidal endothelium in all ischemic livers. However, the degree of damage was less severe in the livers from those rats pretreated with 20 mg/kg SRI 63-441. This study demonstrates that SRI 63-441 pretreatment significantly reduces hepatic warm ischemic injury, and in the present model, appears superior to two other agents that have been advanced in the treatment of ischemic injury. The use of such agents singly or in combinations have important implications as regards gaining a better understanding of the basic mechanisms in organ ischemia, and moreover, for therapeutic applications in organ ischemia and preservation. Images Fig. 3. Figs. 6A-C. Figs. 6A-C. Fig. 7. Figs. 8A-C. Figs. 8A-C. PMID:2916864

  18. Modulation of ? power and functional connectivity during facial affect recognition.

    PubMed

    Popov, Tzvetan; Miller, Gregory A; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Weisz, Nathan

    2013-04-01

    Research has linked oscillatory activity in the ? frequency range, particularly in sensorimotor cortex, to processing of social actions. Results further suggest involvement of sensorimotor ? in the processing of facial expressions, including affect. The sensorimotor face area may be critical for perception of emotional face expression, but the role it plays is unclear. The present study sought to clarify how oscillatory brain activity contributes to or reflects processing of facial affect during changes in facial expression. Neuromagnetic oscillatory brain activity was monitored while 30 volunteers viewed videos of human faces that changed their expression from neutral to fearful, neutral, or happy expressions. Induced changes in ? power during the different morphs, source analysis, and graph-theoretic metrics served to identify the role of ? power modulation and cross-regional coupling by means of phase synchrony during facial affect recognition. Changes from neutral to emotional faces were associated with a 10-15 Hz power increase localized in bilateral sensorimotor areas, together with occipital power decrease, preceding reported emotional expression recognition. Graph-theoretic analysis revealed that, in the course of a trial, the balance between sensorimotor power increase and decrease was associated with decreased and increased transregional connectedness as measured by node degree. Results suggest that modulations in ? power facilitate early registration, with sensorimotor cortex including the sensorimotor face area largely functionally decoupled and thereby protected from additional, disruptive input and that subsequent ? power decrease together with increased connectedness of sensorimotor areas facilitates successful facial affect recognition. PMID:23554483

  19. Managing your Event Module: Registrar Functions, Participants and Reporting

    E-print Network

    Jurafsky, Daniel

    #12;Managing your Event Module: Registrar Functions, Participants and Reporting Table of Contents have paid via cash or check are part of the event manager's responsibilities. If your club has set up have been given access to the event module can manage any of their group's events. They do not have

  20. Modeling development and quantitative trait mapping reveal independent genetic modules for leaf size and shape.

    PubMed

    Baker, Robert L; Leong, Wen Fung; Brock, Marcus T; Markelz, R J Cody; Covington, Michael F; Devisetty, Upendra K; Edwards, Christine E; Maloof, Julin; Welch, Stephen; Weinig, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    Improved predictions of fitness and yield may be obtained by characterizing the genetic controls and environmental dependencies of organismal ontogeny. Elucidating the shape of growth curves may reveal novel genetic controls that single-time-point (STP) analyses do not because, in theory, infinite numbers of growth curves can result in the same final measurement. We measured leaf lengths and widths in Brassica rapa recombinant inbred lines (RILs) throughout ontogeny. We modeled leaf growth and allometry as function valued traits (FVT), and examined genetic correlations between these traits and aspects of phenology, physiology, circadian rhythms and fitness. We used RNA-seq to construct a SNP linkage map and mapped trait quantitative trait loci (QTL). We found genetic trade-offs between leaf size and growth rate FVT and uncovered differences in genotypic and QTL correlations involving FVT vs STPs. We identified leaf shape (allometry) as a genetic module independent of length and width and identified selection on FVT parameters of development. Leaf shape is associated with venation features that affect desiccation resistance. The genetic independence of leaf shape from other leaf traits may therefore enable crop optimization in leaf shape without negative effects on traits such as size, growth rate, duration or gas exchange. PMID:26083847

  1. Ferrocene Functionalized Endocrine Modulators as Anticancer Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillard, Elizabeth A.; Vessičres, Anne; Jaouen, Gerard

    We present here some of our studies on the synthesis and behaviour of ferrocenyl selective endocrine receptor modulators against cancer cells, particularly breast and prostate cancers. The proliferative/anti-proliferative effects of compounds based on steroidal and non-steroidal endocrine modulators have been extensively explored in vitro. Structure-activity relationship studies of such molecules, particularly the hydroxyferrocifens and ferrocene phenols, have shown the effect of (1) the presence and the length of the N,N-dimethylamino side chain, (2) the presence and position of the phenol group, (3) the role of the ferrocenyl moiety, (4) that of conjugation, (5) phenyl functionalisation and (6) the placement of the phenyl group. Compounds possessing a ferrocene moiety linked to a p-phenol by a conjugated ?-system are among the most potent of the series, with IC50 values ranging from 0.090 to 0.6µM on hormone independent breast cancer cells. Based on the SAR data and electrochemical studies, we have proposed an original mechanism to explain the unusual behaviour of these bioorganometallic species and coin the term "kronatropic" to qualify this effect, involving ROS production and bio-oxidation. In addition, the importance of formulation is underlined. We also discuss the behaviour of ferrocenyl androgens and anti-androgens for possible use against prostate cancers. In sum, ferrocene has proven to be a fascinating substituent due to its vast potential for oncology.

  2. Modulation of the intrinsic helix propensity of an intrinsically disordered protein reveals long-range helix-helix interactions.

    PubMed

    Iešmantavi?ius, Vytautas; Jensen, Malene Ringkjřbing; Ozenne, Valéry; Blackledge, Martin; Poulsen, Flemming M; Kjaergaard, Magnus

    2013-07-10

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are widespread and important in biology but defy the classical protein structure-function paradigm by being functional in the absence of a stable, folded conformation. Here we investigate the coupling between transient secondary and tertiary structure in the protein activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptors (ACTR) by rationally modulating the helical propensity of a partially formed ?-helix via mutations. Eight mutations predicted to affect the population of a transient helix were produced and investigated by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shift changes distant to the mutation site are observed in regions containing other transient helices indicating that distant helices are stabilized through long-range hydrophobic helix-helix interactions and demonstrating the coupling of transient secondary and tertiary structure. The long-range structure of ACTR is also probed using paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PRE) and residual dipolar couplings, which reveal an additional long-range contact between the N- and C-terminal segments. Compared to residual dipolar couplings and PRE, modulation of the helical propensity by mutagenesis thus reveals a different set of long-range interactions that may be obscured by stronger interactions that dominate other NMR measurements. This approach thus offers a complementary and generally applicable strategy for probing long-range structure in disordered proteins. PMID:23758617

  3. Developmental modulation of Fab-7 boundary function.

    PubMed

    Schweinsberg, Susan E; Schedl, Paul

    2004-10-01

    The Fab-7 boundary functions to ensure the autonomous activity of the iab-6 and iab-7 cis-regulatory domains in the Drosophila Bithorax Complex from early embryogenesis through to the adult stage. Although Fab-7 is required only for the proper development of a single posterior parasegment, it is active in all tissues and stages of development that have been examined. In this respect, Fab-7 resembles conventional constitutive boundaries in flies and other eukaryotes that act through ubiquitous cis-elements and trans-acting factors. Surprisingly, however, we find that the constitutive activity of Fab-7 is generated by combining sub-elements with developmentally restricted boundary function. We provide in vivo evidence that the Fab-7 boundary contains separable regions that function at different stages of development. These findings suggest that the units (domains) of genetic regulation that boundaries delimit can expand or contract by switching insulator function off or on in a temporally regulated fashion. PMID:15329342

  4. Endothelial microparticles: Sophisticated vesicles modulating vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Anne M; Edelberg, Jay; Jonas, Rebecca; Rogers, Wade T; Moore, Jonni S; Syed, Wajihuddin; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles (EMPs) belong to a family of extracellular vesicles that are dynamic, mobile, biological effectors capable of mediating vascular physiology and function. The release of EMPs can impart autocrine and paracrine effects on target cells through surface interaction, cellular fusion, and, possibly, the delivery of intra-vesicular cargo. A greater understanding of the formation, composition, and function of EMPs will broaden our understanding of endothelial communication and may expose new pathways amenable for therapeutic manipulation. PMID:23892447

  5. A Genome-Wide Screen Reveals that the Vibrio cholerae Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Modulates Virulence Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiyao; Millet, Yves A; Chao, Michael C; Sasabe, Jumpei; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2015-09-01

    Diverse environmental stimuli and a complex network of regulatory factors are known to modulate expression of Vibrio cholerae's principal virulence factors. However, there is relatively little known about how metabolic factors impinge upon the pathogen's well-characterized cascade of transcription factors that induce expression of cholera toxin and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). Here, we used a transposon insertion site (TIS) sequencing-based strategy to identify new factors required for expression of tcpA, which encodes the major subunit of TCP, the organism's chief intestinal colonization factor. Besides identifying most of the genes known to modulate tcpA expression, the screen yielded ptsI and ptsH, which encode the enzyme I (EI) and Hpr components of the V. cholerae phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS). In addition to reduced expression of TcpA, strains lacking EI, Hpr, or the associated EIIA(Glc) protein produced less cholera toxin (CT) and had a diminished capacity to colonize the infant mouse intestine. The PTS modulates virulence gene expression by regulating expression of tcpPH and aphAB, which themselves control expression of toxT, the central activator of virulence gene expression. One mechanism by which PTS promotes virulence gene expression appears to be by modulating the amounts of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP). Our findings reveal that the V. cholerae PTS is an additional modulator of the ToxT regulon and demonstrate the potency of loss-of-function TIS sequencing screens for defining regulatory networks. PMID:26056384

  6. Proteomic profiling reveals insights into Triticeae stigma development and function

    PubMed Central

    Nazemof, Nazila; Couroux, Philippe; Rampitsch, Christof; Xing, Tim; Robert, Laurian S.

    2014-01-01

    To our knowledge, this study represents the first high-throughput characterization of a stigma proteome in the Triticeae. A total of 2184 triticale mature stigma proteins were identified using three different gel-based approaches combined with mass spectrometry. The great majority of these proteins are described in a Triticeae stigma for the first time. These results revealed many proteins likely to play important roles in stigma development and pollen–stigma interactions, as well as protection against biotic and abiotic stresses. Quantitative comparison of the triticale stigma transcriptome and proteome showed poor correlation, highlighting the importance of having both types of analysis. This work makes a significant contribution towards the elucidation of the Triticeae stigma proteome and provides novel insights into its role in stigma development and function. PMID:25170101

  7. Proteomic profiling reveals insights into Triticeae stigma development and function.

    PubMed

    Nazemof, Nazila; Couroux, Philippe; Rampitsch, Christof; Xing, Tim; Robert, Laurian S

    2014-11-01

    To our knowledge, this study represents the first high-throughput characterization of a stigma proteome in the Triticeae. A total of 2184 triticale mature stigma proteins were identified using three different gel-based approaches combined with mass spectrometry. The great majority of these proteins are described in a Triticeae stigma for the first time. These results revealed many proteins likely to play important roles in stigma development and pollen-stigma interactions, as well as protection against biotic and abiotic stresses. Quantitative comparison of the triticale stigma transcriptome and proteome showed poor correlation, highlighting the importance of having both types of analysis. This work makes a significant contribution towards the elucidation of the Triticeae stigma proteome and provides novel insights into its role in stigma development and function. PMID:25170101

  8. Measurement and comparison of modulation transfer function and signal transfer function of image intensifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Liu, Wenli; Zhang, Baomin; Wang, Xiaoting; Jiang, Junyan

    2000-10-01

    The performances of the 3rd generation and Super generation image intensifiers were measured and analyzed about two kinds of transfer functions, including Modulated Transfer Function (MTF) and Signal Transfer Function (SiTF). It was summarized that the change tendency of this two kind functions under different illuminances and color temperatures.

  9. Amplitude-modulated stimuli reveal auditory-visual interactions in brain activity and brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Mark; Rees, Adrian; Vuong, Quoc C.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal congruence between auditory and visual signals coming from the same source can be a powerful means by which the brain integrates information from different senses. To investigate how the brain uses temporal information to integrate auditory and visual information from continuous yet unfamiliar stimuli, we used amplitude-modulated tones and size-modulated shapes with which we could manipulate the temporal congruence between the sensory signals. These signals were independently modulated at a slow or a fast rate. Participants were presented with auditory-only, visual-only, or auditory-visual (AV) trials in the fMRI scanner. On AV trials, the auditory and visual signal could have the same (AV congruent) or different modulation rates (AV incongruent). Using psychophysiological interaction analyses, we found that auditory regions showed increased functional connectivity predominantly with frontal regions for AV incongruent relative to AV congruent stimuli. We further found that superior temporal regions, shown previously to integrate auditory and visual signals, showed increased connectivity with frontal and parietal regions for the same contrast. Our findings provide evidence that both activity in a network of brain regions and their connectivity are important for AV integration, and help to bridge the gap between transient and familiar AV stimuli used in previous studies. PMID:26483710

  10. Aerodynamic parameter estimation via Fourier modulating function techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Parameter estimation algorithms are developed in the frequency domain for systems modeled by input/output ordinary differential equations. The approach is based on Shinbrot's method of moment functionals utilizing Fourier based modulating functions. Assuming white measurement noises for linear multivariable system models, an adaptive weighted least squares algorithm is developed which approximates a maximum likelihood estimate and cannot be biased by unknown initial or boundary conditions in the data owing to a special property attending Shinbrot-type modulating functions. Application is made to perturbation equation modeling of the longitudinal and lateral dynamics of a high performance aircraft using flight-test data. Comparative studies are included which demonstrate potential advantages of the algorithm relative to some well established techniques for parameter identification. Deterministic least squares extensions of the approach are made to the frequency transfer function identification problem for linear systems and to the parameter identification problem for a class of nonlinear-time-varying differential system models.

  11. Genetic modulation of energy metabolism in birds through mitochondrial function

    E-print Network

    Williams, Jos. B.

    Genetic modulation of energy metabolism in birds through mitochondrial function B. Irene Tieleman1 that both mass-specific and whole-organism basal metabolic rate (BMR) were heritable in a captive configurations, implying that the combination of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA affected metabolic rate. Therefore

  12. Gamma-Tocotrienol Modulated Gene Expression in Senescent Human Diploid Fibroblasts as Revealed by Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zainuddin, Azalina; Chua, Kien Hui; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2013-01-01

    The effect of ?-tocotrienol, a vitamin E isomer, in modulating gene expression in cellular aging of human diploid fibroblasts was studied. Senescent cells at passage 30 were incubated with 70??M of ?-tocotrienol for 24?h. Gene expression patterns were evaluated using Sentrix HumanRef-8 Expression BeadChip from Illumina, analysed using GeneSpring GX10 software, and validated using quantitative RT-PCR. A total of 100 genes were differentially expressed (P < 0.001) by at least 1.5 fold in response to ?-tocotrienol treatment. Amongst the genes were IRAK3, SelS, HSPA5, HERPUD1, DNAJB9, SEPR1, C18orf55, ARF4, RINT1, NXT1, CADPS2, COG6, and GLRX5. Significant gene list was further analysed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), and the Normalized Enrichment Score (NES) showed that biological processes such as inflammation, protein transport, apoptosis, and cell redox homeostasis were modulated in senescent fibroblasts treated with ?-tocotrienol. These findings revealed that ?-tocotrienol may prevent cellular aging of human diploid fibroblasts by modulating gene expression. PMID:23634235

  13. Gamma-tocotrienol modulated gene expression in senescent human diploid fibroblasts as revealed by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Makpol, Suzana; Zainuddin, Azalina; Chua, Kien Hui; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2013-01-01

    The effect of ? -tocotrienol, a vitamin E isomer, in modulating gene expression in cellular aging of human diploid fibroblasts was studied. Senescent cells at passage 30 were incubated with 70? ? M of ? -tocotrienol for 24?h. Gene expression patterns were evaluated using Sentrix HumanRef-8 Expression BeadChip from Illumina, analysed using GeneSpring GX10 software, and validated using quantitative RT-PCR. A total of 100 genes were differentially expressed (P < 0.001) by at least 1.5 fold in response to ? -tocotrienol treatment. Amongst the genes were IRAK3, SelS, HSPA5, HERPUD1, DNAJB9, SEPR1, C18orf55, ARF4, RINT1, NXT1, CADPS2, COG6, and GLRX5. Significant gene list was further analysed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), and the Normalized Enrichment Score (NES) showed that biological processes such as inflammation, protein transport, apoptosis, and cell redox homeostasis were modulated in senescent fibroblasts treated with ? -tocotrienol. These findings revealed that ? -tocotrienol may prevent cellular aging of human diploid fibroblasts by modulating gene expression. PMID:23634235

  14. Multi-functional Electric Module for a Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluethmann, William J. (Inventor); Waligora, Thomas M. (Inventor); Fraser-Chanpong, Nathan (Inventor); Reed, Ryan (Inventor); Akinyode, Akinjide Akinniyi (Inventor); Spain, Ivan (Inventor); Dawson, Andrew D. (Inventor); Figuered, Joshua M. (Inventor); Herrera, Eduardo (Inventor); Markee, Mason M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A multi-functional electric module (eModule) is provided for a vehicle having a chassis, a master controller, and a drive wheel having a propulsion-braking module. The eModule includes a steering control assembly, mounting bracket, propulsion control assembly, brake controller, housing, and control arm. The steering control assembly includes a steering motor controlled by steering controllers in response to control signals from the master controller. A mounting feature of the bracket connects to the chassis. The propulsion control assembly and brake controller are in communication with the propulsion-braking module. The control arm connects to the lower portion and contains elements of a suspension system, with the control arm being connectable to the drive wheel via a wheel input/output block. The controllers are responsive to the master controller to control a respective steering, propulsion, and braking function. The steering motor may have a dual-wound stator with windings controlled via the respective steering controllers.

  15. Functional modulation of power-law distribution in visual perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimono, Masanori; Owaki, Takashi; Amano, Kaoru; Kitajo, Keiichi; Takeda, Tsunehiro

    2007-05-01

    Neuronal activities have recently been reported to exhibit power-law scaling behavior. However, it has not been demonstrated that the power-law component can play an important role in human perceptual functions. Here, we demonstrate that the power spectrum of magnetoencephalograph recordings of brain activity varies in coordination with perception of subthreshold visual stimuli. We observed that perceptual performance could be better explained by modulation of the power-law component than by modulation of the peak power in particular narrow frequency ranges. The results suggest that the brain operates in a state of self-organized criticality, modulating the power spectral exponent of its activity to optimize its internal state for response to external stimuli.

  16. System-wide assembly of pathways and modules hierarchically reveal metabolic mechanism of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Guo, Zhili; Zhang, Liangxiao; Zhang, Yingying; Chen, Yinying; Nan, Jingyi; Zhao, Buchang; Xiao, Hongbin; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Yongyan

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between cerebral ischemia and metabolic disorders is poorly understood, which is partly due to the lack of comparative fusing data for larger complete systems and to the complexity of metabolic cascade reactions. Based on the fusing maps of comprehensive serum metabolome, fatty acid and amino acid profiling, we identified 35 potential metabolic biomarkers for ischemic stroke. Our analyses revealed 8 significantly altered pathways by MetPA (Metabolomics Pathway Analysis, impact score >0.10) and 15 significantly rewired modules in a complex ischemic network using the Markov clustering (MCL) method; all of these pathways became more homologous as the number of overlapping nodes was increased. We then detected 24 extensive pathways based on the total modular nodes from the network analysis, 12 of which were new discovery pathways. We provided a new perspective from the viewpoint of abnormal metabolites for the overall study of ischemic stroke as well as a new method to simplify the network analysis by selecting the more closely connected edges and nodes to build a module map of stroke. PMID:26621314

  17. System-wide assembly of pathways and modules hierarchically reveal metabolic mechanism of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Guo, Zhili; Zhang, Liangxiao; Zhang, Yingying; Chen, Yinying; Nan, Jingyi; Zhao, Buchang; Xiao, Hongbin; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Yongyan

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between cerebral ischemia and metabolic disorders is poorly understood, which is partly due to the lack of comparative fusing data for larger complete systems and to the complexity of metabolic cascade reactions. Based on the fusing maps of comprehensive serum metabolome, fatty acid and amino acid profiling, we identified 35 potential metabolic biomarkers for ischemic stroke. Our analyses revealed 8 significantly altered pathways by MetPA (Metabolomics Pathway Analysis, impact score >0.10) and 15 significantly rewired modules in a complex ischemic network using the Markov clustering (MCL) method; all of these pathways became more homologous as the number of overlapping nodes was increased. We then detected 24 extensive pathways based on the total modular nodes from the network analysis, 12 of which were new discovery pathways. We provided a new perspective from the viewpoint of abnormal metabolites for the overall study of ischemic stroke as well as a new method to simplify the network analysis by selecting the more closely connected edges and nodes to build a module map of stroke. PMID:26621314

  18. Pharmacological actions of nobiletin in the modulation of platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Roweth, Harvey; Ali, Marfoua S; Unsworth, Amanda J; Stainer, Alexander R; Flora, Gagan D; Crescente, Marilena; Jones, Chris I; Moraes, Leonardo A; Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The discovery that flavonoids are capable of inhibiting platelet function has led to their investigation as potential antithrombotic agents. However, despite the range of studies on the antiplatelet properties of flavonoids, little is known about the mechanisms by which flavonoids inhibit platelet function. In this study, we aimed to explore the pharmacological effects of a polymethoxy flavonoid, nobiletin, in the modulation of platelet function. Experimental Approach The ability of nobiletin to modulate platelet function was explored by using a range of in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches. Aggregation, dense granule secretion and spreading assays were performed using washed platelets. Fibrinogen binding, ?-granule secretion and calcium mobilization assays were performed using platelet-rich plasma and whole blood was used in impedance aggregometry and thrombus formation experiments. The effect of nobiletin in vivo was assessed by measuring tail bleeding time using C57BL/6 mice. Key Results Nobiletin was shown to suppress a range of well-established activatory mechanisms, including platelet aggregation, granule secretion, integrin modulation, calcium mobilization and thrombus formation. Nobiletin extended bleeding time in mice and reduced the phosphorylation of PKB (Akt) and PLC?2 within the collagen receptor (glycoprotein VI)-stimulated pathway, in addition to increasing the levels of cGMP and phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, a protein whose activity is associated with inhibitory cyclic nucleotide signalling. Conclusions and Implications This study provides insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms through which nobiletin modulates haemostasis and thrombus formation. Therefore, nobiletin may represent a potential antithrombotic agent of dietary origins. PMID:25988959

  19. Parametric dependence of ocean wave-radar modulation transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Cross, A.

    1983-01-01

    Microwave techniques at X and L band were used to determine the dependence of ocean-wave radar modulation transfer functions (MTFs) on various environmental and radar parameters during the Marine Remote Sensing experiment of 1979 (MARSEN 79). These MIF are presented, as are coherence functions between the AM and FM parts of the backscattered microwave signal. It is shown that they both depend on several of these parameters. Besides confirming many of the properties of transfer functions reported by previous authors, indications are found that MTFs decrease with increasing angle between wave propagation and antenna-look directions but are essentially independent of small changes in air-sea temperature difference. However, coherence functions are much smaller when the antennas are pointed perpendicular to long waves. It is found that X band transfer functions measured with horizontally polarized microwave radiation have larger magnitudes than those obtained by using vertical polarization.

  20. Rbg1–Tma46 dimer structure reveals new functional domains and their role in polysome recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Sandrea M.; Gas, María-Eugenia; Daugeron, Marie-Claire; Bravo, Jeronimo; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Developmentally Regulated GTP-binding (DRG) proteins are highly conserved GTPases that associate with DRG Family Regulatory Proteins (DFRP). The resulting complexes have recently been shown to participate in eukaryotic translation. The structure of the Rbg1 GTPase, a yeast DRG protein, in complex with the C-terminal region of its DFRP partner, Tma46, was solved by X-ray diffraction. These data reveal that DRG proteins are multimodular factors with three additional domains, helix–turn–helix (HTH), S5D2L and TGS, packing against the GTPase platform. Surprisingly, the S5D2L domain is inserted in the middle of the GTPase sequence. In contrast, the region of Tma46 interacting with Rbg1 adopts an extended conformation typical of intrinsically unstructured proteins and contacts the GTPase and TGS domains. Functional analyses demonstrate that the various domains of Rbg1, as well as Tma46, modulate the GTPase activity of Rbg1 and contribute to the function of these proteins in vivo. Dissecting the role of the different domains revealed that the Rbg1 TGS domain is essential for the recruitment of this factor in polysomes, supporting further the implication of these conserved factors in translation. PMID:23002146

  1. Rbg1-Tma46 dimer structure reveals new functional domains and their role in polysome recruitment.

    PubMed

    Francis, Sandrea M; Gas, María-Eugenia; Daugeron, Marie-Claire; Bravo, Jeronimo; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2012-11-01

    Developmentally Regulated GTP-binding (DRG) proteins are highly conserved GTPases that associate with DRG Family Regulatory Proteins (DFRP). The resulting complexes have recently been shown to participate in eukaryotic translation. The structure of the Rbg1 GTPase, a yeast DRG protein, in complex with the C-terminal region of its DFRP partner, Tma46, was solved by X-ray diffraction. These data reveal that DRG proteins are multimodular factors with three additional domains, helix-turn-helix (HTH), S5D2L and TGS, packing against the GTPase platform. Surprisingly, the S5D2L domain is inserted in the middle of the GTPase sequence. In contrast, the region of Tma46 interacting with Rbg1 adopts an extended conformation typical of intrinsically unstructured proteins and contacts the GTPase and TGS domains. Functional analyses demonstrate that the various domains of Rbg1, as well as Tma46, modulate the GTPase activity of Rbg1 and contribute to the function of these proteins in vivo. Dissecting the role of the different domains revealed that the Rbg1 TGS domain is essential for the recruitment of this factor in polysomes, supporting further the implication of these conserved factors in translation. PMID:23002146

  2. Modulation of immune function by milk fat globule membrane isolates.

    PubMed

    Zanabria, R; Tellez, A M; Griffiths, M; Sharif, S; Corredig, M

    2014-01-01

    The nutritional value and characterization of minor milk components on mammalian immune function are not fully understood. The aim of this research was to test the ability of a milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) isolate to modulate murine immune function in vitro, by studying its effects on splenocyte proliferation, apoptosis, and cytokine production. Proliferation of spleen cells was not affected by the MFGM isolate; however, in the presence of polyclonal activators, the MFGM isolate suppressed cell proliferation. Results obtained by flow cytometry did not support programmed cell death as the cause of the MFGM immune-modulating capacity. A mode of suppression on the splenocyte activation process was suggested from a marked decrease in the production of IFN-? and tumor necrosis factor-? cytokines, typical indicators of immune cell activation. The effect of MFGM on IL-4 secretion was significantly less than that for the other 2 cytokines. The activity exerted by the MFGM over concanavalin A-stimulated cells differed from that observed in cells treated with lipopolysaccharide, suggesting a different mode of action depending on the activator used. These results indicate the potential of MFGM extracts as functional ingredients with bioactive modulating capacity. PMID:24534496

  3. Determinants of protein function revealed by combinatorial entropy optimization

    PubMed Central

    Reva, Boris; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Sander, Chris

    2007-01-01

    We use a new algorithm (combinatorial entropy optimization [CEO]) to identify specificity residues and functional subfamilies in sets of proteins related by evolution. Specificity residues are conserved within a subfamily but differ between subfamilies, and they typically encode functional diversity. We obtain good agreement between predicted specificity residues and experimentally known functional residues in protein interfaces. Such predicted functional determinants are useful for interpreting the functional consequences of mutations in natural evolution and disease. PMID:17976239

  4. Functional Modules, Structural Topology, and Optimal Activity in Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo; Hernández, Magdalena; Mora, Yolanda; Encarnación, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Modular organization in biological networks has been suggested as a natural mechanism by which a cell coordinates its metabolic strategies for evolving and responding to environmental perturbations. To understand how this occurs, there is a need for developing computational schemes that contribute to integration of genomic-scale information and assist investigators in formulating biological hypotheses in a quantitative and systematic fashion. In this work, we combined metabolome data and constraint-based modeling to elucidate the relationships among structural modules, functional organization, and the optimal metabolic phenotype of Rhizobium etli, a bacterium that fixes nitrogen in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris. To experimentally characterize the metabolic phenotype of this microorganism, we obtained the metabolic profile of 220 metabolites at two physiological stages: under free-living conditions, and during nitrogen fixation with P. vulgaris. By integrating these data into a constraint-based model, we built a refined computational platform with the capability to survey the metabolic activity underlying nitrogen fixation in R. etli. Topological analysis of the metabolic reconstruction led us to identify modular structures with functional activities. Consistent with modular activity in metabolism, we found that most of the metabolites experimentally detected in each module simultaneously increased their relative abundances during nitrogen fixation. In this work, we explore the relationships among topology, biological function, and optimal activity in the metabolism of R. etli through an integrative analysis based on modeling and metabolome data. Our findings suggest that the metabolic activity during nitrogen fixation is supported by interacting structural modules that correlate with three functional classifications: nucleic acids, peptides, and lipids. More fundamentally, we supply evidence that such modular organization during functional nitrogen fixation is a robust property under different environmental conditions. PMID:23071431

  5. Comparison of approaches to estimate the speech modulation transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payton, Karen L.; Chen, Shaoyan; Braida, Louis D.

    2002-05-01

    Using speech as a probe stimulus to compute the Speech Transmission Index (STI) has been of great interest to speech researchers. One technique is based on first computing the speech modulation transfer function (SMTF). Approaches used to obtain the SMTF include those developed by Steeneken and Houtgast [H. Steeneken and T. Houtgast, Proc. 11th ICA, Paris 7, 85-88 (1983)] and Drullman et al. [R. Drullman, J. M. Festen, and R. Plomp, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 2670-2680 (1994)]. This paper compares these two approaches and a new one to the theoretically obtained modulation transfer function (MTF) for reverberant and noisy environments. The new method computes the magnitude of the cross-power spectrum rather than the real part used by Drullman. As previously reported, Houtgast's method exhibits artifacts at high modulation frequencies. Drullman's approach eliminates artifacts in the reverberant environment but does not predict the theoretical MTF for the noisy environment. The new method outperforms the other two approaches in matching the theoretically derived MTF across both environments. This paper also examines the SMTF of amplitude-compressed speech for these three methods. [Work supported by NIDCD.

  6. Direct Modulation of Small GTPase Activity and Function.

    PubMed

    Cromm, Philipp M; Spiegel, Jochen; Grossmann, Tom N; Waldmann, Herbert

    2015-11-01

    Small GTPases are a family of GDP-/GTP-binding proteins that serve as biomolecular switches inside cells to control a variety of essential cellular processes. Aberrant function and regulation of small GTPases is associated with a variety of human diseases, thus rendering these proteins highly interesting targets in drug discovery. However, this class of proteins has been considered "undruggable", as intensive decade-long efforts did not yield clinically relevant direct modulators of small GTPases. Recently, the targeting of small GTPases has gained fresh impetus through the discovery of novel transient cavities on the protein surfaces and the application of new targeting strategies. Besides Ras proteins, other small GTPases have attracted increased attention since improved biological insight in combination with novel targeting strategies identified them as promising targets in drug discovery. This Review gives an overview of relevant aspects of the superfamily of small GTPases and summarizes recent progress and perspectives for the direct modulation of these challenging targets. PMID:26470842

  7. Proteome-wide Light/Dark Modulation of Thiol Oxidation in Cyanobacteria Revealed by Quantitative Site-specific Redox Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Dai, Ziyu; Su, Dian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein thiol oxidation is an essential regulatory mechanism of photosynthesis, metabolism, and gene expression in photosynthetic organisms. Herein, we present proteome-wide quantitative and site-specific profiling of in vivo thiol oxidation modulated by light/dark in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, an oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryote, using a resin-assisted thiol enrichment approach. Our proteomic approach integrates resin-assisted enrichment with isobaric tandem mass tag labeling to enable site-specific and quantitative measurements of reversibly oxidized thiols. The redox dynamics of ?2,100 Cys-sites from 1,060 proteins under light, dark, and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (a photosystem II inhibitor) conditions were quantified. In addition to relative quantification, the stoichiometry or percentage of oxidation (reversibly oxidized/total thiols) for ?1,350 Cys-sites was also quantified. The overall results revealed broad changes in thiol oxidation in many key biological processes, including photosynthetic electron transport, carbon fixation, and glycolysis. Moreover, the redox sensitivity along with the stoichiometric data enabled prediction of potential functional Cys-sites for proteins of interest. The functional significance of redox-sensitive Cys-sites in NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, peroxiredoxin (AhpC/TSA family protein Sll1621), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase was further confirmed with site-specific mutagenesis and biochemical studies. Together, our findings provide significant insights into the broad redox regulation of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25118246

  8. Virus-induced gene complementation reveals a transcription factor network in modulation of tomato fruit ripening

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Hang; Lai, Tongfei; Qin, Cheng; Shi, Nongnong; Wang, Huizhong; Jin, Mingfei; Zhong, Silin; Fan, Zaifeng; Liu, Yule; Wu, Zirong; Jackson, Stephen; Giovannoni, James J.; Rolin, Dominique; Gallusci, Philippe; Hong, Yiguo

    2012-01-01

    Plant virus technology, in particular virus-induced gene silencing, is a widely used reverse- and forward-genetics tool in plant functional genomics. However the potential of virus technology to express genes to induce phenotypes or to complement mutants in order to understand the function of plant genes is not well documented. Here we exploit Potato virus X as a tool for virus-induced gene complementation (VIGC). Using VIGC in tomato, we demonstrated that ectopic viral expression of LeMADS-RIN, which encodes a MADS-box transcription factor (TF), resulted in functional complementation of the non-ripening rin mutant phenotype and caused fruits to ripen. Comparative gene expression analysis indicated that LeMADS-RIN up-regulated expression of the SBP-box (SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein-like) gene LeSPL-CNR, but down-regulated the expression of LeHB-1, an HD-Zip homeobox TF gene. Our data support the hypothesis that a transcriptional network may exist among key TFs in the modulation of fruit ripening in tomato. PMID:23150786

  9. Modulating executive functioning: trait motivational reactivity and resting HRV.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Rachel L; Potter, Robert F; Lang, Annie; Pisoni, David B

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed relationships among individual differences in trait motivational reactivity, executive functioning, and neurovisceral regulation of emotion and attention indexed via resting heart rate variability (rHRV). We derived predictions regarding these relationships according to neurovisceral neural network theory. Because lower rHRV has been suggested as an endophenotype of less adaptive behaviour, low rHRV individuals were predicted to have high aversive and low appetitive trait motivational reactivity, while high rHRV individuals were predicted to have high reactivity in both appetitive and aversive motivational systems. These predictions were supported. Motivational reactivity also was related to executive functioning deficits, although the pattern of results was not in the predicted direction. Results suggest that trait motivational reactivity scores are related to visceral responses proposed in the neurovisceral integration circuit as well as in the modulation of these responses by higher-order cognitive control systems related to executive function. PMID:24606341

  10. Compression of Flow Can Reveal Overlapping-Module Organization in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viamontes Esquivel, Alcides; Rosvall, Martin

    2011-10-01

    To better understand the organization of overlapping modules in large networks with respect to flow, we introduce the map equation for overlapping modules. In this information-theoretic framework, we use the correspondence between compression and regularity detection. The generalized map equation measures how well we can compress a description of flow in the network when we partition it into modules with possible overlaps. When we minimize the generalized map equation over overlapping network partitions, we detect modules that capture flow and determine which nodes at the boundaries between modules should be classified in multiple modules and to what degree. With a novel greedy-search algorithm, we find that some networks, for example, the neural network of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, are best described by modules dominated by hard boundaries, but that others, for example, the sparse European-roads network, have an organization of highly overlapping modules.

  11. Challenges and achievements in the therapeutic modulation of aquaporin functionality.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Eric; Golldack, André; Rothert, Monja; von Bülow, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) water and solute channels have basic physiological functions throughout the human body. AQP-facilitated water permeability across cell membranes is required for rapid reabsorption of water from pre-urine in the kidneys and for sustained near isosmolar water fluxes e.g. in the brain, eyes, inner ear, and lungs. Cellular water permeability is further connected to cell motility. AQPs of the aquaglyceroporin subfamily are necessary for lipid degradation in adipocytes and glycerol uptake into the liver, as well as for skin moistening. Modulation of AQP function is desirable in several pathophysiological situations, such as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, Sjögren's syndrome, Meničre's disease, heart failure, or tumors to name a few. Attempts to design or to find effective small molecule AQP inhibitors have yielded only a few hits. Challenges reside in the high copy number of AQP proteins in the cell membranes, and spatial restrictions in the protein structure. This review gives an overview on selected physiological and pathophysiological conditions in which modulation of AQP functions appears beneficial and discusses first achievements in the search of drug-like AQP inhibitors. PMID:26277280

  12. Functional specification of the Performance Measurement (PM) module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berliner, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The design of the Performance Measurement Module is described with emphasis on what the PM Module would do, and what it would look like to the user. The PM Module as described could take several man-years to develop. An evolutionary approach to the implementation of the PM Module is presented which would provide an operational baseline PM Module within a few months.

  13. Gap junction modulation and its implications for heart function

    PubMed Central

    Kurtenbach, Stefan; Kurtenbach, Sarah; Zoidl, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction communication (GJC) mediated by connexins is critical for heart function. To gain insight into the causal relationship of molecular mechanisms of disease pathology, it is important to understand which mechanisms contribute to impairment of gap junctional communication. Here, we present an update on the known modulators of connexins, including various interaction partners, kinases, and signaling cascades. This gap junction network (GJN) can serve as a blueprint for data mining approaches exploring the growing number of publicly available data sets from experimental and clinical studies. PMID:24578694

  14. Single particle tracking with sterol modulation reveals the cholesterol-mediated diffusion properties of integrin receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Neha; Syed, Aleem; Sander, Suzanne; Smith, Emily A.

    2014-12-01

    A combination of sterol modulation with cyclodextrins plus fluorescence microscopy revealed a biophysical mechanism behind cholesterol’s influence on the diffusion of a ubiquitous class of receptors called integrins. The heterogeneous diffusion of integrins bound to ligand-coated quantum dots was measured using single particle tracking (SPT), and the ensemble changes in integrin diffusion were measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). A 25 ± 1% reduction of membrane cholesterol resulted in three significant changes to the diffusion of ligand-bound ?PS2C?PS integrins as measured by SPT. There was a 23% increase in ligand-bound mobile integrins; there was a statistically significant increase in the average diffusion coefficient inside zones of confined diffusion, and histograms of confined integrin trajectories showed an increased frequency in the range of 0.1-1 ?m2 s-1 and a decreased frequency in the 0.001-0.1 ?m2 s-1 range. No statistical change was measured in the duration of confinement nor the size of confined zones. Restoring the cholesterol-depleted cells with exogenous cholesterol or exogenous epicholesterol resulted in similar diffusion properties. Epicholesterol differs from cholesterol in the orientation of a single hydroxyl group. The ability of epicholesterol to substitute for cholesterol suggests a biophysical mechanism for cholesterol’s effect on integrin diffusion. Influences of bilayer thickness, viscosity and organization are discussed as possible explanations for the measured changes in integrin diffusion when the membrane cholesterol concentration is reduced.

  15. Solution structure of the Big domain from Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals a novel Ca2+-binding module.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Jiahai; Zhang, Xuecheng; Xu, Chao; Tu, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a pathogen causing acute respiratory infection, otitis media and some other severe diseases in human. In this study, the solution structure of a bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domain from a putative S. pneumoniae surface protein SP0498 was determined by NMR spectroscopy. SP0498 Big domain adopts an eight-?-strand barrel-like fold, which is different in some aspects from the two-sheet sandwich-like fold of the canonical Ig-like domains. Intriguingly, we identified that the SP0498 Big domain was a Ca(2+) binding domain. The structure of the Big domain is different from those of the well known Ca(2+) binding domains, therefore revealing a novel Ca(2+)-binding module. Furthermore, we identified the critical residues responsible for the binding to Ca(2+). We are the first to report the interactions between the Big domain and Ca(2+) in terms of structure, suggesting an important role of the Big domain in many essential calcium-dependent cellular processes such as pathogenesis. PMID:23326635

  16. Baroreflex activation in conscious rats modulates the joint inflammatory response via sympathetic function.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Gabriel S; Brognara, Fernanda; Castania, Jaci A; Talbot, Jhimmy; Cunha, Thiago M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Ulloa, Luis; Kanashiro, Alexandre; Dias, Daniel P Martins; Salgado, Helio C

    2015-10-01

    The baroreflex is a critical physiological mechanism controlling cardiovascular function by modulating both the sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. Here, we report that electrical activation of the baroreflex attenuates joint inflammation in experimental arthritis induced by the administration of zymosan into the femorotibial cavity. Baroreflex activation combined with lumbar sympathectomy, adrenalectomy, celiac subdiaphragmatic vagotomy or splenectomy dissected the mechanisms involved in the inflammatory modulation, highlighting the role played by sympathetic inhibition in the attenuation of joint inflammation. From the immunological standpoint, baroreflex activation attenuates neutrophil migration and the synovial levels of inflammatory cytokines including TNF, IL-1? and IL-6, but does not affect the levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The anti-inflammatory effects of the baroreflex system are not mediated by IL-10, the vagus nerve, adrenal glands or the spleen, but by the inhibition of the sympathetic drive to the knee. These results reveal a novel physiological neuronal network controlling peripheral local inflammation. PMID:25986215

  17. Modulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity by surface functionalized quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srabanti; Ray, Manju; Das, Mahua Rani; Chakrabarti, Adrita; Khan, Ali Hossain; Sarma, D D; Acharya, Somobrata

    2014-03-21

    Enzymatic regulation is a fast and reliable diagnosis tool via identification and design of inhibitors for modulation of enzyme function. Previous reports on quantum dots (QDs)-enzyme interactions reveal a protein-surface recognition ability leading to promising applications in protein stabilization, protein delivery, bio-sensing and detection. However, the direct use of QDs to control enzyme inhibition has never been revealed to date. Here we show that a series of biocompatible surface-functionalized metal-chalcogenide QDs can be used as potent inhibitors for malignant cells through the modulation of enzyme activity, while normal cells remain unaffected. The in vitro activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), an enzyme involved critically in the glycolysis of cancer cells, is inactivated selectively in a controlled way by the QDs at a significantly low concentration (nM). Cumulative kinetic studies delineate that the QDs undergo both reversible and irreversible inhibition mechanisms owing to the site-specific interactions, enabling control over the inhibition kinetics. These complementary loss-of-function probes may offer a novel route for rapid clinical diagnosis of malignant cells and biomedical applications. PMID:24496476

  18. Structural and functional distinctions between auditory centers revealed with MRI in living humans

    E-print Network

    Sigalovsky, Irina S., 1972-

    2005-01-01

    From brainstem to cortex, sound is processed in centers that are functionally and structurally distinct. In animals, invasive electrophysiology and histology has revealed these distinctions and, consequently, organizational ...

  19. Genome-Wide Association and Functional Follow-Up Reveals New Loci for Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Feitosa, Mary; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Ĺsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Chouraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tőnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank B.; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Kolcic, Ivana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Endlich, Karlhans; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Giulianini, Franco; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Metzger, Marie; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K.; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem with a genetic component. We performed genome-wide association studies in up to 130,600 European ancestry participants overall, and stratified for key CKD risk factors. We uncovered 6 new loci in association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the primary clinical measure of CKD, in or near MPPED2, DDX1, SLC47A1, CDK12, CASP9, and INO80. Morpholino knockdown of mpped2 and casp9 in zebrafish embryos revealed podocyte and tubular abnormalities with altered dextran clearance, suggesting a role for these genes in renal function. By providing new insights into genes that regulate renal function, these results could further our understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD. PMID:22479191

  20. LANDSAT-4 thematic mapper Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schowengerdt, R. (principal investigator)

    1983-01-01

    A power spectrum (PS) analysis technique was used to compare thematic mapper (TM) A and P-tape data for a Washington, DC scene in two orthogonal directions, along scan and along track. The resulting effective modulation transfer functions (MTF) between the A and P data are repeatable from area to area and consistent with theoretical expectations. The average x-direction (along scan) MTF calculated with the PS technique is compared to the MTF of the cubic convolution resampling function used to create P data from A data. The two curves are nearly identical, indicating that the major factor affecting the image quality of P data relative to A data is the cubic convolution resampling.

  1. Modulation of interhemispheric functional coordination in electroconvulsive therapy for depression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Q; Tian, Y; Yu, Y; Zhang, F; Hu, X; Dong, Y; Chen, Y; Hu, P; Hu, X; Wang, K

    2014-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that depression is related to interhemispheric functional coordination deficits. For depression, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most rapid and effective therapy, but its underlying mechanism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of ECT on the interhemispheric functional coordination in depression patients. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to observe the change of interhemispheric functional coordination with the method of voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) in 11 depressed patients before and after ECT, compared with 15 healthy controls. The results showed that, compared with depression patients before ECT, VMHC was significantly increased in superior frontal gyri (BA 8), middle frontal gyri (two clusters: BA 8/9 and BA 10) and angular gyri (BA 39) in depression patients after ECT. Compared with healthy controls, VMHC in those areas was significantly lower in the middle frontal gyri (BA 8/9) and angular gyri (BA 39) in depression patients before ECT, but no significant difference was observed in the superior frontal gyri (BA 8) and middle frontal gyri (BA 10). There was no significant correlation between the changes of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and changed VMHC values in those four areas in depression patients. The results suggest that ECT selectively modulated interhemispheric functional coordination in depression patients. Such may play an important mechanistic role in the treatment of depression, and may afford a useful avenue for optimizing treatment. PMID:25268257

  2. Response functions for sine- and square-wave modulations of disparity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W.

    1972-01-01

    Depth sensations cannot be elicited by modulations of disparity that are more rapid than about 6 Hz, regardless of the modulation amplitude. Vergence tracking also fails at similar modulation rates, suggesting that this portion of the oculomotor system is limited by the behavior of disparity detectors. For sinusoidal modulations of disparity between 1/2 to 2 deg of disparity, most depth-response functions exhibit a low-frequency decrease that is not observed with square-wave modulations of disparity.

  3. Revealing the density of encoded functions in a viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nikesh; Dykeman, Eric C; Coutts, Robert H A; Lomonossoff, George P; Rowlands, David J; Phillips, Simon E V; Ranson, Neil; Twarock, Reidun; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter G

    2015-02-17

    We present direct experimental evidence that assembly of a single-stranded RNA virus occurs via a packaging signal-mediated mechanism. We show that the sequences of coat protein recognition motifs within multiple, dispersed, putative RNA packaging signals, as well as their relative spacing within a genomic fragment, act collectively to influence the fidelity and yield of capsid self-assembly in vitro. These experiments confirm that the selective advantages for viral yield and encapsidation specificity, predicted from previous modeling of packaging signal-mediated assembly, are found in Nature. Regions of the genome that act as packaging signals also function in translational and transcriptional enhancement, as well as directly coding for the coat protein, highlighting the density of encoded functions within the viral RNA. Assembly and gene expression are therefore direct molecular competitors for different functional folds of the same RNA sequence. The strongest packaging signal in the test fragment, encodes a region of the coat protein that undergoes a conformational change upon contact with packaging signals. A similar phenomenon occurs in other RNA viruses for which packaging signals are known. These contacts hint at an even deeper density of encoded functions in viral RNA, which if confirmed, would have profound consequences for the evolution of this class of pathogens. PMID:25646435

  4. Revealing the density of encoded functions in a viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikesh; Dykeman, Eric C.; Coutts, Robert H. A.; Lomonossoff, George P.; Rowlands, David J.; Phillips, Simon E. V.; Ranson, Neil; Twarock, Reidun; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    We present direct experimental evidence that assembly of a single-stranded RNA virus occurs via a packaging signal-mediated mechanism. We show that the sequences of coat protein recognition motifs within multiple, dispersed, putative RNA packaging signals, as well as their relative spacing within a genomic fragment, act collectively to influence the fidelity and yield of capsid self-assembly in vitro. These experiments confirm that the selective advantages for viral yield and encapsidation specificity, predicted from previous modeling of packaging signal-mediated assembly, are found in Nature. Regions of the genome that act as packaging signals also function in translational and transcriptional enhancement, as well as directly coding for the coat protein, highlighting the density of encoded functions within the viral RNA. Assembly and gene expression are therefore direct molecular competitors for different functional folds of the same RNA sequence. The strongest packaging signal in the test fragment, encodes a region of the coat protein that undergoes a conformational change upon contact with packaging signals. A similar phenomenon occurs in other RNA viruses for which packaging signals are known. These contacts hint at an even deeper density of encoded functions in viral RNA, which if confirmed, would have profound consequences for the evolution of this class of pathogens. PMID:25646435

  5. Unsuspected functional disparity in Devonian fishes revealed by tooth morphometrics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchey, Samuel; Girard, Catherine; Adnet, Sylvain; Renaud, Sabrina

    2014-09-01

    The shape of features involved in key biological functions, such as teeth in nutrition, can provide insights into ecological processes even in ancient time, by linking the occupation of the morphological space (disparity) to the occupation of the ecological space. Investigating disparity in radiating groups may provide insights into the ecological diversification underlying evolution of morphological diversity. Actinopterygian fishes initiated their radiation in the Devonian, a period characterized by the diversification of marine ecosystem. Although a former morpho-functional analysis of jaw shape concluded to conservative and poorly diversified morphologies in this early part of their history, fish tooth disparity evidenced here an unsuspected diversity of possible functional significance in the pivotal period of the Late Devonian (Famennian). All teeth being caniniforms, some were stocky and robust, in agreement with expectations for active generalist predators. More surprisingly, elongated teeth also occurred at the beginning of Famennian. Their needle-like shape challenges morpho-functional interpretations by making them fragile in response to bending or torsion. The occurrence of both types of fish teeth during the beginning of the Famennian points to a discrete but real increase in disparity, thus testifying a first burst of feeding specialization despite overall conservative jaw morphology. The disappearance of these needle-like teeth in the Late Famennian might have been related to a relay in dental diversity with abundant co-occurring groups, namely conodonts and chondrichthyans (sharks).

  6. Unsuspected functional disparity in Devonian fishes revealed by tooth morphometrics?

    PubMed

    Gauchey, Samuel; Girard, Catherine; Adnet, Sylvain; Renaud, Sabrina

    2014-09-01

    The shape of features involved in key biological functions, such as teeth in nutrition, can provide insights into ecological processes even in ancient time, by linking the occupation of the morphological space (disparity) to the occupation of the ecological space. Investigating disparity in radiating groups may provide insights into the ecological diversification underlying evolution of morphological diversity. Actinopterygian fishes initiated their radiation in the Devonian, a period characterized by the diversification of marine ecosystem. Although a former morpho-functional analysis of jaw shape concluded to conservative and poorly diversified morphologies in this early part of their history, fish tooth disparity evidenced here an unsuspected diversity of possible functional significance in the pivotal period of the Late Devonian (Famennian). All teeth being caniniforms, some were stocky and robust, in agreement with expectations for active generalist predators. More surprisingly, elongated teeth also occurred at the beginning of Famennian. Their needle-like shape challenges morpho-functional interpretations by making them fragile in response to bending or torsion. The occurrence of both types of fish teeth during the beginning of the Famennian points to a discrete but real increase in disparity, thus testifying a first burst of feeding specialization despite overall conservative jaw morphology. The disappearance of these needle-like teeth in the Late Famennian might have been related to a relay in dental diversity with abundant co-occurring groups, namely conodonts and chondrichthyans (sharks). PMID:25078254

  7. A selective screen reveals discrete functional domains in Drosophila Nanos.

    PubMed

    Arrizabalaga, G; Lehmann, R

    1999-12-01

    The Drosophila protein Nanos encodes an evolutionarily conserved protein with two zinc finger motifs. In the embryo, Nanos protein function is required for establishment of the anterior-posterior body pattern and for the migration of primordial germ cells. During oogenesis, Nanos protein is involved in the establishment and maintenance of germ-line stem cells and the differentiation of oocyte precursor cells. To establish proper embryonic patterning, Nanos acts as a translational regulator of hunchback RNA. Nanos' targets for germ cell migration and development are not known. Here, we describe a selective genetic screen aimed at isolating new nanos alleles. The molecular and genetic analysis of 68 new alleles has allowed us to identify amino acids critical for nanos function. This analysis shows that the CCHC motifs, which coordinate two metal ions, are essential for all known functions of Nanos protein. Furthermore, a region C-terminal to the zinc fingers seems to constitute a novel functional domain within the Nanos protein. This "tail region" of Nanos is required for abdomen formation and germ cell migration, but not for oogenesis. PMID:10581288

  8. Unsuspected functional disparity in Devonian fishes revealed by tooth morphometrics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchey, Samuel; Girard, Catherine; Adnet, Sylvain; Renaud, Sabrina

    2014-07-01

    The shape of features involved in key biological functions, such as teeth in nutrition, can provide insights into ecological processes even in ancient time, by linking the occupation of the morphological space (disparity) to the occupation of the ecological space. Investigating disparity in radiating groups may provide insights into the ecological diversification underlying evolution of morphological diversity. Actinopterygian fishes initiated their radiation in the Devonian, a period characterized by the diversification of marine ecosystem. Although a former morpho-functional analysis of jaw shape concluded to conservative and poorly diversified morphologies in this early part of their history, fish tooth disparity evidenced here an unsuspected diversity of possible functional significance in the pivotal period of the Late Devonian (Famennian). All teeth being caniniforms, some were stocky and robust, in agreement with expectations for active generalist predators. More surprisingly, elongated teeth also occurred at the beginning of Famennian. Their needle-like shape challenges morpho-functional interpretations by making them fragile in response to bending or torsion. The occurrence of both types of fish teeth during the beginning of the Famennian points to a discrete but real increase in disparity, thus testifying a first burst of feeding specialization despite overall conservative jaw morphology. The disappearance of these needle-like teeth in the Late Famennian might have been related to a relay in dental diversity with abundant co-occurring groups, namely conodonts and chondrichthyans (sharks).

  9. Modulation of Chloride Channel Functions by the Plant Lignan Compounds Kobusin and Eudesmin

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Fang, Fang; Cao, Huanhuan; Ma, Tonghui; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Plant lignans are diphenolic compounds widely present in vegetables, fruits, and grains. These compounds have been demonstrated to have protective effect against cancer, hypertension and diabetes. In the present study, we showed that two lignan compounds, kobusin and eudesmin, isolated from Magnoliae Flos, could modulate intestinal chloride transport mediated by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs). The compounds activated CFTR channel function in both FRT cells and in HT-29 cells. The modulating effects of kobusin and eudesmin on the activity of CaCCgie (CaCC expressed in gastrointestinal epithelial cells) were also investigated, and the result showed that both compounds could stimulate CaCCgie-mediated short-circuit currents and the stimulation was synergistic with ATP. In ex vivo studies, both compounds activated CFTR and CaCCgie chloride channel activities in mouse colonic epithelia. Remarkably, the compounds showed inhibitory effects toward ANO1/CaCC-mediated short-circuit currents in ANO1/CaCC-expressing FRT cells, with IC50 values of 100 ?M for kobusin and 200 ?M for eudesmin. In charcoal transit study, both compounds mildly reduced gastrointestinal motility in mice. Taken together, these results revealed a new kind of activity displayed by the lignan compounds, one that is concerned with the modulation of chloride channel function. PMID:26635857

  10. A DEK domain-containing protein modulates chromatin structure and function in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Waidmann, Sascha; Kusenda, Branislav; Mayerhofer, Juliane; Mechtler, Karl; Jonak, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Chromatin is a major determinant in the regulation of virtually all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin architectural proteins interact with nucleosomes to modulate chromatin accessibility and higher-order chromatin structure. The evolutionarily conserved DEK domain-containing protein is implicated in important chromatin-related processes in animals, but little is known about its DNA targets and protein interaction partners. In plants, the role of DEK has remained elusive. In this work, we identified DEK3 as a chromatin-associated protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. DEK3 specifically binds histones H3 and H4. Purification of other proteins associated with nuclear DEK3 also established DNA topoisomerase 1? and proteins of the cohesion complex as in vivo interaction partners. Genome-wide mapping of DEK3 binding sites by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing revealed enrichment of DEK3 at protein-coding genes throughout the genome. Using DEK3 knockout and overexpressor lines, we show that DEK3 affects nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility and modulates the expression of DEK3 target genes. Furthermore, functional levels of DEK3 are crucial for stress tolerance. Overall, data indicate that DEK3 contributes to modulation of Arabidopsis chromatin structure and function. PMID:25387881

  11. A DEK Domain-Containing Protein Modulates Chromatin Structure and Function in Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Waidmann, Sascha; Kusenda, Branislav; Mayerhofer, Juliane; Mechtler, Karl; Jonak, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a major determinant in the regulation of virtually all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin architectural proteins interact with nucleosomes to modulate chromatin accessibility and higher-order chromatin structure. The evolutionarily conserved DEK domain-containing protein is implicated in important chromatin-related processes in animals, but little is known about its DNA targets and protein interaction partners. In plants, the role of DEK has remained elusive. In this work, we identified DEK3 as a chromatin-associated protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. DEK3 specifically binds histones H3 and H4. Purification of other proteins associated with nuclear DEK3 also established DNA topoisomerase 1? and proteins of the cohesion complex as in vivo interaction partners. Genome-wide mapping of DEK3 binding sites by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing revealed enrichment of DEK3 at protein-coding genes throughout the genome. Using DEK3 knockout and overexpressor lines, we show that DEK3 affects nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility and modulates the expression of DEK3 target genes. Furthermore, functional levels of DEK3 are crucial for stress tolerance. Overall, data indicate that DEK3 contributes to modulation of Arabidopsis chromatin structure and function. PMID:25387881

  12. Structural and Functional Studies of the Rap1 C-Terminus Reveal Novel Separation-of-Function Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Feeser, Elizabeth A.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2010-02-19

    The yeast Rap1 protein plays an important role in transcriptional silencing and in telomere length homeostasis. Rap1 mediates silencing at the HM loci and at telomeres by recruiting the Sir3 and Sir4 proteins to chromatin via a Rap1 C-terminal domain, which also recruits the telomere length regulators, Rif1 and Rif2. We report the 1.85 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the Rap1 C-terminus, which adopts an all-helical fold with no structural homologues. The structure was used to engineer surface mutations in Rap1, and the effects of these mutations on silencing and telomere length regulation were assayed in vivo. Our surprising finding was that there is no overlap between mutations affecting mating-type and telomeric silencing, suggesting that Rap1 plays distinct roles in silencing at the silent mating-type loci and telomeres. We also found novel Rap1 phenotypes and new separation-of-function mutants, which provide new tools for studying Rap1 function. Yeast two-hybrid studies were used to determine how specific mutations affect recruitment of Sir3, Rif1, and Rif2. A comparison of the yeast two-hybrid and functional data reveals patterns of protein interactions that correlate with each Rap1 phenotype. We find that Sir3 interactions are important for telomeric silencing, but not mating type silencing, and that Rif1 and Rif2 interactions are important in different subsets of telomeric length mutants. Our results show that the role of Rap1 in silencing differs between the HM loci and the telomeres and offer insight into the interplay between HM silencing, telomeric silencing, and telomere length regulation. These findings suggest a model in which competition and multiple recruitment events modulate silencing and telomere length regulation.

  13. Yeast studies reveal moonlighting functions of the ancient actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Chernova, Tatiana A; Gogoi, Neeku M; Pillai, Indu V; Chernoff, Yury O; Munn, Alan L

    2014-08-01

    Classic functions of the actin cytoskeleton include control of cell size and shape and the internal organization of cells. These functions are manifest in cellular processes of fundamental importance throughout biology such as the generation of cell polarity, cell migration, cell adhesion, and cell division. However, studies in the unicellular model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) are giving insights into other functions in which the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role. These include endocytosis, control of protein translation, and determination of protein 3-dimensional shape (especially conversion of normal cellular proteins into prions). Here, we present a concise overview of these new "moonlighting" roles for the actin cytoskeleton and how some of these roles might lie at the heart of important molecular switches. This is an exciting time for researchers interested in the actin cytoskeleton. We show here how studies of actin are leading us into many new and exciting realms at the interface of genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology. While many of the pioneering studies have been conducted using yeast, the conservation of the actin cytoskeleton and its component proteins throughout eukaryotes suggests that these new roles for the actin cytoskeleton may not be restricted to yeast cells but rather may reflect new roles for the actin cytoskeleton of all eukaryotes. PMID:25138357

  14. Functional Imaging Reveals Movement Preparatory Activity in the Vegetative State

    PubMed Central

    Bekinschtein, Tristan Andres; Manes, Facundo Francisco; Villarreal, Mirta; Owen, Adrian Mark; Della-Maggiore, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The vegetative state (VS) is characterized by the absence of awareness of self or the environment and preserved autonomic functions. The diagnosis relies critically on the lack of consistent signs of purposeful behavior in response to external stimulation. Yet, given that patients with disorders of consciousness often exhibit fragmented movement patterns, voluntary actions may go unnoticed. Here we designed a simple motor paradigm that could potentially detect signs of purposeful behavior in VS patients with mild to severe brain damage by examining the neural correlates of motor preparation in response to verbal commands. Twenty-four patients who met the diagnostic criteria for VS were recruited for this study. Eleven of these patients showing preserved auditory evoked potentials underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test for basic speech processing. Five of these patients, who showed word related activity, were included in a second fMRI study aimed at detecting functional changes in premotor cortex elicited by specific verbal instructions to move either their left or their right hand. Despite the lack of overt muscle activity, two patients out of five activated the dorsal premotor cortex contralateral to the instructed hand, consistent with movement preparation. Our results may reflect residual voluntary processing in these two patients. We believe that the identification of positive results with fMRI using this simple task, may complement the clinical assessment by helping attain a more precise diagnosis in patients with disorders of consciousness. PMID:21441977

  15. Evolutionary developmental transcriptomics reveals a gene network module regulating interspecific diversity in plant leaf shape

    PubMed Central

    Ichihashi, Yasunori; Aguilar-Martínez, José Antonio; Farhi, Moran; Chitwood, Daniel H.; Kumar, Ravi; Millon, Lee V.; Peng, Jie; Maloof, Julin N.; Sinha, Neelima R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite a long-standing interest in the genetic basis of morphological diversity, the molecular mechanisms that give rise to developmental variation are incompletely understood. Here, we use comparative transcriptomics coupled with the construction of gene coexpression networks to predict a gene regulatory network (GRN) for leaf development in tomato and two related wild species with strikingly different leaf morphologies. The core network in the leaf developmental GRN contains regulators of leaf morphology that function in global cell proliferation with peripheral gene network modules (GNMs). The BLADE-ON-PETIOLE (BOP) transcription factor in one GNM controls the core network by altering effective concentration of the KNOTTED-like HOMEOBOX gene product. Comparative network analysis and experimental perturbations of BOP levels suggest that variation in BOP expression could explain the diversity in leaf complexity among these species through dynamic rewiring of interactions in the GRN. The peripheral location of the BOP-containing GNM in the leaf developmental GRN and the phenotypic mimics of evolutionary diversity caused by alteration in BOP levels identify a key role for this GNM in canalizing the leaf morphospace by modifying the maturation schedule of leaves to create morphological diversity. PMID:24927584

  16. System identification and model reduction using modulating function techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Yan

    1993-01-01

    Weighted least squares (WLS) and adaptive weighted least squares (AWLS) algorithms are initiated for continuous-time system identification using Fourier type modulating function techniques. Two stochastic signal models are examined using the mean square properties of the stochastic calculus: an equation error signal model with white noise residuals, and a more realistic white measurement noise signal model. The covariance matrices in each model are shown to be banded and sparse, and a joint likelihood cost function is developed which links the real and imaginary parts of the modulated quantities. The superior performance of above algorithms is demonstrated by comparing them with the LS/MFT and popular predicting error method (PEM) through 200 Monte Carlo simulations. A model reduction problem is formulated with the AWLS/MFT algorithm, and comparisons are made via six examples with a variety of model reduction techniques, including the well-known balanced realization method. Here the AWLS/MFT algorithm manifests higher accuracy in almost all cases, and exhibits its unique flexibility and versatility. Armed with this model reduction, the AWLS/MFT algorithm is extended into MIMO transfer function system identification problems. The impact due to the discrepancy in bandwidths and gains among subsystem is explored through five examples. Finally, as a comprehensive application, the stability derivatives of the longitudinal and lateral dynamics of an F-18 aircraft are identified using physical flight data provided by NASA. A pole-constrained SIMO and MIMO AWLS/MFT algorithm is devised and analyzed. Monte Carlo simulations illustrate its high-noise rejecting properties. Utilizing the flight data, comparisons among different MFT algorithms are tabulated and the AWLS is found to be strongly favored in almost all facets.

  17. TAAR1 Modulates Cortical Glutamate NMDA Receptor Function.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Stefano; Lignani, Gabriele; Caffino, Lucia; Maggi, Silvia; Sukhanov, Ilya; Leo, Damiana; Mus, Liudmila; Emanuele, Marco; Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Harmeier, Anja; Medrihan, Lucian; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Chieregatti, Evelina; Hoener, Marius C; Benfenati, Fabio; Tucci, Valter; Fumagalli, Fabio; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-08-01

    Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the mammalian brain and known to influence subcortical monoaminergic transmission. Monoamines, such as dopamine, also play an important role within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) circuitry, which is critically involved in high-o5rder cognitive processes. TAAR1-selective ligands have shown potential antipsychotic, antidepressant, and pro-cognitive effects in experimental animal models; however, it remains unclear whether TAAR1 can affect PFC-related processes and functions. In this study, we document a distinct pattern of expression of TAAR1 in the PFC, as well as altered subunit composition and deficient functionality of the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the pyramidal neurons of layer V of PFC in mice lacking TAAR1. The dysregulated cortical glutamate transmission in TAAR1-KO mice was associated with aberrant behaviors in several tests, indicating a perseverative and impulsive phenotype of mutants. Conversely, pharmacological activation of TAAR1 with selective agonists reduced premature impulsive responses observed in the fixed-interval conditioning schedule in normal mice. Our study indicates that TAAR1 plays an important role in the modulation of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in the PFC and related functions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the development of TAAR1-based drugs could provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of disorders related to aberrant cortical functions. PMID:25749299

  18. Modulating functional and dysfunctional mentalizing by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Schuwerk, Tobias; Langguth, Berthold; Sommer, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Mentalizing, the ability to attribute mental states to others and oneself, is a cognitive function with high relevance for social interactions. Recent neuroscientific research has increasingly contributed to attempts to decompose this complex social cognitive function into constituting neurocognitive building blocks. Additionally, clinical research that focuses on social cognition to find links between impaired social functioning and neurophysiological deviations has accumulated evidence that mentalizing is affected in most psychiatric disorders. Recently, both lines of research have started to employ transcranial magnetic stimulation: the first to modulate mentalizing in order to specify its neurocognitive components, the latter to treat impaired mentalizing in clinical conditions. This review integrates findings of these two different approaches to draw a more detailed picture of the neurocognitive basis of mentalizing and its deviations in psychiatric disorders. Moreover, we evaluate the effectiveness of hitherto employed stimulation techniques and protocols, paradigms and outcome measures. Based on this overview we highlight new directions for future research on the neurocognitive basis of functional and dysfunctional social cognition. PMID:25477838

  19. Statistical universals reveal the structures and functions of human music.

    PubMed

    Savage, Patrick E; Brown, Steven; Sakai, Emi; Currie, Thomas E

    2015-07-21

    Music has been called "the universal language of mankind." Although contemporary theories of music evolution often invoke various musical universals, the existence of such universals has been disputed for decades and has never been empirically demonstrated. Here we combine a music-classification scheme with statistical analyses, including phylogenetic comparative methods, to examine a well-sampled global set of 304 music recordings. Our analyses reveal no absolute universals but strong support for many statistical universals that are consistent across all nine geographic regions sampled. These universals include 18 musical features that are common individually as well as a network of 10 features that are commonly associated with one another. They span not only features related to pitch and rhythm that are often cited as putative universals but also rarely cited domains including performance style and social context. These cross-cultural structural regularities of human music may relate to roles in facilitating group coordination and cohesion, as exemplified by the universal tendency to sing, play percussion instruments, and dance to simple, repetitive music in groups. Our findings highlight the need for scientists studying music evolution to expand the range of musical cultures and musical features under consideration. The statistical universals we identified represent important candidates for future investigation. PMID:26124105

  20. Cannabinoid modulation of functional connectivity within regions processing attentional salience.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Falkenberg, Irina; Martin-Santos, Rocio; Atakan, Zerrin; Crippa, Jose A; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Mick; McGuire, Philip

    2015-05-01

    There is now considerable evidence to support the hypothesis that psychotic symptoms are the result of abnormal salience attribution, and that the attribution of salience is largely mediated through the prefrontal cortex, the striatum, and the hippocampus. Although these areas show differential activation under the influence of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), the two major derivatives of cannabis sativa, little is known about the effects of these cannabinoids on the functional connectivity between these regions. We investigated this in healthy occasional cannabis users by employing event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) following oral administration of delta-9-THC, CBD, or a placebo capsule. Employing a seed cluster-based functional connectivity analysis that involved using the average time series from each seed cluster for a whole-brain correlational analysis, we investigated the effect of drug condition on functional connectivity between the seed clusters and the rest of the brain during an oddball salience processing task. Relative to the placebo condition, delta-9-THC and CBD had opposite effects on the functional connectivity between the dorsal striatum, the prefrontal cortex, and the hippocampus. Delta-9-THC reduced fronto-striatal connectivity, which was related to its effect on task performance, whereas this connection was enhanced by CBD. Conversely, mediotemporal-prefrontal connectivity was enhanced by delta-9-THC and reduced by CBD. Our results suggest that the functional integration of brain regions involved in salience processing is differentially modulated by single doses of delta-9-THC and CBD and that this relates to the processing of salient stimuli. PMID:25249057

  1. miRNA proxy approach reveals hidden functions of glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Kurcon, Tomasz; Liu, Zhongyin; Paradkar, Anika V.; Vaiana, Christopher A.; Koppolu, Sujeethraj; Agrawal, Praveen; Mahal, Lara K.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation, the most abundant posttranslational modification, holds an unprecedented capacity for altering biological function. Our ability to harness glycosylation as a means to control biological systems is hampered by our inability to pinpoint the specific glycans and corresponding biosynthetic enzymes underlying a biological process. Herein we identify glycosylation enzymes acting as regulatory elements within a pathway using microRNA (miRNA) as a proxy. Leveraging the target network of the miRNA-200 family (miR-200f), regulators of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), we pinpoint genes encoding multiple promesenchymal glycosylation enzymes (glycogenes). We focus on three enzymes, beta-1,3-glucosyltransferase (B3GLCT), beta-galactoside alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase 5 (ST3GAL5), and (alpha-N-acetyl-neuraminyl-2,3-beta-galactosyl-1,3)-N-acetylgalactosaminide alpha-2,6-sialyltransferase 5 (ST6GALNAC5), encoding glycans that are difficult to analyze by traditional methods. Silencing these glycogenes phenocopied the effect of miR-200f, inducing mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. In addition, all three are up-regulated in TGF-?–induced EMT, suggesting tight integration within the EMT-signaling network. Our work indicates that miRNA can act as a relatively simple proxy to decrypt which glycogenes, including those encoding difficult-to-analyze structures (e.g., proteoglycans, glycolipids), are functionally important in a biological pathway, setting the stage for the rapid identification of glycosylation enzymes driving disease states. PMID:26015571

  2. Phosphoproteome dynamics reveal novel ERK1/2 MAP kinase substrates with broad spectrum of functions

    PubMed Central

    Courcelles, Mathieu; Frémin, Christophe; Voisin, Laure; Lemieux, Sébastien; Meloche, Sylvain; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway is an evolutionarily conserved signaling module that controls many fundamental physiological processes. Deregulated activity of ERK1/2 MAP kinases is associated with developmental syndromes and several human diseases. Despite the importance of this pathway, a comprehensive picture of the natural substrate repertoire and biochemical mechanisms regulated by ERK1/2 is still lacking. In this study, we used large-scale quantitative phosphoproteomics and bioinformatics analyses to identify novel candidate ERK1/2 substrates based on their phosphorylation signature and kinetic profiles in epithelial cells. We identified a total of 7936 phosphorylation sites within 1861 proteins, of which 155 classify as candidate ERK1/2 substrates, including 128 new targets. Candidate ERK1/2 substrates are involved in diverse cellular processes including transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodeling, RNA splicing, cytoskeleton dynamics, cellular junctions and cell signaling. Detailed characterization of one newly identified substrate, the transcriptional regulator JunB, revealed that ERK1/2 phosphorylate JunB on a serine adjacent to the DNA-binding domain, resulting in increased DNA-binding affinity and transcriptional activity. Our study expands the spectrum of cellular functions controlled by ERK1/2 kinases. PMID:23712012

  3. Selection on soil microbiomes reveals reproducible impacts on plant function.

    PubMed

    Panke-Buisse, Kevin; Poole, Angela C; Goodrich, Julia K; Ley, Ruth E; Kao-Kniffin, Jenny

    2015-04-01

    Soil microorganisms found in the root zone impact plant growth and development, but the potential to harness these benefits is hampered by the sheer abundance and diversity of the players influencing desirable plant traits. Here, we report a high level of reproducibility of soil microbiomes in altering plant flowering time and soil functions when partnered within and between plant hosts. We used a multi-generation experimental system using Arabidopsis thaliana Col to select for soil microbiomes inducing earlier or later flowering times of their hosts. We then inoculated the selected microbiomes from the tenth generation of plantings into the soils of three additional A. thaliana genotypes (Ler, Be, RLD) and a related crucifer (Brassica rapa). With the exception of Ler, all other plant hosts showed a shift in flowering time corresponding with the inoculation of early- or late-flowering microbiomes. Analysis of the soil microbial community using 16 S rRNA gene sequencing showed distinct microbiota profiles assembling by flowering time treatment. Plant hosts grown with the late-flowering-associated microbiomes showed consequent increases in inflorescence biomass for three A. thaliana genotypes and an increase in total biomass for B. rapa. The increase in biomass was correlated with two- to five-fold enhancement of microbial extracellular enzyme activities associated with nitrogen mineralization in soils. The reproducibility of the flowering phenotype across plant hosts suggests that microbiomes can be selected to modify plant traits and coordinate changes in soil resource pools. PMID:25350154

  4. Dolphin whistles: a functional misnomer revealed by heliox breathing.

    PubMed

    Madsen, P T; Jensen, F H; Carder, D; Ridgway, S

    2012-04-23

    Delphinids produce tonal whistles shaped by vocal learning for acoustic communication. Unlike terrestrial mammals, delphinid sound production is driven by pressurized air within a complex nasal system. It is unclear how fundamental whistle contours can be maintained across a large range of hydrostatic pressures and air sac volumes. Two opposing hypotheses propose that tonal sounds arise either from tissue vibrations or through actual whistle production from vortices stabilized by resonating nasal air volumes. Here, we use a trained bottlenose dolphin whistling in air and in heliox to test these hypotheses. The fundamental frequency contours of stereotyped whistles were unaffected by the higher sound speed in heliox. Therefore, the term whistle is a functional misnomer as dolphins actually do not whistle, but form the fundamental frequency contour of their tonal calls by pneumatically induced tissue vibrations analogous to the operation of vocal folds in terrestrial mammals and the syrinx in birds. This form of tonal sound production by nasal tissue vibrations has probably evolved in delphinids to enable impedance matching to the water, and to maintain tonal signature contours across changes in hydrostatic pressures, air density and relative nasal air volumes during dives. PMID:21900314

  5. Proteomic profiling of high risk medulloblastoma reveals functional biology.

    PubMed

    Staal, Jerome A; Lau, Ling San; Zhang, Huizhen; Ingram, Wendy J; Hallahan, Andrew R; Northcott, Paul A; Pfister, Stefan M; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Rusert, Jessica M; Taylor, Michael D; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Packer, Roger J; Brown, Kristy J; Rood, Brian R

    2015-06-10

    Genomic characterization of medulloblastoma has improved molecular risk classification but struggles to define functional biological processes, particularly for the most aggressive subgroups. We present here a novel proteomic approach to this problem using a reference library of stable isotope labeled medulloblastoma-specific proteins as a spike-in standard for accurate quantification of the tumor proteome. Utilizing high-resolution mass spectrometry, we quantified the tumor proteome of group 3 medulloblastoma cells and demonstrate that high-risk MYC amplified tumors can be segregated based on protein expression patterns. We cross-validated the differentially expressed protein candidates using an independent transcriptomic data set and further confirmed them in a separate cohort of medulloblastoma tissue samples to identify the most robust proteogenomic differences. Interestingly, highly expressed proteins associated with MYC-amplified tumors were significantly related to glycolytic metabolic pathways via alternative splicing of pyruvate kinase (PKM) by heterogeneous ribonucleoproteins (HNRNPs). Furthermore, when maintained under hypoxic conditions, these MYC-amplified tumors demonstrated increased viability compared to non-amplified tumors within the same subgroup. Taken together, these findings highlight the power of proteomics as an integrative platform to help prioritize genetic and molecular drivers of cancer biology and behavior. PMID:25970789

  6. Acupuncture Modulates the Functional Connectivity of the Default Mode Network in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Kuangshi; Ren, Yi; Cui, Fangyuan; Xie, Zijing; Shin, Jae-Young; Tan, Zhongjian; Tang, Lixin; Bai, Lijun; Zou, Yihuai

    2014-01-01

    Abundant evidence from previous fMRI studies on acupuncture has revealed significant modulatory effects at widespread brain regions. However, few reports on the modulation to the default mode network (DMN) of stroke patients have been investigated in the field of acupuncture. To study the modulatory effects of acupuncture on the DMN of stroke patients, eight right hemispheric infarction and stable ischemic stroke patients and ten healthy subjects were recruited to undergo resting state fMRI scanning before and after acupuncture stimulation. Functional connectivity analysis was applied with the bilateral posterior cingulate cortices chosen as the seed regions. The main finding demonstrated that the interregional interactions between the ACC and PCC especially enhanced after acupuncture at GB34 in stroke patients, compared with healthy controls. The results indicated that the possible mechanisms of the modulatory effects of acupuncture on the DMN of stroke patients could be interpreted in terms of cognitive ability and motor function recovery. PMID:24734113

  7. Structure and Function of the SWIRM Domain, a Conserved Protein Module Found in Chromatin Regulatory Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Da,G.; Lenkart, J.; Zhao, K.; Shiekhattar, R.; Cairns, B.; Marmorstein, R.

    2006-01-01

    The SWIRM domain is a module found in the Swi3 and Rsc8 subunits of SWI/SNF-family chromatin remodeling complexes, and the Ada2 and BHC110/LSD1 subunits of chromatin modification complexes. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the SWIRM domain from Swi3 and characterize the in vitro and in vivo function of the SWIRM domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi3 and Rsc8. The Swi3 SWIRM forms a four-helix bundle containing a pseudo 2-fold axis and a helix-turn-helix motif commonly found in DNA-binding proteins. We show that the Swi3 SWIRM binds free DNA and mononucleosomes with high and comparable affinity and that a subset of Swi3 substitution mutants that display growth defects in vivo also show impaired DNA-binding activity in vitro, consistent with a nucleosome targeting function of this domain. Genetic and biochemical studies also reveal that the Rsc8 and Swi3 SWIRM domains are essential for the proper assembly and in vivo functions of their respective complexes. Together, these studies identify the SWIRM domain as an essential multifunctional module for the regulation of gene expression.

  8. Selective Modulation of Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity by HD-tACS Shapes Perception

    PubMed Central

    Helfrich, Randolph F.; Knepper, Hannah; Nolte, Guido; Strüber, Daniel; Rach, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory neuronal synchronization between cortical areas has been suggested to constitute a flexible mechanism to coordinate information flow in the human cerebral cortex. However, it remains unclear whether synchronized neuronal activity merely represents an epiphenomenon or whether it is causally involved in the selective gating of information. Here, we combined bilateral high-density transcranial alternating current stimulation (HD-tACS) at 40 Hz with simultaneous electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings to study immediate electrophysiological effects during the selective entrainment of oscillatory gamma-band signatures. We found that interhemispheric functional connectivity was modulated in a predictable, phase-specific way: In-phase stimulation enhanced synchronization, anti-phase stimulation impaired functional coupling. Perceptual correlates of these connectivity changes were found in an ambiguous motion task, which strongly support the functional relevance of long-range neuronal coupling. Additionally, our results revealed a decrease in oscillatory alpha power in response to the entrainment of gamma band signatures. This finding provides causal evidence for the antagonistic role of alpha and gamma oscillations in the parieto-occipital cortex and confirms that the observed gamma band modulations were physiological in nature. Our results demonstrate that synchronized cortical network activity across several spatiotemporal scales is essential for conscious perception and cognition. PMID:25549264

  9. Selective modulation of interhemispheric functional connectivity by HD-tACS shapes perception.

    PubMed

    Helfrich, Randolph F; Knepper, Hannah; Nolte, Guido; Strüber, Daniel; Rach, Stefan; Herrmann, Christoph S; Schneider, Till R; Engel, Andreas K

    2014-12-01

    Oscillatory neuronal synchronization between cortical areas has been suggested to constitute a flexible mechanism to coordinate information flow in the human cerebral cortex. However, it remains unclear whether synchronized neuronal activity merely represents an epiphenomenon or whether it is causally involved in the selective gating of information. Here, we combined bilateral high-density transcranial alternating current stimulation (HD-tACS) at 40 Hz with simultaneous electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings to study immediate electrophysiological effects during the selective entrainment of oscillatory gamma-band signatures. We found that interhemispheric functional connectivity was modulated in a predictable, phase-specific way: In-phase stimulation enhanced synchronization, anti-phase stimulation impaired functional coupling. Perceptual correlates of these connectivity changes were found in an ambiguous motion task, which strongly support the functional relevance of long-range neuronal coupling. Additionally, our results revealed a decrease in oscillatory alpha power in response to the entrainment of gamma band signatures. This finding provides causal evidence for the antagonistic role of alpha and gamma oscillations in the parieto-occipital cortex and confirms that the observed gamma band modulations were physiological in nature. Our results demonstrate that synchronized cortical network activity across several spatiotemporal scales is essential for conscious perception and cognition. PMID:25549264

  10. Cued Spatial Attention Drives Functionally Relevant Modulation of the Mu Rhythm in Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    E-print Network

    Jones, Stephanie R.

    Cued spatial attention modulates functionally relevant alpha rhythms in visual cortices in humans. Here, we present evidence for analogous phenomena in primary somatosensory neocortex (SI). Using magnetoencephalography, ...

  11. Analysis and measurement of the modulation transfer function of harmonic shear wave induced phase encoding imaging

    PubMed Central

    McAleavey, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Shear wave induced phase encoding (SWIPE) imaging generates ultrasound backscatter images of tissue-like elastic materials by using traveling shear waves to encode the lateral position of the scatters in the phase of the received echo. In contrast to conventional ultrasound B-scan imaging, SWIPE offers the potential advantages of image formation without beam focusing or steering from a single transducer element, lateral resolution independent of aperture size, and the potential to achieve relatively high lateral resolution with low frequency ultrasound. Here a Fourier series description of the phase modulated echo signal is developed, demonstrating that echo harmonics at multiples of the shear wave frequency reveal target k-space data at identical multiples of the shear wavenumber. Modulation transfer functions of SWIPE imaging systems are calculated for maximum shear wave acceleration and maximum shear constraints, and compared with a conventionally focused aperture. The relative signal-to-noise ratio of the SWIPE method versus a conventionally focused aperture is found through these calculations. Reconstructions of wire targets in a gelatin phantom using 1 and 3.5?MHz ultrasound and a cylindrical shear wave source are presented, generated from the fundamental and second harmonic of the shear wave modulation frequency, demonstrating weak dependence of lateral resolution with ultrasound frequency. PMID:24815265

  12. Functional connectivity and cholinergic modulation in auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Metherate, Raju

    2011-11-01

    Although it is known that primary auditory cortex (A1) contributes to the processing and perception of sound, its precise functions and the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Recent studies point to a remarkably broad spectral range of largely subthreshold inputs to individual neurons in A1--seemingly encompassing, in some cases, the entire audible spectrum--as evidence for potential, and potentially unique, cortical functions. We have proposed a general mechanism for spectral integration by which information converges on neurons in A1 via a combination of thalamocortical pathways and intracortical long-distance, "horizontal", pathways. Here, this proposal is briefly reviewed and updated with results from multiple laboratories. Since spectral integration in A1 is dynamically regulated, we also show how one regulatory mechanism--modulation by the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh)--could act within the hypothesized framework to alter integration in single neurons. The results of these studies promote a cellular understanding of information processing in A1. PMID:21144860

  13. Quetiapine modulates functional connectivity in brain aggression networks.

    PubMed

    Klasen, Martin; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Schwenzer, Michael; Mathiak, Krystyna A; Sarkheil, Pegah; Weber, René; Mathiak, Klaus

    2013-07-15

    Aggressive behavior is associated with dysfunctions in an affective regulation network encompassing amygdala and prefrontal areas such as orbitofrontal (OFC), anterior cingulate (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In particular, prefrontal regions have been postulated to control amygdala activity by inhibitory projections, and this process may be disrupted in aggressive individuals. The atypical antipsychotic quetiapine successfully attenuates aggressive behavior in various disorders; the underlying neural processes, however, are unknown. A strengthened functional coupling in the prefrontal-amygdala system may account for these anti-aggressive effects. An inhibition of this network has been reported for virtual aggression in violent video games as well. However, there have been so far no in-vivo observations of pharmacological influences on corticolimbic projections during human aggressive behavior. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, quetiapine and placebo were administered for three successive days prior to an fMRI experiment. In this experiment, functional brain connectivity was assessed during virtual aggressive behavior in a violent video game and an aggression-free control task in a non-violent modification. Quetiapine increased the functional connectivity of ACC and DLPFC with the amygdala during virtual aggression, whereas OFC-amygdala coupling was attenuated. These effects were observed neither for placebo nor for the non-violent control. These results demonstrate for the first time a pharmacological modification of aggression-related human brain networks in a naturalistic setting. The violence-specific modulation of prefrontal-amygdala networks appears to control aggressive behavior and provides a neurobiological model for the anti-aggressive effects of quetiapine. PMID:23501053

  14. Functional Connectivity during Modulation of Tinnitus with Orofacial Maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Megan H.; Solowski, Nancy; Wineland, Andre; Okuyemi, Oluwafunmilola; Nicklaus, Joyce; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Burton, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine changes in cortical neural networks as defined by resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging during voluntary modulation of tinnitus with orofacial maneuvers. Study Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Academic medical center. Subjects and Methods Participants were scanned during the maneuver and also at baseline to serve as their own control. The authors chose, a priori, 58 seed regions to evaluate previously described cortical neural networks by computing temporal correlations between all seed region pairs. Seed regions whose correlations significantly differed between rest and maneuver (P < .05, uncorrected) entered into a second-stage analysis of computing the correlation coefficient between the seed region and time courses in each of the remaining brain voxels. A threshold-free cluster enhancement permutation analysis evaluated the distribution of these correlation coefficients after transformation to Fisher z scores and registration to a surface-based reconstruction using Freesurfer. Results The median age for the 16 subjects was 54 years (range, 27–72 years), and all had subjective, unilateral or bilateral, nonpulsatile tinnitus for 6 months or longer. In 9 subjects who could voluntarily increase the loudness of their tinnitus, there were no significant differences in functional connectivity in any cortical networks. A separate analysis evaluated results from 3 patients who decreased the loudness of their tinnitus. Four subjects were excluded because of excessive motion in the scanner. Conclusion The absence of significant differences in functional connectivity due to voluntary orofacial maneuvers that increased tinnitus loudness failed to confirm prior reports of altered cerebral blood flows during somatomotor behaviors. PMID:22675003

  15. Functional proteomic analysis reveals the involvement of KIAA1199 in breast cancer growth, motility and invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background KIAA1199 is a recently identified novel gene that is up-regulated in human cancer with poor survival. Our proteomic study on signaling polarity in chemotactic cells revealed KIAA1199 as a novel protein target that may be involved in cellular chemotaxis and motility. In the present study, we examined the functional significance of KIAA1199 expression in breast cancer growth, motility and invasiveness. Methods We validated the previous microarray observation by tissue microarray immunohistochemistry using a TMA slide containing 12 breast tumor tissue cores and 12 corresponding normal tissues. We performed the shRNA-mediated knockdown of KIAA1199 in MDA-MB-231 and HS578T cells to study the role of this protein in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis in vitro. We studied the effects of KIAA1199 knockdown in vivo in two groups of mice (n?=?5). We carried out the SILAC LC-MS/MS based proteomic studies on the involvement of KIAA1199 in breast cancer. Results KIAA1199 mRNA and protein was significantly overexpressed in breast tumor specimens and cell lines as compared with non-neoplastic breast tissues from large-scale microarray and studies of breast cancer cell lines and tumors. To gain deeper insights into the novel role of KIAA1199 in breast cancer, we modulated KIAA1199 expression using shRNA-mediated knockdown in two breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and HS578T), expressing higher levels of KIAA1199. The KIAA1199 knockdown cells showed reduced motility and cell proliferation in vitro. Moreover, when the knockdown cells were injected into the mammary fat pads of female athymic nude mice, there was a significant decrease in tumor incidence and growth. In addition, quantitative proteomic analysis revealed that knockdown of KIAA1199 in breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells affected a broad range of cellular functions including apoptosis, metabolism and cell motility. Conclusions Our findings indicate that KIAA1199 may play an important role in breast tumor growth and invasiveness, and that it may represent a novel target for biomarker development and a novel therapeutic target for breast cancer. PMID:24628760

  16. Single Molecule Analysis of Functionally Asymmetric G Protein-coupled Receptor (GPCR) Oligomers Reveals Diverse Spatial and Structural Assemblies*?

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Kim C.; Fanelli, Francesca; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) into dimers and higher order oligomers represents a key mechanism in pleiotropic signaling, yet how individual protomers function within oligomers remains poorly understood. We present a super-resolution imaging approach, resolving single GPCR molecules to ?8 nm resolution in functional asymmetric dimers and oligomers using dual-color photoactivatable dyes and localization microscopy (PD-PALM). PD-PALM of two functionally defined mutant luteinizing hormone receptors (LHRs), a ligand-binding deficient receptor (LHRB?) and a signaling-deficient (LHRS?) receptor, which only function via intermolecular cooperation, favored oligomeric over dimeric formation. PD-PALM imaging of trimers and tetramers revealed specific spatial organizations of individual protomers in complexes where the ratiometric composition of LHRB? to LHRS? modulated ligand-induced signal sensitivity. Structural modeling of asymmetric LHR oligomers strongly aligned with PD-PALM-imaged spatial arrangements, identifying multiple possible helix interfaces mediating inter-protomer associations. Our findings reveal that diverse spatial and structural assemblies mediating GPCR oligomerization may acutely fine-tune the cellular signaling profile. PMID:25516594

  17. Stimulation of Glia Reveals Modulation of Mammalian Spinal Motor Networks by Adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Acton, David; Miles, Gareth B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence that glia can release modulators to influence the excitability of neighbouring neurons, the importance of gliotransmission for the operation of neural networks and in shaping behaviour remains controversial. Here we characterise the contribution of glia to the modulation of the mammalian spinal central pattern generator for locomotion, the output of which is directly relatable to a defined behaviour. Glia were stimulated by specific activation of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), an endogenous G-protein coupled receptor preferentially expressed by spinal glia during ongoing activity of the spinal central pattern generator for locomotion. Selective activation of PAR1 by the agonist TFLLR resulted in a reversible reduction in the frequency of locomotor-related bursting recorded from ventral roots of spinal cord preparations isolated from neonatal mice. In the presence of the gliotoxins methionine sulfoximine or fluoroacetate, TFLLR had no effect, confirming the specificity of PAR1 activation to glia. The modulation of burst frequency upon PAR1 activation was blocked by the non-selective adenosine-receptor antagonist theophylline and by the A1-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, but not by the A2A-receptor antagonist SCH5826, indicating production of extracellular adenosine upon glial stimulation, followed by A1-receptor mediated inhibition of neuronal activity. Modulation of network output following glial stimulation was also blocked by the ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL67156, indicating glial release of ATP and its subsequent degradation to adenosine rather than direct release of adenosine. Glial stimulation had no effect on rhythmic activity recorded following blockade of inhibitory transmission, suggesting that glial cell-derived adenosine acts via inhibitory circuit components to modulate locomotor-related output. Finally, the modulation of network output by endogenous adenosine was found to scale with the frequency of network activity, implying activity-dependent release of adenosine. Together, these data indicate that glia play an active role in the modulation of mammalian locomotor networks, providing negative feedback control that may stabilise network activity. PMID:26252389

  18. Vitamin C modulates TET1 function during somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiekai; Guo, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Haoyu; Yang, Jiaqi; Liu, He; Wang, Xiaoshan; Hu, Xiao; Gu, Tianpeng; Zhou, Zhiwei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Jiadong; Wu, Hongling; Mao, Shi-Qing; Mo, Kunlun; Li, Yingying; Lai, Keyu; Qi, Jing; Yao, Hongjie; Pan, Guangjin; Xu, Guo-Liang; Pei, Duanqing

    2013-12-01

    Vitamin C, a micronutrient known for its anti-scurvy activity in humans, promotes the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) through the activity of histone demethylating dioxygenases. TET hydroxylases are also dioxygenases implicated in active DNA demethylation. Here we report that TET1 either positively or negatively regulates somatic cell reprogramming depending on the absence or presence of vitamin C. TET1 deficiency enhances reprogramming, and its overexpression impairs reprogramming in the context of vitamin C by modulating the obligatory mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). In the absence of vitamin C, TET1 promotes somatic cell reprogramming independent of MET. Consistently, TET1 regulates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) formation at loci critical for MET in a vitamin C-dependent fashion. Our findings suggest that vitamin C has a vital role in determining the biological outcome of TET1 function at the cellular level. Given its benefit to human health, vitamin C should be investigated further for its role in epigenetic regulation. PMID:24162740

  19. Curcumin Modulates Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cell-Derived Exosomal Function

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Carlos J. Diaz; Lynch, James C.; Leaf, Patrick; Gonda, Amber; Ferguson Bennit, Heather R.; Griffiths, Duncan; Wall, Nathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rates of all cancer types. One potential explanation for the aggressiveness of this disease is that cancer cells have been found to communicate with one another using membrane-bound vesicles known as exosomes. These exosomes carry pro-survival molecules and increase the proliferation, survival, and metastatic potential of recipient cells, suggesting that tumor-derived exosomes are powerful drivers of tumor progression. Thus, to successfully address and eradicate pancreatic cancer, it is imperative to develop therapeutic strategies that neutralize cancer cells and exosomes simultaneously. Curcumin, a turmeric root derivative, has been shown to have potent anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo. Recent studies have suggested that exosomal curcumin exerts anti-inflammatory properties on recipient cells. However, curcumin’s effects on exosomal pro-tumor function have yet to be determined. We hypothesize that curcumin will alter the pro-survival role of exosomes from pancreatic cancer cells toward a pro-death role, resulting in reduced cell viability of recipient pancreatic cancer cells. The main objective of this study was to determine the functional alterations of exosomes released by pancreatic cancer cells exposed to curcumin compared to exosomes from untreated pancreatic cancer cells. We demonstrate, using an in vitro cell culture model involving pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2, that curcumin is incorporated into exosomes isolated from curcumin-treated pancreatic cancer cells as observed by spectral studies and fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, curcumin is delivered to recipient pancreatic cancer cells via exosomes, promoting cytotoxicity as demonstrated by Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy as well as AlamarBlue and Trypan blue exclusion assays. Collectively, these data suggest that the efficacy of curcumin may be enhanced in pancreatic cancer cells through exosomal facilitation. PMID:26177391

  20. Form and Function: An Organic Chemistry Module. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Bruce; Mazzocchi, Paul; Hearle, Robert

    This teacher's guide is designed to provide science teachers with the necessary guidance and suggestions for teaching organic chemistry. In this book, the diverse field of organic chemistry modules is introduced. The material in this book can be integrated with the other modules in a sequence that helps students to see that chemistry is a unified…

  1. Identification and characterization of the lysobactin biosynthetic gene cluster reveals mechanistic insights into an unusual termination module architecture.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jie; Robbel, Lars; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2011-05-27

    Lysobactin (katanosin B) is a macrocyclic depsipeptide, displaying high antibacterial activity against human pathogens. In this work, we have identified and characterized the entire biosynthetic gene cluster responsible for lysobactin assembly. Sequential analysis of the Lysobacter sp. ATCC 53042 genome revealed the lysobactin gene cluster to encode two multimodular nonribosomal peptide synthetases. As the number of modules found within the synthetases LybA and LybB directly correlates with the primary sequence of lysobactin, a linear logic of lysobactin biosynthesis is proposed. Investigation of adenylation domain specificities in vitro confirmed the direct association between the synthetases and lysobactin biosynthesis. Furthermore, an unusual tandem thioesterase architecture of the LybB termination module was identified. Biochemical characterization of the individual thioesterases in vitro provides evidence that solely penultimate thioesterase domain mediates the cyclization and simultaneous release of lysobactin. PMID:21609846

  2. Discovering Distinct Functional Modules of Specific Cancer Types Using Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ru; Wang, Xiaosheng; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Background. The molecular profiles exhibited in different cancer types are very different; hence, discovering distinct functional modules associated with specific cancer types is very important to understand the distinct functions associated with them. Protein-protein interaction networks carry vital information about molecular interactions in cellular systems, and identification of functional modules (subgraphs) in these networks is one of the most important applications of biological network analysis. Results. In this study, we developed a new graph theory based method to identify distinct functional modules from nine different cancer protein-protein interaction networks. The method is composed of three major steps: (i) extracting modules from protein-protein interaction networks using network clustering algorithms; (ii) identifying distinct subgraphs from the derived modules; and (iii) identifying distinct subgraph patterns from distinct subgraphs. The subgraph patterns were evaluated using experimentally determined cancer-specific protein-protein interaction data from the Ingenuity knowledgebase, to identify distinct functional modules that are specific to each cancer type. Conclusion. We identified cancer-type specific subgraph patterns that may represent the functional modules involved in the molecular pathogenesis of different cancer types. Our method can serve as an effective tool to discover cancer-type specific functional modules from large protein-protein interaction networks. PMID:26495282

  3. The Structure of a Streptomyces avermitilis ?-l-Rhamnosidase Reveals a Novel Carbohydrate-binding Module CBM67 within the Six-domain Arrangement*

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Zui; Jackson, Adam; Michikawa, Mari; Maehara, Tomoko; Momma, Mitsuru; Henrissat, Bernard; Gilbert, Harry J.; Kaneko, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    ?-l-Rhamnosidases hydrolyze ?-linked l-rhamnosides from oligosaccharides or polysaccharides. We determined the crystal structure of the glycoside hydrolase family 78 Streptomyces avermitilis ?-l-rhamnosidase (SaRha78A) in its free and l-rhamnose complexed forms, which revealed the presence of six domains N, D, E, F, A, and C. In the ligand complex, l-rhamnose was bound in the proposed active site of the catalytic module, revealing the likely catalytic mechanism of SaRha78A. Glu636 is predicted to donate protons to the glycosidic oxygen, and Glu895 is the likely catalytic general base, activating the nucleophilic water, indicating that the enzyme operates through an inverting mechanism. Replacement of Glu636 and Glu895 resulted in significant loss of ?-rhamnosidase activity. Domain D also bound l-rhamnose in a calcium-dependent manner, with a KD of 135 ?m. Domain D is thus a non-catalytic carbohydrate binding module (designated SaCBM67). Mutagenesis and structural data identified the amino acids in SaCBM67 that target the features of l-rhamnose that distinguishes it from the other major sugars present in plant cell walls. Inactivation of SaCBM67 caused a substantial reduction in the activity of SaRha78A against the polysaccharide composite gum arabic, but not against aryl rhamnosides, indicating that SaCBM67 contributes to enzyme function against insoluble substrates. PMID:23486481

  4. Saturation transfer difference NMR reveals functionally essential kinetic differences for a sugar-binding repressor proteinw

    E-print Network

    Davis, Ben G.

    Saturation transfer difference NMR reveals functionally essential kinetic differences for a sugar on the contrasting biological roles of these two sugars. Saturation transfer difference NMR (STD NMR) is a power- ful operator site.4 Despite this essential physiological functional difference, the crystal structures

  5. Please cite this article in press as: M. Schiavon, et al., Transcriptome profiling of genes differentially modulated by sulfur and chromium identifies potential targets for phytoremediation and reveals a complex SCr interplay on sulfate transport regulati

    E-print Network

    differentially modulated by sulfur and chromium identifies potential targets for phytoremediation and reveals differentially modulated by sulfur and chromium identifies potential targets for phytoremediation and reveals 2012 Accepted 25 August 2012 Available online xxx Keywords: Chromium Sulfur Brassica juncea

  6. Network analysis of S. aureus response to ramoplanin reveals modules for virulence factors and resistance mechanisms and characteristic novel genes.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Devika; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2015-12-10

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and ramoplanin is an antimicrobial attributed for effective treatment. The goal of this study was to examine the transcriptomic profiles of ramoplanin sensitive and resistant S. aureus to identify putative modules responsible for virulence and resistance-mechanisms and its characteristic novel genes. The dysregulated genes were used to reconstruct protein functional association networks for virulence-factors and resistance-mechanisms individually. Strong link between metabolic-pathways and development of virulence/resistance is suggested. We identified 15 putative modules of virulence factors. Six hypothetical genes were annotated with novel virulence activity among which SACOL0281 was discovered to be an essential virulence factor EsaD. The roles of MazEF toxin-antitoxin system, SACOL0202/SACOL0201 two-component system and that of amino-sugar and nucleotide-sugar metabolism in virulence are also suggested. In addition, 14 putative modules of resistance mechanisms including modules of ribosomal protein-coding genes and metabolic pathways such as biotin-synthesis, TCA-cycle, riboflavin-biosynthesis, peptidoglycan-biosynthesis etc. are also indicated. PMID:26255091

  7. A Common Evolutionary Origin for Tailed-Bacteriophage Functional Modules and Bacterial Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Veesler, David; Cambillau, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Bacteriophages belonging to the order Caudovirales possess a tail acting as a molecular nanomachine used during infection to recognize the host cell wall, attach to it, pierce it, and ensure the high-efficiency delivery of the genomic DNA to the host cytoplasm. In this review, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the various proteins constituting tailed bacteriophages from a structural viewpoint. To this end, we had in mind to pinpoint the resemblances within and between functional modules such as capsid/tail connectors, the tails themselves, or the tail distal host recognition devices, termed baseplates. This comparison has been extended to bacterial machineries embedded in the cell wall, for which shared molecular homology with phages has been recently revealed. This is the case for the type VI secretion system (T6SS), an inverted phage tail at the bacterial surface, or bacteriocins. Gathering all these data, we propose that a unique ancestral protein fold may have given rise to a large number of bacteriophage modules as well as to some related bacterial machinery components. PMID:21885679

  8. Spatial control of functional properties via octahedral modulations in complex oxide superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, E. J.; Colby, R.; Wang, Q.; Karapetrova, E.; Schlepütz, C. M.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; May, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Control of atomic structure, namely the topology of the corner-connected metal-oxygen octahedra, has emerged as an important route to tune the functional properties at oxide interfaces. Here we investigate isovalent manganite superlattices (SLs), [(La0.7Sr0.3MnO3)n/(Eu0.7Sr0.3MnO3)n] × m, as a route to spatial control over electronic bandwidth and ferromagnetism through the creation of octahedral superstructures. Electron energy loss spectroscopy confirms a uniform Mn valence state throughout the SLs. In contrast, the presence of modulations of the MnO6 octahedral rotations along the growth direction commensurate with the SL period is revealed by scanning transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. We show that the Curie temperatures of the constituent materials can be systematically engineered via the octahedral superstructures leading to a modulated magnetization in samples where the SL period is larger than the interfacial octahedral coupling length scale, whereas a single magnetic transition is observed in the short-period SLs.

  9. Finite-element modelling reveals force modulation of jaw adductors in stag beetles

    PubMed Central

    Goyens, J.; Soons, J.; Aerts, P.; Dirckx, J.

    2014-01-01

    Male stag beetles carry large and heavy mandibles that arose through sexual selection over mating rights. Although the mandibles of Cyclommatus metallifer males are used in pugnacious fights, they are surprisingly slender. Our bite force measurements show a muscle force reduction of 18% for tip biting when compared with bites with the teeth located halfway along the mandibles. This suggests a behavioural adaptation to prevent failure. We confirmed this by constructing finite-element (FE) models that mimic both natural bite situations as well as the hypothetical situation of tip biting without muscle force modulation. These models, based on micro-CT images, investigate the material stresses in the mandibles for different combinations of bite location and muscle force. Young's modulus of the cuticle was experimentally determined to be 5.1 GPa with the double indentation method, and the model was validated by digital image correlation on living beetles. FE analysis proves to be a valuable tool in the investigation of the trade-offs of (animal) weapon morphology and usage. Furthermore, the demonstrated bite force modulation in male stag beetles suggests the presence of mechanosensors inside the armature. PMID:25297317

  10. Temporal Modulation Transfer Functions Measured From Auditory-Nerve Responses Following Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Sushrut; Heinz, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of auditory-nerve (AN) fibers to encode modulation frequencies, as characterized by temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs), generally shows a low-pass shape with a cut-off frequency that increases with fiber characteristic frequency (CF). Because AN-fiber bandwidth increases with CF, this result has been interpreted to suggest that peripheral filtering has a significant effect on limiting the encoding of higher modulation frequencies. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), which is typically associated with broadened tuning, is thus predicted to increase the range of modulation frequencies encoded; however, perceptual studies have generally not supported this prediction. The present study sought to determine whether the range of modulation frequencies encoded by AN fibers is affected by SNHL, and whether the effects of SNHL on envelope coding are similar at all modulation frequencies within the TMTF passband. Modulation response gain for sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) tones was measured as a function of modulation frequency, with the carrier frequency placed at fiber CF. TMTFs were compared between normal-hearing chinchillas and chinchillas with a noise-induced hearing loss for which AN fibers had significantly broadened tuning. Synchrony and phase responses for individual SAM-tone components were quantified to explore a variety of factors that can influence modulation coding. Modulation gain was found to be higher than normal in noise-exposed fibers across the entire range of modulation frequencies encoded by AN fibers. The range of modulation frequencies encoded by noise-exposed AN fibers was not affected by SNHL, as quantified by TMTF 3- and 10-dB cut-off frequencies. These results suggest that physiological factors other than peripheral filtering may have a significant role in determining the range of modulation frequencies encoded in AN fibers. Furthermore, these neural data may help to explain the lack of a consistent association between perceptual measures of temporal resolution and degraded frequency selectivity. PMID:22366500

  11. Temporal modulation transfer functions measured from auditory-nerve responses following sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kale, Sushrut; Heinz, Michael G

    2012-04-01

    The ability of auditory-nerve (AN) fibers to encode modulation frequencies, as characterized by temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs), generally shows a low-pass shape with a cut-off frequency that increases with fiber characteristic frequency (CF). Because AN-fiber bandwidth increases with CF, this result has been interpreted to suggest that peripheral filtering has a significant effect on limiting the encoding of higher modulation frequencies. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), which is typically associated with broadened tuning, is thus predicted to increase the range of modulation frequencies encoded; however, perceptual studies have generally not supported this prediction. The present study sought to determine whether the range of modulation frequencies encoded by AN fibers is affected by SNHL, and whether the effects of SNHL on envelope coding are similar at all modulation frequencies within the TMTF passband. Modulation response gain for sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) tones was measured as a function of modulation frequency, with the carrier frequency placed at fiber CF. TMTFs were compared between normal-hearing chinchillas and chinchillas with a noise-induced hearing loss for which AN fibers had significantly broadened tuning. Synchrony and phase responses for individual SAM tone components were quantified to explore a variety of factors that can influence modulation coding. Modulation gain was found to be higher than normal in noise-exposed fibers across the entire range of modulation frequencies encoded by AN fibers. The range of modulation frequencies encoded by noise-exposed AN fibers was not affected by SNHL, as quantified by TMTF 3- and 10-dB cut-off frequencies. These results suggest that physiological factors other than peripheral filtering may have a significant role in determining the range of modulation frequencies encoded in AN fibers. Furthermore, these neural data may help to explain the lack of a consistent association between perceptual measures of temporal resolution and degraded frequency selectivity. PMID:22366500

  12. Cholesterol Levels Modulate EGF Receptor-Mediated Signaling by Altering Receptor Function and Trafficking

    E-print Network

    Pike, Linda J.

    Cholesterol Levels Modulate EGF Receptor-Mediated Signaling by Altering Receptor Function to be affected by changes in cellular cholesterol content. However, no information is available regarding the locus (or loci) in the pathways that are susceptible to modulation by cholesterol. We report here

  13. Bio-mimicking of Proline-Rich Motif Applied to Carbon Nanotube Reveals Unexpected Subtleties Underlying Nanoparticle Functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A.; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Bo; Yang, Zaixing; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-11-01

    Here, we report computational studies of the SH3 protein domain interacting with various single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) either bare or functionalized by mimicking the proline-rich motif (PRM) ligand (PPPVPPRR) and compare it to the SH3-PRM complex binding. With prolines or a single arginine attached, the SWCNT gained slightly on specificity when compared with the bare control, whereas with multi-arginine systems the specificity dropped dramatically to our surprise. Although the electrostatic interaction provided by arginines is crucial in the recognition between PRM and SH3 domain, our results suggest that attaching multiple arginines to the SWCNT has a detrimental effect on the binding affinity. Detailed analysis of the MD trajectories found two main factors that modulate the specificity of the binding: the existence of competing acidic patches at the surface of SH3 that leads to ``trapping and clamping'' by the arginines, and the rigidity of the SWCNT introducing entropic penalties in the proper binding. Further investigation revealed that the same ``clamping'' phenomenon exits in the PRM-SH3 system, which has not been reported in previous literature. The competing effects between nanoparticle and its functionalization components revealed by our model system should be of value to current and future nanomedicine designs.

  14. Inferring Protein Function Module From Protein Interaction Information 2009 B.Comp. Dissertation (Final Year Project Report)

    E-print Network

    Wong, Limsoon

    Inferring Protein Function Module From Protein Interaction Information 2009 - 1 - B.Comp. Dissertation (Final Year Project Report) Inferring Protein Function Module From Protein Interaction Information 2008/2009 #12;Inferring Protein Function Module From Protein Interaction Information 2009 - 2 - B

  15. Functional Constraint Profiling of a Viral Protein Reveals Discordance of Evolutionary Conservation and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Nicholas C.; Olson, C. Anders; Du, Yushen; Le, Shuai; Tran, Kevin; Remenyi, Roland; Gong, Danyang; Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Qi, Hangfei; Wu, Ting-Ting; Sun, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Viruses often encode proteins with multiple functions due to their compact genomes. Existing approaches to identify functional residues largely rely on sequence conservation analysis. Inferring functional residues from sequence conservation can produce false positives, in which the conserved residues are functionally silent, or false negatives, where functional residues are not identified since they are species-specific and therefore non-conserved. Furthermore, the tedious process of constructing and analyzing individual mutations limits the number of residues that can be examined in a single study. Here, we developed a systematic approach to identify the functional residues of a viral protein by coupling experimental fitness profiling with protein stability prediction using the influenza virus polymerase PA subunit as the target protein. We identified a significant number of functional residues that were influenza type-specific and were evolutionarily non-conserved among different influenza types. Our results indicate that type-specific functional residues are prevalent and may not otherwise be identified by sequence conservation analysis alone. More importantly, this technique can be adapted to any viral (and potentially non-viral) protein where structural information is available. PMID:26132554

  16. Facilitating Structure-Function Studies of CFTR Modulator Sites with Efficiencies in Mutagenesis and Functional Screening.

    PubMed

    Molinski, Steven V; Ahmadi, Saumel; Hung, Maurita; Bear, Christine E

    2015-12-01

    There are nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene associated with cystic fibrosis disease, and to date, the only approved drug, Kalydeco, has been effective in rescuing the functional expression of a small subset of these mutant proteins with defects in channel activation. However, there is currently an urgent need to assess other mutations for possible rescue by Kalydeco, and further, definition of the binding site of such modulators on CFTR would enhance our understanding of the mechanism of action of such therapeutics. Here, we describe a simple and rapid one-step PCR-based site-directed mutagenesis method to generate mutations in the CFTR gene. This method was used to generate CFTR mutants bearing deletions (p.Gln2_Trp846del, p.Ser700_Asp835del, p.Ile1234_Arg1239del) and truncation with polyhistidine tag insertion (p.Glu1172-3Gly-6-His*), which either recapitulate a disease phenotype or render tools for modulator binding site identification, with subsequent evaluation of drug responses using a high-throughput (384-well) membrane potential-sensitive fluorescence assay of CFTR channel activity within a 1 wk time frame. This proof-of-concept study shows that these methods enable rapid and quantitative comparison of multiple CFTR mutants to emerging drugs, facilitating future large-scale efforts to stratify mutants according to their "theratype" or most promising targeted therapy. PMID:26385858

  17. A functional module-based exploration between inflammation and cancer in esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nannan; Li, Chunhua; Huang, Yan; Yi, Ying; Bo, Wanlan; Li, Chunmiao; Li, Yue; Hu, Yongfei; Li, Kongning; Wang, Hong; Zhuang, Liwei; Fan, Huihui; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation contributing to the underlying progression of diverse human cancers has been generally appreciated, however, explorations into the molecular links between inflammation and cancer in esophagus are still at its early stage. In our study, we presented a functional module-based approach, in combination with multiple data resource (gene expression, protein-protein interactions (PPI), transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations) to decipher the underlying links. Via mapping differentially expressed disease genes, functional disease modules were identified. As indicated, those common genes and interactions tended to play important roles in linking inflammation and cancer. Based on crosstalk analysis, we demonstrated that, although most disease genes were not shared by both kinds of modules, they might act through participating in the same or similar functions to complete the molecular links. Additionally, we applied pivot analysis to extract significant regulators for per significant crosstalk module pair. As shown, pivot regulators might manipulate vital parts of the module subnetworks, and then work together to bridge inflammation and cancer in esophagus. Collectively, based on our functional module analysis, we demonstrated that shared genes or interactions, significant crosstalk modules, and those significant pivot regulators were served as different functional parts underlying the molecular links between inflammation and cancer in esophagus. PMID:26489668

  18. Drosophila Dicer-2 has an RNA interference-independent function that modulates Toll immune signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaowei; Wu, Di; Liu, Yongxiang; Xia, Xiaoling; Gong, Wanyun; Qiu, Yang; Yang, Jie; Zheng, Ya; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Yu-Feng; Xiang, Ye; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2015-10-01

    Dicer-2 is the central player for small interfering RNA biogenesis in the Drosophila RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Intriguingly, we found that Dicer-2 has an unconventional RNAi-independent function that positively modulates Toll immune signaling, which defends against Gram-positive bacteria, fungi, and some viruses, in both cells and adult flies. The loss of Dicer-2 expression makes fruit flies more susceptible to fungal infection. We further revealed that Dicer-2 posttranscriptionally modulates Toll signaling because Dicer-2 is required for the proper expression of Toll protein but not for Toll protein stability or Toll mRNA transcription. Moreover, Dicer-2 directly binds to the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of Toll mRNA via its PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille) domain and is required for protein translation mediated by Toll 3'UTR. The loss of Toll 3'UTR binding activity makes Dicer-2 incapable of promoting Toll signaling. These data indicate that the interaction between Dicer-2 and Toll mRNA plays a pivotal role in Toll immune signaling. In addition, we found that Dicer-2 is also required for the Toll signaling induced by two different RNA viruses in Drosophila cells. Consequently, our findings uncover a novel RNAi-independent function of Dicer-2 in the posttranscriptional regulation of Toll protein expression and signaling, indicate an unexpected intersection of the RNAi pathway and the Toll pathway, and provide new insights into Toll immune signaling, Drosophila Dicer-2, and probably Dicer and Dicer-related proteins in other organisms. PMID:26601278

  19. Drosophila Dicer-2 has an RNA interference–independent function that modulates Toll immune signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaowei; Wu, Di; Liu, Yongxiang; Xia, Xiaoling; Gong, Wanyun; Qiu, Yang; Yang, Jie; Zheng, Ya; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Yu-Feng; Xiang, Ye; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Dicer-2 is the central player for small interfering RNA biogenesis in the Drosophila RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Intriguingly, we found that Dicer-2 has an unconventional RNAi-independent function that positively modulates Toll immune signaling, which defends against Gram-positive bacteria, fungi, and some viruses, in both cells and adult flies. The loss of Dicer-2 expression makes fruit flies more susceptible to fungal infection. We further revealed that Dicer-2 posttranscriptionally modulates Toll signaling because Dicer-2 is required for the proper expression of Toll protein but not for Toll protein stability or Toll mRNA transcription. Moreover, Dicer-2 directly binds to the 3? untranslated region (3?UTR) of Toll mRNA via its PAZ (Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille) domain and is required for protein translation mediated by Toll 3?UTR. The loss of Toll 3?UTR binding activity makes Dicer-2 incapable of promoting Toll signaling. These data indicate that the interaction between Dicer-2 and Toll mRNA plays a pivotal role in Toll immune signaling. In addition, we found that Dicer-2 is also required for the Toll signaling induced by two different RNA viruses in Drosophila cells. Consequently, our findings uncover a novel RNAi-independent function of Dicer-2 in the posttranscriptional regulation of Toll protein expression and signaling, indicate an unexpected intersection of the RNAi pathway and the Toll pathway, and provide new insights into Toll immune signaling, Drosophila Dicer-2, and probably Dicer and Dicer-related proteins in other organisms. PMID:26601278

  20. Cloud-based simulations on Google Exacycle reveal ligand modulation of GPCR activation pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlhoff, Kai J.; Shukla, Diwakar; Lawrenz, Morgan; Bowman, Gregory R.; Konerding, David E.; Belov, Dan; Altman, Russ B.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2014-01-01

    Simulations can provide tremendous insight into the atomistic details of biological mechanisms, but micro- to millisecond timescales are historically only accessible on dedicated supercomputers. We demonstrate that cloud computing is a viable alternative that brings long-timescale processes within reach of a broader community. We used Google's Exacycle cloud-computing platform to simulate two milliseconds of dynamics of a major drug target, the G-protein-coupled receptor ?2AR. Markov state models aggregate independent simulations into a single statistical model that is validated by previous computational and experimental results. Moreover, our models provide an atomistic description of the activation of a G-protein-coupled receptor and reveal multiple activation pathways. Agonists and inverse agonists interact differentially with these pathways, with profound implications for drug design.

  1. Cloud-based simulations on Google Exacycle reveal ligand modulation of GPCR activation pathways.

    PubMed

    Kohlhoff, Kai J; Shukla, Diwakar; Lawrenz, Morgan; Bowman, Gregory R; Konerding, David E; Belov, Dan; Altman, Russ B; Pande, Vijay S

    2014-01-01

    Simulations can provide tremendous insight into the atomistic details of biological mechanisms, but micro- to millisecond timescales are historically only accessible on dedicated supercomputers. We demonstrate that cloud computing is a viable alternative that brings long-timescale processes within reach of a broader community. We used Google's Exacycle cloud-computing platform to simulate two milliseconds of dynamics of a major drug target, the G-protein-coupled receptor ?2AR. Markov state models aggregate independent simulations into a single statistical model that is validated by previous computational and experimental results. Moreover, our models provide an atomistic description of the activation of a G-protein-coupled receptor and reveal multiple activation pathways. Agonists and inverse agonists interact differentially with these pathways, with profound implications for drug design. PMID:24345941

  2. Functional photoreceptor loss revealed with adaptive optics: An alternate cause of color blindness

    E-print Network

    Functional photoreceptor loss revealed with adaptive optics: An alternate cause of color blindness individual variation in color matching behavior. Recently, red­green color blindness has also been shown phenotypic differences within classically defined groups of color blind individuals. Here, adaptive optics

  3. Perfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress

    E-print Network

    Pennsylvania, University of

    Perfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress Jiongjiong) Despite the prevalence of stress in everyday life and its impact on happiness, health, and cognition, little is known about the neural substrate of the experience of everyday stress in humans. We use

  4. Expression Analysis of ABC Transporters Reveals Differential Functions of Tandemly Duplicated Genes in

    E-print Network

    Baillie, David

    molecules across the plasma membrane or the intracellular membranes of organelles, such as the endoplasmicExpression Analysis of ABC Transporters Reveals Differential Functions of Tandemly Duplicated Genes, BC Canada V5Z 1L6 We have previously identified 60 predicted ABC transporter genes

  5. The Neural Consequences of Repeated Cocaine Exposure Revealed by Functional MRI in Awake Rats

    E-print Network

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    The Neural Consequences of Repeated Cocaine Exposure Revealed by Functional MRI in Awake Rats models of cocaine addiction is an invaluable tool for investigating the neuroadaptations that lead circuits affected by repeated cocaine administration. Rats were given an injection of cocaine (15 mg/kg, i

  6. A Multifunctional Turnip Crinkle Virus Replication Enhancer Revealed by in vivo Functional SELEX

    E-print Network

    Simon, Anne

    A Multifunctional Turnip Crinkle Virus Replication Enhancer Revealed by in vivo Functional SELEX College Park College Park, MD 20742, USA The motif1-hairpin (M1H), located on (2)-strands of Turnip, Turnip Crinkle Virus; SELEX, systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment; M1H, motif1

  7. Markov state models provide insights into dynamic modulation of protein function.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Diwakar; Hernández, Carlos X; Weber, Jeffrey K; Pande, Vijay S

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Protein function is inextricably linked to protein dynamics. As we move from a static structural picture to a dynamic ensemble view of protein structure and function, novel computational paradigms are required for observing and understanding conformational dynamics of proteins and its functional implications. In principle, molecular dynamics simulations can provide the time evolution of atomistic models of proteins, but the long time scales associated with functional dynamics make it difficult to observe rare dynamical transitions. The issue of extracting essential functional components of protein dynamics from noisy simulation data presents another set of challenges in obtaining an unbiased understanding of protein motions. Therefore, a methodology that provides a statistical framework for efficient sampling and a human-readable view of the key aspects of functional dynamics from data analysis is required. The Markov state model (MSM), which has recently become popular worldwide for studying protein dynamics, is an example of such a framework. In this Account, we review the use of Markov state models for efficient sampling of the hierarchy of time scales associated with protein dynamics, automatic identification of key conformational states, and the degrees of freedom associated with slow dynamical processes. Applications of MSMs for studying long time scale phenomena such as activation mechanisms of cellular signaling proteins has yielded novel insights into protein function. In particular, from MSMs built using large-scale simulations of GPCRs and kinases, we have shown that complex conformational changes in proteins can be described in terms of structural changes in key structural motifs or "molecular switches" within the protein, the transitions between functionally active and inactive states of proteins proceed via multiple pathways, and ligand or substrate binding modulates the flux through these pathways. Finally, MSMs also provide a theoretical toolbox for studying the effect of nonequilibrium perturbations on conformational dynamics. Considering that protein dynamics in vivo occur under nonequilibrium conditions, MSMs coupled with nonequilibrium statistical mechanics provide a way to connect cellular components to their functional environments. Nonequilibrium perturbations of protein folding MSMs reveal the presence of dynamically frozen glass-like states in their conformational landscape. These frozen states are also observed to be rich in ?-sheets, which indicates their possible role in the nucleation of ?-sheet rich aggregates such as those observed in amyloid-fibril formation. Finally, we describe how MSMs have been used to understand the dynamical behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins such as amyloid-?, human islet amyloid polypeptide, and p53. While certainly not a panacea for studying functional dynamics, MSMs provide a rigorous theoretical foundation for understanding complex entropically dominated processes and a convenient lens for viewing protein motions. PMID:25625937

  8. Markov State Models Provide Insights into Dynamic Modulation of Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Protein function is inextricably linked to protein dynamics. As we move from a static structural picture to a dynamic ensemble view of protein structure and function, novel computational paradigms are required for observing and understanding conformational dynamics of proteins and its functional implications. In principle, molecular dynamics simulations can provide the time evolution of atomistic models of proteins, but the long time scales associated with functional dynamics make it difficult to observe rare dynamical transitions. The issue of extracting essential functional components of protein dynamics from noisy simulation data presents another set of challenges in obtaining an unbiased understanding of protein motions. Therefore, a methodology that provides a statistical framework for efficient sampling and a human-readable view of the key aspects of functional dynamics from data analysis is required. The Markov state model (MSM), which has recently become popular worldwide for studying protein dynamics, is an example of such a framework. In this Account, we review the use of Markov state models for efficient sampling of the hierarchy of time scales associated with protein dynamics, automatic identification of key conformational states, and the degrees of freedom associated with slow dynamical processes. Applications of MSMs for studying long time scale phenomena such as activation mechanisms of cellular signaling proteins has yielded novel insights into protein function. In particular, from MSMs built using large-scale simulations of GPCRs and kinases, we have shown that complex conformational changes in proteins can be described in terms of structural changes in key structural motifs or “molecular switches” within the protein, the transitions between functionally active and inactive states of proteins proceed via multiple pathways, and ligand or substrate binding modulates the flux through these pathways. Finally, MSMs also provide a theoretical toolbox for studying the effect of nonequilibrium perturbations on conformational dynamics. Considering that protein dynamics in vivo occur under nonequilibrium conditions, MSMs coupled with nonequilibrium statistical mechanics provide a way to connect cellular components to their functional environments. Nonequilibrium perturbations of protein folding MSMs reveal the presence of dynamically frozen glass-like states in their conformational landscape. These frozen states are also observed to be rich in ?-sheets, which indicates their possible role in the nucleation of ?-sheet rich aggregates such as those observed in amyloid-fibril formation. Finally, we describe how MSMs have been used to understand the dynamical behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins such as amyloid-?, human islet amyloid polypeptide, and p53. While certainly not a panacea for studying functional dynamics, MSMs provide a rigorous theoretical foundation for understanding complex entropically dominated processes and a convenient lens for viewing protein motions. PMID:25625937

  9. A fast hierarchical clustering algorithm for functional modules discovery in protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxin; Li, Min; Chen, Jianer; Pan, Yi

    2011-01-01

    As advances in the technologies of predicting protein interactions, huge data sets portrayed as networks have been available. Identification of functional modules from such networks is crucial for understanding principles of cellular organization and functions. However, protein interaction data produced by high-throughput experiments are generally associated with high false positives, which makes it difficult to identify functional modules accurately. In this paper, we propose a fast hierarchical clustering algorithm HC-PIN based on the local metric of edge clustering value which can be used both in the unweighted network and in the weighted network. The proposed algorithm HC-PIN is applied to the yeast protein interaction network, and the identified modules are validated by all the three types of Gene Ontology (GO) Terms: Biological Process, Molecular Function, and Cellular Component. The experimental results show that HC-PIN is not only robust to false positives, but also can discover the functional modules with low density. The identified modules are statistically significant in terms of three types of GO annotations. Moreover, HC-PIN can uncover the hierarchical organization of functional modules with the variation of its parameter's value, which is approximatively corresponding to the hierarchical structure of GO annotations. Compared to other previous competing algorithms, our algorithm HC-PIN is faster and more accurate. PMID:20733244

  10. A nanobody modulates the p53 transcriptional program without perturbing its functional architecture

    PubMed Central

    Bethuyne, Jonas; De Gieter, Steven; Zwaenepoel, Olivier; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Durinck, Kaat; Verhelle, Adriaan; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Speleman, Frank; Loris, Remy; Gettemans, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The p53 transcription factor plays an important role in genome integrity. To perform this task, p53 regulates the transcription of genes promoting various cellular outcomes including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence. The precise regulation of this activity remains elusive as numerous mechanisms, e.g. posttranslational modifications of p53 and (non-)covalent p53 binding partners, influence the p53 transcriptional program. We developed a novel, non-invasive tool to manipulate endogenous p53. Nanobodies (Nb), raised against the DNA-binding domain of p53, allow us to distinctively target both wild type and mutant p53 with great specificity. Nb3 preferentially binds ‘structural’ mutant p53, i.e. R175H and R282W, while a second but distinct nanobody, Nb139, binds both mutant and wild type p53. The co-crystal structure of the p53 DNA-binding domain in complex with Nb139 (1.9 Ĺ resolution) reveals that Nb139 binds opposite the DNA-binding surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nb139 does not disturb the functional architecture of the p53 DNA-binding domain using conformation-specific p53 antibody immunoprecipitations, glutaraldehyde crosslinking assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Functionally, the binding of Nb139 to p53 allows us to perturb the transactivation of p53 target genes. We propose that reduced recruitment of transcriptional co-activators or modulation of selected post-transcriptional modifications account for these observations. PMID:25324313

  11. An epigenomic roadmap to induced pluripotency reveals DNA methylation as a reprogramming modulator

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Tonge, Peter D.; Puri, Mira C.; Lee, Seungbok; Park, Hansoo; Lee, Won-Chul; Hussein, Samer M. I.; Bleazard, Thomas; Yun, Ji-Young; Kim, Jihye; Li, Mira; Cloonan, Nicole; Wood, David; Clancy, Jennifer L.; Mosbergen, Rowland; Yi, Jae-Hyuk; Yang, Kap-Seok; Kim, Hyungtae; Rhee, Hwanseok; Wells, Christine A.; Preiss, Thomas; Grimmond, Sean M.; Rogers, Ian M.; Nagy, Andras; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells involves a dynamic rearrangement of the epigenetic landscape. To characterize this epigenomic roadmap, we have performed MethylC-seq, ChIP-seq (H3K4/K27/K36me3) and RNA-Seq on samples taken at several time points during murine secondary reprogramming as part of Project Grandiose. We find that DNA methylation gain during reprogramming occurs gradually, while loss is achieved only at the ESC-like state. Binding sites of activated factors exhibit focal demethylation during reprogramming, while ESC-like pluripotent cells are distinguished by extension of demethylation to the wider neighbourhood. We observed that genes with CpG-rich promoters demonstrate stable low methylation and strong engagement of histone marks, whereas genes with CpG-poor promoters are safeguarded by methylation. Such DNA methylation-driven control is the key to the regulation of ESC-pluripotency genes, including Dppa4, Dppa5a and Esrrb. These results reveal the crucial role that DNA methylation plays as an epigenetic switch driving somatic cells to pluripotency. PMID:25493341

  12. An epigenomic roadmap to induced pluripotency reveals DNA methylation as a reprogramming modulator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Tonge, Peter D; Puri, Mira C; Lee, Seungbok; Park, Hansoo; Lee, Won-Chul; Hussein, Samer M I; Bleazard, Thomas; Yun, Ji-Young; Kim, Jihye; Li, Mira; Cloonan, Nicole; Wood, David; Clancy, Jennifer L; Mosbergen, Rowland; Yi, Jae-Hyuk; Yang, Kap-Seok; Kim, Hyungtae; Rhee, Hwanseok; Wells, Christine A; Preiss, Thomas; Grimmond, Sean M; Rogers, Ian M; Nagy, Andras; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells involves a dynamic rearrangement of the epigenetic landscape. To characterize this epigenomic roadmap, we have performed MethylC-seq, ChIP-seq (H3K4/K27/K36me3) and RNA-Seq on samples taken at several time points during murine secondary reprogramming as part of Project Grandiose. We find that DNA methylation gain during reprogramming occurs gradually, while loss is achieved only at the ESC-like state. Binding sites of activated factors exhibit focal demethylation during reprogramming, while ESC-like pluripotent cells are distinguished by extension of demethylation to the wider neighbourhood. We observed that genes with CpG-rich promoters demonstrate stable low methylation and strong engagement of histone marks, whereas genes with CpG-poor promoters are safeguarded by methylation. Such DNA methylation-driven control is the key to the regulation of ESC-pluripotency genes, including Dppa4, Dppa5a and Esrrb. These results reveal the crucial role that DNA methylation plays as an epigenetic switch driving somatic cells to pluripotency. PMID:25493341

  13. NSP-Cas protein structures reveal a promiscuous interaction module in cell signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, P.D.; Robinson, H.; Wallez, Y.; Dobaczewska, M. K.; Lee, J. J.; Pasquale, E. B.; Riedl, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Members of the novel SH2-containing protein (NSP) and Crk-associated substrate (Cas) protein families form multidomain signaling platforms that mediate cell migration and invasion through a collection of distinct signaling motifs. Members of each family interact via their respective C-terminal domains, but the mechanism of this association has remained enigmatic. Here we present the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain from the NSP protein BCAR3 and the complex of NSP3 with p130Cas. BCAR3 adopts the Cdc25-homology fold of Ras GTPase exchange factors, but it has a 'closed' conformation incapable of enzymatic activity. The structure of the NSP3-p130Cas complex reveals that this closed conformation is instrumental for interaction of NSP proteins with a focal adhesion-targeting domain present in Cas proteins. This enzyme-to-adaptor conversion enables high-affinity, yet promiscuous, interactions between NSP and Cas proteins and represents an unprecedented mechanistic paradigm linking cellular signaling networks.

  14. Modulating Vesicle Priming Reveals that Vesicle Immobilization Is Necessary but not Sufficient for Fusion-Competence

    PubMed Central

    Yizhar, Ofer; Ashery, Uri

    2008-01-01

    In neurons and neuroendocrine cells, docked vesicles need to undergo priming to become fusion competent. Priming is a multi-step process that was shown to be associated with vesicle immobilization. However, it is not known whether vesicle immobilization is sufficient to acquire complete fusion competence. To extend our understanding of the physical manifestation of vesicle priming, we took advantage of tomosyn, a SNARE-related protein that specifically inhibits vesicle priming, and measured its effect on vesicle dynamics in live chromaffin cells using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We show here that while in control cells vesicles undergo immobilization before fusion, vesicle immobilization is attenuated in tomosyn overexpressing cells. This in turn increases the turnover rate of vesicles near the membrane and attenuates the fusion of newcomer vesicles. Moreover, the release probability of immobile vesicles in tomosyn cells is significantly reduced, suggesting that immobilization is an early and necessary step in priming but is insufficient, as further molecular processes are needed to acquire complete fusion competence. Using tomosyn as a molecular tool we provide a mechanistic link between functional docking and priming and suggest that functional docking is the first step in vesicle priming, followed by molecular modifications that do not translate into changes in vesicle mobility. PMID:18628949

  15. Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptors Differentially Contribute to Coronary and Mesenteric Vascular Function Without Modulating Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Barrett Mueller, Katelee; Bender, Shawn B; Hong, Kwangseok; Yang, Yan; Aronovitz, Mark; Jaisser, Frederic; Hill, Michael A; Jaffe, Iris Z

    2015-11-01

    Arteriolar vasoreactivity tightly regulates tissue-specific blood flow and contributes to systemic blood pressure (BP) but becomes dysfunctional in the setting of cardiovascular disease. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is known to regulate BP via the kidney and by vasoconstriction in smooth muscle cells. Although endothelial cells (EC) express MR, the contribution of EC-MR to BP and resistance vessel function remains unclear. To address this, we created a mouse with MR specifically deleted from EC (EC-MR knockout [EC-MR-KO]) but with intact leukocyte MR expression and normal renal MR function. Telemetric BP studies reveal no difference between male EC-MR-KO mice and MR-intact littermates in systolic, diastolic, circadian, or salt-sensitive BP or in the hypertensive responses to aldosterone±salt or angiotensin II±l-nitroarginine methyl ester. Vessel myography demonstrated normal vasorelaxation in mesenteric and coronary arterioles from EC-MR-KO mice. After exposure to angiotensin II-induced hypertension, impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation was prevented in EC-MR-KO mice in mesenteric vessels but not in coronary vessels. Mesenteric vessels from angiotensin II-exposed EC-MR-KO mice showed increased maximum responsiveness to acetylcholine when compared with MR-intact vessels, a difference that is lost with indomethacin+l-nitroarginine methyl ester pretreatment. These data support that EC-MR plays a role in regulating endothelial function in hypertension. Although there was no effect of EC-MR deletion on mesenteric vasoconstriction, coronary arterioles from EC-MR-KO mice showed decreased constriction to endothelin-1 and thromboxane agonist at baseline and also after exposure to hypertension. These data support that EC-MR participates in regulation of vasomotor function in a vascular bed-specific manner that is also modulated by risk factors, such as hypertension. PMID:26351033

  16. Genetic variants of ApoE and ApoER2 differentially modulate endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Victoria; Konaniah, Eddy S.; Herz, Joachim; Gerard, Robert D.; Jung, Eunjeong; Yuhanna, Ivan S.; Ahmed, Mohamed; Hui, David Y.; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W.

    2014-01-01

    It is poorly understood why there is greater cardiovascular disease risk associated with the apolipoprotein E4 (apoE) allele vs. apoE3, and also greater risk with the LRP8/apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) variant ApoER2-R952Q. Little is known about the function of the apoE–ApoER2 tandem outside of the central nervous system. We now report that in endothelial cells apoE3 binding to ApoER2 stimulates endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and endothelial cell migration, and it also attenuates monocyte–endothelial cell adhesion. However, apoE4 does not stimulate eNOS or endothelial cell migration or dampen cell adhesion, and alternatively it selectively antagonizes apoE3/ApoER2 actions. The contrasting endothelial actions of apoE4 vs. apoE3 require the N-terminal to C-terminal interaction in apoE4 that distinguishes it structurally from apoE3. Reconstitution experiments further reveal that ApoER2-R952Q is a loss-of-function variant of the receptor in endothelium. Carotid artery reendothelialization is decreased in ApoER2?/? mice, and whereas adenoviral-driven apoE3 expression in wild-type mice has no effect, apoE4 impairs reendothelialization. Moreover, in a model of neointima formation invoked by carotid artery endothelial denudation, ApoER2?/? mice display exaggerated neointima development. Thus, the apoE3/ApoER2 tandem promotes endothelial NO production, endothelial repair, and endothelial anti-inflammatory properties, and it prevents neointima formation. In contrast, apoE4 and ApoER2-R952Q display dominant-negative action and loss of function, respectively. Thus, genetic variants of apoE and ApoER2 impact cardiovascular health by differentially modulating endothelial function. PMID:25197062

  17. Association between Periodontal Disease and Inflammatory Arthritis Reveals Modulatory Functions by Melanocortin Receptor Type 3

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Madeira, Mila F.M.; Norling, Lucy V.; Alsam, Asil; Curtis, Michael A.; da Silva, Tarcília A.; Perretti, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Because there is clinical evidence for an association between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis, it is important to develop suitable experimental models to explore pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities. The K/BxN serum model of inflammatory arthritis was applied using distinct protocols, and modulation of joint disruption afforded by dexamethasone and calcitonin was established in comparison to the melanocortin (MC) receptor agonist DTrp8–?-melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH; DTrp). Wild-type and MC receptor type 3 (MC3)-null mice of different ages were also used. There was significant association between severity of joint disease, induced with distinct protocols and volumes of the arthritogenic K/BxN serum, and periodontal bone damage. Therapeutic treatment with 10 ?g dexamethasone, 30 ng elcatonin, and 20 ?g DTrp per mouse revealed unique and distinctive pharmacological properties, with only DTrp protecting both joint and periodontal tissue. Further analyses in nonarthritic animals revealed higher susceptibility to periodontal bone loss in Mc3r?/? compared with wild-type mice, with significant exacerbation at 14 weeks of age. These data reveal novel protective properties of endogenous MC3 on periodontal status in health and disease and indicate that MC3 activation could lead to the development of a new genus of anti-arthritic bone-sparing therapeutics. PMID:24979595

  18. Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-05-15

    Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

  19. Metagenomic analysis reveals significant changes of microbial compositions and protective functions during drinking water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yuanqing; Ma, Liping; Yang, Ying; Ju, Feng; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Wu, Wei-Min; Zhang, Tong

    2013-12-01

    The metagenomic approach was applied to characterize variations of microbial structure and functions in raw (RW) and treated water (TW) in a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) at Pearl River Delta, China. Microbial structure was significantly influenced by the treatment processes, shifting from Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria in RW to Alphaproteobacteria in TW. Further functional analysis indicated the basic metabolic functions of microorganisms in TW did not vary considerably. However, protective functions, i.e. glutathione synthesis genes in `oxidative stress' and `detoxification' subsystems, significantly increased, revealing the surviving bacteria may have higher chlorine resistance. Similar results were also found in glutathione metabolism pathway, which identified the major reaction for glutathione synthesis and supported more genes for glutathione metabolism existed in TW. This metagenomic study largely enhanced our knowledge about the influences of treatment processes, especially chlorination, on bacterial community structure and protective functions (e.g. glutathione metabolism) in ecosystems of DWTPs.

  20. Functional Connectivity Estimated from Resting-State fMRI Reveals Selective Alterations in Male Adolescents with Pure Conduct Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lu, Feng-Mei; Zhou, Jian-Song; Zhang, Jiang; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Qi; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Yuan, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is characterized by a persistent pattern of antisocial behavior and aggression in childhood and adolescence. Previous task-based and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have revealed widespread brain regional abnormalities in adolescents with CD. However, whether the resting-state networks (RSNs) are altered in adolescents with CD remains unknown. In this study, resting-state fMRI data were first acquired from eighteen male adolescents with pure CD and eighteen age- and gender-matched typically developing (TD) individuals. Independent component analysis (ICA) was implemented to extract nine representative RSNs, and the generated RSNs were then compared to show the differences between the CD and TD groups. Interestingly, it was observed from the brain mapping results that compared with the TD group, the CD group manifested decreased functional connectivity in four representative RSNs: the anterior default mode network (left middle frontal gyrus), which is considered to be correlated with impaired social cognition, the somatosensory network (bilateral supplementary motor area and right postcentral gyrus), the lateral visual network (left superior occipital gyrus), and the medial visual network (right fusiform, left lingual gyrus and right calcarine), which are expected to be relevant to the perceptual systems responsible for perceptual dysfunction in male adolescents with CD. Importantly, the novel findings suggested that male adolescents with pure CD were identified to have dysfunctions in both low-level perceptual networks (the somatosensory network and visual network) and a high-order cognitive network (the default mode network). Revealing the changes in the functional connectivity of these RSNs enhances our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of emotion and social cognition and the regulation of perception in adolescents with CD. PMID:26713867

  1. Systems-Based Analyses of Brain Regions Functionally Impacted in Parkinson's Disease Reveals Underlying Causal Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Emig-Agius, Dorothea; Bessarabova, Marina; Ivliev, Alexander E.; Schüle, Birgit; Alexander, Jeff; Wallace, William; Halliday, Glenda M.; Langston, J. William; Braxton, Scott; Yednock, Ted; Shaler, Thomas; Johnston, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed analysis of disease-affected tissue provides insight into molecular mechanisms contributing to pathogenesis. Substantia nigra, striatum, and cortex are functionally connected with increasing degrees of alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease. We undertook functional and causal pathway analysis of gene expression and proteomic alterations in these three regions, and the data revealed pathways that correlated with disease progression. In addition, microarray and RNAseq experiments revealed previously unidentified causal changes related to oligodendrocyte function and synaptic vesicle release, and these and other changes were reflected across all brain regions. Importantly, subsets of these changes were replicated in Parkinson's disease blood; suggesting peripheral tissue may provide important avenues for understanding and measuring disease status and progression. Proteomic assessment revealed alterations in mitochondria and vesicular transport proteins that preceded gene expression changes indicating defects in translation and/or protein turnover. Our combined approach of proteomics, RNAseq and microarray analyses provides a comprehensive view of the molecular changes that accompany functional loss and alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease, and may be instrumental to understand, diagnose and follow Parkinson's disease progression. PMID:25170892

  2. Survivin modulates genes with divergent molecular functions and regulates proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells through Evi-1.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, S; Hoggatt, J; Singh, P; Abe, M; Speth, J M; Hu, P; Conway, E M; Nucifora, G; Yamaguchi, S; Pelus, L M

    2015-02-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein Survivin regulates hematopoiesis, although its mechanisms of regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remain largely unknown. While investigating conditional Survivin deletion in mice, we found that Survivin was highly expressed in phenotypically defined HSCs, and Survivin deletion in mice resulted in significantly reduced total marrow HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Transcriptional analysis of Survivin(-/-) HSCs revealed altered expression of multiple genes not previously linked to Survivin activity. In particular, Survivin deletion significantly reduced expression of the Evi-1 transcription factor indispensable for HSC function, and the downstream Evi-1 target genes Gata2, Pbx1 and Sall2. The loss of HSCs following Survivin deletion and impaired long-term HSC repopulating function could be partially rescued by ectopic Evi-1 expression in Survivin -/- HSCs. These data demonstrate that Survivin partially regulates HSC function by modulating the Evi-1 transcription factor and its downstream targets and identify new genetic pathways in HSCs regulated by Survivin. PMID:24903482

  3. Cadmium modulates adipocyte functions in metallothionein-null mice.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Takashige; Nishiyama, Kaori; Kadota, Yoshito; Sato, Masao; Inoue, Masahisa; Suzuki, Shinya

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes a reduction of adipocyte size and the modulation of adipokine expression. To further investigate the significance of the Cd action, we studied the effect of Cd on the white adipose tissue (WAT) of metallothionein null (MT(-/-)) mice, which cannot form atoxic Cd-MT complexes and are used for evaluating Cd as free ions, and wild type (MT(+/+)) mice. Cd administration more significantly reduced the adipocyte size of MT(-/-) mice than that of MT(+/+) mice. Cd exposure also induced macrophage recruitment to WAT with an increase in the expression level of Ccl2 (MCP-1) in the MT(-/-) mice. The in vitro exposure of Cd to adipocytes induce triglyceride release into culture medium, decrease in the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and lipid hydrolysis at 24 h, and at 48 h increase in phosphorylation of the lipid-droplet-associated protein perilipin, which facilitates the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes. Therefore, the reduction in adipocyte size by Cd may arise from an imbalance between lipid synthesis and lipolysis. In addition, the expression levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin decreased in adipocytes. Taken together, exposure to Cd may induce unusually small adipocytes and modulate the expression of adipokines differently from the case of physiologically small adipocytes, and may accelerate the risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23921151

  4. Functional Redundancy Patterns Reveal Non-Random Assembly Rules in a Species-Rich Marine Assemblage

    PubMed Central

    Guillemot, Nicolas; Kulbicki, Michel; Chabanet, Pascale; Vigliola, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between species and the functional diversity of assemblages is fundamental in ecology because it contains key information on functional redundancy, and functionally redundant ecosystems are thought to be more resilient, resistant and stable. However, this relationship is poorly understood and undocumented for species-rich coastal marine ecosystems. Here, we used underwater visual censuses to examine the patterns of functional redundancy for one of the most diverse vertebrate assemblages, the coral reef fishes of New Caledonia, South Pacific. First, we found that the relationship between functional and species diversity displayed a non-asymptotic power-shaped curve, implying that rare functions and species mainly occur in highly diverse assemblages. Second, we showed that the distribution of species amongst possible functions was significantly different from a random distribution up to a threshold of ?90 species/transect. Redundancy patterns for each function further revealed that some functions displayed fast rates of increase in redundancy at low species diversity, whereas others were only becoming redundant past a certain threshold. This suggested non-random assembly rules and the existence of some primordial functions that would need to be fulfilled in priority so that coral reef fish assemblages can gain a basic ecological structure. Last, we found little effect of habitat on the shape of the functional-species diversity relationship and on the redundancy of functions, although habitat is known to largely determine assemblage characteristics such as species composition, biomass, and abundance. Our study shows that low functional redundancy is characteristic of this highly diverse fish assemblage, and, therefore, that even species-rich ecosystems such as coral reefs may be vulnerable to the removal of a few keystone species. PMID:22039543

  5. Modulation of the pupil function of microscope objective lens for multifocal multi-photon microscopy using a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method for high precision modulation of the pupil function of a microscope objective lens to improve the performance of multifocal multi-photon microscopy (MMM). To modulate the pupil function, we adopt a spatial light modulator (SLM) and place it at the conjugate position of the objective lens. The SLM can generate an arbitrary number of spots to excite the multiple fluorescence spots (MFS) at the desired positions and intensities by applying an appropriate computer-generated hologram (CGH). This flexibility allows us to control the MFS according to the photobleaching level of a fluorescent protein and phototoxicity of a specimen. However, when a large number of excitation spots are generated, the intensity distribution of the MFS is significantly different from the one originally designed due to misalignment of the optical setup and characteristics of the SLM. As a result, the image of a specimen obtained using laser scanning for the MFS has block noise segments because the SLM could not generate a uniform MFS. To improve the intensity distribution of the MFS, we adaptively redesigned the CGH based on the observed MFS. We experimentally demonstrate an improvement in the uniformity of a 10 × 10 MFS grid using a dye solution. The simplicity of the proposed method will allow it to be applied for calibration of MMM before observing living tissue. After the MMM calibration, we performed laser scanning with two-photon excitation to observe a real specimen without detecting block noise segments.

  6. Structure of an Arrestin2-clathrin Complex Reveals a Novel Clathrin Binding Domain that Modulates Receptor Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, D.; Kern, R; Puthenveedu, M; von Zastrow, M; Williams, J; Benovic, J

    2009-01-01

    Non-visual arrestins play a pivotal role as adaptor proteins in regulating the signaling and trafficking of multiple classes of receptors. Although arrestin interaction with clathrin, AP-2, and phosphoinositides contributes to receptor trafficking, little is known about the configuration and dynamics of these interactions. Here, we identify a novel interface between arrestin2 and clathrin through x-ray diffraction analysis. The intrinsically disordered clathrin binding box of arrestin2 interacts with a groove between blades 1 and 2 in the clathrin {beta}-propeller domain, whereas an 8-amino acid splice loop found solely in the long isoform of arrestin2 (arrestin2L) interacts with a binding pocket formed by blades 4 and 5 in clathrin. The apposition of the two binding sites in arrestin2L suggests that they are exclusive and may function in higher order macromolecular structures. Biochemical analysis demonstrates direct binding of clathrin to the splice loop in arrestin2L, whereas functional analysis reveals that both binding domains contribute to the receptor-dependent redistribution of arrestin2L to clathrin-coated pits. Mutagenesis studies reveal that the clathrin binding motif in the splice loop is (L/I){sub 2}GXL. Taken together, these data provide a framework for understanding the dynamic interactions between arrestin2 and clathrin and reveal an essential role for this interaction in arrestin-mediated endocytosis.

  7. r Human Brain Mapping 00:0000 (2011) r Modulation of Working Memory Function by

    E-print Network

    2011-01-01

    r Human Brain Mapping 00:00­00 (2011) r Modulation of Working Memory Function by Motivation Through through potential monetary punishment on working memory. We employed functional MRI during a delayed mod- ulate performance on working memory tasks through top-down signals via amplification of activity

  8. Genomic Heterogeneity of Osteosarcoma - Shift from Single Candidates to Functional Modules

    PubMed Central

    Maugg, Doris; Eckstein, Gertrud; Baumhoer, Daniel; Nathrath, Michaela; Korsching, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS), a bone tumor, exhibit a complex karyotype. On the genomic level a highly variable degree of alterations in nearly all chromosomal regions and between individual tumors is observable. This hampers the identification of common drivers in OS biology. To identify the common molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of OS, we follow the hypothesis that all the copy number-associated differences between the patients are intercepted on the level of the functional modules. The implementation is based on a network approach utilizing copy number associated genes in OS, paired expression data and protein interaction data. The resulting functional modules of tightly connected genes were interpreted regarding their biological functions in OS and their potential prognostic significance. We identified an osteosarcoma network assembling well-known and lesser-known candidates. The derived network shows a significant connectivity and modularity suggesting that the genes affected by the heterogeneous genetic alterations share the same biological context. The network modules participate in several critical aspects of cancer biology like DNA damage response, cell growth, and cell motility which is in line with the hypothesis of specifically deregulated but functional modules in cancer. Further, we could deduce genes with possible prognostic significance in OS for further investigation (e.g. EZR, CDKN2A, MAP3K5). Several of those module genes were located on chromosome 6q. The given systems biological approach provides evidence that heterogeneity on the genomic and expression level is ordered by the biological system on the level of the functional modules. Different genomic aberrations are pointing to the same cellular network vicinity to form vital, but already neoplastically altered, functional modules maintaining OS. This observation, exemplarily now shown for OS, has been under discussion already for a longer time, but often in a hypothetical manner, and can here be exemplified for OS. PMID:25848766

  9. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2007-04-09

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the 120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella.

  10. Modulation of nuclear receptor function by cellular redox poise.

    PubMed

    Carter, Eric L; Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-responsive transcription factors involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from metabolism to circadian rhythms. This review focuses on NRs that contain redox-active thiol groups, a common feature within the superfamily. We will begin by describing NRs, how they regulate various cellular processes and how binding ligands, corepressors and/or coactivators modulate their activity. We will then describe the general area of redox regulation, especially as it pertains to thiol-disulfide interconversion and the cellular systems that respond to and govern this redox equilibrium. Lastly, we will discuss specific examples of NRs whose activities are regulated by redox-active thiols. Glucocorticoid, estrogen, and the heme-responsive receptor, Rev-erb, will be described in the most detail as they exhibit archetypal redox regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24495544

  11. Guide RNA functional modules direct Cas9 activity and orthogonality.

    PubMed

    Briner, Alexandra E; Donohoue, Paul D; Gomaa, Ahmed A; Selle, Kurt; Slorach, Euan M; Nye, Christopher H; Haurwitz, Rachel E; Beisel, Chase L; May, Andrew P; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2014-10-23

    The RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease specifically targets and cleaves DNA in a sequence-dependent manner and has been widely used for programmable genome editing. Cas9 activity is dependent on interactions with guide RNAs, and evolutionarily divergent Cas9 nucleases have been shown to work orthogonally. However, the molecular basis of selective Cas9:guide-RNA interactions is poorly understood. Here, we identify and characterize six conserved modules within native crRNA:tracrRNA duplexes and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) that direct Cas9 endonuclease activity. We show the bulge and nexus are necessary for DNA cleavage and demonstrate that the nexus and hairpins are instrumental in defining orthogonality between systems. In contrast, the crRNA:tracrRNA complementary region can be modified or partially removed. Collectively, our results establish guide RNA features that drive DNA targeting by Cas9 and open new design and engineering avenues for CRISPR technologies. PMID:25373540

  12. Cadmium modulates adipocyte functions in metallothionein-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Takashige; Nishiyama, Kaori; Kadota, Yoshito; Sato, Masao; Inoue, Masahisa; Suzuki, Shinya

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes a reduction of adipocyte size and the modulation of adipokine expression. To further investigate the significance of the Cd action, we studied the effect of Cd on the white adipose tissue (WAT) of metallothionein null (MT{sup ?/?}) mice, which cannot form atoxic Cd–MT complexes and are used for evaluating Cd as free ions, and wild type (MT{sup +/+}) mice. Cd administration more significantly reduced the adipocyte size of MT{sup ?/?} mice than that of MT{sup +/+} mice. Cd exposure also induced macrophage recruitment to WAT with an increase in the expression level of Ccl2 (MCP-1) in the MT{sup ?/?} mice. The in vitro exposure of Cd to adipocytes induce triglyceride release into culture medium, decrease in the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and lipid hydrolysis at 24 h, and at 48 h increase in phosphorylation of the lipid-droplet-associated protein perilipin, which facilitates the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes. Therefore, the reduction in adipocyte size by Cd may arise from an imbalance between lipid synthesis and lipolysis. In addition, the expression levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin decreased in adipocytes. Taken together, exposure to Cd may induce unusually small adipocytes and modulate the expression of adipokines differently from the case of physiologically small adipocytes, and may accelerate the risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. - Highlights: • Cd causes a marked reduction in adipocyte size in MT-null mice. • Cd enhances macrophage migration into adipose tissue and disrupt adipokine secretion. • MT gene alleviates Cd-induced adipocyte dysfunctions. • Cd enhances the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes, mediated by perilipin. • Cd induces unusually small adipocytes and the abnormal expression of adipokines.

  13. C-element: a new clustering algorithm to find high quality functional modules in PPI networks.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Mahdieh; Rahgozar, Maseud; Bidkhori, Gholamreza; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Graph clustering algorithms are widely used in the analysis of biological networks. Extracting functional modules in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks is one such use. Most clustering algorithms whose focuses are on finding functional modules try either to find a clique like sub networks or to grow clusters starting from vertices with high degrees as seeds. These algorithms do not make any difference between a biological network and any other networks. In the current research, we present a new procedure to find functional modules in PPI networks. Our main idea is to model a biological concept and to use this concept for finding good functional modules in PPI networks. In order to evaluate the quality of the obtained clusters, we compared the results of our algorithm with those of some other widely used clustering algorithms on three high throughput PPI networks from Sacchromyces Cerevisiae, Homo sapiens and Caenorhabditis elegans as well as on some tissue specific networks. Gene Ontology (GO) analyses were used to compare the results of different algorithms. Each algorithm's result was then compared with GO-term derived functional modules. We also analyzed the effect of using tissue specific networks on the quality of the obtained clusters. The experimental results indicate that the new algorithm outperforms most of the others, and this improvement is more significant when tissue specific networks are used. PMID:24039752

  14. Probing astroglia with carbon nanotubes: modulation of form and function

    PubMed Central

    Gottipati, Manoj K.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown much promise in neurobiology and biomedicine. Their structural stability and ease of chemical modification make them compatible for biological applications. In this review, we discuss the effects that chemically functionalized CNTs, applied as colloidal solutes or used as strata, have on the morpho-functional properties of astrocytes, the most abundant cells present in the brain, with an insight into the potential use of CNTs in neural prostheses. PMID:25225092

  15. Gut microbial communities modulating brain development and function

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmakh, Maha; Anuar, Farhana; Zadjali, Fahad; Rafter, Joseph; Pettersson, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian brain development is initiated in utero and internal and external environmental signals can affect this process all the way until adulthood. Recent observations suggest that one such external cue is the indigenous microbiota which has been shown to affect developmental programming of the brain. This may have consequences for brain maturation and function that impact on cognitive functions later in life. This review discusses these recent findings from a developmental perspective. PMID:22743758

  16. Structural Insights into the Assembly and Function of the SAGA Deubiquitinating Module

    SciTech Connect

    Samara, Nadine L.; Datta, Ajit B.; Berndsen, Christopher E.; Zhang, Xiangbin; Yao, Tingting; Cohen, Robert E.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2010-08-18

    SAGA is a transcriptional coactivator complex that is conserved across eukaryotes and performs multiple functions during transcriptional activation and elongation. One role is deubiquitination of histone H2B, and this activity resides in a distinct subcomplex called the deubiquitinating module (DUBm), which contains the ubiquitin-specific protease Ubp8, bound to Sgf11, Sus1, and Sgf73. The deubiquitinating activity depends on the presence of all four DUBm proteins. We report here the 1.90 angstrom resolution crystal structure of the DUBm bound to ubiquitin aldehyde, as well as the 2.45 angstrom resolution structure of the uncomplexed DUBm. The structure reveals an arrangement of protein domains that gives rise to a highly interconnected complex, which is stabilized by eight structural zinc atoms that are critical for enzymatic activity. The structure suggests a model for how interactions with the other DUBm proteins activate Ubp8 and allows us to speculate about how the DUBm binds to monoubiquitinated histone H2B in nucleosomes.

  17. fMRI reveals lateralized pattern of brain activity modulated by the metrics of stimuli during auditory rhyme processing.

    PubMed

    Hurschler, Martina A; Liem, Franziskus; Oechslin, Mathias; Stämpfli, Philipp; Meyer, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Our fMRI study investigates auditory rhyme processing in spoken language to further elucidate the topic of functional lateralization of language processing. During scanning, 14 subjects listened to four different types of versed word strings and subsequently performed either a rhyme or a meter detection task. Our results show lateralization to auditory-related temporal regions in the right hemisphere irrespective of task. As for the left hemisphere we report responses in the supramarginal gyrus as well as in the opercular part of the inferior frontal gyrus modulated by the presence of regular meter and rhyme. The interaction of rhyme and meter was associated with increased involvement of the superior temporal sulcus and the putamen of the right hemisphere. Overall, these findings support the notion of right-hemispheric specialization for suprasegmental analyses during processing of spoken sentences and provide neuroimaging evidence for the influence of metrics on auditory rhyme processing. PMID:26025759

  18. Modulation of synaptic function through the ?-neurexin–specific ligand neurexophilin-1

    PubMed Central

    Born, Gesche; Breuer, Dorothee; Wang, Shaopeng; Rohlmann, Astrid; Coulon, Philippe; Vakili, Puja; Reissner, Carsten; Kiefer, Friedemann; Heine, Martin; Pape, Hans-Christian; Missler, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Neurotransmission at different synapses is highly variable, and cell-adhesion molecules like ?-neurexins (?-Nrxn) and their extracellular binding partners determine synapse function. Although ?-Nrxn affect transmission at excitatory and inhibitory synapses, the contribution of neurexophilin-1 (Nxph1), an ?-Nrxn ligand with restricted expression in subpopulations of inhibitory neurons, is unclear. To reveal its role, we investigated mice that either lack or overexpress Nxph1. We found that genetic deletion of Nxph1 impaired GABAB receptor (GABABR)-dependent short-term depression of inhibitory synapses in the nucleus reticularis thalami, a region where Nxph1 is normally expressed at high levels. To test the conclusion that Nxph1 supports presynaptic GABABR, we expressed Nxph1 ectopically at excitatory terminals in the neocortex, which normally do not contain this molecule but can be modulated by GABABR. We generated Nxph1-GFP transgenic mice under control of the Thy1.2 promoter and observed a reduced short-term facilitation at these excitatory synapses, representing an inverse phenotype to the knockout. Consistently, the diminished facilitation could be reversed by pharmacologically blocking GABABR with CGP-55845. Moreover, a complete rescue was achieved by additional blocking of postsynaptic GABAAR with intracellular picrotoxin or gabazine, suggesting that Nxph1 is able to recruit or stabilize both presynaptic GABABR and postsynaptic GABAAR. In support, immunoelectron microscopy validated the localization of ectopic Nxph1 at the synaptic cleft of excitatory synapses in transgenic mice and revealed an enrichment of GABAAR and GABABR subunits compared with wild-type animals. Thus, our data propose that Nxph1 plays an instructive role in synaptic short-term plasticity and the configuration with GABA receptors. PMID:24639499

  19. Biology-oriented synthesis of a withanolide-inspired compound collection reveals novel modulators of hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Švenda, Jakub; Sheremet, Michael; Kremer, Lea; Maier, Lukáš; Bauer, Jonathan O; Strohmann, Carsten; Ziegler, Slava; Kumar, Kamal; Waldmann, Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Biology-oriented synthesis employs the structural information encoded in complex natural products to guide the synthesis of compound collections enriched in bioactivity. The trans-hydrindane dehydro-?-lactone motif defines the characteristic scaffold of the steroid-like withanolides, a plant-derived natural product class with a diverse pattern of bioactivity. A withanolide-inspired compound collection was synthesized by making use of three key intermediates that contain this characteristic framework derivatized with different reactive functional groups. Biological evaluation of the compound collection in cell-based assays that monitored biological signal-transduction processes revealed a novel class of Hedgehog signaling inhibitors that target the protein Smoothened. PMID:25736574

  20. Highly multiplexed profiling of single-cell effector functions reveals deep functional heterogeneity in response to pathogenic ligands

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yao; Xue, Qiong; Eisele, Markus R.; Sulistijo, Endah S.; Brower, Kara; Han, Lin; Amir, El-ad David; Pe’er, Dana; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn; Fan, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in single-cell genomic, transcriptional, and mass-cytometric profiling, it remains a challenge to collect highly multiplexed measurements of secreted proteins from single cells for comprehensive analysis of functional states. Herein, we combine spatial and spectral encoding with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchambers for codetection of 42 immune effector proteins secreted from single cells, representing the highest multiplexing recorded to date for a single-cell secretion assay. Using this platform to profile differentiated macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the ligand of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), reveals previously unobserved deep functional heterogeneity and varying levels of pathogenic activation. Uniquely protein profiling on the same single cells before and after LPS stimulation identified a role for macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF) to potentiate the activation of LPS-induced cytokine production. Advanced clustering analysis identified functional subsets including quiescent, polyfunctional fully activated, partially activated populations with different cytokine profiles. This population architecture is conserved throughout the cell activation process and prevails as it is extended to other TLR ligands and to primary macrophages derived from a healthy donor. This work demonstrates that the phenotypically similar cell population still exhibits a large degree of intrinsic heterogeneity at the functional and cell behavior level. This technology enables full-spectrum dissection of immune functional states in response to pathogenic or environmental stimulation, and opens opportunities to quantify deep functional heterogeneity for more comprehensive and accurate immune monitoring. PMID:25646488

  1. Modulation of dendritic cell maturation and function by B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Hermine, Olivier; Tough, David F; Kaveri, Srini V

    2005-07-01

    Investigating the signals that regulate the function of dendritic cells (DC), the sentinels of the immune system, is critical to understanding the role of DC in the regulation of immune responses. Accumulating lines of evidence indicate that in addition to innate stimuli and T cell-derived signals, B lymphocytes exert a profound regulatory effect in vitro and in vivo on the Ag-presenting function of DC. The identification of B cells as a cellular source of cytokines, chemokines, and autoantibodies that are critically involved in the process of maturation, migration, and function of DC provides a rationale for immunotherapeutic intervention of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions by targeting B cells. Conversely, efficient cross-presentation of Ags by DC pulsed with immune complexes provides an alternative approach in the immunotherapy of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:15972625

  2. Selective SERS Sensing Modulated by Functionalized Mesoporous Films.

    PubMed

    López-Puente, Vanesa; Angelomé, Paula C; Soler-Illia, Galo J A A; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2015-11-25

    A hybrid material comprising metal nanoparticles embedded in functionalized mesoporous thin films was constructed, and its use as a selective SERS-based sensor was demonstrated. The presence of specific functional groups in the pore network allows control over the surface chemistry of the pores, tuning the selectivity for specific molecules. Amino-functionalized hybrid mesoporous thin films were used in a proof of concept experiment, to discern the presence of methylene blue (MB) in mixtures with acid blue (AB), with no need for any sample pretreatment step. Selective detection of MB was possible through entrapment of AB in the mesoporous matrix, based on its high affinity for amino groups. The sensor selectivity can be tuned by varying the solution pH, rendering a pH responsive surface and thus, selective SERS-based sensing. The developed sensors allow specific detection of molecules in complex matrixes. PMID:26536368

  3. Severity of polymicrobial sepsis modulates mitochondrial function in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Herminghaus, A; Barthel, F; Heinen, A; Beck, C; Vollmer, C; Bauer, I; Weidinger, A; Kozlov, A V; Picker, O

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is assumed to be an important contributor to multi organ dysfunction syndrome. Here, the effects of varying degrees of sepsis on hepatic mitochondrial function were investigated. Moderate or more severe sepsis was induced in rats using a colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP)-model (16 G and 14 G stent respectively). Respiratory control ratio (RCR) was significantly higher in the 16 G-group and unchanged in the 14 G-group compared with healthy controls. The ADP/O ratio was similar in all groups. Our results indicate that different severities of sepsis differently influence the mitochondrial function, which could be a sign of adaptive reaction. PMID:26277734

  4. Vitamin D3 modulates the function of chicken macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shojadoost, B; Behboudi, S; Villanueva, A I; Brisbin, J T; Ashkar, A A; Sharif, S

    2015-06-01

    Vitamin D3 is known to modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses in mammals, but there is little information on its effects on avian immune system cells. Here, we studied the effects of vitamin D3 on chicken macrophages. Chicken macrophages expressed vitamin D receptor (VDR) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation increased their VDR expression. Macrophages were treated with 1,25(OH)2D3 in the presence or absence of Toll-like receptor ligands, such as LPS and Pam3CSK4. Subsequently, macrophage activation was assessed by measuring nitric oxide (NO) and expression of CXCL8 and interleukin (IL)-1?. In addition, changes in major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-II and CD86 were examined. Treatment of cells with 1,25(OH)2D3 increased the ability of macrophages to respond to stimuli and produce NO, but vitamin D3 alone did not activate macrophages and resulted in the down-regulation of CD86, MHC-II, CXCL8 and IL-1?. These findings suggest that vitamin D3 has an immunomodulatory role in chicken macrophages. PMID:25814176

  5. Serotonin modulates muscle function in the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana

    PubMed Central

    Gerry, Shannon P.; Ellerby, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The body wall muscles of sanguivorous leeches power mechanically diverse behaviours: suction feeding, crawling and swimming. These require longitudinal muscle to exert force over an extremely large length range, from 145 to 46 per cent of the mean segmental swimming length. Previous data, however, suggest that leech body wall muscle has limited capacity for force production when elongated. Serotonin (5-HT) alters the passive properties of the body wall and stimulates feeding. We hypothesized that 5-HT may also have a role in allowing force production in elongated muscle by changing the shape of the length–tension relationship (LTR). LTRs were measured from longitudinal muscle strips in vitro in physiological saline with and without the presence of 10 µM 5-HT. The LTR was much broader than previously measured for leech muscle. Rather than shifting the LTR, 5-HT reduced passive muscle tonus and increased active stress at all lengths. In addition to modulating leech behaviour and passive mechanical properties, 5-HT probably enhances muscle force and work production during locomotion and feeding. PMID:21561963

  6. Serotonin modulates muscle function in the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana.

    PubMed

    Gerry, Shannon P; Ellerby, David J

    2011-12-23

    The body wall muscles of sanguivorous leeches power mechanically diverse behaviours: suction feeding, crawling and swimming. These require longitudinal muscle to exert force over an extremely large length range, from 145 to 46 per cent of the mean segmental swimming length. Previous data, however, suggest that leech body wall muscle has limited capacity for force production when elongated. Serotonin (5-HT) alters the passive properties of the body wall and stimulates feeding. We hypothesized that 5-HT may also have a role in allowing force production in elongated muscle by changing the shape of the length-tension relationship (LTR). LTRs were measured from longitudinal muscle strips in vitro in physiological saline with and without the presence of 10 µM 5-HT. The LTR was much broader than previously measured for leech muscle. Rather than shifting the LTR, 5-HT reduced passive muscle tonus and increased active stress at all lengths. In addition to modulating leech behaviour and passive mechanical properties, 5-HT probably enhances muscle force and work production during locomotion and feeding. PMID:21561963

  7. Revealing Molecular Mechanisms by Integrating High-Dimensional Functional Screens with Protein Interaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Collinet, Claudio; Galvez, Thierry; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Zerial, Marino; Beyer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Functional genomics screens using multi-parametric assays are powerful approaches for identifying genes involved in particular cellular processes. However, they suffer from problems like noise, and often provide little insight into molecular mechanisms. A bottleneck for addressing these issues is the lack of computational methods for the systematic integration of multi-parametric phenotypic datasets with molecular interactions. Here, we present Integrative Multi Profile Analysis of Cellular Traits (IMPACT). The main goal of IMPACT is to identify the most consistent phenotypic profile among interacting genes. This approach utilizes two types of external information: sets of related genes (IMPACT-sets) and network information (IMPACT-modules). Based on the notion that interacting genes are more likely to be involved in similar functions than non-interacting genes, this data is used as a prior to inform the filtering of phenotypic profiles that are similar among interacting genes. IMPACT-sets selects the most frequent profile among a set of related genes. IMPACT-modules identifies sub-networks containing genes with similar phenotype profiles. The statistical significance of these selections is subsequently quantified via permutations of the data. IMPACT (1) handles multiple profiles per gene, (2) rescues genes with weak phenotypes and (3) accounts for multiple biases e.g. caused by the network topology. Application to a genome-wide RNAi screen on endocytosis showed that IMPACT improved the recovery of known endocytosis-related genes, decreased off-target effects, and detected consistent phenotypes. Those findings were confirmed by rescreening 468 genes. Additionally we validated an unexpected influence of the IGF-receptor on EGF-endocytosis. IMPACT facilitates the selection of high-quality phenotypic profiles using different types of independent information, thereby supporting the molecular interpretation of functional screens. PMID:25188415

  8. Kinetics of Salicylate-Mediated Suppression of Jasmonate Signaling Reveal a Role for Redox Modulation1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Koornneef, Annemart; Leon-Reyes, Antonio; Ritsema, Tita; Verhage, Adriaan; Den Otter, Floor C.; Van Loon, L.C.; Pieterse, Corné M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Cross talk between salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathways plays an important role in the regulation and fine tuning of induced defenses that are activated upon pathogen or insect attack. Pharmacological experiments revealed that transcription of JA-responsive marker genes, such as PDF1.2 and VSP2, is highly sensitive to suppression by SA. This antagonistic effect of SA on JA signaling was also observed when the JA pathway was biologically activated by necrotrophic pathogens or insect herbivores, and when the SA pathway was triggered by a biotrophic pathogen. Furthermore, all 18 Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) accessions tested displayed SA-mediated suppression of JA-responsive gene expression, highlighting the potential significance of this phenomenon in induced plant defenses in nature. During plant-attacker interactions, the kinetics of SA and JA signaling are highly dynamic. Mimicking this dynamic response by applying SA and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) at different concentrations and time intervals revealed that PDF1.2 transcription is readily suppressed when the SA response was activated at or after the onset of the JA response, and that this SA-JA antagonism is long lasting. However, when SA was applied more than 30 h prior to the onset of the JA response, the suppressive effect of SA was completely absent. The window of opportunity of SA to suppress MeJA-induced PDF1.2 transcription coincided with a transient increase in glutathione levels. The glutathione biosynthesis inhibitor l-buthionine-sulfoximine strongly reduced PDF1.2 suppression by SA, suggesting that SA-mediated redox modulation plays an important role in the SA-mediated attenuation of the JA signaling pathway. PMID:18539774

  9. Inflammation modulates human HDL composition and function in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation may directly impair HDL functions, in particular reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), but limited data support this concept in humans. Our study was designed to investigate this relationship. We employed low-dose human endotoxemia to assess the effects of inflammation on HDL and RCT-rel...

  10. Salmonella Effectors: Important players modulating host cell function during infection

    PubMed Central

    Agbor, Terence A.; McCormick, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a Gram-negative facultative foodborne pathogen that causes gastroenteritis in humans. This bacterium has evolved a sophisticated machinery to alter host cell function critical to its virulence capabilities. Central to S. Typhimurium pathogenesis are two Type three secretion systems (T3SS) encoded within pathogenicity islands SPI-1 and SPI-2 that are responsible for the secretion and translocation of a set of bacterial proteins termed effectors into host cells with the intention of altering host cell physiology for bacterial entry and survival. Thus, once delivered by the T3SS, the secreted effectors play critical roles in manipulating the host cell to allow for bacteria invasion, induction of inflammatory responses, and the assembly of an intracellular protective niche created for bacterial survival and replication. Emerging evidence indicates that these effectors are modular proteins consisting of distinct functional domains/motifs that are utilized by the bacteria to activate intracellular signaling pathways modifying host cell function. Also, recently reported are the dual functionality of secreted effectors and the concept of “terminal reassortment”. Herein, we highlight some of the nascent concepts regarding Salmonella effectors in the context infection. PMID:21902796

  11. Protein complexes and functional modules in molecular networks

    E-print Network

    Mirny, Leonid

    to the way that protein structure tells us about the function and organization of a protein. Computational. Molecules are nodes of this network, and the interactions between them are edges. The architecture the organization of mo- lecular networks (12­16). Important statistical characteristics of such networks include

  12. Identification of Functional Modules by Integration of Multiple Data Sources Using a Bayesian Network Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinlian; Zuo, Yiming; Liu, Lun; Man, Yangao; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Ressom, Habtom W

    2014-01-01

    Background Prediction of functional modules is indispensable for detecting protein deregulation in human complex diseases such as cancer. Bayesian network (BN) is one of the most commonly used models to integrate heterogeneous data from multiple sources such as protein domain, interactome, functional annotation, genome-wide gene expression, and the literature. Methods and Results In this paper, we present a BN classifier that is customized to: 1) increase the ability to integrate diverse information from different sources, 2) effectively predict protein-protein interactions, 3) infer aberrant networks with scale-free and small world properties, and 4) group molecules into functional modules or pathways based on the primary function and biological features. Application of this model on discovering protein biomarkers of hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) leads to the identification of functional modules that provide insights into the mechanism of the development and progression of HCC. These functional modules include cell cycle deregulation, increased angiogenesis (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor, blood vessel morphogenesis), oxidative metabolic alterations, and aberrant activation of signaling pathways involved in cellular proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Conclusion The discoveries and conclusions derived from our customized BN classifier are consistent with previously published results. The proposed approach for determining BN structure facilitates the integration of heterogeneous data from multiple sources to elucidate the mechanisms of complex diseases. PMID:24736851

  13. “Spatial Mapping of the Neurite and Soma Proteomes Reveals a Functional Cdc42/Rac Regulatory Network”

    SciTech Connect

    Pertz, Olivier C.; Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Wang, Wei; gay, laurie J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Anderson, David J.; Liu, Tao; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2008-02-12

    Neurite extension and growth cone navigation are guided by extracellular cues that control cytoskeletal rearrangements. However, understanding the complex signaling mechanisms that mediate neuritogenesis has been limited by the inability to biochemically separate the neurite and soma for spatial proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Here, we apply global proteome profiling in combination with a novel neurite purification methodology for comparative analysis of the soma and neurite proteomes of neuroblastoma cells. The spatial relationship of 4855 proteins were mapped revealing networks of signaling proteins that control integrins, the actin cytoskeleton, and axonal guidance in the extending neurite. Bioinformatics and functional analyses revealed a spatially compartmentalized Rac/Cdc42 signaling network that operates in conjunction with multiple GEFs and GAPs to control neurite formation. Interestingly, RNA interference experiments revealed that the different GEFs and GAPs regulate specialized functions during neurite formation including neurite growth and retraction kinetics, cytoskeletal organization, and cell polarity. Our findings provide insight into the spatial organization of signaling networks that enable neuritogenesis and provide a comprehensive system-wide profile of proteins that mediate this process including those that control Rac and Cdc42 signaling.

  14. Molecularly clean ionic liquid/rubrene single-crystal interfaces revealed by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yasuyuki; Hara, Hisaya; Morino, Yusuke; Bando, Ken-ichi; Imanishi, Akihito; Uemura, Takafumi; Takeya, Jun; Fukui, Ken-ichi

    2015-03-14

    The structural properties of ionic liquid/rubrene single-crystal interfaces were investigated using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy. The spontaneous dissolution of rubrene molecules into the ionic liquid was triggered by surface defects such as rubrene oxide defects, and the dissolution rate strongly depended on the initial conditions of the rubrene surface. Dissolution of the second rubrene layer was slower due to the lower defect density, leading to the formation of a clean interface irrespective of the initial conditions. Molecular-resolution images were easily obtained at the interface, and their corrugation patterns changed with the applied force. Force curve measurements revealed that a few solvation layers of ionic liquid molecules formed at the interface, and the force needed to penetrate the solvation layers was an order of magnitude smaller than typical ionic liquid/inorganic solid interfaces. These specific properties are discussed with respect to electric double-layer transistors based on the ionic liquid/rubrene single-crystal interface. PMID:25669665

  15. Amplitude-modulated atomic force microscopy reveals the near surface nanostructure of surfactant sponge (L(3)) and lamellar (L(?)) phases.

    PubMed

    Wydro, Marc J; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2015-05-19

    Amplitude-modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) has been used to study the nanostructure of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPCl)-hexanol-0.2 M NaCl sponge (L3) and lamellar (L?) phases near a mica surface. For both phases, membrane volume fractions of 22, 27, and 32 vol % were investigated, with the L3 or L? phase selected by adjusting the co-surfactant/surfactant ratio (hexanol/CPCl). For the L3 phase, the presence of the surface flattens the three-dimensional bulk structure. AM-AFM clearly resolves the membrane and solvent passages in the near surface layer. Increasing the membrane volume fraction decreases the size of the image features because of the lower solvent content. Within error, the average passage sizes in the near surface layer are the same as those in the bulk at the same concentration. Images of the L? phase reveal undulating near surface sheets. At the highest membrane concentration, the image is very smooth, because the lamellar sheet is confined between the surface and the next near surface layer, which is in close proximity as a result of the low solvent content. As the membrane concentration is reduced, the space between layers is increased and undulations appear in the near surface lamellar structure. Undulations are more pronounced at the lowest membrane volume fraction. PMID:25906083

  16. Virtual screening on an ?-helix to ?-strand switchable region of the FGFR2 extracellular domain revealed positive and negative modulators.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Constantino; Corentin, Herbert; Thierry, Vermat; Chantal, Alcouffe; Tanguy, Bozec; David, Sibrac; Jean-Marc, Herbert; Pascual, Ferrara; Françoise, Bono; Edgardo, Ferran

    2014-11-01

    The secondary structure of some protein segments may vary between ?-helix and ?-strand. To predict these switchable segments, we have developed an algorithm, Switch-P, based solely on the protein sequence. This algorithm was used on the extracellular parts of FGF receptors. For FGFR2, it predicted that ?4 and ?5 strands of the third Ig-like domain were highly switchable. These two strands possess a high number of somatic mutations associated with cancer. Analysis of PDB structures of FGF receptors confirmed the switchability prediction for ?5. We thus evaluated if compound-driven ?-helix/?-strand switching of ?5 could modulate FGFR2 signaling. We performed the virtual screening of a library containing 1.4 million of chemical compounds with two models of the third Ig-like domain of FGFR2 showing different secondary structures for ?5, and we selected 32 compounds. Experimental testing using proliferation assays with FGF7-stimulated SNU-16 cells and a FGFR2-dependent Erk1/2 phosphorylation assay with FGFR2-transfected L6 cells, revealed activators and inhibitors of FGFR2. Our method for the identification of switchable proteinic regions, associated with our virtual screening approach, provides an opportunity to discover new generation of drugs with under-explored mechanism of action. PMID:25082719

  17. Cholinergic modulation of mesolimbic dopamine function and reward

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Gregory P.; Shabani, Shkelzen; Dobbs, Lauren K.; Hansen, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    The substantial health risk posed by obesity and compulsive drug use has compelled a serious research effort to identify the neurobiological substrates that underlie the development these pathological conditions. Despite substantial progress, an understanding of the neurochemical systems that mediate the motivational aspects of drug-seeking and craving remains incomplete. Important work from the laboratory of Bart Hoebel has provided key information on neurochemical systems that interact with dopamine (DA) as potentially important components in both the development of addiction and the expression of compulsive behaviors such as binge eating. One such modulatory system appears to be cholinergic pathways that interact with DA systems at all levels of the reward circuit. Cholinergic cells in the pons project to DA-rich cell body regions in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantial nigra (SN) where they modulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons and reward processing. The DA terminal region of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) contains a small but particularly important group of cholinergic interneurons, which have extensive dendritic arbors that make synapses with a vast majority of NAc neurons and afferents. Together with acetylcholine (ACh) input onto DA cell bodies, cholinergic systems could serve a vital role in gating information flow concerning the motivational value of stimuli through the mesolimbic system. In this report we highlight evidence that CNS cholinergic systems play a pivotal role in behaviors that are motivated by both natural and drug rewards. We argue that the search for underlying neurochemical substrates of compulsive behaviors, as well as attempts to identify potential pharmacotherapeutic targets to combat them, must include a consideration of central cholinergic systems. PMID:21549724

  18. Functional Modulation of Regulatory T Cells by IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Byung-In; Kim, Tae Hun; Seoh, Ju-Young

    2015-01-01

    The suppressive function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is critical to the maintenance of immune homeostasis in vivo and yet, the specific identification of Tregs by phenotypic markers is not perfect. Tregs were originally identified in the CD4+CD25+ fraction of T cells, but FoxP3 expression was later included as an additional marker of Tregs as FoxP3 expression was identified as being critical to the development and function of these cells. Intracellular expression of FoxP3 makes it difficult in using to isolate live and not permeabilized cells for functional assays. As such CD4+CD25+ fraction is still frequently used for functional assays of Tregs. Although, the CD4+CD25+ fraction substantially overlaps with the FoxP3+ fraction, the minor mismatch between CD4+CD25+ and FoxP3+ fractions may confound the functional characteristics of Tregs. In this study, we isolated CD4+FoxP3+ as well as CD4+CD25+ fractions from Foxp3 knock-in mice, and compared their proliferative and suppressive activity in the presence or absence of various concentrations of IL-2. Our results showed comparable patterns of proliferative and suppressive responses for both fractions, except that contrary to the CD4+CD25+ fraction the FoxP3+ fraction did not proliferate in an autocrine fashion even in response to a strong stimulation. In presence of exogenous IL-2, both CD4+CD25+ and CD4+FoxP3+ fractions were more sensitive than the CD4+CD25- responder cells in proliferative responsiveness. In addition, a low dose IL-2 enhanced whereas a high dose abrogated the suppressive activities of the CD4+CD25+ and CD4+FoxP3+ fractions. These results may provide an additional understanding of the characteristics of the various fractions of isolated Tregs based on phenotype and function and the role of varying levels of exogenous IL-2 on the suppressive activity of these cells. PMID:26529512

  19. Revealing microbial functional activities in the Red Sea sponge Stylissa carteri by metatranscriptomics.

    PubMed

    Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Seridi, Loqmane; Ryu, Taewoo; Voolstra, Christian R; Ravasi, Timothy; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-12-01

    Sponges are important components of marine benthic environments and are associated with microbial symbionts that carry out ecologically relevant functions. Stylissa carteri is an abundant, low-microbial abundance species in the Red Sea. We aimed to achieve the functional and taxonomic characterization of the most actively expressed prokaryotic genes in S.?carteri. Prokaryotic mRNA was enriched from sponge total RNA, sequenced using Illumina HiSeq technology and annotated using the metagenomics Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (MG-RAST) pipeline. We detected high expression of archaeal ammonia oxidation and photosynthetic carbon fixation by members of the genus Synechococcus. Functions related to stress response and membrane transporters were among the most highly expressed by S.?carteri symbionts. Unexpectedly, gene functions related to methylotrophy were highly expressed by gammaproteobacterial symbionts. The presence of seawater-derived microbes is indicated by the phylogenetic proximity of organic carbon transporters to orthologues of members from the SAR11 clade. In summary, we revealed the most expressed functions of the S.?carteri-associated microbial community and linked them to the dominant taxonomic members of the microbiome. This work demonstrates the applicability of metatranscriptomics to explore poorly characterized symbiotic consortia and expands our knowledge of the ecologically relevant functions carried out by coral reef sponge symbionts. PMID:24920529

  20. BDNF Genotype Modulates Resting Functional Connectivity in Children

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Moriah E.; Yoo, Daniel J.; Glover, Gary H.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2009-01-01

    A specific polymorphism of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene is associated with alterations in brain anatomy and memory; its relevance to the functional connectivity of brain networks, however, is unclear. Given that altered hippocampal function and structure has been found in adults who carry the methionine (met) allele of the BDNF gene and the molecular studies elucidating the role of BDNF in neurogenesis and synapse formation, we examined the association between BDNF gene variants and neural resting connectivity in children and adolescents. We observed a reduction in hippocampal and parahippocampal to cortical connectivity in met-allele carriers within both default-mode and executive networks. In contrast, we observed increased connectivity to amygdala, insula and striatal regions in met-carriers, within the paralimbic network. Because of the known association between the BDNF gene and neuropsychiatric disorder, this latter finding of greater connectivity in circuits important for emotion processing may indicate a new neural mechanism through which these gene-related psychiatric differences are manifest. Here we show that the BDNF gene, known to regulate synaptic plasticity and connectivity in the brain, affects functional connectivity at the neural systems level. In addition, we demonstrate that the spatial topography of multiple high-level resting state networks in healthy children and adolescents is similar to that observed in adults. PMID:19956404

  1. Heteromeric MT1/MT2 melatonin receptors modulate photoreceptor function.

    PubMed

    Baba, Kenkichi; Benleulmi-Chaachoua, Abla; Journé, Anne-Sophie; Kamal, Maud; Guillaume, Jean-Luc; Dussaud, Sébastien; Gbahou, Florence; Yettou, Katia; Liu, Cuimei; Contreras-Alcantara, Susana; Jockers, Ralf; Tosini, Gianluca

    2013-10-01

    The formation of G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromers enables signaling diversification and holds great promise for improved drug selectivity. Most studies of these oligomerization events have been conducted in heterologous expression systems, and in vivo validation is lacking in most cases, thus questioning the physiological significance of GPCR heteromerization. The melatonin receptors MT1 and MT2 exist as homomers and heteromers when expressed in cultured cells. We showed that melatonin MT1/MT2 heteromers mediated the effect of melatonin on the light sensitivity of rod photoreceptors in mice. This effect of melatonin involved activation of the heteromer-specific phospholipase C and protein kinase C (PLC/PKC) pathway and was abolished in MT1(-/-) or MT2(-/-) mice, as well as in mice overexpressing a nonfunctional MT2 mutant that interfered with the formation of functional MT1/MT2 heteromers in photoreceptor cells. Not only does this study establish an essential role of melatonin receptor heteromers in retinal function, it also provides in vivo support for the physiological importance of GPCR heteromerization. Thus, the MT1/MT2 heteromer complex may provide a specific pharmacological target to improve photoreceptor function. PMID:24106342

  2. An Arabidopsis Transcriptional Regulatory Map Reveals Distinct Functional and Evolutionary Features of Novel Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jinpu; He, Kun; Tang, Xing; Li, Zhe; Lv, Le; Zhao, Yi; Luo, Jingchu; Gao, Ge

    2015-07-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play key roles in both development and stress responses. By integrating into and rewiring original systems, novel TFs contribute significantly to the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks. Here, we report a high-confidence transcriptional regulatory map covering 388 TFs from 47 families in Arabidopsis. Systematic analysis of this map revealed the architectural heterogeneity of developmental and stress response subnetworks and identified three types of novel network motifs that are absent from unicellular organisms and essential for multicellular development. Moreover, TFs of novel families that emerged during plant landing present higher binding specificities and are preferentially wired into developmental processes and these novel network motifs. Further unveiled connection between the binding specificity and wiring preference of TFs explains the wiring preferences of novel-family TFs. These results reveal distinct functional and evolutionary features of novel TFs, suggesting a plausible mechanism for their contribution to the evolution of multicellular organisms. PMID:25750178

  3. An Arabidopsis Transcriptional Regulatory Map Reveals Distinct Functional and Evolutionary Features of Novel Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jinpu; He, Kun; Tang, Xing; Li, Zhe; Lv, Le; Zhao, Yi; Luo, Jingchu; Gao, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play key roles in both development and stress responses. By integrating into and rewiring original systems, novel TFs contribute significantly to the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks. Here, we report a high-confidence transcriptional regulatory map covering 388 TFs from 47 families in Arabidopsis. Systematic analysis of this map revealed the architectural heterogeneity of developmental and stress response subnetworks and identified three types of novel network motifs that are absent from unicellular organisms and essential for multicellular development. Moreover, TFs of novel families that emerged during plant landing present higher binding specificities and are preferentially wired into developmental processes and these novel network motifs. Further unveiled connection between the binding specificity and wiring preference of TFs explains the wiring preferences of novel-family TFs. These results reveal distinct functional and evolutionary features of novel TFs, suggesting a plausible mechanism for their contribution to the evolution of multicellular organisms. PMID:25750178

  4. Functional penetration of variability of motor neuron spike timing through a modulated neuromuscular system.

    PubMed

    Brezina, Vladimir

    2007-06-01

    Variability of the neuronal spike pattern is usually thought of in terms of the information that the different interspike intervals might be encoding. However, the very presence of the variability can have other kinds of functional significance. Here we consider the example of the B15/B16-ARC neuromuscular system of Aplysia, a model system for the study of neuromuscular modulation and control. We show that variability of motor neuron spike timing at the input to the system penetrates throughout the system, affecting all downstream variables including modulator release, modulator concentrations, modulatory actions, and the contraction of the muscle. Furthermore, not only does the variability penetrate through the system, but it is actually instrumental in maintaining its modulation and contractions at a robust, physiological level. PMID:18516210

  5. Functional penetration of variability of motor neuron spike timing through a modulated neuromuscular system

    PubMed Central

    Brezina, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Variability of the neuronal spike pattern is usually thought of in terms of the information that the different interspike intervals might be encoding. However, the very presence of the variability can have other kinds of functional significance. Here we consider the example of the B15/B16-ARC neuromuscular system of Aplysia, a model system for the study of neuromuscular modulation and control. We show that variability of motor neuron spike timing at the input to the system penetrates throughout the system, affecting all downstream variables including modulator release, modulator concentrations, modulatory actions, and the contraction of the muscle. Furthermore, not only does the variability penetrate through the system, but it is actually instrumental in maintaining its modulation and contractions at a robust, physiological level. PMID:18516210

  6. Cannabinoids and bone: endocannabinoids modulate human osteoclast function in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, LS; Ford, L; Ridge, SA; Cameron, GA; Rogers, MJ; Ross, RA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Both CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors have been shown to play a role in bone metabolism. Crucially, previous studies have focussed on the effects of cannabinoid ligands in murine bone cells. This study aimed to investigate the effects of cannabinoids on human bone cells in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine expression of cannabinoid receptors and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was used to determine the presence of endocannabinoids in human bone cells. The effect of cannabinoids on human osteoclast formation, polarization and resorption was determined by assessing the number of cells expressing ?v?3 or with F-actin rings, or measurement of resorption area. KEY RESULTS Human osteoclasts express both CB1 and CB2 receptors. CB2 expression was significantly higher in human monocytes compared to differentiated osteoclasts. Furthermore, the differentiation of human osteoclasts from monocytes was associated with a reduction in 2-AG levels and an increase in anandamide (AEA) levels. Treatment of osteoclasts with LPS significantly increased levels of AEA. Nanomolar concentrations of AEA and the synthetic agonists CP 55 940 and JWH015 stimulated human osteoclast polarization and resorption; these effects were attenuated in the presence of CB1 and/or CB2 antagonists. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Low concentrations of cannabinoids activate human osteoclasts in vitro. There is a dynamic regulation of the expression of the CB2 receptor and the production of the endocannabinoids during the differentiation of human bone cells. These data suggest that small molecules modulating the endocannabinoid system could be important therapeutics in human bone disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-8. To view Part I of Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-7 PMID:21649637

  7. Estimating the effects of stationary noise on power spectral density function measurements: frequency, phase, and amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, George D.

    1998-06-01

    The effects of noise modulation on the power spectral density functions of a sinusoidal wave are calculated in closed form. Frequency, phase, and amplitude modulation are considered. Noise processes are modeled using Butterworth filters of various integer orders. Increasing the order of the Butterworth filter increases the signal-to-noise ratio of the modulated sinusoidal wave.

  8. Functional modulation of human monocytes derived DCs by anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Fazekasova, Henrieta; Wang, Naiyin; Peng, Qi; Sacks, Steven H; Lombardi, Giovanna; Zhou, Wuding

    2012-01-01

    Anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a are important modulators for dendritic cell activation and function in mice. In order to verify the significance of these observations in man, we have investigated the functional modulation of human monocytes derived DCs by C3a and C5a. Here we report that engagement of C3aR or C5aR on human monocytes derived DCs (moDCs) enhances the cell activation and their capacity for allostimulation. In addition, we show that intracellular production of cAMP is reduced and PI3K/AKT, ERK and NF-?B signalling is increased following stimulation with C3a or C5a, identifying intracellular signalling pathways that could convert cell surface C3aR and C5aR engagement into changes in moDC functions. Our data provide evidence that human DCs are equipped to react to C3a/C5a and undergo phenotypic change as well as functional modulation. Complement offers a potential route to modulate human DC function and regulate T cell mediated immunity. PMID:21855168

  9. Rheostats and Toggle Switches for Modulating Protein Function

    E-print Network

    Meinhardt, Sarah; Manley Jr., Michael W.; Parente, Daniel J.; Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2013-12-30

    at positions 62, 51, and 55 (19%, 11%, and 9%, respectively; Table 3). Finally, since the linker positions bridge the DNA binding and regulatory domains, we anticipated a number of linker variants would alter allosteric response to effector. However, most amino... of the repressors, the mutated linker positions generally behaved as functional rheostats (Table 4; Figures S1–S12 in Data S3). In contrast, the Miller lab showed that 11–13 substitutions at each of positions Tyr47, Pro49, Ala53, and Leu56 abolished measurable...

  10. Hemodialysis and hemodiafiltration differently modulate left ventricular diastolic function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal replacement therapy may have a favorable effect on diastolic left ventricular function, but it is not clear whether hemodiafiltration is superior to hemodialysis in this field. Nitric oxide (NO) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) may play a role in the changes of intracardiac hemodynamics, but it is not clear whether the different renal replacement methods have disparate influence on the metabolism of these materials. Methods Thirty patients on renal replacement therapy were investigated. First, data was analyzed while patients received hemodiafiltration over a period of three months. Then, the same patients were evaluated during treatment with hemodialysis for at least another three months. Echocardiography was performed before and after renal replacement therapy. Results No significant difference was found in the volume removals between hemodialysis and hemodiafiltration. The left atrial diameter and transmitral flow velocities (E/A) decreased significantly only during hemodiafiltration. A positive correlation was observed between the left atrial diameter and E/Ea representing the left ventricular pressure load during hemodiafiltration. Significant correlations between NO and A and E/A were observed only in the case of hemodiafiltration. Conclusion Hemodiafiltration has a beneficial effect on echocardiographic markers representing left ventricular diastolic function. This could be attributed to the differences between the dynamics of volume removal and its distribution among liquid compartments. PMID:23547981

  11. The characterization of zebrafish antimorphic mib alleles reveals that Mib and Mind bomb-2 (Mib2) function redundantly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengjin; Li, Qing; Lim, Chiaw-Hwee; Qiu, Xuehui; Jiang, Yun-Jin

    2007-05-01

    Both mind bomb (mib) and mind bomb-2 (mib2) encode RING E3 ubiquitin ligases that promote Delta ubiquitylation and endocytosis in Notch activation. Detailed morphological and molecular examinations revealed that zebrafish mib(ta52b) (missense mutation in the C-terminal RING Finger (RF), M1013R) and mib(m132) (nonsense mutation resulting in a truncated protein that loses all three RFs, C785stop) are strong and weak antimorphic alleles, respectively, compared to the null allele, mib(tfi91) (nonsense mutation resulting in a truncated protein of only 60 amino acids, Y60stop). Zebrafish mib2 ortholog was identified in this study. Zebrafish Mib and Mib2 are colocalized in transfected cells and function redundantly in regulating Notch signaling in embryos. Mib(ta52b) and Mib(m132) have a dosage-dependent dominant-negative effect, at least, on Mib2, which is a molecular basis for the antimorphic phenotypes. It was also shown that Notch signaling negatively regulates mib expression in a Su(H)-dependent manner, forming a negative feedback loop in modulating Notch activation. PMID:17331493

  12. Analyses of soil microbial community compositions and functional genes reveal potential consequences of natural forest succession

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Jing; Yang, Yunfeng; Liu, Xueduan; Lu, Hui; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Diqiang; Yin, Huaqun; Ding, Junjun; Zhang, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    The succession of microbial community structure and function is a central ecological topic, as microbes drive the Earth’s biogeochemical cycles. To elucidate the response and mechanistic underpinnings of soil microbial community structure and metabolic potential relevant to natural forest succession, we compared soil microbial communities from three adjacent natural forests: a coniferous forest (CF), a mixed broadleaf forest (MBF) and a deciduous broadleaf forest (DBF) on Shennongjia Mountain in central China. In contrary to plant communities, the microbial taxonomic diversity of the DBF was significantly (P?functional diversity was also highest in the DBF. Furthermore, a network analysis of microbial carbon and nitrogen cycling genes showed the network for the DBF samples was relatively large and tight, revealing strong couplings between microbes. Soil temperature, reflective of climate regimes, was important in shaping microbial communities at both taxonomic and functional gene levels. As a first glimpse of both the taxonomic and functional compositions of soil microbial communities, our results suggest that microbial community structure and function potentials will be altered by future environmental changes, which have implications for forest succession. PMID:25943705

  13. Analyses of soil microbial community compositions and functional genes reveal potential consequences of natural forest succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Jing; Yang, Yunfeng; Liu, Xueduan; Lu, Hui; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Diqiang; Yin, Huaqun; Ding, Junjun; Zhang, Yuguang

    2015-05-01

    The succession of microbial community structure and function is a central ecological topic, as microbes drive the Earth’s biogeochemical cycles. To elucidate the response and mechanistic underpinnings of soil microbial community structure and metabolic potential relevant to natural forest succession, we compared soil microbial communities from three adjacent natural forests: a coniferous forest (CF), a mixed broadleaf forest (MBF) and a deciduous broadleaf forest (DBF) on Shennongjia Mountain in central China. In contrary to plant communities, the microbial taxonomic diversity of the DBF was significantly (P?functional diversity was also highest in the DBF. Furthermore, a network analysis of microbial carbon and nitrogen cycling genes showed the network for the DBF samples was relatively large and tight, revealing strong couplings between microbes. Soil temperature, reflective of climate regimes, was important in shaping microbial communities at both taxonomic and functional gene levels. As a first glimpse of both the taxonomic and functional compositions of soil microbial communities, our results suggest that microbial community structure and function potentials will be altered by future environmental changes, which have implications for forest succession.

  14. Analyses of soil microbial community compositions and functional genes reveal potential consequences of natural forest succession.

    PubMed

    Cong, Jing; Yang, Yunfeng; Liu, Xueduan; Lu, Hui; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Diqiang; Yin, Huaqun; Ding, Junjun; Zhang, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    The succession of microbial community structure and function is a central ecological topic, as microbes drive the Earth's biogeochemical cycles. To elucidate the response and mechanistic underpinnings of soil microbial community structure and metabolic potential relevant to natural forest succession, we compared soil microbial communities from three adjacent natural forests: a coniferous forest (CF), a mixed broadleaf forest (MBF) and a deciduous broadleaf forest (DBF) on Shennongjia Mountain in central China. In contrary to plant communities, the microbial taxonomic diversity of the DBF was significantly (P?functional diversity was also highest in the DBF. Furthermore, a network analysis of microbial carbon and nitrogen cycling genes showed the network for the DBF samples was relatively large and tight, revealing strong couplings between microbes. Soil temperature, reflective of climate regimes, was important in shaping microbial communities at both taxonomic and functional gene levels. As a first glimpse of both the taxonomic and functional compositions of soil microbial communities, our results suggest that microbial community structure and function potentials will be altered by future environmental changes, which have implications for forest succession. PMID:25943705

  15. Remote Synchronization Reveals Network Symmetries and Functional Modules Vincenzo Nicosia,1

    E-print Network

    Diaz-Guilera, Albert

    , and we show how the frustration parameter affects the distribution of phases. An application to brain regions of the human brain [2­5]. In 1975 Y. Kuramoto proposed a simple microscopic model to study--has a relevant impact on the path to synchroniza- tion [14­18], and units that are close to each other

  16. Melanoregulin (MREG) modulates lysosome function in pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Damek-Poprawa, Monika; Diemer, Tanja; Lopes, Vanda S; Lillo, Concepción; Harper, Dawn C; Marks, Michael S; Wu, Yalin; Sparrow, Janet R; Rachel, Rivka A; Williams, David S; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2009-04-17

    Melanoregulin (MREG), the product of the Mreg(dsu) gene, is a small highly charged protein, hypothesized to play a role in organelle biogenesis due to its effect on pigmentation in dilute, ashen, and leaden mutant mice. Here we provide evidence that MREG is required in lysosome-dependent phagosome degradation. In the Mreg(-/-) mouse, we show that loss of MREG function results in phagosome accumulation due to delayed degradation of engulfed material. Over time, the Mreg(-/-) mouse retinal pigment epithelial cells accumulate the lipofuscin component, A2E. MREG-deficient human and mouse retinal pigment epithelial cells exhibit diminished activity of the lysosomal hydrolase, cathepsin D, due to defective processing. Moreover, MREG localizes to small intracellular vesicles and associates with the endosomal phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 3,5-biphosphate. Collectively, these studies suggest that MREG is required for lysosome maturation and support a role for MREG in intracellular trafficking. PMID:19240024

  17. SELECTIVE OESTROGEN RECEPTOR MODULATORS DIFFERENTIALLY POTENTIATE BRAIN MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Ronald W.; Yao, Jia; To, Jimmy; Hamilton, Ryan T.; Cadenas, Enrique; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial energy-transducing capacity of the brain is important for long-term neurological health and is influenced by endocrine hormone responsiveness. This study aimed to determine the role of oestrogen receptor (ER) subtypes in regulating mitochondrial function using selective agonists for ER? (PPT) and ER? (DPN). Ovariectomised female rats were treated with 17?-oestradiol (E2), PPT, DPN or vehicle control. Both ER selective agonists significantly increased the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio and cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity relative to vehicle. Western blots of purified whole brain mitochondria detected ER? and to a greater extent, ER? localization. Pre-treatment with DPN, an ER? agonist, significantly increased ER? association with mitochondria. In hippocampus, DPN activated mitochondrial DNA-encoded COXI expression whereas PPT was ineffective indicating that mechanistically ER?, not ER?, activated mitochondrial transcriptional machinery. Both selective ER agonists increased protein expression of nuclear DNA-encoded COXIV suggesting that activation of ER? or ER? is sufficient. Selective ER agonists up-regulated a panel of bioenergetic enzymes and antioxidant defense proteins. Up-regulated proteins included pyruvate dehydrogenase, ATP synthase, manganese superoxide dismutase, and peroxiredoxin V. In vitro, whole cell metabolism was assessed in live primary cultured hippocampal neurons and mixed glia. Results of in vitro analyses were consistent with in vivo data. Further, lipid peroxides, accumulated as a result of hormone deprivation, were significantly reduced by E2, PPT, and DPN. These findings suggest that activation of both ER? and ER? are differentially required to potentiate mitochondrial function in brain. As active components in hormone therapy, synthetically designed oestrogens as well as natural phyto-oestrogen cocktails can be tailored to improve brain mitochondrial endpoints. PMID:22070562

  18. Single-cell analysis reveals functionally distinct classes within the planarian stem cell compartment.

    PubMed

    van Wolfswinkel, Josien C; Wagner, Daniel E; Reddien, Peter W

    2014-09-01

    Planarians are flatworms capable of regenerating any missing body region. This capacity is mediated by neoblasts, a proliferative cell population that contains pluripotent stem cells. Although population-based studies have revealed many neoblast characteristics, whether functionally distinct classes exist within this population is unclear. Here, we used high-dimensional single-cell transcriptional profiling from over a thousand individual neoblasts to directly compare gene expression fingerprints during homeostasis and regeneration. We identified two prominent neoblast classes that we named ? (zeta) and ? (sigma). Zeta-neoblasts encompass specified cells that give rise to an abundant postmitotic lineage, including epidermal cells, and are not required for regeneration. By contrast, sigma-neoblasts proliferate in response to injury, possess broad lineage capacity, and can give rise to zeta-neoblasts. These findings indicate that planarian neoblasts comprise two major and functionally distinct cellular compartments. PMID:25017721

  19. Single-cell analysis reveals functionally distinct classes within the planarian stem cell compartment

    PubMed Central

    van Wolfswinkel, Josien C.; Wagner, Daniel E.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Planarians are flatworms capable of regenerating any missing body region. This capacity is mediated by neoblasts, a proliferative cell population that contains pluripotent stem cells. Although population-based studies have revealed many neoblast characteristics, whether functionally distinct classes exist within this population is unclear. Here, we used high-dimensional single-cell transcriptional profiling from over a thousand individual neoblasts to directly compare gene expression fingerprints during homeostasis and regeneration. We identified two prominent neoblast classes that we named ? (zeta) and ? (sigma). Zeta-neoblasts encompass specified cells that give rise to an abundant postmitotic lineage including epidermal cells, and are not required for regeneration. By contrast, sigma-neoblasts proliferate in response to injury, possess broad lineage capacity, and can give rise to zeta-neoblasts. These findings present a new view of planarian neoblasts, in which the population is comprised of two major and functionally distinct cellular compartments. PMID:25017721

  20. Interactions between metal-binding domains modulate intracellular targeting of Cu(I)-ATPase ATP7B, as revealed by nanobody binding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yiping; Nokhrin, Sergiy; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Yu, Corey H; Yang, Haojun; Barry, Amanda N; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L; Muyldermans, Serge; Dmitriev, Oleg Y; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2014-11-21

    The biologically and clinically important membrane transporters are challenging proteins to study because of their low level of expression, multidomain structure, and complex molecular dynamics that underlies their activity. ATP7B is a copper transporter that traffics between the intracellular compartments in response to copper elevation. The N-terminal domain of ATP7B (N-ATP7B) is involved in binding copper, but the role of this domain in trafficking is controversial. To clarify the role of N-ATP7B, we generated nanobodies that interact with ATP7B in vitro and in cells. In solution NMR studies, nanobodies revealed the spatial organization of N-ATP7B by detecting transient functionally relevant interactions between metal-binding domains 1-3. Modulation of these interactions by nanobodies in cells enhanced relocalization of the endogenous ATP7B toward the plasma membrane linking molecular and cellular dynamics of the transporter. Stimulation of ATP7B trafficking by nanobodies in the absence of elevated copper provides direct evidence for the important role of N-ATP7B structural dynamics in regulation of ATP7B localization in a cell. PMID:25253690

  1. Perspectives in Pharmacology P2 Purinergic Receptors: Modulation of Cell Function and

    E-print Network

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    Perspectives in Pharmacology P2 Purinergic Receptors: Modulation of Cell Function and Therapeutic of splice variants and approximately 11 P2Y receptors have been cloned and expressed (Ralevic and Burnstock been cloned as the P2Y12 receptor. Pharmacological characterization of P2 receptors has gen- erally

  2. Modulation transfer function of patch-based stereo systems Ronny Klowsky

    E-print Network

    Goesele, Michael

    Modulation transfer function of patch-based stereo systems Ronny Klowsky TU Darmstadt Arjan Kuijper photographs is patch-based (multi-view) stereo reconstruc- tion. Current methods are able to reproduce fine surface de- tails, they are however limited by the sampling density and the patch size used

  3. MODULATION OF RAT LEYDIG CELL STEROIDOGENIC FUNCTION BY DI(2-ETHYLHEXYL)PHTHALATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modulation of rat Leydig cell steroidogenic function by di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate.

    Akingbemi BT, Youker RT, Sottas CM, Ge R, Katz E, Klinefelter GR, Zirkin BR, Hardy MP.

    Center for Biomedical Research, Population Council, New York, New York 10021, USA. benson@popcbr...

  4. High-Density Integration of Functional Modules Using Monolithic 3D-IC Technology

    E-print Network

    Lim, Sung Kyu

    High-Density Integration of Functional Modules Using Monolithic 3D-IC Technology Shreepad Panth1. They can be realized using Through Silicon Vias (TSVs), or monolithic integration using Monolithic Inter is monolithic 3D that enables orders of magnitude higher integration density compared to that of TSV

  5. Characters of highest weight modules over affine Lie algebras are meromorphic functions

    E-print Network

    M. Gorelik; V. Kac

    2007-04-22

    We show that the characters of all highest weight modules over an affine Lie algebra with the highest weight away from the critical hyperplane are meromorphic functions in the positive half of Cartan subalgebra, their singularities being at most simple poles at zeros of real roots. We obtain some information about these singularities.

  6. Cholinergic modulation of learning and memory in the human brain as detected with functional neuroimaging

    E-print Network

    of psychopharmacological approaches in conjunction with neuroimaging. The paper will introduce the combination of neuroi- maging and psychopharmacology as a tool to study neurochemical modulation of human brain function: Acetylcholine; Neuroimaging; Learning; Memory; Review; Drug; Psychopharmacology; fMRI; PET; Human 1

  7. Accuracy of 3D Range Scanners by Measurement of the Slanted Edge Modulation Transfer Function

    E-print Network

    Goesele, Michael

    Accuracy of 3D Range Scanners by Measurement of the Slanted Edge Modulation Transfer Function,cfuchs,hpseidel}@mpi-sb.mpg.de Abstract We estimate the accuracy of a 3D range scanner in terms of its spatial frequency response. We us to determine how well small details can be acquired by the 3D scanner. We report the results

  8. Antihelminthic niclosamide modulates dendritic cells activation and function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Shan; Li, Yi-Rong; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chen, Ying-Che; Chu, Chiang-Liang; Pan, I-Hong; Wu, Yu-Shan; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) link the sensing of the environment by the innate immune system to the initiation of adaptive immune responses. Accordingly, DCs are considered to be a major target in the development of immunomodulating compounds. In this study, the effect of niclosamide, a Food and Drug Administration-approved antihelminthic drug, on the activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine bone marrow-derived DCs was examined. Our experimental results show that niclosamide reduced the pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression of LPS-activated DCs. In addition, niclosamide also affected the expression of MHC and costimulatory molecules and influenced the ability of the cells to take up antigens. Therefore, in mixed cell cultures composed of syngeneic OVA-specific T cells and DCs, niclosamide-treated DCs showed a decreased ability to stimulate T cell proliferation and IFN-? production. Furthermore, intravenous injection of niclosamide also attenuated contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in mice during sensitization with 2,4-dinitro-1-fluorobenzene. Blocking the LPS-induced activation of MAPK-ERK, JNK and NF-?B may contribute to the inhibitory effect of niclosamide on DC activation. Collectively, our findings suggest that niclosamide can manipulate the function of DCs. These results provide new insight into the immunopharmacological role of niclosamide and suggest that it may be useful for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders or DC-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:24561310

  9. Ocean wave-radar modulation transfer functions from the West Coast experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, J. W.; Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Jones, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Short gravity-capillary waves, the equilibrium, or the steady state excitations of the ocean surface are modulated by longer ocean waves. These short waves are the predominant microwave scatterers on the ocean surface under many viewing conditions so that the modulation is readily measured with CW Doppler radar used as a two-scale wave probe. Modulation transfer functions (the ratio of the cross spectrum of the line-of-sight orbital speed and backscattered microwave power to the autospectrum of the line-of-sight orbital speed) were measured at 9.375 and 1.5 GHz (Bragg wavelengths of 2.3 and 13 cm) for winds up to 10 m/s and ocean wave periods from 2-18 s. The measurements were compared with the relaxation-time model; the principal result is that a source of modulation other than straining by the horizontal component of orbital speed, possibly the wave-induced airflow, is responsible for most of the modulation by waves of typical ocean wave period (10 s). The modulations are large; for unit coherence, spectra of radar images of deep-water waves should be proportional to the quotient of the slope spectra of the ocean waves by the ocean wave frequency.

  10. Proteomic analysis reveals a FANCA-modulated neddylation pathway involved in CXCR5 membrane targeting and cell mobility.

    PubMed

    Renaudin, Xavier; Guervilly, Jean-Hugues; Aoufouchi, Said; Rosselli, Filippo

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to identify novel substrates of the FANCcore complex, the inactivation of which leads to the genetic disorder Fanconi anemia, which is associated with bone marrow failure, developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to cancer. Eight FANC proteins participate in the nuclear FANCcore complex, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin-ligase that monoubiquitylates FANCD2 and FANCI in response to replicative stress. Here, we use mass spectrometry to compare proteins from FANCcore-complex-deficient cells to those of rescued control cells after treatment with hydroxyurea, an inducer of FANCD2 monoubiquitylation. FANCD2 and FANCI appear to be the only targets of the FANCcore complex. We identify other proteins that are post-translationally modified in a FANCA- or FANCC-dependent manner. The majority of these potential targets localize to the cell membrane. Finally, we demonstrate that (a) the chemokine receptor CXCR5 is neddylated; (b) FANCA but not FANCC appears to modulate CXCR5 neddylation through an unknown mechanism; (c) CXCR5 neddylation is involved in targeting the receptor to the cell membrane; and (d) CXCR5 neddylation stimulates cell migration and motility. Our work has uncovered a pathway involving FANCA in neddylation and cell motility. PMID:25015289

  11. Separable roles of UFO during floral development revealed by conditional restoration of gene function.

    PubMed

    Laufs, Patrick; Coen, Enrico; Kronenberger, Jocelyne; Traas, Jan; Doonan, John

    2003-02-01

    The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene is required for several aspects of floral development in Arabidopsis including specification of organ identity in the second and third whorls and the proper pattern of primordium initiation in the inner three whorls. UFO is expressed in a dynamic pattern during the early phases of flower development. Here we dissect the role of UFO by ubiquitously expressing it in ufo loss-of-function flowers at different developmental stages and for various durations using an ethanol-inducible expression system. The previously known functions of UFO could be separated and related to its expression at specific stages of development. We show that a 24- to 48-hour period of UFO expression from floral stage 2, before any floral organs are visible, is sufficient to restore normal petal and stamen development. The earliest requirement for UFO is during stage 2, when the endogenous UFO gene is transiently expressed in the centre of the wild-type flower and is required to specify the initiation patterns of petal, stamen and carpel primordia. Petal and stamen identity is determined during stages 2 or 3, when UFO is normally expressed in the presumptive second and third whorl. Although endogenous UFO expression is absent from the stamen whorl from stage 4 onwards, stamen identity can be restored by UFO activation up to stage 6. We also observed floral phenotypes not observed in loss-of-function or constitutive gain-of-function backgrounds, revealing additional roles of UFO in outgrowth of petal primordia. PMID:12506008

  12. Impact of shear rate modulation on vascular function in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tinken, Toni M.; Thijssen, Dick H.J.; Hopkins, Nicola; Black, Mark A.; Dawson, Ellen A.; Minson, Christopher T.; Newcomer, Sean C.; Laughlin, M. Harold; Cable, N. Timothy; Green, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Shear stress is an important stimulus to arterial adaptation in response to exercise and training in humans. We recently observed significant reverse arterial flow and shear during exercise and different antegrade/retrograde patterns of shear and flow in response to different types of exercise. The purpose of this study was to simultaneously examine flow mediated dilation (FMD), a largely nitric oxide mediated vasodilator response, in both brachial arteries of healthy young men before and after 30-minute interventions consisting of bilateral forearm heating, recumbent leg cycling and bilateral handgrip exercise. During each intervention, a cuff inflated to 60mmHg was placed on one arm to unilaterally manipulate the shear rate stimulus. In the non-cuffed arm, antegrade flow and shear increased similarly in response to each intervention (ANOVA; P<0.001, no interaction between interventions; P=0.71). Baseline FMD (4.6, 6.9 and 6.7%) increased similarly in response to heating, handgrip and cycling (8.1, 10.4 and 8.9%, ANOVA; P<0.001, no interaction; 0.89). In contrast, cuffed arm antegrade shear rate was lower than in the non-cuffed arm for all conditions (P<0.05) and the increase in FMD was abolished in this arm (4.7, 6.7 and 6.1%) (2-way ANOVA: all conditions interacted P<0.05). These results suggest that differences in the magnitude of antegrade shear rate transduce differences in endothelial vasodilator function in humans, a finding which may have relevance for the impact of different exercise interventions on vascular adaptation in humans. PMID:19546374

  13. Evolutionary, structural and functional relationships revealed by comparative analysis of syntenic genes in Rhizobiales

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Gabriela; Peralta, Humberto; Aguilar, Alejandro; Díaz, Rafael; Villalobos, Miguel Angel; Medrano-Soto, Arturo; Mora, Jaime

    2005-01-01

    Background Comparative genomics has provided valuable insights into the nature of gene sequence variation and chromosomal organization of closely related bacterial species. However, questions about the biological significance of gene order conservation, or synteny, remain open. Moreover, few comprehensive studies have been reported for rhizobial genomes. Results We analyzed the genomic sequences of four fast growing Rhizobiales (Sinorhizobium meliloti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Mesorhizobium loti and Brucella melitensis). We made a comprehensive gene classification to define chromosomal orthologs, genes with homologs in other replicons such as plasmids, and those which were species-specific. About two thousand genes were predicted to be orthologs in each chromosome and about 80% of these were syntenic. A striking gene colinearity was found in pairs of organisms and a large fraction of the microsyntenic regions and operons were similar. Syntenic products showed higher identity levels than non-syntenic ones, suggesting a resistance to sequence variation due to functional constraints; also, an unusually high fraction of syntenic products contained membranal segments. Syntenic genes encode a high proportion of essential cell functions, presented a high level of functional relationships and a very low horizontal gene transfer rate. The sequence variability of the proteins can be considered the species signature in response to specific niche adaptation. Comparatively, an analysis with genomes of Enterobacteriales showed a different gene organization but gave similar results in the synteny conservation, essential role of syntenic genes and higher functional linkage among the genes of the microsyntenic regions. Conclusion Syntenic bacterial genes represent a commonly evolved group. They not only reveal the core chromosomal segments present in the last common ancestor and determine the metabolic characteristics shared by these microorganisms, but also show resistance to sequence variation and rearrangement, possibly due to their essential character. In Rhizobiales and Enterobacteriales, syntenic genes encode a high proportion of essential cell functions and presented a high level of functional relationships. PMID:16229745

  14. Comparative analysis of ABCB1 reveals novel structural and functional conservation between monocots and dicots

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Amandeep K.; Mohan, Amita; Gill, Kulvinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Phytohormone auxin plays a critical role in modulating plant architecture by creating a gradient regulated via its transporters such as ATP-binding cassette (ABC) B1. Except for Arabidopsis and maize, where it was shown to interrupt auxin transport, ABCB1's presence, structure and function in crop species is not known. Here we describe the structural and putative functional organization of ABCB1 among monocots relative to that of dicots. Identified from various plant species following specific and stringent criteria, ZmABCB1's “true” orthologs sequence identity ranged from 56–90% at the DNA and 75–91% at the predicted amino acid (aa) level. Relative to ZmABCB1, the size of genomic copies ranged from ?27 to +1.5% and aa from ?7.7 to +0.6%. With the average gene size being similar (5.8 kb in monocots and 5.7 kb in dicots), dicots have about triple the number of introns with an average size of 194 bp (total 1743 bp) compared to 556 bp (total 1667 bp) in monocots. The intron-exon junctions across species were however conserved. N-termini of the predicted proteins were highly variable: in monocots due to mismatches and small deletions of 1–13 aa compared to large, species-specific deletions of up to 77 aa in dicots. The species-, family- and group- specific conserved motifs were identified in the N-terminus and linker region of protein, possibly responsible for the specific functions. The near-identical conserved motifs of Nucleotide Binding Domains (NBDs) in two halves of the protein showed subtle aa changes possibly favoring ATP binding to the N-terminus. Predicted 3-D protein structures showed remarkable similarity with each other and for the residues involved in auxin binding. PMID:25505477

  15. Photon-Number Distribution and Wigner Function of Generalized Photon-Modulated Coherent State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Wang, Shuai; Song, Jun; Fan, Hong-Yi

    In this paper, we present the generalized photon-modulated coherent state (GPMCS) generated by repeatedly operating the combination of Bosonic creation and annihilation operators on the coherent state. It is found that the GPMCS is a Hermite-excited coherent state and its normalization factor is related to single-variable Hermite polynomials. Furthermore, some significant quantum statistical properties of the GPMCS are investigated, such as photon-number distribution (PND) and the Wigner function (WF). We find that the WF of the GPMCS has negative values when the generalized photon-modulation exists, which implies the nonclassical properties of the GPMCS.

  16. A High-Content Assay to Screen for Modulators of EGFR Function.

    PubMed

    Antczak, Christophe; Djaballah, Hakim

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based assays have the potential and advantage to identify cell-permeable modulators of kinase function, and hence provide an alternative to the conventional enzymatic activity-driven discovery approaches that rely on purified recombinant kinase catalytic domains. Here, we describe a domain-based high-content biosensor approach to study endogenous EGFR activity whereby EGF-induced receptor activation, subsequent trafficking, and internalization are imaged and quantified using time-dependent granule formation in cells. This method can readily be used to search for EGFR modulators in both chemical and RNAi screening; with potential applicability to other receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:26501905

  17. Cerebellar Contributions to Visual Attention and Visual Working Memory Revealed by Functional MRI and Intrinsic Functional Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Brissenden, James; Levin, Emily; Osher, David; Rosen, Maya; Halko, Mark; Somers, David

    2015-09-01

    The study of cerebellum function has been traditionally limited to the motor domain. Recent research, however, has begun to characterize the cerebellum's role in cognition (see Schmahmann, 2010) and has demonstrated intrinsic functional connectivity between cerebral cortical networks and distinct cerebellar regions (Buckner et al., 2011). Here, in two separate fMRI experiments, we investigated whether cerebro-cerebellar connectivity of dorsal attention network (DAN) predicts cerebellar activation during visual attention and visual working memory (VWM) task performance. In experiment 1 (N=8), subjects performed a multiple-object tracking task. In experiment 2 (N=9), subjects performed a VWM change detection task using oriented bars. Memory load was varied across blocks (set size: SS0, SS1, or SS4). Both experiments employed resting-state functional connectivity analysis using cortical network seeds (Yeo et al., 2011) to parcellate cerebro-cerebellar networks in individual subjects. In experiment 1, a region-of-interest analysis revealed a robust attentional effect within cerebellar regions functionally connected to the cortical DAN (p< .01). Conversely, cerebellar regions functionally connected to the cortical default mode network (DMN) showed reliable deactivation (p< .001). In experiment 2, contrasting SS4 with SS0 and SS1 resulted in a similar pattern of competitive interaction between cerebellar nodes of the DAN and DMN. Load-dependent activation spatially corresponded with cerebellar DAN nodes (SS4-SS0: p< .005; SS4-SS1: p< .0001) and load-dependent deactivation was observed within cerebellar DMN nodes (SS4-SS0: p< .005; SS4-SS1: p< .0005). Across both experiments the strength of intrinsic functional connectivity, with either the cortical DAN or the cortical DMN, significantly predicted the response of individual cerebellar voxels (Experiment 1: rDAN =.67, rDMN =-.71; Experiment 2: rDAN =.60, rDMN =-.56). Our results indicate that cerebellar nodes of the DAN contribute to network function across a diverse range of attentive and working memory conditions. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26325920

  18. GDNF Overexpression from the Native Locus Reveals its Role in the Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic System Function.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anmol; Kopra, Jaakko; Varendi, Kärt; Porokuokka, Lauriina L; Panhelainen, Anne; Kuure, Satu; Marshall, Pepin; Karalija, Nina; Härma, Mari-Anne; Vilenius, Carolina; Lilleväli, Kersti; Tekko, Triin; Mijatovic, Jelena; Pulkkinen, Nita; Jakobson, Madis; Jakobson, Maili; Ola, Roxana; Palm, Erik; Lindahl, Maria; Strömberg, Ingrid; Vőikar, Vootele; Piepponen, T Petteri; Saarma, Mart; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle

    2015-12-01

    Degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic system is the principal lesion in Parkinson's disease. Because glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes survival of dopamine neurons in vitro and in vivo, intracranial delivery of GDNF has been attempted for Parkinson's disease treatment but with variable success. For improving GDNF-based therapies, knowledge on physiological role of endogenous GDNF at the sites of its expression is important. However, due to limitations of existing genetic model systems, such knowledge is scarce. Here, we report that prevention of transcription of Gdnf 3'UTR in Gdnf endogenous locus yields GDNF hypermorphic mice with increased, but spatially unchanged GDNF expression, enabling analysis of postnatal GDNF function. We found that increased level of GDNF in the central nervous system increases the number of adult dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the number of dopaminergic terminals in the dorsal striatum. At the functional level, GDNF levels increased striatal tissue dopamine levels and augmented striatal dopamine release and re-uptake. In a proteasome inhibitor lactacystin-induced model of Parkinson's disease GDNF hypermorphic mice were protected from the reduction in striatal dopamine and failure of dopaminergic system function. Importantly, adverse phenotypic effects associated with spatially unregulated GDNF applications were not observed. Enhanced GDNF levels up-regulated striatal dopamine transporter activity by at least five fold resulting in enhanced susceptibility to 6-OHDA, a toxin transported into dopamine neurons by DAT. Further, we report how GDNF levels regulate kidney development and identify microRNAs miR-9, miR-96, miR-133, and miR-146a as negative regulators of GDNF expression via interaction with Gdnf 3'UTR in vitro. Our results reveal the role of GDNF in nigrostriatal dopamine system postnatal development and adult function, and highlight the importance of correct spatial expression of GDNF. Furthermore, our results suggest that 3'UTR targeting may constitute a useful tool in analyzing gene function. PMID:26681446

  19. Multiplexed strain sensing by synthesis of optical coherence function with time-division phase shift modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotate, Kazuo; Matsuo, Kiyotaka; Song, Kwang-Yong; He, Zuyuan

    2007-09-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) can be multiplexed to realize a quasi-distributed strain or temperature sensing system by use of FBGs of different Bragg wavelength. For a sensing system requiring large number of sensing points, however, this method has difficulties in cost and multiplexable number. On the other hand, we have successfully multiplexed FBGs of the same Bragg wavelength by applying the technique of synthesis of optical coherence function. The measurement range of the technique is limited to the period of the coherence function. Thereafter, we applied Vernier scheme to the system which actively makes use of the periodical coherence function to distinguish the FBGs. In this paper, we propose a new frequency modulation method, time-division phase shift modulation, which solves the FBG-positioning problem in our previous system applying Vernier scheme to the multiplexed FBG sensing with SOCF. Experimental results are reported.

  20. Tailor the functionalities of metasurfaces: From perfect absorption to phase modulation

    E-print Network

    Qu, Che; Hao, Jiaming; Qiu, Meng; Li, Xin; Xiao, Shiyi; Miao, Ziqi; Dai, Ning; He, Qiong; Sun, Shulin; Zhou, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces in metal/insulator/metal configuration have recently been widely used in photonics research, with applications ranging from perfect absorption to phase modulation, but why and when such structures can realize what kind of functionalities are not yet fully understood. Here, based on a coupled-mode theory analysis, we establish a complete phase diagram in which the optical properties of such systems are fully controlled by two simple parameters (i.e., the intrinsic and radiation losses), which are in turn dictated by the geometrical/material parameters of the underlying structures. Such a phase diagram can greatly facilitate the design of appropriate metasurfaces with tailored functionalities (e.g., perfect absorption, phase modulator, electric/magnetic reflector, etc.), demonstrated by our experiments and simulations in the Terahertz regime. In particular, our experiments show that, through appropriate structural/material tuning, the device can be switched across the functionality phase boundaries...

  1. A graph-based integrative method of detecting consistent protein functional modules from multiple data sources.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Cheng, Yue; Ge, Liang; Du, Nan; Jia, Kebin; Zhang, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Many clustering methods have been developed to identify functional modules in Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) networks but the results are far from satisfaction. To overcome the noise and incomplete problems of PPI networks and find more accurate and stable functional modules, we propose an integrative method, bipartite graph-based Non-negative Matrix Factorisation method (BiNMF), in which we adopt multiple biological data sources as different views that describe PPIs. Specifically, traditional clustering models are adopted as preliminary analysis of different views of protein functional similarity. Then the intermediate clustering results are represented by a bipartite graph which can comprehensively represent the relationships between proteins and intermediate clusters and finally overlapping clustering results are achieved. Through extensive experiments, we see that our method is superior to baseline methods and detailed analysis has demonstrated the benefits of integrating diverse clustering methods and multiple biological information sources. PMID:26547971

  2. Edge reconstruction in armchair phosphorene nanoribbons revealed by discontinuous Galerkin density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao

    2015-11-25

    With the help of our recently developed massively parallel DGDFT (Discontinuous Galerkin Density Functional Theory) methodology, we perform large-scale Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations on phosphorene nanoribbons with armchair edges (ACPNRs) containing a few thousands to ten thousand atoms. The use of DGDFT allows us to systematically achieve a conventional plane wave basis set type of accuracy, but with a much smaller number (about 15) of adaptive local basis (ALB) functions per atom for this system. The relatively small number of degrees of freedom required to represent the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian, together with the use of the pole expansion the selected inversion (PEXSI) technique that circumvents the need to diagonalize the Hamiltonian, results in a highly efficient and scalable computational scheme for analyzing the electronic structures of ACPNRs as well as their dynamics. The total wall clock time for calculating the electronic structures of large-scale ACPNRs containing 1080-10?800 atoms is only 10-25 s per self-consistent field (SCF) iteration, with accuracy fully comparable to that obtained from conventional planewave DFT calculations. For the ACPNR system, we observe that the DGDFT methodology can scale to 5000-50?000 processors. We use DGDFT based ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) calculations to study the thermodynamic stability of ACPNRs. Our calculations reveal that a 2 × 1 edge reconstruction appears in ACPNRs at room temperature. PMID:25698178

  3. Altered baseline brain activity in children with ADHD revealed by resting-state functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yu-Feng; He, Yong; Zhu, Chao-Zhe; Cao, Qing-Jiu; Sui, Man-Qiu; Liang, Meng; Tian, Li-Xia; Jiang, Tian-Zi; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2007-03-01

    In children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), functional neuroimaging studies have revealed abnormalities in various brain regions, including prefrontal-striatal circuit, cerebellum, and brainstem. In the current study, we used a new marker of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), amplitude of low-frequency (0.01-0.08Hz) fluctuation (ALFF) to investigate the baseline brain function of this disorder. Thirteen boys with ADHD (13.0+/-1.4 years) were examined by resting-state fMRI and compared with age-matched controls. As a result, we found that patients with ADHD had decreased ALFF in the right inferior frontal cortex, [corrected] and bilateral cerebellum and the vermis as well as increased ALFF in the right anterior cingulated cortex, left sensorimotor cortex, and bilateral brainstem. This resting-state fMRI study suggests that the changed spontaneous neuronal activity of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology in children with ADHD. PMID:16919409

  4. Diurnal Changes in Mitochondrial Function Reveal Daily Optimization of Light and Dark Respiratory Metabolism in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun Pong; Eubel, Holger; Millar, A. Harvey

    2010-01-01

    Biomass production by plants is often negatively correlated with respiratory rate, but the value of this rate changes dramatically during diurnal cycles, and hence, biomass is the cumulative result of complex environment-dependent metabolic processes. Mitochondria in photosynthetic plant tissues undertake substantially different metabolic roles during light and dark periods that are dictated by substrate availability and the functional capacity of mitochondria defined by their protein composition. We surveyed the heterogeneity of the mitochondrial proteome and its function during a typical night and day cycle in Arabidopsis shoots. This used a staged, quantitative analysis of the proteome across 10 time points covering 24 h of the life of 3-week-old Arabidopsis shoots grown under 12-h dark and 12-h light conditions. Detailed analysis of enzyme capacities and substrate-dependent respiratory processes of isolated mitochondria were also undertaken during the same time course. Together these data reveal a range of dynamic changes in mitochondrial capacity and uncover day- and night-enhanced protein components. Clear diurnal changes were evident in mitochondrial capacities to drive the TCA cycle and to undertake functions associated with nitrogen and sulfur metabolism, redox poise, and mitochondrial antioxidant defense. These data quantify the nature and nuances of a daily rhythm in Arabidopsis mitochondrial respiratory capacity. PMID:20601493

  5. Comparative Proteomics Reveal Fundamental Structural and Functional Differences between the Two Progeny Phenotypes of a Baculovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dianhai; Zhang, Leike; Deng, Fei; Fang, Wei; Wang, Ranran; Liu, Xijia; Rayner, Simon; Chen, Xinwen; Wang, Hualin

    2013-01-01

    The replication of lepidopteran baculoviruses is characterized by the production of two progeny phenotypes: the occlusion-derived virus (ODV), which establishes infection in midgut cells, and the budded virus (BV), which disseminates infection to different tissues within a susceptible host. To understand the structural, and hence functional, differences between BV and ODV, we employed multiple proteomic methods to reveal the protein compositions and posttranslational modifications of the two phenotypes of Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus. In addition, Western blotting and quantitative mass spectrometry were used to identify the localization of proteins in the envelope or nucleocapsid fractions. Comparative protein portfolios of BV and ODV showing the distribution of 54 proteins, encompassing the 21 proteins shared by BV and ODV, the 12 BV-specific proteins, and the 21 ODV-specific proteins, were obtained. Among the 11 ODV-specific envelope proteins, 8 either are essential for or contribute to oral infection. Twenty-three phosphorylated and 6 N-glycosylated viral proteins were also identified. While the proteins that are shared by the two phenotypes appear to be important for nucleocapsid assembly and trafficking, the structural and functional differences between the two phenotypes are evidently characterized by the envelope proteins and posttranslational modifications. This comparative proteomics study provides new insight into how BV and ODV are formed and why they function differently. PMID:23115289

  6. Conditional Degradation of Plasmodium Calcineurin Reveals Functions in Parasite Colonization of both Host and Vector

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Nisha; Waters, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional analysis of essential genes in the malarial parasite, Plasmodium, is hindered by lack of efficient strategies for conditional protein regulation. We report the development of a rapid, specific, and inducible chemical-genetic tool in the rodent malaria parasite, P. berghei, in which endogenous proteins engineered to contain the auxin-inducible degron (AID) are selectively degraded upon adding auxin. Application of AID to the calcium-regulated protein phosphatase, calcineurin, revealed functions in host and vector stages of parasite development. Whereas depletion of calcineurin in late-stage schizonts demonstrated its critical role in erythrocyte attachment and invasion in vivo, stage-specific depletion uncovered roles in gamete development, fertilization, and ookinete-to-oocyst and sporozoite-to-liver stage transitions. Furthermore, AID technology facilitated concurrent generation and phenotyping of transgenic lines, allowing multiple lines to be assessed simultaneously with significant reductions in animal use. This study highlights the broad applicability of AID for functional analysis of proteins across the Plasmodium life cycle. PMID:26118994

  7. Conditional Degradation of Plasmodium Calcineurin Reveals Functions in Parasite Colonization of both Host and Vector.

    PubMed

    Philip, Nisha; Waters, Andrew P

    2015-07-01

    Functional analysis of essential genes in the malarial parasite, Plasmodium, is hindered by lack of efficient strategies for conditional protein regulation. We report the development of a rapid, specific, and inducible chemical-genetic tool in the rodent malaria parasite, P. berghei, in which endogenous proteins engineered to contain the auxin-inducible degron (AID) are selectively degraded upon adding auxin. Application of AID to the calcium-regulated protein phosphatase, calcineurin, revealed functions in host and vector stages of parasite development. Whereas depletion of calcineurin in late-stage schizonts demonstrated its critical role in erythrocyte attachment and invasion in vivo, stage-specific depletion uncovered roles in gamete development, fertilization, and ookinete-to-oocyst and sporozoite-to-liver stage transitions. Furthermore, AID technology facilitated concurrent generation and phenotyping of transgenic lines, allowing multiple lines to be assessed simultaneously with significant reductions in animal use. This study highlights the broad applicability of AID for functional analysis of proteins across the Plasmodium life cycle. PMID:26118994

  8. Effective modulation transfer function measurement method for an off-axis optical system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Cheng, Dewen; Wang, Yongtian; Peng, Haichao

    2015-09-01

    The most common modulation transfer function (MTF) measurement equipment operates along a coaxial testing light path. It can be used to test several fields along one radial direction and is suitable for an optical system with rotational symmetry. However, off-axis optical systems need multidimensional adjustment and complex mechanical structures to measure the MTF of fields. In this paper, we propose a MTF testing module to address this issue by adding a rotatable mirror to redirect the light. The testing module greatly simplifies MTF measurement of off-axis imaging systems in both the process and mechanism. The figure error of the rotatable mirror is analyzed to ensure testing accuracy. MTF testing of a free-form surface prism using this novel method was successfully implemented and the results are presented. The method can be extended to the measurement of other parameters, such as the effective focal length. PMID:26368864

  9. Dietary Fatty Acids and Temperature Modulate Mitochondrial Function and Longevity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Holmbeck, Marissa A; Rand, David M

    2015-11-01

    Fluctuations in temperature and resource availability are conditions many organisms contend with in nature. Specific dietary nutrients such as fatty acids play an essential role in reproduction, cold adaptation, and metabolism in a variety of organisms. The present study characterizes how temperature and diet interact to modulate Drosophila physiology and life span. Flies were raised on media containing specific saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fatty acids supplements at low concentrations and were placed in varied thermal environments. We found that dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids improve chill coma recovery and modulate mitochondrial function. Additionally, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid food supplements were detrimental to life span regardless of temperature, and antioxidants were able to partially rescue this effect. This study provides insight into environmental modulation of Drosophila physiology and life span. PMID:25910846

  10. Behavioral state-dependent modulation of distinct interneuron subtypes and consequences for circuit function

    PubMed Central

    Wester, Jason C.; McBain, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple neuromodulators regulate neuronal response properties and synaptic connections in order to adjust circuit function. Inhibitory interneurons are a diverse group of cells that are differentially modulated depending on neuronal subtype and play key roles in regulating local circuit activity. Importantly, new tools to target specific subtypes are greatly improving our understanding of interneuron circuits and their modulation. Indeed, recent work has demonstrated that during different behavioral states interneuron activity changes in a subtype specific manner in both neocortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, in neocortex, modulation of specific interneuron microcircuits results in pyramidal cell disinhibition with important consequences for synaptic plasticity and animal behavior. Thus, neurmodulators tune the output of different interneuron subtypes to provide neural circuits with great flexibility. PMID:25058112

  11. Attention-dependent modulation of cortical taste circuits revealed by Granger causality with signal-dependent noise.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiang; Ge, Tian; Grabenhorst, Fabian; Feng, Jianfeng; Rolls, Edmund T

    2013-10-01

    We show, for the first time, that in cortical areas, for example the insular, orbitofrontal, and lateral prefrontal cortex, there is signal-dependent noise in the fMRI blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) time series, with the variance of the noise increasing approximately linearly with the square of the signal. Classical Granger causal models are based on autoregressive models with time invariant covariance structure, and thus do not take this signal-dependent noise into account. To address this limitation, here we describe a Granger causal model with signal-dependent noise, and a novel, likelihood ratio test for causal inferences. We apply this approach to the data from an fMRI study to investigate the source of the top-down attentional control of taste intensity and taste pleasantness processing. The Granger causality with signal-dependent noise analysis reveals effects not identified by classical Granger causal analysis. In particular, there is a top-down effect from the posterior lateral prefrontal cortex to the insular taste cortex during attention to intensity but not to pleasantness, and there is a top-down effect from the anterior and posterior lateral prefrontal cortex to the orbitofrontal cortex during attention to pleasantness but not to intensity. In addition, there is stronger forward effective connectivity from the insular taste cortex to the orbitofrontal cortex during attention to pleasantness than during attention to intensity. These findings indicate the importance of explicitly modeling signal-dependent noise in functional neuroimaging, and reveal some of the processes involved in a biased activation theory of selective attention. PMID:24204221

  12. Salivary Gland Proteome Analysis Reveals Modulation of Anopheline Unique Proteins in Insensitive Acetylcholinesterase Resistant Anopheles gambiae Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Cornelie, Sylvie; Rossignol, Marie; Seveno, Martial; Demettre, Edith; Mouchet, François; Djčgbč, Innocent; Marin, Philippe; Chandre, Fabrice; Corbel, Vincent; Remoué, Franck; Mathieu-Daudé, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance due to a mutation in the acetylcholinesterase (ace) encoding ace-1 gene confers cross-resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides in Anopheles gambiae populations from Central and West Africa. This mutation is associated with a strong genetic cost revealed through alterations of some life history traits but little is known about the physiological and behavioural changes in insects bearing the ace-1R allele. Comparative analysis of the salivary gland contents between An. gambiae susceptible and ace-1R resistant strains was carried out to charaterize factors that could be involved in modifications of blood meal process, trophic behaviour or pathogen interaction in the insecticide-resistant mosquitoes. Differential analysis of the salivary gland protein profiles revealed differences in abundance for several proteins, two of them showing major differences between the two strains. These two proteins identified as saglin and TRIO are salivary gland-1 related proteins, a family unique to anopheline mosquitoes, one of them playing a crucial role in salivary gland invasion by Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites. Differential expression of two other proteins previously identified in the Anopheles sialome was also observed. The differentially regulated proteins are involved in pathogen invasion, blood feeding process, and protection against oxidation, relevant steps in the outcome of malaria infection. Further functional studies and insect behaviour experiments would confirm the impact of the modification of the sialome composition on blood feeding and pathogen transmission abilities of the resistant mosquitoes. The data supports the hypothesis of alterations linked to insecticide resistance in the biology of the primary vector of human malaria in Africa. PMID:25102176

  13. Attention-Dependent Modulation of Cortical Taste Circuits Revealed by Granger Causality with Signal-Dependent Noise

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qiang; Ge, Tian; Grabenhorst, Fabian; Feng, Jianfeng; Rolls, Edmund T.

    2013-01-01

    We show, for the first time, that in cortical areas, for example the insular, orbitofrontal, and lateral prefrontal cortex, there is signal-dependent noise in the fMRI blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) time series, with the variance of the noise increasing approximately linearly with the square of the signal. Classical Granger causal models are based on autoregressive models with time invariant covariance structure, and thus do not take this signal-dependent noise into account. To address this limitation, here we describe a Granger causal model with signal-dependent noise, and a novel, likelihood ratio test for causal inferences. We apply this approach to the data from an fMRI study to investigate the source of the top-down attentional control of taste intensity and taste pleasantness processing. The Granger causality with signal-dependent noise analysis reveals effects not identified by classical Granger causal analysis. In particular, there is a top-down effect from the posterior lateral prefrontal cortex to the insular taste cortex during attention to intensity but not to pleasantness, and there is a top-down effect from the anterior and posterior lateral prefrontal cortex to the orbitofrontal cortex during attention to pleasantness but not to intensity. In addition, there is stronger forward effective connectivity from the insular taste cortex to the orbitofrontal cortex during attention to pleasantness than during attention to intensity. These findings indicate the importance of explicitly modeling signal-dependent noise in functional neuroimaging, and reveal some of the processes involved in a biased activation theory of selective attention. PMID:24204221

  14. Extracellular Acidification Acts as a Key Modulator of Neutrophil Apoptosis and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shannan; Liu, Peng; Zhu, Haiyan; Gong, Haiyan; Yao, Jianfeng; Sun, Yawei; Geng, Guangfeng; Wang, Tong; Feng, Sizhou; Han, Mingzhe; Zhou, Jiaxi; Xu, Yuanfu

    2015-01-01

    In human pathological conditions, the acidification of local environment is a frequent feature, such as tumor and inflammation. As the pH of microenvironment alters, the functions of immune cells are about to change. It makes the extracellular acidification a key modulator of innate immunity. Here we detected the impact of extracellular acidification on neutrophil apoptosis and functions, including cell death, respiratory burst, migration and phagocytosis. As a result, we found that under the acid environment, neutrophil apoptosis delayed, respiratory burst inhibited, polarization augmented, chemotaxis differed, endocytosis enhanced and bacteria killing suppressed. These findings suggested that extracellular acidification acts as a key regulator of neutrophil apoptosis and functions. PMID:26340269

  15. Two-dimensional, phase modulated lattice sums with application to the Helmholtz Green’s function

    SciTech Connect

    Linton, C. M.

    2015-01-15

    A class of two-dimensional phase modulated lattice sums in which the denominator is an indefinite quadratic polynomial Q is expressed in terms of a single, exponentially convergent series of elementary functions. This expression provides an extremely efficient method for the computation of the quasi-periodic Green’s function for the Helmholtz equation that arises in a number of physical contexts when studying wave propagation through a doubly periodic medium. For a class of sums in which Q is positive definite, our new result can be used to generate representations in terms of ?-functions which are significant generalisations of known results.

  16. Structure of Prokaryotic Polyamine Deacetylase Reveals Evolutionary Functional Relationships with Eukaryotic Histone Deacetylases

    SciTech Connect

    P Lombardi; H Angell; D Whittington; E Flynn; K Rajashankar; D Christianson

    2011-12-31

    Polyamines are a ubiquitous class of polycationic small molecules that can influence gene expression by binding to nucleic acids. Reversible polyamine acetylation regulates nucleic acid binding and is required for normal cell cycle progression and proliferation. Here, we report the structures of Mycoplana ramosa acetylpolyamine amidohydrolase (APAH) complexed with a transition state analogue and a hydroxamate inhibitor and an inactive mutant complexed with two acetylpolyamine substrates. The structure of APAH is the first of a histone deacetylase-like oligomer and reveals that an 18-residue insert in the L2 loop promotes dimerization and the formation of an 18 {angstrom} long 'L'-shaped active site tunnel at the dimer interface, accessible only to narrow and flexible substrates. The importance of dimerization for polyamine deacetylase function leads to the suggestion that a comparable dimeric or double-domain histone deacetylase could catalyze polyamine deacetylation reactions in eukaryotes.

  17. Functional genomic analysis reveals overlapping and distinct features of chronologically long-lived yeast populations

    PubMed Central

    Wierman, Margaret B.; Matecic, Mirela; Valsakumar, Veena; Li, Mingguang; Smith, Daniel L.; Bekiranov, Stefan; Smith, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Yeast chronological lifespan (CLS) is extended by multiple genetic and environmental manipulations, including caloric restriction (CR). Understanding the common changes in molecular pathways induced by such manipulations could potentially reveal conserved longevity mechanisms. We therefore performed gene expression profiling on several long-lived yeast populations, including an ade4? mutant defective in de novo purine (AMP) biosynthesis, and a calorie restricted WT strain. CLS was also extended by isonicotinamide (INAM) or expired media derived from CR cultures. Comparisons between these diverse long-lived conditions revealed a common set of differentially regulated genes, several of which were potential longevity biomarkers. There was also enrichment for genes that function in CLS regulation, including a long-lived adenosine kinase mutant (ado1?) that links CLS regulation to the methyl cycle and AMP. Genes co-regulated between the CR and ade4? conditions were dominated by GO terms related to metabolism of alternative carbon sources, consistent with chronological longevity requiring efficient acetate/acetic acid utilization. Alternatively, treating cells with isonicotinamide (INAM) or the expired CR media resulted in GO terms predominantly related to cell wall remodeling, consistent with improved stress resistance and protection against external insults like acetic acid. Acetic acid therefore has both beneficial and detrimental effects on CLS. PMID:25769345

  18. High-resolution chemical dissection of a model eukaryote reveals targets, pathways and gene functions.

    PubMed

    Hoepfner, Dominic; Helliwell, Stephen B; Sadlish, Heather; Schuierer, Sven; Filipuzzi, Ireos; Brachat, Sophie; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Plikat, Uwe; Abraham, Yann; Altorfer, Marc; Aust, Thomas; Baeriswyl, Lukas; Cerino, Raffaele; Chang, Lena; Estoppey, David; Eichenberger, Juerg; Frederiksen, Mathias; Hartmann, Nicole; Hohendahl, Annika; Knapp, Britta; Krastel, Philipp; Melin, Nicolas; Nigsch, Florian; Oakeley, Edward J; Petitjean, Virginie; Petersen, Frank; Riedl, Ralph; Schmitt, Esther K; Staedtler, Frank; Studer, Christian; Tallarico, John A; Wetzel, Stefan; Fishman, Mark C; Porter, Jeffrey A; Movva, N Rao

    2014-01-01

    Due to evolutionary conservation of biology, experimental knowledge captured from genetic studies in eukaryotic model organisms provides insight into human cellular pathways and ultimately physiology. Yeast chemogenomic profiling is a powerful approach for annotating cellular responses to small molecules. Using an optimized platform, we provide the relative sensitivities of the heterozygous and homozygous deletion collections for nearly 1800 biologically active compounds. The data quality enables unique insights into pathways that are sensitive and resistant to a given perturbation, as demonstrated with both known and novel compounds. We present examples of novel compounds that inhibit the therapeutically relevant fatty acid synthase and desaturase (Fas1p and Ole1p), and demonstrate how the individual profiles facilitate hypothesis-driven experiments to delineate compound mechanism of action. Importantly, the scale and diversity of tested compounds yields a dataset where the number of modulated pathways approaches saturation. This resource can be used to map novel biological connections, and also identify functions for unannotated genes. We validated hypotheses generated by global two-way hierarchical clustering of profiles for (i) novel compounds with a similar mechanism of action acting upon microtubules or vacuolar ATPases, and (ii) an un-annotated ORF, YIL060w, that plays a role in respiration in the mitochondria. Finally, we identify and characterize background mutations in the widely used yeast deletion collection which should improve the interpretation of past and future screens throughout the community. This comprehensive resource of cellular responses enables the expansion of our understanding of eukaryotic pathway biology. PMID:24360837

  19. Septal projections to nucleus incertus in the rat: bidirectional pathways for modulation of hippocampal function.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pérez, Ana M; Arnal-Vicente, Isabel; Santos, Fabio N; Pereira, Celia W; ElMlili, Nisrin; Sanjuan, Julio; Ma, Sherie; Gundlach, Andrew L; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E

    2015-03-01

    Projections from the nucleus incertus (NI) to the septum have been implicated in the modulation of hippocampal theta rhythm. In this study we describe a previously uncharacterized projection from the septum to the NI, which may provide feedback modulation of the ascending circuitry. Fluorogold injections into the NI resulted in retrograde labeling in the septum that was concentrated in the horizontal diagonal band and areas of the posterior septum including the septofimbrial and triangular septal nuclei. Double-immunofluorescent staining indicated that the majority of NI-projecting septal neurons were calretinin-positive and some were parvalbumin-, calbindin-, or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-67-positive. Choline acetyltransferase-positive neurons were Fluorogold-negative. Injection of anterograde tracers into medial septum, or triangular septal and septofimbrial nuclei, revealed fibers descending to the supramammillary nucleus, median raphe, and the NI. These anterogradely labeled varicosities displayed synaptophysin immunoreactivity, indicating septal inputs form synapses on NI neurons. Anterograde tracer also colocalized with GAD-67-positive puncta in labeled fibers, which in some cases made close synaptic contact with GAD-67-labeled NI neurons. These data provide evidence for the existence of an inhibitory descending projection from medial and posterior septum to the NI that provides a "feedback loop" to modulate the comparatively more dense ascending NI projections to medial septum and hippocampus. Neural processes and associated behaviors activated or modulated by changes in hippocampal theta rhythm may depend on reciprocal connections between ascending and descending pathways rather than on unidirectional regulation via the medial septum. PMID:25269409

  20. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rats with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Reveals Brain Cortex Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Tambalo, Stefano; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Rigolio, Roberta; Fiorini, Silvia; Bontempi, Pietro; Mallucci, Giulia; Balzarotti, Beatrice; Marmiroli, Paola; Sbarbati, Andrea; Cavaletti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Cortical reorganization occurring in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is thought to play a key role in limiting the effect of structural tissue damage. Conversely, its exhaustion may contribute to the irreversible disability that accumulates with disease progression. Several aspects of MS-related cortical reorganization, including the overall functional effect and likely modulation by therapies, still remain to be elucidated. The aim of this work was to assess the extent of functional cortical reorganization and its brain structural/pathological correlates in Dark Agouti rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a widely accepted preclinical model of chronic MS. Morphological and functional MRI (fMRI) were performed before disease induction and during the relapsing and chronic phases of EAE. During somatosensory stimulation of the right forepaw, fMRI demonstrated that cortical reorganization occurs in both relapsing and chronic phases of EAE with increased activated volume and decreased laterality index versus baseline values. Voxel-based morphometry demonstrated gray matter (GM) atrophy in the cerebral cortex, and both GM and white matter atrophy were assessed by ex vivo pathology of the sensorimotor cortex and corpus callosum. Neuroinflammation persisted in the relapsing and chronic phases, with dendritic spine density in the layer IV sensory neurons inversely correlating with the number of cluster of differentiation 45-positive inflammatory lesions. Our work provides an innovative experimental platform that may be pivotal for the comprehension of key mechanisms responsible for the accumulation of irreversible brain damage and for the development of innovative therapies to reduce disability in EAE/MS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Since the early 2000s, functional MRI (fMRI) has demonstrated profound modifications in the recruitment of cortical areas during motor, cognitive, and sensory tasks in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) represents a reliable model of the chronic-progressive variant of MS. fMRI studies in EAE have not been performed extensively up to now. This paper reports fMRI studies in a rat model of MS with somatosensory stimulation of the forepaw. We demonstrated modifications in the recruitment of cortical areas consistent with data from MS patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of cortical remodeling in a preclinical in vivo model of MS. PMID:26157006

  1. Effects upon in vivo nicotine metabolism reveal functional variation in FMO3 associated with cigarette consumption

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, A. Joseph; Murphy, Sharon E.; Martinez, Maribel; von Weymarn, Linda B.; Bierut, Laura J.; Goate, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Background Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMO) catalyze the metabolism of nucleophilic heteroatom containing drugs and xenobiotics including nicotine. Rare mutations in FMO3 are responsible for defective N-oxygenation of dietary trimethylamine leading to trimethylaminuria, and common genetic variation in FMO3 has been linked to interindividual variability in metabolic function that may be substrate specific. Methods A genetic model of CYP2A6 function is used as a covariate to reveal functional polymorphism in FMO3 that indirectly influences the ratio of deuterated nicotine metabolized to cotinine following oral administration. The association is tested between FMO3 haplotype and cigarette consumption in a set of nicotine dependent smokers. Results FMO3 haplotype, based on all common coding variants in Europeans, significantly predicts nicotine metabolism and accounts for approximately 2% of variance in the apparent percent of nicotine metabolized to cotinine. The metabolic ratio is not associated with FMO2 haplotype or an FMO1 expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL). Cross validation demonstrates calculated FMO3 haplotype parameters to be robust and significantly improve the predictive nicotine metabolism model over CYP2A6 genotype alone. Functional classes of FMO3 haplotypes, as determined by their influence on nicotine metabolism to cotinine, are also significantly associated with cigarettes per day (CPD) in nicotine dependent European Americans (n=1,025, p=0.04), and significantly interact (p=0.016) with CYP2A6 genotype to predict CPD. Conclusion These findings suggest that common polymorphisms in FMO3 influence nicotine clearance, and that these genetic variants in turn influence cigarette consumption. PMID:23211429

  2. Metagenomes from high-temperature chemotrophic systems reveal geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Roberto

    2010-03-01

    The Yellowstone caldera contains the most numerous and diverse geothermal systems on Earth, yielding an extensive array of unique high-temperature environments that host numerous deeply-rooted and understudied Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. The combination of extreme temperature and chemical conditions encountered in geothermal environments often results in considerably less microbial diversity than other terrestrial habitats and offers a tremendous opportunity for studying the structure and function of indigenous microbial communities and for establishing linkages between putative metabolisms and element cycling. Metagenome sequence (14-15,000 Sanger reads per site) was obtained for five high-temperature (> 65 oC) chemotrophic microbial communities sampled from geothermal springs (or pools) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) that exhibit a wide range in geochemistry including pH, dissolved sulfide, dissolved O2 and ferrous Fe. Metagenome data revealed significant differences in the predominant phyla associated with each of these geochemical environments. Novel members of the Sulfolobales are dominant in low pH environments, while other Crenarchaeota including distantly-related Thermoproteales and Desulfurococcales populations dominate in suboxic sulfidic sediments. Several novel archaeal groups are well represented in an acidic (pH 3) Fe-oxyhydroxide mat, where a higher O2 influx is accompanied with an increase in archaeal diversity. The presence or absence of genes and pathways important in S oxidation-reduction, H2-oxidation, and aerobic respiration (terminal oxidation) provide insight regarding the metabolic strategies of indigenous organisms present in geothermal systems. Multiple-pathway and protein-specific functional analysis of metagenome sequence data corroborated results from phylogenetic analyses and clearly demonstrate major differences in metabolic potential across sites. The distribution of functional genes involved in electron transport is consistent with the hypothesis that geochemical parameters (e.g., pH, sulfide, Fe, O2) control microbial community structure and function in YNP geothermal springs.

  3. Metagenomes from High-Temperature Chemotrophic Systems Reveal Geochemical Controls on Microbial Community Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Inskeep, William P.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Jay, Zackary J.; Herrgard, Markus J.; Kozubal, Mark A.; Richardson, Toby H.; Macur, Richard E.; Hamamura, Natsuko; Jennings, Ryan deM.; Fouke, Bruce W.; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Roberto, Frank; Young, Mark; Schwartz, Ariel; Boyd, Eric S.; Badger, Jonathan H.; Mathur, Eric J.; Ortmann, Alice C.; Bateson, Mary; Geesey, Gill; Frazier, Marvin

    2010-01-01

    The Yellowstone caldera contains the most numerous and diverse geothermal systems on Earth, yielding an extensive array of unique high-temperature environments that host a variety of deeply-rooted and understudied Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. The combination of extreme temperature and chemical conditions encountered in geothermal environments often results in considerably less microbial diversity than other terrestrial habitats and offers a tremendous opportunity for studying the structure and function of indigenous microbial communities and for establishing linkages between putative metabolisms and element cycling. Metagenome sequence (14–15,000 Sanger reads per site) was obtained for five high-temperature (>65°C) chemotrophic microbial communities sampled from geothermal springs (or pools) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) that exhibit a wide range in geochemistry including pH, dissolved sulfide, dissolved oxygen and ferrous iron. Metagenome data revealed significant differences in the predominant phyla associated with each of these geochemical environments. Novel members of the Sulfolobales are dominant in low pH environments, while other Crenarchaeota including distantly-related Thermoproteales and Desulfurococcales populations dominate in suboxic sulfidic sediments. Several novel archaeal groups are well represented in an acidic (pH 3) Fe-oxyhydroxide mat, where a higher O2 influx is accompanied with an increase in archaeal diversity. The presence or absence of genes and pathways important in S oxidation-reduction, H2-oxidation, and aerobic respiration (terminal oxidation) provide insight regarding the metabolic strategies of indigenous organisms present in geothermal systems. Multiple-pathway and protein-specific functional analysis of metagenome sequence data corroborated results from phylogenetic analyses and clearly demonstrate major differences in metabolic potential across sites. The distribution of functional genes involved in electron transport is consistent with the hypothesis that geochemical parameters (e.g., pH, sulfide, Fe, O2) control microbial community structure and function in YNP geothermal springs. PMID:20333304

  4. Multi-voxel Patterns Reveal Functionally Differentiated Networks Underlying Auditory Feedback Processing of Speech

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zane Z.; Vicente-Grabovetsky, Alejandro; MacDonald, Ewen N.; Munhall, Kevin G.; Cusack, Rhodri; Johnsrude, Ingrid S.

    2013-01-01

    The everyday act of speaking involves the complex processes of speech motor control. An important component of control is monitoring, detection and processing of errors when auditory feedback does not correspond to the intended motor gesture. Here we show, using fMRI and converging operations within a multi-voxel pattern analysis framework, that this sensorimotor process is supported by functionally differentiated brain networks. During scanning, a real-time speech-tracking system was employed to deliver two acoustically different types of distorted auditory feedback or unaltered feedback while human participants were vocalizing monosyllabic words, and to present the same auditory stimuli while participants were passively listening. Whole-brain analysis of neural-pattern similarity revealed three functional networks that were differentially sensitive to distorted auditory feedback during vocalization, compared to during passive listening. One network of regions appears to encode an ‘error signal’ irrespective of acoustic features of the error: this network, including right angular gyrus, right supplementary motor area, and bilateral cerebellum, yielded consistent neural patterns across acoustically different, distorted feedback types, only during articulation (not during passive listening). In contrast, a fronto-temporal network appears sensitive to the speech features of auditory stimuli during passive listening; this preference for speech features was diminished when the same stimuli were presented as auditory concomitants of vocalization. A third network, showing a distinct functional pattern from the other two, appears to capture aspects of both neural response profiles. Taken together, our findings suggest that auditory feedback processing during speech motor control may rely on multiple, interactive, functionally differentiated neural systems. PMID:23467350

  5. Coexpression-Based Clustering of Arabidopsis Root Genes Predicts Functional Modules in Early Phosphate Deficiency Signaling1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen-Dar; Liao, Ya-Yun; Yang, Thomas J.W.; Pan, Chao-Yu; Buckhout, Thomas J.; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi) deficiency triggers the differential expression of a large set of genes, which communally adapt the plant to low Pi bioavailability. To infer functional modules in early transcriptional responses to Pi deficiency, we conducted time-course microarray experiments and subsequent coexpression-based clustering of Pi-responsive genes by pairwise comparison of genes against a customized database. Three major clusters, enriched in genes putatively functioning in transcriptional regulation, root hair formation, and developmental adaptations, were predicted from this analysis. Validation of gene expression by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed that transcripts from randomly selected genes were robustly induced within the first hour after transfer to Pi-deplete medium. Pectin-related processes were among the earliest and most robust responses to Pi deficiency, indicating that cell wall alterations are critical in the early transcriptional response to Pi deficiency. Phenotypical analysis of homozygous mutants defective in the expression of genes from the root hair cluster revealed eight novel genes involved in Pi deficiency-induced root hair elongation. The plants responded rapidly to Pi deficiency by the induction of a subset of transcription factors, followed by a repression of genes involved in cell wall alterations. The combined results provide a novel, integrated view at a systems level of the root responses that acclimate Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to suboptimal Pi levels. PMID:21248074

  6. The modulation of brain functional connectivity with manual acupuncture in healthy subjects: An electroencephalograph case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Han, Chun-Xiao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le; Li, Nuo

    2013-02-01

    Manual acupuncture is widely used for pain relief and stress control. Previous studies on acupuncture have shown its modulatory effects on the functional connectivity associated with one or a few preselected brain regions. To investigate how manual acupuncture modulates the organization of functional networks at a whole-brain level, we acupuncture at ST36 of a right leg to obtain electroencephalograph (EEG) signals. By coherence estimation, we determine the synchronizations between all pairwise combinations of EEG channels in three acupuncture states. The resulting synchronization matrices are converted into functional networks by applying a threshold, and the clustering coefficients and path lengths are computed as a function of threshold. The results show that acupuncture can increase functional connections and synchronizations between different brain areas. For a wide range of thresholds, the clustering coefficient during acupuncture and post-acupuncture period is higher than that during the pre-acupuncture control period, whereas the characteristic path length is shorter. We provide further support for the presence of “small-world" network characteristics in functional networks by using acupuncture. These preliminary results highlight the beneficial modulations of functional connectivity by manual acupuncture, which could contribute to the understanding of the effects of acupuncture on the entire brain, as well as the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying acupuncture. Moreover, the proposed method may be a useful approach to the further investigation of the complexity of patterns of interrelations between EEG channels.

  7. Travelling-wave Mach-Zehnder modulators functioning as optical isolators.

    PubMed

    Dong, Po

    2015-04-20

    On-chip optical isolators not requiring the use of magneto-optical materials has become a long-standing challenge in integrated optics. Here, we demonstrate that a traditional travelling-wave modulator can effectively function as an optical isolator, when driven under a prescribed modulation condition. By using an off-shelve lithium niobate modulator, we achieve more than 12.5 dB isolation over an 11.3-THz bandwidth at telecommunication wavelengths with a fiber-to-fiber insertion loss of 5.5 dB, by employing only a single radio-frequency drive signal. We also verify that the proposed active isolator can be functional in a laser system to effectively prevent instability due to strong back reflections. Since travelling-wave modulators are common devices in III-V and silicon photonics, our simple but efficient architecture may provide a practical solution to non-reciprocal light routing in photonic integrated circuits. PMID:25969090

  8. Cued Spatial Attention Drives Functionally-Relevant Modulation of The Mu Rhythm in Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephanie R.; Kerr, Catherine E.; Wan, Qian; Pritchett, Dominique L.; Hämäläinen, Matti; Moore, Christopher I.

    2010-01-01

    Cued spatial attention modulates functionally relevant alpha rhythms in visual cortices in humans. Here, we present evidence for analogous phenomena in primary somatosensory neocortex (SI). Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), we measured changes in the SI mu rhythm containing mu-alpha (7-14 Hz) and mu-beta (15-29 Hz) components. We found that cued attention impacted mu-alpha in the somatopically localized hand representation in SI, showing decreased power after attention was cued to the hand and increased power after attention was cued to the foot, with significant differences observed 500-1100 milliseconds (ms) post-cue. Mu-beta showed differences in a time window 800–850ms post-cue. The visual cue also drove an early evoked response beginning ~70ms post-cue with distinct peaks modulated with cued attention. Distinct components of the tactile stimulus-evoked response were also modulated with cued attention. Analysis of a second data set showed that, on a trial-by-trial basis, tactile detection probabilities decreased linearly with pre-stimulus mu-alpha and mu-beta power. These results support the growing consensus that cue-induced alpha modulation is a functionally relevant sensory gating mechanism deployed by attention. Further, while cued attention had a weaker effect on the allocation of mu-beta, oscillations in this band also predicted tactile detection. PMID:20943916

  9. Microwave influence on the isolated heart function. 1: Effect of modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, A.G.; Dubovick, B.V.; Degtyariov, I.G.; Pronkevich, A.N.

    1995-09-01

    Dependence of the microwave effect on modulation parameters (pulse width, duty ratio, and peak intensity) was studied in an isolated frog auricle preparation. The rate and amplitude of spontaneous auricle twitches were measured during and after a 2 min exposure to 915 or 885 MHz microwaves and were compared to preexposure values. The studied ranges of modulation parameters were: pulse width, 10{sup {minus}6}--10{sup {minus}2} s; duty ratio, 7:100000, and peak specific absorption rate, 100--3,000 W/kg. Combinations of the parameters were chosen by chance, and about 400 various exposure regimes were tested. The experiments established that no regime was effective unless the average microwave power was high enough to induce preparation heating (0.1--0.4 C). The twitch rate instantly increased, and the amplitude decreased, as the temperature rose; similar changes could be induced by equivalent conventional heating. the data provide evidence that the effect of short-term microwave exposure on the isolated heart pacemaker and contractile functions depends on pulse modulation just as much as modulation determines the average absorbed power. These functions demonstrated no specific dependence on exposure parameters such as frequency or power windows.

  10. Elucidation of the mechanism of the regulatory function of the Ig1 module of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kiselyov, Vladislav V.; Kochoyan, Arthur; Poulsen, Flemming M.; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular part of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor (FGFR) consists of up to three Ig modules (Ig1–Ig3), in which the Ig2 and Ig3 modules determine affinity and specificity for FGF and heparin. The FGFR isoforms lacking the Ig1 module have higher affinity for FGF and heparin than the triple Ig-module isoforms, suggesting that the Ig1 module is involved in the regulation of the FGFR–ligand interaction. We show here by surface plasmon resonance and NMR analyses that the Ig1 module binds to the Ig2 module, and identify by NMR the binding sites involved in the Ig1–Ig2 interaction. The identified binding site in the Ig2 module was found to be in the area of the FGF–Ig2 and Ig2–heparin contact sites, thus providing direct structural evidence that the Ig1 module functions as a competitive autoinhibitor of the FGFR–ligand interaction. Furthermore, the Ig1 binding site of the Ig2 module overlaps the Ig2–Ig2 contact site. This suggests that the function of the Ig1 module is not only regulation of the FGFR–ligand binding affinity but also prevention of spontaneous FGFR dimerization (through a direct Ig2–Ig2 interaction) in the absence of FGF. PMID:17008716

  11. Quantitative dissection and modeling of the NF-?B p100-p105 module reveals interdependent precursor proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Y?lmaz, Zekiye Buket; Kofahl, Bente; Beaudette, Patrick; Baum, Katharina; Ipenberg, Inbal; Weih, Falk; Wolf, Jana; Dittmar, Gunnar; Scheidereit, Claus

    2014-12-11

    The mechanisms that govern proteolytic maturation or complete destruction of the precursor proteins p100 and p105 are fundamental to homeostasis and activation of NF-?B; however, they remain poorly understood. Using mass-spectrometry-based quantitative analysis of noncanonical LT?R-induced signaling, we demonstrate that stimulation induces simultaneous processing of both p100 and p105. The precursors not only form hetero-oligomers but also interact with the ATPase VCP/p97, and their induced proteolysis strictly depends on the signal response domain (SRD) of p100, suggesting that the SRD-targeting proteolytic machinery acts in cis and in trans. Separation of cellular pools by isotope labeling revealed synchronous dynamics of p105 and p100 proteolysis. The generation of p50 and p52 from their precursors depends on functional VCP/p97. We have developed quantitative mathematical models that describe the dynamics of the system and predict that p100-p105 complexes are signal responsive. PMID:25482563

  12. Deletion of CFTR Translation Start Site Reveals Functional Isoforms of the Protein in CF Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramalho, Anabela S.; Lewandowska, Marzena A.; Farinha, Carlos M.; Mendes, Filipa; Gonçalves, Juan; Barreto, Celeste; Harris, Ann; Amaral, Margarida D.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims: Mutations in the CFTR gene cause Cystic Fibrosis (CF) the most common life-threatening autosomal recessive disease affecting Caucasians. We identified a CFTR mutation (c.120del23) abolishing the normal translation initiation codon, which occurs in two Portuguese CF patients. This study aims at functionally characterizing the effect of this novel mutation. Methods: RNA and protein techniques were applied to both native tissues from CF patients and recombinant cells expressing CFTR constructs to determine whether c.120del23 allows CFTR protein production through usage of alternative internal codons, and to characterize the putative truncated CFTR form(s). Results: Our data show that two shorter forms of CFTR protein are produced when the initiation translation codon is deleted indicating usage of internal initiation codons. The N-truncated CFTR generated by this mutation has decreased stability, very low processing efficiency, and drastically reduced function. Analysis of mutants of four methionine codons downstream to M1 (M82, M150, M152, M156) revealed that each of the codons M150/M152/M156 (exon 4) can mediate CFTR alternative translation. Conclusions: The CFTR N-terminus has an important role in avoiding CFTR turnover and in rendering effective its plasma membrane traffic. These data correlate well with the severe clinical phenotype of CF patients bearing the c.120del23 mutation. PMID:19910674

  13. Structure reveals function of the dual variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig™) molecule

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Clarissa G.; Edalji, Rohinton; Judge, Russell A.; DiGiammarino, Enrico; Li, Yingchun; Gu, Jijie; Ghayur, Tariq

    2013-01-01

    Several bispecific antibody-based formats have been developed over the past 25 years in an effort to produce a new generation of immunotherapeutics that target two or more disease mechanisms simultaneously. One such format, the dual-variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig™), combines the target binding domains of two monoclonal antibodies via flexible naturally occurring linkers, which yields a tetravalent IgG - like molecule. We report the structure of an interleukin (IL)12-IL18 DVD-Ig™ Fab (DFab) fragment with IL18 bound to the inner variable domain (VD) that reveals the remarkable flexibility of the DVD-Ig™ molecule and how the DVD-Ig™ format can function to bind four antigens simultaneously. An understanding of how the inner variable domain retains function is of critical importance for designing DVD-Ig™ molecules, and for better understanding of the flexibility of immunoglobulin variable domains and linkers, which may aid in the design of improved bi- and multi-specific biologics in general. PMID:23549062

  14. What do plasma beta-endorphin levels reveal about endogenous opioid analgesic function?

    PubMed

    Bruehl, S; Burns, J W; Chung, O Y; Chont, M

    2012-03-01

    Plasma levels of beta-endorphin (BE), an endogenous opioid analgesic, are often reported as they relate to acute and chronic pain outcomes. However, little is known about what resting plasma BE levels might reveal about functioning of the endogenous opioid antinociceptive system. This study directly examined associations between resting plasma BE and subsequent endogenous opioid analgesic responses to acute pain in 39 healthy controls and 37 individuals with chronic low back pain (LBP). Resting baseline levels of plasma BE were assessed. Next, participants received opioid blockade (8 mg naloxone i.v.) or placebo in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Participants then underwent two acute pain stimuli: finger pressure (FP) pain and ischaemic (ISC) forearm pain. Blockade effects (naloxone minus placebo pain ratings) were derived to index endogenous opioid analgesic function. In placebo condition analyses for both pain stimuli, higher resting BE levels were associated with subsequently greater reported pain intensity (p's < 0.05), with this effect occurring primarily in healthy controls (BE × Participant Type interactions, p's < 0.05). In blockade effect analyses across both pain tasks, higher resting plasma BE predicted less subsequent endogenous opioid analgesia (smaller blockade effects; p's < 0.05). For the ISC task, these links were significantly more prominent in LBP participants (BE × Participant Type Interactions, p's < 0.05). Results suggest that elevated resting plasma BE may be a potential biomarker for reduced endogenous opioid analgesic capacity, particularly among individuals with chronic pain. Potential clinical implications are discussed. PMID:22337161

  15. Structure and function of Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase reveals aspects of RING and HECT ligases

    PubMed Central

    Riley, B.E.; Lougheed, J.C.; Callaway, K.; Velasquez, M.; Brecht, E.; Nguyen, L.; Shaler, T.; Walker, D.; Yang, Y.; Regnstrom, K.; Diep, L.; Zhang, Z.; Chiou, S.; Bova, M.; Artis, D.R.; Yao, N.; Baker, J.; Yednock, T.; Johnston, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Parkin is a RING-between-RING E3 ligase that functions in the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to specific substrates, and mutations in Parkin are linked to Parkinson’s disease, cancer and mycobacterial infection. The RING-between-RING family of E3 ligases are suggested to function with a canonical RING domain and a catalytic cysteine residue usually restricted to HECT E3 ligases, thus termed ‘RING/HECT hybrid’ enzymes. Here we present the 1.58?Ĺ structure of Parkin-R0RBR, revealing the fold architecture for the four RING domains, and several unpredicted interfaces. Examination of the Parkin active site suggests a catalytic network consisting of C431 and H433. In cells, mutation of C431 eliminates Parkin-catalysed degradation of mitochondria, and capture of an ubiquitin oxyester confirms C431 as Parkin’s cellular active site. Our data confirm that Parkin is a RING/HECT hybrid, and provide the first crystal structure of an RING-between-RING E3 ligase at atomic resolution, providing insight into this disease-related protein. PMID:23770887

  16. Functional importance of telomerase pseudoknot revealed by single-molecule analysis.

    PubMed

    Mihalusova, Mariana; Wu, John Y; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2011-12-20

    Telomerase ribonucleoprotein (RNP) employs an RNA subunit to template the addition of telomeric repeats onto chromosome ends. Previous studies have suggested that a region of the RNA downstream of the template may be important for telomerase activity and that the region could fold into a pseudoknot. Whether the pseudoknot motif is formed in the active telomerase RNP and what its functional role is have not yet been conclusively established. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that the isolated pseudoknot sequence stably folds into a pseudoknot. However, in the context of the full-length telomerase RNA, interference by other parts of the RNA prevents the formation of the pseudoknot. The protein subunits of the telomerase holoenzyme counteract RNA-induced misfolding and allow a significant fraction of the RNPs to form the pseudoknot structure. Only those RNP complexes containing a properly folded pseudoknot are catalytically active. These results not only demonstrate the functional importance of the pseudoknot but also reveal the critical role played by telomerase proteins in pseudoknot folding. PMID:21571642

  17. Comparative materials differences revealed in engineered bone as a function of cell-specific differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentleman, Eileen; Swain, Robin J.; Evans, Nicholas D.; Boonrungsiman, Suwimon; Jell, Gavin; Ball, Michael D.; Shean, Tamaryn A. V.; Oyen, Michelle L.; Porter, Alexandra; Stevens, Molly M.

    2009-09-01

    An important aim of regenerative medicine is to restore tissue function with implantable, laboratory-grown constructs that contain tissue-specific cells that replicate the function of their counterparts in the healthy native tissue. It remains unclear, however, whether cells used in bone regeneration applications produce a material that mimics the structural and compositional complexity of native bone. By applying multivariate analysis techniques to micro-Raman spectra of mineralized nodules formed in vitro, we reveal cell-source-dependent differences in interactions between multiple bone-like mineral environments. Although osteoblasts and adult stem cells exhibited bone-specific biological activities and created a material with many of the hallmarks of native bone, the `bone nodules' formed from embryonic stem cells were an order of magnitude less stiff, and lacked the distinctive nanolevel architecture and complex biomolecular and mineral composition noted in the native tissue. Understanding the biological mechanisms of bone formation in vitro that contribute to cell-source-specific materials differences may facilitate the development of clinically successful engineered bone.

  18. Principal Component Analysis reveals correlation of cavities evolution and functional motions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Desdouits, Nathan; Nilges, Michael; Blondel, Arnaud

    2015-02-01

    Protein conformation has been recognized as the key feature determining biological function, as it determines the position of the essential groups specifically interacting with substrates. Hence, the shape of the cavities or grooves at the protein surface appears to drive those functions. However, only a few studies describe the geometrical evolution of protein cavities during molecular dynamics simulations (MD), usually with a crude representation. To unveil the dynamics of cavity geometry evolution, we developed an approach combining cavity detection and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This approach was applied to four systems subjected to MD (lysozyme, sperm whale myoglobin, Dengue envelope protein and EF-CaM complex). PCA on cavities allows us to perform efficient analysis and classification of the geometry diversity explored by a cavity. Additionally, it reveals correlations between the evolutions of the cavities and structures, and can even suggest how to modify the protein conformation to induce a given cavity geometry. It also helps to perform fast and consensual clustering of conformations according to cavity geometry. Finally, using this approach, we show that both carbon monoxide (CO) location and transfer among the different xenon sites of myoglobin are correlated with few cavity evolution modes of high amplitude. This correlation illustrates the link between ligand diffusion and the dynamic network of internal cavities. PMID:25424655

  19. Möbius-strip-like columnar functional connections are revealed in somato-sensory receptive field centroids

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James Joseph; Bourke, Paul David; Favorov, Oleg Vyachesslavovich

    2014-01-01

    Receptive fields of neurons in the forelimb region of areas 3b and 1 of primary somatosensory cortex, in cats and monkeys, were mapped using extracellular recordings obtained sequentially from nearly radial penetrations. Locations of the field centroids indicated the presence of a functional system in which cortical homotypic representations of the limb surfaces are entwined in three-dimensional Möbius-strip-like patterns of synaptic connections. Boundaries of somatosensory receptive field in nested groups irregularly overlie the centroid order, and are interpreted as arising from the superposition of learned connections upon the embryonic order. Since the theory of embryonic synaptic self-organization used to model these results was devised and earlier used to explain findings in primary visual cortex, the present findings suggest the theory may be of general application throughout cortex and may reveal a modular functional synaptic system, which, only in some parts of the cortex, and in some species, is manifest as anatomical ordering into columns. PMID:25400552

  20. Metagenomics Reveals Microbial Community Composition And Function With Depth In Arctic Permafrost Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, J.; Tas, N.; Wu, Y.; Ulrich, C.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Torn, M. S.; Hubbard, S. S.; Chakraborty, R.; Graham, D. E.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic is one of the most climatically sensitive regions on Earth and current surveys show that permafrost degradation is widespread in arctic soils. Biogeochemical feedbacks of permafrost thaw are expected to be dominated by the release of currently stored carbon back into the atmosphere as CO2 and CH4. Understanding the dynamics of C release from permafrost requires assessment of microbial functions from different soil compartments. To this end, as part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment in the Arctic, we collected two replicate permafrost cores (1m and 3m deep) from a transitional polygon near Barrow, AK. At this location, permafrost starts from 0.5m in depth and is characterized by variable ice content and higher pH than surface soils. Prior to sectioning, the cores were CT-scanned to determine the physical heterogeneity throughout the cores. In addition to detailed geochemical characterization, we used Illumina MiSeq technology to sequence 16SrRNA genes throughout the depths of the cores at 1 cm intervals. Selected depths were also chosen for metagenome sequencing of total DNA (including phylogenetic and functional genes) using the Illumina HiSeq platform. The 16S rRNA gene sequence data revealed that the microbial community composition and diversity changed dramatically with depth. The microbial diversity decreased sharply below the first few centimeters of the permafrost and then gradually increased in deeper layers. Based on the metagenome sequence data, the permafrost microbial communities were found to contain members with a large metabolic potential for carbon processing, including pathways for fermentation and methanogenesis. The surface active layers had more representatives of Verrucomicrobia (potential methane oxidizers) whereas the deep permafrost layers were dominated by several different species of Actinobacteria. The latter are known to have a diverse metabolic capability and are able to adapt to stress by entering a dormant yet viable state. In addition, several isolates were obtained from different depths throughout the cores, including methanogens from some of the deeper layers. Together these data present a new view of potential geochemical cycles carried out by microorganisms in permafrost and reveal how community members and functions are distributed with depth.

  1. Measurements of ocean wave spectra and modulation transfer function with the airborne two frequency scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The directional spectrum and the microwave modulation transfer function of ocean waves can be measured with the airborne two frequency scatterometer technique. Similar to tower based observations, the aircraft measurements of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) show that it is strongly affected by both wind speed and sea state. Also detected are small differences in the magnitudes of the MTF between downwind and upwind radar look directions, and variations with ocean wavenumber. The MTF inferred from the two frequency radar is larger than that measured using single frequency, wave orbital velocity techniques such as tower based radars or ROWS measurements from low altitude aircraft. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The ability to measure the ocean directional spectrum with the two frequency scatterometer, with supporting MTF data, is demonstrated.

  2. Measurements of ocean wave spectra and modulation transfer function with the airborne two-frequency scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The directional spectrum and the microwave modulation transfer function of ocean waves can be measured with the airborne two frequency scatterometer technique. Similar to tower based observations, the aircraft measurements of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) show that it is strongly affected by both wind speed and sea state. Also detected are small differences in the magnitudes of the MTF between downwind and upwind radar look directions, and variations with ocean wavenumber. The MTF inferred from the two frequency radar is larger than that measured using single frequency, wave orbital velocity techniques such as tower based radars or ROWS measurements from low altitude aircraft. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The ability to measure the ocean directional spectrum with the two frequency scatterometer, with supporting MTF data, is demonstrated.

  3. Age of acquisition modulates neural activity for both regular and irregular syntactic functions

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Arturo E.; Hofmann, Juliane; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2007-01-01

    Studies have found that neural activity is greater for irregular grammatical items than regular items. Findings with monolingual Spanish speakers have revealed a similar effect when making gender decisions for visually presented nouns. The current study extended previous studies by looking at the role of regularity in modulating differences in groups that differ in the age of acquisition of a language. Early and late learners of Spanish matched on measures of language proficiency were asked to make gender decisions to regular (-o for masculine and –a for feminine) and irregular items (which can end in e,l,n,r,s,t and z). Results revealed increased activity in left BA 44 for irregular compared to regular items in separate comparisons for both early and late learners. In addition, within group-comparisons revealed that neural activity for irregulars extended into left BA 47 for late learners and into left BA 6 for early learners. Direct comparisons between-groups revealed increased activity in left BA 44/45 for irregular items indicating the need for more extensive syntactic processing in late learners. The results revealed that processing of irregular grammatical gender leads to increased activity in left BA 44 and adjacent areas in the left IFG regardless of when a language is learned. Furthermore, these findings suggest differential recruitment of brain areas associated with grammatical processing in late learners. The results are discussed with regard to a model which considers L2 learning as emerging from the competitive interplay between two languages. PMID:17490895

  4. Molecular and functional characterization of PEBP genes in barley reveal the diversification of their roles in flowering.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Rie; Kawahigashi, Hiroyuki; Ando, Tsuyu; Tonooka, Takuji; Handa, Hirokazu

    2009-03-01

    Five barley (Hordeum vulgare) PEBP (for phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein) genes were analyzed to clarify their functional roles in flowering using transgenic, expression, and quantitative trait locus analyses. Introduction of HvTFL1 and HvMFT1 into rice (Oryza sativa) plants did not result in any changes in flowering, suggesting that these two genes have functions distinct from flowering. Overexpression of HvFT1, HvFT2, and HvFT3 in rice resulted in early heading, indicating that these FT-like genes can act as promoters of the floral transition. HvFT1 transgenic plants showed the most robust flowering initiation. In barley, HvFT1 was expressed at the time of shoot meristem phase transition. These results suggest that HvFT1 is the key gene responsible for flowering in the barley FT-like gene family. HvFT2 transgenic plants also showed robust flowering initiation, but HvFT2 was expressed only under short-day (SD) conditions during the phase transition, suggesting that its role is limited to specific photoperiodic conditions in barley. Flowering activity in HvFT3 transgenic rice was not as strong and was modulated by the photoperiod. These results suggest that HvFT3 functions in flowering promotion but that its effect is indirect. HvFT3 expression was observed in Morex, a barley cultivar carrying a dominant allele of Ppd-H2, a major quantitative trait locus for flowering under SD conditions, although no expression was detected in Steptoe, a cultivar carrying ppd-H2. HvFT3 was expressed in Morex under both long-day and SD conditions, although its expression was increased under SD conditions. HvFT3 was mapped to chromosome 1HL, the same chromosome that carries Ppd-H2. Genomic sequence analyses revealed that Morex possesses an intact HvFT3 gene, whereas most of this gene has been lost in Steptoe. These data strongly suggest that HvFT3 may be identical to Ppd-H2. PMID:19168644

  5. Transcription profiling reveals stage- and function-dependent expression patterns in the filarial nematode Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Brugia malayi is a nematode parasite that causes lymphatic filariasis, a disfiguring and disabiling tropical disease. Although a first draft genome sequence was released in 2007, very little is understood about transcription programs that govern developmental changes required for the parasite’s development and survival in its mammalian and insect hosts. Results We used a microarray with probes that represent some 85% of predicted genes to generate gene expression profiles for seven parasite life cycle stages/sexes. Approximately 41% of transcripts with detectable expression signals were differentially expressed across lifecycle stages. Twenty-six percent of transcripts were exclusively expressed in a single parasite stage, and 27% were expressed in all stages studied. K-means clustering of differentially expressed transcripts revealed five major transcription patterns that were associated with parasite lifecycle stages or gender. Examination of known stage-associated transcripts validated these data sets and suggested that newly identified stage or gender-associated transcripts may exercise biological functions in development and reproduction. The results also indicate that genes with similar transcription patterns were often involved in similar functions or cellular processes. For example, nuclear receptor family gene transcripts were upregulated in gene expression pattern four (female-enriched) while protein kinase gene family transcripts were upregulated in expression pattern five (male-enriched). We also used pair-wise comparisons to identify transcriptional changes between life cycle stages and sexes. Conclusions Analysis of gene expression patterns of lifecycle in B. malayi has provided novel insights into the biology of filarial parasites. Proteins encoded by stage-associated and/or stage-specific transcripts are likely to be critically important for key parasite functions such as establishment and maintenance of infection, development, reproduction, and survival in the host. Some of these may be useful targets for vaccines or new drug treatments for filariasis. PMID:22583769

  6. Functional TCR retrieval from single antigen-specific human T cells reveals multiple novel epitopes.

    PubMed

    Simon, Petra; Omokoko, Tana A; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Hebich, Lisa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Attig, Sebastian; Konur, Abdo; Britten, Cedrik M; Paret, Claudia; Dhaene, Karl; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-12-01

    The determination of the epitope specificity of disease-associated T-cell responses is relevant for the development of biomarkers and targeted immunotherapies against cancer, autoimmune, and infectious diseases. The lack of known T-cell epitopes and corresponding T-cell receptors (TCR) for novel antigens hinders the efficient development and monitoring of new therapies. We developed an integrated approach for the systematic retrieval and functional characterization of TCRs from single antigen-reactive T cells that includes the identification of epitope specificity. This is accomplished through the rapid cloning of full-length TCR-? and TCR-? chains directly from single antigen-specific CD8(+) or CD4(+) T lymphocytes. The functional validation of cloned TCRs is conducted using in vitro-transcribed RNA transfer for expression of TCRs in T cells and HLA molecules in antigen-presenting cells. This method avoids the work and bias associated with repetitive cycles of in vitro T-cell stimulation, and enables fast characterization of antigen-specific T-cell responses. We applied this strategy to viral and tumor-associated antigens (TAA), resulting in the retrieval of 56 unique functional antigen-specific TCRs from human CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells (13 specific for CMV-pp65, 16 specific for the well-known TAA NY-ESO-1, and 27 for the novel TAA TPTE), which are directed against 39 different epitopes. The proof-of-concept studies with TAAs NY-ESO-1 and TPTE revealed multiple novel TCR specificities. Our approach enables the rational development of immunotherapy strategies by providing antigen-specific TCRs and immunogenic epitopes. PMID:25245536

  7. Prokaryotic Caspase Homologs: Phylogenetic Patterns and Functional Characteristics Reveal Considerable Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Asplund-Samuelsson, Johannes; Bergman, Birgitta; Larsson, John

    2012-01-01

    Caspases accomplish initiation and execution of apoptosis, a programmed cell death process specific to metazoans. The existence of prokaryotic caspase homologs, termed metacaspases, has been known for slightly more than a decade. Despite their potential connection to the evolution of programmed cell death in eukaryotes, the phylogenetic distribution and functions of these prokaryotic metacaspase sequences are largely uncharted, while a few experiments imply involvement in programmed cell death. Aiming at providing a more detailed picture of prokaryotic caspase homologs, we applied a computational approach based on Hidden Markov Model search profiles to identify and functionally characterize putative metacaspases in bacterial and archaeal genomes. Out of the total of 1463 analyzed genomes, merely 267 (18%) were identified to contain putative metacaspases, but their taxonomic distribution included most prokaryotic phyla and a few archaea (Euryarchaeota). Metacaspases were particularly abundant in Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria, which harbor many morphologically and developmentally complex organisms, and a distinct correlation was found between abundance and phenotypic complexity in Cyanobacteria. Notably, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, known to undergo genetically regulated autolysis, lacked metacaspases. Pfam domain architecture analysis combined with operon identification revealed rich and varied configurations among the metacaspase sequences. These imply roles in programmed cell death, but also e.g. in signaling, various enzymatic activities and protein modification. Together our data show a wide and scattered distribution of caspase homologs in prokaryotes with structurally and functionally diverse sub-groups, and with a potentially intriguing evolutionary role. These features will help delineate future characterizations of death pathways in prokaryotes. PMID:23185476

  8. GDNF Overexpression from the Native Locus Reveals its Role in the Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic System Function

    PubMed Central

    Porokuokka, Lauriina L.; Panhelainen, Anne; Kuure, Satu; Marshall, Pepin; Karalija, Nina; Härma, Mari-Anne; Vilenius, Carolina; Lilleväli, Kersti; Tekko, Triin; Mijatovic, Jelena; Pulkkinen, Nita; Jakobson, Madis; Jakobson, Maili; Ola, Roxana; Palm, Erik; Lindahl, Maria; Strömberg, Ingrid; Vőikar, Vootele; Piepponen, T. Petteri; Saarma, Mart; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic system is the principal lesion in Parkinson’s disease. Because glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes survival of dopamine neurons in vitro and in vivo, intracranial delivery of GDNF has been attempted for Parkinson’s disease treatment but with variable success. For improving GDNF-based therapies, knowledge on physiological role of endogenous GDNF at the sites of its expression is important. However, due to limitations of existing genetic model systems, such knowledge is scarce. Here, we report that prevention of transcription of Gdnf 3’UTR in Gdnf endogenous locus yields GDNF hypermorphic mice with increased, but spatially unchanged GDNF expression, enabling analysis of postnatal GDNF function. We found that increased level of GDNF in the central nervous system increases the number of adult dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the number of dopaminergic terminals in the dorsal striatum. At the functional level, GDNF levels increased striatal tissue dopamine levels and augmented striatal dopamine release and re-uptake. In a proteasome inhibitor lactacystin-induced model of Parkinson’s disease GDNF hypermorphic mice were protected from the reduction in striatal dopamine and failure of dopaminergic system function. Importantly, adverse phenotypic effects associated with spatially unregulated GDNF applications were not observed. Enhanced GDNF levels up-regulated striatal dopamine transporter activity by at least five fold resulting in enhanced susceptibility to 6-OHDA, a toxin transported into dopamine neurons by DAT. Further, we report how GDNF levels regulate kidney development and identify microRNAs miR-9, miR-96, miR-133, and miR-146a as negative regulators of GDNF expression via interaction with Gdnf 3’UTR in vitro. Our results reveal the role of GDNF in nigrostriatal dopamine system postnatal development and adult function, and highlight the importance of correct spatial expression of GDNF. Furthermore, our results suggest that 3’UTR targeting may constitute a useful tool in analyzing gene function. PMID:26681446

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation reveals a noncategorical representation of hue in early visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Persichetti, Andrew S.; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.; Butt, Omar H.; Brainard, David H.; Aguirre, Geoffrey K.

    2015-01-01

    Color names divide the fine-grained gamut of color percepts into discrete categories. A categorical transition must occur somewhere between the initial encoding of the continuous spectrum of light by the cones and the verbal report of the name of a color stimulus. Here, we used a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation experiment to examine the representation of hue in the early visual cortex. Our stimuli varied in hue between blue and green. We found in the early visual areas (V1, V2/3, and hV4) a smoothly increasing recovery from adaptation with increasing hue distance between adjacent stimuli during both passive viewing (Experiment 1) and active categorization (Experiment 2). We examined the form of the adaptation effect and found no evidence that a categorical representation mediates the release from adaptation for stimuli that cross the blue–green color boundary. Examination of the direct effect of stimulus hue on the fMRI response did, however, reveal an enhanced response to stimuli near the blue–green category border. This was largest in hV4 and when subjects were engaged in active categorization of the stimulus hue. In contrast with a recent report from another laboratory (Bird, Berens, Horner, & Franklin, 2014), we found no evidence for a categorical representation of color in the middle frontal gyrus. A post hoc whole-brain analysis, however, revealed several regions in the frontal cortex with a categorical effect in the adaptation response. Overall, our results support the idea that the representation of color in the early visual cortex is primarily fine grained and does not reflect color categories. PMID:26024465

  10. Metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and single cell genomics reveal functional response of active Oceanospirillales to Gulf oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Olivia U.; Hazen, Terry C.; Borglin, Sharon; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Dubinsky, Eric A.; Fortney, Julian L.; Han, James; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Hultman, Jenni; Lamendella, Regina; Mackelprang, Rachel; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tom, Lauren M.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Woyke, Tanja; Zhou, Jizhong; Rubin, Edward M.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2012-06-12

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico resulted in a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume that caused a shift in the indigenous microbial community composition with unknown ecological consequences. Early in the spill history, a bloom of uncultured, thus uncharacterized, members of the Oceanospirillales was previously detected, but their role in oil disposition was unknown. Here our aim was to determine the functional role of the Oceanospirillales and other active members of the indigenous microbial community using deep sequencing of community DNA and RNA, as well as single-cell genomics. Shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing revealed that genes for motility, chemotaxis and aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation were significantly enriched and expressed in the hydrocarbon plume samples compared with uncontaminated seawater collected from plume depth. In contrast, although genes coding for degradation of more recalcitrant compounds, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified in the metagenomes, they were expressed at low levels, or not at all based on analysis of the metatranscriptomes. Isolation and sequencing of two Oceanospirillales single cells revealed that both cells possessed genes coding for n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. Specifically, the near-complete pathway for cyclohexane oxidation in the Oceanospirillales single cells was elucidated and supported by both metagenome and metatranscriptome data. The draft genome also included genes for chemotaxis, motility and nutrient acquisition strategies that were also identified in the metagenomes and metatranscriptomes. These data point towards a rapid response of members of the Oceanospirillales to aliphatic hydrocarbons in the deep sea.

  11. Emotional regulatory function of Receptor Interacting Protein 140 revealed in the ventromedial hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Flaisher-Grinberg, S; Tsai, HC; Feng, X; Wei, LN

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein (RIP140) is a transcription co-regulator highly expressed in macrophages to regulate inflammatory and metabolic processes. However, its implication in neurological, cognitive and emotional conditions, and the cellular systems relevant to its biological activity within the central nervous system are currently less clear. A transgenic mouse line with macrophage-specific knockdown of RIP140 was generated (M?RIPKD mice) and brain-region specific RIP140 knockdown efficiency evaluated. Mice were subjected to a battery of tests, designed to evaluate multiple behavioral domains at naďve or following site-specific RIP140 re-expression. Gene expression analysis assessed TNF-?, IL-1?, TGF-1?, IL1-RA and Neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression, and in-vitro studies examined the effects of macrophage’s RIP140 on astrocytes’ NPY production. We found RIP140 expression was dramatically reduced in macrophages within the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and the cingulate cortex of M?RIPKD mice. These animals exhibited increased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. VMH-targeted RIP140 re-expression in M?RIPKD mice reversed its depressive- but not its anxiety-like phenotype. Analysis of specific neurochemical changes revealed reduced astrocytic-NPY expression within the hypothalamus of M?RIPKD mice, and in-vitro analysis confirmed that conditioned medium of RIP140-silnenced macrophage culture could no longer stimulate NPY production from astrocytes. The current study revealed an emotional regulatory function of macrophage-derived RIP140 in the VMH, and secondary dysregulation of NPY within hypothalamic astrocyte population, which might be associated with the observed behavioral phenotype of M?RIPKD mice. This study highlights RIP140 as a novel target for the development of potential therapeutic and intervention strategies for emotional regulation disorders. PMID:24726835

  12. Crystal Structure Analysis Reveals Functional Flexibility in the Selenocysteine-Specific tRNA from Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ganichkin, Oleg M.; Anedchenko, Ekaterina A.; Wahl, Markus C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Selenocysteine tRNAs (tRNASec) exhibit a number of unique identity elements that are recognized specifically by proteins of the selenocysteine biosynthetic pathways and decoding machineries. Presently, these identity elements and the mechanisms by which they are interpreted by tRNASec-interacting factors are incompletely understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We applied rational mutagenesis to obtain well diffracting crystals of murine tRNASec. tRNASec lacking the single-stranded 3?-acceptor end (?GCCARNASec) yielded a crystal structure at 2.0 Ĺ resolution. The global structure of ?GCCARNASec resembles the structure of human tRNASec determined at 3.1 Ĺ resolution. Structural comparisons revealed flexible regions in tRNASec used for induced fit binding to selenophosphate synthetase. Water molecules located in the present structure were involved in the stabilization of two alternative conformations of the anticodon stem-loop. Modeling of a 2?-O-methylated ribose at position U34 of the anticodon loop as found in a sub-population of tRNASec in vivo showed how this modification favors an anticodon loop conformation that is functional during decoding on the ribosome. Soaking of crystals in Mn2+-containing buffer revealed eight potential divalent metal ion binding sites but the located metal ions did not significantly stabilize specific structural features of tRNASec. Conclusions/Significance We provide the most highly resolved structure of a tRNASec molecule to date and assessed the influence of water molecules and metal ions on the molecule's conformation and dynamics. Our results suggest how conformational changes of tRNASec support its interaction with proteins. PMID:21629646

  13. Emotional regulatory function of receptor interacting protein 140 revealed in the ventromedial hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Flaisher-Grinberg, S; Tsai, H C; Feng, X; Wei, L N

    2014-08-01

    Receptor-interacting protein (RIP140) is a transcription co-regulator highly expressed in macrophages to regulate inflammatory and metabolic processes. However, its implication in neurological, cognitive and emotional conditions, and the cellular systems relevant to its biological activity within the central nervous system are currently less clear. A transgenic mouse line with macrophage-specific knockdown of RIP140 was generated (M?RIPKD mice) and brain-region specific RIP140 knockdown efficiency evaluated. Mice were subjected to a battery of tests, designed to evaluate multiple behavioral domains at naďve or following site-specific RIP140 re-expression. Gene expression analysis assessed TNF-?, IL-1?, TGF-1?, IL1-RA and neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression, and in vitro studies examined the effects of macrophage's RIP140 on astrocytes' NPY production. We found that RIP140 expression was dramatically reduced in macrophages within the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and the cingulate cortex of M?RIPKD mice. These animals exhibited increased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. VMH-targeted RIP140 re-expression in M?RIPKD mice reversed its depressive- but not its anxiety-like phenotype. Analysis of specific neurochemical changes revealed reduced astrocytic-NPY expression within the hypothalamus of M?RIPKD mice, and in vitro analysis confirmed that conditioned medium of RIP140-silnenced macrophage culture could no longer stimulate NPY production from astrocytes. The current study revealed an emotional regulatory function of macrophage-derived RIP140 in the VMH, and secondary dysregulation of NPY within hypothalamic astrocyte population, which might be associated with the observed behavioral phenotype of M?RIPKD mice. This study highlights RIP140 as a novel target for the development of potential therapeutic and intervention strategies for emotional regulation disorders. PMID:24726835

  14. Presence and Function of Dopamine Transporter (DAT) in Stallion Sperm: Dopamine Modulates Sperm Motility and Acrosomal Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Alejandra A.; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan Enric; Ramírez-Reveco, Alfredo; Concha, Ilona I.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+), as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM) treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909) and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility. PMID:25402186

  15. Presence and function of dopamine transporter (DAT) in stallion sperm: dopamine modulates sperm motility and acrosomal integrity.

    PubMed

    Urra, Javier A; Villaroel-Espíndola, Franz; Covarrubias, Alejandra A; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan Enric; Ramírez-Reveco, Alfredo; Concha, Ilona I

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)), as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM) treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909) and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility. PMID:25402186

  16. Launch and Functional Considerations Guiding the Scaling and Design of Rigid Inflatable Habitat Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, L.

    2002-01-01

    The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) has a long history of projects that involve design of space structures, including habitats for low-Earth orbit (LEO) and planetary applications. Most of these facilities and component systems are planned to comply with size, geometry and mass restrictions imposed by the Space Shuttle Orbiter's payload and lift/landing abort restrictions. These constraints limit launch elements to approximately 15 ft. diameter, 40 ft. long cylindrical dimensions weighing no more than approximately 25 metric tons. It is clear that future success of commercial space programs such as tourism will hinge upon the availability of bigger and more efficient Earth to LEO launch vehicles which can greatly reduce transportation and operational costs. This will enable development and utilization of larger habitat modules and other infrastructure elements which can be deployed with fewer launches and on-orbit assembly procedures. The sizing of these new heavy lift launchers should be scaled to optimize habitat functionality and efficiency, just as the habitat designs must consider optimization of launch vehicle economy. SICSA's planning studies address these vehicle and habitat optimization priorities as parallel and interdependent considerations. The allowable diameter of habitat modules established by launch vehicle capacity dictates functionally acceptable internal configuration options. Analyses of these options relative to practical dimensions for Earth-to-orbit launch vehicle scaling were conducted for two general schemes. The "bologna slice" configuration stacks the floors within a predominately cylindrical or spherical envelope, producing circular areas. The "banana split" approach divides a cylindrical module longitudinally, creating floors that are generally rectangular in shape. The assessments established minimum sizes for reasonable utility and efficiency. The bologna slice option. This configuration is only acceptable for modules with diameters of approximately 45 ft. or more. Smaller dimensions will severely limit maximum sight lines, creating claustrophobic conditions. Equipment racks and other elements typically located around internal parameters will further reduce open areas, and vertical circulation access ways between floor levels will diminish usable space even more. However this scheme can work very well for larger diameter habitats, particularly for surface applications where a relatively wide-based/low height module is to be landed vertically. The banana split option. A longitudinal floor orientation can serve very satisfactorily for modules with diameters of 15 ft. or more. Unlike the bologna slice's circular floors, the rectangular spaces offer considerable versatility to accommodate diverse equipment and functional arrangements. Modules smaller than 15 ft. in diameter (the International Space Station standard) will be incompatible with efficient equipment rack design and layouts due to tight-radius wall curvatures. Beyond the 15 ft. diameters, it is logical to scale the modules at dimensional increments based upon the number of desired floors, allowing approximately 8-9 ft. of height/level. Current SICSA Mars mission planning advocates development of new launchers with payload accommodations for 45 ft. diameter, 200 metric ton cargo elements. This large booster will offer launch economies along with habitat scaling advantages. Launch system design efficiencies are influenced by the amount of functional drag that results as the vehicle passes through the Earth's atmosphere. These drag losses are subject to a "cubed-squared law". As the launchcraft's external dimensions increase, its surface area increases with the square of the dimension, while the volume increases with the cube. Since drag is a function of surface, not volume, increasing the vehicle size will reduce proportional drag losses. For this reason, the huge Saturn V Moon rocket experienced relatively low drag. Module pressure envelope geometries also influence internal l

  17. DENSE: efficient and prior knowledge-driven discovery of phenotype-associated protein functional modules

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Identifying cellular subsystems that are involved in the expression of a target phenotype has been a very active research area for the past several years. In this paper, cellular subsystem refers to a group of genes (or proteins) that interact and carry out a common function in the cell. Most studies identify genes associated with a phenotype on the basis of some statistical bias, others have extended these statistical methods to analyze functional modules and biological pathways for phenotype-relatedness. However, a biologist might often have a specific question in mind while performing such analysis and most of the resulting subsystems obtained by the existing methods might be largely irrelevant to the question in hand. Arguably, it would be valuable to incorporate biologist's knowledge about the phenotype into the algorithm. This way, it is anticipated that the resulting subsytems would not only be related to the target phenotype but also contain information that the biologist is likely to be interested in. Results In this paper we introduce a fast and theoretically guranteed method called DENSE (Dense and ENriched Subgraph Enumeration) that can take in as input a biologist's prior knowledge as a set of query proteins and identify all the dense functional modules in a biological network that contain some part of the query vertices. The density (in terms of the number of network egdes) and the enrichment (the number of query proteins in the resulting functional module) can be manipulated via two parameters ? and ?, respectively. Conclusion This algorithm has been applied to the protein functional association network of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, a hydrogen producing, acid-tolerant organism. The algorithm was able to verify relationships known to exist in literature and also some previously unknown relationships including those with regulatory and signaling functions. Additionally, we were also able to hypothesize that some uncharacterized proteins are likely associated with the target phenotype. The DENSE code can be downloaded from http://www.freescience.org/cs/DENSE/ PMID:22024446

  18. Functional Genomics Analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Iron Responsive Transcription Factor Aft1 Reveals Iron-Independent Functions

    PubMed Central

    Berthelet, Sharon; Usher, Jane; Shulist, Kristian; Hamza, Akil; Maltez, Nancy; Johnston, Anne; Fong, Ying; Harris, Linda J.; Baetz, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor Aft1 is activated in iron-deficient cells to induce the expression of iron regulon genes, which coordinate the increase of iron uptake and remodel cellular metabolism to survive low-iron conditions. In addition, Aft1 has been implicated in numerous cellular processes including cell-cycle progression and chromosome stability; however, it is unclear if all cellular effects of Aft1 are mediated through iron homeostasis. To further investigate the cellular processes affected by Aft1, we identified >70 deletion mutants that are sensitive to perturbations in AFT1 levels using genome-wide synthetic lethal and synthetic dosage lethal screens. Our genetic network reveals that Aft1 affects a diverse range of cellular processes, including the RIM101 pH pathway, cell-wall stability, DNA damage, protein transport, chromosome stability, and mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, only a subset of mutants identified are sensitive to extracellular iron fluctuations or display genetic interactions with mutants of iron regulon genes AFT2 or FET3. We demonstrate that Aft1 works in parallel with the RIM101 pH pathway and the role of Aft1 in DNA damage repair is mediated by iron. In contrast, through both directed studies and microarray transcriptional profiling, we show that the role of Aft1 in chromosome maintenance and benomyl resistance is independent of its iron regulatory role, potentially through a nontranscriptional mechanism. PMID:20439772

  19. Dynamics of alpha control: Preparatory suppression of posterior alpha oscillations by frontal modulators revealed with combined EEG and event-related optical signal (EROS)

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, Kyle E.; Beck, Diane M.; Ro, Tony; Maclin, Edward L.; Low, Kathy A.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the dynamics of brain processes facilitating conscious experience of external stimuli. Previously we proposed that alpha (8-12 Hz) oscillations, which fluctuate with both sustained and directed attention, represent a pulsed inhibition of ongoing sensory brain activity. Here we tested the prediction that inhibitory alpha oscillations in visual cortex are modulated by top-down signals from frontoparietal attention networks. We measured modulations in phase-coherent alpha oscillations from superficial frontal, parietal, and occipital cortices using the event-related optical signal (EROS), a measure of neuronal activity affording high spatiotemporal resolution, along with concurrently-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG), while subjects performed a visual target-detection task. The pre-target alpha oscillations measured with EEG and EROS from posterior areas were larger for subsequently undetected targets, supporting alpha's inhibitory role. Using EROS, we localized brain correlates of these awareness-related alpha oscillations measured at the scalp to the cuneus and precuneus. Crucially, EROS alpha suppression correlated with posterior EEG alpha power across subjects. Sorting the EROS data based on EEG alpha power quartiles to investigate alpha modulators revealed that suppression of posterior alpha was preceded by increased activity in regions of the dorsal attention network, and decreased activity in regions of the cingulo-opercular network. Cross-correlations revealed the temporal dynamics of activity within these preparatory networks prior to posterior alpha modulation. The novel combination of EEG and EROS afforded localization of the sources and correlates of alpha oscillations and their temporal relationships, supporting our proposal that top-down control from attention networks modulates both posterior alpha and awareness of visual stimuli. PMID:24702458

  20. REVEALING PROBABLE UNIVERSAL FEATURES IN THE LOWER RED GIANT BRANCH LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V. V.

    2009-06-15

    This paper aims at demonstrating, for the first time, very probable universal peculiarities of the evolution of stars in the lower red giant branch (RGB) of Galactic globular clusters (GCs), reflected in two corresponding dips in the luminosity functions (LFs). By relying on the database of Hubble Space Telescope photometry of GCs, we analyze the lower RGB LFs of a sample of 18 GCs in a wide metallicity range, {delta}[Fe/H] {approx} 1.9 dex. We first show that in the F555W-(F439W-F555W) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), the lower RGB of GCs, except for the most metal-poor of them, frequently shows an apparent 'knee'. It reveals itself as a fairly abrupt change of the RGB slope. At the same luminosity level, the RGB LFs show a feature in the form of a more or less pronounced dip. We find that the magnitude difference between the RGB base and the given feature is, on average, around {delta} F555W{sup dip} {sub base}{approx} 1.4 mag. It shows a marginal variation with metallicity, if any, comparable to the error. At the same time, the magnitude difference between the dip and the RGB bump, {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip}, decreases with increasing metallicity and falls within the range 0.8 {approx}< {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip} {approx}< 1.7 mag. Generalized LFs (GLFs) have been obtained for three subsamples of GCs within limited metallicity ranges and with different horizontal branch (HB) morphology. They reproduce the 'knee-related' dip that is statistically significant in two of the GLFs. This feature turns out to be more pronounced in the GLFs of GCs with either the blue or red HB morphology than with the intermediate one. The same GLFs also reveal an additional probable universal dip. It shows up below the RGB bump at {delta} F555W slightly increasing from {approx}0.3 to {approx}0.5 mag with increasing metallicity. Also, the statistical significance of this 'prebump' dip increases, on average, toward higher metallicity. Except for the well known RGB bump, no other universal features corresponding to those found here were so far empirically revealed or theoretically predicted in the lower RGB of GCs.

  1. Design of a supplementary modulation control function for the Chester SVC

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, E.; Rostamkolai, N. . Power Systems Engineering Dept.); Fisher, D. ); Poitras, A. )

    1993-04-01

    The Chester SVC was recently installed in New England on the 345 kV interconnection between Maine and New Brunswick. This SVC provides dynamic voltage support to prevent the rejection of generation in New Brunswick following contingencies related to the Phase II HVDC interconnection between Quebec and New England. As the project evolved from the planning to design stages, a control function referred to as the Supplementary Modulation Control became an important aspect of the overall SVC system. The criteria and analysis necessary to design this control function are described. Considerations for stability and subsynchronous torsional interaction are included.

  2. An investigation of the stationarity of the 3D modulation transfer function of SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, S.J.; King, M.A.; Knesaurek, K.; Burbank, K.

    1989-02-01

    This study evaluated the rotational symmetry and stationarity of the three dimensional (3D) modulation transfer function (MTF) of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The MTF's dependence on methods of averaging opposing projections before reconstruction, and attenuation correction was also determined. Point spread functions (PSF) in scattering media were obtained by placing a point source at varying radial distances from the center of three differently shaped water filled phantoms. Opposing projections were combined using either arithmetic or geometric mean averaging. The data were reconstructed, 3CD FFT'ed, and a 3D MTF was calculated. Three different methods of partial attenuation compensation were studied.

  3. Transcriptome Analysis of Tomato Flower Pedicel Tissues Reveals Abscission Zone-Specific Modulation of Key Meristem Activity Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiuli; Zhang, Rongzhi; Wu, Liang; Liang, Yanchun; Mao, Long

    2013-01-01

    Tomato flower abscises at the anatomically distinct abscission zone that separates the pedicel into basal and apical portions. During abscission, cell separation occurs only at the abscission zone indicating distinctive molecular regulation in its cells. We conducted a transcriptome analysis of tomato pedicel tissues during ethylene promoted abscission. We found that the abscission zone was the most active site with the largest set of differentially expressed genes when compared with basal and apical portions. Gene Ontology analyses revealed enriched transcription regulation and hydrolase activities in the abscission zone. We also demonstrate coordinated responses of hormone and cell wall related genes. Besides, a number of ESTs representing homologs of key Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem activity genes were found to be preferentially expressed in the abscission zone, including WUSCHEL (WUS), KNAT6, LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN PROTEIN 1(LBD1), and BELL-like homeodomain protein 1 (BLH1), as well as tomato axillary meristem genes BLIND (Bl) and LATERAL SUPPRESSOR (Ls). More interestingly, the homologs of WUS and the potential functional partner OVATE FAMILIY PROTEIN (OFP) were subsequently down regulated during abscission while Bl and AGL12 were continuously and specifically induced in the abscission zone. The expression patterns of meristem activity genes corroborate the idea that cells of the abscission zone confer meristem-like nature and coincide with the course of abscission and post-abscission cell differentiation. Our data therefore propose a possible regulatory scheme in tomato involving meristem genes that may be required not only for the abscission zone development, but also for abscission. PMID:23390523

  4. X-ray modulation transfer functions of photostimulable phosphor image plates and scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Holland, Glenn E.; Hudson, Lawrence T.; Henins, Albert

    2008-11-01

    The modulation transfer functions of two types of photostimulable phosphor image plates were determined in the 10 keV to 50 keV x-ray energy range using a resolution test pattern with up to 10 line pairs per mm (LP/mm) and a wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer. Techniques were developed for correcting for the partial transmittance of the high energy x rays through the lead bars of the resolution test pattern, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined from the measured change in contrast with LP/mm values. The MTF was convolved with the slit function of the image plate scanner, and the resulting point spread functions (PSFs) were in good agreement with the observed shapes and widths of x-ray spectral lines and with the PSF derived from edge spread functions. The shapes and the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of the PSF curves of the Fuji Superior Resolution (SR) and Fuji Maximum Sensitivity (MS) image plate detectors, consisting of the image plate and the scanner, determined by the three methods gave consistent results: The SR PSF is Gaussian with 0.13 mm FWHM, and the MS PSF is Lorentzian with 0.19 mm FWHM. These techniques result in the accurate determination of the spatial resolution achievable using image plate and scanner combinations and enable the optimization of spatial resolution for x-ray spectroscopy and radiography.

  5. Haloperidol modulates midbrain-prefrontal functional connectivity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Gass, Natalia; Schwarz, Adam James; Sartorius, Alexander; Cleppien, Dirk; Zheng, Lei; Schenker, Esther; Risterucci, Celine; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Weber-Fahr, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Dopamine D? receptor antagonists effectively reduce positive symptoms in schizophrenia, implicating abnormal dopaminergic neurotransmission as an underlying mechanism of psychosis. Despite the well-established, albeit incomplete, clinical efficacies of D? antagonists, no studies have examined their effects on functional interaction between brain regions. We hypothesized that haloperidol, a widely used antipsychotic and D? antagonist, would modulate functional connectivity in dopaminergic circuits. Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats received either haloperidol (1 mg/kg, s.c.) or the same volume of saline a week apart. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired 20 min after injection. Connectivity analyses were performed using two complementary approaches: correlation analysis between 44 atlas-derived regions of interest, and seed-based connectivity mapping. In the presence of haloperidol, reduced correlation was observed between the substantia nigra and several brain regions, notably the cingulate and prefrontal cortices, posterodorsal hippocampus, ventral pallidum, and motor cortex. Haloperidol induced focal changes in functional connectivity were found to be the most strongly associated with ascending dopamine projections. These included reduced connectivity between the midbrain and the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, possibly relating to its therapeutic action, and decreased coupling between substantia nigra and motor areas, which may reflect dyskinetic effects. These data may help in further characterizing the functional circuits modulated by antipsychotics that could be targeted by innovative drug treatments. PMID:23165219

  6. Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard Allen; Power, Ian M.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Southam, Gordon; Suttle, Curtis A.

    2015-01-01

    Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were dominant in the microbialites and sediments, respectively. The microbialites were also home to many other groups associated with microbialite formation including filamentous cyanobacteria and dissimilatory sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria, consistent with the idea of a shared global microbialite microbiome. Other members were present that are typically not associated with microbialites including Gemmatimonadetes and iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, which participate in carbon metabolism and iron cycling. Compared to the sediments, the microbialite microbiome has significantly more genes associated with photosynthetic processes (e.g., photosystem II reaction centers, carotenoid, and chlorophyll biosynthesis) and carbon fixation (e.g., CO dehydrogenase). The Clinton Creek microbialite communities had strikingly similar functional potentials to non-lithifying microbial mats from the Canadian High Arctic and Antarctica, but are functionally distinct, from non-lithifying mats or biofilms from Yellowstone. Clinton Creek microbialites also share metabolic genes (R2 < 0.750) with freshwater microbial mats from Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico, but are more similar to polar Arctic mats (R2 > 0.900). These metagenomic profiles from an anthropogenic microbialite-forming ecosystem provide context to microbialite formation on a human-relevant timescale. PMID:26441900

  7. Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential.

    PubMed

    White, Richard Allen; Power, Ian M; Dipple, Gregory M; Southam, Gordon; Suttle, Curtis A

    2015-01-01

    Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were dominant in the microbialites and sediments, respectively. The microbialites were also home to many other groups associated with microbialite formation including filamentous cyanobacteria and dissimilatory sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria, consistent with the idea of a shared global microbialite microbiome. Other members were present that are typically not associated with microbialites including Gemmatimonadetes and iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, which participate in carbon metabolism and iron cycling. Compared to the sediments, the microbialite microbiome has significantly more genes associated with photosynthetic processes (e.g., photosystem II reaction centers, carotenoid, and chlorophyll biosynthesis) and carbon fixation (e.g., CO dehydrogenase). The Clinton Creek microbialite communities had strikingly similar functional potentials to non-lithifying microbial mats from the Canadian High Arctic and Antarctica, but are functionally distinct, from non-lithifying mats or biofilms from Yellowstone. Clinton Creek microbialites also share metabolic genes (R (2) < 0.750) with freshwater microbial mats from Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico, but are more similar to polar Arctic mats (R (2) > 0.900). These metagenomic profiles from an anthropogenic microbialite-forming ecosystem provide context to microbialite formation on a human-relevant timescale. PMID:26441900

  8. Proteomic analysis of chromoplasts from six crop species reveals insights into chromoplast function and development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Qiang; Yang, Yong; Fei, Zhangjun; Yuan, Hui; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Mazourek, Michael; Kochian, Leon V; Wang, Xiaowu; Li, Li

    2013-02-01

    Chromoplasts are unique plastids that accumulate massive amounts of carotenoids. To gain a general and comparative characterization of chromoplast proteins, this study performed proteomic analysis of chromoplasts from six carotenoid-rich crops: watermelon, tomato, carrot, orange cauliflower, red papaya, and red bell pepper. Stromal and membrane proteins of chromoplasts were separated by 1D gel electrophoresis and analysed using nLC-MS/MS. A total of 953-2262 proteins from chromoplasts of different crop species were identified. Approximately 60% of the identified proteins were predicted to be plastid localized. Functional classification using MapMan bins revealed large numbers of proteins involved in protein metabolism, transport, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, and redox in chromoplasts from all six species. Seventeen core carotenoid metabolic enzymes were identified. Phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, ?-carotene desaturase, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase, and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 were found in almost all crops, suggesting relative abundance of them among the carotenoid pathway enzymes. Chromoplasts from different crops contained abundant amounts of ATP synthase and adenine nucleotide translocator, which indicates an important role of ATP production and transport in chromoplast development. Distinctive abundant proteins were observed in chromoplast from different crops, including capsanthin/capsorubin synthase and fibrillins in pepper, superoxide dismutase in watermelon, carrot, and cauliflower, and glutathione-S-transferease in papaya. The comparative analysis of chromoplast proteins among six crop species offers new insights into the general metabolism and function of chromoplasts as well as the uniqueness of chromoplasts in specific crop species. This work provides reference datasets for future experimental study of chromoplast biogenesis, development, and regulation in plants. PMID:23314817

  9. What do plasma beta-endorphin levels reveal about endogenous opioid analgesic function?

    PubMed Central

    Bruehl, S.; Burns, J.W.; Chung, O.Y.; Chont, M.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma levels of beta-endorphin (BE), an endogenous opioid analgesic, are often reported as they relate to acute and chronic pain outcomes. However, little is known about what resting plasma BE levels might reveal about functioning of the endogenous opioid antinociceptive system. This study directly examined associations between resting plasma BE and subsequent endogenous opioid analgesic responses to acute pain in 39 healthy controls and 37 individuals with chronic low back pain (LBP). Resting baseline levels of plasma BE were assessed. Next, participants received opioid blockade (8 mg naloxone i.v.) or placebo in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Participants then underwent two acute pain stimuli: finger pressure (FP) pain and ischaemic (ISC) forearm pain. Blockade effects (naloxone minus placebo pain ratings) were derived to index endogenous opioid analgesic function. In placebo condition analyses for both pain stimuli, higher resting BE levels were associated with subsequently greater reported pain intensity (p’s < 0.05), with this effect occurring primarily in healthy controls (BE × Participant Type interactions, p’s < 0.05). In blockade effect analyses across both pain tasks, higher resting plasma BE predicted less subsequent endogenous opioid analgesia (smaller blockade effects; p’s < 0.05). For the ISC task, these links were significantly more prominent in LBP participants (BE × Participant Type Interactions, p’s < 0.05). Results suggest that elevated resting plasma BE may be a potential biomarker for reduced endogenous opioid analgesic capacity, particularly among individuals with chronic pain. Potential clinical implications are discussed. PMID:22337161

  10. Evolution of TNF-induced apoptosis reveals 550 My of functional conservation.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Steven D; Stotland, Aleksandr; Barott, Katie L; Smurthwaite, Cameron A; Hilton, Brett Jameson; Grasis, Juris A; Wolkowicz, Roland; Rohwer, Forest L

    2014-07-01

    The Precambrian explosion led to the rapid appearance of most major animal phyla alive today. It has been argued that the complexity of life has steadily increased since that event. Here we challenge this hypothesis through the characterization of apoptosis in reef-building corals, representatives of some of the earliest animals. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that all of the major components of the death receptor pathway are present in coral with high-predicted structural conservation with Homo sapiens. The TNF receptor-ligand superfamilies (TNFRSF/TNFSF) are central mediators of the death receptor pathway, and the predicted proteome of Acropora digitifera contains more putative coral TNFRSF members than any organism described thus far, including humans. This high abundance of TNFRSF members, as well as the predicted structural conservation of other death receptor signaling proteins, led us to wonder what would happen if corals were exposed to a member of the human TNFSF (HuTNF?). HuTNF? was found to bind directly to coral cells, increase caspase activity, cause apoptotic blebbing and cell death, and finally induce coral bleaching. Next, immortalized human T cells (Jurkats) expressing a functional death receptor pathway (WT) and a corresponding Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD) KO cell line were exposed to a coral TNFSF member (AdTNF1) identified and purified here. AdTNF1 treatment resulted in significantly higher cell death (P < 0.0001) in WT Jurkats compared with the corresponding FADD KO, demonstrating that coral AdTNF1 activates the H. sapiens death receptor pathway. Taken together, these data show remarkable conservation of the TNF-induced apoptotic response representing 550 My of functional conservation. PMID:24927546

  11. Distinct Modulated Pupil Function System for Real-Time Imaging of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Fujita, Hideaki; Ichimura, Taro; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Akira, Shizuo; Yanagida, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Optical microscopy is one of the most contributive tools for cell biology in the past decades. Many microscopic techniques with various functions have been developed to date, i.e., phase contrast microscopy, differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy, confocal microscopy, two photon microscopy, superresolution microscopy, etc. However, person who is in charge of an experiment has to select one of the several microscopic techniques to achieve an experimental goal, which makes the biological assay time-consuming and expensive. To solve this problem, we have developed a microscopic system with various functions in one instrument based on the optical Fourier transformation with a lens system for detection while focusing on applicability and user-friendliness for biology. The present instrument can arbitrarily modulate the pupil function with a micro mirror array on the Fourier plane of the optical pathway for detection. We named the present instrument DiMPS (Distinct optical Modulated Pupil function System). The DiMPS is compatible with conventional fluorescent probes and illumination equipment, and gives us a Fourier-filtered image, a pseudo-relief image, and a deep focus depth. Furthermore, DiMPS achieved a resolution enhancement (pseudo-superresolution) of 110 nm through the subtraction of two images whose pupil functions are independently modulated. In maximum, the spatial and temporal resolution was improved to 120 nm and 2 ms, respectively. Since the DiMPS is based on relay optics, it can be easily combined with another microscopic instrument such as confocal microscope, and provides a method for multi-color pseudo-superresolution. Thus, the DiMPS shows great promise as a flexible optical microscopy technique in biological research fields. PMID:22962597

  12. Modeling Reveals Bistability and Low-Pass Filtering in the Network Module Determining Blood Stem Cell Fate

    E-print Network

    Igoshin, Oleg

    this method to model the Scl-Gata2- Fli1 triad--a network module important for cell fate specification threshold. We have found that the auto-regulation loops connecting the slow-degrading Scl to Gata2 and Fli1

  13. Deep small RNA sequencing from the nematode Ascaris reveals conservation, functional diversification, and novel developmental profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianbin; Czech, Benjamin; Crunk, Amanda; Wallace, Adam; Mitreva, Makedonka; Hannon, Gregory J.; Davis, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells express several classes of small RNAs that regulate gene expression and ensure genome maintenance. Endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) mainly control gene and transposon expression in the germline, while microRNAs (miRNAs) generally function in post-transcriptional gene silencing in both somatic and germline cells. To provide an evolutionary and developmental perspective on small RNA pathways in nematodes, we identified and characterized known and novel small RNA classes through gametogenesis and embryo development in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum and compared them with known small RNAs of Caenorhabditis elegans. piRNAs, Piwi-clade Argonautes, and other proteins associated with the piRNA pathway have been lost in Ascaris. miRNAs are synthesized immediately after fertilization in utero, before pronuclear fusion, and before the first cleavage of the zygote. This is the earliest expression of small RNAs ever described at a developmental stage long thought to be transcriptionally quiescent. A comparison of the two classes of Ascaris endo-siRNAs, 22G-RNAs and 26G-RNAs, to those in C. elegans, suggests great diversification and plasticity in the use of small RNA pathways during spermatogenesis in different nematodes. Our data reveal conserved characteristics of nematode small RNAs as well as features unique to Ascaris that illustrate significant flexibility in the use of small RNAs pathways, some of which are likely an adaptation to Ascaris' life cycle and parasitism. PMID:21685128

  14. Quantitative proteomics reveals oxygen-dependent changes in neuronal mitochondria affecting function and sensitivity to rotenone

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Lance; Tiede, LeAnn M.; Morsey, Brenda; Fox, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are implicated in a variety of degenerative disorders and aging. Mitochondria are responsive to the oxygen in their environment yet tissue culture is performed at atmospheric (21%) oxygen and not at physiological (1-11%) oxygen levels found in tissues. We employed imaging of mitochondrial probes, mass spectrometry, western blots and ATP assays of the human neuroblastoma cell-line SH-SY5Y; and imaging of mitochondrial probes in human primary neurons in standard non-physiological oxygen conditions (atmospheric) and in physiological oxygen levels in the nervous system to assess the impact of oxygen on mitochondrial function. SH-SY5Y cells cultured in physiological 5% oxygen exhibited the lowest reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, indicating that culture at 5% oxygen is favored; these results were mimicked in primary human cells. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed extensive mitochondrial proteomic alterations in SH-SY5Y cells based upon oxygen culture condition. Among these the rotenone-sensitive subunit of complex I NDUFV3 was increased in cells cultured at 5% oxygen. Rotenone is a Parkinson’s disease-linked toxin, and correspondingly SH-SY5Y cells cultured at 5% oxygen also exhibited over 10-fold greater sensitivity to rotenone than those cultured in atmospheric, 21%, oxygen. Our results indicate that neuronal mitochondria are responsive to oxygen levels and produce differential responses under different oxygen levels. PMID:23971408

  15. Microarray Analysis Reveals Potential Biological Functions of Histone H2B Monoubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yuanya; Wang, Chen; Men, Yu-Long; Zhan, Wang; Wang, Qiang; Gan, Zhixue; Huang, Jin; Xie, Kun; Mi, Jiangsheng; Yu, Chenghua; Yu, Xiuqing; Chen, Pei-Chao; Chang, Jian-Feng; Cai, Fengfeng; Chen, Su

    2015-01-01

    Histone H2B monoubiquitination is a key histone modification that has significant effects on chromatin higher-order structure and gene transcription. Multiple biological processes have been suggested to be tightly related to the dynamics of H2B monoubiquitination. However, a comprehensive understanding of biological roles of H2B monoubiquitination is still poorly understood. In the present study, we developed an efficient tool to disrupt endogenous H2B monoubiquitination levels by using an H2BK120R mutant construct expressed in human cells. Genome-wide microarray analysis of these cells revealed a potential global view of biological functions of H2B monoubiquitination. Bioinformatics analysis of our data demonstrated that while H2B monoubiquitination expectedly affected a number of previously reported biological pathways, we also uncovered the influence of this histone modification on many novel biological processes. Therefore, our work provided valuable information for understanding the role of H2B monoubiquitination and indicated potential directions for its further studies. PMID:26177367

  16. Structure-function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H; Davies, Gideon J; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure-function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis-ŕ-vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications. PMID:26680532

  17. Functional plant cell wall design revealed by the Raman imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Richter, Stephan; Müssig, Jörg; Gierlinger, Notburga

    2011-04-01

    Using the Raman imaging approach, the optimization of the plant cell wall design was investigated on the micron level within different tissue types at different positions of a Phormium tenax leaf. Pectin and lignin distribution were visualized and the cellulose microfibril angle (MFA) of the cell walls was determined. A detailed analysis of the Raman spectra extracted from the selected regions, allowed a semi-quantitative comparison of the chemical composition of the investigated tissue types on the micron level. The cell corners of the parenchyma revealed almost pure pectin and the cell wall an amount of 38-49% thereof. Slight lignification was observed in the parenchyma and collenchyma in the top of the leaf and a high variability (7-44%) in the sclerenchyma. In the cell corners and in the cell wall of the sclerenchymatic fibres surrounding the vascular tissue, the highest lignification was observed, which can act as a barrier and protection of the vascular tissue. In the sclerenchyma high variable MFA (4°-40°) was detected, which was related with lignin variability. In the primary cell walls a constant high MFA (57°-58°) was found together with pectin. The different plant cell wall designs on the tissue and microlevel involve changes in chemical composition as well as cellulose microfibril alignment and are discussed and related according to the development and function. PMID:21197544

  18. Structure of Tetrahymena telomerase reveals previously unknown subunits, functions, and interactions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiansen; Chan, Henry; Cash, Darian D; Miracco, Edward J; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R; Upton, Heather E; Cascio, Duilio; O'Brien Johnson, Reid; Collins, Kathleen; Loo, Joseph A; Zhou, Z Hong; Feigon, Juli

    2015-10-30

    Telomerase helps maintain telomeres by processive synthesis of telomere repeat DNA at their 3'-ends, using an integral telomerase RNA (TER) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). We report the cryo-electron microscopy structure of Tetrahymena telomerase at ~9 angstrom resolution. In addition to seven known holoenzyme proteins, we identify two additional proteins that form a complex (TEB) with single-stranded telomere DNA-binding protein Teb1, paralogous to heterotrimeric replication protein A (RPA). The p75-p45-p19 subcomplex is identified as another RPA-related complex, CST (CTC1-STN1-TEN1). This study reveals the paths of TER in the TERT-TER-p65 catalytic core and single-stranded DNA exit; extensive subunit interactions of the TERT essential N-terminal domain, p50, and TEB; and other subunit identities and structures, including p19 and p45C crystal structures. Our findings provide structural and mechanistic insights into telomerase holoenzyme function. PMID:26472759

  19. Novel transport function of adherens junction revealed by live imaging in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Chiao; Yang, Wen-Ting; Cheng, Lien-Chieh; Lin, Chiao-Ming; Ho, Yu-Huei; Lin, Pei-Yi; Chen, Bi-Chang; Rickoll, Wayne L; Hsu, Jui-Chou

    2015-08-01

    Adherens junctions are known for their role in mediating cell-cell adhesion. DE-cadherin and Echinoid are the principle adhesion molecules of adherens junctions in Drosophila epithelia. Here, using live imaging to trace the movement of endocytosed Echinoid vesicles in the epithelial cells of Drosophila embryos, we demonstrate that Echinoid vesicles co-localize and move with Rab5-or Rab11-positive endosomes. Surprisingly, these Echinoid-containing endosomes undergo directional cell-to-cell movement, through adherens junctions. Consistent with this, cell-to-cell movement of Echinoid vesicles requires the presence of DE-cadherin at adherens junctions. Live imaging further revealed that Echinoid vesicles move along adherens junction-associated microtubules into adjacent cells, a process requiring a kinesin motor. Importantly, DE-cadherin- and EGFR-containing vesicles also exhibit intercellular movement. Together, our results unveil a transport function of adherens junctions. Furthermore, this adherens junctions-based intercellular transport provides a platform for the exchange of junctional proteins and signaling receptors between neighboring cells. PMID:26047695

  20. Estimating the effects of stationary and nonstationary noise on power spectral density function measurements: frequency, phase, and amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, George D.

    1998-03-01

    The effects of noise modulation on the power spectral density functions of a sinusoidal wave are calculated in closed form. Frequency, phase, and amplitude modulation are considered. Noise processes are modeled using Butterworth filters of various integer orders. Both stationary and nonstationary noise processes are included with Daubechies wavelet filters used for the nonsteady case.

  1. How emotional abilities modulate the influence of early life stress on hippocampal functioning.

    PubMed

    Aust, Sabine; Alkan Härtwig, Elif; Koelsch, Stefan; Heekeren, Hauke R; Heuser, Isabella; Bajbouj, Malek

    2014-07-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is known to have considerable influence on brain development, mental health and affective functioning. Previous investigations have shown that alexithymia, a prevalent personality trait associated with difficulties experiencing and verbalizing emotions, is particularly related to ELS. The aim of the present study was to investigate how neural correlates of emotional experiences in alexithymia are altered in the presence and absence of ELS. Therefore, 50 healthy individuals with different levels of alexithymia were matched regarding ELS and investigated with respect to neural correlates of audio-visually induced emotional experiences via functional magnetic resonance imaging. The main finding was that ELS modulated hippocampal responses to pleasant (>neutral) stimuli in high-alexithymic individuals, whereas there was no such modulation in low-alexithymic individuals matched for ELS. Behavioral and psychophysiological results followed a similar pattern. When considered independent of ELS, alexithymia was associated with decreased responses in insula (pleasant > neutral) and temporal pole (unpleasant > neutral). Our results show that the influence of ELS on emotional brain responses seems to be modulated by an individual's degree of alexithymia. Potentially, protective and adverse effects of emotional abilities on brain responses to emotional experiences are discussed. PMID:23685776

  2. Mitochondrial functions modulate neuroendocrine, metabolic, inflammatory, and transcriptional responses to acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Martin; McManus, Meagan J.; Gray, Jason D.; Nasca, Carla; Moffat, Cynthia; Kopinski, Piotr K.; Seifert, Erin L.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of psychological stress triggers neuroendocrine, inflammatory, metabolic, and transcriptional perturbations that ultimately predispose to disease. However, the subcellular determinants of this integrated, multisystemic stress response have not been defined. Central to stress adaptation is cellular energetics, involving mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesized that abnormal mitochondrial functions would differentially modulate the organism’s multisystemic response to psychological stress. By mutating or deleting mitochondrial genes encoded in the mtDNA [NADH dehydrogenase 6 (ND6) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] or nuclear DNA [adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT)], we selectively impaired mitochondrial respiratory chain function, energy exchange, and mitochondrial redox balance in mice. The resulting impact on physiological reactivity and recovery from restraint stress were then characterized. We show that mitochondrial dysfunctions altered the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal–medullary activation and catecholamine levels, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, circulating metabolites, and hippocampal gene expression responses to stress. Each mitochondrial defect generated a distinct whole-body stress-response signature. These results demonstrate the role of mitochondrial energetics and redox balance as modulators of key pathophysiological perturbations previously linked to disease. This work establishes mitochondria as stress-response modulators, with implications for understanding the mechanisms of stress pathophysiology and mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26627253

  3. Mitochondrial functions modulate neuroendocrine, metabolic, inflammatory, and transcriptional responses to acute psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Picard, Martin; McManus, Meagan J; Gray, Jason D; Nasca, Carla; Moffat, Cynthia; Kopinski, Piotr K; Seifert, Erin L; McEwen, Bruce S; Wallace, Douglas C

    2015-12-01

    The experience of psychological stress triggers neuroendocrine, inflammatory, metabolic, and transcriptional perturbations that ultimately predispose to disease. However, the subcellular determinants of this integrated, multisystemic stress response have not been defined. Central to stress adaptation is cellular energetics, involving mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesized that abnormal mitochondrial functions would differentially modulate the organism's multisystemic response to psychological stress. By mutating or deleting mitochondrial genes encoded in the mtDNA [NADH dehydrogenase 6 (ND6) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] or nuclear DNA [adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT)], we selectively impaired mitochondrial respiratory chain function, energy exchange, and mitochondrial redox balance in mice. The resulting impact on physiological reactivity and recovery from restraint stress were then characterized. We show that mitochondrial dysfunctions altered the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal-medullary activation and catecholamine levels, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, circulating metabolites, and hippocampal gene expression responses to stress. Each mitochondrial defect generated a distinct whole-body stress-response signature. These results demonstrate the role of mitochondrial energetics and redox balance as modulators of key pathophysiological perturbations previously linked to disease. This work establishes mitochondria as stress-response modulators, with implications for understanding the mechanisms of stress pathophysiology and mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26627253

  4. Selected phenolic compounds in cultivated plants: ecologic functions, health implications, and modulation by pesticides.

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, O; Meier, M S; Schlatter, J; Frischknecht, P

    1999-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are widely distributed in the plant kingdom. Plant tissues may contain up to several grams per kilogram. External stimuli such as microbial infections, ultraviolet radiation, and chemical stressors induce their synthesis. The phenolic compounds resveratrol, flavonoids, and furanocoumarins have many ecologic functions and affect human health. Ecologic functions include defense against microbial pathogens and herbivorous animals. Phenolic compounds may have both beneficial and toxic effects on human health. Effects on low-density lipoproteins and aggregation of platelets are beneficial because they reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Mutagenic, cancerogenic, and phototoxic effects are risk factors of human health. The synthesis of phenolic compounds in plants can be modulated by the application of herbicides and, to a lesser extent, insecticides and fungicides. The effects on ecosystem functioning and human health are complex and cannot be predicted with great certainty. The consequences of the combined natural and pesticide-induced modulating effects for ecologic functions and human health should be further evaluated. PMID:10229712

  5. Insights into the Modulation of Dopamine Transporter Function by Amphetamine, Orphenadrine, and Cocaine Binding

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mary Hongying; Block, Ethan; Hu, Feizhuo; Cobanoglu, Murat Can; Sorkin, Alexander; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-01-01

    Human dopamine (DA) transporter (hDAT) regulates dopaminergic signaling in the central nervous system by maintaining the synaptic concentration of DA at physiological levels, upon reuptake of DA into presynaptic terminals. DA translocation involves the co-transport of two sodium ions and the channeling of a chloride ion, and it is achieved via alternating access between outward-facing (OF) and inward-facing states of DAT. hDAT is a target for addictive drugs, such as cocaine, amphetamine (AMPH), and therapeutic antidepressants. Our recent quantitative systems pharmacology study suggested that orphenadrine (ORPH), an anticholinergic agent and anti-Parkinson drug, might be repurposable as a DAT drug. Previous studies have shown that DAT-substrates like AMPH or -blockers like cocaine modulate the function of DAT in different ways. However, the molecular mechanisms of modulation remained elusive due to the lack of structural data on DAT. The newly resolved DAT structure from Drosophila melanogaster opens the way to a deeper understanding of the mechanism and time evolution of DAT–drug/ligand interactions. Using a combination of homology modeling, docking analysis, molecular dynamics simulations, and molecular biology experiments, we performed a comparative study of the binding properties of DA, AMPH, ORPH, and cocaine and their modulation of hDAT function. Simulations demonstrate that binding DA or AMPH drives a structural transition toward a functional form predisposed to translocate the ligand. In contrast, ORPH appears to inhibit DAT function by arresting it in the OF open conformation. The analysis shows that cocaine and ORPH competitively bind DAT, with the binding pose and affinity dependent on the conformational state of DAT. Further assays show that the effect of ORPH on DAT uptake and endocytosis is comparable to that of cocaine. PMID:26106364

  6. A Hydrodynamic Analysis of APOBEC3G Reveals a Monomer-Dimer-Tetramer Self-Association that has Implications for Anti-HIV Function

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Jason D.; Krucinska, Jolanta; Raina, Jay; Smith, Harold C.; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2009-01-01

    The innate antiviral factor APOBEC3G (A3G) possesses RNA binding activity and deaminates HIV-1 DNA. High-molecular-mass forms of A3G can be isolated from a variety of cell types, but exhibit limited deaminase activity relative to low-molecular-mass species prepared under RNA-depleted conditions. To investigate the fundamental oligomeric state and shape of A3G, we conducted sedimentation velocity analyses of the pure enzyme under RNA-deficient conditions. The results reveal a predominant dimer in equilibrium with minor monomeric and tetrameric species. Hydrodynamic modeling of the dimer supports an extended cylindrical shape that assembles into an elongated tetramer. Overall, the results provide physical restraints for the A3G quaternary structure that have implications for modulating antiviral function. PMID:19839647

  7. Calibration of Modulation Transfer Function of Surface Profilometers with 1D and 2D Binary Pseudo-random Array Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.

    2008-05-19

    We suggest and describe the use of a binary pseudo-random grating as a standard test surface for calibration of the modulation transfer function of microscopes. Results from calibration of a MicromapTM-570 interferometric microscope are presented.

  8. Autistic fluid intelligence: Increased reliance on visual functional connectivity with diminished modulation of coupling by task difficulty.

    PubMed

    Simard, Isabelle; Luck, David; Mottron, Laurent; Zeffiro, Thomas A; Souličres, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Different test types lead to different intelligence estimates in autism, as illustrated by the fact that autistic individuals obtain higher scores on the Raven's Progressive Matrices (RSPM) test than they do on the Wechsler IQ, in contrast to relatively similar performance on both tests in non-autistic individuals. However, the cerebral processes underlying these differences are not well understood. This study investigated whether activity in the fluid "reasoning" network, which includes frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital regions, is differently modulated by task complexity in autistic and non-autistic individuals during the RSPM. In this purpose, we used fMRI to study autistic and non-autistic participants solving the 60 RSPM problems focussing on regions and networks involved in reasoning complexity. As complexity increased, activity in the left superior occipital gyrus and the left middle occipital gyrus increased for autistic participants, whereas non-autistic participants showed increased activity in the left middle frontal gyrus and bilateral precuneus. Using psychophysiological interaction analyses (PPI), we then verified in which regions did functional connectivity increase as a function of reasoning complexity. PPI analyses revealed greater connectivity in autistic, compared to non-autistic participants, between the left inferior occipital gyrus and areas in the left superior frontal gyrus, right superior parietal lobe, right middle occipital gyrus and right inferior temporal gyrus. We also observed generally less modulation of the reasoning network as complexity increased in autistic participants. These results suggest that autistic individuals, when confronted with increasing task complexity, rely mainly on visuospatial processes when solving more complex matrices. In addition to the now well-established enhanced activity observed in visual areas in a range of tasks, these results suggest that the enhanced reliance on visual perception has a central role in autistic cognition. PMID:26594629

  9. Autistic fluid intelligence: Increased reliance on visual functional connectivity with diminished modulation of coupling by task difficulty

    PubMed Central

    Simard, Isabelle; Luck, David; Mottron, Laurent; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Souličres, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Different test types lead to different intelligence estimates in autism, as illustrated by the fact that autistic individuals obtain higher scores on the Raven's Progressive Matrices (RSPM) test than they do on the Wechsler IQ, in contrast to relatively similar performance on both tests in non-autistic individuals. However, the cerebral processes underlying these differences are not well understood. This study investigated whether activity in the fluid “reasoning” network, which includes frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital regions, is differently modulated by task complexity in autistic and non-autistic individuals during the RSPM. In this purpose, we used fMRI to study autistic and non-autistic participants solving the 60 RSPM problems focussing on regions and networks involved in reasoning complexity. As complexity increased, activity in the left superior occipital gyrus and the left middle occipital gyrus increased for autistic participants, whereas non-autistic participants showed increased activity in the left middle frontal gyrus and bilateral precuneus. Using psychophysiological interaction analyses (PPI), we then verified in which regions did functional connectivity increase as a function of reasoning complexity. PPI analyses revealed greater connectivity in autistic, compared to non-autistic participants, between the left inferior occipital gyrus and areas in the left superior frontal gyrus, right superior parietal lobe, right middle occipital gyrus and right inferior temporal gyrus. We also observed generally less modulation of the reasoning network as complexity increased in autistic participants. These results suggest that autistic individuals, when confronted with increasing task complexity, rely mainly on visuospatial processes when solving more complex matrices. In addition to the now well-established enhanced activity observed in visual areas in a range of tasks, these results suggest that the enhanced reliance on visual perception has a central role in autistic cognition.

  10. Optogenetic versus electrical stimulation of dopamine terminals in the nucleus accumbens reveals local modulation of presynaptic release.

    PubMed

    Melchior, James R; Ferris, Mark J; Stuber, Garret D; Riddle, David R; Jones, Sara R

    2015-09-01

    The nucleus accumbens is highly heterogeneous, integrating regionally distinct afferent projections and accumbal interneurons, resulting in diverse local microenvironments. Dopamine (DA) neuron terminals similarly express a heterogeneous collection of terminal receptors that modulate DA signaling. Cyclic voltammetry is often used to probe DA terminal dynamics in brain slice preparations; however, this method traditionally requires electrical stimulation to induce DA release. Electrical stimulation excites all of the neuronal processes in the stimulation field, potentially introducing simultaneous, multi-synaptic modulation of DA terminal release. We used optogenetics to selectively stimulate DA terminals and used voltammetry to compare DA responses from electrical and optical stimulation of the same area of tissue around a recording electrode. We found that with multiple pulse stimulation trains, optically stimulated DA release increasingly exceeded that of electrical stimulation. Furthermore, electrical stimulation produced inhibition of DA release across longer duration stimulations. The GABAB antagonist, CGP 55845, increased electrically stimulated DA release significantly more than light stimulated release. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, dihydro-?-erythroidine hydrobromide, inhibited single pulse electrically stimulated DA release while having no effect on optically stimulated DA release. Our results demonstrate that electrical stimulation introduces local multi-synaptic modulation of DA release that is absent with optogenetically targeted stimulation. The nucleus accumbens is highly heterogeneous, integrating regionally distinct afferent projections and accumbal interneurons, resulting in diverse microenvironments. Local electrical stimulation excites all of the neuronal processes in the stimulation field, potentially modulating the dopamine signal - measured using cyclic voltammetry. Optogenetically targeting light stimulation to dopamine terminals (blue) reduces the cholinergic and GABAergic modulatory effects on stimulated dopamine release. PMID:26011081

  11. Analysis of Candida albicans Mutants Defective in the Cdk8 Module of Mediator Reveal Links between Metabolism and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Allia K.; Morales, Diana K.; Liu, Zhongle; Grahl, Nora; Zhang, Anda; Willger, Sven D.; Myers, Lawrence C.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans biofilm formation is a key virulence trait that involves hyphal growth and adhesin expression. Pyocyanin (PYO), a phenazine secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inhibits both C. albicans biofilm formation and development of wrinkled colonies. Using a genetic screen, we identified two mutants, ssn3?/? and ssn8?/?, which continued to wrinkle in the presence of PYO. Ssn8 is a cyclin-like protein and Ssn3 is similar to cyclin-dependent kinases; both proteins are part of the heterotetrameric Cdk8 module that forms a complex with the transcriptional co-regulator, Mediator. Ssn3 kinase activity was also required for PYO sensitivity as a kinase dead mutant maintained a wrinkled colony morphology in the presence of PYO. Furthermore, similar phenotypes were observed in mutants lacking the other two components of the Cdk8 module—Srb8 and Srb9. Through metabolomics analyses and biochemical assays, we showed that a compromised Cdk8 module led to increases in glucose consumption, glycolysis-related transcripts, oxidative metabolism and ATP levels even in the presence of PYO. In the mutant, inhibition of respiration to levels comparable to the PYO-treated wild type inhibited wrinkled colony development. Several lines of evidence suggest that PYO does not act through Cdk8. Lastly, the ssn3 mutant was a hyperbiofilm former, and maintained higher biofilm formation in the presence of PYO than the wild type. Together these data provide novel insights into the role of the Cdk8 module of Mediator in regulation of C. albicans physiology and the links between respiratory activity and both wrinkled colony and biofilm development. PMID:25275466

  12. Optogenetic versus electrical stimulation of dopamine terminals in the nucleus accumbens reveals local modulation of presynaptic release

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, James R.; Ferris, Mark J.; Stuber, Garret D.; Riddle, David R.; Jones, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens is highly heterogeneous, integrating regionally distinct afferent projections and accumbal interneurons, resulting in diverse local microenvironments. Dopamine (DA) neuron terminals similarly express a heterogeneous collection of terminal receptors that modulate DA signaling. Cyclic voltammetry is often used to probe DA terminal dynamics in brain slice preparations; however, this method traditionally requires electrical stimulation to induce DA release. Electrical stimulation excites all of the neuronal processes in the stimulation field, potentially introducing simultaneous, multi-synaptic modulation of DA terminal release. We used optogenetics to selectively stimulate DA terminals and used voltammetry to compare DA responses from electrical and optical stimulation of the same area of tissue around a recording electrode. We found that with multiple pulse stimulation trains, optically stimulated DA release increasingly exceeded that of electrical stimulation. Furthermore, electrical stimulation produced inhibition of DA release across longer duration stimulations. The GABAB antagonist, CGP 55845, increased electrically stimulated DA release significantly more than light stimulated release. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, dihydro-?-erythroidine hydrobromide, inhibited single pulse electrically stimulated DA release while having no effect on optically stimulated DA release. Our results demonstrate that electrical stimulation introduces local multi-synaptic modulation of DA release that is absent with optogenetically targeted stimulation. PMID:26011081

  13. Functional Network Overlap as Revealed by fMRI Using sICA and Its Potential Relationships with Functional Heterogeneity, Balanced Excitation and Inhibition, and Sparseness of Neuron Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiansong; Calhoun, Vince D.; Worhunsky, Patrick D.; Xiang, Hui; Li, Jian; Wall, John T.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies traditionally use general linear model-based analysis (GLM-BA) and regularly report task-related activation, deactivation, or no change in activation in separate brain regions. However, several recent fMRI studies using spatial independent component analysis (sICA) find extensive overlap of functional networks (FNs), each exhibiting different task-related modulation (e.g., activation vs. deactivation), different from the dominant findings of GLM-BA. This study used sICA to assess overlap of FNs extracted from four datasets, each related to a different cognitive task. FNs extracted from each dataset overlapped with each other extensively across most or all brain regions and showed task-related concurrent increases, decreases, or no changes in activity. These findings indicate that neural substrates showing task-related concurrent but different modulations in activity intermix with each other and distribute across most of the brain. Furthermore, spatial correlation analyses found that most FNs were highly consistent in spatial patterns across different datasets. This finding indicates that these FNs probably reflect large-scale patterns of task-related brain activity. We hypothesize that FN overlaps as revealed by sICA might relate to functional heterogeneity, balanced excitation and inhibition, and population sparseness of neuron activity, three fundamental properties of the brain. These possibilities deserve further investigation. PMID:25714362

  14. Modulhandbuch M.Sc. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Title of the module Functional genomics of marine eukaryotes

    E-print Network

    Diekmann, Martin

    Modulhandbuch M.Sc. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Title of the module Functional genomics and functional genomics), Prof. Frickenhaus (Bioinformatic) Examiner Dr. U. John Objectives Consolidation genomics Development of the abilities to the experimental work and understanding in the field of functional

  15. Resolving Salmonella infection reveals dynamic and persisting changes in murine bone marrow progenitor cell phenotype and function

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Ewan A; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Bobat, Saeeda; Coughlan, Ruth E; Marshall, Jennifer L; Hitchcock, Jessica R; Cook, Charlotte N; Carvalho-Gaspar, Manuela M; Mitchell, Andrea M; Clarke, Mary; Garcia, Paloma; Cobbold, Mark; Mitchell, Tim J; Henderson, Ian R; Jones, Nick D; Anderson, Graham; Buckley, Christopher D; Cunningham, Adam F

    2014-01-01

    The generation of immune cells from BM precursors is a carefully regulated process. This is essential to limit the potential for oncogenesis and autoimmunity yet protect against infection. How infection modulates this is unclear. Salmonella can colonize systemic sites including the BM and spleen. This resolving infection has multiple IFN-?-mediated acute and chronic effects on BM progenitors, and during the first week of infection IFN-? is produced by myeloid, NK, NKT, CD4+ T cells, and some lineage-negative cells. After infection, the phenotype of BM progenitors rapidly but reversibly alters, with a peak ?30-fold increase in Sca-1hi progenitors and a corresponding loss of Sca-1lo/int subsets. Most strikingly, the capacity of donor Sca-1hi cells to reconstitute an irradiated host is reduced; the longer donor mice are exposed to infection, and Sca-1hic-kitint cells have an increased potential to generate B1a-like cells. Thus, Salmonella can have a prolonged influence on BM progenitor functionality not directly related to bacterial persistence. These results reflect changes observed in leucopoiesis during aging and suggest that BM functionality can be modulated by life-long, periodic exposure to infection. Better understanding of this process could offer novel therapeutic opportunities to modulate BM functionality and promote healthy aging. PMID:24825601

  16. Functional Coding Variation in Recombinant Inbred Mouse Lines Reveals Novel Serotonin Transporter-Associated Phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, Ana; Airey, David; Thompson, Brent; Zhu, C; Rinchik, Eugene M; Lu, Lu; Chesler, Elissa J; Erikson, Keith; Blakely, Randy

    2009-01-01

    The human serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transporter (hSERT, SLC6A4) figures prominently in the etiology or treatment of many prevalent neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety, alcoholism, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we utilize naturally occurring polymorphisms in recombinant inbred (RI) lines to identify novel phenotypes associated with altered SERT function. The widely used mouse strain C57BL/6J, harbors a SERT haplotype defined by two nonsynonymous coding variants (Gly39 and Lys152 (GK)). At these positions, many other mouse lines, including DBA/2J, encode Glu39 and Arg152 (ER haplotype), assignments found also in hSERT. Synaptosomal 5-HT transport studies revealed reduced uptake associated with the GK variant. Heterologous expression studies confirmed a reduced SERT turnover rate for the GK variant. Experimental and in silico approaches using RI lines (C57Bl/6J X DBA/2J=BXD) identifies multiple anatomical, biochemical and behavioral phenotypes specifically impacted by GK/ER variation. Among our findings are multiple traits associated with anxiety and alcohol consumption, as well as of the control of dopamine (DA) signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis of BXD phenotypes, combined with biochemical evaluation of SERT knockout mice, nominates SERT-dependent 5-HT signaling as a major determinant of midbrain iron homeostasis that, in turn, dictates ironregulated DA phenotypes. Our studies provide a novel example of the power of coordinated in vitro, in vivo and in silico approaches using murine RI lines to elucidate and quantify the system-level impact of gene variation.

  17. Functional metagenomics reveals novel salt tolerance loci from the human gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Culligan, Eamonn P; Sleator, Roy D; Marchesi, Julian R; Hill, Colin

    2012-10-01

    Metagenomics is a powerful tool that allows for the culture-independent analysis of complex microbial communities. One of the most complex and dense microbial ecosystems known is that of the human distal colon, with cell densities reaching up to 10(12) per gram of faeces. With the majority of species as yet uncultured, there are an enormous number of novel genes awaiting discovery. In the current study, we conducted a functional screen of a metagenomic library of the human gut microbiota for potential salt-tolerant clones. Using transposon mutagenesis, three genes were identified from a single clone exhibiting high levels of identity to a species from the genus Collinsella (closest relative being Collinsella aerofaciens) (COLAER_01955, COLAER_01957 and COLAER_01981), a high G+C, Gram-positive member of the Actinobacteria commonly found in the human gut. The encoded proteins exhibit a strong similarity to GalE, MurB and MazG. Furthermore, pyrosequencing and bioinformatic analysis of two additional fosmid clones revealed the presence of an additional galE and mazG gene, with the highest level of genetic identity to Akkermansia muciniphila and Eggerthella sp. YY7918, respectively. Cloning and heterologous expression of the genes in the osmosensitive strain, Escherichia coli MKH13, resulted in increased salt tolerance of the transformed cells. It is hoped that the identification of atypical salt tolerance genes will help to further elucidate novel salt tolerance mechanisms, and will assist our increased understanding how resident bacteria cope with the osmolarity of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:22534607

  18. Mouse model of CADASIL reveals novel insights into Notch3 function in adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Fanny; Vogler, Steffen; Pojar, Sherin; Elliott, David A; Bradke, Frank; Steiner, Barbara; Kempermann, Gerd

    2015-03-01

    Could impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis be a relevant mechanism underlying CADASIL (cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy)? Memory symptoms in CADASIL, the most common hereditary form of vascular dementia, are usually thought to be primarily due to vascular degeneration and white matter lacunes. Since adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a process essential for the integration of new spatial memory occurs in a highly vascularized niche, we considered dysregulation of adult neurogenesis as a potential mechanism for the manifestation of dementia in CADASIL. Analysis in aged mice overexpressing Notch3 with a CADASIL mutation, revealed vascular deficits in arteries of the hippocampal fissure but not in the niche of the dentate gyrus. At 12 months of age, cell proliferation and survival of newborn neurons were reduced not only in CADASIL mice but also in transgenic controls overexpressing wild type Notch3. At 6 months, hippocampal neurogenesis was altered in CADASIL mice independent of overt vascular abnormalities in the fissure. Further, we identified Notch3 expression in hippocampal precursor cells and maturing neurons in vivo as well as in cultured hippocampal precursor cells. Overexpression and knockdown experiments showed that Notch3 signaling negatively regulated precursor cell proliferation. Notch3 overexpression also led to deficits in KCl-induced precursor cell activation. This suggests a cell-autonomous effect of Notch3 signaling in the regulation of precursor proliferation and activation and a loss-of-function effect in CADASIL. Consequently, besides vascular damage, aberrant precursor cell proliferation and differentiation due to Notch3 dysfunction might be an additional independent mechanism for the development of hippocampal dysfunction in CADASIL. PMID:25555543

  19. A novel class of negative allosteric modulators of NMDA receptor function.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Brooke M; Perszyk, Riley E; Yuan, Hongjie; Tahirovic, Yesim Altas; Sotimehin, Ayodeji E; Traynelis, Stephen F; Liotta, Dennis C

    2015-12-01

    NMDA receptors mediate a slow Ca(2+)-permeable component of excitatory synaptic transmission, and are involved in numerous normal brain functions including learning and memory. NMDA receptor over-activation can lead to cell death and abnormal excitation in ischemia associated with stroke, traumatic brain injury, and epilepsy. We have explored a series of novel noncompetitive allosteric modulators of NMDA receptor function characterized by an iminothiazolidinone ring. Saturating concentrations of these compounds inhibit NMDA receptors to varying maximal extents, raising the possibility that they may attenuate over-activation in pathological situations while preserving some minimal receptor function, which may limit side-effects. The best in class compounds have sub-micromolar IC50 values and show modest preference for GluN2C- and GluN2D-containing receptors. PMID:26525866

  20. Personal experience with narrated events modulates functional connectivity within visual and motor systems during story comprehension.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ho Ming; Mar, Raymond A; Xu, Yisheng; Liu, Siyuan; Wagage, Suraji; Braun, Allen R

    2015-04-01

    Past experience of everyday life activities, which forms the basis of our knowledge about the world, greatly affects how we understand stories. Yet, little is known about how this influence is instantiated in the human brain. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how past experience facilitates functional connectivity during the comprehension of stories rich in perceptual and motor details. We found that comprehenders' past experience with the scenes and actions described in the narratives selectively modulated functional connectivity between lower- and higher-level areas within the neural systems for visual and motor processing, respectively. These intramodal interactions may play an important role in integrating personal knowledge about a narrated situation with an evolving discourse representation. This study provides empirical evidence consistent with the idea that regions related to visual and motor processing are involved in the reenactment of experience as proposed by theories of embodied cognition. PMID:25545633

  1. A hybrid graph-theoretic method for mining overlapping functional modules in large sparse protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihua; Liu, Hong-Wei; Ning, Xue-Mei; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2009-01-01

    Modular architecture, which encompasses groups of genes/proteins involved in elementary biological functional units, is a basic form of the organisation of interacting proteins. Here, we propose a method that combines the Line Graph Transformation (LGT) and clique percolation-clustering algorithm to detect network modules, which may overlap each other in large sparse PPI networks. The resulting modules by the present method show a high coverage among yeast, fly, and worm PPI networks, respectively. Our analysis of the yeast PPI network suggests that most of these modules have well-biological significance in context of protein localisation, function annotation, and protein complexes. PMID:19432377

  2. Elucidation of Sigma Factor-Associated Networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals a Modular Architecture with Limited and Function-Specific Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Sebastian; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Franke, Raimo; Dötsch, Andreas; Hornischer, Klaus; Bruchmann, Sebastian; Düvel, Juliane; Häussler, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Sigma factors are essential global regulators of transcription initiation in bacteria which confer promoter recognition specificity to the RNA polymerase core enzyme. They provide effective mechanisms for simultaneously regulating expression of large numbers of genes in response to challenging conditions, and their presence has been linked to bacterial virulence and pathogenicity. In this study, we constructed nine his-tagged sigma factor expressing and/or deletion mutant strains in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To uncover the direct and indirect sigma factor regulons, we performed mRNA profiling, as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing. We furthermore elucidated the de novo binding motif of each sigma factor, and validated the RNA- and ChIP-seq results by global motif searches in the proximity of transcriptional start sites (TSS). Our integrated approach revealed a highly modular network architecture which is composed of insulated functional sigma factor modules. Analysis of the interconnectivity of the various sigma factor networks uncovered a limited, but highly function-specific, crosstalk which orchestrates complex cellular processes. Our data indicate that the modular structure of sigma factor networks enables P. aeruginosa to function adequately in its environment and at the same time is exploited to build up higher-level functions by specific interconnections that are dominated by a participation of RpoN. PMID:25780925

  3. Security camera resolution measurements: Horizontal TV lines versus modulation transfer function measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Griffin, John Clark

    2015-01-01

    The horizontal television lines (HTVL) metric has been the primary quantity used by division 6000 related to camera resolution for high consequence security systems. This document shows HTVL measurements are fundamen- tally insufficient as a metric to determine camera resolution, and propose a quantitative, standards based methodology by measuring the camera system modulation transfer function (MTF), the most common and accepted metric of res- olution in the optical science community. Because HTVL calculations are easily misinterpreted or poorly defined, we present several scenarios in which HTVL is frequently reported, and discuss their problems. The MTF metric is discussed, and scenarios are presented with calculations showing the application of such a metric.

  4. Ag nanocluster/DNA hybrids: functional modules for the detection of nitroaromatic and RDX explosives.

    PubMed

    Enkin, Natalie; Sharon, Etery; Golub, Eyal; Willner, Itamar

    2014-08-13

    Luminescent Ag nanoclusters (NCs) stabilized by nucleic acids are implemented as optical labels for the detection of the explosives picric acid, trinitrotoluene (TNT), and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The sensing modules consist of two parts, a nucleic acid with the nucleic acid-stabilized Ag NCs and a nucleic acid functionalized with electron-donating units, including L-DOPA, L-tyrosine and 6-hydroxy-L-DOPA, self-assembled on a nucleic acid scaffold. The formation of donor-acceptor complexes between the nitro-substituted explosives, exhibiting electron-acceptor properties, and the electron-donating sites, associated with the sensing modules, concentrates the explosives in close proximity to the Ag NCs. This leads to the electron-transfer quenching of the luminescence of the Ag NCs by the explosive molecule. The quenching of the luminescence of the Ag NCs provides a readout signal for the sensing process. The sensitivities of the analytical platforms are controlled by the electron-donating properties of the donor substituents, and 6-hydroxy-L-DOPA was found to be the most sensitive donor. Picric acid, TNT, and RDX are analyzed with detection limits corresponding to 5.2 × 10(-12) M, 1.0 × 10(-12) M, and 3.0 × 10(-12) M, respectively, using the 6-hydroxy-L-DOPA-modified Ag NCs sensing module. PMID:25072885

  5. The modulation rate transfer function of a harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Linnenschmidt, Meike; Wahlberg, Magnus; Damsgaard Hansen, Janni

    2013-02-01

    During echolocation, toothed whales produce ultrasonic clicks at extremely rapid rates and listen for the returning echoes. The auditory brainstem response (ABR) duration was evaluated in terms of latency between single peaks: 5.5 ms (from peak I to VII), 3.4 ms (I-VI), and 1.4 ms (II-IV). In comparison to the killer whale and the bottlenose dolphin, the ABR of the harbour porpoise has shorter intervals between the peaks and consequently a shorter ABR duration. This indicates that the ABR duration and peak latencies are possibly related to the relative size of the auditory structures of the central nervous system and thus to the animal's size. The ABR to a sinusoidal amplitude modulated stimulus at 125 kHz (sensitivity threshold 63 dB re 1 ?Pa rms) was evaluated to determine the modulation rate transfer function of a harbour porpoise. The ABR showed distinct envelope following responses up to a modulation rate of 1,900 Hz. The corresponding calculated equivalent rectangular duration of 263 ?s indicates a good temporal resolution in the harbour porpoise auditory system similar to the one for the bottlenose dolphin. The results explain how the harbour porpoise can follow clicks and echoes during echolocation with very short inter click intervals. PMID:23149551

  6. SCAM analysis reveals a discrete region of the pore turret that modulates slow inactivation in Kv1.5.

    PubMed

    Eduljee, Cyrus; Claydon, Thomas W; Viswanathan, Vijay; Fedida, David; Kehl, Steven J

    2007-03-01

    In Kv1.5, protonation of histidine 463 in the S5-P linker (turret) increases the rate of depolarization-induced inactivation and decreases the peak current amplitude. In this study, we examined how amino acid substitutions that altered the physico-chemical properties of the side chain at position 463 affected slow inactivation and then used the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) to probe the turret region (E456-P468) to determine whether residue 463 was unique in its ability to modulate the macroscopic current. Substitutions at position 463 of small, neutral (H463G and H463A) or large, charged (H463R, H463K, and H463E) side groups accelerated inactivation and induced a dependency of the current amplitude on the external potassium concentration. When cysteine substitutions were made in the distal turret (T462C-P468C), modification with either the positively charged [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] methanethiosulfonate bromide (MTSET) or negatively charged sodium (2-sulfonatoethyl) methanethiosulfonate reagent irreversibly inhibited current. This inhibition could be antagonized either by the R487V mutation (homologous to T449V in Shaker) or by raising the external potassium concentration, suggesting that current inhibition by MTS reagents resulted from an enhancement of inactivation. These results imply that protonation of residue 463 does not modulate inactivation solely by an electrostatic interaction with residues near the pore mouth, as proposed by others, and that residue 463 is part of a group of residues within the Kv1.5 turret that can modulate P/C-type inactivation. PMID:16956964

  7. Modulation of spontaneous locomotor and respiratory drives to hindlimb motoneurons temporally related to sympathetic drives as revealed by Mayer waves.

    PubMed

    Wienecke, Jacob; Enríquez Denton, Manuel; Stecina, Katinka; Kirkwood, Peter A; Hultborn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated how the networks mediating respiratory and locomotor drives to lumbar motoneurons interact and how this interaction is modulated in relation to periodic variations in blood pressure (Mayer waves). Seven decerebrate cats, under neuromuscular blockade, were used to study central respiratory drive potentials (CRDPs, usually enhanced by added CO2) and spontaneously occurring locomotor drive potentials (LDPs) in hindlimb motoneurons, together with hindlimb and phrenic nerve discharges. In four of the cats both drives and their voltage-dependent amplification were absent or modest, but in the other three, one or other of these drives was common and the voltage-dependent amplification was frequently strong. Moreover, in these three cats the blood pressure showed marked periodic variation (Mayer waves), with a slow rate (periods 9-104 s, mean 39 ± 17 SD). Profound modulation, synchronized with the Mayer waves was seen in the occurrence and/or in the amplification of the CRDPs or LDPs. In one animal, where CRDPs were present in most cells and the amplification was strong, the CRDP consistently triggered sustained plateaux at one phase of the Mayer wave cycle. In the other two animals, LDPs were common, and the occurrence of the locomotor drive was gated by the Mayer wave cycle, sometimes in alternation with the respiratory drive. Other interactions between the two drives involved respiration providing leading events, including co-activation of flexors and extensors during post-inspiration or a locomotor drive gated or sometimes entrained by respiration. We conclude that the respiratory drive in hindlimb motoneurons is transmitted via elements of the locomotor central pattern generator. The rapid modulation related to Mayer waves suggests the existence of a more direct and specific descending modulatory control than has previously been demonstrated. PMID:25713515

  8. Modulation of spontaneous locomotor and respiratory drives to hindlimb motoneurons temporally related to sympathetic drives as revealed by Mayer waves

    PubMed Central

    Wienecke, Jacob; Enríquez Denton, Manuel; Stecina, Katinka; Kirkwood, Peter A.; Hultborn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated how the networks mediating respiratory and locomotor drives to lumbar motoneurons interact and how this interaction is modulated in relation to periodic variations in blood pressure (Mayer waves). Seven decerebrate cats, under neuromuscular blockade, were used to study central respiratory drive potentials (CRDPs, usually enhanced by added CO2) and spontaneously occurring locomotor drive potentials (LDPs) in hindlimb motoneurons, together with hindlimb and phrenic nerve discharges. In four of the cats both drives and their voltage-dependent amplification were absent or modest, but in the other three, one or other of these drives was common and the voltage-dependent amplification was frequently strong. Moreover, in these three cats the blood pressure showed marked periodic variation (Mayer waves), with a slow rate (periods 9–104 s, mean 39 ± 17 SD). Profound modulation, synchronized with the Mayer waves was seen in the occurrence and/or in the amplification of the CRDPs or LDPs. In one animal, where CRDPs were present in most cells and the amplification was strong, the CRDP consistently triggered sustained plateaux at one phase of the Mayer wave cycle. In the other two animals, LDPs were common, and the occurrence of the locomotor drive was gated by the Mayer wave cycle, sometimes in alternation with the respiratory drive. Other interactions between the two drives involved respiration providing leading events, including co-activation of flexors and extensors during post-inspiration or a locomotor drive gated or sometimes entrained by respiration. We conclude that the respiratory drive in hindlimb motoneurons is transmitted via elements of the locomotor central pattern generator. The rapid modulation related to Mayer waves suggests the existence of a more direct and specific descending modulatory control than has previously been demonstrated. PMID:25713515

  9. Functions and requirements for Project W-236B, Initial Pretreatment Module: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, L.M.

    1994-11-22

    Hanford Site tank waste supernatants will be pretreated to separate the low-level and high-level fractions. The low-level waste fraction, containing the bulk of the chemical constituents, must be processed into a vitrified waste product which will be disposed of onsite, in a safe, environmentally sound, and cost effective manner. The high-level waste fraction separated during supernatant pretreatment (primarily cesium) will be recombined with an additional high-level waste fraction generated from pretreatment of the tank waste sludges and solids. This combined high-level waste fraction will be immobilized as glass and disposed in a geological repository. The purpose of this document is to establish the functional requirements baseline for Project W-236B, Initial Pretreatment Module, by defining the level 5 and 6 functions and requirements for the project. A functional analysis approach has been used to break down the program functions and associated physical requirements that each function must meet. As the systems engineering process evolves, the design requirements document will replace this preliminary functions and requirements document. The design requirements document (DRD) will identify key decisions and associated uncertainties that impact the project. A revision of this document to a DRD is not expected to change the performance requirements or open issues. However, additional requirements and issues may be identified.

  10. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Val158Met Polymorphism Modulates Gray Matter Volume and Functional Connectivity of the Default Mode Network

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Qin, Wen; Liu, Bing; Wang, Dawei; Wang, Junping; Jiang, Tianzi; Yu, Chunshui

    2013-01-01

    The effect of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism on brain structure and function has been previously investigated separately and regionally; this prevents us from obtaining a full picture of the effect of this gene variant. Additionally, gender difference must not be overlooked because estrogen exerts an interfering effect on COMT activity. We examined 323 young healthy Chinese Han subjects and analyzed the gray matter volume (GMV) differences between Val/Val individuals and Met carriers in a voxel-wise manner throughout the whole brain. We were interested in genotype effects and genotype × gender interactions. We then extracted these brain regions with GMV differences as seeds to compute resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) with the rest of the brain; we also tested the genotypic differences and gender interactions in the rsFCs. Val/Val individuals showed decreased GMV in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) compared with Met carriers; decreased GMV in the medial superior frontal gyrus (mSFG) was found only in male Val/Val subjects. The rsFC analysis revealed that both the PCC and mSFG were functionally correlated with brain regions of the default mode network (DMN). Both of these regions showed decreased rsFCs with different parts of the frontopolar cortex of the DMN in Val/Val individuals than Met carriers. Our findings suggest that the COMT Val158Met polymorphism modulates both the structure and functional connectivity within the DMN and that gender interactions should be considered in studies of the effect of this genetic variant, especially those involving prefrontal morphology. PMID:24147141

  11. NMR studies reveal the role of biomembranes in modulating ligand binding and release by intracellular bile acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Pedň, Massimo; Löhr, Frank; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Assfalg, Michael; Dötsch, Volker; Molinari, Henriette

    2009-12-18

    Bile acid molecules are transferred vectorially between basolateral and apical membranes of hepatocytes and enterocytes in the context of the enterohepatic circulation, a process regulating whole body lipid homeostasis. This work addresses the role of the cytosolic lipid binding proteins in the intracellular transfer of bile acids between different membrane compartments. We present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data describing the ternary system composed of the bile acid binding protein, bile acids, and membrane mimetic systems, such as anionic liposomes. This work provides evidence that the investigated liver bile acid binding protein undergoes association with the anionic membrane and binding-induced partial unfolding. The addition of the physiological ligand to the protein-liposome mixture is capable of modulating this interaction, shifting the equilibrium towards the free folded holo protein. An ensemble of NMR titration experiments, based on nitrogen-15 protein and ligand observation, confirm that the membrane and the ligand establish competing binding equilibria, modulating the cytoplasmic permeability of bile acids. These results support a mechanism of ligand binding and release controlled by the onset of a bile salt concentration gradient within the polarized cell. The location of a specific protein region interacting with liposomes is highlighted. PMID:19836400

  12. Profiling of Discrete Gynecological Cancers Reveals Novel Transcriptional Modules and Common Features Shared by Other Cancer Types and Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Amariglio, Ninette; Vlachos, George D.; Loutradis, Dimitrios; Anagnou, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on individual types of gynecological cancers (GCs), utilizing novel expression technologies, have revealed specific pathogenetic patterns and gene markers for cervical (CC), endometrial (EC) and vulvar cancer (VC). Although the clinical phenotypes of the three types of gynecological cancers are discrete, the fact they originate from a common embryological origin, has led to the hypothesis that they might share common features reflecting regression to early embryogenesis. To address this question, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of their profiles. Our data identified both common features (pathways and networks) and novel distinct modules controlling the same deregulated biological processes in all three types. Specifically, four novel transcriptional modules were discovered regulating cell cycle and apoptosis. Integration and comparison of our data with other databases, led to the identification of common features among cancer types, embryonic stem (ES) cells and the newly discovered cell population of squamocolumnar (SC) junction of the cervix, considered to host the early cancer events. Conclusively, these data lead us to propose the presence of common features among gynecological cancers, other types of cancers, ES cells and the pre-malignant SC junction cells, where the novel E2F/NFY and MAX/CEBP modules play an important role for the pathogenesis of gynecological carcinomas. PMID:26559525

  13. A Loss-Of-Function Analysis Reveals That Endogenous Rem2 Promotes Functional Glutamatergic Synapse Formation and Restricts Dendritic Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Anna R.; Ghiretti, Amy E.; Paradis, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Rem2 is a member of the RGK family of small Ras-like GTPases whose expression and function is regulated by neuronal activity in the brain. A number of questions still remain as to the endogenous functions of Rem2 in neurons. RNAi-mediated Rem2 knockdown leads to an increase in dendritic complexity and a decrease in functional excitatory synapses, though a recent report challenged the specificity of Rem2-targeted RNAi reagents. In addition, overexpression in a number of cell types has shown that Rem2 can inhibit voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) function, while studies employing RNAi-mediated knockdown of Rem2 have failed to observe a corresponding enhancement of VGCC function. To further investigate these discrepancies and determine the endogenous function of Rem2, we took a comprehensive, loss-of-function approach utilizing two independent, validated Rem2-targeted shRNAs to analyze Rem2 function. We sought to investigate the consequence of endogenous Rem2 knockdown by focusing on the three reported functions of Rem2 in neurons: regulation of synapse formation, dendritic morphology, and voltage-gated calcium channels. We conclude that endogenous Rem2 is a positive regulator of functional, excitatory synapse development and a negative regulator of dendritic complexity. In addition, while we are unable to reach a definitive conclusion as to whether the regulation of VGCCs is an endogenous function of Rem2, our study reports important data regarding RNAi reagents for use in future investigation of this issue. PMID:23991227

  14. Spatial Control Of Functional Properties Via Octahedral Modulations In Complex Oxide Superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, E. J.; Colby, Robert J.; Wang, Q.; Karapetrova, E.; Schleputz, C. M.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; May, Steven J.

    2014-12-15

    The design of distortions and rotations of the corner-connected BO6 octahedra across interfaces has emerged as an exciting platform to control electronic or ferroic behavior in ABO3 perovskite heterostructures. Here, we investigate isovalent manganite superlattices, [(La0.7Sr0.3MnO3)n/(Eu0.7Sr0.3MnO3)n]×m, as a route to spatial control over electronic bandwidth and ferromagnetism through the creation of octahedral superstructures. Electron energy loss spectroscopy confirms a uniform Mn valence state throughout the superlattices. In contrast, the presence of modulations of the MnO6 octahedral rotations along the growth direction commensurate with the superlattice period is revealed by scanning transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. We show that the Curie temperatures of the constituent materials can be systematically engineered via the octahedral superstructures leading to a modulated magnetization in samples where the superlattice period is larger than the interfacial octahedral coupling length scale, while a single magnetic transition is observed in the short period superlattices.

  15. Preservation of tissue microstructure and functionality during freezing by modulation of cytoskeletal structure.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungman; Seawright, Angela; Park, Sinwook; Craig Dutton, J; Grinnell, Frederick; Han, Bumsoo

    2015-05-01

    Cryopreservation is one of the key enabling technologies for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, which can provide reliable long-term storage of engineered tissues (ETs) without losing their functionality. However, it is still extremely difficult to design and develop cryopreservation protocols guaranteeing the post-thaw tissue functionality. One of the major challenges in cryopreservation is associated with the difficulty of identifying effective and less toxic cryoprotective agents (CPAs) to guarantee the post-thaw tissue functionality. In this study, thus, a hypothesis was tested that the modulation of the cytoskeletal structure of cells embedded in the extracellular matrix (ECM) can mitigate the freezing-induced changes of the functionality and can reduce the amount of CPA necessary to preserve the functionality of ETs during cryopreservation. In order to test this hypothesis, we prepared dermal equivalents by seeding fibroblasts in type I collagen matrices resulting in three different cytoskeletal structures. These ETs were exposed to various freeze/thaw (F/T) conditions with and without CPAs. The freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interactions and subsequent functional properties of the ETs were assessed. The results showed that the cytoskeletal structure and the use of CPA were strongly correlated to the preservation of the post-thaw functional properties. As the cytoskeletal structure became stronger via stress fiber formation, the ET's functionality was preserved better. It also reduced the necessary CPA concentration to preserve the post-thaw functionality. However, if the extent of the freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interaction was too excessive, the cytoskeletal structure was completely destroyed and the beneficial effects became minimal. PMID:25679482

  16. Structure-Function Analysis of the Heat Shock Factor-binding Protein Reveals a Protein Composed Solely of a Highly

    E-print Network

    Morimoto, Richard

    Structure-Function Analysis of the Heat Shock Factor-binding Protein Reveals a Protein Composed, Molecular Biology, and Cell Biology, the §Rice Institute for Biomedical Research, and the **Structural Center, San Antonio, Texas 78284-7760 Heat shock factor-binding protein (HSBP) 1 is a small

  17. The bat head-related transfer function reveals binaural cues for sound localization in azimuth and elevation

    E-print Network

    Moss, Cynthia

    The bat head-related transfer function reveals binaural cues for sound localization in azimuth Directional properties of the sound transformation at the ear of four intact echolocating bats, Eptesicus between the spatial and the spectral features in the bat HRTF. The pinna provides gain and shapes

  18. SUPPLEMENTAL DATA An ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor reveals rapamycin-resistant functions of mTORC1

    E-print Network

    Sabatini, David M.

    1 SUPPLEMENTAL DATA An ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor reveals rapamycin-resistant functions of m of inhibitor with 10 M ATP, 2 mM DTT, and a kinase-specific buffer and substrate. 50 M PIP2:PS lipid kinase Adapta Assays For lipid kinase assays, 10 L reactions were performed in triplicate with variable amounts

  19. Neuropeptides function in a homeostatic manner to modulate excitation-inhibition imbalance in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Takayanagi-Kiya, Seika; Zhou, Keming; Jin, Yishi

    2013-05-01

    Neuropeptides play crucial roles in modulating neuronal networks, including changing intrinsic properties of neurons and synaptic efficacy. We previously reported a Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, acr-2(gf), that displays spontaneous convulsions as the result of a gain-of-function mutation in a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. The ACR-2 channel is expressed in the cholinergic motor neurons, and acr-2(gf) causes cholinergic overexcitation accompanied by reduced GABAergic inhibition in the locomotor circuit. Here we show that neuropeptides play a homeostatic role that compensates for this excitation-inhibition imbalance in the locomotor circuit. Loss of function in genes required for neuropeptide processing or release of dense core vesicles specifically modulate the convulsion frequency of acr-2(gf). The proprotein convertase EGL-3 is required in the cholinergic motor neurons to restrain convulsions. Electrophysiological recordings of neuromuscular junctions show that loss of egl-3 in acr-2(gf) causes a further reduction of GABAergic inhibition. We identify two neuropeptide encoding genes, flp-1 and flp-18, that together counteract the excitation-inhibition imbalance in acr-2(gf) mutants. We further find that acr-2(gf) causes an increased expression of flp-18 in the ventral cord cholinergic motor neurons and that overexpression of flp-18 reduces the convulsion of acr-2(gf) mutants. The effects of these peptides are in part mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, NPR-1 and NPR-5. Our data suggest that the chronic overexcitation of the cholinergic motor neurons imposed by acr-2(gf) leads to an increased production of FMRFamide neuropeptides, which act to decrease the activity level of the locomotor circuit, thereby homeostatically modulating the excitation and inhibition imbalance. PMID:23658528

  20. Modulation transfer function analysis for a digitally spectrum-controllable light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Suodong; Wang, Yan; Pan, Qiao; Shen, Weimin

    2015-08-01

    Owing to the ability of generating designated spectrums as special requirements, spectrum-controllable light source has attracted huge interesting in several fields, e.g. medical science, industrial detection, defense-related testing. In principle, optical performance of a spectrum-controllable light source can be predicted by some transfer functions of the corresponding system, e.g. modulation transfer function (MTF). Unfortunately, the aforementioned research work is still lacking at present although it is meaningful for the optical design and evaluation of this new kind of light sources. Hence, a MTF model for a modified version of our previously-proposed spectrum-controllable light source system based on a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) and an Offner dispersion configuration with a convex grating is deduced as an example. Related preliminary analyses have been present in this paper as well.

  1. Functionally Graded Interfaces: Role and Origin of Internal Electric Field and Modulated Electrical Response.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Deepam; Zhou, Yuan; Chen, Bo; Kang, Min-Gyu; Nguyen, Peter; Hudait, Mantu K; Priya, Shashank

    2015-10-14

    We report the tunable electrical response in functionally graded interfaces in lead-free ferroelectric thin films. Multilayer thin film graded heterostructures were synthesized on platinized silicon substrate with oxide layers of varying thickness. Interestingly, the graded heterostructure thin films exhibited shift of the hysteresis loops on electric field and polarization axes depending upon the direction of an applied bias. A diode-like characteristics was observed in current-voltage behavior under forward and reverse bias. This modulated electrical behavior was attributed to the perturbed dynamics of charge carriers under internal bias (self-bias) generated due to the increased skewness of the potential wells. The cyclic sweeping of voltage further demonstrated memristor-like current-voltage behavior in functionally graded heterostructure devices. The presence of an internal bias assisted the generation of photocurrent by facilitating the separation of photogenerated charges. These novel findings provide opportunity to design new circuit components for the next generation of microelectronic device architectures. PMID:26378954

  2. Measurement of the Landsat Thematic Mapper modulation transfer function using an array of point sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauchmiller, Robert F., Jr.; Schowengerdt, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a method for measuring the Thematic Mapper (TM) imaging system point spread function (PSF) using TM imagery or a specially constructed target consisting of a two-dimensional array of approximate point sources of known dimensions and radiometric qualities. The target allows 16 separate point sources to be imaged simultaneously by the TM. The point sources were carefully placed on the ground so that their relative positions were known. Owing to sample-scene phasing, each imaged point source exhibits a different amount of blur in the digital image. The target pixels may then be recombined according to their known relative positions to form a single, sampled, nonaliased imaging system PSF. The modulation transfer function is then obtained as the modulus of the discrete Fourier transform of the PSF.

  3. Modulation of APC Function and Anti-Tumor Immunity by Anti-Cancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kea; Schreiner, Jens; Zippelius, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells (DCs), are central to the initiation and regulation of anti-cancer immunity. However, in the immunosuppressive environment within a tumor APCs may antagonize anti-tumor immunity by inducing regulatory T cells (Tregs) or anergy of effector T cells due to lack of efficient costimulation. Hence, in an optimal setting, anti-cancer drugs have the power to reduce tumor size and thereby may induce the release of tumor antigens and, at the same time, modulate APC function toward efficient priming of antigen-specific effector T cells. Selected cytotoxic agents may revert APC dysfunction either by directly maturing DCs or through induction of immunogenic tumor cell death. Furthermore, specific cytotoxic agents may support adaptive immunity by selectively depleting regulatory subsets, such as Tregs or myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Perspectively, this will allow developing effective combination strategies with novel immunotherapies to exert complementary pressure on tumors via direct toxicity as well as immune activation. We, here, review our current knowledge on the capacity of anti-cancer drugs to modulate APC functions to promote durable anti-cancer immune responses. PMID:26483791

  4. Modulation of APC Function and Anti-Tumor Immunity by Anti-Cancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kea; Schreiner, Jens; Zippelius, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells (DCs), are central to the initiation and regulation of anti-cancer immunity. However, in the immunosuppressive environment within a tumor APCs may antagonize anti-tumor immunity by inducing regulatory T cells (Tregs) or anergy of effector T cells due to lack of efficient costimulation. Hence, in an optimal setting, anti-cancer drugs have the power to reduce tumor size and thereby may induce the release of tumor antigens and, at the same time, modulate APC function toward efficient priming of antigen-specific effector T cells. Selected cytotoxic agents may revert APC dysfunction either by directly maturing DCs or through induction of immunogenic tumor cell death. Furthermore, specific cytotoxic agents may support adaptive immunity by selectively depleting regulatory subsets, such as Tregs or myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Perspectively, this will allow developing effective combination strategies with novel immunotherapies to exert complementary pressure on tumors via direct toxicity as well as immune activation. We, here, review our current knowledge on the capacity of anti-cancer drugs to modulate APC functions to promote durable anti-cancer immune responses. PMID:26483791

  5. Analogy of transistor function with modulating photonic band gap in electromagnetically induced grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Ullah, Zakir; Gao, Mengqin; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yiqi; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-09-01

    Optical transistor is a device used to amplify and switch optical signals. Many researchers focus on replacing current computer components with optical equivalents, resulting in an optical digital computer system processing binary data. Electronic transistor is the fundamental building block of modern electronic devices. To replace electronic components with optical ones, an equivalent optical transistor is required. Here we compare the behavior of an optical transistor with the reflection from a photonic band gap structure in an electromagnetically induced transparency medium. A control signal is used to modulate the photonic band gap structure. Power variation of the control signal is used to provide an analogy between the reflection behavior caused by modulating the photonic band gap structure and the shifting of Q-point (Operation point) as well as amplification function of optical transistor. By means of the control signal, the switching function of optical transistor has also been realized. Such experimental schemes could have potential applications in making optical diode and optical transistor used in quantum information processing.

  6. Neural Substrates of Dopamine D2 Receptor Modulated Executive Functions in the Monkey Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Puig, M Victoria; Miller, Earl K

    2015-09-01

    Dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) play a major role in cognition, mood and motor movements. Their blockade by antipsychotic drugs reduces hallucinatory and delusional behaviors in schizophrenia, but often fails to alleviate affective and cognitive dysfunctions. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) expresses D2R and is altered in schizophrenia. We investigated how D2R modulate behavior and PFC function in monkeys. Two monkeys learned new and performed highly familiar visuomotor associations, where each cue was associated with a saccade to a right or left target. We recorded neural spikes and local field potentials from multiple electrodes while injecting the D2R antagonist eticlopride in the lateral PFC. Blocking prefrontal D2R impaired associative learning and cognitive flexibility, reduced motivation, but left the performance of familiar associations intact. Eticlopride reduced saccade-direction selectivity of prefrontal neurons, leading to a decrease in neural information about the associations, and an increase in alpha oscillations. These results, together with our recent study using a D1R antagonist, suggest that D1R and D2R in the primate lateral PFC cooperate to modulate several executive functions. Our findings help to gain insight into why antipsychotic drugs, with strong antagonistic actions on D2R, fail to ameliorate cognitive and emotional deficits in schizophrenia. PMID:24814093

  7. Analogy of transistor function with modulating photonic band gap in electromagnetically induced grating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiguo; Ullah, Zakir; Gao, Mengqin; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yiqi; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-01-01

    Optical transistor is a device used to amplify and switch optical signals. Many researchers focus on replacing current computer components with optical equivalents, resulting in an optical digital computer system processing binary data. Electronic transistor is the fundamental building block of modern electronic devices. To replace electronic components with optical ones, an equivalent optical transistor is required. Here we compare the behavior of an optical transistor with the reflection from a photonic band gap structure in an electromagnetically induced transparency medium. A control signal is used to modulate the photonic band gap structure. Power variation of the control signal is used to provide an analogy between the reflection behavior caused by modulating the photonic band gap structure and the shifting of Q-point (Operation point) as well as amplification function of optical transistor. By means of the control signal, the switching function of optical transistor has also been realized. Such experimental schemes could have potential applications in making optical diode and optical transistor used in quantum information processing. PMID:26349444

  8. Agonist Activated PKC?II Translocation and Modulation of Cardiac Myocyte Contractile Function

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyosook; Robinson, Dustin; Rogers, Julie B.; Stevenson, Tamara K.; Lang, Sarah E.; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Day, Sharlene M.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Westfall, Margaret V.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated protein kinase C ?II (PKC?II) expression develops during heart failure and yet the role of this isoform in modulating contractile function remains controversial. The present study examines the impact of agonist-induced PKC?II activation on contractile function in adult cardiac myocytes. Diminished contractile function develops in response to low dose phenylephrine (PHE, 100?nM) in controls, while function is preserved in response to PHE in PKC?II-expressing myocytes. PHE also caused PKC?II translocation and a punctate distribution pattern in myocytes expressing this isoform. The preserved contractile function and translocation responses to PHE are blocked by the inhibitor, LY379196 (30?nM) in PKC?II-expressing myocytes. Further analysis showed downstream protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylation and phosphatase activation are associated with the LY379196-sensitive contractile response. PHE also triggered a complex pattern of end-target phosphorylation in PKC?II-expressing myocytes. These patterns are consistent with bifurcated activation of downstream signaling activity by PKC?II. PMID:23756828

  9. Phase-modulated electronic wave packet interferometry reveals high resolution spectra of free Rb atoms and Rb*He molecules.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Lukas; Mudrich, Marcel; Stienkemeier, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Phase-modulated wave packet interferometry is combined with mass-resolved photoion detection to investigate rubidium atoms attached to helium nanodroplets in a molecular beam experiment. The spectra of atomic Rb electronic states show a vastly enhanced sensitivity and spectral resolution when compared to conventional pump-probe wave packet interferometry. Furthermore, the formation of Rb*He exciplex molecules is probed and for the first time a fully resolved vibrational spectrum for transitions between the lowest excited 5?3/2 and the high-lying electronic states 2(2)?, 4(2)?, 6(2)? is obtained and compared to theory. The feasibility of applying coherent multidimensional spectroscopy to dilute cold gas phase samples is demonstrated in these experiments. PMID:26309123

  10. Development and Pilot Testing of the Challenge Module: A Proposed Adjunct to the Gross Motor Function Measure for High-Functioning Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Ashlea; Kavanaugh, Abi; Moher, Rosemarie; McInroy, Megan; Gupta, Neena; Salbach, Nancy M.; Wright, F. Virginia

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to develop a Challenge Module (CM) as a proposed adjunct to the Gross Motor Function Measure for children with cerebral palsy who have high-level motor function. Items were generated in a physiotherapist (PT) focus group. Item reduction was based on PTs' ratings of item importance and safety via online surveys. The proposed CM items…

  11. An animal model of functional electrical stimulation: evidence that the central nervous system modulates the consequences of training

    E-print Network

    Grau, James

    Review An animal model of functional electrical stimulation: evidence that the central nervous system modulates the consequences of training MA Hook*,1 and JW Grau1 1 Department of Psychology, Texas A of functional electrical stimulation (FES) in an animal model. Methods: Spinal effects of FES are examined

  12. Modulation of leg muscle function in response to altered demand for body support and forward propulsion during walking

    E-print Network

    Modulation of leg muscle function in response to altered demand for body support and forward t A number of studies have examined the functional roles of individual muscles during normal walking, but few studies have examined which are the primary muscles that respond to changes in external mechanical demand

  13. Functional profiles reveal unique ecological roles of various biological soil crust organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Mau, R.L.; Maestre, F.T.; Escolar, C.; Castillo-Monroy, A. P.

    2011-01-01

    1. At the heart of the body of research on biodiversity effects on ecosystem function is the debate over whether different species tend to be functionally singular or redundant. When we consider ecosystem multi-function, the provision of multiple ecosystem functions simultaneously, we may find that seemingly redundant species may in fact play unique roles in ecosystems. 2. Over the last few decades, the significance of biological soil crusts (BSCs) as ecological boundaries and ecosystem engineers, and their multi-functional nature, has become increasingly well documented. We compiled 'functional profiles' of the organisms in this understudied community, to determine whether functional singularity emerges when multiple ecosystem functions are considered. 3. In two data sets, one representing multiple sites around the semi-arid regions of Spain (regional scale), and another from a single site in central Spain (local scale), we examined correlations between the abundance or frequency of BSC species in a community, and multiple surrogates of ecosystem functioning. There was a wide array of apparent effects of species on specific functions. 4. Notably, in gypsiferous soils and at regional scale, we found that indicators of carbon (C) and phosphorus cycling were apparently suppressed and promoted by the lichens Diploschistes diacapsis and Squamarina lentigera, respectively. The moss Pleurochaete squarrosa appears to promote C cycling in calcareous soils at this spatial scale. At the local scale in gypsiferous soils, D. diacapsis positively correlated with carbon cycling, but negatively with nitrogen cycling, whereas numerous lichens exhibited the opposite profile. 5. We found a high degree of functional singularity, i.e. that species were highly individualistic in their effects on multiple functions. Many functional attributes were not easily predictable from existing functional grouping systems based primarily on morphology. 6. Our results suggest that maintaining species-rich BSC communities is crucial to maintain the overall functionality of ecosystems dominated by these organisms, and that dominance and the outcome of competition could be highly influential in the determination of such functionality. ?? 2011 The Authors. Functional Ecology ?? 2011 British Ecological Society.

  14. Modulation of GABA and resting state functional connectivity by transcranial direct current stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bachtiar, Velicia; Near, Jamie; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Stagg, Charlotte J

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that network level functional connectivity in the human brain could be related to levels of inhibition in a major network node at baseline (Stagg et al., 2014). In this study, we build upon this finding to directly investigate the effects of perturbing M1 GABA and resting state functional connectivity using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a neuromodulatory approach that has previously been demonstrated to modulate both metrics. FMRI data and GABA levels, as assessed by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, were measured before and after 20 min of 1 mA anodal or sham tDCS. In line with previous studies, baseline GABA levels were negatively correlated with the strength of functional connectivity within the resting motor network. However, although we confirm the previously reported findings that anodal tDCS reduces GABA concentration and increases functional connectivity in the stimulated motor cortex; these changes are not correlated, suggesting they may be driven by distinct underlying mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08789.001 PMID:26381352

  15. Electro-acupuncture at different acupoints modulating the relative specific brain functional network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiliang; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Yin; Liu, Hesheng; Hong, Yang; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Kehua; Wang, Lei; Xue, Chao; Song, Ming; Liu, Baoyan; Zhu, Bing

    2010-11-01

    Objective: The specific brain effects of acupoint are important scientific concern in acupuncture. However, previous acupuncture fMRI studies focused on acupoints in muscle layer on the limb. Therefore, researches on acupoints within connective tissue at trunk are warranted. Material and Methods: Brain effects of acupuncture on abdomen at acupoints Guanyuan (CV4) and Zhongwan (CV12) were tested using fMRI on 21 healthy volunteers. The data acquisition was performed at resting state, during needle retention, electroacupuncture (EA) and post-EA resting state. Needling sensations were rated after every electroacupuncture (EA) procedure. The needling sensations and the brain functional activity and connectivity were compared between CV4 and CV12 using SPSS, SPM2 and the local and remote connectivity maps. Results and conclusion: EA at CV4 and CV12 induced apparent deactivation effects in the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network. The default mode of the brain was modified by needle retention and EA, respectively. The functional brain network was significantly changed post EA. However, the minor differences existed between these two acupoints. The results demonstrated similarity between functional brain network mode of acupuncture modulation and functional circuits of emotional and cognitive regulation. Acupuncture may produce analgesia, anti-anxiety and anti-depression via the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network (LPNN).

  16. Electron Spin-Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) Reveals Water and Phosphate Interactions with the KcsA Potassium Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, John A.; Focia, Pamela J.; Gross, Adrian

    2010-08-13

    Electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy is a well-established technique for the study of naturally occurring paramagnetic metal centers. The technique has been used to study copper complexes, hemes, enzyme mechanisms, micellar water content, and water permeation profiles in membranes, among other applications. In the present study, we combine ESEEM spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and X-ray crystallography in order to evaluate the technique's potential as a structural tool to describe the native environment of membrane proteins. Using the KcsA potassium channel as a model system, we demonstrate that deuterium ESEEM can detect water permeation along the lipid-exposed surface of the KcsA outer helix. We further demonstrate that {sup 31}P ESEEM is able to identify channel residues that interact with the phosphate headgroup of the lipid bilayer. In combination with X-ray crystallography, the {sup 31}P data may be used to define the phosphate interaction surface of the protein. The results presented here establish ESEEM as a highly informative technique for SDSL studies of membrane proteins.

  17. MicroRNA and Transcription Factor Mediated Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Critical Regulators and Regulatory Modules in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Zhou, Meng; Wang, Zhenzhen; Liu, Xiaoxia; Cheng, Liang; Li, Weimin; Li, Xueqi

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a severe coronary artery disease and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. However, the molecular mechanisms of MI have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, we compiled MI-related genes, MI-related microRNAs (miRNAs) and known human transcription factors (TFs), and we then identified 1,232 feed-forward loops (FFLs) among these miRNAs, TFs and their co-regulated target genes through integrating target prediction. By merging these FFLs, the first miRNA and TF mediated regulatory network for MI was constructed, from which four regulators (SP1, ESR1, miR-21-5p and miR-155-5p) and three regulatory modules that might play crucial roles in MI were then identified. Furthermore, based on the miRNA and TF mediated regulatory network and literature survey, we proposed a pathway model for miR-21-5p, the miR-29 family and SP1 to demonstrate their potential co-regulatory mechanisms in cardiac fibrosis, apoptosis and angiogenesis. The majority of the regulatory relations in the model were confirmed by previous studies, which demonstrated the reliability and validity of this miRNA and TF mediated regulatory network. Our study will aid in deciphering the complex regulatory mechanisms involved in MI and provide putative therapeutic targets for MI. PMID:26258537

  18. Signaling between periglomerular cells reveals a bimodal role for GABA in modulating glomerular microcircuitry in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Pirooz Victor; D'Souza, Rinaldo David; Vijayaraghavan, Sukumar

    2015-07-28

    In the mouse olfactory bulb glomerulus, the GABAergic periglomerular (PG) cells provide a major inhibitory drive within the microcircuit. Here we examine GABAergic synapses between these interneurons. At these synapses, GABA is depolarizing and exerts a bimodal control on excitability. In quiescent cells, activation of GABAA receptors can induce the cells to fire, thereby providing a means for amplification of GABA release in the glomerular microcircuit via GABA-induced GABA release. In contrast, GABA is inhibitory in neurons that are induced to fire tonically. PG-PG interactions are modulated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and our data suggest that changes in intracellular calcium concentrations triggered by nAChR activation can be amplified by GABA release. Our results suggest that bidirectional control of inhibition in PG neurons can allow for modulatory inputs, like the cholinergic inputs from the basal forebrain, to determine threshold set points for filtering out weak olfactory inputs in the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb via the activation of nAChRs. PMID:26170298

  19. Structure and Functional Characterization of the RNA-Binding Element of the NLRX1 Innate Immune Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Minsun; Yoon, Sung-il; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-06-20

    Mitochondrial NLRX1 is a member of the family of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing proteins (NLRs) that mediate host innate immunity as intracellular surveillance sensors against common molecular patterns of invading pathogens. NLRX1 functions in antiviral immunity, but the molecular mechanism of its ligand-induced activation is largely unknown. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fragment (residues 629975) of human NLRX1 (cNLRX1) at 2.65 {angstrom} resolution reveals that cNLRX1 consists of an N-terminal helical (LRRNT) domain, central leucine-rich repeat modules (LRRM), and a C-terminal three-helix bundle (LRRCT). cNLRX1 assembles into a compact hexameric architecture that is stabilized by intersubunit and interdomain interactions of LRRNT and LRRCT in the trimer and dimer components of the hexamer, respectively. Furthermore, we find that cNLRX1 interacts directly with RNA and supports a role for NLRX1 in recognition of intracellular viral RNA in antiviral immunity.

  20. ICE1 of Poncirus trifoliata functions in cold tolerance by modulating polyamine levels through interacting with arginine decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-San; Zhang, Qinghua; Zhu, Dexin; Fu, Xingzheng; Wang, Min; Zhang, Qian; Moriguchi, Takaya; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2015-01-01

    ICE1 (Inducer of CBF Expression 1) encodes a MYC-like basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor that acts as a central regulator of cold response. In this study, we elucidated the function and underlying mechanisms of PtrICE1 from trifoliate orange [Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.]. PtrICE1 was upregulated by cold, dehydration, and salt, with the greatest induction under cold conditions. PtrICE1 was localized in the nucleus and could bind to a MYC-recognizing sequence. Ectopic expression of PtrICE1 in tobacco and lemon conferred enhanced tolerance to cold stresses at either chilling or freezing temperatures. Yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that 21 proteins belonged to the PtrICE1 interactome, in which PtADC (arginine decarboxylase) was confirmed as a bona fide protein interacting with PtrICE1. Transcript levels of ADC genes in the transgenic lines were slightly elevated under normal growth condition but substantially increased under cold conditions, consistent with changes in free polyamine levels. By contrast, accumulation of the reactive oxygen species, H2O2 and O2 –, was appreciably alleviated in the transgenic lines under cold stress. Higher activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase and catalase, were detected in the transgenic lines under cold conditions. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PtrICE1 plays a positive role in cold tolerance, which may be due to modulation of polyamine levels through interacting with the ADC gene. PMID:25873670

  1. Calibration of the modulation transfer function of surface profilometers with binary pseudo-random test standards: expanding the application range

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; Cambie, Rossana; Conley, Raymond; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

    2011-03-14

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47, 073602 (2008)] has been proven to be an effective MTF calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A616, 172 (2010)]. Here we report on a further expansion of the application range of the method. We describe the MTF calibration of a 6 inch phase shifting Fizeau interferometer. Beyond providing a direct measurement of the interferometer's MTF, tests with a BPR array surface have revealed an asymmetry in the instrument's data processing algorithm that fundamentally limits its bandwidth. Moreover, the tests have illustrated the effects of the instrument's detrending and filtering procedures on power spectral density measurements. The details of the development of a BPR test sample suitable for calibration of scanning and transmission electron microscopes are also presented. Such a test sample is realized as a multilayer structure with the layer thicknesses of two materials corresponding to BPR sequence. The investigations confirm the universal character of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

  2. Calibration of the modulation transfer function of surface profilometers with binary pseudo-random test standards: Expanding the application range

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; Cambie, Rossana; Conley, Raymond; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

    2010-07-26

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47(7), 073602-1-5 (2008)] has been proven to be an effective MTF calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 616, 172-82 (2010]. Here we report on a significant expansion of the application range of the method. We describe the MTF calibration of a 6 inch phase shifting Fizeau interferometer. Beyond providing a direct measurement of the interferometer's MTF, tests with a BPR array surface have revealed an asymmetry in the instrument's data processing algorithm that fundamentally limits its bandwidth. Moreover, the tests have illustrated the effects of the instrument's detrending and filtering procedures on power spectral density measurements. The details of the development of a BPR test sample suitable for calibration of scanning and transmission electron microscopes are also presented. Such a test sample is realized as a multilayer structure with the layer thicknesses of two materials corresponding to BPR sequence. The investigations confirm the universal character of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

  3. Outcome measures for hand function naturally reveal three latent domains in older adults: strength, coordinated upper extremity function, and sensorimotor processing

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Emily L.; Dayanidhi, Sudarshan; Fassola, Isabella; Requejo, Philip; Leclercq, Caroline; Winstein, Carolee J.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mapping between individual outcome measures and the latent functional domains of interest is critical to a quantitative evaluation and rehabilitation of hand function. We examined whether and how the associations among six hand-specific outcome measures reveal latent functional domains in elderly individuals. We asked 66 healthy older adult participants (38F, 28M, 66.1 ± 11.6 years, range: 45–88 years) and 33 older adults (65.8 ± 9.7 years, 44–81 years, 51 hands) diagnosed with osteoarthritis (OA) of the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint, to complete six functional assessments: hand strength (Grip, Key and Precision Pinch), Box and Block, Nine Hole Pegboard, and Strength-Dexterity tests. The first three principal components suffice to explain 86% of variance among the six outcome measures in healthy older adults, and 84% of variance in older adults with CMC OA. The composition of these dominant associations revealed three distinct latent functional domains: strength, coordinated upper extremity function, and sensorimotor processing. Furthermore, in participants with thumb CMC OA we found a blurring of the associations between the latent functional domains of strength and coordinated upper extremity function. This motivates future work to understand how the physiological effects of thumb CMC OA lead upper extremity coordination to become strongly associated with strength, while dynamic sensorimotor ability remains an independent functional domain. Thus, when assessing the level of hand function in our growing older adult populations, it is particularly important to acknowledge its multidimensional nature—and explicitly consider how each outcome measure maps to these three latent and fundamental domains of function. Moreover, this ability to distinguish among latent functional domains may facilitate the design of treatment modalities to target the rehabilitation of each of them. PMID:26097455

  4. Agonist-dependent modulation of arterial endothelinA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Compeer, MG; Meens, MJPMT; Hackeng, TM; Neugebauer, WA; Höltke, C; De Mey, JGR

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Endothelin-1 (ET-1) causes long-lasting vasoconstrictions. These can be prevented by ETA receptor antagonists but are only poorly reversed by these drugs. We tested the hypothesis that endothelin ETA receptors are susceptible to allosteric modulation by endogenous agonists and exogenous ligands. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Rat isolated mesenteric resistance arteries were pretreated with capsaicin and studied in wire myographs, in the presence of L-NAME and indomethacin to concentrate on arterial smooth muscle responses. KEY RESULTS Endothelins caused contractions with equal maximum but differing potency (ET-1 = ET-2 > ET-3). ET-11–15 neither mimicked nor antagonized these effects in the absence and presence of ET16–21. 4AlaET-1 (ETB agonist) and BQ788 (ETB antagonist) were without effects. BQ123 (peptide ETA antagonist) reduced the sensitivity and relaxed the contractile responses to endothelins. Both effects depended on the agonist (pKB: ET-3 = ET-1 > ET-2; % relaxation: ET-3 = ET-2 > ET-1). Also, with PD156707 (non-peptide ETA antagonist) agonist-dependence and a discrepancy between preventive and inhibitory effects were observed. The latter was even more marked with bulky analogues of BQ123 and PD156707. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings indicate allosteric modulation of arterial smooth muscle ETA receptor function by endogenous agonists and by exogenous endothelin receptor antagonists. This may have consequences for the diagnosis and pharmacotherapy of diseases involving endothelins. PMID:22324472

  5. Modeling Fraunhofer diffractive characteristics for modulation transfer function analysis of tilted ring metallic mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhengang; Tan, Jiubin; Qi, Jing; Fan, Zhigang; Zhang, Luyang

    2011-08-01

    In order to analyze the Fraunhofer diffractive characteristics and modulation transfer function (MTF) of a tilted ring metallic mesh, an optical intensity distribution model of Fraunhofer diffraction is built using Huygens-Fresnel diffraction theory and the diffraction integral is carried out directly in the tilted mesh plane. The diffraction characteristics of the tilted ring metallic mesh are in good agreement with experimental results, which proves the correctness of the model established. MTF of an optical system with metallic mesh is calculated based on the model established and Fourier transform. Analysis shows that the degradation of MTF caused by diffraction of a ring mesh is much less than that of a square mesh whether they are vertical or tilted to the optical axis. Therefore, ring mesh can provide higher imaging quality than square mesh when they are used as high-pass filters in optical windows. A tilted array diffraction modulating factor is abstracted and believed useful in the analysis of diffractive characteristics of tilted square mesh and ring mesh, and it can be extended to Fraunhofer diffractive characteristics analysis of other tilted diffraction arrays.

  6. Myocardin restores erectile function in diabetic rats: phenotypic modulation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    He, S; Zhang, T; Liu, Y; Liu, L; Zhang, H; Chen, F; Wei, A

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether gene transfer of myocardin to the penis of diabetic rats can modulate corpus cavernosum smooth muscle (CCSM) cells phenotype and restore erectile function. Five normal control rats, and 22 diabetic rats were randomly divided into four groups: rats transfected with adCMV-myocardin (N = 6), treated with empty vector (N = 6), injected with medium (N = 5), and sham-operated rats (N = 5). The erectile response was measured 7 days after transfection. The percent of smooth muscle and the expressions of SM?-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMMHC), calponin were evaluated. The increases in intracorporal pressure(ICP)/mean arterial pressure and total ICP in response to nerve stimulation in the adCMV-myocardin treated rats were significantly greater than those in the empty vector (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), medium only (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), and sham-operated rats (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001). The suppressed expressions of SM?-actin, SMMHC and calponin were completely restored, and the amount of smooth muscle in diabetic rats were not restored after treatment. It is concluded that myocardin ameliorated erectile responses in diabetic rats mainly via promoting phenotypic modulation of CCSM cells from a proliferative to a contractile state. PMID:24620720

  7. The Dc-Module of Doublecortin: Dynamics, Domain Boundaries, and Functional Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Cierpicki,T.; Kim, M.; Cooper, D.; Derewenda, U.; Bushweller, J.; Derwenda, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The doublecortin-like (DC) domains, which usually occur in tandem, constitute novel microtubule-binding modules. They were first identified in doublecortin (DCX), a protein expressed in migrating neurons, and in the doublecortin-like kinase (DCLK). They are also found in other proteins, including the RP1 gene product which-when mutated-causes a form of inherited blindness. We previously reported an X-ray structure of the N-terminal DC domain of DCLK (N-DCLK), and a solution structure of an analogous module of human doublecortin (N-DCX). These studies showed that the DC domain has a tertiary fold closely reminiscent of ubiquitin and similar to several GTPase-binding domains. We now report an X-ray structure of a mutant of N-DCX, in which the C-terminal fragment (residues 139-147) unexpectedly shows an altered, 'open' conformation. However, heteronuclear NMR data show that this C-terminal fragment is only transiently open in solution, and assumes a predominantly 'closed' conformation. While the 'open' conformation may be artificially stabilized by crystal packing interactions, the observed switching between the 'open' and 'closed' conformations, which shortens the linker between the two DC-domains by {approx}20 A, is likely to be of functional importance in the control of tubulin polymerization and microtubule bundling by doublecortin.

  8. Engineering micropatterned surfaces to modulate the function of vascular stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jennifer; Wu, Michelle; Chu, Julia; Sochol, Ryan; Patel, Shyam

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • We examine vascular stem cell function on microgrooved and micropost patterned polymer substrates. • 10 ?m microgrooved surfaces significantly lower VSC proliferation but do not modulate calcified matrix deposition. • Micropost surfaces significantly lower VSC proliferation and decrease calcified matrix deposition. - Abstract: Multipotent vascular stem cells have been implicated in vascular disease and in tissue remodeling post therapeutic intervention. Hyper-proliferation and calcified extracellular matrix deposition of VSC cause blood vessel narrowing and plaque hardening thereby increasing the risk of myocardial infarct. In this study, to optimize the surface design of vascular implants, we determined whether micropatterned polymer surfaces can modulate VSC differentiation and calcified matrix deposition. Undifferentiated rat VSC were cultured on microgrooved surfaces of varied groove widths, and on micropost surfaces. 10 ?m microgrooved surfaces elongated VSC and decreased cell proliferation. However, microgrooved surfaces did not attenuate calcified extracellular matrix deposition by VSC cultured in osteogenic media conditions. In contrast, VSC cultured on micropost surfaces assumed a dendritic morphology, were significantly less proliferative, and deposited minimal calcified extracellular matrix. These results have significant implications for optimizing the design of cardiovascular implant surfaces.

  9. GenoQuery: a new querying module for functional annotation in a genomic warehouse

    PubMed Central

    Lemoine, Frédéric; Labedan, Bernard; Froidevaux, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: We have to cope with both a deluge of new genome sequences and a huge amount of data produced by high-throughput approaches used to exploit these genomic features. Crossing and comparing such heterogeneous and disparate data will help improving functional annotation of genomes. This requires designing elaborate integration systems such as warehouses for storing and querying these data. Results: We have designed a relational genomic warehouse with an original multi-layer architecture made of a databases layer and an entities layer. We describe a new querying module, GenoQuery, which is based on this architecture. We use the entities layer to define mixed queries. These mixed queries allow searching for instances of biological entities and their properties in the different databases, without specifying in which database they should be found. Accordingly, we further introduce the central notion of alternative queries. Such queries have the same meaning as the original mixed queries, while exploiting complementarities yielded by the various integrated databases of the warehouse. We explain how GenoQuery computes all the alternative queries of a given mixed query. We illustrate how useful this querying module is by means of a thorough example. Availability: http://www.lri.fr/~lemoine/GenoQuery/ Contact: chris@lri.fr, lemoine@lri.fr PMID:18586731

  10. Structural and Functional Dissection of the Abp1 ADFH Actin-binding Domain Reveals Versatile In Vivo Adapter Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Quintero-Monzon,O.; Rodal, A.; Strokopytov, B.; Almo, S.; Goode, B.

    2005-01-01

    Abp1 is a multidomain protein that regulates the Arp2/3 complex and links proteins involved in endocytosis to the actin cytoskeleton. All of the proposed cellular functions of Abp1 involve actin filament binding, yet the actin binding site(s) on Abp1 have not been identified, nor has the importance of actin binding for Abp1 localization and function in vivo been tested. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Abp1 actin-binding actin depolymerizing factor homology (ADFH) domain and dissect its activities by mutagenesis. Abp1-ADFH domain and ADF/cofilin structures are similar, and they use conserved surfaces to bind actin; however, there are also key differences that help explain their differential effects on actin dynamics. Using point mutations, we demonstrate that actin binding is required for localization of Abp1 in vivo, the lethality caused by Abp1 overexpression, and the ability of Abp1 to activate Arp2/3 complex. Furthermore, we genetically uncouple ABP1 functions that overlap with SAC6, SLA1, and SLA2, showing they require distinct combinations of activities and interactions. Together, our data provide the first structural and functional view of the Abp1-actin interaction and show that Abp1 has distinct cellular roles as an adapter, linking different sets of ligands for each function.

  11. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng

    2010-06-15

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 {angstrom}, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface.

  12. Pharmacological activation of estrogen receptors-? and -? differentially modulates keratinocyte differentiation with functional impact on wound healing

    PubMed Central

    PERŽE?OVÁ, VLASTA; SABOL, FRANTIŠEK; VASILENKO, TOMÁŠ; NOVOTNÝ, MARTIN; KOVÁ?, IVAN; SLEZÁK, MARTIN; ?URKÁ?, JÁN; HOLLÝ, MARTIN; PILÁTOVÁ, MARTINA; SZABO, PAVOL; VARINSKÁ, LENKA; ?RIEPOKOVÁ, ZUZANA; KU?ERA, TOMÁŠ; KALTNER, HERBERT; ANDRÉ, SABINE; GABIUS, HANS-JOACHIM; MU?AJI, PAVEL; SMETANA, KAREL; GÁL, PETER

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen deprivation is considered responsible for many age-related processes, including poor wound healing. Guided by previous observations that estradiol accelerates re-epithelialization through estrogen receptor (ER)-?, in the present study, we examined whether selective ER agonists [4,4?,4?-(4-propyl [1H] pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)-trisphenol (PPT), ER-? agonist; 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (DPN), ER-? agonist] affect the expression of basic proliferation and differentiation markers (Ki-67, keratin-10, -14 and -19, galectin-1 and Sox-2) of keratinocytes using HaCaT cells. In parallel, ovariectomized rats were treated daily with an ER modulator, and wound tissue was removed 21 days after wounding and routinely processed for basic histological analysis. Our results revealed that the HaCaT keratinocytes expressed both ER-? and -?, and thus are well-suited for studying the effects of ER agonists on epidermal regeneration. The activation of ER-? produced a protein expression pattern similar to that observed in the control culture, with a moderate expression of Ki-67 being observed. However, the activation of ER-? led to an increase in cell proliferation and keratin-19 expression, as well as a decrease in galectin-1 expression. Fittingly, in rat wounds treated with the ER-? agonist (DPN), epidermal regeneration was accelerated. In the present study, we provide information on the mechanisms through which estrogens affect the expression patterns of selected markers, thus modulating keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation; in addition, we demonstrate that the pharmacological activation of ER-? and -? has a direct impact on wound healing. PMID:26397183

  13. Pharmacological activation of estrogen receptors-? and -? differentially modulates keratinocyte differentiation with functional impact on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Perže?ová, Vlasta; Sabol, František; Vasilenko, Tomáš; Novotný, Martin; Ková?, Ivan; Slezák, Martin; ?urká?, Ján; Hollý, Martin; Pilátová, Martina; Szabo, Pavol; Varinská, Lenka; ?riepoková, Zuzana; Ku?era, Tomáš; Kaltner, Herbert; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Mu?aji, Pavel; Smetana, Karel; Gál, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen deprivation is considered responsible for many age-related processes, including poor wound healing. Guided by previous observations that estradiol accelerates re?epithelialization through estrogen receptor (ER)??, in the present study, we examined whether selective ER agonists [4,4',4''-(4-propyl [1H] pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)?trisphenol (PPT), ER?? agonist; 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (DPN), ER?? agonist] affect the expression of basic proliferation and differentiation markers (Ki?67, keratin?10, ?14 and ?19, galectin?1 and Sox?2) of keratinocytes using HaCaT cells. In parallel, ovariectomized rats were treated daily with an ER modulator, and wound tissue was removed 21 days after wounding and routinely processed for basic histological analysis. Our results revealed that the HaCaT keratinocytes expressed both ER?? and ??, and thus are well-suited for studying the effects of ER agonists on epidermal regeneration. The activation of ER?? produced a protein expression pattern similar to that observed in the control culture, with a moderate expression of Ki?67 being observed. However, the activation of ER?? led to an increase in cell proliferation and keratin?19 expression, as well as a decrease in galectin?1 expression. Fittingly, in rat wounds treated with the ER?? agonist (DPN), epidermal regeneration was accelerated. In the present study, we provide information on the mechanisms through which estrogens affect the expression patterns of selected markers, thus modulating keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation; in addition, we demonstrate that the pharmacological activation of ER-? and -? has a direct impact on wound healing. PMID:26397183

  14. A method for modulation transfer function determination from blood vessel profiles measured in computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaya, Y.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Ohmatsu, H.; Moriyama, N.

    2012-03-01

    The recent CT systems yield high spatial resolution in all directions of volumetric images in clinical routine. The quantitative characterization of the performance of CT systems is important for comparing the effects of different scan and reconstruction parameters, for comparing between different CT systems, and for evaluating the accuracy of size and density measurements of fine details in CT images. This paper presents a method to determine the modulation transfer function (MTF) in the scan plane obtained by CT system from profiles of human anatomical structures such as blood vessel measured by clinical measurement conditions without magnified reconstruction. MTF estimations are performed for cylindrical tube phantoms with three different diameters (1 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm) injected by solution of contrast material and human blood vessels measured by the clinical measurement conditions. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of the method for estimating the MTF from blood vessel profiles measured in CT systems.

  15. Potassium as a key modulator of tropical woody vegetation structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Sampling a range of tropical vegetation types across Africa, Australia and South America we find - other things being equal - lower soil and plant potassium concentrations in savanna as opposed to forest species. There is also a trend- similarly observed in cross-continental comparisons, for foliar [K] to increase with declining precipitation. Moreover, when considered in a multivariate context with mean annual precipitation and soil plant available water storage capacity as covariates, soil exchangeable K turns to be an excellent predictor of stand-level canopy areas across vegetation types, providing drastically improved predictions as compared to models considering just precipitation or soil water storage potential alone This underlying basis of an important role for potassium as a modulator of tropical vegetation structure and function will be considered in terms of its role in plant water relations as well as in relation to recent key findings implicating potassium to have an important role in many root-shoot signalling pathways.

  16. Functional genomics reveals serine synthesis is essential in PHGDH-amplified breast cancer

    E-print Network

    Possemato, Richard

    Cancer cells adapt their metabolic processes to drive macromolecular biosynthesis for rapid cell growth and proliferation[superscript 1, 2]. RNA interference (RNAi)-based loss-of-function screening has proven powerful for ...

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE An integrative analysis reveals functional targets of GATA6

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    , including MITF in melanoma,1 NKX2­1 in lung adenocarcinoma,2 SOX2 in squamous esophageal cancer3 and AR the dependencies and transcriptional functions of this TF. Worldwide, stomach cancer is the second leading cause

  18. Fundamental gaps with approximate density functionals: the derivative discontinuity revealed from ensemble considerations

    E-print Network

    Kraisler, Eli

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental gap is a central quantity in the electronic structure of matter. Unfortunately, the fundamental gap is not generally equal to the Kohn-Sham gap of density functional theory (DFT), even in principle. The two gaps differ precisely by the derivative discontinuity, namely, an abrupt change in slope of the exchange-correlation (xc) energy as a function of electron number, expected across an integer-electron point. Popular approximate functionals are thought to be devoid of a derivative discontinuity, strongly compromising their performance for prediction of spectroscopic properties. Here we show that, in fact, all exchange-correlation functionals possess a derivative discontinuity, which arises naturally from the application of ensemble considerations within DFT, without any empiricism. This derivative discontinuity can be expressed in closed form using only quantities obtained in the course of a standard DFT calculation of the neutral system. For small, finite systems, addition of this derivative ...

  19. Anxiety Modulates Insula Recruitment in Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Youth and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gotlib, Ian H.; Thompson, Paul M.; Thomason, Moriah E.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Research on resting-state functional connectivity reveals intrinsically connected networks in the brain that are largely consistent across the general population. However, there are individual differences in these networks that have not been elucidated. Here, we measured the influence of naturally occurring mood on functional connectivity. In particular, we examined the association between self-reported levels of anxiety and connectivity in the default mode network (DMN). Healthy youth (n=43; ages 10–18) and adult participants (n=24, ages 19–59) completed a 6-min resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan, then immediately completed questionnaires assessing their mood and thoughts during the scan. Regression analyses conducted separately for the youth and adult samples revealed brain regions in which increases in connectivity differentially corresponded to higher anxiety in each group. In one area, the left insular cortex, both groups showed similar increased connectivity to the DMN (youth: -30, 26, 14; adults: -33, 12, 14) with increased anxiety. State anxiety assessed during scanning was not correlated with trait anxiety, so our results likely reflect state levels of anxiety. To our knowledge, this is the first study to relate naturally occurring mood to resting state connectivity. PMID:22433052

  20. Annotation of Protein Domains Reveals Remarkable Conservation in the Functional Make up of Proteomes Across Superkingdoms

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Naeem, Aisha; Khan, Muhammad Jawad; Lopez-Nicora, Horacio D.; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The functional repertoire of a cell is largely embodied in its proteome, the collection of proteins encoded in the genome of an organism. The molecular functions of proteins are the direct consequence of their structure and structure can be inferred from sequence using hidden Markov models of structural recognition. Here we analyze the functional annotation of protein domain structures in almost a thousand sequenced genomes, exploring the functional and structural diversity of proteomes. We find there is a remarkable conservation in the distribution of domains with respect to the molecular functions they perform in the three superkingdoms of life. In general, most of the protein repertoire is spent in functions related to metabolic processes but there are significant differences in the usage of domains for regulatory and extra-cellular processes both within and between superkingdoms. Our results support the hypotheses that the proteomes of superkingdom Eukarya evolved via genome expansion mechanisms that were directed towards innovating new domain architectures for regulatory and extra/intracellular process functions needed for example to maintain the integrity of multicellular structure or to interact with environmental biotic and abiotic factors (e.g., cell signaling and adhesion, immune responses, and toxin production). Proteomes of microbial superkingdoms Archaea and Bacteria retained fewer numbers of domains and maintained simple and smaller protein repertoires. Viruses appear to play an important role in the evolution of superkingdoms. We finally identify few genomic outliers that deviate significantly from the conserved functional design. These include Nanoarchaeum equitans, proteobacterial symbionts of insects with extremely reduced genomes, Tenericutes and Guillardia theta. These organisms spend most of their domains on information functions, including translation and transcription, rather than on metabolism and harbor a domain repertoire characteristic of parasitic organisms. In contrast, the functional repertoire of the proteomes of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae superphylum was no different than the rest of bacteria, failing to support claims of them representing a separate superkingdom. In turn, Protista and Bacteria shared similar functional distribution patterns suggesting an ancestral evolutionary link between these groups. PMID:24710297

  1. Discovering functional modules by topic modeling RNA-Seq based toxicogenomic data.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ke; Gong, Binsheng; Lee, Mikyung; Liu, Zhichao; Xu, Joshua; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida

    2014-09-15

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) endeavors to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms through exploring gene expression profiles in response to toxic substances. Recently, RNA-Seq is increasingly regarded as a more powerful alternative to microarrays in TGx studies. However, realizing RNA-Seq's full potential requires novel approaches to extracting information from the complex TGx data. Considering read counts as the number of times a word occurs in a document, gene expression profiles from RNA-Seq are analogous to a word by document matrix used in text mining. Topic modeling aiming at to discover the latent structures in text corpora would be helpful to explore RNA-Seq based TGx data. In this study, topic modeling was applied on a typical RNA-Seq based TGx data set to discover hidden functional modules. The RNA-Seq based gene expression profiles were transformed into "documents", on which latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) was used to build a topic model. We found samples treated by the compounds with the same modes of actions (MoAs) could be clustered based on topic similarities. The topic most relevant to each cluster was identified as a "marker" topic, which was interpreted by gene enrichment analysis with MoAs then confirmed by compound and pathways associations mined from literature. To further validate the "marker" topics, we tested topic transferability from RNA-Seq to microarrays. The RNA-Seq based gene expression profile of a topic specifically associated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) signaling pathway was used to query samples with similar expression profiles in two different microarray data sets, yielding accuracy of about 85%. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the applicability of topic modeling to discover functional modules in RNA-Seq data and suggests a valuable computational tool for leveraging information within TGx data in RNA-Seq era. PMID:25083553

  2. The extracellular redox state modulates mitochondrial function, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen synthesis in murine hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nocito, Laura; Kleckner, Amber S; Yoo, Elsia J; Jones Iv, Albert R; Liesa, Marc; Corkey, Barbara E

    2015-01-01

    Circulating redox state changes, determined by the ratio of reduced/oxidized pairs of different metabolites, have been associated with metabolic diseases. However, the pathogenic contribution of these changes and whether they modulate normal tissue function is unclear. As alterations in hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism are hallmarks that characterize insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, we tested whether imposed changes in the extracellular redox state could modulate these processes. Thus, primary hepatocytes were treated with different ratios of the following physiological extracellular redox couples: ?-hydroxybutyrate (?OHB)/acetoacetate (Acoc), reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and cysteine/cystine. Exposure to a more oxidized ratio via extracellular ?OHB/Acoc, GSH/GSSG, and cysteine/cystine in hepatocytes from fed mice increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide without causing oxidative damage. On the other hand, addition of more reduced ratios of extracellular ?OHB/Acoc led to increased NAD(P)H and maximal mitochondrial respiratory capacity in hepatocytes. Greater ?OHB/Acoc ratios were also associated with decreased ?-oxidation, as expected with enhanced lipogenesis. In hepatocytes from fasted mice, a more extracellular reduced state of ?OHB/Acoc led to increased alanine-stimulated gluconeogenesis and enhanced glycogen synthesis capacity from added glucose. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that the extracellular redox state regulates the major metabolic functions of the liver and involves changes in intracellular NADH, hydrogen peroxide, and mitochondrial respiration. Because redox state in the blood can be communicated to all metabolically sensitive tissues, this work confirms the hypothesis that circulating redox state may be an important regulator of whole body metabolism and contribute to alterations associated with metabolic diseases. PMID:25816337

  3. Functional and transmural modulation of M cell behavior in canine ventricular wall.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Norihiro; Zipes, Douglas P; Wu, Jiashin

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a discrete population of midmyocardial (M) cells in the ventricular myocardium having excessive action potential duration (APD) prolongation during long activation cycle lengths (CL) and under the influence of APD-prolonging agents. However, M cells have not been found in other studies. Existing explanations for the discrepancies appear inadequate. We hypothesized that instead of being a discrete group, M cell behavior is functional and conditionally expressed. We mapped APDs on the cut-exposed transmural surfaces of arterially perfused ventricular wedges from 26 dogs during Na+ current modification with anemone toxin II (ATX-II). Compared with the endocardium, APDs were not statistically different in the parallel layer having the longest mean APD (APDL) and were significantly shorter in the epicardium in the 26 wedges before ATX-II. ATX-II (> or =5 nmol/l) prolonged APD heterogeneously (midmyocardium > endocardium > epicardium). The differences increased at longer CLs. ATX-II (20.0 nmol/l) shifted the APD(L) layer to 32 +/- 6.2% (6 wedges, CL: 4,000 ms) of the transmural thickness from the (sub)endocardium (8.6 +/- 7.2%, 26 wedges, ATX-II free). We detected the presence of M cell behavior (significantly longer APDs in the APDL layer than in the endocardium and epicardium, P < or = 0.04, CL: 4,000 ms) in the 18 wedges having > or =5 nmol/l ATX-II but not (P >0.36) in the other 18 wedges having < or =2.5 nmol/l ATX-II. Both the position of the APDL layer and presence of M cell-like behavior were modulated by ATX-II. The dynamic spatial modulation indicates that M cell behavior is functional and only becomes manifest under suitable conditions. PMID:15331367

  4. Novel cardiovascular gene functions revealed via systematic phenotype prediction in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Musso, Gabriel; Tasan, Murat; Mosimann, Christian; Beaver, John E.; Plovie, Eva; Carr, Logan A.; Chua, Hon Nian; Dunham, Julie; Zuberi, Khalid; Rodriguez, Harold; Morris, Quaid; Zon, Leonard; Roth, Frederick P.; MacRae, Calum A.

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive functional annotation of vertebrate genomes is fundamental to biological discovery. Reverse genetic screening has been highly useful for determination of gene function, but is untenable as a systematic approach in vertebrate model organisms given the number of surveyable genes and observable phenotypes. Unbiased prediction of gene-phenotype relationships offers a strategy to direct finite experimental resources towards likely phenotypes, thus maximizing de novo discovery of gene functions. Here we prioritized genes for phenotypic assay in zebrafish through machine learning, predicting the effect of loss of function of each of 15,106 zebrafish genes on 338 distinct embryonic anatomical processes. Focusing on cardiovascular phenotypes, the learning procedure predicted known knockdown and mutant phenotypes with high precision. In proof-of-concept studies we validated 16 high-confidence cardiac predictions using targeted morpholino knockdown and initial blinded phenotyping in embryonic zebrafish, confirming a significant enrichment for cardiac phenotypes as compared with morpholino controls. Subsequent detailed analyses of cardiac function confirmed these results, identifying novel physiological defects for 11 tested genes. Among these we identified tmem88a, a recently described attenuator of Wnt signaling, as a discrete regulator of the patterning of intercellular coupling in the zebrafish cardiac epithelium. Thus, we show that systematic prioritization in zebrafish can accelerate the pace of developmental gene function discovery. PMID:24346703

  5. Comparative genomics reveals a constant rate of origination and convergent acquisition of functional retrogenes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yongsheng; Casola, Claudio; Feschotte, Cédric; Betrán, Esther

    2007-01-01

    Background Processed copies of genes (retrogenes) are duplicate genes that originated through the reverse-transcription of a host transcript and insertion in the genome. This type of gene duplication, as any other, could be a source of new genes and functions. Using whole genome sequence data for 12 Drosophila species, we dated the origin of 94 retroposition events that gave rise to candidate functional genes in D. melanogaster. Results Based on this analysis, we infer that functional retrogenes have emerged at a fairly constant rate of 0.5 genes per million years per lineage over the last approximately 63 million years of Drosophila evolution. The number of functional retrogenes and the rate at which they are recruited in the D. melanogaster lineage are of the same order of magnitude as those estimated in the human lineage, despite the higher deletion bias in the Drosophila genome. However, unlike primates, the rate of retroposition in Drosophila seems to be fairly constant and no burst of retroposition can be inferred from our analyses. In addition, our data also support an important role for retrogenes as a source of lineage-specific male functions, in agreement with previous hypotheses. Finally, we identified three cases of functional retrogenes in D. melanogaster that have been independently retroposed and recruited in parallel as new genes in other Drosophila lineages. Conclusion Together, these results indicate that retroposition is a persistent mechanism and a recurrent pathway for the emergence of new genes in Drosophila. PMID:17233920

  6. Modulation of Intestinal Functions Following Mycotoxin Ingestion: Meta-Analysis of Published Experiments in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Bertrand; Applegate, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of fungi that can cause serious health problems in animals, and may result in severe economic losses. Deleterious effects of these feed contaminants in animals are well documented, ranging from growth impairment, decreased resistance to pathogens, hepato- and nephrotoxicity to death. By contrast, data with regard to their impact on intestinal functions are more limited. However, intestinal cells are the first cells to be exposed to mycotoxins, and often at higher concentrations than other tissues. In addition, mycotoxins specifically target high protein turnover- and activated-cells, which are predominant in gut epithelium. Therefore, intestinal investigations have gained significant interest over the last decade, and some publications have demonstrated that mycotoxins are able to compromise several key functions of the gastrointestinal tract, including decreased surface area available for nutrient absorption, modulation of nutrient transporters, or loss of barrier function. In addition some mycotoxins facilitate persistence of intestinal pathogens and potentiate intestinal inflammation. By contrast, the effect of these fungal metabolites on the intestinal microbiota is largely unknown. This review focuses on mycotoxins which are of concern in terms of occurrence and toxicity, namely: aflatoxins, ochratoxin A and Fusarium toxins. Results from nearly 100 published experiments (in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo) were analyzed with a special attention to the doses used. PMID:23430606

  7. An experimental study of the accuracy in measurement of modulation transfer function using an edge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Lee, Young-Jin; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Image evaluation is necessary in digital radiography (DR) which is widely used in medical imaging. Among parameters of image evaluation, modulation transfer function (MTF) is the important factor in the field of medical imaging and necessary to obtain detective quantum efficiency (DQE) which represents overall performance of the detector signal-to-noise ratio. However, the accurate measurement of MTF is still not easy because of geometric effect, electric noise, quantum noise, and truncation error. Therefore, in order to improve accuracy of MTF, four experimental methods were tested in this study such as changing the tube current, applying smoothing method in edge spread function (ESF), adjusting line spread function (LSF) range, and changing tube angle. Our results showed that MTF's fluctuation was decreased by high tube current and smoothing method. However, tube current should not exceed detector saturation and smoothing in ESF causes a distortion in ESF and MTF. In addition, decreasing LSF range diminished fluctuation and the number of sampling in MTF and high tube angle generates degradation in MTF. Based on these results, excessively low tube current and the smoothing method should be avoided. Also, optimal range of LSF considering reduction of fluctuation and the number of sampling in MTF was necessary and precise tube angle is essential to obtain an accurate MTF. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that accurate MTF can be acquired.

  8. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy prediction of modulation transfer function of optical lens system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovi?, Dalibor; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Anuar, Nor Badrul; Md Nasir, Mohd Hairul Nizam; Pavlovi?, Nenad T.; Akib, Shatirah

    2014-07-01

    The quantitative assessment of image quality is an important consideration in any type of imaging system. The modulation transfer function (MTF) is a graphical description of the sharpness and contrast of an imaging system or of its individual components. The MTF is also known and spatial frequency response. The MTF curve has different meanings according to the corresponding frequency. The MTF of an optical system specifies the contrast transmitted by the system as a function of image size, and is determined by the inherent optical properties of the system. In this study, the adaptive neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS) estimator is designed and adapted to predict MTF value of the actual optical system. Neural network in ANFIS adjusts parameters of membership function in the fuzzy logic of the fuzzy inference system. The back propagation learning algorithm is used for training this network. This intelligent estimator is implemented using MATLAB/Simulink and the performances are investigated. The simulation results presented in this paper show the effectiveness of the developed method.

  9. Modulation transfer function estimation of optical lens system by adaptive neuro-fuzzy methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovi?, Dalibor; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Pavlovi?, Nenad T.; Anuar, Nor Badrul; Kiah, Miss Laiha Mat

    2014-07-01

    The quantitative assessment of image quality is an important consideration in any type of imaging system. The modulation transfer function (MTF) is a graphical description of the sharpness and contrast of an imaging system or of its individual components. The MTF is also known and spatial frequency response. The MTF curve has different meanings according to the corresponding frequency. The MTF of an optical system specifies the contrast transmitted by the system as a function of image size, and is determined by the inherent optical properties of the system. In this study, the adaptive neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS) estimator is designed and adapted to estimate MTF value of the actual optical system. Neural network in ANFIS adjusts parameters of membership function in the fuzzy logic of the fuzzy inference system. The back propagation learning algorithm is used for training this network. This intelligent estimator is implemented using Matlab/Simulink and the performances are investigated. The simulation results presented in this paper show the effectiveness of the developed method.

  10. Melittin modulates keratinocyte function through P2 receptor-dependent ADAM activation.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Anselm; Fries, Anja; Cornelsen, Isabell; Speck, Nancy; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Gimpl, Gerald; Andrä, Jörg; Bhakdi, Sucharit; Reiss, Karina

    2012-07-01

    Melittin, the major component of the bee venom, is an amphipathic, cationic peptide with a wide spectrum of biological properties that is being considered as an anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer agent. It modulates multiple cellular functions but the underlying mechanisms are not clearly understood. Here, we report that melittin activates disintegrin-like metalloproteases (ADAMs) and that downstream events likely contribute to the biological effects evoked by the peptide. Melittin stimulated the proteolysis of ADAM10 and ADAM17 substrates in human neutrophil granulocytes, endothelial cells and murine fibroblasts. In human HaCaT keratinocytes, melittin induced shedding of the adhesion molecule E-cadherin and release of TGF-?, which was accompanied by transactivation of the EGF receptor and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. This was followed by functional consequences such as increased keratinocyte proliferation and enhanced cell migration. Evidence is provided that ATP release and activation of purinergic P2 receptors are involved in melittin-induced ADAM activation. E-cadherin shedding and EGFR phosphorylation were dose-dependently reduced in the presence of ATPases or P2 receptor antagonists. The involvement of P2 receptors was underscored in experiments with HEK cells, which lack the P2X7 receptor and showed strikingly increased response to melittin stimulation after transfection with this receptor. Our study provides new insight into the mechanism of melittin function which should be of interest particularly in the context of its potential use as an anti-inflammatory or anti-cancer agent. PMID:22613720

  11. Copper(II)-bis-histidine coordination structure in a fibrillar amyloid ?-peptide fragment and model complexes revealed by electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Guzmán, Jessica; Sun, Li; Mehta, Anil K; Dong, Jijun; Lynn, David G; Warncke, Kurt

    2013-09-23

    Truncated and mutated amyloid-? (A?) peptides are models for systematic study-in homogeneous preparations-of the molecular origins of metal ion effects on A? aggregation rates, types of aggregate structures formed, and cytotoxicity. The 3D geometry of bis-histidine imidazole coordination of Cu(II) in fibrils of the nonapetide acetyl-A?(13-21)H14A has been determined by powder (14) N electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy. The method of simulation of the anisotropic combination modulation is described and benchmarked for a Cu(II) -bis-cis-imidazole complex of known structure. The revealed bis-cis coordination mode, and the mutual orientation of the imidazole rings, for Cu(II) in Ac-A?(13-21)H14A fibrils are consistent with the proposed ?-sheet structural model and pairwise peptide interaction with Cu(II) , with an alternating [-metal-vacancy-]n pattern, along the N-terminal edge. Metal coordination does not significantly distort the intra-?-strand peptide interactions, which provides a possible explanation for the acceleration of Ac-A?(13-21)H14A fibrillization by Cu(II) , through stabilization of the associated state and low-reorganization integration of ?-strand peptide pair precursors. PMID:24014287

  12. Integrating Genome-Wide Genetic Variations and Monocyte Expression Data Reveals Trans-Regulated Gene Modules in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Maouche, Seraya; Szymczak, Silke; Schillert, Arne; Castagné, Raphaele; Deiseroth, Arne; Proust, Carole; Brocheton, Jessy; Godefroy, Tiphaine; Perret, Claire; Germain, Marine; Eleftheriadis, Medea; Sinning, Christoph R.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Lubos, Edith; Lackner, Karl J.; Rossmann, Heidi; Münzel, Thomas; Rendon, Augusto; Consortium, Cardiogenics; Erdmann, Jeanette; Deloukas, Panos; Hengstenberg, Christian; Diemert, Patrick; Montalescot, Gilles; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schunkert, Heribert; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Ziegler, Andreas; Goodall, Alison H.; Cambien, François; Tiret, Laurence; Blankenberg, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    One major expectation from the transcriptome in humans is to characterize the biological basis of associations identified by genome-wide association studies. So far, few cis expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) have been reliably related to disease susceptibility. Trans-regulating mechanisms may play a more prominent role in disease susceptibility. We analyzed 12,808 genes detected in at least 5% of circulating monocyte samples from a population-based sample of 1,490 European unrelated subjects. We applied a method of extraction of expression patterns—independent component analysis—to identify sets of co-regulated genes. These patterns were then related to 675,350 SNPs to identify major trans-acting regulators. We detected three genomic regions significantly associated with co-regulated gene modules. Association of these loci with multiple expression traits was replicated in Cardiogenics, an independent study in which expression profiles of monocytes were available in 758 subjects. The locus 12q13 (lead SNP rs11171739), previously identified as a type 1 diabetes locus, was associated with a pattern including two cis eQTLs, RPS26 and SUOX, and 5 trans eQTLs, one of which (MADCAM1) is a potential candidate for mediating T1D susceptibility. The locus 12q24 (lead SNP rs653178), which has demonstrated extensive disease pleiotropy, including type 1 diabetes, hypertension, and celiac disease, was associated to a pattern strongly correlating to blood pressure level. The strongest trans eQTL in this pattern was CRIP1, a known marker of cellular proliferation in cancer. The locus 12q15 (lead SNP rs11177644) was associated with a pattern driven by two cis eQTLs, LYZ and YEATS4, and including 34 trans eQTLs, several of them tumor-related genes. This study shows that a method exploiting the structure of co-expressions among genes can help identify genomic regions involved in trans regulation of sets of genes and can provide clues for understanding the mechanisms linking genome-wide association loci to disease. PMID:22144904

  13. The complex and specific pMHC interactions with diverse HIV-1 TCR clonotypes reveal a structural basis for alterations in CTL function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhen; Chen, Huabiao; Kang, Seung-Gu; Huynh, Tien; Fang, Justin W.; Lamothe, Pedro A.; Walker, Bruce D.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-02-01

    Immune control of viral infections is modulated by diverse T cell receptor (TCR) clonotypes engaging peptide-MHC class I complexes on infected cells, but the relationship between TCR structure and antiviral function is unclear. Here we apply in silico molecular modeling with in vivo mutagenesis studies to investigate TCR-pMHC interactions from multiple CTL clonotypes specific for a well-defined HIV-1 epitope. Our molecular dynamics simulations of viral peptide-HLA-TCR complexes, based on two independent co-crystal structure templates, reveal that effective and ineffective clonotypes bind to the terminal portions of the peptide-MHC through similar salt bridges, but their hydrophobic side-chain packings can be very different, which accounts for the major part of the differences among these clonotypes. Non-specific hydrogen bonding to viral peptide also accommodates greater epitope variants. Furthermore, free energy perturbation calculations for point mutations on the viral peptide KK10 show excellent agreement with in vivo mutagenesis assays, with new predictions confirmed by additional experiments. These findings indicate a direct structural basis for heterogeneous CTL antiviral function.

  14. Variation analysis of transcriptome changes reveals cochlear genes and their associated functions in cochlear susceptibility to acoustic overstimulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuzhi; Cai, Qunfeng; Bard, Jonathan; Jamison, Jennifer; Wang, Jianmin; Yang, Weiping; Hu, Bo Hua

    2015-12-01

    Individual variation in the susceptibility of the auditory system to acoustic overstimulation has been well-documented at both the functional and structural levels. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this variation is unclear. The current investigation was designed to examine the variation patterns of cochlear gene expression using RNA-seq data and to identify the genes with expression variation that increased following acoustic trauma. This study revealed that the constitutive expressions of cochlear genes displayed diverse levels of gene-specific variation. These variation patterns were altered by acoustic trauma; approximately one-third of the examined genes displayed marked increases in their expression variation. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that the genes that exhibited increased variation were functionally related to cell death, biomolecule metabolism, and membrane function. In contrast, the stable genes were primarily related to basic cellular processes, including protein and macromolecular syntheses and transport. There was no functional overlap between the stable and variable genes. Importantly, we demonstrated that glutamate metabolism is related to the variation in the functional response of the cochlea to acoustic overstimulation. Taken together, the results indicate that our analyses of the individual variations in transcriptome changes of cochlear genes provide important information for the identification of genes that potentially contribute to the generation of individual variation in cochlear responses to acoustic overstimulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:26024952

  15. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, R. F.; Linke, K.; Teichert, H.; Ehrmann, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  16. Systematic discovery of regulated and conserved alternative exons in the mammalian brain reveals NMD modulating chromatin regulators

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qinghong; Weyn-Vanhentenryck, Sebastien M.; Wu, Jie; Sloan, Steven A.; Zhang, Ye; Chen, Kenian; Wu, Jia Qian; Barres, Ben A.; Zhang, Chaolin

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) dramatically expands the complexity of the mammalian brain transcriptome, but its atlas remains incomplete. Here we performed deep mRNA sequencing of mouse cortex to discover and characterize alternative exons with potential functional significance. Our analysis expands the list of AS events over 10-fold compared with previous annotations, demonstrating that 72% of multiexon genes express multiple splice variants in this single tissue. To evaluate functionality of the newly discovered AS events, we conducted comprehensive analyses on central nervous system (CNS) cell type-specific splicing, targets of tissue- or cell type-specific RNA binding proteins (RBPs), evolutionary selection pressure, and coupling of AS with nonsense-mediated decay (AS-NMD). We show that newly discovered events account for 23–42% of all cassette exons under tissue- or cell type-specific regulation. Furthermore, over 7,000 cassette exons are under evolutionary selection for regulated AS in mammals, 70% of which are new. Among these are 3,058 highly conserved cassette exons, including 1,014 NMD exons that may function directly to control gene expression levels. These NMD exons are particularly enriched in RBPs including splicing factors and interestingly also regulators for other steps of RNA metabolism. Unexpectedly, a second group of NMD exons reside in genes encoding chromatin regulators. Although the conservation of NMD exons in RBPs frequently extends into lower vertebrates, NMD exons in chromatin regulators are introduced later into the mammalian lineage, implying the emergence of a novel mechanism coupling AS and epigenetics. Our results highlight previously uncharacterized complexity and evolution in the mammalian brain transcriptome. PMID:25737549

  17. A 106 year monthly coral record reveals that the East Asian summer monsoon modulates winter PDO variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Kawamura, Takashi; Yamazaki, Atsuko; Murayama, Masafumi; Yamano, Hiroya

    2014-05-01

    The Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) is a dominant climate mode in the Pacific Ocean and thought to be related to seasonal to decadal changes in sea surface conditions. Colonies of long-living Porites coral, widely used to reconstruct monthly to century-scale tropical sea surface temperature and sea surface salinity records, were discovered near Koshiki Island, Japan (31°N, 129°E). A monthly resolved, 106 year ?18O record revealed that distinct decadal-scale variability was significantly correlated with the PDO index. Our comparison showed 1 to 3 years lead-lag correlation of summer coral ?18O with the winter PDO index, suggesting that the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) may act as the driving force of winter PDO variability over the last 100 years. Cross-spectral analysis between the winter PDO index and summer coral ?18O suggested that recent and future global warming may lead to a more frequent and/or stronger teleconnection between EASM and PDO.

  18. An Atlas of the Thioredoxin Fold Class Reveals the Complexity of Function-Enabling Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Holly J.; Babbitt, Patricia C.

    2009-01-01

    The group of proteins that contain a thioredoxin (Trx) fold is huge and diverse. Assessment of the variation in catalytic machinery of Trx fold proteins is essential in providing a foundation for understanding their functional diversity and predicting the function of the many uncharacterized members of the class. The proteins of the Trx fold class retain common features—including variations on a dithiol CxxC active site motif—that lead to delivery of function. We use protein similarity networks to guide an analysis of how structural and sequence motifs track with catalytic function and taxonomic categories for 4,082 representative sequences spanning the known superfamilies of the Trx fold. Domain structure in the fold class is varied and modular, with 2.8% of sequences containing more than one Trx fold domain. Most member proteins are bacterial. The fold class exhibits many modifications to the CxxC active site motif—only 56.8% of proteins have both cysteines, and no functional groupings have absolute conservation of the expected catalytic motif. Only a small fraction of Trx fold sequences have been functionally characterized. This work provides a global view of the complex distribution of domains and catalytic machinery throughout the fold class, showing that each superfamily contains remnants of the CxxC active site. The unifying context provided by this work can guide the comparison of members of different Trx fold superfamilies to gain insight about their structure-function relationships, illustrated here with the thioredoxins and peroxiredoxins. PMID:19851441

  19. Local pulmonary opioid network in patients with lung cancer: a putative modulator of respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Krajnik, Ma?gorzata; Schäfer, Michael; Soba?ski, Piotr; Kowalewski, Janusz; Bloch-Bogus?awska, Elzbieta; Zylicz, Zbigniew; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest in the opioid regulation of physiological respiratory function. However, evidence for a local opioid network that includes endogenous opioid peptides and their receptors is scarce. Tissue samples from patients with lung cancer were examined by immunohistochemistry to identify the components of the opioid network: beta-endorphin (END); its precursor, proopiomelanocortin (POMC); the key processing enzymes prohormone convertase 1 and 2; carboxypeptidase E; and END's corresponding opioid receptor, the mu-opioid receptor (MOR). Additionally, we tested pulmonary function parameters in a patient with advanced lung cancer after inhalation of nebulized morphine. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the opioid precursor POMC colocalizes with its active peptide END, key processing enzymes and MOR in alveolar macrophages, submucosal glands, cancerous cells, and pulmonary neuroendocrine cells within the bronchial epithelium. In addition, MOR was identified on sensory nerve endings within the bronchial epithelium. Furthermore, nebulized morphine improved pulmonary function parameters in advanced lung cancer. These findings provide evidence of a local opioid network in functionally important anatomical structures of the respiratory system; this network consists of all the machinery required for POMC processing into active peptides, such as END, and contains the receptors for END. Our findings indicate a need for further clinical trials to elucidate the modulatory function of peripheral endogenous opioids in the human lung. PMID:20360624

  20. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator trafficking modulates the barrier function of airway epithelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    LeSimple, Pierre; Liao, Jie; Robert, Renaud; Gruenert, Dieter C; Hanrahan, John W

    2010-04-15

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an integral membrane glycoprotein which functions as an anion channel and influences diverse cellular processes. We studied its role in the development of epithelial tightness by expressing wild-type (WT-CFTR) or mutant (Delta F508-CFTR) CFTR in human airway epithelial cell monolayers cultured at the air-liquid interface. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged WT or Delta F508 constructs were expressed in the CF bronchial cell line CFBE41o(-) using adenoviruses, and the results were compared with those obtained using CFBE41o(-) lines stably complemented with wild-type or mutant CFTR. As predicted, GFP-Delta WT-CFTR reached the apical membrane whereas GFP-F508-CFTR was only detected intracellularly. Although CFTR expression would be expected to reduce transepithelial resistance (TER), expressing GFP-CFTR significantly increased the TER of CFBE41o(-) monolayers whilst GFP-Delta F508-CFTR had no effect. Similar results were obtained with cell lines stably overexpressing Delta F508-CFTR or WT-CFTR. Preincubating Delta F508-CFTR monolayers at 29 degrees C reduced mannitol permeability and restored TER, and the effect on TER was reversible during temperature oscillations. Expression of GFP-Delta F508-CFTR or GFP-WT-CFTR in a cell line already containing endogenous WT-CFTR (Calu-3) did not alter TER. The CFTR- and temperature-dependence of TER were not affected by the CFTR inhibitor CFTR(inh)172 or low-chloride medium; therefore the effect of CFTR on barrier function was unrelated to its ion channel activity. Modulation of TER was blunted but not eliminated by genistein, implying the involvement of tyrosine phosphorylation and other mechanisms. Modulation of CFTR trafficking was correlated with an increase in tight junction depth. The results suggest that CFTR trafficking is required for the normal organisation and function of tight junctions. A reduction in barrier function caused by endoplasmic reticulum retention of Delta F508-CFTR may contribute to fluid hyperabsorption in CF airways. PMID:20156845

  1. Modulation of actin dynamics by Rac1 to target cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Tejada-Simon, Maria V

    2015-06-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 is well known for regulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization in cells. Formation of extensions at the surface of the cell is required for migration and even for cell invasion and metastases. Because an elevated level and hyperactivation of this protein has been associated with metastasis in cancer, direct regulators of Rac1 are currently envisioned as a potential strategy to treat certain cancers. Less research, however, has been done regarding the role of this small GTP-binding protein in brain development, where it has an important role in dendritic spine morphogenesis through the regulation of actin. Alteration of dendritic development and spinogenesis has been often associated with mental disorders. Rac1 is associated with and required for learning and the formation of memories in the brain. Rac1 appears to be dysregulated in certain neurodevelopmental disorders that present all these three alterations: mental retardation, atypical synaptic plasticity and aberrant spine morphology. Thus, to develop novel therapies for rescuing cognitive impairment, a reasonable approach might be to target this protein, Rac1, which plays a pivotal role in directing signals that regulate actin dynamics, which in turn might have an effect in spine cytoarchitecture and synaptic function. It is possible that novel drugs that regulate Rac1 activation and function could modulate actin cytoskeleton and spine dynamics, representing potential candidates to repair intellectual disability in disorders associated with spine abnormalities. Herein, we present a list of the current Rac1 inhibitors that might fulfill this role together with a summary of the latest findings concerning their function as they relate to neuronal studies. While the small GTPase Rac1 is well known for regulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization in different type of cells, it appears to be also required for learning and the formation of memories in the brain. Abnormal regulation of this protein has been associated with cognitive disabilities, atypical synaptic plasticity and abnormal morphology of dendritic spines in certain neurodevelopmental disorders. Thus, modulation of Rac1 activity using novel inhibitors might be a strategy to reestablish cognitive function. PMID:25818528

  2. Fundamental gaps with approximate density functionals: The derivative discontinuity revealed from ensemble considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Kraisler, Eli; Kronik, Leeor

    2014-05-14

    The fundamental gap is a central quantity in the electronic structure of matter. Unfortunately, the fundamental gap is not generally equal to the Kohn-Sham gap of density functional theory (DFT), even in principle. The two gaps differ precisely by the derivative discontinuity, namely, an abrupt change in slope of the exchange-correlation energy as a function of electron number, expected across an integer-electron point. Popular approximate functionals are thought to be devoid of a derivative discontinuity, strongly compromising their performance for prediction of spectroscopic properties. Here we show that, in fact, all exchange-correlation functionals possess a derivative discontinuity, which arises naturally from the application of ensemble considerations within DFT, without any empiricism. This derivative discontinuity can be expressed in closed form using only quantities obtained in the course of a standard DFT calculation of the neutral system. For small, finite systems, addition of this derivative discontinuity indeed results in a greatly improved prediction for the fundamental gap, even when based on the most simple approximate exchange-correlation density functional – the local density approximation (LDA). For solids, the same scheme is exact in principle, but when applied to LDA it results in a vanishing derivative discontinuity correction. This failure is shown to be directly related to the failure of LDA in predicting fundamental gaps from total energy differences in extended systems.

  3. Systems biology approach reveals possible evolutionarily conserved moonlighting functions for enolase.

    PubMed

    Paludo, Gabriela Prado; Lorenzatto, Karina Rodrigues; Bonatto, Diego; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2015-10-01

    Glycolytic enzymes, such as enolase, have been described as multifunctional complex proteins that also display non-glycolytic activities, termed moonlighting functions. Although enolase multifunctionality has been described for several organisms, the conservation of enolase alternative functions through different phyla has not been explored with more details. A useful strategy to investigate moonlighting functions is the use of systems biology tools, which allow the prediction of protein functions/interactions by graph design and analysis. In this work, available information from protein-protein interaction (PPI) databases were used to design enolase PPI networks for four eukaryotic organisms, namely Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, covering a wide spectrum of this domain of life. PPI networks with number of nodes ranging from 140 to 411 and up to 15,855 connections were generated, and modularity and centrality analyses, and functional enrichment were performed for all of them. The performed analyses showed that enolase is a central node within the networks, and that, in addition to its canonical interactions with proteins related to glycolysis and energetic metabolism, it is also part of protein clusters related to different biological processes, like transcription, development, and apoptosis, among others. Some of these non-glycolytic clusters, are partially conserved between networks, in terms of overall sharing of orthologs, overall cluster structure, and/or at the levels of key regulatory proteins within clusters. Overall, our results provided evidences of enolase multifunctionality and evolutionary conservation of enolase PPIs at all these levels. PMID:25978602

  4. Quantitative immunofluorescence mapping reveals little functional coclustering of proteins within platelet ?-granules.

    PubMed

    Kamykowski, Jeffrey; Carlton, Peter; Sehgal, Siddharth; Storrie, Brian

    2011-08-01

    Platelets are small anucleate blood cells that aggregate to seal leaks at sites of vascular injury and are important in the pathology of atherosclerosis, acute coronary syndromes, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, and the regulation of angiogenesis. In all cases, platelet aggregation requires release of stored proteins from ?-granules. However, how proteins with potentially antagonistic functions are packaged within ?-granules is controversial. One possibility is the packaging of functional agonists and antagonists into different ?-granule populations. By quantitative immunofluorescence colocalization, we found that pair-wise comparisons of 15 angiogenic-relevant ?-granule proteins displayed little, if any, pattern of functional coclustering. Rather, the data suggested a Gaussian distribution indicative of stochastic protein delivery to individual granules. The apparent physiologic paradox raised by these data may be explained through alternate mechanisms, such as differential content release through incomplete granule fusion or dampened and balanced regulatory networks brought about by the corelease of antagonistic factors. PMID:21622648

  5. Proteomic profiling revealed the functional networks associated with mitotic catastrophe of HepG2 hepatoma cells induced by 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bo; Huang Bo; Guan Hua; Zhang Shimeng; Xu Qinzhi; He Xingpeng; Liu Xiaodan; Wang Yu; Shang Zengfu; Zhou Pingkun

    2011-05-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, a form of cell death resulting from abnormal mitosis, is a cytotoxic death pathway as well as an appealing mechanistic strategy for the development of anti-cancer drugs. In this study, 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde was demonstrated to induce DNA double-strand break, multipolar spindles, sustain mitotic arrest and generate multinucleated cells, all of which indicate mitotic catastrophe, in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. We used proteomic profiling to identify the differentially expressed proteins underlying mitotic catastrophe. A total of 137 differentially expressed proteins (76 upregulated and 61 downregulated proteins) were identified. Some of the changed proteins have previously been associated with mitotic catastrophe, such as DNA-PKcs, FoxM1, RCC1, cyclin E, PLK1-pT210, 14-3-3{sigma} and HSP70. Multiple isoforms of 14-3-3, heat-shock proteins and tubulin were upregulated. Analysis of functional significance revealed that the 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the differentially expressed proteins. The modulated proteins were found to be involved in macromolecule complex assembly, cell death, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin and cytoskeletal organization. These findings revealed the overall molecular events and functional signaling networks associated with spindle disruption and mitotic catastrophe. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: > 6-bromoisovanillin induced spindle disruption and sustained mitotic arrest, consequently resulted in mitotic catastrophe. > Proteomic profiling identified 137 differentially expressed proteins associated mitotic catastrophe. > The 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the altered proteins. > The macromolecule complex assembly, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin organization were also shown involved in mitotic catastrophe.

  6. Functional Screening of Hydrolytic Activities Reveals an Extremely Thermostable Cellulase from a Deep-Sea Archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Leis, Benedikt; Heinze, Simon; Angelov, Angel; Pham, Vu Thuy Trang; Thürmer, Andrea; Jebbar, Mohamed; Golyshin, Peter N.; Streit, Wolfgang R.; Daniel, Rolf; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Extreme habitats serve as a source of enzymes that are active under extreme conditions and are candidates for industrial applications. In this work, six large-insert mixed genomic libraries were screened for hydrolase activities in a broad temperature range (8–70°C). Among a variety of hydrolytic activities, one fosmid clone, derived from a library of pooled isolates of hyperthermophilic archaea from deep sea vents, displayed hydrolytic activity on carboxymethyl cellulose substrate plates at 70°C but not at lower temperatures. Sequence analysis of the fosmid insert revealed a gene encoding a novel glycoside hydrolase family 12 (GHF12) endo-1,4-?-glucanase, termed Cel12E. The enzyme shares 45% sequence identity with a protein from the archaeon Thermococcus sp. AM4 and displays a unique multidomain architecture. Biochemical characterization of Cel12E revealed a remarkably thermostable protein, which appears to be of archaeal origin. The enzyme displayed maximum activity at 92°C and was active on a variety of linear 1,4-?-glucans like carboxymethyl cellulose, ?-glucan, lichenan, and phosphoric acid swollen cellulose. The protein is able to bind to various insoluble ?-glucans. Product pattern analysis indicated that Cel12E is an endo-cleaving ?-glucanase. Cel12E expands the toolbox of hyperthermostable archaeal cellulases with biotechnological potential. PMID:26191525

  7. Comparative genome analysis of PHB gene family reveals deep evolutionary origins and diverse gene function

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background PHB (Prohibitin) gene family is involved in a variety of functions important for different biological processes. PHB genes are ubiquitously present in divergent species from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Human PHB genes have been found to be associated with various diseases. Recent studies by our group and others have shown diverse function of PHB genes in plants for development, senescence, defence, and others. Despite the importance of the PHB gene family, no comprehensive gene family analysis has been carried to evaluate the relatedness of PHB genes across different species. In order to better guide the gene function analysis and understand the evolution of the PHB gene family, we therefore carried out the comparative genome analysis of the PHB genes across different kingdoms. Results The relatedness, motif distribution, and intron/exon distribution all indicated that PHB genes is a relatively conserved gene family. The PHB genes can be classified into 5 classes and each class have a very deep evolutionary origin. The PHB genes within the class maintained the same motif patterns during the evolution. With Arabidopsis as the model species, we found that PHB gene intron/exon structure and domains are also conserved during the evolution. Despite being a conserved gene family, various gene duplication events led to the expansion of the PHB genes. Both segmental and tandem gene duplication were involved in Arabidopsis PHB gene family expansion. However, segmental duplication is predominant in Arabidopsis. Moreover, most of the duplicated genes experienced neofunctionalization. The results highlighted that PHB genes might be involved in important functions so that the duplicated genes are under the evolutionary pressure to derive new function. Conclusion PHB gene family is a conserved gene family and accounts for diverse but important biological functions based on the similar molecular mechanisms. The highly diverse biological function indicated that more research needs to be carried out to dissect the PHB gene function. The conserved gene evolution indicated that the study in the model species can be translated to human and mammalian studies. PMID:20946606

  8. Cells transplanted onto the surface of the glial scar reveal hidden potential for functional neural regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Tetsuji; Holley, Matthew C.; Hashido, Kento; Ono, Kazuya; Shimomura, Koichiro; Horie, Rie T.; Hamaguchi, Kiyomi; Yoshida, Atsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Ito, Juichi

    2015-01-01

    Cell transplantation therapy has long been investigated as a therapeutic intervention for neurodegenerative disorders, including spinal cord injury, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Indeed, patients have high hopes for a cell-based therapy. However, there are numerous practical challenges for clinical translation. One major problem is that only very low numbers of donor cells survive and achieve functional integration into the host. Glial scar tissue in chronic neurodegenerative disorders strongly inhibits regeneration, and this inhibition must be overcome to accomplish successful cell transplantation. Intraneural cell transplantation is considered to be the best way to deliver cells to the host. We questioned this view with experiments in vivo on a rat glial scar model of the auditory system. Our results show that intraneural transplantation to the auditory nerve, preceded by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC)-treatment, is ineffective. There is no functional recovery, and almost all transplanted cells die within a few weeks. However, when donor cells are placed on the surface of a ChABC-treated gliotic auditory nerve, they autonomously migrate into it and recapitulate glia- and neuron-guided cell migration modes to repair the auditory pathway and recover auditory function. Surface transplantation may thus pave the way for improved functional integration of donor cells into host tissue, providing a less invasive approach to rescue clinically important neural tracts. PMID:26080415

  9. Diversity and functions of bacterial community in drinking water biofilms revealed by high-throughput sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yuanqing; Mao, Yanping; Wang, Zhiping; Zhang, Tong

    2015-06-01

    The development of biofilms in drinking water (DW) systems may cause various problems to water quality. To investigate the community structure of biofilms on different pipe materials and the global/specific metabolic functions of DW biofilms, PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing data for 16S rRNA genes and Illumina metagenomic data were generated and analysed. Considerable differences in bacterial diversity and taxonomic structure were identified between biofilms formed on stainless steel and biofilms formed on plastics, indicating that the metallic materials facilitate the formation of higher diversity biofilms. Moreover, variations in several dominant genera were observed during biofilm formation. Based on PCA analysis, the global functions in the DW biofilms were similar to other DW metagenomes. Beyond the global functions, the occurrences and abundances of specific protective genes involved in the glutathione metabolism, the SoxRS system, the OxyR system, RpoS regulated genes, and the production/degradation of extracellular polymeric substances were also evaluated. A near-complete and low-contamination draft genome was constructed from the metagenome of the DW biofilm, based on the coverage and tetranucleotide frequencies, and identified as a Bradyrhizobiaceae-like bacterium according to a phylogenetic analysis. Our findings provide new insight into DW biofilms, especially in terms of their metabolic functions.

  10. proteinsSTRUCTURE O FUNCTION O BIOINFORMATICS Structure-based simulations reveal

    E-print Network

    proteins with roles in diverse functions such as sight, muscle contraction, and gene transcription the cell membrane. However, their allosteric activation mechanism is not fully understood; crystal as allosteric transducers, responding to environmental stimuli and activating sig- nal pathways inside the cell

  11. TURKEY FECAL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND ECOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS REVEALED BY 16S RDNA AND METAGENOME SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Turkey feces are an important source of fecal waste in the United States. With the exception of isolated studies on bacterial pathogens, little is known about the type of bacteria inhabiting the turkey gut. In order to understand the microbial diversity and functional genes assoc...

  12. The functional interactome of PYHIN immune regulators reveals IFIX is a sensor of viral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Diner, Benjamin A; Li, Tuo; Greco, Todd M; Crow, Marni S; Fuesler, John A; Wang, Jennifer; Cristea, Ileana M

    2015-01-01

    The human PYHIN proteins, AIM2, IFI16, IFIX, and MNDA, are critical regulators of immune response, transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle. However, their protein interactions and underlying mechanisms remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we provide the interaction network for all PYHIN proteins and define a function in sensing of viral DNA for the previously uncharacterized IFIX protein. By designing a cell-based inducible system and integrating microscopy, immunoaffinity capture, quantitative mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics, we identify over 300 PYHIN interactions reflective of diverse functions, including DNA damage response, transcription regulation, intracellular signaling, and antiviral response. In view of the IFIX interaction with antiviral factors, including nuclear PML bodies, we further characterize IFIX and demonstrate its function in restricting herpesvirus replication. We discover that IFIX detects viral DNA in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, binding foreign DNA via its HIN domain in a sequence-non-specific manner. Furthermore, IFIX contributes to the induction of interferon response. Our results highlight the value of integrative proteomics in deducing protein function and establish IFIX as an antiviral DNA sensor important for mounting immune responses. PMID:25665578

  13. Functional Ecological Gene Networks to Reveal the Changes Among Microbial Interactions Under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; Zhou, Jizhong; Luo, Feng; He, Zhili; Tu, Qichao; Zhi, Xiaoyang

    2010-05-17

    Biodiversity and its responses to environmental changes is a central issue in ecology, and for society. Almost all microbial biodiversity researches focus on species richness and abundance but ignore the interactions among different microbial species/populations. However, determining the interactions and their relationships to environmental changes in microbial communities is a grand challenge, primarily due to the lack of information on the network structure among different microbial species/populations. Here, a novel random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework for identifying functional ecological gene networks (fEGNs) is developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data from the grassland microbial communities in a long-term FACE (Free Air CO2 Enrichment) experiment. Both fEGNs under elevated CO2 (eCO2) and ambient CO2 (aCO2) possessed general characteristics of many complex systems such as scale-free, small-world, modular and hierarchical. However, the topological structure of the fEGNs is distinctly different between eCO2 and aCO2, suggesting that eCO2 dramatically altered the interactions among different microbial functional groups/populations. In addition, the changes in network structure were significantly correlated with soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, and plant productivity, indicating the potential importance of network interactions in ecosystem functioning. Elucidating network interactions in microbial communities and their responses to environmental changes are fundamentally important for research in microbial ecology, systems microbiology, and global change.

  14. Diversity and functions of bacterial community in drinking water biofilms revealed by high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yuanqing; Mao, Yanping; Wang, Zhiping; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    The development of biofilms in drinking water (DW) systems may cause various problems to water quality. To investigate the community structure of biofilms on different pipe materials and the global/specific metabolic functions of DW biofilms, PCR-based 454 pyrosequencing data for 16S rRNA genes and Illumina metagenomic data were generated and analysed. Considerable differences in bacterial diversity and taxonomic structure were identified between biofilms formed on stainless steel and biofilms formed on plastics, indicating that the metallic materials facilitate the formation of higher diversity biofilms. Moreover, variations in several dominant genera were observed during biofilm formation. Based on PCA analysis, the global functions in the DW biofilms were similar to other DW metagenomes. Beyond the global functions, the occurrences and abundances of specific protective genes involved in the glutathione metabolism, the SoxRS system, the OxyR system, RpoS regulated genes, and the production/degradation of extracellular polymeric substances were also evaluated. A near-complete and low-contamination draft genome was constructed from the metagenome of the DW biofilm, based on the coverage and tetranucleotide frequencies, and identified as a Bradyrhizobiaceae-like bacterium according to a phylogenetic analysis. Our findings provide new insight into DW biofilms, especially in terms of their metabolic functions. PMID:26067561

  15. Resting state functional MRI reveals abnormal network connectivity in neurofibromatosis 1.

    PubMed

    Tomson, Steffie N; Schreiner, Matthew J; Narayan, Manjari; Rosser, Tena; Enrique, Nicole; Silva, Alcino J; Allen, Genevera I; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Bearden, Carrie E

    2015-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the neurofibromin 1 gene at locus 17q11.2. Individuals with NF1 have an increased incidence of learning disabilities, attention deficits, and autism spectrum disorders. As a single-gene disorder, NF1 represents a valuable model for understanding gene-brain-behavior relationships. While mouse models have elucidated molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying learning deficits associated with this mutation, little is known about functional brain architecture in human subjects with NF1. To address this question, we used resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fcMRI) to elucidate the intrinsic network structure of 30 NF1 participants compared with 30 healthy demographically matched controls during an eyes-open rs-fcMRI scan. Novel statistical methods were employed to quantify differences in local connectivity (edge strength) and modularity structure, in combination with traditional global graph theory applications. Our findings suggest that individuals with NF1 have reduced anterior-posterior connectivity, weaker bilateral edges, and altered modularity clustering relative to healthy controls. Further, edge strength and modular clustering indices were correlated with IQ and internalizing symptoms. These findings suggest that Ras signaling disruption may lead to abnormal functional brain connectivity; further investigation into the functional consequences of these alterations in both humans and in animal models is warranted. Hum Brain Mapp 36:4566-4581, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26304096

  16. Role of Survivin in cytokinesis revealed by a separation-of-function allele

    PubMed Central

    Szafer-Glusman, Edith; Fuller, Margaret T.; Giansanti, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), containing Aurora B kinase, Inner Centromere Protein, Survivin, and Borealin, regulates chromosome condensation and interaction between kinetochores and microtubules at metaphase, then relocalizes to midzone microtubules at anaphase and regulates central spindle organization and cytokinesis. However, the precise role(s) played by the CPC in anaphase have been obscured by its prior functions in metaphase. Here we identify a missense allele of Drosophila Survivin that allows CPC localization and function during metaphase but not cytokinesis. Analysis of mutant cells showed that Survivin is essential to target the CPC and the mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 orthologue Pavarotti (Pav) to the central spindle and equatorial cell cortex during anaphase in both larval neuroblasts and spermatocytes. Survivin also enabled localization of Polo kinase and Rho at the equatorial cortex in spermatocytes, critical for contractile ring assembly. In neuroblasts, in contrast, Survivin function was not required for localization of Rho, Polo, or Myosin II to a broad equatorial cortical band but was required for Myosin II to transition to a compact, fully constricted ring. Analysis of this “separation-of-function” allele demonstrates the direct role of Survivin and the CPC in cytokinesis and highlights striking differences in regulation of cytokinesis in different cell systems. PMID:21865602

  17. Functional Biogeography of Ocean Microbes Revealed through Non-Negative Matrix Factorization

    E-print Network

    Elliot, Marie A.

    assemblages of bacteria, archaea, viruses and microeukaryotes has yielded new insights into the structure unknown microbial taxa whose spatial distributions are limited by environmental conditions, ecological identifies common functional signatures within several of the components. We use our method as a filter

  18. Comprehensive analysis reveals how single nucleotides contribute to noncoding RNA function in bacterial quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Steven T; Valastyan, Julie S; Taillefumier, Thibaud; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-11-01

    Five homologous noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs), called the Qrr1-5 sRNAs, function in the Vibrio harveyi quorum-sensing cascade to drive its operation. Qrr1-5 use four different regulatory mechanisms to control the expression of ?20 mRNA targets. Little is known about the roles individual nucleotides play in mRNA target selection, in determining regulatory mechanism, or in defining Qrr potency and dynamics of target regulation. To identify the nucleotides vital for Qrr function, we developed a method we call RSort-Seq that combines saturating mutagenesis, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, high-throughput sequencing, and mutual information theory to explore the role that every nucleotide in Qrr4 plays in regulation of two mRNA targets, luxR and luxO. Companion biochemical assays allowed us to assign specific regulatory functions/underlying molecular mechanisms to each important base. This strategy yielded a regional map of nucleotides in Qrr4 vital for stability, Hfq interaction, stem-loop formation, and base pairing to both luxR and luxO, to luxR only, and to luxO only. In terms of nucleotides critical for sRNA function, the RSort-Seq analysis provided strikingly different results from those predicted by commonly used regulatory RNA-folding algorithms. This approach is applicable to any RNA-RNA interaction, including sRNAs in other bacteria and regulatory RNAs in higher organisms. PMID:26483489

  19. Functional genomic screen and network analysis reveal novel modifiers of tauopathy dissociated from tau phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ambegaokar, Surendra S.; Jackson, George R.

    2011-01-01

    A functional genetic screen using loss-of-function and gain-of-function alleles was performed to identify modifiers of tau-induced neurotoxicity using the 2N/4R (full-length) isoform of wild-type human tau expressed in the fly retina. We previously reported eye pigment mutations, which create dysfunctional lysosomes, as potent modifiers; here, we report 37 additional genes identified from ?1900 genes screened, including the kinases shaggy/GSK-3beta, par-1/MARK, CamKI and Mekk1. Tau acts synergistically with Mekk1 and p38 to down-regulate extracellular regulated kinase activity, with a corresponding decrease in AT8 immunoreactivity (pS202/T205), suggesting that tau can participate in signaling pathways to regulate its own kinases. Modifiers showed poor correlation with tau phosphorylation (using the AT8, 12E8 and AT270 epitopes); moreover, tested suppressors of wild-type tau were equally effective in suppressing toxicity of a phosphorylation-resistant S11A tau construct, demonstrating that changes in tau phosphorylation state are not required to suppress or enhance its toxicity. Genes related to autophagy, the cell cycle, RNA-associated proteins and chromatin-binding proteins constitute a large percentage of identified modifiers. Other functional categories identified include mitochondrial proteins, lipid trafficking, Golgi proteins, kinesins and dynein and the Hsp70/Hsp90-organizing protein (Hop). Network analysis uncovered several other genes highly associated with the functional modifiers, including genes related to the PI3K, Notch, BMP/TGF-? and Hedgehog pathways, and nuclear trafficking. Activity of GSK-3? is strongly upregulated due to TDP-43 expression, and reduced GSK-3? dosage is also a common suppressor of A?42 and TDP-43 toxicity. These findings suggest therapeutic targets other than mitigation of tau phosphorylation. PMID:21949350

  20. Characterization of 4-HNE modified L-FABP reveals alterations in structural and functional dynamics.

    PubMed

    Smathers, Rebecca L; Fritz, Kristofer S; Galligan, James J; Shearn, Colin T; Reigan, Philip; Marks, Michael J; Petersen, Dennis R

    2012-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is a reactive ?,?-unsaturated aldehyde produced during oxidative stress and subsequent lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The reactivity of 4-HNE towards DNA and nucleophilic amino acids has been well established. In this report, using proteomic approaches, liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) is identified as a target for modification by 4-HNE. This lipid binding protein mediates the uptake and trafficking of hydrophobic ligands throughout cellular compartments. Ethanol caused a significant decrease in L-FABP protein (P<0.001) and mRNA (P<0.05), as well as increased poly-ubiquitinated L-FABP (P<0.001). Sites of 4-HNE adduction on mouse recombinant L-FABP were mapped using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry on apo (Lys57 and Cys69) and holo (Lys6, Lys31, His43, Lys46, Lys57 and Cys69) L-FABP. The impact of 4-HNE adduction was found to occur in a concentration-dependent manner; affinity for the fluorescent ligand, anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid, was reduced from 0.347 µM to Kd(1)?=?0.395 µM and Kd(2)?=?34.20 µM. Saturation analyses revealed that capacity for ligand is reduced by approximately 50% when adducted by 4-HNE. Thermal stability curves of apo L-FABP was also found to be significantly affected by 4-HNE adduction (?Tm?=?5.44°C, P<0.01). Computational-based molecular modeling simulations of adducted protein revealed minor conformational changes in global protein structure of apo and holo L-FABP while more apparent differences were observed within the internal binding pocket, revealing reduced area and structural integrity. New solvent accessible portals on the periphery of the protein were observed following 4-HNE modification in both the apo and holo state, suggesting an adaptive response to carbonylation. The results from this study detail the dynamic process associated with L-FABP modification by 4-HNE and provide insight as to how alterations in structural integrity and ligand binding may a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of ALD. PMID:22701647

  1. Genome-Wide Expression Analysis Reveals Diverse Effects of Acute Nicotine Exposure on Neuronal Function-Related Genes and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ju; Cui, Wenyan; Wei, Jinxue; Sun, Dongxiao; Gutala, Ramana; Gu, Jun; Li, Ming D.

    2011-01-01

    Previous human and animal studies demonstrate that acute nicotine exposure has complicated influences on the function of the nervous system, which may lead to long-lasting effects on the behavior and physiology of the subject. To determine the genes and pathways that might account for long-term changes after acute nicotine exposure, a pathway-focused oligoarray specifically designed for drug addiction research was used to assess acute nicotine effect on gene expression in the neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells. Our results showed that 295 genes involved in various biological functions were differentially regulated by 1?h of nicotine treatment. Among these genes, the expression changes of 221 were blocked by mecamylamine, indicating that the majority of nicotine-modulated genes were altered through the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs)-mediated signaling process. We further identified 14 biochemical pathways enriched among the nicotine-modulated genes, among which were those involved in neural development/synaptic plasticity, neuronal survival/death, immune response, or cellular metabolism. In the genes significantly regulated by nicotine but blocked by mecamylamine, 13 enriched pathways were detected. Nine of these pathways were shared with those enriched in the genes regulated by nicotine, including neuronal function-related pathways such as glucocorticoid receptor signaling, p38 MAPK signaling, PI3K/AKT signaling, and PTEN signaling, implying that nAChRs play important roles in the regulation of these biological processes. Together, our results not only provide insights into the mechanism underlying the acute response of neuronal cells to nicotine but also provide clues to how acute nicotine exposure exerts long-term effects on the nervous system. PMID:21556275

  2. Individual protomers of a G protein-coupled receptor dimer integrate distinct functional modules

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Nathan D.; Lee, Kyung-Soon; Wacker-Mhyre, Jennifer L.; Kountz, Timothy S.; Park, Ji-Min; Harris, Dorathy-Ann; Estrada, Marianne; Stewart, Aaron; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Hague, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in proteomic technology reveal G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are organized as large, macromolecular protein complexes in cell membranes, adding a new layer of intricacy to GPCR signaling. We previously reported the ?1D-adrenergic receptor (ADRA1D)—a key regulator of cardiovascular, urinary and CNS function—binds the syntrophin family of PDZ domain proteins (SNTA, SNTB1, and SNTB2) through a C-terminal PDZ ligand interaction, ensuring receptor plasma membrane localization and G-protein coupling. To assess the uniqueness of this novel GPCR complex, 23 human GPCRs containing Type I PDZ ligands were subjected to TAP/MS proteomic analysis. Syntrophins did not interact with any other GPCRs. Unexpectedly, a second PDZ domain protein, scribble (SCRIB), was detected in ADRA1D complexes. Biochemical, proteomic, and dynamic mass redistribution analyses indicate syntrophins and SCRIB compete for the PDZ ligand, simultaneously exist within an ADRA1D multimer, and impart divergent pharmacological properties to the complex. Our results reveal an unprecedented modular dimeric architecture for the ADRA1D in the cell membrane, providing unexpected opportunities for fine-tuning receptor function through novel protein interactions in vivo, and for intervening in signal transduction with small molecules that can stabilize or disrupt unique GPCR:PDZ protein interfaces. PMID:26617989

  3. Functional Gene Polymorphism to Reveal Species History: The Case of the CRTISO Gene in Cultivated Carrots

    PubMed Central

    Clotault, Jérémy; Huet, Sébastien; Briard, Mathilde; Peltier, Didier; Geoffriau, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Carrot is a vegetable cultivated worldwide for the consumption of its root. Historical data indicate that root colour has been differentially selected over time and according to geographical areas. Root pigmentation depends on the relative proportion of different carotenoids for the white, yellow, orange and red types but only internally for the purple one. The genetic control for root carotenoid content might be partially associated with carotenoid biosynthetic genes. Carotenoid isomerase (CRTISO) has emerged as a regulatory step in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway and could be a good candidate to show how a metabolic pathway gene reflects a species genetic history. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, the nucleotide polymorphism and the linkage disequilibrium among the complete CRTISO sequence, and the deviation from neutral expectation were analysed by considering population subdivision revealed with 17 microsatellite markers. A sample of 39 accessions, which represented different geographical origins and root colours, was used. Cultivated carrot was divided into two genetic groups: one from Middle East and Asia (Eastern group), and another one mainly from Europe (Western group). The Western and Eastern genetic groups were suggested to be differentially affected by selection: a signature of balancing selection was detected within the first group whereas the second one showed no selection. A focus on orange-rooted carrots revealed that cultivars cultivated in Asia were mainly assigned to the Western group but showed CRTISO haplotypes common to Eastern carrots. Conclusion The carotenoid pathway CRTISO gene data proved to be complementary to neutral markers in order to bring critical insight in the cultivated carrot history. We confirmed the occurrence of two migration events since domestication. Our results showed a European background in material from Japan and Central Asia. While confirming the introduction of European carrots in Japanese resources, the history of Central Asia material remains unclear. PMID:23940644

  4. Functions of Paracrine PDGF Signaling in the Proangiogenic Tumor Stroma Revealed by Pharmacological Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Pietras, Kristian; Pahler, Jessica; Bergers, Gabriele; Hanahan, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Background Important support functions, including promotion of tumor growth, angiogenesis, and invasion, have been attributed to the different cell types populating the tumor stroma, i.e., endothelial cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts, pericytes, and infiltrating inflammatory cells. Fibroblasts have long been recognized inside carcinomas and are increasingly implicated as functional participants. The stroma is prominent in cervical carcinoma, and distinguishable from nonmalignant tissue, suggestive of altered (tumor-promoting) functions. We postulated that pharmacological targeting of putative stromal support functions, in particular those of cancer-associated fibroblasts, could have therapeutic utility, and sought to assess the possibility in a pre-clinical setting. Methods and Findings We used a genetically engineered mouse model of cervical carcinogenesis to investigate platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor signaling in cancer-associated fibroblasts and pericytes. Pharmacological blockade of PDGF receptor signaling with the clinically approved kinase inhibitor imatinib slowed progression of premalignant cervical lesions in this model, and impaired the growth of preexisting invasive carcinomas. Inhibition of stromal PDGF receptors reduced proliferation and angiogenesis in cervical lesions through a mechanism involving suppression of expression of the angiogenic factor fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) and the epithelial cell growth factor FGF-7 by cancer-associated fibroblasts. Treatment with neutralizing antibodies to the PDGF receptors recapitulated these effects. A ligand trap for the FGFs impaired the angiogenic phenotype similarly to imatinib. Thus PDGF ligands expressed by cancerous epithelia evidently stimulate PDGFR-expressing stroma to up-regulate FGFs, promoting angiogenesis and epithelial proliferation, elements of a multicellular signaling network that elicits functional capabilities in the tumor microenvironment. Conclusions This study illustrates the therapeutic benefits in a mouse model of human cervical cancer of mechanism-based targeting of the stroma, in particular cancer-associated fibroblasts. Drugs aimed at stromal fibroblast signals and effector functions may prove complementary to conventional treatments targeting the overt cancer cells for a range of solid tumors, possibly including cervical carcinoma, the second most common lethal malignancy in women worldwide, for which management remains poor. PMID:18232728

  5. Wnt-5a modulates recycling of functional GABAA receptors on hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Cuitino, Loreto; Godoy, Juan A; Farías, Ginny G; Couve, Andrés; Bonansco, Christian; Fuenzalida, Marco; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2010-06-23

    GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)-Rs) play a significant role in mediating fast synaptic inhibition and it is the main inhibitory receptor in the CNS. The role of Wnt signaling in coordinating synapse structure and function in the mature CNS is poorly understood. In previous studies we found that Wnt ligands can modulate excitatory synapses through remodeling both presynaptic and postsynaptic regions. In this current study we provide evidence for the effect of Wnt-5a on postsynaptic GABA(A)-Rs. We observed that Wnt-5a induces surface expression and maintenance of this receptor in the neuronal membrane. The evoked IPSC recordings in rat hippocampal slice indicate that Wnt-5a can regulates postsynaptically the hippocampal inhibitory synapses. We found also that Wnt-5a: (a) induces the insertion and clustering of GABA(A)-Rs in the membrane; (b) increases the amplitude of GABA-currents due exclusively to postsynaptic mechanisms; (c) does not affect the endocytic process, but increases the receptor recycling. Finally, all these effects on the GABA(A)-Rs are mediated by the activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). Therefore, we postulate that Wnt-5a, by activation of CaMKII, induces the recycling of functional GABA(A)-Rs on the mature hippocampal neurons. PMID:20573888

  6. Expression of functional Bacillus SpoIISAB toxin-antitoxin modules in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Florek, Patrik; Muchová, Katarína; Pavelcíková, Pamela; Barák, Imrich

    2008-01-01

    SpoIISA and SpoIISB proteins from Bacillus subtilis belong to a recently described bacterial programmed-cell death system. The current work demonstrates that the toxin-antitoxin module is also functional in Escherichia coli cells, where the expression of SpoIISA toxin leads to transient growth arrest coupled with cell lysis, and SpoIISA-induced death can be prevented by coexpression of its cognate antitoxin, SpoIISB. Escherichia coli cells appear to be able to escape the SpoIISA killing by activation of a specific, as yet unidentified protease that cleaves out the cytosolic part of the protein. Analysis of the toxic effects of the transmembrane and cytosolic portions of SpoIISA showed that neither of them separately can function as a toxin; therefore, both parts of the protein have to act in concert to exert the killing. This work also identifies genes encoding putative homologues of SpoIISA and SpoIISB proteins on chromosomes of other Bacilli species. The SpoIISA-like proteins from Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus were shown to manifest the same effect on the viability of E. coli as their homologue from B. subtilis. Moreover, expression of the proposed spoIISB-like gene rescues E. coli cells from death induced by the SpoIISA homologue. PMID:18096016

  7. Suggestion-Induced Modulation of Semantic Priming during Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Martin; Kiefer, Markus; Bongartz, Walter; Grön, Georg; Hoenig, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a primed visual lexical decision task, we investigated the neural and functional mechanisms underlying modulations of semantic word processing through hypnotic suggestions aimed at altering lexical processing of primes. The priming task was to discriminate between target words and pseudowords presented 200 ms after the prime word which was semantically related or unrelated to the target. In a counterbalanced study design, each participant performed the task once at normal wakefulness and once after the administration of hypnotic suggestions to perceive the prime as a meaningless symbol of a foreign language. Neural correlates of priming were defined as significantly lower activations upon semantically related compared to unrelated trials. We found significant suggestive treatment-induced reductions in neural priming, albeit irrespective of the degree of suggestibility. Neural priming was attenuated upon suggestive treatment compared with normal wakefulness in brain regions supporting automatic (fusiform gyrus) and controlled semantic processing (superior and middle temporal gyri, pre- and postcentral gyri, and supplementary motor area). Hence, suggestions reduced semantic word processing by conjointly dampening both automatic and strategic semantic processes. PMID:25923740

  8. Prebiotics Modulate the Effects of Antibiotics on Gut Microbial Diversity and Functioning in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura P; Walton, Gemma E; Psichas, Arianna; Frost, Gary S; Gibson, Glenn R; Barraclough, Timothy G

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal bacteria carry out many fundamental roles, such as the fermentation of non-digestible dietary carbohydrates to produce short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which can affect host energy levels and gut hormone regulation. Understanding how to manage this ecosystem to improve human health is an important but challenging goal. Antibiotics are the front line of defence against pathogens, but in turn they have adverse effects on indigenous microbial diversity and function. Here, we have investigated whether dietary supplementation--another method used to modulate gut composition and function--could be used to ameliorate the side effects of antibiotics. We perturbed gut bacterial communities with gentamicin and ampicillin in anaerobic batch cultures in vitro. Cultures were supplemented with either pectin (a non-fermentable fibre), inulin (a commonly used prebiotic that promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria) or neither. Although antibiotics often negated the beneficial effects of dietary supplementation, in some treatment combinations, notably ampicillin and inulin, dietary supplementation ameliorated the effects of antibiotics. There is therefore potential for using supplements to lessen the adverse effects of antibiotics. Further knowledge of such mechanisms could lead to better therapeutic manipulation of the human gut microbiota. PMID:26053617

  9. Effect of tilted metallic mesh on modulation transfer function of optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhengang; Fan, Zhigang; Zheng, Dandan

    2008-10-01

    In order to analyze the effect of a tilted metallic mesh on the modulation transfer function (MTF) of an optical system, the relation between the MTF and tilted angle ? of the mesh was established through calculating the point spread function (PSF) of the tilted mesh using a model based on Huygens-Fresnel diffraction theory and then conducting Fourier transform on the calculated PSF. It was found through analyses that the density of triangular spikes on the MTF curve is compressed by 1/cos(?) times along axis x, and the MTF values are degraded due to the stretch and asymmetrical distribution of diffraction spots of the tilted mesh; moreover, when the aperture of the mesh is so small that it is the optical stop itself, the cutoff frequency of MTF along axis x decreases by cos(?) times and the MTF values drop largely. The degradation effect on MTF caused by a tilted mesh can be reduced by using a large-size metallic mesh and increasing the porosity ratio of metallic mesh.

  10. Cortical organization of inhibition-related functions and modulation by psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Stacie L.; Crocker, Laura D.; Spielberg, Jeffery M.; Engels, Anna S.; Banich, Marie T.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Miller, Gregory A.; Heller, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Individual differences in inhibition-related functions have been implicated as risk factors for a broad range of psychopathology, including anxiety and depression. Delineating neural mechanisms of distinct inhibition-related functions may clarify their role in the development and maintenance of psychopathology. The present study tested the hypothesis that activity in common and distinct brain regions would be associated with an ecologically sensitive, self-report measure of inhibition and a laboratory performance measure of prepotent response inhibition. Results indicated that sub-regions of DLPFC distinguished measures of inhibition, whereas left inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral inferior parietal cortex were associated with both types of inhibition. Additionally, co-occurring anxiety and depression modulated neural activity in select brain regions associated with response inhibition. Results imply that specific combinations of anxiety and depression dimensions are associated with failure to implement top-down attentional control as reflected in inefficient recruitment of posterior DLPFC and increased activation in regions associated with threat (MTG) and worry (BA10). Present findings elucidate possible neural mechanisms of interference that could help explain executive control deficits in psychopathology. PMID:23781192

  11. Cortical organization of inhibition-related functions and modulation by psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Warren, Stacie L; Crocker, Laura D; Spielberg, Jeffery M; Engels, Anna S; Banich, Marie T; Sutton, Bradley P; Miller, Gregory A; Heller, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Individual differences in inhibition-related functions have been implicated as risk factors for a broad range of psychopathology, including anxiety and depression. Delineating neural mechanisms of distinct inhibition-related functions may clarify their role in the development and maintenance of psychopathology. The present study tested the hypothesis that activity in common and distinct brain regions would be associated with an ecologically sensitive, self-report measure of inhibition and a laboratory performance measure of prepotent response inhibition. Results indicated that sub-regions of DLPFC distinguished measures of inhibition, whereas left inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral inferior parietal cortex were associated with both types of inhibition. Additionally, co-occurring anxiety and depression modulated neural activity in select brain regions associated with response inhibition. Results imply that specific combinations of anxiety and depression dimensions are associated with failure to implement top-down attentional control as reflected in inefficient recruitment of posterior DLPFC and increased activation in regions associated with threat (MTG) and worry (BA10). Present findings elucidate possible neural mechanisms of interference that could help explain executive control deficits in psychopathology. PMID:23781192

  12. Reversibly light-modulated dirac point of graphene functionalized with spiropyran.

    PubMed

    Jang, A-Rang; Jeon, Eun Kyung; Kang, Dongwoo; Kim, Gwangwoo; Kim, Byeong-Su; Kang, Dae Joon; Shin, Hyeon Suk

    2012-10-23

    Graphene has been functionalized with spiropyran (SP), a well-known photochromic molecule. It has been realized with pyrene-modified SP, which has been adsorbed on graphene by ?-? interaction between pyrene and graphene. The field-effect transistor (FET) with SP-functionalized graphene exhibited n-doping effect and interesting optoelectronic behaviors. The Dirac point of graphene in the FET could be controlled by light modulation because spiropyran can be reversibly switched between two different conformations, a neutral form (colorless SP) and a charge-separated form (purple colored merocyanine, MC), on UV and visible light irradiation. The MC form is produced during UV light irradiation, inducing the shift of the Dirac point of graphene toward negative gate voltage. The reverse process back to the neutral SP form occurred under visible light irradiation or in darkness, inducing a shift of the Dirac point toward positive gate voltage. The change of the Dirac point by UV and visible light was reproducibly repeated. SP molecules also improved the conductance change in the FET device. Furthermore, dynamics on conversion from MC to SP on graphene was different from that in solution and solid samples with SP-grafted polymer or that on gold nanoparticles. PMID:22980316

  13. NCoR1 is a conserved physiological modulator of muscle mass and oxidative function

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Williams, Evan G.; Mouchiroud, Laurent; Canto, Carles; Fan, Weiwei; Downes, Michael; Héligon, Christophe; Barish, Grant D.; Desvergne, Béatrice; Evans, Ronald M.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Auwerx, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional coregulators control the activity of many transcription factors and are thought to have wide ranging effects on gene expression patterns. We show here that muscle-specific nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1) knockout mice have rather selective phenotypic changes, characterized by enhanced exercise endurance due to an increase of both muscle mass and of mitochondrial number and activity. The activation of selected transcription factors that control muscle function, such as MEF2, PPAR?/? and ERRs, underpinned these phenotypic alterations. NCoR1 levels are decreased in conditions that require fat oxidation resetting transcriptional programs to boost oxidative metabolism. The capacity of NCoR1 to modulate oxidative metabolism may be conserved as the knockdown of gei-8, the sole C.elegans NCoR homolog, also robustly increased muscle mitochondria and respiration. Collectively, our data suggest that NCoR1 plays an adaptive role in muscle physiology and that interference with NCoR1 action could be used to improve muscle function. PMID:22078881

  14. Modulation of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Pump (SERCA) Function by Membrane Cholesterol during Unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, M. S. F.; Hammond, D. K.; Feeback, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated by in situ immuno-localization that cholesterol is predominantly located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), rather than in the sarcolemmal/T-tubule (SL-TT) membranes of both human and rat skeletal muscle (Clarke et al., 2000, JAP). In addition, we have demonstrated that mechanical unloading of skeletal muscle in a rat hindlimb suspension model significantly increases membrane cholesterol content and that this increase is also localized to SR rather than SL-TT membranes in such atrophied muscle. Utilizing a novel fluorescent calcium staining technique in perfusion fixed soleus muscle we observed a significant positive correlation between membrane cholesterol content and free intramyofiber calcium levels during unloading. To determine if a correlation between increased SR membrane cholesterol content and increased free intramyofiber calcium levels during unloading is due to a membrane cholesterol-mediated alteration in SR calcium pump function, we also describe the effects of modulating the cholesterol content of purified SR membrane preparations on SR-Ca2+ ATPase activity and ryanodine channel activity. As an increase in free intra-cellular calcium levels have previously demonstrated to induce catabolism in a wide range of biological systems, we suggest that altered SR calcium pump function may be the underlying basis for the initiation of unloading induced muscle atrophy.

  15. Prebiotics Modulate the Effects of Antibiotics on Gut Microbial Diversity and Functioning in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Laura P.; Walton, Gemma E.; Psichas, Arianna; Frost, Gary S.; Gibson, Glenn R.; Barraclough, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal bacteria carry out many fundamental roles, such as the fermentation of non-digestible dietary carbohydrates to produce short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which can affect host energy levels and gut hormone regulation. Understanding how to manage this ecosystem to improve human health is an important but challenging goal. Antibiotics are the front line of defence against pathogens, but in turn they have adverse effects on indigenous microbial diversity and function. Here, we have investigated whether dietary supplementation—another method used to modulate gut composition and function—could be used to ameliorate the side effects of antibiotics. We perturbed gut bacterial communities with gentamicin and ampicillin in anaerobic batch cultures in vitro. Cultures were supplemented with either pectin (a non-fermentable fibre), inulin (a commonly used prebiotic that promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria) or neither. Although antibiotics often negated the beneficial effects of dietary supplementation, in some treatment combinations, notably ampicillin and inulin, dietary supplementation ameliorated the effects of antibiotics. There is therefore potential for using supplements to lessen the adverse effects of antibiotics. Further knowledge of such mechanisms could lead to better therapeutic manipulation of the human gut microbiota. PMID:26053617

  16. Mast Cell Subsets and Their Functional Modulation by the Acanthocheilonema viteae Product ES-62.

    PubMed

    Ball, Dimity H; Tay, Hwee Kee; Bell, Kara S; Coates, Michelle L; Al-Riyami, Lamyaa; Rzepecka, Justyna; Harnett, William; Harnett, Margaret M

    2013-01-01

    ES-62, an immunomodulator secreted by filarial nematodes, exhibits therapeutic potential in mouse models of allergic inflammation, at least in part by inducing the desensitisation of Fc ? RI-mediated mast cell responses. However, in addition to their pathogenic roles in allergic and autoimmune diseases, mast cells are important in fighting infection, wound healing, and resolving inflammation, reflecting that mast cells exhibit a phenotypic and functional plasticity. We have therefore characterised the differential functional responses to antigen (via Fc ? RI) and LPS and their modulation by ES-62 of the mature peritoneal-derived mast cells (PDMC; serosal) and those of the connective tissue-like mast cells (CTMC) and the mucosal-like mast cells derived from bone marrow progenitors (BMMC) as a first step to produce disease tissue-targeted therapeutics based on ES-62 action. All three mast cell populations were rendered hyporesponsive by ES-62 and whilst the mechanisms underlying such desensitisation have not been fully delineated, they reflect a downregulation of calcium and PKC ? signalling. ES-62 also downregulated MyD88 and PKC ? in mucosal-type BMMC but not PDMC, the additional signals targeted in mucosal-type BMMC likely reflecting that these cells respond to antigen and LPS by degranulation and cytokine secretion whereas PDMC predominantly respond in a degranulation-based manner. PMID:23476740

  17. Mast Cell Subsets and Their Functional Modulation by the Acanthocheilonema viteae Product ES-62

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Dimity H.; Tay, Hwee Kee; Bell, Kara S.; Coates, Michelle L.; Al-Riyami, Lamyaa; Rzepecka, Justyna; Harnett, William; Harnett, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    ES-62, an immunomodulator secreted by filarial nematodes, exhibits therapeutic potential in mouse models of allergic inflammation, at least in part by inducing the desensitisation of Fc?RI-mediated mast cell responses. However, in addition to their pathogenic roles in allergic and autoimmune diseases, mast cells are important in fighting infection, wound healing, and resolving inflammation, reflecting that mast cells exhibit a phenotypic and functional plasticity. We have therefore characterised the differential functional responses to antigen (via Fc?RI) and LPS and their modulation by ES-62 of the mature peritoneal-derived mast cells (PDMC; serosal) and those of the connective tissue-like mast cells (CTMC) and the mucosal-like mast cells derived from bone marrow progenitors (BMMC) as a first step to produce disease tissue-targeted therapeutics based on ES-62 action. All three mast cell populations were rendered hyporesponsive by ES-62 and whilst the mechanisms underlying such desensitisation have not been fully delineated, they reflect a downregulation of calcium and PKC? signalling. ES-62 also downregulated MyD88 and PKC? in mucosal-type BMMC but not PDMC, the additional signals targeted in mucosal-type BMMC likely reflecting that these cells respond to antigen and LPS by degranulation and cytokine secretion whereas PDMC predominantly respond in a degranulation-based manner. PMID:23476740

  18. Mutational and Functional Analysis Reveals ADAMTS18 Metalloproteinase as a Novel Oncogene in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaomu; Prickett, Todd D.; Viloria, Cristina G.; Molinolo, Alfredo; Lin, Jimmy C.; Cardenas-Navia, Isabel; Cruz, Pedro; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Davies, Michael A.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; López-Otín, Carlos; Samuels, Yardena

    2010-01-01

    The disintegrin-metalloproteinases with thrombospondin domains (ADAMTS) genes have been suggested to function as tumor suppressors as several have been found to be epigenetically silenced in various cancers. We performed a mutational analysis of the ADAMTS gene family in human melanoma and identified a large fraction of melanomas to harbor somatic mutations. To evaluate the functional consequences of the most commonly mutated gene, ADAMTS18, six of its mutations were biologically examined. ADAMTS18 mutations had little effect on melanoma cell growth under standard conditions, but reduced cell dependence on growth factors. ADAMTS18 mutations also reduced adhesion to laminin and increased migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo. Melanoma cells expressing mutant ADAMTS18 had reduced cell migration after shRNA-mediated knockdown of ADAMTS18, suggesting that ADAMTS18 mutations are growth-, migration- and metastasis- promoting in melanoma. PMID:21047771

  19. The iBeetle large-scale RNAi screen reveals gene functions for insect development and physiology.

    PubMed

    Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schultheis, Dorothea; Schwirz, Jonas; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Majumdar, Upalparna; Dao, Van Anh; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Tech, Maike; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Theis, Mirko; Schild, Inga; Trauner, Jochen; Koniszewski, Nikolaus D B; Küster, Elke; Kittelmann, Sebastian; Hu, Yonggang; Lehmann, Sabrina; Siemanowski, Janna; Ulrich, Julia; Panfilio, Kristen A; Schröder, Reinhard; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Stanke, Mario; Buchhholz, Frank; Frasch, Manfred; Roth, Siegfried; Wimmer, Ernst A; Schoppmeier, Michael; Klingler, Martin; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screens are powerful tools to identify the genes required for a given biological process. However, for technical reasons, comprehensive screens have been restricted to very few model organisms. Therefore, although deep sequencing is revealing the genes of ever more insect species, the functional studies predominantly focus on candidate genes previously identified in Drosophila, which is biasing research towards conserved gene functions. RNAi screens in other organisms promise to reduce this bias. Here we present the results of the iBeetle screen, a large-scale, unbiased RNAi screen in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, which identifies gene functions in embryonic and postembryonic development, physiology and cell biology. The utility of Tribolium as a screening platform is demonstrated by the identification of genes involved in insect epithelial adhesion. This work transcends the restrictions of the candidate gene approach and opens fields of research not accessible in Drosophila. PMID:26215380

  20. The iBeetle large-scale RNAi screen reveals gene functions for insect development and physiology

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schultheis, Dorothea; Schwirz, Jonas; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Majumdar, Upalparna; Dao, Van Anh; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Tech, Maike; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Theis, Mirko; Schild, Inga; Trauner, Jochen; Koniszewski, Nikolaus D. B.; Küster, Elke; Kittelmann, Sebastian; Hu, Yonggang; Lehmann, Sabrina; Siemanowski, Janna; Ulrich, Julia; Panfilio, Kristen A.; Schröder, Reinhard; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Stanke, Mario; Buchhholz, Frank; Frasch, Manfred; Roth, Siegfried; Wimmer, Ernst A.; Schoppmeier, Michael; Klingler, Martin; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screens are powerful tools to identify the genes required for a given biological process. However, for technical reasons, comprehensive screens have been restricted to very few model organisms. Therefore, although deep sequencing is revealing the genes of ever more insect species, the functional studies predominantly focus on candidate genes previously identified in Drosophila, which is biasing research towards conserved gene functions. RNAi screens in other organisms promise to reduce this bias. Here we present the results of the iBeetle screen, a large-scale, unbiased RNAi screen in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, which identifies gene functions in embryonic and postembryonic development, physiology and cell biology. The utility of Tribolium as a screening platform is demonstrated by the identification of genes involved in insect epithelial adhesion. This work transcends the restrictions of the candidate gene approach and opens fields of research not accessible in Drosophila. PMID:26215380

  1. Genome-wide Functional Analysis of Plasmodium Protein Phosphatases Reveals Key Regulators of Parasite Development and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Guttery, David S.; Poulin, Benoit; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Wall, Richard J.; Ferguson, David J.P.; Brady, Declan; Patzewitz, Eva-Maria; Whipple, Sarah; Straschil, Ursula; Wright, Megan H.; Mohamed, Alyaa M.A.H.; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Arold, Stefan T.; Tate, Edward W.; Holder, Anthony A.; Wickstead, Bill; Pain, Arnab; Tewari, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reversible protein phosphorylation regulated by kinases and phosphatases controls many cellular processes. Although essential functions for the malaria parasite kinome have been reported, the roles of most protein phosphatases (PPs) during Plasmodium development are unknown. We report a functional analysis of the Plasmodium berghei protein phosphatome, which exhibits high conservation with the P. falciparum phosphatome and comprises 30 predicted PPs with differential and distinct expression patterns during various stages of the life cycle. Gene disruption analysis of P. berghei PPs reveals that half of the genes are likely essential for asexual blood stage development, whereas six are required for sexual development/sporogony in mosquitoes. Phenotypic screening coupled with transcriptome sequencing unveiled morphological changes and altered gene expression in deletion mutants of two N-myristoylated PPs. These findings provide systematic functional analyses of PPs in Plasmodium, identify how phosphatases regulate parasite development and differentiation, and can inform the identification of drug targets for malaria. PMID:25011111

  2. Radiation dose calculations for CT scans with tube current modulation using the approach to equilibrium function

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The approach to equilibrium function has been used previously to calculate the radiation dose to a shift-invariant medium undergoing CT scans with constant tube current [Li, Zhang, and Liu, Med. Phys. 39, 5347–5352 (2012)]. The authors have adapted this method to CT scans with tube current modulation (TCM). Methods: For a scan with variable tube current, the scan range was divided into multiple subscan ranges, each with a nearly constant tube current. Then the dose calculation algorithm presented previously was applied. For a clinical CT scan series that presented tube current per slice, the authors adopted an efficient approach that computed the longitudinal dose distribution for one scan length equal to the slice thickness, which center was at z = 0. The cumulative dose at a specific point was a summation of the contributions from all slices and the overscan. Results: The dose calculations performed for a total of four constant and variable tube current distributions agreed with the published results of Dixon and Boone [Med. Phys. 40, 111920 (14pp.) (2013)]. For an abdomen/pelvis scan of an anthropomorphic phantom (model ATOM 701-B, CIRS, Inc., VA) on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 scanner with 120 kV, N × T = 20 mm, pitch = 1.375, z axis current modulation (auto mA), and angular current modulation (smart mA), dose measurements were performed using two lines of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters, one of which was placed near the phantom center and the other on the surface. Dose calculations were performed on the central and peripheral axes of a cylinder containing water, whose cross-sectional mass was about equal to that of the ATOM phantom in its abdominal region, and the results agreed with the measurements within 28.4%. Conclusions: The described method provides an effective approach that takes into account subject size, scan length, and constant or variable tube current to evaluate CT dose to a shift-invariant medium. For a clinical CT scan, dose calculations may be performed with a water-containing cylinder whose cross-sectional mass is equal to that of the subject. This method has the potential to substantially improve evaluations of patient dose from clinical CT scans, compared to CTDI{sub vol}, size-specific dose estimate (SSDE), or the dose evaluated for a TCM scan with a constant tube current equal to the average tube current of the TCM scan.

  3. Essential functions and actin-binding surfaces of yeast cofilin revealed by systematic mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Lappalainen, P; Fedorov, E V; Fedorov, A A; Almo, S C; Drubin, D G

    1997-01-01

    Cofilin stimulates actin filament turnover in vivo. The phenotypes of twenty yeast cofilin mutants generated by systematic mutagenesis were determined. Ten grew as well as the wild type and showed no cytoskeleton defects, seven were recessive-lethal and three were conditional-lethal and caused severe actin organization defects. Biochemical characterization of interactions between nine mutant yeast cofilins and yeast actin provided evidence that F-actin binding and depolymerization are essential cofilin functions. Locating the mutated residues on the yeast cofilin molecular structure allowed several important conclusions to be drawn. First, residues required for actin monomer binding are proximal to each other. Secondly, additional residues are required for interactions with actin filaments; these residues might bind an adjacent subunit in the actin filament. Thirdly, despite striking structural similarity, cofilin interacts with actin in a different manner from gelsolin segment-1. Fourthly, a previously unrecognized cofilin function or interaction is suggested by identification of spatially proximal residues important for cofilin function in vivo, but not for actin interactions in vitro. Finally, mutation of the cofilin N-terminus suggests that its sequence is conserved because of its critical role in actin interactions, not because it is sometimes a target for protein kinases. PMID:9312011

  4. The functional micro-organization of grid cells revealed by cellular-resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heys, James G.; Rangarajan, Krsna V.; Dombeck, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Establishing how grid cells are anatomically arranged, on a microscopic scale, in relation to their firing patterns in the environment would facilitate a greater micro-circuit level understanding of the brain’s representation of space. However, all previous grid cell recordings used electrode techniques that provide limited descriptions of fine-scale organization. We therefore developed a technique for cellular-resolution functional imaging of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) neurons in mice navigating a virtual linear track, enabling a new experimental approach to study MEC. Using these methods, we show that grid cells are physically clustered in MEC compared to non-grid cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that grid cells are functionally micro-organized: The similarity between the environment firing locations of grid cell pairs varies as a function of the distance between them according to a “Mexican Hat” shaped profile. This suggests that, on average, nearby grid cells have more similar spatial firing phases than those further apart. PMID:25467986

  5. Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Reveals Reduced Interhemispheric Cortical Communication after Pediatric Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Karolina J.; Barlow, Karen M.; Jimenez, Jon J.; Goodyear, Bradley G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), is a growing concern, especially among the pediatric population. By age 25, as many as 30% of the population are likely to have had a concussion. Many result in long-term disability, with some evolving to postconcussion syndrome. Treatments are being developed, but are difficult to assess given the lack of measures to quantitatively monitor concussion. There is no accepted quantitative imaging metric for monitoring concussion. We hypothesized that because cognitive function and fiber tracks are often impacted in concussion, interhemispheric brain communication may be impaired. We used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to quantify functional coherence between the left and right motor cortex as a marker of interhemispheric communication. Studies were undertaken during the resting state and with a finger-tapping task to activate the motor cortex. Pediatric patients (ages 12–18) had symptoms for 31–473 days, compared to controls, who have not had reported a previous concussion. We detected differences between patients and controls in coherence between the contralateral motor cortices using measurements of total hemoglobin and oxy-hemoglobin with a p<0.01 (n=8, control; n=12?mTBI). Given the critical need for a quantitative biomarker for recovery after a concussion, we present these data to highlight the potential of fNIRS coupled with interhemispheric coherence analysis as a biomarker of concussion injury. PMID:25387354

  6. Augmented vagal heart rate modulation in active hypoestrogenic pre-menopausal women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Emma; Goodman, Jack M; Morris, Beverly L; Floras, John S; Harvey, Paula J

    2015-11-01

    Compared with eumenorrhoeic women, exercise-trained women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea (ExFHA) exhibit low heart rates (HRs) and absent reflex renin-angiotensin-system activation and augmentation of their muscle sympathetic nerve response to orthostatic stress. To test the hypothesis that their autonomic HR modulation is altered concurrently, three age-matched (pooled mean, 24 ± 1 years; mean ± S.E.M.) groups of women were studied: active with either FHA (ExFHA; n=11) or eumenorrhoeic cycles (ExOv; n=17) and sedentary with eumenorrhoeic cycles (SedOv; n=17). Blood pressure (BP), HR and HR variability (HRV) in the frequency domain were determined during both supine rest and graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -10, -20 and -40 mmHg). Very low (VLF), low (LF) and high (HF) frequency power spectra (ms(2)) were determined and, owing to skewness, log10-transformed. LF/HF ratio and total power (VLF + LF + HF) were calculated. At baseline, HR and systolic BP (SBP) were lower (P<0.05) and HF and total power were higher (P<0.05) in ExFHA than in eumenorrhoeic women. In all groups, LBNP decreased (P<0.05) SBP, HF and total power and increased (P<0.05) HR and LF/HF ratio. However, HF and total power remained higher (P<0.05) and HR, SBP and LF/HF ratio remained lower (P<0.05) in ExFHA than in eumenorrhoeic women, in whom measures did not differ (P>0.05). At each stage, HR correlated inversely (P<0.05) with HF. In conclusion, ExFHA women demonstrate augmented vagal yet unchanged sympathetic HR modulation, both at rest and during orthostatic stress. Although the role of oestrogen deficiency is unclear, these findings are in contrast with studies reporting decreased HRV in hypoestrogenic post-menopausal women. PMID:26221028

  7. The structure of bradyzoite-specific enolase from Toxoplasma gondii reveals insights into its dual cytoplasmic and nuclear functions

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Jiapeng; Mouveaux, Thomas; Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F.; Tomavo, Stanislas; Ngô, Huân M.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to catalyzing a central step in glycolysis, enolase assumes a remarkably diverse set of secondary functions in different organisms, including transcription regulation as documented for the oncogene c-Myc promoter-binding protein 1. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii differentially expresses two nuclear-localized, plant-like enolases: enolase 1 (TgENO1) in the latent bradyzoite cyst stage and enolase 2 (TgENO2) in the rapidly replicative tachyzoite stage. A 2.75?Ĺ resolution crystal structure of bradyzoite enolase 1, the second structure to be reported of a bradyzoite-specific protein in Toxoplasma, captures an open conformational state and reveals that distinctive plant-like insertions are located on surface loops. The enolase 1 structure reveals that a unique residue, Glu164, in catalytic loop 2 may account for the lower activity of this cyst-stage isozyme. Recombinant TgENO1 specifically binds to a TTTTCT DNA motif present in the cyst matrix antigen 1 (TgMAG1) gene promoter as demonstrated by gel retardation. Furthermore, direct physical interactions of both nuclear TgENO1 and TgENO2 with the TgMAG1 gene promoter are demonstrated in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Structural and biochemical studies reveal that T. gondii enolase functions are multifaceted, including the coordination of gene regulation in parasitic stage development. Enolase 1 provides a potential lead in the design of drugs against Toxoplasma brain cysts. PMID:25760592