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Sample records for functional protein hinge

  1. Approximation by hinge functions

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, V.

    1997-05-01

    Breiman has defined {open_quotes}hinge functions{close_quotes} for use as basis functions in least squares approximations to data. A hinge function is the max (or min) function of two linear functions. In this paper, the author assumes the existence of smooth function f(x) and a set of samples of the form (x, f(x)) drawn from a probability distribution {rho}(x). The author hopes to find the best fitting hinge function h(x) in the least squares sense. There are two problems with this plan. First, Breiman has suggested an algorithm to perform this fit. The author shows that this algorithm is not robust and also shows how to create examples on which the algorithm diverges. Second, if the author tries to use the data to minimize the fit in the usual discrete least squares sense, the functional that must be minimized is continuous in the variables, but has a derivative which jumps at the data. This paper takes a different approach. This approach is an example of a method that the author has developed called {open_quotes}Monte Carlo Regression{close_quotes}. (A paper on the general theory is in preparation.) The author shall show that since the function f is continuous, the analytic form of the least squares equation is continuously differentiable. A local minimum is solved for by using Newton`s method, where the entries of the Hessian are estimated directly from the data by Monte Carlo. The algorithm has the desirable properties that it is quadratically convergent from any starting guess sufficiently close to a solution and that each iteration requires only a linear system solve.

  2. DomHR: Accurately Identifying Domain Boundaries in Proteins Using a Hinge Region Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-yan; Lu, Long-jian; Song, Qi; Yang, Qian-qian; Li, Da-peng; Sun, Jiang-ming; Li, Tong-hua; Cong, Pei-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Motivation The precise prediction of protein domains, which are the structural, functional and evolutionary units of proteins, has been a research focus in recent years. Although many methods have been presented for predicting protein domains and boundaries, the accuracy of predictions could be improved. Results In this study we present a novel approach, DomHR, which is an accurate predictor of protein domain boundaries based on a creative hinge region strategy. A hinge region was defined as a segment of amino acids that covers part of a domain region and a boundary region. We developed a strategy to construct profiles of domain-hinge-boundary (DHB) features generated by sequence-domain/hinge/boundary alignment against a database of known domain structures. The DHB features had three elements: normalized domain, hinge, and boundary probabilities. The DHB features were used as input to identify domain boundaries in a sequence. DomHR used a nonredundant dataset as the training set, the DHB and predicted shape string as features, and a conditional random field as the classification algorithm. In predicted hinge regions, a residue was determined to be a domain or a boundary according to a decision threshold. After decision thresholds were optimized, DomHR was evaluated by cross-validation, large-scale prediction, independent test and CASP (Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction) tests. All results confirmed that DomHR outperformed other well-established, publicly available domain boundary predictors for prediction accuracy. Availability The DomHR is available at http://cal.tongji.edu.cn/domain/. PMID:23593247

  3. Method for identification of rigid domains and hinge residues in proteins based on exhaustive enumeration.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jaehyun; Sim, Jun; Park, Eunsung; Lee, Julian

    2015-06-01

    Many proteins undergo large-scale motions where relatively rigid domains move against each other. The identification of rigid domains, as well as the hinge residues important for their relative movements, is important for various applications including flexible docking simulations. In this work, we develop a method for protein rigid domain identification based on an exhaustive enumeration of maximal rigid domains, the rigid domains not fully contained within other domains. The computation is performed by mapping the problem to that of finding maximal cliques in a graph. A minimal set of rigid domains are then selected, which cover most of the protein with minimal overlap. In contrast to the results of existing methods that partition a protein into non-overlapping domains using approximate algorithms, the rigid domains obtained from exact enumeration naturally contain overlapping regions, which correspond to the hinges of the inter-domain bending motion. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on several proteins. PMID:25820699

  4. Deployment hinge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tourville, Thomas (Inventor); Romich, George (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hinge (20) includes two hinge plates (22, 24) and a connecting hinge pin (32). A coil spring (48) supported on a bushing (44) overlies the hinge pin (32), which is free to move along its longitudinal axis (30). A cam follower (42) on the hinge pin (32) engages a cam (32) mounted to one of the hinge plates (22), so that the hinge pin (32) slides longitudinally as the hinge plates (22, 24) pivot relative to each other about the hinge pin (32). As the hinge pin (32) slides longitudinally, it axially compresses or decompresses the spring (48). The cam (32) is oriented such that pivoting of the hinge plates (22, 24) in either direction from an open position compresses the spring (48), providing a restoring force which tends to retain the hinge plates (22, 24) in the open position.

  5. Encephalomyocarditis virus Leader protein hinge domain is responsible for interactions with Ran GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Bacot-Davis, Valjean R.; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2013-08-15

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), a Cardiovirus, initiates its polyprotein with a short 67 amino acid Leader (L) sequence. The protein acts as a unique pathogenicity factor, with anti-host activities which include the triggering of nuclear pore complex hyperphosphorylation and direct binding inhibition of the active cellular transport protein, Ran GTPase. Chemical modifications and protein mutagenesis now map the Ran binding domain to the L hinge-linker region, and in particular, to amino acids 35–40. Large deletions affecting this region were shown previously to diminish Ran binding. New point mutations, especially K35Q, D37A and W40A, preserve the intact L structure, abolish Ran binding and are deficient for nucleoporin (Nup) hyperphosphorylation. Ran itself morphs through multiple configurations, but reacts most effectively with L when in the GDP format, preferably with an empty nucleotide binding pocket. Therefore, L:Ran binding, mediated by the linker-hinge, is a required step in L-induced nuclear transport inhibition. - Highlights: • The hinge domain provides critical residues in Cardiovirus L:Ran complex formation. • Leader prefers to bind Ran in a nucleotide free, GDP-conformation. • L-induced Nup62 phosphorylation is reduced with Ran-deficient binding mutations.

  6. Amino acid changes within the E protein hinge region that affect dengue virus type 2 infectivity and fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Butrapet, Siritorn; Childers, Thomas; Moss, Kelley J.; Erb, Steven M.; Luy, Betty E.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Blair, Carol D.; Roehrig, John T.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.

    2011-04-25

    Fifteen mutant dengue viruses were engineered and used to identify AAs in the molecular hinge of the envelope protein that are critical to viral infection. Substitutions at Q52, A54, or E133 reduced infectivity in mammalian cells and altered the pH threshold of fusion. Mutations at F193, G266, I270, or G281 affected viral replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, but only I270W had reduced fusion activity. T280Y affected the pH threshold for fusion and reduced replication in C6/36 cells. Three different mutations at L135 were lethal in mammalian cells. Among them, L135G abrogated fusion and reduced replication in C6/36 cells, but only slightly reduced the mosquito infection rate. Conversely, L135W replicated well in C6/36 cells, but had the lowest mosquito infection rate. Possible interactions between hinge residues 52 and 277, or among 53, 135, 170, 186, 265, and 276 required for hinge function were discovered by sequence analysis to identify compensatory mutations.

  7. De Novo Design of Protein Kinase Inhibitors by in Silico Identification of Hinge Region-Binding Fragments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinases constitute an attractive family of enzyme targets with high relevance to cell and disease biology. Small molecule inhibitors are powerful tools to dissect and elucidate the function of kinases in chemical biology research and to serve as potential starting points for drug discovery. However, the discovery and development of novel inhibitors remains challenging. Here, we describe a structure-based de novo design approach that generates novel, hinge-binding fragments that are synthetically feasible and can be elaborated to small molecule libraries. Starting from commercially available compounds, core fragments were extracted, filtered for pharmacophoric properties compatible with hinge-region binding, and docked into a panel of protein kinases. Fragments with a high consensus score were subsequently short-listed for synthesis. Application of this strategy led to a number of core fragments with no previously reported activity against kinases. Small libraries around the core fragments were synthesized, and representative compounds were tested against a large panel of protein kinases and subjected to co-crystallization experiments. Each of the tested compounds was active against at least one kinase, but not all kinases in the panel were inhibited. A number of compounds showed high ligand efficiencies for therapeutically relevant kinases; among them were MAPKAP-K3, SRPK1, SGK1, TAK1, and GCK for which only few inhibitors are reported in the literature. PMID:23534475

  8. The importance of hinge sequence for loop function and catalytic activity in the reaction catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Xiang, J; Sun, J; Sampson, N S

    2001-04-01

    We have determined the sequence requirements for the N-terminal protein hinge of the active-site lid of triosephosphate isomerase. The codons for the hinge (PVW) were replaced with a genetic library of all possible 8000 amino acid combinations. The most active of these 8000 mutants were selected using in vivo complementation of a triosephosphate isomerase-deficient strain of Escherichia coli, DF502. Approximately 0.3 % of the mutants complement DF502 with an activity that is between 10 and 70 % of wild-type activity. They all contain Pro at the first position. Furthermore, the sequences of these hinge mutants reveal that hydrophobic packing is very important for efficient formation of the enediol intermediate. However, the reduced catalytic activities observed are not due to increased rates of loop opening. To explore the relationship between the N-terminal and C-terminal hinges, three semi-active mutants from the N-terminal hinge selection experiment (PLH, PHS and PTF), and six active C-terminal hinge mutants from previous work (NSS, LWA, YSL, KTK, NPN, KVA) were combined to form 18 "double-hinge" mutants. The activities of these mutants suggest that the N-terminal and C-terminal hinge structures affect one another. It appears that specific side-chain interactions are important for forming a catalytically active enzyme, but not for preventing release of the unstable enediol intermediate from the active site of the enzyme. The independence of intermediate release on amino acid sequence is consistent with the absence of a "universal" hinge sequence in structurally related enzymes. PMID:11286559

  9. Dynamics of the Peripheral Membrane Protein P2 from Human Myelin Measured by Neutron Scattering—A Comparison between Wild-Type Protein and a Hinge Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Laulumaa, Saara; Nieminen, Tuomo; Lehtimäki, Mari; Aggarwal, Shweta; Simons, Mikael; Koza, Michael M.; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin protein P2 is a fatty acid-binding structural component of the myelin sheath in the peripheral nervous system, and its function is related to its membrane binding capacity. Here, the link between P2 protein dynamics and structure and function was studied using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS). The P38G mutation, at the hinge between the β barrel and the α-helical lid, increased the lipid stacking capacity of human P2 in vitro, and the mutated protein was also functional in cultured cells. The P38G mutation did not change the overall structure of the protein. For a deeper insight into P2 structure-function relationships, information on protein dynamics in the 10 ps to 1 ns time scale was obtained using EINS. Values of mean square displacements mainly from protein H atoms were extracted for wild-type P2 and the P38G mutant and compared. Our results show that at physiological temperatures, the P38G mutant is more dynamic than the wild-type P2 protein, especially on a slow 1-ns time scale. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the enhanced dynamics of the mutant variant, especially within the portal region in the presence of bound fatty acid. The increased softness of the hinge mutant of human myelin P2 protein is likely related to an enhanced flexibility of the portal region of this fatty acid-binding protein, as well as to its interactions with the lipid bilayer surface requiring conformational adaptations. PMID:26068118

  10. Locking hinge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The space station configuration currently studied utilizes structures which require struts to be hinged in the middle in the stowed mode and locked into place in the deployed mode. Since there are hundreds of hinges involved, it is necessary that they have simple, positive locking features with a minimum of joint looseness or slack. This invention comprises two similar housings hinged together with a spring loaded locking member which assists in making as well as breaking the lock. This invention comprises a bracket hinge and bracket members with a spring biased and movable locking member. The locking or latch member has ear parts received in locking openings where wedging surfaces on the ear parts cooperate with complimentary surfaces on the bracket members for bringing the bracket members into a tight end-to-end alignment when the bracket members are in an extended position. When the locking member is moved to an unlocking position, pivoting of the hinge about a pivot pin automatically places the locking member to retain the locking member in an unlocked position. In pivoting the hinge from an extended position to a folded position, longitudinal spring members are placed under tension over annular rollers so that the spring tension in a folded position assists in return of the hinge from a folded to an extended position. Novelty lies in the creation of a locking hinge which allows compact storage and easy assembly of structural members having a minimal number of parts.

  11. Opposing role of condensin hinge against replication protein A in mitosis and interphase through promoting DNA annealing

    PubMed Central

    Akai, Yuko; Kurokawa, Yumiko; Nakazawa, Norihiko; Tonami-Murakami, Yuko; Suzuki, Yuki; Yoshimura, Shige H.; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Shiroiwa, Yoshiharu; Nakamura, Takahiro; Shibata, Eri; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Condensin is required for chromosome dynamics and diverse DNA metabolism. How condensin works, however, is not well understood. Condensin contains two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits with the terminal globular domains connected to coiled-coil that is interrupted by the central hinge. Heterotrimeric non-SMC subunits regulate SMC. We identified a novel fission yeast SMC hinge mutant, cut14-Y1, which displayed defects in DNA damage repair and chromosome segregation. It contains an amino acid substitution at a conserved hinge residue of Cut14/SMC2, resulting in diminished DNA binding and annealing. A replication protein A mutant, ssb1-418, greatly alleviated the repair and mitotic defects of cut14-Y1. Ssb1 protein formed nucleolar foci in cut14-Y1 cells, but the number of foci was diminished in cut14-Y1 ssb1-418 double mutants. Consistent with the above results, Ssb1 protein bound to single-strand DNA was removed by condensin or the SMC dimer through DNA reannealing in vitro. Similarly, RNA hybridized to DNA may be removed by the SMC dimer. Thus, condensin may wind up DNA strands to unload chromosomal components after DNA repair and prior to mitosis. We show that 16 suppressor mutations of cut14-Y1 were all mapped within the hinge domain, which surrounded the original L543 mutation site. PMID:22645654

  12. The impact of joint line restoration on functional results after hinged knee prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Serdar; Cankaya, Deniz; Deveci, Alper; Firat, Ahmet; Ozkurt, Bulent; Bozkurt, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hinged knee prosthesis is an effective treatment method as a salvage procedure in marked ligamentous insufficiency and severe bone defects. Joint line determination and restoration are difficult due to large bone defects and distorted anatomy. We evaluated the impact of joint line alteration on the outcome in rotating hinge knee arthroplasty (RHKA). Materials and Methods: 35 patients who had rotating hinged knee prosthesis applied between 2008 and 2013 were evaluated in this retrospective study. The patients were studied radiologically and clinically. Five patients were lost to followup and two patients died, leaving a total of 28 (7 male, 21 female) patients for final evaluation. The average age of the patients was 66.19 ± 8.35 years (range 52–83 years). The patients were evaluated clinically with Knee Society knee and functional score and patellar score. The joint line positions were evaluated radiographically with femoral epicondylar ratio method. The outcomes were also evaluated according to age, body weight and gender. Student's t-test, independent t-test, and the Wilcoxon signed rank test were used in the statistical analysis. Results: The mean Knee Society knee and functional score significantly improved from preoperative 19.52 ± 11.77 and 12.5 ± 15.66 respectively to 72.46 ± 14.01 and 70.36 ± 9.22 respectively postoperatively (P < 0.001). The mean range of motion of the knee improved from 55.95° ± 25.08° preoperatively to 92.14° ± 13.47° postoperatively (P < 0.001). Joint line position was restored in 20 patients (71.4%). Joint line alteration did not affect Knee Society Scores (KSSs) in contrast to patellar scores. Additionally, KSS was better in the patients with body mass index ≤30 at followup (P = 0.022 and P = 0.045). Conclusion: RHKA is an effective salvage procedure for serious instability and large bone defects. Restoration of the joint line improves the patellar score although it had no effect on the clinical outcome

  13. A hinge migration mechanism unlocks the evolution of green-to-red photoconversion in GFP-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hanseong; Zou, Taisong; Modi, Chintan; Dörner, Katerina; Grunkemeyer, Timothy J; Chen, Liqing; Fromme, Raimund; Matz, Mikhail V; Ozkan, S Banu; Wachter, Rebekka M

    2015-01-01

    In proteins, functional divergence involves mutations that modify structure and dynamics. Here we provide experimental evidence for an evolutionary mechanism driven solely by long-range dynamic motions without significant backbone adjustments, catalytic group rearrangements, or changes in subunit assembly. Crystallographic structures were determined for several reconstructed ancestral proteins belonging to a GFP class frequently employed in superresolution microscopy. Their chain flexibility was analyzed using molecular dynamics and perturbation response scanning. The green-to-red photoconvertible phenotype appears to have arisen from a common green ancestor by migration of a knob-like anchoring region away from the active site diagonally across the β barrel fold. The allosterically coupled mutational sites provide active site conformational mobility via epistasis. We propose that light-induced chromophore twisting is enhanced in a reverse-protonated subpopulation, activating internal acid-base chemistry and backbone cleavage to enlarge the chromophore. Dynamics-driven hinge migration may represent a more general platform for the evolution of novel enzyme activities. PMID:25565105

  14. A hinge migration mechanism unlocks the evolution of green-to-red photoconversion in GFP-like proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanseong; Zou, Taisong; Modi, Chintan; Dörner, Katerina; Grunkemeyer, Timothy J.; Chen, Liqing; Fromme, Raimund; Matz, Mikhail V.; Ozkan, S. Banu; Wachter, Rebekka M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In proteins, functional divergence involves mutations that modify structure and dynamics. Here, we provide experimental evidence for an evolutionary mechanism driven solely by long-range dynamic motions without significant backbone adjustments, catalytic group rearrangements, or changes in subunit assembly. Crystallographic structures were determined for several reconstructed ancestral proteins belonging to a GFP class frequently employed in superresolution microscopy. Their chain flexibility was analyzed using molecular dynamics and perturbation response scanning. The green-tored photoconvertible phenotype appears to have arisen from a common green ancestor by migration of a knob-like anchoring region away from the active site diagonally across the beta-barrel fold. The allosterically coupled mutational sites provide active site conformational mobility via epistasis. We propose that light-induced chromophore twisting is enhanced in a reverse-protonated subpopulation, activating internal acid-base chemistry and backbone cleavage to enlarge the chromophore. Dynamics-driven hinge migration may represent a more general platform for the evolution of novel enzyme activities. PMID:25565105

  15. Hinge assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vandergriff, D.H.

    1999-08-31

    A hinge assembly is disclosed having a first leaf, a second leaf and linking member. The first leaf has a contact surface. The second leaf has a first contact surface and a second contact surface. The linking member pivotally connects to the first leaf and to the second leaf. The hinge assembly is capable of moving from a closed position to an open position. In the closed position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the first contact surface of the second leaf. In the open position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the second contact surface of the second leaf. The hinge assembly can include a seal on the contact surface of the first leaf. 8 figs.

  16. Hinge assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vandergriff, David Houston

    1999-01-01

    A hinge assembly having a first leaf, a second leaf and linking member. The first leaf has a contact surface. The second leaf has a first contact surface and a second contact surface. The linking member pivotally connects to the first leaf and to the second leaf. The hinge assembly is capable of moving from a closed position to an open position. In the closed position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the first contact surface of the second leaf. In the open position, the contact surface of the first leaf merges with the second contact surface of the second leaf. The hinge assembly can include a seal on the contact surface of the first leaf.

  17. Understanding protein lids: structural analysis of active hinge mutants in triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Kursula, I; Salin, M; Sun, J; Norledge, B V; Haapalainen, A M; Sampson, N S; Wierenga, R K

    2004-04-01

    The conformational switch from open to closed of the flexible loop 6 of triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is essential for the catalytic properties of TIM. Using a directed evolution approach, active variants of chicken TIM with a mutated C-terminal hinge tripeptide of loop 6 have been generated (Sun,J. and Sampson,N.S., Biochemistry, 1999, 38, 11474-11481). In chicken TIM, the wild-type C-terminal hinge tripeptide is KTA. Detailed enzymological characterization of six variants showed that some of these (LWA, NPN, YSL, KTK) have decreased catalytic efficiency, whereas others (KVA, NSS) are essentially identical with wild-type. The structural characterization of these six variants is reported. No significant structural differences compared with the wild-type are found for KVA, NSS and LWA, but substantial structural adaptations are seen for NPN, YSL and KTK. These structural differences can be understood from the buried position of the alanine side chain in the C-hinge position 3 in the open conformation of wild-type loop 6. Replacement of this alanine with a bulky side chain causes the closed conformation to be favored, which correlates with the decreased catalytic efficiency of these variants. The structural context of loop 6 and loop 7 and their sequence conservation in 133 wild-type sequences is also discussed. PMID:15166315

  18. Analogs of the hepatocyte growth factor and macrophage-stimulating protein hinge regions act as Met and Ron dual inhibitors in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Church, Kevin J; Vanderwerff, Brett R; Riggers, Rachelle R; McMicheal, Michelle D; Mateo-Victoriano, Beatriz; Sukumar, Sudharsan R; Harding, Joseph W

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is among the leading causes of cancer death in the USA, with limited effective treatment options. A major contributor toward the formation and persistence of pancreatic cancer is the dysregulation of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/Met (HGF receptor) and the macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP)/Ron (MSP receptor) systems. These systems normally mediate a variety of cellular behaviors including proliferation, survival, and migration, but are often overactivated in pancreatic cancer and contribute toward cancer progression. Previous studies have shown that HGF must dimerize to activate Met. Small-molecule antagonists with homology to a 'hinge' region within the putative dimerization domain of HGF have been developed that bind to HGF and block dimerization, therefore inhibiting Met signaling. Because of the structural and sequence homology between MSP and HGF, we hypothesized that the inhibition of HGF by the hinge analogs may extend to MSP. The primary aim of this 'proof-of-concept' study was to determine whether hinge analogs could inhibit cellular responses to both HGF and MSP in pancreatic cancer cells. Our results showed that these compounds inhibited HGF and MSP activity. Hinge analog treatment resulted in decreased Met and Ron activation, and suppressed malignant cell behaviors including proliferation, migration, and invasion in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. These results suggest that the hinge analogs represent a novel group of molecules that may offer a therapeutic approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and warrant further development and optimization. PMID:27314431

  19. Multi-functional hinge equipped with a magneto-rheological rotary damper for solar array deployment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Mingfu; Yu, Miao; Fu, Jie; Wu, Zhengzhong

    2015-02-01

    This article describes the design and simulation of a novel multi-functional hinge equipped with a rotary magnetorheological damper for solar array deployment system, which is comprised of a hinge, an angular sensor, a positioning and locking mechanism and a rotary damper. In order to achieve the compact design in structure, some components were reused in different function modules. It's the first to use magnet-rheological fluid (MRF) to dissipate the energy in solar array deployment system. The main advantage in using MR rotary damper instead of a viscous fluid rotary damper is that the damping force of MR damper can be adjusted according to the external magnetic field environment excited. A mechanic model was built and the structure design was focused on the MR rotary damper, a damping force model of this damper is deduced based on hydromechanics with Bingham plastic constitutive model. A simulation of deployment motion was taken to validate the motion sequence of various components during the unfolding and locking process. It can be obtained that a constant damping coefficient can hardly balance the different performance of solar deployment system, then a simulation of the proposed deployment system equipped with rotary MR damper was carried out. According to the simulation, it can be obtained that the terminal velocity decreased by 75.81% and the deployment time decreased by 72.37% compared with a given constant damping coefficients. Therefore, the proposed new type of rotary damper can reach a compromise with different performance utilizing an on-off control strategy.

  20. Prognostic significance of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase hinge protein expression in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-Si; Liu, Yi-Dong; Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Wei-Juan; Xu, Le; Chang, Yuan; Xu, Jie-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase hinge protein (UQCRH), as a connecter between cytochrome c1 with cytochrome c in complex III of respiratory chain, is top-ranked hypermethylated gene in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). This study aims to evaluate the impact of UQCRH on recurrence and survival of 424 ccRCC patients enrolled retrospectively from a single institution after surgical resection using immunohistochemistry method. UQCRH was specifically downregulated in ccRCC, compared with papillary and chromophobe RCC. Moreover, patients with low UQCRH were prone to possess high T stage and TNM stage and associated with poor survival and early recurrence. UQCRH remained an independent favorable prognosticator for OS (Hazard rate [HR]: 0.510, 95% CI: 0.328-0.795, p=0.003) and RFS (HR: 0.506, 95% CI: 0.334-0.767, p=0.001) adjusting with other well-established factors using backward Cox model. Furthermore, in stratified subgroups, patients with low UQCRH had an increased risk of recurrence (HR: 0.452, 95% CI: 0.261-0.783, p=0.005) and mortality (HR: 0.386, 95% CI: 0.205-0.726, p=0.003) in subgroup of early TNM stage. Taken together, UQCRH is a potential independent favorable prognostic factor for recurrence and survival of patients with ccRCC after nephrectomy. PMID:27186431

  1. Dengue virus envelope protein domain I/II hinge determines long-lived serotype-specific dengue immunity.

    PubMed

    Messer, William B; de Alwis, Ruklanthi; Yount, Boyd L; Royal, Scott R; Huynh, Jeremy P; Smith, Scott A; Crowe, James E; Doranz, Benjamin J; Kahle, Kristen M; Pfaff, Jennifer M; White, Laura J; Sariol, Carlos A; de Silva, Aravinda M; Baric, Ralph S

    2014-02-01

    The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes, DENV-1, -2, -3, and -4, are endemic throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world, with an estimated 390 million acute infections annually. Infection confers long-term protective immunity against the infecting serotype, but secondary infection with a different serotype carries a greater risk of potentially fatal severe dengue disease, including dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The single most effective measure to control this threat to global health is a tetravalent DENV vaccine. To date, attempts to develop a protective vaccine have progressed slowly, partly because the targets of type-specific human neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), which are critical for long-term protection, remain poorly defined, impeding our understanding of natural immunity and hindering effective vaccine development. Here, we show that the envelope glycoprotein domain I/II hinge of DENV-3 and DENV-4 is the primary target of the long-term type-specific NAb response in humans. Transplantation of a DENV-4 hinge into a recombinant DENV-3 virus showed that the hinge determines the serotype-specific neutralizing potency of primary human and nonhuman primate DENV immune sera and that the hinge region both induces NAbs and is targeted by protective NAbs in rhesus macaques. These results suggest that the success of live dengue vaccines may depend on their ability to stimulate NAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein domain I/II hinge region. More broadly, this study shows that complex conformational antibody epitopes can be transplanted between live viruses, opening up similar possibilities for improving the breadth and specificity of vaccines for influenza, HIV, hepatitis C virus, and other clinically important viral pathogens. PMID:24385585

  2. Filamin A-Hinge Region 1-EGFP: A Novel Tool for Tracking the Cellular Functions of Filamin A in Real-Time

    PubMed Central

    Pons, Mónica; Myhren, Lene; Garrido, Georgina; Aragay, Anna M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Filamin A (FLNa) is an actin-crosslinking protein necessary for stabilizing the cell surface, organizing protrusive activity and for promoting efficient cellular translocation. Recently, our group demonstrated the requirement of FLNa for the internalization of the chemokine receptor CCR2B. Methodology and Principal Findings In order to study the role of FLNa in vitro and in real-time, we have developed a fluorescent FLNa-EGFP construct. In this novel imaging tool, we introduced the EGFP-tag inside the flexible hinge 1 region of FLNa between two calpain cleavage sites. Our findings indicate that the FLNa-EGFP construct was correctly expressed, cleaved by calpain and colocalized with actin filaments as shown by immunostaining experiments in the human melanoma cell lines A7 (FLNa-repleted) and M2 (FLNa-deficient). In addition, scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) and micropatterning studies also provided clear evidence that the cell rigidity was restored. FLNa-EGFP allowed us to demonstrate the interaction of FLNa with the chemokine receptor CCR2B in endocytic vesicles after CCL2 ligand stimulation. Through live-cell imaging studies we show that the CCR2B receptor in Rab5-positive vesicles moves along filamin A-positive fibers. Significance Taken together, these results outline the functionality of the FLNa-EGFP and the importance of filamin A for receptor internalization and movement into endocytic vesicles. PMID:22870205

  3. Valgus osteotomy for hinge abduction.

    PubMed

    de Gheldere, Antoine; Eastwood, Deborah M

    2011-07-01

    Failure of the enlarged and deformed anterolateral portion of the femoral head to roll into the acetabulum during abduction alters hip joint mechanics. The resultant hinge abduction is associated with pain, and the patient often has restricted movement. A valgus osteotomy removes the deformed portion of the femoral head away from the weight-bearing area and ensures there is pain-free congruent range of movement around the weight-bearing position. The concomitant improvement in lever arm function and leg length results in a better gait pattern. In immature patients, abolition of hinge abduction allows the lateral acetabular ossification center to grow more normally. PMID:21742146

  4. Gene Duplication, Lineage-Specific Expansion, and Subfunctionalization in the MADF-BESS Family Patterns the Drosophila Wing Hinge

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Vallari; Habib, Farhat; Kulkarni, Apurv; Ratnaparkhi, Girish S.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication, expansion, and subsequent diversification are features of the evolutionary process. Duplicated genes can be lost, modified, or altered to generate novel functions over evolutionary timescales. These features make gene duplication a powerful engine of evolutionary change. In this study, we explore these features in the MADF-BESS family of transcriptional regulators. In Drosophila melanogaster, the family contains 16 similar members, each containing an N-terminal, DNA-binding MADF domain and a C-terminal, protein-interacting, BESS domain. Phylogenetic analysis shows that members of the MADF-BESS family are expanded in the Drosophila lineage. Three members, which we name hinge1, hinge2, and hinge3 are required for wing development, with a critical role in the wing hinge. hinge1 is a negative regulator of Winglesss expression and interacts with core wing-hinge patterning genes such as teashirt, homothorax, and jing. Double knockdowns along with heterologous rescue experiments are used to demonstrate that members of the MADF-BESS family retain function in the wing hinge, in spite of expansion and diversification for over 40 million years. The wing hinge connects the blade to the thorax and has critical roles in fluttering during flight. MADF-BESS family genes appear to retain redundant functions to shape and form elements of the wing hinge in a robust and fail-safe manner. PMID:24336749

  5. Designing Great Hinge Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiliam, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    According to author Dylan Wiliam, because lessons never go exactly as planned, teachers should build plan B into plan A. This involves designing a lesson with a "hinge" somewhere in the middle and using specific kinds of questions--what he calls hinge questions--to quickly assess students' understanding of a concept before moving on.…

  6. Damped leaf flexure hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage.

  7. Damped leaf flexure hinge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Chen, Guisheng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-05-01

    Flexure-based mechanism like compliant actuation system embeds complex dynamics that will reduce the control bandwidth and limits their dynamic positioning precision. This paper presents a theoretical model of a leaf flexure hinge with damping layers using strain energy method and Kelvin damping model. The modified loss factor of the damped leaf flexure hinge is derived, and the equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the damped leaf hinge is obtained, which could be used to improve the pseudo-rigid-model. The free vibration signals of the hinge in three different damping configurations are measured. The experimental modal analysis also is performed on the three kinds of damped leaf flexure hinges in order to evaluate their 1st order bending natural frequency and vibration-suppressing effects. The evaluation of modified loss factor model also is performed. The experimental results indicate that the constrained layer damping can enhance the structure damping of the hinge even if only single damping layer each side, the modified loss factor model can get good predicts of a damped leaf flexure hinge in the frequency range below 1st order natural frequency, and it is necessary that the dimensional parameters of the damping layers and basic layer of the hinge should be optimized for simplification at the mechanism's design stage. PMID:26026549

  8. A Flexible Domain-Domain Hinge Promotes an Induced-fit Dominant Mechanism for the Loading of Guide-DNA into Argonaute Protein in Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizhe; Jiang, Hanlun; Sheong, Fu Kit; Cui, Xuefeng; Gao, Xin; Wang, Yanli; Huang, Xuhui

    2016-03-17

    Argonaute proteins (Ago) are core components of the RNA Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) that load and utilize small guide nucleic acids to silence mRNAs or cleave foreign DNAs. Despite the essential role of Ago in gene regulation and defense against virus, the molecular mechanism of guide-strand loading into Ago remains unclear. We explore such a mechanism in the bacterium Thermus thermophilus Ago (TtAgo), via a computational approach combining molecular dynamics, bias-exchange metadynamics, and protein-DNA docking. We show that apo TtAgo adopts multiple closed states that are unable to accommodate guide-DNA. Conformations able to accommodate the guide are beyond the reach of thermal fluctuations from the closed states. These results suggest an induced-fit dominant mechanism for guide-strand loading in TtAgo, drastically different from the two-step mechanism for human Ago 2 (hAgo2) identified in our previous study. Such a difference between TtAgo and hAgo2 is found to mainly originate from the distinct rigidity of their L1-PAZ hinge. Further comparison among known Ago structures from various species indicates that the L1-PAZ hinge may be flexible in general for prokaryotic Ago's but rigid for eukaryotic Ago's. PMID:26908081

  9. The hinge domain of the epigenetic repressor Smchd1 adopts an unconventional homodimeric configuration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelan; Czabotar, Peter E; Blewitt, Marnie E; Murphy, James M

    2016-03-15

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) proteins are fundamental to chromosome organization. They share a characteristic domain structure, featuring a central SMC hinge domain that is critical for forming SMC dimers and interacting with nucleic acids. The structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1 (Smchd1) is a non-canonical member of the SMC family. Although it has been well established that Smchd1 serves crucial roles in epigenetic silencing events implicated in development and disease, much less is known about the structure and function of the Smchd1 protein. Recently, we demonstrated that the C-terminal hinge domain of Smchd1 forms a nucleic acid-binding homodimer; however, it is unclear how the protomers are assembled within the hinge homodimer and how the full-length Smchd1 protein is organized with respect to the hinge region. In the present study, by employing SAXS we demonstrate that the hinge domain of Smchd1 probably adopts an unconventional homodimeric arrangement augmented by an intermolecular coiled coil formed between the two monomers. Such a dimeric structure differs markedly from that of archetypical SMC proteins, raising the possibility that Smchd1 binds chromatin in an unconventional manner. PMID:26733688

  10. Importance of a flexible hinge near the motor domain in kinesin-driven motility.

    PubMed Central

    Grummt, M; Woehlke, G; Henningsen, U; Fuchs, S; Schleicher, M; Schliwa, M

    1998-01-01

    Conventional kinesin is a molecular motor consisting of an N-terminal catalytic motor domain, an extended stalk and a small globular C-terminus. Whereas the structure and function of the catalytic motor domain has been investigated, little is known about the function of domains outside the globular head. A short coiled-coil region adjacent to the motor domain, termed the neck, is known to be important for dimerization and may be required for kinesin processivity. We now provide evidence that a helix-disrupting hinge region (hinge 1) that separates the neck from the first extended coiled-coil of the stalk plays an essential role in basic motor activity. A fast fungal kinesin from Syncephalastrum racemosum was used for these studies. Deletion, substitution by a coiled-coil and truncation of the hinge 1 region all reduce motor speed and uncouple ATP turnover from gliding velocity. Insertion of hinge 1 regions from two conventional kinesins, Nkin and DmKHC, fully restores motor activity, whereas insertion of putative flexible linkers of other proteins does not, suggesting that hinge 1 regions of conventional kinesins can functionally replace each other. We suggest that this region is essential for kinesin movement in its promotion of chemo-mechanical coupling of the two heads and therefore the functional motor domain should be redefined to include not only the catalytic head but also the adjacent neck and hinge 1 domains. PMID:9755154

  11. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  12. Impaired Acid Catalysis by Mutation of a Protein Loop Hinge Residue in a YopH Mutant Revealed by Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Brandao, T.; Robinson, H; Johnson, S; Hengge, A

    2009-01-01

    Catalysis by the Yersinia protein-tyrosine phosphatase YopH is significantly impaired by the mutation of the conserved Trp354 residue to Phe. Though not a catalytic residue, this Trp is a hinge residue in a conserved flexible loop (the WPD-loop) that must close during catalysis. To learn why this seemingly conservative mutation reduces catalysis by 2 orders of magnitude, we have solved high-resolution crystal structures for the W354F YopH in the absence and in the presence of tungstate and vanadate. Oxyanion binding to the P-loop in W354F is analogous to that observed in the native enzyme. However, the WPD-loop in the presence of oxyanions assumes a half-closed conformation, in contrast to the fully closed state observed in structures of the native enzyme. This observation provides an explanation for the impaired general acid catalysis observed in kinetic experiments with Trp mutants. A 1.4 Angstroms structure of the W354F mutant obtained in the presence of vanadate reveals an unusual divanadate species with a cyclic [VO]2 core, which has precedent in small molecules but has not been previously reported in a protein crystal structure.

  13. 14 CFR 23.657 - Hinges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Surfaces § 23.657 Hinges. (a) Control surface hinges, except ball and roller bearing hinges, must have a... material used as a bearing. (b) For ball or roller bearing hinges, the approved rating of the bearing...

  14. 14 CFR 23.657 - Hinges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Surfaces § 23.657 Hinges. (a) Control surface hinges, except ball and roller bearing hinges, must have a... material used as a bearing. (b) For ball or roller bearing hinges, the approved rating of the bearing...

  15. 14 CFR 23.657 - Hinges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Surfaces § 23.657 Hinges. (a) Control surface hinges, except ball and roller bearing hinges, must have a... material used as a bearing. (b) For ball or roller bearing hinges, the approved rating of the bearing...

  16. 14 CFR 23.657 - Hinges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Surfaces § 23.657 Hinges. (a) Control surface hinges, except ball and roller bearing hinges, must have a... material used as a bearing. (b) For ball or roller bearing hinges, the approved rating of the bearing...

  17. 14 CFR 23.657 - Hinges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Surfaces § 23.657 Hinges. (a) Control surface hinges, except ball and roller bearing hinges, must have a... material used as a bearing. (b) For ball or roller bearing hinges, the approved rating of the bearing...

  18. Protective hinge in insulin opens to enable its receptor engagement

    PubMed Central

    Menting, John G.; Yang, Yanwu; Chan, Shu Jin; Phillips, Nelson B.; Smith, Brian J.; Whittaker, Jonathan; Wickramasinghe, Nalinda P.; Whittaker, Linda J.; Pandyarajan, Vijay; Wan, Zhu-li; Yadav, Satya P.; Carroll, Julie M.; Strokes, Natalie; Roberts, Charles T.; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Milewski, Wieslawa; Steiner, Donald F.; Chauhan, Virander S.; Ward, Colin W.; Weiss, Michael A.; Lawrence, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin provides a classical model of a globular protein, yet how the hormone changes conformation to engage its receptor has long been enigmatic. Interest has focused on the C-terminal B-chain segment, critical for protective self-assembly in β cells and receptor binding at target tissues. Insight may be obtained from truncated “microreceptors” that reconstitute the primary hormone-binding site (α-subunit domains L1 and αCT). We demonstrate that, on microreceptor binding, this segment undergoes concerted hinge-like rotation at its B20-B23 β-turn, coupling reorientation of PheB24 to a 60° rotation of the B25-B28 β-strand away from the hormone core to lie antiparallel to the receptor's L1–β2 sheet. Opening of this hinge enables conserved nonpolar side chains (IleA2, ValA3, ValB12, PheB24, and PheB25) to engage the receptor. Restraining the hinge by nonstandard mutagenesis preserves native folding but blocks receptor binding, whereas its engineered opening maintains activity at the price of protein instability and nonnative aggregation. Our findings rationalize properties of clinical mutations in the insulin family and provide a previously unidentified foundation for designing therapeutic analogs. We envisage that a switch between free and receptor-bound conformations of insulin evolved as a solution to conflicting structural determinants of biosynthesis and function. PMID:25092300

  19. Shape Memory Composite Hybrid Hinge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood; Lin, John; Scarborough, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    There are two conventional types of hinges for in-space deployment applications. The first type is mechanically deploying hinges. A typical mechanically deploying hinge is usually composed of several tens of components. It is complicated, heavy, and bulky. More components imply higher deployment failure probability. Due to the existence of relatively moving components among a mechanically deploying hinge, it unavoidably has microdynamic problems. The second type of conventional hinge relies on strain energy for deployment. A tape-spring hinge is a typical strain energy hinge. A fundamental problem of a strain energy hinge is that its deployment dynamic is uncontrollable. Usually, its deployment is associated with a large impact, which is unacceptable for many space applications. Some damping technologies have been experimented with to reduce the impact, but they increased the risks of an unsuccessful deployment. Coalescing strain energy components with shape memory composite (SMC) components to form a hybrid hinge is the solution. SMCs are well suited for deployable structures. A SMC is created from a high-performance fiber and a shape memory polymer resin. When the resin is heated to above its glass transition temperature, the composite becomes flexible and can be folded or packed. Once cooled to below the glass transition temperature, the composite remains in the packed state. When the structure is ready to be deployed, the SMC component is reheated to above the glass transition temperature, and it returns to its as-fabricated shape. A hybrid hinge is composed of two strain energy flanges (also called tape-springs) and one SMC tube. Two folding lines are placed on the SMC tube to avoid excessive strain on the SMC during folding. Two adapters are used to connect the hybrid hinge to its adjacent structural components. While the SMC tube is heated to above its glass transition temperature, a hybrid hinge can be folded and stays at folded status after the temperature

  20. A monoclonal antibody against hinge-cleaved IgG restores effector function to proteolytically-inactivated IgGs in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brezski, Randall J; Kinder, Michelle; Grugan, Katharine D; Soring, Keri L; Carton, Jill; Greenplate, Allison R; Petley, Theodore; Capaldi, Dorie; Brosnan, Kerry; Emmell, Eva; Watson, Sharon; Jordan, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    We report a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed to a neo-epitope that is exposed in the IgG lower hinge following proteolytic cleavage. The mAb, designated 2095–2, displays specificity for IdeS-generated F(ab’)2 fragments, but not for full-length IgG or for closely-related F(ab’)2 fragments generated with other proteases. A critical component of the specificity is provided by the C-terminal amino acid of the epitope corresponding to gly-236 in the IgG1 (also IgG4) hinge. By its ability to bind to IdeS-cleaved anti-CD20 mAb, mAb 2095–2 fully restored antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) against WIL2-S cells to the otherwise inactive anti-CD20 IgG1 F(ab’)2 fragment. Similarly, 2095–2 reinstated ADCC against MDA-MB-231 cells to an anti-CD142 IgG1 F(ab’)2 fragment. mAb 2095–2 was also capable of eliciting both CDC and ADCC to IgG4 F(ab’)2 fragments, an IgG subclass that has weaker ADCC and CDC when intact relative to intact IgG1. The in vitro cell-based efficacy of 2095–2 was extended to the in vivo setting using platelets as a cell clearance surrogate. In a canine model, the co-administration of 2095–2 together with IdeS-generated, platelet-targeting anti-CD41/61 F(ab’)2 fragment not only restored platelet clearance, but did so at a rate and extent of clearance that exceeded that of intact anti-CD41/61 IgG at comparable concentrations. To further explore this unexpected amplification effect, we conducted a rat study in which 2095–2 was administered at a series of doses in combination with a fixed dose of anti-CD41/61 F(ab’)2 fragments. Again, the combination, at ratios as low as 1:10 (w/w) 2095–2 to F(ab’)2, proved more effective than the anti-CD41/61 IgG1 alone. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for enhancing antibody-mediated cell-killing effector functions with potential applications in pathologic settings such as tumors and acute infections where protease

  1. A monoclonal antibody against hinge-cleaved IgG restores effector function to proteolytically-inactivated IgGs in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Brezski, Randall J; Kinder, Michelle; Grugan, Katharine D; Soring, Keri L; Carton, Jill; Greenplate, Allison R; Petley, Theodore; Capaldi, Dorie; Brosnan, Kerry; Emmell, Eva; Watson, Sharon; Jordan, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    We report a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed to a neo-epitope that is exposed in the IgG lower hinge following proteolytic cleavage. The mAb, designated 2095-2, displays specificity for IdeS-generated F(ab')₂ fragments, but not for full-length IgG or for closely-related F(ab')₂ fragments generated with other proteases. A critical component of the specificity is provided by the C-terminal amino acid of the epitope corresponding to gly-236 in the IgG1 (also IgG4) hinge. By its ability to bind to IdeS-cleaved anti-CD20 mAb, mAb 2095-2 fully restored antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) against WIL2-S cells to the otherwise inactive anti-CD20 IgG1 F(ab')₂ fragment. Similarly, 2095-2 reinstated ADCC against MDA-MB-231 cells to an anti-CD142 IgG1 F(ab')₂ fragment. mAb 2095-2 was also capable of eliciting both CDC and ADCC to IgG4 F(ab')₂ fragments, an IgG subclass that has weaker ADCC and CDC when intact relative to intact IgG1. The in vitro cell-based efficacy of 2095-2 was extended to the in vivo setting using platelets as a cell clearance surrogate. In a canine model, the co-administration of 2095-2 together with IdeS-generated, platelet-targeting anti-CD41/61 F(ab')₂ fragment not only restored platelet clearance, but did so at a rate and extent of clearance that exceeded that of intact anti-CD41/61 IgG at comparable concentrations. To further explore this unexpected amplification effect, we conducted a rat study in which 2095-2 was administered at a series of doses in combination with a fixed dose of anti-CD41/61 F(ab')₂ fragments. Again, the combination, at ratios as low as 1:10 (w/w) 2095-2 to F(ab')₂, proved more effective than the anti-CD41/61 IgG1 alone. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for enhancing antibody-mediated cell-killing effector functions with potential applications in pathologic settings such as tumors and acute infections where protease activity is

  2. Separation of the transcriptional activation and replication functions of the bovine papillomavirus-1 E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Winokur, P L; McBride, A A

    1992-11-01

    Replication of bovine papillomavirus-1 (BPV-1) DNA requires two viral gene products, the E1 protein and the full-length E2 protein. The 48 kDa E2 protein is a site-specific DNA-binding protein that binds to several sites which lie adjacent to the BPV-1 origin of replication. The 85 amino acid C-terminal domain contains the specific DNA binding and dimerization properties of the protein. The approximately 200 amino acid N-terminal domain is crucial for transcriptional activation. Both of these domains are highly conserved among different papillomaviruses. An internal hinge region separates the two functional domains. The region varies in amino acid sequence and length among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. A series of mutations were constructed within the E2 open reading frame which delete various regions of the conserved DNA binding and transactivation domains as well as the internal hinge region. Two mutated E2 proteins that lack portions of the conserved DNA-binding domain but which support DNA replication were identified using transient replication assays. These mutated E2 proteins were unable to function as transcriptional activators. Conversely, two E2 proteins containing large deletions of the hinge region were able to activate transcription, but were defective for replication. Thus, the replication and transactivation functions of the E2 protein are separable. PMID:1327758

  3. Both Interaction Surfaces within Cohesin's Hinge Domain Are Essential for Its Stable Chromosomal Association

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ajay; Hu, Bin; Kurze, Alexander; Beckouët, Frédéric; Farcas, Ana-Maria; Dixon, Sarah E.; Katou, Yuki; Khalid, Syma; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Nasmyth, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background The cohesin complex that mediates sister chromatid cohesion contains three core subunits: Smc1, Smc3, and Scc1. Heterotypic interactions between Smc1 and Smc3 dimerization domains create stable V-shaped Smc1/Smc3 heterodimers with a hinge at the center and nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) at the ends of each arm. Interconnection of each NBD through their association with the N- and C-terminal domains of Scc1 creates a tripartite ring, within which sister DNAs are thought to be entrapped (the ring model). Crystal structures show that the Smc1/Smc3 hinge has a toroidal shape, with independent “north” and “south” interaction surfaces on an axis of pseudosymmetry. The ring model predicts that sister chromatid cohesion would be lost by transient hinge opening. Results We find that mutations within either interface weaken heterodimerization of isolated half hinges in vitro but do not greatly compromise formation of cohesin rings in vivo. They do, however, reduce the residence time of cohesin on chromosomes and cause lethal defects in sister chromatid cohesion. This demonstrates that mere formation of rings is insufficient for cohesin function. Stable cohesion requires cohesin rings that cannot easily open. Conclusions Either the north or south hinge interaction surface is sufficient for the assembly of V-shaped Smc1/Smc3 heterodimers in vivo. Any tendency of Smc proteins with weakened hinges to dissociate will be suppressed by interconnection of their NBDs by Scc1. We suggest that transient hinge dissociation caused by the mutations described here is incompatible with stable sister chromatid cohesion because it permits chromatin fibers to escape from cohesin rings. PMID:20153193

  4. Single Mutation in the Flavivirus Envelope Protein Hinge Region Increases Neurovirulence for Mice and Monkeys but Decreases Viscerotropism for Monkeys: Relevance to Development and Safety Testing of Live, Attenuated Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Monath, Thomas P.; Arroyo, Juan; Levenbook, Inessa; Zhang, Zhen-Xi; Catalan, John; Draper, Ken; Guirakhoo, Farshad

    2002-01-01

    A chimeric yellow fever (YF) virus/Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus vaccine (ChimeriVax-JE) was constructed by insertion of the prM-E genes from the attenuated JE virus SA14-14-2 vaccine strain into a full-length cDNA clone of YF 17D virus. Passage in fetal rhesus lung (FRhL) cells led to the emergence of a small-plaque virus containing a single Met→Lys amino acid mutation at E279, reverting this residue from the SA14-14-2 to the wild-type amino acid. A similar virus was also constructed by site-directed mutagenesis (J. Arroyo, F. Guirakhoo, S. Fenner, Z.-X. Zhang, T. P. Monath, and T. J. Chambers, J. Virol. 75:934-942, 2001). The E279 mutation is located in a beta-sheet in the hinge region of the E protein that is responsible for a pH-dependent conformational change during virus penetration from the endosome into the cytoplasm of the infected cell. In independent transfection-passage studies with FRhL or Vero cells, mutations appeared most frequently in hinge 4 (bounded by amino acids E266 to E284), reflecting genomic instability in this functionally important region. The E279 reversion caused a significant increase in neurovirulence as determined by the 50% lethal dose and survival distribution in suckling mice and by histopathology in rhesus monkeys. Based on sensitivity and comparability of results with those for monkeys, the suckling mouse is an appropriate host for safety testing of flavivirus vaccine candidates for neurotropism. After intracerebral inoculation, the E279 Lys virus was restricted with respect to extraneural replication in monkeys, as viremia and antibody levels (markers of viscerotropism) were significantly reduced compared to those for the E279 Met virus. These results are consistent with the observation that empirically derived vaccines developed by mouse brain passage of dengue and YF viruses have increased neurovirulence for mice but reduced viscerotropism for humans. PMID:11799188

  5. A biomechanical evaluation of hinged total knee replacement prostheses.

    PubMed

    Long, Robin; Gheduzzi, Sabina; Bucher, Thomas A; Toms, Andrew D; Miles, Anthony W

    2013-08-01

    The number of total knee replacements being performed worldwide is undergoing an unprecedented increase. Hinged total knee replacements, used in complex salvage and revision procedures, currently account for a small but growing proportion of prostheses implanted. Modern hinged prostheses share the same basic configuration, allowing flexion-extension and tibial rotation. One aspect on which designs differ is the anteroposterior location of the hinge. A more posterior hinge is designed to increase the patellar tendon moment arm, reducing the quadriceps force required for a given activity and benefiting the patient. Five commonly used total knee replacements were evaluated in terms of quadriceps force and patellar tendon moment arm using a laboratory-based rig. Significant differences were identified between the five prostheses in quadriceps force and patellar tendon moment arm. Analysis of the correlation between these two parameters indicates that while patellar tendon moment arm influences quadriceps force, it is not the only factor. Also important is the lever function of the patella, and it is suggested here that the non-physiological nature of the prosthetic patellofemoral geometry may result in unnatural joint function. Thus, a thorough understanding of the resulting kinematic function of hinged total knee replacements is becoming increasingly important in complex revision total knee replacement to meet rising patient expectations and functional demands. PMID:23722496

  6. Human genome protein function database.

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    A database which focuses on the normal functions of the currently-known protein products of the Human Genome was constructed. Information is stored as text, figures, tables, and diagrams. The program contains built-in functions to modify, update, categorize, hypertext, search, create reports, and establish links to other databases. The semi-automated categorization feature of the database program was used to classify these proteins in terms of biomedical functions. PMID:1807638

  7. A fully redundant power hinge for LANDSAT-D appendages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamrol, F. E.; Matteo, D. N.

    1981-01-01

    The configuration and testing of a power driven hinge for deployment of the solar array and antenna boom for the LANDSAT-D spacecraft is discussed. The hinge is fully mechanically and electrically redundant and, thereby, can sustain a single point failure of any one motor (or its power supply), speed reducer, or bearing set without loss of its ability to function. This design utilizes the capability of the stepper motor drive to remove the flexibility of the drive train from the joint stiffness equation when the hinge is loaded against its stop. This feature precludes gapping of the joint under spacecraft maneuver loads even in the absence of a latching feature. Thus, retraction is easily accomplished by motor reversal without the need for a solenoid function to remove the latch.

  8. Alternative S2 Hinge Regions of the Myosin Rod Affect Myofibrillar Structure and Myosin Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Mark S.; Dambacher, Corey M.; Knowles, Aileen F.; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Swank, Douglas M.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Maughan, David W.

    2009-07-01

    The subfragment 2/light meromyosin 'hinge' region has been proposed to significantly contribute to muscle contraction force and/or speed. Transgenic replacement of the endogenous fast muscle isovariant hinge A (exon 15a) in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle with the slow muscle hinge B (exon 15b) allows examination of the structural and functional changes when only this region of the myosin molecule is different. Hinge B was previously shown to increase myosin rod length, increase A-band and sarcomere length, and decrease flight performance compared to hinge A. We applied additional measures to these transgenic lines to further evaluate the consequences of modifying this hinge region. Structurally, the longer A-band and sarcomere lengths found in the hinge B myofibrils appear to be due to the longitudinal addition of myosin heads. Functionally, hinge B, although a significant distance from the myosin catalytic domain, alters myosin kinetics in a manner consistent with this region increasing myosin rod length. These structural and functional changes combine to decrease whole fly wing-beat frequency and flight performance. Our results indicate that this hinge region plays an important role in determining myosin kinetics and in regulating thick and thin filament lengths as well as sarcomere length.

  9. Passive Stiffness in Drosophila Indirect Flight Muscle Reduced by Disrupting Paramyosin Phosphorylation, but Not by Embryonic Myosin S2 Hinge Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yudong; Miller, Mark S.; Swank, Douglas M.; Liu, Hongjun; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Maughan, David W.; Pollack, Gerald H.

    2006-01-01

    High passive stiffness is one of the characteristic properties of the asynchronous indirect flight muscle (IFM) found in many insects like Drosophila. To evaluate the effects of two thick filament protein domains on passive sarcomeric stiffness, and to investigate their correlation with IFM function, we used microfabricated cantilevers and a high resolution imaging system to study the passive IFM myofibril stiffness of two groups of transgenic Drosophila lines. One group (hinge-switch mutants) had a portion of the endogenous S2 hinge region replaced by an embryonic version; the other group (paramyosin mutants) had one or more putative phosphorylation sites near the N-terminus of paramyosin disabled. Both transgenic groups showed severely compromised flight ability. In this study, we found no difference (compared to the control) in passive elastic modulus in the hinge-switch group, but a 15% reduction in the paramyosin mutants. All results were corroborated by muscle fiber mechanics experiments performed on the same lines. The fact that myofibril elasticity is unaffected by hinge switching implies alternative S2 hinges do not critically affect passive sarcomere stiffness. In contrast, the mechanical defects observed upon disrupting paramyosin phosphorylation sites in Drosophila suggests that paramyosin phosphorylation is important for maintaining high passive stiffness in IFM myofibrils, probably by affecting paramyosin's interaction with other sarcomeric proteins. PMID:17012313

  10. Composite motifs integrating multiple protein structures increase sensitivity for function prediction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Brian Y; Bryant, Drew H; Cruess, Amanda E; Bylund, Joseph H; Fofanov, Viacheslav Y; Kristensen, David M; Kimmel, Marek; Lichtarge, Olivier; Kavraki, Lydia E

    2007-01-01

    The study of disease often hinges on the biological function of proteins, but determining protein function is a difficult experimental process. To minimize duplicated effort, algorithms for function prediction seek characteristics indicative of possible protein function. One approach is to identify substructural matches of geometric and chemical similarity between motifs representing known active sites and target protein structures with unknown function. In earlier work, statistically significant matches of certain effective motifs have identified functionally related active sites. Effective motifs must be carefully designed to maintain similarity to functionally related sites (sensitivity) and avoid incidental similarities to functionally unrelated protein geometry (specificity). Existing motif design techniques use the geometry of a single protein structure. Poor selection of this structure can limit motif effectiveness if the selected functional site lacks similarity to functionally related sites. To address this problem, this paper presents composite motifs, which combine structures of functionally related active sites to potentially increase sensitivity. Our experimentation compares the effectiveness of composite motifs with simple motifs designed from single protein structures. On six distinct families of functionally related proteins, leave-one-out testing showed that composite motifs had sensitivity comparable to the most sensitive of all simple motifs and specificity comparable to the average simple motif. On our data set, we observed that composite motifs simultaneously capture variations in active site conformation, diminish the problem of selecting motif structures, and enable the fusion of protein structures from diverse data sources. PMID:17951837

  11. Functions of S100 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Donato, R.; Cannon, B.R.; Sorci, G.; Riuzzi, F.; Hsu, K.; Weber, D.J.; Geczy, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    The S100 protein family consists of 24 members functionally distributed into three main subgroups: those that only exert intracellular regulatory effects, those with intracellular and extracellular functions and those which mainly exert extracellular regulatory effects. S100 proteins are only expressed in vertebrates and show cell-specific expression patterns. In some instances, a particular S100 protein can be induced in pathological circumstances in a cell type that does not express it in normal physiological conditions. Within cells, S100 proteins are involved in aspects of regulation of proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, Ca2+ homeostasis, energy metabolism, inflammation and migration/invasion through interactions with a variety of target proteins including enzymes, cytoskeletal subunits, receptors, transcription factors and nucleic acids. Some S100 proteins are secreted or released and regulate cell functions in an autocrine and paracrine manner via activation of surface receptors (e.g. the receptor for advanced glycation end-products and toll-like receptor 4), G-protein-coupled receptors, scavenger receptors, or heparan sulfate proteoglycans and N-glycans. Extracellular S100A4 and S100B also interact with epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor, respectively, thereby enhancing the activity of the corresponding receptors. Thus, extracellular S100 proteins exert regulatory activities on monocytes/macrophages/microglia, neutrophils, lymphocytes, mast cells, articular chondrocytes, endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, neurons, astrocytes, Schwann cells, epithelial cells, myoblasts and cardiomyocytes, thereby participating in innate and adaptive immune responses, cell migration and chemotaxis, tissue development and repair, and leukocyte and tumor cell invasion. PMID:22834835

  12. Alternative S2 Hinge Regions of the Myosin Rod Affect Myofibrillar Structure and Myosin Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark S.; Dambacher, Corey M.; Knowles, Aileen F.; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Swank, Douglas M.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Maughan, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The subfragment 2/light meromyosin “hinge” region has been proposed to significantly contribute to muscle contraction force and/or speed. Transgenic replacement of the endogenous fast muscle isovariant hinge A (exon 15a) in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle with the slow muscle hinge B (exon 15b) allows examination of the structural and functional changes when only this region of the myosin molecule is different. Hinge B was previously shown to increase myosin rod length, increase A-band and sarcomere length, and decrease flight performance compared to hinge A. We applied additional measures to these transgenic lines to further evaluate the consequences of modifying this hinge region. Structurally, the longer A-band and sarcomere lengths found in the hinge B myofibrils appear to be due to the longitudinal addition of myosin heads. Functionally, hinge B, although a significant distance from the myosin catalytic domain, alters myosin kinetics in a manner consistent with this region increasing myosin rod length. These structural and functional changes combine to decrease whole fly wing-beat frequency and flight performance. Our results indicate that this hinge region plays an important role in determining myosin kinetics and in regulating thick and thin filament lengths as well as sarcomere length. PMID:19450484

  13. Multifunctional Deployment Hinges Rigidified by Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Simburger, Edward J.; Matusmoto, James; Giants, Thomas W.; Garcia, Alexander; Perry, Alan; Rawal, Suraj; Marshall, Craig; Lin, John Kun Hung; Day, Jonathan Robert; Scarborough, Stephen Emerson

    2005-01-01

    Multifunctional hinges have been developed for deploying and electrically connecting panels comprising planar arrays of thin-film solar photovoltaic cells. In the original intended application of these hinges, the panels would be facets of a 32-sided (and approximately spherical) polyhedral microsatellite (see figure), denoted a PowerSphere, that would be delivered to orbit in a compact folded configuration, then deployed by expansion of gas in inflation bladders. Once deployment was complete, the hinges would be rigidified to provide structural connections that would hold the panels in their assigned relative positions without backlash. Such hinges could also be used on Earth for electrically connecting and structurally supporting solar panels that are similarly shipped in compact form and deployed at their destinations. As shown in section A-A in the figure, a hinge of this type is partly integrated with an inflation bladder and partly integrated with the frame of a solar panel. During assembly of the hinge, strip extensions from a flexible circuit harness on the bladder are connected to corresponding thin-film conductors on the solar panel by use of laser welding and wrap-around contacts. The main structural component of the hinge is a layer of glass fiber impregnated with an ultraviolet-curable resin. After deployment, exposure to ultraviolet light from the Sun cures the resin, thereby rigidifying the hinge.

  14. Learning Protein Folding Energy Functions

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Wei; Ozakin, Arkadas; Gray, Alexander; Borreguero, Jose; Pandit, Shashi; Jagielska, Anna; Wroblewska, Liliana; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    A critical open problem in ab initio protein folding is protein energy function design, which pertains to defining the energy of protein conformations in a way that makes folding most efficient and reliable. In this paper, we address this issue as a weight optimization problem and utilize a machine learning approach, learning-to-rank, to solve this problem. We investigate the ranking-via-classification approach, especially the RankingSVM method and compare it with the state-of-the-art approach to the problem using the MINUIT optimization package. To maintain the physicality of the results, we impose non-negativity constraints on the weights. For this we develop two efficient non-negative support vector machine (NNSVM) methods, derived from L2-norm SVM and L1-norm SVMs, respectively. We demonstrate an energy function which maintains the correct ordering with respect to structure dissimilarity to the native state more often, is more efficient and reliable for learning on large protein sets, and is qualitatively superior to the current state-of-the-art energy function. PMID:25311546

  15. Phospholipid liposomes functionalized by protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Savostyanov, G. V.; Grishina, O. A.

    2015-03-01

    Finding new ways to deliver neurotrophic drugs to the brain in newborns is one of the contemporary problems of medicine and pharmaceutical industry. Modern researches in this field indicate the promising prospects of supramolecular transport systems for targeted drug delivery to the brain which can overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, the solution of this problem is actual not only for medicine, but also for society as a whole because it determines the health of future generations. Phospholipid liposomes due to combination of lipo- and hydrophilic properties are considered as the main future objects in medicine for drug delivery through the BBB as well as increasing their bioavailability and toxicity. Liposomes functionalized by various proteins were used as transport systems for ease of liposomes use. Designing of modification oligosaccharide of liposomes surface is promising in the last decade because it enables the delivery of liposomes to specific receptor of human cells by selecting ligand and it is widely used in pharmacology for the treatment of several diseases. The purpose of this work is creation of a coarse-grained model of bilayer of phospholipid liposomes, functionalized by specific to the structural elements of the BBB proteins, as well as prediction of the most favorable orientation and position of the molecules in the generated complex by methods of molecular docking for the formation of the structure. Investigation of activity of the ligand molecule to protein receptor of human cells by the methods of molecular dynamics was carried out.

  16. 14 CFR 23.393 - Loads parallel to hinge line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Loads parallel to hinge line. 23.393... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.393 Loads parallel to hinge line. (a) Control surfaces and supporting hinge brackets must be designed to withstand inertial loads acting parallel to the hinge line....

  17. 14 CFR 23.393 - Loads parallel to hinge line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Loads parallel to hinge line. 23.393... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.393 Loads parallel to hinge line. (a) Control surfaces and supporting hinge brackets must be designed to withstand inertial loads acting parallel to the hinge line....

  18. 14 CFR 23.393 - Loads parallel to hinge line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loads parallel to hinge line. 23.393... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.393 Loads parallel to hinge line. (a) Control surfaces and supporting hinge brackets must be designed to withstand inertial loads acting parallel to the hinge line....

  19. 14 CFR 23.393 - Loads parallel to hinge line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Loads parallel to hinge line. 23.393... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.393 Loads parallel to hinge line. (a) Control surfaces and supporting hinge brackets must be designed to withstand inertial loads acting parallel to the hinge line....

  20. 14 CFR 23.393 - Loads parallel to hinge line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Loads parallel to hinge line. 23.393... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.393 Loads parallel to hinge line. (a) Control surfaces and supporting hinge brackets must be designed to withstand inertial loads acting parallel to the hinge line....

  1. Protein function annotation using protein domain family resources.

    PubMed

    Das, Sayoni; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-01-15

    As a result of the genome sequencing and structural genomics initiatives, we have a wealth of protein sequence and structural data. However, only about 1% of these proteins have experimental functional annotations. As a result, computational approaches that can predict protein functions are essential in bridging this widening annotation gap. This article reviews the current approaches of protein function prediction using structure and sequence based classification of protein domain family resources with a special focus on functional families in the CATH-Gene3D resource. PMID:26434392

  2. Graphite Composite Booms with Integral Hinges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Wes; Carlos, Rene; Rossoni, Peter; Sturm, James

    2006-01-01

    A document discusses lightweight instrument booms under development for use aboard spacecraft. A boom of this type comprises a thin-walled graphite fiber/ matrix composite tube with an integral hinge that can be bent for stowage and later allowed to spring back to straighten the boom for deployment in outer space. The boom design takes advantage of both the stiffness of the composite in tubular geometry and the flexibility of thin sections of the composite. The hinge is formed by machining windows in the tube at diametrically opposite locations so that there remain two opposing cylindrical strips resembling measuring tapes. Essential to the design is a proprietary composite layup that renders the hinge tough yet flexible enough to be bendable as much as 90 in either of two opposite directions. When the boom is released for deployment, the torque exerted by the bent hinge suffices to overcome parasitic resistance from harnesses and other equipment, so that the two sections of the hinge snap to a straight, rigid condition in the same manner as that of measuring tapes. Issues addressed in development thus far include selection of materials, out-of-plane bending, edge cracking, and separation of plies.

  3. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    SciTech Connect

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-15

    The papillomavirus E4 open reading frame (ORF) is contained within the E2 ORF, with the primary E4 gene-product (E1{sup ∧}E4) being translated from a spliced mRNA that includes the E1 initiation codon and adjacent sequences. E4 is located centrally within the E2 gene, in a region that encodes the E2 protein′s flexible hinge domain. Although a number of minor E4 transcripts have been reported, it is the product of the abundant E1{sup ∧}E4 mRNA that has been most extensively analysed. During the papillomavirus life cycle, the E1{sup ∧}E4 gene products generally become detectable at the onset of vegetative viral genome amplification as the late stages of infection begin. E4 contributes to genome amplification success and virus synthesis, with its high level of expression suggesting additional roles in virus release and/or transmission. In general, E4 is easily visualised in biopsy material by immunostaining, and can be detected in lesions caused by diverse papillomavirus types, including those of dogs, rabbits and cattle as well as humans. The E4 protein can serve as a biomarker of active virus infection, and in the case of high-risk human types also disease severity. In some cutaneous lesions, E4 can be expressed at higher levels than the virion coat proteins, and can account for as much as 30% of total lesional protein content. The E4 proteins of the Beta, Gamma and Mu HPV types assemble into distinctive cytoplasmic, and sometimes nuclear, inclusion granules. In general, the E4 proteins are expressed before L2 and L1, with their structure and function being modified, first by kinases as the infected cell progresses through the S and G2 cell cycle phases, but also by proteases as the cell exits the cell cycle and undergoes true terminal differentiation. The kinases that regulate E4 also affect other viral proteins simultaneously, and include protein kinase A, Cyclin-dependent kinase, members of the MAP Kinase family and protein kinase C. For HPV16 E1{sup

  4. Magnetic Actuation of Self-Assembled DNA Hinges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauback, S.; Mattioli, K.; Armstrong, M.; Miller, C.; Pease, C.; Castro, C.; Sooryakumar, R.

    DNA nanotechnology offers a broad range of applications spanning from the creation of nanoscale devices, motors and nanoparticle templates to the development of precise drug delivery systems. Central to advancing this technology is the ability to actuate or reconfigure structures in real time, which is currently achieved primarily by DNA strand displacement yielding slow actuation times (about 1-10min). Here we exploit superparamagnetic beads to magnetically actuate DNA structures which also provides a system to measure forces associated with molecular interactions. DNA nanodevices are folded using DNA origami, whereby a long single-stranded DNA is folded into a precise compact geometry using hundreds of short oligonucleotides. Our DNA nanodevice is a nanohinge from which rod shaped DNA nanostructures are polymerized into micron-scale filaments forming handles for actuation. By functionalizing one arm of the hinge and the filament ends, the hinge can be attached to a surface while still allowing an arm to rotate and the filaments can be labeled with magnetic beads enabling the hinge to be actuated almost instantaneously by external magnetic fields. These results lay the groundwork to establish real-time manipulation and direct force application of DNA constructs.

  5. Claudin Proteins And Neuronal Function.

    PubMed

    Devaux, Jérôme; Fykkolodziej, Bozena; Gow, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The identification and characterization of the claudin family of tight junction (TJ) proteins in the late 1990s ushered in a new era for research into the molecular and cellular biology of intercellular junctions. Since that time, TJs have been studied in the contexts of many diseases including deafness, male infertility, cancer, bacterial invasion and liver and kidney disorders. In this review, we consider the role of claudins in the nervous system focusing on the mechanisms by which TJs in glial cells are involved in neuronal function. Electrophysiological evidence suggests that claudins may operate in the central nervous system (CNS) in a manner similar to polarized epithelia. We also evaluate hypotheses that TJs are the gatekeepers of an immune-privileged myelin compartment and that TJs emerged during evolution to form major adhesive forces within the myelin sheath. Finally, we consider the implications of CNS myelin TJs in the contexts of behavioral disorders (schizophrenia) and demyelinating/hypomyelinating diseases (multiple sclerosis and the leukodystrophies), and explore evidence of a possible mechanism governing affective disorder symptoms in patients with white matter abnormalities. PMID:25013353

  6. A new protein structure representation for efficient protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Maghawry, Huda A; Mostafa, Mostafa G M; Gharib, Tarek F

    2014-12-01

    One of the challenging problems in bioinformatics is the prediction of protein function. Protein function is the main key that can be used to classify different proteins. Protein function can be inferred experimentally with very small throughput or computationally with very high throughput. Computational methods are sequence based or structure based. Structure-based methods produce more accurate protein function prediction. In this article, we propose a new protein structure representation for efficient protein function prediction. The representation is based on three-dimensional patterns of protein residues. In the analysis, we used protein function based on enzyme activity through six mechanistically diverse enzyme superfamilies: amidohydrolase, crotonase, haloacid dehalogenase, isoprenoid synthase type I, and vicinal oxygen chelate. We applied three different classification methods, naïve Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, and random forest, to predict the enzyme superfamily of a given protein. The prediction accuracy using the proposed representation outperforms a recently introduced representation method that is based only on the distance patterns. The results show that the proposed representation achieved prediction accuracy up to 98%, with improvement of about 10% on average. PMID:25343279

  7. Hinged plakin domains provide specialized degrees of articulation in envoplakin, periplakin and desmoplakin.

    PubMed

    Al-Jassar, Caezar; Bernadό, Pau; Chidgey, Martyn; Overduin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Envoplakin, periplakin and desmoplakin are cytoskeletal proteins that provide structural integrity within the skin and heart by resisting shear forces. Here we reveal the nature of unique hinges within their plakin domains that provides divergent degrees of flexibility between rigid long and short arms composed of spectrin repeats. The range of mobility of the two arms about the hinge is revealed by applying the ensemble optimization method to small-angle X-ray scattering data. Envoplakin and periplakin adopt 'L' shaped conformations exhibiting a 'helicopter propeller'-like mobility about the hinge. By contrast desmoplakin exhibits essentially unrestricted mobility by 'jack-knifing' about the hinge. Thus the diversity of molecular jointing that can occur about plakin hinges includes 'L' shaped bends, 'U' turns and fully extended 'I' orientations between rigid blocks of spectrin repeats. This establishes specialised hinges in plakin domains as a key source of flexibility that may allow sweeping of cellular spaces during assembly of cellular structures and could impart adaptability, so preventing irreversible damage to desmosomes and the cell cytoskeleton upon exposure to mechanical stress. PMID:23922795

  8. Comparison of hinged and contoured rods for occipitocervical arthrodesis in adults: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Abode-Iyamah, Kingsley O; Dlouhy, Brian J; Lopez, Alejandro J; Menezes, Arnold H; Hitchon, Patrick W; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A rigid construct that employs an occipital plate and upper cervical screws and rods is the current standard treatment for craniovertebral junction (CVJ) instability. A rod is contoured to accommodate the occipitocervical angle. Fatigue failure has been associated these acute bends. Hinged rod systems have been developed to obviate intraoperative rod contouring. Object: The aim of this study is to determine the safety and efficacy of the hinged rod system in occipitocervical fusion. Materials and Methods: This study retrospectively evaluated 39 patients who underwent occipitocervical arthrodesis. Twenty patients were treated with hinged rods versus 19 with contoured rods. Clinical and radiographic data were compared and analyzed. Results: Preoperative and postoperative Nurick and Frankel scores were similar between both groups. The use of allograft, autograft or bone morphogenetic protein was similar in both groups. The average number of levels fused was 4.1 (±2.4) and 3.4 (±2) for hinged and contoured rods, respectively. The operative time, estimated blood loss, and length of stay were similar between both groups. The occiput to C2 angle was similarly maintained in both groups and all patients demonstrated no movement across the CVJ on flexion-extension X-rays during their last follow-up. The average follow-up for the hinged and contoured rod groups was 12.2 months and 15.9 months, respectively. Conclusion: Hinged rods provide a safe and effective alternative to contoured rods during occipitocervical arthrodesis.

  9. Triangle-hinge models for unoriented membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sugishita, Sotaro; Umeda, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    Triangle-hinge models [M. Fukuma, S. Sugishita, and N. Umeda, J. High Energy Phys. 1507, 088 (2015)] are introduced to describe worldvolume dynamics of membranes. The Feynman diagrams consist of triangles glued together along hinges and can be restricted to tetrahedral decompositions in a large-N limit. In this paper, after clarifying that all the tetrahedra resulting in the original models are orientable, we define a version of triangle-hinge models that can describe the dynamics of unoriented membranes. By regarding each triangle as representing a propagation of an open membrane of disk topology, we introduce a local worldvolume parity transformation which inverts the orientation of a triangle, and define unoriented triangle-hinge models by gauging the transformation. Unlike two-dimensional cases, this local transformation generally relates a manifold to a nonmanifold, but still is a well-defined manipulation among tetrahedral decompositions. We further show that matter fields can be introduced in the same way as in the original oriented models. In particular, the models will describe unoriented membranes in a target spacetime by taking matter fields to be the target space coordinates.

  10. Functionalizing Microporous Membranes for Protein Purification and Protein Digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jinlan; Bruening, Merlin L.

    2015-07-01

    This review examines advances in the functionalization of microporous membranes for protein purification and the development of protease-containing membranes for controlled protein digestion prior to mass spectrometry analysis. Recent studies confirm that membranes are superior to bead-based columns for rapid protein capture, presumably because convective mass transport in membrane pores rapidly brings proteins to binding sites. Modification of porous membranes with functional polymeric films or TiO2 nanoparticles yields materials that selectively capture species ranging from phosphopeptides to His-tagged proteins, and protein-binding capacities often exceed those of commercial beads. Thin membranes also provide a convenient framework for creating enzyme-containing reactors that afford control over residence times. With millisecond residence times, reactors with immobilized proteases limit protein digestion to increase sequence coverage in mass spectrometry analysis and facilitate elucidation of protein structures. This review emphasizes the advantages of membrane-based techniques and concludes with some challenges for their practical application.

  11. Analysis of serpin inhibitory function by mutagenesis of ovalbumin and generation of chimeric ovalbumin/PAI-2 fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, B J; Worrall, D M

    1997-04-01

    Ovalbumin is a non-inhibitory serpin which lacks the ability to undergo the S --> R transition or conformational change. Amino acid residues in the hinge region (P11 to P14) of ovalbumin and other non-inhibitory serpins differ from the concensus sequence of this region of inhibitory serpins, and have been proposed to be responsible for lack of inhibitory properties, particularly the P14 charged residue. Site directed mutagenesis using PCR overlap extension was performed on these residues in ovalbumin to create a mutant with three amino acid changes, R340T, V342A and V343A. However analysis of the mutant recombinant ovalbumin with the consensus residues failed to show inhibitory activity or decreased stability, indicating that the hinge region alone is not responsible for lack of inhibition. A series of three fusion proteins were then constructed by replacing varying C-terminal regions of ovalbumin with the corresponding region of the inhibitory ov-serpin PAI-2 in order to further analyse serpin inhibitory function. Fusion proteins F1 and F2 contained approximately 16% and 35% PAI-2, respectively. This resulted in the replacing of structural features such as the reactive site loop, hinge region and beta sheet strands 5A and 6A. However both fusion proteins showed no inhibitory activity with the PAI-2 target protease urokinase (uPA) and no decrease in stability as analysed by transverse urea gradient (TUG) gels. The third chimeric fusion protein constructed (F3) contained 64% PAI-2 and did demonstrate inhibition of uPA, SDS-PAGE stable complex formation with uPA and increased instability on TUG gels. Structural differences between the inactive F2 and active F3 include the replacement of helix F and beta sheet strand 3A of ovalbumin with those of PAI-2, suggesting that these features may have a key role in serpin beta-sheet opening and inhibitory function. PMID:9126838

  12. Origins of Protein Functions in Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seelig, Burchard; Pohorille, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis and in vitro evolution of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions yet, important clues have been uncovered. In one example (Keefe and Szostak, 2001), novel ATP binding proteins were identified that appear to be unrelated in both sequence and structure to any known ATP binding proteins. One of these proteins was subsequently redesigned computationally to bind GTP through introducing several mutations that introduce targeted structural changes to the protein, improve its binding to guanine and prevent water from accessing the active center. This study facilitates further investigations of individual evolutionary steps that lead to a change of function in primordial proteins. In a second study (Seelig and Szostak, 2007), novel enzymes were generated that can join two pieces of RNA in a reaction for which no natural enzymes are known

  13. Year 2 Report: Protein Function Prediction Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C E

    2012-04-27

    Upon completion of our second year of development in a 3-year development cycle, we have completed a prototype protein structure-function annotation and function prediction system: Protein Function Prediction (PFP) platform (v.0.5). We have met our milestones for Years 1 and 2 and are positioned to continue development in completion of our original statement of work, or a reasonable modification thereof, in service to DTRA Programs involved in diagnostics and medical countermeasures research and development. The PFP platform is a multi-scale computational modeling system for protein structure-function annotation and function prediction. As of this writing, PFP is the only existing fully automated, high-throughput, multi-scale modeling, whole-proteome annotation platform, and represents a significant advance in the field of genome annotation (Fig. 1). PFP modules perform protein functional annotations at the sequence, systems biology, protein structure, and atomistic levels of biological complexity (Fig. 2). Because these approaches provide orthogonal means of characterizing proteins and suggesting protein function, PFP processing maximizes the protein functional information that can currently be gained by computational means. Comprehensive annotation of pathogen genomes is essential for bio-defense applications in pathogen characterization, threat assessment, and medical countermeasure design and development in that it can short-cut the time and effort required to select and characterize protein biomarkers.

  14. The Alba protein family: Structure and function.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Manish; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Nag, Shiladitya; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2016-05-01

    Alba family proteins are small, basic, dimeric nucleic acid-binding proteins, which are widely distributed in archaea and a number of eukaryotes. This family of proteins bears the distinct features of regulation through acetylation/deacetylation, hence named as acetylation lowers binding affinity (Alba). Alba family proteins bind DNA cooperatively with no apparent sequence specificity. Besides DNA, Alba proteins also interact with diverse RNA species and associate with ribonucleo-protein complexes. Initially, Alba proteins were recognized as chromosomal proteins and supposed to be involved in the maintenance of chromatin architecture and transcription repression. However, recent studies have shown increasing evidence of functional plasticity among Alba family of proteins that widely range from genome packaging and organization, transcriptional and translational regulation, RNA metabolism, and development and differentiation processes. In recent years, Alba family proteins have attracted growing interest due to their widespread occurrence in large number of organisms. Presence in multiple copies, functional crosstalk, differential binding affinity, and posttranslational modifications are some of the key factors that might regulate the biological functions of Alba family proteins. In this review article, we present an overview of the Alba family proteins, their salient features and emphasize their functional role in different organisms reported so far. PMID:26900088

  15. Characterization and Functionality of Corn Germ Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the functional properties of protein extracted from wet-milled corn germ and identify potential applications of the recovered protein. Corn germ comprises 12% of the total weight of normal dent corn and about 29% of the corn protein (moisture-free and oil- free ...

  16. Protein function prediction based on data fusion and functional interrelationship.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jun; Wekesa, Jael-Sanyanda; Shi, Guan-Li; Luan, Yu-Shi

    2016-04-01

    One of the challenging tasks of bioinformatics is to predict more accurate and confident protein functions from genomics and proteomics datasets. Computational approaches use a variety of high throughput experimental data, such as protein-protein interaction (PPI), protein sequences and phylogenetic profiles, to predict protein functions. This paper presents a method that uses transductive multi-label learning algorithm by integrating multiple data sources for classification. Multiple proteomics datasets are integrated to make inferences about functions of unknown proteins and use a directed bi-relational graph to assign labels to unannotated proteins. Our method, bi-relational graph based transductive multi-label function annotation (Bi-TMF) uses functional correlation and topological PPI network properties on both the training and testing datasets to predict protein functions through data fusion of the individual kernel result. The main purpose of our proposed method is to enhance the performance of classifier integration for protein function prediction algorithms. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of Bi-TMF on multi-sources datasets in yeast, human and mouse benchmarks. Bi-TMF outperforms other recently proposed methods. PMID:26869536

  17. Phosphoinositide Control of Membrane Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Logothetis, Diomedes E.; Petrou, Vasileios I.; Zhang, Miao; Mahajan, Rahul; Meng, Xuan-Yu; Adney, Scott K.; Cui, Meng; Baki, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Anionic phospholipids are critical constituents of the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, ensuring appropriate membrane topology of transmembrane proteins. Additionally, in eukaryotes, the negatively charged phosphoinositides serve as key signals not only through their hydrolysis products but also through direct control of transmembrane protein function. Direct phosphoinositide control of the activity of ion channels and transporters has been the most convincing case of the critical importance of phospholipid-protein interactions in the functional control of membrane proteins. Furthermore, second messengers, such as [Ca2+]i, or posttranslational modifications, such as phosphorylation, can directly or allosterically fine-tune phospholipid-protein interactions and modulate activity. Recent advances in structure determination of membrane proteins have allowed investigators to obtain complexes of ion channels with phosphoinositides and to use computational and experimental approaches to probe the dynamic mechanisms by which lipid-protein interactions control active and inactive protein states. PMID:25293526

  18. Thin film solar cell inflatable ultraviolet rigidizable deployment hinge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simburger, Edward J. (Inventor); Matsumoto, James H. (Inventor); Giants, Thomas W. (Inventor); Garcia, III, Alec (Inventor); Perry, Alan R. (Inventor); Rawal, Suraj (Inventor); Marshall, Craig H. (Inventor); Lin, John K. H. (Inventor); Day, Jonathan Robert (Inventor); Kerslake, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A flexible inflatable hinge includes curable resin for rigidly positioning panels of solar cells about the hinge in which wrap around contacts and flex circuits are disposed for routing power from the solar cells to the power bus further used for grounding the hinge. An indium tin oxide and magnesium fluoride coating is used to prevent static discharge while being transparent to ultraviolet light that cures the embedded resin after deployment for rigidizing the inflatable hinge.

  19. Protein microarrays as tools for functional proteomics.

    PubMed

    LaBaer, Joshua; Ramachandran, Niroshan

    2005-02-01

    Protein microarrays present an innovative and versatile approach to study protein abundance and function at an unprecedented scale. Given the chemical and structural complexity of the proteome, the development of protein microarrays has been challenging. Despite these challenges there has been a marked increase in the use of protein microarrays to map interactions of proteins with various other molecules, and to identify potential disease biomarkers, especially in the area of cancer biology. In this review, we discuss some of the promising advances made in the development and use of protein microarrays. PMID:15701447

  20. Molecular dynamics and protein function

    PubMed Central

    Karplus, M.; Kuriyan, J.

    2005-01-01

    A fundamental appreciation for how biological macromolecules work requires knowledge of structure and dynamics. Molecular dynamics simulations provide powerful tools for the exploration of the conformational energy landscape accessible to these molecules, and the rapid increase in computational power coupled with improvements in methodology makes this an exciting time for the application of simulation to structural biology. In this Perspective we survey two areas, protein folding and enzymatic catalysis, in which simulations have contributed to a general understanding of mechanism. We also describe results for the F1 ATPase molecular motor and the Src family of signaling proteins as examples of applications of simulations to specific biological systems. PMID:15870208

  1. Ku proteins function as corepressors to regulate farnesoid X receptor-mediated gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, Masae; Kunimoto, Masaaki; Nishizuka, Makoto; Osada, Shigehiro; Imagawa, Masayoshi

    2009-12-18

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR; NR1H4) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates the expression of genes involved in enterohepatic circulation and the metabolism of bile acids. Based on functional analyses, nuclear receptors are divided into regions A-F. To explore the cofactors interacting with FXR, we performed a pull-down assay using GST-fused to the N-terminal A/B region and the C region, which are required for the ligand-independent transactivation and DNA-binding, respectively, of FXR, and nuclear extracts from HeLa cells. We identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), Ku80, and Ku70 as FXR associated factors. These proteins are known to have an important role in DNA repair, recombination, and transcription. DNA-PKcs mainly interacted with the A/B region of FXR, whereas the Ku proteins interacted with the C region and with the D region (hinge region). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the Ku proteins associated with FXR on the bile salt export pump (BSEP) promoter. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of the Ku proteins decreased the promoter activity and expression of BSEP gene mediated by FXR. These results suggest that the Ku proteins function as corepressors for FXR.

  2. Dynamic Models of Robots with Elastic Hinges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakhmalev, O. N.

    2016-04-01

    Two dynamic models of robots with elastic hinges are considered. Dynamic models are the implementation of the method based on the Lagrange equation using the transformation matrices of elastic coordinates. Dynamic models make it possible to determine the elastic deviations from programmed motion trajectories caused by elastic deformations in hinges, which are taken into account in directions of change of the corresponding generalized coordinates. One model is the exact implementation of the Lagrange method and makes it possible to determine the total elastic deviation of the robot from the programmed motion trajectory. Another dynamic model is approximated and makes it possible to determine small elastic quasi-static deviations and elastic vibrations. The results of modeling the dynamics by two models are compared to the example of a two-link manipulator system. The considered models can be used when performing investigations of the mathematical accuracy of the robots.

  3. Sucrose Synthase: Expanding Protein Function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose synthase (SUS: EC 2.4.1.13), a key enzyme in plant sucrose catabolism, is uniquely able to mobilize sucrose into multiple pathways involved in metabolic, structural, and storage functions. Our research indicates that the biological function of SUS may extend beyond its catalytic activity. Th...

  4. Graph pyramids for protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Uncovering the hidden organizational characteristics and regularities among biological sequences is the key issue for detailed understanding of an underlying biological phenomenon. Thus pattern recognition from nucleic acid sequences is an important affair for protein function prediction. As proteins from the same family exhibit similar characteristics, homology based approaches predict protein functions via protein classification. But conventional classification approaches mostly rely on the global features by considering only strong protein similarity matches. This leads to significant loss of prediction accuracy. Methods Here we construct the Protein-Protein Similarity (PPS) network, which captures the subtle properties of protein families. The proposed method considers the local as well as the global features, by examining the interactions among 'weakly interacting proteins' in the PPS network and by using hierarchical graph analysis via the graph pyramid. Different underlying properties of the protein families are uncovered by operating the proposed graph based features at various pyramid levels. Results Experimental results on benchmark data sets show that the proposed hierarchical voting algorithm using graph pyramid helps to improve computational efficiency as well the protein classification accuracy. Quantitatively, among 14,086 test sequences, on an average the proposed method misclassified only 21.1 sequences whereas baseline BLAST score based global feature matching method misclassified 362.9 sequences. With each correctly classified test sequence, the fast incremental learning ability of the proposed method further enhances the training model. Thus it has achieved more than 96% protein classification accuracy using only 20% per class training data. PMID:26044522

  5. Protein function from its emergence to diversity in contemporary proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncearenco, Alexander; Berezovsky, Igor N.

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this work is to learn from nature the rules that govern evolution and the design of protein function. The fundamental laws of physics lie in the foundation of the protein structure and all stages of the protein evolution, determining optimal sizes and shapes at different levels of structural hierarchy. We looked back into the very onset of the protein evolution with a goal to find elementary functions (EFs) that came from the prebiotic world and served as building blocks of the first enzymes. We defined the basic structural and functional units of biochemical reactions—elementary functional loops. The diversity of contemporary enzymes can be described via combinations of a limited number of elementary chemical reactions, many of which are performed by the descendants of primitive prebiotic peptides/proteins. By analyzing protein sequences we were able to identify EFs shared by seemingly unrelated protein superfamilies and folds and to unravel evolutionary relations between them. Binding and metabolic processing of the metal- and nucleotide-containing cofactors and ligands are among the most abundant ancient EFs that became indispensable in many natural enzymes. Highly designable folds provide structural scaffolds for many different biochemical reactions. We show that contemporary proteins are built from a limited number of EFs, making their analysis instrumental for establishing the rules for protein design. Evolutionary studies help us to accumulate the library of essential EFs and to establish intricate relations between different folds and functional superfamilies. Generalized sequence-structure descriptors of the EF will become useful in future design and engineering of desired enzymatic functions.

  6. Ribosomal proteins: functions beyond the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Liao, Wen-Juan; Liao, Jun-Ming; Liao, Peng; Lu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Although ribosomal proteins are known for playing an essential role in ribosome assembly and protein translation, their ribosome-independent functions have also been greatly appreciated. Over the past decade, more than a dozen of ribosomal proteins have been found to activate the tumor suppressor p53 pathway in response to ribosomal stress. In addition, these ribosomal proteins are involved in various physiological and pathological processes. This review is composed to overview the current understanding of how ribosomal stress provokes the accumulation of ribosome-free ribosomal proteins, as well as the ribosome-independent functions of ribosomal proteins in tumorigenesis, immune signaling, and development. We also propose the potential of applying these pieces of knowledge to the development of ribosomal stress-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:25735597

  7. Assigning protein functions by comparative genome analysis protein phylogenetic profiles

    DOEpatents

    Pellegrini, Matteo; Marcotte, Edward M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Eisenberg, David; Grothe, Robert; Yeates, Todd O.

    2003-05-13

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  8. Turning yeast sequence into protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Heijne, G. von

    1996-04-01

    The complete genome sequencing of the yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae leads us into a new era of potential use for such data base information. Protein engineering studies suggest that genetic selection of overproducing strains may aid the assignment of protein function. Data base management and sequencing software have been developed to scan entire genomes.

  9. Flavin Redox Switching of Protein Functions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weidong; Moxley, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Flavin cofactors impart remarkable catalytic diversity to enzymes, enabling them to participate in a broad array of biological processes. The properties of flavins also provide proteins with a versatile redox sensor that can be utilized for converting physiological signals such as cellular metabolism, light, and redox status into a unique functional output. The control of protein functions by the flavin redox state is important for transcriptional regulation, cell signaling pathways, and environmental adaptation. A significant number of proteins that have flavin redox switches are found in the Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain family and include flavoproteins that act as photosensors and respond to changes in cellular redox conditions. Biochemical and structural studies of PAS domain flavoproteins have revealed key insights into how flavin redox changes are propagated to the surface of the protein and translated into a new functional output such as the binding of a target protein in a signaling pathway. Mechanistic details of proteins unrelated to the PAS domain are also emerging and provide novel examples of how the flavin redox state governs protein–membrane interactions in response to appropriate stimuli. Analysis of different flavin switch proteins reveals shared mechanistic themes for the regulation of protein structure and function by flavins. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1079–1091. PMID:21028987

  10. Elbow- and hinge-bending motions of IgG: Dielectric response and dynamic feature.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Yagihara, Shin

    2016-09-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is a Y-shaped globular protein consisting of two Fab segments connecting to an Fc segment with a flexible hinge region, in which the Fab segments show secondary flexibility at an "elbow" region. In the present work, the hinge-bending and elbow-bending motions of aqueous solutions of IgG by microwave dielectric measurements below the freezing point of bulk water was observed. The presence of unfreezable water around the macromolecules reduced the effects of steric hindrance normally generated by ice and enabled the intramolecular motions of IgG. At the same time, the overall IgG molecule rotation was restricted by ice. Papain digestion and reduction of the disulfide linkage at the hinge region was used to generate Fab and Fc fragments. In solutions of these fragments, the dielectric relaxation process of the hinge-bending motion was absent, although the elbow-bending motion remained. Three relaxation processes were observed for papain-digested IgG. The high, middle, and low frequency processes were attributed to unfrozen water, local peptide motions cooperating with bound water, and the elbow-bending motion, respectively. In the case of the intact IgG, an additional relaxation process due to the hinge-bending motion was observed at frequencies lower than that of the elbow-bending motion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 626-632, 2016. PMID:27018805

  11. Evolution of Ftz protein function in insects.

    PubMed

    Alonso, C R; Maxton-Kuechenmeister, J; Akam, M

    2001-09-18

    The Drosophila gene fushi tarazu (ftz) encodes a homeodomain-containing transcriptional regulator (Ftz) required at several stages during development. Drosophila melanogaster ftz (Dm-ftz) is first expressed in seven stripes defining alternate parasegments of the embryo--a "pair-rule" segmentation function [1, 2]. It is then expressed in specific neural precursor cells in the central nervous system and finally in the developing hindgut [3]. An Orthopteran ortholog of ftz (Sg-ftz, formally Dax) has been isolated from the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria [4]. The pattern of Sg-ftz expression in Schistocerca embryos suggests that some developmental roles of the ftz gene are likely to be conserved between these two species (e.g., CNS functions) while others may have diverged (e.g., segmentation functions). To test whether the function of the Ftz protein itself differs between these two species, here we compare the functions of Sg-Ftz and Dm-Ftz proteins by expressing both in Drosophila embryos. Sg-ftz mimics only poorly several segmentation roles of Dm-ftz (engrailed activation, wingless repression, and embryonic cuticle transformation). However, the two proteins are similarly active in the rescue of a CNS-specific ftz mutant. These findings argue that this ftz CNS function is mediated by conserved parts of the protein, while efficient pair-rule function requires sequences present specifically in the Drosophila protein. PMID:11566109

  12. Thermoelectric generator with hinged assembly for fins

    DOEpatents

    Purdy, David L.; Shapiro, Zalman M.; Hursen, Thomas F.; Maurer, Gerould W.

    1976-11-02

    A cylindrical casing has a central shielded capsule of radioisotope fuel. A plurality of thermonuclear modules are axially arranged with their hot junctions resiliently pressed toward the shield and with their cold junctions adjacent a transition member having fins radiating heat to the environment. For each module, the assembly of transition member and fins is hinged to the casing for swinging to permit access to and removal of such module. A ceramic plate having gold layers on opposite faces prevents diffusion bonding of the hot junction to the shield.

  13. Genetically modified proteins: functional improvement and chimeragenesis

    PubMed Central

    Balabanova, Larissa; Golotin, Vasily; Podvolotskaya, Anna; Rasskazov, Valery

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the emerging role of site-specific mutagenesis and chimeragenesis for the functional improvement of proteins in areas where traditional protein engineering methods have been extensively used and practically exhausted. The novel path for the creation of the novel proteins has been created on the farther development of the new structure and sequence optimization algorithms for generating and designing the accurate structure models in result of x-ray crystallography studies of a lot of proteins and their mutant forms. Artificial genetic modifications aim to expand nature's repertoire of biomolecules. One of the most exciting potential results of mutagenesis or chimeragenesis finding could be design of effective diagnostics, bio-therapeutics and biocatalysts. A sampling of recent examples is listed below for the in vivo and in vitro genetically improvement of various binding protein and enzyme functions, with references for more in-depth study provided for the reader's benefit. PMID:26211369

  14. Network-based prediction of protein function

    PubMed Central

    Sharan, Roded; Ulitsky, Igor; Shamir, Ron

    2007-01-01

    Functional annotation of proteins is a fundamental problem in the post-genomic era. The recent availability of protein interaction networks for many model species has spurred on the development of computational methods for interpreting such data in order to elucidate protein function. In this review, we describe the current computational approaches for the task, including direct methods, which propagate functional information through the network, and module-assisted methods, which infer functional modules within the network and use those for the annotation task. Although a broad variety of interesting approaches has been developed, further progress in the field will depend on systematic evaluation of the methods and their dissemination in the biological community. PMID:17353930

  15. Evolution-Based Functional Decomposition of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Rivoire, Olivier; Reynolds, Kimberly A; Ranganathan, Rama

    2016-06-01

    The essential biological properties of proteins-folding, biochemical activities, and the capacity to adapt-arise from the global pattern of interactions between amino acid residues. The statistical coupling analysis (SCA) is an approach to defining this pattern that involves the study of amino acid coevolution in an ensemble of sequences comprising a protein family. This approach indicates a functional architecture within proteins in which the basic units are coupled networks of amino acids termed sectors. This evolution-based decomposition has potential for new understandings of the structural basis for protein function. To facilitate its usage, we present here the principles and practice of the SCA and introduce new methods for sector analysis in a python-based software package (pySCA). We show that the pattern of amino acid interactions within sectors is linked to the divergence of functional lineages in a multiple sequence alignment-a model for how sector properties might be differentially tuned in members of a protein family. This work provides new tools for studying proteins and for generally testing the concept of sectors as the principal units of function and adaptive variation. PMID:27254668

  16. Quantitative assessment of protein function prediction programs.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, B N; Steffens, M B R; Raittz, R T; Santos-Weiss, I C R; Marchaukoski, J N

    2015-01-01

    Fast prediction of protein function is essential for high-throughput sequencing analysis. Bioinformatic resources provide cheaper and faster techniques for function prediction and have helped to accelerate the process of protein sequence characterization. In this study, we assessed protein function prediction programs that accept amino acid sequences as input. We analyzed the classification, equality, and similarity between programs, and, additionally, compared program performance. The following programs were selected for our assessment: Blast2GO, InterProScan, PANTHER, Pfam, and ScanProsite. This selection was based on the high number of citations (over 500), fully automatic analysis, and the possibility of returning a single best classification per sequence. We tested these programs using 12 gold standard datasets from four different sources. The gold standard classification of the databases was based on expert analysis, the Protein Data Bank, or the Structure-Function Linkage Database. We found that the miss rate among the programs is globally over 50%. Furthermore, we observed little overlap in the correct predictions from each program. Therefore, a combination of multiple types of sources and methods, including experimental data, protein-protein interaction, and data mining, may be the best way to generate more reliable predictions and decrease the miss rate. PMID:26782400

  17. Modulation of opioid receptor function by protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Alfaras-Melainis, Konstantinos; Gomes, Ivone; Rozenfeld, Raphael; Zachariou, Venetia; Devi, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Opioid receptors, MORP, DORP and KORP, belong to the family A of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR), and have been found to modulate a large number of physiological functions, including mood, stress, appetite, nociception and immune responses. Exogenously applied opioid alkaloids produce analgesia, hedonia and addiction. Addiction is linked to alterations in function and responsiveness of all three opioid receptors in the brain. Over the last few years, a large number of studies identified protein-protein interactions that play an essential role in opioid receptor function and responsiveness. Here, we summarize interactions shown to affect receptor biogenesis and trafficking, as well as those affecting signal transduction events following receptor activation. This article also examines protein interactions modulating the rate of receptor endocytosis and degradation, events that play a major role in opiate analgesia. Like several other GPCRs, opioid receptors may form homo or heterodimers. The last part of this review summarizes recent knowledge on proteins known to affect opioid receptor dimerization. PMID:19273296

  18. Calreticulin: one protein, one gene, many functions.

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, M; Corbett, E F; Mesaeli, N; Nakamura, K; Opas, M

    1999-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a critical role in the synthesis and chaperoning of membrane-associated and secreted proteins. The membrane is also an important site of Ca(2+) storage and release. Calreticulin is a unique ER luminal resident protein. The protein affects many cellular functions, both in the ER lumen and outside of the ER environment. In the ER lumen, calreticulin performs two major functions: chaperoning and regulation of Ca(2+) homoeostasis. Calreticulin is a highly versatile lectin-like chaperone, and it participates during the synthesis of a variety of molecules, including ion channels, surface receptors, integrins and transporters. The protein also affects intracellular Ca(2+) homoeostasis by modulation of ER Ca(2+) storage and transport. Studies on the cell biology of calreticulin revealed that the ER membrane is a very dynamic intracellular compartment affecting many aspects of cell physiology. PMID:10567207

  19. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  20. ATPase-dependent auto-phosphorylation of the open condensin hinge diminishes DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Akai, Yuko; Kanai, Ryuta; Nakazawa, Norihiko; Ebe, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Condensin, which contains two structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) subunits and three regulatory non-SMC subunits, is essential for many chromosomal functions, including mitotic chromosome condensation and segregation. The ATPase domain of the SMC subunit comprises two termini connected by a long helical domain that is interrupted by a central hinge. The role of the ATPase domain has remained elusive. Here we report that the condensin SMC subunit of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is phosphorylated in a manner that requires the presence of the intact SMC ATPase Walker motif. Principal phosphorylation sites reside in the conserved, glycine-rich stretch at the hinge interface surrounded by the highly basic DNA-binding patch. Phosphorylation reduces affinity for DNA. Consistently, phosphomimetic mutants produce severe mitotic phenotypes. Structural evidence suggests that prior opening (though slight) of the hinge is necessary for phosphorylation, which is implicated in condensin's dissociation from and its progression along DNA. PMID:25520186

  1. Investigating neuronal function with optically controllable proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin X.; Pan, Michael; Lin, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    In the nervous system, protein activities are highly regulated in space and time. This regulation allows for fine modulation of neuronal structure and function during development and adaptive responses. For example, neurite extension and synaptogenesis both involve localized and transient activation of cytoskeletal and signaling proteins, allowing changes in microarchitecture to occur rapidly and in a localized manner. To investigate the role of specific protein regulation events in these processes, methods to optically control the activity of specific proteins have been developed. In this review, we focus on how photosensory domains enable optical control over protein activity and have been used in neuroscience applications. These tools have demonstrated versatility in controlling various proteins and thereby cellular functions, and possess enormous potential for future applications in nervous systems. Just as optogenetic control of neuronal firing using opsins has changed how we investigate the function of cellular circuits in vivo, optical control may yet yield another revolution in how we study the circuitry of intracellular signaling in the brain. PMID:26257603

  2. Protein structure, spectral properties, and photobiological function of lumazine protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, John W.; Bradley, Elizabeth A.; O'Kane, Dennis J.

    1992-04-01

    Protein sequence analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance, and fluorescence dynamics have been applied in a determination of the interactions of the lumazine derivative with the amino acid residues in the proposed ligand binding site of lumazine protein. It is these interactions that `tune' the excited state properties of the bound lumazine so that it can perform its photobiological function as the emitter of bioluminescence in Photobacterium species. A three- way sequence alignment shows that lumazine protein is homologous with the yellow- fluorescent protein of Vibrio fischeri and the riboflavin synthase from Bacillus subtilis. This last enzyme is ubiquitous in procaryotes, and utilizes two of these same lumazines as substrates for the production of riboflavin. By analogy with riboflavin synthase, a short sequence in the lumazine protein has been suggested as the ligand binding site. In riboflavin synthase there is a second binding site, but this is absent in lumazine protein, thus negating any synthase activity for this protein. Hydrogen bonds to the residues in this binding domain and `freeze' the lumazine structure into the highly polar tautomer deduced from NMR evidence. This also accounts for the rigidity of binding shown by the 23 ns (2 degree(s)C) rotational correlation time of the bound ligand as well as the strong blue shift of the fluorescence maximum, from 490 nm free to 475 nm when bound.

  3. roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail Chopawamsic Recreational ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Main Arts and Crafts Lodge, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  4. Evolution-Based Functional Decomposition of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rivoire, Olivier; Reynolds, Kimberly A.; Ranganathan, Rama

    2016-01-01

    The essential biological properties of proteins—folding, biochemical activities, and the capacity to adapt—arise from the global pattern of interactions between amino acid residues. The statistical coupling analysis (SCA) is an approach to defining this pattern that involves the study of amino acid coevolution in an ensemble of sequences comprising a protein family. This approach indicates a functional architecture within proteins in which the basic units are coupled networks of amino acids termed sectors. This evolution-based decomposition has potential for new understandings of the structural basis for protein function. To facilitate its usage, we present here the principles and practice of the SCA and introduce new methods for sector analysis in a python-based software package (pySCA). We show that the pattern of amino acid interactions within sectors is linked to the divergence of functional lineages in a multiple sequence alignment—a model for how sector properties might be differentially tuned in members of a protein family. This work provides new tools for studying proteins and for generally testing the concept of sectors as the principal units of function and adaptive variation. PMID:27254668

  5. Mechanically Biased, Hinged Pairs of Piezoelectric Benders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, Frank E.

    2005-01-01

    The upper part of the figure depicts an actuator that comprises two mechanically biased piezoelectric benders hinged together at their ends and equipped with tabs at their mid-length points for attachment to the relatively moving objects that are to be actuated. In the example of the figure, the attachment tabs are labeled to indicate that the actuator is used to drive a pump piston relative to a base plate. Actuators of this type could be used to drive low-power, small-volume pumps in consumer, medical, and aerospace applications, and to generate and measure linear displacements in such robotic applications as teleoperation and tactile feedback. Each bender is a bimorph a unitary plate that comprises an upper and a lower piezoelectric layer plus electrode layers. Benders may also be made of several layers arranged to produce the same effect at the lower operating voltages. As stated above, each bender is mechanically biased; it is fabricated to have a small permanent curvature (the bias curvature) in the absence of applied voltage. As on other bimorphs, the electrical connections on each bender are arranged so that an applied voltage of suitable polarity causes the upper layer to expand and the lower layer to contract. In this case, the net effect of applying the voltage is that the plate becomes more concave as viewed from below. Conversely, an applied voltage of the opposite polarity causes the plate to become less concave as viewed from below. The benders in a hinged pair are oriented with their bias curvatures concave inward, so that there is a bias distance between the attachment tabs. The two benders are connected electrically in parallel, with their connection polarities chosen so that an applied voltage of one polarity causes both benders to become more convex inward (more bent), while an applied voltage of the opposite polarity causes both benders to become less convex inward (less bent). An increase or decrease in bend is accompanied by an increase or

  6. Parasitizing of trematodes provokes warts on the hinge plate of the bivalve mollusk Macoma balthica Linnaeus, 1758 (Veneroida, Tellinidae).

    PubMed

    Gantsevich, M M; Strelkov, P P; Basova, L A; Malakhov, V V

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis on non-random correlation between abnormalities in the structure of hinge plate and infection of mollusks Macoma balthica with trematodes of the family Gymnophallidae has been tested on the basis of material from the Barents Sea. Significant correlation between the presence of warts and infection was established upon intraand interpopulation comparison. The hypothesis states that parasitizing of trematodes in the extrapallial cavity of mollusks influences the mantle functioning and provokes abnormalities in the hinge plate structure. PMID:27021361

  7. Proteins with Novel Structure, Function and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a small enzyme that ligates two RNA fragments with the rate of 10(exp 6) above background was evolved in vitro (Seelig and Szostak, Nature 448:828-831, 2007). This enzyme does not resemble any contemporary protein (Chao et al., Nature Chem. Biol. 9:81-83, 2013). It consists of a dynamic, catalytic loop, a small, rigid core containing two zinc ions coordinated by neighboring amino acids, and two highly flexible tails that might be unimportant for protein function. In contrast to other proteins, this enzyme does not contain ordered secondary structure elements, such as alpha-helix or beta-sheet. The loop is kept together by just two interactions of a charged residue and a histidine with a zinc ion, which they coordinate on the opposite side of the loop. Such structure appears to be very fragile. Surprisingly, computer simulations indicate otherwise. As the coordinating, charged residue is mutated to alanine, another, nearby charged residue takes its place, thus keeping the structure nearly intact. If this residue is also substituted by alanine a salt bridge involving two other, charged residues on the opposite sides of the loop keeps the loop in place. These adjustments are facilitated by high flexibility of the protein. Computational predictions have been confirmed experimentally, as both mutants retain full activity and overall structure. These results challenge our notions about what is required for protein activity and about the relationship between protein dynamics, stability and robustness. We hypothesize that small, highly dynamic proteins could be both active and fault tolerant in ways that many other proteins are not, i.e. they can adjust to retain their structure and activity even if subjected to mutations in structurally critical regions. This opens the doors for designing proteins with novel functions, structures and dynamics that have not been yet considered.

  8. Functions of TET Proteins in Hematopoietic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jae-A; An, Jungeun; Ko, Myunggon

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is a well-characterized epigenetic modification that plays central roles in mammalian development, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and silencing of retrotransposon elements. Aberrant DNA methylation pattern is a characteristic feature of cancers and associated with abnormal expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes or repair genes. Ten-eleven-translocation (TET) proteins are recently characterized dioxygenases that catalyze progressive oxidation of 5-methylcytosine to produce 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and further oxidized derivatives. These oxidized methylcytosines not only potentiate DNA demethylation but also behave as independent epigenetic modifications per se. The expression or activity of TET proteins and DNA hydroxymethylation are highly dysregulated in a wide range of cancers including hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies, and accumulating evidence points TET proteins as a novel tumor suppressor in cancers. Here we review DNA demethylation-dependent and -independent functions of TET proteins. We also describe diverse TET loss-of-function mutations that are recurrently found in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies and their potential roles in hematopoietic transformation. We discuss consequences of the deficiency of individual Tet genes and potential compensation between different Tet members in mice. Possible mechanisms underlying facilitated oncogenic transformation of TET-deficient hematopoietic cells are also described. Lastly, we address non-mutational mechanisms that lead to suppression or inactivation of TET proteins in cancers. Strategies to restore normal 5mC oxidation status in cancers by targeting TET proteins may provide new avenues to expedite the development of promising anti-cancer agents. PMID:26552488

  9. Structural and Inhibitory Effects of Hinge Loop Mutagenesis in Serpin-2 from the Malaria Vector Anopheles gambiae*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Meekins, David A.; An, Chunju; Zolkiewski, Michal; Battaile, Kevin P.; Kanost, Michael R.; Lovell, Scott; Michel, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Serpin-2 (SRPN2) is a key negative regulator of the melanization response in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. SRPN2 irreversibly inhibits clip domain serine proteinase 9 (CLIPB9), which functions in a serine proteinase cascade culminating in the activation of prophenoloxidase and melanization. Silencing of SRPN2 in A. gambiae results in spontaneous melanization and decreased life span and is therefore a promising target for vector control. The previously determined structure of SRPN2 revealed a partial insertion of the hinge region of the reactive center loop (RCL) into β sheet A. This partial hinge insertion participates in heparin-linked activation in other serpins, notably antithrombin III. SRPN2 does not contain a heparin binding site, and any possible mechanistic function of the hinge insertion was previously unknown. To investigate the function of the SRPN2 hinge insertion, we developed three SRPN2 variants in which the hinge regions are either constitutively expelled or inserted and analyzed their structure, thermostability, and inhibitory activity. We determined that constitutive hinge expulsion resulted in a 2.7-fold increase in the rate of CLIPB9Xa inhibition, which is significantly lower than previous observations of allosteric serpin activation. Furthermore, we determined that stable insertion of the hinge region did not appreciably decrease the accessibility of the RCL to CLIPB9. Together, these results indicate that the partial hinge insertion in SRPN2 does not participate in the allosteric activation observed in other serpins and instead represents a molecular trade-off between RCL accessibility and efficient formation of an inhibitory complex with the cognate proteinase. PMID:25525260

  10. Hierarchical Ensemble Methods for Protein Function Prediction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Protein function prediction is a complex multiclass multilabel classification problem, characterized by multiple issues such as the incompleteness of the available annotations, the integration of multiple sources of high dimensional biomolecular data, the unbalance of several functional classes, and the difficulty of univocally determining negative examples. Moreover, the hierarchical relationships between functional classes that characterize both the Gene Ontology and FunCat taxonomies motivate the development of hierarchy-aware prediction methods that showed significantly better performances than hierarchical-unaware “flat” prediction methods. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive review of hierarchical methods for protein function prediction based on ensembles of learning machines. According to this general approach, a separate learning machine is trained to learn a specific functional term and then the resulting predictions are assembled in a “consensus” ensemble decision, taking into account the hierarchical relationships between classes. The main hierarchical ensemble methods proposed in the literature are discussed in the context of existing computational methods for protein function prediction, highlighting their characteristics, advantages, and limitations. Open problems of this exciting research area of computational biology are finally considered, outlining novel perspectives for future research. PMID:25937954

  11. Functional Classification of Immune Regulatory Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Rotem; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Nathenson, Stanley G.; Almo, Steven C.; Fiser, Andras

    2013-05-01

    Members of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control innate and adaptive immunity and are prime targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and malignancies. We describe a computational method, termed the Brotherhood algorithm, which utilizes intermediate sequence information to classify proteins into functionally related families. This approach identifies functional relationships within the IgSF and predicts additional receptor-ligand interactions. As a specific example, we examine the nectin/nectin-like family of cell adhesion and signaling proteins and propose receptor-ligand interactions within this family. We were guided by the Brotherhood approach and present the high-resolution structural characterization of a homophilic interaction involving the class-I MHC-restricted T-cell-associated molecule, which we now classify as a nectin-like family member. The Brotherhood algorithm is likely to have a significant impact on structural immunology by identifying those proteins and complexes for which structural characterization will be particularly informative.

  12. FUNCTIONALITY OF MEMBRANE SEPARATED EGG WHITE PROTEINS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The excellent nutritional and functional properties of liquid egg white (LEW), which is essentially a viscous fat-free protein solution, are exploited in many food preparations. Thermal pasteurization (at 56.6oC for 3.5 min. minimum) is currently used by industry to eliminate the microflora in LEW ...

  13. Functional prediction of hypothetical proteins in human adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Dorden, Shane; Mahadevan, Padmanabhan

    2015-01-01

    Assigning functional information to hypothetical proteins in virus genomes is crucial for gaining insight into their proteomes. Human adenoviruses are medium sized viruses that cause a range of diseases. Their genomes possess proteins with uncharacterized function known as hypothetical proteins. Using a wide range of protein function prediction servers, functional information was obtained about these hypothetical proteins. A comparison of functional information obtained from these servers revealed that some of them produced functional information, while others provided little functional information about these human adenovirus hypothetical proteins. The PFP, ESG, PSIPRED, 3d2GO, and ProtFun servers produced the most functional information regarding these hypothetical proteins. PMID:26664031

  14. The hinge region fragment of immunoglobulin G improves immunogenicity of recombinant gonadotrophin-releasing hormone conjugated to the T-helper epitope in designing peptide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinshu; Wu, Jie; Wang, Xuejun; Zhang, Yin; Li, Wenjia; Zhu, Zheng; Zhu, Dongya; Hu, Zhuoyi; Roque, Rouel S; Liu, Jingjing

    2009-09-01

    In our previous study, the hinge fragment (225-232/225'-232') of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) was used as a space peptide linker for synthesizing the GnRH3-hinge-MVP chimeric peptide, whereby three repeated gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) units and a T-cell epitope from measles virus fusion protein (MVP) were amide-bond-linked at the N and C terminus, respectively, to the hinge peptide for producing anti-GnRH antibody responses. To investigate whether or not the hinge region fragment can improve the immunogenicity of GnRH, we further synthesized and purified GnRH3-hinge-MVP, GnRH3-hinge and GnRH3-MVP using recombinant DNA technology. Under high pH conditions, GnRH3-hinge-MVP was capable of forming double-chain structures. Immunization of male mice with the immunogens of GnRH3-hinge-MVP resulted in the generation of high-titre antibodies specific for GnRH. The synthetic GnRH3-hinge and GnRH3-MVP induced a lower titre of anti-GnRH antibody than GnRH3-hinge-MVP. This was followed by a decrease in serum testosterone levels, which resulted in a low level of expression of the relaxin-like factor gene in the testis. Our data suggest that peptide and T-cell epitopes oriented at the N-terminus or C-terminus of hinge peptides simplify the antigenic peptide conjugates and may be considered as potential synthetic immunogens. PMID:19740311

  15. [Pathophysiological functions of follistatin related protein].

    PubMed

    Shen, Hua; Liu, Yu-Yang

    2009-10-01

    Follistatin related protein (FRP) is an extra-cellular glycoprotein, involved in several pathological and physiological processes such as cell proliferation, migration, tissue remodeling, embryonic development, and cell-cell interaction. Nowadays researches showed that FRP possesses dual functions, including inhibiting cell apoptosis and inhibiting cell proliferation. In myocardial ischemia model, FRP is certified to have the effect of protecting myocardial cell and inhibiting apoptosis. At the same time FRP promotes endothelial cell proliferation. FRP is also synthesized by vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) to regulate the functions of VSMC via feedback mechanism. FRP can induce apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. In this review, we summarized the up-to-date data to show the structure, functions, mechanisms and regulation pathways of the protein. PMID:21417029

  16. Ice-Binding Proteins and Their Function.

    PubMed

    Bar Dolev, Maya; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) are a diverse class of proteins that assist organism survival in the presence of ice in cold climates. They have different origins in many organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, diatoms, plants, insects, and fish. This review covers the gamut of IBP structures and functions and the common features they use to bind ice. We discuss mechanisms by which IBPs adsorb to ice and interfere with its growth, evidence for their irreversible association with ice, and methods for enhancing the activity of IBPs. The applications of IBPs in the food industry, in cryopreservation, and in other technologies are vast, and we chart out some possibilities. PMID:27145844

  17. Insect Seminal Fluid Proteins: Identification and Function

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Frank W.; Sirot, Laura K.; LaFlamme, Brooke A.; Rubinstein, C. Dustin; Wolfner, Mariana F.

    2014-01-01

    Seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) produced in reproductive tract tissues of male insects and transferred to females during mating induce numerous physiological and behavioral post-mating changes in females. These changes include decreasing receptivity to re-mating, affecting sperm storage parameters, increasing egg production, modulating sperm competition, feeding behaviors, and mating plug formation. In addition, SFPs also have anti-microbial functions and induce expression of anti-microbial peptides in at least some insects. Here, we review recent identification of insect SFPs and discuss the multiple roles these proteins play in the post-mating processes of female insects. PMID:20868282

  18. Genome-wide protein-protein interactions and protein function exploration in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Qi; Ma, Weimin; Liu, Hui; Li, Jiang; Wang, Huan; Lu, Fang; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Tieliu

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide network analysis is well implemented to study proteins of unknown function. Here, we effectively explored protein functions and the biological mechanism based on inferred high confident protein-protein interaction (PPI) network in cyanobacteria. We integrated data from seven different sources and predicted 1,997 PPIs, which were evaluated by experiments in molecular mechanism, text mining of literatures in proved direct/indirect evidences, and “interologs” in conservation. Combined the predicted PPIs with known PPIs, we obtained 4,715 no-redundant PPIs (involving 3,231 proteins covering over 90% of genome) to generate the PPI network. Based on the PPI network, terms in Gene ontology (GO) were assigned to function-unknown proteins. Functional modules were identified by dissecting the PPI network into sub-networks and analyzing pathway enrichment, with which we investigated novel function of underlying proteins in protein complexes and pathways. Examples of photosynthesis and DNA repair indicate that the network approach is a powerful tool in protein function analysis. Overall, this systems biology approach provides a new insight into posterior functional analysis of PPIs in cyanobacteria. PMID:26490033

  19. Genome-wide protein-protein interactions and protein function exploration in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qi; Ma, Weimin; Liu, Hui; Li, Jiang; Wang, Huan; Lu, Fang; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Tieliu

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide network analysis is well implemented to study proteins of unknown function. Here, we effectively explored protein functions and the biological mechanism based on inferred high confident protein-protein interaction (PPI) network in cyanobacteria. We integrated data from seven different sources and predicted 1,997 PPIs, which were evaluated by experiments in molecular mechanism, text mining of literatures in proved direct/indirect evidences, and "interologs" in conservation. Combined the predicted PPIs with known PPIs, we obtained 4,715 no-redundant PPIs (involving 3,231 proteins covering over 90% of genome) to generate the PPI network. Based on the PPI network, terms in Gene ontology (GO) were assigned to function-unknown proteins. Functional modules were identified by dissecting the PPI network into sub-networks and analyzing pathway enrichment, with which we investigated novel function of underlying proteins in protein complexes and pathways. Examples of photosynthesis and DNA repair indicate that the network approach is a powerful tool in protein function analysis. Overall, this systems biology approach provides a new insight into posterior functional analysis of PPIs in cyanobacteria. PMID:26490033

  20. Folding funnels, binding funnels, and protein function.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Kumar, S.; Ma, B.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    Folding funnels have been the focus of considerable attention during the last few years. These have mostly been discussed in the general context of the theory of protein folding. Here we extend the utility of the concept of folding funnels, relating them to biological mechanisms and function. In particular, here we describe the shape of the funnels in light of protein synthesis and folding; flexibility, conformational diversity, and binding mechanisms; and the associated binding funnels, illustrating the multiple routes and the range of complexed conformers. Specifically, the walls of the folding funnels, their crevices, and bumps are related to the complexity of protein folding, and hence to sequential vs. nonsequential folding. Whereas the former is more frequently observed in eukaryotic proteins, where the rate of protein synthesis is slower, the latter is more frequent in prokaryotes, with faster translation rates. The bottoms of the funnels reflect the extent of the flexibility of the proteins. Rugged floors imply a range of conformational isomers, which may be close on the energy landscape. Rather than undergoing an induced fit binding mechanism, the conformational ensembles around the rugged bottoms argue that the conformers, which are most complementary to the ligand, will bind to it with the equilibrium shifting in their favor. Furthermore, depending on the extent of the ruggedness, or of the smoothness with only a few minima, we may infer nonspecific, broad range vs. specific binding. In particular, folding and binding are similar processes, with similar underlying principles. Hence, the shape of the folding funnel of the monomer enables making reasonable guesses regarding the shape of the corresponding binding funnel. Proteins having a broad range of binding, such as proteolytic enzymes or relatively nonspecific endonucleases, may be expected to have not only rugged floors in their folding funnels, but their binding funnels will also behave similarly

  1. Heterogeneity in Retroviral Nucleocapsid Protein Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, Christy

    2009-03-01

    Time-resolved single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) chaperone activity as compared to that of the HIV-1 NC protein. HTLV-1 NC contains two zinc fingers with each having a CCHC binding motif similar to HIV-1 NC. HIV-1 NC is required for recognition and packaging of the viral RNA and is also a nucleic acid chaperone protein that facilitates nucleic acid restructuring during reverse transcription. Because of similarities in structures between the two retroviruses, we have used single-molecule fluorescence energy transfer to investigate the chaperoning activity of HTLV-1 NC protein. The results indicate that HTLV-1 NC protein induces structural changes by opening the transactivation response (TAR)-DNA hairpin to an even greater extent than HIV-1 NC. However, unlike HIV-1 NC, HTLV-1 NC does not chaperone the strand-transfer reaction involving TAR-DNA. These results suggest that despite its effective destabilization capability, HTLV-1 NC is not as effective at overall chaperone function as is its HIV-1 counterpart.

  2. Visualizing key hinges and a potential major source of compliance in the lever arm of myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.H.; Robinson, H.; Senthil Kumar, V. S.; O'Neall-Hennessey, E.; Reshetnikova, L.; Nguyen-McCarty, M.; Szent-Gyorgyi, A. G.; Cohen, C.

    2011-01-04

    We have determined the 2.3-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of a myosin light chain domain, corresponding to one type found in sea scallop catch ('smooth') muscle. This structure reveals hinges that may function in the 'on' and 'off' states of myosin. The molecule adopts two different conformations about the heavy chain 'hook' and regulatory light chain (RLC) helix D. This conformational change results in extended and compressed forms of the lever arm whose lengths differ by 10 {angstrom}. The heavy chain hook and RLC helix D hinges could thus serve as a potential major and localized source of cross-bridge compliance during the contractile cycle. In addition, in one of the molecules of the crystal, part of the RLC N-terminal extension is seen in atomic detail and forms a one-turn alpha-helix that interacts with RLC helix D. This extension, whose sequence is highly variable in different myosins, may thus modulate the flexibility of the lever arm. Moreover, the relative proximity of the phosphorylation site to the helix D hinge suggests a potential role for conformational changes about this hinge in the transition between the on and off states of regulated myosins.

  3. Visualizing Key Hinges and a Potential Major Source of Compliance in the Lever Arm of Myosin

    SciTech Connect

    J Brown; V Senthil Kumar; E ONeall-Hennessey; L Reshetnikova; H Robinson; M Nguyen-McCarty; A Szent-Gyorgyi; C Cohen

    2011-12-31

    We have determined the 2.3-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of a myosin light chain domain, corresponding to one type found in sea scallop catch ('smooth') muscle. This structure reveals hinges that may function in the 'on' and 'off' states of myosin. The molecule adopts two different conformations about the heavy chain 'hook' and regulatory light chain (RLC) helix D. This conformational change results in extended and compressed forms of the lever arm whose lengths differ by 10 {angstrom}. The heavy chain hook and RLC helix D hinges could thus serve as a potential major and localized source of cross-bridge compliance during the contractile cycle. In addition, in one of the molecules of the crystal, part of the RLC N-terminal extension is seen in atomic detail and forms a one-turn alpha-helix that interacts with RLC helix D. This extension, whose sequence is highly variable in different myosins, may thus modulate the flexibility of the lever arm. Moreover, the relative proximity of the phosphorylation site to the helix D hinge suggests a potential role for conformational changes about this hinge in the transition between the on and off states of regulated myosins.

  4. Functionalized nanoparticle probes for protein detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Jae-Seung

    2015-05-01

    In this Review, we discuss representative studies of recent advances in the development of nanoparticle-based protein detection methods, with a focus on the properties and functionalization of nanoparticle probes, as well as their use in detection schemes. We have focused on functionalized nanoparticle probes because they offer a number of advantages over conventional assays and because their use for detecting protein targets for diagnostic purposed has been demonstrated. In this report, we discuss nanoparticle probes classified by material type (gold, silver, silica, semiconductor, carbon, and virus) and surface functionality (antibody, aptamer, and DNA), which play a critical role in enhancing the sensitivity, selectivity, and efficiency of the detection systems. In particular, the synergistic function of each component of the nanoparticle probe is emphasized in terms of specific chemical and physical properties. This research area is in its early stages with many milestones to reach before nanoparticle probes are successfully applied in the field; however, the substantial ongoing efforts of researchers underline the great promise offered by nanoparticlebased probes for future applications. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Functional Characterization of the Alphavirus TF Protein

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Jonathan E.; Kulcsar, Kirsten A.; Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Riley, Catherine P.; Neary, Jacob T.; Marr, Scott; Jose, Joyce; Griffin, Diane E.

    2013-01-01

    Alphavirus dogma has long dictated the production of a discrete set of structural proteins during infection of a cell: capsid, pE2, 6K, and E1. However, bioinformatic analyses of alphavirus genomes (A. E. Firth, B. Y. Chung, M. N. Fleeton, and J. F. Atkins, Virol. J. 5:108, 2008) suggested that a ribosomal frameshifting event occurs during translation of the alphavirus structural polyprotein. Specifically, a frameshift event is suggested to occur during translation of the 6K gene, yielding production of a novel protein, termed transframe (TF), comprised of a C-terminal extension of the 6K protein in the −1 open reading frame (ORF). Here, we validate the findings of Firth and colleagues with respect to the production of the TF protein and begin to characterize the function of TF. Using a mass spectrometry-based approach, we identified TF in purified preparations of both Sindbis and Chikungunya virus particles. We next constructed a panel of Sindbis virus mutants with mutations which alter the production, size, or sequence of TF. We demonstrate that TF is not absolutely required in culture, although disrupting TF production leads to a decrease in virus particle release in both mammalian and insect cells. In a mouse neuropathogenesis model, mortality was <15% in animals infected with the TF mutants, whereas mortality was 95% in animals infected with the wild-type virus. Using a variety of additional assays, we demonstrate that TF retains ion-channel activity analogous to that of 6K and that lack of production of TF does not affect genome replication, particle infectivity, or envelope protein transit to the cell surface. The TF protein therefore represents a previously uncharacterized factor important for alphavirus assembly. PMID:23720714

  6. [Moving Mirror Scanning System Based on the Flexible Hinge Support].

    PubMed

    Xie, Fei; Feng, Fei; Wang, Fu-bei; Wu, Qiong-shui; Zeng, Li-bo

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve moving mirror drive of Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, we design a dynamic scanning system based on flexible hinge support. Using the flexible hinge support way and the voice coil motor drive mode. Specifically, Using right Angle with high accuracy high stability type flexible hinge support mechanism support moving mirror, dynamic mirror can be moved forward and backward driven by voice coil motor reciprocating motion, DSP control system to control the moving mirror at a constant speed. The experimental results show that the designed of moving mirror scanning system has advantages of stability direction, speed stability, superior seismic performance. PMID:26672322

  7. Nanostructured functional films from engineered repeat proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Tijana Z.; Regan, Lynne; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental advances in biotechnology, medicine, environment, electronics and energy require methods for precise control of spatial organization at the nanoscale. Assemblies that rely on highly specific biomolecular interactions are an attractive approach to form materials that display novel and useful properties. Here, we report on assembly of films from the designed, rod-shaped, superhelical, consensus tetratricopeptide repeat protein (CTPR). We have designed three peptide-binding sites into the 18 repeat CTPR to allow for further specific and non-covalent functionalization of films through binding of fluorescein labelled peptides. The fluorescence signal from the peptide ligand bound to the protein in the solid film is anisotropic, demonstrating that CTPR films can impose order on otherwise isotropic moieties. Circular dichroism measurements show that the individual protein molecules retain their secondary structure in the film, and X-ray scattering, birefringence and atomic force microscopy experiments confirm macroscopic alignment of CTPR molecules within the film. This work opens the door to the generation of innovative biomaterials with tailored structure and function. PMID:23594813

  8. [Location and functions of secretagogin protein].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Lai, Maode

    2016-01-01

    Secretagogin (SCGN) is a novel member of EF-hand Ca2+-binding proteins, which was identified in islet β cells by Wagner. SCGN is a six EF-hand Ca2+-binding protein, primarily expressed on the neuroendocrine axis and the central nervous system. The protein has abundant biological functions. A certain concentration of calcium ion can lead to conformation change of SCGN, resulting in the change of intracellular signal transduction. Preliminary studies showed that SCGN would be used to treat stress reaction, such as mental illness (depression), burns or post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic stress reaction caused by pain. In Alzheimer's disease, the expression of SCGN in the hippocampus can boycott neurodegeneration. In neuroendocrine tumors, SCGN presents a good consistency with neuroendocrine markers such as CgA, Syn, and NSE, with a higher overall sensitivity and specificity. In addition, SCGN is released into serum after neural damage in cerebral ischemic diseases, suggesting that SCGN can be used as a marker for brain trauma. In this article, we review the recent research progress of secretagogin, focus on its distribution and functions in various tumorous diseases and non-tumorous diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27045242

  9. [Functions of prion protein PrPc].

    PubMed

    Cazaubon, Sylvie; Viegas, Pedro; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier

    2007-01-01

    It is now well established that both normal and pathological (or scrapie) isoforms of prion protein, PrPc and PrPsc respectively, are involved in the development and progression of various forms of neurodegenerative diseases, including scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or "mad cow disease") and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in human, collectively known as prion diseases. The protein PrPc is highly expressed in the central nervous system in neurons and glial cells, and also present in non-brain cells, such as immune cells or epithelial and endothelial cells. Identification of the physiological functions of PrPc in these different cell types thus appears crucial for understanding the progression of prion diseases. Recent studies highlighted several major roles for PrPc that may be considered in two major domains : (1) cell survival (protection against oxidative stress and apoptosis) and (2) cell adhesion. In association with cell adhesion, distinct functions of PrPc were observed, depending on cell types : neuronal differentiation, epithelial and endothelial barrier integrity, transendothelial migration of monocytes, T cell activation. These observations suggest that PrPc functions may be particularly relevant to cellular stress, as well as inflammatory or infectious situations. PMID:17875293

  10. Collective prediction of protein functions from protein-protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Automated assignment of functions to unknown proteins is one of the most important task in computational biology. The development of experimental methods for genome scale analysis of molecular interaction networks offers new ways to infer protein function from protein-protein interaction (PPI) network data. Existing techniques for collective classification (CC) usually increase accuracy for network data, wherein instances are interlinked with each other, using a large amount of labeled data for training. However, the labeled data are time-consuming and expensive to obtain. On the other hand, one can easily obtain large amount of unlabeled data. Thus, more sophisticated methods are needed to exploit the unlabeled data to increase prediction accuracy for protein function prediction. Results In this paper, we propose an effective Markov chain based CC algorithm (ICAM) to tackle the label deficiency problem in CC for interrelated proteins from PPI networks. Our idea is to model the problem using two distinct Markov chain classifiers to make separate predictions with regard to attribute features from protein data and relational features from relational information. The ICAM learning algorithm combines the results of the two classifiers to compute the ranks of labels to indicate the importance of a set of labels to an instance, and uses an ICA framework to iteratively refine the learning models for improving performance of protein function prediction from PPI networks in the paucity of labeled data. Conclusion Experimental results on the real-world Yeast protein-protein interaction datasets show that our proposed ICAM method is better than the other ICA-type methods given limited labeled training data. This approach can serve as a valuable tool for the study of protein function prediction from PPI networks. PMID:24564855

  11. 13. POWER CIRCUIT BREAKER, RECESSED IN CABINET BEHIND HINGED METAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. POWER CIRCUIT BREAKER, RECESSED IN CABINET BEHIND HINGED METAL DOOR (SHOWN OPEN), WEST SIDE, MAIN FLOOR - Bonneville Power Administration South Bank Substation, I-84, South of Bonneville Dam Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  12. Lock 6 Detail of hinge stone with iron straps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 6 - Detail of hinge stone with iron straps and carved completion date (1830) located on ground at southeast corner of lock - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  13. 19. Detail, center hinge of south span arches, transverse floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Detail, center hinge of south span arches, transverse floor beams, deck cantilever, railings; view to northwest. - Parks Bar Bridge, Spanning Yuba River at State Highway 20, Smartville, Yuba County, CA

  14. 7. DETAIL OF HINGE OF BASCULE SPAN OF B & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF HINGE OF BASCULE SPAN OF B & O RAILROAD, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Chicago Terminal Railroad, South Branch of Chicago River Bridge, Spanning South Branch of Chicago River, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  15. Adjustable hinge permits movement of knee in plaster cast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maley, W. E.

    1967-01-01

    Metal knee hinge with an adjustable sleeve worn on the outside of a leg cast facilitates movement of the knee joint. This helps eliminate stiffness of the knee and eliminates bulkiness and adjustment difficulty.

  16. Drag-compensated, precision-powered hinge system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquemin, G. G.; Rusk, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    The design of a high precision powered hinge is complicated by the unavoidable presence of parasitic drag torque resulting mainly from friction and transfer of power, signals, and fluids across the hinge. Regardless of the type of drive system selected, it is impossible to completely eliminate all parasitic drag. However, the mechanism described here comes very close to providing a drag free system. All sources of parasitic drag torque are collected on a shaft which is powered by an electric motor independent of the main hinge drive. Under control of a sensor, the electric motor applies a compensating torque equal to that of the parasitic drag torque, allowing the main hinge drive to operate in a practically drag free environment with very high positioning precision.

  17. 5. COMPOSITE PHOTOGRAPH: Left: SHOWS HINGE ON CELLAR STAIR ENTRANCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. COMPOSITE PHOTOGRAPH: Left: SHOWS HINGE ON CELLAR STAIR ENTRANCE Right: WOODEN LATCH ON SAME DOOR NOTE THAT SLIDE IS OPERATED BY PUTTING FINGER THROUGH HOLE IN DOOR - Issac Hammer House, Johnson City, Washington County, TN

  18. 14 CFR 25.393 - Loads parallel to hinge line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... designed for inertia loads acting parallel to the hinge line. (b) In the absence of more rational data, the inertia loads may be assumed to be equal to KW, where— (1) K=24 for vertical surfaces; (2) K=12...

  19. 14 CFR 25.393 - Loads parallel to hinge line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... designed for inertia loads acting parallel to the hinge line. (b) In the absence of more rational data, the inertia loads may be assumed to be equal to KW, where— (1) K=24 for vertical surfaces; (2) K=12...

  20. 14 CFR 25.393 - Loads parallel to hinge line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... designed for inertia loads acting parallel to the hinge line. (b) In the absence of more rational data, the inertia loads may be assumed to be equal to KW, where— (1) K=24 for vertical surfaces; (2) K=12...

  1. 14 CFR 25.393 - Loads parallel to hinge line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... designed for inertia loads acting parallel to the hinge line. (b) In the absence of more rational data, the inertia loads may be assumed to be equal to KW, where— (1) K=24 for vertical surfaces; (2) K=12...

  2. 14 CFR 25.393 - Loads parallel to hinge line.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... designed for inertia loads acting parallel to the hinge line. (b) In the absence of more rational data, the inertia loads may be assumed to be equal to KW, where— (1) K=24 for vertical surfaces; (2) K=12...

  3. Functions and possible provenance of primordial proteins.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Andrei P; Miyake, Norimune; Wickramasinghe, N Chandra; Narlikar, Jayant V; Al-Mufti, Shirwan

    2004-01-01

    Nanobacteria or living nanovesicles are of great interest to the scientific community because of their dual nature: on the one hand, they appear as primal biosystems originating life; on the other hand, they can cause severe diseases. Their survival as well as their pathogenic potential is apparently linked to a self-synthesized protein-based slime, rich in calcium and phosphate (when available). Here, we provide challenging evidence for the occurrence of nanobacteria in the stratosphere, reflecting a possibly primordial provenance of the slime. An analysis of the slime's biological functions may lead to novel strategies suitable to block adhesion modalities in modern bacterial populations. PMID:15595742

  4. Probing High-density Functional Protein Microarrays to Detect Protein-protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Fasolo, Joseph; Im, Hogune; Snyder, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    High-density functional protein microarrays containing ~4,200 recombinant yeast proteins are examined for kinase protein-protein interactions using an affinity purified yeast kinase fusion protein containing a V5-epitope tag for read-out. Purified kinase is obtained through culture of a yeast strain optimized for high copy protein production harboring a plasmid containing a Kinase-V5 fusion construct under a GAL inducible promoter. The yeast is grown in restrictive media with a neutral carbon source for 6 hr followed by induction with 2% galactose. Next, the culture is harvested and kinase is purified using standard affinity chromatographic techniques to obtain a highly purified protein kinase for use in the assay. The purified kinase is diluted with kinase buffer to an appropriate range for the assay and the protein microarrays are blocked prior to hybridization with the protein microarray. After the hybridization, the arrays are probed with monoclonal V5 antibody to identify proteins bound by the kinase-V5 protein. Finally, the arrays are scanned using a standard microarray scanner, and data is extracted for downstream informatics analysis to determine a high confidence set of protein interactions for downstream validation in vivo. PMID:26274875

  5. Principle of bio-inspired insect wing rotational hinge design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Fan

    A principle for designing and fabricating bio-inspired miniature artificial insect flapping wing using flexure rotational hinge design is presented. A systematic approach of selecting rotational hinge stiffness value is proposed. Based on the understanding of flapping wing aerodynamics, a dynamic simulation is constructed using the established quasi-steady model and the wing design. Simulations were performed to gain insight on how different parameters affect the wing rotational response. Based on system resonance a model to predict the optimal rotational hinge stiffness based on given wing parameter and flapping wing kinematic is proposed. By varying different wing parameters, the proposed method is shown to be applicable to a wide range of wing designs with different sizes and shapes. With the selected hinge stiffness value, aspects of the rotational joint design is discussed and an integrated wing-hinge structure design using laminated carbon fiber and polymer film is presented. Manufacturing process of such composite structure is developed to achieve high accuracy and repeatability. The yielded hinge stiffness is verified by measurements. To validate the proposed model, flapping wing experiments were conducted. A flapping actuation set up is built using DC motor and a controller is implemented on a microcontroller to track desired wing stroke kinematic. Wing stroke and rotation kinematic were extracted using a high speed camera and the lift generation is evaluated. A total of 49 flapping experiments were presented, experimental data shows good correlation with the model's prediction. With the wing rotational hinge stiffness designed so that the rotational resonant frequency is twice as the stroke frequency, the resulting wing rotation generates near optimal lift. With further simulation, the proposed model shows low sensitivity to wing parameter variation. As a result, giving a design parameter of a flapping wing robot platform, the proposed principle can

  6. Physiological Functions of APP Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Ulrike C.; Zheng, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical and genetic evidence establishes a central role of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis. Biochemically, deposition of the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides produced from proteolytic processing of APP forms the defining pathological hallmark of AD; genetically, both point mutations and duplications of wild-type APP are linked to a subset of early onset of familial AD (FAD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. As such, the biological functions of APP and its processing products have been the subject of intense investigation, and the past 20+ years of research have met with both excitement and challenges. This article will review the current understanding of the physiological functions of APP in the context of APP family members. PMID:22355794

  7. Design and analysis of a high-accuracy flexure hinge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Zhang, Xianmin; Fatikow, Sergej

    2016-05-01

    This paper designs and analyzes a new kind of flexure hinge obtained by using a topology optimization approach, namely, a quasi-V-shaped flexure hinge (QVFH). Flexure hinges are formed by three segments: the left and right segments with convex shapes and the middle segment with straight line. According to the results of topology optimization, the curve equations of profiles of the flexure hinges are developed by numerical fitting. The in-plane dimensionless compliance equations of the flexure hinges are derived based on Castigliano's second theorem. The accuracy of rotation, which is denoted by the compliance of the center of rotation that deviates from the midpoint, is derived. The equations for evaluating the maximum stresses are also provided. These dimensionless equations are verified by finite element analysis and experimentation. The analytical results are within 8% uncertainty compared to the finite element analysis results and within 9% uncertainty compared to the experimental measurement data. Compared with the filleted V-shaped flexure hinge, the QVFH has a higher accuracy of rotation and better ability of preserving the center of rotation position but smaller compliance. PMID:27250469

  8. Multiple functions of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) was first identified as a major cellular protein capable of transferring neutral lipids between membrane vesicles. Its role as an essential chaperone for the biosynthesis of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing triglyceride-rich lipoproteins was established after the realization that abetalipoproteinemia patients carry mutations in the MTTP gene resulting in the loss of its lipid transfer activity. Now it is known that it also plays a role in the biosynthesis of CD1, glycolipid presenting molecules, as well as in the regulation of cholesterol ester biosynthesis. In this review, we will provide a historical perspective about the identification, purification and characterization of MTP, describe methods used to measure its lipid transfer activity, and discuss tissue expression and function. Finally, we will review the role MTP plays in the assembly of apoB-lipoprotein, the regulation of cholesterol ester synthesis, biosynthesis of CD1 proteins and propagation of hepatitis C virus. We will also provide a brief overview about the clinical potentials of MTP inhibition. PMID:22353470

  9. Green fluorescent protein nanopolygons as monodisperse supramolecular assemblies of functional proteins with defined valency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Eun; Kim, Yu-Na; Kim, Jung A.; Kim, Ho Min; Jung, Yongwon

    2015-05-01

    Supramolecular protein assemblies offer novel nanoscale architectures with molecular precision and unparalleled functional diversity. A key challenge, however, is to create precise nano-assemblies of functional proteins with both defined structures and a controlled number of protein-building blocks. Here we report a series of supramolecular green fluorescent protein oligomers that are assembled in precise polygonal geometries and prepared in a monodisperse population. Green fluorescent protein is engineered to be self-assembled in cells into oligomeric assemblies that are natively separated in a single-protein resolution by surface charge manipulation, affording monodisperse protein (nano)polygons from dimer to decamer. Several functional proteins are multivalently displayed on the oligomers with controlled orientations. Spatial arrangements of protein oligomers and displayed functional proteins are directly visualized by a transmission electron microscope. By employing our functional protein assemblies, we provide experimental insight into multivalent protein-protein interactions and tools to manipulate receptor clustering on live cell surfaces.

  10. Dietary proteins and functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Erica; Crowe, Sheila E

    2013-05-01

    Food intolerance is a common complaint amongst patients with functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders (FGIDs), including those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia, as well as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Although there has been a longstanding interest in the possible role of food allergy in IBS, there are limited data supporting the association. However, the prevalence of food allergy is sufficiently high that patients with FGID may also have food allergies or hypersensitivities. Food intolerances or sensitivities are reactions to foods, which are not due to immunological mechanisms. Lactose intolerance is common in the general population and can mimic symptoms of FGID or coexist with FGID. As discussed in other articles in this series, other carbohydrate intolerances may be responsible for symptom generation in patients with IBS and perhaps other FGIDs. There is a great interest in the role of a major dietary protein, gluten, in the production of symptoms that are very similar to those of patients with celiac disease without the enteropathy that characterizes celiac disease. Emerging research into a syndrome known as nonceliac gluten sensitivity suggests a heterogeneous condition with some features of celiac disease but often categorized as FGIDs, including IBS. This article summarizes the role of dietary proteins in the symptoms and pathophysiology of FGIDs. PMID:23567359

  11. Rosetta stone method for detecting protein function and protein-protein interactions from genome sequences

    DOEpatents

    Eisenberg, David; Marcotte, Edward M.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Thompson, Michael J.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2002-10-15

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  12. Characterization of the functional properties of carob germ proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins from the carob germ were identified as having gluten-like proteins in 1935. While some biochemical characterization of carob germ proteins and their functionality has been carried out, relatively little has been done when compared to proteins such as gluten. Carob germ proteins were separ...

  13. The Hinge Region Strengthens the Nonspecific Interaction between Lac-Repressor and DNA: A Computer Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lili; Tabaka, Marcin; Hou, Sen; Li, Lin; Burdzy, Krzysztof; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Maffeo, Christopher; Zhang, Xuzhu; Holyst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    LacI is commonly used as a model to study the protein-DNA interaction and gene regulation. The headpiece of the lac-repressor (LacI) protein is an ideal system for investigation of nonspecific binding of the whole LacI protein to DNA. The hinge region of the headpiece has been known to play a key role in the specific binding of LacI to DNA, whereas its role in nonspecific binding process has not been elucidated. Here, we report the results of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation and continuum electrostatic calculations suggesting that the hinge region strengthens the nonspecific interaction, accounting for up to 50% of the micro-dissociation free energy of LacI from DNA. Consequently, the rate of microscopic dissociation of LacI from DNA is reduced by 2~3 orders of magnitude in the absence of the hinge region. We find the hinge region makes an important contribution to the electrostatic energy, the salt dependence of electrostatic energy, and the number of salt ions excluded from binding of the LacI-DNA complex. PMID:27008630

  14. The Hinge Region Strengthens the Nonspecific Interaction between Lac-Repressor and DNA: A Computer Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lili; Tabaka, Marcin; Hou, Sen; Li, Lin; Burdzy, Krzysztof; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Maffeo, Christopher; Zhang, Xuzhu; Holyst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    LacI is commonly used as a model to study the protein-DNA interaction and gene regulation. The headpiece of the lac-repressor (LacI) protein is an ideal system for investigation of nonspecific binding of the whole LacI protein to DNA. The hinge region of the headpiece has been known to play a key role in the specific binding of LacI to DNA, whereas its role in nonspecific binding process has not been elucidated. Here, we report the results of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation and continuum electrostatic calculations suggesting that the hinge region strengthens the nonspecific interaction, accounting for up to 50% of the micro-dissociation free energy of LacI from DNA. Consequently, the rate of microscopic dissociation of LacI from DNA is reduced by 2~3 orders of magnitude in the absence of the hinge region. We find the hinge region makes an important contribution to the electrostatic energy, the salt dependence of electrostatic energy, and the number of salt ions excluded from binding of the LacI-DNA complex. PMID:27008630

  15. How special is the biochemical function of native proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Skolnick, Jeffrey; Gao, Mu; Zhou, Hongyi

    2016-01-01

    Native proteins perform an amazing variety of biochemical functions, including enzymatic catalysis, and can engage in protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that are essential for life. A key question is how special are these functional properties of proteins. Are they extremely rare, or are they an intrinsic feature? Comparison to the properties of compact conformations of artificially generated compact protein structures selected for thermodynamic stability but not any type of function, the artificial (ART) protein library, demonstrates that a remarkable number of the properties of native-like proteins are recapitulated. These include the complete set of small molecule ligand-binding pockets and most protein-protein interfaces. ART structures are predicted to be capable of weakly binding metabolites and cover a significant fraction of metabolic pathways, with the most enriched pathways including ancient ones such as glycolysis. Native-like active sites are also found in ART proteins. A small fraction of ART proteins are predicted to have strong protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Overall, it appears that biochemical function is an intrinsic feature of proteins which nature has significantly optimized during evolution. These studies raise questions as to the relative roles of specificity and promiscuity in the biochemical function and control of cells that need investigation. PMID:26962440

  16. Primary rotating-hinge total knee arthroplasty: good outcomes at mid-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kowalczewski, Jacek; Marczak, Dariusz; Synder, Marek; Sibiński, Marcin

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the clinical and radiologic outcomes of primary knee replacements using a rotating-hinge knee prosthesis in 12 knees with a minimum follow-up of 10 years. Indications for the operation included gross joint destruction, significant axial deformities and contracture with a dysfunctional medial collateral ligament in all cases. The patients' WOMAC and Knee Society scores improved, and the use of mobility aids decreased. No loosening of implants was observed. Nonprogressive radiolucent lines were identified around three tibial components. Three patients required marginal wound excision with resuturing and thereafter healed uneventfully. With significant improvement in function, pain and range of motion, the rotating-hinge knee prosthesis can be used as a salvage device in patients with medial collateral ligament deficiency, contracture, and gross joint destruction. PMID:24418767

  17. Next generation high density self assembling functional protein arrays

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Raphael, Jacob V.; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Demirkan, Gokhan; Fuentes, Manuel G.; Rolfs, Andreas; Hu, Yanhui; LaBaer, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    We report a high-density self assembling protein microarray that displays thousands of proteins, produced and captured in situ from immobilized cDNA templates. Over 1500 unique cDNAs were tested with > 90% success with nearly all proteins displaying yields within 2 fold of the mean, minimal sample variation and good day to day reproducibility. The displayed proteins revealed selective protein interactions. This method will enable various experimental approaches to study protein function in high throughput. PMID:18469824

  18. Plastic Hinging Collapse of Periodic Cellular Truss Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwhuis, B. A.; Bele, E.; Hibbard, G. D.

    2008-10-01

    Periodic cellular metals (PCMs) have considerable potential as a new type of hybrid material for sandwich panel cores, due to their high architectural efficiency and load-bearing capability at relatively low mass. The mechanical performance of these materials is controlled by both architectural and microstructural parameters. In the case of PCM struts that have intermediate slenderness ratios, the peak load capacity is determined by the inelastic buckling stress, in which the rotation of the strut ends is opposed by their plastic hinging resistance. Strut rotation is, therefore, a key component of the overall PCM failure mechanism. In the present study, a method is developed for measuring the plastic hinging strength by allowing the truss core nodes to spread radially outward during collapse. Both finite element (FE) and experimental methods were used to study this behavior in AA3003 truss cores; the effect of work hardening, interfacial friction, and specimen size was examined. Direct measures for the plastic hinging resistance can be obtained and it was possible to demonstrate that while work hardening during PCM stretch-forming fabrication introduces significant work hardening in the near-hinge region, not all of the strengthening is available to resist plastic hinging collapse by virtue of the Bauschinger effect.

  19. Functional proteins from a random-sequence library

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Anthony D; Szostak, Jack W.

    2015-01-01

    Functional primordial proteins presumably originated from random sequences, but it is not known how frequently functional, or even folded, proteins occur in collections of random sequences. Here we have used in vitro selection of messenger RNA displayed proteins, in which each protein is covalently linked through its carboxy terminus to the 3′ end of its encoding mRNA1, to sample a large number of distinct random sequences. Starting from a library of 6 × 1012 proteins each containing 80 contiguous random amino acids, we selected functional proteins by enriching for those that bind to ATP. This selection yielded four new ATP-binding proteins that appear to be unrelated to each other or to anything found in the current databases of biological proteins. The frequency of occurrence of functional proteins in random-sequence libraries appears to be similar to that observed for equivalent RNA libraries2,3. PMID:11287961

  20. Using search engine technology for protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziyang; Cai, Zhao; Li, Min; Liu, Binbin

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of protein function is one of the most challenging problems in the post-genomic era. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm Improved ProteinRank (IPR) for protein function prediction, which is based on the search engine technology and the preferential attachment criteria. In addition, an improved algorithm IPRW is developed from IPR to be used in the weighted protein?protein interaction (PPI) network. The proposed algorithms IPR and IPRW are applied to the PPI network of S.cerevisiae. The experimental results show that both IPR and IPRW outweigh the previous methods for the prediction of protein functions. PMID:21441099

  1. Synthetic protein interactions reveal a functional map of the cell

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Lisa K; Ólafsson, Guðjón; Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    To understand the function of eukaryotic cells, it is critical to understand the role of protein-protein interactions and protein localization. Currently, we do not know the importance of global protein localization nor do we understand to what extent the cell is permissive for new protein associations – a key requirement for the evolution of new protein functions. To answer this question, we fused every protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a partner from each of the major cellular compartments and quantitatively assessed the effects upon growth. This analysis reveals that cells have a remarkable and unanticipated tolerance for forced protein associations, even if these associations lead to a proportion of the protein moving compartments within the cell. Furthermore, the interactions that do perturb growth provide a functional map of spatial protein regulation, identifying key regulatory complexes for the normal homeostasis of eukaryotic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13053.001 PMID:27098839

  2. The CCN family of proteins: structure–function relationships

    PubMed Central

    Holbourn, Kenneth P.; Acharya, K. Ravi; Perbal, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    The CCN proteins are key signalling and regulatory molecules involved in many vital biological functions, including cell proliferation, angiogenesis, tumourigenesis and wound healing. How these proteins influence such a range of functions remains incompletely understood but is probably related to their discrete modular nature and a complex array of intra- and inter-molecular interactions with a variety of regulatory proteins and ligands. Although certain aspects of their biology can be attributed to the four individual modules that constitute the CCN proteins, recent results suggest that some of their biological functions require cooperation between modules. Indeed, the modular structure of CCN proteins provides important insight into their structure–function relationships. PMID:18789696

  3. Modelling protein functional domains in signal transduction using Maude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriram, M. G.

    2003-01-01

    Modelling of protein-protein interactions in signal transduction is receiving increased attention in computational biology. This paper describes recent research in the application of Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic, to the modelling of functional domains within signalling proteins. Protein functional domains (PFDs) are a critical focus of modern signal transduction research. In general, Maude models can simulate biological signalling networks and produce specific testable hypotheses at various levels of abstraction. Developing symbolic models of signalling proteins containing functional domains is important because of the potential to generate analyses of complex signalling networks based on structure-function relationships.

  4. Visualizing and Clustering Protein Similarity Networks: Sequences, Structures, and Functions.

    PubMed

    Mai, Te-Lun; Hu, Geng-Ming; Chen, Chi-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Research in the recent decade has demonstrated the usefulness of protein network knowledge in furthering the study of molecular evolution of proteins, understanding the robustness of cells to perturbation, and annotating new protein functions. In this study, we aimed to provide a general clustering approach to visualize the sequence-structure-function relationship of protein networks, and investigate possible causes for inconsistency in the protein classifications based on sequences, structures, and functions. Such visualization of protein networks could facilitate our understanding of the overall relationship among proteins and help researchers comprehend various protein databases. As a demonstration, we clustered 1437 enzymes by their sequences and structures using the minimum span clustering (MSC) method. The general structure of this protein network was delineated at two clustering resolutions, and the second level MSC clustering was found to be highly similar to existing enzyme classifications. The clustering of these enzymes based on sequence, structure, and function information is consistent with each other. For proteases, the Jaccard's similarity coefficient is 0.86 between sequence and function classifications, 0.82 between sequence and structure classifications, and 0.78 between structure and function classifications. From our clustering results, we discussed possible examples of divergent evolution and convergent evolution of enzymes. Our clustering approach provides a panoramic view of the sequence-structure-function network of proteins, helps visualize the relation between related proteins intuitively, and is useful in predicting the structure and function of newly determined protein sequences. PMID:27267620

  5. Integrated protein function prediction by mining function associations, sequences, and protein–protein and gene–gene interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Motivations Protein function prediction is an important and challenging problem in bioinformatics and computational biology. Functionally relevant biological information such as protein sequences, gene expression, and protein–protein interactions has been used mostly separately for protein function prediction. One of the major challenges is how to effectively integrate multiple sources of both traditional and new information such as spatial gene–gene interaction networks generated from chromosomal conformation data together to improve protein function prediction. Results In this work, we developed three different probabilistic scores (MIS, SEQ, and NET score) to combine protein sequence, function associations, and protein–protein interaction and spatial gene–gene interaction networks for protein function prediction. The MIS score is mainly generated from homologous proteins found by PSI-BLAST search, and also association rules between Gene Ontology terms, which are learned by mining the Swiss-Prot database. The SEQ score is generated from protein sequences. The NET score is generated from protein–protein interaction and spatial gene–gene interaction networks. These three scores were combined in a new Statistical Multiple Integrative Scoring System (SMISS) to predict protein function. We tested SMISS on the data set of 2011 Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA). The method performed substantially better than three base-line methods and an advanced method based on protein profile–sequence comparison, profile–profile comparison, and domain co-occurrence networks according to the maximum F-measure. PMID:26370280

  6. Gas turbine combustor exit piece with hinged connections

    DOEpatents

    Charron, Richard C.; Pankey, William W.

    2016-04-26

    An exit piece (66) with an inlet throat (67) that conducts a combustion gas flow (36A) in a path (82) from a combustor (63) to an annular chamber (68) that feeds the first blade section (37) of a gas turbine (26). The exit piece further includes an outlet portion (69) that forms a circumferential segment of the annular chamber. The outlet portion interconnects with adjacent outlet portions by hinges (78A, 78B, 80A, 80B). Each hinge may have a hinge axis (82A, 82B) parallel to a centerline (21) of the turbine. Respective gas flows (36A) are configured by an assembly (60) of the exit pieces to converge on the feed chamber (68) into a uniform helical flow that drives the first blade section with minimal circumferential variations in force.

  7. Evolutionary and functional diversity of coronin proteins.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Charles-Peter; Eichinger, Ludwig; Fernandez, M Pilar; Morgan, Reginald O; Clemen, Christoph S

    2008-01-01

    This chapter discusses various aspects of coronin phylogeny, structure and function that are of specific interest. Two subfamilies of ancient coronins of unicellular pathogens such as Entamoeba, Trypanosoma, Leishmania and Acanthamoeba as well as of Plasmodium, Babesia, and Trichomonas are presented in the first two sections. Their coronins generally bind to F-actin and apparently are involved in proliferation, locomotion and phagocytosis. However, there are so far no studies addressing a putative role of coronin in the virulence of these pathogens. The following section delineates genetic anomalies like the chimeric coronin-fusion products with pelckstrin homology and gelsolin domains that are found in amoeba. Moreover, most nonvertebrate metazoa appear to encode CRN8, CRN9 and CRN7 representatives (for these coronin symbols see Chapter 2), but in e.g., Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans a CRN9 is missing. The forth section deals with the evolutionary expansion of vertebrate coronins. Experimental data on the F-actin binding CRN2 of Xenopus (Xcoronin) including a Cdc42/Rac interactive binding (CRIB) motif that is also present in other members of the coronin protein family are discussed. Xenopus laevis represents a case for the expansion of the seven vertebrate coronins due to tetraploidization events. Other examples for a change in the number of coronin paralogs are zebrafish and birds, but (coronin) gene duplication events also occurred in unicellular protozoa. The fifth section of this chapter briefly summarizes three different cellular processes in which CRN4/CORO1A is involved, namely actin-binding, superoxide generation and Ca(2+)-signaling and refers to the largely unexplored mammalian coronins CRN5/CORO2A and CRN6/CORO2B, the latter binding to vinculin. The final section discusses how, by unveiling the aspects of coronin function in organisms reported so far, one can trace a remarkable evolution and diversity in their individual roles

  8. Computational approaches for rational design of proteins with novel functionalities

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Singh, Ranjitha; Singh, Raushan Kumar; Kim, In-Won; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are the most multifaceted macromolecules in living systems and have various important functions, including structural, catalytic, sensory, and regulatory functions. Rational design of enzymes is a great challenge to our understanding of protein structure and physical chemistry and has numerous potential applications. Protein design algorithms have been applied to design or engineer proteins that fold, fold faster, catalyze, catalyze faster, signal, and adopt preferred conformational states. The field of de novo protein design, although only a few decades old, is beginning to produce exciting results. Developments in this field are already having a significant impact on biotechnology and chemical biology. The application of powerful computational methods for functional protein designing has recently succeeded at engineering target activities. Here, we review recently reported de novo functional proteins that were developed using various protein design approaches, including rational design, computational optimization, and selection from combinatorial libraries, highlighting recent advances and successes. PMID:24688643

  9. INTEGRATING COMPUTATIONAL PROTEIN FUNCTION PREDICTION INTO DRUG DISCOVERY INITIATIVES

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marianne A.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical researchers must evaluate vast numbers of protein sequences and formulate innovative strategies for identifying valid targets and discovering leads against them as a way of accelerating drug discovery. The ever increasing number and diversity of novel protein sequences identified by genomic sequencing projects and the success of worldwide structural genomics initiatives have spurred great interest and impetus in the development of methods for accurate, computationally empowered protein function prediction and active site identification. Previously, in the absence of direct experimental evidence, homology-based protein function annotation remained the gold-standard for in silico analysis and prediction of protein function. However, with the continued exponential expansion of sequence databases, this approach is not always applicable, as fewer query protein sequences demonstrate significant homology to protein gene products of known function. As a result, several non-homology based methods for protein function prediction that are based on sequence features, structure, evolution, biochemical and genetic knowledge have emerged. Herein, we review current bioinformatic programs and approaches for protein function prediction/annotation and discuss their integration into drug discovery initiatives. The development of such methods to annotate protein functional sites and their application to large protein functional families is crucial to successfully utilizing the vast amounts of genomic sequence information available to drug discovery and development processes. PMID:25530654

  10. Applications in high-content functional protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Moore, Cedric D; Ajala, Olutobi Z; Zhu, Heng

    2016-02-01

    Protein microarray technology provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds to thousands of proteins in a parallel and high-throughput manner. Over the last decade, applications of functional protein microarrays in particular have flourished in studying protein function at a systems level and have led to the construction of networks and pathways describing these functions. Relevant areas of research include the detection of various binding properties of proteins, the study of enzyme-substrate relationships, the analysis of host-microbe interactions, and profiling antibody specificity. In addition, discovery of novel biomarkers in autoimmune diseases and cancers is emerging as a major clinical application of functional protein microarrays. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances of functional protein microarrays in both basic and clinical applications. PMID:26599287

  11. Design and test analysis of a solar array root hinge drive assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xilun; Li, Xin

    2014-09-01

    A root hinge drive assembly is preferred in place of the classical viscous damper in a large solar array system. It has advantages including better deployment control and higher reliability. But the traditional single degree of freedom model should be improved. A multiple degrees of freedom dynamics model is presented for the solar arrays deployment to guide the drive assembly design. The established model includes the functions of the torsion springs, the synchronization mechanism and the lock-up impact. A numerical computation method is proposed to solve the dynamics coupling problem. Then considering the drive torque requirement calculated by the proposed model, a root hinge drive assembly is developed based on the reliability engineering design methods, and dual actuators are used as a redundancy design. Pseudo-efficiency is introduced and the major factors influencing the (pseudo-) efficiency of the gear mechanism designed with high reduction ratio are studied for further test data analysis. A ground prototype deployment test is conducted to verify the capacity of the drive assembly. The test device consists of a large-area solar array system and a root hinge drive assembly. The RHDA development time is about 43 s. The theoretical drive torque is compared with the test values which are obtained according to the current data and the reduction efficiency analysis, and the results show that the presented model and the calibration methods are proper enough.

  12. A hinged external fixator for complex elbow dislocations: A multicenter prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Elbow dislocations can be classified as simple or complex. Simple dislocations are characterized by the absence of fractures, while complex dislocations are associated with fractures of the radial head, olecranon, or coronoid process. The majority of patients with these complex dislocations are treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF), or arthroplasty in case of a non-reconstructable radial head fracture. If the elbow joint remains unstable after fracture fixation, a hinged elbow fixator can be applied. The fixator provides stability to the elbow joint, and allows for early mobilization. The latter may be important for preventing stiffness of the joint. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of early mobilization with a hinged external elbow fixator on clinical outcome in patients with complex elbow dislocations with residual instability following fracture fixation. Methods/Design The design of the study will be a multicenter prospective cohort study of 30 patients who have sustained a complex elbow dislocation and are treated with a hinged elbow fixator following fracture fixation because of residual instability. Early active motion exercises within the limits of pain will be started immediately after surgery under supervision of a physical therapist. Outcome will be evaluated at regular intervals over the subsequent 12 months. The primary outcome is the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score. The secondary outcome measures are the Mayo Elbow Performance Index, Oxford Elbow Score, pain level at both sides, range of motion of the elbow joint at both sides, radiographic healing of the fractures and formation of periarticular ossifications, rate of secondary interventions and complications, and health-related quality of life (Short-Form 36). Discussion The outcome of this study will yield quantitative data on the functional outcome in patients with a complex elbow dislocation and who are treated with ORIF and

  13. Probabilistic Protein Function Prediction from Heterogeneous Genome-Wide Data

    PubMed Central

    Nariai, Naoki; Kolaczyk, Eric D.; Kasif, Simon

    2007-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in high throughput sequencing technologies have led to a staggering growth in the number of predicted genes. However, a large fraction of these newly discovered genes do not have a functional assignment. Fortunately, a variety of novel high-throughput genome-wide functional screening technologies provide important clues that shed light on gene function. The integration of heterogeneous data to predict protein function has been shown to improve the accuracy of automated gene annotation systems. In this paper, we propose and evaluate a probabilistic approach for protein function prediction that integrates protein-protein interaction (PPI) data, gene expression data, protein motif information, mutant phenotype data, and protein localization data. First, functional linkage graphs are constructed from PPI data and gene expression data, in which an edge between nodes (proteins) represents evidence for functional similarity. The assumption here is that graph neighbors are more likely to share protein function, compared to proteins that are not neighbors. The functional linkage graph model is then used in concert with protein domain, mutant phenotype and protein localization data to produce a functional prediction. Our method is applied to the functional prediction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes, using Gene Ontology (GO) terms as the basis of our annotation. In a cross validation study we show that the integrated model increases recall by 18%, compared to using PPI data alone at the 50% precision. We also show that the integrated predictor is significantly better than each individual predictor. However, the observed improvement vs. PPI depends on both the new source of data and the functional category to be predicted. Surprisingly, in some contexts integration hurts overall prediction accuracy. Lastly, we provide a comprehensive assignment of putative GO terms to 463 proteins that currently have no assigned function. PMID:17396164

  14. Functional innovation from changes in protein domains and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    Domains are the functional building blocks of proteins. In this work we discuss how domains can contribute to the evolution of new functions. Domains themselves can evolve through various mechanisms, altering their intrinsic function. Domains can also facilitate functional innovations by combining with other domains to make novel proteins. We discuss the mechanisms by which domain and domain combinations support functional innovations. We highlight interesting examples where changes in domain combination promote changes at the domain level. PMID:27309309

  15. Extra-nuclear starbursts: young luminous Hinge clumps in interacting galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Beverly J.; Giroux, Mark L.; Soria, Roberto; Struck, Curtis; Swartz, Douglas A.; Yukita, Mihoko E-mail: girouxm@etsu.edu E-mail: curt@iastate.edu

    2014-03-01

    Hinge clumps are luminous knots of star formation near the base of tidal features in some interacting galaxies. We use archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV/optical/IR images and Chandra X-ray maps along with Galaxy Evolution Explorer UV, Spitzer IR, and ground-based optical/near-IR images to investigate the star forming properties in a sample of 12 hinge clumps in five interacting galaxies. The most extreme of these hinge clumps have star formation rates of 1-9 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, comparable to or larger than the 'overlap' region of intense star formation between the two disks of the colliding galaxy system the Antennae. In the HST images, we have found remarkably large and luminous sources at the centers of these hinge clumps. These objects are much larger and more luminous than typical 'super star clusters' in interacting galaxies, and are sometimes embedded in a linear ridge of fainter star clusters, consistent with star formation along a narrow caustic. These central sources have FWHM diameters of ∼70 pc, compared to ∼3 pc in 'ordinary' super star clusters. Their absolute I magnitudes range from M{sub I} ∼ – 12.2 to –16.5; thus, if they are individual star clusters they would lie near the top of the 'super star cluster' luminosity function of star clusters. These sources may not be individual star clusters, but instead may be tightly packed groups of clusters that are blended together in the HST images. Comparison to population synthesis modeling indicates that the hinge clumps contain a range of stellar ages. This is consistent with expectations based on models of galaxy interactions, which suggest that star formation may be prolonged in these regions. In the Chandra images, we have found strong X-ray emission from several of these hinge clumps. In most cases, this emission is well-resolved with Chandra and has a thermal X-ray spectrum, thus it is likely due to hot gas associated with the star formation. The ratio of the extinction

  16. Functional properties of select edible oilseed proteins.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Girdhari M; Su, Mengna; Joshi, Aditya U; Roux, Kenneth H; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2010-05-12

    Borate saline buffer (0.1 M, pH 8.45) solubilized proteins from almond, Brazil nut, cashew nut, hazelnut, macadamia, pine nut, pistachio, Spanish peanut, Virginia peanut, and soybean seeds were prepared from the corresponding defatted flour. The yield was in the range from 10.6% (macadamia) to 27.4% (almond). The protein content, on a dry weight basis, of the lyophilized preparations ranged from 69.23% (pine nut) to 94.80% (soybean). Isolated proteins from Brazil nut had the lightest and hazelnut the darkest color. Isolated proteins exhibited good solubility in aqueous media. Foaming capacity (<40% overrun) and stability (<1 h) of the isolated proteins were poor to fair. Almond proteins had the highest viscosity among the tested proteins. Oil-holding capacity of the isolated proteins ranged from 2.8 (macadamia) to 7 (soybean) g of oil/g of protein. Least gelation concentrations (% w/v) for almond, Brazil nut, cashew, hazelnut, macadamia, pine nut, pistachio, Spanish peanut, Virginia peanut, and soybean were, respectively, 6, 8, 8, 12, 20, 12, 10, 14, 14, and 16. PMID:20201552

  17. Printing Proteins as Microarrays for High-Throughput Function Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacBeath, Gavin; Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2000-09-01

    Systematic efforts are currently under way to construct defined sets of cloned genes for high-throughput expression and purification of recombinant proteins. To facilitate subsequent studies of protein function, we have developed miniaturized assays that accommodate extremely low sample volumes and enable the rapid, simultaneous processing of thousands of proteins. A high-precision robot designed to manufacture complementary DNA microarrays was used to spot proteins onto chemically derivatized glass slides at extremely high spatial densities. The proteins attached covalently to the slide surface yet retained their ability to interact specifically with other proteins, or with small molecules, in solution. Three applications for protein microarrays were demonstrated: screening for protein-protein interactions, identifying the substrates of protein kinases, and identifying the protein targets of small molecules.

  18. Protein Function Annotation By Local Binding Site Surface Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E.; Varela, Rocco; Jain, Ajay N.

    2013-01-01

    Hundreds of protein crystal structures exist for proteins whose function cannot be confidently determined from sequence similarity. Surflex-PSIM, a previously reported surface-based protein similarity algorithm, provides an alternative method for hypothesizing function for such proteins. The method now supports fully automatic binding site detection and is fast enough to screen comprehensive databases of protein binding sites. The binding site detection methodology was validated on apo/holo cognate protein pairs, correctly identifying 91% of ligand binding sites in holo structures and 88% in apo structures where corresponding sites existed. For correctly detected apo binding sites, the cognate holo site was the most similar binding site 87% of the time. PSIM was used to screen a set of proteins that had poorly characterized functions at the time of crystallization, but were later biochemically annotated. Using a fully automated protocol, this set of 8 proteins was screened against approximately 60,000 ligand binding sites from the PDB. PSIM correctly identified functional matches that pre-dated query protein biochemical annotation for five out of the eight query proteins. A panel of twelve currently unannotated proteins was also screened, resulting in a large number of statistically significant binding site matches, some of which suggest likely functions for the poorly characterized proteins. PMID:24166661

  19. A Remote Indicating Hinge-Moment Balance, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoller, Morton J.; Ribner, Herbert S.

    1941-01-01

    This report describes an electrical hinge-moment balance for use with wind-tunnel models of aircraft. A brief description of the principle of operation and operating experience with the balance is given in part I. Part II gives constructional details and part III gives theoretical considerations. Extensive constructional information is given to enable the reproduction of the equipment.

  20. Stiffness characterization of corner-filleted flexure hinges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobontiu, Nicolae; Garcia, Ephrahim; Hardau, Mihail; Bal, Nicolae

    2004-11-01

    The paper formulates the closed-form stiffness equations that can be used to characterize the static, modal, and dynamic behavior of single-axis corner-filleted flexure hinges, which are incorporated into macro/microscale monolithic mechanisms. The derivation is based on Castiliagno's first theorem and the resulting stiffness equations reflect sensitivity to direct- and cross-bending, axial loading, and torsion. Compared to previous analytical work, which assessed the stiffness of flexures by means of compliances, this paper directly gives the stiffness factors that completely define the elastic response of corner-filleted flexure hinges. The method is cost-effective as it requires considerably less calculation steps, compared to either finite element simulation or experimental characterization. Limit calculations demonstrate that the known engineering equations for a constant cross-section flexure are retrieved from those of a corner-filleted flexure hinge when the fillet radius becomes zero. The analytical model results are compared to experimental and finite element data and the errors are less than 8%. Further numerical simulation based on the analytical model highlights the influence of the geometric parameters on the stiffness properties of a corner-filleted flexure hinge.

  1. 23. 'General Drawing Of Proposed Three Hinged Arch Bridge At ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. 'General Drawing Of Proposed Three Hinged Arch Bridge At Parks Bar Crossing Over The Yuba River, Yuba County Cal., Thomas System, Thomas & Post, Consulting Engrs, Hibernian Building, Los Angeles, Oct. 18, 1912,' and marked 'Revised Oct. 22, 1912.' - Parks Bar Bridge, Spanning Yuba River at State Highway 20, Smartville, Yuba County, CA

  2. 22. 'General Drawing Of Proposed Three Hinged Arch Bridge At ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. 'General Drawing Of Proposed Three Hinged Arch Bridge At Parks Bar Crossing Over The Yuba River, Yuba County Cal., Thomas System, Thomas & Post, Consulting Engrs, Hibernian Building, Los Angeles, Aug. 3, 1912.' - Parks Bar Bridge, Spanning Yuba River at State Highway 20, Smartville, Yuba County, CA

  3. Thermal distortion testing of a 90-degree deployment hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lininger, Lance

    2003-09-01

    Virtually all modern spacecraft have at least one (if not many) deployable items, some of which require a high degree of positional accuracy and repeatability. There are many variables that affect the deployment performance, and often the most critical and difficult variable to quantify is the affect of the thermal environment on the deployment mechanisms. Temperature changes before and after deployment can greatly affect the final deployment position and the subsequent thermal distortion of the mechanism, and it is critical to properly quantify these factors. Historically the affects of temperature change on deployment mechanisms have been evaluated via analysis due to the relative cost and difficulty in performing a test. However, during the design process of a recent Lockheed Martin deployment hinge, the engineers wanted to provide their customer with a more reliable empirical assessment. Thus, it was decided to conduct a thermal distortion and repeatability test on the hinge during the qualification phase. Testing of this nature is very rare for relatively inexpensive deployment hinges and is usually reserved for high precision, actively-latched optical hinges. Results of this testing are presented, along with lessons learned when performing the test.

  4. Hinge specification for a square-faceted tetrahedral truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    A square-faceted tetrahedral truss is geometrically analyzed. Expressions are developed for single degree of freedom hinges which allow packaging of the structure into a configuration in which all members are parallel and closely packed in a square pattern. Deployment is sequential, thus providing control over the structure during deployment.

  5. 61. DETAIL OF HEAD, VANE STEM, VANE HINGE, AND WHEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. DETAIL OF HEAD, VANE STEM, VANE HINGE, AND WHEEL OF AN ELI WINDMILL ON THE GROUND AT THE STOLL RESIDENCE ABOUT 1-1/2 MILES WEST OF NEBRASKA CITY ON STEAM WAGON ROAD. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  6. Recent approaches in physical modification of protein functionality.

    PubMed

    Mirmoghtadaie, Leila; Shojaee Aliabadi, Saeedeh; Hosseini, Seyede Marzieh

    2016-05-15

    Today, there is a growing demand for novel technologies, such as high hydrostatic pressure, irradiation, ultrasound, filtration, supercritical carbon dioxide, plasma technology, and electrical methods, which are not based on chemicals or heat treatment for modifying ingredient functionality and extending product shelf life. Proteins are essential components in many food processes, and provide various functions in food quality and stability. They can create interfacial films that stabilize emulsions and foams as well as interact to make networks that play key roles in gel and edible film production. These properties of protein are referred to as 'protein functionality', because they can be modified by different processing. The common protein modification (chemical, enzymatic and physical) methods have strong effects on the structure and functionality of food proteins. Furthermore, novel technologies can modify protein structure and functional properties that will be reviewed in this study. PMID:26776016

  7. Spatial and functional organization of mitochondrial protein network

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Jinho; Park, Solip; Jeon, Jouhyun; Shin, Young-Eun; Kim, Sanguk

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial organization of the human mitochondrial proteome will enhance our understanding of mitochondrial functions at the molecular level and provide key insight into protein-disease associations. However, the sub-organellar location and possible association with mitochondrial diseases are not annotated for most mitochondrial proteins. Here, we characterized the functional and spatial organization of mitochondrial proteins by assessing their position in the Mitochondrial Protein Functional (MPF) network. Network position was assigned to the MPF network and facilitated the determination of sub-organellar location and functional organization of mitochondrial proteins. Moreover, network position successfully identified candidate disease genes of several mitochondrial disorders. Thus, our data support the use of network position as a novel method to explore the molecular function and pathogenesis of mitochondrial proteins. PMID:23466738

  8. Structure and Function of Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ralf R.; Leong, Steven R.; Flaggs, Gail W.; Gray, Patrick W.; Wright, Samuel D.; Mathison, John C.; Tobias, Peter S.; Ulevitch, Richard J.

    1990-09-01

    The primary structure of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), a trace plasma protein that binds to the lipid A moiety of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), was deduced by sequencing cloned complementary DNA. LBP shares sequence identity with another LPS binding protein found in granulocytes, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, and with cholesterol ester transport protein of the plasma. LBP may control the response to LPS under physiologic conditions by forming high-affinity complexes with LPS that bind to monocytes and macrophages, which then secrete tumor necrosis factor. The identification of this pathway for LPS-induced monocyte stimulation may aid in the development of treatments for diseases in which Gram-negative sepsis or endotoxemia are involved.

  9. Method for printing functional protein microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delehanty, James B.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2003-01-01

    Piezoelectric dispensing of proteins from borosilicate glass capillaries is a popular method of protein biochip fabrication that offers the advantages of sample recovery and noncontact with the printing substrate. However, little regard has been given to the quantitative aspects of dispensing minute volumes (1 nL or less) at the low protein concentrations (20 micrograms/mL or less) typically used in microprinting. Specifically, loss of protein sample due to nonspecific adsorption to the glass surface of the dispensing capillaries can limit the amount of protein delivered to the substrate. We demonstrate the benefits of a low ionic strength buffer containing the carrier protein BSA that effectively minimizes the ionic strength-dependent phenomenon of nonspecific protein adsorption to borosilicate glass. Over the concentration range of 20-2.5 micrograms/mL, the dispensing of a reference IgG in 10 mM PBS including 0.1% BSA resulted in the deposition of 3.6- to 44-fold more IgG compared to the deposition of IgG in standard 150 mM PBS in the absence of BSA. Furthermore, when the IgG was dispensed with carrier protein, the resulting spots exhibited a more uniform morphology. In a direct immunoassay for cholera toxin, capture antibody spots dispensed in 10 mM PBS containing 0.1% BSA produced fluorescent signals that were 2.8- to 4.3-fold more intense than antibody spots that were dispensed in 150 mM PBS without BSA. Interestingly, no differences were observed in the specific activities of the capture antibodies as a result of printing in the different buffers. The implications of these results on the future development of protein biochips are discussed.

  10. Emergence of Complexity in Protein Functions and Metabolic Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andzej

    2009-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences and subsequently subjecting them to in vitro evolution. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions, important clues have been uncovered. Considerable progress has been also achieved in understanding the origins of membrane proteins. We will address this issue in the example of ion channels - proteins that mediate transport of ions across cell walls. Remarkably, despite overall complexity of these proteins in contemporary cells, their structural motifs are quite simple, with -helices being most common. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and simple, natural channels, I will show that, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during

  11. Identification of ligament intra-crystalline peptide (LICP) from the hinge ligament of the bivalve, Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michio; Kogure, Toshihiro; Sakuda, Shohei; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2015-04-01

    The hinge ligament of the bivalve is an important hard tissue that functions to open and close the shells. The ligament contains a fibrous structure consisting of aragonite crystals surrounded by dense organic matrices. Although many matrix proteins have been identified from various shell microstructures in previous works, ligament-specific matrix proteins have not yet been reported. In this study, in order to reveal the formation mechanism of the fibrous aragonite crystals in the ligament of Pinctada fucata, we identified a novel, small acidic peptide, named ligament intra-crystalline peptide (LICP), from the aragonite crystal of the ligament that had been pre-treated with sodium hypochlorite to remove the inter-crystalline organic matrices. LICP consists of 10 amino acid residues with N-terminal pyroglutamic acid. The result of cDNA cloning showed that the cDNA encodes another putative 10-residue peptide at the C-terminal end of LICP. LICP showed inhibitory activity on calcium carbonate precipitation, while the synthetic 10-residue peptide from the C-terminal sequence of proLICP did not. We also noted that the TEM and SEM observations of aragonite crystals formed by the in vitro crystallization experiment showed that LICP inhibited the growth of aragonite crystal to stop elongation in the c-axis direction. These results suggested that LICP has a role of regulating the formation of the aragonite crystals in the ligament. PMID:25315163

  12. A large-scale evaluation of computational protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    Radivojac, Predrag; Clark, Wyatt T; Ronnen Oron, Tal; Schnoes, Alexandra M; Wittkop, Tobias; Sokolov, Artem; Graim, Kiley; Funk, Christopher; Verspoor, Karin; Ben-Hur, Asa; Pandey, Gaurav; Yunes, Jeffrey M; Talwalkar, Ameet S; Repo, Susanna; Souza, Michael L; Piovesan, Damiano; Casadio, Rita; Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Jianlin; Fang, Hai; Gough, Julian; Koskinen, Patrik; Törönen, Petri; Nokso-Koivisto, Jussi; Holm, Liisa; Cozzetto, Domenico; Buchan, Daniel W A; Bryson, Kevin; Jones, David T; Limaye, Bhakti; Inamdar, Harshal; Datta, Avik; Manjari, Sunitha K; Joshi, Rajendra; Chitale, Meghana; Kihara, Daisuke; Lisewski, Andreas M; Erdin, Serkan; Venner, Eric; Lichtarge, Olivier; Rentzsch, Robert; Yang, Haixuan; Romero, Alfonso E; Bhat, Prajwal; Paccanaro, Alberto; Hamp, Tobias; Kassner, Rebecca; Seemayer, Stefan; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schaefer, Christian; Achten, Dominik; Auer, Florian; Böhm, Ariane; Braun, Tatjana; Hecht, Maximilian; Heron, Mark; Hönigschmid, Peter; Hopf, Thomas; Kaufmann, Stefanie; Kiening, Michael; Krompass, Denis; Landerer, Cedric; Mahlich, Yannick; Roos, Manfred; Björne, Jari; Salakoski, Tapio; Wong, Andrew; Shatkay, Hagit; Gatzmann, Fanny; Sommer, Ingolf; Wass, Mark N; Sternberg, Michael J E; Škunca, Nives; Supek, Fran; Bošnjak, Matko; Panov, Panče; Džeroski, Sašo; Šmuc, Tomislav; Kourmpetis, Yiannis A I; van Dijk, Aalt D J; ter Braak, Cajo J F; Zhou, Yuanpeng; Gong, Qingtian; Dong, Xinran; Tian, Weidong; Falda, Marco; Fontana, Paolo; Lavezzo, Enrico; Di Camillo, Barbara; Toppo, Stefano; Lan, Liang; Djuric, Nemanja; Guo, Yuhong; Vucetic, Slobodan; Bairoch, Amos; Linial, Michal; Babbitt, Patricia C; Brenner, Steven E; Orengo, Christine; Rost, Burkhard; Mooney, Sean D; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-01-01

    Automated annotation of protein function is challenging. As the number of sequenced genomes rapidly grows, the overwhelming majority of protein products can only be annotated computationally. If computational predictions are to be relied upon, it is crucial that the accuracy of these methods be high. Here we report the results from the first large-scale community-based Critical Assessment of protein Function Annotation (CAFA) experiment. Fifty-four methods representing the state-of-the-art for protein function prediction were evaluated on a target set of 866 proteins from eleven organisms. Two findings stand out: (i) today’s best protein function prediction algorithms significantly outperformed widely-used first-generation methods, with large gains on all types of targets; and (ii) although the top methods perform well enough to guide experiments, there is significant need for improvement of currently available tools. PMID:23353650

  13. A large-scale evaluation of computational protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Radivojac, Predrag; Clark, Wyatt T; Oron, Tal Ronnen; Schnoes, Alexandra M; Wittkop, Tobias; Sokolov, Artem; Graim, Kiley; Funk, Christopher; Verspoor, Karin; Ben-Hur, Asa; Pandey, Gaurav; Yunes, Jeffrey M; Talwalkar, Ameet S; Repo, Susanna; Souza, Michael L; Piovesan, Damiano; Casadio, Rita; Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Jianlin; Fang, Hai; Gough, Julian; Koskinen, Patrik; Törönen, Petri; Nokso-Koivisto, Jussi; Holm, Liisa; Cozzetto, Domenico; Buchan, Daniel W A; Bryson, Kevin; Jones, David T; Limaye, Bhakti; Inamdar, Harshal; Datta, Avik; Manjari, Sunitha K; Joshi, Rajendra; Chitale, Meghana; Kihara, Daisuke; Lisewski, Andreas M; Erdin, Serkan; Venner, Eric; Lichtarge, Olivier; Rentzsch, Robert; Yang, Haixuan; Romero, Alfonso E; Bhat, Prajwal; Paccanaro, Alberto; Hamp, Tobias; Kaßner, Rebecca; Seemayer, Stefan; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schaefer, Christian; Achten, Dominik; Auer, Florian; Boehm, Ariane; Braun, Tatjana; Hecht, Maximilian; Heron, Mark; Hönigschmid, Peter; Hopf, Thomas A; Kaufmann, Stefanie; Kiening, Michael; Krompass, Denis; Landerer, Cedric; Mahlich, Yannick; Roos, Manfred; Björne, Jari; Salakoski, Tapio; Wong, Andrew; Shatkay, Hagit; Gatzmann, Fanny; Sommer, Ingolf; Wass, Mark N; Sternberg, Michael J E; Škunca, Nives; Supek, Fran; Bošnjak, Matko; Panov, Panče; Džeroski, Sašo; Šmuc, Tomislav; Kourmpetis, Yiannis A I; van Dijk, Aalt D J; ter Braak, Cajo J F; Zhou, Yuanpeng; Gong, Qingtian; Dong, Xinran; Tian, Weidong; Falda, Marco; Fontana, Paolo; Lavezzo, Enrico; Di Camillo, Barbara; Toppo, Stefano; Lan, Liang; Djuric, Nemanja; Guo, Yuhong; Vucetic, Slobodan; Bairoch, Amos; Linial, Michal; Babbitt, Patricia C; Brenner, Steven E; Orengo, Christine; Rost, Burkhard; Mooney, Sean D; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-03-01

    Automated annotation of protein function is challenging. As the number of sequenced genomes rapidly grows, the overwhelming majority of protein products can only be annotated computationally. If computational predictions are to be relied upon, it is crucial that the accuracy of these methods be high. Here we report the results from the first large-scale community-based critical assessment of protein function annotation (CAFA) experiment. Fifty-four methods representing the state of the art for protein function prediction were evaluated on a target set of 866 proteins from 11 organisms. Two findings stand out: (i) today's best protein function prediction algorithms substantially outperform widely used first-generation methods, with large gains on all types of targets; and (ii) although the top methods perform well enough to guide experiments, there is considerable need for improvement of currently available tools. PMID:23353650

  14. Neuroprotective Function of 14-3-3 Proteins in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Tadayuki; Fournier, Alyson E.; Yamagata, Kanato

    2013-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins are abundantly expressed adaptor proteins that interact with a vast number of binding partners to regulate their cellular localization and function. They regulate substrate function in a number of ways including protection from dephosphorylation, regulation of enzyme activity, formation of ternary complexes and sequestration. The diversity of 14-3-3 interacting partners thus enables 14-3-3 proteins to impact a wide variety of cellular and physiological processes. 14-3-3 proteins are broadly expressed in the brain, and clinical and experimental studies have implicated 14-3-3 proteins in neurodegenerative disease. A recurring theme is that 14-3-3 proteins play important roles in pathogenesis through regulating the subcellular localization of target proteins. Here, we review the evidence that 14-3-3 proteins regulate aspects of neurodegenerative disease with a focus on their protective roles against neurodegeneration. PMID:24364034

  15. Computational design of proteins with novel structure and functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yang; Lu-Hua, Lai

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of proteins is a relatively new field, where scientists search the enormous sequence space for sequences that can fold into desired structure and perform desired functions. With the computational approach, proteins can be designed, for example, as regulators of biological processes, novel enzymes, or as biotherapeutics. These approaches not only provide valuable information for understanding of sequence-structure-function relations in proteins, but also hold promise for applications to protein engineering and biomedical research. In this review, we briefly introduce the rationale for computational protein design, then summarize the recent progress in this field, including de novo protein design, enzyme design, and design of protein-protein interactions. Challenges and future prospects of this field are also discussed. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB910300), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012AA020308), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11021463).

  16. Linking structural features of protein complexes and biological function.

    PubMed

    Sowmya, Gopichandran; Breen, Edmond J; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2015-09-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) establishes the central basis for complex cellular networks in a biological cell. Association of proteins with other proteins occurs at varying affinities, yet with a high degree of specificity. PPIs lead to diverse functionality such as catalysis, regulation, signaling, immunity, and inhibition, playing a crucial role in functional genomics. The molecular principle of such interactions is often elusive in nature. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of known protein complexes from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) is essential for the characterization of structural interface features to determine structure-function relationship. Thus, we analyzed a nonredundant dataset of 278 heterodimer protein complexes, categorized into major functional classes, for distinguishing features. Interestingly, our analysis has identified five key features (interface area, interface polar residue abundance, hydrogen bonds, solvation free energy gain from interface formation, and binding energy) that are discriminatory among the functional classes using Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Significant correlations between these PPI interface features amongst functional categories are also documented. Salt bridges correlate with interface area in regulator-inhibitors (r = 0.75). These representative features have implications for the prediction of potential function of novel protein complexes. The results provide molecular insights for better understanding of PPIs and their relation to biological functions. PMID:26131659

  17. Post-translational control of protein function with light using a LOV-intein fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Jones, D C; Mistry, I N; Tavassoli, A

    2016-04-01

    Methods for the post-translational control of protein function with light hold much value as tools in cell biology. To this end, we report a fusion protein that consists of DnaE split-inteins, flanking the light sensitive LOV2 domain of Avena sativa. The resulting chimera combines the activities of these two unrelated proteins to enable controlled formation of a functional protein via upregulation of intein splicing with blue light in bacterial and human cells. PMID:26940144

  18. Is protein classification necessary? Towards alternative approaches to function annotation

    PubMed Central

    Petrey, Donald; Honig, Barry

    2009-01-01

    The current non-redundant protein sequence database contains over seven million entries and the number of individual functional domains is significantly larger than this value. The vast quantity of data associated with these proteins poses enormous challenges to any attempt at function annotation. Classification of proteins into sequence and structural groups has been widely used as an approach to simplifying the problem. In this article we question such strategies. We describe how the multi-functionality and structural diversity of even closely related proteins confounds efforts to assign function based on overall sequence or structural similarity. Rather, we suggest that strategies that avoid classification may offer a more robust approach to protein function annotation. PMID:19269161

  19. Study of Functional and Allosteric Sites in Protein Superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Suplatov, D.; Švedas, V.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of proteins (enzymes) with a variety of low-molecular-weight compounds, as well as protein-protein interactions, is the most important factor in the regulation of their functional properties. To date, research effort has routinely focused on studying ligand binding to the functional sites of proteins (active sites of enzymes), whereas the molecular mechanisms of allosteric regulation, as well as binding to other pockets and cavities in protein structures, remained poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that allostery may be an intrinsic property of virtually all proteins. Novel approaches are needed to systematically analyze the architecture and role of various binding sites and establish the relationship between structure, function, and regulation. Computational biology, bioinformatics, and molecular modeling can be used to search for new regulatory centers, characterize their structural peculiarities, as well as compare different pockets in homologous proteins, study the molecular mechanisms of allostery, and understand the communication between topologically independent binding sites in protein structures. The establishment of an evolutionary relationship between different binding centers within protein superfamilies and the discovery of new functional and allosteric (regulatory) sites using computational approaches can improve our understanding of the structure-function relationship in proteins and provide new opportunities for drug design and enzyme engineering. PMID:26798490

  20. A Survey of Computational Intelligence Techniques in Protein Function Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Arvind Kumar; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    During the past, there was a massive growth of knowledge of unknown proteins with the advancement of high throughput microarray technologies. Protein function prediction is the most challenging problem in bioinformatics. In the past, the homology based approaches were used to predict the protein function, but they failed when a new protein was different from the previous one. Therefore, to alleviate the problems associated with homology based traditional approaches, numerous computational intelligence techniques have been proposed in the recent past. This paper presents a state-of-the-art comprehensive review of various computational intelligence techniques for protein function predictions using sequence, structure, protein-protein interaction network, and gene expression data used in wide areas of applications such as prediction of DNA and RNA binding sites, subcellular localization, enzyme functions, signal peptides, catalytic residues, nuclear/G-protein coupled receptors, membrane proteins, and pathway analysis from gene expression datasets. This paper also summarizes the result obtained by many researchers to solve these problems by using computational intelligence techniques with appropriate datasets to improve the prediction performance. The summary shows that ensemble classifiers and integration of multiple heterogeneous data are useful for protein function prediction. PMID:25574395

  1. Protein Carbonylation and Adipocyte Mitochondrial Function*

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Jessica M.; Hahn, Wendy S.; Stone, Matthew D.; Inda, Jacob J.; Droullard, David J.; Kuzmicic, Jovan P.; Donoghue, Margaret A.; Long, Eric K.; Armien, Anibal G.; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar; Griffin, Timothy J.; Bernlohr, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonylation is the covalent, non-reversible modification of the side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues by lipid peroxidation end products such as 4-hydroxy- and 4-oxononenal. In adipose tissue the effects of such modifications are associated with increased oxidative stress and metabolic dysregulation centered on mitochondrial energy metabolism. To address the role of protein carbonylation in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction, quantitative proteomics was employed to identify specific targets of carbonylation in GSTA4-silenced or overexpressing 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GSTA4-silenced adipocytes displayed elevated carbonylation of several key mitochondrial proteins including the phosphate carrier protein, NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 and 3, translocase of inner mitochondrial membrane 50, and valyl-tRNA synthetase. Elevated protein carbonylation is accompanied by diminished complex I activity, impaired respiration, increased superoxide production, and a reduction in membrane potential without changes in mitochondrial number, area, or density. Silencing of the phosphate carrier or NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 or 3 in 3T3-L1 cells results in decreased basal and maximal respiration. These results suggest that protein carbonylation plays a major instigating role in cytokine-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and may be linked to the development of insulin resistance in the adipocyte. PMID:22822087

  2. Artificial supramolecular protein assemblies as functional high-order protein scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Na; Jung, Yongwon

    2016-06-28

    Supramolecular assemblies of protein building blocks potentially offer unique biomaterials with unmatched functionalities as well as atomic level structural accuracy. An increasing number of assembling strategies have been reported for the fabrication of diverse artificial protein assemblies, ranging from rather heterogeneous protein oligomers to computationally designed discrete protein architectures. In this perspective, we discuss these artificial protein supramolecules in terms of their use as highly potent high-order protein scaffolds that can display various functional proteins with precise structural and valency control. Following a brief overview of current approaches for protein assembly, several examples of functional protein assemblies have been introduced, with a particular focus on our recent report of valency-controlled green fluorescent protein nano-assemblies. Our supramolecular protein scaffolds allow building a series of polygonal assemblies of functional binding proteins, which provide unprecedented ways to study multivalent protein interactions. Even with many remaining challenges, there is unlimited potential of artificial protein scaffolds in many fields from nanotechnology to vaccine development. PMID:26964520

  3. Bioinformatics pipeline for functional identification and characterization of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarzyńska, Agnieszka; Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; Krzywkowski, Tomasz; Świerkula, Katarzyna; PlÄ der, Wojciech; Przybecki, Zbigniew

    2015-09-01

    The new sequencing methods, called Next Generation Sequencing gives an opportunity to possess a vast amount of data in short time. This data requires structural and functional annotation. Functional identification and characterization of predicted proteins could be done by in silico approches, thanks to a numerous computational tools available nowadays. However, there is a need to confirm the results of proteins function prediction using different programs and comparing the results or confirm experimentally. Here we present a bioinformatics pipeline for structural and functional annotation of proteins.

  4. Composition and functional properties of Lupinus campestris protein isolates.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ambriz, S L; Martínez-Ayala, A L; Millán, F; Dávila-Ortíz, G

    2005-09-01

    Protein isolates from L. campestris and soybean seeds were prepared using isoelectric precipitation (PI) and micellization (MI) procedures. The amount of protein recovered was considerably higher with the isoelectric precipitation than with the micellization procedure (60% and 30%, respectively). Protein contents were higher than 90% in protein isolates. Antinutritional factors content (alkaloids, lectins, and tannins) were reduced to innocuous levels after protein isolate preparation. Minimum protein solubility for the precipitated lupin protein isolate (LPI) was at pH 4.0, and between pH 4 and 6 for the micellized lupin protein isolate (LMI), increasing at both extremes of the pH scale. Water absorption for the LMI was 1.3 ml/g of protein and its oil absorption 2.2 ml/g of protein. The LPI had 1.7 ml/g of protein in both water and oil absorption. Foaming capacity and stability was pH-dependent. Foaming capacity was higher at pH 2 and lower near the protein isoelectric points. Minimum protein concentration for gelation in LMI was 8% w/v at pH 4, while for LPI was 6% at pH 4 and 6. Amino acid composition in L. campestris flour and protein isolates was high in lysine and low in methionine. Most of the essential amino acids in lupin protein isolates were at acceptable levels compared to a reference pattern for infants and adults. The electrophoretic pattern of both protein isolates showed three bands with different mobilities, suggesting that the protein fractions belong to alpha-conglutin (11S-like protein), beta-conglutin (7S-like protein) and gamma-conglutin. It is proven that some of the functional properties of L. campestris protein isolates are similar to those soybean protein isolates recovered under equal conditions. PMID:16187011

  5. Integrative analysis of human protein, function and disease networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wu, Aiping; Pellegrini, Matteo; Wang, Xiaofan

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks serve as a powerful tool for unraveling protein functions, disease-gene and disease-disease associations. However, a direct strategy for integrating protein interaction, protein function and diseases is still absent. Moreover, the interrelated relationships among these three levels are poorly understood. Here we present a novel systematic method to integrate protein interaction, function, and disease networks. We first identified topological modules in human protein interaction data using the network topological algorithm (NeTA) we previously developed. The resulting modules were then associated with functional terms using Gene Ontology to obtain functional modules. Finally, disease modules were constructed by associating the modules with OMIM and GWAS. We found that most topological modules have cohesive structure, significant pathway annotations and good modularity. Most functional modules (70.6%) fully cover corresponding topological modules, and most disease modules (88.5%) are fully covered by the corresponding functional modules. Furthermore, we identified several protein modules of interest that we describe in detail, which demonstrate the power of our integrative approach. This approach allows us to link genes, and pathways with their corresponding disorders, which may ultimately help us to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease. PMID:26399914

  6. Functional assembly of a randomly cleaved protein.

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, K; Schimmel, P

    1992-01-01

    The sequence of a 939-amino acid polypeptide that is a member of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase class of enzymes has been aligned with sequences of 15 related proteins. This alignment guided the design of 18 fragment pairs that were tested for internal sequence complementarity by reconstitution of enzyme activity. Reconstitution was achieved with fragments that divide the protein at both nonconserved and conserved sequences, including locations proximal to or within elements believed to form critical elements of secondary structure. Structure assembly is sufficiently flexible to accommodate fusion of short segments of unrelated sequences at fragment junctions. Complementary chain packing interactions and chain flexibility appear to be widely distributed throughout the sequence and are sufficient to reconstruct large three-dimensional structures from an array of disconnected pieces. The results may have implications for the evolution and assembly of large proteins. Images PMID:1542687

  7. Infrared Structural Biology: Detect Functionally Important Structural Motions of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Aihua

    Proteins are dynamic. Lack of dynamic structures of proteins hampers our understanding of protein functions. Infrared structural biology (IRSB) is an emerging technology. There are several advantages of IRSB for mechanistic studies of proteins: (1) its excellent dynamic range (detecting structural motions from picoseconds to >= seconds); (2) its high structural sensitivity (detect tiny but functionally important structural motions such as proton transfer and changes in hydrogen bonding interaction); (3) its ability to detect different structural motions simultaneously. Successful development of infrared structural biology demands not only new experimental techniques (from infrared technologies to chemical synthesis and cell biology), but also new data processing (how to translate infrared signals into quantitative structural information of proteins). These topics will be discussed as well as examples of how to use IRSB to study structure-function relationship of proteins. This work was supported by NSF DBI1338097 and OCAST HR10-078.

  8. The Structure and Function of Non-Collagenous Bone Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hook, Magnus; McQuillan, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The research done under the cooperative research agreement for the project titled 'The structure and function of non-collagenous bone proteins' represented the first phase of an ongoing program to define the structural and functional relationships of the principal noncollagenous proteins in bone. An ultimate goal of this research is to enable design and execution of useful pharmacological compounds that will have a beneficial effect in treatment of osteoporosis, both land-based and induced by long-duration space travel. The goals of the now complete first phase were as follows: 1. Establish and/or develop powerful recombinant protein expression systems; 2. Develop and refine isolation and purification of recombinant proteins; 3. Express wild-type non-collagenous bone proteins; 4. Express site-specific mutant proteins and domains of wild-type proteins to enhance likelihood of crystal formation for subsequent solution of structure.

  9. Biases in the Experimental Annotations of Protein Function and Their Effect on Our Understanding of Protein Function Space

    PubMed Central

    Schnoes, Alexandra M.; Ream, David C.; Thorman, Alexander W.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-01-01

    The ongoing functional annotation of proteins relies upon the work of curators to capture experimental findings from scientific literature and apply them to protein sequence and structure data. However, with the increasing use of high-throughput experimental assays, a small number of experimental studies dominate the functional protein annotations collected in databases. Here, we investigate just how prevalent is the “few articles - many proteins” phenomenon. We examine the experimentally validated annotation of proteins provided by several groups in the GO Consortium, and show that the distribution of proteins per published study is exponential, with 0.14% of articles providing the source of annotations for 25% of the proteins in the UniProt-GOA compilation. Since each of the dominant articles describes the use of an assay that can find only one function or a small group of functions, this leads to substantial biases in what we know about the function of many proteins. Mass-spectrometry, microscopy and RNAi experiments dominate high throughput experiments. Consequently, the functional information derived from these experiments is mostly of the subcellular location of proteins, and of the participation of proteins in embryonic developmental pathways. For some organisms, the information provided by different studies overlap by a large amount. We also show that the information provided by high throughput experiments is less specific than those provided by low throughput experiments. Given the experimental techniques available, certain biases in protein function annotation due to high-throughput experiments are unavoidable. Knowing that these biases exist and understanding their characteristics and extent is important for database curators, developers of function annotation programs, and anyone who uses protein function annotation data to plan experiments. PMID:23737737

  10. Protein Structure and Function Prediction Using I-TASSER

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianyi; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    I-TASSER is a hierarchical protocol for automated protein structure prediction and structure-based function annotation. Starting from the amino acid sequence of target proteins, I-TASSER first generates full-length atomic structural models from multiple threading alignments and iterative structural assembly simulations followed by atomic-level structure refinement. The biological functions of the protein, including ligand-binding sites, enzyme commission number, and gene ontology terms, are then inferred from known protein function databases based on sequence and structure profile comparisons. I-TASSER is freely available as both an on-line server and a stand-alone package. This unit describes how to use the I-TASSER protocol to generate structure and function prediction and how to interpret the prediction results, as well as alternative approaches for further improving the I-TASSER modeling quality for distant-homologous and multi-domain protein targets. PMID:26678386

  11. Collective Dynamics Differentiates Functional Divergence in Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Glembo, Tyler J.; Farrell, Daniel W.; Gerek, Z. Nevin; Thorpe, M. F.; Ozkan, S. Banu

    2012-01-01

    Protein evolution is most commonly studied by analyzing related protein sequences and generating ancestral sequences through Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood methods, and/or by resurrecting ancestral proteins in the lab and performing ligand binding studies to determine function. Structural and dynamic evolution have largely been left out of molecular evolution studies. Here we incorporate both structure and dynamics to elucidate the molecular principles behind the divergence in the evolutionary path of the steroid receptor proteins. We determine the likely structure of three evolutionarily diverged ancestral steroid receptor proteins using the Zipping and Assembly Method with FRODA (ZAMF). Our predictions are within ∼2.7 Å all-atom RMSD of the respective crystal structures of the ancestral steroid receptors. Beyond static structure prediction, a particular feature of ZAMF is that it generates protein dynamics information. We investigate the differences in conformational dynamics of diverged proteins by obtaining the most collective motion through essential dynamics. Strikingly, our analysis shows that evolutionarily diverged proteins of the same family do not share the same dynamic subspace, while those sharing the same function are simultaneously clustered together and distant from those, that have functionally diverged. Dynamic analysis also enables those mutations that most affect dynamics to be identified. It correctly predicts all mutations (functional and permissive) necessary to evolve new function and ∼60% of permissive mutations necessary to recover ancestral function. PMID:22479170

  12. Discovering Distinct Functional Modules of Specific Cancer Types Using Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ru; Wang, Xiaosheng; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Background. The molecular profiles exhibited in different cancer types are very different; hence, discovering distinct functional modules associated with specific cancer types is very important to understand the distinct functions associated with them. Protein-protein interaction networks carry vital information about molecular interactions in cellular systems, and identification of functional modules (subgraphs) in these networks is one of the most important applications of biological network analysis. Results. In this study, we developed a new graph theory based method to identify distinct functional modules from nine different cancer protein-protein interaction networks. The method is composed of three major steps: (i) extracting modules from protein-protein interaction networks using network clustering algorithms; (ii) identifying distinct subgraphs from the derived modules; and (iii) identifying distinct subgraph patterns from distinct subgraphs. The subgraph patterns were evaluated using experimentally determined cancer-specific protein-protein interaction data from the Ingenuity knowledgebase, to identify distinct functional modules that are specific to each cancer type. Conclusion. We identified cancer-type specific subgraph patterns that may represent the functional modules involved in the molecular pathogenesis of different cancer types. Our method can serve as an effective tool to discover cancer-type specific functional modules from large protein-protein interaction networks. PMID:26495282

  13. The AAA+ superfamily of functionally diverse proteins

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Jamie; Thibault, Guillaume; Houry, Walid A

    2008-01-01

    The AAA+ superfamily is a large and functionally diverse superfamily of NTPases that are characterized by a conserved nucleotide-binding and catalytic module, the AAA+ module. Members are involved in an astonishing range of different cellular processes, attaining this functional diversity through additions of structural motifs and modifications to the core AAA+ module. PMID:18466635

  14. Influence of hinge point on flexible flap aerodynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Zhao, H.; Ye, Z.; Wu, P.; Li, C.

    2013-12-01

    Large scale wind turbines lead to increasing blade lengths and weights, which presents new challenges for blade design. This paper selects NREL S809 airfoil, uses the parameterized technology to realize the flexible trailing edge deformation, researches the static aerodynamic characteristics of wind turbine blade airfoil with flexible deformation, and the dynamic aerodynamic characteristics in the process of continuous deformation, analyses the influence of hinge point position on flexible flap aerodynamic performance, in order to further realize the flexible wind turbine blade design and provides some references for the active control scheme. The results show that compared with the original airfoil, proper trailing edge deformation can improve the lift coefficient, reduce the drag coefficient, and thereby more efficiently realize flow field active control. With hinge point moving forward, total aerodynamic performance of flexible flap improves. Positive swing angle can push the transition point backward, thus postpones the occurrence of the transition phenomenon.

  15. Protein mislocalization: mechanisms, functions and clinical applications in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    The changes from normal cells to cancer cells are primarily regulated by genome instability, which foster hallmark functions of cancer through multiple mechanisms including protein mislocalization. Mislocalization of these proteins, including oncoproteins, tumor suppressors, and other cancer-related proteins, can interfere with normal cellular function and cooperatively drive tumor development and metastasis. This review describes the cancer-related effects of protein subcellular mislocalization, the related mislocalization mechanisms, and the potential application of this knowledge to cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. PMID:24709009

  16. Characterization of Functionalized Nanoporous Supports for Protein Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Chenghong; Shin, Yongsoon; Magnuson, Jon K.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Lasure, Linda L.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Liu, Jun; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2006-11-28

    Here we characterize a highly efficient approach for protein confinement and enzyme immobilization in NH2- or HOOC- functionalized mesoporous silica (FMS) with pore sizes as large as tens of nanometers. We observed a dramatic increase of enzyme loading in both enzyme activity and protein amount when using appropriate FMS in comparison with unfunctionalized mesoporous silica and normal porous silica. In principle, the general approach described here should be applicable to many enzymes, proteins, and protein complexes since both pore sizes and functional groups of FMS are controllable.

  17. Fish protein hydrolysates: production, biochemical, and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, H G; Rasco, B A

    2000-01-01

    Considerable amounts of fish processing byproducts are discarded each year. By developing enzyme technologies for protein recovery and modification, production of a broad spectrum of food ingredients and industrial products may be possible. Hydrolyzed vegetable and milk proteins are widely used food ingredients. There are few hydrolyzed fish protein foods with the exception of East Asian condiments and sauces. This review describes various manufacturing techniques for fish protein hydrolysates using acid, base, endogenous enzymes, and added bacterial or digestive proteases. The chemical and biochemical characteristics of hydrolyzed fish proteins are discussed. In addition, functional properties of fish protein hydrolysates are described, including solubility, water-holding capacity, emulsification, and foam-forming ability. Possible applications of fish protein hydrolysates in food systems are provided, and comparison with other food protein hydrolysates where pertinent. PMID:10674201

  18. Early Results of a New Rotating Hinge Knee Implant

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, Hans-Joachim; Miehlke, Rolf; Schuh, Reinhard; Kubista, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Background. Indication for rotating hinge (RH) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) includes primary and revision cases, with contradictory results. The aim of this study was to report prospective early results of a new modular rotating hinge TKA (EnduRo). For this implant several new design features and a new bearing material (carbon-fiber reinforced poly-ether-ether-ketone) have been developed. Furthermore, we tried to establish a new classification of failure modes for revision TKA. Methods. 152 EnduRo rotating-hinge prostheses were implanted in two centers. In 90 patients a primary implantation has been performed and 62 patients were revision cases. Knee Society Score (KSS), Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Oxford Knee Score (OKS), and Range of motion (ROM) were assessed before surgery, 3 months postoperatively, 12 months postoperatively, and annually thereafter. We defined 3 types of complications: Type 1, infection; type 2, periprosthetic complications; type 3, implant failures. Results. KSS, WOMAC, OKS, and ROM revealed significant improvements between the preoperative and the follow-up investigations. There were 14 complications (9.2%) leading to revision surgery, predominantly type 2. Conclusion. Our study shows excellent clinical results of the EnduRo TKA. Furthermore, no premature material failure or unusual biological response to the new bearing material could be detected. PMID:25089279

  19. Biomechanical Analysis of the Effects of Bilateral Hinged Knee Bracing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hangil; Ha, Dokyeong; Kang, Yeoun-Seung; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2016-01-01

    This research analyzed the effect of bilateral hinged knee braces on a healthy knee from a biomechanical frame in vivo. This was accomplished by fitting a knee brace with two customized wireless force/torque (F/T) sensors that could readily record force and torque during live motion, while the kinetics at the knee were computed using the inverse dynamics of the motion capture and force plate data. Four tasks to test the brace’s effects were drop vertical jumping, pivoting, stop vertical jumping, and cutting. The results showed that the hinges in the knee brace can absorb up to 18% of the force and 2.7% of the torque at the knee during various athletic motions. Thus, the hinges demonstrated minimal effect in reducing the mechanical load on the knee. There were limitations concerning the consistency of the motions performed by the subjects during the trials and the influence of the other portions of the brace to evaluate the overall effectiveness of the brace as a whole. Future works may incorporate a fatigue protocol and injured subjects to better determine the effects of the brace. There is still a need for more research on the biomechanical influence of knee braces to develop safer and more effective products. PMID:27379233

  20. Text Mining Improves Prediction of Protein Functional Sites

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Judith D.; Ravikumar, Komandur E.

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach that integrates protein structure analysis and text mining for protein functional site prediction, called LEAP-FS (Literature Enhanced Automated Prediction of Functional Sites). The structure analysis was carried out using Dynamics Perturbation Analysis (DPA), which predicts functional sites at control points where interactions greatly perturb protein vibrations. The text mining extracts mentions of residues in the literature, and predicts that residues mentioned are functionally important. We assessed the significance of each of these methods by analyzing their performance in finding known functional sites (specifically, small-molecule binding sites and catalytic sites) in about 100,000 publicly available protein structures. The DPA predictions recapitulated many of the functional site annotations and preferentially recovered binding sites annotated as biologically relevant vs. those annotated as potentially spurious. The text-based predictions were also substantially supported by the functional site annotations: compared to other residues, residues mentioned in text were roughly six times more likely to be found in a functional site. The overlap of predictions with annotations improved when the text-based and structure-based methods agreed. Our analysis also yielded new high-quality predictions of many functional site residues that were not catalogued in the curated data sources we inspected. We conclude that both DPA and text mining independently provide valuable high-throughput protein functional site predictions, and that integrating the two methods using LEAP-FS further improves the quality of these predictions. PMID:22393388

  1. Insights into Hox Protein Function from a Large Scale Combinatorial Analysis of Protein Domains

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K.; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-01-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences. PMID:22046139

  2. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Merabet, Samir; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-10-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences. PMID:22046139

  3. Architecture and Function of Mechanosensitive Membrane Protein Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D.; Klug, William S.; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments have revealed that membrane proteins can form two-dimensional clusters with regular translational and orientational protein arrangements, which may allow cells to modulate protein function. However, the physical mechanisms yielding supramolecular organization and collective function of membrane proteins remain largely unknown. Here we show that bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between membrane proteins can yield regular and distinctive lattice architectures of protein clusters, and may provide a link between lattice architecture and lattice function. Using the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) as a model system, we obtain relations between the shape of MscL and the supramolecular architecture of MscL lattices. We predict that the tetrameric and pentameric MscL symmetries observed in previous structural studies yield distinct lattice architectures of MscL clusters and that, in turn, these distinct MscL lattice architectures yield distinct lattice activation barriers. Our results suggest general physical mechanisms linking protein symmetry, the lattice architecture of membrane protein clusters, and the collective function of membrane protein lattices. PMID:26771082

  4. The formation and the functionality of soy protein-dextran and soy protein mannose conjugates.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thermally modified, readily reconstituted, soy protein isolate (SPI) demonstrated improved heat stability and cold-set gel functionality when prepared at 8% protein (w/w) for three hours at 95°C compared to the control SPI. When SPI was heated at 3% protein (w/w) equivalently, prior to reconstitu...

  5. Accuracy of functional surfaces on comparatively modeled protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jieling; Dundas, Joe; Kachalo, Sema; Ouyang, Zheng; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Identification and characterization of protein functional surfaces are important for predicting protein function, understanding enzyme mechanism, and docking small compounds to proteins. As the rapid speed of accumulation of protein sequence information far exceeds that of structures, constructing accurate models of protein functional surfaces and identify their key elements become increasingly important. A promising approach is to build comparative models from sequences using known structural templates such as those obtained from structural genome projects. Here we assess how well this approach works in modeling binding surfaces. By systematically building three-dimensional comparative models of proteins using Modeller, we determine how well functional surfaces can be accurately reproduced. We use an alpha shape based pocket algorithm to compute all pockets on the modeled structures, and conduct a large-scale computation of similarity measurements (pocket RMSD and fraction of functional atoms captured) for 26,590 modeled enzyme protein structures. Overall, we find that when the sequence fragment of the binding surfaces has more than 45% identity to that of the tempalte protein, the modeled surfaces have on average an RMSD of 0.5 Å, and contain 48% or more of the binding surface atoms, with nearly all of the important atoms in the signatures of binding pockets captured. PMID:21541664

  6. Exploring Protein Dynamics Space: The Dynasome as the Missing Link between Protein Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Hensen, Ulf; Meyer, Tim; Haas, Jürgen; Rex, René; Vriend, Gert; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are usually described and classified according to amino acid sequence, structure or function. Here, we develop a minimally biased scheme to compare and classify proteins according to their internal mobility patterns. This approach is based on the notion that proteins not only fold into recurring structural motifs but might also be carrying out only a limited set of recurring mobility motifs. The complete set of these patterns, which we tentatively call the dynasome, spans a multi-dimensional space with axes, the dynasome descriptors, characterizing different aspects of protein dynamics. The unique dynamic fingerprint of each protein is represented as a vector in the dynasome space. The difference between any two vectors, consequently, gives a reliable measure of the difference between the corresponding protein dynamics. We characterize the properties of the dynasome by comparing the dynamics fingerprints obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of 112 proteins but our approach is, in principle, not restricted to any specific source of data of protein dynamics. We conclude that: 1. the dynasome consists of a continuum of proteins, rather than well separated classes. 2. For the majority of proteins we observe strong correlations between structure and dynamics. 3. Proteins with similar function carry out similar dynamics, which suggests a new method to improve protein function annotation based on protein dynamics. PMID:22606222

  7. UET: a database of evolutionarily-predicted functional determinants of protein sequences that cluster as functional sites in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Lua, Rhonald C; Wilson, Stephen J; Konecki, Daniel M; Wilkins, Angela D; Venner, Eric; Morgan, Daniel H; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The structure and function of proteins underlie most aspects of biology and their mutational perturbations often cause disease. To identify the molecular determinants of function as well as targets for drugs, it is central to characterize the important residues and how they cluster to form functional sites. The Evolutionary Trace (ET) achieves this by ranking the functional and structural importance of the protein sequence positions. ET uses evolutionary distances to estimate functional distances and correlates genotype variations with those in the fitness phenotype. Thus, ET ranks are worse for sequence positions that vary among evolutionarily closer homologs but better for positions that vary mostly among distant homologs. This approach identifies functional determinants, predicts function, guides the mutational redesign of functional and allosteric specificity, and interprets the action of coding sequence variations in proteins, people and populations. Now, the UET database offers pre-computed ET analyses for the protein structure databank, and on-the-fly analysis of any protein sequence. A web interface retrieves ET rankings of sequence positions and maps results to a structure to identify functionally important regions. This UET database integrates several ways of viewing the results on the protein sequence or structure and can be found at http://mammoth.bcm.tmc.edu/uet/. PMID:26590254

  8. UET: a database of evolutionarily-predicted functional determinants of protein sequences that cluster as functional sites in protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Lua, Rhonald C.; Wilson, Stephen J.; Konecki, Daniel M.; Wilkins, Angela D.; Venner, Eric; Morgan, Daniel H.; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The structure and function of proteins underlie most aspects of biology and their mutational perturbations often cause disease. To identify the molecular determinants of function as well as targets for drugs, it is central to characterize the important residues and how they cluster to form functional sites. The Evolutionary Trace (ET) achieves this by ranking the functional and structural importance of the protein sequence positions. ET uses evolutionary distances to estimate functional distances and correlates genotype variations with those in the fitness phenotype. Thus, ET ranks are worse for sequence positions that vary among evolutionarily closer homologs but better for positions that vary mostly among distant homologs. This approach identifies functional determinants, predicts function, guides the mutational redesign of functional and allosteric specificity, and interprets the action of coding sequence variations in proteins, people and populations. Now, the UET database offers pre-computed ET analyses for the protein structure databank, and on-the-fly analysis of any protein sequence. A web interface retrieves ET rankings of sequence positions and maps results to a structure to identify functionally important regions. This UET database integrates several ways of viewing the results on the protein sequence or structure and can be found at http://mammoth.bcm.tmc.edu/uet/. PMID:26590254

  9. KNEE ARTHROPLASTY REVISION WITH A CONSTRAINED IMPLANT USING HINGE AND ROTATING TIBIAL BASIS

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Fabio Jansen; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Veronesi, Bruno Azevedo; Guimarães, Tales Mollica; Pécora, José Ricardo; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the results of total knee arthoplasty revisions performed in high complexity cases, with large bone defects or serious ligament deficiencies using a constrained implant hinge associated to a rotating tibial basis. Methods: We evaluated 11 patients in which we used the constrained implant hinge associated to rotating tibial basis, with minimum follow-up of two years. The indications for the procedure included instability, septic loosening, late postoperative infection without loosening and periprosthetic fracture. We evaluated the knee range of movement and functional outcomes by the Knee Society Score (KSS) e Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), besides the presence of complications. Results: All patients achieved 5o to 85o minimum range of motion at 1 year postoperatively and, in the present evaluation, KSS ranged from 67 to 95. Three patients had no complications until the last evaluation and two patients required implant revision. Conclusion: Despite the complications rate observed, the functional result were acceptable for most patients, and it proved being a viable alternative, especially for patients with low functional demand. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:26997909

  10. Elastic Properties of Protein Functionalized Nanoporous Polymer Films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoyu; Black, Charles T; Akcora, Pinar

    2016-01-12

    Retaining the conformational structure and bioactivity of immobilized proteins is important for biosensor designs and drug delivery systems. Confined environments often lead to changes in conformation and functions of proteins. In this study, lysozyme is chemically tethered into nanopores of polystyrene thin films, and submicron pores in poly(methyl methacrylate) films are functionalized with streptavidin. Nanoindentation experiments show that stiffness of streptavidin increases with decreasing submicron pore sizes. Lysozymes in polystyrene nanopores are found to behave stiffer than the submicron pore sizes and still retain their specific bioactivity relative to the proteins on flat surfaces. Our results show that protein functionalized ordered nanoporous polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) films present heterogeneous elasticity and can be used to study interactions between free proteins and designed surfaces. PMID:26672623

  11. Elastic properties of protein functionalized nanoporous polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Charles T. Black; Wang, Haoyu; Akcora, Pinar

    2015-12-16

    Retaining the conformational structure and bioactivity of immobilized proteins is important for biosensor designs and drug delivery systems. Confined environments often lead to changes in conformation and functions of proteins. In this study, lysozyme is chemically tethered into nanopores of polystyrene thin films, and submicron pores in poly(methyl methacrylate) films are functionalized with streptavidin. Nanoindentation experiments show that stiffness of streptavidin increases with decreasing submicron pore sizes. Lysozymes in polystyrene nanopores are found to behave stiffer than the submicron pore sizes and still retain their specific bioactivity relative to the proteins on flat surfaces. Lastly, our results show that protein functionalized ordered nanoporous polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) films present heterogeneous elasticity and can be used to study interactions between free proteins and designed surfaces.

  12. A functional protein retention and release multilayer with high stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Kun; An, Qi; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-04-01

    Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by varying the number of capping layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the protein-loaded interfacial layers could not only be used to construct catalytic-active interfaces, but also be integrated as the power-generating unit to propel a macroscopic floating device.Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by

  13. Biochemical functional predictions for protein structures of unknown or uncertain function

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Caitlyn L.; Beuning, Penny J.; Ondrechen, Mary Jo

    2015-01-01

    With the exponential growth in the determination of protein sequences and structures via genome sequencing and structural genomics efforts, there is a growing need for reliable computational methods to determine the biochemical function of these proteins. This paper reviews the efforts to address the challenge of annotating the function at the molecular level of uncharacterized proteins. While sequence- and three-dimensional-structure-based methods for protein function prediction have been reviewed previously, the recent trends in local structure-based methods have received less attention. These local structure-based methods are the primary focus of this review. Computational methods have been developed to predict the residues important for catalysis and the local spatial arrangements of these residues can be used to identify protein function. In addition, the combination of different types of methods can help obtain more information and better predictions of function for proteins of unknown function. Global initiatives, including the Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI), COMputational BRidges to EXperiments (COMBREX), and the Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA), are evaluating and testing the different approaches to predicting the function of proteins of unknown function. These initiatives and global collaborations will increase the capability and reliability of methods to predict biochemical function computationally and will add substantial value to the current volume of structural genomics data by reducing the number of absent or inaccurate functional annotations. PMID:25848497

  14. A stepwise approach for the management of capsular contraction syndrome in hinge-based accommodative intraocular lenses

    PubMed Central

    Page, Timothy P; Whitman, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study are to define the various stages of capsular contraction syndrome (CCS) and its effect on refractive error with hinge-based accommodating intraocular lenses (IOLs) and to describe a systematic approach for the management of the different stages of CCS. Methods Hinge-based accommodative IOLs function via flexible hinges that vault the optic forward during accommodation. However, it is the flexibility of the IOL that makes it prone to deformation in the event of CCS. The signs of CCS are identified and described as posterior capsular striae, fibrotic bands across the anterior or posterior capsule, and capsule opacification. Various degrees of CCS may affect hinge-based accommodating IOLs in a spectrum from subtle changes in IOL appearance to significant increases in refractive error and loss of uncorrected visual acuity. The signs of CCS and its effect on IOL position and the resulting changes in refractive error are matched to appropriate treatment plans. Results A surgeon can avoid CCS and manage the condition if familiar with the early signs of CCS. If CCS is identified, yttrium–aluminum–garnet laser capsulotomy should be considered. If moderate CCS occurs, it may be effectively treated with insertion of a capsular tension ring. If CCS is allowed to progress to advanced stages, an IOL exchange may be necessary. Conclusion Surgeons should be familiar with the stages of CCS and subsequent interventions. The steps outlined in this article help to guide surgeons in the prevention and management of CCS with hinge-based accommodative IOLs in order to provide improved refractive outcomes for patients. PMID:27354757

  15. A Correlation between Protein Function and Ligand Binding Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge, Matthew D.; Bokemper, Michael; Copeland, Jennifer C.; Stark, Jaime L.; Powers, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We report that proteins with the same function bind the same set of small molecules from a standardized chemical library. This observation led to a quantifiable and rapidly adaptable method for protein functional analysis using experimentally-derived ligand binding profiles. Ligand binding is measured using a high-throughput NMR ligand affinity screen with a structurally diverse chemical library. The method was demonstrated using a set of 19 proteins with a range of functions. A statistically significant similarity in ligand binding profiles was only observed between the two functionally identical albumins and between the five functionally similar amylases. This new approach is independent of sequence, structure or evolutionary information, and therefore, extends our ability to analyze and functionally annotate novel genes. PMID:21366353

  16. Regulation of bacterial RecA protein function.

    PubMed

    Cox, Michael M

    2007-01-01

    The RecA protein is a recombinase functioning in recombinational DNA repair in bacteria. RecA is regulated at many levels. The expression of the recA gene is regulated within the SOS response. The activity of the RecA protein itself is autoregulated by its own C-terminus. RecA is also regulated by the action of other proteins. To date, these include the RecF, RecO, RecR, DinI, RecX, RdgC, PsiB, and UvrD proteins. The SSB protein also indirectly affects RecA function by competing for ssDNA binding sites. The RecO and RecR, and possibly the RecF proteins, all facilitate RecA loading onto SSB-coated ssDNA. The RecX protein blocks RecA filament extension, and may have other effects on RecA activity. The DinI protein stabilizes RecA filaments. The RdgC protein binds to dsDNA and blocks RecA access to dsDNA. The PsiB protein, encoded by F plasmids, is uncharacterized, but may inhibit RecA in some manner. The UvrD helicase removes RecA filaments from RecA. All of these proteins function in a network that determines where and how RecA functions. Additional regulatory proteins may remain to be discovered. The elaborate regulatory pattern is likely to be reprised for RecA homologues in archaeans and eukaryotes. PMID:17364684

  17. Classifying proteins into functional groups based on all-versus-all BLAST of 10 million proteins.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Natali; Higdon, Roger; Broomall, William; Stanberry, Larissa; Welch, Dean; Lu, Wei; Haynes, Winston; Barga, Roger; Kolker, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    To address the monumental challenge of assigning function to millions of sequenced proteins, we completed the first of a kind all-versus-all sequence alignments using BLAST for 9.9 million proteins in the UniRef100 database. Microsoft Windows Azure produced over 3 billion filtered records in 6 days using 475 eight-core virtual machines. Protein classification into functional groups was then performed using Hive and custom jars implemented on top of Apache Hadoop utilizing the MapReduce paradigm. First, using the Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COG) database, a length normalized bit score (LNBS) was determined to be the best similarity measure for classification of proteins. LNBS achieved sensitivity and specificity of 98% each. Second, out of 5.1 million bacterial proteins, about two-thirds were assigned to significantly extended COG groups, encompassing 30 times more assigned proteins. Third, the remaining proteins were classified into protein functional groups using an innovative implementation of a single-linkage algorithm on an in-house Hadoop compute cluster. This implementation significantly reduces the run time for nonindexed queries and optimizes efficient clustering on a large scale. The performance was also verified on Amazon Elastic MapReduce. This clustering assigned nearly 2 million proteins to approximately half a million different functional groups. A similar approach was applied to classify 2.8 million eukaryotic sequences resulting in over 1 million proteins being assign to existing KOG groups and the remainder clustered into 100,000 functional groups. PMID:21809957

  18. Functional correlations of respiratory syncytial virus proteins to intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jillian N; Reddy, Krishna D; Uversky, Vladimir N; Teng, Michael N

    2016-04-26

    Protein intrinsic disorder is an important characteristic demonstrated by the absence of higher order structure, and is commonly detected in multifunctional proteins encoded by RNA viruses. Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins exhibit high flexibility and solvent accessibility, which permit several distinct protein functions, including but not limited to binding of multiple partners and accessibility for post-translational modifications. IDR-containing viral proteins can therefore execute various functional roles to enable productive viral replication. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a globally circulating, non-segmented, negative sense (NNS) RNA virus that causes severe lower respiratory infections. In this study, we performed a comprehensive evaluation of predicted intrinsic disorder of the RSV proteome to better understand the functional role of RSV protein IDRs. We included 27 RSV strains to sample major RSV subtypes and genotypes, as well as geographic and temporal isolate differences. Several types of disorder predictions were applied to the RSV proteome, including per-residue (PONDR®-FIT and PONDR® VL-XT), binary (CH, CDF, CH-CDF), and disorder-based interactions (ANCHOR and MoRFpred). We classified RSV IDRs by size, frequency and function. Finally, we determined the functional implications of RSV IDRs by mapping predicted IDRs to known functional domains of each protein. Identification of RSV IDRs within functional domains improves our understanding of RSV pathogenesis in addition to providing potential therapeutic targets. Furthermore, this approach can be applied to other NNS viruses that encode essential multifunctional proteins for the elucidation of viral protein regions that can be manipulated for attenuation of viral replication. PMID:27062995

  19. FunPred-1: protein function prediction from a protein interaction network using neighborhood analysis.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sovan; Chatterjee, Piyali; Basu, Subhadip; Kundu, Mahantapas; Nasipuri, Mita

    2014-12-01

    Proteins are responsible for all biological activities in living organisms. Thanks to genome sequencing projects, large amounts of DNA and protein sequence data are now available, but the biological functions of many proteins are still not annotated in most cases. The unknown function of such non-annotated proteins may be inferred or deduced from their neighbors in a protein interaction network. In this paper, we propose two new methods to predict protein functions based on network neighborhood properties. FunPred 1.1 uses a combination of three simple-yet-effective scoring techniques: the neighborhood ratio, the protein path connectivity and the relative functional similarity. FunPred 1.2 applies a heuristic approach using the edge clustering coefficient to reduce the search space by identifying densely connected neighborhood regions. The overall accuracy achieved in FunPred 1.2 over 8 functional groups involving hetero-interactions in 650 yeast proteins is around 87%, which is higher than the accuracy with FunPred 1.1. It is also higher than the accuracy of many of the state-of-the-art protein function prediction methods described in the literature. The test datasets and the complete source code of the developed software are now freely available at http://code.google.com/p/cmaterbioinfo/ . PMID:25424913

  20. Vertebrate Membrane Proteins: Structure, Function, and Insights from Biophysical Approaches

    PubMed Central

    MÜLLER, DANIEL J.; WU, NAN; PALCZEWSKI, KRZYSZTOF

    2008-01-01

    Membrane proteins are key targets for pharmacological intervention because they are vital for cellular function. Here, we analyze recent progress made in the understanding of the structure and function of membrane proteins with a focus on rhodopsin and development of atomic force microscopy techniques to study biological membranes. Membrane proteins are compartmentalized to carry out extra- and intracellular processes. Biological membranes are densely populated with membrane proteins that occupy approximately 50% of their volume. In most cases membranes contain lipid rafts, protein patches, or paracrystalline formations that lack the higher-order symmetry that would allow them to be characterized by diffraction methods. Despite many technical difficulties, several crystal structures of membrane proteins that illustrate their internal structural organization have been determined. Moreover, high-resolution atomic force microscopy, near-field scanning optical microscopy, and other lower resolution techniques have been used to investigate these structures. Single-molecule force spectroscopy tracks interactions that stabilize membrane proteins and those that switch their functional state; this spectroscopy can be applied to locate a ligand-binding site. Recent development of this technique also reveals the energy landscape of a membrane protein, defining its folding, reaction pathways, and kinetics. Future development and application of novel approaches during the coming years should provide even greater insights to the understanding of biological membrane organization and function. PMID:18321962

  1. Rheological and Functional Properties of Catfish Skin Protein Hydrolysates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catfish skin is an abundant and underutilized resource that can be used as a unique protein source to make fish skin hydrolysates. The objectives of this study were to: isolating soluble and insoluble proteins from hydrolyzed catfish skin and study the chemical and functional properties of the prote...

  2. Tactile Teaching: Exploring Protein Structure/Function Using Physical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Tim; Morris, Jennifer; Colton, Shannon; Batiza, Ann; Patrick, Michael; Franzen, Margaret; Goodsell, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The technology now exists to construct physical models of proteins based on atomic coordinates of solved structures. We review here our recent experiences in using physical models to teach concepts of protein structure and function at both the high school and the undergraduate levels. At the high school level, physical models are used in a…

  3. Casein kinase 1 controls the activation threshold of an α-arrestin by multisite phosphorylation of the interdomain hinge

    PubMed Central

    Herrador, Antonio; Livas, Daniela; Soletto, Lucía; Becuwe, Michel; Léon, Sébastien; Vincent, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    α-Arrestins play a key role as trafficking adaptors in both yeast and mammals. The yeast Rim8/Art9 α-arrestin mediates the recruitment of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) to the seven-transmembrane protein Rim21 in the ambient pH signaling RIM pathway. ESCRT is believed to function as a signaling platform that enables the proteolytic activation of the Rim101 transcription factor upon external alkalization. Here we provide evidence that the pH signal promotes the stable association of Rim8 with Rim21 at the plasma membrane. We show that Rim8 is phosphorylated in a pH-independent but Rim21-dependent manner by the plasma membrane–associated casein kinase 1 (CK1). We further show that this process involves a cascade of phosphorylation events within the hinge region connecting the arrestin domains. Strikingly, loss of casein kinase 1 activity causes constitutive activation of the RIM pathway, and, accordingly, pH signaling is activated in a phosphodeficient Rim8 mutant and impaired in the corresponding phosphomimetic mutant. Our results indicate that Rim8 phosphorylation prevents its accumulation at the plasma membrane at acidic pH and thereby inhibits RIM signaling. These findings support a model in which CK1-mediated phosphorylation of Rim8 contributes to setting a signaling threshold required to inhibit the RIM pathway at acidic pH. PMID:25851600

  4. Casein kinase 1 controls the activation threshold of an α-arrestin by multisite phosphorylation of the interdomain hinge.

    PubMed

    Herrador, Antonio; Livas, Daniela; Soletto, Lucía; Becuwe, Michel; Léon, Sébastien; Vincent, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    α-Arrestins play a key role as trafficking adaptors in both yeast and mammals. The yeast Rim8/Art9 α-arrestin mediates the recruitment of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) to the seven-transmembrane protein Rim21 in the ambient pH signaling RIM pathway. ESCRT is believed to function as a signaling platform that enables the proteolytic activation of the Rim101 transcription factor upon external alkalization. Here we provide evidence that the pH signal promotes the stable association of Rim8 with Rim21 at the plasma membrane. We show that Rim8 is phosphorylated in a pH-independent but Rim21-dependent manner by the plasma membrane-associated casein kinase 1 (CK1). We further show that this process involves a cascade of phosphorylation events within the hinge region connecting the arrestin domains. Strikingly, loss of casein kinase 1 activity causes constitutive activation of the RIM pathway, and, accordingly, pH signaling is activated in a phosphodeficient Rim8 mutant and impaired in the corresponding phosphomimetic mutant. Our results indicate that Rim8 phosphorylation prevents its accumulation at the plasma membrane at acidic pH and thereby inhibits RIM signaling. These findings support a model in which CK1-mediated phosphorylation of Rim8 contributes to setting a signaling threshold required to inhibit the RIM pathway at acidic pH. PMID:25851600

  5. Discovering conformational sub-states relevant to protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Pratul K; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Internal motions enable proteins to explore a range of conformations, even in the vicinity of native state. The role of conformational fluctuations in the designated function of a protein is widely debated. Emerging evidence suggests that sub-groups within the range of conformations (or sub-states) contain properties that may be functionally relevant. However, low populations in these sub-states and the transient nature of conformational transitions between these sub-states present significant challenges for their identification and characterization. To overcome these challenges we have developed a new computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA). QAA utilizes higher-order statistics of protein motions to identify sub-states in the conformational landscape. Further, the focus on anharmonicity allows identification of conformational fluctuations that enable transitions between sub-states. QAA applied to equilibrium simulations of human ubiquitin and T4 lysozyme reveals functionally relevant sub-states and protein motions involved in molecular recognition. In combination with a reaction pathway sampling method, QAA characterizes conformational sub-states associated with cis/trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerization catalyzed by the enzyme cyclophilin A. In these three proteins, QAA allows identification of conformational sub-states, with critical structural and dynamical features relevant to protein function. Overall, QAA provides a novel framework to intuitively understand the biophysical basis of conformational diversity and its relevance to protein function.

  6. Discovering Conformational Sub-States Relevant to Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej J.; Langmead, Christopher J.; Agarwal, Pratul K.; Chennubhotla, Chakra S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Internal motions enable proteins to explore a range of conformations, even in the vicinity of native state. The role of conformational fluctuations in the designated function of a protein is widely debated. Emerging evidence suggests that sub-groups within the range of conformations (or sub-states) contain properties that may be functionally relevant. However, low populations in these sub-states and the transient nature of conformational transitions between these sub-states present significant challenges for their identification and characterization. Methods and Findings To overcome these challenges we have developed a new computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA). QAA utilizes higher-order statistics of protein motions to identify sub-states in the conformational landscape. Further, the focus on anharmonicity allows identification of conformational fluctuations that enable transitions between sub-states. QAA applied to equilibrium simulations of human ubiquitin and T4 lysozyme reveals functionally relevant sub-states and protein motions involved in molecular recognition. In combination with a reaction pathway sampling method, QAA characterizes conformational sub-states associated with cis/trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerization catalyzed by the enzyme cyclophilin A. In these three proteins, QAA allows identification of conformational sub-states, with critical structural and dynamical features relevant to protein function. Conclusions Overall, QAA provides a novel framework to intuitively understand the biophysical basis of conformational diversity and its relevance to protein function. PMID:21297978

  7. Functions and mechanics of dynein motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Anthony J.; Kon, Takahide; Knight, Peter J.; Sutoh, Kazuo; Burgess, Stan A.

    2014-01-01

    Fuelled by ATP hydrolysis, dyneins generate force and movement on microtubules in a wealth of biological processes, including ciliary beating, cell division and intracellular transport. The large mass and complexity of dynein motors have made elucidating their mechanisms a sizable task. Yet, through a combination of approaches, including X-ray crystallography, cryo-electron microscopy, single-molecule assays and biochemical experiments, important progress has been made towards understanding how these giant motor proteins work. From these studies, a model for the mechanochemical cycle of dynein is emerging, in which nucleotide-driven flexing motions within the AAA+ ring of dynein alter the affinity of its microtubule-binding stalk and reshape its mechanical element to generate movement. PMID:24064538

  8. Assessment of protein set coherence using functional annotations

    PubMed Central

    Chagoyen, Monica; Carazo, Jose M; Pascual-Montano, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Background Analysis of large-scale experimental datasets frequently produces one or more sets of proteins that are subsequently mined for functional interpretation and validation. To this end, a number of computational methods have been devised that rely on the analysis of functional annotations. Although current methods provide valuable information (e.g. significantly enriched annotations, pairwise functional similarities), they do not specifically measure the degree of homogeneity of a protein set. Results In this work we present a method that scores the degree of functional homogeneity, or coherence, of a set of proteins on the basis of the global similarity of their functional annotations. The method uses statistical hypothesis testing to assess the significance of the set in the context of the functional space of a reference set. As such, it can be used as a first step in the validation of sets expected to be homogeneous prior to further functional interpretation. Conclusion We evaluate our method by analysing known biologically relevant sets as well as random ones. The known relevant sets comprise macromolecular complexes, cellular components and pathways described for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which are mostly significantly coherent. Finally, we illustrate the usefulness of our approach for validating 'functional modules' obtained from computational analysis of protein-protein interaction networks. Matlab code and supplementary data are available at PMID:18937846

  9. Linking phenotype to kinase: identification of a novel benzoxaborole hinge-binding motif for kinase inhibition and development of high-potency rho kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Akama, Tsutomu; Dong, Chen; Virtucio, Charlotte; Sullivan, David; Zhou, Yasheen; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Rock, Fernando; Freund, Yvonne; Liu, Liang; Bu, Wei; Wu, Anne; Fan, Xiao-Qing; Jarnagin, Kurt

    2013-12-01

    Benzoxaboroles are a novel class of drug-like compounds that have been rich sources of novel inhibitors for various enzymes and of new drugs. While examining benzoxaborole activity in phenotypic screens, our attention was attracted by the (aminomethylphenoxy)benzoxaborole family, which potently inhibited Toll-like receptor-stimulated cytokine secretion from leukocytes. After considering their structure-activity relationships and the central role of kinases in leukocyte biology, we performed a kinome-wide screen to investigate the members of the (aminomethylphenoxy)benzoxaborole family. This technique identified Rho-activated kinase (ROCK) as a target. We showed competitive behavior, with respect to ATP, and then determined the ROCK2-drug cocrystal structure. The drug occupies the ATP site in which the oxaborole moiety provides hydrogen bond donors and acceptors to the hinge, and the aminomethyl group interacts with the magnesium/ATP-interacting aspartic acid common to protein kinases. The series exhibits excellent selectivity against most of the kinome, with greater than 15-fold selectivity against the next best member of the AGC protein kinase subfamily. Medicinal chemistry efforts with structure-based design resulted in a compound with a Ki of 170 nM. Cellular studies revealed strong enzyme inhibition rank correlation with suppression of intracellular phosphorylation of a ROCK substrate. The biochemical potencies of these compounds also translated to functional activity, causing smooth muscle relaxation in rat aorta and guinea pig trachea. The series exhibited oral availability and one member reduced rat blood pressure, consistent with ROCK's role in smooth muscle contraction. Thus, the benzoxaborole moiety represents a novel hinge-binding kinase scaffold that may have potential for therapeutic use. PMID:24049062

  10. Role of the hinge region of glucocorticoid receptor for HEXIM1-mediated transcriptional repression

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Noritada; Shimizu, Noriaki; Sano, Motoaki; Ohnuma, Kei; Iwata, Satoshi; Hosono, Osamu; Fukuda, Keiichi; Morimoto, Chikao

    2008-06-20

    We previously reported that HEXIM1 (hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible protein 1), which suppresses transcription elongation via sequestration of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) using 7SK RNA as a scaffold, directly associates with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to suppress glucocorticoid-inducible gene activation. Here, we revealed that the hinge region of GR is essential for its interaction with HEXIM1, and that oxosteroid receptors including GR show sequence homology in their hinge region and interact with HEXIM1, whereas the other members of nuclear receptors do not. We also showed that HEXIM1 suppresses GR-mediated transcription in two ways: sequestration of P-TEFb by HEXIM1 and direct interaction between GR and HEXIM1. In contrast, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}-dependent gene expression is negatively modulated by HEXIM1 solely via sequestration of P-TEFb. We, therefore, conclude that HEXIM1 may act as a gene-selective transcriptional regulator via direct interaction with certain transcriptional regulators including GR and contribute to fine-tuning of, for example, glucocorticoid-mediated biological responses.