Sample records for functional modules revealed

  1. Predicting invasive species impacts: a community module functional response approach reveals context dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Rachel A; Dick, Jaimie T A; Pritchard, Daniel W; Ennis, Marilyn; Hatcher, Melanie J; Dunn, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Predatory functional responses play integral roles in predator–prey dynamics, and their assessment promises greater understanding and prediction of the predatory impacts of invasive species. Other interspecific interactions, however, such as parasitism and higher-order predation, have the potential to modify predator–prey interactions and thus the predictive capability of the comparative functional response approach. We used a four-species community module (higher-order predator; focal native or invasive predators; parasites of focal predators; native prey) to compare the predatory functional responses of native Gammarus duebeni celticus and invasive Gammarus pulex amphipods towards three invertebrate prey species (Asellus aquaticus, Simulium spp., Baetis rhodani), thus, quantifying the context dependencies of parasitism and a higher-order fish predator on these functional responses. Our functional response experiments demonstrated that the invasive amphipod had a higher predatory impact (lower handling time) on two of three prey species, which reflects patterns of impact observed in the field. The community module also revealed that parasitism had context-dependent influences, for one prey species, with the potential to further reduce the predatory impact of the invasive amphipod or increase the predatory impact of the native amphipod in the presence of a higher-order fish predator. Partial consumption of prey was similar for both predators and occurred increasingly in the order A. aquaticus, Simulium spp. and B. rhodani. This was associated with increasing prey densities, but showed no context dependencies with parasitism or higher-order fish predator. This study supports the applicability of comparative functional responses as a tool to predict and assess invasive species impacts incorporating multiple context dependencies. PMID:25265905

  2. Predicting invasive species impacts: a community module functional response approach reveals context dependencies.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Rachel A; Dick, Jaimie T A; Pritchard, Daniel W; Ennis, Marilyn; Hatcher, Melanie J; Dunn, Alison M

    2014-09-29

    Predatory functional responses play integral roles in predator-prey dynamics, and their assessment promises greater understanding and prediction of the predatory impacts of invasive species. Other interspecific interactions, however, such as parasitism and higher-order predation, have the potential to modify predator-prey interactions and thus the predictive capability of the comparative functional response approach. We used a four-species community module (higher-order predator; focal native or invasive predators; parasites of focal predators; native prey) to compare the predatory functional responses of native Gammarus duebeni celticus and invasive Gammarus pulex amphipods towards three invertebrate prey species (Asellus aquaticus, Simulium spp., Baetis rhodani), thus, quantifying the context dependencies of parasitism and a higher-order fish predator on these functional responses. Our functional response experiments demonstrated that the invasive amphipod had a higher predatory impact (lower handling time) on two of three prey species, which reflects patterns of impact observed in the field. The community module also revealed that parasitism had context-dependent influences, for one prey species, with the potential to further reduce the predatory impact of the invasive amphipod or increase the predatory impact of the native amphipod in the presence of a higher-order fish predator. Partial consumption of prey was similar for both predators and occurred increasingly in the order A. aquaticus, Simulium spp. and B. rhodani. This was associated with increasing prey densities, but showed no context dependencies with parasitism or higher-order fish predator. This study supports the applicability of comparative functional responses as a tool to predict and assess invasive species impacts incorporating multiple context dependencies. PMID:25265905

  3. Selective Actions of Novel Allosteric Modulators Reveal Functional Heteromers of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shen; Noetzel, Meredith J.; Johnson, Kari A.; Zamorano, Rocio; Jalan-Sakrikar, Nidhi; Gregory, Karen J.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors play important roles in regulating CNS function and are known to function as obligatory dimers. Although recent studies have suggested heterodimeric assembly of mGlu receptors in vitro, the demonstration that distinct mGlu receptor proteins can form heterodimers or hetero-complexes with other mGlu subunits in native tissues, such as neurons, has not been shown. Using biochemical and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate here that mGlu2 and mGlu4 form a hetero-complex in native rat and mouse tissues which exhibits a distinct pharmacological profile. These data greatly extend our current understanding of mGlu receptor interaction and function and provide compelling evidence that mGlu receptors can function as heteromers in intact brain circuits. PMID:24381270

  4. Genome-Wide Survey and Expression Profiling of CCCH-Zinc Finger Family Reveals a Functional Module in Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jian; Song, Wenjun; Tromp, Gail; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E.; Fu, Mingui

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we have identified a novel CCCH zinc finger protein family as negative regulators of macrophage activation. To gain an overall insight into the entire CCCH zinc finger gene family and to evaluate their potential role in macrophage activation, here we performed a genome-wide survey of CCCH zinc finger genes in mouse and human. Totally 58 CCCH zinc finger genes in mouse and 55 in human were identified and most of them have not been reported previously. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the mouse CCCH family was divided into 6 groups. Meanwhile, we employed quantitative real-time PCR to profile their tissue expression patterns in adult mice. Clustering analysis showed that most of CCCH genes were broadly expressed in all of tissues examined with various levels. Interestingly, several CCCH genes Mbnl3, Zfp36l2, Zfp36, Zc3h12a, Zc3h12d, Zc3h7a and Leng9 were enriched in macrophage-related organs such as thymus, spleen, lung, intestine and adipose. Consistently, a comprehensive assessment of changes in expression of the 58 members of the mouse CCCH family during macrophage activation also revealed that these CCCH zinc finger genes were associated with the activation of bone marrow-derived macrophages by lipopolysaccharide. Taken together, this study not only identified a functional module of CCCH zinc finger genes in the regulation of macrophage activation but also provided the framework for future studies to dissect the function of this emerging gene family. PMID:18682727

  5. Conservation and Rewiring of Functional Modules Revealed by an Epistasis Map in Fission Yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Assen Roguev; Sourav Bandyopadhyay; Martin Zofall; Ke Zhang; Tamas Fischer; Sean R. Collins; Hongjing Qu; Michael Shales; Han-Oh Park; Jacqueline Hayles; Kwang-Lae Hoe; Dong-Uk Kim; Trey Ideker; Shiv I. Grewal; Jonathan S. Weissman; Nevan J. Krogan

    2008-01-01

    An epistasis map (E-MAP) was constructed in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, by systematically measuring the phenotypes associated with pairs of mutations. This high-density, quantitative genetic interaction map focused on various aspects of chromosome function, including transcription regulation and DNA repair\\/replication. The E-MAP uncovered a previously unidentified component of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery (rsh1) and linked the RNAi pathway

  6. Structural and functional studies of the modulator NS9283 reveal agonist-like mechanism of action at ?4?2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Jeppe A; Ahring, Philip K; Kastrup, Jette S; Gajhede, Michael; Balle, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Modulation of Cys loop receptor ion channels is a proven drug discovery strategy, but many underlying mechanisms of the mode of action are poorly understood. We report the x-ray structure of the acetylcholine-binding protein from Lymnaea stagnalis with NS9283, a stoichiometry selective positive modulator that targets the ?4-?4 interface of ?4?2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Together with homology modeling, mutational data, quantum mechanical calculations, and pharmacological studies on ?4?2 nAChRs, the structure reveals a modulator binding mode that overlaps the ?4-?4 interface agonist (acetylcholine)-binding site. Analysis of contacts to residues known to govern agonist binding and function suggests that modulation occurs by an agonist-like mechanism. Selectivity for ?4-?4 over ?4-?2 interfaces is determined mainly by steric restrictions from Val-136 on the ?2-subunit and favorable interactions between NS9283 and His-142 at the complementary side of ?4. In the concentration ranges where modulation is observed, its selectivity prevents NS9283 from directly activating nAChRs because activation requires coordinated action from more than one interface. However, we demonstrate that in a mutant receptor with one natural and two engineered ?4-?4 interfaces, NS9283 is an agonist. Modulation via extracellular binding sites is well known for benzodiazepines acting at ?-aminobutyric acid type A receptors. Like NS9283, benzodiazepines increase the apparent agonist potency with a minimal effect on efficacy. The shared modulatory profile along with a binding site located in an extracellular subunit interface suggest that modulation via an agonist-like mechanism may be a common mechanism of action that potentially could apply to Cys loop receptors beyond the ?4?2 nAChRs. PMID:24982426

  7. Functional asymmetry in cohesin binding belies inherent symmetry of the dockerin module: insight into cellulosome assembly revealed by systematic mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Karpol, Alon; Barak, Yoav; Lamed, Raphael; Shoham, Yuval; Bayer, Edward A

    2008-03-01

    The cellulosome is an intricate multi-enzyme complex, known for its efficient degradation of recalcitrant cellulosic substrates. Its supramolecular architecture is determined by the high-affinity intermodular cohesin-dockerin interaction. The dockerin module comprises a calcium-binding, duplicated 'F-hand' loop-helix motif that bears striking similarity to the EF-hand loop-helix-loop motif of eukaryotic calcium-binding proteins. In the present study, we demonstrate by progressive truncation and alanine scanning of a representative type-I dockerin module from Clostridium thermocellum, that only one of the repeated motifs is critical for high-affinity cohesin binding. The results suggest that the near-symmetry in sequence and structure of the repeated elements of the dockerin is not essential to cohesin binding. The first calcium-binding loop can be deleted entirely, with almost full retention of binding. Likewise, significant deletion of the second repeated segment can be achieved, provided that its calcium-binding loop remains intact. Essentially the same conclusion was verified by systematically mutating the highly conserved residues in the calcium-binding loop. Mutations in one of the calcium-binding loops failed to disrupt cohesin recognition and binding, whereas a single mutation in both loops served to reduce the affinity significantly. The results are mutually compatible with recent crystal structures of the type-I cohesin-dockerin heterodimer, which demonstrate that the dockerin can bind in an equivalent manner to its cohesin counterpart through either its first or second repeated motif. The observed plasticity in cohesin-dockerin binding may facilitate cellulosome assembly in vivo or, alternatively, provide a conformational switch that promotes access of the tethered cellulosomal enzymes to their polysaccharide substrates. PMID:18021074

  8. Morphological and Proteomic Analyses Reveal that Unsaturated Guluronate Oligosaccharide Modulates Multiple Functional Pathways in Murine Macrophage RAW264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; Bi, De-Cheng; Li, Chao; Fang, Wei-Shan; Zhou, Rui; Li, Shui-Ming; Chi, Lian-Li; Wan, Min; Shen, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Alginate is a natural polysaccharide extracted from various species of marine brown algae. Alginate-derived guluronate oligosaccharide (GOS) obtained by enzymatic depolymerization has various pharmacological functions. Previous studies have demonstrated that GOS can trigger the production of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)/nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? by macrophages and that it is involved in the nuclear factor (NF)-?B and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling pathways. To expand upon the current knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms associated with the GOS-induced immune response in macrophages, comparative proteomic analysis was employed together with two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) and Western blot verification. Proteins showing significant differences in expression in GOS-treated cells were categorized into multiple functional pathways, including the NF-?B signaling pathway and pathways involved in inflammation, antioxidant activity, glycolysis, cytoskeletal processes and translational elongation. Moreover, GOS-stimulated changes in the morphologies and actin cytoskeleton organization of RAW264.7 cells were also investigated as possible adaptations to GOS. This study is the first to reveal GOS as a promising agent that can modulate the proper balance between the pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses, and it provides new insights into pharmaceutical applications of polysaccharides. PMID:25830683

  9. Spectro-temporal modulation masking patterns reveal frequency selectivity.

    PubMed

    Oetjen, Arne; Verhey, Jesko L

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigated the possibility that the human auditory system demonstrates frequency selectivity to spectro-temporal amplitude modulations. Threshold modulation depth for detecting sinusoidal spectro-temporal modulations was measured using a generalized masked threshold pattern paradigm with narrowband masker modulations. Four target spectro-temporal modulations were examined, differing in their temporal and spectral modulation frequencies: a temporal modulation of -8, 8, or 16?Hz combined with a spectral modulation of 1 cycle/octave and a temporal modulation of 4?Hz combined with a spectral modulation of 0.5 cycles/octave. The temporal center frequencies of the masker modulation ranged from 0.25 to 4 times the target temporal modulation. The spectral masker-modulation center-frequencies were 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 times the target spectral modulation. For all target modulations, the pattern of average thresholds for the eight normal-hearing listeners was consistent with the hypothesis of a spectro-temporal modulation filter. Such a pattern of modulation-frequency sensitivity was predicted on the basis of psychoacoustical data for purely temporal amplitude modulations and purely spectral amplitude modulations. An analysis of separability indicates that, for the present data set, selectivity in the spectro-temporal modulation domain can be described by a combination of a purely spectral and a purely temporal modulation filter function. PMID:25698006

  10. Structural and functional modules in RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei

    2009-06-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) uses small RNA molecules to regulate transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene expression. In recent years, a number of structural studies provided insights into the molecular architecture and mechanism of functional modules of RNAi. Mechanisms of nucleic acid recognition and cleavage have been revealed by structural studies of proteins and their nucleic acid complexes involved in RNA biogenesis, for example, Argonaute, PIWI, RNase III, Dicer, Drosha, and DGCR8. While quite a few questions remain, an excellent structural and mechanistic overview of RNAi processes has already emerged. In this review, we examine functional modules and their assemblies in RNAi processes. PMID:19477631

  11. Serotonergic modulation of intrinsic functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Alexander; Burmann, Inga; Regenthal, Ralf; Arélin, Katrin; Barth, Claudia; Pampel, André; Villringer, Arno; Margulies, Daniel S; Sacher, Julia

    2014-10-01

    Serotonin functions as an essential neuromodulator that serves a multitude of roles, most prominently balancing mood. Serotonergic challenge has been observed to reduce intrinsic functional connectivity in brain regions implicated in mood regulation. However, the full scope of serotonergic action on functional connectivity in the human brain has not been explored. Here, we show evidence that a single dose of a serotonin reuptake inhibitor dramatically alters functional connectivity throughout the whole brain in healthy subjects (n = 22). Our network-centrality analysis reveals a widespread decrease in connectivity in most cortical and subcortical areas. In the cerebellum and thalamus, however, we find localized increases. These rapid and brain-encompassing connectivity changes linked to acute serotonin transporter blockade suggest a key role for the serotonin transporter in the modulation of the functional macroscale connectome. PMID:25242032

  12. Time-resolved metabolomics reveals metabolic modulation in rice foliage

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shigeru; Arita, Masanori; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nishioka, Takaaki; Tomita, Masaru

    2008-01-01

    Background To elucidate the interaction of dynamics among modules that constitute biological systems, comprehensive datasets obtained from "omics" technologies have been used. In recent plant metabolomics approaches, the reconstruction of metabolic correlation networks has been attempted using statistical techniques. However, the results were unsatisfactory and effective data-mining techniques that apply appropriate comprehensive datasets are needed. Results Using capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS) and capillary electrophoresis diode-array detection (CE-DAD), we analyzed the dynamic changes in the level of 56 basic metabolites in plant foliage (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica) at hourly intervals over a 24-hr period. Unsupervised clustering of comprehensive metabolic profiles using Kohonen's self-organizing map (SOM) allowed classification of the biochemical pathways activated by the light and dark cycle. The carbon and nitrogen (C/N) metabolism in both periods was also visualized as a phenotypic linkage map that connects network modules on the basis of traditional metabolic pathways rather than pairwise correlations among metabolites. The regulatory networks of C/N assimilation/dissimilation at each time point were consistent with previous works on plant metabolism. In response to environmental stress, glutathione and spermidine fluctuated synchronously with their regulatory targets. Adenine nucleosides and nicotinamide coenzymes were regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. We also demonstrated that SOM analysis was applicable to the estimation of unidentifiable metabolites in metabolome analysis. Hierarchical clustering of a correlation coefficient matrix could help identify the bottleneck enzymes that regulate metabolic networks. Conclusion Our results showed that our SOM analysis with appropriate metabolic time-courses effectively revealed the synchronous dynamics among metabolic modules and elucidated the underlying biochemical functions. The application of discrimination of unidentified metabolites and the identification of bottleneck enzymatic steps even to non-targeted comprehensive analysis promise to facilitate an understanding of large-scale interactions among components in biological systems. PMID:18564421

  13. A Reduced-Function Allele Reveals That EARLY FLOWERING3 Repressive Action on the Circadian Clock Is Modulated by Phytochrome Signals in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kolmos, Elsebeth; Herrero, Eva; Bujdoso, Nora; Millar, Andrew J.; Tóth, Réka; Gyula, Peter; Nagy, Ferenc; Davis, Seth J.

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) is essential for the generation of circadian rhythms. ELF3 has been proposed to restrict light signals to the oscillator through phytochrome photoreceptors, but that has not been explicitly shown. Furthermore, the genetic action of ELF3 within the clock had remained elusive. Here, we report a functional characterization of ELF3 through the analysis of the elf3-12 allele, which encodes an amino acid replacement in a conserved domain. Circadian oscillations persisted, and unlike elf3 null alleles, elf3-12 resulted in a short circadian period only under ambient light. The period shortening effect of elf3-12 was enhanced by the overexpression of phytochromes phyA and phyB. We found that elf3-12 was only modestly perturbed in resetting of the oscillator and in gating light-regulated gene expression. Furthermore, elf3-12 essentially displayed wild-type development. We identified targets of ELF3 transcriptional repression in the oscillator, highlighting the action at the morning gene PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR9. Taken together, we identified two separable roles for ELF3, one affecting the circadian network and the other affecting light input to the oscillator. This is consistent with a dual function of ELF3 as both an integrator of phytochrome signals and a repressor component of the core oscillator. PMID:21908721

  14. Functional and structural studies of the disulfide isomerase DsbC from the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa reveals a redox-dependent oligomeric modulation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Santos, Clelton A; Toledo, Marcelo A S; Trivella, Daniela B B; Beloti, Lilian L; Schneider, Dilaine R S; Saraiva, Antonio M; Crucello, Aline; Azzoni, Adriano R; Souza, Alessandra A; Aparicio, Ricardo; Souza, Anete P

    2012-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that grows as a biofilm inside the xylem vessels of susceptible plants and causes several economically relevant crop diseases. In the present study, we report the functional and low-resolution structural characterization of the X. fastidiosa disulfide isomerase DsbC (XfDsbC). DsbC is part of the disulfide bond reduction/isomerization pathway in the bacterial periplasm and plays an important role in oxidative protein folding. In the present study, we demonstrate the presence of XfDsbC during different stages of X. fastidiosa biofilm development. XfDsbC was not detected during X. fastidiosa planktonic growth; however, after administering a sublethal copper shock, we observed an overexpression of XfDsbC that also occurred during planktonic growth. These results suggest that X. fastidiosa can use XfDsbC in vivo under oxidative stress conditions similar to those induced by copper. In addition, using dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering, we observed that the oligomeric state of XfDsbC in vitro may be dependent on the redox environment. Under reducing conditions, XfDsbC is present as a dimer, whereas a putative tetrameric form was observed under nonreducing conditions. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the overexpression of XfDsbC during biofilm formation and provide the first structural model of a bacterial disulfide isomerase in solution. PMID:22889056

  15. Genome-Wide Survey and Expression Analysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii U-box E3 Ubiquitin Ligases (CrPUBs) Reveal a Functional Lipid Metabolism Module

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qiulan; Li, Yajun; Wang, Wenquan; Fei, Xiaowen; Deng, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases determine the substrate specificity of ubiquitination. Plant U-box (PUB) E3 ligases, with a typical 70-amino acid U-box domain, participate in plant developmental processes and environmental responses. Thus far, 64 PUB proteins have been identified in Arabidopsis and 77 PUB proteins have been identified in Oryza. However, detailed studies on U-box genes in the model microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are lacking. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the genes encoding U-box family proteins in C. reinhardtii. Following BLASTP analysis, 30 full-length U-box genes were identified in the C. reinhardtii genome sequence. Bioinformatics analyses of CrPUB genes were performed to characterize the phylogenetic relationships, chromosomal locations and gene structures of each member. The 30 identified CrPUB proteins are clustered into 3 distinct subfamilies, and the genes for these proteins are unevenly distributed among 14 chromosomes. Furthermore, the quantitative real-time RT-PCR or semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of 30 CrPUB mRNA abundances under nitrogen starvation showed that 18 CrPUB genes were induced by N starvation and that 7 genes were repressed in the N-poor environment. We selected five CrPUB genes exhibiting marked changes in expression under N-free conditions for further analysis in RNAi experiments and examined the oil content of these gene-silenced transgenic strains. The silencing of CrPUB5 and CrPUB14, which are typically down-regulated under N starvation, induced 9.8%-45.0% and 14.4%-61.8% lipid accumulation, respectively. In contrast, the silencing of CrPUB11, CrPUB23 and CrPUB28, which are markedly up-regulated under N-free conditions, decreased the lipid content by 5.5%-27.8%, 8.1%-27.3% and 6.6%-27.9%, respectively. These results provide a useful reference for the identification and functional analysis of this gene family and fundamental information for microalgae lipid metabolism research. PMID:25822994

  16. Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic

    E-print Network

    Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key indus- trial

  17. Sensitivity of human auditory cortex to rapid frequency modulation revealed by multivariate representational similarity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Joanisse, Marc F.; DeSouza, Diedre D.

    2014-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the extent, magnitude, and pattern of brain activity in response to rapid frequency-modulated sounds. We examined this by manipulating the direction (rise vs. fall) and the rate (fast vs. slow) of the apparent pitch of iterated rippled noise (IRN) bursts. Acoustic parameters were selected to capture features used in phoneme contrasts, however the stimuli themselves were not perceived as speech per se. Participants were scanned as they passively listened to sounds in an event-related paradigm. Univariate analyses revealed a greater level and extent of activation in bilateral auditory cortex in response to frequency-modulated sweeps compared to steady-state sounds. This effect was stronger in the left hemisphere. However, no regions showed selectivity for either rate or direction of frequency modulation. In contrast, multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) revealed feature-specific encoding for direction of modulation in auditory cortex bilaterally. Moreover, this effect was strongest when analyses were restricted to anatomical regions lying outside Heschl's gyrus. We found no support for feature-specific encoding of frequency modulation rate. Differential findings of modulation rate and direction of modulation are discussed with respect to their relevance to phonetic discrimination. PMID:25324713

  18. [Novel function of astrocytes revealed by optogenetics].

    PubMed

    Beppu, Kaoru; Matsui, Ko

    2014-12-01

    Astrocytes respond to neuronal activity. However, whether astrocytic activity has any significance in brain function is unknown. Signaling pathway leading from astrocytes to neurons would be required for astrocytes to participate in neuronal functions and, here, we investigated the presence of such pathway. Optogenetics was used to manipulate astrocytic activity. A light-sensitive protein, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), was selectively expressed in astrocytes. Photostimulation of these astrocytes induced glutamate release which modulated neuronal activity and animal behavior. Such glutamate release was triggered by intracellular acidification produced by ChR2 photoactivation. Astrocytic acidification occurs upon brain ischemia, and we found that another optogenetic tool, archaerhodopsin (ArchT), could counter the acidification and suppress astrocytic glutamate release. Controlling of astrocytic pH may become a therapeutic strategy upon ischemia. PMID:25518365

  19. Network analysis reveals that bacteria and fungi form modules that correlate independently with soil parameters.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Alexandre B; Prendergast-Miller, Miranda T; Richardson, Alan E; Toscas, Peter; Farrell, Mark; Macdonald, Lynne M; Baker, Geoff; Wark, Tim; Thrall, Peter H

    2014-07-11

    Network and multivariate statistical analyses were performed to determine interactions between bacterial and fungal community terminal restriction length polymorphisms as well as soil properties in paired woodland and pasture sites. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed that shifts in woodland community composition correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon, while changes in pasture community composition correlated with moisture, nitrogen and phosphorus. Weighted correlation network analysis detected two distinct microbial modules per land use. Bacterial and fungal ribotypes did not group separately, rather all modules comprised of both bacterial and fungal ribotypes. Woodland modules had a similar fungal?:?bacterial ribotype ratio, while in the pasture, one module was fungal dominated. There was no correspondence between pasture and woodland modules in their ribotype composition. The modules had different relationships to soil variables, and these contrasts were not detected without the use of network analysis. This study demonstrated that fungi and bacteria, components of the soil microbial communities usually treated as separate functional groups as in a CCA approach, were co-correlated and formed distinct associations in these adjacent habitats. Understanding these distinct modular associations may shed more light on their niche space in the soil environment, and allow a more realistic description of soil microbial ecology and function. PMID:25040229

  20. Carrier Modulation Via Waveform Probability Density Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.

    2004-01-01

    Beyond the classic modes of carrier modulation by varying amplitude (AM), phase (PM), or frequency (FM), we extend the modulation domain of an analog carrier signal to include a class of general modulations which are distinguished by their probability density function histogram. Separate waveform states are easily created by varying the pdf of the transmitted waveform. Individual waveform states are assignable as proxies for digital ONEs or ZEROs. At the receiver, these states are easily detected by accumulating sampled waveform statistics and performing periodic pattern matching, correlation, or statistical filtering. No fundamental natural laws are broken in the detection process. We show how a typical modulation scheme would work in the digital domain and suggest how to build an analog version. We propose that clever variations of the modulating waveform (and thus the histogram) can provide simple steganographic encoding.

  1. Carrier Modulation Via Waveform Probability Density Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.

    2006-01-01

    Beyond the classic modes of carrier modulation by varying amplitude (AM), phase (PM), or frequency (FM), we extend the modulation domain of an analog carrier signal to include a class of general modulations which are distinguished by their probability density function histogram. Separate waveform states are easily created by varying the pdf of the transmitted waveform. Individual waveform states are assignable as proxies for digital one's or zero's. At the receiver, these states are easily detected by accumulating sampled waveform statistics and performing periodic pattern matching, correlation, or statistical filtering. No fundamental physical laws are broken in the detection process. We show how a typical modulation scheme would work in the digital domain and suggest how to build an analog version. We propose that clever variations of the modulating waveform (and thus the histogram) can provide simple steganographic encoding.

  2. A Walsh Function Module Users' Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) with Walsh functions offers new opportunities to simulate many challenging problems in mathematical physics. The approach was developed to better simulate hypersonic flows with shocks on unstructured grids. It is unique in that integrals and derivatives are computed using simple matrix multiplication of series representations of functions without the need for divided differences. The product of any two Walsh functions is another Walsh function - a feature that radically changes an algorithm for solving PDEs. A FORTRAN module for supporting Walsh function simulations is documented. A FORTRAN code is also documented with options for solving time-dependent problems: an advection equation, a Burgers equation, and a Riemann problem. The sample problems demonstrate the usage of the Walsh function module including such features as operator overloading, Fast Walsh Transforms in multi-dimensions, and a Fast Walsh reciprocal.

  3. Caffeine Modulates Attention Network Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Lieberman, Harris R.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigated the effects of caffeine (0 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg) on a flanker task designed to test Posner's three visual attention network functions: alerting, orienting, and executive control [Posner, M. I. (2004). "Cognitive neuroscience of attention". New York, NY: Guilford Press]. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind…

  4. Discovery of Novel Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Reveals Chemical and Functional Diversity and In Vivo Activity in Rat Behavioral Models of Anxiolytic and Antipsychotic ActivityS?

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alice L.; Grier, Mark D.; Jones, Carrie K.; Herman, Elizabeth J.; Kane, Alexander S.; Smith, Randy L.; Williams, Richard; Zhou, Ya; Marlo, Joy E.; Days, Emily L.; Blatt, Tasha N.; Jadhav, Satyawan; Menon, Usha N.; Vinson, Paige N.; Rook, Jerri M.; Stauffer, Shaun R.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Weaver, C. David

    2010-01-01

    Modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) may provide novel treatments for multiple central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including anxiety and schizophrenia. Although compounds have been developed to better understand the physiological roles of mGluR5 and potential usefulness for the treatment of these disorders, there are limitations in the tools available, including poor selectivity, low potency, and limited solubility. To address these issues, we developed an innovative assay that allows simultaneous screening for mGluR5 agonists, antagonists, and potentiators. We identified multiple scaffolds that possess diverse modes of activity at mGluR5, including both positive and negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively). 3-Fluoro-5-(3-(pyridine-2-yl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)benzonitrile (VU0285683) was developed as a novel selective mGluR5 NAM with high affinity for the 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP) binding site. VU0285683 had anxiolytic-like activity in two rodent models for anxiety but did not potentiate phencyclidine-induced hyperlocomotor activity. (4-Hydroxypiperidin-1-yl)(4-phenylethynyl)phenyl)methanone (VU0092273) was identified as a novel mGluR5 PAM that also binds to the MPEP site. VU0092273 was chemically optimized to an orally active analog, N-cyclobutyl-6-((3-fluorophenyl)ethynyl)nicotinamide hydrochloride (VU0360172), which is selective for mGluR5. This novel mGluR5 PAM produced a dose-dependent reversal of amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion, a rodent model predictive of antipsychotic activity. Discovery of structurally and functionally diverse allosteric modulators of mGluR5 that demonstrate in vivo efficacy in rodent models of anxiety and antipsychotic activity provide further support for the tremendous diversity of chemical scaffolds and modes of efficacy of mGluR5 ligands. In addition, these studies provide strong support for the hypothesis that multiple structurally distinct mGluR5 modulators have robust activity in animal models that predict efficacy in the treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:20923853

  5. Multifunctional ferromagnetic disks for modulating cell function

    PubMed Central

    Vitol, Elina A.; Novosad, Valentyn; Rozhkova, Elena A.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we focus on the methods for controlling cell function with ferromagnetic disk-shaped particles. We will first review the history of magnetically assisted modulation of cell behavior and applications of magnetic particles for studying physical properties of a cell. Then, we consider the biological applications of the microdisks such as the method for induction of cancer cell apoptosis, controlled drug release, hyperthermia and MRI imaging. PMID:23766544

  6. Modulation of Immune Functions by Foods

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Evidence is rapidly accumulating as to the beneficial effects of foods. However, it is not always clear whether the information is based on data evaluated impartially in a scientific fashion. Human research into whether foods modulate immune functions in either intervention studies or randomized controlled trials can be classified into three categories according to the physical state of subjects enrolled for investigation: (i) studies examining the effect of foods in healthy individuals; (ii) studies analyzing the effect of foods on patients with hypersensitivity; and (iii) studies checking the effect of foods on immunocompromized subjects, including patients who had undergone surgical resection of cancer and newborns. The systematization of reported studies has made it reasonable to conclude that foods are able to modulate immune functions manifesting as either innate immunity (phagocytic activity, NK cell activity) or acquired immunity (T cell response, antibody production). Moreover, improvement of immune functions by foods can normalize the physical state of allergic patients or cancer patients, and may reduce the risk of diseases in healthy individuals. Therefore, it is valuable to assess the immune-modulating abilities of foods by measuring at least one parameter of either innate or acquired immunity. PMID:15841257

  7. On Functional Module Detection in Metabolic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Ina; Ackermann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Functional modules of metabolic networks are essential for understanding the metabolism of an organism as a whole. With the vast amount of experimental data and the construction of complex and large-scale, often genome-wide, models, the computer-aided identification of functional modules becomes more and more important. Since steady states play a key role in biology, many methods have been developed in that context, for example, elementary flux modes, extreme pathways, transition invariants and place invariants. Metabolic networks can be studied also from the point of view of graph theory, and algorithms for graph decomposition have been applied for the identification of functional modules. A prominent and currently intensively discussed field of methods in graph theory addresses the Q-modularity. In this paper, we recall known concepts of module detection based on the steady-state assumption, focusing on transition-invariants (elementary modes) and their computation as minimal solutions of systems of Diophantine equations. We present the Fourier-Motzkin algorithm in detail. Afterwards, we introduce the Q-modularity as an example for a useful non-steady-state method and its application to metabolic networks. To illustrate and discuss the concepts of invariants and Q-modularity, we apply a part of the central carbon metabolism in potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum) as running example. The intention of the paper is to give a compact presentation of known steady-state concepts from a graph-theoretical viewpoint in the context of network decomposition and reduction and to introduce the application of Q-modularity to metabolic Petri net models. PMID:24958145

  8. The Revealed Objective Functions of Nonprofit Firms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Steinberg

    1986-01-01

    Although assertions have often been made about the objectives underlying the behavior of nonprofit firms, there has been no empirical confirmation of these assertions. This article proposes a way to infer a nonprofit organization's objective function by estimating the marginal donative product of its fundraising. Panel data estimates derived by using Hildreth and Houck's (1968) random coefficients model, suggest that

  9. Modulating Brain Oscillations to Drive Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Thut, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Do neuronal oscillations play a causal role in brain function? In a study in this issue of PLOS Biology, Helfrich and colleagues address this long-standing question by attempting to drive brain oscillations using transcranial electrical current stimulation. Remarkably, they were able to manipulate visual perception by forcing brain oscillations of the left and right visual hemispheres into synchrony using oscillatory currents over both hemispheres. Under this condition, human observers more often perceived an inherently ambiguous visual stimulus in one of its perceptual instantiations. These findings shed light on the mechanisms underlying neuronal computation. They show that it is the neuronal oscillations that drive the visual experience, not the experience driving the oscillations. And they indicate that synchronized oscillatory activity groups brain areas into functional networks. This points to new ways for controlled experimental and possibly also clinical interventions for the study and modulation of brain oscillations and associated functions. PMID:25549340

  10. Modulation Based on Probability Density Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.

    2009-01-01

    A proposed method of modulating a sinusoidal carrier signal to convey digital information involves the use of histograms representing probability density functions (PDFs) that characterize samples of the signal waveform. The method is based partly on the observation that when a waveform is sampled (whether by analog or digital means) over a time interval at least as long as one half cycle of the waveform, the samples can be sorted by frequency of occurrence, thereby constructing a histogram representing a PDF of the waveform during that time interval.

  11. Revealing neuronal function through microelectrode array recordings

    PubMed Central

    Obien, Marie Engelene J.; Deligkaris, Kosmas; Bullmann, Torsten; Bakkum, Douglas J.; Frey, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays and microprobes have been widely utilized to measure neuronal activity, both in vitro and in vivo. The key advantage is the capability to record and stimulate neurons at multiple sites simultaneously. However, unlike the single-cell or single-channel resolution of intracellular recording, microelectrodes detect signals from all possible sources around every sensor. Here, we review the current understanding of microelectrode signals and the techniques for analyzing them. We introduce the ongoing advancements in microelectrode technology, with focus on achieving higher resolution and quality of recordings by means of monolithic integration with on-chip circuitry. We show how recent advanced microelectrode array measurement methods facilitate the understanding of single neurons as well as network function. PMID:25610364

  12. Bcl2-associated Athanogene 3 Interactome Analysis Reveals a New Role in Modulating Proteasome Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Yang, Li-Na; Cheng, Li; Tu, Shun; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Xiong, Qian; Mo, Ran; Li, Chong-Yang; Jeong, Jun-Seop; Jiang, Lizhi; Blackshaw, Seth; Bi, Li-Jun; Zhu, Heng; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Ge, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3), a member of the BAG family of co-chaperones, plays a critical role in regulating apoptosis, development, cell motility, autophagy, and tumor metastasis and in mediating cell adaptive responses to stressful stimuli. BAG3 carries a BAG domain, a WW domain, and a proline-rich repeat (PXXP), all of which mediate binding to different partners. To elucidate BAG3's interaction network at the molecular level, we employed quantitative immunoprecipitation combined with knockdown and human proteome microarrays to comprehensively profile the BAG3 interactome in humans. We identified a total of 382 BAG3-interacting proteins with diverse functions, including transferase activity, nucleic acid binding, transcription factors, proteases, and chaperones, suggesting that BAG3 is a critical regulator of diverse cellular functions. In addition, we characterized interactions between BAG3 and some of its newly identified partners in greater detail. In particular, bioinformatic analysis revealed that the BAG3 interactome is strongly enriched in proteins functioning within the proteasome-ubiquitination process and that compose the proteasome complex itself, suggesting that a critical biological function of BAG3 is associated with the proteasome. Functional studies demonstrated that BAG3 indeed interacts with the proteasome and modulates its activity, sustaining cell survival and underlying resistance to therapy through the down-modulation of apoptosis. Taken as a whole, this study expands our knowledge of the BAG3 interactome, provides a valuable resource for understanding how BAG3 affects different cellular functions, and demonstrates that biologically relevant data can be harvested using this kind of integrated approach. PMID:23824909

  13. Revealing Biological Modules via Graph Summarization Saket Navlakha, Michael C. Schatz, and Carl Kingsford

    E-print Network

    Kingsford, Carl

    . A common approach to this task is to partition the interaction graph into modules -- subsets of proteinsRevealing Biological Modules via Graph Summarization Saket Navlakha, Michael C. Schatz, and Carl the global organization of the cell. We propose a novel graph summarization (GS) technique, based on graph

  14. Madagascar corals reveal Pacific multidecadal modulation of rainfall since 1708

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, C. A.; Zinke, J.; Peeters, F.; Park, W.; Scheufen, T.; Kasper, S.; Randriamanantsoa, B.; McCulloch, M. T.; Brummer, G.-J. A.

    2012-03-01

    The Pacific Ocean modulates Australian and North American rainfall variability on multidecadal timescales, in concert with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). It has been suggested that Pacific decadal variability may also influence Indian Ocean surface temperature and rainfall in a far-field response, similar to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on interannual timescales. However, instrumental records of rainfall are too short and too sparse to confidently assess such multidecadal climatic teleconnections. Here, we present four climate archives spanning the past 300 yr from giant Madagascar corals. We decouple 20th century human deforestation effects from rainfall induced soil erosion using spectral luminescence scanning and geochemistry. The corals provide the first evidence for Pacific decadal modulation of rainfall over the Western Indian Ocean. We find that positive PDO phases are associated with increased Indian Ocean temperatures and rainfall in Eastern Madagascar, while precipitation in Southern Africa and Eastern Australia declines. Consequently, the negative PDO phase that started in 1998 should lead to reduced rainfall over Eastern Madagascar and increased precipitation in Southern Africa and Eastern Australia. We conclude that the PDO has important implications for future multidecadal variability of African rainfall, where water resource management is increasingly important under the warming climate.

  15. Apolipoprotein E ?4 modulates functional brain connectome in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhui; Wang, Xiao; He, Yi; Yu, Xin; Wang, Huali; He, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ?4 allele is a well-established genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent research has demonstrated an APOE ?4-mediated modulation of intrinsic functional brain networks in cognitively normal individuals. However, it remains largely unknown whether and how APOE ?4 affects the brain's functional network architecture in patients with AD. Using resting-state functional MRI and graph-theory approaches, we systematically investigated the topological organization of whole-brain functional networks in 16 APOE ?4 carriers and 26 matched noncarriers with AD at three levels: global whole-brain, intermediate module, and regional node/connection. Neuropsychological analysis showed that the APOE ?4 carriers performed worse on delayed memory but better on a late item generation of a verbal fluency task (associated with executive function) than noncarriers. Whole-brain graph analyses revealed that APOE ?4 significantly disrupted whole-brain topological organization as characterized by (i) reduced parallel information transformation efficiency; (ii) decreased intramodular connectivity within the posterior default mode network (pDMN) and intermodular connectivity of the pDMN and executive control network (ECN) with other neuroanatomical systems; and (iii) impaired functional hubs and their rich-club connectivities that primarily involve the pDMN, ECN, and sensorimotor systems. Further simulation analysis indicated that these altered connectivity profiles of the pDMN and ECN largely accounted for the abnormal global network topology. Finally, the changes in network topology exhibited significant correlations with the patients' cognitive performances. Together, our findings suggest that the APOE genotype modulates large-scale brain networks in AD and shed new light on the gene-connectome interaction in this disease. Hum Brain Mapp 36:1828-1846, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25619771

  16. Functional Association of Catalytic and Ancillary Modules Dictates Enzymatic Activity in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 43 ?-Xylosidase*

    PubMed Central

    Moraïs, Sarah; Salama-Alber, Orly; Barak, Yoav; Hadar, Yitzhak; Wilson, David B.; Lamed, Raphael; Shoham, Yuval; Bayer, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    ?-Xylosidases are hemicellulases that hydrolyze short xylo-oligosaccharides into xylose units, thus complementing endoxylanase degradation of the hemicellulose component of lignocellulosic substrates. Here, we describe the cloning, characterization, and kinetic analysis of a glycoside hydrolase family 43 ?-xylosidase (Xyl43A) from the aerobic cellulolytic bacterium, Thermobifida fusca. Temperature and pH optima of 55–60 °C and 5.5–6, respectively, were determined. The apparent Km value was 0.55 mm, using p-nitrophenyl xylopyranoside as substrate, and the catalytic constant (kcat) was 6.72 s?1. T. fusca Xyl43A contains a catalytic module at the N terminus and an ancillary module (termed herein as Module-A) of undefined function at the C terminus. We expressed the two recombinant modules independently in Escherichia coli and examined their remaining catalytic activity and binding properties. The separation of the two Xyl43A modules caused the complete loss of enzymatic activity, whereas potent binding to xylan was fully maintained in the catalytic module and partially in the ancillary Module-A. Nondenaturing gel electrophoresis revealed a specific noncovalent coupling of the two modules, thereby restoring enzymatic activity to 66.7% (relative to the wild-type enzyme). Module-A contributes a phenylalanine residue that functions as an essential part of the active site, and the two juxtaposed modules function as a single functional entity. PMID:22270362

  17. Heterogeneity in Neutrophil Microparticles Reveals Distinct Proteome and Functional Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Dalli, Jesmond; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Norling, Lucy V; Yin, Xiaoke; Hinds, Charles; Haskard, Dorian; Mayr, Manuel; Perretti, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Altered plasma neutrophil microparticle levels have recently been implicated in a number of vascular and inflammatory diseases, yet our understanding of their actions is very limited. Herein, we investigate the proteome of neutrophil microparticles in order to shed light on their biological actions. Stimulation of human neutrophils, either in suspension or adherent to an endothelial monolayer, led to the production of microparticles containing >400 distinct proteins with only 223 being shared by the two subsets. For instance, postadherent microparticles were enriched in alpha-2 macroglobulin and ceruloplasmin, whereas microparticles produced by neutrophils in suspension were abundant in heat shock 70 kDa protein 1. Annexin A1 and lactotransferrin were expressed in both microparticle subsets. We next determined relative abundance of these proteins in three types of human microparticle samples: healthy volunteer plasma, plasma of septic patients and skin blister exudates finding that these proteins were differentially expressed on neutrophil microparticles from these samples reflecting in part the expression profiles we found in vitro. Functional assessment of the neutrophil microparticles subsets demonstrated that in response to direct stimulation neutrophil microparticles produced reactive oxygen species and leukotriene B4 as well as locomoted toward a chemotactic gradient. Finally, we investigated the actions of the two neutrophil microparticles subsets described herein on target cell responses. Microarray analysis with human primary endothelial cells incubated with either microparticle subset revealed a discrete modulation of endothelial cell gene expression profile. These findings demonstrate that neutrophil microparticles are heterogenous and can deliver packaged information propagating the activation status of the parent cell, potentially exerting novel and fundamental roles both under homeostatic and disease conditions. PMID:23660474

  18. Fold modulating function: bacterial toxins to functional amyloids

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Adnan K.; Boles, Blaise R.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria produce cytolytic toxins that target host cells or other competing microbes. It is well known that environmental factors control toxin expression, however, recent work suggests that some bacteria manipulate the fold of these protein toxins to control their function. The ?-sheet rich amyloid fold is a highly stable ordered aggregate that many toxins form in response to specific environmental conditions. When in the amyloid state, toxins become inert, losing the cytolytic activity they display in the soluble form. Emerging evidence suggest that some amyloids function as toxin storage systems until they are again needed, while other bacteria utilize amyloids as a structural matrix component of biofilms. This amyloid matrix component facilitates resistance to biofilm disruptive challenges. The bacterial amyloids discussed in this review reveal an elegant system where changes in protein fold and solubility dictate the function of proteins in response to the environment. PMID:25136340

  19. Revealing conformational substates of lipidated N-Ras protein by pressure modulation

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Shobhna; Triola, Gemma; Vetter, Ingrid R.; Erlkamp, Mirko; Waldmann, Herbert; Winter, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of protein function is often linked to a conformational switch triggered by chemical or physical signals. To evaluate such conformational changes and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of subsequent protein function, experimental identification of conformational substates and characterization of conformational equilibria are mandatory. We apply pressure modulation in combination with FTIR spectroscopy to reveal equilibria between spectroscopically resolved substates of the lipidated signaling protein N-Ras. Pressure has the advantage that its thermodynamic conjugate is volume, a parameter that is directly related to structure. The conformational dynamics of N-Ras in its different nucleotide binding states in the absence and presence of a model biomembrane was probed by pressure perturbation. We show that not only nucleotide binding but also the presence of the membrane has a drastic effect on the conformational dynamics and selection of conformational substates of the protein, and a new substate appearing upon membrane binding could be uncovered. Population of this new substate is accompanied by structural reorientations of the G domain, as also indicated by complementary ATR-FTIR and IRRAS measurements. These findings thus illustrate that the membrane controls signaling conformations by acting as an effective interaction partner, which has consequences for the G-domain orientation of membrane-associated N-Ras, which in turn is known to be critical for its effector and modulator interactions. Finally, these results provide insights into the influence of pressure on Ras-controlled signaling events in organisms living under extreme environmental conditions as they are encountered in the deep sea where pressures reach the kbar range. PMID:22203965

  20. Key herbivores reveal limited functional redundancy on inshore coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, C. L.; van de Leemput, I. A.; Depczynski, M.; Hoey, A. S.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Marine ecosystems are facing increasing exposure to a range of stressors and declines in critical ecological functions. The likelihood of further loss of functions and resilience is dependent, in part, on the extent of functional redundancy (i.e. the capacity of one species to functionally compensate for the loss of another species) within critical functional groups. We used multiple metrics; species richness, generic richness, abundance and reserve capacity (i.e. the relative number of individuals available to fulfil the function if the numerically dominant species is lost), as indicators to assess the potential functional redundancy of four functional groups of herbivorous fishes (browsers, excavators, grazers and scrapers) in two of the worlds' most intact coral reef ecosystems: the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia. We found marked variations in potential redundancy among habitats within each reef system and functional groups. Despite negligible fishing of herbivorous fishes, coastal habitats in both reef systems had lower functional redundancy compared to offshore locations for all herbivorous fishes collectively and the four functional groups independently. This pattern was consistent in all four indicators of redundancy. The potential vulnerability of these coastal habitats is highlighted by recent shifts from coral to macroalgal dominance on several coastal reefs of the GBR. Our approach provides a simple yet revealing evaluation of potential functional redundancy. Moreover, it highlights the spatial variation in potential vulnerability and resilience of reef systems.

  1. LOW RF CONTROL FEEDBACK AND IQ VECTOR MODULATOR COMPENSATION FUNCTIONS.

    E-print Network

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    RF gun and linac control circuits. Power and phase set points cover operational range of 20 dLOW RF CONTROL FEEDBACK AND IQ VECTOR MODULATOR COMPENSATION FUNCTIONS. M. Fedurin# , B. Malone, V. Yakimenko, BNL ATF, Upton, NY, 11973, U.S.A. Abstract I-Q vector modulator is key element of the gun

  2. Ferrocene Functionalized Endocrine Modulators as Anticancer Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillard, Elizabeth A.; Vessières, Anne; Jaouen, Gerard

    We present here some of our studies on the synthesis and behaviour of ferrocenyl selective endocrine receptor modulators against cancer cells, particularly breast and prostate cancers. The proliferative/anti-proliferative effects of compounds based on steroidal and non-steroidal endocrine modulators have been extensively explored in vitro. Structure-activity relationship studies of such molecules, particularly the hydroxyferrocifens and ferrocene phenols, have shown the effect of (1) the presence and the length of the N,N-dimethylamino side chain, (2) the presence and position of the phenol group, (3) the role of the ferrocenyl moiety, (4) that of conjugation, (5) phenyl functionalisation and (6) the placement of the phenyl group. Compounds possessing a ferrocene moiety linked to a p-phenol by a conjugated ?-system are among the most potent of the series, with IC50 values ranging from 0.090 to 0.6µM on hormone independent breast cancer cells. Based on the SAR data and electrochemical studies, we have proposed an original mechanism to explain the unusual behaviour of these bioorganometallic species and coin the term "kronatropic" to qualify this effect, involving ROS production and bio-oxidation. In addition, the importance of formulation is underlined. We also discuss the behaviour of ferrocenyl androgens and anti-androgens for possible use against prostate cancers. In sum, ferrocene has proven to be a fascinating substituent due to its vast potential for oncology.

  3. Using structure to inform carbohydrate binding module function.

    PubMed

    Abbott, D Wade; van Bueren, Alicia Lammerts

    2014-10-01

    Generally, non-catalytic carbohydrate binding module (CBM) specificity has been shown to parallel the catalytic activity of the carbohydrate active enzyme (CAZyme) module it is appended to. With the rapid expansion in metagenomic sequence space for the potential discovery of new CBMs in addition to the recent emergence of several new CBM families that display diverse binding profiles and novel functions, elucidating the function of these protein modules has become a much more challenging task. This review summarizes several approaches that have been reported for using primary structure to inform CBM specificity and streamlining their biophysical characterization. In addition we discuss general trends in binding site architecture and several newly identified functions for CBMs. Streams of investigation that will facilitate the development and refinement of sequence-based prediction tools are suggested. PMID:25108190

  4. Serotonergic modulating drugs for functional gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Robin

    2002-01-01

    After many years of basic research we have now begun to learn how to manipulate the serotonergic mechanisms within the gut. This has lead to a number of significant advances including 5HT3 antagonists for the treatment of functional diarrhoea, 5HT4 agonists for the treatment of constipation and 5HT1 agonists for the treatment of impaired fundal relaxation. Initial enthusiasm has been somewhat dented by the withdrawal of alosetron because of ischaemic colitis, but it remains to be seen whether this adverse event will be seen with other 5HT3 antagonists. Finally it should be recognized that, in a substantial proportion of patients attending clinics complaining of functional symptoms, anxiety is a major component. The drugs so far described are by and large devoid of CNS effects. It remains possible therefore that a drug which combines both peripheral and central effects would likely to be beneficial. PMID:12100220

  5. Genome-wide computational prediction of transcriptional regulatory modules reveals new insights into human gene expression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mathieu Blanchette; Alain R. Bataille; Xiaoyu Chen; Christian Poitras; Josée Laganière; Céline Lefèbvre; Geneviève Deblois; Vincent Giguère; Vincent Ferretti; Dominique Bergeron; Benoit Coulombe; François Robert

    2006-01-01

    The identification of regulatory regions is one of the most important and challenging problems toward the functional annotation of the human genome. In higher eukaryotes, transcription-factor (TF) binding sites are often organized in clusters called cis-regulatory modules (CRM). While the prediction of individual TF-binding sites is a notoriously difficult problem, CRM prediction has proven to be somewhat more reliable. Starting

  6. Glycosylation modulates arenavirus glycoprotein expression and function

    SciTech Connect

    Bonhomme, Cyrille J., E-mail: cbonhomm@uci.edu; Capul, Althea A., E-mail: acapul@uci.edu; Lauron, Elvin J., E-mail: elauron@chori.org; Bederka, Lydia H., E-mail: lbederka@uci.edu; Knopp, Kristeene A., E-mail: kknopp@uci.edu; Buchmeier, Michael J., E-mail: m.buchmeier@uci.ed

    2011-01-20

    The glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) contains nine potential N-linked glycosylation sites. We investigated the function of these N-glycosylations by using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. All the available sites were occupied on GP1 and two of three on GP2. N-linked glycan mutations at positions 87 and 97 on GP1 resulted in reduction of expression and absence of cleavage and were necessary for downstream functions, as confirmed by the loss of GP-mediated fusion activity with T87A and S97A mutants. In contrast, T234A and E379N/A381T mutants impaired GP-mediated cell fusion without altered expression or processing. Infectivity via virus-like particles required glycans and a cleaved glycoprotein. Glycosylation at the first site within GP2, not normally utilized by LCMV, exhibited increased VLP infectivity. We also confirmed the role of the N-linked glycan at position 173 in the masking of the neutralizing epitope GP-1D. Taken together, our results indicated a strong relationship between fusion and infectivity.

  7. Glycosylation modulates arenavirus glycoprotein expression and function

    PubMed Central

    Bonhomme, Cyrille J.; Capul, Althea A.; Lauron, Elvin J.; Bederka, Lydia H.; Knopp, Kristeene A.; Buchmeier, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) contains nine potential N-linked glycosylation sites. We investigated the function of these N-glycosylations by using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. All the available sites were occupied on GP1 and two of three on GP2. N-linked glycan mutations at positions 87 and 97 on GP1 resulted in reduction of expression and absence of cleavage and were necessary for downstream functions, as confirmed by the loss of GP-mediated fusion activity with T87A, S97A mutants. In contrast, T234A and E379N/A381T mutants impaired GP-mediated cell fusion without altered expression or processing. Infectivity via virus-like particles required glycans and a cleaved glycoprotein. Glycosylation at the first site within GP2, not normally utilized by LCMV, exhibited increased VLP-infectivity. We also confirmed the role of the N-linked glycan at position 173 in the masking of the neutralizing epitope GP-1D. Taken together, our results indicated a strong relationship between fusion and infectivity. PMID:21056893

  8. Proteomic profiling reveals insights into Triticeae stigma development and function

    PubMed Central

    Nazemof, Nazila; Couroux, Philippe; Rampitsch, Christof; Xing, Tim; Robert, Laurian S.

    2014-01-01

    To our knowledge, this study represents the first high-throughput characterization of a stigma proteome in the Triticeae. A total of 2184 triticale mature stigma proteins were identified using three different gel-based approaches combined with mass spectrometry. The great majority of these proteins are described in a Triticeae stigma for the first time. These results revealed many proteins likely to play important roles in stigma development and pollen–stigma interactions, as well as protection against biotic and abiotic stresses. Quantitative comparison of the triticale stigma transcriptome and proteome showed poor correlation, highlighting the importance of having both types of analysis. This work makes a significant contribution towards the elucidation of the Triticeae stigma proteome and provides novel insights into its role in stigma development and function. PMID:25170101

  9. End-Capped ?-Helices as Modulators of Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Andrew B.; Arora, Paramjit S.

    2011-01-01

    Examination of complexes of proteins with other biomolecules reveals that proteins tend to interact with partners via folded sub-domains, in which the backbone possesses secondary structure. ?-Helices, the largest class of protein secondary structures, play fundamental roles in a multitude of highly specific protein-protein and protein-nucleic acids interactions. Herein, we describe the potential of a helix nucleation strategy to afford modulators of protein-protein interactions. PMID:22712023

  10. Aerodynamic parameter estimation via Fourier modulating function techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Parameter estimation algorithms are developed in the frequency domain for systems modeled by input/output ordinary differential equations. The approach is based on Shinbrot's method of moment functionals utilizing Fourier based modulating functions. Assuming white measurement noises for linear multivariable system models, an adaptive weighted least squares algorithm is developed which approximates a maximum likelihood estimate and cannot be biased by unknown initial or boundary conditions in the data owing to a special property attending Shinbrot-type modulating functions. Application is made to perturbation equation modeling of the longitudinal and lateral dynamics of a high performance aircraft using flight-test data. Comparative studies are included which demonstrate potential advantages of the algorithm relative to some well established techniques for parameter identification. Deterministic least squares extensions of the approach are made to the frequency transfer function identification problem for linear systems and to the parameter identification problem for a class of nonlinear-time-varying differential system models.

  11. Cohesive versus Flexible Evolution of Functional Modules in Eukaryotes

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    to evolve cohesively according to case studies and systematic analyses in prokaryotes. In this study we of flexible evolution has also been suggested by a number of large scale studies in prokaryotes [9­11]. Both as in prokaryotes [12]. This raises the question to what extent, if at all, functional modules evolve cohesively

  12. Response function of modulated grid Faraday cup plasma instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, A.; Olbert, S.

    1986-01-01

    Modulated grid Faraday cup plasma analyzers are a very useful tool for making in situ measurements of space plasmas. One of their great attributes is that their simplicity permits their angular response function to be calculated theoretically. An expression is derived for this response function by computing the trajectories of the charged particles inside the cup. The Voyager plasma science experiment is used as a specific example. Two approximations to the rigorous response function useful for data analysis are discussed. Multisensor analysis of solar wind data indicates that the formulas represent the true cup response function for all angles of incidence with a maximum error of only a few percent.

  13. Functional connectivity of frontoparietal network predicts cognitive modulation of pain

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jian; Jensen, Karin; Loiotile, Rita; Cheetham, Alexandra; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Tan, Ying; Rosen, Bruce; Smoller, Jordan W.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Gollub, Randy L.

    2013-01-01

    The experience of pain can be significantly influenced by expectancy (predictive cues). This ability to modulate pain has the potential to affect therapeutic analgesia substantially and constitutes a foundation for non-pharmacological pain relief. In this study, we investigated 1) brain regions involved in visual cue modulation of pain during anticipation of pain, pain administration, and pain rating; and 2) the association between pre-test resting-state functional connectivity and the magnitude of cue effects on pain ratings. We found that after cue conditioning, visual cues can significantly modulate subjective pain ratings. fMRI results suggested that brain regions pertaining to the frontoparietal network (prefrontal and parietal cortex) and a pain/emotion modulatory region (rostral anterior cingulate cortex, rACC) are involved in cue modulation during both pain anticipation and administration stage. Most interestingly, we found that pre-test resting state functional connectivity between the frontoparietal network (as identified by independent component analysis) and the rACC/MPFC was positively associated with cue effects on pain rating changes. We believe that these finding will shed new light on our understanding of variable cue/expectancy effects across individuals and how the intrinsic connectivity of the brain may influence expectancy induced modulation of pain. PMID:23352757

  14. Holistic Atlases of Functional Networks and Interactions Reveal Reciprocal Organizational Architecture of Cortical Function.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jinglei; Jiang, Xi; Li, Xiang; Zhu, Dajiang; Zhang, Shu; Zhao, Shijie; Chen, Hanbo; Zhang, Tuo; Hu, Xintao; Han, Junwei; Ye, Jieping; Guo, Lei; Liu, Tianming

    2014-11-20

    For decades, it has been largely unknown to what extent multiple functional networks spatially overlap/interact with each other and jointly realize the total cortical function. Here, by developing novel sparse representation of whole-brain fMRI signals and by using the recently publicly released large-scale Human Connectome Project (HCP) high-quality fMRI data, we show that a number of reproducible and robust functional networks, including both task-evoked and resting state networks, are simultaneously distributed in distant neuroanatomic areas and substantially spatially overlapping with each other, thus forming an initial collection of holistic atlases of functional networks and interactions (HAFNI). More interestingly, the HAFNIs revealed two distinct patterns of highly overlapped regions and highly-specialized regions and exhibited that these two patterns of areas are reciprocally localized, revealing a novel organizational principle of cortical function. PMID:25420254

  15. Human Intellectual Disability Genes Form Conserved Functional Modules in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Oortveld, Merel A. W.; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Oti, Martin; Nijhof, Bonnie; Fernandes, Ana Clara; Kochinke, Korinna; Castells-Nobau, Anna; van Engelen, Eva; Ellenkamp, Thijs; Eshuis, Lilian; Galy, Anne; van Bokhoven, Hans; Habermann, Bianca; Brunner, Han G.; Zweier, Christiane; Verstreken, Patrik; Huynen, Martijn A.; Schenck, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual Disability (ID) disorders, defined by an IQ below 70, are genetically and phenotypically highly heterogeneous. Identification of common molecular pathways underlying these disorders is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of cognition and for the development of therapeutic intervention strategies. To systematically establish their functional connectivity, we used transgenic RNAi to target 270 ID gene orthologs in the Drosophila eye. Assessment of neuronal function in behavioral and electrophysiological assays and multiparametric morphological analysis identified phenotypes associated with knockdown of 180 ID gene orthologs. Most of these genotype-phenotype associations were novel. For example, we uncovered 16 genes that are required for basal neurotransmission and have not previously been implicated in this process in any system or organism. ID gene orthologs with morphological eye phenotypes, in contrast to genes without phenotypes, are relatively highly expressed in the human nervous system and are enriched for neuronal functions, suggesting that eye phenotyping can distinguish different classes of ID genes. Indeed, grouping genes by Drosophila phenotype uncovered 26 connected functional modules. Novel links between ID genes successfully predicted that MYCN, PIGV and UPF3B regulate synapse development. Drosophila phenotype groups show, in addition to ID, significant phenotypic similarity also in humans, indicating that functional modules are conserved. The combined data indicate that ID disorders, despite their extreme genetic diversity, are caused by disruption of a limited number of highly connected functional modules. PMID:24204314

  16. Functional Metabolomics Reveals Novel Active Products in the DHA Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Masakazu; Mirakaj, Valbona; Serhan, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous mechanisms for successful resolution of an acute inflammatory response and the local return to homeostasis are of interest because excessive inflammation underlies many human diseases. In this review, we provide an update and overview of functional metabolomics that identified a new bioactive metabolome of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Systematic studies revealed that DHA was converted to DHEA-derived novel bioactive products as well as aspirin-triggered forms of protectins (AT-PD1). The new oxygenated DHEA-derived products blocked PMN chemotaxis, reduced P-selectin expression and platelet-leukocyte adhesion, and showed organ protection in ischemia/reperfusion injury. These products activated cannabinoid receptor (CB2 receptor) and not CB1 receptors. The AT-PD1 reduced neutrophil (PMN) recruitment in murine peritonitis. With human cells, AT-PD1 decreased transendothelial PMN migration as well as enhanced efferocytosis of apoptotic human PMN by macrophages. The recent findings reviewed here indicate that DHEA oxidative metabolism and aspirin-triggered conversion of DHA produce potent novel molecules with anti-inflammatory and organ-protective properties, opening the DHA metabolome functional roles. PMID:22566962

  17. Soluble Axoplasm Enriched from Injured CNS Axons Reveals the Early Modulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Patrick; Broom, Lucy J.; Quraishe, Shmma; Dalton, Paul D.; Skipp, Paul; Newman, Tracey A.; Perry, V. Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Axon injury and degeneration is a common consequence of diverse neurological conditions including multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. The molecular events underlying axon degeneration are poorly understood. We have developed a novel method to enrich for axoplasm from rodent optic nerve and characterised the early events in Wallerian degeneration using an unbiased proteomics screen. Our detergent-free method draws axoplasm into a dehydrated hydrogel of the polymer poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), which is then recovered using centrifugation. This technique is able to recover axonal proteins and significantly deplete glial contamination as confirmed by immunoblotting. We have used iTRAQ to compare axoplasm-enriched samples from naïve vs injured optic nerves, which has revealed a pronounced modulation of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton. To confirm the modulation of the actin cytoskeleton in injured axons we focused on the RhoA pathway. Western blotting revealed an augmentation of RhoA and phosphorylated cofilin in axoplasm-enriched samples from injured optic nerve. To investigate the localisation of these components of the RhoA pathway in injured axons we transected axons of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro. We observed an early modulation of filamentous actin with a concomitant redistribution of phosphorylated cofilin in injured axons. At later time-points, RhoA is found to accumulate in axonal swellings and also colocalises with filamentous actin. The actin cytoskeleton is a known sensor of cell viability across multiple eukaryotes, and our results suggest a similar role for the actin cytoskeleton following axon injury. In agreement with other reports, our data also highlights the role of the RhoA pathway in axon degeneration. These findings highlight a previously unexplored area of axon biology, which may open novel avenues to prevent axon degeneration. Our method for isolating CNS axoplasm also represents a new tool to study axon biology. PMID:23115653

  18. Microarray analysis reveals global modulation of endogenous retroelement transcription by microbes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A substantial proportion of both the mouse and human genomes comprise of endogenous retroelements (REs), which include endogenous retroviruses. Over evolutionary time, REs accumulate inactivating mutations or deletions and thus lose the ability to replicate. Additionally, REs can be transcriptionally repressed by dedicated mechanisms of the host. Nevertheless, many of them still possess and express intact open reading frames, and their transcriptional activity has been associated with many physiological and pathological processes of the host. However, this association remains tenuous due to incomplete understanding of the mechanism by which RE transcription is regulated. Here, we use a bioinformatics tool to examine RE transcriptional activity, measured by microarrays, in murine and human immune cells responding to microbial stimulation. Results Immune cell activation by microbial signals in vitro caused extensive changes in the transcription not only of the host genes involved in the immune response, but also of numerous REs. Modulated REs were frequently found near or embedded within similarly-modulated host genes. Focusing on probes reporting single-integration, intergenic REs, revealed extensive transcriptional responsiveness of these elements to microbial signals. Microbial stimulation modulated RE expression in a cell-intrinsic manner. In line with these results, the transcriptional activity of numerous REs followed characteristics in different tissues according to exposure to environmental microbes and was further heavily altered during viral infection or imbalances with intestinal microbiota, both in mice and humans. Conclusions Together, these results highlight the utility of improved methodologies in assessing RE transcription profiles in both archived and new microarray data sets. More importantly, application of this methodology suggests that immune activation, as a result of infection with pathogens or dysbiosis with commensal microbes, causes global modulation of RE transcription. RE responsiveness to external stimuli should, therefore, be considered in any association between RE transcription and disease. PMID:25063042

  19. T-cadherin modulates hepatocyte functions in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Khetani, Salman R.; Chen, Alice A.; Ranscht, Barbara; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2008-01-01

    Primary hepatocytes from several different species rapidly lose viability and phenotypic functions on isolation from their native microenvironment of the liver. Stromal cells derived from both within and outside the liver can induce phenotypic functions in primary hepatocytes in vitro; however, the molecular mediators underlying this “coculture effect” have not been fully elucidated. We have previously developed a functional genomic screen utilizing cocultures of hepatocytes and 3T3 fibroblasts to identify such candidate hepatocyte-function-inducing molecules. In particular, truncated-cadherin (T-cadherin) was identified as a potential molecule of interest in induction of hepatic functions. Here we demonstrate that liver-specific functions of primary rat hepatocytes are induced on cocultivation with Chinese hamster ovary cells engineered to express T-cadherin on their surface as compared with wild-type controls. Additionally, culture of cells on substrata presenting recombinant T-cadherin protein (acellular presentation) enhanced hepatic functions in both pure hepatocyte cultures and in hepatocyte-stromal cocultures lacking endogenous T-cadherin expression. Collectively, these data indicate that both cellular and acellular presentation of T-cadherin can be used to modulate the hepatocyte phenotype in vitro for tissue engineering applications. Our work suggests potential avenues for investigating the role of T-cadherin on hepatocellular function in vivo in settings such as embryogenesis and liver pathology.—Khetani, S. R., Chen, A. A., Ranscht, B., Bhatia, S. N. T-cadherin modulates hepatocyte functions in vitro. PMID:18635739

  20. Modulation of function and gated learning in a network memory

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, L.F. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States))

    1990-12-01

    Memory and learning are studied in a model neural network made from component cells with a variety of realistic intrinsic dynamic behaviors. Modulation of intrinsic cellular characteristics causes a network to switch between two entirely different modes of operation. In one mode the network acts as a selective, long-term associative memory, whereas in the other it is a nonselective, short-term latching memory. Such functional modulation can be used as a mechanism for initiating and terminating learning in a network associative memory.

  1. Band gap modulation of functionalized metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Musho, Terence; Li, Jiangtan; Wu, Nianqiang

    2014-11-21

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been envisioned as alternatives to planar metallic catalysts for solar-to-fuel conversion. This is a direct result of their porous structure and the ability to tailor their optical absorption properties. This study investigates the band gap modulation of Zr-UiO-66 MOFs from both the computational and experimental points of view for three linker designs that include benzenedicarboxylate (BDC), BDC-NO2, and BDC-NH2. Emphasis in this study was aimed at understanding the influence of the bonding between the aromatic ring and the functional group. A ground state density functional theory (DFT) calculation was carried out to investigate the projected density of states and the origins of the modulation. A time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculation of the hydrogen terminated linkers confirmed the modulation and accounted for the electron charge transfer providing comparable optical band gap predictions to experimental results. Computational results confirmed the hybridization of the carbon-nitrogen bond in conjunction with the donor state resulting from the NH2 functionalization. The NO2 functionalization resulted in an acceptor configuration with marginal modification to the valence band maximum. The largest modulation was BDC-NH2 with a band gap of 2.75 eV, followed by BDC-NO2 with a band gap of 2.93 eV and BDC with a band gap of 3.76 eV. The electron effective mass was predicted from the band structure to be 8.9 me for all MOF designs. PMID:25269595

  2. Secretory protein profiling reveals TNF-? inactivation by selective and promiscuous Sec61 modulators.

    PubMed

    Maifeld, Sarah V; MacKinnon, Andrew L; Garrison, Jennifer L; Sharma, Ajay; Kunkel, Eric J; Hegde, Ramanujan S; Taunton, Jack

    2011-09-23

    Cotransins are cyclic heptadepsipeptides that bind the Sec61 translocon to inhibit cotranslational translocation of a subset of secreted and type I transmembrane proteins. The few known cotransin-sensitive substrates are all targeted to the translocon by a cleavable signal sequence, previously shown to be a critical determinant of cotransin sensitivity. By profiling two cotransin variants against a panel of secreted and transmembrane proteins, we demonstrate that cotransin side-chain differences profoundly affect substrate selectivity. Among the most sensitive substrates we identified is the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?). Like all type II transmembrane proteins, TNF-? is targeted to the translocon by its membrane-spanning domain, indicating that a cleavable signal sequence is not strictly required for cotransin sensitivity. Our results thus reveal an unanticipated breadth of translocon substrates whose expression is inhibited by Sec61 modulators. PMID:21944747

  3. Degree of musical expertise modulates higher order brain functioning.

    PubMed

    Oechslin, Mathias S; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Lazeyras, François; Hauert, Claude-Alain; James, Clara E

    2013-09-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show for the first time that levels of musical expertise stepwise modulate higher order brain functioning. This suggests that degree of training intensity drives such cerebral plasticity. Participants (non-musicians, amateurs, and expert musicians) listened to a comprehensive set of specifically composed string quartets with hierarchically manipulated endings. In particular, we implemented 2 irregularities at musical closure that differed in salience but were both within the tonality of the piece (in-key). Behavioral sensitivity scores (d') of both transgressions perfectly separated participants according to their level of musical expertise. By contrasting brain responses to harmonic transgressions against regular endings, functional brain imaging data showed compelling evidence for stepwise modulation of brain responses by both violation strength and expertise level in a fronto-temporal network hosting universal functions of working memory and attention. Additional independent testing evidenced an advantage in visual working memory for the professionals, which could be predicted by musical training intensity. The here introduced findings of brain plasticity demonstrate the progressive impact of musical training on cognitive brain functions that may manifest well beyond the field of music processing. PMID:22832388

  4. Functional Relations of Cerebellar Modules of the Cat

    PubMed Central

    Pong, Milton; Gibson, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    The cerebellum consists of parasagittal zones that define fundamental modules of neural processing. Each zone receives input from a distinct subdivision of the inferior olive (IO)—activity in one olivary subdivision will affect activity in one cerebellar module. To define functions of the cerebellar modules, we inactivated specific olivary subdivisions in six male cats with a glutamate receptor blocker. Olivary inactivation eliminates Purkinje cell complex spikes, which results in a high rate of Purkinje cell simple spike discharge. The increased simple spike discharge inhibits output from connected regions of the cerebellar nuclei. After inactivation, behavior was evaluated during a reach-to-grasp task and during locomotion. Inactivation of each subdivision produced unique behavioral deficits. Performance of the reach-to-grasp task was affected by inactivation of the rostral dorsal accessory olive (rDAO) and the rostral medial accessory olive (rMAO) and, possibly, the principal olive. rDAO inactivation produced paw drag during locomotion and a deficit in grasping the handle during the reach-to-grasp task. rMAO inactivation caused the cats to reach under the handle and produced severe limb drag during locomotion. Inactivation of the dorsal medial cell column, cell group ?, or caudal medial accessory olive produced little deficit in the reach-to-grasp task, but each produced a different deficit during locomotion. In all cases, the cats appeared to have intact sensation, good spatial awareness, and no change of affect. Normal cerebellar function requires low rates of IO discharge, and each cerebellar module has a specific and unique function in sensory–motor integration. PMID:20631170

  5. The response function of modulated grid Faraday cup plasma instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, A.; Olbert, S.

    1986-01-01

    Modulated grid Faraday cup plasma analyzers are a very useful tool for making in situ measurements of space plasmas. One of their great attributes is that their simplicity permits their angular response function to be calculated theoretically. An expression is derived for this response function by computing the trajectories of the charged particles inside the cup. The Voyager Plasma Science (PLS) experiment is used as a specific example. Two approximations to the rigorous response function useful for data analysis are discussed. The theoretical formulas were tested by multi-sensor analysis of solar wind data. The tests indicate that the formulas represent the true cup response function for all angles of incidence with a maximum error of only a few percent.

  6. Control over the strength of connections between modules: a double dissociation between stimulus format and task revealed by Granger causality mapping in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Britt; Soliman, Sherif; O’Malley, Shannon; Danckert, James; Besner, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on theoretical and computational work with the localist dual route reading model and results from behavioral studies, Besner et al. (2011) proposed that the ability to perform tasks that require overriding stimulus-specific defaults (e.g., semantics when naming Arabic numerals, and phonology when evaluating the parity of number words) necessitate the ability to modulate the strength of connections between cognitive modules for lexical representation, semantics, and phonology on a task- and stimulus-specific basis. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate this account by assessing changes in functional connectivity while participants performed tasks that did and did not require such stimulus-task default overrides. The occipital region showing the greatest modulation of BOLD signal strength for the two stimulus types was used as the seed region for Granger causality mapping (GCM). Our GCM analysis revealed a region of rostromedial frontal cortex with a crossover interaction. When participants performed tasks that required overriding stimulus type defaults (i.e., parity judgments of number words and naming Arabic numerals) functional connectivity between the occipital region and rostromedial frontal cortex was present. Statistically significant functional connectivity was absent when the tasks were the default for the stimulus type (i.e., parity judgments of Arabic numerals and reading number words). This frontal region (BA 10) has previously been shown to be involved in goal-directed behavior and maintenance of a specific task set. We conclude that overriding stimulus-task defaults requires a modulation of connection strengths between cognitive modules and that the override mechanism predicted from cognitive theory is instantiated by frontal modulation of neural activity of brain regions specialized for sensory processing.

  7. Proteome-wide light/dark modulation of thiol oxidation in cyanobacteria revealed by quantitative site-specific redox proteomics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Nguyen, Amelia Y; Dai, Ziyu; Su, Dian; Gaffrey, Matthew J; Moore, Ronald J; Jacobs, Jon M; Monroe, Matthew E; Smith, Richard D; Koppenaal, David W; Pakrasi, Himadri B; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2014-12-01

    Reversible protein thiol oxidation is an essential regulatory mechanism of photosynthesis, metabolism, and gene expression in photosynthetic organisms. Herein, we present proteome-wide quantitative and site-specific profiling of in vivo thiol oxidation modulated by light/dark in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, an oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryote, using a resin-assisted thiol enrichment approach. Our proteomic approach integrates resin-assisted enrichment with isobaric tandem mass tag labeling to enable site-specific and quantitative measurements of reversibly oxidized thiols. The redox dynamics of ?2,100 Cys-sites from 1,060 proteins under light, dark, and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (a photosystem II inhibitor) conditions were quantified. In addition to relative quantification, the stoichiometry or percentage of oxidation (reversibly oxidized/total thiols) for ?1,350 Cys-sites was also quantified. The overall results revealed broad changes in thiol oxidation in many key biological processes, including photosynthetic electron transport, carbon fixation, and glycolysis. Moreover, the redox sensitivity along with the stoichiometric data enabled prediction of potential functional Cys-sites for proteins of interest. The functional significance of redox-sensitive Cys-sites in NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, peroxiredoxin (AhpC/TSA family protein Sll1621), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase was further confirmed with site-specific mutagenesis and biochemical studies. Together, our findings provide significant insights into the broad redox regulation of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25118246

  8. Compression of Flow Can Reveal Overlapping-Module Organization in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viamontes Esquivel, Alcides; Rosvall, Martin

    2011-10-01

    To better understand the organization of overlapping modules in large networks with respect to flow, we introduce the map equation for overlapping modules. In this information-theoretic framework, we use the correspondence between compression and regularity detection. The generalized map equation measures how well we can compress a description of flow in the network when we partition it into modules with possible overlaps. When we minimize the generalized map equation over overlapping network partitions, we detect modules that capture flow and determine which nodes at the boundaries between modules should be classified in multiple modules and to what degree. With a novel greedy-search algorithm, we find that some networks, for example, the neural network of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, are best described by modules dominated by hard boundaries, but that others, for example, the sparse European-roads network, have an organization of highly overlapping modules.

  9. Functional specification of the Performance Measurement (PM) module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berliner, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The design of the Performance Measurement Module is described with emphasis on what the PM Module would do, and what it would look like to the user. The PM Module as described could take several man-years to develop. An evolutionary approach to the implementation of the PM Module is presented which would provide an operational baseline PM Module within a few months.

  10. Gene expression module-based chemical function similarity search.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Hao, Pei; Zheng, Siyuan; Tu, Kang; Fan, Haiwei; Zhu, Ruixin; Ding, Guohui; Dong, Changzheng; Wang, Chuan; Li, Xuan; Thiesen, H-J; Chen, Y Eugene; Jiang, Hualiang; Liu, Lei; Li, Yixue

    2008-11-01

    Investigation of biological processes using selective chemical interventions is generally applied in biomedical research and drug discovery. Many studies of this kind make use of gene expression experiments to explore cellular responses to chemical interventions. Recently, some research groups constructed libraries of chemical related expression profiles, and introduced similarity comparison into chemical induced transcriptome analysis. Resembling sequence similarity alignment, expression pattern comparison among chemical intervention related expression profiles provides a new way for chemical function prediction and chemical-gene relation investigation. However, existing methods place more emphasis on comparing profile patterns globally, which ignore noises and marginal effects. At the same time, though the whole information of expression profiles has been used, it is difficult to uncover the underlying mechanisms that lead to the functional similarity between two molecules. Here a new approach is presented to perform biological effects similarity comparison within small biologically meaningful gene categories. Regarding gene categories as units, a reduced similarity matrix is generated for measuring the biological distances between query and profiles in library and pointing out in which modules do chemical pairs resemble. Through the modularization of expression patterns, this method reduces experimental noises and marginal effects and directly correlates chemical molecules with gene function modules. PMID:18842630

  11. Cytokine Signaling Modulates Blood-Brain Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weihong; Stone, Kirsten P.; Hsuchou, Hung; Manda, Vamshi K.; Zhang, Yan; Kastin, Abba J.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) provides a vast interface for cytokines to affect CNS function. The BBB is a target for therapeutic intervention. It is essential, therefore, to understand how cytokines interact with each other at the level of the BBB and how secondary signals modulate CNS functions beyond the BBB. The interactions between cytokines and lipids, however, have not been fully addressed at the level of the BBB. Here, we summarize current understanding of the localization of cytokine receptors and transporters in specific membrane microdomains, particularly lipid rafts, on the luminal (apical) surface of the microvascular endothelial cells composing the BBB. We then illustrate the clinical context of cytokine effects on the BBB by neuroendocrine regulation and amplification of inflammatory signals. Two unusual aspects discussed are signaling crosstalk by different classes of cytokines and genetic regulation of drug efflux transporters. We also introduce a novel area of focus on how cytokines may act through nuclear hormone receptors to modulate efflux transporters and other targets. A specific example discussed is the ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 (ABCA-1) that regulates lipid metabolism. Overall, cytokine signaling at the level of the BBB is a crucial feature of the dynamic regulation that can rapidly change BBB function and affect brain health and disease. PMID:21834767

  12. Gap junction modulation and its implications for heart function

    PubMed Central

    Kurtenbach, Stefan; Kurtenbach, Sarah; Zoidl, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction communication (GJC) mediated by connexins is critical for heart function. To gain insight into the causal relationship of molecular mechanisms of disease pathology, it is important to understand which mechanisms contribute to impairment of gap junctional communication. Here, we present an update on the known modulators of connexins, including various interaction partners, kinases, and signaling cascades. This gap junction network (GJN) can serve as a blueprint for data mining approaches exploring the growing number of publicly available data sets from experimental and clinical studies. PMID:24578694

  13. Single particle tracking with sterol modulation reveals the cholesterol-mediated diffusion properties of integrin receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Neha; Syed, Aleem; Sander, Suzanne; Smith, Emily A.

    2014-12-01

    A combination of sterol modulation with cyclodextrins plus fluorescence microscopy revealed a biophysical mechanism behind cholesterol’s influence on the diffusion of a ubiquitous class of receptors called integrins. The heterogeneous diffusion of integrins bound to ligand-coated quantum dots was measured using single particle tracking (SPT), and the ensemble changes in integrin diffusion were measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). A 25 ± 1% reduction of membrane cholesterol resulted in three significant changes to the diffusion of ligand-bound ?PS2C?PS integrins as measured by SPT. There was a 23% increase in ligand-bound mobile integrins; there was a statistically significant increase in the average diffusion coefficient inside zones of confined diffusion, and histograms of confined integrin trajectories showed an increased frequency in the range of 0.1–1 ?m2 s?1 and a decreased frequency in the 0.001–0.1 ?m2 s?1 range. No statistical change was measured in the duration of confinement nor the size of confined zones. Restoring the cholesterol-depleted cells with exogenous cholesterol or exogenous epicholesterol resulted in similar diffusion properties. Epicholesterol differs from cholesterol in the orientation of a single hydroxyl group. The ability of epicholesterol to substitute for cholesterol suggests a biophysical mechanism for cholesterol’s effect on integrin diffusion. Influences of bilayer thickness, viscosity and organization are discussed as possible explanations for the measured changes in integrin diffusion when the membrane cholesterol concentration is reduced.

  14. Thiolactone modulators of quorum sensing revealed through library design and screening

    PubMed Central

    McInnis, Christine E.; Blackwell, Helen E.

    2011-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process by which bacteria use small molecules or peptidic signals to assess their local population densities. At sufficiently high density, bacteria can alter gene expression levels to regulate group behaviors involved in a range of important and diverse phenotypes, including virulence factor production, biofilm formation, root nodulation, and bioluminescence. Gram-negative bacteria most commonly use N-acylated L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as their QS signals. The AHL lactone ring is hydrolyzed relatively rapidly at biological pH, and the ring-opened product is QS inactive. We seek to identify AHL analogues with heightened hydrolytic stability, and thereby potentially heightened activity, for use as non-native modulators of bacterial QS. As part of this effort, we probed the utility of thiolactone analogues in the current study as QS agonists and antagonists in Gram-negative bacteria. A focused library of thiolactone analogs was designed and rapidly synthesized in solution. We examined the activity of the library as agonists and antagonists of LuxR-type QS receptors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (LasR), Vibrio fischeri (LuxR), and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (TraR) using bacterial reporter strains. The thiolactone library contained several highly active compounds, including some of the most active LuxR inhibitors and the most active synthetic TraR agonist reported to date. Analysis of a representative thiolactone analog revealed that its hydrolysis half-life was almost double that of its parent AHL in bacterial growth medium. PMID:21798746

  15. Modulation of microsaccade rate by task difficulty revealed through between- and within-trial comparisons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Yan, Hongmei; Sun, Hong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Microsaccades (MSs) are small eye movements that occur during attempted visual fixation. While most studies concerning MSs focus on their roles in visual processing, some also suggest that the MS rate can be modulated by the amount of mental exertion involved in nonvisual processing. The current study focused on the effects of task difficulty on MS rate in a nonvisual mental arithmetic task. Experiment 1 revealed a general inverse relationship between MS rate and subjective task difficulty. During Experiment 2, three task phases with different requirements were identified: during calculation (between stimulus presentation and response), postcalculation (after reporting an answer), and a control condition (undergoing a matching sequence of events without the need to make a calculation). MS rate was observed to approximately double from the during-calculation phase to the postcalculation phase, and was significantly higher in the control condition compared to postcalculation. Only during calculation was the MS rate generally decreased with greater task difficulty. Our results suggest that the nonvisual cognitive processing can suppress MS rate, and that the extent of such suppression is related to the task difficulty. PMID:25740876

  16. Walk the Line: A Module on Linear Functions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    VU Bioengineering RET Program,

    Prepared with pre-algebra or algebra 1 classes in mind, this module leads students through the process of graphing data and finding a line of best fit while exploring the characteristics of linear equations in algebraic and graphic formats. Then, these topics are connected to real-world experiences in which people use linear functions. During the module, students use these scientific concepts to solve the following hypothetical challenge: You are a new researcher in a lab, and your boss has just given you your first task to analyze a set of data. It being your first assignment, you ask an undergraduate student working in your lab to help you figure it out. She responds that you must determine what the data represents and then find an equation that models the data. You believe that you will be able to determine what the data represents on your own, but you ask for further help modeling the data. In response, she says she is not completely sure how to do it, but gives a list of equations that may fit the data. This module is built around the legacy cycle, a format that incorporates educational research feindings on how people best learn.

  17. Walk the Line: A Module on Linear Functions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering,

    2007-01-01

    This module was written for a Pre-Algebra or Algebra I class in mind. It will lead students through the process of graphing data and finding a line of best fit while simultaneously exploring the characteristics of linear equations in algebraic and graphic formats. These topics are then tied back into real-world experiences in which people use linear functions. During the module, students utilize these scientific concepts to solve the following problem: You are a new researcher in a lab, and your boss has just given you your first task to analyze a set of data. It being your first assignment, you ask an undergraduate student working in your lab to help you figure it out. She responds that you must determine what the data represents and then find an equation which models the data. You determine that you will be able to determine what the data represents on your own, but you ask for further help modeling the data. In response, she says she is not completely sure how to do it, but gives a list of equations that may fit the data. This module is built around the Legacy Cycle, a format that incorporates findings from educational research on how people best learn.

  18. Phase noise reveals early category-specific modulation of the event-related potentials

    PubMed Central

    Németh, Kornél; Kovács, Petra; Vakli, Pál; Kovács, Gyula; Zimmer, Márta

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have found that the amplitude of the early event-related potential (ERP) components evoked by faces, such as N170 and P2, changes systematically as a function of noise added to the stimuli. This change has been linked to an increased perceptual processing demand and to enhanced difficulty in perceptual decision making about faces. However, to date it has not yet been tested whether noise manipulation affects the neural correlates of decisions about face and non-face stimuli similarly. To this end, we measured the ERPs for faces and cars at three different phase noise levels. Subjects performed the same two-alternative age-discrimination task on stimuli chosen from young–old morphing continua that were created from faces as well as cars and were calibrated to lead to similar performances at each noise-level. Adding phase noise to the stimuli reduced performance and enhanced response latency for the two categories to the same extent. Parallel to that, phase noise reduced the amplitude and prolonged the latency of the face-specific N170 component. The amplitude of the P1 showed category-specific noise dependence: it was enhanced over the right hemisphere for cars and over the left hemisphere for faces as a result of adding phase noise to the stimuli, but remained stable across noise levels for cars over the left and for faces over the right hemisphere. Moreover, noise modulation altered the category-selectivity of the N170, while the P2 ERP component, typically associated with task decision difficulty, was larger for the more noisy stimuli regardless of stimulus category. Our results suggest that the category-specificity of noise-induced modulations of ERP responses starts at around 100 ms post-stimulus. PMID:24795689

  19. Revealing Topological Organization of Human Brain Functional Networks with Resting-State Functional near Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tengda; Shu, Ni; He, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Background The human brain is a highly complex system that can be represented as a structurally interconnected and functionally synchronized network, which assures both the segregation and integration of information processing. Recent studies have demonstrated that a variety of neuroimaging and neurophysiological techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion MRI and electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography can be employed to explore the topological organization of human brain networks. However, little is known about whether functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), a relatively new optical imaging technology, can be used to map functional connectome of the human brain and reveal meaningful and reproducible topological characteristics. Results We utilized resting-state fNIRS (R-fNIRS) to investigate the topological organization of human brain functional networks in 15 healthy adults. Brain networks were constructed by thresholding the temporal correlation matrices of 46 channels and analyzed using graph-theory approaches. We found that the functional brain network derived from R-fNIRS data had efficient small-world properties, significant hierarchical modular structure and highly connected hubs. These results were highly reproducible both across participants and over time and were consistent with previous findings based on other functional imaging techniques. Conclusions Our results confirmed the feasibility and validity of using graph-theory approaches in conjunction with optical imaging techniques to explore the topological organization of human brain networks. These results may expand a methodological framework for utilizing fNIRS to study functional network changes that occur in association with development, aging and neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:23029235

  20. Pattern codes for perceived gaze direction revealed by functional MRI

    E-print Network

    Carlin, Johan D.

    2012-06-12

    . (a) The gabor filter is generated by multiplying a wave function with a Gaussian envelope. The filter shape changes with the phase of the wave function. White represents positive filter components and black represents negative components. (b... effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.1.3 The role of gaze in social interaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1.4 Why study perception of gaze direction? . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 Gaze direction representations...

  1. What does the medical record reveal about functional status?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sidney T. Bogardus; Virginia Towle; Christianna S. Williams; Mayur M. Desai; Sharon K. Inouye

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Functional status measures are potent independent predictors of hospital outcomes and mortality. The study objective was\\u000a to compare medical record with interview data for functional status.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Subjects were 525 medical patients, aged 70 years or older, hospitalized at an academic medical center. Patient interviews\\u000a determined status for 7 basic activities of daily living (BADLs) and 7

  2. Functional genomic screen for modulators of ciliogenesis and cilium length

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon; Lee, Ji Eun; Heynen, Susanne; Suyama, Eigo; Ono, Keiichiro; Lee, KiYoung; Ideker, Trey; Aza-Blac, Pedro; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2010-01-01

    Primary cilia are evolutionarily conserved cellular organelles that organize diverse signaling pathways1,2. Defects in the formation or function of primary cilia are associated with a spectrum of human diseases and developmental abnormalities3. Genetic screens in model organisms have discovered core machineries of cilium assembly and maintenance4. However, regulatory molecules that coordinate the biogenesis of primary cilia with other cellular processes, including cytoskeletal organization, vesicle trafficking and cell-cell adhesion, remain to be identified. Here we report the results of a functional genomic screen using RNA interference (RNAi) to identify human genes involved in ciliogenesis control. The screen identified 36 positive and 13 negative ciliogenesis modulators, which include molecules involved in actin dynamics and vesicle trafficking. Further investigation demonstrated that blocking actin assembly facilitates ciliogenesis by stabilizing the pericentrosomal preciliary compartment (PPC), a previously uncharacterized compact vesiculotubular structure storing transmembrane proteins destined for cilia during the early phase of ciliogenesis. PPC was labeled by recycling endosome markers. Moreover, knockdown of modulators that are involved in the endocytic recycling pathway affected the formation of PPC as well as ciliogenesis. Our results uncover a critical regulatory step that couples actin dynamics and endocytic recycling with ciliogenesis, and also provide potential target molecules for future study. PMID:20393563

  3. Genome-Wide Association and Functional Follow-Up Reveals New Loci for Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Feitosa, Mary; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Chouraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank B.; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Kolcic, Ivana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Endlich, Karlhans; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Giulianini, Franco; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Metzger, Marie; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K.; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem with a genetic component. We performed genome-wide association studies in up to 130,600 European ancestry participants overall, and stratified for key CKD risk factors. We uncovered 6 new loci in association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the primary clinical measure of CKD, in or near MPPED2, DDX1, SLC47A1, CDK12, CASP9, and INO80. Morpholino knockdown of mpped2 and casp9 in zebrafish embryos revealed podocyte and tubular abnormalities with altered dextran clearance, suggesting a role for these genes in renal function. By providing new insights into genes that regulate renal function, these results could further our understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD. PMID:22479191

  4. Functional photoreceptor loss revealed with adaptive optics: An alternate cause of color blindness

    E-print Network

    Williams, David

    Functional photoreceptor loss revealed with adaptive optics: An alternate cause of color blindness phenotypic differences within classically defined groups of color blind individuals. Here, adaptive optics

  5. Structural and functional distinctions between auditory centers revealed with MRI in living humans

    E-print Network

    Sigalovsky, Irina S., 1972-

    2005-01-01

    From brainstem to cortex, sound is processed in centers that are functionally and structurally distinct. In animals, invasive electrophysiology and histology has revealed these distinctions and, consequently, organizational ...

  6. Metagenomic Analysis of Streptomyces lividans Reveals Host-Dependent Functional Expression

    E-print Network

    Handelsman, Jo

    Metagenomic Analysis of Streptomyces lividans Reveals Host- Dependent Functional Expression Matthew libraries in Streptomyces lividans. We expanded on previ- ously published protocols by constructing a system

  7. Unsuspected functional disparity in Devonian fishes revealed by tooth morphometrics?

    PubMed

    Gauchey, Samuel; Girard, Catherine; Adnet, Sylvain; Renaud, Sabrina

    2014-09-01

    The shape of features involved in key biological functions, such as teeth in nutrition, can provide insights into ecological processes even in ancient time, by linking the occupation of the morphological space (disparity) to the occupation of the ecological space. Investigating disparity in radiating groups may provide insights into the ecological diversification underlying evolution of morphological diversity. Actinopterygian fishes initiated their radiation in the Devonian, a period characterized by the diversification of marine ecosystem. Although a former morpho-functional analysis of jaw shape concluded to conservative and poorly diversified morphologies in this early part of their history, fish tooth disparity evidenced here an unsuspected diversity of possible functional significance in the pivotal period of the Late Devonian (Famennian). All teeth being caniniforms, some were stocky and robust, in agreement with expectations for active generalist predators. More surprisingly, elongated teeth also occurred at the beginning of Famennian. Their needle-like shape challenges morpho-functional interpretations by making them fragile in response to bending or torsion. The occurrence of both types of fish teeth during the beginning of the Famennian points to a discrete but real increase in disparity, thus testifying a first burst of feeding specialization despite overall conservative jaw morphology. The disappearance of these needle-like teeth in the Late Famennian might have been related to a relay in dental diversity with abundant co-occurring groups, namely conodonts and chondrichthyans (sharks). PMID:25078254

  8. Unsuspected functional disparity in Devonian fishes revealed by tooth morphometrics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchey, Samuel; Girard, Catherine; Adnet, Sylvain; Renaud, Sabrina

    2014-07-01

    The shape of features involved in key biological functions, such as teeth in nutrition, can provide insights into ecological processes even in ancient time, by linking the occupation of the morphological space (disparity) to the occupation of the ecological space. Investigating disparity in radiating groups may provide insights into the ecological diversification underlying evolution of morphological diversity. Actinopterygian fishes initiated their radiation in the Devonian, a period characterized by the diversification of marine ecosystem. Although a former morpho-functional analysis of jaw shape concluded to conservative and poorly diversified morphologies in this early part of their history, fish tooth disparity evidenced here an unsuspected diversity of possible functional significance in the pivotal period of the Late Devonian (Famennian). All teeth being caniniforms, some were stocky and robust, in agreement with expectations for active generalist predators. More surprisingly, elongated teeth also occurred at the beginning of Famennian. Their needle-like shape challenges morpho-functional interpretations by making them fragile in response to bending or torsion. The occurrence of both types of fish teeth during the beginning of the Famennian points to a discrete but real increase in disparity, thus testifying a first burst of feeding specialization despite overall conservative jaw morphology. The disappearance of these needle-like teeth in the Late Famennian might have been related to a relay in dental diversity with abundant co-occurring groups, namely conodonts and chondrichthyans (sharks).

  9. Unsuspected functional disparity in Devonian fishes revealed by tooth morphometrics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchey, Samuel; Girard, Catherine; Adnet, Sylvain; Renaud, Sabrina

    2014-09-01

    The shape of features involved in key biological functions, such as teeth in nutrition, can provide insights into ecological processes even in ancient time, by linking the occupation of the morphological space (disparity) to the occupation of the ecological space. Investigating disparity in radiating groups may provide insights into the ecological diversification underlying evolution of morphological diversity. Actinopterygian fishes initiated their radiation in the Devonian, a period characterized by the diversification of marine ecosystem. Although a former morpho-functional analysis of jaw shape concluded to conservative and poorly diversified morphologies in this early part of their history, fish tooth disparity evidenced here an unsuspected diversity of possible functional significance in the pivotal period of the Late Devonian (Famennian). All teeth being caniniforms, some were stocky and robust, in agreement with expectations for active generalist predators. More surprisingly, elongated teeth also occurred at the beginning of Famennian. Their needle-like shape challenges morpho-functional interpretations by making them fragile in response to bending or torsion. The occurrence of both types of fish teeth during the beginning of the Famennian points to a discrete but real increase in disparity, thus testifying a first burst of feeding specialization despite overall conservative jaw morphology. The disappearance of these needle-like teeth in the Late Famennian might have been related to a relay in dental diversity with abundant co-occurring groups, namely conodonts and chondrichthyans (sharks).

  10. Revealing the density of encoded functions in a viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikesh; Dykeman, Eric C.; Coutts, Robert H. A.; Lomonossoff, George P.; Rowlands, David J.; Phillips, Simon E. V.; Ranson, Neil; Twarock, Reidun; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    We present direct experimental evidence that assembly of a single-stranded RNA virus occurs via a packaging signal-mediated mechanism. We show that the sequences of coat protein recognition motifs within multiple, dispersed, putative RNA packaging signals, as well as their relative spacing within a genomic fragment, act collectively to influence the fidelity and yield of capsid self-assembly in vitro. These experiments confirm that the selective advantages for viral yield and encapsidation specificity, predicted from previous modeling of packaging signal-mediated assembly, are found in Nature. Regions of the genome that act as packaging signals also function in translational and transcriptional enhancement, as well as directly coding for the coat protein, highlighting the density of encoded functions within the viral RNA. Assembly and gene expression are therefore direct molecular competitors for different functional folds of the same RNA sequence. The strongest packaging signal in the test fragment, encodes a region of the coat protein that undergoes a conformational change upon contact with packaging signals. A similar phenomenon occurs in other RNA viruses for which packaging signals are known. These contacts hint at an even deeper density of encoded functions in viral RNA, which if confirmed, would have profound consequences for the evolution of this class of pathogens. PMID:25646435

  11. Systematic analysis of experimental phenotype data reveals gene functions.

    PubMed

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Hardy, Nigel W; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Tweedie, Susan; Schofield, Paul N; Gkoutos, Georgios V

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput phenotyping projects in model organisms have the potential to improve our understanding of gene functions and their role in living organisms. We have developed a computational, knowledge-based approach to automatically infer gene functions from phenotypic manifestations and applied this approach to yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), nematode worm (Caenorhabditis elegans), zebrafish (Danio rerio), fruitfly (Drosophila melanogaster) and mouse (Mus musculus) phenotypes. Our approach is based on the assumption that, if a mutation in a gene [Formula: see text] leads to a phenotypic abnormality in a process [Formula: see text], then [Formula: see text] must have been involved in [Formula: see text], either directly or indirectly. We systematically analyze recorded phenotypes in animal models using the formal definitions created for phenotype ontologies. We evaluate the validity of the inferred functions manually and by demonstrating a significant improvement in predicting genetic interactions and protein-protein interactions based on functional similarity. Our knowledge-based approach is generally applicable to phenotypes recorded in model organism databases, including phenotypes from large-scale, high throughput community projects whose primary mode of dissemination is direct publication on-line rather than in the literature. PMID:23626672

  12. Glycolysis modulates trypanosome glycoprotein expression as revealed by an RNAi library.

    PubMed

    Morris, James C; Wang, Zefeng; Drew, Mark E; Englund, Paul T

    2002-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool for identifying gene function in Trypanosoma brucei. We generated an RNAi library, the first of its kind in any organism, by ligation of genomic fragments into the vector pZJMbeta. After transfection at approximately 5-fold genome coverage, trypanosomes were induced to express double-stranded RNA and screened for reduced con canavalin A (conA) binding. Since this lectin binds the surface glycoprotein EP-procyclin, we predicted that cells would lose affinity to conA if RNAi silenced genes affecting EP-procyclin expression or modification. We found a cell line in which RNAi switches expression from glycosylated EP-procyclins to the unglycosylated GPEET-procyclin. This switch results from silencing a hexokinase gene. The relationship between procyclin expression and glycolysis was supported by silencing other genes in the glycolytic pathway, and confirmed by observation of a similar upregulation of GPEET- procyclin when parental cells were grown in medium depleted of glucose. These data suggest that T.brucei 'senses' changes in glucose level and modulates procyclin expression accordingly. PMID:12198145

  13. System identification and model reduction using modulating function techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Yan

    1993-01-01

    Weighted least squares (WLS) and adaptive weighted least squares (AWLS) algorithms are initiated for continuous-time system identification using Fourier type modulating function techniques. Two stochastic signal models are examined using the mean square properties of the stochastic calculus: an equation error signal model with white noise residuals, and a more realistic white measurement noise signal model. The covariance matrices in each model are shown to be banded and sparse, and a joint likelihood cost function is developed which links the real and imaginary parts of the modulated quantities. The superior performance of above algorithms is demonstrated by comparing them with the LS/MFT and popular predicting error method (PEM) through 200 Monte Carlo simulations. A model reduction problem is formulated with the AWLS/MFT algorithm, and comparisons are made via six examples with a variety of model reduction techniques, including the well-known balanced realization method. Here the AWLS/MFT algorithm manifests higher accuracy in almost all cases, and exhibits its unique flexibility and versatility. Armed with this model reduction, the AWLS/MFT algorithm is extended into MIMO transfer function system identification problems. The impact due to the discrepancy in bandwidths and gains among subsystem is explored through five examples. Finally, as a comprehensive application, the stability derivatives of the longitudinal and lateral dynamics of an F-18 aircraft are identified using physical flight data provided by NASA. A pole-constrained SIMO and MIMO AWLS/MFT algorithm is devised and analyzed. Monte Carlo simulations illustrate its high-noise rejecting properties. Utilizing the flight data, comparisons among different MFT algorithms are tabulated and the AWLS is found to be strongly favored in almost all facets.

  14. Modulating functional and dysfunctional mentalizing by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Schuwerk, Tobias; Langguth, Berthold; Sommer, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Mentalizing, the ability to attribute mental states to others and oneself, is a cognitive function with high relevance for social interactions. Recent neuroscientific research has increasingly contributed to attempts to decompose this complex social cognitive function into constituting neurocognitive building blocks. Additionally, clinical research that focuses on social cognition to find links between impaired social functioning and neurophysiological deviations has accumulated evidence that mentalizing is affected in most psychiatric disorders. Recently, both lines of research have started to employ transcranial magnetic stimulation: the first to modulate mentalizing in order to specify its neurocognitive components, the latter to treat impaired mentalizing in clinical conditions. This review integrates findings of these two different approaches to draw a more detailed picture of the neurocognitive basis of mentalizing and its deviations in psychiatric disorders. Moreover, we evaluate the effectiveness of hitherto employed stimulation techniques and protocols, paradigms and outcome measures. Based on this overview we highlight new directions for future research on the neurocognitive basis of functional and dysfunctional social cognition. PMID:25477838

  15. SUMOylation modulates the function of Aurora-B kinase

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Miranda, Gonzalo; de Castro, Ignacio Pérez; Carmena, Mar; Aguirre-Portolés, Cristina; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Fant, Xavier; Montoya, Guillermo; Earnshaw, William C.; Malumbres, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    Aurora kinases are central regulators of mitotic-spindle assembly, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Aurora B is a member of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) with crucial functions in regulation of the attachment of kinetochores to microtubules and in cytokinesis. We report here that Aurora B contains a conserved SUMO modification motif within its kinase domain. Aurora B can bind SUMO peptides in vitro when bound to the IN-box domain of its CPC partner INCENP. Mutation of Lys207 to arginine (Aurora BK207R) impairs the formation of conjugates of Aurora B and SUMO in vivo. Expression of the SUMO-null form of Aurora B results in abnormal chromosome segregation and cytokinesis failure and it is not able to rescue mitotic defects in Aurora-B-knockout cells. These defects are accompanied by increased levels of the CPC on chromosome arms and defective centromeric function, as detected by decreased phosphorylation of the Aurora-B substrate CENP-A. The Aurora-BK207R mutant does not display reduced kinase activity, suggesting that functional defects are probably a consequence of the altered localization, rather than decreased intrinsic kinase activity. These data suggest that SUMOylation of Aurora B modulates its function, possibly by mediating the extraction of CPC complexes from chromosome arms during prometaphase. PMID:20663916

  16. A DEK domain-containing protein modulates chromatin structure and function in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Waidmann, Sascha; Kusenda, Branislav; Mayerhofer, Juliane; Mechtler, Karl; Jonak, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Chromatin is a major determinant in the regulation of virtually all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin architectural proteins interact with nucleosomes to modulate chromatin accessibility and higher-order chromatin structure. The evolutionarily conserved DEK domain-containing protein is implicated in important chromatin-related processes in animals, but little is known about its DNA targets and protein interaction partners. In plants, the role of DEK has remained elusive. In this work, we identified DEK3 as a chromatin-associated protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. DEK3 specifically binds histones H3 and H4. Purification of other proteins associated with nuclear DEK3 also established DNA topoisomerase 1? and proteins of the cohesion complex as in vivo interaction partners. Genome-wide mapping of DEK3 binding sites by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing revealed enrichment of DEK3 at protein-coding genes throughout the genome. Using DEK3 knockout and overexpressor lines, we show that DEK3 affects nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility and modulates the expression of DEK3 target genes. Furthermore, functional levels of DEK3 are crucial for stress tolerance. Overall, data indicate that DEK3 contributes to modulation of Arabidopsis chromatin structure and function. PMID:25387881

  17. A DEK Domain-Containing Protein Modulates Chromatin Structure and Function in Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Waidmann, Sascha; Kusenda, Branislav; Mayerhofer, Juliane; Mechtler, Karl; Jonak, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a major determinant in the regulation of virtually all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin architectural proteins interact with nucleosomes to modulate chromatin accessibility and higher-order chromatin structure. The evolutionarily conserved DEK domain-containing protein is implicated in important chromatin-related processes in animals, but little is known about its DNA targets and protein interaction partners. In plants, the role of DEK has remained elusive. In this work, we identified DEK3 as a chromatin-associated protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. DEK3 specifically binds histones H3 and H4. Purification of other proteins associated with nuclear DEK3 also established DNA topoisomerase 1? and proteins of the cohesion complex as in vivo interaction partners. Genome-wide mapping of DEK3 binding sites by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing revealed enrichment of DEK3 at protein-coding genes throughout the genome. Using DEK3 knockout and overexpressor lines, we show that DEK3 affects nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility and modulates the expression of DEK3 target genes. Furthermore, functional levels of DEK3 are crucial for stress tolerance. Overall, data indicate that DEK3 contributes to modulation of Arabidopsis chromatin structure and function. PMID:25387881

  18. Structural and Functional Studies of the Rap1 C-Terminus Reveal Novel Separation-of-Function Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Feeser, Elizabeth A.; Wolberger, Cynthia (JHU-MED)

    2010-02-19

    The yeast Rap1 protein plays an important role in transcriptional silencing and in telomere length homeostasis. Rap1 mediates silencing at the HM loci and at telomeres by recruiting the Sir3 and Sir4 proteins to chromatin via a Rap1 C-terminal domain, which also recruits the telomere length regulators, Rif1 and Rif2. We report the 1.85 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the Rap1 C-terminus, which adopts an all-helical fold with no structural homologues. The structure was used to engineer surface mutations in Rap1, and the effects of these mutations on silencing and telomere length regulation were assayed in vivo. Our surprising finding was that there is no overlap between mutations affecting mating-type and telomeric silencing, suggesting that Rap1 plays distinct roles in silencing at the silent mating-type loci and telomeres. We also found novel Rap1 phenotypes and new separation-of-function mutants, which provide new tools for studying Rap1 function. Yeast two-hybrid studies were used to determine how specific mutations affect recruitment of Sir3, Rif1, and Rif2. A comparison of the yeast two-hybrid and functional data reveals patterns of protein interactions that correlate with each Rap1 phenotype. We find that Sir3 interactions are important for telomeric silencing, but not mating type silencing, and that Rif1 and Rif2 interactions are important in different subsets of telomeric length mutants. Our results show that the role of Rap1 in silencing differs between the HM loci and the telomeres and offer insight into the interplay between HM silencing, telomeric silencing, and telomere length regulation. These findings suggest a model in which competition and multiple recruitment events modulate silencing and telomere length regulation.

  19. Attentional load modulates large-scale functional brain connectivity beyond the core attention networks.

    PubMed

    Alnæs, Dag; Kaufmann, Tobias; Richard, Geneviève; Duff, Eugene P; Sneve, Markus H; Endestad, Tor; Nordvik, Jan Egil; Andreassen, Ole A; Smith, Stephen M; Westlye, Lars T

    2015-04-01

    In line with the notion of a continuously active and dynamic brain, functional networks identified during rest correspond with those revealed by task-fMRI. Characterizing the dynamic cross-talk between these network nodes is key to understanding the successful implementation of effortful cognitive processing in healthy individuals and its breakdown in a variety of conditions involving aberrant brain biology and cognitive dysfunction. We employed advanced network modeling on fMRI data collected during a task involving sustained attentive tracking of objects at two load levels and during rest. Using multivariate techniques, we demonstrate that attentional load levels can be significantly discriminated, and from a resting-state condition, the accuracy approaches 100%, by means of estimates of between-node functional connectivity. Several network edges were modulated during task engagement: The dorsal attention network increased connectivity with a visual node, while decreasing connectivity with motor and sensory nodes. Also, we observed a decoupling between left and right hemisphere dorsal visual streams. These results support the notion of dynamic network reconfigurations based on attentional effort. No simple correspondence between node signal amplitude change and node connectivity modulations was found, thus network modeling provides novel information beyond what is revealed by conventional task-fMRI analysis. The current decoding of attentional states confirms that edge connectivity contains highly predictive information about the mental state of the individual, and the approach shows promise for the utilization in clinical contexts. PMID:25595500

  20. Cannabinoid Modulation of Functional Connectivity within Regions Processing Attentional Salience.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Falkenberg, Irina; Martin-Santos, Rocio; Atakan, Zerrin; Crippa, Jose A; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Mick; McGuire, Philip

    2015-05-01

    There is now considerable evidence to support the hypothesis that psychotic symptoms are the result of abnormal salience attribution, and that the attribution of salience is largely mediated through the prefrontal cortex, the striatum, and the hippocampus. Although these areas show differential activation under the influence of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), the two major derivatives of cannabis sativa, little is known about the effects of these cannabinoids on the functional connectivity between these regions. We investigated this in healthy occasional cannabis users by employing event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) following oral administration of delta-9-THC, CBD, or a placebo capsule. Employing a seed cluster-based functional connectivity analysis that involved using the average time series from each seed cluster for a whole-brain correlational analysis, we investigated the effect of drug condition on functional connectivity between the seed clusters and the rest of the brain during an oddball salience processing task. Relative to the placebo condition, delta-9-THC and CBD had opposite effects on the functional connectivity between the dorsal striatum, the prefrontal cortex, and the hippocampus. Delta-9-THC reduced fronto-striatal connectivity, which was related to its effect on task performance, whereas this connection was enhanced by CBD. Conversely, mediotemporal-prefrontal connectivity was enhanced by delta-9-THC and reduced by CBD. Our results suggest that the functional integration of brain regions involved in salience processing is differentially modulated by single doses of delta-9-THC and CBD and that this relates to the processing of salient stimuli. PMID:25249057

  1. Transcriptome analysis of alternative splicing events regulated by SRSF10 reveals position-dependent splicing modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuexia; Wu, Wenwu; Li, Huang; Cheng, Yuanming; Wei, Ning; Zong, Jie; Feng, Xiaoyan; Xie, Zhiqin; Chen, Dai; Manley, James L.; Wang, Hui; Feng, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Splicing factor SRSF10 is known to function as a sequence-specific splicing activator. Here, we used RNA-seq coupled with bioinformatics analysis to identify the extensive splicing network regulated by SRSF10 in chicken cells. We found that SRSF10 promoted both exon inclusion and exclusion. Motif analysis revealed that SRSF10 binding to cassette exons was associated with exon inclusion, whereas the binding of SRSF10 within downstream constitutive exons was associated with exon exclusion. This positional effect was further demonstrated by the mutagenesis of potential SRSF10 binding motifs in two minigene constructs. Functionally, many of SRSF10-verified alternative exons are linked to pathways of stress and apoptosis. Consistent with this observation, cells depleted of SRSF10 expression were far more susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis than control cells. Importantly, reconstituted SRSF10 in knockout cells recovered wild-type splicing patterns and considerably rescued the stress-related defects. Together, our results provide mechanistic insight into SRSF10-regulated alternative splicing events in vivo and demonstrate that SRSF10 plays a crucial role in cell survival under stress conditions. PMID:24442672

  2. Spontaneous Neuronal Network Dynamics Reveal Circuit's Functional Adaptations for Behavior.

    PubMed

    Romano, Sebastián A; Pietri, Thomas; Pérez-Schuster, Verónica; Jouary, Adrien; Haudrechy, Mathieu; Sumbre, Germán

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous neuronal activity is spatiotemporally structured, influencing brain computations. Nevertheless, the neuronal interactions underlying these spontaneous activity patterns, and their biological relevance, remain elusive. Here, we addressed these questions using two-photon calcium imaging of intact zebrafish larvae to monitor the neuron-to-neuron spontaneous activity fine structure in the tectum, a region involved in visual spatial detection. Spontaneous activity was organized in topographically compact assemblies, grouping functionally similar neurons rather than merely neighboring ones, reflecting the tectal retinotopic map despite being independent of retinal drive. Assemblies represent all-or-none-like sub-networks shaped by competitive dynamics, mechanisms advantageous for visual detection in noisy natural environments. Notably, assemblies were tuned to the same angular sizes and spatial positions as prey-detection performance in behavioral assays, and their spontaneous activation predicted directional tail movements. Therefore, structured spontaneous activity represents "preferred" network states, tuned to behaviorally relevant features, emerging from the circuit's intrinsic non-linear dynamics, adapted for its functional role. PMID:25704948

  3. Molecular dissection of botulinum neurotoxin reveals interdomain chaperone function

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Audrey; Montal, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a multi-domain protein made up of the approximately 100 kDa heavy chain (HC) and the approximately 50 kDa light chain (LC). The HC can be further subdivided into two halves: the N-terminal translocation domain (TD) and the C-terminal Receptor Binding Domain (RBD). We have investigated the minimal requirements for channel activity and LC translocation. We utilize a cellular protection assay and a single channel/single molecule LC translocation assay to characterize in real time the channel and chaperone activities of BoNT/A truncation constructs in Neuro 2A cells. The unstructured, elongated belt region of the TD is demonstrated to be dispensable for channel activity, although may be required for productive LC translocation. We show that the RBD is not necessary for channel activity or LC translocation, however it dictates the pH threshold of channel insertion into the membrane. These findings indicate that each domain functions as a chaperone for the others in addition to their individual functions, working in concert to achieve productive intoxication. PMID:23396042

  4. Functional Organization of Color Domains in V1 and V2 of Macaque Monkey Revealed

    E-print Network

    Roe, Anna Wang

    significant functional differences between blobs and interblobs. In this study, we have used optical imaging. Fine alignment of optical maps and CO-stained tissue revealed that color domains in V1 stronglyFunctional Organization of Color Domains in V1 and V2 of Macaque Monkey Revealed by Optical Imaging

  5. Selection on soil microbiomes reveals reproducible impacts on plant function.

    PubMed

    Panke-Buisse, Kevin; Poole, Angela C; Goodrich, Julia K; Ley, Ruth E; Kao-Kniffin, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Soil microorganisms found in the root zone impact plant growth and development, but the potential to harness these benefits is hampered by the sheer abundance and diversity of the players influencing desirable plant traits. Here, we report a high level of reproducibility of soil microbiomes in altering plant flowering time and soil functions when partnered within and between plant hosts. We used a multi-generation experimental system using Arabidopsis thaliana Col to select for soil microbiomes inducing earlier or later flowering times of their hosts. We then inoculated the selected microbiomes from the tenth generation of plantings into the soils of three additional A. thaliana genotypes (Ler, Be, RLD) and a related crucifer (Brassica rapa). With the exception of Ler, all other plant hosts showed a shift in flowering time corresponding with the inoculation of early- or late-flowering microbiomes. Analysis of the soil microbial community using 16?S rRNA gene sequencing showed distinct microbiota profiles assembling by flowering time treatment. Plant hosts grown with the late-flowering-associated microbiomes showed consequent increases in inflorescence biomass for three A. thaliana genotypes and an increase in total biomass for B. rapa. The increase in biomass was correlated with two- to five-fold enhancement of microbial extracellular enzyme activities associated with nitrogen mineralization in soils. The reproducibility of the flowering phenotype across plant hosts suggests that microbiomes can be selected to modify plant traits and coordinate changes in soil resource pools. PMID:25350154

  6. Acupuncture Modulates the Functional Connectivity of the Default Mode Network in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Kuangshi; Ren, Yi; Cui, Fangyuan; Xie, Zijing; Shin, Jae-Young; Tan, Zhongjian; Tang, Lixin; Bai, Lijun; Zou, Yihuai

    2014-01-01

    Abundant evidence from previous fMRI studies on acupuncture has revealed significant modulatory effects at widespread brain regions. However, few reports on the modulation to the default mode network (DMN) of stroke patients have been investigated in the field of acupuncture. To study the modulatory effects of acupuncture on the DMN of stroke patients, eight right hemispheric infarction and stable ischemic stroke patients and ten healthy subjects were recruited to undergo resting state fMRI scanning before and after acupuncture stimulation. Functional connectivity analysis was applied with the bilateral posterior cingulate cortices chosen as the seed regions. The main finding demonstrated that the interregional interactions between the ACC and PCC especially enhanced after acupuncture at GB34 in stroke patients, compared with healthy controls. The results indicated that the possible mechanisms of the modulatory effects of acupuncture on the DMN of stroke patients could be interpreted in terms of cognitive ability and motor function recovery. PMID:24734113

  7. Functional dissection and module swapping of fungal cyclooligomer depsipeptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dayu; Xu, Fuchao; Gage, David; Zhan, Jixun

    2013-07-14

    BbBSLS and BbBEAS were dissected and reconstituted in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The intermodular linker is essential for the reconstitution of the separate modules. Module 1 can be swapped between BbBEAS and BbBSLS, while modules 2 and 3 control the product profiles. BbBSLS is a flexible enzyme that also synthesizes beauvericins. PMID:23727842

  8. Clostridium difficile Transcriptome Analysis Using Pig Ligated Loop Model Reveals Modulation of Pathways Not Modulated In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Scaria, Joy; Janvilisri, Tavan; Fubini, Susan; Gleed, Robin D.; McDonough, Sean P.; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2011-01-01

    A pig ligated loop model was used to analyze the in vivo transcriptome response of Clostridium difficile. Bacterial RNA from the loops was retrieved at different times and was used for microarray analysis. Several virulence-associated genes and genes involved in sporulation cascade were differentially expressed (DE). In concordance with observed upregulation of toxin genes in microarray, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay estimation of total toxin showed high amounts of toxin in the loops. Several genes that were absent in primary annotation of C. difficile 630 but annotated in a secondary annotation were found to be DE. Pathway comparison of DE genes in vitro and in vivo showed that when several pathways were expressed in all conditions, several of the C. difficile pathways were uniquely expressed only in vivo. The pathways observed to be modulated only in this study could be targets of new therapeutic agents against C. difficile infection. PMID:21592991

  9. Ocean wave-radar modulation transfer functions from the west coast experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Wright; W. J. Plant; W. C. Keller; W. L. Jones

    1980-01-01

    Short gravity-capillary waves, the equilibrium, or the steady state excitations of the ocean surface are modulated by longer ocean waves. These short waves are the predominant microwave scatterers on the ocean surface under many viewing conditions so that the modulation is readily measured with CW Doppler radar used as a two-scale wave probe. Modulation transfer functions (the ratio of the

  10. Nuclear Technology. Course 30: Mechanical Inspection. Module 30-2, Pump Functional Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasel, Ed; Espy, John

    This second in a series of eight modules for a course titled Mechanical Inspection describes typical pump functional tests which are performed after pump installation and prior to release of the plant for unrestricted power operation. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module

  11. Ocean Wave-Radar Modulation Transfer Functions From the West Coast Experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Wright; W. J. Plant; W. C. Keller; W. L. Jones

    1980-01-01

    Short gravity-capillary waves, the equilibrium, or the steady state excitations of the ocean surface are modulated by longer ocean waves. These short waves are the predominant microwave scatterers on the ocean surface under many viewing conditions so that the modulation is readily measured with CW Doppler radar used as a two-scale wave probe. Modulation transfer functions (the ratio of the

  12. Structure and Function of the SWIRM Domain, a Conserved Protein Module Found in Chromatin Regulatory Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Da,G.; Lenkart, J.; Zhao, K.; Shiekhattar, R.; Cairns, B.; Marmorstein, R.

    2006-01-01

    The SWIRM domain is a module found in the Swi3 and Rsc8 subunits of SWI/SNF-family chromatin remodeling complexes, and the Ada2 and BHC110/LSD1 subunits of chromatin modification complexes. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the SWIRM domain from Swi3 and characterize the in vitro and in vivo function of the SWIRM domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi3 and Rsc8. The Swi3 SWIRM forms a four-helix bundle containing a pseudo 2-fold axis and a helix-turn-helix motif commonly found in DNA-binding proteins. We show that the Swi3 SWIRM binds free DNA and mononucleosomes with high and comparable affinity and that a subset of Swi3 substitution mutants that display growth defects in vivo also show impaired DNA-binding activity in vitro, consistent with a nucleosome targeting function of this domain. Genetic and biochemical studies also reveal that the Rsc8 and Swi3 SWIRM domains are essential for the proper assembly and in vivo functions of their respective complexes. Together, these studies identify the SWIRM domain as an essential multifunctional module for the regulation of gene expression.

  13. Selective Modulation of Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity by HD-tACS Shapes Perception

    PubMed Central

    Helfrich, Randolph F.; Knepper, Hannah; Nolte, Guido; Strüber, Daniel; Rach, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory neuronal synchronization between cortical areas has been suggested to constitute a flexible mechanism to coordinate information flow in the human cerebral cortex. However, it remains unclear whether synchronized neuronal activity merely represents an epiphenomenon or whether it is causally involved in the selective gating of information. Here, we combined bilateral high-density transcranial alternating current stimulation (HD-tACS) at 40 Hz with simultaneous electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings to study immediate electrophysiological effects during the selective entrainment of oscillatory gamma-band signatures. We found that interhemispheric functional connectivity was modulated in a predictable, phase-specific way: In-phase stimulation enhanced synchronization, anti-phase stimulation impaired functional coupling. Perceptual correlates of these connectivity changes were found in an ambiguous motion task, which strongly support the functional relevance of long-range neuronal coupling. Additionally, our results revealed a decrease in oscillatory alpha power in response to the entrainment of gamma band signatures. This finding provides causal evidence for the antagonistic role of alpha and gamma oscillations in the parieto-occipital cortex and confirms that the observed gamma band modulations were physiological in nature. Our results demonstrate that synchronized cortical network activity across several spatiotemporal scales is essential for conscious perception and cognition. PMID:25549264

  14. The small GTPase Arf1 modulates mitochondrial morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Ackema, Karin B; Hench, Jürgen; Böckler, Stefan; Wang, Shyi Chyi; Sauder, Ursula; Mergentaler, Heidi; Westermann, Benedikt; Bard, Frédéric; Frank, Stephan; Spang, Anne

    2014-11-18

    The small GTPase Arf1 plays critical roles in membrane traffic by initiating the recruitment of coat proteins and by modulating the activity of lipid-modifying enzymes. Here, we report an unexpected but evolutionarily conserved role for Arf1 and the ArfGEF GBF1 at mitochondria. Loss of function of ARF-1 or GBF-1 impaired mitochondrial morphology and activity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similarly, mitochondrial defects were observed in mammalian and yeast cells. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aberrant clusters of the mitofusin Fzo1 accumulated in arf1-11 mutants and were resolved by overexpression of Cdc48, an AAA-ATPase involved in ER and mitochondria-associated degradation processes. Yeast Arf1 co-fractionated with ER and mitochondrial membranes and interacted genetically with the contact site component Gem1. Furthermore, similar mitochondrial abnormalities resulted from knockdown of either GBF-1 or contact site components in worms, suggesting that the role of Arf1 in mitochondrial functioning is linked to ER-mitochondrial contacts. Thus, Arf1 is involved in mitochondrial homeostasis and dynamics, independent of its role in vesicular traffic. PMID:25190516

  15. Probiotic modulation of dendritic cell function is influenced by ageing.

    PubMed

    You, Jialu; Dong, Honglin; Mann, Elizabeth R; Knight, Stella C; Yaqoob, Parveen

    2014-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical for the generation of T-cell responses. DC function may be modulated by probiotics, which confer health benefits in immunocompromised individuals, such as the elderly. This study investigated the effects of four probiotics, Bifidobacterium longum bv. infantis CCUG 52486, B. longum SP 07/3, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (L.GG) and L. casei Shirota (LcS), on DC function in an allogeneic mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR) model, using DCs and T-cells from young and older donors in different combinations. All four probiotics enhanced expression of CD40, CD80 and CCR7 on both young and older DCs, but enhanced cytokine production (TGF-?, TNF-?) by old DCs only. LcS induced IL-12 and IFN? production by DC to a greater degree than other strains, while B. longum bv. infantis CCUG 52486 favoured IL-10 production. Stimulation of young T cells in an allogeneic MLR with DC was enhanced by probiotic pretreatment of old DCs, which demonstrated greater activation (CD25) than untreated controls. However, pretreatment of young or old DCs with LPS or probiotics failed to enhance the proliferation of T-cells derived from older donors. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that ageing increases the responsiveness of DCs to probiotics, but this is not sufficient to overcome the impact of immunosenescence in the MLR. PMID:24094416

  16. Acute Modulations in Permeability Barrier Function Regulate Epidermal Cornification

    PubMed Central

    Demerjian, Marianne; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Tschachler, Erwin; Denecker, Geertrui; Declercq, Wim; Vandenabeele, Peter; Mauro, Theodora; Hupe, Melanie; Crumrine, Debra; Roelandt, Truus; Houben, Evi; Elias, Peter M.; Feingold, Kenneth R.

    2008-01-01

    Stratum corneum comprises corneocytes, derived from outer stratum granulosum during terminal differentiation, embedded in a lipid-enriched extracellular matrix, secreted from epidermal lamellar bodies. Permeability barrier insults stimulate rapid secretion of preformed lamellar bodies from the outer stratum granulosum, regulated through modulations in ionic gradients and serine protease (SP)/protease-activated receptor type 2 (PAR2) signaling. Because corneocytes are also required for barrier function, we hypothesized that corneocyte formation could also be regulated by barrier function. Barrier abrogation by two unrelated methods initiated a wave of cornification, assessed as TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling-positive cells in stratum granulosum and newly cornified cells by electron microscopy. Because cornification was blocked by occlusion, corneocytes formed specifically in response to barrier, rather than injury or cell replacement, requirements. SP inhibitors and hyperacidification (which decreases SP activity) blocked cornification after barrier disruption. Similarly, cornification was delayed in PAR2?/? mice. Although classical markers of apoptosis [poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase and caspase (Casp)-3] remained unchanged, barrier disruption activated Casp-14. Moreover, the pan-Casp inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK delayed cornification, and corneocytes were structurally aberrant in Casp14?/? mice. Thus, permeability barrier requirements coordinately drive both the generation of the stratum corneum lipid-enriched extracellular matrix and the transformation of granular cells into corneocytes, in an SP- and Casp-14-dependent manner, signaled by PAR2. PMID:18156206

  17. Rheostats and Toggle Switches for Modulating Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Meinhardt, Sarah; Manley, Michael W.; Parente, Daniel J.; Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2013-01-01

    The millions of protein sequences generated by genomics are expected to transform protein engineering and personalized medicine. To achieve these goals, tools for predicting outcomes of amino acid changes must be improved. Currently, advances are hampered by insufficient experimental data about nonconserved amino acid positions. Since the property “nonconserved” is identified using a sequence alignment, we designed experiments to recapitulate that context: Mutagenesis and functional characterization was carried out in 15 LacI/GalR homologs (rows) at 12 nonconserved positions (columns). Multiple substitutions were made at each position, to reveal how various amino acids of a nonconserved column were tolerated in each protein row. Results showed that amino acid preferences of nonconserved positions were highly context-dependent, had few correlations with physico-chemical similarities, and were not predictable from their occurrence in natural LacI/GalR sequences. Further, unlike the “toggle switch” behaviors of conserved positions, substitutions at nonconserved positions could be rank-ordered to show a “rheostatic”, progressive effect on function that spanned several orders of magnitude. Comparisons to various sequence analyses suggested that conserved and strongly co-evolving positions act as functional toggles, whereas other important, nonconserved positions serve as rheostats for modifying protein function. Both the presence of rheostat positions and the sequence analysis strategy appear to be generalizable to other protein families and should be considered when engineering protein modifications or predicting the impact of protein polymorphisms. PMID:24386217

  18. In-silico identification of phenotype-biased functional modules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Phenotypes exhibited by microorganisms can be useful for several purposes, e.g., ethanol as an alternate fuel. Sometimes, the target phenotype maybe required in combination with other phenotypes, in order to be useful, for e.g., an industrial process may require that the organism survive in an anaerobic, alcohol rich environment and be able to feed on both hexose and pentose sugars to produce ethanol. This combination of traits may not be available in any existing organism or if they do exist, the mechanisms involved in the phenotype-expression may not be efficient enough to be useful. Thus, it may be required to genetically modify microorganisms. However, before any genetic modification can take place, it is important to identify the underlying cellular subsystems responsible for the expression of the target phenotype. Results In this paper, we develop a method to identify statistically significant and phenotypically-biased functional modules. The method can compare the organismal network information from hundreds of phenotype expressing and phenotype non-expressing organisms to identify cellular subsystems that are more prone to occur in phenotype-expressing organisms than in phenotype non-expressing organisms. We have provided literature evidence that the phenotype-biased modules identified for phenotypes such as hydrogen production (dark and light fermentation), respiration, gram-positive, gram-negative and motility, are indeed phenotype-related. Conclusion Thus we have proposed a methodology to identify phenotype-biased cellular subsystems. We have shown the effectiveness of our methodology by applying it to several target phenotypes. The code and all supplemental files can be downloaded from (http://freescience.org/cs/phenotype-biased-biclusters/). PMID:22759578

  19. Epigenetic modulation of neuronal apoptosis and cognitive functions in sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jun; Lian, Yanhong; Xie, Kangjie; Cai, Shunv; Wen, Penglu

    2014-02-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE), which associates with neuronal apoptosis and cognitive disorders, is a common complication of systemic sepsis. However, the mechanism involving its modulation remains to be elucidated. Recent studies showed that histone deacetylases (HDACs) were implicated in neurodegeneration and cognitive functions. The current study was designed to investigate whether septic brain is epigenetically modulated by HDACs, using cecal ligation and peroration (CLP) rats and primary hippocampal neuronal cultures. We found that hippocampal acetylated histone 3 (AcH3), acetylated histone 4 (AcH4), cytoplasmic HDAC4 and Bcl-XL were inhibited in septic brain. Hippocampal Bax and nuclear HDAC4 expressions were enhanced in CLP rats. Administration of HDACs inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA) or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) rescued the changes of Bcl-XL and Bax in vivo, and decreased apoptotic cells in vitro. In addition, HDAC4 shRNA transfection significantly enhanced AcH3, AcH4 and Bcl-XL, but suppressed Bax. Neuronal apoptosis was also reduced by transfection of HDAC4 shRNA. Furthermore, CLP rats exhibited significant spatial learning and memory deficits, which could be ameliorated by application of TSA or SAHA without influence on locomotive activity. These results reveal that epigenetic modulation is involved in septic brain, and the inhibition of HDACs may serve as a potential therapeutic approach for SAE treatment. PMID:23925573

  20. Identification of Arabidopsis Meiotic Cyclins Reveals Functional Diversification among Plant Cyclin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bulankova, Petra; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Fellner, Nicole; Riha, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Meiosis is a modified cell division in which a single S-phase is followed by two rounds of chromosome segregation resulting in the production of haploid gametes. The meiotic mode of chromosome segregation requires extensive remodeling of the basic cell cycle machinery and employment of unique regulatory mechanisms. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins represent an ancient molecular module that drives and regulates cell cycle progression. The cyclin gene family has undergone a massive expansion in angiosperm plants, but only a few cyclins were thoroughly characterized. In this study we performed a systematic immunolocalization screen to identify Arabidopsis thaliana A- and B-type cyclins expressed in meiosis. Many of these cyclins exhibit cell-type-specific expression in vegetative tissues and distinct subcellular localization. We found six A-type cyclins and a single B-type cyclin (CYCB3;1) to be expressed in male meiosis. Mutant analysis revealed that these cyclins contribute to distinct meiosis-related processes. While A2 cyclins are important for chromosome segregation, CYCB3;1 prevents ectopic cell wall formation. We further show that cyclin SDS does not contain a D-box and is constitutively expressed throughout meiosis. Analysis of plants carrying cyclin SDS with an introduced D-box motif determined that, in addition to its function in recombination, SDS acts together with CYCB3;1 in suppressing unscheduled cell wall synthesis. Our phenotypic and expression data provide extensive evidence that multiplication of cyclins is in plants accompanied by functional diversification. PMID:23671425

  1. Quetiapine modulates functional connectivity in brain aggression networks.

    PubMed

    Klasen, Martin; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Schwenzer, Michael; Mathiak, Krystyna A; Sarkheil, Pegah; Weber, René; Mathiak, Klaus

    2013-07-15

    Aggressive behavior is associated with dysfunctions in an affective regulation network encompassing amygdala and prefrontal areas such as orbitofrontal (OFC), anterior cingulate (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In particular, prefrontal regions have been postulated to control amygdala activity by inhibitory projections, and this process may be disrupted in aggressive individuals. The atypical antipsychotic quetiapine successfully attenuates aggressive behavior in various disorders; the underlying neural processes, however, are unknown. A strengthened functional coupling in the prefrontal-amygdala system may account for these anti-aggressive effects. An inhibition of this network has been reported for virtual aggression in violent video games as well. However, there have been so far no in-vivo observations of pharmacological influences on corticolimbic projections during human aggressive behavior. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, quetiapine and placebo were administered for three successive days prior to an fMRI experiment. In this experiment, functional brain connectivity was assessed during virtual aggressive behavior in a violent video game and an aggression-free control task in a non-violent modification. Quetiapine increased the functional connectivity of ACC and DLPFC with the amygdala during virtual aggression, whereas OFC-amygdala coupling was attenuated. These effects were observed neither for placebo nor for the non-violent control. These results demonstrate for the first time a pharmacological modification of aggression-related human brain networks in a naturalistic setting. The violence-specific modulation of prefrontal-amygdala networks appears to control aggressive behavior and provides a neurobiological model for the anti-aggressive effects of quetiapine. PMID:23501053

  2. Modulation of Apoptotic Pathways of Macrophages by Surface-Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuanqin; Zhang, Honggang; Wang, Yange; Chen, Min; Ye, Shefang; Hou, Zhenqing; Ren, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) often involve improving their hydrophilicity and dispersion in biological media by modifying them through noncovalent or covalent functionalization. However, the potential adverse effects of surface-functionalized CNTs have not been well characterized. In this study, we functionalized multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) via carboxylation, to produce MWCNTs-COOH, and via poly (ethylene glycol) linking, to produce MWCNTs-PEG. We used these functionalized MWCNTs to study the effect of surface functionalization on MWCNTs-induced toxicity to macrophages, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action. Our results revealed that MWCNTs-PEG were less cytotoxic and were associated with less apoptotic cell death of macrophages than MWCNTs-COOH. Additionally, MWCNTs-PEG induced less generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) involving less activation of NADPH oxidase compared with MWCNTs-COOH, as evidenced by membrane translocation of p47phox and p67phox in macrophages. The less cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of MWCNTs-PEG compared with MWCNTs-COOH resulted from the lower cellular uptake of MWCNTs-PEG, which resulted in less activation of oxidative stress-responsive pathways, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-?B. These results demonstrate that surface functionalization of CNTs may alter ROS-mediated cytotoxic and apoptotic response by modulating apoptotic signaling pathways. Our study thus provides new insights into the molecular basis for the surface properties affecting CNTs toxicity. PMID:23755279

  3. Mechanisms of the 14-3-3 protein function: regulation of protein function through conformational modulation.

    PubMed

    Obsilova, V; Kopecka, M; Kosek, D; Kacirova, M; Kylarova, S; Rezabkova, L; Obsil, T

    2014-01-01

    Many aspects of protein function regulation require specific protein-protein interactions to carry out the exact biochemical and cellular functions. The highly conserved members of the 14-3-3 protein family mediate such interactions and through binding to hundreds of other proteins provide multitude of regulatory functions, thus playing key roles in many cellular processes. The 14-3-3 protein binding can affect the function of the target protein in many ways including the modulation of its enzyme activity, its subcellular localization, its structure and stability, or its molecular interactions. In this minireview, we focus on mechanisms of the 14-3-3 protein-dependent regulation of three important 14-3-3 binding partners: yeast neutral trehalase Nth1, regulator of G-protein signaling 3 (RGS3), and phosducin. PMID:24564655

  4. Relative sideband amplitudes versus modulation index for common functions using frequency and phase modulation. [for design and testing of communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocklin, F.

    1973-01-01

    The equations defining the amplitude of sidebands resulting from either frequency modulation or phase modulation by either square wave, sine wave, sawtooth or triangular modulating functions are presented. Spectral photographs and computer generated tables of modulation index vs. relative sideband amplitudes are also included.

  5. Functional proteomic analysis reveals the involvement of KIAA1199 in breast cancer growth, motility and invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background KIAA1199 is a recently identified novel gene that is up-regulated in human cancer with poor survival. Our proteomic study on signaling polarity in chemotactic cells revealed KIAA1199 as a novel protein target that may be involved in cellular chemotaxis and motility. In the present study, we examined the functional significance of KIAA1199 expression in breast cancer growth, motility and invasiveness. Methods We validated the previous microarray observation by tissue microarray immunohistochemistry using a TMA slide containing 12 breast tumor tissue cores and 12 corresponding normal tissues. We performed the shRNA-mediated knockdown of KIAA1199 in MDA-MB-231 and HS578T cells to study the role of this protein in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis in vitro. We studied the effects of KIAA1199 knockdown in vivo in two groups of mice (n?=?5). We carried out the SILAC LC-MS/MS based proteomic studies on the involvement of KIAA1199 in breast cancer. Results KIAA1199 mRNA and protein was significantly overexpressed in breast tumor specimens and cell lines as compared with non-neoplastic breast tissues from large-scale microarray and studies of breast cancer cell lines and tumors. To gain deeper insights into the novel role of KIAA1199 in breast cancer, we modulated KIAA1199 expression using shRNA-mediated knockdown in two breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and HS578T), expressing higher levels of KIAA1199. The KIAA1199 knockdown cells showed reduced motility and cell proliferation in vitro. Moreover, when the knockdown cells were injected into the mammary fat pads of female athymic nude mice, there was a significant decrease in tumor incidence and growth. In addition, quantitative proteomic analysis revealed that knockdown of KIAA1199 in breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells affected a broad range of cellular functions including apoptosis, metabolism and cell motility. Conclusions Our findings indicate that KIAA1199 may play an important role in breast tumor growth and invasiveness, and that it may represent a novel target for biomarker development and a novel therapeutic target for breast cancer. PMID:24628760

  6. Allosteric modulation and functional selectivity of G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Agonists of a single G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) may activate distinct signaling pathways. Functional selectivity, an emerging concept with therapeutic relevance for GPCRs, may be due to conformational selection or stabilization with respect to particular agonists, receptor dimerization, variable expression levels of GPCRs and downstream signaling molecules, and allosteric modulation. Allosteric modulators may have potential advantages over orthosteric ligands, including greater selectivity and safety. This review focuses on functional selectivity resulting from allosteric modulation. PMID:24050274

  7. A Product of Heme Catabolism Modulates Bacterial Function and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Nobles, Christopher L.; Green, Sabrina I.; Maresso, Anthony W.

    2013-01-01

    Bilirubin is the terminal metabolite in heme catabolism in mammals. After deposition into bile, bilirubin is released in large quantities into the mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We hypothesized that intestinal bilirubin may modulate the function of enteric bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of bilirubin on two enteric pathogens; enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), a Gram-negative that causes life-threatening intestinal infections, and E. faecalis, a Gram-positive human commensal bacterium known to be an opportunistic pathogen with broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance. We demonstrate that bilirubin can protect EHEC from exogenous and host-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the absorption of free radicals. In contrast, E. faecalis was highly susceptible to bilirubin, which causes significant membrane disruption and uncoupling of respiratory metabolism in this bacterium. Interestingly, similar results were observed for other Gram-positive bacteria, including B. cereus and S. aureus. A model is proposed whereby bilirubin places distinct selective pressure on enteric bacteria, with Gram-negative bacteria being protected from ROS (positive outcome) and Gram-positive bacteria being susceptible to membrane disruption (negative outcome). This work suggests bilirubin has differential but biologically relevant effects on bacteria and justifies additional efforts to determine the role of this neglected waste catabolite in disease processes, including animal models. PMID:23935485

  8. Sex Hormones as Potential Modulators of Vascular Function in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2005-01-01

    The greater incidence of hypertension in men and postmenopausal women compared with premenopausal women has suggested gender differences in vascular function. Vascular effects of the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone, and the male hormone testosterone have been described. Sex steroid receptors have been identified in vascular endothelium and smooth muscle. Interaction of sex hormones with cytosolic/nuclear receptors initiates long-term genomic effects that stimulate endothelial cell growth, but inhibit smooth muscle proliferation. Activation of sex hormone receptors on the plasma membrane triggers non-genomic effects that stimulate endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation via nitric oxide-cGMP, prostacyclin-cAMP and hyperpolarization pathways. Sex hormones also cause endothelium-independent inhibition of vascular smooth muscle contraction, [Ca2+]i and protein kinase C. These vasorelaxant/vasodilator effects suggested vascular benefits of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) during natural and surgically-induced deficiencies of gonadal hormones. Although some clinical trials showed minimal benefits of HRT in postmenopausal hypertension, the lack of effect should not be generalized as it could be related to the type/dose of sex hormone, subjects’ age and other cardiovascular conditions. The prospect of HRT relies on continued investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the vascular effects of sex hormones and identification of compounds that specifically target the vascular sex hormone receptors. Naturally occurring hormones and phytoestrogens may be more beneficial HRT than synthesized compounds. Also, the type/dose, time of initiation and duration of HRT should be customized depending on the subject’s age and preexisting cardiovascular condition, and thereby enhance the outlook of sex hormones as potential modulators of vascular function in hypertension. PMID:15983238

  9. Modulation of neutrophil function by the tripeptide feG

    PubMed Central

    Mathison, Ronald D; Befus, A Dean; Davison, Joseph S; Woodman, Richard C

    2003-01-01

    Background Neutrophils are critical in the defense against potentially harmful microorganisms, but their excessive and inappropriate activation can contribute significantly to tissue damage and a worsening pathology. Through the release of endocrine factors submandibular glands contribute to achieving a balance in neutrophil function by modulating the state of activation and migratory potential of circulating neutrophils. A putative hormonal candidate for these effects on neutrophils was identified as a heptapeptide named submandibular gland peptide T (SGP-T; sequence = TDIFEGG). Since the tripeptide FEG, derived from SGP-T, and its D-amino acid analogue feG had similar inhibitory effects on inflammatory reactions, we investigated the effects of feG on human and rat neutrophil function. Results With human neutrophils feG had no discernible effect on oxidative burst or phagocytosis, but in picomolar amounts it reduced PAF-induced neutrophil movement and adhesion, and the binding of CD11b by 34% and that of CD16b close to control values. In the rat feG (10-11M) reduced the binding of CD11b and CD16 antibodies to PAF-stimulated circulating neutrophils by 35% and 43%, respectively, and at 100 micrograms/kilograms intraperitoneally feG reduced neutrophil in vivo migration by 40%. With ovalbumin-sensitized rats that were challenged with antigen, feG inhibited binding of antibodies against CD16b but not CD11b, on peritoneal leukocytes. Conclusions The inhibitory effect of feG on neutrophil movement may be mediated by alterations in the co-stimulatory molecules CD11b and CD16. PMID:12659660

  10. Form and Function: An Organic Chemistry Module. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Bruce; Mazzocchi, Paul; Hearle, Robert

    This teacher's guide is designed to provide science teachers with the necessary guidance and suggestions for teaching organic chemistry. In this book, the diverse field of organic chemistry modules is introduced. The material in this book can be integrated with the other modules in a sequence that helps students to see that chemistry is a unified…

  11. Single Molecule Analysis of Functionally Asymmetric G Protein-coupled Receptor (GPCR) Oligomers Reveals Diverse Spatial and Structural Assemblies*?

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Kim C.; Fanelli, Francesca; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) into dimers and higher order oligomers represents a key mechanism in pleiotropic signaling, yet how individual protomers function within oligomers remains poorly understood. We present a super-resolution imaging approach, resolving single GPCR molecules to ?8 nm resolution in functional asymmetric dimers and oligomers using dual-color photoactivatable dyes and localization microscopy (PD-PALM). PD-PALM of two functionally defined mutant luteinizing hormone receptors (LHRs), a ligand-binding deficient receptor (LHRB?) and a signaling-deficient (LHRS?) receptor, which only function via intermolecular cooperation, favored oligomeric over dimeric formation. PD-PALM imaging of trimers and tetramers revealed specific spatial organizations of individual protomers in complexes where the ratiometric composition of LHRB? to LHRS? modulated ligand-induced signal sensitivity. Structural modeling of asymmetric LHR oligomers strongly aligned with PD-PALM-imaged spatial arrangements, identifying multiple possible helix interfaces mediating inter-protomer associations. Our findings reveal that diverse spatial and structural assemblies mediating GPCR oligomerization may acutely fine-tune the cellular signaling profile. PMID:25516594

  12. Single Molecule Analysis of Functionally Asymmetric G Protein-coupled Receptor (GPCR) Oligomers Reveals Diverse Spatial and Structural Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Kim C; Fanelli, Francesca; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C

    2015-02-13

    Formation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) into dimers and higher order oligomers represents a key mechanism in pleiotropic signaling, yet how individual protomers function within oligomers remains poorly understood. We present a super-resolution imaging approach, resolving single GPCR molecules to ?8 nm resolution in functional asymmetric dimers and oligomers using dual-color photoactivatable dyes and localization microscopy (PD-PALM). PD-PALM of two functionally defined mutant luteinizing hormone receptors (LHRs), a ligand-binding deficient receptor (LHR(B-)) and a signaling-deficient (LHR(S-)) receptor, which only function via intermolecular cooperation, favored oligomeric over dimeric formation. PD-PALM imaging of trimers and tetramers revealed specific spatial organizations of individual protomers in complexes where the ratiometric composition of LHR(B-) to LHR(S-) modulated ligand-induced signal sensitivity. Structural modeling of asymmetric LHR oligomers strongly aligned with PD-PALM-imaged spatial arrangements, identifying multiple possible helix interfaces mediating inter-protomer associations. Our findings reveal that diverse spatial and structural assemblies mediating GPCR oligomerization may acutely fine-tune the cellular signaling profile. PMID:25516594

  13. Head impulse test reveals residual semicircular canal function after vestibular neurectomy.

    PubMed

    Lehnen, Nadine; Aw, Swee T; Todd, Michael J; Halmagyi, G Michael

    2004-06-22

    Meniere disease patients sometimes report vertiginous Meniere attacks after vestibular neurectomy that spares hearing. To determine why, the authors compared postsurgical semicircular canal function in nine patients with preserved hearing with that of a control group with no preservation of hearing. The three-dimensional head impulse test revealed residual posterior canal function in all patients with vertigo attacks (eight). The control patients had no residual canal function. Thus, residual vestibular function on the ipsilesional side may cause vertiginous Meniere attacks. PMID:15210899

  14. Membrane proteins bind lipids selectively to modulate their structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Timothy M.; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Baldwin, Andrew J.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have established that the folding, structure and function of membrane proteins are influenced by their lipid environments1-7 and that lipids can bind to specific sites, for example in potassium channels8. Fundamental questions remain however regarding the extent of membrane protein selectivity toward lipids. Here we report a mass spectrometry (MS) approach designed to determine the selectivity of lipid binding to membrane protein complexes. We investigate the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL), aquaporin Z (AqpZ), and the ammonia channel (AmtB) using ion mobility MS (IM-MS), which reports gas-phase collision cross sections. We demonstrate that folded conformations of membrane protein complexes can exist in the gas-phase. By resolving lipid-bound states we then rank bound lipids based on their ability to resist gas phase unfolding and thereby stabilize membrane protein structure. Results show that lipids bind non-selectively and with high avidity to MscL, all imparting comparable stability, the highest-ranking lipid however is phosphatidylinositol phosphate, in line with its proposed functional role in mechanosensation9. AqpZ is also stabilized by many lipids with cardiolipin imparting the most significant resistance to unfolding. Subsequently, through functional assays, we discover that cardiolipin modulates AqpZ function. Analogous experiments identify AmtB as being highly selective for phosphatidylglycerol prompting us to obtain an X-ray structure in this lipid membrane-like environment. The 2.3Å resolution structure, when compared with others obtained without lipid bound, reveals distinct conformational changes that reposition AmtB residues to interact with the lipid bilayer. Overall our results demonstrate that resistance to unfolding correlates with specific lipid-binding events enabling distinction of lipids that merely bind from those that modulate membrane protein structure and/or function. We anticipate that these findings will be influential not only for defining the selectivity of membrane proteins toward lipids but also for understanding the role of lipids in modulating function or drug binding. PMID:24899312

  15. The Structure of a Streptomyces avermitilis ?-l-Rhamnosidase Reveals a Novel Carbohydrate-binding Module CBM67 within the Six-domain Arrangement*

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Zui; Jackson, Adam; Michikawa, Mari; Maehara, Tomoko; Momma, Mitsuru; Henrissat, Bernard; Gilbert, Harry J.; Kaneko, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    ?-l-Rhamnosidases hydrolyze ?-linked l-rhamnosides from oligosaccharides or polysaccharides. We determined the crystal structure of the glycoside hydrolase family 78 Streptomyces avermitilis ?-l-rhamnosidase (SaRha78A) in its free and l-rhamnose complexed forms, which revealed the presence of six domains N, D, E, F, A, and C. In the ligand complex, l-rhamnose was bound in the proposed active site of the catalytic module, revealing the likely catalytic mechanism of SaRha78A. Glu636 is predicted to donate protons to the glycosidic oxygen, and Glu895 is the likely catalytic general base, activating the nucleophilic water, indicating that the enzyme operates through an inverting mechanism. Replacement of Glu636 and Glu895 resulted in significant loss of ?-rhamnosidase activity. Domain D also bound l-rhamnose in a calcium-dependent manner, with a KD of 135 ?m. Domain D is thus a non-catalytic carbohydrate binding module (designated SaCBM67). Mutagenesis and structural data identified the amino acids in SaCBM67 that target the features of l-rhamnose that distinguishes it from the other major sugars present in plant cell walls. Inactivation of SaCBM67 caused a substantial reduction in the activity of SaRha78A against the polysaccharide composite gum arabic, but not against aryl rhamnosides, indicating that SaCBM67 contributes to enzyme function against insoluble substrates. PMID:23486481

  16. Modulation of working memory function by motivation through loss-aversion.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Daniel C; D'Esposito, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Cognitive performance is affected by motivation. Few studies, however, have investigated the neural mechanisms of the influence of motivation through potential monetary punishment on working memory. We employed functional MRI during a delayed recognition task that manipulated top-down control demands with added monetary incentives to some trials in the form of potential losses of bonus money. Behavioral performance on the task was influenced by loss-threatening incentives in the form of faster and more accurate performance. As shown previously, we found enhancement of activity for relevant stimuli occurs throughout all task periods (e.g., stimulus encoding, maintenance, and response) in both prefrontal and visual association cortex. Further, these activation patterns were enhanced for trials with possible monetary loss relative to nonincentive trials. During the incentive cue, the amygdala and striatum showed significantly greater activation when money was at a possible loss on the trial. We also evaluated patterns of functional connectivity between regions responsive to monetary consequences and prefrontal areas responsive to the task. This analysis revealed greater delay period connectivity between and the left insula and prefrontal cortex with possible monetary loss relative to nonincentive trials. Overall, these results reveal that incentive motivation can modulate performance on working memory tasks through top-down signals via amplification of activity within prefrontal and visual association regions selective to processing the perceptual inputs of the stimuli to be remembered. PMID:22113962

  17. A novel subgradient-based optimization algorithm for blockmodel functional module identification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Functional module identification in biological networks may provide new insights into the complex interactions among biomolecules for a better understanding of cellular functional organization. Most of existing functional module identification methods are based on the optimization of network modularity and cluster networks into groups of nodes within which there are a higher-than-expectation number of edges. However, module identification simply based on this topological criterion may not discover certain kinds of biologically meaningful modules within which nodes are sparsely connected but have similar interaction patterns with the rest of the network. In order to unearth more biologically meaningful functional modules, we propose a novel efficient convex programming algorithm based on the subgradient method with heuristic path generation to solve the problem in a recently proposed framework of blockmodel module identification. We have implemented our algorithm for large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, including Saccharomyces cerevisia and Homo sapien PPI networks collected from the Database of Interaction Proteins (DIP) and Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD). Our experimental results have shown that our algorithm achieves comparable network clustering performance in comparison to the more time-consuming simulated annealing (SA) optimization. Furthermore, preliminary results for identifying fine-grained functional modules in both biological networks and the comparison with the commonly adopted Markov Clustering (MCL) algorithm have demonstrated the potential of our algorithm to discover new types of modules, within which proteins are sparsely connected but with significantly enriched biological functionalities. PMID:23368964

  18. In Vivo Analysis of Lrig Genes Reveals Redundant and Independent Functions in the Inner Ear

    E-print Network

    Goodrich, Lisa V.

    In Vivo Analysis of Lrig Genes Reveals Redundant and Independent Functions in the Inner Ear Tony compared the expression and function of the Lrigs in the inner ear, which offers a sensitive system in the inner ear throughout development, with Lrig1 and Lrig3 restricted to subsets of cells and Lrig2

  19. Purification of a Tat-associated kinase reveals a TFIIH complex that modulates HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, L F; Mavankal, G; Neveu, J M; Lane, W S; Ivanov, D; Gaynor, R B

    1997-01-01

    The Tat protein is a transcriptional activator which is required for efficient human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) gene expression Tat stimulates HIV-1 transcriptional elongation by increasing the processivity of RNA polymerase II. To address whether Tat-mediated effects on HIV-1 gene expression are due to modulation in the phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD), we developed a purification protocol to identify cellular kinases that are capable of binding to Tat and hyperphosphorylating the RNA polymerase II CTD. A 600 kDa protein complex with these properties was isolated, and specific components were identified using peptide microsequence analysis. This analysis indicated that proteins comprising the multi-subunit TFIIH complex, in addition to several novel factors, were associated with Tat using both in vitro and in vivo analysis. The Tat-associated kinase bound to the activation domain of Tat, and its ability to hyperphosphorylate RNA polymerase II was markedly stimulated by Tat. Furthermore, the addition of the Tat-associated kinase to in vitro transcription assays stimulated the ability of Tat to activate HIV-1 transcription. These results define a cellular kinase complex whose activity is modulated by Tat to result in activation of HIV-1 trancription. PMID:9184228

  20. Network Integration of Parallel Metabolic and Transcriptional Data Reveals Metabolic Modules that Regulate Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Jha, Abhishek K; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; Sergushichev, Alexey; Lampropoulou, Vicky; Ivanova, Yulia; Loginicheva, Ekaterina; Chmielewski, Karina; Stewart, Kelly M; Ashall, Juliet; Everts, Bart; Pearce, Edward J; Driggers, Edward M; Artyomov, Maxim N

    2015-03-17

    Macrophage polarization involves a coordinated metabolic and transcriptional rewiring that is only partially understood. By using an integrated high-throughput transcriptional-metabolic profiling and analysis pipeline, we characterized systemic changes during murine macrophage M1 and M2 polarization. M2 polarization was found to activate glutamine catabolism and UDP-GlcNAc-associated modules. Correspondingly, glutamine deprivation or inhibition of N-glycosylation decreased M2 polarization and production of chemokine CCL22. In M1 macrophages, we identified a metabolic break at Idh, the enzyme that converts isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate, providing mechanistic explanation for TCA cycle fragmentation. (13)C-tracer studies suggested the presence of an active variant of the aspartate-arginosuccinate shunt that compensated for this break. Consistently, inhibition of aspartate-aminotransferase, a key enzyme of the shunt, inhibited nitric oxide and interleukin-6 production in M1 macrophages, while promoting mitochondrial respiration. This systems approach provides a highly integrated picture of the physiological modules supporting macrophage polarization, identifying potential pharmacologic control points for both macrophage phenotypes. PMID:25786174

  1. Energetic changes caused by antigenic module insertion in a virus-like particle revealed by experiment and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Tang, Ronghong; Bai, Shu; Connors, Natalie K; Lua, Linda H L; Chuan, Yap P; Middelberg, Anton P J; Sun, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The success of recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) for human papillomavirus and hepatitis B demonstrates the potential of VLPs as safe and efficacious vaccines. With new modular designs emerging, the effects of antigen module insertion on the self-assembly and structural integrity of VLPs should be clarified so as to better enabling improved design. Previous work has revealed insights into the molecular energetics of a VLP subunit, capsomere, comparing energetics within various solution conditions known to drive or inhibit self-assembly. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method were performed to examine the molecular interactions and energetics in a modular capsomere of a murine polyomavirus (MPV) VLP designed to protect against influenza. Insertion of an influenza antigenic module is found to lower the binding energy within the capsomere, and a more active state is observed in Assembly Buffer as compared with that in Stabilization Buffer, which has been experimentally validated through measurements using differential scanning calorimetry. Further in-depth analysis based on free-energy decomposition indicates that destabilized binding can be attributed to electrostatic interaction induced by the chosen antigen module. These results provide molecular insights into the conformational stability of capsomeres and their abilities to be exploited for antigen presentation, and are expected to be beneficial for the biomolecular engineering of VLP vaccines. PMID:25215874

  2. Energetic Changes Caused by Antigenic Module Insertion in a Virus-Like Particle Revealed by Experiment and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Tang, Ronghong; Bai, Shu; Connors, Natalie K.; Lua, Linda H. L.; Chuan, Yap P.; Middelberg, Anton P. J.; Sun, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The success of recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) for human papillomavirus and hepatitis B demonstrates the potential of VLPs as safe and efficacious vaccines. With new modular designs emerging, the effects of antigen module insertion on the self-assembly and structural integrity of VLPs should be clarified so as to better enabling improved design. Previous work has revealed insights into the molecular energetics of a VLP subunit, capsomere, comparing energetics within various solution conditions known to drive or inhibit self-assembly. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method were performed to examine the molecular interactions and energetics in a modular capsomere of a murine polyomavirus (MPV) VLP designed to protect against influenza. Insertion of an influenza antigenic module is found to lower the binding energy within the capsomere, and a more active state is observed in Assembly Buffer as compared with that in Stabilization Buffer, which has been experimentally validated through measurements using differential scanning calorimetry. Further in-depth analysis based on free-energy decomposition indicates that destabilized binding can be attributed to electrostatic interaction induced by the chosen antigen module. These results provide molecular insights into the conformational stability of capsomeres and their abilities to be exploited for antigen presentation, and are expected to be beneficial for the biomolecular engineering of VLP vaccines. PMID:25215874

  3. Identification and Evaluation of Functional Modules in Gene Co-expression Networks

    E-print Network

    Ruan, Jianhua

    functional modules is an important step to- wards elucidating gene functions at a global scale. In this paper that are on the same pathways or in the same functional complex are often regulated #12;2 Jianhua Ruan and Weixiong diverse temporal and physiological conditions. Therefore, an im- portant step in analyzing gene functions

  4. Spatial control of functional properties via octahedral modulations in complex oxide superlattices.

    PubMed

    Moon, E J; Colby, R; Wang, Q; Karapetrova, E; Schlepütz, C M; Fitzsimmons, M R; May, S J

    2014-01-01

    Control of atomic structure, namely the topology of the corner-connected metal-oxygen octahedra, has emerged as an important route to tune the functional properties at oxide interfaces. Here we investigate isovalent manganite superlattices (SLs), [(La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO(3))n/(Eu(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO(3))n] × m, as a route to spatial control over electronic bandwidth and ferromagnetism through the creation of octahedral superstructures. Electron energy loss spectroscopy confirms a uniform Mn valence state throughout the SLs. In contrast, the presence of modulations of the MnO(6) octahedral rotations along the growth direction commensurate with the SL period is revealed by scanning transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. We show that the Curie temperatures of the constituent materials can be systematically engineered via the octahedral superstructures leading to a modulated magnetization in samples where the SL period is larger than the interfacial octahedral coupling length scale, whereas a single magnetic transition is observed in the short-period SLs. PMID:25501927

  5. Cholesterol Levels Modulate EGF Receptor-Mediated Signaling by Altering Receptor Function and Trafficking

    E-print Network

    Pike, Linda J.

    Cholesterol Levels Modulate EGF Receptor-Mediated Signaling by Altering Receptor Function to be affected by changes in cellular cholesterol content. However, no information is available regarding the locus (or loci) in the pathways that are susceptible to modulation by cholesterol. We report here

  6. Radiation inactivation reveals discrete cation binding sites that modulate dihydropyridine binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bolger, G.T.; Skolnick, P.; Kempner, E.S. (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1989-08-01

    In low ionic strength buffer (5 mM Tris.HCl), the binding of (3H) nitrendipine to dihydropyridine calcium antagonist binding sites of mouse forebrain membranes is increased by both Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. Radiation inactivation was used to determine the target size of ({sup 3}H)nitrendipine binding sites in 5 mM Tris.HCl buffer, in the presence and absence of these cations. After irradiation, ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine binding in buffer with or without Na+ was diminished, due to a loss of binding sites and also to an increase in Kd. After accounting for radiation effects on the dissociation constant, the target size for the nitrendipine binding site in buffer was 160-170 kDa and was 170-180 kDa in the presence of sodium. In the presence of calcium ions, ({sup 3}H)nitrendipine binding showed no radiation effects on Kd and yielded a target size of 150-170 kDa. These findings suggest, as in the case of opioid receptors, the presence of high molecular weight membrane components that modulate cation-induced alterations in radioligand binding to dihydropyridine binding sites.

  7. Individual preferences modulate incentive values: Evidence from functional MRI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan Koeneke; Andreas F Pedroni; Anja Dieckmann; Volker Bosch; Lutz Jäncke

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In most studies on human reward processing, reward intensity has been manipulated on an objective scale (e.g., varying monetary value). Everyday experience, however, teaches us that objectively equivalent rewards may differ substantially in their subjective incentive values. One factor influencing incentive value in humans is branding. The current study explores the hypothesis that individual brand preferences modulate activity in

  8. Bio-mimicking of Proline-Rich Motif Applied to Carbon Nanotube Reveals Unexpected Subtleties Underlying Nanoparticle Functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A.; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Bo; Yang, Zaixing; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-11-01

    Here, we report computational studies of the SH3 protein domain interacting with various single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) either bare or functionalized by mimicking the proline-rich motif (PRM) ligand (PPPVPPRR) and compare it to the SH3-PRM complex binding. With prolines or a single arginine attached, the SWCNT gained slightly on specificity when compared with the bare control, whereas with multi-arginine systems the specificity dropped dramatically to our surprise. Although the electrostatic interaction provided by arginines is crucial in the recognition between PRM and SH3 domain, our results suggest that attaching multiple arginines to the SWCNT has a detrimental effect on the binding affinity. Detailed analysis of the MD trajectories found two main factors that modulate the specificity of the binding: the existence of competing acidic patches at the surface of SH3 that leads to ``trapping and clamping'' by the arginines, and the rigidity of the SWCNT introducing entropic penalties in the proper binding. Further investigation revealed that the same ``clamping'' phenomenon exits in the PRM-SH3 system, which has not been reported in previous literature. The competing effects between nanoparticle and its functionalization components revealed by our model system should be of value to current and future nanomedicine designs.

  9. Bio-mimicking of Proline-Rich Motif Applied to Carbon Nanotube Reveals Unexpected Subtleties Underlying Nanoparticle Functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A.; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Bo; Yang, Zaixing; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report computational studies of the SH3 protein domain interacting with various single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) either bare or functionalized by mimicking the proline-rich motif (PRM) ligand (PPPVPPRR) and compare it to the SH3-PRM complex binding. With prolines or a single arginine attached, the SWCNT gained slightly on specificity when compared with the bare control, whereas with multi-arginine systems the specificity dropped dramatically to our surprise. Although the electrostatic interaction provided by arginines is crucial in the recognition between PRM and SH3 domain, our results suggest that attaching multiple arginines to the SWCNT has a detrimental effect on the binding affinity. Detailed analysis of the MD trajectories found two main factors that modulate the specificity of the binding: the existence of competing acidic patches at the surface of SH3 that leads to “trapping and clamping” by the arginines, and the rigidity of the SWCNT introducing entropic penalties in the proper binding. Further investigation revealed that the same “clamping” phenomenon exits in the PRM-SH3 system, which has not been reported in previous literature. The competing effects between nanoparticle and its functionalization components revealed by our model system should be of value to current and future nanomedicine designs. PMID:25427563

  10. PfMDR1: Mechanisms of Transport Modulation by Functional Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Pedro Eduardo; Holmgren, Gabrielle; Veiga, Maria Isabel; Uhlén, Per; Kaneko, Akira; Gil, José Pedro

    2011-01-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters are efflux pumps frequently associated with multidrug resistance in many biological systems, including malaria. Antimalarial drug-resistance involves an ABC transporter, PfMDR1, a homologue of P-glycoprotein in humans. Twenty years of research have shown that several single nucleotide polymorphisms in pfmdr1 modulate in vivo and/or in vitro drug susceptibility. The underlying physiological mechanism of the effect of these mutations remains unclear. Here we develop structural models for PfMDR1 in different predicted conformations, enabling the study of transporter motion. Such analysis of functional polymorphisms allows determination of their potential role in transport and resistance. The bacterial MsbA ABC pump is a PfMDR1 homologue. MsbA crystals in different conformations were used to create PfMDR1 models with Modeller software. Sequences were aligned with ClustalW and analysed by Ali2D revealing a high level of secondary structure conservation. To validate a potential drug binding pocket we performed antimalarial docking simulations. Using aminoquinoline as probe drugs in PfMDR1 mutated parasites we evaluated the physiology underlying the mechanisms of resistance mediated by PfMDR1 polymorphisms. We focused on the analysis of well known functional polymorphisms in PfMDR1 amino acid residues 86, 184, 1034, 1042 and 1246. Our structural analysis suggested the existence of two different biophysical mechanisms of PfMDR1 drug resistance modulation. Polymorphisms in residues 86/184/1246 act by internal allosteric modulation and residues 1034 and 1042 interact directly in a drug pocket. Parasites containing mutated PfMDR1 variants had a significant altered aminoquinoline susceptibility that appears to be dependent on the aminoquinoline lipophobicity characteristics as well as vacuolar efflux by PfCRT. We previously described the in vivo selection of PfMDR1 polymorphisms under antimalarial drug pressure. Now, together with recent PfMDR1 functional reports, we contribute to the understanding of the specific structural role of these polymorphisms in parasite antimalarial drug response. PMID:21912647

  11. Nuclear proteome analysis reveals a role of Vav1 in modulating RNA processing during maturation of tumoral promyelocytes.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolo, Valeria; Grassilli, Silvia; Petretto, Andrea; Lambertini, Elisabetta; Astati, Laura; Bruschi, Maurizio; Brugnoli, Federica; Nika, Ervin; Candiano, Giovanni; Piva, Roberta; Capitani, Silvano

    2011-12-21

    Vav1 is a key molecule in the ATRA-induced acquisition of a mature phenotype by tumoral myeloid precursors. Since ATRA acts throughout events that require extensive changes of nuclear architecture and activity and considering that Vav1 accumulates inside the nuclear compartment of differentiating APL-derived cells, the possible role of this protein in modulating the nuclear proteome was investigated. Membrane-depleted nuclei purified from NB4 cells induced to differentiate with ATRA in the presence of forcedly down-modulated Vav1 were subjected to 2D-DIGE followed by mass spectra analysis. The obtained data demonstrated that, in NB4 cells treated with ATRA, Vav1 is involved in determining the nuclear amount of proteins involved in molecular complexes with DNA and may participate to RNA processing by carrying in the nucleus molecules involved in modulating mRNA production and stability, like hnRNPs and SR proteins. Our results provide the first evidence that, at least in maturation of tumoral myeloid precursors, Vav1 is part of interconnected networks of functionally related proteins ended to regulate different aspects of gene expression. Since defects in mRNA processing are common in tumor development, our data suggest that Vav1 is a potential target molecule for developing new anti-cancer strategies. PMID:21856460

  12. Pharmacological, antioxidant, genotoxic studies and modulation of rat splenocyte functions by Cyperus rotundus extracts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyperus rotundus Linn. (Cyperaceae) is a Tunisian medicinal plant used in folkloric (traditional) medicine to treat stomach disorders and inflammatory diseases. The present study explored the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and genotoxic activities of extracts from the aerial parts of C. rotundus. The antioxidant capacity and the modulation of splenocyte functions by these extracts were also investigated in mice. The phytochemical analysis was carried out using standard methods. Methods Aqueous, ethyl acetate, methanol and TOF-enriched extracts (300, 150, and 50??g/ml) were evaluated for their analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. 4, 2, and 1?mg/ml of each extract were tested to investigate their effect on lipid peroxidation. The genotoxic study was monitored by measuring the structural chromosome aberrations of mice treated with 300?mg/kg of extract. The proliferation of lymphocytes in the absence and presence of mitogens was assessed at a concentration range 1–1000??g/ml. Results The tested extracts were able to decrease the mouse ear oedema induced by xylene. Furthermore, it was shown that the same extracts reduced the number of abdominal contractions caused by acetic acid in mice, revealing the peripheral analgesic activity of these extracts. It is worth noting that mice treated with doses up to 300?mg/kg b.w. of Cyperus rotundus extracts did not exhibit any toxicity. The tested extracts significantly enhance lymphocyte proliferation at 1?mg/ml. Conclusions It appears that C. rotundus extracts contain potent components such as flavonoids that may potentially be useful for modulating the immune cell functions, provoking analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. PMID:23388107

  13. Comparative systems biology reveals allelic variation modulating Tocochromanol profiles in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Oliver, Rebekah E; Islamovic, Emir; Obert, Donald E; Wise, Mitchell L; Herrin, Lauri L; Hang, An; Harrison, Stephen A; Ibrahim, Amir; Marshall, Juliet M; Miclaus, Kelci J; Lazo, Gerard R; Hu, Gongshe; Jackson, Eric W

    2014-01-01

    Tocochromanols are recognized for nutritional content, plant stress response, and seed longevity. Here we present a systems biological approach to characterize and develop predictive assays for genes affecting tocochromanol variation in barley. Major QTL, detected in three regions of a SNP linkage map, affected multiple tocochromanol forms. Candidate genes were identified through barley/rice orthology and sequenced in genotypes with disparate tocochromanol profiles. Gene-specific markers, designed based on observed polymorphism, mapped to the originating QTL, increasing R2 values at the respective loci. Polymorphism within promoter regions corresponded to motifs known to influence gene expression. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed a trend of increased expression in tissues grown at cold temperatures. These results demonstrate utility of a novel method for rapid gene identification and characterization, and provide a resource for efficient development of barley lines with improved tocochromanol profiles. PMID:24820172

  14. Cloud-based simulations on Google Exacycle reveal ligand-modulation of GPCR activation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Gregory R.; Konerding, David E.; Belov, Dan; Altman, Russ B.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2014-01-01

    Simulations can provide tremendous insight into atomistic details of biological mechanisms, but micro- to milliseconds timescales are historically only accessible on dedicated supercomputers. We demonstrate that cloud computing is a viable alternative, bringing long-timescale processes within reach of a broader community. We used Google's Exacycle cloud computing platform to simulate 2 milliseconds of dynamics of the ?2 adrenergic receptor — a major drug target G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Markov state models aggregate independent simulations into a single statistical model that is validated by previous computational and experimental results. Moreover, our models provide an atomistic description of the activation of a GPCR, revealing multiple activation pathways. Agonists and inverse agonists interact differentially with these pathways, with profound implications for drug design PMID:24345941

  15. Comparative Systems Biology Reveals Allelic Variation Modulating Tocochromanol Profiles in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Rebekah E.; Islamovic, Emir; Obert, Donald E.; Wise, Mitchell L.; Herrin, Lauri L.; Hang, An; Harrison, Stephen A.; Ibrahim, Amir; Marshall, Juliet M.; Miclaus, Kelci J.; Lazo, Gerard R.; Hu, Gongshe; Jackson, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Tocochromanols are recognized for nutritional content, plant stress response, and seed longevity. Here we present a systems biological approach to characterize and develop predictive assays for genes affecting tocochromanol variation in barley. Major QTL, detected in three regions of a SNP linkage map, affected multiple tocochromanol forms. Candidate genes were identified through barley/rice orthology and sequenced in genotypes with disparate tocochromanol profiles. Gene-specific markers, designed based on observed polymorphism, mapped to the originating QTL, increasing R2 values at the respective loci. Polymorphism within promoter regions corresponded to motifs known to influence gene expression. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed a trend of increased expression in tissues grown at cold temperatures. These results demonstrate utility of a novel method for rapid gene identification and characterization, and provide a resource for efficient development of barley lines with improved tocochromanol profiles. PMID:24820172

  16. Transcriptome analysis of a cnidarian – dinoflagellate mutualism reveals complex modulation of host gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio; Phillips, Wendy S; Weis, Virginia M

    2006-01-01

    Background Cnidarian – dinoflagellate intracellular symbioses are one of the most important mutualisms in the marine environment. They form the trophic and structural foundation of coral reef ecosystems, and have played a key role in the evolutionary radiation and biodiversity of cnidarian species. Despite the prevalence of these symbioses, we still know very little about the molecular modulators that initiate, regulate, and maintain the interaction between these two different biological entities. In this study, we conducted a comparative host anemone transcriptome analysis using a cDNA microarray platform to identify genes involved in cnidarian – algal symbiosis. Results We detected statistically significant differences in host gene expression profiles between sea anemones (Anthopleura elegantissima) in a symbiotic and non-symbiotic state. The group of genes, whose expression is altered, is diverse, suggesting that the molecular regulation of the symbiosis is governed by changes in multiple cellular processes. In the context of cnidarian – dinoflagellate symbioses, we discuss pivotal host gene expression changes involved in lipid metabolism, cell adhesion, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Conclusion Our data do not support the existence of symbiosis-specific genes involved in controlling and regulating the symbiosis. Instead, it appears that the symbiosis is maintained by altering expression of existing genes involved in vital cellular processes. Specifically, the finding of key genes involved in cell cycle progression and apoptosis have led us to hypothesize that a suppression of apoptosis, together with a deregulation of the host cell cycle, create a platform that might be necessary for symbiont and/or symbiont-containing host cell survival. This first comprehensive molecular examination of the cnidarian – dinoflagellate associations provides critical insights into the maintenance and regulation of the symbiosis. PMID:16472376

  17. ?-Secretase modulator (GSM) photoaffinity probes reveal distinct allosteric binding sites on presenilin.

    PubMed

    Pozdnyakov, Nikolay; Murrey, Heather E; Crump, Christina J; Pettersson, Martin; Ballard, T Eric; Am Ende, Christopher W; Ahn, Kwangwook; Li, Yue-Ming; Bales, Kelly R; Johnson, Douglas S

    2013-04-01

    ?-Secretase is an intramembrane aspartyl protease that cleaves the amyloid precursor protein to produce neurotoxic ?-amyloid peptides (i.e. A?42) that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Small molecule ?-secretase modulators (GSMs) have emerged as potential disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer disease because they reduce the formation of A?42 while not blocking the processing of ?-secretase substrates. We developed clickable GSM photoaffinity probes with the goal of identifying the target of various classes of GSMs and to better understand their mechanism of action. Here, we demonstrate that the photoaffinity probe E2012-BPyne specifically labels the N-terminal fragment of presenilin-1 (PS1-NTF) in cell membranes as well as in live cells and primary neuronal cultures. The labeling is competed in the presence of the parent imidazole GSM E2012, but not with acid GSM-1, allosteric GSI BMS-708163, or substrate docking site peptide inhibitor pep11, providing evidence that these compounds have distinct binding sites. Surprisingly, we found that the cross-linking of E2012-BPyne to PS1-NTF is significantly enhanced in the presence of the active site-directed GSI L-685,458 (L458). In contrast, L458 does not affect the labeling of the acid GSM photoprobe GSM-5. We also observed that E2012-BPyne specifically labels PS1-NTF (active ?-secretase) but not full-length PS1 (inactive ?-secretase) in ANP.24 cells. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that multiple binding sites within the ?-secretase complex exist, each of which may contribute to different modes of modulatory action. Furthermore, the enhancement of PS1-NTF labeling by E2012-BPyne in the presence of L458 suggests a degree of cooperativity between the active site of ?-secretase and the modulatory binding site of certain GSMs. PMID:23396974

  18. Engineered TAL Effector modulators for the large-scale gain-of-function screening

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanshuo; Li, Juan; Hou, Sha; Wang, Gancheng; Jiang, Mingjun; Sun, Changhong; Hu, Xiongbing; Zhuang, Fengfeng; Dai, Zhifei; Dai, Junbiao; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Recent effective use of TAL Effectors (TALEs) has provided an important approach to the design and synthesis of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. However, it is still a challenging task to design and manufacture effective TALE modulators because of the limited knowledge of TALE–DNA interactions. Here we synthesized more than 200 TALE modulators and identified two determining factors of transcription activity in vivo: chromatin accessibility and the distance from the transcription start site. The implementation of these modulators in a gain-of-function screen was successfully demonstrated for four cell lines in migration/invasion assays and thus has broad relevance in this field. Furthermore, a novel TALE–TALE modulator was developed to transcriptionally inhibit target genes. Together, these findings underscore the huge potential of these TALE modulators in the study of gene function, reprogramming of cellular behaviors, and even clinical investigation. PMID:24939900

  19. Markov State Models Provide Insights into Dynamic Modulation of Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Protein function is inextricably linked to protein dynamics. As we move from a static structural picture to a dynamic ensemble view of protein structure and function, novel computational paradigms are required for observing and understanding conformational dynamics of proteins and its functional implications. In principle, molecular dynamics simulations can provide the time evolution of atomistic models of proteins, but the long time scales associated with functional dynamics make it difficult to observe rare dynamical transitions. The issue of extracting essential functional components of protein dynamics from noisy simulation data presents another set of challenges in obtaining an unbiased understanding of protein motions. Therefore, a methodology that provides a statistical framework for efficient sampling and a human-readable view of the key aspects of functional dynamics from data analysis is required. The Markov state model (MSM), which has recently become popular worldwide for studying protein dynamics, is an example of such a framework. In this Account, we review the use of Markov state models for efficient sampling of the hierarchy of time scales associated with protein dynamics, automatic identification of key conformational states, and the degrees of freedom associated with slow dynamical processes. Applications of MSMs for studying long time scale phenomena such as activation mechanisms of cellular signaling proteins has yielded novel insights into protein function. In particular, from MSMs built using large-scale simulations of GPCRs and kinases, we have shown that complex conformational changes in proteins can be described in terms of structural changes in key structural motifs or “molecular switches” within the protein, the transitions between functionally active and inactive states of proteins proceed via multiple pathways, and ligand or substrate binding modulates the flux through these pathways. Finally, MSMs also provide a theoretical toolbox for studying the effect of nonequilibrium perturbations on conformational dynamics. Considering that protein dynamics in vivo occur under nonequilibrium conditions, MSMs coupled with nonequilibrium statistical mechanics provide a way to connect cellular components to their functional environments. Nonequilibrium perturbations of protein folding MSMs reveal the presence of dynamically frozen glass-like states in their conformational landscape. These frozen states are also observed to be rich in ?-sheets, which indicates their possible role in the nucleation of ?-sheet rich aggregates such as those observed in amyloid-fibril formation. Finally, we describe how MSMs have been used to understand the dynamical behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins such as amyloid-?, human islet amyloid polypeptide, and p53. While certainly not a panacea for studying functional dynamics, MSMs provide a rigorous theoretical foundation for understanding complex entropically dominated processes and a convenient lens for viewing protein motions. PMID:25625937

  20. Splicing Modulation as a Modifier of the CFTR Function

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Malka Nissim-Rafinia; Batsheva Kerem

    A significant fraction of CF-causing mutations affects pre-mRNA splicing. These mutations can generate both aberrant and correct transcripts, the level of which varies among different patients. An inverse correlation was found between this level and disease severity, suggesting a role for splicing regulation as a genetic modifier. Subsequent studies showed that overexpression of splicing factors modulated the level of correctly

  1. The Neural Consequences of Repeated Cocaine Exposure Revealed by Functional MRI in Awake Rats

    E-print Network

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    The Neural Consequences of Repeated Cocaine Exposure Revealed by Functional MRI in Awake Rats models of cocaine addiction is an invaluable tool for investigating the neuroadaptations that lead circuits affected by repeated cocaine administration. Rats were given an injection of cocaine (15 mg/kg, i

  2. Perfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress

    E-print Network

    Pennsylvania, University of

    to stress in the brain, secretion of corticotrophin-releasing hormone and norepinephrine, causes symptomsPerfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress Jiongjiong) Despite the prevalence of stress in everyday life and its impact on happiness, health, and cognition

  3. Mechanisms of migraine aura revealed by functional MRI in human visual cortex

    E-print Network

    Hadjikhani, Nouchine

    Mechanisms of migraine aura revealed by functional MRI in human visual cortex Nouchine Hadjikhani spreading depression (CSD) has been suggested to under- lie migraine visual aura. However, it has been the aura in human visual cortex. Migraine is a very common and debilitating disorder. In 20% of cases (1

  4. A Multifunctional Turnip Crinkle Virus Replication Enhancer Revealed by in vivo Functional SELEX

    E-print Network

    Simon, Anne

    A Multifunctional Turnip Crinkle Virus Replication Enhancer Revealed by in vivo Functional SELEX College Park College Park, MD 20742, USA The motif1-hairpin (M1H), located on (2)-strands of Turnip, Turnip Crinkle Virus; SELEX, systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment; M1H, motif1

  5. What Peripheral Vestibular Manipulations Reveal about the Function and Plasticity in the Primate Oculomotor System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shawn D. Newlands; Dora E. Angelaki

    2006-01-01

    Central to our understanding of the function and dysfunction of the vestibular system are results from experiments where distinct manipulations of the peripheral vestibular apparatus have been used to characterize deficits and recovery of neural and reflexive responses. Using the primate oculomotor system as a focus, we summarize here recent advances where peripheral vestibular manipulations have revealed important properties of

  6. An epigenomic roadmap to induced pluripotency reveals DNA methylation as a reprogramming modulator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Tonge, Peter D; Puri, Mira C; Lee, Seungbok; Park, Hansoo; Lee, Won-Chul; Hussein, Samer M I; Bleazard, Thomas; Yun, Ji-Young; Kim, Jihye; Li, Mira; Cloonan, Nicole; Wood, David; Clancy, Jennifer L; Mosbergen, Rowland; Yi, Jae-Hyuk; Yang, Kap-Seok; Kim, Hyungtae; Rhee, Hwanseok; Wells, Christine A; Preiss, Thomas; Grimmond, Sean M; Rogers, Ian M; Nagy, Andras; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells involves a dynamic rearrangement of the epigenetic landscape. To characterize this epigenomic roadmap, we have performed MethylC-seq, ChIP-seq (H3K4/K27/K36me3) and RNA-Seq on samples taken at several time points during murine secondary reprogramming as part of Project Grandiose. We find that DNA methylation gain during reprogramming occurs gradually, while loss is achieved only at the ESC-like state. Binding sites of activated factors exhibit focal demethylation during reprogramming, while ESC-like pluripotent cells are distinguished by extension of demethylation to the wider neighbourhood. We observed that genes with CpG-rich promoters demonstrate stable low methylation and strong engagement of histone marks, whereas genes with CpG-poor promoters are safeguarded by methylation. Such DNA methylation-driven control is the key to the regulation of ESC-pluripotency genes, including Dppa4, Dppa5a and Esrrb. These results reveal the crucial role that DNA methylation plays as an epigenetic switch driving somatic cells to pluripotency. PMID:25493341

  7. A nanobody modulates the p53 transcriptional program without perturbing its functional architecture

    PubMed Central

    Bethuyne, Jonas; De Gieter, Steven; Zwaenepoel, Olivier; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Durinck, Kaat; Verhelle, Adriaan; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Speleman, Frank; Loris, Remy; Gettemans, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The p53 transcription factor plays an important role in genome integrity. To perform this task, p53 regulates the transcription of genes promoting various cellular outcomes including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence. The precise regulation of this activity remains elusive as numerous mechanisms, e.g. posttranslational modifications of p53 and (non-)covalent p53 binding partners, influence the p53 transcriptional program. We developed a novel, non-invasive tool to manipulate endogenous p53. Nanobodies (Nb), raised against the DNA-binding domain of p53, allow us to distinctively target both wild type and mutant p53 with great specificity. Nb3 preferentially binds ‘structural’ mutant p53, i.e. R175H and R282W, while a second but distinct nanobody, Nb139, binds both mutant and wild type p53. The co-crystal structure of the p53 DNA-binding domain in complex with Nb139 (1.9 Å resolution) reveals that Nb139 binds opposite the DNA-binding surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nb139 does not disturb the functional architecture of the p53 DNA-binding domain using conformation-specific p53 antibody immunoprecipitations, glutaraldehyde crosslinking assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Functionally, the binding of Nb139 to p53 allows us to perturb the transactivation of p53 target genes. We propose that reduced recruitment of transcriptional co-activators or modulation of selected post-transcriptional modifications account for these observations. PMID:25324313

  8. Modulating the function of human serine racemase and human serine dehydratase by protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cyong-Yi; Ku, Shan Chi; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2012-11-01

    D-Serine is a co-agonist of N-methyl D-aspartate, a glutamate receptor, which is a major excitatory neurotransmitter receptor in the brain. Human serine racemase (hSR) and serine dehydratase (hSDH) are two important pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that synthesize and degrade D-serine, respectively. hSR and hSDH have significant sequence homology (28% identity) and are similar in their structural folds (root-mean-square deviation, 1.12 Å). Sequence alignment and structural comparison between hSR and hSDH reveal that S84 in hSR and A65 in hSDH play important roles in their respective enzyme activities. We surmise that exchange of these two amino acids by introducing S84A hSR and A65S hSDH mutants may result in switching their protein functions. To understand the modulating mechanism of the key residues, mutants S84A in hSR and A65S in hSDH were constructed to monitor the change of activities. The structure of A65S hSDH mutant was determined at 1.3 Å resolution (PDB 4H27), elucidating the role of this critical amino acid. Our study demonstrated S84A hSR mutant behaved like hSDH, whereas A65S hSDH mutant acquired an additional function of using D-serine as a substrate. PMID:23112234

  9. Modulation of Neutrophil Function by a Secreted Mucinase of Escherichia coli O157?H7

    PubMed Central

    Szabady, Rose L.; Lokuta, Mary A.; Walters, Kevin B.; Huttenlocher, Anna; Welch, Rodney A.

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157?H7 is a human enteric pathogen that causes hemorrhagic colitis which can progress to hemolytic uremic syndrome, a severe kidney disease with immune involvement. During infection, E. coli O157?H7 secretes StcE, a metalloprotease that promotes the formation of attaching and effacing lesions and inhibits the complement cascade via cleavage of mucin-type glycoproteins. We found that StcE cleaved the mucin-like, immune cell-restricted glycoproteins CD43 and CD45 on the neutrophil surface and altered neutrophil function. Treatment of human neutrophils with StcE led to increased respiratory burst production and increased cell adhesion. StcE-treated neutrophils exhibited an elongated morphology with defective rear detachment and impaired migration, suggesting that removal of the anti-adhesive capability of CD43 by StcE impairs rear release. Use of zebrafish embryos to model neutrophil migration revealed that StcE induced neutrophil retention in the fin after tissue wounding, suggesting that StcE modulates neutrophil-mediated inflammation in vivo. Neutrophils are crucial innate effectors of the antibacterial immune response and can contribute to severe complications caused by infection with E. coli O157?H7. Our data suggest that the StcE mucinase can play an immunomodulatory role by directly altering neutrophil function during infection. StcE may contribute to inflammation and tissue destruction by mediating inappropriate neutrophil adhesion and activation. PMID:19247439

  10. Modulation transfer function evaluation of cone beam computed tomography for dental use with the oversampling method

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, H; Honda, E; Kurabayashi, T

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to investigate the possibility of evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF) of cone beam CT (CBCT) for dental use using the oversampling method. Methods The CBCT apparatus (3D Accuitomo) with an image intensifier was used with a 100 ?m tungsten wire placed inside the scanner at a slight angle to the plane perpendicular to the plane of interest and scanned. 200 contiguous reconstructed images were used to obtain the oversampling line-spread function (LSF). The MTF curve was obtained by computing the Fourier transformation from the oversampled LSF. Line pair tests were also performed using Catphan®. Results The oversampling method provided smooth and reproducible MTF curves. The MTF curves revealed that the spatial resolution in the z-axis direction was significantly higher than that in the axial direction. This result was also confirmed by the line pair test. Conclusions MTF analysis was performed successfully using the oversampling method. In addition, this study clarified that the 3D Accuitomo had high spatial resolution, especially in the z-axis direction. PMID:20089741

  11. Principles of motivation revealed by the diverse functions of neuropharmacological and neuroanatomical substrates underlying feeding behavior

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Brian A.; Pratt, Wayne E.; Will, Matthew J.; Hanlon, Erin C.; Bakshi, Vaishali P.; Cador, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Circuits that participate in specific subcomponents of feeding (e.g., gustatory perception, peripheral feedback relevant to satiety and energy balance, reward coding, etc.) are found at all levels of the neural axis. Further complexity is conferred by the wide variety of feeding-modulatory neurotransmitters and neuropeptides that act within these circuits. An ongoing challenge has been to refine the understanding of the functional specificity of these neurotransmitters and circuits, and there have been exciting advances in recent years. We focus here on foundational work of Dr. Ann Kelley that identified distinguishable actions of striatal opioid peptide modulation and dopamine transmission in subcomponents of reward processing. We also discuss her work in overlaying these neuropharmacological effects upon anatomical pathways that link the telencephalon (cortex and basal ganglia) with feeding-control circuits in the hypothalamus. Using these seminal contributions as a starting point, we will discuss new findings that expand our understanding of (1) the specific, differentiable motivational processes that are governed by central dopamine and opioid transmission, (2) the manner in which other striatal neuromodulators, specifically acetylcholine, endocannabinoids and adenosine, modulate these motivational processes (including via interactions with opioid systems), and (3) the organization of the cortical-subcortical network that subserves opioid-driven feeding. The findings discussed here strengthen the view that incentive-motivational properties of food are coded by substrates and neural circuits that are distinguishable from those that mediate the acute hedonic experience of food reward. Striatal opioid transmission modulates reward processing by engaging frontotemporal circuits, possibly via a hypothalamic-thalamic axis, that ultimately impinges upon hypothalamic modules dedicated to autonomic function and motor pattern control. We will conclude by discussing implications for understanding disorders of “non-homeostatic” feeding. PMID:23466532

  12. Parametric Dependence of Ocean Wave-Radar Modulation Transfer Functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. Plant; W. C. Keller; A. Cross

    1983-01-01

    much smaller when the antennas are pointed perpendicular to long waves, however. X band transfer functions measured with horizontally polarized microwave radiation are found to have larger magnitudes than those obtained by using vertical polarization. Under conditions encountered in this experiment, transfer functions are independent of long-wave amplitude when waves and antennas are aligned. Coherence functions, however, depend strongly on

  13. A Functional Screen Reveals an Extensive Layer of Transcriptional and Splicing Control Underlying RAS/MAPK Signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ashton-Beaucage, Dariel; Udell, Christian M.; Gendron, Patrick; Sahmi, Malha; Lefrançois, Martin; Baril, Caroline; Guenier, Anne-Sophie; Duchaine, Jean; Lamarre, Daniel; Lemieux, Sébastien; Therrien, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The small GTPase RAS is among the most prevalent oncogenes. The evolutionarily conserved RAF-MEK-MAPK module that lies downstream of RAS is one of the main conduits through which RAS transmits proliferative signals in normal and cancer cells. Genetic and biochemical studies conducted over the last two decades uncovered a small set of factors regulating RAS/MAPK signaling. Interestingly, most of these were found to control RAF activation, thus suggesting a central regulatory role for this event. Whether additional factors are required at this level or further downstream remains an open question. To obtain a comprehensive view of the elements functionally linked to the RAS/MAPK cascade, we used a quantitative assay in Drosophila S2 cells to conduct a genome-wide RNAi screen for factors impacting RAS-mediated MAPK activation. The screen led to the identification of 101 validated hits, including most of the previously known factors associated to this pathway. Epistasis experiments were then carried out on individual candidates to determine their position relative to core pathway components. While this revealed several new factors acting at different steps along the pathway—including a new protein complex modulating RAF activation—we found that most hits unexpectedly work downstream of MEK and specifically influence MAPK expression. These hits mainly consist of constitutive splicing factors and thereby suggest that splicing plays a specific role in establishing MAPK levels. We further characterized two representative members of this group and surprisingly found that they act by regulating mapk alternative splicing. This study provides an unprecedented assessment of the factors modulating RAS/MAPK signaling in Drosophila. In addition, it suggests that pathway output does not solely rely on classical signaling events, such as those controlling RAF activation, but also on the regulation of MAPK levels. Finally, it indicates that core splicing components can also specifically impact alternative splicing. PMID:24643257

  14. Finding type 2 diabetes causal single nucleotide polymorphism combinations and functional modules from genome-wide association data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the low statistical power of individual markers from a genome-wide association study (GWAS), detecting causal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for complex diseases is a challenge. SNP combinations are suggested to compensate for the low statistical power of individual markers, but SNP combinations from GWAS generate high computational complexity. Methods We aim to detect type 2 diabetes (T2D) causal SNP combinations from a GWAS dataset with optimal filtration and to discover the biological meaning of the detected SNP combinations. Optimal filtration can enhance the statistical power of SNP combinations by comparing the error rates of SNP combinations from various Bonferroni thresholds and p-value range-based thresholds combined with linkage disequilibrium (LD) pruning. T2D causal SNP combinations are selected using random forests with variable selection from an optimal SNP dataset. T2D causal SNP combinations and genome-wide SNPs are mapped into functional modules using expanded gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) considering pathway, transcription factor (TF)-target, miRNA-target, gene ontology, and protein complex functional modules. The prediction error rates are measured for SNP sets from functional module-based filtration that selects SNPs within functional modules from genome-wide SNPs based expanded GSEA. Results A T2D causal SNP combination containing 101 SNPs from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) GWAS dataset are selected using optimal filtration criteria, with an error rate of 10.25%. Matching 101 SNPs with known T2D genes and functional modules reveals the relationships between T2D and SNP combinations. The prediction error rates of SNP sets from functional module-based filtration record no significance compared to the prediction error rates of randomly selected SNP sets and T2D causal SNP combinations from optimal filtration. Conclusions We propose a detection method for complex disease causal SNP combinations from an optimal SNP dataset by using random forests with variable selection. Mapping the biological meanings of detected SNP combinations can help uncover complex disease mechanisms. PMID:23566118

  15. Functional Modules Distinguish Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anyou; Huang, Kevin; Shen, Yin; Xue, Zhigang; Cai, Chaochao; Horvath, Steve

    2011-01-01

    It has been debated whether human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) express distinctive transcriptomes. By using the method of weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we showed here that iPSCs exhibit altered functional modules compared with ESCs. Notably, iPSCs and ESCs differentially express 17 modules that primarily function in transcription, metabolism, development, and immune response. These module activations (up- and downregulation) are highly conserved in a variety of iPSCs, and genes in each module are coherently co-expressed. Furthermore, the activation levels of these modular genes can be used as quantitative variables to discriminate iPSCs and ESCs with high accuracy (96%). Thus, differential activations of these functional modules are the conserved features distinguishing iPSCs from ESCs. Strikingly, the overall activation level of these modules is inversely correlated with the DNA methylation level, suggesting that DNA methylation may be one mechanism regulating the module differences. Overall, we conclude that human iPSCs and ESCs exhibit distinct gene expression networks, which are likely associated with different epigenetic reprogramming events during the derivation of iPSCs and ESCs. PMID:21542696

  16. Association between Periodontal Disease and Inflammatory Arthritis Reveals Modulatory Functions by Melanocortin Receptor Type 3

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Madeira, Mila F.M.; Norling, Lucy V.; Alsam, Asil; Curtis, Michael A.; da Silva, Tarcília A.; Perretti, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Because there is clinical evidence for an association between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis, it is important to develop suitable experimental models to explore pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities. The K/BxN serum model of inflammatory arthritis was applied using distinct protocols, and modulation of joint disruption afforded by dexamethasone and calcitonin was established in comparison to the melanocortin (MC) receptor agonist DTrp8–?-melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH; DTrp). Wild-type and MC receptor type 3 (MC3)-null mice of different ages were also used. There was significant association between severity of joint disease, induced with distinct protocols and volumes of the arthritogenic K/BxN serum, and periodontal bone damage. Therapeutic treatment with 10 ?g dexamethasone, 30 ng elcatonin, and 20 ?g DTrp per mouse revealed unique and distinctive pharmacological properties, with only DTrp protecting both joint and periodontal tissue. Further analyses in nonarthritic animals revealed higher susceptibility to periodontal bone loss in Mc3r?/? compared with wild-type mice, with significant exacerbation at 14 weeks of age. These data reveal novel protective properties of endogenous MC3 on periodontal status in health and disease and indicate that MC3 activation could lead to the development of a new genus of anti-arthritic bone-sparing therapeutics. PMID:24979595

  17. HPV-18 E6 mutants reveal p53 modulation of viral DNA amplification in organotypic cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Eun-Young; Wang, Hsu-Kun; Banerjee, N. Sanjib; Broker, Thomas R.; Chow, Louise T.

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) amplify in differentiated strata of a squamous epithelium. The HPV E7 protein destabilizes the p130/retinoblastoma susceptibility protein family of tumor suppressors and reactivates S-phase reentry, thereby facilitating viral DNA amplification. The high-risk HPV E6 protein destabilizes the p53 tumor suppressor and many other host proteins. However, the critical E6 targets relevant to viral DNA amplification have not been identified, because functionally significant E6 mutants are not stably maintained in transfected cells. Using Cre-loxP recombination, which efficiently generates HPV genomic plasmids in transfected primary human keratinocytes, we have recapitulated a highly productive infection of HPV-18 in organotypic epithelial cultures. By using this system, we now report the characterization of four HPV-18 E6 mutations. An E6 null mutant accumulated high levels of p53 and amplified very poorly. p53 siRNA or ectopic WT E6 partially restored amplification, whereas three missense E6 mutations that did not effectively destabilize p53 complemented the null mutant poorly. Unexpectedly, in cis, two of the missense mutants amplified, albeit to a lower extent than the WT and only in cells with undetectable p53. These observations and others implicate p53 and additional host proteins in regulating viral DNA amplification and also suggest an inhibitory effect of E6 overexpression. We show that high levels of viral DNA amplification are critical for late protein expression and report several previously undescribed viral RNAs, including bicistronic transcripts predicted to encode E5 and L2 or an alternative form of E1^E4 and L1. PMID:23572574

  18. Cadmium modulates adipocyte functions in metallothionein-null mice.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Takashige; Nishiyama, Kaori; Kadota, Yoshito; Sato, Masao; Inoue, Masahisa; Suzuki, Shinya

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes a reduction of adipocyte size and the modulation of adipokine expression. To further investigate the significance of the Cd action, we studied the effect of Cd on the white adipose tissue (WAT) of metallothionein null (MT(-/-)) mice, which cannot form atoxic Cd-MT complexes and are used for evaluating Cd as free ions, and wild type (MT(+/+)) mice. Cd administration more significantly reduced the adipocyte size of MT(-/-) mice than that of MT(+/+) mice. Cd exposure also induced macrophage recruitment to WAT with an increase in the expression level of Ccl2 (MCP-1) in the MT(-/-) mice. The in vitro exposure of Cd to adipocytes induce triglyceride release into culture medium, decrease in the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and lipid hydrolysis at 24 h, and at 48 h increase in phosphorylation of the lipid-droplet-associated protein perilipin, which facilitates the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes. Therefore, the reduction in adipocyte size by Cd may arise from an imbalance between lipid synthesis and lipolysis. In addition, the expression levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin decreased in adipocytes. Taken together, exposure to Cd may induce unusually small adipocytes and modulate the expression of adipokines differently from the case of physiologically small adipocytes, and may accelerate the risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23921151

  19. Metagenomic analysis reveals significant changes of microbial compositions and protective functions during drinking water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yuanqing; Ma, Liping; Yang, Ying; Ju, Feng; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Wu, Wei-Min; Zhang, Tong

    2013-12-01

    The metagenomic approach was applied to characterize variations of microbial structure and functions in raw (RW) and treated water (TW) in a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) at Pearl River Delta, China. Microbial structure was significantly influenced by the treatment processes, shifting from Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria in RW to Alphaproteobacteria in TW. Further functional analysis indicated the basic metabolic functions of microorganisms in TW did not vary considerably. However, protective functions, i.e. glutathione synthesis genes in `oxidative stress' and `detoxification' subsystems, significantly increased, revealing the surviving bacteria may have higher chlorine resistance. Similar results were also found in glutathione metabolism pathway, which identified the major reaction for glutathione synthesis and supported more genes for glutathione metabolism existed in TW. This metagenomic study largely enhanced our knowledge about the influences of treatment processes, especially chlorination, on bacterial community structure and protective functions (e.g. glutathione metabolism) in ecosystems of DWTPs.

  20. Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-05-15

    Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

  1. Modulation of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Interleukin-6 Function by Hypoxia-Upregulated Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Louise; Yan, Feng; Major, M. Ben

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, also called human herpesvirus 8) is linked to the development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). KSHV expresses several proteins that modulate host cell signaling pathways. One of these proteins is viral interleukin-6 (vIL-6), which is a homolog of human IL-6 (hIL-6). vIL-6 is able to prevent apoptosis and promote proinflammatory signaling, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation. Although it can be secreted, vIL-6 is mainly an intracellular protein that is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We performed affinity purification and mass spectrometry to identify novel vIL-6 binding partners and found that a cellular ER chaperone, hypoxia-upregulated protein 1 (HYOU1), interacts with vIL-6. Immunohistochemical staining reveals that both PEL and KS tumor tissues express significant amounts of HYOU1. We also show that HYOU1 increases endogenous vIL-6 protein levels and that HYOU1 facilitates vIL-6-induced JAK/STAT signaling, migration, and survival in endothelial cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that HYOU1 also modulates vIL-6's ability to induce CCL2, a chemokine involved in cell migration. Finally, we investigated the impact of HYOU1 on cellular hIL-6 signaling. Collectively, our data indicate that HYOU1 is important for vIL-6 function and may play a role in the pathogenesis of KSHV-associated cancers. IMPORTANCE KSHV vIL-6 is detectable in all KSHV-associated malignancies and promotes tumorigenesis and inflammation. We identified a cellular protein, called hypoxia-upregulated protein 1 (HYOU1), that interacts with KSHV vIL-6 and is present in KSHV-infected tumors. Our data suggest that HYOU1 facilitates the vIL-6-induced signaling, migration, and survival of endothelial cells. PMID:24920810

  2. Systems-Based Analyses of Brain Regions Functionally Impacted in Parkinson's Disease Reveals Underlying Causal Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Emig-Agius, Dorothea; Bessarabova, Marina; Ivliev, Alexander E.; Schüle, Birgit; Alexander, Jeff; Wallace, William; Halliday, Glenda M.; Langston, J. William; Braxton, Scott; Yednock, Ted; Shaler, Thomas; Johnston, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed analysis of disease-affected tissue provides insight into molecular mechanisms contributing to pathogenesis. Substantia nigra, striatum, and cortex are functionally connected with increasing degrees of alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease. We undertook functional and causal pathway analysis of gene expression and proteomic alterations in these three regions, and the data revealed pathways that correlated with disease progression. In addition, microarray and RNAseq experiments revealed previously unidentified causal changes related to oligodendrocyte function and synaptic vesicle release, and these and other changes were reflected across all brain regions. Importantly, subsets of these changes were replicated in Parkinson's disease blood; suggesting peripheral tissue may provide important avenues for understanding and measuring disease status and progression. Proteomic assessment revealed alterations in mitochondria and vesicular transport proteins that preceded gene expression changes indicating defects in translation and/or protein turnover. Our combined approach of proteomics, RNAseq and microarray analyses provides a comprehensive view of the molecular changes that accompany functional loss and alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease, and may be instrumental to understand, diagnose and follow Parkinson's disease progression. PMID:25170892

  3. Survivin modulates genes with divergent molecular functions and regulates proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells through Evi-1.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, S; Hoggatt, J; Singh, P; Abe, M; Speth, J M; Hu, P; Conway, E M; Nucifora, G; Yamaguchi, S; Pelus, L M

    2015-02-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein Survivin regulates hematopoiesis, although its mechanisms of regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remain largely unknown. While investigating conditional Survivin deletion in mice, we found that Survivin was highly expressed in phenotypically defined HSCs, and Survivin deletion in mice resulted in significantly reduced total marrow HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Transcriptional analysis of Survivin(-/-) HSCs revealed altered expression of multiple genes not previously linked to Survivin activity. In particular, Survivin deletion significantly reduced expression of the Evi-1 transcription factor indispensable for HSC function, and the downstream Evi-1 target genes Gata2, Pbx1 and Sall2. The loss of HSCs following Survivin deletion and impaired long-term HSC repopulating function could be partially rescued by ectopic Evi-1 expression in Survivin -/- HSCs. These data demonstrate that Survivin partially regulates HSC function by modulating the Evi-1 transcription factor and its downstream targets and identify new genetic pathways in HSCs regulated by Survivin. PMID:24903482

  4. Modulation of nuclear receptor function by cellular redox poise

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Eric L.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-responsive transcription factors involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from metabolism to circadian rhythms. This review focuses on NRs that contain redox-active thiol groups, a common feature within the superfamily. We will begin by describing NRs, how they regulate various cellular processes and how binding ligands, corepressors and/or coactivators modulates their activity. We will then describe the general area of redox regulation, especially as it pertains to thiol-disulfide interconversion and the cellular systems that respond to and govern this redox equilibrium. Lastly, we will discuss specific examples of NRs whose activities are regulated by redox-active thiols. Glucocorticoid, estrogen, and the heme-responsive receptor, Rev-erb, will be described in the most detail as they exhibit archetypal redox regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24495544

  5. Modulation of nuclear receptor function by cellular redox poise.

    PubMed

    Carter, Eric L; Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-responsive transcription factors involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from metabolism to circadian rhythms. This review focuses on NRs that contain redox-active thiol groups, a common feature within the superfamily. We will begin by describing NRs, how they regulate various cellular processes and how binding ligands, corepressors and/or coactivators modulate their activity. We will then describe the general area of redox regulation, especially as it pertains to thiol-disulfide interconversion and the cellular systems that respond to and govern this redox equilibrium. Lastly, we will discuss specific examples of NRs whose activities are regulated by redox-active thiols. Glucocorticoid, estrogen, and the heme-responsive receptor, Rev-erb, will be described in the most detail as they exhibit archetypal redox regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24495544

  6. Cadmium modulates adipocyte functions in metallothionein-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Takashige; Nishiyama, Kaori; Kadota, Yoshito; Sato, Masao; Inoue, Masahisa; Suzuki, Shinya, E-mail: suzukis@ph.bunri-u.ac.jp

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes a reduction of adipocyte size and the modulation of adipokine expression. To further investigate the significance of the Cd action, we studied the effect of Cd on the white adipose tissue (WAT) of metallothionein null (MT{sup ?/?}) mice, which cannot form atoxic Cd–MT complexes and are used for evaluating Cd as free ions, and wild type (MT{sup +/+}) mice. Cd administration more significantly reduced the adipocyte size of MT{sup ?/?} mice than that of MT{sup +/+} mice. Cd exposure also induced macrophage recruitment to WAT with an increase in the expression level of Ccl2 (MCP-1) in the MT{sup ?/?} mice. The in vitro exposure of Cd to adipocytes induce triglyceride release into culture medium, decrease in the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and lipid hydrolysis at 24 h, and at 48 h increase in phosphorylation of the lipid-droplet-associated protein perilipin, which facilitates the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes. Therefore, the reduction in adipocyte size by Cd may arise from an imbalance between lipid synthesis and lipolysis. In addition, the expression levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin decreased in adipocytes. Taken together, exposure to Cd may induce unusually small adipocytes and modulate the expression of adipokines differently from the case of physiologically small adipocytes, and may accelerate the risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. - Highlights: • Cd causes a marked reduction in adipocyte size in MT-null mice. • Cd enhances macrophage migration into adipose tissue and disrupt adipokine secretion. • MT gene alleviates Cd-induced adipocyte dysfunctions. • Cd enhances the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes, mediated by perilipin. • Cd induces unusually small adipocytes and the abnormal expression of adipokines.

  7. Genomic Heterogeneity of Osteosarcoma - Shift from Single Candidates to Functional Modules

    PubMed Central

    Maugg, Doris; Eckstein, Gertrud; Baumhoer, Daniel; Nathrath, Michaela; Korsching, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS), a bone tumor, exhibit a complex karyotype. On the genomic level a highly variable degree of alterations in nearly all chromosomal regions and between individual tumors is observable. This hampers the identification of common drivers in OS biology. To identify the common molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of OS, we follow the hypothesis that all the copy number-associated differences between the patients are intercepted on the level of the functional modules. The implementation is based on a network approach utilizing copy number associated genes in OS, paired expression data and protein interaction data. The resulting functional modules of tightly connected genes were interpreted regarding their biological functions in OS and their potential prognostic significance. We identified an osteosarcoma network assembling well-known and lesser-known candidates. The derived network shows a significant connectivity and modularity suggesting that the genes affected by the heterogeneous genetic alterations share the same biological context. The network modules participate in several critical aspects of cancer biology like DNA damage response, cell growth, and cell motility which is in line with the hypothesis of specifically deregulated but functional modules in cancer. Further, we could deduce genes with possible prognostic significance in OS for further investigation (e.g. EZR, CDKN2A, MAP3K5). Several of those module genes were located on chromosome 6q. The given systems biological approach provides evidence that heterogeneity on the genomic and expression level is ordered by the biological system on the level of the functional modules. Different genomic aberrations are pointing to the same cellular network vicinity to form vital, but already neoplastically altered, functional modules maintaining OS. This observation, exemplarily now shown for OS, has been under discussion already for a longer time, but often in a hypothetical manner, and can here be exemplified for OS. PMID:25848766

  8. Essential functional modules for pathogenic and defensive mechanisms in Candida albicans infections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chao; Tsai, I-Chun; Lin, Che; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Lan, Chung-Yu; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2014-01-01

    The clinical and biological significance of the study of fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) has markedly increased. However, the explicit pathogenic and invasive mechanisms of such host-pathogen interactions have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, the essential functional modules involved in C. albicans-zebrafish interactions were investigated in this study. Adopting a systems biology approach, the early-stage and late-stage protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for both C. albicans and zebrafish were constructed. By comparing PPI networks at the early and late stages of the infection process, several critical functional modules were identified in both pathogenic and defensive mechanisms. Functional modules in C. albicans, like those involved in hyphal morphogenesis, ion and small molecule transport, protein secretion, and shifts in carbon utilization, were seen to play important roles in pathogen invasion and damage caused to host cells. Moreover, the functional modules in zebrafish, such as those involved in immune response, apoptosis mechanisms, ion transport, protein secretion, and hemostasis-related processes, were found to be significant as defensive mechanisms during C. albicans infection. The essential functional modules thus determined could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions during the infection process and thereby devise potential therapeutic strategies to treat C. albicans infection. PMID:24757665

  9. Genetic Interaction Maps in Escherichia coli Reveal Functional Crosstalk among Cell Envelope Biogenesis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Vlasblom, James; Gagarinova, Alla; Phanse, Sadhna; Graham, Chris; Yousif, Fouad; Ding, Huiming; Xiong, Xuejian; Nazarians-Armavil, Anaies; Alamgir, Md; Ali, Mehrab; Pogoutse, Oxana; Pe'er, Asaf; Arnold, Roland; Michaut, Magali; Parkinson, John; Golshani, Ashkan; Whitfield, Chris; Wodak, Shoshana J.; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Emili, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium) and prototrophic (minimal medium) culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among >235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens) and an important target. PMID:22125496

  10. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Vallon, Olivier; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Karpowicz, Steven J.; Witman, George B.; Terry, Astrid; Salamov, Asaf; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Marshall, Wallace F.; Qu, Liang-Hu; Nelson, David R.; Sanderfoot, Anton A.; Spalding, Martin H.; Kapitonov, Vladimir V.; Ren, Qinghu; Ferris, Patrick; Lindquist, Erika; Shapiro, Harris; Lucas, Susan M.; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Cardol, Pierre; Cerutti, Heriberto; Chanfreau, Guillaume; Chen, Chun-Long; Cognat, Valérie; Croft, Martin T.; Dent, Rachel; Dutcher, Susan; Fernández, Emilio; Ferris, Patrick; Fukuzawa, Hideya; González-Ballester, David; González-Halphen, Diego; Hallmann, Armin; Hanikenne, Marc; Hippler, Michael; Inwood, William; Jabbari, Kamel; Kalanon, Ming; Kuras, Richard; Lefebvre, Paul A.; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Lobanov, Alexey V.; Lohr, Martin; Manuell, Andrea; Meier, Iris; Mets, Laurens; Mittag, Maria; Mittelmeier, Telsa; Moroney, James V.; Moseley, Jeffrey; Napoli, Carolyn; Nedelcu, Aurora M.; Niyogi, Krishna; Novoselov, Sergey V.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Pazour, Greg; Purton, Saul; Ral, Jean-Philippe; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Riekhof, Wayne; Rymarquis, Linda; Schroda, Michael; Stern, David; Umen, James; Willows, Robert; Wilson, Nedra; Zimmer, Sara Lana; Allmer, Jens; Balk, Janneke; Bisova, Katerina; Chen, Chong-Jian; Elias, Marek; Gendler, Karla; Hauser, Charles; Lamb, Mary Rose; Ledford, Heidi; Long, Joanne C.; Minagawa, Jun; Page, M. Dudley; Pan, Junmin; Pootakham, Wirulda; Roje, Sanja; Rose, Annkatrin; Stahlberg, Eric; Terauchi, Aimee M.; Yang, Pinfen; Ball, Steven; Bowler, Chris; Dieckmann, Carol L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Green, Pamela; Jorgensen, Richard; Mayfield, Stephen; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Rajamani, Sathish; Sayre, Richard T.; Brokstein, Peter; Dubchak, Inna; Goodstein, David; Hornick, Leila; Huang, Y. Wayne; Jhaveri, Jinal; Luo, Yigong; Martínez, Diego; Ngau, Wing Chi Abby; Otillar, Bobby; Poliakov, Alexander; Porter, Aaron; Szajkowski, Lukasz; Werner, Gregory; Zhou, Kemin; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the ?120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella. PMID:17932292

  11. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2007-04-09

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the 120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella.

  12. Modelling NifH2 protein of Clostridium pasteurianum reveals clues about its physiological function.

    PubMed

    Kasap, Murat

    2006-11-01

    Clostridium pasteurianum is an anaerobic free-living nitrogen fixer. As a unique feature, the organism contains five extra nifH-like genes in addition to nifH1. Detailed analysis with respect to the structure and function of the nifH-like gene products is missing due to the lack of information about the presence of their translation products in the cell. Recent work indicates that the nifH2 gene is transcribed and translated into a polypeptide of expected size in nitrogen-fixing cells of C. pasteurianum and is regulated both at the transcriptional and translational levels. However, the current data do not reveal the physiological function of the NifH2 protein. In this study, we have used computer tools and the NifH1 of C. pasteurianum as the template to predict a possible tertiary structure and assign a putative function for NifH2 protein. A comparison of the structures of the NifH1 and modelled NifH2 revealed similarities in the polypeptide conformations for both monomers. Analysis of the properties of nucleotide binding, dimer interacting and cluster containing regions did not reveal major differences between NifH1 and modelled NifH2, although minor differences were observed. Rigid docking results revealed the possibility of formation of a NifH1-NifH2 heterodimer as well as formation of a NifH2 homodimer. We, therefore, propose that NifH2 can form a dimer with NifH1, albeit less efficiently and may function as a regulatory Fe-protein. PMID:16495101

  13. Structural Insights into the Assembly and Function of the SAGA Deubiquitinating Module

    SciTech Connect

    Samara, Nadine L.; Datta, Ajit B.; Berndsen, Christopher E.; Zhang, Xiangbin; Yao, Tingting; Cohen, Robert E.; Wolberger, Cynthia (CSU); (JHU-MED)

    2010-08-18

    SAGA is a transcriptional coactivator complex that is conserved across eukaryotes and performs multiple functions during transcriptional activation and elongation. One role is deubiquitination of histone H2B, and this activity resides in a distinct subcomplex called the deubiquitinating module (DUBm), which contains the ubiquitin-specific protease Ubp8, bound to Sgf11, Sus1, and Sgf73. The deubiquitinating activity depends on the presence of all four DUBm proteins. We report here the 1.90 angstrom resolution crystal structure of the DUBm bound to ubiquitin aldehyde, as well as the 2.45 angstrom resolution structure of the uncomplexed DUBm. The structure reveals an arrangement of protein domains that gives rise to a highly interconnected complex, which is stabilized by eight structural zinc atoms that are critical for enzymatic activity. The structure suggests a model for how interactions with the other DUBm proteins activate Ubp8 and allows us to speculate about how the DUBm binds to monoubiquitinated histone H2B in nucleosomes.

  14. Cardiac effects of 3-iodothyronamine: a new aminergic system modulating cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Chiellini, Grazia; Frascarelli, Sabina; Ghelardoni, Sandra; Carnicelli, Vittoria; Tobias, Sandra C; DeBarber, Andrea; Brogioni, Simona; Ronca-Testoni, Simonetta; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Grandy, David K; Scanlan, Thomas S; Zucchi, Riccardo

    2007-05-01

    3-Iodothyronamine T1AM is a novel endogenous thyroid hormone derivative that activates the G protein-coupled receptor known as trace anime-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). In the isolated working rat heart and in rat cardiomyocytes, T1AM produced a reversible, dose-dependent negative inotropic effect (e.g., 27+/-5, 51+/-3, and 65+/-2% decrease in cardiac output at 19, 25, and 38 microM concentration, respectively). An independent negative chronotropic effect was also observed. The hemodynamic effects of T1AM were remarkably increased in the presence of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, whereas they were attenuated in the presence of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate. No effect was produced by inhibitors of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, calcium-calmodulin kinase II, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, or MAP kinases. Tissue cAMP levels were unchanged. In rat ventricular tissue, Western blot experiments with antiphosphotyrosine antibodies showed reduced phosphorylation of microsomal and cytosolic proteins after perfusion with synthetic T1AM; reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction experiments revealed the presence of transcripts for at least 5 TAAR subtypes; specific and saturable binding of [125I]T1AM was observed, with a dissociation constant in the low micromolar range (5 microM); and endogenous T1AM was detectable by tandem mass spectrometry. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence for the existence of a novel aminergic system modulating cardiac function. PMID:17284482

  15. Functional Biogeography of Ocean Microbes Revealed through Non-Negative Matrix Factorization

    PubMed Central

    Neches, Russell Y.; Elliot, Marie; Levin, Simon A.; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Weitz, Joshua S.; Dushoff, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The direct “metagenomic” sequencing of genomic material from complex assemblages of bacteria, archaea, viruses and microeukaryotes has yielded new insights into the structure of microbial communities. For example, analysis of metagenomic data has revealed the existence of previously unknown microbial taxa whose spatial distributions are limited by environmental conditions, ecological competition, and dispersal mechanisms. However, differences in genotypes that might lead biologists to designate two microbes as taxonomically distinct need not necessarily imply differences in ecological function. Hence, there is a growing need for large-scale analysis of the distribution of microbial function across habitats. Here, we present a framework for investigating the biogeography of microbial function by analyzing the distribution of protein families inferred from environmental sequence data across a global collection of sites. We map over 6,000,000 protein sequences from unassembled reads from the Global Ocean Survey dataset to protein families, generating a protein family relative abundance matrix that describes the distribution of each protein family across sites. We then use non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) to approximate these protein family profiles as linear combinations of a small number of ecological components. Each component has a characteristic functional profile and site profile. Our approach identifies common functional signatures within several of the components. We use our method as a filter to estimate functional distance between sites, and find that an NMF-filtered measure of functional distance is more strongly correlated with environmental distance than a comparable PCA-filtered measure. We also find that functional distance is more strongly correlated with environmental distance than with geographic distance, in agreement with prior studies. We identify similar protein functions in several components and suggest that functional co-occurrence across metagenomic samples could lead to future methods for de-novo functional prediction. We conclude by discussing how NMF, and other dimension reduction methods, can help enable a macroscopic functional description of marine ecosystems. PMID:23049741

  16. PROTEINSStructure, Function, and Genetics 26:217-235 (1996) Structural Aspects of the Functional Modules in

    E-print Network

    Srinivasan, N.

    1996-01-01

    resonance and crystal struc- tures of such modules in other PKC isoforms while the calcium phospholipid binding regions in zinc-binding modules and the calcium binding region in the C2 domain are similar.'l The structure consists of two small p-sheets with a C-terminal he- lix. Phorbol 13-acetate binds in a gap formed

  17. Functional modules, mutational load and human genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, Norann A; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2010-04-01

    The ability to generate a massive amount of sequencing and genotyping data is transforming the study of human genetic disorders. Driven by such innovation, it is likely that whole exome and whole-genome resequencing will replace regionally focused approaches for gene discovery and clinical testing in the next few years. However, this opportunity brings a significant interpretative challenge to assigning function and phenotypic variance to common and rare alleles. Understanding the effect of individual mutations in the context of the remaining genomic variation represents a major challenge to our interpretation of disease. Here, we discuss the challenges of assigning mutation functionality and, drawing from the examples of ciliopathies as well as cohesinopathies and channelopathies, discuss possibilities for the functional modularization of the human genome. Functional modularization in addition to the development of physiologically relevant assays to test allele functionality will accelerate our understanding of disease architecture and enable the use of genome-wide sequence data for disease diagnosis and phenotypic prediction in individuals. PMID:20226561

  18. Modulation of synaptic function through the ?-neurexin–specific ligand neurexophilin-1

    PubMed Central

    Born, Gesche; Breuer, Dorothee; Wang, Shaopeng; Rohlmann, Astrid; Coulon, Philippe; Vakili, Puja; Reissner, Carsten; Kiefer, Friedemann; Heine, Martin; Pape, Hans-Christian; Missler, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Neurotransmission at different synapses is highly variable, and cell-adhesion molecules like ?-neurexins (?-Nrxn) and their extracellular binding partners determine synapse function. Although ?-Nrxn affect transmission at excitatory and inhibitory synapses, the contribution of neurexophilin-1 (Nxph1), an ?-Nrxn ligand with restricted expression in subpopulations of inhibitory neurons, is unclear. To reveal its role, we investigated mice that either lack or overexpress Nxph1. We found that genetic deletion of Nxph1 impaired GABAB receptor (GABABR)-dependent short-term depression of inhibitory synapses in the nucleus reticularis thalami, a region where Nxph1 is normally expressed at high levels. To test the conclusion that Nxph1 supports presynaptic GABABR, we expressed Nxph1 ectopically at excitatory terminals in the neocortex, which normally do not contain this molecule but can be modulated by GABABR. We generated Nxph1-GFP transgenic mice under control of the Thy1.2 promoter and observed a reduced short-term facilitation at these excitatory synapses, representing an inverse phenotype to the knockout. Consistently, the diminished facilitation could be reversed by pharmacologically blocking GABABR with CGP-55845. Moreover, a complete rescue was achieved by additional blocking of postsynaptic GABAAR with intracellular picrotoxin or gabazine, suggesting that Nxph1 is able to recruit or stabilize both presynaptic GABABR and postsynaptic GABAAR. In support, immunoelectron microscopy validated the localization of ectopic Nxph1 at the synaptic cleft of excitatory synapses in transgenic mice and revealed an enrichment of GABAAR and GABABR subunits compared with wild-type animals. Thus, our data propose that Nxph1 plays an instructive role in synaptic short-term plasticity and the configuration with GABA receptors. PMID:24639499

  19. IL-28A (IFN-?2) modulates lung DC function to promote Th1 immune skewing and suppress allergic airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Koltsida, Ourania; Hausding, Michael; Stavropoulos, Athanasios; Koch, Sonja; Tzelepis, George; Übel, Caroline; Kotenko, Sergei V; Sideras, Paschalis; Lehr, Hans A; Tepe, Marcus; Klucher, Kevin M; Doyle, Sean E; Neurath, Markus F; Finotto, Susetta; Andreakos, Evangelos

    2011-01-01

    IL-28 (IFN-?) cytokines exhibit potent antiviral and antitumor function but their full spectrum of activities remains largely unknown. Recently, IL-28 cytokine family members were found to be profoundly down-regulated in allergic asthma. We now reveal a novel role of IL-28 cytokines in inducing type 1 immunity and protection from allergic airway disease. Treatment of wild-type mice with recombinant or adenovirally expressed IL-28A ameliorated allergic airway disease, suppressed Th2 and Th17 responses and induced IFN-?. Moreover, abrogation of endogenous IL-28 cytokine function in IL-28R??/? mice exacerbated allergic airway inflammation by augmenting Th2 and Th17 responses, and IgE levels. Central to IL-28A immunoregulatory activity was its capacity to modulate lung CD11c+ dendritic cell (DC) function to down-regulate OX40L, up-regulate IL-12p70 and promote Th1 differentiation. Consistently, IL-28A-mediated protection was absent in IFN-??/? mice or after IL-12 neutralization and could be adoptively transferred by IL-28A-treated CD11c+ cells. These data demonstrate a critical role of IL-28 cytokines in controlling T cell responses in vivo through the modulation of lung CD11c+ DC function in experimental allergic asthma. PMID:21538995

  20. Complex Interplay between the P-Glycoprotein Multidrug Efflux Pump and the Membrane: Its Role in Modulating Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Sharom, Frances Jane

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in cancer is linked to expression of the P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter (Pgp, ABCB1), which exports many structurally diverse compounds from cells. Substrates first partition into the bilayer and then interact with a large flexible binding pocket within the transporter’s transmembrane regions. Pgp has been described as a hydrophobic vacuum cleaner or an outwardly directed drug/lipid flippase. Recent X-ray crystal structures have shed some light on the nature of the drug-binding pocket and suggested routes by which substrates can enter it from the membrane. Detergents have profound effects on Pgp function, and several appear to be substrates. Biochemical and biophysical studies in vitro, some using purified reconstituted protein, have explored the effects of the membrane environment. They have demonstrated that Pgp is involved in a complex relationship with its lipid environment, which modulates the behavior of its substrates, as well as various functions of the protein, including ATP hydrolysis, drug binding, and drug transport. Membrane lipid composition and fluidity, phospholipid headgroup and acyl chain length all influence Pgp function. Recent studies focusing on thermodynamics and kinetics have revealed some important principles governing Pgp–lipid and substrate–lipid interactions, and how these affect drug-binding and transport. In some cells, Pgp is associated with cholesterol-rich microdomains, which may modulate its functions. The relationship between Pgp and cholesterol remains an open question; however, it clearly affects several aspects of its function in addition to substrate–membrane partitioning. The action of Pgp modulators appears to depend on their membrane permeability, and membrane fluidizers and surfactants reverse drug resistance, likely via an indirect mechanism. A detailed understanding of how the membrane affects Pgp substrates and Pgp’s catalytic cycle may lead to new strategies to combat clinical drug resistance. PMID:24624364

  1. RNAs - physical and functional modulators of chromatin reader proteins.

    PubMed

    Hiragami-Hamada, Kyoko; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2014-08-01

    The regulatory role of histone modifications with respect to the structure and function of chromatin is well known. Proteins and protein complexes establishing, erasing and binding these marks have been extensively studied. RNAs have only recently entered the picture of epigenetic regulation with the discovery of a vast number of long non-coding RNAs. Fast growing evidence suggests that such RNAs influence all aspects of histone modification biology. Here, we focus exclusively on the emerging functional interplay between RNAs and proteins that bind histone modifications. We discuss recent findings of reciprocally positive and negative regulations as well as summarize the current insights into the molecular mechanism directing these interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Molecular mechanisms of histone modification function. PMID:24704208

  2. Individual preferences modulate incentive values: Evidence from functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Koeneke, Susan; Pedroni, Andreas F; Dieckmann, Anja; Bosch, Volker; Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Background In most studies on human reward processing, reward intensity has been manipulated on an objective scale (e.g., varying monetary value). Everyday experience, however, teaches us that objectively equivalent rewards may differ substantially in their subjective incentive values. One factor influencing incentive value in humans is branding. The current study explores the hypothesis that individual brand preferences modulate activity in reward areas similarly to objectively measurable differences in reward intensity. Methods A wheel-of-fortune game comprising an anticipation phase and a subsequent outcome evaluation phase was implemented. Inside a 3 Tesla MRI scanner, 19 participants played for chocolate bars of three different brands that differed in subjective attractiveness. Results Parametrical analysis of the obtained fMRI data demonstrated that the level of activity in anatomically distinct neural networks was linearly associated with the subjective preference hierarchy of the brands played for. During the anticipation phases, preference-dependent neural activity has been registered in premotor areas, insular cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and in the midbrain. During the outcome phases, neural activity in the caudate nucleus, precuneus, lingual gyrus, cerebellum, and in the pallidum was influenced by individual preference. Conclusion Our results suggest a graded effect of differently preferred brands onto the incentive value of objectively equivalent rewards. Regarding the anticipation phase, the results reflect an intensified state of wanting that facilitates action preparation when the participants play for their favorite brand. This mechanism may underlie approach behavior in real-life choice situations. PMID:19032746

  3. Serotonin modulates muscle function in the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana

    PubMed Central

    Gerry, Shannon P.; Ellerby, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The body wall muscles of sanguivorous leeches power mechanically diverse behaviours: suction feeding, crawling and swimming. These require longitudinal muscle to exert force over an extremely large length range, from 145 to 46 per cent of the mean segmental swimming length. Previous data, however, suggest that leech body wall muscle has limited capacity for force production when elongated. Serotonin (5-HT) alters the passive properties of the body wall and stimulates feeding. We hypothesized that 5-HT may also have a role in allowing force production in elongated muscle by changing the shape of the length–tension relationship (LTR). LTRs were measured from longitudinal muscle strips in vitro in physiological saline with and without the presence of 10 µM 5-HT. The LTR was much broader than previously measured for leech muscle. Rather than shifting the LTR, 5-HT reduced passive muscle tonus and increased active stress at all lengths. In addition to modulating leech behaviour and passive mechanical properties, 5-HT probably enhances muscle force and work production during locomotion and feeding. PMID:21561963

  4. Functional traits reveal processes driving natural afforestation at large spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Mason, Norman W H; Wiser, Susan K; Richardson, Sarah J; Thorsen, Michael J; Holdaway, Robert J; Dray, Stéphane; Thomson, Fiona J; Carswell, Fiona E

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the processes governing natural afforestation over large spatial scales is vital for enhancing forest carbon sequestration. Models of tree species occurrence probability in non-forest vegetation could potentially identify the primary variables determining natural afforestation. However, inferring processes governing afforestation using tree species occurrence is potentially problematic, since it is impossible to know whether observed occurrences are due to recruitment or persistence of existing trees following disturbance. Plant functional traits have the potential to reveal the processes by which key environmental and land cover variables influence afforestation. We used 10,061 survey plots to identify the primary environmental and land cover variables influencing tree occurrence probability in non-forest vegetation in New Zealand. We also examined how these variables influenced diversity of functional traits linked to plant ecological strategy and dispersal ability. Mean annual temperature was the most important environmental predictor of tree occurrence. Local woody cover and distance to forest were the most important land cover variables. Relationships between these variables and ecological strategy traits revealed a trade-off between ability to compete for light and colonize sites that were marginal for tree occurrence. Biotically dispersed species occurred less frequently with declining temperature and local woody cover, suggesting that abiotic stress limited their establishment and that biotic dispersal did not increase ability to colonize non-woody vegetation. Functional diversity for ecological strategy traits declined with declining temperature and woody cover and increasing distance to forest. Functional diversity for dispersal traits showed the opposite trend. This suggests that low temperatures and woody cover and high distance to forest may limit tree species establishment through filtering on ecological strategy traits, but not on dispersal traits. This study shows that 'snapshot' survey plot data, combined with functional trait data, may reveal the processes driving tree species establishment in non-forest vegetation over large spatial scales. PMID:24058664

  5. Functional Traits Reveal Processes Driving Natural Afforestation at Large Spatial Scales

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Norman W. H.; Wiser, Susan K.; Richardson, Sarah J.; Thorsen, Michael J.; Holdaway, Robert J.; Dray, Stéphane; Thomson, Fiona J.; Carswell, Fiona E.

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the processes governing natural afforestation over large spatial scales is vital for enhancing forest carbon sequestration. Models of tree species occurrence probability in non-forest vegetation could potentially identify the primary variables determining natural afforestation. However, inferring processes governing afforestation using tree species occurrence is potentially problematic, since it is impossible to know whether observed occurrences are due to recruitment or persistence of existing trees following disturbance. Plant functional traits have the potential to reveal the processes by which key environmental and land cover variables influence afforestation. We used 10,061 survey plots to identify the primary environmental and land cover variables influencing tree occurrence probability in non-forest vegetation in New Zealand. We also examined how these variables influenced diversity of functional traits linked to plant ecological strategy and dispersal ability. Mean annual temperature was the most important environmental predictor of tree occurrence. Local woody cover and distance to forest were the most important land cover variables. Relationships between these variables and ecological strategy traits revealed a trade-off between ability to compete for light and colonize sites that were marginal for tree occurrence. Biotically dispersed species occurred less frequently with declining temperature and local woody cover, suggesting that abiotic stress limited their establishment and that biotic dispersal did not increase ability to colonize non-woody vegetation. Functional diversity for ecological strategy traits declined with declining temperature and woody cover and increasing distance to forest. Functional diversity for dispersal traits showed the opposite trend. This suggests that low temperatures and woody cover and high distance to forest may limit tree species establishment through filtering on ecological strategy traits, but not on dispersal traits. This study shows that ‘snapshot’ survey plot data, combined with functional trait data, may reveal the processes driving tree species establishment in non-forest vegetation over large spatial scales. PMID:24058664

  6. Mesocortical dopamine modulation of executive functions: beyond working memory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stan B. Floresco; Orsolya Magyar

    2006-01-01

    Rationale  Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is known to play an essential role in mediating executive functions such as the working memory. DA exerts these effects by acting on D1 receptors because blockade or stimulation of these receptors in the PFC can impair performance on delayed response tasks. However, comparatively less is known about dopaminergic mechanisms that mediate

  7. Inflammation modulates human HDL composition and function in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation may directly impair HDL functions, in particular reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), but limited data support this concept in humans. Our study was designed to investigate this relationship. We employed low-dose human endotoxemia to assess the effects of inflammation on HDL and RCT-rel...

  8. Dynamic changes in network synchrony reveal resting-state functional networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuksanovi?, Vesna; Hövel, Philipp

    2015-02-01

    Experimental functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown that spontaneous brain activity, i.e., in the absence of any external input, exhibit complex spatial and temporal patterns of co-activity between segregated brain regions. These so-called large-scale resting-state functional connectivity networks represent dynamically organized neural assemblies interacting with each other in a complex way. It has been suggested that looking at the dynamical properties of complex patterns of brain functional co-activity may reveal neural mechanisms underlying the dynamic changes in functional interactions. Here, we examine how global network dynamics is shaped by different network configurations, derived from realistic brain functional interactions. We focus on two main dynamics measures: synchrony and variations in synchrony. Neural activity and the inferred hemodynamic response of the network nodes are simulated using a system of 90 FitzHugh-Nagumo neural models subject to system noise and time-delayed interactions. These models are embedded into the topology of the complex brain functional interactions, whose architecture is additionally reduced to its main structural pathways. In the simulated functional networks, patterns of correlated regional activity clearly arise from dynamical properties that maximize synchrony and variations in synchrony. Our results on the fast changes of the level of the network synchrony also show how flexible changes in the large-scale network dynamics could be.

  9. Dynamic changes in network synchrony reveal resting-state functional networks.

    PubMed

    Vuksanovi?, Vesna; Hövel, Philipp

    2015-02-01

    Experimental functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown that spontaneous brain activity, i.e., in the absence of any external input, exhibit complex spatial and temporal patterns of co-activity between segregated brain regions. These so-called large-scale resting-state functional connectivity networks represent dynamically organized neural assemblies interacting with each other in a complex way. It has been suggested that looking at the dynamical properties of complex patterns of brain functional co-activity may reveal neural mechanisms underlying the dynamic changes in functional interactions. Here, we examine how global network dynamics is shaped by different network configurations, derived from realistic brain functional interactions. We focus on two main dynamics measures: synchrony and variations in synchrony. Neural activity and the inferred hemodynamic response of the network nodes are simulated using a system of 90 FitzHugh-Nagumo neural models subject to system noise and time-delayed interactions. These models are embedded into the topology of the complex brain functional interactions, whose architecture is additionally reduced to its main structural pathways. In the simulated functional networks, patterns of correlated regional activity clearly arise from dynamical properties that maximize synchrony and variations in synchrony. Our results on the fast changes of the level of the network synchrony also show how flexible changes in the large-scale network dynamics could be. PMID:25725652

  10. Revealing molecular mechanisms by integrating high-dimensional functional screens with protein interaction data.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Angela; Marsico, Giovanni; Collinet, Claudio; Galvez, Thierry; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Zerial, Marino; Beyer, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Functional genomics screens using multi-parametric assays are powerful approaches for identifying genes involved in particular cellular processes. However, they suffer from problems like noise, and often provide little insight into molecular mechanisms. A bottleneck for addressing these issues is the lack of computational methods for the systematic integration of multi-parametric phenotypic datasets with molecular interactions. Here, we present Integrative Multi Profile Analysis of Cellular Traits (IMPACT). The main goal of IMPACT is to identify the most consistent phenotypic profile among interacting genes. This approach utilizes two types of external information: sets of related genes (IMPACT-sets) and network information (IMPACT-modules). Based on the notion that interacting genes are more likely to be involved in similar functions than non-interacting genes, this data is used as a prior to inform the filtering of phenotypic profiles that are similar among interacting genes. IMPACT-sets selects the most frequent profile among a set of related genes. IMPACT-modules identifies sub-networks containing genes with similar phenotype profiles. The statistical significance of these selections is subsequently quantified via permutations of the data. IMPACT (1) handles multiple profiles per gene, (2) rescues genes with weak phenotypes and (3) accounts for multiple biases e.g. caused by the network topology. Application to a genome-wide RNAi screen on endocytosis showed that IMPACT improved the recovery of known endocytosis-related genes, decreased off-target effects, and detected consistent phenotypes. Those findings were confirmed by rescreening 468 genes. Additionally we validated an unexpected influence of the IGF-receptor on EGF-endocytosis. IMPACT facilitates the selection of high-quality phenotypic profiles using different types of independent information, thereby supporting the molecular interpretation of functional screens. PMID:25188415

  11. Revealing Molecular Mechanisms by Integrating High-Dimensional Functional Screens with Protein Interaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Collinet, Claudio; Galvez, Thierry; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Zerial, Marino; Beyer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Functional genomics screens using multi-parametric assays are powerful approaches for identifying genes involved in particular cellular processes. However, they suffer from problems like noise, and often provide little insight into molecular mechanisms. A bottleneck for addressing these issues is the lack of computational methods for the systematic integration of multi-parametric phenotypic datasets with molecular interactions. Here, we present Integrative Multi Profile Analysis of Cellular Traits (IMPACT). The main goal of IMPACT is to identify the most consistent phenotypic profile among interacting genes. This approach utilizes two types of external information: sets of related genes (IMPACT-sets) and network information (IMPACT-modules). Based on the notion that interacting genes are more likely to be involved in similar functions than non-interacting genes, this data is used as a prior to inform the filtering of phenotypic profiles that are similar among interacting genes. IMPACT-sets selects the most frequent profile among a set of related genes. IMPACT-modules identifies sub-networks containing genes with similar phenotype profiles. The statistical significance of these selections is subsequently quantified via permutations of the data. IMPACT (1) handles multiple profiles per gene, (2) rescues genes with weak phenotypes and (3) accounts for multiple biases e.g. caused by the network topology. Application to a genome-wide RNAi screen on endocytosis showed that IMPACT improved the recovery of known endocytosis-related genes, decreased off-target effects, and detected consistent phenotypes. Those findings were confirmed by rescreening 468 genes. Additionally we validated an unexpected influence of the IGF-receptor on EGF-endocytosis. IMPACT facilitates the selection of high-quality phenotypic profiles using different types of independent information, thereby supporting the molecular interpretation of functional screens. PMID:25188415

  12. Revealing molecular-level surface structure of amyloid fibrils in liquid by means of frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Mostaert, Anika S.; Serpell, Louise C.; Jarvis, Suzanne P.

    2008-09-01

    We have investigated the surface structure of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) fibrils and ?-synuclein protofibrils in liquid by means of frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM). Ångström-resolution FM-AFM imaging of isolated macromolecules in liquid is demonstrated for the first time. Individual ?-strands aligned perpendicular to the fibril axis with a spacing of 0.5 nm are resolved in FM-AFM images, which confirms cross-? structure of IAPP fibrils in real space. FM-AFM images also reveal the existence of 4 nm periodic domains along the axis of IAPP fibrils. Stripe features with 0.5 nm spacing are also found in images of ?-synuclein protofibrils. However, in contrast to the case for IAPP fibrils, the stripes are oriented 30° from the axis, suggesting the possibility of ?-strand alignment in protofibrils different from that in mature fibrils or the regular arrangement of thioflavin T molecules present during the fibril preparation aligned at the surface of the protofibrils.

  13. Identification of Functional Modules by Integration of Multiple Data Sources Using a Bayesian Network Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinlian; Zuo, Yiming; Liu, Lun; Man, Yangao; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Ressom, Habtom W

    2014-01-01

    Background Prediction of functional modules is indispensable for detecting protein deregulation in human complex diseases such as cancer. Bayesian network (BN) is one of the most commonly used models to integrate heterogeneous data from multiple sources such as protein domain, interactome, functional annotation, genome-wide gene expression, and the literature. Methods and Results In this paper, we present a BN classifier that is customized to: 1) increase the ability to integrate diverse information from different sources, 2) effectively predict protein-protein interactions, 3) infer aberrant networks with scale-free and small world properties, and 4) group molecules into functional modules or pathways based on the primary function and biological features. Application of this model on discovering protein biomarkers of hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) leads to the identification of functional modules that provide insights into the mechanism of the development and progression of HCC. These functional modules include cell cycle deregulation, increased angiogenesis (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor, blood vessel morphogenesis), oxidative metabolic alterations, and aberrant activation of signaling pathways involved in cellular proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Conclusion The discoveries and conclusions derived from our customized BN classifier are consistent with previously published results. The proposed approach for determining BN structure facilitates the integration of heterogeneous data from multiple sources to elucidate the mechanisms of complex diseases. PMID:24736851

  14. Core Microbial Functional Activities in Ocean Environments Revealed by Global Metagenomic Profiling Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ari J. S.; Siam, Rania; Setubal, João C.; Moustafa, Ahmed; Sayed, Ahmed; Chambergo, Felipe S.; Dawe, Adam S.; Ghazy, Mohamed A.; Sharaf, Hazem; Ouf, Amged; Alam, Intikhab; Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.; Lehvaslaiho, Heikki; Ramadan, Eman; Antunes, André; Stingl, Ulrich; Archer, John A. C.; Jankovic, Boris R.; Sogin, Mitchell; Bajic, Vladimir B.; El-Dorry, Hamza

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics-based functional profiling analysis is an effective means of gaining deeper insight into the composition of marine microbial populations and developing a better understanding of the interplay between the functional genome content of microbial communities and abiotic factors. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of 24 datasets covering surface and depth-related environments at 11 sites around the world's oceans. The complete datasets comprises approximately 12 million sequences, totaling 5,358 Mb. Based on profiling patterns of Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) of proteins, a core set of reference photic and aphotic depth-related COGs, and a collection of COGs that are associated with extreme oxygen limitation were defined. Their inferred functions were utilized as indicators to characterize the distribution of light- and oxygen-related biological activities in marine environments. The results reveal that, while light level in the water column is a major determinant of phenotypic adaptation in marine microorganisms, oxygen concentration in the aphotic zone has a significant impact only in extremely hypoxic waters. Phylogenetic profiling of the reference photic/aphotic gene sets revealed a greater variety of source organisms in the aphotic zone, although the majority of individual photic and aphotic depth-related COGs are assigned to the same taxa across the different sites. This increase in phylogenetic and functional diversity of the core aphotic related COGs most probably reflects selection for the utilization of a broad range of alternate energy sources in the absence of light. PMID:24921648

  15. Meta-analytic connectivity modeling reveals differential functional connectivity of the medial and lateral orbitofrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Zald, David H; McHugo, Maureen; Ray, Kimberly L; Glahn, David C; Eickhoff, Simon B; Laird, Angela R

    2014-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is implicated in a broad range of behaviors and neuropsychiatric disorders. Anatomical tracing studies in nonhuman primates reveal differences in connectivity across subregions of the OFC, but data on the connectivity of the human OFC remain limited. We applied meta-analytic connectivity modeling in order to examine which brain regions are most frequently coactivated with the medial and lateral portions of the OFC in published functional neuroimaging studies. The analysis revealed a clear divergence in the pattern of connectivity for the medial OFC (mOFC) and lateral OFC (lOFC) regions. The lOFC showed coactivations with a network of prefrontal regions and areas involved in cognitive functions including language and memory. In contrast, the mOFC showed connectivity with default mode, autonomic, and limbic regions. Convergent patterns of coactivations were observed in the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and thalamus. A small number of regions showed connectivity specific to the anterior or posterior sectors of the OFC. Task domains involving memory, semantic processing, face processing, and reward were additionally analyzed in order to identify the different patterns of OFC functional connectivity associated with specific cognitive and affective processes. These data provide a framework for understanding the human OFC's position within widespread functional networks. PMID:23042731

  16. Meta-Analytic Connectivity Modeling Reveals Differential Functional Connectivity of the Medial and Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zald, David H.; McHugo, Maureen; Ray, Kimberly L.; Glahn, David C.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Laird, Angela R.

    2014-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is implicated in a broad range of behaviors and neuropsychiatric disorders. Anatomical tracing studies in nonhuman primates reveal differences in connectivity across subregions of the OFC, but data on the connectivity of the human OFC remain limited. We applied meta-analytic connectivity modeling in order to examine which brain regions are most frequently coactivated with the medial and lateral portions of the OFC in published functional neuroimaging studies. The analysis revealed a clear divergence in the pattern of connectivity for the medial OFC (mOFC) and lateral OFC (lOFC) regions. The lOFC showed coactivations with a network of prefrontal regions and areas involved in cognitive functions including language and memory. In contrast, the mOFC showed connectivity with default mode, autonomic, and limbic regions. Convergent patterns of coactivations were observed in the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and thalamus. A small number of regions showed connectivity specific to the anterior or posterior sectors of the OFC. Task domains involving memory, semantic processing, face processing, and reward were additionally analyzed in order to identify the different patterns of OFC functional connectivity associated with specific cognitive and affective processes. These data provide a framework for understanding the human OFC's position within widespread functional networks. PMID:23042731

  17. Campylobacter infection in chickens modulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Molnár, Andor; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Ghareeb, Khaled; Khayal, Basel; Hess, Claudia; Liebhart, Dieter; Dublecz, Károly; Hess, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Asymptomatic carriage of Campylobacter jejuni is highly prevalent in chicken flocks. Thus, we investigated whether chronic Campylobacter carriage affects chicken intestinal functions despite the absence of clinical symptoms. An experiment was carried out in which commercial chickens were orally infected with C. jejuni (1 × 10(8) CFU/bird) at 14 days of life. Changes in ion transport and barrier function were assessed by short-circuit current (I(sc)) and transepithelial ion conductance (G(t)) in Ussing chambers. G(t) increased in cecum and colon of Campylobacter-infected chicken 7 d post-infection (DPI), whereas G t initially decreased in the jejunum at 7 DPI and increased thereafter at 14 DPI. The net charge transfer across the epithelium was reduced or tended to be reduced in all segments, as evidenced by a decreased I sc. Furthermore, the infection induced intestinal histomorphological changes, most prominently including a decrease in villus height, crypt depth and villus surface area in the jejunum at 7 DPI. Furthermore, body mass gain was decreased by Campylobacter carriage. This study demonstrates, for the first time, changes in the intestinal barrier function in Campylobacter-infected chickens and these changes were associated with a decrease in growth performance in otherwise healthy-appearing birds. PMID:24553586

  18. “Spatial Mapping of the Neurite and Soma Proteomes Reveals a Functional Cdc42/Rac Regulatory Network”

    SciTech Connect

    Pertz, Olivier C.; Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Wang, Wei; gay, laurie J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Anderson, David J.; Liu, Tao; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2008-02-12

    Neurite extension and growth cone navigation are guided by extracellular cues that control cytoskeletal rearrangements. However, understanding the complex signaling mechanisms that mediate neuritogenesis has been limited by the inability to biochemically separate the neurite and soma for spatial proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Here, we apply global proteome profiling in combination with a novel neurite purification methodology for comparative analysis of the soma and neurite proteomes of neuroblastoma cells. The spatial relationship of 4855 proteins were mapped revealing networks of signaling proteins that control integrins, the actin cytoskeleton, and axonal guidance in the extending neurite. Bioinformatics and functional analyses revealed a spatially compartmentalized Rac/Cdc42 signaling network that operates in conjunction with multiple GEFs and GAPs to control neurite formation. Interestingly, RNA interference experiments revealed that the different GEFs and GAPs regulate specialized functions during neurite formation including neurite growth and retraction kinetics, cytoskeletal organization, and cell polarity. Our findings provide insight into the spatial organization of signaling networks that enable neuritogenesis and provide a comprehensive system-wide profile of proteins that mediate this process including those that control Rac and Cdc42 signaling.

  19. Structure of the SthK Carboxy-Terminal Region Reveals a Gating Mechanism for Cyclic Nucleotide-Modulated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Kesters, Divya; Brams, Marijke; Nys, Mieke; Wijckmans, Eveline; Spurny, Radovan; Voets, Thomas; Tytgat, Jan; Kusch, Jana; Ulens, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-sensitive ion channels are molecular pores that open in response to cAMP or cGMP, which are universal second messengers. Binding of a cyclic nucleotide to the carboxyterminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) of these channels is thought to cause a conformational change that promotes channel opening. The C-linker domain, which connects the channel pore to this CNBD, plays an important role in coupling ligand binding to channel opening. Current structural insight into this mechanism mainly derives from X-ray crystal structures of the C-linker/CNBD from hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN) channels. However, these structures reveal little to no conformational changes upon comparison of the ligand-bound and unbound form. In this study, we take advantage of a recently identified prokaryote ion channel, SthK, which has functional properties that strongly resemble cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels and is activated by cAMP, but not by cGMP. We determined X-ray crystal structures of the C-linker/CNBD of SthK in the presence of cAMP or cGMP. We observe that the structure in complex with cGMP, which is an antagonist, is similar to previously determined HCN channel structures. In contrast, the structure in complex with cAMP, which is an agonist, is in a more open conformation. We observe that the CNBD makes an outward swinging movement, which is accompanied by an opening of the C-linker. This conformation mirrors the open gate structures of the Kv1.2 channel or MthK channel, which suggests that the cAMP-bound C-linker/CNBD from SthK represents an activated conformation. These results provide a structural framework for better understanding cyclic nucleotide modulation of ion channels, including HCN and CNG channels. PMID:25625648

  20. Cannabinoids and bone: endocannabinoids modulate human osteoclast function in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, LS; Ford, L; Ridge, SA; Cameron, GA; Rogers, MJ; Ross, RA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Both CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors have been shown to play a role in bone metabolism. Crucially, previous studies have focussed on the effects of cannabinoid ligands in murine bone cells. This study aimed to investigate the effects of cannabinoids on human bone cells in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine expression of cannabinoid receptors and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was used to determine the presence of endocannabinoids in human bone cells. The effect of cannabinoids on human osteoclast formation, polarization and resorption was determined by assessing the number of cells expressing ?v?3 or with F-actin rings, or measurement of resorption area. KEY RESULTS Human osteoclasts express both CB1 and CB2 receptors. CB2 expression was significantly higher in human monocytes compared to differentiated osteoclasts. Furthermore, the differentiation of human osteoclasts from monocytes was associated with a reduction in 2-AG levels and an increase in anandamide (AEA) levels. Treatment of osteoclasts with LPS significantly increased levels of AEA. Nanomolar concentrations of AEA and the synthetic agonists CP 55 940 and JWH015 stimulated human osteoclast polarization and resorption; these effects were attenuated in the presence of CB1 and/or CB2 antagonists. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Low concentrations of cannabinoids activate human osteoclasts in vitro. There is a dynamic regulation of the expression of the CB2 receptor and the production of the endocannabinoids during the differentiation of human bone cells. These data suggest that small molecules modulating the endocannabinoid system could be important therapeutics in human bone disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-8. To view Part I of Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-7 PMID:21649637

  1. Opposite Modulation of Brain Functional Networks Implicated at Low vs. High Demand of Attention and Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiansong; Calhoun, Vince D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies indicate that the brain organizes its activity into multiple functional networks (FNs) during either resting condition or task-performance. However, the functions of these FNs are not fully understood yet. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the operation of these FNs, spatial independent component analysis (sICA) was used to extract FNs from fMRI data acquired from healthy participants performing a visual task with two levels of attention and working memory load. The task-related modulations of extracted FNs were assessed. A group of FNs showed increased activity at low-load conditions and reduced activity at high-load conditions. These FNs together involve the left lateral frontoparietal cortex, insula, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. A second group of FNs showed increased activity at high-load conditions and reduced activity at low-load conditions. These FNs together involve the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye field, lateral frontoparietal cortex, insula, and dorsal anterior cingulate, bilaterally. Though the two groups of FNs showed opposite task-related modulations, they overlapped extensively at both the lateral and medial frontoparietal cortex and insula. Such an overlap of FNs would not likely be revealed using standard general-linear-model-based analyses. Conclusions By assessing task-related modulations, this study differentiated the functional roles of overlapping FNs. Several FNs including the left frontoparietal network are implicated in task conditions of low attentional load, while another set of FNs including the dorsal attentional network is implicated in task conditions involving high attentional demands. PMID:24498021

  2. Context-dependent function of a conserved translational regulatory module

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qinwen; Stumpf, Craig; Thomas, Cristel; Wickens, Marvin; Haag, Eric S.

    2012-01-01

    The modification of transcriptional regulation is a well-documented evolutionary mechanism in both plants and animals, but post-transcriptional controls have received less attention. The derived hermaphrodite of C. elegans has regulated spermatogenesis in an otherwise female body. The PUF family RNA-binding proteins FBF-1 and FBF-2 limit XX spermatogenesis by repressing the male-promoting proteins FEM-3 and GLD-1. Here, we examine the function of PUF homologs from other Caenorhabditis species, with emphasis on C. briggsae, which evolved selfing convergently. C. briggsae lacks a bona fide fbf-1/2 ortholog, but two members of the related PUF-2 subfamily, Cbr-puf-2 and Cbr-puf-1.2, do have a redundant germline sex determination role. Surprisingly, this is to promote, rather than limit, hermaphrodite spermatogenesis. We provide genetic, molecular and biochemical evidence that Cbr-puf-2 and Cbr-puf-1.2 repress Cbr-gld-1 by a conserved mechanism. However, Cbr-gld-1 acts to limit, rather than promote, XX spermatogenesis. As with gld-1, no sex determination function for fbf or puf-2 orthologs is observed in gonochoristic Caenorhabditis. These results indicate that PUF family genes were co-opted for sex determination in each hermaphrodite via their long-standing association with gld-1, and that their precise sex-determining roles depend on the species-specific context in which they act. Finally, we document non-redundant roles for Cbr-puf-2 in embryonic and early larval development, the latter role being essential. Thus, recently duplicated PUF paralogs have already acquired distinct functions. PMID:22399679

  3. Coherent Functional Modules Improve Transcription Factor Target Identification, Cooperativity Prediction, and Disease Association

    PubMed Central

    Karczewski, Konrad J.; Snyder, Michael; Altman, Russ B.; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are fundamental controllers of cellular regulation that function in a complex and combinatorial manner. Accurate identification of a transcription factor's targets is essential to understanding the role that factors play in disease biology. However, due to a high false positive rate, identifying coherent functional target sets is difficult. We have created an improved mapping of targets by integrating ChIP-Seq data with 423 functional modules derived from 9,395 human expression experiments. We identified 5,002 TF-module relationships, significantly improved TF target prediction, and found 30 high-confidence TF-TF associations, of which 14 are known. Importantly, we also connected TFs to diseases through these functional modules and identified 3,859 significant TF-disease relationships. As an example, we found a link between MEF2A and Crohn's disease, which we validated in an independent expression dataset. These results show the power of combining expression data and ChIP-Seq data to remove noise and better extract the associations between TFs, functional modules, and disease. PMID:24516403

  4. Phosphatidic acid modulation of Kv channel voltage sensor function

    PubMed Central

    Hite, Richard K; Butterwick, Joel A; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2014-01-01

    Membrane phospholipids can function as potent regulators of ion channel function. This study uncovers and investigates the effect of phosphatidic acid on Kv channel gating. Using the method of reconstitution into planar lipid bilayers, in which protein and lipid components are defined and controlled, we characterize two effects of phosphatidic acid. The first is a non-specific electrostatic influence on activation mediated by electric charge density on the extracellular and intracellular membrane surfaces. The second is specific to the presence of a primary phosphate group, acts only through the intracellular membrane leaflet and depends on the presence of a particular arginine residue in the voltage sensor. Intracellular phosphatidic acid accounts for a nearly 50 mV shift in the midpoint of the activation curve in a direction consistent with stabilization of the voltage sensor's closed conformation. These findings support a novel mechanism of voltage sensor regulation by the signaling lipid phosphatidic acid. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04366.001 PMID:25285449

  5. Modulation of mast cell and basophil functions by benzene metabolites.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, Massimo; Loffredo, Stefania; Granata, Francescopaolo; Staiano, Rosaria I; Marone, Gianni

    2011-11-01

    Benzene is a carcinogenic compound used in industrial manufacturing and a common environmental pollutant mostly derived from vehicle emissions and cigarette smoke. Benzene exposure is associated with a variety of clinical conditions ranging from hematologic diseases to chronic lung disorders. Beside its direct toxicity, benzene exerts multiple effects after being converted to reactive metabolites such as hydroquinone and benzoquinone. Mast cells and basophils are primary effector cells involved in the development of respiratory allergies such as rhinitis and bronchial asthma and they play an important role in innate immunity. Benzene and its metabolites can influence mast cell and basophil responses either directly or by interfering with other cells, such as T cells, macrophages and monocytes, which are functionally connected to mast cells and basophils. Hydroquinone and benzoquinone inhibit the release of preformed mediators, leukotriene synthesis and cytokine production in human basophils stimulated by IgE- and non IgE-mediated agonists. Furthermore, these metabolites reduce IgE-mediated degranulation of mast cells and the development of allergic lung inflammation in rats. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that benzene metabolites alter biochemical and functional activities of other immunocompetent cells and may impair immune responses in the lung. These inhibitory effects of benzene metabolites are primarily mediated by interference with early transduction signals such as PI3 kinase. Together, currently available studies indicate that benzene metabolites interfere by multiple mechanisms with the role of basophils and mast cells in innate immunity and in chronic inflammation in the lung. PMID:22103854

  6. Domain ChIRP reveals the modularity of long noncoding RNA architecture, chromatin interactions, and function

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Jeffrey J; Chu, Ci; Akhtar, Asifa; Chang, Howard Y

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the functional domain architecture of long RNA molecules, mainly because of a relative paucity of suitable methods to analyze RNA function at a domain level. Here we describe domain-specific chromatin isolation by RNA purification (dChIRP), a scalable technique to dissect pairwise RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and RNA-chromatin interactions in living cells. dChIRP of roX1, a lncRNA essential for Drosophila X-chromosome dosage compensation, reveals a “three-fingered hand” ribonucleoprotein topology. Each RNA finger binds chromatin and the Male-Specific Lethal (MSL) protein complex, and can individually rescue male lethality in roX-null flies, thus defining a minimal RNA domain for chromosome-wide dosage compensation. dChIRP improves RNA genomic localization signal by >20-fold relative to previous techniques, and these binding sites are correlated with chromosome conformation data, indicating that most roX-bound loci cluster in a nuclear territory. These results suggest dChIRP can reveal lncRNA architecture and function with new precision and sensitivity. PMID:24997788

  7. Individual-based analyses reveal limited functional overlap in a coral reef fish community.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Simon J; Bellwood, David R

    2013-10-26

    Detailed knowledge of a species' functional niche is crucial for the study of ecological communities and processes. The extent of niche overlap, functional redundancy and functional complementarity is of particular importance if we are to understand ecosystem processes and their vulnerability to disturbances. Coral reefs are among the most threatened marine systems, and anthropogenic activity is changing the functional composition of reefs. The loss of herbivorous fishes is particularly concerning as the removal of algae is crucial for the growth and survival of corals. Yet, the foraging patterns of the various herbivorous fish species are poorly understood. Using a multidimensional framework, we present novel individual-based analyses of species' realized functional niches, which we apply to a herbivorous coral reef fish community. In calculating niche volumes for 21 species, based on their microhabitat utilization patterns during foraging, and computing functional overlaps, we provide a measurement of functional redundancy or complementarity. Complementarity is the inverse of redundancy and is defined as less than 50% overlap in niche volumes. The analyses reveal extensive complementarity with an average functional overlap of just 15·2%. Furthermore, the analyses divide herbivorous reef fishes into two broad groups. The first group (predominantly surgeonfishes and parrotfishes) comprises species feeding on exposed surfaces and predominantly open reef matrix or sandy substrata, resulting in small niche volumes and extensive complementarity. In contrast, the second group consists of species (predominantly rabbitfishes) that feed over a wider range of microhabitats, penetrating the reef matrix to exploit concealed surfaces of various substratum types. These species show high variation among individuals, leading to large niche volumes, more overlap and less complementarity. These results may have crucial consequences for our understanding of herbivorous processes on coral reefs, as algal removal appears to depend strongly on species-specific microhabitat utilization patterns of herbivores. Furthermore, the results emphasize the capacity of the individual-based analyses to reveal variation in the functional niches of species, even in high-diversity systems such as coral reefs, demonstrating its potential applicability to other high-diversity ecosystems. PMID:24164060

  8. Narcissism: its function in modulating self-conscious emotions.

    PubMed

    Uji, Masayo; Nagata, Toshiaki; Kitamura, Toshinori

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the functional aspects of narcissism in regulating self-conscious emotions (guilt, shame, hubristic pride, and achievement-oriented pride) as well as two other attribution styles (externalization and detachment). The authors investigated Japanese university students (N = 452) with regard to their self-conscious emotions using the Test of Self-Conscious Affect-3 (TOSCA-3) and their narcissistic personality using the short version of Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI-S). Structural equation modeling was used for the analysis. The authors found that narcissism led individuals to feel achievement-oriented pride, hubristic pride, externalization, and detachment, but inhibited feelings of shame. It did not have a significant effect on guilt. Shame-proneness prompted hubristic pride and externalization. Guilt-proneness inclined an individual toward achievement-oriented pride, but deterred externalization. In this article, the authors present and interpret these results in detail and then discuss how they can be utilized in psychotherapy. PMID:22988899

  9. Combining functional and anatomical connectivity reveals brain networks for auditory language comprehension.

    PubMed

    Saur, Dorothee; Schelter, Björn; Schnell, Susanne; Kratochvil, David; Küpper, Hanna; Kellmeyer, Philipp; Kümmerer, Dorothee; Klöppel, Stefan; Glauche, Volkmar; Lange, Rüdiger; Mader, Wolfgang; Feess, David; Timmer, Jens; Weiller, Cornelius

    2010-02-15

    Cognitive functions are organized in distributed, overlapping, and interacting brain networks. Investigation of those large-scale brain networks is a major task in neuroimaging research. Here, we introduce a novel combination of functional and anatomical connectivity to study the network topology subserving a cognitive function of interest. (i) In a given network, direct interactions between network nodes are identified by analyzing functional MRI time series with the multivariate method of directed partial correlation (dPC). This method provides important improvements over shortcomings that are typical for ordinary (partial) correlation techniques. (ii) For directly interacting pairs of nodes, a region-to-region probabilistic fiber tracking on diffusion tensor imaging data is performed to identify the most probable anatomical white matter fiber tracts mediating the functional interactions. This combined approach is applied to the language domain to investigate the network topology of two levels of auditory comprehension: lower-level speech perception (i.e., phonological processing) and higher-level speech recognition (i.e., semantic processing). For both processing levels, dPC analyses revealed the functional network topology and identified central network nodes by the number of direct interactions with other nodes. Tractography showed that these interactions are mediated by distinct ventral (via the extreme capsule) and dorsal (via the arcuate/superior longitudinal fascicle fiber system) long- and short-distance association tracts as well as commissural fibers. Our findings demonstrate how both processing routines are segregated in the brain on a large-scale network level. Combining dPC with probabilistic tractography is a promising approach to unveil how cognitive functions emerge through interaction of functionally interacting and anatomically interconnected brain regions. PMID:19913624

  10. Structural and functional analysis of amphioxus HIF? reveals ancient features of the HIF? family

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Lu, Ling; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Peng; Song, Weibo; Duan, Cunming

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are master regulators of the transcriptional response to hypoxia. To gain insight into the structural and functional evolution of the HIF family, we characterized the HIF? gene from amphioxus, an invertebrate chordate, and identified several alternatively spliced HIF? isoforms. Whereas HIF? Ia, the full-length isoform, contained a complete oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain, the isoforms Ib, Ic, and Id had 1 or 2 deletions in the ODD domain. When tagged with GFP and tested in mammalian cells, the amphioxus HIF? Ia protein level increased in response to hypoxia or CoCl2 treatment, whereas HIF? Ib, Ic, and Id showed reduced or no hypoxia regulation. Deletion of the ODD sequence in HIF? Ia up-regulated the HIF? Ia levels under normoxia. Gene expression analysis revealed HIF? Ic to be the predominant isoform in embryos and larvae, whereas isoform Ia was the most abundant form in the adult stage. The expression levels of Ib and Id were very low. Hypoxia treatment of adults had no effect on the mRNA levels of these HIF? isoforms. Functional analyses in mammalian cells showed all 4 HIF? isoforms capable of entering the nucleus and activating hypoxia response element–dependent reporter gene expression. The functional nuclear location signal (NLS) mapped to 3 clusters of basic residues. 775KKARL functioned as the primary NLS, but 737KRK and 754KK also contributed to the nuclear localization. All amphioxus HIF? isoforms had 2 functional transactivation domains (TADs). Its C-terminal transactivation (C-TAD) shared high sequence identity with the human HIF-1? and HIF-2? C-TAD. This domain contained a conserved asparagine, and its mutation resulted in an increase in transcriptional activity. These findings reveal many ancient features of the HIF? family and provide novel insights into the evolution of the HIF? family.—Gao, S., Lu, L., Bai, Y., Zhang, P., Song, W., Duan, C. Structural and functional analysis of amphioxus HIF? reveals ancient features of the HIF? family. PMID:24174425

  11. Interactions between metal-binding domains modulate intracellular targeting of Cu(I)-ATPase ATP7B, as revealed by nanobody binding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yiping; Nokhrin, Sergiy; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Yu, Corey H; Yang, Haojun; Barry, Amanda N; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L; Muyldermans, Serge; Dmitriev, Oleg Y; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2014-11-21

    The biologically and clinically important membrane transporters are challenging proteins to study because of their low level of expression, multidomain structure, and complex molecular dynamics that underlies their activity. ATP7B is a copper transporter that traffics between the intracellular compartments in response to copper elevation. The N-terminal domain of ATP7B (N-ATP7B) is involved in binding copper, but the role of this domain in trafficking is controversial. To clarify the role of N-ATP7B, we generated nanobodies that interact with ATP7B in vitro and in cells. In solution NMR studies, nanobodies revealed the spatial organization of N-ATP7B by detecting transient functionally relevant interactions between metal-binding domains 1-3. Modulation of these interactions by nanobodies in cells enhanced relocalization of the endogenous ATP7B toward the plasma membrane linking molecular and cellular dynamics of the transporter. Stimulation of ATP7B trafficking by nanobodies in the absence of elevated copper provides direct evidence for the important role of N-ATP7B structural dynamics in regulation of ATP7B localization in a cell. PMID:25253690

  12. Genetic modulation of energy metabolism in birds through mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, B. Irene; Versteegh, Maaike A.; Fries, Anthony; Helm, Barbara; Dingemanse, Niels J.; Gibbs, H. Lisle; Williams, Joseph B.

    2009-01-01

    Despite their central importance for the evolution of physiological variation, the genetic mechanisms that determine energy expenditure in animals have largely remained unstudied. We used quantitative genetics to confirm that both mass-specific and whole-organism basal metabolic rate (BMR) were heritable in a captive-bred population of stonechats (Saxicola torquata spp.) founded on birds from three wild populations (Europe, Africa and Asia) that differed in BMR. This argues that BMR is at least partially under genetic control by multiple unknown nuclear loci each with a limited effect on the phenotype. We then tested for a genetic effect on BMR based on mitochondrial–nuclear coadaptation using hybrids between ancestral populations with high and low BMR (Europe–Africa and Asia–Europe), with different parental configurations (femalehigh–malelow or femalelow–malehigh) within each combination of populations. Hybrids with different parental configurations have on average identical mixtures of nuclear DNA, but differ in mitochondrial DNA because it is inherited only from the mother. Mass-specific BMR differed between hybrids with different parental configurations, implying that the combination of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA affected metabolic rate. Therefore, our findings implicate mitochondrial function as an important regulator of energy metabolism. In combination with the substantial heritabilities of metabolic rate, and corroborated by genetic differences in the mitochondrial genome, these results set the stage for further investigations of a genetic control mechanism involving both mitochondrial and nuclear genes determining metabolic rate at the whole-organism level. PMID:19324832

  13. Caveolin modulates integrin function and mechanical activation in the cardiomyocyte.

    PubMed

    Israeli-Rosenberg, Sharon; Chen, Chao; Li, Ruixia; Deussen, Daniel N; Niesman, Ingrid R; Okada, Hideshi; Patel, Hemal H; Roth, David M; Ross, Robert S

    2015-02-01

    ?1 integrins (?1) transduce mechanical signals in many cells, including cardiac myocytes (CM). Given their close localization, as well as their role in mechanotransduction and signaling, we hypothesized that caveolin (Cav) proteins might regulate integrins in the CM. ?1 localization, complex formation, activation state, and signaling were analyzed using wild-type, Cav3 knockout, and Cav3 CM-specific transgenic heart and myocyte samples. Studies were performed under basal and mechanically loaded conditions. We found that: (1) ?1 and Cav3 colocalize in CM and coimmunoprecipitate from CM protein lysates; (2) ?1 is detected in a subset of caveolae; (3) loss of Cav3 caused reduction of ?1D integrin isoform and active ?1 integrin from the buoyant domains in the heart; (4) increased expression of myocyte Cav3 correlates with increased active ?1 integrin in adult CM; (5) in vivo pressure overload of the wild-type heart results in increased activated integrin in buoyant membrane domains along with increased association between active integrin and Cav3; and (6) Cav3-deficient myocytes have perturbed basal and stretch mediated signaling responses. Thus, Cav3 protein can modify integrin function and mechanotransduction in the CM and intact heart. PMID:25366344

  14. CRISPR-Cas Functional Module Exchange in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Almendros, Cristóbal; Mojica, Francisco J. M.; Díez-Villaseñor, César; Guzmán, Noemí M.; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (cas) genes constitute the CRISPR-Cas systems found in the Bacteria and Archaea domains. At least in some strains they provide an efficient barrier against transmissible genetic elements such as plasmids and viruses. Two CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified in Escherichia coli, pertaining to subtypes I-E (cas-E genes) and I-F (cas-F genes), respectively. In order to unveil the evolutionary dynamics of such systems, we analyzed the sequence variations in the CRISPR-Cas loci of a collection of 131 E. coli strains. Our results show that the strain grouping inferred from these CRISPR data slightly differs from the phylogeny of the species, suggesting the occurrence of recombinational events between CRISPR arrays. Moreover, we determined that the primary cas-E genes of E. coli were altogether replaced with a substantially different variant in a minor group of strains that include K-12. Insertion elements play an important role in this variability. This result underlines the interchange capacity of CRISPR-Cas constituents and hints that at least some functional aspects documented for the K-12 system may not apply to the vast majority of E. coli strains. PMID:24473126

  15. Cholinergic modulation of learning and memory in the human brain as detected with functional neuroimaging

    E-print Network

    of psychopharmacological approaches in conjunction with neuroimaging. The paper will introduce the combination of neuroi- maging and psychopharmacology as a tool to study neurochemical modulation of human brain function: Acetylcholine; Neuroimaging; Learning; Memory; Review; Drug; Psychopharmacology; fMRI; PET; Human 1

  16. Remote sensing image restoration with modulation transfer function compensation technology in-orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xin; Xu, Shuyan; Li, Guangxin; Hu, Jun

    2013-03-01

    In order to improve the characteristic of light-duty of space optical remote sensors and the quality of remote sensing images. A novel means was designed. It is used for remote sensing image restoration in-orbit that based on the modulation transfer function compensation (MTFC). The principle of the modulation transfer function compensation in-orbit was given, and the control system in-orbit of the modulation transfer function compensation was designed. The modulation transfer function curve was obtained by direct measurement in laboratory. The remote sensing image restoration was realized by constrained least square filter. The indexes including mean, standard deviation, edge intensity and others are used to evaluate the quality of remote sensing image restoration. The results show that the evaluation indicators of the restored image are better than the original image, and the MTF at Nyquist frequency is increased to 0.1635 from 0.1501. It totally satisfies the requirement for real-time remote sensing image restoration in-orbit, and significantly improves the image quality.

  17. SNAP-25/Syntaxin 1A Complex Functionally Modulates Neurotransmitter -Aminobutyric Acid Reuptake*S

    E-print Network

    Tian, Weidong

    SNAP-25/Syntaxin 1A Complex Functionally Modulates Neurotransmitter -Aminobutyric Acid Reuptake-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex, which includes two target SNAREs syntaxin 1A and SNAP-25 and one vesicle SNARE VAMP-2. The target SNAREs syntaxin 1A and SNAP-25 form a heterodimer

  18. Moire modulation transfer function of alexandrite rods and their thresholds as lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kafri, O.; Samelson, H.; Chin, T.; Heller, D.F.

    1986-04-01

    We show that there is a simple correlation between the modulation transfer function (MTF) of alexandrite laser rods and the thresholds of these rods as cw lasers. Thus the MTF provides a novel and important way to evaluate material (before or after fabrication) for use in solid-state lasers. This approach should be generally applicable to all solid-state laser materials.

  19. Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) measurement techniques for lenses and linear detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnabel, J. J., Jr.; Kaishoven, J. E., Jr.; Tom, D.

    1984-01-01

    Application is the determination of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for linear detector arrays. A system set up requires knowledge of the MTF of the imaging lens. Procedure for this measurement is described for standard optical lab equipment. Given this information, various possible approaches to MTF measurement for linear arrays is described. The knife edge method is then described in detail.

  20. Measurement of MODIS optics effective focal length, distortion, and modulation transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurlow, Paul E.; Cline, Richard W.

    1993-08-01

    A combination MODIS optics characteristics, short back focal length, and relatively distorting optics, has required major revisions in techniques used earlier to characterize effective focal length (EFL) and modulation transfer function (MTF) in the thematic mapper (TM) project. This paper compares measurement approaches used to characterize TM optics and revised methodology intended to characterize MODIS optics at an integration and assembly level.

  1. MODULATION OF RAT LEYDIG CELL STEROIDOGENIC FUNCTION BY DI(2-ETHYLHEXYL)PHTHALATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modulation of rat Leydig cell steroidogenic function by di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate. Akingbemi BT, Youker RT, Sottas CM, Ge R, Katz E, Klinefelter GR, Zirkin BR, Hardy MP. Center for Biomedical Research, Population Council, New York, New York 10021, USA. benson@popcbr...

  2. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates Dendritic Cell Function through Modulation of p38 MAPK-CREB/ATF1 Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Al-Huseini, Laith M. A.; Aw Yeang, Han Xian; Hamdam, Junnat M.; Sethu, Swaminathan; Alhumeed, Naif; Wong, Wai; Sathish, Jean G.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical for the initiation of immune responses including activation of CD8 T cells. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels influence DC maturation and function. Intracellular heme, a product of catabolism of heme-containing metalloproteins, is a key inducer of ROS. Intracellular heme levels are regulated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which catalyzes the degradation of heme. Heme oxygenase-1 has been implicated in regulating DC maturation; however, its role in other DC functions is unclear. Furthermore, the signaling pathways modulated by HO-1 in DCs are unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that inhibition of HO-1 activity in murine bone marrow-derived immature DCs (iDCs) resulted in DCs with raised intracellular ROS levels, a mature phenotype, impaired phagocytic and endocytic function, and increased capacity to stimulate antigen-specific CD8 T cells. Interestingly, our results reveal that the increased ROS levels following HO-1 inhibition did not underlie the changes in phenotype and functions observed in these iDCs. Importantly, we show that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), and activating transcription factor 1 (ATF1) pathway is involved in the mediation of the phenotypic and functional changes arising from HO-1 inhibition. Furthermore, up-regulation of HO-1 activity rendered iDCs refractory to lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of p38 MAPK-CREB/ATF1 pathway and DC maturation. Finally, we demonstrate that treatment of iDC with the HO-1 substrate, heme, recapitulates the effects that result from HO-1 inhibition. Based on these results, we conclude that HO-1 regulates DC maturation and function by modulating the p38 MAPK-CREB/ATF1 signaling axis. PMID:24719331

  3. Genome-wide mapping of HATs and HDACs reveals distinct functions in active and inactive genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhibin; Zang, Chongzhi; Cui, Kairong; Schones, Dustin E.; Barski, Artem; Peng, Weiqun; Zhao, Keji

    2009-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) function antagonistically to control histone acetylation states that are crucial to many cellular processes. We describe here genome-wide mapping experiments that reveal that both HATs (CBP, p300, PCAF, Tip60, MOF) and HDACs (HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC6) on chromatin are positively correlated with gene expression and histone acetylation. We provide evidence that Tip60 and HDAC6 are targeted to transcribed regions of active genes by phosphorylated RNA Pol II. Our results indicate that MLL-mediated H3K4 methylation primes chromatin to facilitate histone acetylation. Our data suggest that the majority of HDACs in the human genome function to reset chromatin by removing acetylation in active genes; the dynamic cycle of acetylation and deacetylation by transient HAT/HDAC binding prevents Pol II from binding to the genes primed by H3K4 methylation and poises them for future activation. PMID:19698979

  4. ?-Catenin, a Wnt/?-catenin modulator, reveals inducible mutagenesis promoting cancer cell survival adaptation and metabolic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Nopparat, J; Zhang, J; Lu, J-P; Chen, Y-H; Zheng, D; Neufer, P D; Fan, J M; Hong, H; Boykin, C; Lu, Q

    2015-03-19

    Mutations of Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway has essential roles in development and cancer. Although ?-catenin and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene mutations are well established and are known to drive tumorigenesis, discoveries of mutations in other components of the pathway lagged, which hinders the understanding of cancer mechanisms. Here we report that ?-catenin (gene designation: CTNND2), a primarily neural member of the ?-catenin superfamily that promotes canonical Wnt/?-catenin/LEF-1-mediated transcription, displays exonic mutations in human prostate cancer and promotes cancer cell survival adaptation and metabolic reprogramming. When overexpressed in cells derived from prostate tumor xenografts, ?-catenin gene invariably gives rise to mutations, leading to sequence disruptions predicting functional alterations. Ectopic ?-catenin gene integrating into host chromosomes is locus nonselective. ?-Catenin mutations promote tumor development in mouse prostate with probasin promoter (ARR2PB)-driven, prostate-specific expression of Myc oncogene, whereas mutant cells empower survival advantage upon overgrowth and glucose deprivation. Reprogramming energy utilization accompanies the downregulation of glucose transporter-1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage while preserving tumor type 2 pyruvate kinase expression. ?-Catenin mutations increase ?-catenin translocation to the nucleus and hypoxia-inducible factor 1? (HIF-1?) expression. Therefore, introducing ?-catenin mutations is an important milestone in prostate cancer metabolic adaptation by modulating ?-catenin and HIF-1? signaling under glucose shortage to amplify its tumor-promoting potential. PMID:24727894

  5. Quantitative Protein Localization Signatures Reveal an Association between Spatial and Functional Divergences of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Laksameethanasan, Danai; Tung, Yi-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Protein subcellular localization is a major determinant of protein function. However, this important protein feature is often described in terms of discrete and qualitative categories of subcellular compartments, and therefore it has limited applications in quantitative protein function analyses. Here, we present Protein Localization Analysis and Search Tools (PLAST), an automated analysis framework for constructing and comparing quantitative signatures of protein subcellular localization patterns based on microscopy images. PLAST produces human-interpretable protein localization maps that quantitatively describe the similarities in the localization patterns of proteins and major subcellular compartments, without requiring manual assignment or supervised learning of these compartments. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we show that PLAST is more accurate than existing, qualitative protein localization annotations in identifying known co-localized proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PLAST can reveal protein localization-function relationships that are not obvious from these annotations. First, we identified proteins that have similar localization patterns and participate in closely-related biological processes, but do not necessarily form stable complexes with each other or localize at the same organelles. Second, we found an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins during evolution. Surprisingly, as proteins with common ancestors evolve, they tend to develop more diverged subcellular localization patterns, but still occupy similar numbers of compartments. This suggests that divergence of protein localization might be more frequently due to the development of more specific localization patterns over ancestral compartments than the occupation of new compartments. PLAST enables systematic and quantitative analyses of protein localization-function relationships, and will be useful to elucidate protein functions and how these functions were acquired in cells from different organisms or species. A public web interface of PLAST is available at http://plast.bii.a-star.edu.sg. PMID:24603469

  6. Ocean wave-radar modulation transfer functions from the West Coast experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, J. W.; Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Jones, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Short gravity-capillary waves, the equilibrium, or the steady state excitations of the ocean surface are modulated by longer ocean waves. These short waves are the predominant microwave scatterers on the ocean surface under many viewing conditions so that the modulation is readily measured with CW Doppler radar used as a two-scale wave probe. Modulation transfer functions (the ratio of the cross spectrum of the line-of-sight orbital speed and backscattered microwave power to the autospectrum of the line-of-sight orbital speed) were measured at 9.375 and 1.5 GHz (Bragg wavelengths of 2.3 and 13 cm) for winds up to 10 m/s and ocean wave periods from 2-18 s. The measurements were compared with the relaxation-time model; the principal result is that a source of modulation other than straining by the horizontal component of orbital speed, possibly the wave-induced airflow, is responsible for most of the modulation by waves of typical ocean wave period (10 s). The modulations are large; for unit coherence, spectra of radar images of deep-water waves should be proportional to the quotient of the slope spectra of the ocean waves by the ocean wave frequency.

  7. Modulation of multiple pathways involved in the maintenance of neuronal function during aging by fisetin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pamela Maher

    2009-01-01

    Multiple factors have been implicated in the age-related declines in brain function. Thus, it is unlikely that modulating\\u000a only a single factor will be effective at slowing this decline. A better approach is to identify small molecules that have\\u000a multiple biological activities relevant to the maintenance of brain function. Over the last few years, we have identified\\u000a an orally active,

  8. Lasting modulation effects of rTMS on neural activity and connectivity as revealed by resting-state EEG.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lei; Shou, Guofa; Yuan, Han; Urbano, Diamond; Cha, Yoon-Hee

    2014-07-01

    The long-lasting neuromodulatory effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) are of great interest for therapeutic applications in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, due to which functional connectivity among brain regions is profoundly disturbed. Classic TMS studies selectively alter neural activity in specific brain regions and observe neural activity changes on nonperturbed areas to infer underlying connectivity and its changes. Less has been indicated in direct measures of functional connectivity and/or neural network and on how connectivity/network alterations occur. Here, we developed a novel analysis framework to directly investigate both neural activity and connectivity changes induced by rTMS from resting-state EEG (rsEEG) acquired in a group of subjects with a chronic disorder of imbalance, known as the mal de debarquement syndrome (MdDS). Resting-state activity in multiple functional brain areas was identified through a data-driven blind source separation analysis on rsEEG data, and the connectivity among them was characterized using a phase synchronization measure. Our study revealed that there were significant long-lasting changes in resting-state neural activity, in theta, low alpha, and high alpha bands and neural networks in theta, low alpha, high alpha and beta bands, over broad cortical areas 4 to 5 h after the last application of rTMS in a consecutive five-day protocol. Our results of rsEEG connectivity further indicated that the changes, mainly in the alpha band, over the parietal and occipital cortices from pre- to post-TMS sessions were significantly correlated, in both magnitude and direction, to symptom changes in this group of subjects with MdDS. This connectivity measure not only suggested that rTMS can generate positive treatment effects in MdDS patients, but also revealed new potential targets for future therapeutic trials to improve treatment effects. It is promising that the new connectivity measure from rsEEG can be used to understand the variability in treatment response to rTMS in brain disorders with impaired functional connectivity and, eventually, to determine individually tailored stimulation parameters and treatment procedures in rTMS. PMID:24686227

  9. Cryptic biodiversity effects: importance of functional redundancy revealed through addition of food web complexity.

    PubMed

    Philpott, Stacy M; Pardee, Gabriella L; Gonthier, David J

    2012-05-01

    Interactions between predators and the degree of functional redundancy among multiple predator species may determine whether herbivores experience increased or decreased predation risk. Specialist parasites can modify predator behavior, yet rarely have cascading effects on multiple predator species and prey been evaluated. We examined influences of specialist phorid parasites (Pseudacteon spp.) on three predatory ant species and herbivores in a coffee agroecosystem. Specifically, we examined whether changes in ant richness affected fruit damage by the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei) and whether phorids altered multi-predator effects. Each ant species reduced borer damage, and without phorids, increasing predator richness did not further decrease borer damage. However, with phorids, activity of one ant species was reduced, indicating that the presence of multiple ant species was necessary to limit borer damage. In addition, phorid presence revealed synergistic effects of multiple ant species, not observed without the presence of this parasite. Thus, a trait-mediated cascade resulting from a parasite-induced predator behavioral change revealed the importance of functional redundancy, predator diversity, and food web complexity for control of this important pest. PMID:22764486

  10. Conserved functions for Mos in eumetazoan oocyte maturation revealed by studies in a cnidarian.

    PubMed

    Amiel, Aldine; Leclère, Lucas; Robert, Lucie; Chevalier, Sandra; Houliston, Evelyn

    2009-02-24

    The kinase Mos, which activates intracellularly the MAP kinase pathway, is a key regulator of animal oocyte meiotic maturation. In vertebrate and echinoderm models, Mos RNA translation upon oocyte hormonal stimulation mediates "cytostatic" arrest of the egg after meiosis, as well as diverse earlier events [1-5]. Our phylogenetic survey has revealed that MOS genes are conserved in cnidarians and ctenophores, but not found outside the metazoa or in sponges. We demonstrated MAP kinase-mediated cytostatic activity for Mos orthologs from Pleurobrachia (ctenophore) and Clytia (cnidarian) by RNA injection into Xenopus blastomeres. Analyses of endogenous Mos in Clytia with morpholino antisense oligonucleotides and pharmacological inhibition demonstrated that Mos/MAP kinase function in postmeiotic arrest is conserved. They also revealed additional roles in spindle formation and positioning, strongly reminiscent of observations in starfish, mouse, and Xenopus. Unusually, cnidarians were found to possess multiple Mos paralogs. In Clytia, one of two maternally expressed paralogs accounted for the majority MAP kinase activation during maturation, whereas the other may be subject to differential translational regulation and have additional roles. Our findings indicate that Mos appeared early during animal evolution as an oocyte-expressed kinase and functioned ancestrally in regulating core specializations of female meiosis. PMID:19230670

  11. Statistically significant contrasts between EMG waveforms revealed using wavelet-based functional ANOVA

    PubMed Central

    McKay, J. Lucas; Welch, Torrence D. J.; Vidakovic, Brani

    2013-01-01

    We developed wavelet-based functional ANOVA (wfANOVA) as a novel approach for comparing neurophysiological signals that are functions of time. Temporal resolution is often sacrificed by analyzing such data in large time bins, increasing statistical power by reducing the number of comparisons. We performed ANOVA in the wavelet domain because differences between curves tend to be represented by a few temporally localized wavelets, which we transformed back to the time domain for visualization. We compared wfANOVA and ANOVA performed in the time domain (tANOVA) on both experimental electromyographic (EMG) signals from responses to perturbation during standing balance across changes in peak perturbation acceleration (3 levels) and velocity (4 levels) and on simulated data with known contrasts. In experimental EMG data, wfANOVA revealed the continuous shape and magnitude of significant differences over time without a priori selection of time bins. However, tANOVA revealed only the largest differences at discontinuous time points, resulting in features with later onsets and shorter durations than those identified using wfANOVA (P < 0.02). Furthermore, wfANOVA required significantly fewer (?¼×; P < 0.015) significant F tests than tANOVA, resulting in post hoc tests with increased power. In simulated EMG data, wfANOVA identified known contrast curves with a high level of precision (r2 = 0.94 ± 0.08) and performed better than tANOVA across noise levels (P < <0.01). Therefore, wfANOVA may be useful for revealing differences in the shape and magnitude of neurophysiological signals (e.g., EMG, firing rates) across multiple conditions with both high temporal resolution and high statistical power. PMID:23100136

  12. Functional wiring of the yeast kinome revealed by global analysis of genetic network motifs

    PubMed Central

    Sharifpoor, Sara; van Dyk, Dewald; Costanzo, Michael; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Friesen, Helena; Douglas, Alison C.; Youn, Ji-Young; VanderSluis, Benjamin; Myers, Chad L.; Papp, Balázs; Boone, Charles; Andrews, Brenda J.

    2012-01-01

    A combinatorial genetic perturbation strategy was applied to interrogate the yeast kinome on a genome-wide scale. We assessed the global effects of gene overexpression or gene deletion to map an integrated genetic interaction network of synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) and loss-of-function genetic interactions (GIs) for 92 kinases, producing a meta-network of 8700 GIs enriched for pathways known to be regulated by cognate kinases. Kinases most sensitive to dosage perturbations had constitutive cell cycle or cell polarity functions under standard growth conditions. Condition-specific screens confirmed that the spectrum of kinase dosage interactions can be expanded substantially in activating conditions. An integrated network composed of systematic SDL, negative and positive loss-of-function GIs, and literature-curated kinase–substrate interactions revealed kinase-dependent regulatory motifs predictive of novel gene-specific phenotypes. Our study provides a valuable resource to unravel novel functional relationships and pathways regulated by kinases and outlines a general strategy for deciphering mutant phenotypes from large-scale GI networks. PMID:22282571

  13. Separable roles of UFO during floral development revealed by conditional restoration of gene function.

    PubMed

    Laufs, Patrick; Coen, Enrico; Kronenberger, Jocelyne; Traas, Jan; Doonan, John

    2003-02-01

    The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene is required for several aspects of floral development in Arabidopsis including specification of organ identity in the second and third whorls and the proper pattern of primordium initiation in the inner three whorls. UFO is expressed in a dynamic pattern during the early phases of flower development. Here we dissect the role of UFO by ubiquitously expressing it in ufo loss-of-function flowers at different developmental stages and for various durations using an ethanol-inducible expression system. The previously known functions of UFO could be separated and related to its expression at specific stages of development. We show that a 24- to 48-hour period of UFO expression from floral stage 2, before any floral organs are visible, is sufficient to restore normal petal and stamen development. The earliest requirement for UFO is during stage 2, when the endogenous UFO gene is transiently expressed in the centre of the wild-type flower and is required to specify the initiation patterns of petal, stamen and carpel primordia. Petal and stamen identity is determined during stages 2 or 3, when UFO is normally expressed in the presumptive second and third whorl. Although endogenous UFO expression is absent from the stamen whorl from stage 4 onwards, stamen identity can be restored by UFO activation up to stage 6. We also observed floral phenotypes not observed in loss-of-function or constitutive gain-of-function backgrounds, revealing additional roles of UFO in outgrowth of petal primordia. PMID:12506008

  14. High-throughput mutagenesis reveals functional determinants for DNA targeting by activation-induced deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Gajula, Kiran S.; Huwe, Peter J.; Mo, Charlie Y.; Crawford, Daniel J.; Stivers, James T.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Kohli, Rahul M.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody maturation is a critical immune process governed by the enzyme activation-induced deaminase (AID), a member of the AID/APOBEC DNA deaminase family. AID/APOBEC deaminases preferentially target cytosine within distinct preferred sequence motifs in DNA, with specificity largely conferred by a small 9–11 residue protein loop that differs among family members. Here, we aimed to determine the key functional characteristics of this protein loop in AID and to thereby inform our understanding of the mode of DNA engagement. To this end, we developed a methodology (Sat-Sel-Seq) that couples saturation mutagenesis at each position across the targeting loop, with iterative functional selection and next-generation sequencing. This high-throughput mutational analysis revealed dominant characteristics for residues within the loop and additionally yielded enzymatic variants that enhance deaminase activity. To rationalize these functional requirements, we performed molecular dynamics simulations that suggest that AID and its hyperactive variants can engage DNA in multiple specific modes. These findings align with AID's competing requirements for specificity and flexibility to efficiently drive antibody maturation. Beyond insights into the AID-DNA interface, our Sat-Sel-Seq approach also serves to further expand the repertoire of techniques for deep positional scanning and may find general utility for high-throughput analysis of protein function. PMID:25064858

  15. Bisphosphonates modulate vital functions of human osteoblasts and affect their interactions with breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Tatjana; Teufel, Ingrid; Geiger, Konstanze; Vater, Yvonne; Aicher, Wilhelm K; Klein, Gerd; Fehm, Tanja

    2013-07-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are in clinical use for the treatment of breast cancer patients with bone metastases. Their anti-resorptive effect is mainly explained by inhibition of osteoclast activity, but recent evidence also points to a direct action of BPs on bone-forming osteoblasts. However, the mechanisms how BPs influence osteoblasts and their interactions with breast cancer cells are still poorly characterized. Human osteoblasts isolated from bone specimens were characterized in depth by their expression of osteogenic marker genes. The influence of the nitrogen-containing BPs zoledronate (Zol), ibandronate (Iban), and pamidronate (Pam) on molecular and cellular functions of osteoblasts was assessed focusing on cell proliferation and viability, apoptosis, cytokine secretion, and osteogenic-associated genes. Furthermore, effects of BPs on osteoblast-breast tumor cell interactions were examined in an established in vitro model system. The BPs Zol and Pam inhibited cell viability of osteoblasts. This effect was mediated by an induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis in osteoblasts. By interfering with the mevalonate pathway, Zol also reduces the proliferation of osteoblasts. The expression of phenotypic markers of osteogenic differentiation was altered by Zol and Pam. In addition, both BPs strongly influenced the secretion of the chemokine CCL2 by osteoblasts. Breast cancer cells also responded to Zol and Pam with a reduced cell adhesion to osteoblast-derived extracellular matrix molecules and with a decreased migration in response to osteoblast-secreted factors. BPs revealed prominent effects on human osteoblasts. Zol and Pam as the most potent BPs affected not only the expression of osteogenic markers, osteoblast viability, and proliferation but also important osteoblast-tumor cell interactions. Changing the osteoblast metabolism by BPs modulates migration and adhesion of breast cancer cells as well. PMID:23807419

  16. Review series on helminths, immune modulation and the hygiene hypothesis: Mechanisms underlying helminth modulation of dendritic cell function

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Lucas; Sun, Jie; Kane, Colleen; Marshall, Fraser; Krawczyk, Connie; Pearce, Edward J

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in activating CD4 T (T helper, Th) cells. As a component of their response to pathogen-associated stimuli, DCs produce cytokines and express surface molecules that provide important cues to modulate the effector functions of responding Th cells. Much is known of how DCs respond to, and influence immune response outcome to, bacterial and viral pathogens. However, relatively little is understood about how DCs respond to helminth parasites. This is an area of considerable interest since it impacts our understanding of the initiation of Th2 responses, which are stereotypically associated with helminth infections, and the regulation of allergic and autoimmune pathologies which evidence suggests are less severe or absent in individuals infected with helminths. This review attempts to summarize our understanding of the effects of helminth products on dendritic cell biology. PMID:19120496

  17. Comparative analysis of ABCB1 reveals novel structural and functional conservation between monocots and dicots

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Amandeep K.; Mohan, Amita; Gill, Kulvinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Phytohormone auxin plays a critical role in modulating plant architecture by creating a gradient regulated via its transporters such as ATP-binding cassette (ABC) B1. Except for Arabidopsis and maize, where it was shown to interrupt auxin transport, ABCB1's presence, structure and function in crop species is not known. Here we describe the structural and putative functional organization of ABCB1 among monocots relative to that of dicots. Identified from various plant species following specific and stringent criteria, ZmABCB1's “true” orthologs sequence identity ranged from 56–90% at the DNA and 75–91% at the predicted amino acid (aa) level. Relative to ZmABCB1, the size of genomic copies ranged from ?27 to +1.5% and aa from ?7.7 to +0.6%. With the average gene size being similar (5.8 kb in monocots and 5.7 kb in dicots), dicots have about triple the number of introns with an average size of 194 bp (total 1743 bp) compared to 556 bp (total 1667 bp) in monocots. The intron-exon junctions across species were however conserved. N-termini of the predicted proteins were highly variable: in monocots due to mismatches and small deletions of 1–13 aa compared to large, species-specific deletions of up to 77 aa in dicots. The species-, family- and group- specific conserved motifs were identified in the N-terminus and linker region of protein, possibly responsible for the specific functions. The near-identical conserved motifs of Nucleotide Binding Domains (NBDs) in two halves of the protein showed subtle aa changes possibly favoring ATP binding to the N-terminus. Predicted 3-D protein structures showed remarkable similarity with each other and for the residues involved in auxin binding. PMID:25505477

  18. Cluster analysis reveals a binary effect of storage on boar sperm motility function.

    PubMed

    Henning, Heiko; Petrunkina, Anna M; Harrison, Robin A P; Waberski, Dagmar

    2014-06-01

    Storage of liquid-preserved boar spermatozoa is associated with a loss of fertilising ability of the preserved spermatozoa, which standard semen parameters barely reflect. Monitoring responses to molecular effectors of sperm function (e.g. bicarbonate) has proven to be a more sensitive approach to investigating storage effects. Bicarbonate not only initiates capacitation in spermatozoa, but also induces motility activation. This occurs at ejaculation, but also happens throughout passage through the oviduct. In the present study we tested whether the specific response of boar sperm subpopulations to bicarbonate, as assessed by motility activation, is altered with the duration of storage in vitro. Three ejaculates from each of seven boars were diluted in Beltsville thawing solution and stored at 17°C. Only minor changes in the parameters of diluted semen were revealed over a period of 72h storage. For assessment of bicarbonate responses, subsamples of diluted spermatozoa were centrifuged through a discontinuous Percoll gradient after 12, 24 and 72h storage. Subsequently, spermatozoa were incubated in two Ca2+-free variants of Tyrode's medium either without (TyrControl) or with (TyrBic) 15mM bicarbonate, and computer-aided sperm analysis motility measurements were made. Cluster analysis of imaging data from motile spermatozoa revealed the presence of five major sperm subpopulations with distinct motility characteristics, differing between TyrBic and TyrControl at any given time (P<0.001). Although there was an increasing loss of motility function in both media, bicarbonate induced an increase in a 'fast linear' cohort of spermatozoa in TyrBic regardless of storage (66.4% at 12h and 63.9% at 72h). These results imply a binary pattern in response of sperm motility function descriptors to storage: although the quantitative descriptor (percentage of motile spermatozoa) declines in washed semen samples, the qualitative descriptor (percentage of spermatozoa stimulated into fast linear motion by bicarbonate) is sustained independent of the duration of storage. PMID:24942182

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of COMPLEXIN Fusion Clamp Function in Synaptic Exocytosis Revealed in a New Drosophila Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Janani; Wahlmark, Christopher J.; Kuser-Ahnert, Giselle A.; Kawasaki, Fumiko

    2013-01-01

    The COMPLEXIN (CPX) proteins play a critical role in synaptic vesicle fusion and neurotransmitter release. Previous studies demonstrated that CPX functions in both activation of evoked neurotransmitter release and inhibition/clamping of spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion. Here we report a new cpx mutant in Drosophila melanogaster, cpx1257, revealing spatially defined and separable pools of CPX which make distinct contributions to the activation and clamping functions. In cpx1257, lack of only the last C-terminal amino acid of CPX is predicted to disrupt prenylation and membrane targeting of CPX. Immunocytochemical analysis established localization of wild-type CPX to active zone (AZ) regions containing neurotransmitter release sites as well as broader presynaptic membrane compartments including synaptic vesicles. Parallel biochemical studies confirmed CPX membrane association and demonstrated robust binding interactions of CPX with all three SNAREs. This is in contrast to the cpx1257 mutant, in which AZ localization of CPX persists but general membrane localization and, surprisingly, the bulk of CPX-SNARE protein interactions are abolished. Furthermore, electrophysiological analysis of neuromuscular synapses revealed interesting differences between cpx1257 and a cpx null mutant. The cpx null exhibited a marked decrease in the EPSC amplitude, slowed EPSC rise and decay times and an increased mEPSC frequency with respect to wild-type. In contrast, cpx1257 exhibited a wild-type EPSC with an increased mEPSC frequency and thus a selective failure to clamp spontaneous release. These results indicate that spatially distinct and separable interactions of CPX with presynaptic membranes and SNARE proteins mediate separable activation and clamping functions of CPX in neurotransmitter release. PMID:23769723

  20. Sparing functional anatomical structures during intensity-modulated radiotherapy: an old problem, a new solution.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenyong; Han, Guang; Wei, Shaozhong; Hu, Desheng

    2014-08-01

    During intensity-modulated radiotherapy, an organ is usually assumed to be functionally homogeneous and, generally, its anatomical and spatial heterogeneity with respect to radiation response are not taken into consideration. However, advances in imaging and radiation techniques as well as an improved understanding of the radiobiological response of organs have raised the possibility of sparing the critical functional structures within various organs at risk during intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Here, we discuss these structures, which include the critical brain structure, or neural nuclei, and the nerve fiber tracts in the CNS, head and neck structures related to radiation-induced salivary and swallowing dysfunction, and functional structures in the heart and lung. We suggest that these structures can be used as potential surrogate organs at risk in order to minimize their radiation dose and/or irradiated volume without compromising the dose coverage of the target volume during radiation treatment. PMID:23987920

  1. Analysis of protein-protein interaction network and functional modules on primary osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary osteoporosis is an age-related disease, and the main cause of this disease is the failure of bone homeostasis. Previous studies have shown that primary osteoporosis is associated with gene mutations. To explore the functional modules of the PPI (protein-protein interaction) network of differentially expressed genes (DEGs), and the related pathways participating in primary osteoporosis. Methods The gene expression profile of primary osteoporosis GSE35956 was downloaded from the GEO (Gene Expression Omnibus) database and included five MSC (mesenchymal stem cell) specimens of normal osseous tissue and five MSC specimens of osteoporosis. The DEGs between the two types of MSC specimens were identified by the samr package in R language. In addition, the functions and pathways of DEGs were enriched. Then the DEGs were mapped to String to acquire PPI pairs and the PPI network was constructed with by these PPI pairs. Topological properties of the network were calculated by Network Analyzer, and modules in the network were screened by Cluster ONE software. Subsequently, the fronting five modules whose P-value was less than 1.0e-05 were identified and function analysis was conducted. Results A total of 797 genes were filtered as DEGs from these ten specimens of GSE35956 with 660 up-regulated genes and 137 down-regulated genes. Meanwhile, up-regulated DEGs were mainly enriched in functions and pathways related to cell cycle and DNA replication. Furthermore, there were 4,135 PPI pairs and 377 nodes in the PPI network. Four modules were enriched in different pathways, including cell cycle and DNA replication pathway in module 2. Conclusions In this paper, we explored the genes and pathways involved in primary osteoporosis based on gene expression profiles, and the present findings have the potential to be used clinically for the future treatment of primary osteoporosis. PMID:24656062

  2. Please cite this article in press as: M. Schiavon, et al., Transcriptome profiling of genes differentially modulated by sulfur and chromium identifies potential targets for phytoremediation and reveals a complex SCr interplay on sulfate transport regulati

    E-print Network

    differentially modulated by sulfur and chromium identifies potential targets for phytoremediation and reveals differentially modulated by sulfur and chromium identifies potential targets for phytoremediation and reveals in the short-time response of plants to Cr exposure. I Potential gene targets for Cr phytoremediation have been

  3. Functional groups modulate the sensitivity and electron transfer kinetics of neurochemicals at carbon nanotube modified microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Christopher B.; Vickrey, Trisha L.; Venton, B. Jill

    2014-01-01

    The surface properties of carbon based electrodes are critically important for the detection of biomolecules and can modulate electrostatic interactions, adsorption and electrocatalysis. Carbon nanotube (CNT) modified electrodes have previously been shown to have increased oxidative sensitivity and reduced overpotential for catecholamine neurotransmitters, but the effect of surface functionalities on these properties has not been characterized. In this study, we modified carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) with three differently functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes and measured their response to serotonin, dopamine, and ascorbic acid using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Both carboxylic acid functionalized and amide functionalized CNTs increased the oxidative current of CFMEs by approximately 2–6 fold for the cationic neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine, but octadecylamine functionalized CNTs resulted in no significant signal change. Similarly, electron transfer was faster for both amide and carboxylic acid functionalized CNT modified electrodes but slower for octadecylamine CNT modified electrodes. Oxidation of ascorbic acid was only increased with carboxylic acid functionalized CNTs although all CNT-modified electrodes showed a trend towards increased reversibility for ascorbic acid. Carboxylic acid-CNT modified disk electrodes were then tested for detection of serotonin in the ventral nerve cord of a Drosophila melanogaster larva, and the increase in sensitivity was maintained in biological tissue. The functional groups of CNTs therefore modulate the electrochemical properties, and the increase in sensitivity from CNT modification facilitates measurements in biological samples. PMID:21373669

  4. Salivary Gland Proteome Analysis Reveals Modulation of Anopheline Unique Proteins in Insensitive Acetylcholinesterase Resistant Anopheles gambiae Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Cornelie, Sylvie; Rossignol, Marie; Seveno, Martial; Demettre, Edith; Mouchet, François; Djègbè, Innocent; Marin, Philippe; Chandre, Fabrice; Corbel, Vincent; Remoué, Franck; Mathieu-Daudé, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance due to a mutation in the acetylcholinesterase (ace) encoding ace-1 gene confers cross-resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides in Anopheles gambiae populations from Central and West Africa. This mutation is associated with a strong genetic cost revealed through alterations of some life history traits but little is known about the physiological and behavioural changes in insects bearing the ace-1R allele. Comparative analysis of the salivary gland contents between An. gambiae susceptible and ace-1R resistant strains was carried out to charaterize factors that could be involved in modifications of blood meal process, trophic behaviour or pathogen interaction in the insecticide-resistant mosquitoes. Differential analysis of the salivary gland protein profiles revealed differences in abundance for several proteins, two of them showing major differences between the two strains. These two proteins identified as saglin and TRIO are salivary gland-1 related proteins, a family unique to anopheline mosquitoes, one of them playing a crucial role in salivary gland invasion by Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites. Differential expression of two other proteins previously identified in the Anopheles sialome was also observed. The differentially regulated proteins are involved in pathogen invasion, blood feeding process, and protection against oxidation, relevant steps in the outcome of malaria infection. Further functional studies and insect behaviour experiments would confirm the impact of the modification of the sialome composition on blood feeding and pathogen transmission abilities of the resistant mosquitoes. The data supports the hypothesis of alterations linked to insecticide resistance in the biology of the primary vector of human malaria in Africa. PMID:25102176

  5. Salivary gland proteome analysis reveals modulation of anopheline unique proteins in insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistant Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Cornelie, Sylvie; Rossignol, Marie; Seveno, Martial; Demettre, Edith; Mouchet, François; Djègbè, Innocent; Marin, Philippe; Chandre, Fabrice; Corbel, Vincent; Remoué, Franck; Mathieu-Daudé, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance due to a mutation in the acetylcholinesterase (ace) encoding ace-1 gene confers cross-resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides in Anopheles gambiae populations from Central and West Africa. This mutation is associated with a strong genetic cost revealed through alterations of some life history traits but little is known about the physiological and behavioural changes in insects bearing the ace-1(R) allele. Comparative analysis of the salivary gland contents between An. gambiae susceptible and ace-1(R) resistant strains was carried out to charaterize factors that could be involved in modifications of blood meal process, trophic behaviour or pathogen interaction in the insecticide-resistant mosquitoes. Differential analysis of the salivary gland protein profiles revealed differences in abundance for several proteins, two of them showing major differences between the two strains. These two proteins identified as saglin and TRIO are salivary gland-1 related proteins, a family unique to anopheline mosquitoes, one of them playing a crucial role in salivary gland invasion by Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites. Differential expression of two other proteins previously identified in the Anopheles sialome was also observed. The differentially regulated proteins are involved in pathogen invasion, blood feeding process, and protection against oxidation, relevant steps in the outcome of malaria infection. Further functional studies and insect behaviour experiments would confirm the impact of the modification of the sialome composition on blood feeding and pathogen transmission abilities of the resistant mosquitoes. The data supports the hypothesis of alterations linked to insecticide resistance in the biology of the primary vector of human malaria in Africa. PMID:25102176

  6. Attention-Dependent Modulation of Cortical Taste Circuits Revealed by Granger Causality with Signal-Dependent Noise

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qiang; Ge, Tian; Grabenhorst, Fabian; Feng, Jianfeng; Rolls, Edmund T.

    2013-01-01

    We show, for the first time, that in cortical areas, for example the insular, orbitofrontal, and lateral prefrontal cortex, there is signal-dependent noise in the fMRI blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) time series, with the variance of the noise increasing approximately linearly with the square of the signal. Classical Granger causal models are based on autoregressive models with time invariant covariance structure, and thus do not take this signal-dependent noise into account. To address this limitation, here we describe a Granger causal model with signal-dependent noise, and a novel, likelihood ratio test for causal inferences. We apply this approach to the data from an fMRI study to investigate the source of the top-down attentional control of taste intensity and taste pleasantness processing. The Granger causality with signal-dependent noise analysis reveals effects not identified by classical Granger causal analysis. In particular, there is a top-down effect from the posterior lateral prefrontal cortex to the insular taste cortex during attention to intensity but not to pleasantness, and there is a top-down effect from the anterior and posterior lateral prefrontal cortex to the orbitofrontal cortex during attention to pleasantness but not to intensity. In addition, there is stronger forward effective connectivity from the insular taste cortex to the orbitofrontal cortex during attention to pleasantness than during attention to intensity. These findings indicate the importance of explicitly modeling signal-dependent noise in functional neuroimaging, and reveal some of the processes involved in a biased activation theory of selective attention. PMID:24204221

  7. Diurnal Changes in Mitochondrial Function Reveal Daily Optimization of Light and Dark Respiratory Metabolism in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun Pong; Eubel, Holger; Millar, A. Harvey

    2010-01-01

    Biomass production by plants is often negatively correlated with respiratory rate, but the value of this rate changes dramatically during diurnal cycles, and hence, biomass is the cumulative result of complex environment-dependent metabolic processes. Mitochondria in photosynthetic plant tissues undertake substantially different metabolic roles during light and dark periods that are dictated by substrate availability and the functional capacity of mitochondria defined by their protein composition. We surveyed the heterogeneity of the mitochondrial proteome and its function during a typical night and day cycle in Arabidopsis shoots. This used a staged, quantitative analysis of the proteome across 10 time points covering 24 h of the life of 3-week-old Arabidopsis shoots grown under 12-h dark and 12-h light conditions. Detailed analysis of enzyme capacities and substrate-dependent respiratory processes of isolated mitochondria were also undertaken during the same time course. Together these data reveal a range of dynamic changes in mitochondrial capacity and uncover day- and night-enhanced protein components. Clear diurnal changes were evident in mitochondrial capacities to drive the TCA cycle and to undertake functions associated with nitrogen and sulfur metabolism, redox poise, and mitochondrial antioxidant defense. These data quantify the nature and nuances of a daily rhythm in Arabidopsis mitochondrial respiratory capacity. PMID:20601493

  8. Genetic Analysis Reveals Different Functions for the Products of the Thyroid Hormone Receptor ? Locus

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Karine; Plateroti, Michelina; Harvey, Clare B.; Williams, Graham R.; Weiss, Roy E.; Refetoff, Samuel; Willott, James F.; Sundin, Victoria; Roux, Jean-Paul; Malaval, Luc; Hara, Masahiro; Samarut, Jacques; Chassande, Olivier

    2001-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors are encoded by the TR? (NR1A1) and TR? (NR1A2) loci. These genes are transcribed into multiple variants whose functions are unclear. Analysis by gene inactivation in mice has provided new insights into the functional complexity of these products. Different strategies designed to modify the TR? locus have led to strikingly different phenotypes. In order to analyze the molecular basis for these alterations, we generated mice devoid of all known isoforms produced from the TR? locus (TR?0/0). These mice are viable and exhibit reduced linear growth, bone maturation delay, moderate hypothermia, and reduced thickness of the intestinal mucosa. Compounding TR?0 and TR?? mutations produces viable TR?0/0??/? mice, which display a more severe linear growth reduction and a more profound hypothermia as well as impaired hearing. A striking phenotypic difference is observed between TR?0/0 and the previously described TR??/? mice, which retain truncated TR?? isoforms arising from a newly described promoter in intron 7. The lethality and severe impairment of the intestinal maturation in TR??/? mice are rescued in TR?0/0 animals. We demonstrate that the TR?? protein isoforms, which are natural products of the TR? locus, are the key determinants of these phenotypical differences. These data reveal the functional importance of the non-T3-binding variants encoded by the TR? locus in vertebrate postnatal development and homeostasis. PMID:11416150

  9. Two-dimensional, phase modulated lattice sums with application to the Helmholtz Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linton, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    A class of two-dimensional phase modulated lattice sums in which the denominator is an indefinite quadratic polynomial Q is expressed in terms of a single, exponentially convergent series of elementary functions. This expression provides an extremely efficient method for the computation of the quasi-periodic Green's function for the Helmholtz equation that arises in a number of physical contexts when studying wave propagation through a doubly periodic medium. For a class of sums in which Q is positive definite, our new result can be used to generate representations in terms of ?-functions which are significant generalisations of known results.

  10. Septal projections to nucleus incertus in the rat: bidirectional pathways for modulation of hippocampal function.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pérez, Ana M; Arnal-Vicente, Isabel; Santos, Fabio N; Pereira, Celia W; ElMlili, Nisrin; Sanjuan, Julio; Ma, Sherie; Gundlach, Andrew L; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E

    2015-03-01

    Projections from the nucleus incertus (NI) to the septum have been implicated in the modulation of hippocampal theta rhythm. In this study we describe a previously uncharacterized projection from the septum to the NI, which may provide feedback modulation of the ascending circuitry. Fluorogold injections into the NI resulted in retrograde labeling in the septum that was concentrated in the horizontal diagonal band and areas of the posterior septum including the septofimbrial and triangular septal nuclei. Double-immunofluorescent staining indicated that the majority of NI-projecting septal neurons were calretinin-positive and some were parvalbumin-, calbindin-, or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-67-positive. Choline acetyltransferase-positive neurons were Fluorogold-negative. Injection of anterograde tracers into medial septum, or triangular septal and septofimbrial nuclei, revealed fibers descending to the supramammillary nucleus, median raphe, and the NI. These anterogradely labeled varicosities displayed synaptophysin immunoreactivity, indicating septal inputs form synapses on NI neurons. Anterograde tracer also colocalized with GAD-67-positive puncta in labeled fibers, which in some cases made close synaptic contact with GAD-67-labeled NI neurons. These data provide evidence for the existence of an inhibitory descending projection from medial and posterior septum to the NI that provides a "feedback loop" to modulate the comparatively more dense ascending NI projections to medial septum and hippocampus. Neural processes and associated behaviors activated or modulated by changes in hippocampal theta rhythm may depend on reciprocal connections between ascending and descending pathways rather than on unidirectional regulation via the medial septum. PMID:25269409

  11. Functional Architecture of the Inferior Colliculus Revealed with Voltage-Sensitive Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Lakshmi; Xiao, Ying; Sivaramakrishnan, Shobhana

    2013-01-01

    We used optical imaging with voltage-sensitive dyes to investigate the spatio-temporal dynamics of synaptically evoked activity in brain slices of the inferior colliculus (IC). Responses in transverse slices which preserve cross-frequency connections and in modified sagittal slices that preserve connections within frequency laminae were evoked by activating the lateral lemniscal tract. Comparing activity between small and large populations of cells revealed response areas in the central nucleus of the IC that were similar in magnitude but graded temporally. In transverse sections, these response areas are summed to generate a topographic response profile. Activity through the commissure to the contralateral IC required an excitation threshold that was reached when GABAergic inhibition was blocked. Within laminae, module interaction created temporal homeostasis. Diffuse activity evoked by a single lemniscal shock re-organized into distinct spatial and temporal compartments when stimulus trains were used, and generated a directional activity profile within the lamina. Using different stimulus patterns to activate subsets of microcircuits in the central nucleus of the IC, we found that localized responses evoked by low-frequency stimulus trains spread extensively when train frequency was increased, suggesting recruitment of silent microcircuits. Long stimulus trains activated a circuit specific to post-inhibitory rebound neurons. Rebound microcircuits were defined by a focal point of initiation that spread to an annular ring that oscillated between inhibition and excitation. We propose that much of the computing power of the IC is derived from local circuits, some of which are cell-type specific. These circuits organize activity within and across frequency laminae, and are critical in determining the stimulus-selectivity of auditory coding. PMID:23518906

  12. Revealing the Functions of the Transketolase Enzyme Isoforms in Rhodopseudomonas palustris Using a Systems Biology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chia-Wei; Chang, Ya-Ling; Chen, Shiang Jiuun; Kuo-Huang, Ling-Long; Liao, James C.; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhodopseudomonas palustris (R. palustris) is a purple non-sulfur anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium that belongs to the class of proteobacteria. It is capable of absorbing atmospheric carbon dioxide and converting it to biomass via the process of photosynthesis and the Calvin–Benson–Bassham (CBB) cycle. Transketolase is a key enzyme involved in the CBB cycle. Here, we reveal the functions of transketolase isoforms I and II in R. palustris using a systems biology approach. Methodology/Principal Findings By measuring growth ability, we found that transketolase could enhance the autotrophic growth and biomass production of R. palustris. Microarray and real-time quantitative PCR revealed that transketolase isoforms I and II were involved in different carbon metabolic pathways. In addition, immunogold staining demonstrated that the two transketolase isoforms had different spatial localizations: transketolase I was primarily associated with the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) but transketolase II was mostly distributed in the cytoplasm. Comparative proteomic analysis and network construction of transketolase over-expression and negative control (NC) strains revealed that protein folding, transcriptional regulation, amino acid transport and CBB cycle-associated carbon metabolism were enriched in the transketolase I over-expressed strain. In contrast, ATP synthesis, carbohydrate transport, glycolysis-associated carbon metabolism and CBB cycle-associated carbon metabolism were enriched in the transketolase II over-expressed strain. Furthermore, ATP synthesis assays showed a significant increase in ATP synthesis in the transketolase II over-expressed strain. A PEPCK activity assay showed that PEPCK activity was higher in transketolase over-expressed strains than in the negative control strain. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our results indicate that the two isoforms of transketolase in R. palustris could affect photoautotrophic growth through both common and divergent metabolic mechanisms. PMID:22174789

  13. Functional Genomics Analysis Reveals a MYC Signature Associated with a Poor Clinical Prognosis in Liposarcomas.

    PubMed

    Tran, Dat; Verma, Kundan; Ward, Kristin; Diaz, Dolores; Kataria, Esha; Torabi, Alireza; Almeida, Anna; Malfoy, Bernard; Stratford, Eva W; Mitchell, Dianne C; Bryan, Brad A

    2015-03-01

    Liposarcomas, which are malignant fatty tumors, are the second most common soft-tissue sarcomas. Several histologically defined liposarcoma subtypes exist, yet little is known about the molecular pathology that drives the diversity in these tumors. We used functional genomics to classify a panel of diverse liposarcoma cell lines based on hierarchical clustering of their gene expression profiles, indicating that liposarcoma gene expression profiles and histologic classification are not directly correlated. Boolean probability approaches based on cancer-associated properties identified differential expression in multiple genes, including MYC, as potentially affecting liposarcoma signaling networks and cancer outcome. We confirmed our method with a large panel of lipomatous tumors, revealing that MYC protein expression is correlated with patient survival. These data encourage increased reliance on genomic features in conjunction with histologic features for liposarcoma clinical characterization and lay the groundwork for using Boolean-based probabilities to identify prognostic biomarkers for clinical outcome in tumor patients. PMID:25622542

  14. Structure of Prokaryotic Polyamine Deacetylase Reveals Evolutionary Functional Relationships with Eukaryotic Histone Deacetylases

    SciTech Connect

    P Lombardi; H Angell; D Whittington; E Flynn; K Rajashankar; D Christianson

    2011-12-31

    Polyamines are a ubiquitous class of polycationic small molecules that can influence gene expression by binding to nucleic acids. Reversible polyamine acetylation regulates nucleic acid binding and is required for normal cell cycle progression and proliferation. Here, we report the structures of Mycoplana ramosa acetylpolyamine amidohydrolase (APAH) complexed with a transition state analogue and a hydroxamate inhibitor and an inactive mutant complexed with two acetylpolyamine substrates. The structure of APAH is the first of a histone deacetylase-like oligomer and reveals that an 18-residue insert in the L2 loop promotes dimerization and the formation of an 18 {angstrom} long 'L'-shaped active site tunnel at the dimer interface, accessible only to narrow and flexible substrates. The importance of dimerization for polyamine deacetylase function leads to the suggestion that a comparable dimeric or double-domain histone deacetylase could catalyze polyamine deacetylation reactions in eukaryotes.

  15. Lipidomic profiling reveals protective function of fatty acid oxidation in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity[S

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaolei; Yao, Dan; Gosnell, Blake A.; Chen, Chi

    2012-01-01

    During cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity, lipid accumulation occurs prior to necrotic cell death in the liver. However, the exact influences of cocaine on the homeostasis of lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In this study, the progression of subacute hepatotoxicity, including centrilobular necrosis in the liver and elevation of transaminase activity in serum, was observed in a three-day cocaine treatment, accompanying the disruption of triacylglycerol (TAG) turnover. Serum TAG level increased on day 1 of cocaine treatment but remained unchanged afterwards. In contrast, hepatic TAG level was elevated continuously during three days of cocaine treatment and was better correlated with the development of hepatotoxicity. Lipidomic analyses of serum and liver samples revealed time-dependent separation of the control and cocaine-treated mice in multivariate models, which was due to the accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines together with the disturbances of many bioactive phospholipid species in the cocaine-treated mice. An in vitro function assay confirmed the progressive inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation after the cocaine treatment. Cotreatment of fenofibrate significantly increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?)-targeted genes and the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation activity in the cocaine-treated mice, resulting in the inhibition of cocaine-induced acylcarnitine accumulation and other hepatotoxic effects. Overall, the results from this lipidomics-guided study revealed that the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation plays an important role in cocaine-induced liver injury. PMID:22904346

  16. Targeted mutagenesis of zebrafish antithrombin III triggers disseminated intravascular coagulation and thrombosis, revealing insight into function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Kretz, Colin A; Maeder, Morgan L; Richter, Catherine E; Tsao, Philip; Vo, Andy H; Huarng, Michael C; Rode, Thomas; Hu, Zhilian; Mehra, Rohit; Olson, Steven T; Joung, J Keith; Shavit, Jordan A

    2014-07-01

    Pathologic blood clotting is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, underlying deep vein thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Genetic predisposition to thrombosis is still poorly understood, and we hypothesize that there are many additional risk alleles and modifying factors remaining to be discovered. Mammalian models have contributed to our understanding of thrombosis, but are low throughput and costly. We have turned to the zebrafish, a tool for high-throughput genetic analysis. Using zinc finger nucleases, we show that disruption of the zebrafish antithrombin III (at3) locus results in spontaneous venous thrombosis in larvae. Although homozygous mutants survive into early adulthood, they eventually succumb to massive intracardiac thrombosis. Characterization of null fish revealed disseminated intravascular coagulation in larvae secondary to unopposed thrombin activity and fibrinogen consumption, which could be rescued by both human and zebrafish at3 complementary DNAs. Mutation of the human AT3-reactive center loop abolished the ability to rescue, but the heparin-binding site was dispensable. These results demonstrate overall conservation of AT3 function in zebrafish, but reveal developmental variances in the ability to tolerate excessive clot formation. The accessibility of early zebrafish development will provide unique methods for dissection of the underlying mechanisms of thrombosis. PMID:24782510

  17. Functional genomic analysis reveals overlapping and distinct features of chronologically long-lived yeast populations

    PubMed Central

    Wierman, Margaret B.; Matecic, Mirela; Valsakumar, Veena; Li, Mingguang; Smith, Daniel L.; Bekiranov, Stefan; Smith, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Yeast chronological lifespan (CLS) is extended by multiple genetic and environmental manipulations, including caloric restriction (CR). Understanding the common changes in molecular pathways induced by such manipulations could potentially reveal conserved longevity mechanisms. We therefore performed gene expression profiling on several long-lived yeast populations, including an ade4? mutant defective in de novo purine (AMP) biosynthesis, and a calorie restricted WT strain. CLS was also extended by isonicotinamide (INAM) or expired media derived from CR cultures. Comparisons between these diverse long-lived conditions revealed a common set of differentially regulated genes, several of which were potential longevity biomarkers. There was also enrichment for genes that function in CLS regulation, including a long-lived adenosine kinase mutant (ado1?) that links CLS regulation to the methyl cycle and AMP. Genes co-regulated between the CR and ade4? conditions were dominated by GO terms related to metabolism of alternative carbon sources, consistent with chronological longevity requiring efficient acetate/acetic acid utilization. Alternatively, treating cells with isonicotinamide (INAM) or the expired CR media resulted in GO terms predominantly related to cell wall remodeling, consistent with improved stress resistance and protection against external insults like acetic acid. Acetic acid therefore has both beneficial and detrimental effects on CLS. PMID:25769345

  18. Surround modulation in cortical orientation map revealed by optical imaging and its dependency on receptive field eccentricity.

    PubMed

    Uchimura, Kanami; Okamura, Jun-ya; Wang, Gang

    2012-11-01

    Optical imaging was used to investigate the difference in surround modulation on orientation map related to receptive field eccentricity in cat visual cortex. Presentation of center-surround stimuli at the center of gaze resulted in no clear surround modulation; however, significant modulation was observed in its corresponding cortical area when the center-surround stimuli were presented at 10° eccentricity in more peripheral parts of the visual field. Modulation was observed both in the response magnitude and in the spatial pattern of the response. Surround orientation perpendicular to the orientation of a center patch grating showed the largest modulation in the response magnitude. The modulation became weaker as the orientation difference between the center and surround gratings became smaller. Regardless of the orientations for the central patch gratings, a similar response spatial pattern was observed in the cortical region where the underlying cells had their receptive fields covering the central patch, if the stimuli were with the same surround gratings. These properties support the notion of a relative specialization for visual information processing in peripheral representations of cortical areas. PMID:22882341

  19. Microwave influence on the isolated heart function. 1: Effect of modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, A.G.; Dubovick, B.V.; Degtyariov, I.G.; Pronkevich, A.N. [Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Obninsk (Russian Federation). Medical Radiology Research Center

    1995-09-01

    Dependence of the microwave effect on modulation parameters (pulse width, duty ratio, and peak intensity) was studied in an isolated frog auricle preparation. The rate and amplitude of spontaneous auricle twitches were measured during and after a 2 min exposure to 915 or 885 MHz microwaves and were compared to preexposure values. The studied ranges of modulation parameters were: pulse width, 10{sup {minus}6}--10{sup {minus}2} s; duty ratio, 7:100000, and peak specific absorption rate, 100--3,000 W/kg. Combinations of the parameters were chosen by chance, and about 400 various exposure regimes were tested. The experiments established that no regime was effective unless the average microwave power was high enough to induce preparation heating (0.1--0.4 C). The twitch rate instantly increased, and the amplitude decreased, as the temperature rose; similar changes could be induced by equivalent conventional heating. the data provide evidence that the effect of short-term microwave exposure on the isolated heart pacemaker and contractile functions depends on pulse modulation just as much as modulation determines the average absorbed power. These functions demonstrated no specific dependence on exposure parameters such as frequency or power windows.

  20. Angiogenic functions of voltage-gated Na+ Channels in human endothelial cells: modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulos, Petros; Fraser, Scott P; Patterson, Lisa; Ahmad, Zahida; Burcu, Hakan; Ottaviani, Diego; Diss, James K J; Box, Carol; Eccles, Suzanne A; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2011-05-13

    Voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) activity has previously been reported in endothelial cells (ECs). However, the exact isoforms of VGSCs present, their mode(s) of action, and potential role(s) in angiogenesis have not been investigated. The main aims of this study were to determine the role of VGSC activity in angiogenic functions and to elucidate the potentially associated signaling mechanisms using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a model system. Real-time PCR showed that the primary functional VGSC ?- and ?-subunit isoforms in HUVECs were Nav1.5, Nav1.7, VGSC?1, and VGSC?3. Western blots verified that VGSC? proteins were expressed in HUVECs, and immunohistochemistry revealed VGSC? expression in mouse aortic ECs in vivo. Electrophysiological recordings showed that the channels were functional and suppressed by tetrodotoxin (TTX). VGSC activity modulated the following angiogenic properties of HUVECs: VEGF-induced proliferation or chemotaxis, tubular differentiation, and substrate adhesion. Interestingly, different aspects of angiogenesis were controlled by the different VGSC isoforms based on TTX sensitivity and effects of siRNA-mediated gene silencing. Additionally, we show for the first time that TTX-resistant (TTX-R) VGSCs (Nav1.5) potentiate VEGF-induced ERK1/2 activation through the PKC?-B-RAF signaling axis. We postulate that this potentiation occurs through modulation of VEGF-induced HUVEC depolarization and [Ca(2+)](i). We conclude that VGSCs regulate multiple angiogenic functions and VEGF signaling in HUVECs. Our results imply that targeting VGSC expression/activity could be a novel strategy for controlling angiogenesis. PMID:21385874

  1. The modulation of brain functional connectivity with manual acupuncture in healthy subjects: An electroencephalograph case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Han, Chun-Xiao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le; Li, Nuo

    2013-02-01

    Manual acupuncture is widely used for pain relief and stress control. Previous studies on acupuncture have shown its modulatory effects on the functional connectivity associated with one or a few preselected brain regions. To investigate how manual acupuncture modulates the organization of functional networks at a whole-brain level, we acupuncture at ST36 of a right leg to obtain electroencephalograph (EEG) signals. By coherence estimation, we determine the synchronizations between all pairwise combinations of EEG channels in three acupuncture states. The resulting synchronization matrices are converted into functional networks by applying a threshold, and the clustering coefficients and path lengths are computed as a function of threshold. The results show that acupuncture can increase functional connections and synchronizations between different brain areas. For a wide range of thresholds, the clustering coefficient during acupuncture and post-acupuncture period is higher than that during the pre-acupuncture control period, whereas the characteristic path length is shorter. We provide further support for the presence of “small-world" network characteristics in functional networks by using acupuncture. These preliminary results highlight the beneficial modulations of functional connectivity by manual acupuncture, which could contribute to the understanding of the effects of acupuncture on the entire brain, as well as the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying acupuncture. Moreover, the proposed method may be a useful approach to the further investigation of the complexity of patterns of interrelations between EEG channels.

  2. Metagenomes from High-Temperature Chemotrophic Systems Reveal Geochemical Controls on Microbial Community Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Inskeep, William P.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Jay, Zackary J.; Herrgard, Markus J.; Kozubal, Mark A.; Richardson, Toby H.; Macur, Richard E.; Hamamura, Natsuko; Jennings, Ryan deM.; Fouke, Bruce W.; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Roberto, Frank; Young, Mark; Schwartz, Ariel; Boyd, Eric S.; Badger, Jonathan H.; Mathur, Eric J.; Ortmann, Alice C.; Bateson, Mary; Geesey, Gill; Frazier, Marvin

    2010-01-01

    The Yellowstone caldera contains the most numerous and diverse geothermal systems on Earth, yielding an extensive array of unique high-temperature environments that host a variety of deeply-rooted and understudied Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. The combination of extreme temperature and chemical conditions encountered in geothermal environments often results in considerably less microbial diversity than other terrestrial habitats and offers a tremendous opportunity for studying the structure and function of indigenous microbial communities and for establishing linkages between putative metabolisms and element cycling. Metagenome sequence (14–15,000 Sanger reads per site) was obtained for five high-temperature (>65°C) chemotrophic microbial communities sampled from geothermal springs (or pools) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) that exhibit a wide range in geochemistry including pH, dissolved sulfide, dissolved oxygen and ferrous iron. Metagenome data revealed significant differences in the predominant phyla associated with each of these geochemical environments. Novel members of the Sulfolobales are dominant in low pH environments, while other Crenarchaeota including distantly-related Thermoproteales and Desulfurococcales populations dominate in suboxic sulfidic sediments. Several novel archaeal groups are well represented in an acidic (pH 3) Fe-oxyhydroxide mat, where a higher O2 influx is accompanied with an increase in archaeal diversity. The presence or absence of genes and pathways important in S oxidation-reduction, H2-oxidation, and aerobic respiration (terminal oxidation) provide insight regarding the metabolic strategies of indigenous organisms present in geothermal systems. Multiple-pathway and protein-specific functional analysis of metagenome sequence data corroborated results from phylogenetic analyses and clearly demonstrate major differences in metabolic potential across sites. The distribution of functional genes involved in electron transport is consistent with the hypothesis that geochemical parameters (e.g., pH, sulfide, Fe, O2) control microbial community structure and function in YNP geothermal springs. PMID:20333304

  3. Metagenomes from high-temperature chemotrophic systems reveal geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function.

    PubMed

    Inskeep, William P; Rusch, Douglas B; Jay, Zackary J; Herrgard, Markus J; Kozubal, Mark A; Richardson, Toby H; Macur, Richard E; Hamamura, Natsuko; Jennings, Ryan deM; Fouke, Bruce W; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Roberto, Frank; Young, Mark; Schwartz, Ariel; Boyd, Eric S; Badger, Jonathan H; Mathur, Eric J; Ortmann, Alice C; Bateson, Mary; Geesey, Gill; Frazier, Marvin

    2010-01-01

    The Yellowstone caldera contains the most numerous and diverse geothermal systems on Earth, yielding an extensive array of unique high-temperature environments that host a variety of deeply-rooted and understudied Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. The combination of extreme temperature and chemical conditions encountered in geothermal environments often results in considerably less microbial diversity than other terrestrial habitats and offers a tremendous opportunity for studying the structure and function of indigenous microbial communities and for establishing linkages between putative metabolisms and element cycling. Metagenome sequence (14-15,000 Sanger reads per site) was obtained for five high-temperature (>65 degrees C) chemotrophic microbial communities sampled from geothermal springs (or pools) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) that exhibit a wide range in geochemistry including pH, dissolved sulfide, dissolved oxygen and ferrous iron. Metagenome data revealed significant differences in the predominant phyla associated with each of these geochemical environments. Novel members of the Sulfolobales are dominant in low pH environments, while other Crenarchaeota including distantly-related Thermoproteales and Desulfurococcales populations dominate in suboxic sulfidic sediments. Several novel archaeal groups are well represented in an acidic (pH 3) Fe-oxyhydroxide mat, where a higher O2 influx is accompanied with an increase in archaeal diversity. The presence or absence of genes and pathways important in S oxidation-reduction, H2-oxidation, and aerobic respiration (terminal oxidation) provide insight regarding the metabolic strategies of indigenous organisms present in geothermal systems. Multiple-pathway and protein-specific functional analysis of metagenome sequence data corroborated results from phylogenetic analyses and clearly demonstrate major differences in metabolic potential across sites. The distribution of functional genes involved in electron transport is consistent with the hypothesis that geochemical parameters (e.g., pH, sulfide, Fe, O2) control microbial community structure and function in YNP geothermal springs. PMID:20333304

  4. In-depth proteomic analyses of ovarian cancer cell line exosomes reveals differential enrichment of functional categories compared to the NCI 60 proteome.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ankit; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Ignatchenko, Alex; Mejia-Guerrero, Salvador; Kislinger, Thomas

    2014-03-21

    Molecular communication between cancer cells and its stromal microenvironment is a key factor for cancer progression. Alongside classic secretory pathways, it has recently been proposed that small membranous vesicles are alternative mediators of intercellular communication. Exosomes carry an effector-rich proteome with the ability to modulate various functional properties of the recipient cell. In this study, exosomes isolated from four epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines (OVCAR3, OVCAR433, OVCAR5 and SKOV3) were characterized using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Using an optimized workflow consisting of efficient exosome solubilization and the latest generation of proteomic instrumentation, we demonstrate improved detection depth. Systematic comparison of our cancer cell line exosome proteome against public data (Exocarta) and the recently published NCI 60 proteome revealed enrichment of functional categories related to signaling biology and biomarker discovery. PMID:24434149

  5. A non-coding transcript of nephronectin promotes osteoblast differentiation by modulating microRNA functions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shao-Chen; Fang, Ling; Wang, Chia-Hui; Kahai, Shireen; Deng, Zhaoqun; Yang, Burton B

    2011-08-19

    We investigated the roles of the non-coding transcripts and found that expression of a fragment containing the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of nephronectin in osteoblast progenitor cells MC3T3-E1 promoted cell differentiation dramatically. We hypothesized that the ectopically expressed 3'-UTR binds microRNAs and modulates their functions. ?-Catenin and GSK3? were up-regulated in the 3'-UTR-transfected cells, contributing to the increased cell differentiation, through reduction of EGFR and ERK phosphorylation. Activator of GSK3? promoted differentiation, while inhibitor of GSK3? blocked differentiation. Our results indicate that the non-coding transcripts are important in regulating cell activities and may have potential application for modulating endogenous microRNA functions. PMID:21784074

  6. Möbius-strip-like columnar functional connections are revealed in somato-sensory receptive field centroids.

    PubMed

    Wright, James Joseph; Bourke, Paul David; Favorov, Oleg Vyachesslavovich

    2014-01-01

    Receptive fields of neurons in the forelimb region of areas 3b and 1 of primary somatosensory cortex, in cats and monkeys, were mapped using extracellular recordings obtained sequentially from nearly radial penetrations. Locations of the field centroids indicated the presence of a functional system in which cortical homotypic representations of the limb surfaces are entwined in three-dimensional Möbius-strip-like patterns of synaptic connections. Boundaries of somatosensory receptive field in nested groups irregularly overlie the centroid order, and are interpreted as arising from the superposition of learned connections upon the embryonic order. Since the theory of embryonic synaptic self-organization used to model these results was devised and earlier used to explain findings in primary visual cortex, the present findings suggest the theory may be of general application throughout cortex and may reveal a modular functional synaptic system, which, only in some parts of the cortex, and in some species, is manifest as anatomical ordering into columns. PMID:25400552

  7. Möbius-strip-like columnar functional connections are revealed in somato-sensory receptive field centroids

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James Joseph; Bourke, Paul David; Favorov, Oleg Vyachesslavovich

    2014-01-01

    Receptive fields of neurons in the forelimb region of areas 3b and 1 of primary somatosensory cortex, in cats and monkeys, were mapped using extracellular recordings obtained sequentially from nearly radial penetrations. Locations of the field centroids indicated the presence of a functional system in which cortical homotypic representations of the limb surfaces are entwined in three-dimensional Möbius-strip-like patterns of synaptic connections. Boundaries of somatosensory receptive field in nested groups irregularly overlie the centroid order, and are interpreted as arising from the superposition of learned connections upon the embryonic order. Since the theory of embryonic synaptic self-organization used to model these results was devised and earlier used to explain findings in primary visual cortex, the present findings suggest the theory may be of general application throughout cortex and may reveal a modular functional synaptic system, which, only in some parts of the cortex, and in some species, is manifest as anatomical ordering into columns. PMID:25400552

  8. Comparative materials differences revealed in engineered bone as a function of cell-specific differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentleman, Eileen; Swain, Robin J.; Evans, Nicholas D.; Boonrungsiman, Suwimon; Jell, Gavin; Ball, Michael D.; Shean, Tamaryn A. V.; Oyen, Michelle L.; Porter, Alexandra; Stevens, Molly M.

    2009-09-01

    An important aim of regenerative medicine is to restore tissue function with implantable, laboratory-grown constructs that contain tissue-specific cells that replicate the function of their counterparts in the healthy native tissue. It remains unclear, however, whether cells used in bone regeneration applications produce a material that mimics the structural and compositional complexity of native bone. By applying multivariate analysis techniques to micro-Raman spectra of mineralized nodules formed in vitro, we reveal cell-source-dependent differences in interactions between multiple bone-like mineral environments. Although osteoblasts and adult stem cells exhibited bone-specific biological activities and created a material with many of the hallmarks of native bone, the `bone nodules' formed from embryonic stem cells were an order of magnitude less stiff, and lacked the distinctive nanolevel architecture and complex biomolecular and mineral composition noted in the native tissue. Understanding the biological mechanisms of bone formation in vitro that contribute to cell-source-specific materials differences may facilitate the development of clinically successful engineered bone.

  9. Yeast mitochondrial protein-protein interactions reveal diverse complexes and disease-relevant functional relationships.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ke; Musso, Gabriel; Vlasblom, James; Jessulat, Matthew; Deineko, Viktor; Negroni, Jacopo; Mosca, Roberto; Malty, Ramy; Nguyen-Tran, Diem-Hang; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Minic, Zoran; Freywald, Tanya; Phanse, Sadhna; Xiang, Qian; Freywald, Andrew; Aloy, Patrick; Zhang, Zhaolei; Babu, Mohan

    2015-02-01

    Although detailed, focused, and mechanistic analyses of associations among mitochondrial proteins (MPs) have identified their importance in varied biological processes, a systematic understanding of how MPs function in concert both with one another and with extra-mitochondrial proteins remains incomplete. Consequently, many questions regarding the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of human disease remain unanswered. To address this, we compiled all existing mitochondrial physical interaction data for over 1200 experimentally defined yeast MPs and, through bioinformatic analysis, identified hundreds of heteromeric MP complexes having extensive associations both within and outside the mitochondria. We provide support for these complexes through structure prediction analysis, morphological comparisons of deletion strains, and protein co-immunoprecipitation. The integration of these MP complexes with reported genetic interaction data reveals substantial crosstalk between MPs and non-MPs and identifies novel factors in endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial organization, membrane structure, and mitochondrial lipid homeostasis. More than one-third of these MP complexes are conserved in humans, with many containing members linked to clinical pathologies, enabling us to identify genes with putative disease function through guilt-by-association. Although still remaining incomplete, existing mitochondrial interaction data suggests that the relevant molecular machinery is modular, yet highly integrated with non-mitochondrial processes. PMID:25546499

  10. Splicing Functions and Global Dependency on Fission Yeast Slu7 Reveal Diversity in Spliceosome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shataparna; Khandelia, Piyush; Melangath, Geetha; Bashir, Samirul; Nagampalli, Vijaykrishna

    2013-01-01

    The multiple short introns in Schizosaccharomyces pombe genes with degenerate cis sequences and atypically positioned polypyrimidine tracts make an interesting model to investigate canonical and alternative roles for conserved splicing factors. Here we report functions and interactions of the S. pombe slu7+ (spslu7+) gene product, known from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human in vitro reactions to assemble into spliceosomes after the first catalytic reaction and to dictate 3? splice site choice during the second reaction. By using a missense mutant of this essential S. pombe factor, we detected a range of global splicing derangements that were validated in assays for the splicing status of diverse candidate introns. We ascribe widespread, intron-specific SpSlu7 functions and have deduced several features, including the branch nucleotide-to-3? splice site distance, intron length, and the impact of its A/U content at the 5? end on the intron's dependence on SpSlu7. The data imply dynamic substrate-splicing factor relationships in multiintron transcripts. Interestingly, the unexpected early splicing arrest in spslu7-2 revealed a role before catalysis. We detected a salt-stable association with U5 snRNP and observed genetic interactions with spprp1+, a homolog of human U5-102k factor. These observations together point to an altered recruitment and dependence on SpSlu7, suggesting its role in facilitating transitions that promote catalysis, and highlight the diversity in spliceosome assembly. PMID:23754748

  11. Principal Component Analysis reveals correlation of cavities evolution and functional motions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Desdouits, Nathan; Nilges, Michael; Blondel, Arnaud

    2015-02-01

    Protein conformation has been recognized as the key feature determining biological function, as it determines the position of the essential groups specifically interacting with substrates. Hence, the shape of the cavities or grooves at the protein surface appears to drive those functions. However, only a few studies describe the geometrical evolution of protein cavities during molecular dynamics simulations (MD), usually with a crude representation. To unveil the dynamics of cavity geometry evolution, we developed an approach combining cavity detection and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This approach was applied to four systems subjected to MD (lysozyme, sperm whale myoglobin, Dengue envelope protein and EF-CaM complex). PCA on cavities allows us to perform efficient analysis and classification of the geometry diversity explored by a cavity. Additionally, it reveals correlations between the evolutions of the cavities and structures, and can even suggest how to modify the protein conformation to induce a given cavity geometry. It also helps to perform fast and consensual clustering of conformations according to cavity geometry. Finally, using this approach, we show that both carbon monoxide (CO) location and transfer among the different xenon sites of myoglobin are correlated with few cavity evolution modes of high amplitude. This correlation illustrates the link between ligand diffusion and the dynamic network of internal cavities. PMID:25424655

  12. Functional Modules for Teaching Mechatronics to non-EE Engineering Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victor Giurgiutiu; Brian Mouzon

    2003-01-01

    The Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of South Carolina has embarked upon a project to enhance the Mechatronics education of non-EE engineering students. NSF funds the project with cost-share by the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the College of Engineering and Information Technology. An essential part of this project is the construction of functional modules for teaching hands-on

  13. Instrumentation system for determination and compensation of electro-optic modulator transfer function drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Bui, Dang; Thanh Nguyen, Chi; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Zyss, Joseph; Journet, Bernard

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents an instrumentation system developed to improve the operation of an electro-optic modulator (EOM). During their operating time, EOM are subject to a drift of the optical transfer function; therefore the initial tuning of the bias point no longer corresponds to the best characteristics of the device. Because of this drift the EOM no longer behaves linearly and there is degradation during time of the performances of the system in which the EOM is included. To determine the drift, a low frequency modulation signal (at 500 Hz) is applied to the EOM and the second harmonic component at 1 kHz is detected. A new criterion is introduced for estimating the nonlinearity and for compensating the drift of the transfer function, keeping the optical bias point at the quadrature position. Temperature changes significantly influence the EOM characteristics. Thus, the instrumentation system has to be simultaneously developed with temperature control and drift compensation of the optical transfer function. The design is based on PSOC microcontrollers for tuning the different parameters, for data acquisition and regulation process. By setting the temperature to some specific values, it is possible to test the behaviour of the modulator. Finally, by using both temperature and bias point control, a significant reduction of the nonlinearity can be obtained during 2 h of experiment: the biasing point at the quadrature point of the transfer function which corresponds to the most linear behaviour can be stabilized within ±0.22% of the half-wave voltage. All the works presented here were carried out with a Mach-Zehnder intensity modulator made of lithium niobate, but it is also possible to apply this method to other kinds of material, for example polymer material.

  14. The hypoxia inducible factor HIF-1 functions as both a positive and negative modulator of aging

    PubMed Central

    Leiser, Scott F.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2014-01-01

    In the past year and a half, five studies have independently established a direct connection between the hypoxic response transcription factor, HIF-1, and aging in Caenorhabditis elegans. These studies demonstrated that HIF-1 can both promote and limit longevity via pathways that are mechanistically distinct. Here we review the current state of knowledge regarding modulation of aging by HIF-1 and speculate on potential aspects of HIF-1 function that may be relevant for mammalian longevity and healthspan. PMID:20707608

  15. A non-coding transcript of nephronectin promotes osteoblast differentiation by modulating microRNA functions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shao-Chen Lee; Ling Fang; Chia-Hui Wang; Shireen Kahai; Zhaoqun Deng; Burton B. Yang

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the roles of the non-coding transcripts and found that expression of a fragment containing the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR) of nephronectin in osteoblast progenitor cells MC3T3-E1 promoted cell differentiation dramatically. We hypothesized that the ectopically expressed 3?-UTR binds microRNAs and modulates their functions. ?-Catenin and GSK3? were up-regulated in the 3?-UTR-transfected cells, contributing to the increased cell differentiation, through

  16. Metagenomics Reveals Microbial Community Composition And Function With Depth In Arctic Permafrost Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, J.; Tas, N.; Wu, Y.; Ulrich, C.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Torn, M. S.; Hubbard, S. S.; Chakraborty, R.; Graham, D. E.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic is one of the most climatically sensitive regions on Earth and current surveys show that permafrost degradation is widespread in arctic soils. Biogeochemical feedbacks of permafrost thaw are expected to be dominated by the release of currently stored carbon back into the atmosphere as CO2 and CH4. Understanding the dynamics of C release from permafrost requires assessment of microbial functions from different soil compartments. To this end, as part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment in the Arctic, we collected two replicate permafrost cores (1m and 3m deep) from a transitional polygon near Barrow, AK. At this location, permafrost starts from 0.5m in depth and is characterized by variable ice content and higher pH than surface soils. Prior to sectioning, the cores were CT-scanned to determine the physical heterogeneity throughout the cores. In addition to detailed geochemical characterization, we used Illumina MiSeq technology to sequence 16SrRNA genes throughout the depths of the cores at 1 cm intervals. Selected depths were also chosen for metagenome sequencing of total DNA (including phylogenetic and functional genes) using the Illumina HiSeq platform. The 16S rRNA gene sequence data revealed that the microbial community composition and diversity changed dramatically with depth. The microbial diversity decreased sharply below the first few centimeters of the permafrost and then gradually increased in deeper layers. Based on the metagenome sequence data, the permafrost microbial communities were found to contain members with a large metabolic potential for carbon processing, including pathways for fermentation and methanogenesis. The surface active layers had more representatives of Verrucomicrobia (potential methane oxidizers) whereas the deep permafrost layers were dominated by several different species of Actinobacteria. The latter are known to have a diverse metabolic capability and are able to adapt to stress by entering a dormant yet viable state. In addition, several isolates were obtained from different depths throughout the cores, including methanogens from some of the deeper layers. Together these data present a new view of potential geochemical cycles carried out by microorganisms in permafrost and reveal how community members and functions are distributed with depth.

  17. Proteomic Profiling of SupT1 Cells Reveal Modulation of Host Proteins by HIV-1 Nef Variants

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Reshu; Gupta, Sudipti; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Tripathi, Anil Kumar; Tripathi, Raj Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Nef is an accessory viral protein that promotes HIV-1 replication, facilitating alterations in cellular pathways via multiple protein-protein interactions. The advent of proteomics has expanded the focus on better identification of novel molecular pathways regulating disease progression. In this study, nef was sequenced from randomly selected patients, however, sequence variability identified did not elicited any specific mutation that could have segregated HIV-1 patients in different stages of disease progression. To explore the difference in Nef functionality based on sequence variability we used proteomics approach. Proteomic profiling was done to compare the effect of Nef variants in host cell protein expression. 2DGE in control and Nef transfected SupT1 cells demonstrated several differentially expressed proteins. Fourteen protein spots were detected with more than 1.5 fold difference. Significant down regulation was seen in six unique protein spots in the Nef treated cells. Proteins were identified as Cyclophilin A, EIF5A-1 isoform B, Rho GDI 1 isoform a, VDAC1, OTUB1 and ?-enolase isoform 1 (ENO1) through LC-MS/MS. The differential expression of the 6 proteins was analyzed by Real time PCR, Western blotting and Immunofluorescence studies with two Nef variants (RP14 and RP01) in SupT1 cells. There was contrasting difference between the effect of these Nef variants upon the expression of these six proteins. Downregulation of ?-enolase (ENO1), VDAC1 and OTUB1 was more significant by Nef RP01 whereas Cyclophilin A and RhoGDI were found to be more downregulated by Nef RP14. This difference in Nef variants upon host protein expression was also studied through a site directed mutant of Nef RP01 (55AAAAAAA61) and the effect was found to be reversed. Deciphering the role of these proteins mediated by Nef variants will open a new avenue of research in understanding Nef mediated pathogenesis. Overall study determines modulation of cellular protein expression in T cells by HIV-1 Nef variants. PMID:25874870

  18. NCS-1 associates with adenosine A2A receptors and modulates receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gemma; Hradsky, Johannes; Lluís, Carmen; Casadó, Vicent; McCormick, Peter J.; Kreutz, Michael R.; Mikhaylova, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Modulation of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling by local changes in intracellular calcium concentration is an established function of Calmodulin (CaM) which is known to interact with many GPCRs. Less is known about the functional role of the closely related neuronal EF-hand Ca2+-sensor proteins that frequently associate with CaM targets with different functional outcome. In the present study we aimed to investigate if a target of CaM—the A2A adenosine receptor is able to associate with two other neuronal calcium binding proteins (nCaBPs), namely NCS-1 and caldendrin. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and co-immunoprecipitation experiments we show the existence of A2A—NCS-1 complexes in living cells whereas caldendrin did not associate with A2A receptors under the conditions tested. Interestingly, NCS-1 binding modulated downstream A2A receptor intracellular signaling in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Taken together this study provides further evidence that neuronal Ca2+-sensor proteins play an important role in modulation of GPCR signaling. PMID:22529776

  19. Comparison of REST Cistromes across Human Cell Types Reveals Common and Context-Specific Functions

    PubMed Central

    Rockowitz, Shira; Lien, Wen-Hui; Pedrosa, Erika; Wei, Gang; Lin, Mingyan; Zhao, Keji; Lachman, Herbert M.; Fuchs, Elaine; Zheng, Deyou

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the transcriptional functions of REST are much broader than repressing neuronal genes in non-neuronal systems. Whether REST occupies similar chromatin regions in different cell types and how it interacts with other transcriptional regulators to execute its functions in a context-dependent manner has not been adequately investigated. We have applied ChIP-seq analysis to identify the REST cistrome in human CD4+ T cells and compared it with published data from 15 other cell types. We found that REST cistromes were distinct among cell types, with REST binding to several tumor suppressors specifically in cancer cells, whereas 7% of the REST peaks in non-neuronal cells were ubiquitously called and <25% were identified for ?5 cell types. Nevertheless, using a quantitative metric directly comparing raw ChIP-seq signals, we found the majority (?80%) was shared by ?2 cell types. Integration with RNA-seq data showed that REST binding was generally correlated with low gene expression. Close examination revealed that multiple contexts were correlated with reduced expression of REST targets, e.g., the presence of a cognate RE1 motif and cellular specificity of REST binding. These contexts were shown to play a role in differential corepressor recruitment. Furthermore, transcriptional outcome was highly influenced by REST cofactors, e.g., SIN3 and EZH2 co-occupancy marked higher and lower expression of REST targets, respectively. Unexpectedly, the REST cistrome in differentiated neurons exhibited unique features not observed in non-neuronal cells, e.g., the lack of RE1 motifs and an association with active gene expression. Finally, our analysis demonstrated how REST could differentially regulate a transcription network constituted of miRNAs, REST complex and neuronal factors. Overall, our findings of contexts playing critical roles in REST occupancy and regulatory outcome provide insights into the molecular interactions underlying REST's diverse functions, and point to novel roles of REST in differentiated neurons. PMID:24922058

  20. Launch and Functional Considerations Guiding the Scaling and Design of Rigid Inflatable Habitat Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, L.

    2002-01-01

    The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) has a long history of projects that involve design of space structures, including habitats for low-Earth orbit (LEO) and planetary applications. Most of these facilities and component systems are planned to comply with size, geometry and mass restrictions imposed by the Space Shuttle Orbiter's payload and lift/landing abort restrictions. These constraints limit launch elements to approximately 15 ft. diameter, 40 ft. long cylindrical dimensions weighing no more than approximately 25 metric tons. It is clear that future success of commercial space programs such as tourism will hinge upon the availability of bigger and more efficient Earth to LEO launch vehicles which can greatly reduce transportation and operational costs. This will enable development and utilization of larger habitat modules and other infrastructure elements which can be deployed with fewer launches and on-orbit assembly procedures. The sizing of these new heavy lift launchers should be scaled to optimize habitat functionality and efficiency, just as the habitat designs must consider optimization of launch vehicle economy. SICSA's planning studies address these vehicle and habitat optimization priorities as parallel and interdependent considerations. The allowable diameter of habitat modules established by launch vehicle capacity dictates functionally acceptable internal configuration options. Analyses of these options relative to practical dimensions for Earth-to-orbit launch vehicle scaling were conducted for two general schemes. The "bologna slice" configuration stacks the floors within a predominately cylindrical or spherical envelope, producing circular areas. The "banana split" approach divides a cylindrical module longitudinally, creating floors that are generally rectangular in shape. The assessments established minimum sizes for reasonable utility and efficiency. The bologna slice option. This configuration is only acceptable for modules with diameters of approximately 45 ft. or more. Smaller dimensions will severely limit maximum sight lines, creating claustrophobic conditions. Equipment racks and other elements typically located around internal parameters will further reduce open areas, and vertical circulation access ways between floor levels will diminish usable space even more. However this scheme can work very well for larger diameter habitats, particularly for surface applications where a relatively wide-based/low height module is to be landed vertically. The banana split option. A longitudinal floor orientation can serve very satisfactorily for modules with diameters of 15 ft. or more. Unlike the bologna slice's circular floors, the rectangular spaces offer considerable versatility to accommodate diverse equipment and functional arrangements. Modules smaller than 15 ft. in diameter (the International Space Station standard) will be incompatible with efficient equipment rack design and layouts due to tight-radius wall curvatures. Beyond the 15 ft. diameters, it is logical to scale the modules at dimensional increments based upon the number of desired floors, allowing approximately 8-9 ft. of height/level. Current SICSA Mars mission planning advocates development of new launchers with payload accommodations for 45 ft. diameter, 200 metric ton cargo elements. This large booster will offer launch economies along with habitat scaling advantages. Launch system design efficiencies are influenced by the amount of functional drag that results as the vehicle passes through the Earth's atmosphere. These drag losses are subject to a "cubed-squared law". As the launchcraft's external dimensions increase, its surface area increases with the square of the dimension, while the volume increases with the cube. Since drag is a function of surface, not volume, increasing the vehicle size will reduce proportional drag losses. For this reason, the huge Saturn V Moon rocket experienced relatively low drag. Module pressure envelope geometries also influence internal l

  1. DENSE: efficient and prior knowledge-driven discovery of phenotype-associated protein functional modules

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Identifying cellular subsystems that are involved in the expression of a target phenotype has been a very active research area for the past several years. In this paper, cellular subsystem refers to a group of genes (or proteins) that interact and carry out a common function in the cell. Most studies identify genes associated with a phenotype on the basis of some statistical bias, others have extended these statistical methods to analyze functional modules and biological pathways for phenotype-relatedness. However, a biologist might often have a specific question in mind while performing such analysis and most of the resulting subsystems obtained by the existing methods might be largely irrelevant to the question in hand. Arguably, it would be valuable to incorporate biologist's knowledge about the phenotype into the algorithm. This way, it is anticipated that the resulting subsytems would not only be related to the target phenotype but also contain information that the biologist is likely to be interested in. Results In this paper we introduce a fast and theoretically guranteed method called DENSE (Dense and ENriched Subgraph Enumeration) that can take in as input a biologist's prior knowledge as a set of query proteins and identify all the dense functional modules in a biological network that contain some part of the query vertices. The density (in terms of the number of network egdes) and the enrichment (the number of query proteins in the resulting functional module) can be manipulated via two parameters ? and ?, respectively. Conclusion This algorithm has been applied to the protein functional association network of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824, a hydrogen producing, acid-tolerant organism. The algorithm was able to verify relationships known to exist in literature and also some previously unknown relationships including those with regulatory and signaling functions. Additionally, we were also able to hypothesize that some uncharacterized proteins are likely associated with the target phenotype. The DENSE code can be downloaded from http://www.freescience.org/cs/DENSE/ PMID:22024446

  2. Dynamics of alpha control: Preparatory suppression of posterior alpha oscillations by frontal modulators revealed with combined EEG and event-related optical signal (EROS)

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, Kyle E.; Beck, Diane M.; Ro, Tony; Maclin, Edward L.; Low, Kathy A.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the dynamics of brain processes facilitating conscious experience of external stimuli. Previously we proposed that alpha (8-12 Hz) oscillations, which fluctuate with both sustained and directed attention, represent a pulsed inhibition of ongoing sensory brain activity. Here we tested the prediction that inhibitory alpha oscillations in visual cortex are modulated by top-down signals from frontoparietal attention networks. We measured modulations in phase-coherent alpha oscillations from superficial frontal, parietal, and occipital cortices using the event-related optical signal (EROS), a measure of neuronal activity affording high spatiotemporal resolution, along with concurrently-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG), while subjects performed a visual target-detection task. The pre-target alpha oscillations measured with EEG and EROS from posterior areas were larger for subsequently undetected targets, supporting alpha's inhibitory role. Using EROS, we localized brain correlates of these awareness-related alpha oscillations measured at the scalp to the cuneus and precuneus. Crucially, EROS alpha suppression correlated with posterior EEG alpha power across subjects. Sorting the EROS data based on EEG alpha power quartiles to investigate alpha modulators revealed that suppression of posterior alpha was preceded by increased activity in regions of the dorsal attention network, and decreased activity in regions of the cingulo-opercular network. Cross-correlations revealed the temporal dynamics of activity within these preparatory networks prior to posterior alpha modulation. The novel combination of EEG and EROS afforded localization of the sources and correlates of alpha oscillations and their temporal relationships, supporting our proposal that top-down control from attention networks modulates both posterior alpha and awareness of visual stimuli. PMID:24702458

  3. Presence and Function of Dopamine Transporter (DAT) in Stallion Sperm: Dopamine Modulates Sperm Motility and Acrosomal Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Alejandra A.; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan Enric; Ramírez-Reveco, Alfredo; Concha, Ilona I.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+), as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM) treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909) and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility. PMID:25402186

  4. The roles of evolutionarily conserved functional modules in cilia-related trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ching-Hwa; Leroux, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are present across most eukaryotic phyla and have diverse sensory and motility roles in animal physiology, cell signalling and development. Their biogenesis and maintenance depend on vesicular and intraciliary (intraflagellar) trafficking pathways that share conserved structural and functional modules. The functional units of the interconnected pathways, which include proteins involved in membrane coating as well as small GTPases and their accessory factors, were first experimentally associated with canonical vesicular trafficking. These components are, however, ancient, having been co-opted by the ancestral eukaryote to establish the ciliary organelle, and their study can inform us about ciliary biology in higher organisms. PMID:24296415

  5. Altered functional connectivity in seizure onset zones revealed by fMRI intrinsic connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Jagriti; Papademetris, Xenophon; Tokoglu, Fuyuze; Negishi, Michiro; Scheinost, Dustin; Farooque, Pue; Blumenfeld, Hal; Spencer, Dennis D.; Constable, R. Todd

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate functional connectivity (FC) changes in epileptogenic networks in intractable partial epilepsy obtained from resting-state fMRI by using intrinsic connectivity contrast (ICC), a voxel-based network measure of degree that reflects the number of connections to each voxel. Methods: We measured differences between intrahemispheric- and interhemispheric-ICC (ICCintra?inter) that could reveal localized connectivity abnormalities in epileptogenic zones while more global network changes would be eliminated when subtracting these values. The ICCintra?inter map was compared with the seizure onset zone (SOZ) based on intracranial EEG (icEEG) recordings in 29 patients with at least 1 year of postsurgical follow-up. Two independent reviewers blindly interpreted the icEEG and fMRI data, and the concordance rates were compared for various clinical factors. Results: Concordance between the icEEG SOZ and ICCintra?inter map was observed in 72.4% (21/29) of the patients, which was higher in patients with good surgical outcome, especially in those patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) or lateral temporal seizure localization. Concordance was also better in the extratemporal lobe epilepsy than the TLE group. In 85.7% (18/21) of the cases, the ICCintra?inter values were negative in the SOZ, indicating decreased FC within the epileptic hemisphere relative to between hemispheres. Conclusions: Assessing alterations in FC using fMRI-ICC map can help localize the SOZ, which has potential as a noninvasive presurgical diagnostic tool to improve surgical outcome. In addition, the method reveals that, in focal epilepsy, both intrahemispheric- and interhemispheric-FC may be altered, in the presence of both regional as well as global network abnormalities. PMID:25391304

  6. Metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and single cell genomics reveal functional response of active Oceanospirillales to Gulf oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Olivia U.; Hazen, Terry C.; Borglin, Sharon; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Dubinsky, Eric A.; Fortney, Julian L.; Han, James; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Hultman, Jenni; Lamendella, Regina; Mackelprang, Rachel; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tom, Lauren M.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Woyke, Tanja; Zhou, Jizhong; Rubin, Edward M.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2012-06-12

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico resulted in a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume that caused a shift in the indigenous microbial community composition with unknown ecological consequences. Early in the spill history, a bloom of uncultured, thus uncharacterized, members of the Oceanospirillales was previously detected, but their role in oil disposition was unknown. Here our aim was to determine the functional role of the Oceanospirillales and other active members of the indigenous microbial community using deep sequencing of community DNA and RNA, as well as single-cell genomics. Shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing revealed that genes for motility, chemotaxis and aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation were significantly enriched and expressed in the hydrocarbon plume samples compared with uncontaminated seawater collected from plume depth. In contrast, although genes coding for degradation of more recalcitrant compounds, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified in the metagenomes, they were expressed at low levels, or not at all based on analysis of the metatranscriptomes. Isolation and sequencing of two Oceanospirillales single cells revealed that both cells possessed genes coding for n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. Specifically, the near-complete pathway for cyclohexane oxidation in the Oceanospirillales single cells was elucidated and supported by both metagenome and metatranscriptome data. The draft genome also included genes for chemotaxis, motility and nutrient acquisition strategies that were also identified in the metagenomes and metatranscriptomes. These data point towards a rapid response of members of the Oceanospirillales to aliphatic hydrocarbons in the deep sea.

  7. Transcriptome Analysis of Tomato Flower Pedicel Tissues Reveals Abscission Zone-Specific Modulation of Key Meristem Activity Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiuli; Zhang, Rongzhi; Wu, Liang; Liang, Yanchun; Mao, Long

    2013-01-01

    Tomato flower abscises at the anatomically distinct abscission zone that separates the pedicel into basal and apical portions. During abscission, cell separation occurs only at the abscission zone indicating distinctive molecular regulation in its cells. We conducted a transcriptome analysis of tomato pedicel tissues during ethylene promoted abscission. We found that the abscission zone was the most active site with the largest set of differentially expressed genes when compared with basal and apical portions. Gene Ontology analyses revealed enriched transcription regulation and hydrolase activities in the abscission zone. We also demonstrate coordinated responses of hormone and cell wall related genes. Besides, a number of ESTs representing homologs of key Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem activity genes were found to be preferentially expressed in the abscission zone, including WUSCHEL (WUS), KNAT6, LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN PROTEIN 1(LBD1), and BELL-like homeodomain protein 1 (BLH1), as well as tomato axillary meristem genes BLIND (Bl) and LATERAL SUPPRESSOR (Ls). More interestingly, the homologs of WUS and the potential functional partner OVATE FAMILIY PROTEIN (OFP) were subsequently down regulated during abscission while Bl and AGL12 were continuously and specifically induced in the abscission zone. The expression patterns of meristem activity genes corroborate the idea that cells of the abscission zone confer meristem-like nature and coincide with the course of abscission and post-abscission cell differentiation. Our data therefore propose a possible regulatory scheme in tomato involving meristem genes that may be required not only for the abscission zone development, but also for abscission. PMID:23390523

  8. REVEALING PROBABLE UNIVERSAL FEATURES IN THE LOWER RED GIANT BRANCH LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V. V. [Instituto de AstronomIa, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Avenida Angamos 0610, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile)], E-mail: vkravtsov@ucn.cl

    2009-06-15

    This paper aims at demonstrating, for the first time, very probable universal peculiarities of the evolution of stars in the lower red giant branch (RGB) of Galactic globular clusters (GCs), reflected in two corresponding dips in the luminosity functions (LFs). By relying on the database of Hubble Space Telescope photometry of GCs, we analyze the lower RGB LFs of a sample of 18 GCs in a wide metallicity range, {delta}[Fe/H] {approx} 1.9 dex. We first show that in the F555W-(F439W-F555W) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), the lower RGB of GCs, except for the most metal-poor of them, frequently shows an apparent 'knee'. It reveals itself as a fairly abrupt change of the RGB slope. At the same luminosity level, the RGB LFs show a feature in the form of a more or less pronounced dip. We find that the magnitude difference between the RGB base and the given feature is, on average, around {delta} F555W{sup dip} {sub base}{approx} 1.4 mag. It shows a marginal variation with metallicity, if any, comparable to the error. At the same time, the magnitude difference between the dip and the RGB bump, {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip}, decreases with increasing metallicity and falls within the range 0.8 {approx}< {delta} F555W{sup bump} {sub dip} {approx}< 1.7 mag. Generalized LFs (GLFs) have been obtained for three subsamples of GCs within limited metallicity ranges and with different horizontal branch (HB) morphology. They reproduce the 'knee-related' dip that is statistically significant in two of the GLFs. This feature turns out to be more pronounced in the GLFs of GCs with either the blue or red HB morphology than with the intermediate one. The same GLFs also reveal an additional probable universal dip. It shows up below the RGB bump at {delta} F555W slightly increasing from {approx}0.3 to {approx}0.5 mag with increasing metallicity. Also, the statistical significance of this 'prebump' dip increases, on average, toward higher metallicity. Except for the well known RGB bump, no other universal features corresponding to those found here were so far empirically revealed or theoretically predicted in the lower RGB of GCs.

  9. X-ray modulation transfer functions of photostimulable phosphor image plates and scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Holland, Glenn E.; Hudson, Lawrence T.; Henins, Albert

    2008-11-01

    The modulation transfer functions of two types of photostimulable phosphor image plates were determined in the 10 keV to 50 keV x-ray energy range using a resolution test pattern with up to 10 line pairs per mm (LP/mm) and a wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer. Techniques were developed for correcting for the partial transmittance of the high energy x rays through the lead bars of the resolution test pattern, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined from the measured change in contrast with LP/mm values. The MTF was convolved with the slit function of the image plate scanner, and the resulting point spread functions (PSFs) were in good agreement with the observed shapes and widths of x-ray spectral lines and with the PSF derived from edge spread functions. The shapes and the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of the PSF curves of the Fuji Superior Resolution (SR) and Fuji Maximum Sensitivity (MS) image plate detectors, consisting of the image plate and the scanner, determined by the three methods gave consistent results: The SR PSF is Gaussian with 0.13 mm FWHM, and the MS PSF is Lorentzian with 0.19 mm FWHM. These techniques result in the accurate determination of the spatial resolution achievable using image plate and scanner combinations and enable the optimization of spatial resolution for x-ray spectroscopy and radiography.

  10. X-ray modulation transfer functions of photostimulable phosphor image plates and scanners.

    PubMed

    Seely, John F; Holland, Glenn E; Hudson, Lawrence T; Henins, Albert

    2008-11-01

    The modulation transfer functions of two types of photostimulable phosphor image plates were determined in the 10 keV to 50 keV x-ray energy range using a resolution test pattern with up to 10 line pairs per mm (LP/mm) and a wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer. Techniques were developed for correcting for the partial transmittance of the high energy x rays through the lead bars of the resolution test pattern, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined from the measured change in contrast with LP/mm values. The MTF was convolved with the slit function of the image plate scanner, and the resulting point spread functions (PSFs) were in good agreement with the observed shapes and widths of x-ray spectral lines and with the PSF derived from edge spread functions. The shapes and the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of the PSF curves of the Fuji Superior Resolution (SR) and Fuji Maximum Sensitivity (MS) image plate detectors, consisting of the image plate and the scanner, determined by the three methods gave consistent results: The SR PSF is Gaussian with 0.13 mm FWHM, and the MS PSF is Lorentzian with 0.19 mm FWHM. These techniques result in the accurate determination of the spatial resolution achievable using image plate and scanner combinations and enable the optimization of spatial resolution for x-ray spectroscopy and radiography. PMID:19122716

  11. Visual input modulates audiomotor function via hypothalamic dopaminergic neurons through a cooperative mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yu; Li, Xiao-quan; Zhang, Bo; Du, Jiu-lin

    2012-08-23

    Visual cues often modulate auditory signal processing, leading to improved sound detection. However, the synaptic and circuit mechanism underlying this cross-modal modulation remains poorly understood. Using larval zebrafish, we first established a cross-modal behavioral paradigm in which a preceding flash enhances sound-evoked escape behavior, which is known to be executed through auditory afferents (VIII(th) nerves) and command-like neurons (Mauthner cells). In vivo recording revealed that the visual enhancement of auditory escape is achieved by increasing sound-evoked Mauthner cell responses. This increase in Mauthner cell responses is accounted for by the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of sound-evoked VIII(th) nerve spiking and efficacy of VIII(th) nerve-Mauthner cell synapses. Furthermore, the visual enhancement of Mauthner cell response and escape behavior requires light-responsive dopaminergic neurons in the caudal hypothalamus and D1 dopamine receptor activation. Our findings illustrate a cooperative neural mechanism for visual modulation of audiomotor processing that involves dopaminergic neuromodulation. PMID:22920259

  12. Evolution of TNF-induced apoptosis reveals 550 My of functional conservation.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Steven D; Stotland, Aleksandr; Barott, Katie L; Smurthwaite, Cameron A; Hilton, Brett Jameson; Grasis, Juris A; Wolkowicz, Roland; Rohwer, Forest L

    2014-07-01

    The Precambrian explosion led to the rapid appearance of most major animal phyla alive today. It has been argued that the complexity of life has steadily increased since that event. Here we challenge this hypothesis through the characterization of apoptosis in reef-building corals, representatives of some of the earliest animals. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that all of the major components of the death receptor pathway are present in coral with high-predicted structural conservation with Homo sapiens. The TNF receptor-ligand superfamilies (TNFRSF/TNFSF) are central mediators of the death receptor pathway, and the predicted proteome of Acropora digitifera contains more putative coral TNFRSF members than any organism described thus far, including humans. This high abundance of TNFRSF members, as well as the predicted structural conservation of other death receptor signaling proteins, led us to wonder what would happen if corals were exposed to a member of the human TNFSF (HuTNF?). HuTNF? was found to bind directly to coral cells, increase caspase activity, cause apoptotic blebbing and cell death, and finally induce coral bleaching. Next, immortalized human T cells (Jurkats) expressing a functional death receptor pathway (WT) and a corresponding Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD) KO cell line were exposed to a coral TNFSF member (AdTNF1) identified and purified here. AdTNF1 treatment resulted in significantly higher cell death (P < 0.0001) in WT Jurkats compared with the corresponding FADD KO, demonstrating that coral AdTNF1 activates the H. sapiens death receptor pathway. Taken together, these data show remarkable conservation of the TNF-induced apoptotic response representing 550 My of functional conservation. PMID:24927546

  13. Transcriptomic Analysis of Toxoplasma Development Reveals Many Novel Functions and Structures Specific to Sporozoites and Oocysts

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Heather M.; Buchholz, Kerry R.; Chen, Xiucui; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Rocke, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Sexual reproduction of Toxoplasma gondii occurs exclusively within enterocytes of the definitive felid host. The resulting immature oocysts are excreted into the environment during defecation, where in the days following, they undergo a complex developmental process. Within each oocyst, this culminates in the generation of two sporocysts, each containing 4 sporozoites. A single felid host is capable of shedding millions of oocysts, which can survive for years in the environment, are resistant to most methods of microbial inactivation during water-treatment and are capable of producing infection in warm-blooded hosts at doses as low as 1–10 ingested oocysts. Despite its extremely interesting developmental biology and crucial role in initiating an infection, almost nothing is known about the oocyst stage beyond morphological descriptions. Here, we present a complete transcriptomic analysis of the oocyst from beginning to end of its development. In addition, and to identify genes whose expression is unique to this developmental form, we compared the transcriptomes of developing oocysts with those of in vitro-derived tachyzoites and in vivo-derived bradyzoites. Our results reveal many genes whose expression is specifically up- or down-regulated in different developmental stages, including many genes that are likely critical to oocyst development, wall formation, resistance to environmental destruction and sporozoite infectivity. Of special note is the up-regulation of genes that appear “off” in tachyzoites and bradyzoites but that encode homologues of proteins known to serve key functions in those asexual stages, including a novel pairing of sporozoite-specific paralogues of AMA1 and RON2, two proteins that have recently been shown to form a crucial bridge during tachyzoite invasion of host cells. This work provides the first in-depth insight into the development and functioning of one of the most important but least studied stages in the Toxoplasma life cycle. PMID:22347997

  14. Proteomic analysis of chromoplasts from six crop species reveals insights into chromoplast function and development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Qiang; Yang, Yong; Fei, Zhangjun; Yuan, Hui; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Mazourek, Michael; Kochian, Leon V; Wang, Xiaowu; Li, Li

    2013-02-01

    Chromoplasts are unique plastids that accumulate massive amounts of carotenoids. To gain a general and comparative characterization of chromoplast proteins, this study performed proteomic analysis of chromoplasts from six carotenoid-rich crops: watermelon, tomato, carrot, orange cauliflower, red papaya, and red bell pepper. Stromal and membrane proteins of chromoplasts were separated by 1D gel electrophoresis and analysed using nLC-MS/MS. A total of 953-2262 proteins from chromoplasts of different crop species were identified. Approximately 60% of the identified proteins were predicted to be plastid localized. Functional classification using MapMan bins revealed large numbers of proteins involved in protein metabolism, transport, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, and redox in chromoplasts from all six species. Seventeen core carotenoid metabolic enzymes were identified. Phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, ?-carotene desaturase, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase, and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 were found in almost all crops, suggesting relative abundance of them among the carotenoid pathway enzymes. Chromoplasts from different crops contained abundant amounts of ATP synthase and adenine nucleotide translocator, which indicates an important role of ATP production and transport in chromoplast development. Distinctive abundant proteins were observed in chromoplast from different crops, including capsanthin/capsorubin synthase and fibrillins in pepper, superoxide dismutase in watermelon, carrot, and cauliflower, and glutathione-S-transferease in papaya. The comparative analysis of chromoplast proteins among six crop species offers new insights into the general metabolism and function of chromoplasts as well as the uniqueness of chromoplasts in specific crop species. This work provides reference datasets for future experimental study of chromoplast biogenesis, development, and regulation in plants. PMID:23314817

  15. Proteomic analysis of chromoplasts from six crop species reveals insights into chromoplast function and development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Qiang; Yang, Yong; Li, Li

    2013-01-01

    Chromoplasts are unique plastids that accumulate massive amounts of carotenoids. To gain a general and comparative characterization of chromoplast proteins, this study performed proteomic analysis of chromoplasts from six carotenoid-rich crops: watermelon, tomato, carrot, orange cauliflower, red papaya, and red bell pepper. Stromal and membrane proteins of chromoplasts were separated by 1D gel electrophoresis and analysed using nLC-MS/MS. A total of 953–2262 proteins from chromoplasts of different crop species were identified. Approximately 60% of the identified proteins were predicted to be plastid localized. Functional classification using MapMan bins revealed large numbers of proteins involved in protein metabolism, transport, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, and redox in chromoplasts from all six species. Seventeen core carotenoid metabolic enzymes were identified. Phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, ?-carotene desaturase, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase, and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 were found in almost all crops, suggesting relative abundance of them among the carotenoid pathway enzymes. Chromoplasts from different crops contained abundant amounts of ATP synthase and adenine nucleotide translocator, which indicates an important role of ATP production and transport in chromoplast development. Distinctive abundant proteins were observed in chromoplast from different crops, including capsanthin/capsorubin synthase and fibrillins in pepper, superoxide dismutase in watermelon, carrot, and cauliflower, and glutathione-S-transferease in papaya. The comparative analysis of chromoplast proteins among six crop species offers new insights into the general metabolism and function of chromoplasts as well as the uniqueness of chromoplasts in specific crop species. This work provides reference datasets for future experimental study of chromoplast biogenesis, development, and regulation in plants. PMID:23314817

  16. Molecular processes during fat cell development revealed by gene expression profiling and functional annotation

    PubMed Central

    Hackl, Hubert; Burkard, Thomas Rainer; Sturn, Alexander; Rubio, Renee; Schleiffer, Alexander; Tian, Sun; Quackenbush, John; Eisenhaber, Frank; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2005-01-01

    Background Large-scale transcription profiling of cell models and model organisms can identify novel molecular components involved in fat cell development. Detailed characterization of the sequences of identified gene products has not been done and global mechanisms have not been investigated. We evaluated the extent to which molecular processes can be revealed by expression profiling and functional annotation of genes that are differentially expressed during fat cell development. Results Mouse microarrays with more than 27,000 elements were developed, and transcriptional profiles of 3T3-L1 cells (pre-adipocyte cells) were monitored during differentiation. In total, 780 differentially expressed expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were subjected to in-depth bioinformatics analyses. The analysis of 3'-untranslated region sequences from 395 ESTs showed that 71% of the differentially expressed genes could be regulated by microRNAs. A molecular atlas of fat cell development was then constructed by de novo functional annotation on a sequence segment/domain-wise basis of 659 protein sequences, and subsequent mapping onto known pathways, possible cellular roles, and subcellular localizations. Key enzymes in 27 out of 36 investigated metabolic pathways were regulated at the transcriptional level, typically at the rate-limiting steps in these pathways. Also, coexpressed genes rarely shared consensus transcription-factor binding sites, and were typically not clustered in adjacent chromosomal regions, but were instead widely dispersed throughout the genome. Conclusions Large-scale transcription profiling in conjunction with sophisticated bioinformatics analyses can provide not only a list of novel players in a particular setting but also a global view on biological processes and molecular networks. PMID:16420668

  17. A ryanodine fluorescent derivative reveals the presence of high-affinity ryanodine binding sites in the Golgi complex of rat sympathetic neurons, with possible functional roles in intracellular Ca 2+ signaling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fredy Cifuentes; Carlos E González; Tatiana Fiordelisio; Georgina Guerrero; F. Anthony Lai; Arturo Hernández-Cruz

    2001-01-01

    The plant alkaloid ryanodine (Ry) is a high-affinity modulator of ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+ release channels. Although these channels are present in a variety of cell types, their functional role in nerve cells is still puzzling. Here, a monosubstituted fluorescent Ry analogue, B-FL-X Ry, was used to reveal the distribution of RyRs in cultured rat sympathetic neurons. B-FL-X Ry competitively

  18. Functional insights into modulation of BKCa channel activity to alter myometrial contractility

    PubMed Central

    Lorca, Ramón A.; Prabagaran, Monali; England, Sarah K.

    2014-01-01

    The large-conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel (BKCa) is an important regulator of membrane excitability in a wide variety of cells and tissues. In myometrial smooth muscle, activation of BKCa plays essential roles in buffering contractility to maintain uterine quiescence during pregnancy and in the transition to a more contractile state at the onset of labor. Multiple mechanisms of modulation have been described to alter BKCa channel activity, expression, and cellular localization. In the myometrium, BKCa is regulated by alternative splicing, protein targeting to the plasma membrane, compartmentation in membrane microdomains, and posttranslational modifications. In addition, interaction with auxiliary proteins (i.e., ?1- and ?2-subunits), association with G-protein coupled receptor signaling pathways, such as those activated by adrenergic and oxytocin receptors, and hormonal regulation provide further mechanisms of variable modulation of BKCa channel function in myometrial smooth muscle. Here, we provide an overview of these mechanisms of BKCa channel modulation and provide a context for them in relation to myometrial function. PMID:25132821

  19. Extension of depth of field using amplitude modulation of the pupil function for bio-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavehvash, Zahra; Bagheri, Saeed; Mehrany, Khashayar; Javidi, Bahram; Sanchez, Emilio; Martinez-Corral, Manuel

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach to generate images of extended depth of field (DOF) without compromising the lateral resolution to support realization of three-dimensional imaging systems such as integral imaging. In our approach in extending DOF, we take advantage of the spatial frequency spectrum of the object specific to the task in hand. The pupil function is thus engineered in such a fashion that the modulation transfer function (MTF) is maximized only in these selected spatial frequencies. We extract these high energy spatial frequencies using PCA method. The advantage of our approach is illustrated using an amplitude modulation and a phase modulation example. In these examples, we split the pupil filter and choose the optimum transmission/phase value of each section in the filter in a way that the response of the system in all the DOF range as well as spatial frequencies of interest is optimized. Consequently, we have optimized the DOF extension process with blocking the minimum possible area in the pupil plane. This maximizes the output image quality (e.g. 10% DOF improvement) compared to the existing methods where non-optimal blocking of the lens area may cause more degradation in output image quality. Experimental results are presented to illustrate our proposed approach.

  20. Modulation of the Contrast Response Function by Electrical Microstimulation of the Macaque Frontal Eye Field

    PubMed Central

    Ekstrom, Leeland B.; Roelfsema, Pieter R.; Arsenault, John T.; Kolster, Hauke; Vanduffel, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Spatial attention influences representations in visual cortical areas as well as perception. Some models predict a contrast gain, while others a response or activity gain when attention is directed to a contrast varying stimulus. Recent evidence has indicated that microstimulating the Frontal Eye Field (FEF) can produce modulations of V4 neuronal firing rates that resemble spatial attention-like effects, and we have shown similar modulations of functional magnetic resonance imaging activity throughout the visual system. Here, we used fMRI in awake, fixating monkeys to first measure the response in twelve visual cortical areas to stimuli of varying luminance contrast. Next, we simultaneously microstimulated sub-regions of the FEF with movement fields that overlapped the stimulus locations and measured how microstimulation modulated these contrast response functions (CRFs) throughout visual cortex. In general, we found evidence for a non-proportional scaling of the CRF under these conditions, resembling a contrast gain effect. Representations of low contrast stimuli were enhanced by stimulation of the FEF below the threshold needed to evoke saccades, while high contrast stimuli were unaffected or in some areas even suppressed. Further, we measured a characteristic spatial pattern of enhancement and suppression across the cortical surface, from which we propose a simple schematic of this contrast-dependent fMRI response. PMID:19710320

  1. Structural and functional characterizations reveal the importance of a zinc binding domain in Bloom's syndrome helicase

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rong-bin; Rigolet, Pascal; Zargarian, Loussiné; Fermandjian, Serge; Xi, Xu Guang

    2005-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive human disorder characterized by genomic instability and a predisposition to a wide variety of cancers. The gene mutated in BS, BLM, encodes a protein containing three domains: an N-terminal domain whose function remains elusive, a helicase domain characterized by seven ‘signature’ motifs conserved in a wide range of helicases and a C-terminal extension that can be further divided into two sub-domains: RecQ-Ct and HRDC. The RecQ-Ct domain appears essential because two point-mutations altering highly conserved cysteine residues within this domain have been found in BS patients. We report herein that BLM contains a zinc ion. Modelling studies suggest that four conserved cysteine residues within the RecQ-Ct domain coordinate this zinc ion and subsequent mutagenesis studies further confirm this prediction. Biochemical and biophysical studies show that the ATPase, helicase and DNA binding activities of the mutants are severely modified. Structural analysis of both wild-type and mutant proteins reveal that alteration of cysteine residues does not significantly change the overall conformation. The observed defects in ATPase and helicase activities were inferred to result from a compromise of DNA binding. Our results implicate an important role of this zinc binding domain in both DNA binding and protein conformation. They could be pivotal for understanding the molecular basis of BS disease. PMID:15930159

  2. A functional genomics strategy reveals clockwork orange as a transcriptional regulator in the Drosophila circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Akira; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Yamada, Rikuhiro G; Houl, Jerry; Uno, Kenichiro D; Kasukawa, Takeya; Dauwalder, Brigitte; Itoh, Taichi Q; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Ueda, Ryu; Hardin, Paul E; Tanimura, Teiichi; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2007-07-01

    The Drosophila circadian clock consists of integrated autoregulatory feedback loops, making the clock difficult to elucidate without comprehensively identifying the network components in vivo. Previous studies have adopted genome-wide screening for clock-controlled genes using high-density oligonucleotide arrays that identified hundreds of clock-controlled genes. In an attempt to identify the core clock genes among these candidates, we applied genome-wide functional screening using an RNA interference (RNAi) system in vivo. Here we report the identification of novel clock gene candidates including clockwork orange (cwo), a transcriptional repressor belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix ORANGE family. cwo is rhythmically expressed and directly regulated by CLK-CYC through canonical E-box sequences. A genome-wide search for its target genes using the Drosophila genome tiling array revealed that cwo forms its own negative feedback loop and directly suppresses the expression of other clock genes through the E-box sequence. Furthermore, this negative transcriptional feedback loop contributes to sustaining a high-amplitude circadian oscillation in vivo. Based on these results, we propose that the competition between cyclic CLK-CYC activity and the adjustable threshold imposed by CWO keeps E-box-mediated transcription within the controllable range of its activity, thereby rendering a Drosophila circadian clock capable of generating high-amplitude oscillation. PMID:17578908

  3. Proteomics profiling reveals novel proteins and functions of the plant stigma exudate

    PubMed Central

    Rejón, Juan David; Delalande, François; Castro, Antonio Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of the stigmatic exudate of Lilium longiflorum and Olea europaea led to the identification of 51 and 57 proteins, respectively, most of which are described for the first time in this secreted fluid. These results indicate that the stigmatic exudate is an extracellular environment metabolically active, participating in at least 80 different biological processes and 97 molecular functions. The stigma exudate showed a markedly catabolic profile and appeared to possess the enzyme machinery necessary to degrade large polysaccharides and lipids secreted by papillae to smaller units, allowing their incorporation into the pollen tube during pollination. It may also regulate pollen-tube growth in the pistil through the selective degradation of tube-wall components. Furthermore, some secreted proteins were involved in pollen-tube adhesion and orientation, as well as in programmed cell death of the papillae cells in response to either compatible pollination or incompatible pollen rejection. Finally, the results also revealed a putative cross-talk between genetic programmes regulating stress/defence and pollination responses in the stigma. PMID:24151302

  4. Distinct cortical anatomy linked to subregions of the medial temporal lobe revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Itamar; Andrews-Hanna, Jessica R; Vincent, Justin L; Snyder, Abraham Z; Buckner, Randy L

    2008-07-01

    The hippocampus and adjacent cortical structures in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) contribute to memory through interactions with distributed brain areas. Studies of monkey and rodent anatomy suggest that parallel pathways converge on distinct subregions of the MTL. To explore the cortical areas linked to subregions of the MTL in humans, we examined cortico-cortical and hippocampal-cortical correlations using high-resolution, functional connectivity analysis in 100 individuals. MTL seed regions extended along the anterior to posterior axis and included hippocampus and adjacent structures. Results revealed two separate brain pathways that correlated with distinct subregions within the MTL. The body of the hippocampus and posterior parahippocampal cortex correlated with lateral parietal cortex, regions along the posterior midline including posterior cingulate and retrosplenial cortex, and ventral medial prefrontal cortex. By contrast, anterior hippocampus and the perirhinal/entorhinal cortices correlated with distinct regions in the lateral temporal cortex extending into the temporal pole. The present results are largely consistent with known connectivity in the monkey and provide a novel task-independent dissociation of the parallel pathways supporting the MTL memory system in humans. The cortical pathways include regions that have undergone considerable areal expansion in humans, providing insight into how the MTL memory system has evolved to support a diverse array of cognitive domains. PMID:18385483

  5. Proteomic Analysis Reveals a Novel Function of the Kinase Sat4p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Gey, Uta; Czupalla, Cornelia; Hoflack, Bernard; Krause, Udo; Rödel, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinase Sat4p has been originally identified as a protein involved in salt tolerance and stabilization of plasma membrane transporters, implicating a cytoplasmic localization. Our study revealed an additional mitochondrial (mt) localization, suggesting a dual function for Sat4p. While no mt related phenotype was observed in the absence of Sat4p, its overexpression resulted in significant changes of a specific mitochondrial subproteome. As shown by a comparative two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) approach combined with mass spectrometry, particularly two groups of proteins were affected: the iron-sulfur containing aconitase-type proteins (Aco1p, Lys4p) and the lipoamide-containing subproteome (Lat1p, Kgd2p and Gcv3p). The lipoylation sites of all three proteins could be assigned by nanoLC-MS/MS to Lys75 (Lat1p), Lys114 (Kgd2p) and Lys102 (Gcv3p), respectively. Sat4p overexpression resulted in accumulation of the delipoylated protein variants and in reduced levels of aconitase-type proteins, accompanied by a decrease in the activities of the respective enzyme complexes. We propose a regulatory role of Sat4p in the late steps of the maturation of a specific subset of mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster proteins, including Aco1p and lipoate synthase Lip5p. Impairment of the latter enzyme may account for the observed lipoylation defects. PMID:25117470

  6. Reconstruction of an Integrated Genome-Scale Co-Expression Network Reveals Key Modules Involved in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini Ashtiani, Saman; Moeini, Ali; Nowzari-Dalini, Abbas; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Our goal of this study was to reconstruct a “genome-scale co-expression network” and find important modules in lung adenocarcinoma so that we could identify the genes involved in lung adenocarcinoma. We integrated gene mutation, GWAS, CGH, array-CGH and SNP array data in order to identify important genes and loci in genome-scale. Afterwards, on the basis of the identified genes a co-expression network was reconstructed from the co-expression data. The reconstructed network was named “genome-scale co-expression network”. As the next step, 23 key modules were disclosed through clustering. In this study a number of genes have been identified for the first time to be implicated in lung adenocarcinoma by analyzing the modules. The genes EGFR, PIK3CA, TAF15, XIAP, VAPB, Appl1, Rab5a, ARF4, CLPTM1L, SP4, ZNF124, LPP, FOXP1, SOX18, MSX2, NFE2L2, SMARCC1, TRA2B, CBX3, PRPF6, ATP6V1C1, MYBBP1A, MACF1, GRM2, TBXA2R, PRKAR2A, PTK2, PGF and MYO10 are among the genes that belong to modules 1 and 22. All these genes, being implicated in at least one of the phenomena, namely cell survival, proliferation and metastasis, have an over-expression pattern similar to that of EGFR. In few modules, the genes such as CCNA2 (Cyclin A2), CCNB2 (Cyclin B2), CDK1, CDK5, CDC27, CDCA5, CDCA8, ASPM, BUB1, KIF15, KIF2C, NEK2, NUSAP1, PRC1, SMC4, SYCE2, TFDP1, CDC42 and ARHGEF9 are present that play a crucial role in cell cycle progression. In addition to the mentioned genes, there are some other genes (i.e. DLGAP5, BIRC5, PSMD2, Src, TTK, SENP2, PSMD2, DOK2, FUS and etc.) in the modules. PMID:23874428

  7. Selected phenolic compounds in cultivated plants: ecologic functions, health implications, and modulation by pesticides.

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, O; Meier, M S; Schlatter, J; Frischknecht, P

    1999-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are widely distributed in the plant kingdom. Plant tissues may contain up to several grams per kilogram. External stimuli such as microbial infections, ultraviolet radiation, and chemical stressors induce their synthesis. The phenolic compounds resveratrol, flavonoids, and furanocoumarins have many ecologic functions and affect human health. Ecologic functions include defense against microbial pathogens and herbivorous animals. Phenolic compounds may have both beneficial and toxic effects on human health. Effects on low-density lipoproteins and aggregation of platelets are beneficial because they reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Mutagenic, cancerogenic, and phototoxic effects are risk factors of human health. The synthesis of phenolic compounds in plants can be modulated by the application of herbicides and, to a lesser extent, insecticides and fungicides. The effects on ecosystem functioning and human health are complex and cannot be predicted with great certainty. The consequences of the combined natural and pesticide-induced modulating effects for ecologic functions and human health should be further evaluated. PMID:10229712

  8. Optimizing the rotating point spread function by SLM aided spiral phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baránek, M.; Bouchal, Z.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate the vortex point spread function (PSF) whose shape and the rotation sensitivity to defocusing can be controlled by a phase-only modulation implemented in the spatial or frequency domains. Rotational effects are studied in detail as a result of the spiral modulation carried out in discrete radial and azimuthal sections with different topological charges. As the main result, a direct connection between properties of the PSF and the parameters of the spiral mask is found and subsequently used for an optimal shaping of the PSF and control of its defocusing rotation rate. Experiments on the PSF rotation verify a good agreement with theoretical predictions and demonstrate potential of the method for applications in microscopy, tracking of particles and 3D imaging.

  9. Modulation of Immune Function by Polyphenols: Possible Contribution of Epigenetic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Alejandro; Saavedra, Nicolás; Salazar, Luis A.; Abdalla, Dulcineia S. P.

    2013-01-01

    Several biological activities have been described for polyphenolic compounds, including a modulator effect on the immune system. The effects of these biologically active compounds on the immune system are associated to processes as differentiation and activation of immune cells. Among the mechanisms associated to immune regulation are epigenetic modifications as DNA methylation of regulatory sequences, histone modifications and posttranscriptional repression by microRNAs that influences the gene expression of key players involved in the immune response. Considering that polyphenols are able to regulate the immune function and has been also demonstrated an effect on epigenetic mechanisms, it is possible to hypothesize that there exists a mediator role of epigenetic mechanisms in the modulation of the immune response by polyphenols. PMID:23812304

  10. Measurement of optical modulation functions in sparsely sampled mosaic focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. B.; Thurlow, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the measurement of optical modulation functions for detectors in focal plane arrays may be somewhat more difficult under 'full-up' systems conditions as compared to ideal laboratory conditions. An idealized optical modulation test arrangement is considered along with a full-up scanned system involving an earth mapper in polar orbit. In testing the system in full-up condition, a problem arises with respect to the acquisition of knife edge response data. In order to overcome this problem, a preferred method is developed for obtaining KER data on a single scan. A special 'phased edge' reticle is developed for use in the test set-up. Attention is given to aspects of knife edge reconstruction.

  11. Submillisecond measurements of system optical modulation functions in mosaic focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurlow, P. E.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of system optical modulation functions (MTF, SWR) may be distorted by time-dependent environmental effects (thermal, vibration, flexure) and by electronics drift. Fast data collection may therefore be advantageous by minimizing drift time. The problem of fast data collection is accentuated when modulation data must be taken on a large number of detectors in a focal plane array. A method has been developed for the generation and storage of knife edge data from focal plane arrays, where data collection time per detector is in the submillisecond range. Once knife edge collects are completed, MTF response is found using conventional convolution techniques. SWR is obtained directly from knife edge response using a computerized simulation algorithm which bypasses use of MTF harmonics. Requirements for detector electronics speed, damping, and dynamic range are considered.

  12. Kinase Suppressor of Ras (KSR1) modulates multiple Kit-ligand-dependent mast cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mia; Burgin, Sarah; Staser, Karl; He, Yongzheng; Li, Xiaohong; Robinson, Mikella; Jiang, Li; Chan, Rebecca J.; Ingram, David; Clapp, D. Wade

    2011-01-01

    The intricately regulated Ras pathway coordinates multiple kit-ligand induced mast cell functions, including chemotaxis, proliferation and degranulation. However, the intracellular proteins that modulate the intensity and duration of SCF-induced signals and the consequent cellular response are incompletely understood. Scaffolding proteins coordinate the spatial organization of MAPK proteins that may potentiate and/or inhibit cell functions. The Kinase Suppressor of Ras (KSR1) protein is known to function as a molecular scaffold and coordinates the organization of Raf/Mek/Erk in response to receptor tyrosine kinases. However, the impact of KSR1 in myeloid mast cell functions and in response to stem cell factor remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the role of KSR1 in regulating cellular functions of bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs) of KSR1 deficient (?/?) mice. Genetic disruption of KSR1 resulted in both striking reductions in kit-ligand mediated proliferation and degranulation that are commonly attributed to MAPK signals. Surprisingly, disruption of the KSR1 scaffold also resulted in a decline in migration that is generally not linked to Raf-Erk signals. We found that loss of KSR1 does impact the biochemical activation of Pak kinase, a kinase that is known to modulate Raf-Erk signals and also F-actin polymerization key to mast cell migration. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that the scaffolding protein KSR1 has an important role in multiple kit-ligand mediated mast cell functions. This study elucidates varied mast cell physiological functions for KSR1, including those related to cytoskeletal organization, and it suggests a novel molecular target for attenuating mast cell-mediated inflammation. PMID:21726514

  13. Global Analysis of Pub1p Targets Reveals a Coordinate Control of Gene Expression through Modulation of Binding and Stability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Radharani Duttagupta; Bin Tian; Carol J. Wilusz; Danny T. Khounh; Patricia Soteropoulos; Ming Ouyang; Joseph P. Dougherty; Stuart W. Peltz

    2005-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA turnover is an important cellular strategy for posttranscriptional control of gene expression, mediated by the interplay of cis-acting sequences and associated trans-acting factors. Pub1p, an ELAV-like yeast RNA-binding protein with homology to T-cell internal antigen 1 (TIA-1)\\/TIA-1-related protein (TIAR), is an important modulator of the decay of two known classes of mRNA. Our goal in this study

  14. Conditional Expression in Corticothalamic Efferents Reveals a Developmental Role for Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Modulation of Passive Avoidance Behavior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah L. King; Michael J. Marks; Sharon R. Grady; Barbara J. Caldarone; Andrei O. Koren; Alexey G. Mukhin; Allan C. Collins; Marina R. Picciotto

    2003-01-01

    Prenatal nicotine exposure has been linked to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and cognitive impairment, but the sites of action for these effects of nicotine are still under investigation. High-affinity nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) contain the2 subunit and modulate passive avoidance (PA) learning in mice. Using an inducible, tetracycline-regulated transgenic system, we generated lines of mice with expression of high-affinity nicotinic

  15. Functional design and implementation with on-line programmable technology in optical fiber communication pulse code modulation test system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuan Xu; Huan Ding; Youtang Gao

    2010-01-01

    In order to complete the functional design in the fiber optical communication pulse code modulation test system, taking advantage of CPLD \\/ FPGA and SOPC technology, software solutions used to design system hardware features and control functions, thereby the whole system could attain optimisation in the logic control as well as encoding and decoding functional designs on the motherboard, enabling

  16. A Hydrodynamic Analysis of APOBEC3G Reveals a Monomer-Dimer-Tetramer Self-Association that has Implications for Anti-HIV Function

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Jason D.; Krucinska, Jolanta; Raina, Jay; Smith, Harold C.; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2009-01-01

    The innate antiviral factor APOBEC3G (A3G) possesses RNA binding activity and deaminates HIV-1 DNA. High-molecular-mass forms of A3G can be isolated from a variety of cell types, but exhibit limited deaminase activity relative to low-molecular-mass species prepared under RNA-depleted conditions. To investigate the fundamental oligomeric state and shape of A3G, we conducted sedimentation velocity analyses of the pure enzyme under RNA-deficient conditions. The results reveal a predominant dimer in equilibrium with minor monomeric and tetrameric species. Hydrodynamic modeling of the dimer supports an extended cylindrical shape that assembles into an elongated tetramer. Overall, the results provide physical restraints for the A3G quaternary structure that have implications for modulating antiviral function. PMID:19839647

  17. Modulation of dendritic cell functions by viral IL-10 encoded by human cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Avdic, Selmir; McSharry, Brian P.; Slobedman, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a clinically important ?-herpesvirus, is a master of evasion and modulation of the host immune system, including inhibition of a number of dendritic cell (DC) functions. DCs play a central role in co-ordination of the immune response against pathogens and any disturbance of DCs functions can result in a cascade effect on a range of immune cells. Recently, the HCMV gene UL111A, which encodes viral homologs of human interleukin 10, has been identified as a strong suppressor of a number of DCs functions. In this mini review, we focus on HCMV-encoded viral IL-10-mediated inhibitory effects on DCs and implications for the development of an effective HCMV vaccine. PMID:25071749

  18. Efficient assessment method of on-board modulation transfer function of optical remote sensing sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Xing, Fei; Sun, Ting; You, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Modulation transfer function (MTF) can be used to evaluate the imaging performance of on-board optical remote sensing sensors, as well as recover and restore images to improve imaging quality. Laboratory measurement approaches for MTF have achieved high precision. However, they are not yet suitable for on-board measurement. In this paper, a new five-step approach to calculate MTF of space optical remote sensing sensors is proposed. First, a pixel motion model is used to extract the conditional sub-frame images. Second, a mathematical morphology algorithm and a correlation-homomorphic filter algorithm are used to eliminate noise and enhance sub-frame image. Third, an image partial differentiation determines the accurate position of edge points. Fourth, a model optical function is used to build a high-resolution edge spread function. Finally, MTF is calculated by derivation and Fourier transform. The experiment shows that the assessment method of MTF is superior to others. PMID:25836841

  19. Resolving Salmonella infection reveals dynamic and persisting changes in murine bone marrow progenitor cell phenotype and function

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Ewan A; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Bobat, Saeeda; Coughlan, Ruth E; Marshall, Jennifer L; Hitchcock, Jessica R; Cook, Charlotte N; Carvalho-Gaspar, Manuela M; Mitchell, Andrea M; Clarke, Mary; Garcia, Paloma; Cobbold, Mark; Mitchell, Tim J; Henderson, Ian R; Jones, Nick D; Anderson, Graham; Buckley, Christopher D; Cunningham, Adam F

    2014-01-01

    The generation of immune cells from BM precursors is a carefully regulated process. This is essential to limit the potential for oncogenesis and autoimmunity yet protect against infection. How infection modulates this is unclear. Salmonella can colonize systemic sites including the BM and spleen. This resolving infection has multiple IFN-?-mediated acute and chronic effects on BM progenitors, and during the first week of infection IFN-? is produced by myeloid, NK, NKT, CD4+ T cells, and some lineage-negative cells. After infection, the phenotype of BM progenitors rapidly but reversibly alters, with a peak ?30-fold increase in Sca-1hi progenitors and a corresponding loss of Sca-1lo/int subsets. Most strikingly, the capacity of donor Sca-1hi cells to reconstitute an irradiated host is reduced; the longer donor mice are exposed to infection, and Sca-1hic-kitint cells have an increased potential to generate B1a-like cells. Thus, Salmonella can have a prolonged influence on BM progenitor functionality not directly related to bacterial persistence. These results reflect changes observed in leucopoiesis during aging and suggest that BM functionality can be modulated by life-long, periodic exposure to infection. Better understanding of this process could offer novel therapeutic opportunities to modulate BM functionality and promote healthy aging. PMID:24825601

  20. Gene co-expression network and function modules in three types of glioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Pan, Weiran; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Miao, Jinming

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the disease?associated genes and their functions involved in the development of three types of glioma (astrocytoma, glioblastoma and oligodendroglioma) with DNA microarray technology, and to analyze their differences and correlations. First, the gene expression profile GSE4290 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, then the probe?level data were pre?processed and the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified with limma package in R language. Gene functions of the selected DEGs were further analyzed with the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. After the co?expression network of DEGs was constructed by Cytoscape, the functional modules were mined and enrichment analysis was performed, and then the similarities and differences between any two types of glioma were compared. A total of 1151 genes between normal and astrocytoma tissues, 684 genes between normal and malignant glioma tissues, and 551 genes between normal and oligodendroglioma tissues were filtered as DEGs, respectively. By constructing co?expression networks of DEGs, a total of 77232, 455 and 987 interactions were involved in the differentially co?expressed networks of astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma and glioblastoma, respectively. The functions of DEGs were consistent with the modules in astrocytoma, glioblastoma and oligodendroglioma, which were mainly enriched in neuron signal transmission, immune responses and synthesis of organic acids, respectively. Model functions of astrocytoma and glioblastoma were similar (mainly related with immune response), while the model functions of oligodendroglioma differed markedly from that of the other two types. The identification of the associations among these three types of glioma has potential clinical utility for improving the diagnosis of different types of glioma in the future. In addition, these results have marked significance in studying the underlying mechanisms, distinguishing between normal and cancer tissues, and examining novel therapeutic strategies for patients with glioma. PMID:25435164

  1. Functional Coding Variation in Recombinant Inbred Mouse Lines Reveals Novel Serotonin Transporter-Associated Phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, Ana [Vanderbilt University; Airey, David [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Thompson, Brent [Vanderbilt University; Zhu, C [Vanderbilt University; Rinchik, Eugene M [ORNL; Lu, Lu [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Erikson, Keith [University of North Carolina; Blakely, Randy [Vanderbilt University

    2009-01-01

    The human serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transporter (hSERT, SLC6A4) figures prominently in the etiology or treatment of many prevalent neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety, alcoholism, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we utilize naturally occurring polymorphisms in recombinant inbred (RI) lines to identify novel phenotypes associated with altered SERT function. The widely used mouse strain C57BL/6J, harbors a SERT haplotype defined by two nonsynonymous coding variants (Gly39 and Lys152 (GK)). At these positions, many other mouse lines, including DBA/2J, encode Glu39 and Arg152 (ER haplotype), assignments found also in hSERT. Synaptosomal 5-HT transport studies revealed reduced uptake associated with the GK variant. Heterologous expression studies confirmed a reduced SERT turnover rate for the GK variant. Experimental and in silico approaches using RI lines (C57Bl/6J X DBA/2J=BXD) identifies multiple anatomical, biochemical and behavioral phenotypes specifically impacted by GK/ER variation. Among our findings are multiple traits associated with anxiety and alcohol consumption, as well as of the control of dopamine (DA) signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis of BXD phenotypes, combined with biochemical evaluation of SERT knockout mice, nominates SERT-dependent 5-HT signaling as a major determinant of midbrain iron homeostasis that, in turn, dictates ironregulated DA phenotypes. Our studies provide a novel example of the power of coordinated in vitro, in vivo and in silico approaches using murine RI lines to elucidate and quantify the system-level impact of gene variation.

  2. Mouse model of CADASIL reveals novel insights into Notch3 function in adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Fanny; Vogler, Steffen; Pojar, Sherin; Elliott, David A; Bradke, Frank; Steiner, Barbara; Kempermann, Gerd

    2015-03-01

    Could impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis be a relevant mechanism underlying CADASIL (cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy)? Memory symptoms in CADASIL, the most common hereditary form of vascular dementia, are usually thought to be primarily due to vascular degeneration and white matter lacunes. Since adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a process essential for the integration of new spatial memory occurs in a highly vascularized niche, we considered dysregulation of adult neurogenesis as a potential mechanism for the manifestation of dementia in CADASIL. Analysis in aged mice overexpressing Notch3 with a CADASIL mutation, revealed vascular deficits in arteries of the hippocampal fissure but not in the niche of the dentate gyrus. At 12months of age, cell proliferation and survival of newborn neurons were reduced not only in CADASIL mice but also in transgenic controls overexpressing wild type Notch3. At 6months, hippocampal neurogenesis was altered in CADASIL mice independent of overt vascular abnormalities in the fissure. Further, we identified Notch3 expression in hippocampal precursor cells and maturing neurons in vivo as well as in cultured hippocampal precursor cells. Overexpression and knockdown experiments showed that Notch3 signaling negatively regulated precursor cell proliferation. Notch3 overexpression also led to deficits in KCl-induced precursor cell activation. This suggests a cell-autonomous effect of Notch3 signaling in the regulation of precursor proliferation and activation and a loss-of-function effect in CADASIL. Consequently, besides vascular damage, aberrant precursor cell proliferation and differentiation due to Notch3 dysfunction might be an additional independent mechanism for the development of hippocampal dysfunction in CADASIL. PMID:25555543

  3. A fossil subduction zone in the East Greenland Caledonides revealed by a Receiver Function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffer, Christian; Holm Jacobsen, Bo; Balling, Niels; Bom Nielsen, Søren

    2013-04-01

    Subsequent to their formation the East Greenland and Scandinavian Caledonides formed a major coherent mountain range. The understanding of the European Caledonides therefore naturally involves also the East Greenland Caledonides. The present-day topography and crustal and upper mantle structure in East Greenland were influenced by an extensive geological evolution involving several geodynamical processes, including the closure of the Iapetus Ocean with continent-continent collision, subsequent gravitational collapse, extension and rifting. The passive margin development associated with the opening of the North Atlantic was furthermore spiced up by the pronounced localized anomalous volcanism around Iceland. Erosion shaped the today's distinct geological structure and landscape, culminating in the Quaternary glaciations. The focus of this presentation is on the deep crustal and upper mantle evidence for the processes before and under the Caledonian orogeny. We performed a Receiver Function analysis of data from 11 seismological broadband stations forming the Ella-Ø-array. This array, maintained by Aarhus University, covered an approximately 270 km long profile, spanning the East Greenland Caledonides from the Greenland Ice Sheet to the coast at about 73 °N for a period of two years (2009-2011). The data reveal a clear eastward dipping lineament through the mantle lithosphere underneath the study area. The geophysical character as well as synthetic modelling is consistent with a 6-12 km thick, subducted slab of high velocity, eclogitized oceanic crust. We interpret this structure as a remnant of an early subduction and collisional event which pre-dates the main Scandian phase of orogeny with the collision of Baltica and Laurentia. This is a key evidence for the unravelling of the complexity of the closure of the Iapetus Ocean and the formation of the Caledonides.

  4. Network Analyses Reveal Pervasive Functional Regulation Between Proteases in the Human Protease Web

    PubMed Central

    Fortelny, Nikolaus; Cox, Jennifer H.; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Starr, Amanda E.; Lange, Philipp F.; Pavlidis, Paul; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic processing is an irreversible posttranslational modification affecting a large portion of the proteome. Protease-cleaved mediators frequently exhibit altered activity, and biological pathways are often regulated by proteolytic processing. Many of these mechanisms have not been appreciated as being protease-dependent, and the potential in unraveling a complex new dimension of biological control is increasingly recognized. Proteases are currently believed to act individually or in isolated cascades. However, conclusive but scattered biochemical evidence indicates broader regulation of proteases by protease and inhibitor interactions. Therefore, to systematically study such interactions, we assembled curated protease cleavage and inhibition data into a global, computational representation, termed the protease web. This revealed that proteases pervasively influence the activity of other proteases directly or by cleaving intermediate proteases or protease inhibitors. The protease web spans four classes of proteases and inhibitors and so links both recently and classically described protease groups and cascades, which can no longer be viewed as operating in isolation in vivo. We demonstrated that this observation, termed reachability, is robust to alterations in the data and will only increase in the future as additional data are added. We further show how subnetworks of the web are operational in 23 different tissues reflecting different phenotypes. We applied our network to develop novel insights into biologically relevant protease interactions using cell-specific proteases of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte as a system. Predictions from the protease web on the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP8) and neutrophil elastase being linked by an inactivating cleavage of serpinA1 by MMP8 were validated and explain perplexing Mmp8?/? versus wild-type polymorphonuclear chemokine cleavages in vivo. Our findings supply systematically derived and validated evidence for the existence of the protease web, a network that affects the activity of most proteases and thereby influences the functional state of the proteome and cell activity. PMID:24865846

  5. Psychological Stress as a Modulator of Functional Recovery Following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado Bouchard, Sioui; Hook, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence indicating that the social environment triggers changes to the psychological stress response and glucocorticoid receptor function. Considerable literature links the subsequent changes in stress resiliency to physical health. Here, converging evidence for the modulatory role of chronic psychological stress in the recovery process following spinal cord injury (SCI) is presented. Despite the considerable advances in SCI research, we are still unable to identify the causes of variability in patients’ recovery following injury. We propose that individuals’ past and present life experiences (in the form of stress exposure) may significantly modulate patients’ outcome post-SCI. We propose a theoretical model to explain the negative impact of chronic psychological stress on physical and psychological recovery. The stress experienced in life prior to SCI and also as a result of the traumatic injury, could compromise glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity and function, and contribute to high levels of inflammation and apoptosis post-SCI, decreasing the tissue remaining at the injury site and undermining recovery of function. Both stress-induced glucocorticoid resistance and stress-induced epigenetic changes to the glucocorticoid receptor can modulate the nuclear factor-kappa B regulated inflammatory pathways and the Bcl-2 regulated apoptosis pathways. This model not only contributes to the theoretical understanding of the recovery process following injury, but also provides concrete testable hypotheses for future studies. PMID:24782818

  6. A Global Census of Fission Yeast Deubiquitinating Enzyme Localization and Interaction Networks Reveals Distinct Compartmentalization Profiles and Overlapping Functions in Endocytosis and Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Kouranti, Ilektra; McLean, Janel R.; Feoktistova, Anna; Liang, Ping; Johnson, Alyssa E.; Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H.; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reciprocal processes that tune protein stability, function, and/or localization. The removal of ubiquitin and remodeling of ubiquitin chains is catalyzed by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which are cysteine proteases or metalloproteases. Although ubiquitination has been extensively studied for decades, the complexity of cellular roles for deubiquitinating enzymes has only recently been explored, and there are still several gaps in our understanding of when, where, and how these enzymes function to modulate the fate of polypeptides. To address these questions we performed a systematic analysis of the 20 Schizosaccharomyces pombe DUBs using confocal microscopy, proteomics, and enzymatic activity assays. Our results reveal that S. pombe DUBs are present in almost all cell compartments, and the majority are part of stable protein complexes essential for their function. Interestingly, DUB partners identified by our study include the homolog of a putative tumor suppressor gene not previously linked to the ubiquitin pathway, and two conserved tryptophan-aspartate (WD) repeat proteins that regulate Ubp9, a DUB that we show participates in endocytosis, actin dynamics, and cell polarity. In order to understand how DUB activity affects these processes we constructed multiple DUB mutants and find that a quintuple deletion of ubp4 ubp5 ubp9 ubp15 sst2/amsh displays severe growth, polarity, and endocytosis defects. This mutant allowed the identification of two common substrates for five cytoplasmic DUBs. Through these studies, a common regulatory theme emerged in which DUB localization and/or activity is modulated by interacting partners. Despite apparently distinct cytoplasmic localization patterns, several DUBs cooperate in regulating endocytosis and cell polarity. These studies provide a framework for dissecting DUB signaling pathways in S. pombe and may shed light on DUB functions in metazoans. PMID:20838651

  7. Modulation of spontaneous locomotor and respiratory drives to hindlimb motoneurons temporally related to sympathetic drives as revealed by Mayer waves.

    PubMed

    Wienecke, Jacob; Enríquez Denton, Manuel; Stecina, Katinka; Kirkwood, Peter A; Hultborn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated how the networks mediating respiratory and locomotor drives to lumbar motoneurons interact and how this interaction is modulated in relation to periodic variations in blood pressure (Mayer waves). Seven decerebrate cats, under neuromuscular blockade, were used to study central respiratory drive potentials (CRDPs, usually enhanced by added CO2) and spontaneously occurring locomotor drive potentials (LDPs) in hindlimb motoneurons, together with hindlimb and phrenic nerve discharges. In four of the cats both drives and their voltage-dependent amplification were absent or modest, but in the other three, one or other of these drives was common and the voltage-dependent amplification was frequently strong. Moreover, in these three cats the blood pressure showed marked periodic variation (Mayer waves), with a slow rate (periods 9-104 s, mean 39 ± 17 SD). Profound modulation, synchronized with the Mayer waves was seen in the occurrence and/or in the amplification of the CRDPs or LDPs. In one animal, where CRDPs were present in most cells and the amplification was strong, the CRDP consistently triggered sustained plateaux at one phase of the Mayer wave cycle. In the other two animals, LDPs were common, and the occurrence of the locomotor drive was gated by the Mayer wave cycle, sometimes in alternation with the respiratory drive. Other interactions between the two drives involved respiration providing leading events, including co-activation of flexors and extensors during post-inspiration or a locomotor drive gated or sometimes entrained by respiration. We conclude that the respiratory drive in hindlimb motoneurons is transmitted via elements of the locomotor central pattern generator. The rapid modulation related to Mayer waves suggests the existence of a more direct and specific descending modulatory control than has previously been demonstrated. PMID:25713515

  8. Modulation of spontaneous locomotor and respiratory drives to hindlimb motoneurons temporally related to sympathetic drives as revealed by Mayer waves

    PubMed Central

    Wienecke, Jacob; Enríquez Denton, Manuel; Stecina, Katinka; Kirkwood, Peter A.; Hultborn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated how the networks mediating respiratory and locomotor drives to lumbar motoneurons interact and how this interaction is modulated in relation to periodic variations in blood pressure (Mayer waves). Seven decerebrate cats, under neuromuscular blockade, were used to study central respiratory drive potentials (CRDPs, usually enhanced by added CO2) and spontaneously occurring locomotor drive potentials (LDPs) in hindlimb motoneurons, together with hindlimb and phrenic nerve discharges. In four of the cats both drives and their voltage-dependent amplification were absent or modest, but in the other three, one or other of these drives was common and the voltage-dependent amplification was frequently strong. Moreover, in these three cats the blood pressure showed marked periodic variation (Mayer waves), with a slow rate (periods 9–104 s, mean 39 ± 17 SD). Profound modulation, synchronized with the Mayer waves was seen in the occurrence and/or in the amplification of the CRDPs or LDPs. In one animal, where CRDPs were present in most cells and the amplification was strong, the CRDP consistently triggered sustained plateaux at one phase of the Mayer wave cycle. In the other two animals, LDPs were common, and the occurrence of the locomotor drive was gated by the Mayer wave cycle, sometimes in alternation with the respiratory drive. Other interactions between the two drives involved respiration providing leading events, including co-activation of flexors and extensors during post-inspiration or a locomotor drive gated or sometimes entrained by respiration. We conclude that the respiratory drive in hindlimb motoneurons is transmitted via elements of the locomotor central pattern generator. The rapid modulation related to Mayer waves suggests the existence of a more direct and specific descending modulatory control than has previously been demonstrated. PMID:25713515

  9. Security camera resolution measurements: Horizontal TV lines versus modulation transfer function measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Griffin, John Clark

    2015-01-01

    The horizontal television lines (HTVL) metric has been the primary quantity used by division 6000 related to camera resolution for high consequence security systems. This document shows HTVL measurements are fundamen- tally insufficient as a metric to determine camera resolution, and propose a quantitative, standards based methodology by measuring the camera system modulation transfer function (MTF), the most common and accepted metric of res- olution in the optical science community. Because HTVL calculations are easily misinterpreted or poorly defined, we present several scenarios in which HTVL is frequently reported, and discuss their problems. The MTF metric is discussed, and scenarios are presented with calculations showing the application of such a metric.

  10. Elucidation of Sigma Factor-Associated Networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals a Modular Architecture with Limited and Function-Specific Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Sebastian; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Franke, Raimo; Dötsch, Andreas; Hornischer, Klaus; Bruchmann, Sebastian; Düvel, Juliane; Häussler, Susanne

    2015-03-01

    Sigma factors are essential global regulators of transcription initiation in bacteria which confer promoter recognition specificity to the RNA polymerase core enzyme. They provide effective mechanisms for simultaneously regulating expression of large numbers of genes in response to challenging conditions, and their presence has been linked to bacterial virulence and pathogenicity. In this study, we constructed nine his-tagged sigma factor expressing and/or deletion mutant strains in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To uncover the direct and indirect sigma factor regulons, we performed mRNA profiling, as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing. We furthermore elucidated the de novo binding motif of each sigma factor, and validated the RNA- and ChIP-seq results by global motif searches in the proximity of transcriptional start sites (TSS). Our integrated approach revealed a highly modular network architecture which is composed of insulated functional sigma factor modules. Analysis of the interconnectivity of the various sigma factor networks uncovered a limited, but highly function-specific, crosstalk which orchestrates complex cellular processes. Our data indicate that the modular structure of sigma factor networks enables P. aeruginosa to function adequately in its environment and at the same time is exploited to build up higher-level functions by specific interconnections that are dominated by a participation of RpoN. PMID:25780925

  11. Elucidation of Sigma Factor-Associated Networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals a Modular Architecture with Limited and Function-Specific Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Sebastian; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Franke, Raimo; Dötsch, Andreas; Hornischer, Klaus; Bruchmann, Sebastian; Düvel, Juliane; Häussler, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Sigma factors are essential global regulators of transcription initiation in bacteria which confer promoter recognition specificity to the RNA polymerase core enzyme. They provide effective mechanisms for simultaneously regulating expression of large numbers of genes in response to challenging conditions, and their presence has been linked to bacterial virulence and pathogenicity. In this study, we constructed nine his-tagged sigma factor expressing and/or deletion mutant strains in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To uncover the direct and indirect sigma factor regulons, we performed mRNA profiling, as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing. We furthermore elucidated the de novo binding motif of each sigma factor, and validated the RNA- and ChIP-seq results by global motif searches in the proximity of transcriptional start sites (TSS). Our integrated approach revealed a highly modular network architecture which is composed of insulated functional sigma factor modules. Analysis of the interconnectivity of the various sigma factor networks uncovered a limited, but highly function-specific, crosstalk which orchestrates complex cellular processes. Our data indicate that the modular structure of sigma factor networks enables P. aeruginosa to function adequately in its environment and at the same time is exploited to build up higher-level functions by specific interconnections that are dominated by a participation of RpoN. PMID:25780925

  12. NMR studies reveal the role of biomembranes in modulating ligand binding and release by intracellular bile acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Pedò, Massimo; Löhr, Frank; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Assfalg, Michael; Dötsch, Volker; Molinari, Henriette

    2009-12-18

    Bile acid molecules are transferred vectorially between basolateral and apical membranes of hepatocytes and enterocytes in the context of the enterohepatic circulation, a process regulating whole body lipid homeostasis. This work addresses the role of the cytosolic lipid binding proteins in the intracellular transfer of bile acids between different membrane compartments. We present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data describing the ternary system composed of the bile acid binding protein, bile acids, and membrane mimetic systems, such as anionic liposomes. This work provides evidence that the investigated liver bile acid binding protein undergoes association with the anionic membrane and binding-induced partial unfolding. The addition of the physiological ligand to the protein-liposome mixture is capable of modulating this interaction, shifting the equilibrium towards the free folded holo protein. An ensemble of NMR titration experiments, based on nitrogen-15 protein and ligand observation, confirm that the membrane and the ligand establish competing binding equilibria, modulating the cytoplasmic permeability of bile acids. These results support a mechanism of ligand binding and release controlled by the onset of a bile salt concentration gradient within the polarized cell. The location of a specific protein region interacting with liposomes is highlighted. PMID:19836400

  13. Functions and requirements for Project W-236B, Initial Pretreatment Module: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, L.M.

    1994-11-22

    Hanford Site tank waste supernatants will be pretreated to separate the low-level and high-level fractions. The low-level waste fraction, containing the bulk of the chemical constituents, must be processed into a vitrified waste product which will be disposed of onsite, in a safe, environmentally sound, and cost effective manner. The high-level waste fraction separated during supernatant pretreatment (primarily cesium) will be recombined with an additional high-level waste fraction generated from pretreatment of the tank waste sludges and solids. This combined high-level waste fraction will be immobilized as glass and disposed in a geological repository. The purpose of this document is to establish the functional requirements baseline for Project W-236B, Initial Pretreatment Module, by defining the level 5 and 6 functions and requirements for the project. A functional analysis approach has been used to break down the program functions and associated physical requirements that each function must meet. As the systems engineering process evolves, the design requirements document will replace this preliminary functions and requirements document. The design requirements document (DRD) will identify key decisions and associated uncertainties that impact the project. A revision of this document to a DRD is not expected to change the performance requirements or open issues. However, additional requirements and issues may be identified.

  14. Fatty acids derived from royal jelly are modulators of estrogen receptor functions.

    PubMed

    Moutsatsou, Paraskevi; Papoutsi, Zoi; Kassi, Eva; Heldring, Nina; Zhao, Chunyan; Tsiapara, Anna; Melliou, Eleni; Chrousos, George P; Chinou, Ioanna; Karshikoff, Andrey; Nilsson, Lennart; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) excreted by honeybees and used as a nutritional and medicinal agent has estrogen-like effects, yet the compounds mediating these effects remain unidentified. The possible effects of three RJ fatty acids (FAs) (10-hydroxy-2-decenoic-10H2DA, 3,10-dihydroxydecanoic-3,10DDA, sebacic acid-SA) on estrogen signaling was investigated in various cellular systems. In MCF-7 cells, FAs, in absence of estradiol (E(2)), modulated the estrogen receptor (ER) recruitment to the pS2 promoter and pS2 mRNA levels via only ER? but not ER?, while in presence of E(2) FAs modulated both ER? and ER?. Moreover, in presence of FAs, the E(2)-induced recruitment of the EAB1 co-activator peptide to ER? is masked and the E(2)-induced estrogen response element (ERE)-mediated transactivation is inhibited. In HeLa cells, in absence of E(2), FAs inhibited the ERE-mediated transactivation by ER? but not ER?, while in presence of E(2), FAs inhibited ERE-activity by both ER? and ER?. Molecular modeling revealed favorable binding of FAs to ER? at the co-activator-binding site, while binding assays showed that FAs did not bind to the ligand-binding pocket of ER? or ER?. In KS483 osteoblasts, FAs, like E(2), induced mineralization via an ER-dependent way. Our data propose a possible molecular mechanism for the estrogenic activities of RJ's components which, although structurally entirely different from E(2), mediate estrogen signaling, at least in part, by modulating the recruitment of ER?, ER? and co-activators to target genes. PMID:21203528

  15. Preservation of tissue microstructure and functionality during freezing by modulation of cytoskeletal structure.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungman; Seawright, Angela; Park, Sinwook; Craig Dutton, J; Grinnell, Frederick; Han, Bumsoo

    2015-05-01

    Cryopreservation is one of the key enabling technologies for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, which can provide reliable long-term storage of engineered tissues (ETs) without losing their functionality. However, it is still extremely difficult to design and develop cryopreservation protocols guaranteeing the post-thaw tissue functionality. One of the major challenges in cryopreservation is associated with the difficulty of identifying effective and less toxic cryoprotective agents (CPAs) to guarantee the post-thaw tissue functionality. In this study, thus, a hypothesis was tested that the modulation of the cytoskeletal structure of cells embedded in the extracellular matrix (ECM) can mitigate the freezing-induced changes of the functionality and can reduce the amount of CPA necessary to preserve the functionality of ETs during cryopreservation. In order to test this hypothesis, we prepared dermal equivalents by seeding fibroblasts in type I collagen matrices resulting in three different cytoskeletal structures. These ETs were exposed to various freeze/thaw (F/T) conditions with and without CPAs. The freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interactions and subsequent functional properties of the ETs were assessed. The results showed that the cytoskeletal structure and the use of CPA were strongly correlated to the preservation of the post-thaw functional properties. As the cytoskeletal structure became stronger via stress fiber formation, the ET's functionality was preserved better. It also reduced the necessary CPA concentration to preserve the post-thaw functionality. However, if the extent of the freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interaction was too excessive, the cytoskeletal structure was completely destroyed and the beneficial effects became minimal. PMID:25679482

  16. A Loss-Of-Function Analysis Reveals That Endogenous Rem2 Promotes Functional Glutamatergic Synapse Formation and Restricts Dendritic Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Anna R.; Ghiretti, Amy E.; Paradis, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Rem2 is a member of the RGK family of small Ras-like GTPases whose expression and function is regulated by neuronal activity in the brain. A number of questions still remain as to the endogenous functions of Rem2 in neurons. RNAi-mediated Rem2 knockdown leads to an increase in dendritic complexity and a decrease in functional excitatory synapses, though a recent report challenged the specificity of Rem2-targeted RNAi reagents. In addition, overexpression in a number of cell types has shown that Rem2 can inhibit voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) function, while studies employing RNAi-mediated knockdown of Rem2 have failed to observe a corresponding enhancement of VGCC function. To further investigate these discrepancies and determine the endogenous function of Rem2, we took a comprehensive, loss-of-function approach utilizing two independent, validated Rem2-targeted shRNAs to analyze Rem2 function. We sought to investigate the consequence of endogenous Rem2 knockdown by focusing on the three reported functions of Rem2 in neurons: regulation of synapse formation, dendritic morphology, and voltage-gated calcium channels. We conclude that endogenous Rem2 is a positive regulator of functional, excitatory synapse development and a negative regulator of dendritic complexity. In addition, while we are unable to reach a definitive conclusion as to whether the regulation of VGCCs is an endogenous function of Rem2, our study reports important data regarding RNAi reagents for use in future investigation of this issue. PMID:23991227

  17. The Origin of Allosteric Functional Modulation: Multiple Pre-existing Pathways

    PubMed Central

    del Sol, Antonio; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    While allostery draws increasing attention, not much is known about allosteric mechanisms. Here we argue that in all proteins, allosteric signals transmit through multiple, pre-existing pathways; which pathways dominate depend on protein topologies, specific binding events, covalent modifications and cellular (environmental) conditions. Further, perturbation events at any site on the protein surface (or in the interior) will not create new pathways but only shift the pre-existing ensemble of pathways. Drugs binding at different sites or mutational events in disease shift the ensemble toward the same conformations; however, the relative populations of the different states will change. Consequently the observed functional, conformational, and dynamic effects will be different. This is the origin of allosteric functional modulation in dynamic proteins: allostery does not necessarily need to invoke conformational rearrangements to control protein activity and pre-existing pathways are always defaulted to during allostery regardless of the stimulant and perturbation site in the protein. PMID:19679084

  18. Endothelial progenitor cells enhance islet engraftment, influence ?-cell function, and modulate islet connexin 36 expression.

    PubMed

    Penko, Daniella; Rojas-Canales, Darling; Mohanasundaram, Daisy; Peiris, Heshan S; Sun, Wai Y; Drogemuller, Christopher J; Keating, Damien J; Coates, P Toby H; Bonder, Claudine S; Jessup, Claire F

    2015-01-01

    The success of pancreatic islet transplantation is limited by delayed engraftment and suboptimal function in the longer term. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) represent a potential cellular therapy that may improve the engraftment of transplanted pancreatic islets. In addition, EPCs may directly affect the function of pancreatic ?-cells. The objective of this study was to examine the ability of EPCs to enhance pancreatic islet transplantation in a murine syngeneic marginal mass transplant model and to examine the mechanisms through which this occurs. We found that cotransplanted EPCs improved the cure rate and initial glycemic control of transplanted islets. Gene expression data indicate that EPCs, or their soluble products, modulate the expression of the ?-cell surface molecule connexin 36 and affect glucose-stimulated insulin release in vitro. In conclusion, EPCs are a promising candidate for improving outcomes in islet transplantation, and their mechanisms of action warrant further study. PMID:24069942

  19. Sumoylation modulates oxidative stress relevant to the viability and functionality of pancreatic beta cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping; Hu, Shuang; Yang, Fei; Guan, Xiang-Qian; Wang, Shi-Qiang; Zhu, Ping; Xiong, Fei; Zhang, Shu; Xu, Junfa; Yu, Qi-Lin; Wang, Cong-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Sumoylation is an evolutionarily conserved regulatory mechanism to play an important role in various cellular processes through modulation of protein localization, stability and functionality. Recent studies including ours have consistently demonstrated that sumoylation provides protection for cells against oxidative stress. Given that pancreatic beta cells are a vulnerable target of oxidative stress, we thus in this minireview, updated the advancement of sumoylation in the regulation of ROS generation, and discussed its impact on several critical signaling pathways relevant to beta cells against oxidative stress and maintenance of functionality. Specifically, we bring together how sumoylation represses intracellular ROS formation, and protects beta cells against oxidative stress through regulating I?B/NF?B, JNK/c-Jun, and Maf/Nrf2 pathways. The tight implication of sumoylation in oxidative stress reflects that it could be an essential mechanism for beta cells to adapt to the detrimental cellular microenvironment. PMID:25075252

  20. Features, processing states and heterologous protein interactions in the modulation of the retroviral nucleocapsid protein function

    PubMed Central

    Mirambeau, Gilles; Lyonnais, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    Nucleocapsid (NC) is central to retroviral replication. Nucleic acid chaperoning is a key function for NC through the action of its conserved basic amino acids and zinc-finger structures. NC manipulates genomic RNA from its packaging in the producer cell to reverse transcription into the infected host cell. This chaperone function, in conjunction with NCs aggregating properties, is up-modulated by successive NC processing events, from the Gag precursor to the fully mature protein, resulting in the condensation of the nucleocapsid within the capsid shell. Reverse transcription also depends on NC processing, whereas this process provokes NC dissociation from double-stranded DNA, leading to a preintegration complex (PIC), competent for host chromosomal integration. In addition NC interacts with cellular proteins, some of which are involved in viral budding, and also with several viral proteins. All of these properties are reviewed here, focusing on HIV-1 as a paradigmatic reference and highlighting the plasticity of the nucleocapsid architecture. PMID:21045549

  1. Demethoxycurcumin modulates human P-glycoprotein function via uncompetitive inhibition of ATPase hydrolysis activity.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yu-Ning; Hsieh, Yow-Wen; Hung, Chin-Chuan; Lin, Hui-Yi

    2015-01-28

    Curcuminoids are major components of Curcuma longa L., which is widely used as spice in food. This study aimed at identifying whether curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin could modulate efflux function of human P-glycoprotein and be used as chemosensitizers in cancer treatments. Without altering P-glycoprotein expression levels and conformation, the purified curcuminoids significantly inhibited P-glycoprotein efflux function. In rhodamine 123 efflux and calcein-AM accumulation assays, demethoxycurcumin demonstrated the highest inhibition potency (inhibitory IC50 = 1.56 ± 0.13 ?M) among the purified curcuminoids, as well as in the fold of reversal assays. Demethoxycurcumin inhibited P-glycoprotein-mediated ATP hydrolysis under concentrations of <1 ?M and efficiently inhibited 200 ?M verapamil-stimulated ATPase activity, indicating a high affinity of demethoxycurcumin for P-glycoprotein. These results suggested that demethoxycurcumin may be a potential additive natural product in combination with chemotherapeutic agents in drug-resistant cancers. PMID:25594233

  2. Combinatorial Modulation of Signaling Pathways Reveals Cell-Type-Specific Requirements for Highly Efficient and Synchronous iPSC Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Simon E.; Amlani, Bhishma; Chen, Taotao; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Stadtfeld, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Summary The differentiated state of somatic cells provides barriers for the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). To address why some cell types reprogram more readily than others, we studied the effect of combined modulation of cellular signaling pathways. Surprisingly, inhibition of transforming growth factor ? (TGF-?) together with activation of Wnt signaling in the presence of ascorbic acid allows >80% of murine fibroblasts to acquire pluripotency after 1 week of reprogramming factor expression. In contrast, hepatic and blood progenitors predominantly required only TGF-? inhibition or canonical Wnt activation, respectively, to reprogram at efficiencies approaching 100%. Strikingly, blood progenitors reactivated endogenous pluripotency loci in a highly synchronous manner, and we demonstrate that expression of specific chromatin-modifying enzymes and reduced TGF-?/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity are intrinsic properties associated with the unique reprogramming response of these cells. Our observations define cell-type-specific requirements for the rapid and synchronous reprogramming of somatic cells. PMID:25358786

  3. Combinatorial modulation of signaling pathways reveals cell-type-specific requirements for highly efficient and synchronous iPSC reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Simon E; Amlani, Bhishma; Chen, Taotao; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Stadtfeld, Matthias

    2014-10-14

    The differentiated state of somatic cells provides barriers for the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). To address why some cell types reprogram more readily than others, we studied the effect of combined modulation of cellular signaling pathways. Surprisingly, inhibition of transforming growth factor ? (TGF-?) together with activation of Wnt signaling in the presence of ascorbic acid allows >80% of murine fibroblasts to acquire pluripotency after 1 week of reprogramming factor expression. In contrast, hepatic and blood progenitors predominantly required only TGF-? inhibition or canonical Wnt activation, respectively, to reprogram at efficiencies approaching 100%. Strikingly, blood progenitors reactivated endogenous pluripotency loci in a highly synchronous manner, and we demonstrate that expression of specific chromatin-modifying enzymes and reduced TGF-?/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity are intrinsic properties associated with the unique reprogramming response of these cells. Our observations define cell-type-specific requirements for the rapid and synchronous reprogramming of somatic cells. PMID:25358786

  4. Differential modulation of GABA(A) receptor function by aryl pyrazoles.

    PubMed

    Mascia, Maria Paola; Ledda, Giovanni; Orrù, Alessandro; Marongiu, Alessandro; Loriga, Giovanni; Maciocco, Elisabetta; Biggio, Giovanni; Ruiu, Stefania

    2014-06-15

    Several aryl pyrazoles characterized by a different molecular structure (flexible vs constrained), but chemically related to rimonabant and AM251, were tested for their ability to modulate the function of recombinant ?1?2?2L GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The effects of 6Bio-R, 14Bio-R, NESS 0327, GP1a and GP2a (0.3-30 ?M) were evaluated using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. 6Bio-R and 14Bio-R potentiated GABA-evoked Cl(-) currents. NESS 0327, GP1a and GP2a did not affect the GABAA receptor function, but they acted as antagonists of 6Bio-R. Moreover, NESS 0327 inhibited the potentiation of the GABAA receptor function induced by rimonabant. The benzodiazepine site seems to participate in the action of these compounds. In fact, flumazenil antagonized the potentiation of the GABAA receptor induced by 6Bio-R, and NESS 0327 reduced the action of lorazepam and zolpidem. On the contrary, NESS 0327 did not antagonize the action of "classic" GABAergic modulators (propanol, anesthetics, barbiturates or steroids). In ?1?2 receptors 6Bio-R potentiated the GABAergic function, but flumazenil was still able to antagonize the potentiation induced by 6Bio-R. Aryl pyrazole derivatives activity at the GABAA receptor depends on their molecular structure. These compounds bind to both an ??? binding site, and to an ?/? site which do not require the ? subunit and that may provide structural leads for drugs with potential anticonvulsant effects. PMID:24704372

  5. New Insights into the Function of IAP Proteins: Modulation of the MYC/MAX/MAD Network

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Casey W.; Duckett, Colin S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY A growing number of studies have revealed that the IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis) proteins play a variety of cellular roles in addition to suppression of apoptosis. A recent study in Molecular Cell demonstrates that one IAP member, c-IAP1, functions to potentiate the activity of Myc by triggering the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of the Myc inhibitory protein, Mad1. PMID:18194645

  6. Extending bicluster analysis to annotate unclassified ORFs and predict novel functional modules using expression data

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Kenneth; Cunningham, Pádraig

    2008-01-01

    Background Microarrays have the capacity to measure the expressions of thousands of genes in parallel over many experimental samples. The unsupervised classification technique of bicluster analysis has been employed previously to uncover gene expression correlations over subsets of samples with the aim of providing a more accurate model of the natural gene functional classes. This approach also has the potential to aid functional annotation of unclassified open reading frames (ORFs). Until now this aspect of biclustering has been under-explored. In this work we illustrate how bicluster analysis may be extended into a 'semi-supervised' ORF annotation approach referred to as BALBOA. Results The efficacy of the BALBOA ORF classification technique is first assessed via cross validation and compared to a multi-class k-Nearest Neighbour (kNN) benchmark across three independent gene expression datasets. BALBOA is then used to assign putative functional annotations to unclassified yeast ORFs. These predictions are evaluated using existing experimental and protein sequence information. Lastly, we employ a related semi-supervised method to predict the presence of novel functional modules within yeast. Conclusion In this paper we demonstrate how unsupervised classification methods, such as bicluster analysis, may be extended using of available annotations to form semi-supervised approaches within the gene expression analysis domain. We show that such methods have the potential to improve upon supervised approaches and shed new light on the functions of unclassified ORFs and their co-regulation. PMID:18831786

  7. Agonist Activated PKC?II Translocation and Modulation of Cardiac Myocyte Contractile Function

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyosook; Robinson, Dustin; Rogers, Julie B.; Stevenson, Tamara K.; Lang, Sarah E.; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Day, Sharlene M.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Westfall, Margaret V.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated protein kinase C ?II (PKC?II) expression develops during heart failure and yet the role of this isoform in modulating contractile function remains controversial. The present study examines the impact of agonist-induced PKC?II activation on contractile function in adult cardiac myocytes. Diminished contractile function develops in response to low dose phenylephrine (PHE, 100?nM) in controls, while function is preserved in response to PHE in PKC?II-expressing myocytes. PHE also caused PKC?II translocation and a punctate distribution pattern in myocytes expressing this isoform. The preserved contractile function and translocation responses to PHE are blocked by the inhibitor, LY379196 (30?nM) in PKC?II-expressing myocytes. Further analysis showed downstream protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylation and phosphatase activation are associated with the LY379196-sensitive contractile response. PHE also triggered a complex pattern of end-target phosphorylation in PKC?II-expressing myocytes. These patterns are consistent with bifurcated activation of downstream signaling activity by PKC?II. PMID:23756828

  8. Sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium channels modulate skeletal muscle function under low-intensity workloads

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhiyong; Sierra, Ana; Burnett, Colin M.-L.; Chen, Biyi; Subbotina, Ekaterina; Koganti, Siva Rama Krishna; Gao, Zhan; Wu, Yuejin; Anderson, Mark E.; Song, Long-Sheng; Goldhamer, David J.; Coetzee, William A.; Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M.

    2014-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels have the unique ability to adjust membrane excitability and functions in accordance with the metabolic status of the cell. Skeletal muscles are primary sites of activity-related energy consumption and have KATP channels expressed in very high density. Previously, we demonstrated that transgenic mice with skeletal muscle–specific disruption of KATP channel function consume more energy than wild-type littermates. However, how KATP channel activation modulates skeletal muscle resting and action potentials under physiological conditions, particularly low-intensity workloads, and how this can be translated to muscle energy expenditure are yet to be determined. Here, we developed a technique that allows evaluation of skeletal muscle excitability in situ, with minimal disruption of the physiological environment. Isometric twitching of the tibialis anterior muscle at 1 Hz was used as a model of low-intensity physical activity in mice with normal and genetically disrupted KATP channel function. This workload was sufficient to induce KATP channel opening, resulting in membrane hyperpolarization as well as reduction in action potential overshoot and duration. Loss of KATP channel function resulted in increased calcium release and aggravated activity-induced heat production. Thus, this study identifies low-intensity workload as a trigger for opening skeletal muscle KATP channels and establishes that this coupling is important for regulation of myocyte function and thermogenesis. These mechanisms may provide a foundation for novel strategies to combat metabolic derangements when energy conservation or dissipation is required. PMID:24344248

  9. Sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium channels modulate skeletal muscle function under low-intensity workloads.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiyong; Sierra, Ana; Burnett, Colin M-L; Chen, Biyi; Subbotina, Ekaterina; Koganti, Siva Rama Krishna; Gao, Zhan; Wu, Yuejin; Anderson, Mark E; Song, Long-Sheng; Goldhamer, David J; Coetzee, William A; Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M; Zingman, Leonid V

    2014-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels have the unique ability to adjust membrane excitability and functions in accordance with the metabolic status of the cell. Skeletal muscles are primary sites of activity-related energy consumption and have KATP channels expressed in very high density. Previously, we demonstrated that transgenic mice with skeletal muscle-specific disruption of KATP channel function consume more energy than wild-type littermates. However, how KATP channel activation modulates skeletal muscle resting and action potentials under physiological conditions, particularly low-intensity workloads, and how this can be translated to muscle energy expenditure are yet to be determined. Here, we developed a technique that allows evaluation of skeletal muscle excitability in situ, with minimal disruption of the physiological environment. Isometric twitching of the tibialis anterior muscle at 1 Hz was used as a model of low-intensity physical activity in mice with normal and genetically disrupted KATP channel function. This workload was sufficient to induce KATP channel opening, resulting in membrane hyperpolarization as well as reduction in action potential overshoot and duration. Loss of KATP channel function resulted in increased calcium release and aggravated activity-induced heat production. Thus, this study identifies low-intensity workload as a trigger for opening skeletal muscle KATP channels and establishes that this coupling is important for regulation of myocyte function and thermogenesis. These mechanisms may provide a foundation for novel strategies to combat metabolic derangements when energy conservation or dissipation is required. PMID:24344248

  10. A Tale of Switched Functions: From Cyclooxygenase Inhibition to M-Channel Modulation in New Diphenylamine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Asher; Degani-Katzav, Nurit; Talmon, Maya; Danieli, Eyal; Gopin, Anna; Malka, Eti; Nachman, Rachel; Raz, Amiram; Shabat, Doron; Attali, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes are molecular targets of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the most used medication worldwide. However, the COX enzymes are not the sole molecular targets of NSAIDs. Recently, we showed that two NSAIDs, diclofenac and meclofenamate, also act as openers of Kv7.2/3 K+ channels underlying the neuronal M-current. Here we designed new derivatives of diphenylamine carboxylate to dissociate the M-channel opener property from COX inhibition. The carboxylate moiety was derivatized into amides or esters and linked to various alkyl and ether chains. Powerful M-channel openers were generated, provided that the diphenylamine moiety and a terminal hydroxyl group are preserved. In transfected CHO cells, they activated recombinant Kv7.2/3 K+ channels, causing a hyperpolarizing shift of current activation as measured by whole-cell patch-clamp recording. In sensory dorsal root ganglion and hippocampal neurons, the openers hyperpolarized the membrane potential and robustly depressed evoked spike discharges. They also decreased hippocampal glutamate and GABA release by reducing the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic currents. In vivo, the openers exhibited anti-convulsant activity, as measured in mice by the maximal electroshock seizure model. Conversion of the carboxylate function into amide abolished COX inhibition but preserved M-channel modulation. Remarkably, the very same template let us generating potent M-channel blockers. Our results reveal a new and crucial determinant of NSAID-mediated COX inhibition. They also provide a structural framework for designing novel M-channel modulators, including openers and blockers. PMID:18159230

  11. Comprehensive functional analysis of chymotrypsin C (CTRC) variants reveals distinct loss-of-function mechanisms associated with pancreatitis risk

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Sebastian; Zhou, Jiayi; Szabó, András; Keiles, Steven; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Witt, Heiko; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2013-01-01

    Objective The digestive enzyme chymotrypsin C (CTRC) protects against pancreatitis by promoting degradation of trypsinogen and thereby curtailing potentially harmful trypsinogen activation. Loss-of-function variants in CTRC increase the risk for chronic pancreatitis. The aim of the present study was to perform comprehensive functional analysis of all missense CTRC variants identified to date. Design We investigated secretion, activity and degradation of 27 published and 5 novel CTRC mutants. We also assessed the effect of 5 mutants on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Results None of the mutants exhibited a gain of function such as increased secretion or activity. In contrast, 11 mutants showed marked loss of function, 3 mutants had moderate functional defects, whereas 18 mutants were functionally similar to wild-type CTRC. The functional deficiencies observed were diminished secretion, impaired catalytic activity and degradation by trypsin. Mutants with a secretion defect caused ER stress that was proportional to the loss in secretion. ER stress was not associated with loss-of-function phenotypes related to catalytic defect or proteolytic instability. Conclusion Pathogenic CTRC variants cause loss of function by three distinct but mutually non-exclusive mechanisms that affect secretion, activity and proteolytic stability. ER stress may be induced by a subset of CTRC mutants but does not represent a common pathological mechanism of CTRC variants. This phenotypic dataset should aid in the classification of the clinical relevance of CTRC variants identified in patients with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:22942235

  12. Modulation of leg muscle function in response to altered demand for body support and forward propulsion during walking

    E-print Network

    Modulation of leg muscle function in response to altered demand for body support and forward t A number of studies have examined the functional roles of individual muscles during normal walking, but few studies have examined which are the primary muscles that respond to changes in external mechanical demand

  13. Electron Spin-Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) Reveals Water and Phosphate Interactions with the KcsA Potassium Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, John A.; Focia, Pamela J.; Gross, Adrian (NWU)

    2010-08-13

    Electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy is a well-established technique for the study of naturally occurring paramagnetic metal centers. The technique has been used to study copper complexes, hemes, enzyme mechanisms, micellar water content, and water permeation profiles in membranes, among other applications. In the present study, we combine ESEEM spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and X-ray crystallography in order to evaluate the technique's potential as a structural tool to describe the native environment of membrane proteins. Using the KcsA potassium channel as a model system, we demonstrate that deuterium ESEEM can detect water permeation along the lipid-exposed surface of the KcsA outer helix. We further demonstrate that {sup 31}P ESEEM is able to identify channel residues that interact with the phosphate headgroup of the lipid bilayer. In combination with X-ray crystallography, the {sup 31}P data may be used to define the phosphate interaction surface of the protein. The results presented here establish ESEEM as a highly informative technique for SDSL studies of membrane proteins.

  14. Modulation of endogenous GATA-4 activity reveals its dual contribution to Müllerian inhibiting substance gene transcription in Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, J J; Robert, N M; Viger, R S

    2001-09-01

    Secretion of Müllerian inhibiting substance by fetal Sertoli cells is essential for normal male sex differentiation since it induces regression of the Müllerian ducts in the developing male embryo. Proper spatiotemporal expression of the MIS gene requires a specific combination of transcription factors, including the zinc finger factor GATA-4 and the nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor-1, which both colocalize with Müllerian inhibiting substance in Sertoli cells. To establish the molecular mechanisms through which GATA-4 contributes to MIS transcription, we have generated and characterized novel GATA-4 dominant negative competitors. The first one, which consisted solely of the GATA-4 zinc finger DNA-binding domain, was an efficient competitor of GATA transcription mediated both by direct GATA binding to DNA and protein-protein interactions involving GATA factors. The second type of competitor consisted of the same GATA-4 zinc finger DNA-binding domain but harboring mutations that prevented DNA binding. This second class of competitors repressed GATA-dependent transactivation by specifically competing for GATA protein-protein interactions without affecting the DNA-binding activity of endogenous GATA factors. These competitors, along with the GATA-4 cofactor FOG-2 (friend of GATA-2), were used to specifically modulate endogenous GATA-4 activity in Sertoli cells. Our results indicate that GATA-4 contributes to MIS promoter activity through two distinct mechanisms. Moreover, the GATA competitors described here should provide invaluable in vitro and in vivo tools for the study of GATA- dependent transcription and the identification of new target genes. PMID:11518812

  15. Selective GABAA ?5 Positive Allosteric Modulators Improve Cognitive Function in Aged Rats with Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ming Teng; Rosenzweig-Lipson, Sharon; Gallagher, Michela

    2012-01-01

    A condition of excess activity in the hippocampal formation is observed in the aging brain and in conditions that confer additional risk during aging for Alzheimer’s disease. Compounds that act as positive allosteric modulators at GABAA ?5 receptors might be useful in targeting this condition because GABAA ?5 receptors mediate tonic inhibition of principal neurons in the affected network. While agents to improve cognitive function in the past focused on inverse agonists, which are negative allosteric modulators at GABAA ?5 receptors, research supporting that approach used only young animals and predated current evidence for excessive hippocampal activity in age-related conditions of cognitive impairment. Here, we used two compounds, Compound 44 [6,6-dimethyl-3-(3-hydroxypropyl)thio-1-(thiazol-2-yl)-6,7-dihydro-2-benzothiophen-4(5H)-one] and Compound 6 [methyl 3,5-diphenylpyridazine-4-carboxylate], with functional activity as potentiators of ?-aminobutyric acid at GABAA ?5 receptors, to test their ability to improve hippocampal-dependent memory in aged rats with identified cognitive impairment. Improvement was obtained in aged rats across protocols differing in motivational and performance demands and across varying retention intervals. Significant memory improvement occurred after either intracereboventricular infusion with Compound 44 (100 ?g) in a water maze task or systemic administration with Compound 6 (3 mg/kg) in a radial arm maze task. Furthermore, systemic administration improved behavioral performance at dosing shown to provide drug exposure in the brain and in vivo receptor occupancy in the hippocampus. These data suggest a novel approach to improve neural network function in clinical conditions of excess hippocampal activity. PMID:22732440

  16. Structure-guided discovery of the metabolite carboxy-SAM that modulates tRNA function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungwook; Xiao, Hui; Bonanno, Jeffrey B; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Brown, Shoshana; Tang, Xiangying; Al-Obaidi, Nawar F; Patskovsky, Yury; Babbitt, Patricia C; Jacobson, Matthew P; Lee, Young-Sam; Almo, Steven C

    2013-06-01

    The identification of novel metabolites and the characterization of their biological functions are major challenges in biology. X-ray crystallography can reveal unanticipated ligands that persist through purification and crystallization. These adventitious protein-ligand complexes provide insights into new activities, pathways and regulatory mechanisms. We describe a new metabolite, carboxy-S-adenosyl-l-methionine (Cx-SAM), its biosynthetic pathway and its role in transfer RNA modification. The structure of CmoA, a member of the SAM-dependent methyltransferase superfamily, revealed a ligand consistent with Cx-SAM in the catalytic site. Mechanistic analyses showed an unprecedented role for prephenate as the carboxyl donor and the involvement of a unique ylide intermediate as the carboxyl acceptor in the CmoA-mediated conversion of SAM to Cx-SAM. A second member of the SAM-dependent methyltransferase superfamily, CmoB, recognizes Cx-SAM and acts as a carboxymethyltransferase to convert 5-hydroxyuridine into 5-oxyacetyl uridine at the wobble position of multiple tRNAs in Gram-negative bacteria, resulting in expanded codon-recognition properties. CmoA and CmoB represent the first documented synthase and transferase for Cx-SAM. These findings reveal new functional diversity in the SAM-dependent methyltransferase superfamily and expand the metabolic and biological contributions of SAM-based biochemistry. These discoveries highlight the value of structural genomics approaches in identifying ligands within the context of their physiologically relevant macromolecular binding partners, and in revealing their functions. PMID:23676670

  17. Discrete change of spin-density-wave modulation in Cr(100)/Sn multilayers as a function of Cr layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Mibu, K; Takeda, M; Suzuki, J; Nakanishi, A; Kobayashi, T; Endoh, Y; Shinjo, T

    2002-12-31

    Magnetic structures of epitaxial Cr(001)/Sn multilayers, where monatomic Sn layers are periodically embedded in a Cr(001) film, were studied using neutron diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. It was found that spin-density-wave (SDW) antiferromagnetic structures with the modulation along the perpendicular direction to the film plane are stabilized at low temperatures. The wavelength of the SDW discretely changes as a function of the superlattice period. The enhanced magnetic moments of Cr at the Cr/Sn interfaces are thought to pin the antimode of the SDW modulation at the interface, resulting in the SDW with the modulation harmonic to the superlattice period. PMID:12513176

  18. Seismological Features of the Subducting Slab Beneath the Kii Peninsula, Central Japan, Revealed by Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, K.; Park, J.

    2007-12-01

    We report seismological evidence that the subducting Philippine Sea slab (PHS) beneath the Kii Peninsula, central Japan, can be divided into three segments. Offshore the Kii Peninsula, the "Tonankai" and "Nankai" fault segments suffer mega-thrust earthquakes that repeat every 100 to 150 years. The structure of the young, thin, contorted PHS is important to the seismo-tectonics in this region. We apply the receiver function (RF) analysis to 26 Hi-net short-period and 4 F-net broad-band seismographic stations. In the case that dipping velocity discontinuities and/or anisotropic media exist beneath seismometer, both radial RFs and transverse RFs contain useful information to estimate underground structure. For isotropic media with a dipping-slab interface, back- azimuthal variation in RFs depends largely on three parameters, the downdip azimuth, dip angle and the depth of the interface. We stack both radial and transverse RFs with allowance a time-shift caused by the dipping interface, searching for optimal parameters based on the grid-search technique at each station. At some stations located near the eastern coastline of the Kii Peninsula, the dip angle of the interface inferred from RF stacking is much steeper than that estimated by the local seismicity. This discrepancy arises from the interference of two slab-converted phases, suggesting a layer atop the slab. In these cases we refine the stack to distinguish two slab phases and estimate three parameters of each dipping interface separately. Two interfaces with the same dip direction and low dip angle are estimated at these stations, with depth difference near 6 km. Thus, the shallower interface may be related to the layer within the oceanic crust and the deeper one is the slab Moho. These double-layered interfaces are detected only at stations located up-dip of a belt-like distribution of non- volcanic low-frequency tremor. Comparing the interface dips estimated in this study with the direction of slab motion determined by the GPS observation, we can classify the slab beneath the Kii Peninsula into three segments: eastern, central and southern. Within the eastern part, the RF-estimated dip direction is shifted about 30° clockwise from the GPS- estimated slab motion, and the dip angle is small. The difference of RF-estimated slab dip and GPS-estimated slab motion is small in the central part. Discrepancy between slab dip and motion estimates increases to 40°--90° in the western part. At the some stations located in the western and eastern part of the Kii Peninsula, the dip angle of the interface is much steeper than another model estimated by the local seismicity. Since the local seismicity distribution reflects well the larger-scale geometry of the slab, the RF-estimated dip angle may imply anisotropic wavespeeds within strongly sheared media above the slab. The boundary between the eastern and central regions of the Kii Peninsula corresponds to the region where (1) a topographic high in the slab interface is subducting and (2) the intraslab seismicity shows double-layered activity. The boundary between central and southern regions is coincident with the segment boundary of megathrust earthquakes in the Nankai region. The structural features revealed by RF-stacking may be an important key to the seismotectonics around the Kii Peninsula.

  19. Acupuncture modulates cortical thickness and functional connectivity in knee osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Spaeth, Rosa B; Retzepi, Kallirroi; Ott, Daniel; Kong, Jian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated cortical thickness and functional connectivity across longitudinal acupuncture treatments in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Over a period of four weeks (six treatments), we collected resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans from 30 patients before their first, third and sixth treatments. Clinical outcome showed a significantly greater Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) pain score (improvement) with verum acupuncture compared to the sham acupuncture. Longitudinal cortical thickness analysis showed that the cortical thickness at left posterior medial prefrontal cortex (pMPFC) decreased significantly in the sham group across treatment sessions as compared with verum group. Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) analysis using the left pMPFC as a seed showed that after longitudinal treatments, the rsFC between the left pMPFC and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), medial frontal pole (mFP) and periaquiduct grey (PAG) are significantly greater in the verum acupuncture group as compared with the sham group. Our results suggest that acupuncture may achieve its therapeutic effect on knee OA pain by preventing cortical thinning and decreases in functional connectivity in major pain related areas, therefore modulating pain in the descending pain modulatory pathway. PMID:25258037

  20. Herpes simplex virus enhances chemokine function through modulation of receptor trafficking and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Martin, Nadia; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Martín, Rocío; Blanco, Soledad; Benovic, Jeffrey L; Thelen, Marcus; Alcamí, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Glycoprotein G (gG) from herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, important human neurotropic pathogens) is the first viral chemokine-binding protein found to potentiate chemokine function. Here we show that gG attaches to cell surface glycosaminoglycans and induces lipid raft clustering, increasing the incorporation of CXCR4 receptors into these microdomains. gG induces conformational rearrangements in CXCR4 homodimers and changes their intracellular partners, leading to sustained, functional chemokine/receptor complexes at the surface. This results in increased chemotaxis dependent on the cholesterol content of the plasma membrane and receptor association to Src-kinases and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase signalling pathways, but independent of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Furthermore, using electron microscopy, we show that such enhanced functionality is associated with the accumulation of low-order CXCR4 nanoclusters. Our results provide insights into basic mechanisms of chemokine receptor function and into a viral strategy of immune modulation. PMID:25625471

  1. Electro-acupuncture at different acupoints modulating the relative specific brain functional network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiliang; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Yin; Liu, Hesheng; Hong, Yang; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Kehua; Wang, Lei; Xue, Chao; Song, Ming; Liu, Baoyan; Zhu, Bing

    2010-11-01

    Objective: The specific brain effects of acupoint are important scientific concern in acupuncture. However, previous acupuncture fMRI studies focused on acupoints in muscle layer on the limb. Therefore, researches on acupoints within connective tissue at trunk are warranted. Material and Methods: Brain effects of acupuncture on abdomen at acupoints Guanyuan (CV4) and Zhongwan (CV12) were tested using fMRI on 21 healthy volunteers. The data acquisition was performed at resting state, during needle retention, electroacupuncture (EA) and post-EA resting state. Needling sensations were rated after every electroacupuncture (EA) procedure. The needling sensations and the brain functional activity and connectivity were compared between CV4 and CV12 using SPSS, SPM2 and the local and remote connectivity maps. Results and conclusion: EA at CV4 and CV12 induced apparent deactivation effects in the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network. The default mode of the brain was modified by needle retention and EA, respectively. The functional brain network was significantly changed post EA. However, the minor differences existed between these two acupoints. The results demonstrated similarity between functional brain network mode of acupuncture modulation and functional circuits of emotional and cognitive regulation. Acupuncture may produce analgesia, anti-anxiety and anti-depression via the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network (LPNN).

  2. Acupuncture modulates cortical thickness and functional connectivity in knee osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Spaeth, Rosa B.; Retzepi, Kallirroi; Ott, Daniel; Kong, Jian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated cortical thickness and functional connectivity across longitudinal acupuncture treatments in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Over a period of four weeks (six treatments), we collected resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans from 30 patients before their first, third and sixth treatments. Clinical outcome showed a significantly greater Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) pain score (improvement) with verum acupuncture compared to the sham acupuncture. Longitudinal cortical thickness analysis showed that the cortical thickness at left posterior medial prefrontal cortex (pMPFC) decreased significantly in the sham group across treatment sessions as compared with verum group. Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) analysis using the left pMPFC as a seed showed that after longitudinal treatments, the rsFC between the left pMPFC and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), medial frontal pole (mFP) and periaquiduct grey (PAG) are significantly greater in the verum acupuncture group as compared with the sham group. Our results suggest that acupuncture may achieve its therapeutic effect on knee OA pain by preventing cortical thinning and decreases in functional connectivity in major pain related areas, therefore modulating pain in the descending pain modulatory pathway. PMID:25258037

  3. Response inhibition is modulated by functional cerebral asymmetries for facial expression perception

    PubMed Central

    Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Ness, Vanessa; Güntürkün, Onur; Suchan, Boris; Beste, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of executive functions is critically modulated by information processing in earlier cognitive stages. For example, initial processing of verbal stimuli in the language-dominant left-hemisphere leads to more efficient response inhibition than initial processing of verbal stimuli in the non-dominant right hemisphere. However, it is unclear whether this organizational principle is specific for the language system, or a general principle that also applies to other types of lateralized cognition. To answer this question, we investigated the neurophysiological correlates of early attentional processes, facial expression perception and response inhibition during tachistoscopic presentation of facial “Go” and “Nogo” stimuli in the left and the right visual field (RVF). Participants committed fewer false alarms after Nogo-stimulus presentation in the left compared to the RVF. This right-hemispheric asymmetry on the behavioral level was also reflected in the neurophysiological correlates of face perception, specifically in a right-sided asymmetry in the N170 amplitude. Moreover, the right-hemispheric dominance for facial expression processing also affected event-related potentials typically related to response inhibition, namely the Nogo-N2 and Nogo-P3. These findings show that an effect of hemispheric asymmetries in early information processing on the efficacy of higher cognitive functions is not limited to left-hemispheric language functions, but can be generalized to predominantly right-hemispheric functions. PMID:24319440

  4. CarD integrates three functional modules to promote efficient transcription, antibiotic tolerance, and pathogenesis in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Garner, Ashley L; Weiss, Leslie A; Manzano, Ana Ruiz; Galburt, Eric A; Stallings, Christina L

    2014-08-01

    Although the basic mechanisms of prokaryotic transcription are conserved, it has become evident that some bacteria require additional factors to allow for efficient gene transcription. CarD is an RNA polymerase (RNAP)-binding protein conserved in numerous bacterial species and essential in mycobacteria. Despite the importance of CarD, its function at transcription complexes remains unclear. We have generated a panel of mutations that individually target three independent functional modules of CarD: the RNAP interaction domain, the DNA-binding domain, and a conserved tryptophan residue. We have dissected the roles of each functional module in CarD activity and built a model where each module contributes to stabilizing RNAP-promoter complexes. Our work highlights the requirement of all three modules of CarD in the obligate pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but not in Mycobacterium smegmatis. We also report divergent use of the CarD functional modules in resisting oxidative stress and pigmentation. These studies provide new information regarding the functional domains involved in transcriptional regulation by CarD while also improving understanding of the physiology of M. tuberculosis. PMID:24962732

  5. Calibration of the modulation transfer function of surface profilometers with binary pseudo-random test standards: expanding the application range

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; Cambie, Rossana; Conley, Raymond; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

    2011-03-14

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47, 073602 (2008)] has been proven to be an effective MTF calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A616, 172 (2010)]. Here we report on a further expansion of the application range of the method. We describe the MTF calibration of a 6 inch phase shifting Fizeau interferometer. Beyond providing a direct measurement of the interferometer's MTF, tests with a BPR array surface have revealed an asymmetry in the instrument's data processing algorithm that fundamentally limits its bandwidth. Moreover, the tests have illustrated the effects of the instrument's detrending and filtering procedures on power spectral density measurements. The details of the development of a BPR test sample suitable for calibration of scanning and transmission electron microscopes are also presented. Such a test sample is realized as a multilayer structure with the layer thicknesses of two materials corresponding to BPR sequence. The investigations confirm the universal character of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

  6. Calibration of the modulation transfer function of surface profilometers with binary pseudo-random test standards: Expanding the application range

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; Cambie, Rossana; Conley, Raymond; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

    2010-07-26

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47(7), 073602-1-5 (2008)] has been proven to be an effective MTF calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 616, 172-82 (2010]. Here we report on a significant expansion of the application range of the method. We describe the MTF calibration of a 6 inch phase shifting Fizeau interferometer. Beyond providing a direct measurement of the interferometer's MTF, tests with a BPR array surface have revealed an asymmetry in the instrument's data processing algorithm that fundamentally limits its bandwidth. Moreover, the tests have illustrated the effects of the instrument's detrending and filtering procedures on power spectral density measurements. The details of the development of a BPR test sample suitable for calibration of scanning and transmission electron microscopes are also presented. Such a test sample is realized as a multilayer structure with the layer thicknesses of two materials corresponding to BPR sequence. The investigations confirm the universal character of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

  7. Structure and Functional Characterization of the RNA-Binding Element of the NLRX1 Innate Immune Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Minsun; Yoon, Sung-il; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps)

    2012-06-20

    Mitochondrial NLRX1 is a member of the family of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing proteins (NLRs) that mediate host innate immunity as intracellular surveillance sensors against common molecular patterns of invading pathogens. NLRX1 functions in antiviral immunity, but the molecular mechanism of its ligand-induced activation is largely unknown. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fragment (residues 629975) of human NLRX1 (cNLRX1) at 2.65 {angstrom} resolution reveals that cNLRX1 consists of an N-terminal helical (LRRNT) domain, central leucine-rich repeat modules (LRRM), and a C-terminal three-helix bundle (LRRCT). cNLRX1 assembles into a compact hexameric architecture that is stabilized by intersubunit and interdomain interactions of LRRNT and LRRCT in the trimer and dimer components of the hexamer, respectively. Furthermore, we find that cNLRX1 interacts directly with RNA and supports a role for NLRX1 in recognition of intracellular viral RNA in antiviral immunity.

  8. Expression of functional aromatase in the epididymis: role of androgens and LH in modulation of expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Shayu, D; Rao, A J

    2006-04-25

    The primary source of 17beta-estradiol (E2) in the male is the testis, which expresses the enzyme complex aromatase that is involved in E2 biosynthesis. However, recent evidences suggest that the epididymis is also capable of E2 biosynthesis. Our results demonstrate the presence of cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450(AROM)) and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase I messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in the caput and cauda regions of rat epididymis. The androgenic substrates testosterone and androstenedione could be utilized by the rat epididymal aromatase for E2 biosynthesis as assessed by radioimmunoassay. P450(AROM) expression is transcriptionally regulated in a tissue-specific manner by various factors including androgens and luteinizing hormone (LH). Androgens could positively modulate epididymal P450(AROM) mRNA levels as assessed by castration studies, treatment with flutamide or in vitro incubation of tissue minces with 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Several extra-gonadal tissues including the epididymis are known to express LH receptors (LHR). Our study revealed a higher level of LHR mRNA expression in the cauda region compared to the caput. Caudal membrane extracts could bind human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which resulted in the production of cAMP. Interestingly, hCG could also regulate P450(AROM) mRNA expression in vitro and enhance E2 biosynthesis. Together our results highlight the presence of a functional aromatase in the epididymis that is subject to regulation by LH and androgens. PMID:16569475

  9. Bidirectional modulation of deep cerebellar nuclear cells revealed by optogenetic manipulation of inhibitory inputs from Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Han, V Z; Magnus, G; Zhang, Y; Wei, A D; Turner, E E

    2014-09-26

    In the mammalian cerebellum, deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN) cells convey all information from cortical Purkinje cells (PCs) to premotor nuclei and other brain regions. However, how DCN cells integrate inhibitory input from PCs with excitatory inputs from other sources has been difficult to assess, in part due to the large spatial separation between cortical PCs and their target cells in the nuclei. To circumvent this problem we have used a Cre-mediated genetic approach to generate mice in which channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), fused with a fluorescent reporter, is selectively expressed by GABAergic neurons, including PCs. In recordings from brain slice preparations from this model, mammalian PCs can be robustly depolarized and discharged by brief photostimulation. In recordings of postsynaptic DCN cells, photostimulation of PC axons induces a strong inhibition that resembles these cells' responses to focal electrical stimulation, but without a requirement for the glutamate receptor blockers typically applied in such experiments. In this optogenetic model, laser pulses as brief as 1 ms can reliably induce an inhibition that shuts down the spontaneous spiking of a DCN cell for ?50 ms. If bursts of such brief light pulses are delivered, a fixed pattern of bistable bursting emerges. If these pulses are delivered continuously to a spontaneously bistable cell, the immediate response to such photostimulation is inhibitory in the cell's depolarized state and excitatory when the membrane has repolarized; a less regular burst pattern then persists after stimulation has been terminated. These results indicate that the spiking activity of DCN cells can be bidirectionally modulated by the optically activated synaptic inhibition of cortical PCs. PMID:25020121

  10. The Dc-Module of Doublecortin: Dynamics, Domain Boundaries, and Functional Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Cierpicki,T.; Kim, M.; Cooper, D.; Derewenda, U.; Bushweller, J.; Derwenda, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The doublecortin-like (DC) domains, which usually occur in tandem, constitute novel microtubule-binding modules. They were first identified in doublecortin (DCX), a protein expressed in migrating neurons, and in the doublecortin-like kinase (DCLK). They are also found in other proteins, including the RP1 gene product which-when mutated-causes a form of inherited blindness. We previously reported an X-ray structure of the N-terminal DC domain of DCLK (N-DCLK), and a solution structure of an analogous module of human doublecortin (N-DCX). These studies showed that the DC domain has a tertiary fold closely reminiscent of ubiquitin and similar to several GTPase-binding domains. We now report an X-ray structure of a mutant of N-DCX, in which the C-terminal fragment (residues 139-147) unexpectedly shows an altered, 'open' conformation. However, heteronuclear NMR data show that this C-terminal fragment is only transiently open in solution, and assumes a predominantly 'closed' conformation. While the 'open' conformation may be artificially stabilized by crystal packing interactions, the observed switching between the 'open' and 'closed' conformations, which shortens the linker between the two DC-domains by {approx}20 A, is likely to be of functional importance in the control of tubulin polymerization and microtubule bundling by doublecortin.

  11. Myocardin restores erectile function in diabetic rats: phenotypic modulation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    He, S; Zhang, T; Liu, Y; Liu, L; Zhang, H; Chen, F; Wei, A

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether gene transfer of myocardin to the penis of diabetic rats can modulate corpus cavernosum smooth muscle (CCSM) cells phenotype and restore erectile function. Five normal control rats, and 22 diabetic rats were randomly divided into four groups: rats transfected with adCMV-myocardin (N = 6), treated with empty vector (N = 6), injected with medium (N = 5), and sham-operated rats (N = 5). The erectile response was measured 7 days after transfection. The percent of smooth muscle and the expressions of SM?-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMMHC), calponin were evaluated. The increases in intracorporal pressure(ICP)/mean arterial pressure and total ICP in response to nerve stimulation in the adCMV-myocardin treated rats were significantly greater than those in the empty vector (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), medium only (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), and sham-operated rats (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001). The suppressed expressions of SM?-actin, SMMHC and calponin were completely restored, and the amount of smooth muscle in diabetic rats were not restored after treatment. It is concluded that myocardin ameliorated erectile responses in diabetic rats mainly via promoting phenotypic modulation of CCSM cells from a proliferative to a contractile state. PMID:24620720

  12. Preliminary safety analysis for the Chinese ITER Dual Functional Lithium-Lead Test Blanket Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongli; Bai, Yunqing; Hu, Liqin; Chen, Mingliang; Song, Yong; Zeng, Qin; Liu, Songlin

    2009-07-01

    Safety analysis is part of the ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM) design process ensuring that the TBM does not adversely affect the safety of ITER. To get the licence for TBM as a whole with ITER, relevant safety analysis is required for each TBM system proposed by each party. The safety analysis for the Chinese Dual Functional Lithium-Lead Test Blanket Module (DFLL-TBM) has been performed based on the latest DFLL-TBM design. In this paper, the following safety considerations, such as source terms, operational releases, accident sequence analyses and waste assessment, were analysed. Both the deterministic approach and the complementary systematic approach starting with failure mode and effects analysis studies were adopted in the accidental analysis. The preliminary results showed that the DFLL-TBM system at normal operating conditions and under accident scenarios did not add additional safety hazards to the ITER machine and could meet the ITER safety requirements and additional safety requirements for the TBM system.

  13. A novel mechanism of post-translational modulation of HMGA functions by the histone chaperone nucleophosmin

    PubMed Central

    Arnoldo, Laura; Sgarra, Riccardo; Chiefari, Eusebio; Iiritano, Stefania; Arcidiacono, Biagio; Pegoraro, Silvia; Pellarin, Ilenia; Brunetti, Antonio; Manfioletti, Guidalberto

    2015-01-01

    High Mobility Group A are non-histone nuclear proteins that regulate chromatin plasticity and accessibility, playing an important role both in physiology and pathology. Their activity is controlled by transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational mechanisms. In this study we provide evidence for a novel modulatory mechanism for HMGA functions. We show that HMGAs are complexed in vivo with the histone chaperone nucleophosmin (NPM1), that this interaction requires the histone-binding domain of NPM1, and that NPM1 modulates both DNA-binding affinity and specificity of HMGAs. By focusing on two human genes whose expression is directly regulated by HMGA1, the Insulin receptor (INSR) and the Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) genes, we demonstrated that occupancy of their promoters by HMGA1 was NPM1-dependent, reflecting a mechanism in which the activity of these cis-regulatory elements is directly modulated by NPM1 leading to changes in gene expression. HMGAs need short stretches of AT-rich nucleosome-free regions to bind to DNA. Therefore, many putative HMGA binding sites are present within the genome. Our findings indicate that NPM1, by exerting a chaperoning activity towards HMGAs, may act as a master regulator in the control of DNA occupancy by these proteins and hence in HMGA-mediated gene expression. PMID:25711412

  14. Functional assays and metagenomic analyses reveals differences between the microbial communities inhabiting the soil horizons of a Norway spruce plantation.

    PubMed

    Uroz, Stéphane; Ioannidis, Panos; Lengelle, Juliette; Cébron, Aurélie; Morin, Emmanuelle; Buée, Marc; Martin, Francis

    2013-01-01

    In temperate ecosystems, acidic forest soils are among the most nutrient-poor terrestrial environments. In this context, the long-term differentiation of the forest soils into horizons may impact the assembly and the functions of the soil microbial communities. To gain a more comprehensive understanding of the ecology and functional potentials of these microbial communities, a suite of analyses including comparative metagenomics was applied on independent soil samples from a spruce plantation (Breuil-Chenue, France). The objectives were to assess whether the decreasing nutrient bioavailability and pH variations that naturally occurs between the organic and mineral horizons affects the soil microbial functional biodiversity. The 14 Gbp of pyrosequencing and Illumina sequences generated in this study revealed complex microbial communities dominated by bacteria. Detailed analyses showed that the organic soil horizon was significantly enriched in sequences related to Bacteria, Chordata, Arthropoda and Ascomycota. On the contrary the mineral horizon was significantly enriched in sequences related to Archaea. Our analyses also highlighted that the microbial communities inhabiting the two soil horizons differed significantly in their functional potentials according to functional assays and MG-RAST analyses, suggesting a functional specialisation of these microbial communities. Consistent with this specialisation, our shotgun metagenomic approach revealed a significant increase in the relative abundance of sequences related glycoside hydrolases in the organic horizon compared to the mineral horizon that was significantly enriched in glycoside transferases. This functional stratification according to the soil horizon was also confirmed by a significant correlation between the functional assays performed in this study and the functional metagenomic analyses. Together, our results suggest that the soil stratification and particularly the soil resource availability impact the functional diversity and to a lesser extent the taxonomic diversity of the bacterial communities. PMID:23418476

  15. Genetic randomization reveals functional relationships among morphologic and tissue-quality traits that contribute to bone strength and fragility.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Karl J; Hu, Bin; Tommasini, Steven M; Courtland, Hayden-William; Price, Christopher; Terranova, Carl J; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2007-07-01

    We examined femora from adult AXB/BXA recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains to identify skeletal traits that are functionally related and to determine how functional interactions among these traits contribute to genetic variability in whole-bone stiffness, strength, and toughness. Randomization of A/J and C57BL/6J genomic regions resulted in each adult male and female RI strain building mechanically functional femora by assembling unique sets of morphologic and tissue-quality traits. A correlation analysis was conducted using the mean trait values for each RI strain. A third of the 66 correlations examined were significant, indicating that many bone traits covaried or were functionally related. Path analysis revealed important functional interactions among bone slenderness, cortical thickness, and tissue mineral density. The path coefficients describing these functional relations were similar for both sexes. The causal relationship among these three traits suggested that cellular processes during growth simultaneously regulate bone slenderness, cortical thickness, and tissue mineral density so that the combination of traits is sufficiently stiff and strong to satisfy daily loading demands. A disadvantage of these functional interactions was that increases in tissue mineral density also deleteriously affected tissue ductility. Consequently, slender bones with high mineral density may be stiff and strong but they are also brittle. Thus, genetically randomized mouse strains revealed a basic biological paradigm that allows for flexibility in building bones that are functional for daily activities but that creates preferred sets of traits under extreme loading conditions. Genetic or environmental perturbations that alter these functional interactions during growth would be expected to lead to loss of function and suboptimal adult bone quality. PMID:17557179

  16. A novel fragile X syndrome mutation reveals a conserved role for the carboxy-terminus in FMRP localization and function

    PubMed Central

    Okray, Zeynep; de Esch, Celine EF; Van Esch, Hilde; Devriendt, Koen; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Verbeeck, Jelle; Froyen, Guy; Willemsen, Rob; de Vrij, Femke MS; Hassan, Bassem A

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of intellectual disability. The loss of FMR1 function is usually caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 promoter leading to expansion and subsequent methylation of a CGG repeat in the 5? untranslated region. Very few coding sequence variations have been experimentally characterized and shown to be causal to the disease. Here, we describe a novel FMR1 mutation and reveal an unexpected nuclear export function for the C-terminus of FMRP. We screened a cohort of patients with typical FXS symptoms who tested negative for CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 locus. In one patient, we identified a guanine insertion in FMR1 exon 15. This mutation alters the open reading frame creating a short novel C-terminal sequence, followed by a stop codon. We find that this novel peptide encodes a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) targeting the patient FMRP to the nucleolus in human cells. We also reveal an evolutionarily conserved nuclear export function associated with the endogenous C-terminus of FMRP. In vivo analyses in Drosophila demonstrate that a patient-mimetic mutation alters the localization and function of Dfmrp in neurons, leading to neomorphic neuronal phenotypes. PMID:25693964

  17. Numerical Simulation of the Modulation Transfer Function in HgCdTe Detector Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkie, Benjamin; Bellotti, Enrico

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we develop a method for simulating the modulation transfer function (MTF) of infrared detector arrays, which is based on numerical evaluation of the detector physics. The finite-difference time-domain and finite element methods are used to solve the electromagnetic and electrical equations for the device, respectively. We show how the total MTF can be deconvolved to examine the effects of specific physical processes. We introduce the MTF area difference and use it to quantify the effectiveness of several crosstalk mitigation techniques in improving the system MTF. We then apply our simulation methods to two-thirds generation mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) detector architectures. The methodology is general, can be implemented with commercially available software, has experimentally realizable analogs, and is extendable to other material systems and device designs.

  18. Functional Modules Analysis Based on Coexpression Network in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Baomin; Wang, Xiuyan; Han, Xujie; Liu, Pengfei; Wei, Weiwei; Li, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the most common epithelial, exocrine pancreatic malignancy, accounting for more than 80 % of the malignant neoplasms of the pancreas. Although the molecular basis of pancreatic cancer is now better understood than ever before, there remains a long distance from being completely understood. In this study, we identified the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in PDAC tissue compared with normal tissue and constructed a co-expression network by computing the pairwise correlation coefficient between the DEGs. We applied a statistical approach of MCODE to cluster genes in the coexpression network. Ten functional modules were identified in this network. Our results strongly suggest that dysregulations of immune response, homeostasis and cell adhesion may significantly contribute to the development and progression of PDAC. Results from this study will provide the groundwork for the understanding of PDAC. Future studies are needed to confirm some of the possible interactions suggested by this study. PMID:24185439

  19. Modulation Transfer Function Consequences of Planar Dense Array Geometries in Infrared Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkie, Benjamin; Wichman, Adam R.; Bellotti, Enrico

    2015-03-01

    Finite-difference time-domain and finite element method simulations are used to evaluate two-dimensional spot-scan profiles of p-on-n double-layer planar heterostructure (DLPH) detector arrays with abrupt p-type diffusions. The modulation transfer function (MTF) is calculated from the spot-scan profiles. An asymmetric dark and photo current collection mechanism is identified and explained as a result of electric field bunching through the corners of polygonal diffusions in DLPH arrays. The MTF consequences of the asymmetric collection are studied for triangular, square, and hexagonal diffusions in square and hexagonal arrays. We show that the placement and shape of the diffusion relative to the pixel can modify the MTF by several percent. The magnitude of the effect is largest for diffusions with fewer degrees of rotational symmetry.

  20. Experimental measurement of modulation transfer function of a retina-like sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Cao, Fengmei; Bai, Tingzhu; Cao, Nan; Liu, Changju; Deng, Guangping

    2014-11-01

    The retina-like sensor is a kind of anthropomorphic visual sensor. It plays an important role in both biological and machine vision due to its advantages of high resolution in the fovea, a wide field-of-view, and minimum pixel count. The space-variant property of the sensor makes it difficult to directly measure its modulation transfer function (MTF). The MTF of a retina-like sensor is measured with the bar-target pattern method. According to the pixel arrangement, the sensor is divided into rings and the MTF of each ring is measured using spoke targets with different periods. Comparison between the measured MTF and the theoretical MTF of the sensor showed that they coincide. The differences between them are also analyzed and discussed. The measured MTF helps to analyze the performance of an imaging system containing a retina-like sensor.

  1. Parametric analysis of the effect of scattered light upon the modulation transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, James E.

    2013-07-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is widely used as the image quality criterion of choice for imaging applications where fine detail in extended images needs to be specified or evaluated. We present a parametric analysis of the effect of scattered light upon the MTF of an imaging system and illustrate the results for three specific applications: (1) a visible Newtonian telescope with moderately good optical surfaces which produce no significant effect upon the MTF, (2) an extreme ultraviolet Newtonian telescope where scattering effects can dominate both diffraction effects and aberrations in the resulting image degradation even for state-of-the-art optical surfaces, and (3) a visible system made up of three diamond-turned off-axis aspheric mirrors where we use the predicted MTF to estimate whether post-polishing is required (huge cost and schedule impact) to meet a specific image quality requirement.

  2. Parametric analysis of the effect of scattered light upon the modulation transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, James E.

    2013-09-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is widely used as the image quality criterion of choice for imaging applications where fine detail in extended images needs to be specified or evaluated. In this paper we present a parametric analysis of the effect of scattered light upon the MTF of an imaging system, and illustrate the results for three specific applications: (i) a visible Newtonian telescope with moderately good optical surfaces which produce no significant effect upon the MTF, (ii) an extreme ultraviolet Newtonian telescope where scattering effects can dominate both diffraction effects and aberrations in the resulting image degradation even for state-of-the-art optical surfaces, and (iii) a visible system made up of three diamond-turned off-axis aspheric mirrors where we use the predicted MTF to estimate whether post-polishing is required (huge cost and schedule impact) to meet a specific image quality requirement.

  3. Allosteric Modulation of Beta1 Integrin Function Induces Lung Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    AlJamal-Naylor, Rehab; Wilson, Linda; McIntyre, Susan; Rossi, Fiona; Harrison, Beth; Marsden, Mark; Harrison, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton, adhesion receptors, extracellular matrix composition, and their spatial distribution are together fundamental in a cell's balanced mechanical sensing of its environment. We show that, in lung injury, extracellular matrix-integrin interactions are altered and this leads to signalling alteration and mechanical missensing. The missensing, secondary to matrix alteration and cell surface receptor alterations, leads to increased cellular stiffness, injury, and death. We have identified a monoclonal antibody against ?1 integrin which caused matrix remodelling and enhancement of cell survival. The antibody acts as an allosteric dual agonist/antagonist modulator of ?1 integrin. Intriguingly, this antibody reversed both functional and structural tissue injury in an animal model of degenerative disease in lung. PMID:22505883

  4. Resting-state functional connectivity in the human brain revealed with diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    White, Brian R.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Cohen, Alexander L.; Petersen, Steven E.; Raich-le, Marcus E.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.; Culver, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    Mapping resting-state networks allows insight into the brain's functional architecture and physiology and has rapidly become important in contemporary neuroscience research. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is an emerging functional neuroimaging technique with the advantages, relative to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), of portability and the ability to simultaneously measure both oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin. Previous optical studies have evaluated the temporal features of spontaneous resting brain signals. Herein, we develop techniques for spatially mapping functional connectivity with DOT (fc-DOT). Simultaneous imaging over the motor and visual cortices yielded robust correlation maps reproducing the expected functional neural architecture. The localization of the maps was confirmed with task-response studies and with subject-matched fc-MRI. These fc-DOT methods provide a task-less approach to mapping brain function in populations that were previously difficult to research. Our advances may permit new studies of early childhood development and of unconscious patients. In addition, the comprehensive hemoglobin contrasts of fc-DOT enable innovative studies of the biophysical origin of the functional connectivity signal. PMID:19344773

  5. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng (Texas-HSC); (OKLU)

    2010-06-15

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 {angstrom}, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface.

  6. Distribution of neurons in functional areas of the mouse cerebral cortex reveals quantitatively different cortical zones

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2013-01-01

    How are neurons distributed along the cortical surface and across functional areas? Here we use the isotropic fractionator (Herculano-Houzel and Lent, 2005) to analyze the distribution of neurons across the entire isocortex of the mouse, divided into 18 functional areas defined anatomically. We find that the number of neurons underneath a surface area (the N/A ratio) varies 4.5-fold across functional areas and neuronal density varies 3.2-fold. The face area of S1 contains the most neurons, followed by motor cortex and the primary visual cortex. Remarkably, while the distribution of neurons across functional areas does not accompany the distribution of surface area, it mirrors closely the distribution of cortical volumes—with the exception of the visual areas, which hold more neurons than expected for their volume. Across the non-visual cortex, the volume of individual functional areas is a shared linear function of their number of neurons, while in the visual areas, neuronal densities are much higher than in all other areas. In contrast, the 18 functional areas cluster into three different zones according to the relationship between the N/A ratio and cortical thickness and neuronal density: these three clusters can be called visual, sensory, and, possibly, associative. These findings are remarkably similar to those in the human cerebral cortex (Ribeiro et al., 2013) and suggest that, like the human cerebral cortex, the mouse cerebral cortex comprises two zones that differ in how neurons form the cortical volume, and three zones that differ in how neurons are distributed underneath the cortical surface, possibly in relation to local differences in connectivity through the white matter. Our results suggest that beyond the developmental divide into visual and non-visual cortex, functional areas initially share a common distribution of neurons along the parenchyma that become delimited into functional areas according to the pattern of connectivity established later. PMID:24155697

  7. Functional diversity of the p24? homologue Erp reveals physiological differences between two filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangzhong; Liang, Ya; Wang, Mingyu; Yang, Hui; Liu, Kuimei; Zhao, Qiushuang; Fang, Xu

    2013-12-01

    The protein hyper-secreting filamentous fungi impact their surrounding environments by secreting cellulases and digesting plant cell wall via microbe-plant interspecies interaction. This process is of paramount importance in biofuel production from the renewable lignocellulosic biomass, because cellulase production is the key factor in cost determination. Despite the importance of protein secretion, p24 protein, a key factor in eukaryotic protein maturation and secretion, was never investigated in filamentous fungi. The erp genes encoding p24? homologues were identified in Trichoderma reesei and Penicillium decumbens. The roles of Erp and their participated cellular pathways were investigated via disruption of erp, revealing significant differences: sporulation was hampered in T. reesei ?erp but not in P. decumbens ?erp; in both species Erp maintains membrane integrity; Erp is likely involved in hyphae polarity maintenance in T. reesei. Protein- and transcription-level investigations of Erp participation in cellulase production revealed distinct regulatory mechanisms. In T. reesei, cellulase encoding genes were repressed under secretion stress. In contrast, activation of the same genes under the same stress was identified in P. decumbens. These observations revealed a novel cellulase gene regulation mechanism, clearly suggested the different physiological roles of Erp, and further demonstrated the different physiology of T. reesei and P. decumbens, despite above 75% sequence identity between the proteins and the close evolutionary relationship between the two species. PMID:24035805

  8. The Extracellular Redox State Modulates Mitochondrial Function, Gluconeogenesis, and Glycogen Synthesis in Murine Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nocito, Laura; Kleckner, Amber S.; Yoo, Elsia J.; Jones IV, Albert R.; Liesa, Marc; Corkey, Barbara E.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating redox state changes, determined by the ratio of reduced/oxidized pairs of different metabolites, have been associated with metabolic diseases. However, the pathogenic contribution of these changes and whether they modulate normal tissue function is unclear. As alterations in hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism are hallmarks that characterize insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, we tested whether imposed changes in the extracellular redox state could modulate these processes. Thus, primary hepatocytes were treated with different ratios of the following physiological extracellular redox couples: ?-hydroxybutyrate (?OHB)/acetoacetate (Acoc), reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and cysteine/cystine. Exposure to a more oxidized ratio via extracellular ?OHB/Acoc, GSH/GSSG, and cysteine/cystine in hepatocytes from fed mice increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide without causing oxidative damage. On the other hand, addition of more reduced ratios of extracellular ?OHB/Acoc led to increased NAD(P)H and maximal mitochondrial respiratory capacity in hepatocytes. Greater ?OHB/Acoc ratios were also associated with decreased ?-oxidation, as expected with enhanced lipogenesis. In hepatocytes from fasted mice, a more extracellular reduced state of ?OHB/Acoc led to increased alanine-stimulated gluconeogenesis and enhanced glycogen synthesis capacity from added glucose. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that the extracellular redox state regulates the major metabolic functions of the liver and involves changes in intracellular NADH, hydrogen peroxide, and mitochondrial respiration. Because redox state in the blood can be communicated to all metabolically sensitive tissues, this work confirms the hypothesis that circulating redox state may be an important regulator of whole body metabolism and contribute to alterations associated with metabolic diseases. PMID:25816337

  9. Ulipristal acetate modulates the expression and functions of activin a in leiomyoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ciarmela, Pasquapina; Carrarelli, Patrizia; Islam, Md Soriful; Janjusevic, Milijana; Zupi, Errico; Tosti, Claudia; Castellucci, Mario; Petraglia, Felice

    2014-09-01

    Uterine leiomyoma is the most common benign gynecological tumor in women of reproductive age and represents the single most common indication for hysterectomy. A development of new treatments is necessary for a medical management, and in this direction, several hormonal drugs are under investigation. Ulipristal acetate (UPA; a selective progesterone receptor modulator) is considered as one of the most promising because progesterone has a critical role in development and growth of uterine leiomyoma. The effect of steroids is partly mediated by growth factors like activin A which increases extracellular matrix expression contributing to the growth of leiomyoma. The present study aimed to test whether UPA acts on leiomyoma cells affecting expression and functions of activin A system. Cultured myometrial and leiomyoma cells were treated with UPA, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of activin A (inhibin ?A [INHBA] subunits), its binding proteins (follistatin [FST] and FST-related gene), and its receptors (activin receptor-like kinase 4 [ALK4], activin receptor type [ActR] II, and ActRIIB) were evaluated. The effect of UPA on activin A modulation of fibronectin and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) mRNA expression in cultured myometrial and leiomyoma cells was also studied. Ulipristal acetate decreased INHBA, FST, ActRIIB, and Alk4 mRNA expressions in leiomyoma cultured cells. In addition, UPA was able to block the activin A-induced increase in fibronectin or VEGF-A mRNA expression in myometrial and in leiomyoma cultured cells. The present data show that UPA inhibits activin A expression and functions in leiomyoma cells, and this may represent a possible mechanism of action of the drug on uterine leiomyoma. PMID:25001022

  10. Modulation of STAT3 Folding and Function by TRiC/CCT Chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Kasembeli, Moses; Lau, Wilson Chun Yu; Roh, Soung-Hun; Eckols, T. Kris; Frydman, Judith; Chiu, Wah; Tweardy, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) transduces signals of many peptide hormones from the cell surface to the nucleus and functions as an oncoprotein in many types of cancers, yet little is known about how it achieves its native folded state within the cell. Here we show that Stat3 is a novel substrate of the ring-shaped hetero-oligomeric eukaryotic chaperonin, TRiC/CCT, which contributes to its biosynthesis and activity in vitro and in vivo. TRiC binding to Stat3 was mediated, at least in part, by TRiC subunit CCT3. Stat3 binding to TRiC mapped predominantly to the ?-strand rich, DNA-binding domain of Stat3. Notably, enhancing Stat3 binding to TRiC by engineering an additional TRiC-binding domain from the von Hippel-Lindau protein (vTBD), at the N-terminus of Stat3, further increased its affinity for TRiC as well as its function, as determined by Stat3's ability to bind to its phosphotyrosyl-peptide ligand, an interaction critical for Stat3 activation. Thus, Stat3 levels and function are regulated by TRiC and can be modulated by manipulating its interaction with TRiC. PMID:24756126

  11. Androgens modulate endothelial function and endothelial progenitor cells in erectile physiology.

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged M; Galoosian, Artin

    2013-11-01

    The incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED) increases with age and cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity, and diabetes. These risk factors are thought to contribute to endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, thus contributing to the pathophysiology of ED. The role of the endothelium in regulating erectile physiology is well established. However, the role of androgens in modulating endothelial function and endothelial repair mechanisms subsequent to vascular injury in erectile tissue remains a subject of intensive research. The clinical and preclinical evidence discussed in this review suggests that androgens regulate endothelial function and also play an important role in the development and maturation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which are thought to play a critical role in repair of endothelial injury in vascular beds. In this review, we discuss the data available on the effects of androgens on endothelial function and EPCs in the repair of vascular injury. Indeed, more research is needed to fully understand the molecular and cellular basis of androgen action in regulating the development, differentiation, maturation, migration, and homing of EPCs to the site of injury. A better understanding of these processes will be critical to the development of new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of vascular ED. PMID:24255752

  12. Modulation transfer function estimation of optical lens system by adaptive neuro-fuzzy methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovi?, Dalibor; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Pavlovi?, Nenad T.; Anuar, Nor Badrul; Kiah, Miss Laiha Mat

    2014-07-01

    The quantitative assessment of image quality is an important consideration in any type of imaging system. The modulation transfer function (MTF) is a graphical description of the sharpness and contrast of an imaging system or of its individual components. The MTF is also known and spatial frequency response. The MTF curve has different meanings according to the corresponding frequency. The MTF of an optical system specifies the contrast transmitted by the system as a function of image size, and is determined by the inherent optical properties of the system. In this study, the adaptive neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS) estimator is designed and adapted to estimate MTF value of the actual optical system. Neural network in ANFIS adjusts parameters of membership function in the fuzzy logic of the fuzzy inference system. The back propagation learning algorithm is used for training this network. This intelligent estimator is implemented using Matlab/Simulink and the performances are investigated. The simulation results presented in this paper show the effectiveness of the developed method.

  13. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy prediction of modulation transfer function of optical lens system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovi?, Dalibor; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Anuar, Nor Badrul; Md Nasir, Mohd Hairul Nizam; Pavlovi?, Nenad T.; Akib, Shatirah

    2014-07-01

    The quantitative assessment of image quality is an important consideration in any type of imaging system. The modulation transfer function (MTF) is a graphical description of the sharpness and contrast of an imaging system or of its individual components. The MTF is also known and spatial frequency response. The MTF curve has different meanings according to the corresponding frequency. The MTF of an optical system specifies the contrast transmitted by the system as a function of image size, and is determined by the inherent optical properties of the system. In this study, the adaptive neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS) estimator is designed and adapted to predict MTF value of the actual optical system. Neural network in ANFIS adjusts parameters of membership function in the fuzzy logic of the fuzzy inference system. The back propagation learning algorithm is used for training this network. This intelligent estimator is implemented using MATLAB/Simulink and the performances are investigated. The simulation results presented in this paper show the effectiveness of the developed method.

  14. [Comparison of biological functional assessment in intensity-modulated radiotherapy: two-dimensional study].

    PubMed

    Dejean, C; Lemosquet, A; Lefkopoulos, D; Touboul, E

    2001-12-01

    Modulated intensity dose distributions are obtained by inverse planning. It requires an inversion algorithm and an objective function that can be physical or biological. The biological objective functions aim at quantifying the probability of the favourable end of the treatment. The inversion algorithm used is analytical and is based on the mathematical analysis of the singular values decomposition. It proposes as many solutions as there are elementary beams. From the Tumour Control Probability, Normal Tissue Complication Probabilities and complication free tumour control, three biological assessment functions of the proposed solutions are compared with the least square difference between the prescribed and obtained dose distributions. We used a simplified irradiation configuration: Brahme's dose prescription (2D modelling of a prostate) and 9 beams (1D). The choice by mean of biological criterion of the optimal solution makes it possible to increase the average dose in the tumour, so as its homogeneity compared to physical optimisation. Conversely, the organs at risk are then less protected. The laying down of relevant constraints makes it possible to obtain satisfactory dose distributions. Concerning the validity of the models and data used, some limitations appear. At present time, it seems to exclude the use in clinical routine of an only biological optimisation. The future availability of new biological data will allow the development and in particular the clinical use of biological optimisation. PMID:11797296

  15. The functional tumor necrosis factor-? (308A/G) polymorphism modulates attentional selection in elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Patrick D; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus; Falkenstein, Michael; Beste, Christian

    2013-11-01

    There has been increasing interest in understanding the role of inflammatory processes for cognitive functions in aging using molecular genetic approaches. Though this has mostly been evaluated in pathological aging, little is known about the relevance for cognitive functions in healthy aging in humans. On the basis of behavioral data and neurophysiological data (event-related potentials and time-frequency decomposition) we show that the A-allele of the functional tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? -308 A/G polymorphism confers dysfunction in a number of cognitive processes: prolonged attentional selection indexed by a delayed P1/N1 complex, an increased P3a, which is interpreted as an enhanced distractibility by nonrelevant stimuli and compromised response selection mechanisms, as indexed by a reduced frontocentral N2. Time-frequency analyses show that allelic variations further exert their effects by modulating alpha and beta frequency oscillations. On a neurobiological level, these effects might be because of the interaction of TNF-? with glutamatergic neural transmission by which TNF-? is known to boost apoptotic mechanisms in elderly individuals. PMID:23673311

  16. Aerosol modulation transfer function model for passive long-range imaging over a nonuniform atmospheric path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eismann, Michael T.; LeMaster, Daniel A.

    2013-04-01

    An aerosol modulation transfer function (MTF) model is developed to assess the impact of aerosol scattering on passive long-range imaging sensors. The methodology extends from previous work to explicitly address imaging scenarios with a nonuniform distribution of scattering characteristics over the propagation path and incorporates the moderate resolution transfer code database of aerosol cross-section and phase function characteristics in order to provide an empirical foundation for realistic quantitative MTF assessments. The resulting model is compared with both predictions from a Monte-Carlo scattering simulation and a scene-derived MTF estimate from an empirical image, with reasonable agreement in both cases. Application to long-range imaging situations at both visible and infrared wavelengths indicates that the magnitude and functional form of the aerosol MTF differ significantly from other contributors to the composite system MTF. Furthermore, the image-quality impact is largely radiometric in the sense that the contrast reduction is approximately independent of spatial frequency, and image blur is practically negligible.

  17. Androgens Modulate Endothelial Function and Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Erectile Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Galoosian, Artin

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED) increases with age and cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity, and diabetes. These risk factors are thought to contribute to endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, thus contributing to the pathophysiology of ED. The role of the endothelium in regulating erectile physiology is well established. However, the role of androgens in modulating endothelial function and endothelial repair mechanisms subsequent to vascular injury in erectile tissue remains a subject of intensive research. The clinical and preclinical evidence discussed in this review suggests that androgens regulate endothelial function and also play an important role in the development and maturation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which are thought to play a critical role in repair of endothelial injury in vascular beds. In this review, we discuss the data available on the effects of androgens on endothelial function and EPCs in the repair of vascular injury. Indeed, more research is needed to fully understand the molecular and cellular basis of androgen action in regulating the development, differentiation, maturation, migration, and homing of EPCs to the site of injury. A better understanding of these processes will be critical to the development of new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of vascular ED. PMID:24255752

  18. Modulation of Intestinal Functions Following Mycotoxin Ingestion: Meta-Analysis of Published Experiments in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Bertrand; Applegate, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of fungi that can cause serious health problems in animals, and may result in severe economic losses. Deleterious effects of these feed contaminants in animals are well documented, ranging from growth impairment, decreased resistance to pathogens, hepato- and nephrotoxicity to death. By contrast, data with regard to their impact on intestinal functions are more limited. However, intestinal cells are the first cells to be exposed to mycotoxins, and often at higher concentrations than other tissues. In addition, mycotoxins specifically target high protein turnover- and activated-cells, which are predominant in gut epithelium. Therefore, intestinal investigations have gained significant interest over the last decade, and some publications have demonstrated that mycotoxins are able to compromise several key functions of the gastrointestinal tract, including decreased surface area available for nutrient absorption, modulation of nutrient transporters, or loss of barrier function. In addition some mycotoxins facilitate persistence of intestinal pathogens and potentiate intestinal inflammation. By contrast, the effect of these fungal metabolites on the intestinal microbiota is largely unknown. This review focuses on mycotoxins which are of concern in terms of occurrence and toxicity, namely: aflatoxins, ochratoxin A and Fusarium toxins. Results from nearly 100 published experiments (in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo) were analyzed with a special attention to the doses used. PMID:23430606

  19. Analysis of Graph Invariants in Functional Neocortical Circuitry Reveals Generalized Features Common to Three Areas of Sensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gururangan, Suchin S.; Sadovsky, Alexander J.; MacLean, Jason N.

    2014-01-01

    Correlations in local neocortical spiking activity can provide insight into the underlying organization of cortical microcircuitry. However, identifying structure in patterned multi-neuronal spiking remains a daunting task due to the high dimensionality of the activity. Using two-photon imaging, we monitored spontaneous circuit dynamics in large, densely sampled neuronal populations within slices of mouse primary auditory, somatosensory, and visual cortex. Using the lagged correlation of spiking activity between neurons, we generated functional wiring diagrams to gain insight into the underlying neocortical circuitry. By establishing the presence of graph invariants, which are label-independent characteristics common to all circuit topologies, our study revealed organizational features that generalized across functionally distinct cortical regions. Regardless of sensory area, random and -nearest neighbors null graphs failed to capture the structure of experimentally derived functional circuitry. These null models indicated that despite a bias in the data towards spatially proximal functional connections, functional circuit structure is best described by non-random and occasionally distal connections. Eigenvector centrality, which quantifies the importance of a neuron in the temporal flow of circuit activity, was highly related to feedforwardness in all functional circuits. The number of nodes participating in a functional circuit did not scale with the number of neurons imaged regardless of sensory area, indicating that circuit size is not tied to the sampling of neocortex. Local circuit flow comprehensively covered angular space regardless of the spatial scale that we tested, demonstrating that circuitry itself does not bias activity flow toward pia. Finally, analysis revealed that a minimal numerical sample size of neurons was necessary to capture at least 90 percent of functional circuit topology. These data and analyses indicated that functional circuitry exhibited rules of organization which generalized across three areas of sensory neocortex. PMID:25010654

  20. A functional siRNA screen identifies genes modulating angiotensin II-mediated EGFR transactivation

    PubMed Central

    George, Amee J.; Purdue, Brooke W.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Thomas, Daniel W.; Handoko, Yanny; Qian, Hongwei; Quaife-Ryan, Gregory A.; Morgan, Kylie A.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Thomas, Walter G.; Hannan, Ross D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to mediate cellular growth, however, the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been resolved. To address this, we performed a functional siRNA screen of the human kinome in human mammary epithelial cells that demonstrate a robust AT1R–EGFR transactivation. We identified a suite of genes encoding proteins that both positively and negatively regulate AT1R–EGFR transactivation. Many candidates are components of EGFR signalling networks, whereas others, including TRIO, BMX and CHKA, have not been previously linked to EGFR transactivation. Individual knockdown of TRIO, BMX or CHKA attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR by angiotensin II stimulation, but this did not occur following direct stimulation of the EGFR with EGF, indicating that these proteins function between the activated AT1R and the EGFR. Further investigation of TRIO and CHKA revealed that their activity is likely to be required for AT1R–EGFR transactivation. CHKA also mediated EGFR transactivation in response to another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand, thrombin, indicating a pervasive role for CHKA in GPCR–EGFR crosstalk. Our study reveals the power of unbiased, functional genomic screens to identify new signalling mediators important for tissue remodelling in cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:24046455

  1. Systematic discovery of regulated and conserved alternative exons in the mammalian brain reveals NMD modulating chromatin regulators.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qinghong; Weyn-Vanhentenryck, Sebastien M; Wu, Jie; Sloan, Steven A; Zhang, Ye; Chen, Kenian; Wu, Jia Qian; Barres, Ben A; Zhang, Chaolin

    2015-03-17

    Alternative splicing (AS) dramatically expands the complexity of the mammalian brain transcriptome, but its atlas remains incomplete. Here we performed deep mRNA sequencing of mouse cortex to discover and characterize alternative exons with potential functional significance. Our analysis expands the list of AS events over 10-fold compared with previous annotations, demonstrating that 72% of multiexon genes express multiple splice variants in this single tissue. To evaluate functionality of the newly discovered AS events, we conducted comprehensive analyses on central nervous system (CNS) cell type-specific splicing, targets of tissue- or cell type-specific RNA binding proteins (RBPs), evolutionary selection pressure, and coupling of AS with nonsense-mediated decay (AS-NMD). We show that newly discovered events account for 23-42% of all cassette exons under tissue- or cell type-specific regulation. Furthermore, over 7,000 cassette exons are under evolutionary selection for regulated AS in mammals, 70% of which are new. Among these are 3,058 highly conserved cassette exons, including 1,014 NMD exons that may function directly to control gene expression levels. These NMD exons are particularly enriched in RBPs including splicing factors and interestingly also regulators for other steps of RNA metabolism. Unexpectedly, a second group of NMD exons reside in genes encoding chromatin regulators. Although the conservation of NMD exons in RBPs frequently extends into lower vertebrates, NMD exons in chromatin regulators are introduced later into the mammalian lineage, implying the emergence of a novel mechanism coupling AS and epigenetics. Our results highlight previously uncharacterized complexity and evolution in the mammalian brain transcriptome. PMID:25737549

  2. Human herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases: a family of proteins that modulate dendritic cell function and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Glaser, Ronald; Williams, Marshall V.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded dUTPase can modulate innate immune responses through the activation of TLR2 and NF-?B signaling. However, whether this novel immune function of the dUTPase is specific for EBV or a common property of the Herpesviridae family is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the purified viral dUTPases encoded by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A), human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) differentially activate NF-?B through ligation of TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers. Furthermore, activation of NF-?B by the viral dUTPases was inhibited by anti-TLR2 blocking antibodies (Abs) and the over-expression of dominant-negative constructs of TLR2, lacking the TIR domain, and MyD88 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing TLR2/TLR1. In addition, treatment of human dendritic cells and PBMCs with the herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases from HSV-2, HHV-6A, HHV-8, and VZV resulted in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, TNF-?, IL-10, and IFN-?. Interestingly, blocking experiments revealed that the anti-TLR2 Ab significantly reduced the secretion of cytokines by the various herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases (p < 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that a non-structural protein encoded by herpesviruses HHV-6A, HHV-8, VZV and to a lesser extent HSV-2 is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Our results reveal a novel function of the virus-encoded dUTPases, which may be important to the pathophysiology of diseases caused by these viruses. More importantly, this study demonstrates that the immunomodulatory functions of dUTPases are a common property of the Herpesviridae family and thus, the dUTPase could be a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents against infections caused by these herpesviruses. PMID:25309527

  3. Proteomic Analyses Reveal that Sky1 Modulates Apoptosis and Mitophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells Exposed to Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lombardero, Silvia; Rodríguez-Belmonte, M. Esther; González-Siso, M. Isabel; Vizoso-Vázquez, Ángel; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Laffón, Blanca; Cerdán, M. Esperanza

    2014-01-01

    Sky1 is the only member of the SR (Serine–Arginine) protein kinase family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When yeast cells are treated with the anti-cancer drug cisplatin, Sky1 kinase activity is necessary to produce the cytotoxic effect. In this study, proteome changes in response to this drug and/or SKY1 deletion have been evaluated in order to understand the role of Sky1 in the response of yeast cells to cisplatin. Results reveal differential expression of proteins previously related to the oxidative stress response, DNA damage, apoptosis and mitophagy. With these precedents, the role of Sky1 in apoptosis, necrosis and mitophagy has been evaluated by flow-cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, biosensors and fluorescence techniques. After cisplatin treatment, an apoptotic-like process diminishes in the ?sky1 strain in comparison to the wild-type. The treatment does not affect mitophagy in the wild-type strain, while an increase is observed in the ?sky1 strain. The increased resistance to cisplatin observed in the ?sky1 strain may be attributable to a decrease of apoptosis and an increase of mitophagy. PMID:25029545

  4. Superspace extrapolation reveals inductive biases in function learning Christopher G. Lucas

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    functions defined over continuous variables. For example, consider a truck driver who wants to predict how quickly his truck can accelerate based on the mass of his cargo. If the driver has transported similar

  5. Functional genomics reveals serine synthesis is essential in PHGDH-amplified breast cancer

    E-print Network

    Possemato, Richard

    Cancer cells adapt their metabolic processes to drive macromolecular biosynthesis for rapid cell growth and proliferation[superscript 1, 2]. RNA interference (RNAi)-based loss-of-function screening has proven powerful for ...

  6. Theoretical Studies on Proteins to Reveal the Mechanism of Their Folding and Biological Functions

    E-print Network

    Shao, Qiang

    2011-02-22

    models on the folding simulation of ?-structure was also tested. Through the analysis of the free energy landscape as the function of several suitable reaction coordinates, we observed that the folding of ?-hairpins is actually a two-state transition...

  7. Annotation of Protein Domains Reveals Remarkable Conservation in the Functional Make up of Proteomes Across Superkingdoms

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Naeem, Aisha; Khan, Muhammad Jawad; Lopez-Nicora, Horacio D.; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The functional repertoire of a cell is largely embodied in its proteome, the collection of proteins encoded in the genome of an organism. The molecular functions of proteins are the direct consequence of their structure and structure can be inferred from sequence using hidden Markov models of structural recognition. Here we analyze the functional annotation of protein domain structures in almost a thousand sequenced genomes, exploring the functional and structural diversity of proteomes. We find there is a remarkable conservation in the distribution of domains with respect to the molecular functions they perform in the three superkingdoms of life. In general, most of the protein repertoire is spent in functions related to metabolic processes but there are significant differences in the usage of domains for regulatory and extra-cellular processes both within and between superkingdoms. Our results support the hypotheses that the proteomes of superkingdom Eukarya evolved via genome expansion mechanisms that were directed towards innovating new domain architectures for regulatory and extra/intracellular process functions needed for example to maintain the integrity of multicellular structure or to interact with environmental biotic and abiotic factors (e.g., cell signaling and adhesion, immune responses, and toxin production). Proteomes of microbial superkingdoms Archaea and Bacteria retained fewer numbers of domains and maintained simple and smaller protein repertoires. Viruses appear to play an important role in the evolution of superkingdoms. We finally identify few genomic outliers that deviate significantly from the conserved functional design. These include Nanoarchaeum equitans, proteobacterial symbionts of insects with extremely reduced genomes, Tenericutes and Guillardia theta. These organisms spend most of their domains on information functions, including translation and transcription, rather than on metabolism and harbor a domain repertoire characteristic of parasitic organisms. In contrast, the functional repertoire of the proteomes of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae superphylum was no different than the rest of bacteria, failing to support claims of them representing a separate superkingdom. In turn, Protista and Bacteria shared similar functional distribution patterns suggesting an ancestral evolutionary link between these groups. PMID:24710297

  8. Heterologous vaccination against human tuberculosis modulates antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell function

    PubMed Central

    Dintwe, One B; Day, Cheryl L; Smit, Erica; Nemes, Elisa; Gray, Clive; Tameris, Michele; McShane, Helen; Mahomed, Hassan; Hanekom, Willem A; Scriba, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Heterologous prime-boost strategies hold promise for vaccination against tuberculosis. However, the T-cell characteristics required for protection are not known. We proposed that boost vaccines should induce long-lived functional and phenotypic changes to T cells primed by Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) and/or natural exposure to mycobacteria. We characterized changes among specific CD4+ T cells after vaccination with the MVA85A vaccine in adults, adolescents, and children. CD4+ T cells identified with Ag85A peptide-bearing HLA class II tetramers were characterized by flow cytometry. We also measured proliferative potential and cytokine expression of Ag85A-specific CD4+ T cells. During the effector phase, MVA85A-induced specific CD4+ T cells coexpressed IFN-? and IL-2, skin homing integrins, and the activation marker CD38. This was followed by contraction and a transition to predominantly IL-2-expressing, CD45RA?CCR7+CD27+ or CD45RA+CCR7+CD27+ specific CD4+ T cells. These surface phenotypes were similar to Ag85A-specific T cells prior to MVA85A. However, functional differences were observed postvaccination: specific proliferative capacity was markedly higher after 6–12 months than before vaccination. Our data suggest that MVA85A vaccination may modulate Ag85A-specific CD4+ T-cell function, resulting in greater recall potential. Importantly, surface phenotypes commonly used as proxies for memory T-cell function did not associate with functional effects of vaccination. PMID:23737382

  9. Atypical modulation of distant functional connectivity by cognitive state in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    You, Xiaozhen; Norr, Megan; Murphy, Eric; Kuschner, Emily S.; Bal, Elgiz; Gaillard, William D.; Kenworthy, Lauren; Vaidya, Chandan J.

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether modulation of functional connectivity by cognitive state differed between pre-adolescent children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and age and IQ-matched control children. Children underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during two states, a resting state followed by a sustained attention task. A voxel-wise method was used to characterize functional connectivity at two levels, local (within a voxel's 14 mm neighborhood) and distant (outside of the voxel's 14 mm neighborhood to the rest of the brain) and regions exhibiting Group × State interaction were identified for both types of connectivity maps. Distant functional connectivity of regions in the left frontal lobe (dorsolateral [BA 11, 10]; supplementary motor area extending into dorsal anterior cingulate [BA 32/8]; and premotor [BA 6, 8, 9]), right parietal lobe (paracentral lobule [BA 6]; angular gyrus [BA 39/40]), and left posterior middle temporal cortex (BA 19/39) showed a Group × State interaction such that relative to the resting state, connectivity reduced (i.e., became focal) in control children but increased (i.e., became diffuse) in ASD children during the task state. Higher state-related increase in distant connectivity of left frontal and right angular gyrus predicted worse inattention in ASD children. Two graph theory measures (global efficiency and modularity) were also sensitive to Group × State differences, with the magnitude of state-related change predicting inattention in the ASD children. Our results indicate that as ASD children transition from an unconstrained to a sustained attentional state, functional connectivity of frontal and parietal regions with the rest of the brain becomes more widespread in a manner that may be maladaptive as it was associated with attention problems in everyday life. PMID:23986678

  10. Size-dependent accumulation of particles in lysosomes modulates dendritic cell function through impaired antigen degradation

    PubMed Central

    Seydoux, Emilie; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Nita, Izabela M; Balog, Sandor; Gazdhar, Amiq; Stumbles, Philip A; Petri-Fink, Alke; Blank, Fabian; von Garnier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nanosized particles may enable therapeutic modulation of immune responses by targeting dendritic cell (DC) networks in accessible organs such as the lung. To date, however, the effects of nanoparticles on DC function and downstream immune responses remain poorly understood. Methods Bone marrow–derived DCs (BMDCs) were exposed in vitro to 20 or 1,000 nm polystyrene (PS) particles. Particle uptake kinetics, cell surface marker expression, soluble protein antigen uptake and degradation, as well as in vitro CD4+ T-cell proliferation and cytokine production were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, co-localization of particles within the lysosomal compartment, lysosomal permeability, and endoplasmic reticulum stress were analyzed. Results The frequency of PS particle–positive CD11c+/CD11b+ BMDCs reached an early plateau after 20 minutes and was significantly higher for 20 nm than for 1,000 nm PS particles at all time-points analyzed. PS particles did not alter cell viability or modify expression of the surface markers CD11b, CD11c, MHC class II, CD40, and CD86. Although particle exposure did not modulate antigen uptake, 20 nm PS particles decreased the capacity of BMDCs to degrade soluble antigen, without affecting their ability to induce antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Co-localization studies between PS particles and lysosomes using laser scanning confocal microscopy detected a significantly higher frequency of co-localized 20 nm particles as compared with their 1,000 nm counterparts. Neither size of PS particle caused lysosomal leakage, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress gene markers, or changes in cytokines profiles. Conclusion These data indicate that although supposedly inert PS nanoparticles did not induce DC activation or alteration in CD4+ T-cell stimulating capacity, 20 nm (but not 1,000 nm) PS particles may reduce antigen degradation through interference in the lysosomal compartment. These findings emphasize the importance of performing in-depth analysis of DC function when developing novel approaches for immune modulation with nanoparticles. PMID:25152619

  11. Research report Changing patterns of brain activation during category learning revealed by functional MRI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deborah M. Little; Raymond Klein; Donna M. Shobat; Erik D. McClure; Keith R. Thulborn

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate neural changes as a function of category learning in normals (n=8). Subjects were trained to classify patterns of dots into four categories over 4 consecutive days. fMRI monitored the changes that occurred during learning prior to training and then following each training session. During fMRI, subjects determined whether two patterns of

  12. Gas7Deficient Mouse Reveals Roles in Motor Function and Muscle Fiber Composition during Aging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bo-Tsang Huang; Pu-Yuan Chang; Ching-Hua Su; Chuck C.-K. Chao; Sue Lin-Chao

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundGrowth arrest-specific gene 7 (Gas7) has previously been shown to be involved in neurite outgrowth in vitro; however, its actual role has yet to be determined. To investigate the physiological function of Gas7 in vivo, here we generated a Gas7-deficient mouse strain with a labile Gas7 mutant protein whose functions are similar to wild-type Gas7.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsOur data show that aged

  13. Biochemical characterization of a Neisseria meningitidis polysialyltransferase reveals novel functional motifs in bacterial sialyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Freiberger, Friedrich; Claus, Heike; Günzel, Almut; Oltmann-Norden, Imke; Vionnet, Justine; Mühlenhoff, Martina; Vogel, Ulrich; Vann, Willie F; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Stummeyer, Katharina

    2007-09-01

    The extracellular polysaccharide capsule is an essential virulence factor of Neisseria meningitidis, a leading cause of severe bacterial meningitis and sepsis. Serogroup B strains, the primary disease causing isolates in Europe and America, are encapsulated in alpha-2,8 polysialic acid (polySia). The capsular polymer is synthesized from activated sialic acid by action of a membrane-associated polysialyltransferase (NmB-polyST). Here we present a comprehensive characterization of NmB-polyST. Different from earlier studies, we show that membrane association is not essential for enzyme functionality. Recombinant NmB-polyST was expressed, purified and shown to synthesize long polySia chains in a non-processive manner in vitro. Subsequent structure-function analyses of NmB-polyST based on refined sequence alignments allowed the identification of two functional motifs in bacterial sialyltransferases. Both (D/E-D/E-G and HP motif) are highly conserved among different sialyltransferase families with otherwise little or no sequence identity. Their functional importance for enzyme catalysis and CMP-Neu5Ac binding was demonstrated by mutational analysis of NmB-polyST and is emphasized by structural data available for the Pasteurella multocida sialyltransferase PmST1. Together our data are the first description of conserved functional elements in the highly diverse families of bacterial (poly)sialyltransferases and thus provide an advanced basis for understanding structure-function relations and for phylogenetic sorting of these important enzymes. PMID:17662040

  14. Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals an intrinsic pathway for histone deacetylase 7 regulation that controls cytotoxic T lymphocyte function

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Maria N.; Goebel, Jurgen; Feijoo-Carnero, Carmen; Morrice, Nick; Cantrell, Doreen A.

    2011-01-01

    The present study reports an unbiased analysis of cytotoxic T cell serine-threonine phosphoproteome using high resolution mass spectrometry. Approximately 2,000 phosphorylations were identified in CTLs of which approximately 450 were controlled by TCR signaling. A significantly overrepresented group of molecules identified were transcription activators, co-repressors and chromatin regulators. A focus on chromatin regulators revealed that CTLs have high expression of histone deacetylase HDAC7 but continually phosphorylate and export this transcriptional repressor from the nucleus. HDAC7 dephosphorylation results in its nuclear accumulation and suppressed expression of genes encoding key cytokines, cytokine receptors and adhesion molecules that determine CTL function. The screening of CTL phosphoproteome thus reveals intrinsic pathways of serine-threonine phosphorylation that target chromatin regulators and determine the CTL functional program. PMID:21399638

  15. Characterization of the RelBbu Regulon in Borrelia burgdorferi Reveals Modulation of Glycerol Metabolism by (p)ppGpp

    PubMed Central

    Bugrysheva, Julia V.; Pappas, Christopher J.; Terekhova, Darya A.; Iyer, Radha; Godfrey, Henry P.; Schwartz, Ira; Cabello, Felipe C.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response is triggered by deficiencies of available nutrients and other environmental stresses. It is mediated by 5'-triphosphate-guanosine-3'-diphosphate and 5'-diphosphate-guanosine-3'-diphosphate (collectively (p)ppGpp) and generates global changes in gene expression and metabolism that enable bacteria to adapt to and survive these challenges. Borrelia burgdorferi encounters multiple stressors in its cycling between ticks and mammals that could trigger the stringent response. We have previously shown that the B. burgdorferi stringent response is mediated by a single enzyme, RelBbu, with both (p)ppGpp synthase and hydrolase activities, and that a B. burgdorferi 297 relBbu null deletion mutant was defective in adapting to stationary phase, incapable of down-regulating synthesis of rRNA and could not infect mice. We have now used this deletion mutant and microarray analysis to identify genes comprising the rel regulon in B. burgdorferi cultured at 34°C, and found that transcription of genes involved in glycerol metabolism is induced by relBbu. Culture of the wild type parental strain, the relBbu deletion mutant and its complemented derivative at 34°C and 25°C in media containing glucose or glycerol as principal carbon sources revealed a growth defect in the mutant, most evident at the lower temperature. Transcriptional analysis of the glp operon for glycerol uptake and metabolism in these three strains confirmed that relBbu was necessary and sufficient to increase transcription of this operon in the presence of glycerol at both temperatures. These results confirm and extend previous findings regarding the stringent response in B. burgdorferi. They also demonstrate that the stringent response regulates glycerol metabolism in this organism and is likely crucial for its optimal growth in ticks. PMID:25688856

  16. Functional Analyses Reveal Extensive RRE Plasticity in Primary HIV-1 Sequences Selected under Selective Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Cunyat, Francesc; Beerens, Nancy; García, Elisabet; Clotet, Bonaventura; Kjems, Jørgen; Cabrera, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-1 Rev response element (RRE) is a functional region of viral RNA lying immediately downstream to the junction of gp120 and gp41 in the env coding sequence. The RRE is essential for HIV replication and binds with the Rev protein to facilitate the export of viral mRNA from nucleus to cytoplasm. It has been suggested that changes in the predicted secondary structure of primary RRE sequences impact the function of the RREs; however, functional assays have not yet been performed. The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic, structural and functional variation in the RRE primary sequences selected in vivo by Enfuvirtide pressure. Results Multiple RRE variants were obtained from viruses isolated from patients who failed an Enfuvirtide-containing regimen. Different alterations were observed in the predicted RRE secondary structures, with the abrogation of the primary Rev binding site in one of the variants. In spite of this, most of the RRE variants were able to bind Rev and promote the cytoplasmic export of the viral mRNAs with equivalent efficiency in a cell-based assay. Only RRE45 and RRE40-45 showed an impaired ability to bind Rev in a gel-shift binding assay. Unexpectedly, this impairment was not reflected in functional capacity when RNA export was evaluated using a reporter assay, or during virus replication in lymphoid cells, suggesting that in vivo the RRE would be highly malleable. Conclusions The Rev-RRE functionality is unaffected in RRE variants selected in patients failing an ENF-containing regimen. Our data show that the current understanding of the Rev-RRE complex structure does not suffice and fails to rationally predict the function of naturally occurring RRE mutants. Therefore, this data should be taken into account in the development of antiviral agents that target the RRE-Rev complex. PMID:25170621

  17. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Binding Protein BiP Displays Dual Function in Modulating Cell Death Events1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Humberto H.; Silva, Priscila A.; Mendes, Giselle C.; Brustolini, Otávio J.B.; Pimenta, Maiana R.; Gouveia, Bianca C.; Valente, Maria Anete S.; Ramos, Humberto J.O.; Soares-Ramos, Juliana R.L.; Fontes, Elizabeth P.B.

    2014-01-01

    The binding protein (BiP) has been demonstrated to participate in innate immunity and attenuate endoplasmic reticulum- and osmotic stress-induced cell death. Here, we employed transgenic plants with manipulated levels of BiP to assess whether BiP also controlled developmental and hypersensitive programmed cell death (PCD). Under normal conditions, the BiP-induced transcriptome revealed a robust down-regulation of developmental PCD genes and an up-regulation of the genes involved in hypersensitive PCD triggered by nonhost-pathogen interactions. Accordingly, the BiP-overexpressing line displayed delayed leaf senescence under normal conditions and accelerated hypersensitive response triggered by Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato in soybean (Glycine max) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), as monitored by measuring hallmarks of PCD in plants. The BiP-mediated delay of leaf senescence correlated with the attenuation of N-rich protein (NRP)-mediated cell death signaling and the inhibition of the senescence-associated activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). By contrast, under biological activation of salicylic acid (SA) signaling and hypersensitive PCD, BiP overexpression further induced NRP-mediated cell death signaling and antagonistically inhibited the UPR. Thus, the SA-mediated induction of NRP cell death signaling occurs via a pathway distinct from UPR. Our data indicate that during the hypersensitive PCD, BiP positively regulates the NRP cell death signaling through a yet undefined mechanism that is activated by SA signaling and related to ER functioning. By contrast, BiP’s negative regulation of leaf senescence may be linked to its capacity to attenuate the UPR activation and NRP cell death signaling. Therefore, BiP can function either as a negative or positive modulator of PCD events. PMID:24319082

  18. Analyses of functional domains within the PF6 protein of the central apparatus reveal a role for PF6 sub-complex members in regulating flagellar beat frequency

    PubMed Central

    Goduti, Daniel J.; Smith, Elizabeth F.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that each of the seven projections associated with the central pair of microtubules plays a distinct role in regulating eukaryotic ciliary / flagellar motility. Mutants which lack specific projections have distinct motility phenotypes. For example, Chlamydomonas pf6 mutants lack the C1a projection and have twitchy, non-beating flagella. The C1a projection is a complex of proteins including PF6, C1a-86, C1a-34, C1a-32, C1a-18 and calmodulin. To define functional domains within PF6 and to potentially assign functions to specific C1a components, we generated deletion constructs of the PF6 gene and tested for their ability to assemble and rescue motility upon transformation of mutant pf6 cells. Our results demonstrate that domains near the carboxyl-terminus of PF6 are essential for motility and/or assembly of the projection. The amino terminal half of PF6 is not required for C1a assembly; however, this region is important for stability of the C1a-34, C1a-32, and C1a-18 sub-complex and wild-type beat frequency. Analysis of double mutants lacking the amino terminus of PF6 and outer dynein arms reveal that C1a may play a role in modulating both inner and outer dynein arm activity. PMID:22278927

  19. Analysis of transcriptional codes for zebrafish dopaminergic neurons reveals essential functions of Arx and Isl1 in prethalamic dopaminergic neuron development.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Alida; Jainok, Chamaiphorn; Driever, Wolfgang

    2012-09-01

    Distinct groups of dopaminergic neurons develop at defined anatomical sites in the brain to modulate function of a large diversity of local and far-ranging circuits. However, the molecular identity as judged from transcription factor expression has not been determined for all dopaminergic groups. Here, we analyze regional expression of transcription factors in the larval zebrafish brain to determine co-expression with the Tyrosine hydroxylase marker in dopaminergic neurons. We define sets of transcription factors that clearly identify each dopaminergic group. These data confirm postulated relations to dopaminergic groups defined for mammalian systems. We focus our functional analysis on prethalamic dopaminergic neurons, which co-express the transcription factors Arx and Isl1. Morpholino-based knockdown reveals that both Arx and Isl1 are strictly required for prethalamic dopaminergic neuron development and appear to act in parallel. We further show that Arx contributes to patterning in the prethalamic region, while Isl1 is required for differentiation of prethalamic dopaminergic neurons. PMID:22728160

  20. The complex and specific pMHC interactions with diverse HIV-1 TCR clonotypes reveal a structural basis for alterations in CTL function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhen; Chen, Huabiao; Kang, Seung-Gu; Huynh, Tien; Fang, Justin W.; Lamothe, Pedro A.; Walker, Bruce D.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-02-01

    Immune control of viral infections is modulated by diverse T cell receptor (TCR) clonotypes engaging peptide-MHC class I complexes on infected cells, but the relationship between TCR structure and antiviral function is unclear. Here we apply in silico molecular modeling with in vivo mutagenesis studies to investigate TCR-pMHC interactions from multiple CTL clonotypes specific for a well-defined HIV-1 epitope. Our molecular dynamics simulations of viral peptide-HLA-TCR complexes, based on two independent co-crystal structure templates, reveal that effective and ineffective clonotypes bind to the terminal portions of the peptide-MHC through similar salt bridges, but their hydrophobic side-chain packings can be very different, which accounts for the major part of the differences among these clonotypes. Non-specific hydrogen bonding to viral peptide also accommodates greater epitope variants. Furthermore, free energy perturbation calculations for point mutations on the viral peptide KK10 show excellent agreement with in vivo mutagenesis assays, with new predictions confirmed by additional experiments. These findings indicate a direct structural basis for heterogeneous CTL antiviral function.

  1. Ka-band ocean wave\\/radar modulation transfer function: a comparative study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Haimov; B. Gotwols; William Plant; Richard K. Moore

    1994-01-01

    For radar systems looking at moderate angles of incidence most scattering theories assume that the prime scatterers are ripples. Various mechanisms relate the modulation of radar returned power to the long ocean waves. The most important contributors to the radar-signal modulation for real-aperture radars are the tilt and aero-hydrodynamic modulation. The tilt modulation is a purely geometric effect and can

  2. Protein Similarity Networks Reveal Relationships among Sequence, Structure, and Function within the Cupin Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Uberto, Richard; Moomaw, Ellen W.

    2013-01-01

    The cupin superfamily is extremely diverse and includes catalytically inactive seed storage proteins, sugar-binding metal-independent epimerases, and metal-dependent enzymes possessing dioxygenase, decarboxylase, and other activities. Although numerous proteins of this superfamily have been structurally characterized, the functions of many of them have not been experimentally determined. We report the first use of protein similarity networks (PSNs) to visualize trends of sequence and structure in order to make functional inferences in this remarkably diverse superfamily. PSNs provide a way to visualize relatedness of structure and sequence among a given set of proteins. Structure- and sequence-based clustering of cupin members reflects functional clustering. Networks based only on cupin domains and networks based on the whole proteins provide complementary information. Domain-clustering supports phylogenetic conclusions that the N- and C-terminal domains of bicupin proteins evolved independently. Interestingly, although many functionally similar enzymatic cupin members bind the same active site metal ion, the structure and sequence clustering does not correlate with the identity of the bound metal. It is anticipated that the application of PSNs to this superfamily will inform experimental work and influence the functional annotation of databases. PMID:24040257

  3. Fundamental gaps with approximate density functionals: The derivative discontinuity revealed from ensemble considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Kraisler, Eli; Kronik, Leeor [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovoth 76100 (Israel)] [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovoth 76100 (Israel)

    2014-05-14

    The fundamental gap is a central quantity in the electronic structure of matter. Unfortunately, the fundamental gap is not generally equal to the Kohn-Sham gap of density functional theory (DFT), even in principle. The two gaps differ precisely by the derivative discontinuity, namely, an abrupt change in slope of the exchange-correlation energy as a function of electron number, expected across an integer-electron point. Popular approximate functionals are thought to be devoid of a derivative discontinuity, strongly compromising their performance for prediction of spectroscopic properties. Here we show that, in fact, all exchange-correlation functionals possess a derivative discontinuity, which arises naturally from the application of ensemble considerations within DFT, without any empiricism. This derivative discontinuity can be expressed in closed form using only quantities obtained in the course of a standard DFT calculation of the neutral system. For small, finite systems, addition of this derivative discontinuity indeed results in a greatly improved prediction for the fundamental gap, even when based on the most simple approximate exchange-correlation density functional – the local density approximation (LDA). For solids, the same scheme is exact in principle, but when applied to LDA it results in a vanishing derivative discontinuity correction. This failure is shown to be directly related to the failure of LDA in predicting fundamental gaps from total energy differences in extended systems.

  4. Functional Roles of 10 Hz Alpha-Band Power Modulating Engagement and Disengagement of Cortical Networks in a Complex Visual Motion Task

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Kunjan D.; Vaina, Lucia M.

    2014-01-01

    Alpha band power, particularly at the 10 Hz frequency, is significantly involved in sensory inhibition, attention modulation, and working memory. However, the interactions between cortical areas and their relationship to the different functional roles of the alpha band oscillations are still poorly understood. Here we examined alpha band power and the cortico-cortical interregional phase synchrony in a psychophysical task involving the detection of an object moving in depth by an observer in forward self-motion. Wavelet filtering at the 10 Hz frequency revealed differences in the profile of cortical activation in the visual processing regions (occipital and parietal lobes) and in the frontoparietal regions. The alpha rhythm driving the visual processing areas was found to be asynchronous with the frontoparietal regions. These findings suggest a decoupling of the 10 Hz frequency into separate functional roles: sensory inhibition in the visual processing regions and spatial attention in the frontoparietal regions. PMID:25285560

  5. A three-scale composite surface model for the ocean wave-radar modulation transfer function

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roland Romeiser; Anke Schmidt; Werner Alpers

    1994-01-01

    An improved three-scale composite surface model for the modulation of the radar backscatter from the ocean surface by long ocean waves is presented. The model is based on Bragg scattering theory. In the conventional two-scale model, only the geometric modulation of the radar backscatter and the hydrodynamic modulation of the short Bragg waves by the long waves is considered. In

  6. Functional analysis of OsHSBP1 and OsHSBP2 revealed their involvement in the heat shock response in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Rana, Rashid Mehmood; Dong, Shinan; Tang, Haijuan; Ahmad, Fiaz; Zhang, Hongsheng

    2012-10-01

    The heat shock response (HSR) induces the production of heat shock proteins (HSPs) through the activation of heat shock factors (HSF). HSF binding protein (HSBP) is reported to modulate the function of HSF by binding to their trimer and hence to regulate HSR. This report describes the role of OsHSBP1 and OsHSBP2 in the regulation of the HSR and seed development of rice. Both genes expressed ubiquitously in all tissues under normal growth conditions while their expression levels were significantly increased during recovery after heat shock treatment. Subcellular localization revealed the cytosol-nuclear localization of both OsHSBP1 and OsHSBP2 in onion epidermal cells. The yeast two-hybrid assay depicted the self-binding ability of both genes. Both genes were also important for seed development, as their knock-down lines were associated with significant seed abortion. The thermotolerance assay revealed that OsHSBP1 and OsHSBP2 are negative regulators of HSR and involved in acquired thermotolerance but not in basal thermotolerance since their over-expression transgenic lines pre-heated at sublethal temperature, showed significantly decreased seedling survival after heat shock treatment. Furthermore, antioxidant activity and gene expression of catalase and peroxidase was significantly increased in knock-down transgenic seedlings of OsHSBP1 and OsHSBP2 after heat stress compared with the wild type. The expression of heat specific HSPs was also increased significantly in knockdown line of both genes but in a specific manner, suggesting the involvement of HSBP genes in different pathways. Overall, the present study reveals the role of OsHSBP1 and OsHSBP2 in the regulation of the HSR and seed development of rice. PMID:22996677

  7. The scaling behavior of hand motions reveals self-organization during an executive function task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastas, Jason R.; Stephen, Damian G.; Dixon, James A.

    2011-05-01

    Recent approaches to cognition explain cognitive phenomena in terms of interaction-dominant dynamics. In the current experiment, we extend this approach to executive function, a construct used to describe flexible, goal-oriented behavior. Participants were asked to perform a widely used executive function task, card sorting, under two conditions. In one condition, participants were given a rule with which to sort the cards. In the other condition, participants had to induce the rule from experimenter feedback. The motion of each participant’s hand was tracked during the sorting task. Detrended fluctuation analysis was performed on the inter-point time series using a windowing strategy to capture changes over each trial. For participants in the induction condition, the Hurst exponent sharply increased and then decreased. The Hurst exponents for the explicit condition did not show this pattern. Our results suggest that executive function may be understood in terms of changes in stability that arise from interaction-dominant dynamics.

  8. Utilization of fractionated soluble egg antigens reveals selectively modulated granulomatous and lymphokine responses during murine schistosomiasis mansoni.

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, N W; Boros, D L

    1992-01-01

    Worm eggs deposited in the livers and intestines of Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice secrete soluble egg antigens (SEA) and induce T cell-mediated circumoval granulomas. In the present study, we fractionated crude SEA by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and tested the fractions for granuloma elicitation and lymphokine production at different stages of the infection. SEA fraction-coupled beads were used to elicit artificial pulmonary granulomas. Acutely infected mice responded with granulomas to seven fractions (less than 21-, 25- to 30-, 32- to 38-, 60- to 66-, 70- to 90-, 93- to 125-, and greater than 200-kDa fractions) of SEA, whereas chronically infected mice responded to four fractions (60- to 66-, 70- to 90-, 93- to 125-, and greater than 200-kDa fractions). In response to both crude and fractionated SEA, granuloma T cells produced high levels of gamma interferon at the preacute (6-week) stage of infection, but production subsequently diminished. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4 production peaked at the acute (8-week) stage of infection and concurrently decreased at the chronic (20-week) stage. At the acute stage of the infection, the granulomagenic SEA fractions also elicited IL-2 and IL-4 production; at the chronic stage, IL-2 production and, to a lesser degree, IL-4 production corresponded to SEA fractions that elicited granulomas. Isolated SEA proteins from the 32- to 38-kDa fraction demonstrated differential lymphokine responses: predominant gamma interferon and IL-2 production was elicited by the 32-kDa fraction, whereas the 35- and 38-kDa proteins elicited predominant gamma interferon and IL-4 production. However, all three proteins elicited granuloma formation. The present study reveals changes in granulomatous responses to SEA fractions during the acute and chronic stages of the infection as well as distinct phases of gamma interferon, IL-2, and IL-4 lymphokine production throughout the infection. Based on these results, it is concluded that granuloma formation and IL-2 and IL-4 production are interrelated. PMID:1639491

  9. Integrating abundance and functional traits reveals new global hotspots of fish diversity.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Smith, Rick D; Bates, Amanda E; Lefcheck, Jonathan S; Duffy, J Emmett; Baker, Susan C; Thomson, Russell J; Stuart-Smith, Jemina F; Hill, Nicole A; Kininmonth, Stuart J; Airoldi, Laura; Becerro, Mikel A; Campbell, Stuart J; Dawson, Terence P; Navarrete, Sergio A; Soler, German A; Strain, Elisabeth M A; Willis, Trevor J; Edgar, Graham J

    2013-09-26

    Species richness has dominated our view of global biodiversity patterns for centuries. The dominance of this paradigm is reflected in the focus by ecologists and conservation managers on richness and associated occurrence-based measures for understanding drivers of broad-scale diversity patterns and as a biological basis for management. However, this is changing rapidly, as it is now recognized that not only the number of species but the species present, their phenotypes and the number of individuals of each species are critical in determining the nature and strength of the relationships between species diversity and a range of ecological functions (such as biomass production and nutrient cycling). Integrating these measures should provide a more relevant representation of global biodiversity patterns in terms of ecological functions than that provided by simple species counts. Here we provide comparisons of a traditional global biodiversity distribution measure based on richness with metrics that incorporate species abundances and functional traits. We use data from standardized quantitative surveys of 2,473 marine reef fish species at 1,844 sites, spanning 133 degrees of latitude from all ocean basins, to identify new diversity hotspots in some temperate regions and the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean. These relate to high diversity of functional traits amongst individuals in the community (calculated using Rao's Q), and differ from previously reported patterns in functional diversity and richness for terrestrial animals, which emphasize species-rich tropical regions only. There is a global trend for greater evenness in the number of individuals of each species, across the reef fish species observed at sites ('community evenness'), at higher latitudes. This contributes to the distribution of functional diversity hotspots and contrasts with well-known latitudinal gradients in richness. Our findings suggest that the contribution of species diversity to a range of ecosystem functions varies over large scales, and imply that in tropical regions, which have higher numbers of species, each species contributes proportionally less to community-level ecological processes on average than species in temperate regions. Metrics of ecological function usefully complement metrics of species diversity in conservation management, including when identifying planning priorities and when tracking changes to biodiversity values. PMID:24067714

  10. Single-cell gene expression profiling reveals functional heterogeneity of undifferentiated human epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, David W. M.; Jensen, Kim B.; Trotter, Matthew W. B.; Connelly, John T.; Broad, Simon; Watt, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Human epidermal stem cells express high levels of ?1 integrins, delta-like 1 (DLL1) and the EGFR antagonist LRIG1. However, there is cell-to-cell variation in the relative abundance of DLL1 and LRIG1 mRNA transcripts. Single-cell global gene expression profiling showed that undifferentiated cells fell into two clusters delineated by expression of DLL1 and its binding partner syntenin. The DLL1+ cluster had elevated expression of genes associated with endocytosis, integrin-mediated adhesion and receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Differentially expressed genes were not independently regulated, as overexpression of DLL1 alone or together with LRIG1 led to the upregulation of other genes in the DLL1+ cluster. Overexpression of DLL1 and LRIG1 resulted in enhanced extracellular matrix adhesion and increased caveolin-dependent EGFR endocytosis. Further characterisation of CD46, one of the genes upregulated in the DLL1+ cluster, revealed it to be a novel cell surface marker of human epidermal stem cells. Cells with high endogenous levels of CD46 expressed high levels of ?1 integrin and DLL1 and were highly adhesive and clonogenic. Knockdown of CD46 decreased proliferative potential and ?1 integrin-mediated adhesion. Thus, the previously unknown heterogeneity revealed by our studies results in differences in the interaction of undifferentiated basal keratinocytes with their environment. PMID:23482486

  11. Functional genetic screen of human diversity reveals that a methionine salvage enzyme regulates inflammatory cell death.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dennis C; Gamazon, Eric R; Shukla, Kajal P; Pfuetzner, Richard A; Whittington, Dale; Holden, Tarah D; Brittnacher, Mitchell J; Fong, Christine; Radey, Matthew; Ogohara, Cassandra; Stark, Amy L; Akey, Joshua M; Dolan, M Eileen; Wurfel, Mark M; Miller, Samuel I

    2012-08-28

    Genome-wide association studies can identify common differences that contribute to human phenotypic diversity and disease. When genome-wide association studies are combined with approaches that test how variants alter physiology, biological insights can emerge. Here, we used such an approach to reveal regulation of cell death by the methionine salvage pathway. A common SNP associated with reduced expression of a putative methionine salvage pathway dehydratase, apoptotic protease activating factor 1 (APAF1)-interacting protein (APIP), was associated with increased caspase-1-mediated cell death in response to Salmonella. The role of APIP in methionine salvage was confirmed by growth assays with methionine-deficient media and quantitation of the methionine salvage substrate, 5'-methylthioadenosine. Reducing expression of APIP or exogenous addition of 5'-methylthioadenosine increased Salmonellae-induced cell death. Consistent with APIP originally being identified as an inhibitor of caspase-9-dependent apoptosis, the same allele was also associated with increased sensitivity to the chemotherapeutic agent carboplatin. Our results show that common human variation affecting expression of a single gene can alter susceptibility to two distinct cell death programs. Furthermore, the same allele that promotes cell death is associated with improved survival of individuals with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, suggesting a possible evolutionary pressure that may explain the geographic pattern observed for the frequency of this SNP. Our study shows that in vitro association screens of disease-related traits can not only reveal human genetic differences that contribute to disease but also provide unexpected insights into cell biology. PMID:22837397

  12. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: Unique tissue-specific functions revealed by selective gene knockout studies

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Van Duyn, Lauren B.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2008-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (originally called LRP, but now referred to as LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that is widely expressed in several tissues. LRP1 is a member of the LDL receptor family that plays diverse roles in various biological processes including lipoprotein metabolism, degradation of proteases, activation of lysosomal enzymes and cellular entry of bacterial toxins and viruses. Deletion of the LRP1 gene leads to lethality in mice, revealing a critical, but as of yet, undefined role in development. Tissue-specific gene deletion studies reveal an important contribution of LRP1 in the vasculature, central nervous system, in macrophages and in adipocytes. Three important properties of LRP1 dictate its diverse role in physiology: first, its ability to recognize more than thirty distinct ligands; second, its ability to bind a large number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins via determinants located on its cytoplasmic domain in a phosphorylation-specific manner; and third, its ability to associate with and modulate the activity of other transmembrane receptors such as integrins and receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:18626063

  13. Proteomic profiling revealed the functional networks associated with mitotic catastrophe of HepG2 hepatoma cells induced by 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bo [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Huang Bo [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); School of Public Health, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Guan Hua; Zhang Shimeng; Xu Qinzhi [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); He Xingpeng [School of Public Health, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Liu Xiaodan; Wang Yu; Shang Zengfu [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Zhou Pingkun, E-mail: zhoupk@nic.bmi.ac.cn [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); School of Public Health, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China)

    2011-05-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, a form of cell death resulting from abnormal mitosis, is a cytotoxic death pathway as well as an appealing mechanistic strategy for the development of anti-cancer drugs. In this study, 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde was demonstrated to induce DNA double-strand break, multipolar spindles, sustain mitotic arrest and generate multinucleated cells, all of which indicate mitotic catastrophe, in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. We used proteomic profiling to identify the differentially expressed proteins underlying mitotic catastrophe. A total of 137 differentially expressed proteins (76 upregulated and 61 downregulated proteins) were identified. Some of the changed proteins have previously been associated with mitotic catastrophe, such as DNA-PKcs, FoxM1, RCC1, cyclin E, PLK1-pT210, 14-3-3{sigma} and HSP70. Multiple isoforms of 14-3-3, heat-shock proteins and tubulin were upregulated. Analysis of functional significance revealed that the 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the differentially expressed proteins. The modulated proteins were found to be involved in macromolecule complex assembly, cell death, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin and cytoskeletal organization. These findings revealed the overall molecular events and functional signaling networks associated with spindle disruption and mitotic catastrophe. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: > 6-bromoisovanillin induced spindle disruption and sustained mitotic arrest, consequently resulted in mitotic catastrophe. > Proteomic profiling identified 137 differentially expressed proteins associated mitotic catastrophe. > The 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the altered proteins. > The macromolecule complex assembly, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin organization were also shown involved in mitotic catastrophe.

  14. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome-associated Small GTPase ARL6 (BBS3) Functions at or near the Ciliary Gate and Modulates Wnt Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Cheryl J.; Tong, Yufeng; Esmail, Muneer A.; Oh, Edwin; Gerdes, Jantje M.; Wang, Jihong; Tempel, Wolfram; Rattner, Jerome B.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Park, Hee-Won; Leroux, Michel R.

    2010-01-01

    The expansive family of metazoan ADP-ribosylation factor and ADP-ribosylation factor-like small GTPases is known to play essential roles in modulating membrane trafficking and cytoskeletal functions. Here, we present the crystal structure of ARL6, mutations in which cause Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS3), and reveal its unique ring-like localization at the distal end of basal bodies, in proximity to the so-called ciliary gate where vesicles carrying ciliary cargo fuse with the membrane. Overproduction of GDP- or GTP-locked variants of ARL6/BBS3 in vivo influences primary cilium length and abundance. ARL6/BBS3 also modulates Wnt signaling, a signal transduction pathway whose association with cilia in vertebrates is just emerging. Importantly, this signaling function is lost in ARL6 variants containing BBS-associated point mutations. By determining the structure of GTP-bound ARL6/BBS3, coupled with functional assays, we provide a mechanistic explanation for such pathogenic alterations, namely altered nucleotide binding. Our findings therefore establish a previously unknown role for ARL6/BBS3 in mammalian ciliary (dis)assembly and Wnt signaling and provide the first structural information for a BBS protein. PMID:20207729

  15. A functional genomics strategy that uses metabolome data to reveal the phenotype of silent mutations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Léonie M. Raamsdonk; Bas Teusink; David Broadhurst; Nianshu Zhang; Andrew Hayes; Michael C. Walsh; Jan A. Berden; Kevin M. Brindle; Douglas B. Kell; Jem J. Rowland; Hans V. Westerhoff; Karel van Dam; Stephen G. Oliver

    2001-01-01

    A large proportion of the 6,000 genes present in th