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Sample records for functionally related genes

  1. Covariation of Branch Lengths in Phylogenies of Functionally Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wai Lok Sibon; Rodrigo, Allen G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence for the coevolution of functionally-related genes. This coevolution is a result of constraints to maintain functional relationships between interacting proteins. The studies have focused on the correlation in gene tree branch lengths of proteins that are directly interacting with each other. We here hypothesize that the correlation in branch lengths is not limited only to proteins that directly interact, but also to proteins that operate within the same pathway. Using generalized linear models as a basis of identifying correlation, we attempted to predict the gene ontology (GO) terms of a gene based on its gene tree branch lengths. We applied our method to a dataset consisting of proteins from ten prokaryotic species. We found that the degree of accuracy to which we could predict the function of the proteins from their gene tree varied substantially with different GO terms. In particular, our model could accurately predict genes involved in translation and certain ribosomal activities with the area of the receiver-operator curve of up to 92%. Further analysis showed that the similarity between the trees of genes labeled with similar GO terms was not limited to genes that physically interacted, but also extended to genes functioning within the same pathway. We discuss the relevance of our findings as it relates to the use of phylogenetic methods in comparative genomics. PMID:20041191

  2. Molecular functions of genes related to grain shape in rice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jia; Zhang, Yadong; Wang, Cailin

    2015-01-01

    Because grain shape is an important component of rice grain yield, the discovery of genes related to rice grain shape has attracted much attention of rice breeding programs. In recent years, some of these genes have been cloned and studied. They have been found not only regulate grain shape by changing the shape of the spikelet hull, but also regulate endosperm development through control of cell division using different molecular mechanisms. In this paper, we review the recent research on genes related to rice grain shape and their possible regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26069441

  3. Comparative and functional analysis of cardiovascular-related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-09-01

    The ability to detect putative cis-regulatory elements in cardiovascular-related genes has been accelerated by the availability of genomic sequence data from numerous vertebrate species and the recent development of comparative genomic tools. This improvement is anticipated to lead to a better understanding of the complex regulatory architecture of cardiovascular (CV) genes and how genetic variants in these non-coding regions can potentially play a role in cardiovascular disease. This manuscript reviews a recently established database dedicated to the comparative sequence analysis of 250 human CV genes of known importance, 37 of which currently contain sequence comparison data for organisms beyond those of human, mouse and rat. These data have provided a glimpse into the variety of possible insights from deep vertebrate sequence comparisons and the identification of putative gene regulatory elements.

  4. The clustering of functionally related genes contributes to CNV-mediated disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Tallulah; Honti, Frantisek; Pfundt, Rolph; de Leeuw, Nicole; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke; de Vries, Bert; Webber, Caleb

    2015-01-01

    Clusters of functionally related genes can be disrupted by a single copy number variant (CNV). We demonstrate that the simultaneous disruption of multiple functionally related genes is a frequent and significant characteristic of de novo CNVs in patients with developmental disorders (P = 1 × 10−3). Using three different functional networks, we identified unexpectedly large numbers of functionally related genes within de novo CNVs from two large independent cohorts of individuals with developmental disorders. The presence of multiple functionally related genes was a significant predictor of a CNV's pathogenicity when compared to CNVs from apparently healthy individuals and a better predictor than the presence of known disease or haploinsufficient genes for larger CNVs. The functionally related genes found in the de novo CNVs belonged to 70% of all clusters of functionally related genes found across the genome. De novo CNVs were more likely to affect functional clusters and affect them to a greater extent than benign CNVs (P = 6 × 10−4). Furthermore, such clusters of functionally related genes are phenotypically informative: Different patients possessing CNVs that affect the same cluster of functionally related genes exhibit more similar phenotypes than expected (P < 0.05). The spanning of multiple functionally similar genes by single CNVs contributes substantially to how these variants exert their pathogenic effects. PMID:25887030

  5. Gene Risk Factors for Age-Related Brain Disorders May Affect Immune System Function

    MedlinePlus

    ... for age-related brain disorders may affect immune system function June 17, 2014 Scientists have discovered gene ... factors for age-related neurological disorders to immune system functions, such as inflammation, offers new insights into ...

  6. CSCdb: a cancer stem cells portal for markers, related genes and functional information

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi; Yao, Heming; Wang, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into various tumor cell types, are a special class of tumor cells. Characterizing the genes involved in CSCs regulation is fundamental to understand the mechanisms underlying the biological process and develop treatment methods for tumor therapy. Recently, much effort has been expended in the study of CSCs and a large amount of data has been generated. However, to the best of our knowledge, database dedicated to CSCs is not available until now. We have thus developed a CSCs database (CSCdb), which includes marker genes, CSCs-related genes/microRNAs and functional annotations. The information in the CSCdb was manual collected from about 13 000 articles. The CSCdb provides detailed information of 1769 genes that have been reported to participate in the functional regulation of CSCs and 74 marker genes that can be used for identification or isolation of CSCs. The CSCdb also provides 9475 annotations about 13 CSCs-related functions, such as oncogenesis, radio resistance, tumorigenesis, differentiation, etc. Annotations of the identified genes, which include protein function description, post-transcription modification information, related literature, Gene Ontology (GO), protein-protein interaction (PPI) information and regulatory relationships, are integrated into the CSCdb to help users get information more easily. CSCdb provides a comprehensive resource for CSCs research work, which would assist in finding new CSCs-related genes and would be a useful tool for biologists. Database URL: http://bioinformatics.ustc.edu.cn/cscdb PMID:26989154

  7. CSCdb: a cancer stem cells portal for markers, related genes and functional information.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Yao, Heming; Li, Ao; Wang, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into various tumor cell types, are a special class of tumor cells. Characterizing the genes involved in CSCs regulation is fundamental to understand the mechanisms underlying the biological process and develop treatment methods for tumor therapy. Recently, much effort has been expended in the study of CSCs and a large amount of data has been generated. However, to the best of our knowledge, database dedicated to CSCs is not available until now. We have thus developed a CSCs database (CSCdb), which includes marker genes, CSCs-related genes/microRNAs and functional annotations. The information in the CSCdb was manual collected from about 13 000 articles. The CSCdb provides detailed information of 1769 genes that have been reported to participate in the functional regulation of CSCs and 74 marker genes that can be used for identification or isolation of CSCs. The CSCdb also provides 9475 annotations about 13 CSCs-related functions, such as oncogenesis, radio resistance, tumorigenesis, differentiation, etc. Annotations of the identified genes, which include protein function description, post-transcription modification information, related literature, Gene Ontology (GO), protein-protein interaction (PPI) information and regulatory relationships, are integrated into the CSCdb to help users get information more easily. CSCdb provides a comprehensive resource for CSCs research work, which would assist in finding new CSCs-related genes and would be a useful tool for biologists.Database URL: http://bioinformatics.ustc.edu.cn/cscdb. PMID:26989154

  8. Systematic Analysis of Integrated Gene Functional Network of Four Chronic Stress-related Lifestyle Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Souvick; Chakraborty, Abhik; Ghosh, Chinmoy; Banerjee, Birendranath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stress is a term used to define factors involved in changes in the physiological balances resulting in disease conditions. Chronic exposure to stress conditions in modern lifestyles has resulted in a group of disorders called lifestyle disorders. Genetic background and environmental factors are interrelated to lifestyle in determining the health status of individuals. Hence, identification of disease-associated genes is the primary step toward explanations of pathogenesis of these diseases. In functional genomics, large-scale molecular and physiological data are used for the identification of causative genes associated with a disease. Aim: The objective of our study was to find a common set of genes involved in chronic stress-related lifestyle diseases such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), type 2 diabetes (T2D), hypertension (HTN), and obesity. Materials and Methods: In our study, we have performed a systematic analysis of the functional gene network of four chronic stress-related lifestyle diseases by retrieving genes from published databases. We have tried to systematically construct a functional protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. The goals of establishing this network were the functional enrichment study of interacting partners as well as functional disease ontology annotation (FunDO) of the enriched genes. Results: This study enabled the identification of key genes involved in these stress-related lifestyle diseases by prioritizing candidate genes based on their degree of involvement. In this systematic analysis, we have found key genes for these diseases based on their involvement and association at the gene network level and PPI. Conclusion: We have deciphered a group of genes that in combination play a crucial role and may impact the function of the whole genome in the four lifestyle disorders mentioned. PMID:27330735

  9. A functional and phylogenetic comparison of quorum sensing related genes in Brucella melitensis 16M.

    PubMed

    Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2014-08-01

    A quorum-sensing (QS) system is involved in Brucella melitensis survival inside the host cell. Two transcriptional regulators identified in B. melitensis, BlxR and VjbR, regulate the expression of virB, an operon required for bacterial intracellular persistence. In this work, 628 genes affected by VjbR and 124 by BlxR were analyzed to gain insights into their functional and taxonomical distributions among the Bacteria and Archaea cellular domains. In this regard, the Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) genes and orthologous genes in 789 nonredundant bacterial and archaeal genomes were obtained and compared against a group of randomly selected genes. From these analyses, we found 71 coaffected genes between VjbR and BlxR. In the COG comparison, VjbR activated genes associated with intracellular trafficking, secretion and vesicular transport and defense mechanisms, while BlxR affected genes related to energy production and conversion (with an equal effect) and translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis, posttranslational modifications and carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism (with a negative effect). When the taxonomical distribution of orthologous genes was evaluated, the VjbR- and BlxR-related genes presented more orthologous genes in Crenarchaeota (Archaea), Firmicutes, and Tenericutes and fewer genes in Proteobacteria than expected by chance. These findings suggest that QS system exert a fine-tuning modulation of gene expression, by which VjbR activates genes related to infection persistence and defense, while BlxR represses general bacterial metabolism for intracellular adaptations. Finally, these affected genes present a degree of presence among Bacteria and Archaea genomes that is different from that expected by chance. PMID:24994008

  10. Pretransplant Immune- and Apoptosis-Related Gene Expression Is Associated with Kidney Allograft Function

    PubMed Central

    Kamińska, Dorota; Kościelska-Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Chudoba, Paweł; Mazanowska, Oktawia; Banasik, Mirosław; Żabinska, Marcelina; Boratyńska, Maria; Lepiesza, Agnieszka; Gomółkiewicz, Agnieszka; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Klinger, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplant candidates present immune dysregulation, caused by chronic uremia. The aim of the study was to investigate whether pretransplant peripheral blood gene expression of immune factors affects clinical outcome of renal allograft recipients. Methods. In a prospective study, we analyzed pretransplant peripheral blood gene expression in87 renal transplant candidates with real-time PCR on custom-designed low density arrays (TaqMan). Results. Immediate posttransplant graft function (14-day GFR) was influenced negatively by TGFB1 (P = 0.039) and positively by IL-2 gene expression (P = 0.040). Pretransplant blood mRNA expression of apoptosis-related genes (CASP3, FAS, and IL-18) and Th1-derived cytokine gene IFNG correlated positively with short- (6-month GFR CASP3: P = 0.027, FAS: P = 0.021, and IFNG: P = 0.029) and long-term graft function (24-month GFR CASP3: P = 0.003, FAS: P = 0.033, IL-18: P = 0.044, and IFNG: P = 0.04). Conclusion. Lowered pretransplant Th1-derived cytokine and apoptosis-related gene expressions were a hallmark of subsequent worse kidney function but not of acute rejection rate. The pretransplant IFNG and CASP3 and FAS and IL-18 genes' expression in the recipients' peripheral blood is the possible candidate for novel biomarker of short- and long-term allograft function. PMID:27382192

  11. Eukaryotic operon-like transcription of functionally related genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shahar, Yehuda; Nannapaneni, Kishore; Casavant, Thomas L.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Complex biological processes require coordinated function of many genes. One evolutionary solution to the problem of coordinately expressing functionally related genes in bacteria and nematodes is organization of genes in operons. Surprisingly, eukaryotic operons are considered rare outside the nematode lineage. In Drosophila melanogaster, we found lounge lizard (llz), which encodes a degenerin/ENaC cation channel, cotranscribed with CheB42a, a nonhomologous gene of unknown function residing <100 bp upstream. These two genes were transcribed from a single promoter as one primary transcript and were processed posttranscriptionally to generate individual mRNAs. The mechanism did not involve alternative splicing, and it differed from the trans splicing used in nematode operons. Both genes were expressed in the same tissues, and previous work suggested that both may be involved in courtship behavior. A bioinformatic approach identified numerous additional loci as potential Drosophila operons. These data reveal eukaryotic operon-like transcription of functionally related genes in Drosophila. The results also suggest that operon-based transcription may be more common in eukaryotes than previously appreciated. PMID:17190802

  12. Metagenomes reveal microbial structures, functional potentials, and biofouling-related genes in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinxing; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Huan; Park, Hee-Deung; Wu, Zhichao

    2016-06-01

    Metagenomic sequencing was used to investigate the microbial structures, functional potentials, and biofouling-related genes in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). The results showed that the microbial community in the MBR was highly diverse. Notably, function analysis of the dominant genera indicated that common genes from different phylotypes were identified for important functional potentials with the observation of variation of abundances of genes in a certain taxon (e.g., Dechloromonas). Despite maintaining similar metabolic functional potentials with a parallel full-scale conventional activated sludge (CAS) system due to treating the identical wastewater, the MBR had more abundant nitrification-related bacteria and coding genes of ammonia monooxygenase, which could well explain its excellent ammonia removal in the low-temperature period. Furthermore, according to quantification of the genes involved in exopolysaccharide and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) protein metabolism, the MBR did not show a much different potential in producing EPS compared to the CAS system, and bacteria from the membrane biofilm had lower abundances of genes associated with EPS biosynthesis and transport compared to the activated sludge in the MBR. PMID:26816093

  13. Evidence for Related Functions of the RNA Genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Last, Robert L.; Maddock, Janine R.; Woolford, John L.

    1987-01-01

    The yeast genes RNA2-RNA11 are necessary for splicing of nuclear intron-containing pre-mRNAs. We investigated the relationships among these genes by asking whether increased expression of one RNA gene leads to suppression of the temperature-sensitive lethality of a mutation in any other RNA gene. The presence of extra plasmid-borne copies of the RNA3 gene relieves the lethality of temperature-sensitive rna4 mutations. A region of the yeast genome (SRN2) is described that suppresses temperature-sensitive rna2 mutations when it is present on either medium or high-copy number plasmids. Neither suppression occurs via a bypass of RNA gene function since null alleles of rna2 and rna4 are not suppressed by elevated dosage of SRN2 and RNA3, respectively. These results suggest that the SRN2 and RNA2 gene products have related functions, as do the RNA3 and RNA4 gene products. PMID:3322934

  14. DNA Hypomethylation Affects Cancer-Related Biological Functions and Genes Relevant in Neuroblastoma Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mayol, Gemma; Martín-Subero, José I.; Ríos, José; Queiros, Ana; Kulis, Marta; Suñol, Mariona; Esteller, Manel; Gómez, Soledad; Garcia, Idoia; de Torres, Carmen; Rodríguez, Eva; Galván, Patricia; Mora, Jaume; Lavarino, Cinzia

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) pathogenesis has been reported to be closely associated with numerous genetic alterations. However, underlying DNA methylation patterns have not been extensively studied in this developmental malignancy. Here, we generated microarray-based DNA methylation profiles of primary neuroblastic tumors. Stringent supervised differential methylation analyses allowed us to identify epigenetic changes characteristic for NB tumors as well as for clinical and biological subtypes of NB. We observed that gene-specific loss of DNA methylation is more prevalent than promoter hypermethylation. Remarkably, such hypomethylation affected cancer-related biological functions and genes relevant to NB pathogenesis such as CCND1, SPRR3, BTC, EGF and FGF6. In particular, differential methylation in CCND1 affected mostly an evolutionary conserved functionally relevant 3′ untranslated region, suggesting that hypomethylation outside promoter regions may play a role in NB pathogenesis. Hypermethylation targeted genes involved in cell development and proliferation such as RASSF1A, POU2F2 or HOXD3, among others. The results derived from this study provide new candidate epigenetic biomarkers associated with NB as well as insights into the molecular pathogenesis of this tumor, which involves a marked gene-specific hypomethylation. PMID:23144874

  15. Transcriptional and functional studies of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans genes related to survival in the presence of copper.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Claudio A; Orellana, Luis H; Mauriaca, Cecilia; Jerez, Carlos A

    2009-10-01

    The acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans can resist exceptionally high copper (Cu) concentrations. This property is important for its use in biomining processes, where Cu and other metal levels range usually between 15 and 100 mM. To learn about the mechanisms that allow A. ferrooxidans cells to survive in this environment, a bioinformatic search of its genome showed the presence of at least 10 genes that are possibly related to Cu homeostasis. Among them are three genes coding for putative ATPases related to the transport of Cu (A. ferrooxidans copA1 [copA1(Af)], copA2(Af), and copB(Af)), three genes related to a system of the resistance nodulation cell division family involved in the extraction of Cu from the cell (cusA(Af), cusB(Af), and cusC(Af)), and two genes coding for periplasmic chaperones for this metal (cusF(Af) and copC(Af)). The expression of most of these open reading frames was studied by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR using A. ferrooxidans cells adapted for growth in the presence of high concentrations of Cu. The putative A. ferrooxidans Cu resistance determinants were found to be upregulated when this bacterium was exposed to Cu in the range of 5 to 25 mM. These A. ferrooxidans genes conferred to Escherichia coli a greater Cu resistance than wild-type cells, supporting their functionality. The results reported here and previously published data strongly suggest that the high resistance of the extremophilic A. ferrooxidans to Cu may be due to part or all of the following key elements: (i) a wide repertoire of Cu resistance determinants, (ii) the duplication of some of these Cu resistance determinants, (iii) the existence of novel Cu chaperones, and (iv) a polyP-based Cu resistance system. PMID:19666734

  16. The mouse protein synthesis initiation factor 4A gene family includes two related functional genes which are differentially expressed.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, P J; Trachsel, H

    1988-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized a family of mouse genomic sequences hybridizing to mouse cDNA probes coding for eIF-4A, one of the protein synthesis initiation factors involved in the binding of mRNA to the ribosome. We estimate that there is a total of approximately 9-13 eIF-4A pseudogenes. We also found an eIF-4A intronless retroposon which, when compared to the cDNA, contains a single nucleotide difference. This possibly functional gene contains a mouse repetitive B1 element integrated in the promoter region. Furthermore, we have cloned two intron-containing eIF-4A genes (termed eIF-4AI and eIF-4AII). The eIF-4AII gene codes for a previously unknown form of eIF-4A. Northern blot hybridization with RNA from several mouse organs shows a variation in eIF-4AI expression within a factor of 7. In contrast, relative to liver, eIF-4AII expression is 20- to 30-times higher in brain and kidney, 10- to 17-fold higher in lung and heart, and is about equally abundant in liver, spleen and thymus. These data suggest that the relative efficiency of protein synthesis initiation for different mRNAs, as reflected by discrimination in messenger 5'-terminal cap recognition and binding to ribosomes, varies in different tissues. Images PMID:3046931

  17. Expression and Function of Enamel-related Gene Products in Calvarial Development

    PubMed Central

    Atsawasuwan, P.; Lu, X.; Ito, Y.; Chen, Y.; Gopinathan, G.; Evans, C.A.; Kulkarni, A.B.; Gibson, C.W.; Luan, X.; Diekwisch, T.G.H.

    2013-01-01

    Enamel-related gene products (ERPs) are detected in non-enamel tissues such as bone. We hypothesized that, if functional, ERP expression corresponds with distinct events during osteoblast differentiation and affects bone development and mineralization. In mouse calvariae and MC3T3 cells, expression profiles of enamel-related gene products (ERPs) correlated with key events in post-natal calvarial development and MC3T3 cell mineralization. Developing skulls from both Amel- and Ambn-deficient animals were approximately 15% shorter when compared with those of wild-type controls, and their sutures remained patent for a longer period of time. Analysis of Amel- and Ambn-deficient calvariae and calvarial osteoblast cultures revealed a dramatic reduction in mineralized nodules, a significant reduction in Runx2, Sp7, Ibsp, and Msx2 expression, and a reduction in Alx4 in Amel-deficient calvariae vs. an increase in Alx4 in Ambn-deficient calvariae. Analysis of these data indicates that ERP expression follows defined developmental profiles and affects osteoblast differentiation, mineralization, and calvarial bone development. We propose that, in parallel to their role in the developing enamel matrix, ERPs have retained an evolutionary conserved function related to the biomineralization of bones. PMID:23625374

  18. Possible functional links among brain- and skull-related genes selected in modern humans.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Burraco, Antonio; Boeckx, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    The sequencing of the genomes from extinct hominins has revealed that changes in some brain-related genes have been selected after the split between anatomically-modern humans and Neanderthals/Denisovans. To date, no coherent view of these changes has been provided. Following a line of research we initiated in Boeckx and Benítez-Burraco (2014a), we hypothesize functional links among most of these genes and their products, based on the existing literature for each of the gene discussed. The genes we focus on are found mutated in different cognitive disorders affecting modern populations and their products are involved in skull and brain morphology, and neural connectivity. If our hypothesis turns out to be on the right track, it means that the changes affecting most of these proteins resulted in a more globular brain and ultimately brought about modern cognition, with its characteristic generativity and capacity to form and exploit cross-modular concepts, properties most clearly manifested in language. PMID:26136701

  19. Possible functional links among brain- and skull-related genes selected in modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Benítez-Burraco, Antonio; Boeckx, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    The sequencing of the genomes from extinct hominins has revealed that changes in some brain-related genes have been selected after the split between anatomically-modern humans and Neanderthals/Denisovans. To date, no coherent view of these changes has been provided. Following a line of research we initiated in Boeckx and Benítez-Burraco (2014a), we hypothesize functional links among most of these genes and their products, based on the existing literature for each of the gene discussed. The genes we focus on are found mutated in different cognitive disorders affecting modern populations and their products are involved in skull and brain morphology, and neural connectivity. If our hypothesis turns out to be on the right track, it means that the changes affecting most of these proteins resulted in a more globular brain and ultimately brought about modern cognition, with its characteristic generativity and capacity to form and exploit cross-modular concepts, properties most clearly manifested in language. PMID:26136701

  20. Functional identification of a Leishmania gene related to the peroxin 2 gene reveals common ancestry of glycosomes and peroxisomes.

    PubMed Central

    Flaspohler, J A; Rickoll, W L; Beverley, S M; Parsons, M

    1997-01-01

    Glycosomes are membrane-bounded microbody organelles that compartmentalize glycolysis as well as other important metabolic processes in trypanosomatids. The compartmentalization of these enzymatic reactions is hypothesized to play a crucial role in parasite physiology. Although the metabolic role of glycosomes differs substantially from that of the peroxisomes that are found in other eukaryotes, similarities in signals targeting proteins to these organelles suggest that glycosomes and peroxisomes may have evolved from a common ancestor. To examine this hypothesis, as well as gain insights into the function of the glycosome, we used a positive genetic selection procedure to isolate the first Leishmania mutant (gim1-1 [glycosome import] mutant) with a defect in the import of glycosomal proteins. The mutant retains glycosomes but mislocalizes a subset glycosomal proteins to the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, the gim1-1 mutant lacks lipid bodies, suggesting a heretofore unknown role of the glycosome. We used genetic approaches to identify a gene, GIM1, that is able to restore import and lipid bodies. A nonsense mutation was found in one allele of this gene in the mutant line. The predicted Gim1 protein is related the peroxin 2 family of integral membrane proteins, which are required for peroxisome biogenesis. The similarities in sequence and function provide strong support for the common origin model of glycosomes and peroxisomes. The novel phenotype of gim1-1 and distinctive role of Leishmania glycosomes suggest that future studies of this system will provide a new perspective on microbody biogenesis and function. PMID:9032236

  1. Characterization of functionally active gene fusions in human papillomavirus related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Theresa; Gaykalova, Daria A; Considine, Michael; Wheelan, Sarah; Pallavajjala, Aparna; Bishop, Justin A; Westra, William H; Ideker, Trey; Koch, Wayne M; Khan, Zubair; Fertig, Elana J; Califano, Joseph A

    2016-07-15

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) sequencing analysis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) recently reported on gene fusions, however, few human papillomavirus (HPV) positive samples were included, and the functional relevance of identified fusions was not explored. We therefore performed an independent analysis of gene fusions in HPV-positive oropharyngeal SCC (OPSCC). RNA sequencing was performed on 47 HPV-positive OPSCC primary tumors and 25 normal mucosal samples from cancer unaffected controls on an Illumina TruSeq platform. MapSplice2 was used for alignment and identification of fusion candidates. Putative fusions with less than five spanning reads, detected in normal tissues, or that mapped to the same gene were filtered out. Selected fusions were validated by RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing. Within 47 HPV-positive OPSCC tumors, 282 gene fusions were identified. Most fusions (85.1%) occurred in a single tumor, and the remaining fusions recurred in 2-16 tumors. Gene fusions were associated with significant up regulation of 16 genes (including EGFR and ERBB4) and down regulation of four genes (PTPRT, ZNF750, DLG2, SLCO5A1). Expression of these genes followed similar patterns of up regulation and down regulation in tumors without these fusions compared to normal tissue. Five of six gene fusions selected for validation were confirmed through RT-PCR and sequencing. This integrative analysis provides a method of prioritizing functionally relevant gene fusions that may be expanded to other tumor types. These results demonstrate that gene fusions may be one mechanism by which functionally relevant genes are altered in HPV-positive OPSCC. PMID:26949921

  2. Inhibition of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Function: A Promising Strategy for Treating Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine. Serum levels of CGRP, which are elevated during a migraine attack, have been reported to return to normal with alleviation of pain. In addition, CGRP administration has been shown to cause a migraine-like headache in susceptible individuals. Importantly, CGRP receptors are found on many cell types within the trigeminovascular system that are thought to play important roles in controlling inflammatory and nociceptive processes. Based on these findings, it was proposed that blockage of CGRP receptor function and, hence, the physiological effects of CGRP would be effective in aborting a migraine attack. This review will summarize key preclinical data that support the therapeutic potential of using CGRP receptor antagonists or molecules that bind CGRP within the context of current neurovascular theories on migraine pathology. PMID:18808507

  3. SARS-CoV Regulates Immune Function-Related Gene Expression in Human Monocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wanchung; Yen, Yu-Ting; Singh, Sher; Kao, Chuan-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is characterized by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pulmonary fibrosis, and monocytes/macrophages are the key players in the pathogenesis of SARS. In this study, we compared the transcriptional profiles of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-infected monocytic cells against that infected by coronavirus 229E (CoV-229E). Total RNA was extracted from infected DC-SIGN-transfected monocytes (THP-1-DC-SIGN) at 6 and 24 h after infection, and the gene expression was profiled in oligonucleotide-based microarrays. Analysis of immune-related gene expression profiles showed that at 24 h after SARS-CoV infection: (1) IFN-α/β-inducible and cathepsin/proteasome genes were downregulated; (2) hypoxia/hyperoxia-related genes were upregulated; and (3) TLR/TLR-signaling, cytokine/cytokine receptor-related, chemokine/chemokine receptor-related, lysosome-related, MHC/chaperon-related, and fibrosis-related genes were differentially regulated. These results elucidate that SARS-CoV infection regulates immune-related genes in monocytes/macrophages, which may be important to the pathogenesis of SARS. PMID:22876772

  4. A novel function of calcitonin gene-related peptide in body fluid Cl- homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Fang; Lafont, Anne-Gaëlle; Lee, Yi-Chun; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2016-06-15

    Vertebrates need to maintain extracellular chloride (Cl(-)) concentrations to ensure the normal operation of physiological processes; the transition from aquatic to terrestrial environments necessitated the development of sophisticated mechanisms to ensure Cl(-) homeostasis in the face of fluctuating Cl(-) levels. Zebrafish calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), unlike its splice variant calcitonin, does not respond to environmental Ca(2+) levels. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that CGRP is involved in the control of body fluid Cl(-) homeostasis. Acclimation to high-Cl(-) artificial water stimulated the mRNA expression of cgrp and the receptor (crlr1) when compared with low-Cl(-) CGRP knockdown induced upregulation of the Na(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter (ncc2b), while overexpression of CGRP resulted in the downregulation of ncc2b mRNA synthesis and a simultaneous decrease in Cl(-) uptake in embryos. Consistent with these findings, knockdown of either cgrp or crlr1 was found to increase the density of NCC2b-expressing cells in embryos. This is the first demonstration that CGRP acts as a hypochloremic hormone through suppressing NCC2b expression and the differentiation of NCC-expressing ionocytes. Elucidation of this novel function of CGRP in fish body fluid Cl(-) homeostasis promises to enhance our understanding of the related physiology in vertebrates. PMID:27306053

  5. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission.

    PubMed

    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-07-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood. PMID:26980613

  6. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood. PMID:26980613

  7. Expression and Functional Characterization of two Pathogenesis-Related Protein 10 Genes from Zea mays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenesis-related protein 10 (PR10) is one of seventeen PR protein families and plays important roles in plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses. A novel PR10 gene (ZmPR10.1), which shares 89.8% and 85.7% identity to the previous ZmPR10 at the nucleotide and amino acid sequence level, respe...

  8. Conservation of the function counts: homologous neurons express sequence-related neuropeptides that originate from different genes.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Susanne; Huetteroth, Wolf; Schachtner, Joachim; Predel, Reinhard

    2009-11-01

    By means of single-cell matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we analysed neuropeptide expression in all FXPRLamide/pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide synthesizing neurons of the adult tobacco hawk moth, Manduca sexta. Mass spectra clearly suggest a completely identical processing of the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide-precursor in the mandibular, maxillary and labial neuromeres of the subesophageal ganglion. Only in the pban-neurons of the labial neuromere, products of two neuropeptide genes, namely the pban-gene and the capa-gene, were detected. Both of these genes expressed, amongst others, sequence-related neuropeptides (extended WFGPRLamides). We speculate that the expression of the two neuropeptide genes is a plesiomorph character typical of moths. A detailed examination of the neuroanatomy and the peptidome of the (two) pban-neurons in the labial neuromere of moths with homologous neurons of different insects indicates a strong conservation of the function of this neuroendocrine system. In other insects, however, the labial neurons either express products of the fxprl-gene or products of the capa-gene. The processing of the respective genes is reduced to extended WFGPRLamides in each case and yields a unique peptidome in the labial cells. Thus, sequence-related messenger molecules are always produced in these cells and it seems that the respective neurons recruited different neuropeptide genes for this motif. PMID:19712058

  9. Immune-Related Functions of the Hivep Gene Family in East African Cichlid Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Diepeveen, Eveline T.; Roth, Olivia; Salzburger, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Immune-related genes are often characterized by adaptive protein evolution. Selection on immune genes can be particularly strong when hosts encounter novel parasites, for instance, after the colonization of a new habitat or upon the exploitation of vacant ecological niches in an adaptive radiation. We examined a set of new candidate immune genes in East African cichlid fishes. More specifically, we studied the signatures of selection in five paralogs of the human immunodeficiency virus type I enhancer-binding protein (Hivep) gene family, tested their involvement in the immune defense, and related our results to explosive speciation and adaptive radiation events in cichlids. We found signatures of long-term positive selection in four Hivep paralogs and lineage-specific positive selection in Hivep3b in two radiating cichlid lineages. Exposure of the cichlid Astatotilapia burtoni to a vaccination with Vibrio anguillarum bacteria resulted in a positive correlation between immune response parameters and expression levels of three Hivep loci. This work provides the first evidence for a role of Hivep paralogs in teleost immune defense and links the signatures of positive selection to host–pathogen interactions within an adaptive radiation. PMID:24142922

  10. Tumor-derived exosomes regulate expression of immune function-related genes in human T cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Laurent; Mitsuhashi, Masato; Simms, Patricia; Gooding, William E.; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell-derived exosomes (TEX) suppress functions of immune cells. Here, changes in the gene profiles of primary human T lymphocytes exposed in vitro to exosomes were evaluated. CD4+ Tconv, CD8+ T or CD4+ CD39+ Treg were isolated from normal donors’ peripheral blood and co-incubated with TEX or exosomes isolated from supernatants of cultured dendritic cells (DEX). Expression levels of 24–27 immune response-related genes in these T cells were quantified by qRT-PCR. In activated T cells, TEX and DEX up-regulated mRNA expression levels of multiple genes. Multifactorial data analysis of ΔCt values identified T cell activation and the immune cell type, but not exosome source, as factors regulating gene expression by exosomes. Treg were more sensitive to TEX-mediated effects than other T cell subsets. In Treg, TEX-mediated down-regulation of genes regulating the adenosine pathway translated into high expression of CD39 and increased adenosine production. TEX also induced up-regulation of inhibitory genes in CD4+ Tconv, which translated into a loss of CD69 on their surface and a functional decline. Exosomes are not internalized by T cells, but signals they carry and deliver to cell surface receptors modulate gene expression and functions of human T lymphocytes. PMID:26842680

  11. Expanding the Landscape of Chromatin Modification (CM)-Related Functional Domains and Genes in Human

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Shuye; Turinsky, Andrei L.; Vlasblom, James; On, Tuan; Xiong, Xuejian; Emili, Andrew; Zhang, Zhaolei; Greenblatt, Jack; Parkinson, John; Wodak, Shoshana J.

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin modification (CM) plays a key role in regulating transcription, DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, our knowledge of these processes in humans remains very limited. Here we use computational approaches to study proteins and functional domains involved in CM in humans. We analyze the abundance and the pair-wise domain-domain co-occurrences of 25 well-documented CM domains in 5 model organisms: yeast, worm, fly, mouse and human. Results show that domains involved in histone methylation, DNA methylation, and histone variants are remarkably expanded in metazoan, reflecting the increased demand for cell type-specific gene regulation. We find that CM domains tend to co-occur with a limited number of partner domains and are hence not promiscuous. This property is exploited to identify 47 potentially novel CM domains, including 24 DNA-binding domains, whose role in CM has received little attention so far. Lastly, we use a consensus Machine Learning approach to predict 379 novel CM genes (coding for 329 proteins) in humans based on domain compositions. Several of these predictions are supported by very recent experimental studies and others are slated for experimental verification. Identification of novel CM genes and domains in humans will aid our understanding of fundamental epigenetic processes that are important for stem cell differentiation and cancer biology. Information on all the candidate CM domains and genes reported here is publicly available. PMID:21124763

  12. Relation between functional polymorphism of catalase gene (-262C>T) and recurrent depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Galecki, Piotr; Szemraj, Janusz; Zboralski, Krzysztof; Florkowski, Antoni; Lewinski, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have provided information indicating the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of depressive disorder (DD). The antioxidative system protects against the effects caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Catalase (CAT) is one of antioxidative enzymes observed to change their levels in the course of depression. The enzyme decomposes hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), whose overproduction is a result of many processes taking place in depression. Therefore, functional polymorphism of the CAT gene can be a candidate marker of the risk of depression. The presented study assessed the correlation between -262C>T polymorphism of the CAT gene, which influences the increase of CAT expression and activity, and the risk of depression development. The study, carried out on a homogeneous group recruited from the Polish population, enrolled 149 healthy subjects and 149 depressive patients. The groups were age-matched. The obtained results indicate no correlation between -262C>T polymorphism of the CAT gene (both with respect to genotype distribution and allele frequency) and the risk of depression. Nevertheless, further studies assessing the correlations between depression and polymorphism of the genes encoding antioxidative enzymes on larger groups of subjects should be undertaken. PMID:19855359

  13. Functional characterization of an apple apomixis-related MhFIE gene in reproduction development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan-Dan; Dong, Qing-Long; Sun, Chao; Wang, Qing-Lian; You, Chun-Xiang; Yao, Yu-Xin; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2012-04-01

    The products of the FIS genes play important regulatory roles in diverse developmental processes, especially in seed formation after fertilization. In this study, a FIS-class gene MhFIE was isolated from apple. It encoded a predicted protein highly similar to polycomb group (PcG) protein FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE). MhFIE functioned as an Arabidopsis FIE homologue, as indicated by functional complementation experiment using Arabidopsis fie mutant. In addition, BiFC assay showed that MhFIE protein interacted with AtCLF. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis ectopically expressing MhFIE produced less APETALA3 (AtAP3) and AGAMOUS (AtAG) transcripts than WT control, and therefore exhibited abnormal flower, seed development. These results suggested that polycomb complex including FIE and CLF proteins played an important role in reproductive development by regulating the expression of its downstream genes. In addition, it was found that MhFIE constitutively expressed in various tissues tested. Its expression levels were lower in apomictic apple species than the sexual reproductive species, suggested it was possibly involved into apomixis in apple. Furthermore, the hybrids of tea crabapple generated MhFIE transcripts at different levels. The parthenogenesis capacity was negatively correlated with MhFIE expression level in these hybrids. These results suggested that MhFIE was involved into the regulation of flower development and apomixis in apple. PMID:22325871

  14. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Paul K.; Bowl, Michael R.; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E.; Simon, Michelle M.; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V.; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E.; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H.; Foster, Russell G.; Jackson, Ian J.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Thakker, Rajesh V.; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M.; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D. M.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss. PMID:27534441

  15. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Potter, Paul K; Bowl, Michael R; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E; Simon, Michelle M; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H; Foster, Russell G; Jackson, Ian J; Peirson, Stuart N; Thakker, Rajesh V; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2016-01-01

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss. PMID:27534441

  16. Genetic Analysis of Genes Related to Tight Junction Function in the Korean Population with Non-Syndromic Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Sagong, Borum; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Bae, Jae Woong; Kim, Jeongho; Lee, Jinwook; Park, Hong-Joon; Choi, Jae Young; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Kim, Un-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are essential components of eukaryotic cells, and serve as paracellular barriers and zippers between adjacent tissues. TJs are critical for normal functioning of the organ of Corti, a part of the inner ear that causes loss of sensorineural hearing when damaged. To investigate the relation between genes involved in TJ function and hereditary loss of sensorineural hearing in the Korean population, we selected the TJP2 and CLDN14 genes as candidates for gene screening of 135 Korean individuals. The TJP2 gene, mutation of which causes autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL), lies at the DFNA51 locus on chromosome 9. The CLDN14 gene, mutation of which causes autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL), lies at the DFNB29 locus on chromosome 21. In the present study, we conducted genetic analyses of the TJP2 and CLDN14 genes in 87 unrelated patients with ADNSHL and 48 unrelated patients with either ARNSHL or potentially sporadic hearing loss. We identified two pathogenic variations, c.334G>A (p.A112T) and c.3562A>G (p.T1188A), and ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the TJP2 gene. We found eight non-pathogenic variations in the CLDN14 gene. These findings indicate that, whereas mutation of the TJP2 gene might cause ADNSHL, CLDN14 is not a major causative gene for ARNSHL in the Korean population studied. Our findings may improve the understanding of the genetic cause of non-syndromic hearing loss in the Korean population. PMID:24752540

  17. Functional analysis of PI-like gene in relation to flower development from bamboo (Bambusa oldhamii).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Longfei; Shi, Yan; Zang, Qiaolu; Shi, Quan; Liu, Shinan; Xu, Yingwu; Lin, Xinchun

    2016-03-01

    Bamboo flowering owns many unique characteristics and remains a mystery. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying flower development in bamboo, a petal-identity gene was identified as a PISTILLATA homologue named BoPI from Bambusa oldhamii (bamboo family). Expression analysis showed that BoPI was highly expressed in flower organs and gradually increased during flower development stage, suggesting that BoPI played an important role in flower development. Ectopic expression of BoPI in Arabidopsis caused conversion of sepals to petals. 35S::BoPI fully rescued the defective petal formation in the pi-1 mutant. BoPI could interact with BoAP3 protein in vitro. These results suggested that BoPI regulated flower development of bamboo in a similar way with PI. Besides flower organs, BoPI was also expressed in leaf and branch, which revealed that BoPI may involve in leaf and branch development. Similar to other MIKC-type gene, BoPI contained the Cterminal sequence but its function was controversial. Ectopic expression of the C-terminal deletion construct (BoPI- ∆C) in Arabidopsis converted sepals to petals; BoPI- ∆C interacted with BoAP3 on yeast two-hybrid assay, just like the full-length con struct. The result implied that the C-terminal sequence may not be absolutely required for organ identity function in the context of BoPI. PMID:27019434

  18. Renal function in relation to three candidate genes in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Lifang; Zagato, Laura; Xie, Jinxiang; Fagard, Robert; Jin, Kugen; Wang, Jinxiang; Li, Yan; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Staessen, Jan A; Liu, Lisheng

    2004-10-01

    We recently found in a white population that the genes encoding angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE, I/D polymorphism), alpha-adducin (Gly460Trp), and aldosterone synthase (-344C/T) jointly influence renal function. We therefore investigated in a Chinese population the associations between the serum concentrations of creatinine and uric acid and these three genetic polymorphisms. We genotyped 471 ethnic Han Chinese subjects from 125 nuclear families recruited in northern China via random population sampling (75%) and at specialized hypertension clinics (25%). We performed population-based and family-based association analyses using generalized estimating equations (GEE) and quantitative transmission disequilibrium test (QTDT), respectively, while controlling for covariables. The participants were 39.7 years old and included 235 women (49.9%). The blood pressure measured at the subjects' homes averaged 126/80 mmHg. Mean values were 71 micromol/l for serum creatinine, 111 ml min(-1) 1.73 m(-2) for calculated creatinine clearance, and 236 micromol/l for serum uric acid. With adjustment for covariables, GEE analyses of single genes demonstrated that serum uric acid, but not serum creatinine, was positively associated with the ACE D allele. Serum uric acid concentrations were 15.8 micromol/l (95% confidence interval 3.3-28.2) and 25.7 micromol/l (11.1-40.2) higher in DD homozygotes than in ID and II subjects, respectively. Further GEE analyses of the three genes combined showed that the association between serum uric acid and the ACE polymorphism was confined to carriers of the alpha-adducin Gly and/or aldosterone synthase C alleles. Sensitivity analyses in parents and offspring separately as well as QTDT analyses were confirmatory. Among 114 informative offspring carrying the alpha-adducin Gly allele serum uric acid was significantly and positively associated with the transmission of the ACE D allele (beta=20.7 micromol/l). In conclusion, the present study extends our

  19. microRNAs in the Same Clusters Evolve to Coordinately Regulate Functionally Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yirong; Luo, Junjie; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously expressed small noncoding RNAs. The genomic locations of animal miRNAs are significantly clustered in discrete loci. We found duplication and de novo formation were important mechanisms to create miRNA clusters and the clustered miRNAs tend to be evolutionarily conserved. We proposed a “functional co-adaptation” model to explain how clustering helps newly emerged miRNAs survive and develop functions. We presented evidence that abundance of miRNAs in the same clusters were highly correlated and those miRNAs exerted cooperative repressive effects on target genes in human tissues. By transfecting miRNAs into human and fly cells and extensively profiling the transcriptome alteration with deep-sequencing, we further demonstrated the functional co-adaptation between new and old miRNAs in the miR-17–92 cluster. Our population genomic analysis suggest that positive Darwinian selection might be the driving force underlying the formation and evolution of miRNA clustering. Our model provided novel insights into mechanisms and evolutionary significance of miRNA clustering. PMID:27189568

  20. microRNAs in the Same Clusters Evolve to Coordinately Regulate Functionally Related Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yirong; Luo, Junjie; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously expressed small noncoding RNAs. The genomic locations of animal miRNAs are significantly clustered in discrete loci. We found duplication and de novo formation were important mechanisms to create miRNA clusters and the clustered miRNAs tend to be evolutionarily conserved. We proposed a "functional co-adaptation" model to explain how clustering helps newly emerged miRNAs survive and develop functions. We presented evidence that abundance of miRNAs in the same clusters were highly correlated and those miRNAs exerted cooperative repressive effects on target genes in human tissues. By transfecting miRNAs into human and fly cells and extensively profiling the transcriptome alteration with deep-sequencing, we further demonstrated the functional co-adaptation between new and old miRNAs in the miR-17-92 cluster. Our population genomic analysis suggest that positive Darwinian selection might be the driving force underlying the formation and evolution of miRNA clustering. Our model provided novel insights into mechanisms and evolutionary significance of miRNA clustering. PMID:27189568

  1. Combination Training in Aging Individuals Modifies Functional Connectivity and Cognition, and Is Potentially Affected by Dopamine-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pieramico, Valentina; Esposito, Roberto; Sensi, Francesca; Cilli, Franco; Mantini, Dante; Mattei, Peter A.; Frazzini, Valerio; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Gatta, Valentina; Ferretti, Antonio; Romani, Gian Luca; Sensi, Stefano L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Aging is a major co-risk factor in many neurodegenerative diseases. Cognitive enrichment positively affects the structural plasticity of the aging brain. In this study, we evaluated effects of a set of structured multimodal activities (Combination Training; CT) on cognitive performances, functional connectivity, and cortical thickness of a group of healthy elderly individuals. CT lasted six months. Methodology Neuropsychological and occupational performances were evaluated before and at the end of the training period. fMRI was used to assess effects of training on resting state network (RSN) functional connectivity using Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Effects on cortical thickness were also studied. Finally, we evaluated whether specific dopamine-related genes can affect the response to training. Principal Findings Results of the study indicate that CT improves cognitive/occupational performances and reorganizes functional connectivity. Intriguingly, individuals responding to CT showed specific dopamine-related genotypes. Indeed, analysis of dopamine-related genes revealed that carriers of DRD3 ser9gly and COMT Val158Met polymorphisms had the greatest benefits from exposure to CT. Conclusions and Significance Overall, our findings support the idea that exposure to a set of structured multimodal activities can be an effective strategy to counteract aging-related cognitive decline and also indicate that significant capability of functional and structural changes are maintained in the elderly. PMID:22937122

  2. WUSCHEL-related Homeobox genes in Populus tomentosa: diversified expression patterns and a functional similarity in adventitious root formation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background WUSCHEL (WUS)-related homeobox (WOX) protein family members play important roles in the maintenance and proliferation of the stem cell niche in the shoot apical meristem (SAM), root apical meristem (RAM), and cambium (CAM). Although the roles of some WOXs in meristematic cell regulation have been well studied in annual plants such as Arabidopsis and rice, the expression and function of WOX members in woody plant poplars has not been systematically investigated. Here, we present the identification and comprehensive analysis of the expression and function of WOXs in Populus tomentosa. Results A genome-wide survey identified 18 WOX encoding sequences in the sequenced genome of Populus trichocarpa (PtrWOXs). Phylogenetic and gene structure analysis revealed that these 18 PtrWOXs fall into modern/WUS, intermediate, and ancient clades, but that the WOX genes in P. trichocarpa may have expanded differently from the WOX genes in Arabidopsis. In the P. trichocarpa genome, no WOX members could be closely classified as AtWOX3, AtWOX6, AtWOX7, AtWOX10, and AtWOX14, but there were two copies of WOX genes that could be classified as PtrWUS, PtrWOX2, PtrWOX4, PtrWOX5, PtrWOX8/9, and PtrWOX11/12, and three copies of WOX genes that could be classified as PtrWOX1 and PtrWOX13. The use of primers specific for each PtrWOX gene allowed the identification and cloning of 18 WOX genes from P. tomentosa (PtoWOXs), a poplar species physiologically close to P. trichocarpa. It was found that PtoWOXs and PtrWOXs shared very high amino acid sequence identity, and that PtoWOXs could be classified identically to PtrWOXs. We revealed that the expression patterns of some PtoWOXs were different to their Arabidopsis counterparts. When PtoWOX5a and PtoWOX11/12a, as well as PtoWUSa and PtoWOX4a were ectopically expressed in transgenic hybrid poplars, the regeneration of adventitious root (AR) was promoted, indicating a functional similarity of these four WOXs in AR regeneration. Conclusions

  3. Determining Semantically Related Significant Genes.

    PubMed

    Taha, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    GO relation embodies some aspects of existence dependency. If GO term xis existence-dependent on GO term y, the presence of y implies the presence of x. Therefore, the genes annotated with the function of the GO term y are usually functionally and semantically related to the genes annotated with the function of the GO term x. A large number of gene set enrichment analysis methods have been developed in recent years for analyzing gene sets enrichment. However, most of these methods overlook the structural dependencies between GO terms in GO graph by not considering the concept of existence dependency. We propose in this paper a biological search engine called RSGSearch that identifies enriched sets of genes annotated with different functions using the concept of existence dependency. We observe that GO term xcannot be existence-dependent on GO term y, if x- and y- have the same specificity (biological characteristics). After encoding into a numeric format the contributions of GO terms annotating target genes to the semantics of their lowest common ancestors (LCAs), RSGSearch uses microarray experiment to identify the most significant LCA that annotates the result genes. We evaluated RSGSearch experimentally and compared it with five gene set enrichment systems. Results showed marked improvement. PMID:26357049

  4. Converging evidence for an impact of a functional NOS gene variation on anxiety-related processes.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Manuel; Haaker, Jan; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Schümann, Dirk; Andreatta, Marta; Mechias, Marie-Luise; Raczka, Karolina; Gartmann, Nina; Büchel, Christian; Mühlberger, Andreas; Pauli, Paul; Reif, Andreas; Kalisch, Raffael; Lonsdorf, Tina B

    2016-05-01

    Being a complex phenotype with substantial heritability, anxiety and related phenotypes are characterized by a complex polygenic basis. Thereby, one candidate pathway is neuronal nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and accordingly, rodent studies have identified NO synthase (NOS-I), encoded by NOS1, as a strong molecular candidate for modulating anxiety and hippocampus-dependent learning processes. Using a multi-dimensional and -methodological replication approach, we investigated the impact of a functional promoter polymorphism (NOS1-ex1f-VNTR) on human anxiety-related phenotypes in a total of 1019 healthy controls in five different studies. Homozygous carriers of the NOS1-ex1f short-allele displayed enhanced trait anxiety, worrying and depression scores. Furthermore, short-allele carriers were characterized by increased anxious apprehension during contextual fear conditioning. While autonomous measures (fear-potentiated startle) provided only suggestive evidence for a modulatory role of NOS1-ex1f-VNTR on (contextual) fear conditioning processes, neural activation at the amygdala/anterior hippocampus junction was significantly increased in short-allele carriers during context conditioning. Notably, this could not be attributed to morphological differences. In accordance with data from a plethora of rodent studies, we here provide converging evidence from behavioral, subjective, psychophysiological and neuroimaging studies in large human cohorts that NOS-I plays an important role in anxious apprehension but provide only limited evidence for a role in (contextual) fear conditioning. PMID:26746182

  5. Functional overexpression and characterization of lipogenesis-related genes in the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Andrew M; Qiao, Kangjian; Xu, Peng; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    Single cell oil (SCO) is an attractive energy source due to scalability, utilization of low-cost renewable feedstocks, and type of product(s) made. Engineering strains capable of producing high lipid titers and yields is crucial to the economic viability of these processes. However, lipid synthesis in cells is a complex phenomenon subject to multiple layers of regulation, making gene target identification a challenging task. In this study, we aimed to identify genes in the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica whose overexpression enhances lipid production by this organism. To this end, we examined the effect of the overexpression of a set of 44 native genes on lipid production in Y. lipolytica, including those involved in glycerolipid synthesis, fatty acid synthesis, central carbon metabolism, NADPH generation, regulation, and metabolite transport and characterized each resulting strain's ability to produce lipids growing on both glucose and acetate as a sole carbon source. Our results suggest that a diverse subset of genes was effective at individually influencing lipid production in Y. lipolytica, sometimes in a substrate-dependent manner. The most productive strain on glucose overexpressed the diacylglycerol acyltransferase DGA2 gene, increasing lipid titer, cellular content, and yield by 236, 165, and 246 %, respectively, over our control strain. On acetate, our most productive strain overexpressed the acylglycerol-phosphate acyltransferase SLC1 gene, with a lipid titer, cellular content, and yield increase of 99, 91, and 151 %, respectively, over the control strain. Aside from genes encoding enzymes that directly catalyze the reactions of lipid synthesis, other ways by which lipogenesis was increased in these cells include overexpressing the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1) gene to increase production of glycerol head groups and overexpressing the 6-phosphogluconolactonase (SOL3) gene from the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway to increase NADPH

  6. A common gene signature across multiple studies relate biomarkers and functional regulation in tolerance to renal allograft

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Daniel; Ramstein, Gérard; Chesneau, Mélanie; Echasseriau, Yann; Pallier, Annaick; Paul, Chloé; Degauque, Nicolas; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria P; Sanchez-Fueyo, Alberto; Newell, Kenneth A; Giral, Magali; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Houlgatte, Rémi; Brouard, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Patients tolerant to a kidney graft display a specific blood cell transcriptional pattern but results from five different studies were inconsistent, raising the question of relevance for future clinical application. To resolve this, we sought to identify a common gene signature, specific functional and cellular components, and discriminating biomarkers for tolerance following kidney transplantation. A meta-analysis of studies identified a robust gene signature involving proliferation of B and CD4 T cells, and inhibition of CD14 monocyte related functions among 96 tolerant samples. This signature was further supported through a cross-validation approach, yielding 92.5% accuracy independent of the study of origin. Experimental validation, performed on new tolerant samples and using a selection of the top-20 biomarkers, returned 91.7% of good classification. Beyond the confirmation of B-cell involvement, our data also indicated participation of other cell subsets in tolerance. Thus, the use of the top 20 biomarkers, mostly centered on B cells, may provide a common and standardized tool towards personalized medicine for the monitoring of tolerant or low-risk patients among kidney allotransplant recipients. These data point to a global preservation of genes favoring the maintenance of a homeostatic and ‘healthy' environment in tolerant patients and may contribute to a better understanding of tolerance maintenance mechanisms. PMID:25629549

  7. Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} is essential for the expression of antioxidant protection genes and mitochondrial function

    SciTech Connect

    Rangwala, Shamina M. . E-mail: shamina.rangwala@novartis.com; Li, Xiaoyan; Lindsley, Loren; Wang, Xiaomei; Shaughnessy, Stacey; Daniels, Thomas G.; Szustakowski, Joseph; Nirmala, N.R.; Wu, Zhidan; Stevenson, Susan C.

    2007-05-25

    Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} (ERR{alpha}) is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. To investigate the transcriptional network controlling these phenomena, we investigated mitochondrial gene expression in embryonic fibroblasts isolated from ERR{alpha} null mice. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) stimulated mitochondrial gene expression program in control cells, but not in the ERR{alpha} null cells. Interestingly, the induction of levels of mitochondrial oxidative stress protection genes in response to increased PGC-1{alpha} levels was dependent on ERR{alpha}. Furthermore, we found that the PGC-1{alpha}-mediated induction of estrogen-related receptor {gamma} and nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), was dependent on the presence of ERR{alpha}. Basal levels of NRF-2 were decreased in the absence of ERR{alpha}. The absence of ERR{alpha} resulted in a decrease in citrate synthase enzyme activity in response to PGC-1{alpha} overexpression. Our results indicate an essential role for ERR{alpha} as a key regulator of oxidative metabolism.

  8. Cognitive Function Related to the Sirh11/Zcchc16 Gene Acquired from an LTR Retrotransposon in Eutherians

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Ono, Ryuichi; Iwafune, Hirotaka; Furuse, Tamio; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Takaya; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Gene targeting of mouse S ushi- i chi-related r etrotransposon h omologue 11 / Z inc finger CCHC domain-containing 16 (Sirh11/Zcchc16) causes abnormal behaviors related to cognition, including attention, impulsivity and working memory. Sirh11/Zcchc16 encodes a CCHC type of zinc-finger protein that exhibits high homology to an LTR retrotransposon Gag protein. Upon microdialysis analysis of the prefrontal cortex region, the recovery rate of noradrenaline (NA) was reduced compared with dopamine (DA) after perfusion of high potassium-containing artificial cerebrospinal fluid in knockout (KO) mice. These data indicate that Sirh11/Zcchc16 is involved in cognitive function in the brain, possibly via the noradrenergic system, in the contemporary mouse developmental systems. Interestingly, it is highly conserved in three out of the four major groups of the eutherians, euarchontoglires, laurasiatheria and afrotheria, but is heavily mutated in xenarthran species such as the sloth and armadillo, suggesting that it has contributed to brain evolution in the three major eutherian lineages, including humans and mice. Sirh11/Zcchc16 is the first SIRH gene to be involved in brain function, instead of just the placenta, as seen in the case of Peg10, Peg11/Rtl1 and Sirh7/Ldoc1. PMID:26402067

  9. Cognitive Function Related to the Sirh11/Zcchc16 Gene Acquired from an LTR Retrotransposon in Eutherians.

    PubMed

    Irie, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Ono, Ryuichi; Iwafune, Hirotaka; Furuse, Tamio; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Takaya; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2015-09-01

    Gene targeting of mouse Sushi-ichi-related retrotransposon homologue 11/Zinc finger CCHC domain-containing 16 (Sirh11/Zcchc16) causes abnormal behaviors related to cognition, including attention, impulsivity and working memory. Sirh11/Zcchc16 encodes a CCHC type of zinc-finger protein that exhibits high homology to an LTR retrotransposon Gag protein. Upon microdialysis analysis of the prefrontal cortex region, the recovery rate of noradrenaline (NA) was reduced compared with dopamine (DA) after perfusion of high potassium-containing artificial cerebrospinal fluid in knockout (KO) mice. These data indicate that Sirh11/Zcchc16 is involved in cognitive function in the brain, possibly via the noradrenergic system, in the contemporary mouse developmental systems. Interestingly, it is highly conserved in three out of the four major groups of the eutherians, euarchontoglires, laurasiatheria and afrotheria, but is heavily mutated in xenarthran species such as the sloth and armadillo, suggesting that it has contributed to brain evolution in the three major eutherian lineages, including humans and mice. Sirh11/Zcchc16 is the first SIRH gene to be involved in brain function, instead of just the placenta, as seen in the case of Peg10, Peg11/Rtl1 and Sirh7/Ldoc1. PMID:26402067

  10. Isolation and functional analysis of the pathogenicity-related gene VdPR3 from Verticillium dahliae on cotton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Lin; Li, Zhi-Fang; Feng, Zi-Li; Feng, Hong-Jie; Zhao, Li-Hong; Shi, Yong-Qiang; Hu, Xiao-Ping; Zhu, He-Qin

    2015-11-01

    The fungal plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae is the causal agent of vascular wilt, a disease that can seriously diminish cotton fiber yield. The pathogenicity mechanism and the identity of the genes that interact with cotton during the infection process still remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the low-pathogenic, non-microsclerotium-producing mutant vdpr3 obtained in a previous study from the screening of a T-DNA insertional library of the highly virulent isolate Vd080; the pathogenicity-related gene (VdPR3) in wild-type strain Vd080 was cloned. Knockout mutants (ΔVdPR3) showed lower mycelium growth and obvious reduction in sporulation ability without microsclerotium formation. An evaluation of carbon utilization in mutants and wild-type isolate Vd080 demonstrated that mutants-lacking VdPR3 exhibited decreased cellulase and amylase activities, which was restored in the complementary mutants (ΔVdPR3-C) to levels similar to those of Vd080. ΔVdPR3 postponed infectious events in cotton and showed a significant reduction in pathogenicity. Reintroduction of a functional VdPR3 copy into ΔVdPR3-C restored the ability to infect cotton plants. These results suggest that VdPR3 is a multifunctional gene involved in growth development, extracellular enzyme activity, and virulence of V. dahliae on cotton. PMID:25652159

  11. NF-κB oscillations translate into functionally related patterns of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Samuel; De Toma, Ilario; Piffer, Arianna; Bianchi, Marco E; Agresti, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Several transcription factors (TFs) oscillate, periodically relocating between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. NF-κB, which plays key roles in inflammation and cancer, displays oscillations whose biological advantage remains unclear. Recent work indicated that NF-κB displays sustained oscillations that can be entrained, that is, reach a persistent synchronized state through small periodic perturbations. We show here that for our GFP-p65 knock-in cells NF-κB behaves as a damped oscillator able to synchronize to a variety of periodic external perturbations with no memory. We imposed synchronous dynamics to prove that transcription of NF-κB-controlled genes also oscillates, but mature transcript levels follow three distinct patterns. Two sets of transcripts accumulate fast or slowly, respectively. Another set, comprising chemokine and chemokine receptor mRNAs, oscillates and resets at each new stimulus, with no memory of the past. We propose that TF oscillatory dynamics is a means of segmenting time to provide renewing opportunity windows for decision. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09100.001 PMID:26765569

  12. Genomic Resources for Gene Discovery, Functional Genome Annotation, and Evolutionary Studies of Maize and Its Close Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Shi, Xue; Liu, Lin; Li, Haiyan; Ammiraju, Jetty S.S.; Kudrna, David A.; Xiong, Wentao; Wang, Hao; Dai, Zhaozhao; Zheng, Yonglian; Lai, Jinsheng; Jin, Weiwei; Messing, Joachim; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Wing, Rod A.; Luo, Meizhong

    2013-01-01

    Maize is one of the most important food crops and a key model for genetics and developmental biology. A genetically anchored and high-quality draft genome sequence of maize inbred B73 has been obtained to serve as a reference sequence. To facilitate evolutionary studies in maize and its close relatives, much like the Oryza Map Alignment Project (OMAP) (www.OMAP.org) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) resource did for the rice community, we constructed BAC libraries for maize inbred lines Zheng58, Chang7-2, and Mo17 and maize wild relatives Zea mays ssp. parviglumis and Tripsacum dactyloides. Furthermore, to extend functional genomic studies to maize and sorghum, we also constructed binary BAC (BIBAC) libraries for the maize inbred B73 and the sorghum landrace Nengsi-1. The BAC/BIBAC vectors facilitate transfer of large intact DNA inserts from BAC clones to the BIBAC vector and functional complementation of large DNA fragments. These seven Zea Map Alignment Project (ZMAP) BAC/BIBAC libraries have average insert sizes ranging from 92 to 148 kb, organellar DNA from 0.17 to 2.3%, empty vector rates between 0.35 and 5.56%, and genome equivalents of 4.7- to 8.4-fold. The usefulness of the Parviglumis and Tripsacum BAC libraries was demonstrated by mapping clones to the reference genome. Novel genes and alleles present in these ZMAP libraries can now be used for functional complementation studies and positional or homology-based cloning of genes for translational genomics. PMID:24037269

  13. Functional conservation of Toxoplasma gondii virulence genes in its avirulent relative, Hammondia hammondi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous protozoan parasite capable of infecting all warm blooded animals, including humans. Its closest extant relative, Hammondia hammondi, has never been found to infect humans and in contrast to T. gondii is highly attenuated in mice. To better understand the genetic b...

  14. Modification of the association of bisphenol A with abnormal liver function by polymorphisms of oxidative stress-related genes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Mee-Ri; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2016-05-01

    Some studies suggested oxidative stress as a possible mechanism for the relation between exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) and liver damage. Therefore, we evaluated modification of genetic polymorphisms of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 or PTGS2), epoxide hydrolase 1 (EPHX1), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2 or MnSOD), which are oxidative stress-related genes, on the relation between exposure to BPA and liver function in the elderly. We assessed the association of visit-to-visit variations in BPA exposure with abnormal liver function by each genotype or haplotype after controlling for age, sex, BMI, alcohol consumption, exercise, urinary cotinine levels, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol using a GLIMMIX model. A significant association of BPA with abnormal liver function was observed only in participants with COX2 GG genotype at rs5277 (odds ratio (OR)=3.04 and p=0.0231), CAT genotype at rs769218 (OR=4.16 and p=0.0356), CAT CT genotype at rs769217 (OR=4.19 and p=0.0348), SOD2 TT genotype at rs4880 (OR=2.59 and p=0.0438), or SOD2 GG genotype at rs2758331 (OR=2.57 and p=0.0457). Moreover, we also found higher OR values in participants with a pair of G-G haplotypes for COX2 (OR=2.81 and p=0.0384), G-C-A haplotype for EPHX1 (OR=4.63 and p=0.0654), A-T haplotype for CAT (OR=4.48 and p=0.0245), or T-G-A haplotype for SOD2 (OR=2.91 and p=0.0491) compared with those with the other pair of haplotypes for each gene. Furthermore, the risk score composed of 4 risky pair of haplotypes showed interactive effect with BPA on abnormal liver function (p=0.0057). Our study results suggest that genetic polymorphisms of COX2, EPHX1, CAT, and SOD2 modify the association of BPA with liver function. PMID:26922413

  15. Investigating regulatory signatures of human autophagy related gene 5 (ATG5) through functional in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Vij, Avni; Randhawa, Rohit; Parkash, Jyoti; Changotra, Harish

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy is an essential, homeostatic process which removes damaged cellular proteins and organelles for cellular renewal. ATG5, a part of E3 ubiquitin ligase-like complex (Atg12-Atg5/Atg16L1), is a key regulator involved in autophagosome formation - a crucial phase of autophagy. In this study, we used different in silico methods for comprehensive analysis of ATG5 to investigate its less explored regulatory activity. We have predicted various physico-chemical parameters and two possible transmembrane models that helped in exposing its functional regions. Twenty four PTM sites and 44 TFBS were identified which could be targeted to modulate the autophagy pathway. Furthermore, LD analysis identified 3 blocks of genotyped SNPs and 2 deleterious nsSNPs that may have damaging impact on protein function and thus could be employed for carrying genome-wide association studies. In conclusion, the information obtained in this study could be helpful for better understanding of regulatory roles of ATG5 and provides a base for its implication in population-based studies. PMID:27617225

  16. Expression and function of osteogenic genes runt-related transcription factor 2 and osterix in orthodontic tooth movement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jinyou; He, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression and function of osteogenic genes osterix (OSX) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) in the rat periodontal tissues under orthodontic force for the remodeling of the periodontal tissues. Methods: 24 Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups of orthodontic tooth movements for 1, 3, and 7 days (experimental groups) and control group (without orthodontic force). The expression of RUNX2 and OSX in the periodontal tissues was analyzed using real time PCR for mRNA and Western blot analysis for protein. The data were also analyzed for involvement of the two genes in signal pathways using bioinformatics tools. Results: The mRNA levels of RUNX2 and OSX increased in the periodontal tissues after subjected to the orthodontic force for 1 to 7 days, with the highest level occurring at day 7. The relative expression levels of RUNX2 and OSX mRNA were 1.85±0.12, 304±0.06 and 4.16±0.068, and 1.52±0.09, 1.83±0.03 and 2.56±0.06 at day 1, 3 and 7, respectively. The results of Western blot analysis were consistent with the mRNA results. Conclusion: In orthodontic tooth movement, the expression of RUNX2 and OSX was upregulated as a result of external stimulation, suggesting that the two genes is involved in periodontal tissue remodeling and plays an important role in periodontal tissue remodeling. PMID:26617945

  17. The impact of mitochondrial DNA and nuclear genes related to mitochondrial functioning on the risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gaweda-Walerych, Katarzyna; Zekanowski, Cezary

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are the major factors implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. The maintenance of healthy mitochondria is a very complex process coordinated bi-genomically. Here, we review association studies on mitochondrial haplogroups and subhaplogroups, discussing the underlying molecular mechanisms. We also focus on variation in the nuclear genes (NDUFV2, PGC-1alpha, HSPA9, LRPPRC, MTIF3, POLG1, and TFAM encoding NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) flavoprotein 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha, mortalin, leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein, translation initiation factor 3, mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma, and mitochondrial transcription factor A, respectively) primarily linked to regulation of mitochondrial functioning that recently have been associated with PD risk. Possible interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear genetic variants and related proteins are discussed. PMID:24532986

  18. The Impact of Mitochondrial DNA and Nuclear Genes Related to Mitochondrial Functioning on the Risk of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gaweda-Walerych, Katarzyna; Zekanowski, Cezary

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are the major factors implicated in Parkinson’s disease (PD) pathogenesis. The maintenance of healthy mitochondria is a very complex process coordinated bi-genomically. Here, we review association studies on mitochondrial haplogroups and subhaplogroups, discussing the underlying molecular mechanisms. We also focus on variation in the nuclear genes (NDUFV2, PGC-1alpha, HSPA9, LRPPRC, MTIF3, POLG1, and TFAM encoding NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) flavoprotein 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha, mortalin, leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein, translation initiation factor 3, mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma, and mitochondrial transcription factor A, respectively) primarily linked to regulation of mitochondrial functioning that recently have been associated with PD risk. Possible interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear genetic variants and related proteins are discussed. PMID:24532986

  19. Parallel re-modeling of EF-1α function: divergent EF-1α genes co-occur with EFL genes in diverse distantly related eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Elongation factor-1α (EF-1α) and elongation factor-like (EFL) proteins are functionally homologous to one another, and are core components of the eukaryotic translation machinery. The patchy distribution of the two elongation factor types across global eukaryotic phylogeny is suggestive of a ‘differential loss’ hypothesis that assumes that EF-1α and EFL were present in the most recent common ancestor of eukaryotes followed by independent differential losses of one of the two factors in the descendant lineages. To date, however, just one diatom and one fungus have been found to have both EF-1α and EFL (dual-EF-containing species). Results In this study, we characterized 35 new EF-1α/EFL sequences from phylogenetically diverse eukaryotes. In so doing we identified 11 previously unreported dual-EF-containing species from diverse eukaryote groups including the Stramenopiles, Apusomonadida, Goniomonadida, and Fungi. Phylogenetic analyses suggested vertical inheritance of both genes in each of the dual-EF lineages. In the dual-EF-containing species we identified, the EF-1α genes appeared to be highly divergent in sequence and suppressed at the transcriptional level compared to the co-occurring EFL genes. Conclusions According to the known EF-1α/EFL distribution, the differential loss process should have occurred independently in diverse eukaryotic lineages, and more dual-EF-containing species remain unidentified. We predict that dual-EF-containing species retain the divergent EF-1α homologues only for a sub-set of the original functions. As the dual-EF-containing species are distantly related to each other, we propose that independent re-modelling of EF-1α function took place in multiple branches in the tree of eukaryotes. PMID:23800323

  20. Analysis of genes contributing to plant-beneficial functions in plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and related Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bruto, Maxime; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Muller, Daniel; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan

    2014-01-01

    The positive effects of root-colonizing bacteria cooperating with plants lead to improved growth and/or health of their eukaryotic hosts. Some of these Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) display several plant-beneficial properties, suggesting that the accumulation of the corresponding genes could have been selected in these bacteria. Here, this issue was targeted using 23 genes contributing directly or indirectly to established PGPR effects, based on genome sequence analysis of 304 contrasted Alpha- Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria. Most of the 23 genes studied were also found in non-PGPR Proteobacteria and none of them were common to all 25 PGPR genomes studied. However, ancestral character reconstruction indicated that gene transfers -predominantly ancient- resulted in characteristic gene combinations according to taxonomic subgroups of PGPR strains. This suggests that the PGPR-plant cooperation could have established separately in various taxa, yielding PGPR strains that use different gene assortments. The number of genes contributing to plant-beneficial functions increased along the continuum -animal pathogens, phytopathogens, saprophytes, endophytes/symbionts, PGPR- indicating that the accumulation of these genes (and possibly of different plant-beneficial traits) might be an intrinsic PGPR feature. This work uncovered preferential associations occurring between certain genes contributing to phytobeneficial traits and provides new insights into the emergence of PGPR bacteria. PMID:25179219

  1. Analysis of genes contributing to plant-beneficial functions in Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria and related Proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bruto, Maxime; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Muller, Daniel; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan

    2014-01-01

    The positive effects of root-colonizing bacteria cooperating with plants lead to improved growth and/or health of their eukaryotic hosts. Some of these Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) display several plant-beneficial properties, suggesting that the accumulation of the corresponding genes could have been selected in these bacteria. Here, this issue was targeted using 23 genes contributing directly or indirectly to established PGPR effects, based on genome sequence analysis of 304 contrasted Alpha- Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria. Most of the 23 genes studied were also found in non-PGPR Proteobacteria and none of them were common to all 25 PGPR genomes studied. However, ancestral character reconstruction indicated that gene transfers -predominantly ancient- resulted in characteristic gene combinations according to taxonomic subgroups of PGPR strains. This suggests that the PGPR-plant cooperation could have established separately in various taxa, yielding PGPR strains that use different gene assortments. The number of genes contributing to plant-beneficial functions increased along the continuum -animal pathogens, phytopathogens, saprophytes, endophytes/symbionts, PGPR- indicating that the accumulation of these genes (and possibly of different plant-beneficial traits) might be an intrinsic PGPR feature. This work uncovered preferential associations occurring between certain genes contributing to phytobeneficial traits and provides new insights into the emergence of PGPR bacteria. PMID:25179219

  2. Functional analysis of pyochelin-/enantiopyochelin-related genes from a pathogenicity island of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14.

    PubMed

    Maspoli, Alessandro; Wenner, Nicolas; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2014-06-01

    Genomic islands are foreign DNA blocks inserted in so-called regions of genomic plasticity (RGP). Depending on their gene content, they are classified as pathogenicity, symbiosis, metabolic, fitness or resistance islands, although a detailed functional analysis is often lacking. Here we focused on a 34-kb pathogenicity island of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 (PA14GI-6), which is inserted at RGP5 and carries genes related to those for pyochelin/enantiopyochelin biosynthesis. These enantiomeric siderophores of P. aeruginosa and certain strains of Pseudomonas protegens are assembled by a thiotemplate mechanism from salicylate and two molecules of cysteine. The biochemical function of several proteins encoded by PA14GI-6 was investigated by a series of complementation analyses using mutants affected in potential homologs. We found that PA14_54940 codes for a bifunctional salicylate synthase/salicyl-AMP ligase (for generation and activation of salicylate), that PA14_54930 specifies a dihydroaeruginoic acid (Dha) synthetase (for coupling salicylate with a cysteine-derived thiazoline ring), that PA14_54910 produces a type II thioesterase (for quality control), and that PA14_54880 encodes a serine O-acetyltransferase (for increased cysteine availability). The structure of the PA14GI-6-specified metabolite was determined by mass spectrometry, thin-layer chromatography, and HPLC as (R)-Dha, an iron chelator with antibacterial, antifungal and antitumor activity. The conservation of this genomic island in many clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa isolates of different geographical origin suggests that the ability for Dha production may confer a selective advantage to its host. PMID:24682869

  3. Functional and bioinformatics analysis of an exopolysaccharide-related gene (epsN) from Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens ZW3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingrui; Tang, Wei; Zheng, Yongna; Xing, Zhuqing; Wang, Yanping

    2016-09-01

    A novel lactic acid bacteria strain Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens ZW3 exhibited the characteristics of high production of exopolysaccharide (EPS). The epsN gene, located in the eps gene cluster of this strain, is associated with EPS biosynthesis. Bioinformatics analysis of this gene was performed. The conserved domain analysis showed that the EpsN protein contained MATE-Wzx-like domains. Then the epsN gene was amplified to construct the recombinant expression vector pMG36e-epsN. The results showed that the EPS yields of the recombinants were significantly improved. By determining the yields of EPS and intracellular polysaccharide, it was considered that epsN gene could play its Wzx flippase role in the EPS biosynthesis. This is the first time to prove the effect of EpsN on L. kefiranofaciens EPS biosynthesis and further prove its functional property. PMID:27084765

  4. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of three pathogenesis-related cytochrome P450 genes from Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Tylenchida: Aphelenchoidoidea).

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Lu; Wu, Xiao-Qin; Ye, Jian-Ren; Huang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, the causal agent of pine wilt disease, causes huge economic losses in pine forests. The high expression of cytochrome P450 genes in B. xylophilus during infection in P. thunbergii indicated that these genes had a certain relationship with the pathogenic process of B. xylophilus. Thus, we attempted to identify the molecular characterization and functions of cytochrome P450 genes in B. xylophilus. In this study, full-length cDNA of three cytochrome P450 genes, BxCYP33C9, BxCYP33C4 and BxCYP33D3 were first cloned from B. xylophilus using 3' and 5' RACE PCR amplification. Sequence analysis showed that all of them contained a highly-conserved cytochrome P450 domain. The characteristics of the three putative proteins were analyzed with bioinformatic methods. RNA interference (RNAi) was used to assess the functions of BxCYP33C9, BxCYP33C4 and BxCYP33D3. The results revealed that these cytochrome P450 genes were likely to be associated with the vitality, dispersal ability, reproduction, pathogenicity and pesticide metabolism of B. xylophilus. This discovery confirmed the molecular characterization and functions of three cytochrome P450 genes from B. xylophilus and provided fundamental information in elucidating the molecular interaction mechanism between B. xylophilus and its host plant. PMID:25756378

  5. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of Three Pathogenesis-Related Cytochrome P450 Genes from Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Tylenchida: Aphelenchoidoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Lu; Wu, Xiao-Qin; Ye, Jian-Ren; Huang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, the causal agent of pine wilt disease, causes huge economic losses in pine forests. The high expression of cytochrome P450 genes in B. xylophilus during infection in P. thunbergii indicated that these genes had a certain relationship with the pathogenic process of B. xylophilus. Thus, we attempted to identify the molecular characterization and functions of cytochrome P450 genes in B. xylophilus. In this study, full-length cDNA of three cytochrome P450 genes, BxCYP33C9, BxCYP33C4 and BxCYP33D3 were first cloned from B. xylophilus using 3' and 5' RACE PCR amplification. Sequence analysis showed that all of them contained a highly-conserved cytochrome P450 domain. The characteristics of the three putative proteins were analyzed with bioinformatic methods. RNA interference (RNAi) was used to assess the functions of BxCYP33C9, BxCYP33C4 and BxCYP33D3. The results revealed that these cytochrome P450 genes were likely to be associated with the vitality, dispersal ability, reproduction, pathogenicity and pesticide metabolism of B. xylophilus. This discovery confirmed the molecular characterization and functions of three cytochrome P450 genes from B. xylophilus and provided fundamental information in elucidating the molecular interaction mechanism between B. xylophilus and its host plant. PMID:25756378

  6. Novel metastasis-related gene CIM functions in the regulation of multiple cellular stress-response pathways.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Arima, Chinatsu; Tomida, Shuta; Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Shimada, Yukako; Yatabe, Yasushi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Osada, Hirotaka; Takahashi, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    Various stresses of the tumor microenvironment produced by insufficient nutrients, pH, and oxygen can contribute to the generation of altered metabolic and proliferative states that promote the survival of metastatic cells. Among many cellular stress-response pathways activated under such conditions are the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway and the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is elicited as a response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In this study, we report the identification of a novel cancer invasion and metastasis-related gene (hereafter referred to as CIM, also called ERLEC1), which influences both of these stress-response pathways to promote metastasis. CIM was identified by comparing the gene expression profile of a highly metastatic human lung cancer cell line with its weakly metastatic parental clone. We showed that CIM is critical for metastatic properties in this system. Proteomic approaches combined with bioinformatic analyses revealed that CIM has multifaceted roles in controlling the response to hypoxia and ER stress. Specifically, CIM sequestered OS-9 from the HIF-1α complex and PHD2, permitting HIF-1α accumulation by preventing its degradation. Ectopic expression of CIM in lung cancer cells increased their tolerance to hypoxia. CIM also modulated UPR through interaction with the key ER stress protein BiP, influencing cell proliferation under ER stress conditions. Our findings shed light on how tolerance to multiple cellular stresses at a metastatic site can be evoked by an integrated mechanism involving CIM, which can function to coordinate those responses in a manner that promotes metastatic cell survival. PMID:21118962

  7. Integration of genome-wide association studies with biological knowledge identifies six novel genes related to kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Chasman, Daniel I.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Böger, Carsten A.; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Coassin, Stefan; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Meisinger, Christa; Gieger, Christian; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K.; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Kao, W.H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.; Köttgen, Anna

    2012-01-01

    In conducting genome-wide association studies (GWAS), analytical approaches leveraging biological information may further understanding of the pathophysiology of clinical traits. To discover novel associations with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), a measure of kidney function, we developed a strategy for integrating prior biological knowledge into the existing GWAS data for eGFR from the CKDGen Consortium. Our strategy focuses on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in genes that are connected by functional evidence, determined by literature mining and gene ontology (GO) hierarchies, to genes near previously validated eGFR associations. It then requires association thresholds consistent with multiple testing, and finally evaluates novel candidates by independent replication. Among the samples of European ancestry, we identified a genome-wide significant SNP in FBXL20 (P = 5.6 × 10−9) in meta-analysis of all available data, and additional SNPs at the INHBC, LRP2, PLEKHA1, SLC3A2 and SLC7A6 genes meeting multiple-testing corrected significance for replication and overall P-values of 4.5 × 10−4–2.2 × 10−7. Neither the novel PLEKHA1 nor FBXL20 associations, both further supported by association with eGFR among African Americans and with transcript abundance, would have been implicated by eGFR candidate gene approaches. LRP2, encoding the megalin receptor, was identified through connection with the previously known eGFR gene DAB2 and extends understanding of the megalin system in kidney function. These findings highlight integration of existing genome-wide association data with independent biological knowledge to uncover novel candidate eGFR associations, including candidates lacking known connections to kidney-specific pathways. The strategy may also be applicable to other clinical phenotypes, although more testing will be needed to assess its potential for discovery in general. PMID:22962313

  8. Association Between a Prognostic Gene Signature and Functional Gene Sets

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Manuela; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Buske, Christian; Bohlander, Stefan K.; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Background The development of expression-based gene signatures for predicting prognosis or class membership is a popular and challenging task. Besides their stringent validation, signatures need a functional interpretation and must be placed in a biological context. Popular tools such as Gene Set Enrichment have drawbacks because they are restricted to annotated genes and are unable to capture the information hidden in the signature’s non-annotated genes. Methodology We propose concepts to relate a signature with functional gene sets like pathways or Gene Ontology categories. The connection between single signature genes and a specific pathway is explored by hierarchical variable selection and gene association networks. The risk score derived from an individual patient’s signature is related to expression patterns of pathways and Gene Ontology categories. Global tests are useful for these tasks, and they adjust for other factors. GlobalAncova is used to explore the effect on gene expression in specific functional groups from the interaction of the score and selected mutations in the patient’s genome. Results We apply the proposed methods to an expression data set and a corresponding gene signature for predicting survival in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). The example demonstrates strong relations between the signature and cancer-related pathways. The signature-based risk score was found to be associated with development-related biological processes. Conclusions Many authors interpret the functional aspects of a gene signature by linking signature genes to pathways or relevant functional gene groups. The method of gene set enrichment is preferred to annotating signature genes to specific Gene Ontology categories. The strategies proposed in this paper go beyond the restriction of annotation and deepen the insights into the biological mechanisms reflected in the information given by a signature. PMID:19812786

  9. [Cloning and function identification of gene 'admA' and up-stream regulatory sequence related to antagonistic activity of Enterobacter cloacae B8].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun-Li; Li, De-Bao; Yu, Xu-Ping

    2012-04-01

    To reveal the antagonistic mechanism of B8 strain to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, transposon tagging method and chromosome walking were deployed to clone antagonistic related fragments around Tn5 insertion site in the mutant strain B8B. The function of up-stream regulatory sequence of gene 'admA' involved in the antagonistic activity was further identified by gene knocking out technique. An antagonistic related left fragment of Tn5 insertion site, 2 608 bp in length, was obtained by tagging with Kan resistance gene of Tn5. A 2 354 bp right fragment of Tn5 insertion site was amplified with 2 rounds of chromosome walking. The length of the B contig around the Tn5 insertion site was 4 611 bp, containing 7 open reading frames (ORFs). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that these ORFs corresponded to the partial coding regions of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, two LysR family transcriptional regulators, hypothetical protein VSWAT3-20465 of Vibrionales and admA, admB, and partial sequence of admC gene of Pantoea agglomerans biosynthetic gene cluster, respectively. Tn5 was inserted in the up-stream of 200 bp or 894 bp of the sequence corresponding to anrP ORF or admA gene on B8B, respectively. The B-1 and B-2 mutants that lost antagonistic activity were selected by homeologuous recombination technology in association with knocking out plasmid pMB-BG. These results suggested that the transcription and expression of anrP gene might be disrupted as a result of the knocking out of up-stream regulatory sequence by Tn5 in B8B strain, further causing biosythesis regulation of the antagonistic related gene cluster. Thus, the antagonistic related genes in B8 strain is a gene family similar as andrimid biosynthetic gene cluster, and the upstream regulatory region appears to be critical for the antibiotics biosynthesis. PMID:22522167

  10. The thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin (trh) gene of Vibrio parahaemolyticus: Sequence variation and implications for detection and function.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, William B; Turner, Jeffrey W

    2016-07-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of bacterial food-related illness associated with the consumption of undercooked seafood. Only a small subset of strains is pathogenic. Most clinical strains encode for the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and/or the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH). In this work, we amplify and sequence the trh gene from over 80 trh+strains of this bacterium and identify thirteen genetically distinct alleles, most of which have not been deposited in GenBank previously. Sequence data was used to design new primers for more reliable detection of trh by endpoint PCR. We also designed a new quantitative PCR assay to target a more conserved gene that is genetically-linked to trh. This gene, ureR, encodes the transcriptional regulator for the urease gene cluster immediately upstream of trh. We propose that this ureR assay can be a useful screening tool as a surrogate for direct detection of trh that circumvents challenges associated with trh sequence variation. PMID:27094247

  11. Possible Regulatory Roles of Promoter G-Quadruplexes in Cardiac Function-Related Genes – Human TnIc as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenhua; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Brand, Nigel J.; Barton, Paul J. R.; Vilar, Ramon; Ying, Liming

    2013-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (G4s) are four-stranded DNA secondary structures, which are involved in a diverse range of biological processes. Although the anti-cancer potential of G4s in oncogene promoters has been thoroughly investigated, the functions of promoter G4s in non-cancer-related genes are not well understood. We have explored the possible regulatory roles of promoter G4s in cardiac function-related genes using both computational and a wide range of experimental approaches. According to our bioinformatics results, it was found that potential G4-forming sequences are particularly enriched in the transcription regulatory regions (TRRs) of cardiac function-related genes. Subsequently, the promoter of human cardiac troponin I (TnIc) was chosen as a model, and G4s found in this region were subjected to biophysical characterisations. The chromosome 19 specific minisatellite G4 sequence (MNSG4) and near transcription start site (TSS) G4 sequence (−80 G4) adopt anti-parallel and parallel structures respectively in 100 mM KCl, with stabilities comparable to those of oncogene G4s. It was also found that TnIc G4s act cooperatively as enhancers in gene expression regulation in HEK293 cells, when stabilised by a synthetic G4-binding ligand. This study provides the first evidence of the biological significance of promoter G4s in cardiac function-related genes. The feasibility of using a single ligand to target multiple G4s in a particular gene has also been discussed. PMID:23326389

  12. Senescence-related functional nuclear barrier by down-regulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Young; Ryu, Sung Jin; Ahn, Hong Ju; Choi, Hae Ri; Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    One of the characteristic natures of senescent cells is the hypo- or irresponsiveness not only to growth factors but also to apoptotic stress. In the present study, we confirmed the inhibition of nuclear translocation of activated p-ERK1/2 and NF-kB p50 in response to growth stimuli or LPS in the senescent human diploid fibroblasts. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanism for the senescence-associated hypo-responsiveness, we carried out the comparison study for gene expression profiles through microarray analysis. In consequence, we observed the vast reduction in expression of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in senescent cells, when compared with those in young cells. Expression levels of several nucleoporins, karyopherin {alpha}, karyopherin {beta}, Ran, and Ran-regulating factors were confirmed to be down-regulated in senescent HDFs by using RT-PCR and Western blot methods. Taken together, these data suggest the operation of certain senescence-associated functional nuclear barriers by down-regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in the senescent cells.

  13. Functional Studies of Heading Date-Related Gene TaPRR73, a Paralog of Ppd1 in Common Wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenping; Zhao, Guangyao; Gao, Lifeng; Kong, Xiuying; Guo, Zhiai; Wu, Bihua; Jia, Jizeng

    2016-01-01

    Photoperiod response-related genes play a crucial role in duration of the plant growth. In this study, we focused on TaPRR73, a paralog of "Green Revolution" gene Ppd1 (TaPRR37). We found that overexpression of the truncated TaPRR73 form lacking part of the N-terminal PR domain in transgenic rice promoted heading under long day conditions. Association analysis in common wheat verified that TaPRR73 was an important agronomic photoperiod response gene that significantly affected heading date and plant height; expression analysis proved that specific alleles of TaPRR73-A1 had highly expressed levels in earlier heading lines; the distribution of haplotypes indicated that one of these alleles had been selected in breeding programs. Our results demonstrated that TaPRR73 contributed to regulation of heading date in wheat and could be useful in wheat breeding and in broadening adaptation of the crop to new regions. PMID:27313595

  14. Functional Studies of Heading Date-Related Gene TaPRR73, a Paralog of Ppd1 in Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenping; Zhao, Guangyao; Gao, Lifeng; Kong, Xiuying; Guo, Zhiai; Wu, Bihua; Jia, Jizeng

    2016-01-01

    Photoperiod response-related genes play a crucial role in duration of the plant growth. In this study, we focused on TaPRR73, a paralog of “Green Revolution” gene Ppd1 (TaPRR37). We found that overexpression of the truncated TaPRR73 form lacking part of the N-terminal PR domain in transgenic rice promoted heading under long day conditions. Association analysis in common wheat verified that TaPRR73 was an important agronomic photoperiod response gene that significantly affected heading date and plant height; expression analysis proved that specific alleles of TaPRR73-A1 had highly expressed levels in earlier heading lines; the distribution of haplotypes indicated that one of these alleles had been selected in breeding programs. Our results demonstrated that TaPRR73 contributed to regulation of heading date in wheat and could be useful in wheat breeding and in broadening adaptation of the crop to new regions. PMID:27313595

  15. TinII intron, an enhancer to affect the function of the cytoplasmic male sterility related gene T in Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Jin, ZhuPing; Wu, LingLing; Cao, JiaShu; Chen, ZhuJun; Pei, YanXi

    2013-12-01

    The T gene, which was cloned from the mitochondria of tumorous stem mustard (Brassica juncea var. tumida), is a cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS)-related gene that can produce two transcripts, T1170 and T1243. The latter is transcribed with the uncleaved intron TinII. In our previous study, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants over-expressing the T1243 transcript (OE-T1243) showed a severe male-sterile phenotype, whereas OE-T1170 plants did not. However, the functional mechanism of the T gene in B. Juncea remained unknown. In this study, microscopic analyses of paraffin sections of anthers confirmed that OE-T1243 plants did not produce normal pollen, whereas OE-T1170 plants did. We analyzed the transcription of 15 anther development-related genes and found that transcript levels of nozzle/sporocyteless and barely any meristem 1 and 2 were markedly lower in OE-T1243 plants than those in wild type, while the transcript levels of these genes in OE-T1170 plants were unchanged. To investigate the potential roles of TinII, we inserted the TinII sequence upstream of a minimal region (-60) of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter fused to the 5' end of the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. Analysis of the transgenic plants suggested that TinII acted as an enhancer to significantly increase GUS expression. The potential action mechanism is that the TinII intron acts as an enhancer to affect the function of the CMS-related gene T. PMID:24302291

  16. FunGene: the functional gene pipeline and repository

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Jordan A.; Chai, Benli; Wang, Qiong; Sun, Yanni; Brown, C. Titus; Tiedje, James M.; Cole, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA genes have become the standard molecular markers for microbial community analysis for good reasons, including universal occurrence in cellular organisms, availability of large databases, and ease of rRNA gene region amplification and analysis. As markers, however, rRNA genes have some significant limitations. The rRNA genes are often present in multiple copies, unlike most protein-coding genes. The slow rate of change in rRNA genes means that multiple species sometimes share identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, while many more species share identical sequences in the short 16S rRNA regions commonly analyzed. In addition, the genes involved in many important processes are not distributed in a phylogenetically coherent manner, potentially due to gene loss or horizontal gene transfer. While rRNA genes remain the most commonly used markers, key genes in ecologically important pathways, e.g., those involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling, can provide important insights into community composition and function not obtainable through rRNA analysis. However, working with ecofunctional gene data requires some tools beyond those required for rRNA analysis. To address this, our Functional Gene Pipeline and Repository (FunGene; http://fungene.cme.msu.edu/) offers databases of many common ecofunctional genes and proteins, as well as integrated tools that allow researchers to browse these collections and choose subsets for further analysis, build phylogenetic trees, test primers and probes for coverage, and download aligned sequences. Additional FunGene tools are specialized to process coding gene amplicon data. For example, FrameBot produces frameshift-corrected protein and DNA sequences from raw reads while finding the most closely related protein reference sequence. These tools can help provide better insight into microbial communities by directly studying key genes involved in important ecological processes. PMID:24101916

  17. Polyamines are essential in embryo implantation: expression and function of polyamine-related genes in mouse uterus during peri-implantation period.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue-Chao; Chi, Yu-Jing; Yu, Yong-Sheng; Liu, Ji-Long; Su, Ren-Wei; Ma, Xing-Hong; Shan, Chun-Hua; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2008-05-01

    Polyamines are key regulators in cell growth and differentiation. It has been shown that ornithine decarboxylase (Odc) was essential for post-implantation embryo development, and overexpression of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase will lead to ovarian hypofunction and hypoplastic uteri. However, the expression and function of polyamine-related genes in mouse uterus during early pregnancy are still unknown. In this study we investigated the expression, regulation, and function of polyamine-related genes in mouse uterus during the peri-implantation period. Odc expression was strongly detected at implantation sites and stimulated by estrogen treatment. The expression of Odc antizyme 1 and spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase was also highly shown at implantation sites and regulated by Odc or polyamine level in uterine cells. Embryo implantation was significantly inhibited by alpha-difluoromethylornithine, an Odc inhibitor. Moreover, the reduction of Odc activity caused by alpha-difluoromethylornithine treatment was compensated by the up-regulation of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase gene expression. Collectively, our results indicated that the coordinated expression of uterine polyamine-related genes may be important for embryo implantation. PMID:18202119

  18. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: Unique tissue-specific functions revealed by selective gene knockout studies

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Van Duyn, Lauren B.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2008-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (originally called LRP, but now referred to as LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that is widely expressed in several tissues. LRP1 is a member of the LDL receptor family that plays diverse roles in various biological processes including lipoprotein metabolism, degradation of proteases, activation of lysosomal enzymes and cellular entry of bacterial toxins and viruses. Deletion of the LRP1 gene leads to lethality in mice, revealing a critical, but as of yet, undefined role in development. Tissue-specific gene deletion studies reveal an important contribution of LRP1 in the vasculature, central nervous system, in macrophages and in adipocytes. Three important properties of LRP1 dictate its diverse role in physiology: first, its ability to recognize more than thirty distinct ligands; second, its ability to bind a large number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins via determinants located on its cytoplasmic domain in a phosphorylation-specific manner; and third, its ability to associate with and modulate the activity of other transmembrane receptors such as integrins and receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:18626063

  19. Two Novel AP2/EREBP Transcription Factor Genes TaPARG Have Pleiotropic Functions on Plant Architecture and Yield-Related Traits in Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Li, Qiaoru; Mao, Xinguo; Li, Ang; Wang, Jingyi; Chang, Xiaoping; Hao, Chenyang; Zhang, Xueyong; Jing, Ruilian

    2016-01-01

    AP2/EREBPs play significant roles in plant growth and development. A novel, pleiotropic TaPARG (PLANT ARCHITECTURE-RELATED GENE), a member of the AP2/EREBP transcription factor gene family, and its flanking sequences were isolated in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Two TaPARG genes were identified and named as TaPARG-2A and TaPARG-2D. Their amino acid sequences were highly similar especially in the functional domains. TaPARG-2A on chromosome 2A was flanked by markers Xwmc63 and Xgwm372. TaPARG-2D was mapped to chromosome 2D. Subcellular localization revealed that TaPARG-2D was localized in the nucleus. The results of tissue expression pattern, overexpression in rice, association analysis and distinct population verification jointly revealed that TaPARG functions during the entire growth cycle of wheat. Its functions include regulation of plant architecture-related and yield-related traits. Association analysis, geographic distribution and allelic frequencies suggested that favored haplotypes Hap-2A-2 and Hap-2A-3 were selected in Chinese wheat breeding programs. Both favored haplotypes might be caused by a single amino acid substitution (His/Tyr). These results suggest that TaPARG is a regulatory factor in plant growth and development, and that the favored alleles might be useful for improving plant architecture and grain yield of wheat. PMID:27555860

  20. Two Novel AP2/EREBP Transcription Factor Genes TaPARG Have Pleiotropic Functions on Plant Architecture and Yield-Related Traits in Common Wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Li, Qiaoru; Mao, Xinguo; Li, Ang; Wang, Jingyi; Chang, Xiaoping; Hao, Chenyang; Zhang, Xueyong; Jing, Ruilian

    2016-01-01

    AP2/EREBPs play significant roles in plant growth and development. A novel, pleiotropic TaPARG (PLANT ARCHITECTURE-RELATED GENE), a member of the AP2/EREBP transcription factor gene family, and its flanking sequences were isolated in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Two TaPARG genes were identified and named as TaPARG-2A and TaPARG-2D. Their amino acid sequences were highly similar especially in the functional domains. TaPARG-2A on chromosome 2A was flanked by markers Xwmc63 and Xgwm372. TaPARG-2D was mapped to chromosome 2D. Subcellular localization revealed that TaPARG-2D was localized in the nucleus. The results of tissue expression pattern, overexpression in rice, association analysis and distinct population verification jointly revealed that TaPARG functions during the entire growth cycle of wheat. Its functions include regulation of plant architecture-related and yield-related traits. Association analysis, geographic distribution and allelic frequencies suggested that favored haplotypes Hap-2A-2 and Hap-2A-3 were selected in Chinese wheat breeding programs. Both favored haplotypes might be caused by a single amino acid substitution (His/Tyr). These results suggest that TaPARG is a regulatory factor in plant growth and development, and that the favored alleles might be useful for improving plant architecture and grain yield of wheat. PMID:27555860

  1. A genome-wide linkage and association study of musical aptitude identifies loci containing genes related to inner ear development and neurocognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Oikkonen, J; Huang, Y; Onkamo, P; Ukkola-Vuoti, L; Raijas, P; Karma, K; Vieland, V J; Järvelä, I

    2015-02-01

    Humans have developed the perception, production and processing of sounds into the art of music. A genetic contribution to these skills of musical aptitude has long been suggested. We performed a genome-wide scan in 76 pedigrees (767 individuals) characterized for the ability to discriminate pitch (SP), duration (ST) and sound patterns (KMT), which are primary capacities for music perception. Using the Bayesian linkage and association approach implemented in program package KELVIN, especially designed for complex pedigrees, several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near genes affecting the functions of the auditory pathway and neurocognitive processes were identified. The strongest association was found at 3q21.3 (rs9854612) with combined SP, ST and KMT test scores (COMB). This region is located a few dozen kilobases upstream of the GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) gene. GATA2 regulates the development of cochlear hair cells and the inferior colliculus (IC), which are important in tonotopic mapping. The highest probability of linkage was obtained for phenotype SP at 4p14, located next to the region harboring the protocadherin 7 gene, PCDH7. Two SNPs rs13146789 and rs13109270 of PCDH7 showed strong association. PCDH7 has been suggested to play a role in cochlear and amygdaloid complexes. Functional class analysis showed that inner ear and schizophrenia-related genes were enriched inside the linked regions. This study is the first to show the importance of auditory pathway genes in musical aptitude. PMID:24614497

  2. Calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and CDPK-related kinase (CRK) gene families in tomato: genome-wide identification and functional analyses in disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Peng; Xu, You-Ping; Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Liu, Tian-Yu; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-04-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and CDPK-related kinases (CRKs) play multiple roles in plant. Nevertheless, genome-wide identification of these two families is limited to several plant species, and role of CRKs in disease resistance remains unclear. In this study, we identified the CDPK and CRK gene families in genome of the economically important crop tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and analyzed their function in resistance to various pathogens. Twenty-nine CDPK and six CRK genes were identified in tomato genome. Both SlCDPK and SlCRK proteins harbored an STKc_CAMK type protein kinase domain, while only SlCDPKs contained EF-hand type Ca(2+) binding domain(s). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that plant CRK family diverged early from CDPKs, and shared a common ancestor gene with subgroup IV CDPKs. Subgroup IV SlCDPK proteins were basic and their genes contained 11 introns, which were distinguished from other subgroups but similar to CRKs. Subgroup I SlCDPKs generally did not carry an N-terminal myristoylation motif while those of the remaining subgroups and SlCRKs universally did. SlCDPK and SlCRK genes were differently responsive to pathogenic stimuli. Furthermore, silencing analyses demonstrated that SlCDPK18 and SlCDPK10 positively regulated nonhost resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and host resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000, respectively, while SlCRK6 positively regulated resistance to both Pst DC3000 and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in tomato. In conclusion, CRKs apparently evolved from CDPK lineage, SlCDPK and SlCRK genes regulate a wide range of resistance and SlCRK6 is the first CRK gene proved to function in plant disease resistance. PMID:26520101

  3. Age-related changes of gene expression in the neocortex: Preliminary data on RNA-Seq of the transcriptome in three functionally distinct cortical areas

    PubMed Central

    NAUMOVA, OKSANA YU.; PALEJEV, DEAN; VLASOVA, NATALIA V.; LEE, MARIA; RYCHKOV, SERGEI YU.; BABICH, OLGA N.; VACCARINO, FLORA M.; GRIGORENKO, ELENA L.

    2012-01-01

    The study of gene expression (i.e., the study of the transcriptome) in different cells and tissues allows us to understand the molecular mechanisms of their differentiation, development and functioning. In this article, we describe some studies of gene-expression profiling for the purposes of understanding developmental (age-related) changes in the brain using different technologies (e.g., DNA-Microarray) and the new and increasingly popular RNA-Seq. We focus on advancements in studies of gene expression in the human brain, which have provided data on the structure and age-related variability of the transcriptome in the brain. We present data on RNA-Seq of the transcriptome in three distinct areas of the neocortex from different ages: mature and elderly individuals. We report that most age-related transcriptional changes affect cellular signaling systems, and, as a result, the transmission of nerve impulses. In general, the results demonstrate the high potential of RNA-Seq for the study of distinctive features of gene expression among cortical areas and the changes in expression through normal and atypical development of the central nervous system. PMID:23062308

  4. Long non-coding RNA LINC00628 functions as a gastric cancer suppressor via long-range modulating the expression of cell cycle related genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Zhen; Zhao, Gang; Zhuang, Chun; Shen, Yan-Ying; Zhao, Wen-Yi; Xu, Jia; Wang, Ming; Wang, Chao-Jie; Tu, Lin; Cao, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    To discover new biomarkers for gastric cancer (GC) diagnose and treatment, we screened the lncRNAs in GC tissues from 5 patients. We found 6 lncRNAs had altered expression, and in the same time, the levels of their neighboring genes (located near 300 kb upstream or downstream of lncRNA locus) were significantly changed. After confirming the results of microarray by qRT-PCR in 82 GC patients, the biological function of LINC00628 was examined through cell proliferation and apoptosis, cell migration and invasion, colony formation assay and cell cycle detection. We confirmed that LINC00628 functions as a GC suppressor through suppressing proliferation, migration and colony formation of cancer cells. Furthermore, LINC00628 can also suppress the tumor size in mouse xenograft models. Although LINC00628 can modulate LRRN2 expression, the GC suppressor function of LINC00628 is not LRRN2 dependent. The result of mRNA microarray indicated that LINC00628 perform GC inhibitor function through long-range modulating cell cycle related genes. Importantly, we confirmed that LINC00628 mainly located in the nucleus and interacted with EZH2, and modulated genes expression by regulating H3K27me3 level. This research shed light on the role of dysregulated LINC00628 during GC process and may serve as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27272474

  5. Long non-coding RNA LINC00628 functions as a gastric cancer suppressor via long-range modulating the expression of cell cycle related genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zi-Zhen; Zhao, Gang; Zhuang, Chun; Shen, Yan-Ying; Zhao, Wen-Yi; Xu, Jia; Wang, Ming; Wang, Chao-Jie; Tu, Lin; Cao, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    To discover new biomarkers for gastric cancer (GC) diagnose and treatment, we screened the lncRNAs in GC tissues from 5 patients. We found 6 lncRNAs had altered expression, and in the same time, the levels of their neighboring genes (located near 300 kb upstream or downstream of lncRNA locus) were significantly changed. After confirming the results of microarray by qRT-PCR in 82 GC patients, the biological function of LINC00628 was examined through cell proliferation and apoptosis, cell migration and invasion, colony formation assay and cell cycle detection. We confirmed that LINC00628 functions as a GC suppressor through suppressing proliferation, migration and colony formation of cancer cells. Furthermore, LINC00628 can also suppress the tumor size in mouse xenograft models. Although LINC00628 can modulate LRRN2 expression, the GC suppressor function of LINC00628 is not LRRN2 dependent. The result of mRNA microarray indicated that LINC00628 perform GC inhibitor function through long-range modulating cell cycle related genes. Importantly, we confirmed that LINC00628 mainly located in the nucleus and interacted with EZH2, and modulated genes expression by regulating H3K27me3 level. This research shed light on the role of dysregulated LINC00628 during GC process and may serve as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27272474

  6. Yeast Vps55p, a functional homolog of human obesity receptor gene-related protein, is involved in late endosome to vacuole trafficking.

    PubMed

    Belgareh-Touzé, Naïma; Avaro, Sandrine; Rouillé, Yves; Hoflack, Bernard; Haguenauer-Tsapis, Rosine

    2002-05-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae VPS55 (YJR044c) gene encodes a small protein of 140 amino acids with four potential transmembrane domains. VPS55 belongs to a family of genes of unknown function, including the human gene encoding the obesity receptor gene-related protein (OB-RGRP). Yeast cells with a disrupted VPS55 present normal vacuolar morphology, but exhibit an abnormal secretion of the Golgi form of the soluble vacuolar carboxypeptidase Y. However, trafficking of the membrane-bound vacuolar alkaline phosphatase remains normal. The endocytosis of uracil permease, used as an endocytic marker, is normal in vps55Delta cells, but its degradation is delayed and this marker transiently accumulates in late endosomal compartments. We also found that Vps55p is mainly localized in the late endosomes. Collectively, these results indicate that Vps55p is involved in late endosome to vacuole trafficking. Finally, we show that human OB-RGRP displays the same distribution as Vps55p and corrects the phenotypic defects of the vps55Delta strain. Therefore, the function of Vps55p has been conserved throughout evolution. This study highlights the importance of the multispanning Vps55p and OB-RGRP in membrane trafficking to the vacuole/lysosome of eukaryotic cells. PMID:12006663

  7. Yeast Vps55p, a Functional Homolog of Human Obesity Receptor Gene-related Protein, Is Involved in Late Endosome to Vacuole Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Belgareh-Touzé, Naïma; Avaro, Sandrine; Rouillé, Yves; Hoflack, Bernard; Haguenauer-Tsapis, Rosine

    2002-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae VPS55 (YJR044c) gene encodes a small protein of 140 amino acids with four potential transmembrane domains. VPS55 belongs to a family of genes of unknown function, including the human gene encoding the obesity receptor gene-related protein (OB-RGRP). Yeast cells with a disrupted VPS55 present normal vacuolar morphology, but exhibit an abnormal secretion of the Golgi form of the soluble vacuolar carboxypeptidase Y. However, trafficking of the membrane-bound vacuolar alkaline phosphatase remains normal. The endocytosis of uracil permease, used as an endocytic marker, is normal in vps55Δ cells, but its degradation is delayed and this marker transiently accumulates in late endosomal compartments. We also found that Vps55p is mainly localized in the late endosomes. Collectively, these results indicate that Vps55p is involved in late endosome to vacuole trafficking. Finally, we show that human OB-RGRP displays the same distribution as Vps55p and corrects the phenotypic defects of the vps55Δ strain. Therefore, the function of Vps55p has been conserved throughout evolution. This study highlights the importance of the multispanning Vps55p and OB-RGRP in membrane trafficking to the vacuole/lysosome of eukaryotic cells. PMID:12006663

  8. How the Serotonin Story is Being Rewritten By New Gene-Based Discoveries Principally Related to SLC6A4, the Serotonin Transporter Gene, Which Functions To Influence All Cellular Serotonin Systems

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Dennis L.; Fox, Meredith A.; Timpano, Kiara R.; Moya, Pablo; Ren-Patterson, Renee; Andrews, Anne M.; Holmes, Andrew; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Wendland, Jens R.

    2009-01-01

    Discovered and crystallized over sixty years ago, serotonin's important functions in the brain and body were identified over the ensuing years by neurochemical, physiological and pharmacological investigations. This 2008 M. Rapport Memorial Serotonin Review focuses on some of the most recent discoveries in serotonin that are based on genetic methodologies. These include examples of the consequences that result from direct serotonergic gene manipulation (gene deletion or overexpression) in mice and other species; an evaluation of some phenotypes related to functional human serotonergic gene variants, particularly in SLC6A4, the serotonin transporter gene; and finally, a consideration of the pharmacogenomics of serotonergic drugs with respect to both their therapeutic actions and side effects. The serotonin transporter (SERT) has been the most comprehensively studied of the serotonin system molecular components, and will be the primary focus of this review. We provide in-depth examples of gene-based discoveries primarily related to SLC6A4 that have clarified serotonin's many important homeostatic functions in humans, non-human primates, mice and other species. PMID:18824000

  9. Pattern Genes Suggest Functional Connectivity of Organs.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yangmei; Pan, Jianbo; Cai, Meichun; Yao, Lixia; Ji, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    Human organ, as the basic structural and functional unit in human body, is made of a large community of different cell types that organically bound together. Each organ usually exerts highly specified physiological function; while several related organs work smartly together to perform complicated body functions. In this study, we present a computational effort to understand the roles of genes in building functional connection between organs. More specifically, we mined multiple transcriptome datasets sampled from 36 human organs and tissues, and quantitatively identified 3,149 genes whose expressions showed consensus modularly patterns: specific to one organ/tissue, selectively expressed in several functionally related tissues and ubiquitously expressed. These pattern genes imply intrinsic connections between organs. According to the expression abundance of the 766 selective genes, we consistently cluster the 36 human organs/tissues into seven functional groups: adipose &gland, brain, muscle, immune, metabolism, mucoid and nerve conduction. The organs and tissues in each group either work together to form organ systems or coordinate to perform particular body functions. The particular roles of specific genes and selective genes suggest that they could not only be used to mechanistically explore organ functions, but also be designed for selective biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27225987

  10. Pattern Genes Suggest Functional Connectivity of Organs

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yangmei; Pan, Jianbo; Cai, Meichun; Yao, Lixia; Ji, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    Human organ, as the basic structural and functional unit in human body, is made of a large community of different cell types that organically bound together. Each organ usually exerts highly specified physiological function; while several related organs work smartly together to perform complicated body functions. In this study, we present a computational effort to understand the roles of genes in building functional connection between organs. More specifically, we mined multiple transcriptome datasets sampled from 36 human organs and tissues, and quantitatively identified 3,149 genes whose expressions showed consensus modularly patterns: specific to one organ/tissue, selectively expressed in several functionally related tissues and ubiquitously expressed. These pattern genes imply intrinsic connections between organs. According to the expression abundance of the 766 selective genes, we consistently cluster the 36 human organs/tissues into seven functional groups: adipose & gland, brain, muscle, immune, metabolism, mucoid and nerve conduction. The organs and tissues in each group either work together to form organ systems or coordinate to perform particular body functions. The particular roles of specific genes and selective genes suggest that they could not only be used to mechanistically explore organ functions, but also be designed for selective biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27225987

  11. Pattern Genes Suggest Functional Connectivity of Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yangmei; Pan, Jianbo; Cai, Meichun; Yao, Lixia; Ji, Zhiliang

    2016-05-01

    Human organ, as the basic structural and functional unit in human body, is made of a large community of different cell types that organically bound together. Each organ usually exerts highly specified physiological function; while several related organs work smartly together to perform complicated body functions. In this study, we present a computational effort to understand the roles of genes in building functional connection between organs. More specifically, we mined multiple transcriptome datasets sampled from 36 human organs and tissues, and quantitatively identified 3,149 genes whose expressions showed consensus modularly patterns: specific to one organ/tissue, selectively expressed in several functionally related tissues and ubiquitously expressed. These pattern genes imply intrinsic connections between organs. According to the expression abundance of the 766 selective genes, we consistently cluster the 36 human organs/tissues into seven functional groups: adipose & gland, brain, muscle, immune, metabolism, mucoid and nerve conduction. The organs and tissues in each group either work together to form organ systems or coordinate to perform particular body functions. The particular roles of specific genes and selective genes suggest that they could not only be used to mechanistically explore organ functions, but also be designed for selective biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  12. Immunohistochemical localization of the calcitonin gene-related peptide binding site in the primate trigeminovascular system using functional antagonist antibodies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Silke; Liu, Hantao; Warfvinge, Karin; Shi, Licheng; Dovlatyan, Mary; Xu, Cen; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-07-22

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent vasodilator and a neuromodulator implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. It binds to the extracellular domains of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP) 1 that together form the CGRP receptor. Antagonist antibodies against CGRP and its binding site at the receptor are clinically effective in preventing migraine attacks. The blood-brain barrier penetration of these antagonist antibodies is limited, suggesting that a potential peripheral site of action is sufficient to prevent migraine attacks. To further understand the sites of CGRP-mediated signaling in migraine, we used immunohistochemical staining with recently developed antagonist antibodies specifically recognizing a fusion protein of the extracellular domains of RAMP1 and CLR that comprise the CGRP binding pocket at the CGRP receptor in monkey and man. We confirmed binding of the antagonist antibodies to human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of dural meningeal arteries and neurons in the trigeminal ganglion, both of which are likely sites of action for therapeutic antibodies in migraine patients. We further used one of these antibodies for detailed mapping on cynomolgus monkey tissue and found antagonist antibody binding sites at multiple levels in the trigeminovascular system: in the dura mater VSMCs, in neurons and satellite glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion, and in neurons in the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis. These data reinforce and clarify our understanding of CGRP receptor localization in a pattern consistent with a role for CGRP receptors in trigeminal sensitization and migraine pathology. PMID:27155150

  13. The DAVID Gene Functional Classification Tool: a novel biological module-centric algorithm to functionally analyze large gene lists

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Da Wei; Sherman, Brad T; Tan, Qina; Collins, Jack R; Alvord, W Gregory; Roayaei, Jean; Stephens, Robert; Baseler, Michael W; Lane, H Clifford; Lempicki, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    The DAVID Gene Functional Classification Tool uses a novel agglomeration algorithm to condense a list of genes or associated biological terms into organized classes of related genes or biology, called biological modules. This organization is accomplished by mining the complex biological co-occurrences found in multiple sources of functional annotation. It is a powerful method to group functionally related genes and terms into a manageable number of biological modules for efficient interpretation of gene lists in a network context. PMID:17784955

  14. Exposure in utero to 2,2',3,3',4,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 132) impairs sperm function and alters testicular apoptosis-related gene expression in rat offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P.-C.; Pan, M.-H.; Li, L.-A.; Chen, C.-J.; Tsai, S.-S.; Guo, Y.L. . E-mail: leonguo@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2007-05-15

    Toxicity of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) depends on their molecular structure. Mechanisms by prenatal exposure to a non-dioxin-like PCB, 2,2',3,4',5',6-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 132) that may act on reproductive pathways in male offspring are relatively unknown. The purpose was to determine whether epididymal sperm function and expression of apoptosis-related genes were induced or inhibited by prenatal exposure to PCB 132. Pregnant rats were treated with a single dose of PCB 132 at 1 or 10 mg/kg on gestational day 15. Male offspring were killed and the epididymal sperm counts, motility, velocity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, sperm-oocyte penetration rate (SOPR), testicular histopathology, apoptosis-related gene expression and caspase activation were assessed on postnatal day 84. Prenatal exposure to PCB 132 with a single dose of 1 or 10 mg/kg decreased cauda epididymal weight, epididymal sperm count and motile epididymal sperm count in adult offspring. The spermatozoa of PCB 132-exposed offspring produced significantly higher levels of ROS than the controls; ROS induction and SOPR reduction were dose-related. In the low-dose PCB 132 group, p53 was significantly induced and caspase-3 was inhibited. In the high-dose group, activation of caspase-3 and -9 was significantly increased, while the expressions of Fas, Bax, bcl-2, and p53 genes were significantly decreased. Gene expression and caspase activation data may provide insight into the mechanisms by which exposure to low-dose or high-dose PCB 132 affects reproduction in male offspring in rats. Because the doses of PCB 132 administered to the dams were approximately 625-fold in low-dose group and 6250-fold higher in high-dose group than the concentration in human tissue levels, the concentrations are not biologically or environmentally relevant. Further studies using environmentally relevant doses are needed for hazard identification.

  15. Chromatin structures of the rat tyrosine aminotransferase gene relate to the function of its cis-acting elements.

    PubMed Central

    Nitsch, D; Stewart, A F; Boshart, M; Mestril, R; Weih, F; Schütz, G

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between DNase I-hypersensitive sites (HSs) and transcriptional enhancers of the rat tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene was examined by comparing HSs in and around the TAT gene with the activity of the corresponding DNA sequences in transient transfection assays. In this manner, we identified two HSs as liver-specific enhancers. Of three hepatoma cell lines examined, only one sustained TAT mRNA levels comparable to those of liver. In this cell line, both enhancers were strongly active, and strong hypersensitivity in chromatin over the enhancers was evident. The other two hepatoma cell lines had reduced levels of TAT mRNA and no or altered hypersensitivity over either the enhancers or the promoter. One of these lines carried a negative regulator of the TAT gene, the tissue specific extinguisher Tse-1. This cell line exhibited all HSs characteristic of the strongly active gene except at the promoter; however, one enhancer was inactive even though hypersensitive in chromatin. In a TAT-nonexpressing cell line, inactivity of both enhancers correlated with absence of the respective HSs. We conclude that although hypersensitivity in chromatin necessarily accompanies cell-type-specific enhancer activity, the occurrence of cell-type-specific HSs does not imply that the underlying sequences harbor enhancers active in transient transfection assays. Images PMID:1972541

  16. Establishment of Relational Model of Congenital Heart Disease Markers and GO Functional Analysis of the Association between Its Serum Markers and Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Zhao, Luosha; Yuan, Jiaying

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of present study was to construct the best screening model of congenital heart disease serum markers and to provide reference for further prevention and treatment of the disease. Methods. Documents from 2006 to 2014 were collected and meta-analysis was used for screening susceptibility genes and serum markers closely related to the diagnosis of congenital heart disease. Data of serum markers were extracted from 80 congenital heart disease patients and 80 healthy controls, respectively, and then logistic regression analysis and support vector machine were utilized to establish prediction models of serum markers and Gene Ontology (GO) functional annotation. Results. Results showed that NKX2.5, GATA4, and FOG2 were susceptibility genes of congenital heart disease. CRP, BNP, and cTnI were risk factors of congenital heart disease (p < 0.05); cTnI, hs-CRP, BNP, and Lp(a) were significantly close to congenital heart disease (p < 0.01). ROC curve indicated that the accuracy rate of Lp(a) and cTnI, Lp(a) and BNP, and BNP and cTnI joint prediction was 93.4%, 87.1%, and 97.2%, respectively. But the detection accuracy rate of the markers' relational model established by support vector machine was only 85%. GO analysis suggested that NKX2.5, GATA4, and FOG2 were functionally related to Lp(a) and BNP. Conclusions. The combined markers model of BNP and cTnI had the highest accuracy rate, providing a theoretical basis for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease. PMID:27118988

  17. Loss of functional K+ channels encoded by ether-à-go-go-related genes in mouse myometrium prior to labour onset

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, I A; Yeung, S Y; Tribe, R M; Ohya, S

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation that ion channels encoded by the ether-à-go-go-related gene family have a functional impact in smooth muscle in addition to their accepted role in cardiac myocytes and neurones. This study aimed to assess the expression of ERG1–3 (KCNH1–3) genes in the murine myometrium (smooth muscle layer of the uterus) and determine the functional impact of the ion channels encoded by these genes in pregnant and non-pregnant animals. Quantitative RT-PCR did not detect message for ERG2 and 3 in whole myometrial tissue extracts. In contrast, message for two isoforms of mERG1 were readily detected with mERG1a more abundant than mERG1b. In isometric tension studies of non-pregnant myometrium, the ERG channel blockers dofetilide (1 μm), E4031 (1 μm) and Be-KM1 (100 nm) increased spontaneous contractility and ERG activators (PD118057 and NS1643) inhibited spontaneous contractility. In contrast, neither ERG blockade nor activation had any effect on the inherent contractility in myometrium from late pregnant (19 days gestation) animals. Moreover, dofetilide-sensitive K+ currents with distinctive ‘hooked’ kinetics were considerably smaller in uterine myocytes from late pregnant compared to non-pregnant animals. Expression of mERG1 isoforms did not alter throughout gestation or upon delivery, but the expression of genes encoding auxillary subunits (KCNE) were up-regulated considerably. This study provides the first evidence for a regulation of ERG-encoded K+ channels as a precursor to late pregnancy physiological activity. PMID:19332483

  18. Functional variants of gene encoding folate metabolizing enzyme and methotrexate-related toxicity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kałużna, Ewelina; Strauss, Ewa; Zając-Spychała, Olga; Gowin, Ewelina; Świątek-Kościelna, Bogna; Nowak, Jerzy; Fichna, Marta; Mańkowski, Przemysław; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta

    2015-12-15

    Methotrexate (MTX) is commonly used agent in therapy of malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Based on the literature data it is known that MTX elimination and toxicity can be affected by polymorphisms in genes encoding enzymes involved in MTX metabolism. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of C677T and A1298C polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene on MTX-induced toxicity during treatment of children with ALL. We also tried to answer the question whether simultaneous occurrence of these two polymorphisms has a clinical significance. MTHFR polymorphisms were assessed in 47 pediatric ALL patients, treated according to intensive chemotherapy for childhood ALL, ALL IC BFM 2009. Prolonged MTX elimination and higher incidence of toxicity were observed for patients with 677T-1298A haplotype. On the other hand, occurrence of 677C-1298A haplotype had protective effect on MTX clearance and toxicity, that was not observed in carriers of 677C-1298C haplotype. In patients with coexistence of studied variants 677CT/1298AC heterozygotes as well as in 677TT/1298AA homozygotes more frequently toxicity incidents were noted. The obtained results suggest that occurrence of 677T allele and coexistence of 677T and 1298C alleles may be associated with lower MTX clearance and elevated risk of adverse effects during MTX-treatment of pediatric ALL patients. PMID:26528799

  19. A New Semantic Functional Similarity over Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Cheol; Chen, Xuewen

    2015-01-01

    Identifying functionally similar or closely related genes and gene products has significant impacts on biological and clinical studies as well as drug discovery. In this paper, we propose an effective and practically useful method measuring both gene and gene product similarity by integrating the topology of gene ontology, known functional domains and their functional annotations. The proposed method is comprehensively evaluated through statistical analysis of the similarities derived from sequence, structure and phylogenetic profiles, and clustering analysis of disease genes clusters. Our results show that the proposed method clearly outperforms other conventional methods. Furthermore, literature analysis also reveals that the proposed method is both statistically and biologically promising for identifying functionally similar genes or gene products. In particular, we demonstrate that the proposed functional similarity metric is capable of discoverying new disease related genes or gene products. PMID:26357220

  20. ACE and UCP2 gene polymorphisms and their association with baseline and exercise-related changes in the functional performance of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Barry R.; Taylor, Denise; Kilding, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining high levels of physical function is an important aspect of successful ageing. While muscle mass and strength contribute to functional performance in older adults, little is known about the possible genetic basis for the heterogeneity of physical function in older adults and in how older adults respond to exercise. Two genes that have possible roles in determining levels of muscle mass, strength and function in young and older adults are angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). This study examined whether polymorphisms in these two individual genes were associated with baseline functional performance levels and/or the training-related changes following exercise in previously untrained older adults. Five-eight Caucasian older adults (mean age 69.8 years) with no recent history of resistance training enrolled in a 12 week program of resistance, balance and cardiovascular exercises aimed at improving functional performance. Performance in 6 functional tasks was recorded at baseline and after 12 weeks. Genomic DNA was assayed for the ACE intron 16 insertion/deletion (I/D) and the UCP2 G-866A polymorphism. Baseline differences among genotype groups were tested using analysis of variance. Genotype differences in absolute and relative changes in physical function among the exercisers were tested using a general linear model, adjusting for age and gender. The genotype frequencies for each of the studied polymorphisms conformed to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The ACE I/D genotype was significantly associated with mean baseline measures of handgrip strength (II 30.9 ± 3.01 v. ID 31.7 ± 1.48 v. DD 29.3 ± 2.18 kg, p < 0.001), 8ft Up and Go time (II 6.45 ± 0.48 v. ID/DD 4.41 ± 0.19 s, p < 0.001) and 6 min walk distance (II 458 ± 28.7 v. ID/DD 546 ± 12.1m, p = 0.008). The UCP2 G-866A genotype was also associated with baseline 8ft Up and Go time (GG 5.45 ± 0.35 v. GA 4.47 ± 0.26 v. AA 3.89 ± 0.71 s, p = 0

  1. Hammondia hammondi, an avirulent relative of Toxoplasma gondii, has functional orthologs of known T. gondii virulence genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous protozoan parasite capable of infecting all warm-blooded animals, including humans. Its closest extant relative, Hammondia hammondi, has never been found to infect humans and in contrast to T. gondii is highly attenuated in mice. To better understand the genetic bas...

  2. Highly sensitive detection of cancer-related genes based on complete fluorescence restoration of a molecular beacon with a functional overhang.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Zhou, Ying-Ying; Peng, Ting; Xu, Huo; Zhang, Rong-Bo; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Zheng-Yong; Lv, Jian-Xin; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Zhi-Fa

    2016-07-21

    The accurate detection of cancer-related genes is of great significance for early diagnosis and targeted therapy of cancer. In this contribution, an automatically cycling operation of a functional overhang-containing molecular beacon (OMB)-based sensing system was proposed to perform amplification detection of the p53 gene. Contrary to the common molecular beacon (MB), a target DNA is designated to hybridize with a label-free recognition probe (RP) with a hairpin structure rather than OMB. In the presence of a target DNA of interest, the locked primer in RP opens and triggers the subsequent amplification procedures. The newly-developed OMB is not only capable of accomplishing cyclical nucleic acid strand-displacement polymerization (CNDP) with the help of polymerase and nicking endonuclease, but is also cleaved by restriction endonucleases, removing the quencher away from the fluorophore. Thus, the target DNA at an extremely low concentration is expected to generate a considerable amount of double-stranded and cleaved OMBs, and the quenched fluorescence is completely restored, leading to a dramatic increase in fluorescence intensity. Utilizing this sensing platform, the target gene can be detected down to 8.2 pM in a homogeneous way, and a linear response range of 0.01 to 150 nM could be obtained. More strikingly, the mutant genes can be easily distinguished from the wild-type ones. The proof-of-concept demonstrations reported herein are expected to promote the development of DNA biosensing systems, showing great potential in basic research and clinical diagnosis. PMID:27221763

  3. Necessity of angiotensin-converting enzyme-related gene for cardiac functions and longevity of Drosophila melanogaster assessed by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fang-Tsu; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Su, Ming-Tsan; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies have established the necessity of an angiotensin-converting enzyme-related (ACER) gene for heart morphogenesis of Drosophila. Nevertheless, the physiology of ACER has yet to be comprehensively understood. Herein, we employed RNA interference to down-regulate the expression of ACER in Drosophila's heart and swept source optical coherence tomography to assess whether ACER is required for cardiac functions in living adult flies. Several contractile parameters of Drosophila heart, including the heart rate (HR), end-diastolic diameter (EDD), end-systolic diameter (ESD), percent fractional shortening (%FS), and stress-induced cardiac performance, are shown, which are age dependent. These age-dependent cardiac functions declined significantly when ACER was down-regulated. Moreover, the lifespans of ACER knock-down flies were significantly shorter than those of wild-type control flies. Thus, we posit that ACER, the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), is essential for both heart physiology and longevity of animals. Since mammalian ACE2 controls many cardiovascular physiological features and is implicated in cardiomyopathies, our findings that ACER plays conserved roles in genetically tractable animals will pave the way for uncovering the genetic pathway that controls the renin-angiotensin system.

  4. Rotavirus gene structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Estes, M K; Cohen, J

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure and function of the genes and proteins of the rotaviruses has expanded rapidly. Information obtained in the last 5 years has revealed unexpected and unique molecular properties of rotavirus proteins of general interest to virologists, biochemists, and cell biologists. Rotaviruses share some features of replication with reoviruses, yet antigenic and molecular properties of the outer capsid proteins, VP4 (a protein whose cleavage is required for infectivity, possibly by mediating fusion with the cell membrane) and VP7 (a glycoprotein), show more similarities with those of other viruses such as the orthomyxoviruses, paramyxoviruses, and alphaviruses. Rotavirus morphogenesis is a unique process, during which immature subviral particles bud through the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). During this process, transiently enveloped particles form, the outer capsid proteins are assembled onto particles, and mature particles accumulate in the lumen of the ER. Two ER-specific viral glycoproteins are involved in virus maturation, and these glycoproteins have been shown to be useful models for studying protein targeting and retention in the ER and for studying mechanisms of virus budding. New ideas and approaches to understanding how each gene functions to replicate and assemble the segmented viral genome have emerged from knowledge of the primary structure of rotavirus genes and their proteins and from knowledge of the properties of domains on individual proteins. Localization of type-specific and cross-reactive neutralizing epitopes on the outer capsid proteins is becoming increasingly useful in dissecting the protective immune response, including evaluation of vaccine trials, with the practical possibility of enhancing the production of new, more effective vaccines. Finally, future analyses with recently characterized immunologic and gene probes and new animal models can be expected to provide a basic understanding of what regulates the

  5. Functional microarray analysis of differentially expressed genes in granulosa cells from women with polycystic ovary syndrome related to MAPK/ERK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chen-Wei; Chen, Mei-Jou; Tai, Kang-Yu; Yu, Danny CW; Yang, Yu-Chieh; Jan, Pey-Shynan; Yang, Yu-Shih; Chen, Hsin-Fu; Ho, Hong-Nerng

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age. Although its aetiology and pathogenesis remain unclear, recent studies suggest that the dysfunction of granulosa cells may partly be responsible. This study aimed to use cDNA microarray technology to compare granulosa cell gene expression profiles in women with and without PCOS to identify genes that may be aetiologically implicated in the pathogenesis of PCOS. The study cohort included 12 women undergoing in vitro fertilization, six with PCOS and six without PCOS. Differential gene expression profiles were classified by post-analyses of microarray data, followed by western blot analyses to confirm the microarray data of selected genes. In total, 243 genes were differentially expressed (125 upregulated and 118 downregulated) between the PCOS and non-PCOS granulosa cells. These genes are involved in reproductive system development, amino acid metabolism and cellular development and proliferation. Comparative analysis revealed genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathways. Western blot analyses confirmed that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 4 and phospho-ERK1/2 were decreased in PCOS granulosa cells. This study identified candidate genes involved in MAPK/ERK signaling pathways that may influence the function of granulosa cells in PCOS. PMID:26459919

  6. Ventromedial hypothalamic lesions change the expression of neuron-related genes and immune-related genes in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Kiba, Takayoshi; Kintaka, Yuri; Suzuki, Yoko; Nakata, Eiko; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Inoue, Shuji

    2009-05-01

    There are no reports that hypothalamus can directly affect the expression of neuron-related genes and immune-related genes in liver. We identified genes of which expression profiles showed significant modulation in rat liver after ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) lesions. Total RNA was extracted, and differences in the gene expression profiles between rats at day 3 after VMH lesioning and sham-VMH lesioned rats were investigated using DNA microarray analysis. The result revealed that VMH lesions regulated the genes that were involved in functions related to neuronal development and immunofunction in the liver. Real-time PCR also confirmed that gene expression of SULT4A1 was upregulated, but expression of ACSL1 and CISH were downregulated at day 3 after VMH lesions. VMH lesions may change the expression of neuron-related genes and immune-related genes in rat liver. PMID:19429097

  7. Concepts of relative sample outlier (RSO) and weighted sample similarity (WSS) for improving performance of clustering genes: co-function and co-regulation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anindya; Chowdhury, Nirmalya; De, Rajat K

    2015-01-01

    Performance of clustering algorithms is largely dependent on selected similarity measure. Efficiency in handling outliers is a major contributor to the success of a similarity measure. Better the ability of similarity measure in measuring similarity between genes in the presence of outliers, better will be the performance of the clustering algorithm in forming biologically relevant groups of genes. In the present article, we discuss the problem of handling outliers with different existing similarity measures and introduce the concepts of Relative Sample Outlier (RSO). We formulate new similarity, called Weighted Sample Similarity (WSS), incorporated in Euclidean distance and Pearson correlation coefficient and then use them in various clustering and biclustering algorithms to group different gene expression profiles. Our results suggest that WSS improves performance, in terms of finding biologically relevant groups of genes, of all the considered clustering algorithms. PMID:26333265

  8. Genes Related to Fatty Acid β-Oxidation Play a Role in the Functional Decline of the Drosophila Brain with Age

    PubMed Central

    Laranjeira, António; Schulz, Joachim; Dotti, Carlos G.

    2016-01-01

    In living organisms, ageing is widely considered to be the result of a multifaceted process consisting of the progressive accumulation of damage over time, having implications both in terms of function and survival. The study of ageing presents several challenges, from the different mechanisms implicated to the great diversity of systems affected over time. In the current study, we set out to identify genes involved in the functional decline of the brain with age and study its relevance in a tissue dependent manner using Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Here we report the age-dependent upregulation of genes involved in the metabolic process of fatty acid β-oxidation in the nervous tissue of female wild-type flies. Downregulation of CG10814, dHNF4 and lipid mobilizing genes bmm and dAkh rescues the functional decline of the brain with age, both at the cellular and behaviour level, while over-expression worsens performance. Our data proposes the occurrence of a metabolic alteration in the fly brain with age, whereby the process of β-oxidation of fatty acids experiences a genetic gain-of-function. This event proved to be one of the main causes contributing to the functional decline of the brain with age. PMID:27518101

  9. In vivo effects of LCO soluble fraction on immune-related functions and gene transcription in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg).

    PubMed

    Bado-Nilles, Anne; Renault, Tristan; Faury, Nicole; Le Floch, Stéphane; Quentel, Claire; Auffret, Michel; Thomas-Guyon, Hélène

    2010-05-01

    The effects of a soluble fraction of light cycle oil (LCO) on haemocyte parameters, phenoloxidase (PO) activity and mRNA expression of immune-related genes, in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, were tested after seven days of exposure and two weeks of recovery period. Five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) out of ten detected in tank water had bioaccumulated at the end of the contamination period. The concentration of PAHs in oyster tissues decreased during the recovery period and 14 days after the exposure, 69% of bioaccumulated PAHs were detected in contaminated oysters. The exposure induced severe oyster mortality (21%), external and internal green colouration of the shell and a significant decrease of PO activity. The mRNA expression of several genes was altered. As a conclusion, a modulation of immune-related parameters was demonstrated using three different approaches, namely cellular (flow cytometry), biochemical (spectrophotometry) and genomics (gene transcription) in oysters after contact with soluble fraction of LCO. PMID:19800699

  10. Expression and function of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors in trigeminal ganglia of R192Q Cacna1a knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Vilotti, Sandra; Vana, Natascha; Van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Nistri, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Migraine is a neurovascular brain disorder suggested to be due to dysfunction of the trigeminovascular system with sensitization of trigeminal ganglion (TG) nociceptors. Since the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been established as a key player in the pathogenesis of migraine, CGRP receptor antagonists have been considered useful compounds to block headache originating from hyperactivation of such TG neurons. Whereas there is some information on the expression of CGRP receptors in postmortem human tissue, data are lacking for migraineurs suffering from common or genetic migraine. To help to clarify these issues it is very useful to study a transgenic knock-in (KI) mouse model of hemiplegic migraine expressing a R192Q missense mutation in the α1 subunit of CaV2.1 calcium channels previously found in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 (FHM-1). The aim of the present study, therefore, was to compare CGRP receptor expression and function in wildtype (WT) versus KI mouse TG. The principal components of the CGRP receptor, namely the CLR and RAMP-1 proteins, were similarly expressed in WT and KI TG neurons (in situ or in culture) and responded to exogenous CGRP with a strong rise in cAMP concentration. Hence, the previously reported phenotype of sensitization of KI TG neurons is not due to up-regulation of CGRP receptors but is likely caused by a constitutively larger release of CGRP. This observation implies that, in FHM-1 TG, normal TG sensory neuron signaling can be restored once the extracellular concentration of CGRP returns to control level with targeted treatment. PMID:27021026

  11. Functional characterization of ether-à-go-go-related gene potassium channels in midbrain dopamine neurons - implications for a role in depolarization block.

    PubMed

    Ji, Huifang; Tucker, Kristal R; Putzier, Ilva; Huertas, Marco A; Horn, John P; Canavier, Carmen C; Levitan, Edwin S; Shepard, Paul D

    2012-10-01

    Bursting activity by midbrain dopamine neurons reflects the complex interplay between their intrinsic pacemaker activity and synaptic inputs. Although the precise mechanism responsible for the generation and modulation of bursting in vivo has yet to be established, several ion channels have been implicated in the process. Previous studies with nonselective blockers suggested that ether-à-go-go-related gene (ERG) K(+) channels are functionally significant. Here, electrophysiology with selective chemical and peptide ERG channel blockers (E-4031 and rBeKm-1) and computational methods were used to define the contribution made by ERG channels to the firing properties of midbrain dopamine neurons in vivo and in vitro. Selective ERG channel blockade increased the frequency of spontaneous activity as well as the response to depolarizing current pulses without altering spike frequency adaptation. ERG channel block also accelerated entry into depolarization inactivation during bursts elicited by virtual NMDA receptors generated with the dynamic clamp, and significantly prolonged the duration of the sustained depolarization inactivation that followed pharmacologically evoked bursts. In vivo, somatic ERG blockade was associated with an increase in bursting activity attributed to a reduction in doublet firing. Taken together, these results show that dopamine neuron ERG K(+) channels play a prominent role in limiting excitability and in minimizing depolarization inactivation. As the therapeutic actions of antipsychotic drugs are associated with depolarization inactivation of dopamine neurons and blockade of cardiac ERG channels is a prominent side effect of these drugs, ERG channels in the central nervous system may represent a novel target for antipsychotic drug development. PMID:22780096

  12. Comparative and functional analysis of testis-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, FuJun; Jin, ShaoHua; Li, Ning; Liu, Xin; Wang, HaiYan; Li, JianYuan

    2011-01-01

    The testis is the special male gonad responsible for spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis with complex gene expressions. Characterizing and comparing the testis-specific genes in different species can reveal key genes related to testis specific functions and provide supplementary information for study of human testis function. We screened testis-specific genes from Unigene libraries, total 317, 449 and 147 testis-specific genes were identified for human, mouse and rat, respectively. Ten from thirteen selected human testis-specific genes were validated exclusively expressed in the testis by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Systematic bioinformatics analysis showed that specific genes were mainly related to spermatogenesis and testis development process with significant Glycolysis and Pyruvate metabolism. Enrichment functions were discussed. PMID:21212513

  13. Combining Hierarchical and Associative Gene Ontology Relations with Textual Evidence in Estimating Gene and Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2007-03-01

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the Gene Ontology, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes or gene products is obtained by comparing Gene Ontology (GO) annotations associated with the genes or gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene subontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene subontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy, and demonstrate that further improvements can be obtained by integrating textual evidence extracted from relevant biomedical literature.

  14. Systematic analysis of genes required for synapse structure and function.

    PubMed

    Sieburth, Derek; Ch'ng, QueeLim; Dybbs, Michael; Tavazoie, Masoud; Kennedy, Scott; Wang, Duo; Dupuy, Denis; Rual, Jean-François; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Ruvkun, Gary; Kaplan, Joshua M

    2005-07-28

    Chemical synapses are complex structures that mediate rapid intercellular signalling in the nervous system. Proteomic studies suggest that several hundred proteins will be found at synaptic specializations. Here we describe a systematic screen to identify genes required for the function or development of Caenorhabditis elegans neuromuscular junctions. A total of 185 genes were identified in an RNA interference screen for decreased acetylcholine secretion; 132 of these genes had not previously been implicated in synaptic transmission. Functional profiles for these genes were determined by comparing secretion defects observed after RNA interference under a variety of conditions. Hierarchical clustering identified groups of functionally related genes, including those involved in the synaptic vesicle cycle, neuropeptide signalling and responsiveness to phorbol esters. Twenty-four genes encoded proteins that were localized to presynaptic specializations. Loss-of-function mutations in 12 genes caused defects in presynaptic structure. PMID:16049479

  15. Distribution of typical denitrifying functional genes and diversity of the nirS-encoding bacterial community related to environmental characteristics of river sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Chen, C.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, R.; Yang, X.

    2011-05-01

    Denitrification in river sediments leads to nitrate removal from the aquatic system; therefore, it is necessary to understand functional diversity of denitrifier communities in the system. Sediment samples (0-25 cm depth) were collected from three typical locations along the Pearl River. The real-time PCR approach was used to measure the abundance of nitrate (narG), nitrite (nirS, nirK and nrfA), and nitrous oxide (nosZ) reductase genes from the sediment samples. Assemblages of nirS, nirK and nosZ indicated that complete denitrification occurred in sediment cores, with the greatest number of gene copies from 5-15 cm depth. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction appeared to be important below 15 cm depth, based on increasing gene copies of narG and nrfA with sediment depth. There was a close match (78-94 %) between the nirS sequences recovered from Pearl River sediment and those detected in estuarine and marine sediments as well as active sludge, suggesting that domestic sewage inputs and irregular tides. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that the spatial distribution of denitrifying bacteria was highly correlated with dissolved inorganic N (DIN: NH4+, NO2genes and the nirS-encoding denitrifier community in the river sediment. Our results also reveal a variety of novel denitrifying bacteria in the river sediment.

  16. [The molecular evolution of rice stress-related genes].

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaojun; Xie, Kaibin; Zhang, Yanping; Jin, Ping

    2014-10-01

    In the processes of evolution, plants have formed a perfect regulation system to tolerate adverse environmental conditions. However, there has not been any report about the molecular evolution of rice stress-related genes. We derived a family of 22 stress-related genes in rice from Plant Stress Gene Database, and analyzed it by bioinformatics and comparative genome method. The results showed that these genes are relatively conservative in low organisms, and their copy numbers increase along with the environmental changes and the evolution. We also found four conserved sequence motifs and three other specific motifs. We propose that these motifs are closely associated with the function of rice stress-related genes. The analysis of selection pressure showed that about 50% rice stress-related genes have positive selection sites, although they were subject to a strong purifying selection. Positive selection sites might be very significant for plants to adapt to environmental changes. PMID:25406251

  17. Genes2FANs: connecting genes through functional association networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein-protein, cell signaling, metabolic, and transcriptional interaction networks are useful for identifying connections between lists of experimentally identified genes/proteins. However, besides physical or co-expression interactions there are many ways in which pairs of genes, or their protein products, can be associated. By systematically incorporating knowledge on shared properties of genes from diverse sources to build functional association networks (FANs), researchers may be able to identify additional functional interactions between groups of genes that are not readily apparent. Results Genes2FANs is a web based tool and a database that utilizes 14 carefully constructed FANs and a large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI) network to build subnetworks that connect lists of human and mouse genes. The FANs are created from mammalian gene set libraries where mouse genes are converted to their human orthologs. The tool takes as input a list of human or mouse Entrez gene symbols to produce a subnetwork and a ranked list of intermediate genes that are used to connect the query input list. In addition, users can enter any PubMed search term and then the system automatically converts the returned results to gene lists using GeneRIF. This gene list is then used as input to generate a subnetwork from the user’s PubMed query. As a case study, we applied Genes2FANs to connect disease genes from 90 well-studied disorders. We find an inverse correlation between the counts of links connecting disease genes through PPI and links connecting diseases genes through FANs, separating diseases into two categories. Conclusions Genes2FANs is a useful tool for interpreting the relationships between gene/protein lists in the context of their various functions and networks. Combining functional association interactions with physical PPIs can be useful for revealing new biology and help form hypotheses for further experimentation. Our finding that disease genes in

  18. The dMRP/CG6214 gene of Drosophila is evolutionarily and functionally related to the human multidrug resistance-associated protein family.

    PubMed

    Tarnay, J N; Szeri, F; Iliás, A; Annilo, T; Sung, C; Le Saux, O; Váradi, A; Dean, M; Boyd, C D; Robinow, S

    2004-10-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are involved in the transport of substrates across biological membranes and are essential for many cellular processes. Of the fifty-six Drosophila ABC transporter genes only white, brown, scarlet, E23 and Atet have been studied in detail. Phylogenetic analyses identify the Drosophila gene dMRP/CG6214 as an orthologue to the human multidrug-resistance associated proteins MRP1, MRP2, MRP3 and MRP6. To study evolutionarily conserved roles of MRPs we have initiated a characterization of dMRP. In situ hybridization and Northern analysis indicate that dMRP is expressed throughout development and appears to be head enriched in adults. Functional studies indicate that DMRP is capable of transporting a known MRP1 substrate and establishes DMRP as a high capacity ATP-dependent, vanadate-sensitive organic anion transporter. PMID:15373810

  19. Changes of Nitrogen Transformation Rates and Related Functional Genes Abundance under Different Dissolved Oxygen Levels in sediments form an Urban River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In the nitrogen rich urban river sediments, we investigated the nitrogen transformation rates and nitrogen-cycling genes in response to different dissolved oxygen (DO) supply levels (saturation, DO > 8.00 mg L-1; aerobic, 2.50 mg L-1 gene) abundance by an order, but its influence on anammox (hzsB) was insignificant. Four quantitative response relationships between nitrogen transformation rates, nitrogen functional genes abundances, and nitrogen concentrations were established by stepwise linear regression analysis. These relationships confirmed that different nitrogen transformation processes were coupled at the molecular level (functional genes), especially for the coupling of ammonium oxidation and anammox.

  20. Immunity-related genes and gene families in Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Christophides, George K; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Birney, Ewan; Blandin, Stephanie; Blass, Claudia; Brey, Paul T; Collins, Frank H; Danielli, Alberto; Dimopoulos, George; Hetru, Charles; Hoa, Ngo T; Hoffmann, Jules A; Kanzok, Stefan M; Letunic, Ivica; Levashina, Elena A; Loukeris, Thanasis G; Lycett, Gareth; Meister, Stephan; Michel, Kristin; Moita, Luis F; Müller, Hans-Michael; Osta, Mike A; Paskewitz, Susan M; Reichhart, Jean-Marc; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Troxler, Laurent; Vernick, Kenneth D; Vlachou, Dina; Volz, Jennifer; von Mering, Christian; Xu, Jiannong; Zheng, Liangbiao; Bork, Peer; Kafatos, Fotis C

    2002-10-01

    We have identified 242 Anopheles gambiae genes from 18 gene families implicated in innate immunity and have detected marked diversification relative to Drosophila melanogaster. Immune-related gene families involved in recognition, signal modulation, and effector systems show a marked deficit of orthologs and excessive gene expansions, possibly reflecting selection pressures from different pathogens encountered in these insects' very different life-styles. In contrast, the multifunctional Toll signal transduction pathway is substantially conserved, presumably because of counterselection for developmental stability. Representative expression profiles confirm that sequence diversification is accompanied by specific responses to different immune challenges. Alternative RNA splicing may also contribute to expansion of the immune repertoire. PMID:12364793

  1. Gene function prediction with knowledge from gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Zhang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Gene function prediction is an important problem in bioinformatics. Due to the inherent noise existing in the gene expression data, the attempt to improve the prediction accuracy resorting to new classification techniques is limited. With the emergence of Gene Ontology (GO), extra knowledge about the gene products can be extracted from GO and facilitates solving the gene function prediction problem. In this paper, we propose a new method which utilises GO information to improve the classifiers' performance in gene function prediction. Specifically, our method learns a distance metric under the supervision of the GO knowledge using the distance learning technique. Compared with the traditional distance metrics, the learned one produces a better performance and consequently classification accuracy can be improved. The effectiveness of our proposed method has been corroborated by the extensive experimental results. PMID:26529907

  2. Discovery of Tumor Suppressor Gene Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Steven B.

    1995-01-01

    This is an update of a 1991 review on tumor suppressor genes written at a time when understanding of how the genes work was limited. A recent major breakthrough in the understanding of the function of tumor suppressor genes is discussed. (LZ)

  3. Cross-Ontological Analytics: Combining Associative and Hierarchical Relations in the Gene Ontologies to Assess Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Posse, Christian; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.

    2006-05-28

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the gene ontologies, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes/gene products is obtained by comparing gene ontology (GO) annotations associated with the gene/gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene ontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene ontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy.

  4. Distribution of typical denitrifying functional genes and diversity of the nirS-encoding bacterial community related to environmental characteristics of river sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Chen, C.; Yang, X.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, R.

    2011-10-01

    Denitrification in river sediments leads to nitrate removal from the aquatic system; therefore, it is necessary to understand functional diversity of denitrifier communities in the system. Sediment samples (0-25 cm depth) were collected from three typical locations along the Pearl River. The real-time PCR approach was used to measure the abundance of nitrate (narG), nitrite (nirS, nirK and nrfA), and nitrous oxide (nosZ) reductase genes from the sediment samples. Assemblages of nirS, nirK and nosZ indicated that complete denitrification occurred in sediment cores, with the greatest number of gene copies from 5-15 cm depth. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction appeared to be important below 15 cm depth, based on increasing gene copies of narG and nrfA with sediment depth. There was a close match (78-94 %) between the nirS sequences recovered from the Pearl River sediment and those detected in estuarine and marine sediments as well as active sludge, suggesting that the nitrogen source in the Pearl River sediment was affected by domestic sewage inputs and irregular tides. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that the spatial distribution of denitrifying bacteria was highly correlated with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (including NH4+, NO2- and NO3-) concentrations in sediment. It was concluded that the difference in dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations along the sediment profile influenced the distribution of denitrifying genes and the nirS-encoding denitrifier community in the river sediment. In addition, a variety of novel denitrifying bacteria were revealed in the river sediment.

  5. The Adh-related gene of Drosophila melanogaster is expressed as a functional dicistronic messenger RNA: multigenic transcription in higher organisms.

    PubMed

    Brogna, S; Ashburner, M

    1997-04-15

    Essentially all eukaryotic cellular mRNAs are monocistronic, and are usually transcribed individually. Two tandemly arranged Drosophila genes, alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) and Adh-related (Adhr), are transcribed as a dicistronic transcript. From transcripts initiated from the Adh promoter, two classes of mRNA are accumulated, one is monocistronic and encodes Adh alone, the other is dicistronic and includes the open reading frames of both Adh and Adhr. The dicistronic transcript is found in polysomes and the Adhr protein product is detected by antibody staining. We present evidence that the accumulation of the dicistronic mRNA is controlled at the level of the 3' end processing. PMID:9155028

  6. Neofunctionalization of Duplicated Tic40 Genes Caused a Gain-of-Function Variation Related to Male Fertility in Brassica oleracea Lineages1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Xiaoling; Shen, Wenhao; Hu, Kaining; Zhou, Zhengfu; Xia, Shengqian; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication followed by functional divergence in the event of polyploidization is a major contributor to evolutionary novelties. The Brassica genus evolved from a common ancestor after whole-genome triplication. Here, we studied the evolutionary and functional features of Brassica spp. homologs to Tic40 (for translocon at the inner membrane of chloroplasts with 40 kDa). Four Tic40 loci were identified in allotetraploid Brassica napus and two loci in each of three basic diploid Brassica spp. Although these Tic40 homologs share high sequence identities and similar expression patterns, they exhibit altered functional features. Complementation assays conducted on Arabidopsis thaliana tic40 and the B. napus male-sterile line 7365A suggested that all Brassica spp. Tic40 homologs retain an ancestral function similar to that of AtTic40, whereas BolC9.Tic40 in Brassica oleracea and its ortholog in B. napus, BnaC9.Tic40, in addition, evolved a novel function that can rescue the fertility of 7365A. A homologous chromosomal rearrangement placed bnac9.tic40 originating from the A genome (BraA10.Tic40) as an allele of BnaC9.Tic40 in the C genome, resulting in phenotypic variation for male sterility in the B. napus near-isogenic two-type line 7365AB. Assessment of the complementation activity of chimeric B. napus Tic40 domain-swapping constructs in 7365A suggested that amino acid replacements in the carboxyl terminus of BnaC9.Tic40 cause this functional divergence. The distribution of these amino acid replacements in 59 diverse Brassica spp. accessions demonstrated that the neofunctionalization of Tic40 is restricted to B. oleracea and its derivatives and thus occurred after the divergence of the Brassica spp. A, B, and C genomes. PMID:25185122

  7. Functional Gene Networks: R/Bioc package to generate and analyse gene networks derived from functional enrichment and clustering

    PubMed Central

    Aibar, Sara; Fontanillo, Celia; Droste, Conrad; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Functional Gene Networks (FGNet) is an R/Bioconductor package that generates gene networks derived from the results of functional enrichment analysis (FEA) and annotation clustering. The sets of genes enriched with specific biological terms (obtained from a FEA platform) are transformed into a network by establishing links between genes based on common functional annotations and common clusters. The network provides a new view of FEA results revealing gene modules with similar functions and genes that are related to multiple functions. In addition to building the functional network, FGNet analyses the similarity between the groups of genes and provides a distance heatmap and a bipartite network of functionally overlapping genes. The application includes an interface to directly perform FEA queries using different external tools: DAVID, GeneTerm Linker, TopGO or GAGE; and a graphical interface to facilitate the use. Availability and implementation: FGNet is available in Bioconductor, including a tutorial. URL: http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/FGNet.html Contact: jrivas@usal.es Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25600944

  8. Biological cluster evaluation for gene function prediction.

    PubMed

    Klie, Sebastian; Nikoloski, Zoran; Selbig, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput omics techniques render it possible to decode the function of genes by using the "guilt-by-association" principle on biologically meaningful clusters of gene expression data. However, the existing frameworks for biological evaluation of gene clusters are hindered by two bottleneck issues: (1) the choice for the number of clusters, and (2) the external measures which do not take in consideration the structure of the analyzed data and the ontology of the existing biological knowledge. Here, we address the identified bottlenecks by developing a novel framework that allows not only for biological evaluation of gene expression clusters based on existing structured knowledge, but also for prediction of putative gene functions. The proposed framework facilitates propagation of statistical significance at each of the following steps: (1) estimating the number of clusters, (2) evaluating the clusters in terms of novel external structural measures, (3) selecting an optimal clustering algorithm, and (4) predicting gene functions. The framework also includes a method for evaluation of gene clusters based on the structure of the employed ontology. Moreover, our method for obtaining a probabilistic range for the number of clusters is demonstrated valid on synthetic data and available gene expression profiles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Finally, we propose a network-based approach for gene function prediction which relies on the clustering of optimal score and the employed ontology. Our approach effectively predicts gene function on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae data set and is also employed to obtain putative gene functions for an Arabidopsis thaliana data set. PMID:20059365

  9. RNA Interference for Wheat Functional Gene Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi) refers to a common mechanism of RNA-based post-transcriptional gene silencing in eukaryotic cells. In model plant species such as Arabidopsis and rice, RNAi has been routinely used to characterize gene function and to engineer novel phenotypes. In polyploid species, this appr...

  10. Genes and gene networks implicated in aggression related behaviour.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Pain, Oliver; Du Rietz, Ebba; Tosto, Maria Grazia; Paya-Cano, Jose; Sandnabba, Kenneth N; de Boer, Sietse; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Sluyter, Frans

    2014-10-01

    Aggressive behaviour is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Despite of moderate heritability estimates, progress in identifying the genetic factors underlying aggressive behaviour has been limited. There are currently three genetic mouse models of high and low aggression created using selective breeding. This is the first study to offer a global transcriptomic characterization of the prefrontal cortex across all three genetic mouse models of aggression. A systems biology approach has been applied to transcriptomic data across the three pairs of selected inbred mouse strains (Turku Aggressive (TA) and Turku Non-Aggressive (TNA), Short Attack Latency (SAL) and Long Attack Latency (LAL) mice and North Carolina Aggressive (NC900) and North Carolina Non-Aggressive (NC100)), providing novel insight into the neurobiological mechanisms and genetics underlying aggression. First, weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was performed to identify modules of highly correlated genes associated with aggression. Probe sets belonging to gene modules uncovered by WGCNA were carried forward for network analysis using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). The RankProd non-parametric algorithm was then used to statistically evaluate expression differences across the genes belonging to modules significantly associated with aggression. IPA uncovered two pathways, involving NF-kB and MAPKs. The secondary RankProd analysis yielded 14 differentially expressed genes, some of which have previously been implicated in pathways associated with aggressive behaviour, such as Adrbk2. The results highlighted plausible candidate genes and gene networks implicated in aggression-related behaviour. PMID:25142712

  11. Functional requirements driving the gene duplication in 12 Drosophila species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene duplication supplies the raw materials for novel gene functions and many gene families arisen from duplication experience adaptive evolution. Most studies of young duplicates have focused on mammals, especially humans, whereas reports describing their genome-wide evolutionary patterns across the closely related Drosophila species are rare. The sequenced 12 Drosophila genomes provide the opportunity to address this issue. Results In our study, 3,647 young duplicate gene families were identified across the 12 Drosophila species and three types of expansions, species-specific, lineage-specific and complex expansions, were detected in these gene families. Our data showed that the species-specific young duplicate genes predominated (86.6%) over the other two types. Interestingly, many independent species-specific expansions in the same gene family have been observed in many species, even including 11 or 12 Drosophila species. Our data also showed that the functional bias observed in these young duplicate genes was mainly related to responses to environmental stimuli and biotic stresses. Conclusions This study reveals the evolutionary patterns of young duplicates across 12 Drosophila species on a genomic scale. Our results suggest that convergent evolution acts on young duplicate genes after the species differentiation and adaptive evolution may play an important role in duplicate genes for adaption to ecological factors and environmental changes in Drosophila. PMID:23945147

  12. Gene Function Prediction from Functional Association Networks Using Kernel Partial Least Squares Regression

    PubMed Central

    Lehtinen, Sonja; Lees, Jon; Bähler, Jürg; Shawe-Taylor, John; Orengo, Christine

    2015-01-01

    With the growing availability of large-scale biological datasets, automated methods of extracting functionally meaningful information from this data are becoming increasingly important. Data relating to functional association between genes or proteins, such as co-expression or functional association, is often represented in terms of gene or protein networks. Several methods of predicting gene function from these networks have been proposed. However, evaluating the relative performance of these algorithms may not be trivial: concerns have been raised over biases in different benchmarking methods and datasets, particularly relating to non-independence of functional association data and test data. In this paper we propose a new network-based gene function prediction algorithm using a commute-time kernel and partial least squares regression (Compass). We compare Compass to GeneMANIA, a leading network-based prediction algorithm, using a number of different benchmarks, and find that Compass outperforms GeneMANIA on these benchmarks. We also explicitly explore problems associated with the non-independence of functional association data and test data. We find that a benchmark based on the Gene Ontology database, which, directly or indirectly, incorporates information from other databases, may considerably overestimate the performance of algorithms exploiting functional association data for prediction. PMID:26288239

  13. Functional characterization of FaNIP1;1 gene, a ripening-related and receptacle-specific aquaporin in strawberry fruit.

    PubMed

    Molina-Hidalgo, Francisco J; Medina-Puche, Laura; Gelis, Samuel; Ramos, José; Sabir, Farzana; Soveral, Graça; Prista, Catarina; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Caballero, José L; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Blanco-Portales, Rosario

    2015-09-01

    Strawberry fruit (Fragaria × ananassa) is a soft fruit with high water content at ripe stage (more than 90% of its fresh weight). Aquaporins play an important role in plant water homeostasis, through the facilitation of water transport and solutes. We report the role played by FaNIP1;1 in the receptacle ripening process. The analysis by qRT-PCR of FaNIP1;1 showed that this gene is mainly expressed in fruit receptacle and has a ripening-related expression pattern that was accompanied by an increase in both the abscisic acid and water content of the receptacle throughout fruit ripening. Moreover, FaNIP1;1 was induced in situations of water deficit. Additionally, we show that FaNIP1;1 expression was positively regulated by abscisic acid and negatively regulated by auxins. The water transport capacity of FaNIP1;1 was determined by a stopped-flow spectroscopy in yeast over-expressing FaNIP1;1. Glycerol, H2O2 and boron transport were also demonstrated in yeast. On the other hand, GFP-FaNIP1;1 fusion protein was located in plasma membrane. In conclusion, FaNIP1;1 seems to play an important role increasing the plasma membrane permeability, that allows the water accumulation in the strawberry fruit receptacle throughout the ripening process. PMID:26259188

  14. Identification of N-terminal receptor activity-modifying protein residues important for calcitonin gene-related peptide, adrenomedullin, and amylin receptor function.

    PubMed

    Qi, Tao; Christopoulos, George; Bailey, Richard J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M; Hay, Debbie L

    2008-10-01

    Calcitonin-family receptors comprise calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CL) or calcitonin receptor and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP) pairings. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors are CL/RAMP1, whereas adrenomedullin (AM) receptors are CL/RAMP2 (AM1 receptor) or CL/RAMP3 (AM2 receptor). Amylin (Amy) receptors are RAMP hetero-oligomers with the calcitonin receptor (AMY1, AMY2, and AMY3, respectively). How RAMPs change G protein-coupled receptor pharmacology is not fully understood. We exploited sequence differences between RAMP1 and RAMP3 to identify individual residues capable of altering receptor pharmacology. Alignment of human RAMPs revealed eight residues that are conserved in RAMP2 and RAMP3 but are different in RAMP1. We hypothesized that residues in RAMP2 and RAMP3, but not RAMP1, are responsible for making CL/RAMP2 and CL/RAMP3 AM receptors. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we introduced individual RAMP3 residues into RAMP1 and vice versa in these eight positions. Mutant or wild-type RAMPs were transfected into Cos7 cells with CL or the insert-negative form of the calcitonin receptor [CT(a)]. Agonist-stimulated cAMP production and cell-surface expression of constructs were measured. Position 74 in RAMP1 and RAMP3 was critical for determining AM potency and affinity, and Phe93 in RAMP1 was an important contributor to alphaCGRP potency at CGRP receptors. Mutant RAMP/CT(a) receptor complexes displayed different phenotypes. It is noteworthy that RAMP1 S103N and W74E mutations led to enhanced rAmy potency, probably related to increased cell-surface expression of these complexes. This differs from the effect on CL-based receptors where expression was unchanged. Targeted substitution has emphasized the importance of position 74 in RAMP1/RAMP3 as a key determinant of AM pharmacology. PMID:18593822

  15. Missing gene identification using functional coherence scores

    PubMed Central

    Chitale, Meghana; Khan, Ishita K.; Kihara, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing metabolic and signaling pathways is an effective way of interpreting a genome sequence. A challenge in a pathway reconstruction is that often genes in a pathway cannot be easily found, reflecting current imperfect information of the target organism. In this work, we developed a new method for finding missing genes, which integrates multiple features, including gene expression, phylogenetic profile, and function association scores. Particularly, for considering function association between candidate genes and neighboring proteins to the target missing gene in the network, we used Co-occurrence Association Score (CAS) and PubMed Association Score (PAS), which are designed for capturing functional coherence of proteins. We showed that adding CAS and PAS substantially improve the accuracy of identifying missing genes in the yeast enzyme-enzyme network compared to the cases when only the conventional features, gene expression, phylogenetic profile, were used. Finally, it was also demonstrated that the accuracy improves by considering indirect neighbors to the target enzyme position in the network using a proper network-topology-based weighting scheme. PMID:27552989

  16. A translational systems biology approach in both animals and humans identifies a functionally related module of accumbal genes involved in the regulation of reward processing and binge drinking in males

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, David; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Ruggeri, Barbara; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Cattrell, Anna; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Band, Hamid; Barker, Gareth; Bokde, Arun; Buchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Easton, Alanna; Fauth-Buehler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jurgen; Garavanh, Hugh; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Mann, Karl; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Rotter, Andrea; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael; Sommer, Wolfgang; Mameli, Manuel; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Mueller, Christian; Schumann, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Background The mesolimbic dopamine system, composed primarily of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area that project to striatal structures, is considered to be the key mediator of reinforcement-related mechanisms in the brain. Prompted by a genome-wide association meta-analysis implicating the Ras-specific guanine nucleotide-releasing factor 2 (RASGRF2) gene in the regulation of alcohol intake in men, we have recently shown that male Rasgrf2−/− mice exhibit reduced ethanol intake and preference accompanied by a perturbed mesolimbic dopamine system. We therefore propose that these mice represent a valid model to further elucidate the precise genes and mechanisms regulating mesolimbic dopamine functioning. Methods Transcriptomic data from the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of male Rasgrf2−/− mice and wild-type controls were analyzed by weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA). We performed follow-up genetic association tests in humans using a sample of male adolescents from the IMAGEN study characterized for binge drinking (n = 905) and ventral striatal activation during an fMRI reward task (n = 608). Results The WGCNA analyses using accumbal transcriptomic data revealed 37 distinct “modules,” or functionally related groups of genes. Two of these modules were significantly associated with Rasgrf2 knockout status: M5 (p < 0.001) and M6 (p < 0.001). In follow-up translational analyses we found that human orthologues for the M5 module were significantly (p < 0.01) enriched with genetic association signals for binge drinking in male adolescents. Furthermore, the most significant locus, originating from the EH-domain containing 4 (EHD4) gene (p < 0.001), was also significantly associated with altered ventral striatal activity in male adolescents performing an fMRI reward task (pempirical < 0.001). Limitations It was not possible to determine the extent to which the M5 module was dysregulated in Rasgrf2−/− mice by perturbed mesolimbic

  17. Morpholinos: studying gene function in the chick

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Anneliese; Streit, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The use of morpholinos for perturbing gene function in the chick, Gallus gallus, has led to many important discoveries in developmental biology. This technology makes use of in vivo electroporation, which allows gain and loss of function in a temporally, and spatially controlled manner. Using this method, morpholinos can be transfected into embryonic tissues from early to late developmental stages. In this article, we describe the methods currently used in our laboratory to knock down gene function using morpholinos in vivo. We also detail how morpholinos are used to provide consistency of the results, and describe two protocols to visualise the morpholino after electroporation. In addition, we provide guidance on avoiding potential pitfalls, and suggestions for troubleshooting solutions. These revised techniques provide a practical starting point for investigating gene function in the chick. PMID:24184187

  18. Evolutionary, Comparative and Functional Analyses of the Brassinosteroid Receptor Gene, BRI1, in Wheat and Its Relation to Other Plant Genomes.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Christopher; Moore, Jerott; Ott, Alina; Baumert, Eric; Mohan, Amita; Gill, Kulvinder S; Sandhu, Devinder

    2015-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are plant hormones, fundamental for the growth and development of plants. A trans-membrane protein receptor kinase, Brassinosteroid-Insensitive 1 (BRI1), is known to interact with BRs and be directly involved in plant development. This study investigates the structural organization of BRI1 orthologs in several taxa, with a specific interest in Triticum aestivum. True orthologs of Arabidopsis thaliana BRI1 (AtBRI1) from seven-plant species showed sequence identity ranging from 54% to 95% at the protein level. All gene sequences lacked introns, leading to speculation that post-transcriptional processing in TaBRI1 is similar to AtBRI1. Based on in silico analysis, a single copy of BRI1 was present in each of the three wheat genomes on the long arm of chromosome 3. Domain structure of BRI1 orthologs among different taxa showed multiple leucine rich repeats (LRRs), an island domain (ID), a juxtamembrane/transmembrane domain (JTMD), a catalytic kinase domain (KD), C and N-Terminal domains. The KD showed the highest level of conservation while the LRRs and JTMD were most variable. Phosphorylation of residues in the juxtamembrane domain, known to be involved in the activation of the KD, is conserved in TaBRI1. While TaBRI1 has well-defined differences in the ID and LRR domains, many residues involved in ligand binding are conserved. The activation loop present in the KD showed 100% conservation in all taxa. Despite residue differences, hydrophobicity was conserved in the BR binding pocket across taxa, suggesting that function may not differ as drastically as residue identity may suggest. Predicted 3D structure of AtBRI1 and TaBRI1 showed a conserved super helical assembly, a feature essential in protein-protein interactions. An unrooted phylogram showed TaBRI1 in the monocot clade to be distinct from that of dicots. New insight in the structure and functions of BRI1 may help in targeting BR pathway for crop improvement. PMID:26020768

  19. Evolutionary, Comparative and Functional Analyses of the Brassinosteroid Receptor Gene, BRI1, in Wheat and Its Relation to Other Plant Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Christopher; Moore, Jerott; Ott, Alina; Baumert, Eric; Mohan, Amita; Gill, Kulvinder S.; Sandhu, Devinder

    2015-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are plant hormones, fundamental for the growth and development of plants. A trans-membrane protein receptor kinase, Brassinosteroid-Insensitive 1 (BRI1), is known to interact with BRs and be directly involved in plant development. This study investigates the structural organization of BRI1 orthologs in several taxa, with a specific interest in Triticum aestivum. True orthologs of Arabidopsis thaliana BRI1 (AtBRI1) from seven-plant species showed sequence identity ranging from 54% to 95% at the protein level. All gene sequences lacked introns, leading to speculation that post-transcriptional processing in TaBRI1 is similar to AtBRI1. Based on in silico analysis, a single copy of BRI1 was present in each of the three wheat genomes on the long arm of chromosome 3. Domain structure of BRI1 orthologs among different taxa showed multiple leucine rich repeats (LRRs), an island domain (ID), a juxtamembrane/transmembrane domain (JTMD), a catalytic kinase domain (KD), C and N-Terminal domains. The KD showed the highest level of conservation while the LRRs and JTMD were most variable. Phosphorylation of residues in the juxtamembrane domain, known to be involved in the activation of the KD, is conserved in TaBRI1. While TaBRI1 has well-defined differences in the ID and LRR domains, many residues involved in ligand binding are conserved. The activation loop present in the KD showed 100% conservation in all taxa. Despite residue differences, hydrophobicity was conserved in the BR binding pocket across taxa, suggesting that function may not differ as drastically as residue identity may suggest. Predicted 3D structure of AtBRI1 and TaBRI1 showed a conserved super helical assembly, a feature essential in protein-protein interactions. An unrooted phylogram showed TaBRI1 in the monocot clade to be distinct from that of dicots. New insight in the structure and functions of BRI1 may help in targeting BR pathway for crop improvement. PMID:26020768

  20. A functional polymorphism in the SULT1A1 gene (G638A) is associated with risk of lung cancer in relation to tobacco smoking.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gang; Miao, Xiaoping; Zhou, Yifeng; Tan, Wen; Lin, Dongxin

    2004-05-01

    Sulfotransferase 1A1, an important member of sulfotransferase superfamily, is involved in the biotransformation of many compounds including tobacco carcinogens. A single nucleotide polymorphism (G638A) in the sulfotransferase 1A1 (SULT1A1) gene causes Arg213His amino acid change and consequently results in significantly reduced enzyme activity and thermostability. We thus hypothesized that the variant SULT1A1 allele may protect against the risk of lung cancer related to tobacco smoking. To examine this hypothesis, we analyzed 805 patients with lung cancer and 809 controls for this polymorphism in a hospital-based, case-control study. We observed that, compared with the GG genotype, the variant SULT1A1 genotype (638GA or AA) was associated with a significantly increased risk for overall lung cancer [odds ratio (OR) 1.85; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.44-2.37]. Stratification analysis showed that the increased risk of lung cancer related to the variant SULT1A1 genotypes was more pronounced in younger subjects and limited to smokers but not non-smokers [OR 2.28 (95% CI 1.66-3.13) versus OR 1.35 (95% CI 0.91-1.99); P for homogeneity = 0.000]. Furthermore, the risk of lung cancer for the variant genotypes was increased consistently with cumulative smoking dose, with the ORs being 1.66 (95% CI, 0.75-3.68), 2.28 (95% CI, 1.47-3.54) and 3.35 (95% CI, 1.71-6.57) for those who smoked <15 pack-years, 15-36 pack-years and >36 pack-years, respectively (P for trend = 0.000). When analysis was stratified by histological subtypes of lung cancer, consistent results were observed for all three major types of the cancer, i.e. squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and other types. Our results, which are against the original hypothesis, demonstrate that the variant SULT1A1 638A allele is associated with susceptibility to lung cancer in relation to tobacco smoking. PMID:14688021

  1. Association of Functional Polymorphisms from Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Serotonin-Related Genes with Depressive Symptoms after a Medical Stressor in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Kerri S.; Dixon, David; Nowotny, Petra; Ricci, William M.; Binder, Ellen F.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Wendleton, Leah; Doré, Peter; Lenze, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in older adults after a disabling medical event and interfere with rehabilitation and recovery from the disability. This prospective study examined the role of genetic polymorphisms implicated in synaptic integrity and stress-associated depression as predictors of depressive symptoms after hip fracture. We recruited healthy comparisons from the community and participants with hip fracture after surgical fixation from Saint Louis, Missouri hospitals. We examined the valine (Val) to methionine (Met) polymorphism in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), serotonin 1A receptor (5HT1a-rs6295) polymorphism, and the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) interaction with the rs25531 A to G single nucleotide polymorphism (5HTTLPR-rs25531) as predictors of depressive symptoms. We also examined whether depressive symptoms mediate the influence of BDNF genotype on functional recovery. Among 429 participants with hip fracture, BDNF Met/Met carriers developed significantly more depressive symptoms than Val/Val carriers during a four-week period after the fracture (p=.012). BDNF genotype also predicted functional recovery over the ensuing year, mediated by its effects on depressive symptoms (CI: 0.07-3.37). Unlike prior studies of stressful life events, the S′ 5HTTLPR-rs25531 variant did not predict higher levels of depressive symptoms; instead, we report an exploratory finding of an epistatic effect between BDNF and 5HTTLPR-rs25531 whereby the compounded effects of two LA alleles and BDNF Met/Met genotype elevate risk of depressive symptoms after hip fracture (p=.006). No differences between 5HT1a genotypes were found. Our findings suggest plasticity-related genetic factors contribute to the neural mechanisms of mental and functional well-being after a disabling medical stressor. PMID:25781924

  2. Long-term effects of recurrent neonatal seizures on neurobehavioral function and related gene expression and its intervention by inhibitor of cathepsin B.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hong; Yan, Jian-Zhen; Zhang, Le-Ling; Feng, Xing; Wu, Xi-Ru

    2012-01-01

    Cathepsins are families of proteases that have been reported to play the key roles in neuroexcitotoxicity. The present study was sought to determine the effect of CBI, a cathepsin B inhibitor, in the prevention of neurobehavioral deficits after inhalant flurothyl-induced recurrent neonatal seizures in rats. We examined the expression pattern of autophagy-related genes at acute phase after the last seizures using western blot method, and evaluated behavioral deficits during postnatal day 28 (P28) to P35. The results showed improved neurological scores and learning ability in CBI-treated rats compared with the nontreated control. Flurothyl-induced increases in the ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I, Beclin-1 and Cathepsin-B were blocked by pre-treatment with CBI at 1.5, 3, 6 and 24 h after the last seizures in hippocampus and cerebral cortex by western blot analysis. Meanwhile, CBI also reversed flurothyl-induced down-regulation of Bcl-2 protein levels. Furthermore, in the long-term time point of 35 days (P35), PRG-1 mRNA and protein level in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of recurrent seizure group were up-regulated when compared to the control rats; meanwhile, the up-regulated expression of PRG-1 were robustly inhibited by CBI. These date demonstrated, for the first time, that lysosomal enzymes participate in neonatal seizure-induced brain damage and that modulation of cathepsin B may offer a new strategy for the development of therapeutic interventions for treatment of developmental seizure-induced brain damage. PMID:21842268

  3. The ubiquilin gene family: evolutionary patterns and functional insights

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ubiquilins are proteins that function as ubiquitin receptors in eukaryotes. Mutations in two ubiquilin-encoding genes have been linked to the genesis of neurodegenerative diseases. However, ubiquilin functions are still poorly understood. Results In this study, evolutionary and functional data are combined to determine the origin and diversification of the ubiquilin gene family and to characterize novel potential roles of ubiquilins in mammalian species, including humans. The analysis of more than six hundred sequences allowed characterizing ubiquilin diversity in all the main eukaryotic groups. Many organisms (e. g. fungi, many animals) have single ubiquilin genes, but duplications in animal, plant, alveolate and excavate species are described. Seven different ubiquilins have been detected in vertebrates. Two of them, here called UBQLN5 and UBQLN6, had not been hitherto described. Significantly, marsupial and eutherian mammals have the most complex ubiquilin gene families, composed of up to 6 genes. This exceptional mammalian-specific expansion is the result of the recent emergence of four new genes, three of them (UBQLN3, UBQLN5 and UBQLNL) with precise testis-specific expression patterns that indicate roles in the postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis. A gene with related features has independently arisen in species of the Drosophila genus. Positive selection acting on some mammalian ubiquilins has been detected. Conclusions The ubiquilin gene family is highly conserved in eukaryotes. The infrequent lineage-specific amplifications observed may be linked to the emergence of novel functions in particular tissues. PMID:24674348

  4. Performing integrative functional genomics analysis in GeneWeaver.org.

    PubMed

    Jay, Jeremy J; Chesler, Elissa J

    2014-01-01

    Functional genomics experiments and analyses give rise to large sets of results, each typically quantifying the relation of molecular entities including genes, gene products, polymorphisms, and other genomic features with biological characteristics or processes. There is tremendous utility and value in using these data in an integrative fashion to find convergent evidence for the role of genes in various processes, to identify functionally similar molecular entities, or to compare processes based on their genomic correlates. However, these gene-centered data are often deposited in diverse and non-interoperable stores. Therefore, integration requires biologists to implement computational algorithms and harmonization of gene identifiers both within and across species. The GeneWeaver web-based software system brings together a large data archive from diverse functional genomics data with a suite of combinatorial tools in an interactive environment. Account management features allow data and results to be shared among user-defined groups. Users can retrieve curated gene set data, upload, store, and share their own experimental results and perform integrative analyses including novel algorithmic approaches for set-set integration of genes and functions. PMID:24233775

  5. Studying Functions of All Yeast Genes Simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Eason, Robert G.; Poumand, Nader; Herman, Zelek S.; Davis, Ronald W.; Anthony Kevin; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2006-01-01

    A method of studying the functions of all the genes of a given species of microorganism simultaneously has been developed in experiments on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (commonly known as baker's or brewer's yeast). It is already known that many yeast genes perform functions similar to those of corresponding human genes; therefore, by facilitating understanding of yeast genes, the method may ultimately also contribute to the knowledge needed to treat some diseases in humans. Because of the complexity of the method and the highly specialized nature of the underlying knowledge, it is possible to give only a brief and sketchy summary here. The method involves the use of unique synthetic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences that are denoted as DNA bar codes because of their utility as molecular labels. The method also involves the disruption of gene functions through deletion of genes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a particularly powerful experimental system in that multiple deletion strains easily can be pooled for parallel growth assays. Individual deletion strains recently have been created for 5,918 open reading frames, representing nearly all of the estimated 6,000 genetic loci of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Tagging of each deletion strain with one or two unique 20-nucleotide sequences enables identification of genes affected by specific growth conditions, without prior knowledge of gene functions. Hybridization of bar-code DNA to oligonucleotide arrays can be used to measure the growth rate of each strain over several cell-division generations. The growth rate thus measured serves as an index of the fitness of the strain.

  6. The autophagy-related genes BbATG1 and BbATG8 have different functions in differentiation, stress resistance and virulence of mycopathogen Beauveria bassiana

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Sheng-Hua; Liu, Jing; Chu, Xin-Ling; Xie, Xue-Qin; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy-related proteins play significantly different roles in eukaryotes. In the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana, autophagy is associated with fungal growth and development. BbATG1 (a serine/threonine protein kinase) and BbATG8 (a ubiquitin-like protein) have similar roles in autophagy, but different roles in other processes. Disruption mutants of BbATG1 and BbATG8 had impaired conidial germination under starvation stress. The mutant ΔBbATG8 exhibited enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress, while a ΔBbATG1 mutant did not. BbATG1 and BbATG8 showed different roles in spore differentiation. The blastospore yield was reduced by 70% and 92% in ΔBbATG1 and ΔBbATG8 mutants, respectively, and the double mutant had a reduction of 95%. Conidial yield was reduced by approximately 90% and 50% in ΔBbATG1 and ΔBbATG8 mutants, respectively. A double mutant had a reduction similar to ΔBbATG1. Additionally, both BbATG1 and BbATG8 affected the levels of conidial protein BbCP15p required for conidiation. The virulence of each autophagy-deficient mutant was considerably weakened as indicated in topical and intrahemocoel injection assays, and showed a greater reduction in topical infection. However, BbATG1 and BbATG8 had different effects on fungal virulence. Our data indicate that these autophagy-related proteins have different functions in fungal stress response, asexual development and virulence. PMID:27197558

  7. The autophagy-related genes BbATG1 and BbATG8 have different functions in differentiation, stress resistance and virulence of mycopathogen Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Ying, Sheng-Hua; Liu, Jing; Chu, Xin-Ling; Xie, Xue-Qin; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy-related proteins play significantly different roles in eukaryotes. In the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana, autophagy is associated with fungal growth and development. BbATG1 (a serine/threonine protein kinase) and BbATG8 (a ubiquitin-like protein) have similar roles in autophagy, but different roles in other processes. Disruption mutants of BbATG1 and BbATG8 had impaired conidial germination under starvation stress. The mutant ΔBbATG8 exhibited enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress, while a ΔBbATG1 mutant did not. BbATG1 and BbATG8 showed different roles in spore differentiation. The blastospore yield was reduced by 70% and 92% in ΔBbATG1 and ΔBbATG8 mutants, respectively, and the double mutant had a reduction of 95%. Conidial yield was reduced by approximately 90% and 50% in ΔBbATG1 and ΔBbATG8 mutants, respectively. A double mutant had a reduction similar to ΔBbATG1. Additionally, both BbATG1 and BbATG8 affected the levels of conidial protein BbCP15p required for conidiation. The virulence of each autophagy-deficient mutant was considerably weakened as indicated in topical and intrahemocoel injection assays, and showed a greater reduction in topical infection. However, BbATG1 and BbATG8 had different effects on fungal virulence. Our data indicate that these autophagy-related proteins have different functions in fungal stress response, asexual development and virulence. PMID:27197558

  8. Systematic prediction of gene function in Arabidopsis thaliana using a probabilistic functional gene network

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sohyun; Rhee, Seung Y; Marcotte, Edward M; Lee, Insuk

    2012-01-01

    AraNet is a functional gene network for the reference plant Arabidopsis and has been constructed in order to identify new genes associated with plant traits. It is highly predictive for diverse biological pathways and can be used to prioritize genes for functional screens. Moreover, AraNet provides a web-based tool with which plant biologists can efficiently discover novel functions of Arabidopsis genes (http://www.functionalnet.org/aranet/). This protocol explains how to conduct network-based prediction of gene functions using AraNet and how to interpret the prediction results. Functional discovery in plant biology is facilitated by combining candidate prioritization by AraNet with focused experimental tests. PMID:21886106

  9. Gene Transfers Between Distantly Related Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2003-01-01

    With the completion of numerous microbial genome sequences, reports of individual gene transfers between distantly related prokaryotes have become commonplace. On the other hand, transfers between prokaryotes and eukaryotes still excite the imagination. Many of these claims may be premature, but some are certainly valid. In this chapter, the kinds of supporting data needed to propose transfers between distantly related organisms and cite some interesting examples are considered.

  10. The relative merits of the tetO2 and tetO7 promoter systems for the functional analysis of heterologous genes in yeast and a compilation of essential yeast genes with tetO2 promoter substitutions.

    PubMed

    Wishart, Jill A; Osborn, Michael; Gent, Manda E; Yen, Kuangyu; Vujovic, Zorana; Gitsham, Paul; Zhang, Nianshu; Ross Miller, J; Oliver, Stephen G

    2006-03-01

    We have generated a collection of yeast strains, each of which has an essential yeast gene under the control of the tetracycline-responsive, tetO, promoter. Screens using first-generation promoter-swap strains uncovered the non-specific responsiveness of the tetO7 promoter to a known human transcription factor (hIRF-1). Non-specific regulation was not observed with the tetO2 promoter. Reporter assays have been used to demonstrate this phenomenon. Subsequent efforts to generate a collection of tetracycline-regulatable strains have focused on the tetO2 promoter. These strains are available to the yeast community and can be used for functional genomics studies. PMID:16544274

  11. Structure, expression and functions of MTA genes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Wang, Rui-An

    2016-05-15

    Metastatic associated proteins (MTA) are integrators of upstream regulatory signals with the ability to act as master coregulators for modifying gene transcriptional activity. The MTA family includes three genes and multiple alternatively spliced variants. The MTA proteins neither have their own enzymatic activity nor have been shown to directly interact with DNA. However, MTA proteins interact with a variety of chromatin remodeling factors and complexes with enzymatic activities for modulating the plasticity of nucleosomes, leading to the repression or derepression of target genes or other extra-nuclear and nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD)-complex independent activities. The functions of MTA family members are driven by the steady state levels and subcellular localization of MTA proteins, the dynamic nature of modifying signals and enzymes, the structural features and post-translational modification of protein domains, interactions with binding proteins, and the nature of the engaged and resulting features of nucleosomes in the proximity of target genes. In general, MTA1 and MTA2 are the most upregulated genes in human cancer and correlate well with aggressive phenotypes, therapeutic resistance, poor prognosis and ultimately, unfavorable survival of cancer patients. Here we will discuss the structure, expression and functions of the MTA family of genes in the context of cancer cells. PMID:26869315

  12. The GeneMANIA prediction server: biological network integration for gene prioritization and predicting gene function.

    PubMed

    Warde-Farley, David; Donaldson, Sylva L; Comes, Ovi; Zuberi, Khalid; Badrawi, Rashad; Chao, Pauline; Franz, Max; Grouios, Chris; Kazi, Farzana; Lopes, Christian Tannus; Maitland, Anson; Mostafavi, Sara; Montojo, Jason; Shao, Quentin; Wright, George; Bader, Gary D; Morris, Quaid

    2010-07-01

    GeneMANIA (http://www.genemania.org) is a flexible, user-friendly web interface for generating hypotheses about gene function, analyzing gene lists and prioritizing genes for functional assays. Given a query list, GeneMANIA extends the list with functionally similar genes that it identifies using available genomics and proteomics data. GeneMANIA also reports weights that indicate the predictive value of each selected data set for the query. Six organisms are currently supported (Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and hundreds of data sets have been collected from GEO, BioGRID, Pathway Commons and I2D, as well as organism-specific functional genomics data sets. Users can select arbitrary subsets of the data sets associated with an organism to perform their analyses and can upload their own data sets to analyze. The GeneMANIA algorithm performs as well or better than other gene function prediction methods on yeast and mouse benchmarks. The high accuracy of the GeneMANIA prediction algorithm, an intuitive user interface and large database make GeneMANIA a useful tool for any biologist. PMID:20576703

  13. Rice functionality, starch structure and the genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Through collaborative efforts among USDA scientists at Beaumont, Texas, we have gained in-depth knowledge of how rice functionality, i.e. the texture of the cooked rice, rice processing properties, and starch gelatinization temperature, are associated with starch-synthesis genes and starch structure...

  14. The relativity of biological function.

    PubMed

    Laubichler, Manfred D; Stadler, Peter F; Prohaska, Sonja J; Nowick, Katja

    2015-12-01

    Function is a central concept in biological theories and explanations. Yet discussions about function are often based on a narrow understanding of biological systems and processes, such as idealized molecular systems or simple evolutionary, i.e., selective, dynamics. Conflicting conceptions of function continue to be used in the scientific literature to support certain claims, for instance about the fraction of "functional DNA" in the human genome. Here we argue that all biologically meaningful interpretations of function are necessarily context dependent. This implies that they derive their meaning as well as their range of applicability only within a specific theoretical and measurement context. We use this framework to shed light on the current debate about functional DNA and argue that without considering explicitly the theoretical and measurement contexts all attempts to integrate biological theories are prone to fail. PMID:26449352

  15. Cost benefit theory and optimal design of gene regulation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisky, Tomer; Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2007-12-01

    Cells respond to the environment by regulating the expression of genes according to environmental signals. The relation between the input signal level and the expression of the gene is called the gene regulation function. It is of interest to understand the shape of a gene regulation function in terms of the environment in which it has evolved and the basic constraints of biological systems. Here we address this by presenting a cost-benefit theory for gene regulation functions that takes into account temporally varying inputs in the environment and stochastic noise in the biological components. We apply this theory to the well-studied lac operon of E. coli. The present theory explains the shape of this regulation function in terms of temporal variation of the input signals, and of minimizing the deleterious effect of cell-cell variability in regulatory protein levels. We also apply the theory to understand the evolutionary tradeoffs in setting the number of regulatory proteins and for selection of feed-forward loops in genetic circuits. The present cost-benefit theory can be used to understand the shape of other gene regulatory functions in terms of environment and noise constraints.

  16. Identification and functional characterization of cDNAs coding for hydroxybenzoate/hydroxycinnamate glucosyltransferases co-expressed with genes related to proanthocyanidin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Khater, F.; Fournand, D.; Vialet, S.; Meudec, E.; Cheynier, V.; Terrier, N.

    2012-01-01

    Grape proanthocyanidins (PAs) play a major role in the organoleptic properties of wine. They are accumulated mainly in grape skin and seeds during the early stages of berry development. Despite the recent progress in the identification of genes involved in PA biosynthesis, the mechanisms involved in subunit condensation, galloylation, or fine regulation of the spatio-temporal composition of grape berries in PAs are still not elucidated. Two Myb transcription factors, VvMybPA1 and VvMybPA2, controlling the PA pathway have recently been identified and ectopically over-expressed in an homologous system. In addition to already known PA genes, three genes coding for glucosyltransferases were significantly differentially expressed between hairy roots over-expressing VvMybPA1 or VvMybPA2 and control lines. The involvement of these genes in PA biosynthesis metabolism is unclear. The three glucosyltransferases display high sequence similarities with other plant glucosyltransferases able to catalyse the formation of glucose esters, which are important intermediate actors for the synthesis of different phenolic compounds. Studies of the in vitro properties of these three enzymes (Km, Vmax, substrate specificity, pH sensitivity) were performed through production of recombinant proteins in E. coli and demonstrated that they are able to catalyse the formation of 1-O-acyl-Glc esters of phenolic acids but are not active on flavonoids and stilbenes. The transcripts are expressed in the early stages of grape berry development, mainly in the berry skins and seeds. The results presented here suggest that these enzymes could be involved in vivo in PA galloylation or in the synthesis of hydroxycinnamic esters. PMID:22090445

  17. Review of Literature: Genes Related to Postaxial Polydactyly

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Prashant Kumar; El-Harouni, Ashraf A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postaxial polydactyly (PAP) is one of the commonest congenital malformations and usually is associated to several syndromes. There is no primary investigational strategy for PAP cases with single gene disorder in literature. PAP cases with single gene disorder can be classified according to common pathways and molecular basis. Molecular classification may help in diagnostic approach. Materials and Methods: All single gene disorders associated with PAP reported on PubMed and OMIM are analyzed and classified according to molecular basis. Results: Majority of genes related to cilia structure and functions are associated with PAP, so we classified them as ciliopathies and non-ciliopathies groups. Genes related to Shh–Gli3 pathway was the commonest group in non-ciliopathies. Conclusion: Genes related to cilia are most commonly related to PAP due to their indirect relationship to Shh–Gli3 signaling pathway. Initially, PAP may be the only clinical finding with ciliopathies so those cases need follow up. Proper diagnosis is helpful for management and genetic counseling. Molecular approach may help to define pleiotropy. PMID:25717468

  18. Annotation of gene function in citrus using gene expression information and co-expression networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Citrus encompasses major cultivated plants such as sweet orange, mandarin, lemon and grapefruit, among the world’s most economically important fruit crops. With increasing volumes of transcriptomics data available for these species, Gene Co-expression Network (GCN) analysis is a viable option for predicting gene function at a genome-wide scale. GCN analysis is based on a “guilt-by-association” principle whereby genes encoding proteins involved in similar and/or related biological processes may exhibit similar expression patterns across diverse sets of experimental conditions. While bioinformatics resources such as GCN analysis are widely available for efficient gene function prediction in model plant species including Arabidopsis, soybean and rice, in citrus these tools are not yet developed. Results We have constructed a comprehensive GCN for citrus inferred from 297 publicly available Affymetrix Genechip Citrus Genome microarray datasets, providing gene co-expression relationships at a genome-wide scale (33,000 transcripts). The comprehensive citrus GCN consists of a global GCN (condition-independent) and four condition-dependent GCNs that survey the sweet orange species only, all citrus fruit tissues, all citrus leaf tissues, or stress-exposed plants. All of these GCNs are clustered using genome-wide, gene-centric (guide) and graph clustering algorithms for flexibility of gene function prediction. For each putative cluster, gene ontology (GO) enrichment and gene expression specificity analyses were performed to enhance gene function, expression and regulation pattern prediction. The guide-gene approach was used to infer novel roles of genes involved in disease susceptibility and vitamin C metabolism, and graph-clustering approaches were used to investigate isoprenoid/phenylpropanoid metabolism in citrus peel, and citric acid catabolism via the GABA shunt in citrus fruit. Conclusions Integration of citrus gene co-expression networks

  19. Gene Ontology and KEGG Enrichment Analyses of Genes Related to Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Xing, ZhiHao; Ma, Mingming; Wang, Ning; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chen, Lei; Xu, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Identifying disease genes is one of the most important topics in biomedicine and may facilitate studies on the mechanisms underlying disease. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a serious eye disease; it typically affects older adults and results in a loss of vision due to retina damage. In this study, we attempt to develop an effective method for distinguishing AMD-related genes. Gene ontology and KEGG enrichment analyses of known AMD-related genes were performed, and a classification system was established. In detail, each gene was encoded into a vector by extracting enrichment scores of the gene set, including it and its direct neighbors in STRING, and gene ontology terms or KEGG pathways. Then certain feature-selection methods, including minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection, were adopted to extract key features for the classification system. As a result, 720 GO terms and 11 KEGG pathways were deemed the most important factors for predicting AMD-related genes. PMID:25165703

  20. The Drosophila melanogaster methuselah Gene: A Novel Gene with Ancient Functions

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Helder; Aguiar, Bruno; Morales-Hojas, Ramiro; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Fonseca, Nuno A.; Reboiro-Jato, David; Reboiro-Jato, Miguel; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster G protein-coupled receptor gene, methuselah (mth), has been described as a novel gene that is less than 10 million years old. Nevertheless, it shows a highly specific expression pattern in embryos, larvae, and adults, and has been implicated in larval development, stress resistance, and in the setting of adult lifespan, among others. Although mth belongs to a gene subfamily with 16 members in D. melanogaster, there is no evidence for functional redundancy in this subfamily. Therefore, it is surprising that a novel gene influences so many traits. Here, we explore the alternative hypothesis that mth is an old gene. Under this hypothesis, in species distantly related to D. melanogaster, there should be a gene with features similar to those of mth. By performing detailed phylogenetic, synteny, protein structure, and gene expression analyses we show that the D. virilis GJ12490 gene is the orthologous of mth in species distantly related to D. melanogaster. We also show that, in D. americana (a species of the virilis group of Drosophila), a common amino acid polymorphism at the GJ12490 orthologous gene is significantly associated with developmental time, size, and lifespan differences. Our results imply that GJ12490 orthologous genes are candidates for developmental time and lifespan differences in Drosophila in general. PMID:23696853

  1. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of three genes encoding polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins from Capsicum annuum, and their relation to increased resistance to two fungal pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are plant cell wall glycoproteins that can inhibit fungal endopolygalacturonases (PGs). Inhibiting by PGIPs directly reduces potential PG activity in specific plant pathogenic fungi, reducing their aggressiveness. Here, we isolated and functionally chara...

  2. Molecular and functional characterization of broccoli EMBRYONIC FLOWER 2 genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mao-Sen; Chen, Long-Fang O; Lin, Chun-Hung; Lai, Ying-Mi; Huang, Jia-Yuan; Sung, Zinmay Renee

    2012-07-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate major developmental processes in Arabidopsis. EMBRYONIC FLOWER 2 (EMF2), the VEFS domain-containing PcG gene, regulates diverse genetic pathways and is required for vegetative development and plant survival. Despite widespread EMF2-like sequences in plants, little is known about their function other than in Arabidopsis and rice. To study the role of EMF2 in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica cv. Elegance) development, we identified two broccoli EMF2 (BoEMF2) genes with sequence homology to and a similar gene expression pattern to that in Arabidopsis (AtEMF2). Reducing their expression in broccoli resulted in aberrant phenotypes and gene expression patterns. BoEMF2 regulates genes involved in diverse developmental and stress programs similar to AtEMF2 in Arabidopsis. However, BoEMF2 differs from AtEMF2 in the regulation of flower organ identity, cell proliferation and elongation, and death-related genes, which may explain the distinct phenotypes. The expression of BoEMF2.1 in the Arabidopsis emf2 mutant (Rescued emf2) partially rescued the mutant phenotype and restored the gene expression pattern to that of the wild type. Many EMF2-mediated molecular and developmental functions are conserved in broccoli and Arabidopsis. Furthermore, the restored gene expression pattern in Rescued emf2 provides insights into the molecular basis of PcG-mediated growth and development. PMID:22537758

  3. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions. PMID:26616172

  4. High presence/absence gene variability in defense-related gene clusters of Cucumis melo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Changes in the copy number of DNA sequences are one of the main mechanisms generating genome variability in eukaryotes. These changes are often related to phenotypic effects such as genetic disorders or novel pathogen resistance. The increasing availability of genome sequences through the application of next-generation massive sequencing technologies has allowed the study of genomic polymorphisms at both the interspecific and intraspecific levels, thus helping to understand how species adapt to changing environments through genome variability. Results Data on gene presence/absence variation (PAV) in melon was obtained by resequencing a cultivated accession and an old-relative melon variety, and using previously obtained resequencing data from three other melon cultivars, among them DHL92, on which the current draft melon genome sequence is based. A total of 1,697 PAV events were detected, involving 4.4% of the predicted melon gene complement. In all, an average 1.5% of genes were absent from each analyzed cultivar as compared to the DHL92 reference genome. The most populated functional category among the 304 PAV genes of known function was that of stress response proteins (30% of all classified PAVs). Our results suggest that genes from multi-copy families are five times more likely to be affected by PAV than singleton genes. Also, the chance of genes present in the genome in tandem arrays being affected by PAV is double that of isolated genes, with PAV genes tending to be in longer clusters. The highest concentration of PAV events detected in the melon genome was found in a 1.1 Mb region of linkage group V, which also shows the highest density of melon stress-response genes. In particular, this region contains the longest continuous gene-containing PAV sequence so far identified in melon. Conclusions The first genome-wide report of PAV variation among several melon cultivars is presented here. Multi-copy and clustered genes, especially those with

  5. Cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes in human and mouse as annotated in the gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mohamed; Ismael, Siba; Paulsen, Martina; Helms, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes as annotated in the Gene Ontology for human and mouse, we found that imprinted genes are often involved in developmental, transport and regulatory processes. In the human, paternally expressed genes are enriched in GO terms related to the development of organs and of anatomical structures. In the mouse, maternally expressed genes regulate cation transport as well as G-protein signaling processes. Furthermore, we investigated if imprinted genes are regulated by common transcription factors. We identified 25 TF families that showed an enrichment of binding sites in the set of imprinted genes in human and 40 TF families in mouse. In general, maternally and paternally expressed genes are not regulated by different transcription factors. The genes Nnat, Klf14, Blcap, Gnas and Ube3a contribute most to the enrichment of TF families. In the mouse, genes that are maternally expressed in placenta are enriched for AP1 binding sites. In the human, we found that these genes possessed binding sites for both, AP1 and SP1. PMID:23226257

  6. Functional Genomic and Proteomic Analysis Reveals Disruption of Myelin-Related Genes and Translation in a Mouse Model of Early Life Neglect

    PubMed Central

    Bordner, Kelly A.; George, Elizabeth D.; Carlyle, Becky C.; Duque, Alvaro; Kitchen, Robert R.; Lam, TuKiet T.; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Stone, Kathryn L.; Abbott, Thomas B.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Nairn, Angus C.; Simen, Arthur A.

    2011-01-01

    Early life neglect is an important public health problem which can lead to lasting psychological dysfunction. Good animal models are necessary to understand the mechanisms responsible for the behavioral and anatomical pathology that results. We recently described a novel model of early life neglect, maternal separation with early weaning (MSEW), that produces behavioral changes in the mouse that persist into adulthood. To begin to understand the mechanism by which MSEW leads to these changes we applied cDNA microarray, next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq), label-free proteomics, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) proteomics, and methylation analysis to tissue samples obtained from medial prefrontal cortex to determine the molecular changes induced by MSEW that persist into adulthood. The results show that MSEW leads to dysregulation of markers of mature oligodendrocytes and genes involved in protein translation and other categories, an apparent downward biasing of translation, and methylation changes in the promoter regions of selected dysregulated genes. These findings are likely to prove useful in understanding the mechanism by which early life neglect affects brain structure, cognition, and behavior. PMID:21629843

  7. Gene function analysis in osteosarcoma based on microarray gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Jinghua; Tan, Hongyu; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Yilin; Song, Ruipeng; Wang, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Osteosa rcoma is an aggressive malignant neoplasm that exhibits osteoblastic differentiation and produces malignant osteoid. The aim of this study was to find feature genes associated with osteosarcoma and correlative gene functions which can distinguish cancer tissues from non-tumor tissues. Gene expression profile GSE14359 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, including 10 osteosarcoma samples and 2 normal samples. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between osteosarcoma and normal specimens were identified using limma package of R. DAVID was applied to mine osteosarcoma associated genes and analyze the GO enrichment on gene functions and KEGG pathways. Then, corresponding protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs was constructed based on the data collected from STRING datasets. Principal component of top10 DEGs and PPI network of top 20 DEGs were further analyzed. Finally, transcription factors were predicted by uploading the two groups of DEGs to TfactS database. A total of 437 genes, including 114 up-regulated genes and 323 down-regulated genes, were filtered as DEGs, of which 46 were associated with osteosarcoma by Disease Module. GO and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis showed that genes mainly affected the process of immune response and the development of skeletal and vascular system. The PPI network analysis elucidated that hemoglobin and histocompatibility proteins and enzymes, which were associated with immune response, were closely associated with osteosarcoma. Transcription factors MYC and SP1 were predicted to be significantly related to osteosarcoma. The discovery of gene functions and transcription factors has the potential to use in clinic for diagnosis of osteosarcoma in future. In addition, it will pave the way to studying mechanism and effective therapies for osteosarcoma. PMID:26379830

  8. Norrie disease gene: Characterization of deletions and possible function

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.Y.; Battinelli, E.M.; Hendriks, R.W.; Craig, I.W.; Powell, J.F.; Middleton-Price, H.; Sims, K.B.; Breakefield, X.O.

    1993-05-01

    Positional cloning experiments have resulted recently in the isolation of a candidate gene for Norrie disease (pseudoglioma; NDP), a severe X-linked neuro-developmental disorder. Here the authors report the isolation and analysis of human genomic DNA clones encompassing the NDP gene. The gene spans 28 kb and consists of 3 exons, the first of which is entirely contained within the 5{prime} untranslated region. Detailed analysis of genomic deletions in Norrie patients shows that they are heterogeneous, both in size and in position. By PCR analysis, they found that expression of the NDP gene was not confined to the eye or to the brain. An extensive DNA and protein sequence comparison between the human NDP gene and related genes from the database revealed homology with cysteine-rich protein-binding domains of immediate--early genes implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation. They propose that NDP is a molecule related in function to these genes and may be involved in a pathway that regulates neural cell differentiation and proliferation. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Functional gene diversity of oolitic sands from Great Bahama Bank.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M R; Van Norstrand, J D; Eberli, G P; Piggot, A M; Zhou, J; Klaus, J S

    2014-05-01

    Despite the importance of oolitic depositional systems as indicators of climate and reservoirs of inorganic C, little is known about the microbial functional diversity, structure, composition, and potential metabolic processes leading to precipitation of carbonates. To fill this gap, we assess the metabolic gene carriage and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) development in microbial communities associated with oolitic carbonate sediments from the Bahamas Archipelago. Oolitic sediments ranging from high-energy 'active' to lower energy 'non-active' and 'microbially stabilized' environments were examined as they represent contrasting depositional settings, mostly influenced by tidal flows and wave-generated currents. Functional gene analysis, which employed a microarray-based gene technology, detected a total of 12,432 of 95,847 distinct gene probes, including a large number of metabolic processes previously linked to mineral precipitation. Among these, gene-encoding enzymes for denitrification, sulfate reduction, ammonification, and oxygenic/anoxygenic photosynthesis were abundant. In addition, a broad diversity of genes was related to organic carbon degradation, and N2 fixation implying these communities has metabolic plasticity that enables survival under oligotrophic conditions. Differences in functional genes were detected among the environments, with higher diversity associated with non-active and microbially stabilized environments in comparison with the active environment. EPS showed a gradient increase from active to microbially stabilized communities, and when combined with functional gene analysis, which revealed genes encoding EPS-degrading enzymes (chitinases, glucoamylase, amylases), supports a putative role of EPS-mediated microbial calcium carbonate precipitation. We propose that carbonate precipitation in marine oolitic biofilms is spatially and temporally controlled by a complex consortium of microbes with diverse physiologies, including

  10. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-08-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  11. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  12. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  13. Gene analogue finder: a GRID solution for finding functionally analogous gene products

    PubMed Central

    Tulipano, Angelica; Donvito, Giacinto; Licciulli, Flavio; Maggi, Giorgio; Gisel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Background To date more than 2,1 million gene products from more than 100000 different species have been described specifying their function, the processes they are involved in and their cellular localization using a very well defined and structured vocabulary, the gene ontology (GO). Such vast, well defined knowledge opens the possibility of compare gene products at the level of functionality, finding gene products which have a similar function or are involved in similar biological processes without relying on the conventional sequence similarity approach. Comparisons within such a large space of knowledge are highly data and computing intensive. For this reason this project was based upon the use of the computational GRID, a technology offering large computing and storage resources. Results We have developed a tool, GENe AnaloGue FINdEr (ENGINE) that parallelizes the search process and distributes the calculation and data over the computational GRID, splitting the process into many sub-processes and joining the calculation and the data on the same machine and therefore completing the whole search in about 3 days instead of occupying one single machine for more than 5 CPU years. The results of the functional comparison contain potential functional analogues for more than 79000 gene products from the most important species. 46% of the analyzed gene products are well enough described for such an analysis to individuate functional analogues, such as well-known members of the same gene family, or gene products with similar functions which would never have been associated by standard methods. Conclusion ENGINE has produced a list of potential functionally analogous relations between gene products within and between species using, in place of the sequence, the gene description of the GO, thus demonstrating the potential of the GO. However, the current limiting factor is the quality of the associations of many gene products from non-model organisms that often have

  14. The systematic functional characterisation of Xq28 genes prioritises candidate disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Mehrle, Alexander; Bechtel, Stephanie; Simpson, Jeremy C; Kioschis, Petra; Wiemann, Stefan; Wellenreuther, Ruth; Poustka, Annemarie

    2006-01-01

    Background Well known for its gene density and the large number of mapped diseases, the human sub-chromosomal region Xq28 has long been a focus of genome research. Over 40 of approximately 300 X-linked diseases map to this region, and systematic mapping, transcript identification, and mutation analysis has led to the identification of causative genes for 26 of these diseases, leaving another 17 diseases mapped to Xq28, where the causative gene is still unknown. To expedite disease gene identification, we have initiated the functional characterisation of all known Xq28 genes. Results By using a systematic approach, we describe the Xq28 genes by RNA in situ hybridisation and Northern blotting of the mouse orthologs, as well as subcellular localisation and data mining of the human genes. We have developed a relational web-accessible database with comprehensive query options integrating all experimental data. Using this database, we matched gene expression patterns with affected tissues for 16 of the 17 remaining Xq28 linked diseases, where the causative gene is unknown. Conclusion By using this systematic approach, we have prioritised genes in linkage regions of Xq28-mapped diseases to an amenable number for mutational screens. Our database can be queried by any researcher performing highly specified searches including diseases not listed in OMIM or diseases that might be linked to Xq28 in the future. PMID:16503986

  15. Development and Evaluation of Functional Gene Arrays for Detection of Selected Genes in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liyou; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Li, Guangshan; Hurt, Richard A.; Tiedje, James M.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2001-01-01

    To determine the potential of DNA array technology for assessing functional gene diversity and distribution, a prototype microarray was constructed with genes involved in nitrogen cycling: nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK) genes, ammonia mono-oxygenase (amoA) genes, and methane mono-oxygenase (pmoA) genes from pure cultures and those cloned from marine sediments. In experiments using glass slide microarrays, genes possessing less than 80 to 85% sequence identity were differentiated under hybridization conditions of high stringency (65°C). The detection limit for nirS genes was approximately 1 ng of pure genomic DNA and 25 ng of soil community DNA using our optimized protocol. A linear quantitative relationship (r2 = 0.89 to 0.94) was observed between signal intensity and target DNA concentration over a range of 1 to 100 ng for genomic DNA (or genomic DNA equivalent) from both pure cultures and mixed communities. However, the quantitative capacity of microarrays for measuring the relative abundance of targeted genes in complex environmental samples is less clear due to divergent target sequences. Sequence divergence and probe length affected hybridization signal intensity within a certain range of sequence identity and size, respectively. This prototype functional gene array did reveal differences in the apparent distribution of nir and amoA and pmoA gene families in sediment and soil samples. Our results indicate that glass-based microarray hybridization has potential as a tool for revealing functional gene composition in natural microbial communities; however, more work is needed to improve sensitivity and quantitation and to understand the associated issue of specificity. PMID:11722935

  16. Genotype and gene expression associations with immune function in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sackton, Timothy B; Lazzaro, Brian P; Clark, Andrew G

    2010-01-01

    It is now well established that natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster harbor substantial genetic variation associated with physiological measures of immune function. In no case, however, have intermediate measures of immune function, such as transcriptional activity of immune-related genes, been tested as mediators of phenotypic variation in immunity. In this study, we measured bacterial load sustained after infection of D. melanogaster with Serratia marcescens, Providencia rettgeri, Enterococcus faecalis, and Lactococcus lactis in a panel of 94 third-chromosome substitution lines. We also measured transcriptional levels of 329 immune-related genes eight hours after infection with E. faecalis and S. marcescens in lines from the phenotypic tails of the test panel. We genotyped the substitution lines at 137 polymorphic markers distributed across 25 genes in order to test for statistical associations among genotype, bacterial load, and transcriptional dynamics. We find that genetic polymorphisms in the pathogen recognition genes (and particularly in PGRP-LC, GNBP1, and GNBP2) are most significantly associated with variation in bacterial load. We also find that overall transcriptional induction of effector proteins is a significant predictor of bacterial load after infection with E. faecalis, and that a marker upstream of the recognition gene PGRP-SD is statistically associated with variation in both bacterial load and transcriptional induction of effector proteins. These results show that polymorphism in genes near the top of the immune system signaling cascade can have a disproportionate effect on organismal phenotype due to the amplification of minor effects through the cascade. PMID:20066029

  17. GO-based Functional Dissimilarity of Gene Sets

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Gene Ontology (GO) provides a controlled vocabulary for describing the functions of genes and can be used to evaluate the functional coherence of gene sets. Many functional coherence measures consider each pair of gene functions in a set and produce an output based on all pairwise distances. A single gene can encode multiple proteins that may differ in function. For each functionality, other proteins that exhibit the same activity may also participate. Therefore, an identification of the most common function for all of the genes involved in a biological process is important in evaluating the functional similarity of groups of genes and a quantification of functional coherence can helps to clarify the role of a group of genes working together. Results To implement this approach to functional assessment, we present GFD (GO-based Functional Dissimilarity), a novel dissimilarity measure for evaluating groups of genes based on the most relevant functions of the whole set. The measure assigns a numerical value to the gene set for each of the three GO sub-ontologies. Conclusions Results show that GFD performs robustly when applied to gene set of known functionality (extracted from KEGG). It performs particularly well on randomly generated gene sets. An ROC analysis reveals that the performance of GFD in evaluating the functional dissimilarity of gene sets is very satisfactory. A comparative analysis against other functional measures, such as GS2 and those presented by Resnik and Wang, also demonstrates the robustness of GFD. PMID:21884611

  18. Transient transformation meets gene function discovery: the strawberry fruit case

    PubMed Central

    Guidarelli, Michela; Baraldi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Beside the well known nutritional and health benefits, strawberry (Fragaria X ananassa) crop draws increasing attention as plant model system for the Rosaceae family, due to the short generation time, the rapid in vitro regeneration, and to the availability of the genome sequence of F. X ananassa and F. vesca species. In the last years, the use of high-throughput sequence technologies provided large amounts of molecular information on the genes possibly related to several biological processes of this crop. Nevertheless, the function of most genes or gene products is still poorly understood and needs investigation. Transient transformation technology provides a powerful tool to study gene function in vivo, avoiding difficult drawbacks that typically affect the stable transformation protocols, such as transformation efficiency, transformants selection, and regeneration. In this review we provide an overview of the use of transient expression in the investigation of the function of genes important for strawberry fruit development, defense and nutritional properties. The technical aspects related to an efficient use of this technique are described, and the possible impact and application in strawberry crop improvement are discussed. PMID:26124771

  19. Transient transformation meets gene function discovery: the strawberry fruit case.

    PubMed

    Guidarelli, Michela; Baraldi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Beside the well known nutritional and health benefits, strawberry (FragariaXananassa) crop draws increasing attention as plant model system for the Rosaceae family, due to the short generation time, the rapid in vitro regeneration, and to the availability of the genome sequence of F.Xananassa and F. vesca species. In the last years, the use of high-throughput sequence technologies provided large amounts of molecular information on the genes possibly related to several biological processes of this crop. Nevertheless, the function of most genes or gene products is still poorly understood and needs investigation. Transient transformation technology provides a powerful tool to study gene function in vivo, avoiding difficult drawbacks that typically affect the stable transformation protocols, such as transformation efficiency, transformants selection, and regeneration. In this review we provide an overview of the use of transient expression in the investigation of the function of genes important for strawberry fruit development, defense and nutritional properties. The technical aspects related to an efficient use of this technique are described, and the possible impact and application in strawberry crop improvement are discussed. PMID:26124771

  20. [PRRT2 gene-related paroxysmal disorders].

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Mao, Xiao; Wang, Junling; Li, Nan; Tang, Beisha

    2014-10-01

    Proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2), the causative gene of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesias (PKD), benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS) and infantile convulsions with paroxysmal choreoathetosis (ICCA), also causes a variety of neurological paroxysmal disorders. These diseases share the same characteristics which may be due to the same genetic defect. We therefore propose to name them as PRRT2-related paroxysmal disorders (PRPDs) in order to assist clinical diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. This paper has reviewed the clinical phenotype, common features and pathogenesis of the PRPDs. PMID:25297589

  1. Microbial Functional Gene Diversity with a Shift of Subsurface Redox Conditions during In Situ Uranium Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuting; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; N′Guessan, Lucie A.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Deng, Ye; Long, Philip E.; Resch, C. Tom; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Li, Guanghe; Hazen, Terry C.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the microbial functional diversity changes with subsurface redox conditions during in situ uranium bioremediation, key functional genes were studied with GeoChip, a comprehensive functional gene microarray, in field experiments at a uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) site (Rifle, CO). The results indicated that functional microbial communities altered with a shift in the dominant metabolic process, as documented by hierarchical cluster and ordination analyses of all detected functional genes. The abundance of dsrAB genes (dissimilatory sulfite reductase genes) and methane generation-related mcr genes (methyl coenzyme M reductase coding genes) increased when redox conditions shifted from Fe-reducing to sulfate-reducing conditions. The cytochrome genes detected were primarily from Geobacter sp. and decreased with lower subsurface redox conditions. Statistical analysis of environmental parameters and functional genes indicated that acetate, U(VI), and redox potential (Eh) were the most significant geochemical variables linked to microbial functional gene structures, and changes in microbial functional diversity were strongly related to the dominant terminal electron-accepting process following acetate addition. The study indicates that the microbial functional genes clearly reflect the in situ redox conditions and the dominant microbial processes, which in turn influence uranium bioreduction. Microbial functional genes thus could be very useful for tracking microbial community structure and dynamics during bioremediation. PMID:22327592

  2. Physicochemical Evolution and Molecular Adaptation of the Cetacean Osmoregulation-related Gene UT-A2 and Implications for Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingzhen; Yu, Xueying; Hu, Bo; Zheng, Jinsong; Xiao, Wuhan; Hao, Yujiang; Liu, Wenhua; Wang, Ding

    2015-01-01

    Cetaceans have an enigmatic evolutionary history of re-invading aquatic habitats. One of their essential adaptabilities that has enabled this process is their homeostatic strategy adjustment. Here, we investigated the physicochemical evolution and molecular adaptation of the cetacean urea transporter UT-A2, which plays an important role in urine concentration and water homeostasis. First, we cloned UT-A2 from the freshwater Yangtze finless porpoise, after which bioinformatics analyses were conducted based on available datasets (including freshwater baiji and marine toothed and baleen whales) using MEGA, PAML, DataMonkey, TreeSAAP and Consurf. Our findings suggest that the UT-A2 protein shows folding similar to that of dvUT and UT-B, whereas some variations occurred in the functional So and Si regions of the selectivity filter. Additionally, several regions of the cetacean UT-A2 protein have experienced molecular adaptations. We suggest that positive-destabilizing selection could contribute to adaptations by influencing its biochemical and conformational character. The conservation of amino acid residues within the selectivity filter of the urea conduction pore is likely to be necessary for urea conduction, whereas the non-conserved amino acid replacements around the entrance and exit of the conduction pore could potentially affect the activity, which could be interesting target sites for future mutagenesis studies. PMID:25762239

  3. Clock genes, pancreatic function, and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Elaine; Burris, Thomas P; Quesada, Ivan

    2014-12-01

    Circadian physiology is responsible for the temporal regulation of metabolism to optimize energy homeostasis throughout the day. Disturbances in the light/dark cycle, sleep/wake schedule, or feeding/activity behavior can affect the circadian function of the clocks located in the brain and peripheral tissues. These alterations have been associated with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes. Animal models with molecular manipulation of clock genes and genetic studies in humans also support these links. It has been demonstrated that the endocrine pancreas has an intrinsic self-sustained clock, and recent studies have revealed an important role of clock genes in pancreatic β cells, glucose homeostasis, and diabetes. PMID:25457619

  4. Functional gene clustering via gene annotation sentences, MeSH and GO keywords from biomedical literature

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Jeyakumar; Ganapathy, Jawahar

    2007-01-01

    Gene function annotation remains a key challenge in modern biology. This is especially true for high-throughput techniques such as gene expression experiments. Vital information about genes is available electronically from biomedical literature in the form of full texts and abstracts. In addition, various publicly available databases (such as GenBank, Gene Ontology and Entrez) provide access to gene-related information at different levels of biological organization, granularity and data format. This information is being used to assess and interpret the results from high-throughput experiments. To improve keyword extraction for annotational clustering and other types of analyses, we have developed a novel text mining approach, which is based on keywords identified at the level of gene annotation sentences (in particular sentences characterizing biological function) instead of entire abstracts. Further, to improve the expressiveness and usefulness of gene annotation terms, we investigated the combination of sentence-level keywords with terms from the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and Gene Ontology (GO) resources. We find that sentence-level keywords combined with MeSH terms outperforms the typical ‘baseline’ set-up (term frequencies at the level of abstracts) by a significant margin, whereas the addition of GO terms improves matters only marginally. We validated our approach on the basis of a manually annotated corpus of 200 abstracts generated on the basis of 2 cancer categories and 10 genes per category. We applied the method in the context of three sets of differentially expressed genes obtained from pediatric brain tumor samples. This analysis suggests novel interpretations of discovered gene expression patterns. PMID:18305827

  5. All systems GO for understanding mouse gene function

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Chris; Brown, Steve DM

    2004-01-01

    It is widely supposed that the tissue specificity of gene expression indicates gene function. Now, an extensive analysis of gene expression in the mouse reveals that quantitative measurement of expression levels in different tissues can contribute powerfully to the prediction of gene function. PMID:15610553

  6. Elucidating gene function and function evolution through comparison of co-expression networks of plants

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Bjoern O.; Vaid, Neha; Musialak-Lange, Magdalena; Janowski, Marcin; Mutwil, Marek

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of gene expression data has shown that transcriptionally coordinated (co-expressed) genes are often functionally related, enabling scientists to use expression data in gene function prediction. This Focused Review discusses our original paper (Large-scale co-expression approach to dissect secondary cell wall formation across plant species, Frontiers in Plant Science 2:23). In this paper we applied cross-species analysis to co-expression networks of genes involved in cellulose biosynthesis. We showed that the co-expression networks from different species are highly similar, indicating that whole biological pathways are conserved across species. This finding has two important implications. First, the analysis can transfer gene function annotation from well-studied plants, such as Arabidopsis, to other, uncharacterized plant species. As the analysis finds genes that have similar sequence and similar expression pattern across different organisms, functionally equivalent genes can be identified. Second, since co-expression analyses are often noisy, a comparative analysis should have higher performance, as parts of co-expression networks that are conserved are more likely to be functionally relevant. In this Focused Review, we outline the comparative analysis done in the original paper and comment on the recent advances and approaches that allow comparative analyses of co-function networks. We hypothesize that in comparison to simple co-expression analysis, comparative analysis would yield more accurate gene function predictions. Finally, by combining comparative analysis with genomic information of green plants, we propose a possible composition of cellulose biosynthesis machinery during earlier stages of plant evolution. PMID:25191328

  7. Gene Profiling of Mta1 Identifies Novel Gene Targets and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Kumar, Rakesh

    2011-01-01

    Background Metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1), a master dual co-regulatory protein is found to be an integral part of NuRD (Nucleosome Remodeling and Histone Deacetylation) complex, which has indispensable transcriptional regulatory functions via histone deacetylation and chromatin remodeling. Emerging literature establishes MTA1 to be a valid DNA-damage responsive protein with a significant role in maintaining the optimum DNA-repair activity in mammalian cells exposed to genotoxic stress. This DNA-damage responsive function of MTA1 was reported to be a P53-dependent and independent function. Here, we investigate the influence of P53 on gene regulation function of Mta1 to identify novel gene targets and functions of Mta1. Methods Gene expression analysis was performed on five different mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) samples (i) the Mta1 wild type, (ii) Mta1 knock out (iii) Mta1 knock out in which Mta1 was reintroduced (iv) P53 knock out (v) P53 knock out in which Mta1 was over expressed using Affymetrix Mouse Exon 1.0 ST arrays. Further Hierarchical Clustering, Gene Ontology analysis with GO terms satisfying corrected p-value<0.1, and the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis were performed. Finally, RT-qPCR was carried out on selective candidate genes. Significance/Conclusion This study represents a complete genome wide screen for possible target genes of a coregulator, Mta1. The comparative gene profiling of Mta1 wild type, Mta1 knockout and Mta1 re-expression in the Mta1 knockout conditions define “bona fide” Mta1 target genes. Further extensive analyses of the data highlights the influence of P53 on Mta1 gene regulation. In the presence of P53 majority of the genes regulated by Mta1 are related to inflammatory and anti-microbial responses whereas in the absence of P53 the predominant target genes are involved in cancer signaling. Thus, the presented data emphasizes the known functions of Mta1 and serves as a rich resource which could help us identify novel Mta

  8. Inferring gene transcriptional modulatory relations: a genetical genomics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongqiang; Lu, Lu; Manly, Kenneth; Chesler, Elissa J; Bao, Lei; Wang, Jintao; Zhou, Mi; Williams, Robert; Cui, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Bayesian network modeling is a promising approach to define and evaluate gene expression circuits in diverse tissues and cell types under different experimental conditions. The power and practicality of this approach can be improved by restricting the number of potential interactions among genes and by defining causal relations before evaluating posterior probabilities for billions of networks. A newly developed genetical genomics method that combines transcriptome profiling with complex trait analysis now provides strong constraints on network architecture. This method detects those chromosomal intervals responsible for differences in mRNA expression using quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. We have developed an efficient Bayesian approach that exploits the genetical genomics method to focus computational effort on the most plausible gene modulatory networks. We exploit a dense marker map for a genetic reference population (GRP) that consists of 32 BXD strains of mice made by intercrossing two progenitor strains- C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. These progenitors differ at 1.3 million known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), all of which can be exploited to estimate the probability that a gene contains functional polymorphisms that segregate within the GRP. We constructed 66 candidate networks that include all the candidate modulator genes located in the 209 statistically significant trans-acting QTL regions. SNPs that distinguish between the two progenitor strains were used to further winnow the list of candidate modulators. Bayesian network was then used to identify the genetic modulatory relations that best explain the microarray data.

  9. A human TAPBP (TAPASIN)-related gene, TAPBP-R.

    PubMed

    Teng, Michelle S; Stephens, Richard; Du Pasquier, Louis; Freeman, Tom; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Trowsdale, John

    2002-04-01

    TAPASIN, a V-C1 (variable-constant) immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) molecule that links MHC class I molecules to the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is encoded by the TAPBP gene, located near to the MHC at 6p21.3. A related gene was identified at chromosome position 12p13.3 between the CD27 and VAMP1 genes near a group of MHC-paralogous loci. The gene, which we have called TAPBP-R (R for related), also encodes a member of the IgSF, TAPASIN-R. Its putative product contains similar structural motifs to TAPASIN, with some marked differences, especially in the V domain, transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions. By using the mouse ortholog to screen tissue, we revealed that the TAPBP-R gene was broadly expressed. Sub-cellular localization showed that the bulk of TAPASIN-R is located within the ER but biotinylation experiments were consistent with some expression at thecell surface. TAPASIN-R lacks an obvious ER retention signal. The function of TAPASIN-R will be of interest in regards to the evolution of the immune system as well as antigen processing. PMID:11920573

  10. Gain of function mutations for paralogous Hox genes: implications for the evolution of Hox gene function.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, R A; Sreenath, T; Ngo, L; Bieberich, C J

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the functions of paralogous Hox genes, we compared the phenotypic consequences of altering the embryonic patterns of expression of Hoxb-8 and Hoxc-8 in transgenic mice. A comparison of the phenotypic consequences of altered expression of the two paralogs in the axial skeletons of newborns revealed an array of common transformations as well as morphological changes unique to each gene. Divergence of function of the two paralogs was clearly evident in costal derivatives, where increased expression of the two genes affected opposite ends of the ribs. Many of the morphological consequences of expanding the mesodermal domain and magnitude of expression of either gene were atavistic, inducing the transformation of axial skeletal structures from a modern to an earlier evolutionary form. We propose that regional specialization of the vertebral column has been driven by regionalization of Hox gene function and that a major aspect of this evolutionary progression may have been restriction of Hox gene expression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7753831

  11. Warming Alters Expressions of Microbial Functional Genes Important to Ecosystem Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Kai; Xie, Jianping; Zhou, Aifen; Liu, Feifei; Li, Dejun; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Luo, Yiqi; Zhou, Jizhong

    2016-01-01

    Soil microbial communities play critical roles in ecosystem functioning and are likely altered by climate warming. However, so far, little is known about effects of warming on microbial functional gene expressions. Here, we applied functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) to analyze cDNA reversely transcribed from total RNA to assess expressed functional genes in active soil microbial communities after nine years of experimental warming in a tallgrass prairie. Our results showed that warming significantly altered the community wide gene expressions. Specifically, expressed genes for degrading more recalcitrant carbon were stimulated by warming, likely linked to the plant community shift toward more C4 species under warming and to decrease the long-term soil carbon stability. In addition, warming changed expressed genes in labile C degradation and N cycling in different directions (increase and decrease), possibly reflecting the dynamics of labile C and available N pools during sampling. However, the average abundances of expressed genes in phosphorus and sulfur cycling were all increased by warming, implying a stable trend of accelerated P and S processes which might be a mechanism to sustain higher plant growth. Furthermore, the expressed gene composition was closely related to both dynamic (e.g., soil moisture) and stable environmental attributes (e.g., C4 leaf C or N content), indicating that RNA analyses could also capture certain stable trends in the long-term treatment. Overall, this study revealed the importance of elucidating functional gene expressions of soil microbial community in enhancing our understanding of ecosystem responses to warming. PMID:27199978

  12. Analysis of gene functions in Maize chlorotic mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Scheets, Kay

    2016-08-15

    Gene functions of strains of Maize chlorotic mottle virus, which comprises the monotypic genus Machlomovirus, have not been previously identified. In this study mutagenesis of the seven genes encoded in maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV) showed that the genes with positional and sequence similarity to their homologs in viruses of related tombusvirid genera had similar functions. p50 and its readthrough protein p111 are the only proteins required for replication in maize protoplasts, and they function at a low level in trans. Two movement proteins, p7a and p7b, and coat protein, encoded on subgenomic RNA1, are required for cell-to-cell movement in maize, and p7a and p7b function in trans. A unique protein, p31, expressed as a readthrough extension of p7a, is required for efficient systemic infection. The 5' proximal MCMV gene encodes a unique 32kDa protein that is not required for replication or movement. Transcripts lacking p32 expression accumulate to about 1/3 the level of wild type transcripts in protoplasts and produce delayed, mild infections in maize plants. Additional studies on p32, p31 and the unique amino-terminal region of p50 are needed to further characterize the life cycle of this unique tombusvirid. PMID:27242072

  13. Functional Cloning and Characterization of Antibiotic Resistance Genes from the Chicken Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Culture-independent sampling in conjunction with a functional cloning approach identified diverse antibiotic resistance genes for different classes of antibiotics in gut microbiomes from both conventionally raised and free-range chickens. Many of the genes are phylogenetically distant from known resistance genes. Two unique genes that conferred ampicillin and spectinomycin resistance were also functional in Campylobacter, a distant relative of the Escherichia coli host used to generate the genomic libraries. PMID:22286984

  14. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP)

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that manifests as a debilitating headache associated with altered sensory perception. The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is now firmly established as a key player in migraine. Clinical trials carried out during the past decade have proved that CGRP receptor antagonists are effective for treating migraine, and antibodies to the receptor and CGRP are currently under investigation. Despite this progress in the clinical arena, the mechanisms by which CGRP triggers migraine remain uncertain. This review discusses mechanisms whereby CGRP enhances sensitivity to sensory input at multiple levels in both the periphery and central nervous system. Future studies on epistatic and epigenetic regulators of CGRP actions are expected to shed further light on CGRP actions in migraine. In conclusion, targeting CGRP represents an approachable therapeutic strategy for migraine. PMID:25340934

  15. Combinatorial gene regulation by modulation of relative pulse timing

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Sohn, Chang Ho; Dalal, Chiraj K.; Cai, Long; Elowitz, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of individual living cells have revealed that many transcription factors activate in dynamic, and often stochastic, pulses within the same cell. However, it has remained unclear whether cells might modulate the relative timing of these pulses to control gene expression. Here, using quantitative single-cell time-lapse imaging of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the pulsatile transcription factors Msn2 and Mig1 combinatorially regulate their target genes through modulation of their relative pulse timing. The activator Msn2 and repressor Mig1 pulsed in either a temporally overlapping or non-overlapping manner during their transient response to different inputs, with only the non-overlapping dynamics efficiently activating target gene expression. Similarly, under constant environmental conditions, where Msn2 and Mig1 exhibit sporadic pulsing, glucose concentration modulated the temporal overlap between pulses of the two factors. Together, these results reveal a time-based mode of combinatorial gene regulation. Regulation through relative signal timing is common in engineering and neurobiology, and these results suggest that it could also function broadly within the signaling and regulatory systems of the cell. PMID:26466562

  16. Characterization and expression analysis of a Retinoblastoma-related gene from Chinese wild Vitis pseudoreticulata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Retinoblastoma-related (RBR) genes, a conserved gene family in higher eukaryotes, plays an important role in cell differentiation, development and mammalian cell death in animals; however, little is known about its function in plants. In this study, an RBR gene was isolated from the Chinese wild gr...

  17. Characterization of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) spleen transcriptome and identification of immune-related genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance against specific diseases is affecting profitability in fish production systems including rainbow trout. Limited information is known about functions and mechanisms of the immune gene pathways in teleosts. Immunogenomics are powerful tools to determine immune-related genes/gene pathways a...

  18. Genome-Wide Gene Expression in relation to Age in Large Laboratory Cohorts of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Kimberly A.; Gardner, Kylee; Pashaj, Anjeza; Carlson, Darby J.; Yu, Fang; Eudy, James D.; Zhang, Chi; Harshman, Lawrence G.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a complex process characterized by a steady decline in an organism's ability to perform life-sustaining tasks. In the present study, two cages of approximately 12,000 mated Drosophila melanogaster females were used as a source of RNA from individuals sampled frequently as a function of age. A linear model for microarray data method was used for the microarray analysis to adjust for the box effect; it identified 1,581 candidate aging genes. Cluster analyses using a self-organizing map algorithm on the 1,581 significant genes identified gene expression patterns across different ages. Genes involved in immune system function and regulation, chorion assembly and function, and metabolism were all significantly differentially expressed as a function of age. The temporal pattern of data indicated that gene expression related to aging is affected relatively early in life span. In addition, the temporal variance in gene expression in immune function genes was compared to a random set of genes. There was an increase in the variance of gene expression within each cohort, which was not observed in the set of random genes. This observation is compatible with the hypothesis that D. melanogaster immune function genes lose control of gene expression as flies age. PMID:26090231

  19. Relating Phylogenetic and Functional Diversity among Denitrifiers and Quantifying their Capacity to Predict Community Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Joana Falcão; Le Roux, Xavier; Poly, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity of phylogenetic or functional markers is widely used as a proxy of microbial diversity. However, it remains unclear to what extent functional diversity (FD), gene sequence diversity and community functioning are linked. For a range of denitrifying bacteria, we analyzed the relationships between (i) the similarity of functional traits evaluated from metabolic profiles (BIOLOG plates) or from N2O accumulation patterns on different carbon sources and (ii) the similarity of phylogenetic (16S rRNA gene) or functional (nir gene) markers. We also calculated different proxies for the diversity of denitrifier community based on taxa richness, phylogenetic (16S rRNA gene) or functional similarities (based either on metabolic profiles or N2O accumulation patterns), and evaluated their performance in inferring the functioning of assembled denitrifying communities. For individual strains, the variation in the 16S rRNA gene sequence was weakly correlated with the variation in metabolic patterns (ρ = 0.35) and was not related to N2O accumulation. The latter was correlated with the similarity of nitrite reductase residues. When nir genes were analyzed separately, the similarity in amino acids coded by the nirS genes was highly correlated with the observed patterns of N2O accumulation (ρ = 0.62), whereas nirK amino acid residues were unrelated to N2O accumulation. For bacterial assemblages, phylogenetic diversity (average similarity among species in a community) and mean community dissimilarity (average distance between species) calculated using 16S rRNA gene sequences, and FD measures associated with metabolic profiles, poorly predicted the variation in the functioning of assembled communities (≤15%). In contrast, the proxies of FD based on N2O accumulation patterns performed better and explained from 23 to 42% of the variation in denitrification. Amongst those, community niche was the best metric, indicating the importance of complementarity for

  20. Identification of Autophagy in the Pine Wood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and the Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of Two Novel Autophagy-Related Genes, BxATG1 and BxATG8.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li-Na; Wu, Xiao-Qin; Ye, Jian-Ren; Xue, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, causes huge economic losses in pine forests, has a complex life cycle, and shows the remarkable ability to survive under unfavorable and changing environmental conditions. This ability may be related to autophagy, which is still poorly understood in B. xylophilus and no autophagy-related genes have been previously characterized. In this study, transmission electron microscopy was used to confirm that autophagy exists in B. xylophilus. The full-length cDNAs of BxATG1 and BxATG8 were first cloned from B. xylophilus, and BxATG1 and BxATG8 were characterized using bioinformatics methods. The expression pattern of the autophagy marker BxATG8 was investigated using in situ hybridization (ISH). BxATG8 was expressed in esophageal gland and hypodermal seam cells. We tested the effects of RNA interference (RNAi) on BxATG1 and BxATG8. The results revealed that BxATG1 and BxATG8 were likely associated with propagation of nematodes on fungal mats. This study confirmed the molecular characterization and functions of BxATG1 and BxATG8 in B. xylophilus and provided fundamental information between autophagy and B. xylophilus. PMID:26950119

  1. Identification of Autophagy in the Pine Wood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and the Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of Two Novel Autophagy-Related Genes, BxATG1 and BxATG8

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Li-Na; Wu, Xiao-Qin; Ye, Jian-Ren; Xue, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, causes huge economic losses in pine forests, has a complex life cycle, and shows the remarkable ability to survive under unfavorable and changing environmental conditions. This ability may be related to autophagy, which is still poorly understood in B. xylophilus and no autophagy-related genes have been previously characterized. In this study, transmission electron microscopy was used to confirm that autophagy exists in B. xylophilus. The full-length cDNAs of BxATG1 and BxATG8 were first cloned from B. xylophilus, and BxATG1 and BxATG8 were characterized using bioinformatics methods. The expression pattern of the autophagy marker BxATG8 was investigated using in situ hybridization (ISH). BxATG8 was expressed in esophageal gland and hypodermal seam cells. We tested the effects of RNA interference (RNAi) on BxATG1 and BxATG8. The results revealed that BxATG1 and BxATG8 were likely associated with propagation of nematodes on fungal mats. This study confirmed the molecular characterization and functions of BxATG1 and BxATG8 in B. xylophilus and provided fundamental information between autophagy and B. xylophilus. PMID:26950119

  2. Functional Analysis of Prognostic Gene Expression Network Genes in Metastatic Breast Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Thomas R.; Ha, Ngoc-Han; Faraji, Farhoud; Michael, Helen T.; Rodriguez, Loren; Walker, Renard C.; Green, Jeffery E.; Simpson, R. Mark; Hunter, Kent W.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of conserved co-expression networks is a useful tool for clustering groups of genes enriched for common molecular or cellular functions [1]. The relative importance of genes within networks can frequently be inferred by the degree of connectivity, with those displaying high connectivity being significantly more likely to be associated with specific molecular functions [2]. Previously we utilized cross-species network analysis to identify two network modules that were significantly associated with distant metastasis free survival in breast cancer. Here, we validate one of the highly connected genes as a metastasis associated gene. Tpx2, the most highly connected gene within a proliferation network specifically prognostic for estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers, enhances metastatic disease, but in a tumor autonomous, proliferation-independent manner. Histologic analysis suggests instead that variation of TPX2 levels within disseminated tumor cells may influence the transition between dormant to actively proliferating cells in the secondary site. These results support the co-expression network approach for identification of new metastasis-associated genes to provide new information regarding the etiology of breast cancer progression and metastatic disease. PMID:25368990

  3. [Atipical antipsychotics in relation with social functioning].

    PubMed

    Vrdoljak, Marijo; Sesar, Marijan Alfonso; Ivezić, Sladana Strkalj

    2007-01-01

    We studied influence of type of antipsychotics in relation with social functioning in sample of 123 patients diagnozed with schizophrenia accordingto lCD 10 criteria. On atypicals (olanzapin, risperidon, clozapin) were 39 patients, 26 female and 13 male. The social functioning scale according to Bellak et al was used for assessment of social functioning. Results of our study show that there is no difference in social functioning between patients on atypical in comapration with patients on typical antipsychotics. We observed a positive trend of better social functioning in group of patients who takes atypicals. Results also showed that women had better social functioning comparing to males Education and duration of illness were not in relation with social functioning. PMID:18298001

  4. Denoising inferred functional association networks obtained by gene fusion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kamburov, Atanas; Goldovsky, Leon; Freilich, Shiri; Kapazoglou, Aliki; Kunin, Victor; Enright, Anton J; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Ouzounis, Christos A

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene fusion detection – also known as the 'Rosetta Stone' method – involves the identification of fused composite genes in a set of reference genomes, which indicates potential interactions between its un-fused counterpart genes in query genomes. The precision of this method typically improves with an ever-increasing number of reference genomes. Results In order to explore the usefulness and scope of this approach for protein interaction prediction and generate a high-quality, non-redundant set of interacting pairs of proteins across a wide taxonomic range, we have exhaustively performed gene fusion analysis for 184 genomes using an efficient variant of a previously developed protocol. By analyzing interaction graphs and applying a threshold that limits the maximum number of possible interactions within the largest graph components, we show that we can reduce the number of implausible interactions due to the detection of promiscuous domains. With this generally applicable approach, we generate a robust set of over 2 million distinct and testable interactions encompassing 696,894 proteins in 184 species or strains, most of which have never been the subject of high-throughput experimental proteomics. We investigate the cumulative effect of increasing numbers of genomes on the fidelity and quantity of predictions, and show that, for large numbers of genomes, predictions do not become saturated but continue to grow linearly, for the majority of the species. We also examine the percentage of component (and composite) proteins with relation to the number of genes and further validate the functional categories that are highly represented in this robust set of detected genome-wide interactions. Conclusion We illustrate the phylogenetic and functional diversity of gene fusion events across genomes, and their usefulness for accurate prediction of protein interaction and function. PMID:18081932

  5. Influence of Rice Development on the Function of Bacterial Blight Resistance Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance genes most commonly used in breeding programs are single, dominant, resistance (R) genes with relative effectiveness influenced by plant developmental stage. Knowing the developmental stages at which an R gene is functional is important for disease management. In rice, resistanc...

  6. Novel metal resistance genes from microorganisms: a functional metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    González-Pastor, José E; Mirete, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    Most of the known metal resistance mechanisms are based on studies of cultured microorganisms, and the abundant uncultured fraction could be an important source of genes responsible for uncharacterized resistance mechanisms. A functional metagenomic approach was selected to recover metal resistance genes from the rhizosphere microbial community of an acid-mine drainage (AMD)-adapted plant, Erica andevalensis, from Rio Tinto, Spain. A total of 13 nickel resistant clones were isolated and analyzed, encoding hypothetical or conserved hypothetical proteins of uncertain functions, or well-characterized proteins, but not previously reported to be related to nickel resistance. The resistance clones were classified into two groups according to their nickel accumulation properties: those preventing or those favoring metal accumulation. Two clones encoding putative ABC transporter components and a serine O-acetyltransferase were found as representatives of each group, respectively. PMID:20830571

  7. Relating equivalence relations to equivalence relations: A relational framing model of complex human functioning

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Dermot; Hegarty, Neil; Smeets, Paul M.

    1997-01-01

    The current study aimed to develop a behavior-analytic model of analogical reasoning. In Experiments 1 and 2 subjects (adults and children) were trained and tested for the formation of four, three-member equivalence relations using a delayed matching-to-sample procedure. All subjects (Experiments 1 and 2) were exposed to tests that examined relations between equivalence and non-equivalence relations. For example, on an equivalence-equivalence relation test, the complex sample B1/C1 and the two complex comparisons B3/C3 and B3/C4 were used, and on a nonequivalence-nonequivalence relation test the complex sample B1/C2 was presented with the same two comparisons. All subjects consistently related equivalence relations to equivalence relations and nonequivalence relations to nonequivalence relations (e.g., picked B3/C3 in the presence of B1/C1 and picked B3/C4 in the presence of B1/C2). In Experiment 3, the equivalence responding, the equivalence-equivalence responding, and the nonequivalence-nonequivalence responding was successfully brought under contextual control. Finally, it was shown that the contextual cues could function successfully as comparisons, and the complex samples and comparisons could function successfully as contextual cues and samples, respectively. These data extend the equivalence paradigm and contribute to a behaviour-analytic interpretation of analogical reasoning and complex human functioning, in general. PMID:22477120

  8. Large-scale cDNA transfection screening for genes related to cancer development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Dafang; Gong, Yi; Qin, Wenxin; Zhang, Pingping; Li, Jinjun; Wei, Lin; Zhou, Xiaomei; Li, Hongnian; Qiu, Xiaokun; Zhong, Fei; He, Liping; Yu, Jian; Yao, Genfu; Jiang, Huiqiu; Qian, Lianfang; Yu, Ye; Shu, Huiqun; Chen, Xianlian; Xu, Huili; Guo, Minglei; Pan, Zhimei; Chen, Yan; Ge, Chao; Yang, Shengli; Gu, Jianren

    2004-01-01

    A large-scale assay was performed by transfecting 29,910 individual cDNA clones derived from human placenta, fetus, and normal liver tissues into human hepatoma cells and 22,926 cDNA clones into mouse NIH 3T3 cells. Based on the results of colony formation in hepatoma cells and foci formation in NIH 3T3 cells, 3,806 cDNA species (8,237 clones) were found to possess the ability of either stimulating or inhibiting cell growth. Among them, 2,836 (6,958 clones) were known genes, 372 (384 clones) were previously unrecognized genes, and 598 (895 clones) were unigenes of uncharacterized structure and function. A comprehensive analysis of the genes and the potential mechanisms for their involvement in the regulation of cell growth is provided. The genes were classified into four categories: I, genes related to the basic cellular mechanism for growth and survival; II, genes related to the cellular microenvironment; III, genes related to host-cell systemic regulation; and IV, genes of miscellaneous function. The extensive growth-regulatory activity of genes with such highly diversified functions suggests that cancer may be related to multiple levels of cellular and systemic controls. The present assay provides a direct genomewide functional screening method. It offers a better understanding of the basic machinery of oncogenesis, including previously undescribed systemic regulatory mechanisms, and also provides a tool for gene discovery with potential clinical applications. PMID:15498874

  9. PoplarGene: poplar gene network and resource for mining functional information for genes from woody plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Ding, Changjun; Chu, Yanguang; Chen, Jiafei; Zhang, Weixi; Zhang, Bingyu; Huang, Qinjun; Su, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Poplar is not only an important resource for the production of paper, timber and other wood-based products, but it has also emerged as an ideal model system for studying woody plants. To better understand the biological processes underlying various traits in poplar, e.g., wood development, a comprehensive functional gene interaction network is highly needed. Here, we constructed a genome-wide functional gene network for poplar (covering ~70% of the 41,335 poplar genes) and created the network web service PoplarGene, offering comprehensive functional interactions and extensive poplar gene functional annotations. PoplarGene incorporates two network-based gene prioritization algorithms, neighborhood-based prioritization and context-based prioritization, which can be used to perform gene prioritization in a complementary manner. Furthermore, the co-functional information in PoplarGene can be applied to other woody plant proteomes with high efficiency via orthology transfer. In addition to poplar gene sequences, the webserver also accepts Arabidopsis reference gene as input to guide the search for novel candidate functional genes in PoplarGene. We believe that PoplarGene (http://bioinformatics.caf.ac.cn/PoplarGene and http://124.127.201.25/PoplarGene) will greatly benefit the research community, facilitating studies of poplar and other woody plants. PMID:27515999

  10. PoplarGene: poplar gene network and resource for mining functional information for genes from woody plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Ding, Changjun; Chu, Yanguang; Chen, Jiafei; Zhang, Weixi; Zhang, Bingyu; Huang, Qinjun; Su, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Poplar is not only an important resource for the production of paper, timber and other wood-based products, but it has also emerged as an ideal model system for studying woody plants. To better understand the biological processes underlying various traits in poplar, e.g., wood development, a comprehensive functional gene interaction network is highly needed. Here, we constructed a genome-wide functional gene network for poplar (covering ~70% of the 41,335 poplar genes) and created the network web service PoplarGene, offering comprehensive functional interactions and extensive poplar gene functional annotations. PoplarGene incorporates two network-based gene prioritization algorithms, neighborhood-based prioritization and context-based prioritization, which can be used to perform gene prioritization in a complementary manner. Furthermore, the co-functional information in PoplarGene can be applied to other woody plant proteomes with high efficiency via orthology transfer. In addition to poplar gene sequences, the webserver also accepts Arabidopsis reference gene as input to guide the search for novel candidate functional genes in PoplarGene. We believe that PoplarGene (http://bioinformatics.caf.ac.cn/PoplarGene and http://124.127.201.25/PoplarGene) will greatly benefit the research community, facilitating studies of poplar and other woody plants. PMID:27515999

  11. Functional profiling and gene expression analysis of chromosomal copy number alterations

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Lucía; Montaner, David; Burguet-Castell, Jordi; Tárraga, Joaquín; Al-Shahrour, Fátima; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2007-01-01

    Contrarily to the traditional view in which only one or a few key genes were supposed to be the causative factors of diseases, we discuss the importance of considering groups of functionally related genes in the study of pathologies characterised by chromosomal copy number alterations. Recent observations have reported the existence of regions in higher eukaryotic chromosomes (including humans) containing genes of related function that show a high degree of coregulation. Copy number alterations will consequently affect to clusters of functionally related genes, which will be the final causative agents of the diseased phenotype, in many cases. Therefore, we propose that the functional profiling of the regions affected by copy number alterations must be an important aspect to take into account in the understanding of this type of pathologies. To illustrate this, we present an integrated study of DNA copy number variations, gene expression along with the functional profiling of chromosomal regions in a case of multiple myeloma. PMID:17597935

  12. Cloning and characterization of temperature-related gene TRS1.

    PubMed

    Han, X-B; Zhou, X-C; Hu, Z-Y; Zhang, Z-H; Liu, Y-X

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of spermatogenesis arrest derived from heat treatment and to screen temperature-related genes involved in spermatogenesis, the authors analyzed the differences in gene expression between cryptorchid and scrotal testes in rats, and cloned a full-length cDNA named TRS1. In situ hybridization showed that TRS1 mRNA was mainly expressed in spermatocyte and round spermatids in testis. The expression level decreased in cryptorchid testis, suggesting that the lower scrotal temperature is a key factor in keeping the normal expression of TRS1. At the N-terminal of TRS1, there was a plecstrin homology (PH) domain signature. This PH domain has high similarity to that in PEPP2, a homosapien protein, which has a characteristic of binding phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate via its PH domain in vitro. These findings suggest that TRS1 may be important in spermatogenesis and give clues for further research on the function of TRS1. PMID:12137588

  13. Association of tissue lineage and gene expression: conservatively and differentially expressed genes define common and special functions of tissues

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Embryogenesis is the process by which the embryo is formed, develops, and establishes developmental hierarchies of tissues. The recent advance in microarray technology made it possible to investigate the tissue specific patterns of gene expression and their relationship with tissue lineages. This study is focused on how tissue specific functions, tissue lineage, and cell differentiation are correlated, which is essential to understand embryonic development and organism complexity. Results We performed individual gene and gene set based analysis on multiple tissue expression data, in association with the classic topology of mammalian fate maps of embryogenesis. For each sub-group of tissues on the fate map, conservatively, differentially and correlatively expressed genes or gene sets were identified. Tissue distance was found to correlate with gene expression divergence. Tissues of the ectoderm or mesoderm origins from the same segments on the fate map shared more similar expression pattern than those from different origins. Conservatively expressed genes or gene sets define common functions in a tissue group and are related to tissue specific diseases, which is supported by results from Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analysis. Gene expression divergence is larger in certain human tissues than in the mouse homologous tissues. Conclusion The results from tissue lineage and gene expression analysis indicate that common function features of neighbor tissue groups were defined by the conservatively expressed genes and were related to tissue specific diseases, and differentially expressed genes contribute to the functional divergence of tissues. The difference of gene expression divergence in human and mouse homologous tissues reflected the organism complexity, i.e. distinct neural development levels and different body sizes. PMID:21172044

  14. From immunogenetics to immunomics: functional prospecting of genes and transcripts.

    PubMed

    Schönbach, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Human and mouse genome and transcriptome projects have expanded the field of 'immunogenetics' beyond the traditional study of the genetics and evolution of MHC, TCR and Ig loci into the new interdisciplinary area of 'immunomics'. Immunomics is the study of the molecular functions associated with all immune-related coding and non-coding mRNA transcripts. To unravel the function, regulation and diversity of the immunome requires that we identify and correctly categorize all immune-related transcripts. The importance of intercalated genes, antisense transcripts and non-coding RNAs and their potential role in regulation of immune development and function are only just starting to be appreciated. To better understand immune function and regulation, transcriptome projects (e.g. Functional Annotation of the Mouse, FANTOM), that focus on sequencing full-length transcripts from multiple tissue sources, ideally should include specific immune cells (e.g. T cell, B cells, macrophages, dendritic cells) at various states of development, in activated and unactivated states and in different disease contexts. Progress in deciphering immune regulatory networks will require the cooperative efforts of immunologists, immunogeneticists, molecular biologists and bioinformaticians. Although primary sequence analysis remains useful for annotation of new transcripts it is less useful for identifying novel functions of known transcripts in a new context (protein interaction network or pathway). The most efficient approach to mine useful information from the vast a priori knowledge contained in biological databases and the scientific literature, is to use a combination of computational and expert-driven knowledge discovery strategies. This paper will illustrate the challenges posed in attempts to functionally infer transcriptional regulation and interaction of immune-related genes from text and sequence-based data sources. PMID:14712938

  15. Non-functional genes repaired at the RNA level.

    PubMed

    Burger, Gertraud

    2016-01-01

    Genomes and genes continuously evolve. Gene sequences undergo substitutions, deletions or nucleotide insertions; mobile genetic elements invade genomes and interleave in genes; chromosomes break, even within genes, and pieces reseal in reshuffled order. To maintain functional gene products and assure an organism's survival, two principal strategies are used - either repair of the gene itself or of its product. I will introduce common types of gene aberrations and how gene function is restored secondarily, and then focus on systematically fragmented genes found in a poorly studied protist group, the diplonemids. Expression of their broken genes involves restitching of pieces at the RNA-level, and substantial RNA editing, to compensate for point mutations. I will conclude with thoughts on how such a grotesquely unorthodox system may have evolved, and why this group of organisms persists and thrives since tens of millions of years. PMID:27180109

  16. Identification and function analysis of contrary genes in Dupuytren's contracture.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xianglu; Tian, Feng; Tian, Lijie

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the expression of genes involved in Dupuytren's contracture (DC), using bioinformatic methods. The profile of GSE21221 was downloaded from the gene expression ominibus, which included six samples, derived from fibroblasts and six healthy control samples, derived from carpal-tunnel fibroblasts. A Distributed Intrusion Detection System was used in order to identify differentially expressed genes. The term contrary genes is proposed. Contrary genes were the genes that exhibited opposite expression patterns in the positive and negative groups, and likely exhibited opposite functions. These were identified using Coexpress software. Gene ontology (GO) function analysis was conducted for the contrary genes. A network of GO terms was constructed using the reduce and visualize gene ontology database. Significantly expressed genes (801) and contrary genes (98) were screened. A significant association was observed between Chitinase-3-like protein 1 and ten genes in the positive gene set. Positive regulation of transcription and the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-inducing kinase activity exhibited the highest degree values in the network of GO terms. In the present study, the expression of genes involved in the development of DC was analyzed, and the concept of contrary genes proposed. The genes identified in the present study are involved in the positive regulation of transcription and activation of NF-κB-inducing kinase activity. The contrary genes and GO terms identified in the present study may potentially be used for DC diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25760233

  17. Phylogenetic and functional gene structure shifts of the oral microbiomes in periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; He, Jinzhi; He, Zhili; Zhou, Yuan; Yuan, Mengting; Xu, Xin; Sun, Feifei; Liu, Chengcheng; Li, Jiyao; Xie, Wenbo; Deng, Ye; Qin, Yujia; VanNostrand, Joy D; Xiao, Liying; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong; Shi, Wenyuan; Zhou, Xuedong

    2014-01-01

    Determining the composition and function of subgingival dental plaque is crucial to understanding human periodontal health and disease, but it is challenging because of the complexity of the interactions between human microbiomes and human body. Here, we examined the phylogenetic and functional gene differences between periodontal and healthy individuals using MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and a specific functional gene array (a combination of GeoChip 4.0 for biogeochemical processes and HuMiChip 1.0 for human microbiomes). Our analyses indicated that the phylogenetic and functional gene structure of the oral microbiomes were distinctly different between periodontal and healthy groups. Also, 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis indicated that 39 genera were significantly different between healthy and periodontitis groups, and Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas, Treponema, Filifactor, Eubacterium, Tannerella, Hallella, Parvimonas, Peptostreptococcus and Catonella showed higher relative abundances in the periodontitis group. In addition, functional gene array data showed that a lower gene number but higher signal intensity of major genes existed in periodontitis, and a variety of genes involved in virulence factors, amino acid metabolism and glycosaminoglycan and pyrimidine degradation were enriched in periodontitis, suggesting their potential importance in periodontal pathogenesis. However, the genes involved in amino acid synthesis and pyrimidine synthesis exhibited a significantly lower relative abundance compared with healthy group. Overall, this study provides new insights into our understanding of phylogenetic and functional gene structure of subgingival microbial communities of periodontal patients and their importance in pathogenesis of periodontitis. PMID:24671083

  18. AtSUC8 and AtSUC9 encode functional sucrose transporters, but the closely related AtSUC6 and AtSUC7 genes encode aberrant proteins in different Arabidopsis ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Norbert; Ludwig, Andreas; Knoblauch, Alexander; Rothe, Petra; Gahrtz, Manfred; Klebl, Franz

    2004-10-01

    Three members of the Arabidopsis sucrose transporter gene family, AtSUC6-AtSUC8 (At5g43610; At1g66570; At2g14670), share a high degree of sequence homology in their coding regions and even in their introns and in their 5'- and 3'-flanking regions. A fourth sucrose transporter gene, AtSUC9 (At5g06170), which is on the same branch of the AtSUC-phylogenetic tree, shows only slightly less sequence homology. Here we present data demonstrating that two genes from this subgroup, AtSUC6 and AtSUC7, encode aberrant proteins and seem to represent sucrose transporter pseudogenes, whereas AtSUC8 and AtSUC9 encode functional sucrose transporters. These results are based on analyses of splice patterns and polymorphic sites between these genes in different Arabidopsis ecotypes, as well as on functional analyses by cDNA expression in baker's yeast. For one of these genes, AtSUC7 (At1g66570), different, ecotype-specific splice patterns were observed in Wassilewskija (Ws), C24, Columbia wild type (Col-0) and Landsberg erecta (Ler). No incorrect splicing and no sequence polymorphism were detected in the cDNAs of AtSUC8 and AtSUC9, which encode functional sucrose transporters and are expressed in floral tissue. Finally, promoter-reporter gene plants and T-DNA insertion lines were analyzed for AtSUC8 and AtSUC9. PMID:15361146

  19. Using Text Analysis to Identify Functionally Coherent Gene Groups

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Schütze, Hinrich; Altman, Russ B.

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of large-scale genomic information (such as sequence data or expression patterns) frequently involves grouping genes on the basis of common experimental features. Often, as with gene expression clustering, there are too many groups to easily identify the functionally relevant ones. One valuable source of information about gene function is the published literature. We present a method, neighbor divergence, for assessing whether the genes within a group share a common biological function based on their associated scientific literature. The method uses statistical natural language processing techniques to interpret biological text. It requires only a corpus of documents relevant to the genes being studied (e.g., all genes in an organism) and an index connecting the documents to appropriate genes. Given a group of genes, neighbor divergence assigns a numerical score indicating how “functionally coherent” the gene group is from the perspective of the published literature. We evaluate our method by testing its ability to distinguish 19 known functional gene groups from 1900 randomly assembled groups. Neighbor divergence achieves 79% sensitivity at 100% specificity, comparing favorably to other tested methods. We also apply neighbor divergence to previously published gene expression clusters to assess its ability to recognize gene groups that had been manually identified as representative of a common function. PMID:12368251

  20. GeneMesh: a web-based microarray analysis tool for relating differentially expressed genes to MeSH terms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An important objective of DNA microarray-based gene expression experimentation is determining inter-relationships that exist between differentially expressed genes and biological processes, molecular functions, cellular components, signaling pathways, physiologic processes and diseases. Results Here we describe GeneMesh, a web-based program that facilitates analysis of DNA microarray gene expression data. GeneMesh relates genes in a query set to categories available in the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) hierarchical index. The interface enables hypothesis driven relational analysis to a specific MeSH subcategory (e.g., Cardiovascular System, Genetic Processes, Immune System Diseases etc.) or unbiased relational analysis to broader MeSH categories (e.g., Anatomy, Biological Sciences, Disease etc.). Genes found associated with a given MeSH category are dynamically linked to facilitate tabular and graphical depiction of Entrez Gene information, Gene Ontology information, KEGG metabolic pathway diagrams and intermolecular interaction information. Expression intensity values of groups of genes that cluster in relation to a given MeSH category, gene ontology or pathway can be displayed as heat maps of Z score-normalized values. GeneMesh operates on gene expression data derived from a number of commercial microarray platforms including Affymetrix, Agilent and Illumina. Conclusions GeneMesh is a versatile web-based tool for testing and developing new hypotheses through relating genes in a query set (e.g., differentially expressed genes from a DNA microarray experiment) to descriptors making up the hierarchical structure of the National Library of Medicine controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH. The system further enhances the discovery process by providing links between sets of genes associated with a given MeSH category to a rich set of html linked tabular and graphic information including Entrez Gene summaries, gene ontologies, intermolecular interactions

  1. Gene Coexpression Network Analysis as a Source of Functional Annotation for Rice Genes

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Kevin L.; Davidson, Rebecca M.; Buell, C. Robin

    2011-01-01

    With the existence of large publicly available plant gene expression data sets, many groups have undertaken data analyses to construct gene coexpression networks and functionally annotate genes. Often, a large compendium of unrelated or condition-independent expression data is used to construct gene networks. Condition-dependent expression experiments consisting of well-defined conditions/treatments have also been used to create coexpression networks to help examine particular biological processes. Gene networks derived from either condition-dependent or condition-independent data can be difficult to interpret if a large number of genes and connections are present. However, algorithms exist to identify modules of highly connected and biologically relevant genes within coexpression networks. In this study, we have used publicly available rice (Oryza sativa) gene expression data to create gene coexpression networks using both condition-dependent and condition-independent data and have identified gene modules within these networks using the Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analysis method. We compared the number of genes assigned to modules and the biological interpretability of gene coexpression modules to assess the utility of condition-dependent and condition-independent gene coexpression networks. For the purpose of providing functional annotation to rice genes, we found that gene modules identified by coexpression analysis of condition-dependent gene expression experiments to be more useful than gene modules identified by analysis of a condition-independent data set. We have incorporated our results into the MSU Rice Genome Annotation Project database as additional expression-based annotation for 13,537 genes, 2,980 of which lack a functional annotation description. These results provide two new types of functional annotation for our database. Genes in modules are now associated with groups of genes that constitute a collective functional annotation of those

  2. A Comprehensive, CRISPR-based Functional Analysis of Essential Genes in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jason M; Colavin, Alexandre; Shi, Handuo; Czarny, Tomasz L; Larson, Matthew H; Wong, Spencer; Hawkins, John S; Lu, Candy H S; Koo, Byoung-Mo; Marta, Elizabeth; Shiver, Anthony L; Whitehead, Evan H; Weissman, Jonathan S; Brown, Eric D; Qi, Lei S; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gross, Carol A

    2016-06-01

    Essential gene functions underpin the core reactions required for cell viability, but their contributions and relationships are poorly studied in vivo. Using CRISPR interference, we created knockdowns of every essential gene in Bacillus subtilis and probed their phenotypes. Our high-confidence essential gene network, established using chemical genomics, showed extensive interconnections among distantly related processes and identified modes of action for uncharacterized antibiotics. Importantly, mild knockdown of essential gene functions significantly reduced stationary-phase survival without affecting maximal growth rate, suggesting that essential protein levels are set to maximize outgrowth from stationary phase. Finally, high-throughput microscopy indicated that cell morphology is relatively insensitive to mild knockdown but profoundly affected by depletion of gene function, revealing intimate connections between cell growth and shape. Our results provide a framework for systematic investigation of essential gene functions in vivo broadly applicable to diverse microorganisms and amenable to comparative analysis. PMID:27238023

  3. Functional-Network-Based Gene Set Analysis Using Gene-Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Billy; Kustra, Rafal; Tian, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    To account for the functional non-equivalence among a set of genes within a biological pathway when performing gene set analysis, we introduce GOGANPA, a network-based gene set analysis method, which up-weights genes with functions relevant to the gene set of interest. The genes are weighted according to its degree within a genome-scale functional network constructed using the functional annotations available from the gene ontology database. By benchmarking GOGANPA using a well-studied P53 data set and three breast cancer data sets, we will demonstrate the power and reproducibility of our proposed method over traditional unweighted approaches and a competing network-based approach that involves a complex integrated network. GOGANPA’s sole reliance on gene ontology further allows GOGANPA to be widely applicable to the analysis of any gene-ontology-annotated genome. PMID:23418449

  4. Odd-skipped related 2 regulates genes related to proliferation and development

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Shinji; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Amano, Atsuo

    2010-07-23

    Cell proliferation is a biological process in which chromosomes replicate in one cell and equally divide into two daughter cells. Our previous findings suggested that Odd-skipped related 2 (Osr2) plays an important role in cellular quiescence and proliferation under epigenetic regulation. However, the mechanism used by Osr2 to establish and maintain proliferation is unknown. To examine the functional role of Osr2 in cell proliferation, we analyzed its downstream target genes using microarray analysis following adenovirus-induced overexpression of Osr2 as well as knockdown with Osr2 siRNA, which showed that Osr2 regulates a multitude of genes involved in proliferation and the cell cycle, as well as development. Additional proliferation assays also indicated that Osr2 likely functions to elicit cell proliferation. Together, these results suggest that Osr2 plays important roles in proliferation and development.

  5. Circadian rhythm-related genes: implication in autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lebailly, B; Boitard, C; Rogner, U C

    2015-09-01

    Recent gene association and functional studies have proven the implication of several circadian rhythm-related genes in diabetes. Diabetes has been related to variation in central circadian regulation and peripheral oscillation. Different transcriptional regulators have been identified. Circadian genes are clearly implicated in metabolic pathways, pancreatic function and in type 2 diabetes. Much less evidence has been shown for the link between circadian regulation and type 1 diabetes. The hypothesis that circadian genes are involved in type 1 diabetes is reinforced by findings that the immune system undergoes circadian variation and that several autoimmune diseases are associated with circadian genes. Recent findings in the non-obese diabetic mouse model pinpoint to specific mechanisms controlling type 1 diabetes by the clock-related gene Arntl2 in the immune system. PMID:26332978

  6. Transport of Magnesium by a Bacterial Nramp-Related Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Freedman, Benjamin G.; Senger, Ryan S.; Winkler, Wade C.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5–2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

  7. Transport of magnesium by a bacterial Nramp-related gene.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Ho; Wakeman, Catherine A; Goodson, Jonathan R; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Freedman, Benjamin G; Senger, Ryan S; Winkler, Wade C

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (∼0.5-2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

  8. Age-related regulation of genes: slow homeostatic changes and age-dimension technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurachi, Kotoku; Zhang, Kezhong; Huo, Jeffrey; Ameri, Afshin; Kuwahara, Mitsuhiro; Fontaine, Jean-Marc; Yamamoto, Kei; Kurachi, Sumiko

    2002-11-01

    Through systematic studies of pro- and anti-blood coagulation factors, we have determined molecular mechanisms involving two genetic elements, age-related stability element (ASE), GAGGAAG and age-related increase element (AIE), a unique stretch of dinucleotide repeats (AIE). ASE and AIE are essential for age-related patterns of stable and increased gene expression patterns, respectively. Such age-related gene regulatory mechanisms are also critical for explaining homeostasis in various physiological reactions as well as slow homeostatic changes in them. The age-related increase expression of the human factor IX (hFIX) gene requires the presence of both ASE and AIE, which apparently function additively. The anti-coagulant factor protein C (hPC) gene uses an ASE (CAGGAG) to produce age-related stable expression. Both ASE sequences (G/CAGAAG) share consensus sequence of the transcriptional factor PEA-3 element. No other similar sequences, including another PEA-3 consensus sequence, GAGGATG, function in conferring age-related gene regulation. The age-regulatory mechanisms involving ASE and AIE apparently function universally with different genes and across different animal species. These findings have led us to develop a new field of research and applications, which we named “age-dimension technology (ADT)”. ADT has exciting potential for modifying age-related expression of genes as well as associated physiological processes, and developing novel, more effective prophylaxis or treatments for age-related diseases.

  9. Leptin regulates gallbladder genes related to absorption and secretion.

    PubMed

    Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Lu, Debao; Basile, David P; Graewin, Shannon J; Al-Azzawi, Hayder; Kiely, James M; Mathur, Abhishek; Yancey, Kyle; Pitt, Henry A

    2007-07-01

    Dysregulation of gallbladder ion and water absorption and/or secretion has been linked to cholesterol crystal and gallstone formation. We have recently demonstrated that obese, leptin-deficient (Lep(ob)) mice have enlarged gallbladder volumes and decreased gallbladder contractility and that leptin administration to these mice normalizes gallbladder function. However, the effect of leptin on gallbladder absorption/secretion is not known. Therefore, we sought to determine whether leptin would alter the expression of genes involved in water and ion transport across the gallbladder epithelium. Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays representing 39,000 transcripts were used to compare gallbladder gene-expression profiles from 12-wk-old control saline-treated Lep(ob) and from leptin-treated Lep(ob) female mice. Leptin administration to Lep(ob) mice decreased gallbladder volume, bile sodium concentration, and pH. Leptin repletion upregulated the expression of aquaporin 1 water channel by 1.3-fold and downregulated aquaporin 4 by 2.3-fold. A number of genes involved in sodium transport were also influenced by leptin replacement. Epithelial sodium channel-alpha and sodium hydrogen exchangers 1 and 3 were moderately downregulated by 2.0-, 1.6-, and 1.3-fold, respectively. Carbonic anhydrase-IV, which plays a role in the acidification of bile, was upregulated 3.7-fold. In addition, a number of inflammatory cytokines that are known to influence gallbladder epithelial cell absorption and secretion were upregulated. Thus leptin, an adipocyte-derived cytokine involved with satiety and energy balance, influences gallbladder bile volume, sodium, and pH as well as multiple inflammatory cytokine genes and genes related to water, sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate transport. PMID:17463181

  10. Analysis of AVR gene function in pathogenicity and host specificity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the dual functions of avirulence (AVR) genes in triggering resistance and promoting pathogenicity is a first step toward producing durable disease resistance. We continue our characterization of the rice blast AVR-Pita gene and its corresponding resistance gene Pi-ta. AVR-Pita is a me...

  11. Identification of Hub Genes Related to the Recovery Phase of Irradiation Injury by Microarray and Integrated Gene Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Yang, Yue; Wang, Yin; Zhang, Jinyuan; Wang, Zejian; Yin, Ming; Shen, Xudong

    2011-01-01

    Background Irradiation commonly causes long-term bone marrow injury charactertized by defective HSC self-renewal and a decrease in HSC reserve. However, the effect of high-dose IR on global gene expression during bone marrow recovery remains unknown. Methodology Microarray analysis was used to identify differentially expressed genes that are likely to be critical for bone marrow recovery. Multiple bioinformatics analyses were conducted to identify key hub genes, pathways and biological processes. Principal Findings 1) We identified 1302 differentially expressed genes in murine bone marrow at 3, 7, 11 and 21 days after irradiation. Eleven of these genes are known to be HSC self-renewal associated genes, including Adipoq, Ccl3, Ccnd1, Ccnd2, Cdkn1a, Cxcl12, Junb, Pten, Tal1, Thy1 and Tnf; 2) These 1302 differentially expressed genes function in multiple biological processes of immunity, including hematopoiesis and response to stimuli, and cellular processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and signaling; 3) Dynamic Gene Network analysis identified a subgroup of 25 core genes that participate in immune response, regulation of transcription and nucleosome assembly; 4) A comparison of our data with known irradiation-related genes extracted from literature showed 42 genes that matched the results of our microarray analysis, thus demonstrated consistency between studies; 5) Protein-protein interaction network and pathway analyses indicated several essential protein-protein interactions and signaling pathways, including focal adhesion and several immune-related signaling pathways. Conclusions Comparisons to other gene array datasets indicate that global gene expression profiles of irradiation damaged bone marrow show significant differences between injury and recovery phases. Our data suggest that immune response (including hematopoiesis) can be considered as a critical biological process in bone marrow recovery. Several critical hub genes that are

  12. Isolation of tumor suppressor genes from MEN-1 related neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Yavari, R.; Kinder, B.; Bale, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) is a cancer predisposition syndrome marked by the development of tumors in specific endocrine tissues such as the pituitary, parathyroid and pancreatic islets. Genetic linkage studies have mapped the MEN 1 gene to 11q13, and allelic loss in related tumors suggests that the gene is a tumor suppressor. Because inactivation of tumor suppressors may be accompanied by underexpression, subtractive hybridization was used to isolate potential candidate genes underexpressed in MEN 1 tumors. cDNA was synthesized from tumor and normal parathyroid tissue by RT-PCR. Biotinylated tumor cDNA was used as a driver and normal cDNA as a tester in subtractive hybridization. Following annealing of the driver and tester amplicons, the biotinylated strands were removed with streptavidin. The subtracted material was then used as a probe to isolate clones from a normal pancreatic islet library. Screening 2 x 10{sup 5} plaques yielded 14 positive clones. Of 6 clones analyzed, 3 were confirmed to be underexpressed in parathyroid tumors. Sequence analysis identified 2 clones as human ribosomal protein S10 (RPS10, chromosome 6) and 1 as the islet amyloid polypeptide (1AP, chromosome 12). The precise function of human RPS10 is not known but the related RPS6 functions as a tumor suppressor in Drosophila. 1AP has been implicated in modulation of G protein activity. The remaining positive clones will be mapped to determine if any fall on chromosome 11q13, and additional subtractions with parathyroid and pancreatic islet neoplasms are underway.

  13. An efficient RNA interference screening strategy for gene functional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is commonly applied in genome-scale gene functional screens. However, a one-on-one RNAi analysis that targets each gene is cost-ineffective and laborious. Previous studies have indicated that siRNAs can also affect RNAs that are near-perfectly complementary, and this phenomenon has been termed an off-target effect. This phenomenon implies that it is possible to silence several genes simultaneously with a carefully designed siRNA. Results We propose a strategy that is combined with a heuristic algorithm to design suitable siRNAs that can target multiple genes and a group testing method that would reduce the number of required RNAi experiments in a large-scale RNAi analysis. To verify the efficacy of our strategy, we used the Orchid expressed sequence tag data as a case study to screen the putative transcription factors that are involved in plant disease responses. According to our computation, 94 qualified siRNAs were sufficient to examine all of the predicated 229 transcription factors. In addition, among the 94 computer-designed siRNAs, an siRNA that targets both TF15 (a previously identified transcription factor that is involved in the plant disease-response pathway) and TF21 was introduced into orchids. The experimental results showed that this siRNA can simultaneously silence TF15 and TF21, and application of our strategy successfully confirmed that TF15 is involved in plant defense responses. Interestingly, our second-round analysis, which used an siRNA specific to TF21, indicated that TF21 is a previously unidentified transcription factor that is related to plant defense responses. Conclusions Our computational results showed that it is possible to screen all genes with fewer experiments than would be required for the traditional one-on-one RNAi screening. We also verified that our strategy is capable of identifying genes that are involved in a specific phenotype. PMID:22988976

  14. Evolutionary analysis of the jacalin-related lectin family genes in 11 fishes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Lv, Yueqing

    2016-09-01

    Jacalin-related lectins are a type of carbohydrate-binding proteins, which are distributed across a wide variety of organisms and involved in some important biological processes. The evolution of this gene family in fishes is unknown. Here, 47 putative jacalin genes in 11 fish species were identified and divided into 4 groups through phylogenetic analysis. Conserved gene organization and motif distribution existed in each group, suggesting their functional conservation. Some fishes have eleven jacalin genes, while others have only one or zero gene in their genomes, suggesting dynamic changes in the number of jacalin genes during the evolution of fishes. Intragenic recombination played a key role in the evolution of jacalin genes. Synteny analyses of jacalin genes in some fishes implied conserved and dynamic evolution characteristics of this gene family and related genome segments. Moreover, a few functional divergence sites were identified within each group pairs. Divergent expression profiles of the zebra fish jacalin genes were further investigated in different stresses. The results provided a foundation for exploring the characterization of the jacalin genes in fishes and will offer insights for additional functional studies. PMID:27514782

  15. Evolution of new functions de novo and from preexisting genes.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Dan I; Jerlström-Hultqvist, Jon; Näsvall, Joakim

    2015-06-01

    How the enormous structural and functional diversity of new genes and proteins was generated (estimated to be 10(10)-10(12) different proteins in all organisms on earth [Choi I-G, Kim S-H. 2006. Evolution of protein structural classes and protein sequence families. Proc Natl Acad Sci 103: 14056-14061] is a central biological question that has a long and rich history. Extensive work during the last 80 years have shown that new genes that play important roles in lineage-specific phenotypes and adaptation can originate through a multitude of different mechanisms, including duplication, lateral gene transfer, gene fusion/fission, and de novo origination. In this review, we focus on two main processes as generators of new functions: evolution of new genes by duplication and divergence of pre-existing genes and de novo gene origination in which a whole protein-coding gene evolves from a noncoding sequence. PMID:26032716

  16. SNP in starch biosynthesis genes associated with nutritional and functional properties of rice

    PubMed Central

    Kharabian-Masouleh, Ardashir; Waters, Daniel L. E.; Reinke, Russell F.; Ward, Rachelle; Henry, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is a major component of human diets. The relative contribution of variation in the genes of starch biosynthesis to the nutritional and functional properties of the rice was evaluated in a rice breeding population. Sequencing 18 genes involved in starch synthesis in a population of 233 rice breeding lines discovered 66 functional SNPs in exonic regions. Five genes, AGPS2b, Isoamylase1, SPHOL, SSIIb and SSIVb showed no polymorphism. Association analysis found 31 of the SNP were associated with differences in pasting and cooking quality properties of the rice lines. Two genes appear to be the major loci controlling traits under human selection in rice, GBSSI (waxy gene) and SSIIa. GBSSI influenced amylose content and retrogradation. Other genes contributing to retrogradation were GPT1, SSI, BEI and SSIIIa. SSIIa explained much of the variation in cooking characteristics. Other genes had relatively small effects. PMID:22870386

  17. A Genome-Wide Screen Indicates Correlation between Differentiation and Expression of Metabolism Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation. PMID:23717462

  18. Tmc gene therapy restores auditory function in deaf mice.

    PubMed

    Askew, Charles; Rochat, Cylia; Pan, Bifeng; Asai, Yukako; Ahmed, Hena; Child, Erin; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2015-07-01

    Genetic hearing loss accounts for up to 50% of prelingual deafness worldwide, yet there are no biologic treatments currently available. To investigate gene therapy as a potential biologic strategy for restoration of auditory function in patients with genetic hearing loss, we tested a gene augmentation approach in mouse models of genetic deafness. We focused on DFNB7/11 and DFNA36, which are autosomal recessive and dominant deafnesses, respectively, caused by mutations in transmembrane channel-like 1 (TMC1). Mice that carry targeted deletion of Tmc1 or a dominant Tmc1 point mutation, known as Beethoven, are good models for human DFNB7/11 and DFNA36. We screened several adeno-associated viral (AAV) serotypes and promoters and identified AAV2/1 and the chicken β-actin (Cba) promoter as an efficient combination for driving the expression of exogenous Tmc1 in inner hair cells in vivo. Exogenous Tmc1 or its closely related ortholog, Tmc2, were capable of restoring sensory transduction, auditory brainstem responses, and acoustic startle reflexes in otherwise deaf mice, suggesting that gene augmentation with Tmc1 or Tmc2 is well suited for further development as a strategy for restoration of auditory function in deaf patients who carry TMC1 mutations. PMID:26157030

  19. Reconstruction of a Functional Human Gene Network, with an Application for Prioritizing Positional Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Lude; Bakel, Harm van; Fokkens, Like; de Jong, Edwin D.; Egmont-Petersen, Michael; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2006-01-01

    Most common genetic disorders have a complex inheritance and may result from variants in many genes, each contributing only weak effects to the disease. Pinpointing these disease genes within the myriad of susceptibility loci identified in linkage studies is difficult because these loci may contain hundreds of genes. However, in any disorder, most of the disease genes will be involved in only a few different molecular pathways. If we know something about the relationships between the genes, we can assess whether some genes (which may reside in different loci) functionally interact with each other, indicating a joint basis for the disease etiology. There are various repositories of information on pathway relationships. To consolidate this information, we developed a functional human gene network that integrates information on genes and the functional relationships between genes, based on data from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, the Biomolecular Interaction Network Database, Reactome, the Human Protein Reference Database, the Gene Ontology database, predicted protein-protein interactions, human yeast two-hybrid interactions, and microarray coexpressions. We applied this network to interrelate positional candidate genes from different disease loci and then tested 96 heritable disorders for which the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database reported at least three disease genes. Artificial susceptibility loci, each containing 100 genes, were constructed around each disease gene, and we used the network to rank these genes on the basis of their functional interactions. By following up the top five genes per artificial locus, we were able to detect at least one known disease gene in 54% of the loci studied, representing a 2.8-fold increase over random selection. This suggests that our method can significantly reduce the cost and effort of pinpointing true disease genes in analyses of disorders for which numerous loci have been reported but for which

  20. Relations between Prosodic Variables and Communicative Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flax, Judy; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Three children were observed interacting with their mothers before the onset of single words, when vocabulary consisted of 10 words, and when it consisted of 50 words. Relations between communicative functions and acoustic analysis of prosodic variables were studied. Considerable variability was found in the number of rises produced overall and…

  1. Graphical Features of Functional Genes in Human Protein Interaction Network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Chen, Yao; Lü, Jinhu; Wang, Qingyun; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-06-01

    With the completion of the human genome project, it is feasible to investigate large-scale human protein interaction network (HPIN) with complex networks theory. Proteins are encoded by genes. Essential, viable, disease, conserved, housekeeping (HK) and tissue-enriched (TE) genes are functional genes, which are organized and functioned via interaction networks. Based on up-to-date data from various databases or literature, two large-scale HPINs and six subnetworks are constructed. We illustrate that the HPINs and most of the subnetworks are sparse, small-world, scale-free, disassortative and with hierarchical modularity. Among the six subnetworks, essential, disease and HK subnetworks are more densely connected than the others. Statistical analysis on the topological structures of the HPIN reveals that the lethal, the conserved, the HK and the TE genes are with hallmark graphical features. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicate that the essential genes can be distinguished from the viable ones with accuracy as high as almost 70%. Closeness, semi-local and eigenvector centralities can distinguish the HK genes from the TE ones with accuracy around 82%. Furthermore, the Venn diagram, cluster dendgrams and classifications of disease genes reveal that some classes of disease genes are with hallmark graphical features, especially for cancer genes, HK disease genes and TE disease genes. The findings facilitate the identification of some functional genes via topological structures. The investigations shed some light on the characteristics of the compete interactome, which have potential implications in networked medicine and biological network control. PMID:26841412

  2. Land use change alters functional gene diversity, composition and abundance in Amazon forest soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Paula, Fabiana S; Rodrigues, Jorge L M; Zhou, Jizhong; Wu, Liyou; Mueller, Rebecca C; Mirza, Babur S; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Nüsslein, Klaus; Deng, Ye; Tiedje, James M; Pellizari, Vivian H

    2014-06-01

    Land use change in the Amazon rainforest alters the taxonomic structure of soil microbial communities, but whether it alters their functional gene composition is unknown. We used the highly parallel microarray technology GeoChip 4.0, which contains 83,992 probes specific for genes linked nutrient cycling and other processes, to evaluate how the diversity, abundance and similarity of the targeted genes responded to forest-to-pasture conversion. We also evaluated whether these parameters were reestablished with secondary forest growth. A spatially nested scheme was employed to sample a primary forest, two pastures (6 and 38 years old) and a secondary forest. Both pastures had significantly lower microbial functional genes richness and diversity when compared to the primary forest. Gene composition and turnover were also significantly modified with land use change. Edaphic traits associated with soil acidity, iron availability, soil texture and organic matter concentration were correlated with these gene changes. Although primary and secondary forests showed similar functional gene richness and diversity, there were differences in gene composition and turnover, suggesting that community recovery was not complete in the secondary forest. Gene association analysis revealed that response to ecosystem conversion varied significantly across functional gene groups, with genes linked to carbon and nitrogen cycling mostly altered. This study indicates that diversity and abundance of numerous environmentally important genes respond to forest-to-pasture conversion and hence have the potential to affect the related processes at an ecosystem scale. PMID:24806276

  3. BRONCO: Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus for extracting gene-variant-disease-drug relations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyubum; Lee, Sunwon; Park, Sungjoon; Kim, Sunkyu; Kim, Suhkyung; Choi, Kwanghun; Tan, Aik Choon; Kang, Jaewoo

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of genomic variants in a biological context is key for precision medicine. As next-generation sequencing technologies improve, the amount of literature containing genomic variant data, such as new functions or related phenotypes, rapidly increases. Because numerous articles are published every day, it is almost impossible to manually curate all the variant information from the literature. Many researchers focus on creating an improved automated biomedical natural language processing (BioNLP) method that extracts useful variants and their functional information from the literature. However, there is no gold-standard data set that contains texts annotated with variants and their related functions. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus (BRONCO) that contains more than 400 variants and their relations with genes, diseases, drugs and cell lines in the context of cancer and anti-tumor drug screening research. The variants and their relations were manually extracted from 108 full-text articles. BRONCO can be utilized to evaluate and train new methods used for extracting biomedical entity relations from full-text publications, and thus be a valuable resource to the biomedical text mining research community. Using BRONCO, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the performance of three state-of-the-art BioNLP methods. We also identified their shortcomings, and suggested remedies for each method. We implemented post-processing modules for the three BioNLP methods, which improved their performance. Database URL: http://infos.korea.ac.kr/bronco PMID:27074804

  4. BRONCO: Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus for extracting gene-variant-disease-drug relations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyubum; Lee, Sunwon; Park, Sungjoon; Kim, Sunkyu; Kim, Suhkyung; Choi, Kwanghun; Tan, Aik Choon; Kang, Jaewoo

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of genomic variants in a biological context is key for precision medicine. As next-generation sequencing technologies improve, the amount of literature containing genomic variant data, such as new functions or related phenotypes, rapidly increases. Because numerous articles are published every day, it is almost impossible to manually curate all the variant information from the literature. Many researchers focus on creating an improved automated biomedical natural language processing (BioNLP) method that extracts useful variants and their functional information from the literature. However, there is no gold-standard data set that contains texts annotated with variants and their related functions. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus (BRONCO) that contains more than 400 variants and their relations with genes, diseases, drugs and cell lines in the context of cancer and anti-tumor drug screening research. The variants and their relations were manually extracted from 108 full-text articles. BRONCO can be utilized to evaluate and train new methods used for extracting biomedical entity relations from full-text publications, and thus be a valuable resource to the biomedical text mining research community. Using BRONCO, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the performance of three state-of-the-art BioNLP methods. We also identified their shortcomings, and suggested remedies for each method. We implemented post-processing modules for the three BioNLP methods, which improved their performance.Database URL:http://infos.korea.ac.kr/bronco. PMID:27074804

  5. Structure of the mouse calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide alpha and beta genes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P M; Nasonkin, I; Zhang, H; Gagel, R F; Cote, G J

    2001-01-01

    We report the cloning, genomic organization and sequence of the mouse alpha-CALC and beta-CALC genes. The two genes share extensive sequence homology. The transcription units of both genes contain 6 exons. Transcripts of the alpha-CALC gene were found to alternatively include exon 4 or exons 5 and 6. For the beta-CALC gene exon 4 was not detected in transcripts derived from this gene. The predicted mouse alpha-CGRP was found to be identical to rat alpha-CGRP, however, beta-CGRP predicted amino acid sequences revealed three amino acid differences suggesting these residues are not critical to CGRP function. PMID:11761712

  6. Reveal genes functionally associated with ACADS by a network study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yulong; Su, Zhiguang

    2015-09-15

    Establishing a systematic network is aimed at finding essential human gene-gene/gene-disease pathway by means of network inter-connecting patterns and functional annotation analysis. In the present study, we have analyzed functional gene interactions of short-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase gene (ACADS). ACADS plays a vital role in free fatty acid β-oxidation and regulates energy homeostasis. Modules of highly inter-connected genes in disease-specific ACADS network are derived by integrating gene function and protein interaction data. Among the 8 genes in ACADS web retrieved from both STRING and GeneMANIA, ACADS is effectively conjoined with 4 genes including HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1. The functional analysis is done via ontological briefing and candidate disease identification. We observed that the highly efficient-interlinked genes connected with ACADS are HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1. Interestingly, the ontological aspect of genes in the ACADS network reveals that ACADS, HAHDA and HADHB play equally vital roles in fatty acid metabolism. The gene ACAT1 together with ACADS indulges in ketone metabolism. Our computational gene web analysis also predicts potential candidate disease recognition, thus indicating the involvement of ACADS, HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1 not only with lipid metabolism but also with infant death syndrome, skeletal myopathy, acute hepatic encephalopathy, Reye-like syndrome, episodic ketosis, and metabolic acidosis. The current study presents a comprehensible layout of ACADS network, its functional strategies and candidate disease approach associated with ACADS network. PMID:26045367

  7. Relating Stomatal Conductance to Leaf Functional Traits

    PubMed Central

    Kröber, Wenzel; Plath, Isa; Heklau, Heike; Bruelheide, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Leaf functional traits are important because they reflect physiological functions, such as transpiration and carbon assimilation. In particular, morphological leaf traits have the potential to summarize plants strategies in terms of water use efficiency, growth pattern and nutrient use. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) is a recognized framework in functional plant ecology and reflects a gradient of increasing specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen, phosphorus and cation content, and decreasing leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and carbon nitrogen ratio (CN). The LES describes different strategies ranging from that of short-lived leaves with high photosynthetic capacity per leaf mass to long-lived leaves with low mass-based carbon assimilation rates. However, traits that are not included in the LES might provide additional information on the species' physiology, such as those related to stomatal control. Protocols are presented for a wide range of leaf functional traits, including traits of the LES, but also traits that are independent of the LES. In particular, a new method is introduced that relates the plants’ regulatory behavior in stomatal conductance to vapor pressure deficit. The resulting parameters of stomatal regulation can then be compared to the LES and other plant functional traits. The results show that functional leaf traits of the LES were also valid predictors for the parameters of stomatal regulation. For example, leaf carbon concentration was positively related to the vapor pressure deficit (vpd) at the point of inflection and the maximum of the conductance-vpd curve. However, traits that are not included in the LES added information in explaining parameters of stomatal control: the vpd at the point of inflection of the conductance-vpd curve was lower for species with higher stomatal density and higher stomatal index. Overall, stomata and vein traits were more powerful predictors for explaining stomatal regulation than traits used in the LES

  8. HTLV-1 subgroups associated with the risk of HAM/TSP are related to viral and host gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, independent of the transactivation functions of the viral factors.

    PubMed

    Yasuma, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Toshio; Yamano, Yoshihisa; Takashima, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Masao; Saito, Mineki

    2016-08-01

    Among human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected individuals, the risk of developing HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) across lifetime differs between ethnic groups. There is an association between HTLV-1 tax gene subgroups (subgroup-A or subgroup-B) and the risk of HAM/TSP in the Japanese population. In this study, we investigated the full-length proviral genome sequences of various HTLV-1-infected cell lines and patient samples. The functional differences in the viral transcriptional regulators Tax and HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) between each subgroup and the relationships between subgroups and the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HAM/TSP patients were evaluated. The results of these analyses indicated the following: (1) distinct nucleotide substitutions corresponding to each subgroup were associated with nucleotide substitutions in viral structural, regulatory, and accessory genes; (2) the HBZ messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in HTLV-1-infected cells was significantly higher in HAM/TSP patients with subgroup-B than in those with subgroup-A; (3) a positive correlation was observed between the expression of HBZ mRNA and its target Foxp3 mRNA in HAM/TSP patients with subgroup-B, but not in patients with subgroup-A; (4) no clear differences were noted in clinical and laboratory characteristics between HAM/TSP patients with subgroup-A and subgroup-B; and (5) no functional differences were observed in Tax and HBZ between each subgroup based on reporter gene assays. Our results indicate that although different HTLV-1 subgroups are characterized by different patterns of viral and host gene expression in HAM/TSP patients via independent mechanisms of direct transcriptional regulation, these differences do not significantly affect the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HAM/TSP patients. PMID:26635027

  9. Network analysis of EtOH-related candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Guo, An-Yuan; Sun, Jingchun; Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming

    2010-05-01

    Recently, we collected many large-scale datasets for alcohol dependence and EtOH response in five organisms and deposited them in our EtOH-related gene resource database (ERGR, http://bioinfo.mc.vanderbilt.edu/ERGR/). Based on multidimensional evidence among these datasets, we prioritized 57 EtOH-related candidate genes. To explore their biological roles, and the molecular mechanisms of EtOH response and alcohol dependence, we examined the features of these genes by the Gene Ontology (GO) term-enrichment test and network/pathway analysis. Our analysis revealed that these candidate genes were highly enriched in alcohol dependence/alcoholism and highly expressed in brain or liver tissues. All the significantly enriched GO terms were related to neurotransmitter systems or EtOH metabolic processes. Using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis system, we found that these genes were involved in networks of neurological disease, cardiovascular disease, inflammatory response, and small molecular metabolism. Many key genes in signaling pathways were in the central position of these networks. Furthermore, our protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis suggested some novel candidate genes which also had evidence in the ERGR database. This study demonstrated that our candidate gene selection is effective and our network/pathway analysis is useful for uncovering the molecular mechanisms of EtOH response and alcohol dependence. This approach can be applied to study the features of candidate genes of other complex traits/phenotypes. PMID:20491071

  10. Function does not follow form in gene regulatory circuits

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Joshua L.; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulatory circuits are to the cell what arithmetic logic units are to the chip: fundamental components of information processing that map an input onto an output. Gene regulatory circuits come in many different forms, distinct structural configurations that determine who regulates whom. Studies that have focused on the gene expression patterns (functions) of circuits with a given structure (form) have examined just a few structures or gene expression patterns. Here, we use a computational model to exhaustively characterize the gene expression patterns of nearly 17 million three-gene circuits in order to systematically explore the relationship between circuit form and function. Three main conclusions emerge. First, function does not follow form. A circuit of any one structure can have between twelve and nearly thirty thousand distinct gene expression patterns. Second, and conversely, form does not follow function. Most gene expression patterns can be realized by more than one circuit structure. And third, multifunctionality severely constrains circuit form. The number of circuit structures able to drive multiple gene expression patterns decreases rapidly with the number of these patterns. These results indicate that it is generally not possible to infer circuit function from circuit form, or vice versa. PMID:26290154

  11. When natural selection gives gene function the cold shoulder.

    PubMed

    Cutter, Asher D; Jovelin, Richard

    2015-11-01

    It is tempting to invoke organismal selection as perpetually optimizing the function of any given gene. However, natural selection can drive genic functional change without improvement of biochemical activity, even to the extinction of gene activity. Detrimental mutations can creep in owing to linkage with other selectively favored loci. Selection can promote functional degradation, irrespective of genetic drift, when adaptation occurs by loss of gene function. Even stabilizing selection on a trait can lead to divergence of the underlying molecular constituents. Selfish genetic elements can also proliferate independent of any functional benefits to the host genome. Here we review the logic and evidence for these diverse processes acting in genome evolution. This collection of distinct evolutionary phenomena - while operating through easily understandable mechanisms - all contribute to the seemingly counterintuitive notion that maintenance or improvement of a gene's biochemical function sometimes do not determine its evolutionary fate. PMID:26411745

  12. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  13. Biological Functions of the Genes in the Mammaprint Breast Cancer Profile Reflect the Hallmarks of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Sun; Roepman, Paul; van’t Veer, Laura J; Bernards, Rene; de Snoo, Femke; Glas, Annuska M

    2010-01-01

    Background: MammaPrint was developed as a diagnostic tool to predict risk of breast cancer metastasis using the expression of 70 genes. To better understand the tumor biology assessed by MammaPrint, we interpreted the biological functions of the 70-genes and showed how the genes reflect the six hallmarks of cancer as defined by Hanahan and Weinberg. Results: We used a bottom-up system biology approach to elucidate how the cellular processes reflected by the 70-genes work together to regulate tumor activities and progression. The biological functions of the genes were analyzed using literature research and several bioinformatics tools. Protein-protein interaction network analyses indicated that the 70-genes form highly interconnected networks and that their expression levels are regulated by key tumorigenesis related genes such as TP53, RB1, MYC, JUN and CDKN2A. The biological functions of the genes could be associated with the essential steps necessary for tumor progression and metastasis, and cover the six well-defined hallmarks of cancer, reflecting the acquired malignant characteristics of a cancer cell along with tumor progression and metastasis-related biological activities. Conclusion: Genes in the MammaPrint gene signature comprehensively measure the six hallmarks of cancer-related biology. This finding establishes a link between a molecular signature and the underlying molecular mechanisms of tumor cell progression and metastasis. PMID:21151591

  14. Distinct Functions of Egr Gene Family Members in Cognitive Processes

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Roseline; Cheval, Hélène; Mailhes, Caroline; Garel, Sonia; Charnay, Patrick; Davis, Sabrina; Laroche, Serge

    2008-01-01

    The different gene members of the Egr family of transcriptional regulators have often been considered to have related functions in brain, based on their co-expression in many cell-types and structures, the relatively high homology of the translated proteins and their ability to bind to the same consensus DNA binding sequence. Recent research, however, suggest this might not be the case. In this review, we focus on the current understanding of the functional roles of the different Egr family members in learning and memory. We briefly outline evidence from mutant mice that Egr1 is required specifically for the consolidation of long-term memory, while Egr3 is primarily essential for short-term memory. We also review our own recent findings from newly generated forebrain-specific conditional Egr2 mutant mice, which revealed that Egr2, as opposed to Egr1 and Egr3, is dispensable for several forms of learning and memory and on the contrary can act as an inhibitory constraint for certain cognitive functions. The studies reviewed here highlight the fact that Egr family members may have different, and in certain circumstances antagonistic functions in the adult brain. PMID:18982106

  15. [Pathophysiological functions of follistatin related protein].

    PubMed

    Shen, Hua; Liu, Yu-Yang

    2009-10-01

    Follistatin related protein (FRP) is an extra-cellular glycoprotein, involved in several pathological and physiological processes such as cell proliferation, migration, tissue remodeling, embryonic development, and cell-cell interaction. Nowadays researches showed that FRP possesses dual functions, including inhibiting cell apoptosis and inhibiting cell proliferation. In myocardial ischemia model, FRP is certified to have the effect of protecting myocardial cell and inhibiting apoptosis. At the same time FRP promotes endothelial cell proliferation. FRP is also synthesized by vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) to regulate the functions of VSMC via feedback mechanism. FRP can induce apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. In this review, we summarized the up-to-date data to show the structure, functions, mechanisms and regulation pathways of the protein. PMID:21417029

  16. Functional Hypervariability and Gene Diversity of Cardioactive Neuropeptides*

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Carolina; Melaun, Christian; Castillo, Cecilia; Díaz, Mary E.; Renzelman, Chad M.; Estrada, Omar; Kuch, Ulrich; Lokey, Scott; Marí, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) and related peptides are multifunctional regulatory neurohormones found in invertebrates. We isolated a CCAP-related peptide (conoCAP-a, for cone snail CardioActive Peptide) and cloned the cDNA of its precursor from venom of Conus villepinii. The precursor of conoCAP-a encodes for two additional CCAP-like peptides: conoCAP-b and conoCAP-c. This multi-peptide precursor organization is analogous to recently predicted molluscan CCAP-like preprohormones, and suggests a mechanism for the generation of biological diversification without gene amplification. While arthropod CCAP is a cardio-accelerator, we found that conoCAP-a decreases the heart frequency in Drosophila larvae, demonstrating that conoCAP-a and CCAP have opposite effects. Intravenous injection of conoCAP-a in rats caused decreased heart frequency and blood pressure in contrast to the injection of CCAP, which did not elicit any cardiac effect. Perfusion of rat ventricular cardiac myocytes with conoCAP-a decreased systolic calcium, indicating that conoCAP-a cardiac negative inotropic effects might be mediated via impairment of intracellular calcium trafficking. The contrasting cardiac effects of conoCAP-a and CCAP indicate that molluscan CCAP-like peptides have functions that differ from those of their arthropod counterparts. Molluscan CCAP-like peptides sequences, while homologous, differ between taxa and have unique sequences within a species. This relates to the functional hypervariability of these peptides as structure activity relationship studies demonstrate that single amino acids variations strongly affect cardiac activity. The discovery of conoCAPs in cone snail venom emphasizes the significance of their gene plasticity to have mutations as an adaptive evolution in terms of structure, cellular site of expression, and physiological functions. PMID:20923766

  17. Horizontal functional gene transfer from bacteria to fishes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bao-Fa; Li, Tong; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Jia, Ling-Yi; Liu, Li; Zhang, Peng; Murphy, Robert W.; He, Shun-Min; Huang, Da-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Invertebrates can acquire functional genes via horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from bacteria but fishes are not known to do so. We provide the first reliable evidence of one HGT event from marine bacteria to fishes. The HGT appears to have occurred after emergence of the teleosts. The transferred gene is expressed and regulated developmentally. Its successful integration and expression may change the genetic and metabolic repertoire of fishes. In addition, this gene contains conserved domains and similar tertiary structures in fishes and their putative donor bacteria. Thus, it may function similarly in both groups. Evolutionary analyses indicate that it evolved under purifying selection, further indicating its conserved function. We document the first likely case of HGT of functional gene from prokaryote to fishes. This discovery certifies that HGT can influence vertebrate evolution. PMID:26691285

  18. Characterization and Functional Analysis of PEBP Family Genes in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congcong; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Wang, Hantao; Song, Meizhen; Fan, Shuli; Yu, Shuxun

    2016-01-01

    Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is a naturally occurring photoperiod-sensitive perennial plant species. However, sensitivity to the day length was lost during domestication. The phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) gene family, of which three subclades have been identified in angiosperms, functions to promote and suppress flowering in photoperiod pathway. Recent evidence indicates that PEBP family genes play an important role in generating mobile flowering signals. We isolated homologues of the PEBP gene family in upland cotton and examined their regulation and function. Nine PEBP-like genes were cloned and phylogenetic analysis indicated the genes belonged to four subclades (FT, MFT, TFL1 and PEBP). Cotton PEBP-like genes showed distinct expression patterns in relation to different cotton genotypes, photoperiod responsive and cultivar maturity. The GhFT gene expression of a semi-wild race of upland cotton were strongly induced under short day condition, whereas the GhPEBP2 gene expression was induced under long days. We also elucidated that GhFT but not GhPEBP2 interacted with FD-like bZIP transcription factor GhFD and promote flowering under both long- and short-day conditions. The present result indicated that GhPEBP-like genes may perform different functions. This work corroborates the involvement of PEBP-like genes in photoperiod response and regulation of flowering time in different cotton genotypes, and contributes to an improved understanding of the function of PEBP-like genes in cotton. PMID:27552108

  19. Characterization and Functional Analysis of PEBP Family Genes in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Congcong; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Wang, Hantao; Song, Meizhen; Fan, Shuli; Yu, Shuxun

    2016-01-01

    Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is a naturally occurring photoperiod-sensitive perennial plant species. However, sensitivity to the day length was lost during domestication. The phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) gene family, of which three subclades have been identified in angiosperms, functions to promote and suppress flowering in photoperiod pathway. Recent evidence indicates that PEBP family genes play an important role in generating mobile flowering signals. We isolated homologues of the PEBP gene family in upland cotton and examined their regulation and function. Nine PEBP-like genes were cloned and phylogenetic analysis indicated the genes belonged to four subclades (FT, MFT, TFL1 and PEBP). Cotton PEBP-like genes showed distinct expression patterns in relation to different cotton genotypes, photoperiod responsive and cultivar maturity. The GhFT gene expression of a semi-wild race of upland cotton were strongly induced under short day condition, whereas the GhPEBP2 gene expression was induced under long days. We also elucidated that GhFT but not GhPEBP2 interacted with FD-like bZIP transcription factor GhFD and promote flowering under both long- and short-day conditions. The present result indicated that GhPEBP-like genes may perform different functions. This work corroborates the involvement of PEBP-like genes in photoperiod response and regulation of flowering time in different cotton genotypes, and contributes to an improved understanding of the function of PEBP-like genes in cotton. PMID:27552108

  20. Myelination-related genes are associated with decreased white matter integrity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chavarria-Siles, Ivan; White, Tonya; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Goudriaan, Andrea; Lips, Esther; Ehrlich, Stefan; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D; Gollub, Randy L; Magnotta, Vincent A; Ho, Beng-Choon; Smit, August B; Verheijen, Mark H G; Posthuma, Danielle

    2016-03-01

    Disruptions in white matter (WM) tract structures have been implicated consistently in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Global WM integrity--as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA)--is highly heritable and may provide a good endophenotype for genetic studies of schizophrenia. WM abnormalities in schizophrenia are not localized to one specific brain region but instead reflect global low-level decreases in FA coupled with focal abnormalities. In this study, we sought to investigate whether functional gene sets associated with schizophrenia are also associated with WM integrity. We analyzed FA and genetic data from the Mind Research Network Clinical Imaging Consortium to study the effect of multiple oligodendrocyte gene sets on schizophrenia and WM integrity using a functional gene set analysis in 77 subjects with schizophrenia and 104 healthy controls. We found that a gene set involved in myelination was significantly associated with schizophrenia and FA. This gene set includes 17 genes that are expressed in oligodendrocytes and one neuronal gene (NRG1) that is known to regulate myelination. None of the genes within the gene set were associated with schizophrenia or FA individually, suggesting that no single gene was driving the association of the gene set. Our findings support the hypothesis that multiple genetic variants in myelination-related genes contribute to the observed correlation between schizophrenia and decreased WM integrity as measured by FA. PMID:26014434

  1. Evolutionary Fates and Dynamic Functionalization of Young Duplicate Genes in Arabidopsis Genomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Tao, Feng; Marowsky, Nicholas C; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2016-09-01

    Gene duplication is a primary means to generate genomic novelties, playing an essential role in speciation and adaptation. Particularly in plants, a high abundance of duplicate genes has been maintained for significantly long periods of evolutionary time. To address the manner in which young duplicate genes were derived primarily from small-scale gene duplication and preserved in plant genomes and to determine the underlying driving mechanisms, we generated transcriptomes to produce the expression profiles of five tissues in Arabidopsis thaliana and the closely related species Arabidopsis lyrata and Capsella rubella Based on the quantitative analysis metrics, we investigated the evolutionary processes of young duplicate genes in Arabidopsis. We determined that conservation, neofunctionalization, and specialization are three main evolutionary processes for Arabidopsis young duplicate genes. We explicitly demonstrated the dynamic functionalization of duplicate genes along the evolutionary time scale. Upon origination, duplicates tend to maintain their ancestral functions; but as they survive longer, they might be likely to develop distinct and novel functions. The temporal evolutionary processes and functionalization of plant duplicate genes are associated with their ancestral functions, dynamic DNA methylation levels, and histone modification abundances. Furthermore, duplicate genes tend to be initially expressed in pollen and then to gain more interaction partners over time. Altogether, our study provides novel insights into the dynamic retention processes of young duplicate genes in plant genomes. PMID:27485883

  2. Saliva microbiota carry caries-specific functional gene signatures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Ning, Kang; Chang, Xingzhi; Yuan, Xiao; Tu, Qichao; Yuan, Tong; Deng, Ye; Hemme, Christopher L; Van Nostrand, Joy; Cui, Xinping; He, Zhili; Chen, Zhenggang; Guo, Dawei; Yu, Jiangbo; Zhang, Yue; Zhou, Jizhong; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Human saliva microbiota is phylogenetically divergent among host individuals yet their roles in health and disease are poorly appreciated. We employed a microbial functional gene microarray, HuMiChip 1.0, to reconstruct the global functional profiles of human saliva microbiota from ten healthy and ten caries-active adults. Saliva microbiota in the pilot population featured a vast diversity of functional genes. No significant distinction in gene number or diversity indices was observed between healthy and caries-active microbiota. However, co-presence network analysis of functional genes revealed that caries-active microbiota was more divergent in non-core genes than healthy microbiota, despite both groups exhibited a similar degree of conservation at their respective core genes. Furthermore, functional gene structure of saliva microbiota could potentially distinguish caries-active patients from healthy hosts. Microbial functions such as Diaminopimelate epimerase, Prephenate dehydrogenase, Pyruvate-formate lyase and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase were significantly linked to caries. Therefore, saliva microbiota carried disease-associated functional signatures, which could be potentially exploited for caries diagnosis. PMID:24533043

  3. Saliva Microbiota Carry Caries-Specific Functional Gene Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xingzhi; Yuan, Xiao; Tu, Qichao; Yuan, Tong; Deng, Ye; Hemme, Christopher L.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Cui, Xinping; He, Zhili; Chen, Zhenggang; Guo, Dawei; Yu, Jiangbo; Zhang, Yue; Zhou, Jizhong; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Human saliva microbiota is phylogenetically divergent among host individuals yet their roles in health and disease are poorly appreciated. We employed a microbial functional gene microarray, HuMiChip 1.0, to reconstruct the global functional profiles of human saliva microbiota from ten healthy and ten caries-active adults. Saliva microbiota in the pilot population featured a vast diversity of functional genes. No significant distinction in gene number or diversity indices was observed between healthy and caries-active microbiota. However, co-presence network analysis of functional genes revealed that caries-active microbiota was more divergent in non-core genes than healthy microbiota, despite both groups exhibited a similar degree of conservation at their respective core genes. Furthermore, functional gene structure of saliva microbiota could potentially distinguish caries-active patients from healthy hosts. Microbial functions such as Diaminopimelate epimerase, Prephenate dehydrogenase, Pyruvate-formate lyase and N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase were significantly linked to caries. Therefore, saliva microbiota carried disease-associated functional signatures, which could be potentially exploited for caries diagnosis. PMID:24533043

  4. Quantitative analysis of gene function in the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed Central

    Tracey, W D; Ning, X; Klingler, M; Kramer, S G; Gergen, J P

    2000-01-01

    The specific functions of gene products frequently depend on the developmental context in which they are expressed. Thus, studies on gene function will benefit from systems that allow for manipulation of gene expression within model systems where the developmental context is well defined. Here we describe a system that allows for genetically controlled overexpression of any gene of interest under normal physiological conditions in the early Drosophila embryo. This regulated expression is achieved through the use of Drosophila lines that express a maternal mRNA for the yeast transcription factor GAL4. Embryos derived from females that express GAL4 maternally activate GAL4-dependent UAS transgenes at uniform levels throughout the embryo during the blastoderm stage of embryogenesis. The expression levels can be quantitatively manipulated through the use of lines that have different levels of maternal GAL4 activity. Specific phenotypes are produced by expression of a number of different developmental regulators with this system, including genes that normally do not function during Drosophila embryogenesis. Analysis of the response to overexpression of runt provides evidence that this pair-rule segmentation gene has a direct role in repressing transcription of the segment-polarity gene engrailed. The maternal GAL4 system will have applications both for the measurement of gene activity in reverse genetic experiments as well as for the identification of genetic factors that have quantitative effects on gene function in vivo. PMID:10628987

  5. Identification of Immunity Related Genes to Study the Physalis peruviana – Fusarium oxysporum Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E.; González, Carolina; Rodríguez, Edwin A.; López, Camilo E.; Landsman, David; Barrero, Luz Stella; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    The Cape gooseberry (Physalisperuviana L) is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercosporaphysalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site), CC (Coiled-Coil), TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor). We identified 74 immunity related gene candidates in P. peruviana which have the typical resistance gene (R-gene) architecture, 17 Receptor like kinase (RLKs) candidates related to PAMP-Triggered Immunity (PTI), eight (TIR-NBS-LRR, or TNL) and nine (CC–NBS-LRR, or CNL) candidates related to Effector-Triggered Immunity (ETI) genes among others. These candidate genes were categorized by molecular function (98%), biological process (85%) and cellular component (79%) using gene ontology. Some of the most interesting predicted roles were those associated with binding and transferase activity. We designed 94 primers pairs from the 74 immunity-related genes (IRGs) to amplify the corresponding genomic regions on six genotypes that included resistant and susceptible materials. From these, we selected 17 single band amplicons and sequenced them in 14 F. oxysporum resistant and susceptible genotypes. Sequence polymorphisms were analyzed through preliminary candidate gene association, which allowed the detection of one SNP at the PpIRG-63 marker revealing a nonsynonymous mutation in the predicted LRR domain suggesting functional roles for resistance. PMID:23844210

  6. Identification of immunity related genes to study the Physalis peruviana--Fusarium oxysporum pathosystem.

    PubMed

    Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E; González, Carolina; Rodríguez, Edwin A; López, Camilo E; Landsman, David; Barrero, Luz Stella; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    The Cape gooseberry (Physalisperuviana L) is an Andean exotic fruit with high nutritional value and appealing medicinal properties. However, its cultivation faces important phytosanitary problems mainly due to pathogens like Fusarium oxysporum, Cercosporaphysalidis and Alternaria spp. Here we used the Cape gooseberry foliar transcriptome to search for proteins that encode conserved domains related to plant immunity including: NBS (Nucleotide Binding Site), CC (Coiled-Coil), TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor). We identified 74 immunity related gene candidates in P. peruviana which have the typical resistance gene (R-gene) architecture, 17 Receptor like kinase (RLKs) candidates related to PAMP-Triggered Immunity (PTI), eight (TIR-NBS-LRR, or TNL) and nine (CC-NBS-LRR, or CNL) candidates related to Effector-Triggered Immunity (ETI) genes among others. These candidate genes were categorized by molecular function (98%), biological process (85%) and cellular component (79%) using gene ontology. Some of the most interesting predicted roles were those associated with binding and transferase activity. We designed 94 primers pairs from the 74 immunity-related genes (IRGs) to amplify the corresponding genomic regions on six genotypes that included resistant and susceptible materials. From these, we selected 17 single band amplicons and sequenced them in 14 F. oxysporum resistant and susceptible genotypes. Sequence polymorphisms were analyzed through preliminary candidate gene association, which allowed the detection of one SNP at the PpIRG-63 marker revealing a nonsynonymous mutation in the predicted LRR domain suggesting functional roles for resistance. PMID:23844210

  7. A metabolic gene cluster in Lotus japonicus discloses novel enzyme functions and products in triterpene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Krokida, Afrodite; Delis, Costas; Geisler, Katrin; Garagounis, Constantine; Tsikou, Daniela; Peña-Rodríguez, Luis M; Katsarou, Dimitra; Field, Ben; Osbourn, Anne E; Papadopoulou, Kalliope K

    2013-11-01

    Genes for triterpene biosynthetic pathways exist as metabolic gene clusters in oat and Arabidopsis thaliana plants. We characterized the presence of an analogous gene cluster in the model legume Lotus japonicus. In the genomic regions flanking the oxidosqualene cyclase AMY2 gene, genes for two different classes of cytochrome P450 and a gene predicted to encode a reductase were identified. Functional characterization of the cluster genes was pursued by heterologous expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The gene expression pattern was studied under different developmental and environmental conditions. The physiological role of the gene cluster in nodulation and plant development was studied in knockdown experiments. A novel triterpene structure, dihydrolupeol, was produced by AMY2. A new plant cytochrome P450, CYP71D353, which catalyses the formation of 20-hydroxybetulinic acid in a sequential three-step oxidation of 20-hydroxylupeol was characterized. The genes within the cluster are highly co-expressed during root and nodule development, in hormone-treated plants and under various environmental stresses. A transcriptional gene silencing mechanism that appears to be involved in the regulation of the cluster genes was also revealed. A tightly co-regulated cluster of functionally related genes is involved in legume triterpene biosynthesis, with a possible role in plant development. PMID:23909862

  8. Characterizing Milk Production Related Genes in Holstein Using RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Seo, Minseok; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Kwondo; Caetano-Anolles, Kelsey; Jeong, Jin Young; Park, Sungkwon; Oh, Young Kyun; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal

    2016-03-01

    Although the chemical, physical, and nutritional properties of bovine milk have been extensively studied, only a few studies have attempted to characterize milk-synthesizing genes using RNA-seq data. RNA-seq data was collected from 21 Holstein samples, along with group information about milk production ability; milk yield; and protein, fat, and solid contents. Meta-analysis was employed in order to generally characterize genes related to milk production. In addition, we attempted to investigate the relationship between milk related traits, parity, and lactation period. We observed that milk fat is highly correlated with lactation period; this result indicates that this effect should be considered in the model in order to accurately detect milk production related genes. By employing our developed model, 271 genes were significantly (false discovery rate [FDR] adjusted p-value<0.1) detected as milk production related differentially expressed genes. Of these genes, five (albumin, nitric oxide synthase 3, RNA-binding region (RNP1, RRM) containing 3, secreted and transmembrane 1, and serine palmitoyltransferase, small subunit B) were technically validated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in order to check the accuracy of RNA-seq analysis. Finally, 83 gene ontology biological processes including several blood vessel and mammary gland development related terms, were significantly detected using DAVID gene-set enrichment analysis. From these results, we observed that detected milk production related genes are highly enriched in the circulation system process and mammary gland related biological functions. In addition, we observed that detected genes including caveolin 1, mammary serum amyloid A3.2, lingual antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin 4 (CATHL4), cathelicidin 6 (CATHL6) have been reported in other species as milk production related gene. For this reason, we concluded that our detected 271 genes would be strong candidates for

  9. Characterizing Milk Production Related Genes in Holstein Using RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minseok; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Kwondo; Caetano-Anolles, Kelsey; Jeong, Jin Young; Park, Sungkwon; Oh, Young Kyun; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal

    2016-01-01

    Although the chemical, physical, and nutritional properties of bovine milk have been extensively studied, only a few studies have attempted to characterize milk-synthesizing genes using RNA-seq data. RNA-seq data was collected from 21 Holstein samples, along with group information about milk production ability; milk yield; and protein, fat, and solid contents. Meta-analysis was employed in order to generally characterize genes related to milk production. In addition, we attempted to investigate the relationship between milk related traits, parity, and lactation period. We observed that milk fat is highly correlated with lactation period; this result indicates that this effect should be considered in the model in order to accurately detect milk production related genes. By employing our developed model, 271 genes were significantly (false discovery rate [FDR] adjusted p-value<0.1) detected as milk production related differentially expressed genes. Of these genes, five (albumin, nitric oxide synthase 3, RNA-binding region (RNP1, RRM) containing 3, secreted and transmembrane 1, and serine palmitoyltransferase, small subunit B) were technically validated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in order to check the accuracy of RNA-seq analysis. Finally, 83 gene ontology biological processes including several blood vessel and mammary gland development related terms, were significantly detected using DAVID gene-set enrichment analysis. From these results, we observed that detected milk production related genes are highly enriched in the circulation system process and mammary gland related biological functions. In addition, we observed that detected genes including caveolin 1, mammary serum amyloid A3.2, lingual antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin 4 (CATHL4), cathelicidin 6 (CATHL6) have been reported in other species as milk production related gene. For this reason, we concluded that our detected 271 genes would be strong candidates for

  10. Incorporating Functional Gene Quantification into Traditional Decomposition Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd-Brown, K. E.; Zhou, J.; Yin, H.; Wu, L.; Tiedje, J. M.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Konstantinidis, K.; Luo, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Incorporating new genetic quantification measurements into traditional substrate pool models represents a substantial challenge. These decomposition models are built around the idea that substrate availablity, with environmental drivers, limit carbon dioxide respiration rates. In this paradigm, microbial communities optimally adapt to a given substrate and environment on much shorter time scales then the carbon flux of interest. By characterizing the relative shift in biomass of these microbial communities, we informed previously poorly constrained parameters in traditional decomposition models. In this study we coupled a 9 month laboratory incubation study with quantitative gene measurements with traditional CO2 flux measurements plus initial soil organic carbon quantification. GeoChip 5.0 was used to quantify the functional genes associated with carbon cycling at 2 weeks, 3 months and 9 months. We then combined the genes which 'collapsed' over the experiment and assumed that this tracked the relative change in the biomass associated with the 'fast' pool. We further assumed that this biomass was proportional to the 'fast' SOC pool and thus were able to constrain the relative change in the fast SOC pool in our 3-pool decomposition model. We found that biomass quantification described above, combined with traditional CO2 flux and SOC measurements, improve the transfer coefficient estimation in traditional decomposition models. Transfer coefficients are very difficult to characterized using traditional CO2 flux measurements, thus DNA quantification provides new and significant information about the system. Over a 100 year simulation, these new biologically informed parameters resulted in an additional 10% of SOC loss over the traditionally informed parameters.

  11. [Fish growth-hormone genes: functionality evidence of paralogous genes in Levanidov's charr].

    PubMed

    Kamenskaya, D N; Pankova, M V; Atopkin, D M; Brykov, V A

    2015-01-01

    In the genome of most vertebrates growth-hormone gene is presented in a single copy, while in salmonids after one of the duplication events many genes were multiplied, including growth hormone gene. In salmonids, the growth-hormone gene exists as two independently inherited functional paralogues, gh1 and gh2. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis of gh1 and gh2 growth-hormone genes and their adjacent sequences in Levanidov's charr Salvelinus levanidovi to determine their functionality and define the potential differences. We found that both genes have the same gene structure and are composed of six exons (I-VI) and five introns (A, B, C, D, E). However, the respective gene sequences differ in length. A comparison of exons showed that the size of each exon is identical in both paralogues. The overall length of genes differs due to the varying lengths of introns. Coding sequence of both genes contains an open reading frame for 210 amino acids. We identified regulatory elements in the promoter region of both genes: TATA box, A/T-rich regions that contain binding sites for pituitary-specific transcriptional activator Pit-1, and regions responsible for interaction with other transcriptional activators and initiators, in particular hormone receptors. The obtained data indicate that both genes are functional. PMID:26510594

  12. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Russell, F. A.; King, R.; Smillie, S.-J.; Kodji, X.; Brain, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino acid neuropeptide. Discovered 30 years ago, it is produced as a consequence of alternative RNA processing of the calcitonin gene. CGRP has two major forms (α and β). It belongs to a group of peptides that all act on an unusual receptor family. These receptors consist of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) linked to an essential receptor activity modifying protein (RAMP) that is necessary for full functionality. CGRP is a highly potent vasodilator and, partly as a consequence, possesses protective mechanisms that are important for physiological and pathological conditions involving the cardiovascular system and wound healing. CGRP is primarily released from sensory nerves and thus is implicated in pain pathways. The proven ability of CGRP antagonists to alleviate migraine has been of most interest in terms of drug development, and knowledge to date concerning this potential therapeutic area is discussed. Other areas covered, where there is less information known on CGRP, include arthritis, skin conditions, diabetes, and obesity. It is concluded that CGRP is an important peptide in mammalian biology, but it is too early at present to know if new medicines for disease treatment will emerge from our knowledge concerning this molecule. PMID:25287861

  13. RNA interference can be used to disrupt gene function in tardigrades

    PubMed Central

    Tenlen, Jennifer R.; McCaskill, Shaina; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    How morphological diversity arises is a key question in evolutionary developmental biology. As a long-term approach to address this question, we are developing the water bear Hypsibius dujardini (Phylum Tardigrada) as a model system. We expect that using a close relative of two well-studied models, Drosophila (Phylum Arthropoda) and Caenorhabditis elegans (Phylum Nematoda), will facilitate identifying genetic pathways relevant to understanding the evolution of development. Tardigrades are also valuable research subjects for investigating how organisms and biological materials can survive extreme conditions. Methods to disrupt gene activity are essential to each of these efforts, but no such method yet exists for the Phylum Tardigrada. We developed a protocol to disrupt tardigrade gene functions by double-stranded RNA-mediated RNA interference (RNAi). We show that targeting tardigrade homologs of essential developmental genes by RNAi produced embryonic lethality, whereas targeting green fluorescent protein did not. Disruption of gene functions appears to be relatively specific by two criteria: targeting distinct genes resulted in distinct phenotypes that were consistent with predicted gene functions, and by RT-PCR, RNAi reduced the level of a target mRNA and not a control mRNA. These studies represent the first evidence that gene functions can be disrupted by RNAi in the phylum Tardigrada. Our results form a platform for dissecting tardigrade gene functions for understanding the evolution of developmental mechanisms and survival in extreme environments. PMID:23187800

  14. Spaceflight effects on T lymphocyte distribution, function and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Gridley, Daila S.; Slater, James M.; Luo-Owen, Xian; Rizvi, Asma; Chapes, Stephen K.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Pecaut, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The immune system is highly sensitive to stressors present during spaceflight. The major emphasis of this study was on the T lymphocytes in C57BL/6NTac mice after return from a 13-day space shuttle mission (STS-118). Spleens and thymuses from flight animals (FLT) and ground controls similarly housed in animal enclosure modules (AEM) were evaluated within 3–6 h after landing. Phytohemagglutinin-induced splenocyte DNA synthesis was significantly reduced in FLT mice when based on both counts per minute and stimulation indexes (P < 0.05). Flow cytometry showed that CD3+ T and CD19+ B cell counts were low in spleens from the FLT group, whereas the number of NK1.1+ natural killer (NK) cells was increased (P < 0.01 for all three populations vs. AEM). The numerical changes resulted in a low percentage of T cells and high percentage of NK cells in FLT animals (P < 0.05). After activation of spleen cells with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, interleukin-2 (IL-2) was decreased, but IL-10, interferon-γ, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α were increased in FLT mice (P < 0.05). Analysis of cancer-related genes in the thymus showed that the expression of 30 of 84 genes was significantly affected by flight (P < 0.05). Genes that differed from AEM controls by at least 1.5-fold were Birc5, Figf, Grb2, and Tert (upregulated) and Fos, Ifnb1, Itgb3, Mmp9, Myc, Pdgfb, S100a4, Thbs, and Tnf (downregulated). Collectively, the data show that T cell distribution, function, and gene expression are significantly modified shortly after return from the spaceflight environment. PMID:18988762

  15. DING proteins: numerous functions, elusive genes, a potential for health.

    PubMed

    Bernier, François

    2013-09-01

    DING proteins, named after their conserved N-terminus, form an overlooked protein family whose members were generally discovered through serendipity. It is characterized by an unusually high sequence conservation, even between distantly related species, and by an outstanding diversity of activities and ligands. They all share a demonstrated capacity to bind phosphate with high affinity or at least a predicted phosphate-binding site. However, DING protein genes are conspicuously absent from databases. The many novel family members identified in recent years have confirmed that DING proteins are ubiquitous not only in animals and plants but probably also in prokaryotes. At the functional level, there is increasing evidence that they participate in many health-related processes such as cancers as well as bacterial (Pseudomonas) and viral (HIV) infections, by mechanisms that are now beginning to be understood. They thus represent potent targets for the development of novel therapeutic approaches, especially against HIV. The few genomic sequences that are now available are starting to give some clues on why DING protein genes and mRNAs are well conserved and difficult to clone. This could open a new era of research, of both fundamental and applied importance. PMID:23743708

  16. Efflux Pump Control Alters Synthetic Gene Circuit Function.

    PubMed

    Diao, Junchen; Charlebois, Daniel A; Nevozhay, Dmitry; Bódi, Zoltán; Pál, Csaba; Balázsi, Gábor

    2016-07-15

    Synthetic biology aims to design new biological systems for predefined purposes, such as the controlled secretion of biofuels, pharmaceuticals, or other chemicals. Synthetic gene circuits regulating an efflux pump from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family could achieve this. However, ABC efflux pumps can also drive out intracellular inducer molecules that control the gene circuits. This will introduce an implicit feedback that could alter gene circuit function in ways that are poorly understood. Here, we used two synthetic gene circuits inducible by tetracycline family molecules to regulate the expression of a yeast ABC pump (Pdr5p) that pumps out the inducer. Pdr5p altered the dose-responses of the original gene circuits substantially in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While one aspect of the change could be attributed to the efflux pumping function of Pdr5p, another aspect remained unexplained. Quantitative modeling indicated that reduced regulator gene expression in addition to efflux pump function could fully explain the altered dose-responses. These predictions were validated experimentally. Overall, we highlight how efflux pumps can alter gene circuit dynamics and demonstrate the utility of mathematical modeling in understanding synthetic gene circuit function in new circumstances. PMID:27111147

  17. Sex chromosome complement regulates expression of mood-related genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies on major depressive and anxiety disorders suggest dysfunctions in brain corticolimbic circuits, including altered gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and modulatory (serotonin and dopamine) neurotransmission. Interestingly, sexual dimorphisms in GABA, serotonin, and dopamine systems are also reported. Understanding the mechanisms behind these sexual dimorphisms may help unravel the biological bases of the heightened female vulnerability to mood disorders. Here, we investigate the contribution of sex-related factors (sex chromosome complement, developmental gonadal sex, or adult circulating hormones) to frontal cortex expression of selected GABA-, serotonin-, and dopamine-related genes. Methods As gonadal sex is determined by sex chromosome complement, the role of sex chromosomes cannot be investigated individually in humans. Therefore, we used the Four Core Genotypes (FCG) mouse model, in which sex chromosome complement and gonadal sex are artificially decoupled, to examine the expression of 13 GABA-related genes, 6 serotonin- and dopamine-related genes, and 8 associated signal transduction genes under chronic stress conditions. Results were analyzed by three-way ANOVA (sex chromosome complement × gonadal sex × circulating testosterone). A global perspective of gene expression changes was provided by heatmap representation and gene co-expression networks to identify patterns of transcriptional activities related to each main factor. Results We show that under chronic stress conditions, sex chromosome complement influenced GABA/serotonin/dopamine-related gene expression in the frontal cortex, with XY mice consistently having lower gene expression compared to XX mice. Gonadal sex and circulating testosterone exhibited less pronounced, more complex, and variable control over gene expression. Across factors, male conditions were associated with a tightly co-expressed set of signal transduction genes. Conclusions Under chronic stress conditions

  18. Relating significance and relations of differentially expressed genes in response to Aspergillus flavus infection in maize.

    PubMed

    Asters, Matthew C; Williams, W Paul; Perkins, Andy D; Mylroie, J Erik; Windham, Gary L; Shan, Xueyan

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a pathogenic fungus infecting maize and producing aflatoxins that are health hazards to humans and animals. Characterizing host defense mechanism and prioritizing candidate resistance genes are important to the development of resistant maize germplasm. We investigated methods amenable for the analysis of the significance and relations among maize candidate genes based on the empirical gene expression data obtained by RT-qPCR technique from maize inbred lines. We optimized a pipeline of analysis tools chosen from various programs to provide rigorous statistical analysis and state of the art data visualization. A network-based method was also explored to construct the empirical gene expression relational structures. Maize genes at the centers in the network were considered as important candidate genes for maize DNA marker studies. The methods in this research can be used to analyze large RT-qPCR datasets and establish complex empirical gene relational structures across multiple experimental conditions. PMID:24770700

  19. Relating significance and relations of differentially expressed genes in response to Aspergillus flavus infection in maize

    PubMed Central

    Asters, Matthew C.; Williams, W. Paul; Perkins, Andy D.; Mylroie, J. Erik; Windham, Gary L.; Shan, Xueyan

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a pathogenic fungus infecting maize and producing aflatoxins that are health hazards to humans and animals. Characterizing host defense mechanism and prioritizing candidate resistance genes are important to the development of resistant maize germplasm. We investigated methods amenable for the analysis of the significance and relations among maize candidate genes based on the empirical gene expression data obtained by RT-qPCR technique from maize inbred lines. We optimized a pipeline of analysis tools chosen from various programs to provide rigorous statistical analysis and state of the art data visualization. A network-based method was also explored to construct the empirical gene expression relational structures. Maize genes at the centers in the network were considered as important candidate genes for maize DNA marker studies. The methods in this research can be used to analyze large RT-qPCR datasets and establish complex empirical gene relational structures across multiple experimental conditions. PMID:24770700

  20. Zebrafish Hoxa and Evx-2 genes: cloning, developmental expression and implications for the functional evolution of posterior Hox genes.

    PubMed

    Sordino, P; Duboule, D; Kondo, T

    1996-10-01

    Vertebrate Hox genes are required for the establishment of regional identities along body axes. This gene family is strongly conserved among vertebrates, even in bony fish which display less complex ranges of axial morphologies. We have analysed the structural organization and expression of Abd-B related zebrafish HoxA cluster genes (Hoxa-9, Hoxa-10, Hoxa-11 and Hoxa-13) as well as of Evx-2, a gene closely linked to the HoxD complex. We show that the genomic organization of Hoxa genes in fish resembles that of tetrapods albeit intergenic distances are shorter. During development of the fish trunk, Hoxa genes are coordinately expressed, whereas in pectoral fins, they display transcript domains similar to those observed in developing tetrapod limbs. Likewise, the Evx-2 gene seems to respond to both Hox- and Evx-types of regulation. During fin development, this latter gene is expressed as the neighbouring Hox genes, in contrast to its expression in the central nervous system which does not comply with colinearity and extends up to anterior parts of the brain. These results are discussed in the context of the functional evolution of Hoxa versus Hoxd genes and their different roles in building up paired appendages. PMID:8951794

  1. Domesticated retroviral GAG gene in Drosophila: new functions for an old gene.

    PubMed

    Nefedova, L N; Kuzmin, I V; Makhnovskii, P A; Kim, A I

    2014-02-01

    The domestication of foreign genes is a powerful mechanism for new gene formation and genome evolution. It is known that domesticated retroviral gag genes in mammals not only take part in protecting against viral infection but also control cell division, apoptosis, function of the placenta, and other biological processes. In this study, we focused on the domesticated retroviral gag gene homolog (Grp) in the Drosophila melanogaster genome. According to the results of a bioinformatic analysis, the Grp gene product is primarily under purifying selection in Drosophilidae family. The Grp protein has been shown to be transmembrane. The Grp gene is expressed at the adult stage of D. melanogaster in gender-specific and tissue-specific manner. Also the Grp gene expression is increased in response to the gypsy retrovirus. A function of the protein as a component of the endosomic membrane is considered. PMID:24503082

  2. Gene set internal coherence in the context of functional profiling

    PubMed Central

    Montaner, David; Minguez, Pablo; Al-Shahrour, Fátima; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional profiling methods have been extensively used in the context of high-throughput experiments and, in particular, in microarray data analysis. Such methods use available biological information to define different types of functional gene modules (e.g. gene ontology -GO-, KEGG pathways, etc.) whose representation in a pre-defined list of genes is further studied. In the most popular type of microarray experimental designs (e.g. up- or down-regulated genes, clusters of co-expressing genes, etc.) or in other genomic experiments (e.g. Chip-on-chip, epigenomics, etc.) these lists are composed by genes with a high degree of co-expression. Therefore, an implicit assumption in the application of functional profiling methods within this context is that the genes corresponding to the modules tested are effectively defining sets of co-expressing genes. Nevertheless not all the functional modules are biologically coherent entities in terms of co-expression, which will eventually hinder its detection with conventional methods of functional enrichment. Results Using a large collection of microarray data we have carried out a detailed survey of internal correlation in GO terms and KEGG pathways, providing a coherence index to be used for measuring functional module co-regulation. An unexpected low level of internal correlation was found among the modules studied. Only around 30% of the modules defined by GO terms and 57% of the modules defined by KEGG pathways display an internal correlation higher than the expected by chance. This information on the internal correlation of the genes within the functional modules can be used in the context of a logistic regression model in a simple way to improve their detection in gene expression experiments. Conclusion For the first time, an exhaustive study on the internal co-expression of the most popular functional categories has been carried out. Interestingly, the real level of coexpression within many of them is lower

  3. Ventromedial hypothalamic lesions change the expression of cell proliferation-related genes and morphology-related genes in rat pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Kiba, Takayoshi; Ishigaki, Yasuhito

    2014-01-01

    Studies in normal rats and ob/ob mice indicated that islet neogenesis does not occur in the intact rodent pancreas. We previously reported that ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) lesions stimulated cell proliferation of rat pancreatic islet B and acinar cells primarily through a cholinergic receptor mechanism and examined how gene families involved in cell proliferation in total pancreatic tissue are regulated after VMH lesions formation. This study examined how gene families involved in cell proliferation in pancreatic islets alone are regulated after VMH lesions formation. Pancreatic islet RNA was extracted, and differences in gene expression profiles between rats at day 3 after VMH lesioning and sham-VMH-lesioned rats were investigated using DNA microarray and real-time polymerase chain reaction. VMH lesions regulated genes that were involved in functions related to cell cycle and differentiation, growth, binding, apoptosis and morphology in pancreas islets. Real-time polymerase chain reaction also confirmed that gene expression of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) and topoisomerase (DNA) II α 170 kDa (Top2a), and stanniocalcin 1 (Stc1) were upregulated at day 3 after the VMH lesions. Ventromedial hypothalamic lesions may change the expression of cell proliferation-related genes and morphology-related genes in rat pancreatic islets. PMID:25658146

  4. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html. PMID:21913285

  5. Mining for Candidate Genes Related to Pancreatic Cancer Using Protein-Protein Interactions and a Shortest Path Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fei; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Wan, Sibao; Wang, ShaoPeng; Kong, Xiang-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly malignant tumor derived from pancreas tissue and is one of the leading causes of death from cancer. Its molecular mechanism has been partially revealed by validating its oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes; however, the available data remain insufficient for medical workers to design effective treatments. Large-scale identification of PC-related genes can promote studies on PC. In this study, we propose a computational method for mining new candidate PC-related genes. A large network was constructed using protein-protein interaction information, and a shortest path approach was applied to mine new candidate genes based on validated PC-related genes. In addition, a permutation test was adopted to further select key candidate genes. Finally, for all discovered candidate genes, the likelihood that the genes are novel PC-related genes is discussed based on their currently known functions. PMID:26613085

  6. Measuring semantic similarities by combining gene ontology annotations and gene co-function networks

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Jiajie; Uygun, Sahra; Kim, Taehyong; Wang, Yadong; Rhee, Seung Y.; Chen, Jin

    2015-02-14

    Background: Gene Ontology (GO) has been used widely to study functional relationships between genes. The current semantic similarity measures rely only on GO annotations and GO structure. This limits the power of GO-based similarity because of the limited proportion of genes that are annotated to GO in most organisms. Results: We introduce a novel approach called NETSIM (network-based similarity measure) that incorporates information from gene co-function networks in addition to using the GO structure and annotations. Using metabolic reaction maps of yeast, Arabidopsis, and human, we demonstrate that NETSIM can improve the accuracy of GO term similarities. We also demonstrate that NETSIM works well even for genomes with sparser gene annotation data. We applied NETSIM on large Arabidopsis gene families such as cytochrome P450 monooxygenases to group the members functionally and show that this grouping could facilitate functional characterization of genes in these families. Conclusions: Using NETSIM as an example, we demonstrated that the performance of a semantic similarity measure could be significantly improved after incorporating genome-specific information. NETSIM incorporates both GO annotations and gene co-function network data as a priori knowledge in the model. Therefore, functional similarities of GO terms that are not explicitly encoded in GO but are relevant in a taxon-specific manner become measurable when GO annotations are limited.

  7. Measuring semantic similarities by combining gene ontology annotations and gene co-function networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Peng, Jiajie; Uygun, Sahra; Kim, Taehyong; Wang, Yadong; Rhee, Seung Y.; Chen, Jin

    2015-02-14

    Background: Gene Ontology (GO) has been used widely to study functional relationships between genes. The current semantic similarity measures rely only on GO annotations and GO structure. This limits the power of GO-based similarity because of the limited proportion of genes that are annotated to GO in most organisms. Results: We introduce a novel approach called NETSIM (network-based similarity measure) that incorporates information from gene co-function networks in addition to using the GO structure and annotations. Using metabolic reaction maps of yeast, Arabidopsis, and human, we demonstrate that NETSIM can improve the accuracy of GO term similarities. We also demonstratemore » that NETSIM works well even for genomes with sparser gene annotation data. We applied NETSIM on large Arabidopsis gene families such as cytochrome P450 monooxygenases to group the members functionally and show that this grouping could facilitate functional characterization of genes in these families. Conclusions: Using NETSIM as an example, we demonstrated that the performance of a semantic similarity measure could be significantly improved after incorporating genome-specific information. NETSIM incorporates both GO annotations and gene co-function network data as a priori knowledge in the model. Therefore, functional similarities of GO terms that are not explicitly encoded in GO but are relevant in a taxon-specific manner become measurable when GO annotations are limited.« less

  8. Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis of Flowering-Related Genes in Arabidopsis, Wheat, and Barley

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Fred Y.; Hu, Zhiqiu; Yang, Rong-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Early flowering is an important trait influencing grain yield and quality in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in short-season cropping regions. However, due to large and complex genomes of these species, direct identification of flowering genes and their molecular characterization remain challenging. Here, we used a bioinformatic approach to predict flowering-related genes in wheat and barley from 190 known Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.) flowering genes. We identified 900 and 275 putative orthologs in wheat and barley, respectively. The annotated flowering-related genes were clustered into 144 orthologous groups with one-to-one, one-to-many, many-to-one, and many-to-many orthology relationships. Our approach was further validated by domain and phylogenetic analyses of flowering-related proteins and comparative analysis of publicly available microarray data sets for in silico expression profiling of flowering-related genes in 13 different developmental stages of wheat and barley. These further analyses showed that orthologous gene pairs in three critical flowering gene families (PEBP, MADS, and BBX) exhibited similar expression patterns among 13 developmental stages in wheat and barley, suggesting similar functions among the orthologous genes with sequence and expression similarities. The predicted candidate flowering genes can be confirmed and incorporated into molecular breeding for early flowering wheat and barley in short-season cropping regions. PMID:26435710

  9. Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis of Flowering-Related Genes in Arabidopsis, Wheat, and Barley.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fred Y; Hu, Zhiqiu; Yang, Rong-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Early flowering is an important trait influencing grain yield and quality in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in short-season cropping regions. However, due to large and complex genomes of these species, direct identification of flowering genes and their molecular characterization remain challenging. Here, we used a bioinformatic approach to predict flowering-related genes in wheat and barley from 190 known Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.) flowering genes. We identified 900 and 275 putative orthologs in wheat and barley, respectively. The annotated flowering-related genes were clustered into 144 orthologous groups with one-to-one, one-to-many, many-to-one, and many-to-many orthology relationships. Our approach was further validated by domain and phylogenetic analyses of flowering-related proteins and comparative analysis of publicly available microarray data sets for in silico expression profiling of flowering-related genes in 13 different developmental stages of wheat and barley. These further analyses showed that orthologous gene pairs in three critical flowering gene families (PEBP, MADS, and BBX) exhibited similar expression patterns among 13 developmental stages in wheat and barley, suggesting similar functions among the orthologous genes with sequence and expression similarities. The predicted candidate flowering genes can be confirmed and incorporated into molecular breeding for early flowering wheat and barley in short-season cropping regions. PMID:26435710

  10. Functional microarray analysis of nitrogen and carbon cycling genes across an Antarctic latitudinal transect.

    PubMed

    Yergeau, Etienne; Kang, Sanghoon; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Kowalchuk, George A

    2007-06-01

    Soil-borne microbial communities were examined via a functional gene microarray approach across a southern polar latitudinal gradient to gain insight into the environmental factors steering soil N- and C-cycling in terrestrial Antarctic ecosystems. The abundance and diversity of functional gene families were studied for soil-borne microbial communities inhabiting a range of environments from 51 degrees S (cool temperate-Falkland Islands) to 72 degrees S (cold rock desert-Coal Nunatak). The recently designed functional gene array used contains 24,243 oligonucleotide probes and covers >10,000 genes in >150 functional groups involved in nitrogen, carbon, sulfur and phosphorus cycling, metal reduction and resistance and organic contaminant degradation (He et al. 2007). The detected N- and C-cycle genes were significantly different across different sampling locations and vegetation types. A number of significant trends were observed regarding the distribution of key gene families across the environments examined. For example, the relative detection of cellulose degradation genes was correlated with temperature, and microbial C-fixation genes were more present in plots principally lacking vegetation. With respect to the N-cycle, denitrification genes were linked to higher soil temperatures, and N2-fixation genes were linked to plots mainly vegetated by lichens. These microarray-based results were confirmed for a number of gene families using specific real-time PCR, enzymatic assays and process rate measurements. The results presented demonstrate the utility of an integrated functional gene microarray approach in detecting shifts in functional community properties in environmental samples and provide insight into the forces driving important processes of terrestrial Antarctic nutrient cycling. PMID:18043626

  11. Functions of the gene products of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M

    1993-01-01

    A list of currently identified gene products of Escherichia coli is given, together with a bibliography that provides pointers to the literature on each gene product. A scheme to categorize cellular functions is used to classify the gene products of E. coli so far identified. A count shows that the numbers of genes concerned with small-molecule metabolism are on the same order as the numbers concerned with macromolecule biosynthesis and degradation. One large category is the category of tRNAs and their synthetases. Another is the category of transport elements. The categories of cell structure and cellular processes other than metabolism are smaller. Other subjects discussed are the occurrence in the E. coli genome of redundant pairs and groups of genes of identical or closely similar function, as well as variation in the degree of density of genetic information in different parts of the genome. PMID:7508076

  12. Ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes with desirability functions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In functional genomics experiments, researchers often select genes to follow-up or validate from a long list of differentially expressed genes. Typically, sharp thresholds are used to bin genes into groups such as significant/non-significant or fold change above/below a cut-off value, and ad hoc criteria are also used such as favouring well-known genes. Binning, however, is inefficient and does not take the uncertainty of the measurements into account. Furthermore, p-values, fold-changes, and other outcomes are treated as equally important, and relevant genes may be overlooked with such an approach. Desirability functions are proposed as a way to integrate multiple selection criteria for ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes. These functions map any variable to a continuous 0–1 scale, where one is maximally desirable and zero is unacceptable. Multiple selection criteria are then combined to provide an overall desirability that is used to rank genes. In addition to p-values and fold-changes, further experimental results and information contained in databases can be easily included as criteria. The approach is demonstrated with a breast cancer microarray data set. The functions and an example data set can be found in the desiR package on CRAN (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/desiR/) and the development version is available on GitHub (https://github.com/stanlazic/desiR). PMID:26644980

  13. Gene mining in halophytes: functional identification of stress tolerance genes in Lepidium crassifolium.

    PubMed

    Rigó, Gábor; Valkai, Ildikó; Faragó, Dóra; Kiss, Edina; Van Houdt, Sara; Van de Steene, Nancy; Hannah, Matthew A; Szabados, László

    2016-09-01

    Extremophile plants are valuable sources of genes conferring tolerance traits, which can be explored to improve stress tolerance of crops. Lepidium crassifolium is a halophytic relative of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and displays tolerance to salt, osmotic and oxidative stresses. We have employed the modified Conditional cDNA Overexpression System to transfer a cDNA library from L. crassifolium to the glycophyte A. thaliana. By screening for salt, osmotic and oxidative stress tolerance through in vitro growth assays and non-destructive chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, 20 Arabidopsis lines were identified with superior performance under restrictive conditions. Several cDNA inserts were cloned and confirmed to be responsible for the enhanced tolerance by analysing independent transgenic lines. Examples include full-length cDNAs encoding proteins with high homologies to GDSL-lipase/esterase or acyl CoA-binding protein or proteins without known function, which could confer tolerance to one or several stress conditions. Our results confirm that random gene transfer from stress tolerant to sensitive plant species is a valuable tool to discover novel genes with potential for biotechnological applications. PMID:27343166

  14. Sexual Dimorphism in the Expression of Mitochondria-Related Genes in Rat Heart at Different Ages

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Vikrant; Han, Tao; Moland, Carrie L.; Kwekel, Joshua C.; Fuscoe, James C.; Desai, Varsha G.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Moreover, sex and age are considered major risk factors in the development of CVDs. Mitochondria are vital for normal cardiac function, and regulation of mitochondrial structure and function may impact susceptibility to CVD. To identify potential role of mitochondria in sex-related differences in susceptibility to CVD, we analyzed the basal expression levels of mitochondria-related genes in the hearts of male and female rats. Whole genome expression profiling was performed in the hearts of young (8-week), adult (21-week), and old (78-week) male and female Fischer 344 rats and the expression of 670 unique genes related to various mitochondrial functions was analyzed. A significant (p<0.05) sexual dimorphism in expression levels of 46, 114, and 41 genes was observed in young, adult and old rats, respectively. Gene Ontology analysis revealed the influence of sex on various biological pathways related to cardiac energy metabolism at different ages. The expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism was significantly different between the sexes in young and adult rat hearts. Adult male rats also showed higher expression of genes associated with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex compared to females. In young and adult hearts, sexual dimorphism was not noted in genes encoding oxidative phosphorylation. In old rats, however, a majority of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation had higher expression in females compared to males. Such basal differences between the sexes in cardiac expression of genes associated with energy metabolism may indicate a likely involvement of mitochondria in susceptibility to CVDs. In addition, female rats showed lower expression levels of apoptotic genes in hearts compared to males at all ages, which may have implications for better preservation of cardiac mass in females than in males. PMID:25615628

  15. Functional genes of non-model arthropods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technology and bioinformatics facilitate studies of non-model organisms, including pest insects and insect biological control agents. A cDNA library prepared from a laboratory-reared colony of Lygus lineolaris male nymphs identified sequences that appeared to have known functions or close homologues...

  16. Molecular Basis of Klotho: From Gene to Function in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuechi

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the Klotho (KL) gene, which was originally identified as a putative aging-suppressor gene, has generated tremendous interest and has advanced understanding of the aging process. In mice, the overexpression of the KL gene extends the life span, whereas mutations to the KL gene shorten the life span. The human KL gene encodes the α-Klotho protein, which is a multifunctional protein that regulates the metabolism of phosphate, calcium, and vitamin D. α-Klotho also may function as a hormone, although the α-Klotho receptor(s) has not been found. Point mutations of the KL gene in humans are associated with hypertension and kidney disease, which suggests that α-Klotho may be essential to the maintenance of normal renal function. Three α-Klotho protein types with potentially different functions have been identified: a full-length transmembrane α-Klotho, a truncated soluble α-Klotho, and a secreted α-Klotho. Recent evidence suggests that α-Klotho suppresses the insulin and Wnt signaling pathways, inhibits oxidative stress, and regulates phosphatase and calcium absorption. In this review, we provide an update on recent advances in the understanding of the molecular, genetic, biochemical, and physiological properties of the KL gene. Specifically, this review focuses on the structure of the KL gene and the factors that regulate KL gene transcription, the key sites in the regulation of α-Klotho enzyme activity, the α-Klotho signaling pathways, and the molecular mechanisms that underlie α-Klotho function. This current understanding of the molecular biology of the α-Klotho protein may offer new insights into its function and role in aging. PMID:25695404

  17. An improved chemically inducible gene switch that functions in the monocotyledonous plant sugar cane.

    PubMed

    Kinkema, Mark; Geijskes, R Jason; Shand, Kylie; Coleman, Heather D; De Lucca, Paulo C; Palupe, Anthony; Harrison, Mark D; Jepson, Ian; Dale, James L; Sainz, Manuel B

    2014-03-01

    Chemically inducible gene switches can provide precise control over gene expression, enabling more specific analyses of gene function and expanding the plant biotechnology toolkit beyond traditional constitutive expression systems. The alc gene expression system is one of the most promising chemically inducible gene switches in plants because of its potential in both fundamental research and commercial biotechnology applications. However, there are no published reports demonstrating that this versatile gene switch is functional in transgenic monocotyledonous plants, which include some of the most important agricultural crops. We found that the original alc gene switch was ineffective in the monocotyledonous plant sugar cane, and describe a modified alc system that is functional in this globally significant crop. A promoter consisting of tandem copies of the ethanol receptor inverted repeat binding site, in combination with a minimal promoter sequence, was sufficient to give enhanced sensitivity and significantly higher levels of ethanol inducible gene expression. A longer CaMV 35S minimal promoter than was used in the original alc gene switch also substantially improved ethanol inducibility. Treating the roots with ethanol effectively induced the modified alc system in sugar cane leaves and stem, while an aerial spray was relatively ineffective. The extension of this chemically inducible gene expression system to sugar cane opens the door to new opportunities for basic research and crop biotechnology. PMID:24142380

  18. Characterization of MAT gene functions in the life cycle of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum reveals a lineage-specific MAT gene functioning in apothecium morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Doughan, Benjamin; Rollins, Jeffrey A

    2016-09-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary is a phytopathogenic fungus that relies on the completion of the sexual cycle to initiate aerial infections. The sexual cycle produces apothecia required for inoculum dispersal. In this study, insight into the regulation of apothecial multicellular development was pursued through functional characterization of mating-type genes. These genes are hypothesized to encode master regulatory proteins required for aspects of sexual development ranging from fertilization through fertile fruiting body development. Experimentally, loss-of-function mutants were created for the conserved core mating-type genes (MAT1-1-1, and MAT1-2-1), and the lineage-specific genes found only in S. sclerotiorum and closely related fungi (MAT1-1-5, and MAT1-2-4). The MAT1-1-1, MAT1-1-5, and MAT1-2-1 mutants are able to form ascogonia but are blocked in all aspects of apothecium development. These mutants also exhibit defects in secondary sexual characters including lower numbers of spermatia. The MAT1-2-4 mutants are delayed in carpogenic germination accompanied with altered disc morphogenesis and ascospore production. They too produce lower numbers of spermatia. All four MAT gene mutants showed alterations in the expression of putative pheromone precursor (Ppg-1) and pheromone receptor (PreA, PreB) genes. Our findings support the involvement of MAT genes in sexual fertility, gene regulation, meiosis, and morphogenesis in S. sclerotiorum. PMID:27567717

  19. Rapid turnover of antimicrobial-type cysteine-rich protein genes in closely related Oryza genomes.

    PubMed

    Shenton, Matthew R; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Nagata, Toshifumi; Feng, Qi; Han, Bin; Kurata, Nori

    2015-10-01

    Defensive and reproductive protein genes undergo rapid evolution. Small, cysteine-rich secreted peptides (CRPs) act as antimicrobial agents and function in plant intercellular signaling and are over-represented among reproductively expressed proteins. Because of their roles in defense, reproduction and development and their presence in multigene families, CRP variation can have major consequences for plant phenotypic and functional diversification. We surveyed the CRP genes of six closely related Oryza genomes comprising Oryza sativa ssp. japonica and ssp. indica, Oryza glaberrima and three accessions of Oryza rufipogon to observe patterns of evolution in these gene families and the effects of variation on their gene expression. These Oryza genomes, like other plant genomes, have accumulated large reservoirs of CRP sequences, comprising 26 groups totaling between 676 and 843 genes, in contrast to antimicrobial CRPs in animal genomes. Despite the close evolutionary relationships between the genomes, we observed rapid changes in number and structure among CRP gene families. Many CRP sequences are in gene clusters generated by local duplications, have undergone rapid turnover and are more likely to be silent or specifically expressed. By contrast, conserved CRP genes are more likely to be highly and broadly expressed. Variable CRP genes created by repeated duplication, gene modification and inactivation can gain new functions and expression patterns in newly evolved gene copies. For the CRP proteins, the process of gain/loss by deletion or duplication at gene clusters seems to be an important mechanism in evolution of the gene families, which also contributes to their expression evolution. PMID:25842177

  20. Predicting Gene-Regulation Functions: Lessons from Temperate Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Teif, Vladimir B.

    2010-01-01

    Gene-regulation functions (GRF) provide a unique characteristic of a cis-regulatory module (CRM), relating the concentrations of transcription factors (input) to the promoter activities (output). The challenge is to predict GRFs from the sequence. Here we systematically consider the lysogeny-lysis CRMs of different temperate bacteriophages such as the Lactobacillus casei phage A2, Escherichia coli phages λ, and 186 and Lactococcal phage TP901-1. This study allowed explaining a recent experimental puzzle on the role of Cro protein in the lambda switch. Several general conclusions have been drawn: 1), long-range interactions, multilayer assembly and DNA looping may lead to complex GRFs that cannot be described by linear functions of binding site occupancies; 2), in general, GRFs cannot be described by the Boolean logic, whereas a three-state non-Boolean logic suffices for the studied examples; 3), studied CRMs of the intact phages seemed to have a similar GRF topology (the number of plateaus and peaks corresponding to different expression regimes); we hypothesize that functionally equivalent CRMs might have topologically equivalent GRFs for a larger class of genetic systems; and 4) within a given GRF class, a set of mechanistic-to-mathematical transformations has been identified, which allows shaping the GRF before carrying out a system-level analysis. PMID:20371324

  1. Calreticulin: one protein, one gene, many functions.

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, M; Corbett, E F; Mesaeli, N; Nakamura, K; Opas, M

    1999-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a critical role in the synthesis and chaperoning of membrane-associated and secreted proteins. The membrane is also an important site of Ca(2+) storage and release. Calreticulin is a unique ER luminal resident protein. The protein affects many cellular functions, both in the ER lumen and outside of the ER environment. In the ER lumen, calreticulin performs two major functions: chaperoning and regulation of Ca(2+) homoeostasis. Calreticulin is a highly versatile lectin-like chaperone, and it participates during the synthesis of a variety of molecules, including ion channels, surface receptors, integrins and transporters. The protein also affects intracellular Ca(2+) homoeostasis by modulation of ER Ca(2+) storage and transport. Studies on the cell biology of calreticulin revealed that the ER membrane is a very dynamic intracellular compartment affecting many aspects of cell physiology. PMID:10567207

  2. The Structure of a Gene Co-Expression Network Reveals Biological Functions Underlying eQTLs

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Vialaneix, Nathalie; Liaubet, Laurence; Laurent, Thibault; Cherel, Pierre; Gamot, Adrien; SanCristobal, Magali

    2013-01-01

    What are the commonalities between genes, whose expression level is partially controlled by eQTL, especially with regard to biological functions? Moreover, how are these genes related to a phenotype of interest? These issues are particularly difficult to address when the genome annotation is incomplete, as is the case for mammalian species. Moreover, the direct link between gene expression and a phenotype of interest may be weak, and thus difficult to handle. In this framework, the use of a co-expression network has proven useful: it is a robust approach for modeling a complex system of genetic regulations, and to infer knowledge for yet unknown genes. In this article, a case study was conducted with a mammalian species. It showed that the use of a co-expression network based on partial correlation, combined with a relevant clustering of nodes, leads to an enrichment of biological functions of around 83%. Moreover, the use of a spatial statistics approach allowed us to superimpose additional information related to a phenotype; this lead to highlighting specific genes or gene clusters that are related to the network structure and the phenotype. Three main results are worth noting: first, key genes were highlighted as a potential focus for forthcoming biological experiments; second, a set of biological functions, which support a list of genes under partial eQTL control, was set up by an overview of the global structure of the gene expression network; third, pH was found correlated with gene clusters, and then with related biological functions, as a result of a spatial analysis of the network topology. PMID:23577081

  3. The structure of a gene co-expression network reveals biological functions underlying eQTLs.

    PubMed

    Villa-Vialaneix, Nathalie; Liaubet, Laurence; Laurent, Thibault; Cherel, Pierre; Gamot, Adrien; SanCristobal, Magali

    2013-01-01

    What are the commonalities between genes, whose expression level is partially controlled by eQTL, especially with regard to biological functions? Moreover, how are these genes related to a phenotype of interest? These issues are particularly difficult to address when the genome annotation is incomplete, as is the case for mammalian species. Moreover, the direct link between gene expression and a phenotype of interest may be weak, and thus difficult to handle. In this framework, the use of a co-expression network has proven useful: it is a robust approach for modeling a complex system of genetic regulations, and to infer knowledge for yet unknown genes. In this article, a case study was conducted with a mammalian species. It showed that the use of a co-expression network based on partial correlation, combined with a relevant clustering of nodes, leads to an enrichment of biological functions of around 83%. Moreover, the use of a spatial statistics approach allowed us to superimpose additional information related to a phenotype; this lead to highlighting specific genes or gene clusters that are related to the network structure and the phenotype. Three main results are worth noting: first, key genes were highlighted as a potential focus for forthcoming biological experiments; second, a set of biological functions, which support a list of genes under partial eQTL control, was set up by an overview of the global structure of the gene expression network; third, pH was found correlated with gene clusters, and then with related biological functions, as a result of a spatial analysis of the network topology. PMID:23577081

  4. Using Immediate-Early Genes to Map Hippocampal Subregional Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubik, Stepan; Miyashita, Teiko; Guzowski, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Different functions have been suggested for the hippocampus and its subdivisions along both transversal and longitudinal axes. Expression of immediate-early genes (IEGs) has been used to map specific functions onto neuronal activity in different areas of the brain including the hippocampus (IEG imaging). Here we review IEG studies on hippocampal…

  5. Gene evolution and functions of extracellular matrix proteins in teeth.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Keigo; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2013-03-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) not only provides physical support for tissues, but it is also critical for tissue development, homeostasis and disease. Over 300 ECM molecules have been defined as comprising the "core matrisome" in mammals through the analysis of whole genome sequences. During tooth development, the structure and functions of the ECM dynamically change. In the early stages, basement membranes (BMs) separate two cell layers of the dental epithelium and the mesenchyme. Later in the differentiation stages, the BM layer is replaced with the enamel matrix and the dentin matrix, which are secreted by ameloblasts and odontoblasts, respectively. The enamel matrix genes and the dentin matrix genes are each clustered in two closed regions located on human chromosome 4 (mouse chromosome 5), except for the gene coded for amelogenin, the major enamel matrix protein, which is located on the sex chromosomes. These genes for enamel and dentin matrix proteins are derived from a common ancestral gene, but as a result of evolution, they diverged in terms of their specific functions. These matrix proteins play important roles in cell adhesion, polarity, and differentiation and mineralization of enamel and dentin matrices. Mutations of these genes cause diseases such as odontogenesis imperfect (OI) and amelogenesis imperfect (AI). In this review, we discuss the recently defined terms matrisome and matrixome for ECMs, as well as focus on genes and functions of enamel and dentin matrix proteins. PMID:23539364

  6. Downstream of homeotic genes: in the heart of Hox function.

    PubMed

    Monier, Bruno; Tevy, Maria Florencia; Perrin, Laurent; Capovilla, Maria; Sémériva, Michel

    2007-01-01

    A functional organ is constituted of diverse cell types. Each one occupies a distinct position and is associated to specific morphological and physiological functions. The identification of the genetic programs controlling these elaborated and highly precise features of organogenesis is crucial to understand how a mature organ works under normal conditions, and how pathologies can develop. Recently, a number of studies have reported a critical role for Hox genes in one example of organogenesis: cardiogenesis in Drosophila. Beyond the interest in understanding the molecular basis of functional cardiogenesis, this system might provide a model for proposing new paradigms of how Hox genes achieve their action throughout development. PMID:18820463

  7. Arabidopsis gene co-expression network and its functional modules

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Linyong; Van Hemert, John L; Dash, Sudhansu; Dickerson, Julie A

    2009-01-01

    Background Biological networks characterize the interactions of biomolecules at a systems-level. One important property of biological networks is the modular structure, in which nodes are densely connected with each other, but between which there are only sparse connections. In this report, we attempted to find the relationship between the network topology and formation of modular structure by comparing gene co-expression networks with random networks. The organization of gene functional modules was also investigated. Results We constructed a genome-wide Arabidopsis gene co-expression network (AGCN) by using 1094 microarrays. We then analyzed the topological properties of AGCN and partitioned the network into modules by using an efficient graph clustering algorithm. In the AGCN, 382 hub genes formed a clique, and they were densely connected only to a small subset of the network. At the module level, the network clustering results provide a systems-level understanding of the gene modules that coordinate multiple biological processes to carry out specific biological functions. For instance, the photosynthesis module in AGCN involves a very large number (> 1000) of genes which participate in various biological processes including photosynthesis, electron transport, pigment metabolism, chloroplast organization and biogenesis, cofactor metabolism, protein biosynthesis, and vitamin metabolism. The cell cycle module orchestrated the coordinated expression of hundreds of genes involved in cell cycle, DNA metabolism, and cytoskeleton organization and biogenesis. We also compared the AGCN constructed in this study with a graphical Gaussian model (GGM) based Arabidopsis gene network. The photosynthesis, protein biosynthesis, and cell cycle modules identified from the GGM network had much smaller module sizes compared with the modules found in the AGCN, respectively. Conclusion This study reveals new insight into the topological properties of biological networks. The

  8. A complex network analysis of hypertension-related genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huan; Xu, Chuan-Yun; Hu, Jing-Bo; Cao, Ke-Fei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a network of hypertension-related genes is constructed by analyzing the correlations of gene expression data among the Dahl salt-sensitive rat and two consomic rat strains. The numerical calculations show that this sparse and assortative network has small-world and scale-free properties. Further, 16 key hub genes (Col4a1, Lcn2, Cdk4, etc.) are determined by introducing an integrated centrality and have been confirmed by biological/medical research to play important roles in hypertension.

  9. Genome-wide identification and functional analyses of calmodulin genes in Solanaceous species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Calmodulin (CaM) is a major calcium sensor in all eukaryotes. It binds calcium and modulates the activity of a wide range of downstream proteins in response to calcium signals. However, little is known about the CaM gene family in Solanaceous species, including the economically important species, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and the gene silencing model plant, Nicotiana benthamiana. Moreover, the potential function of CaM in plant disease resistance remains largely unclear. Results We performed genome-wide identification of CaM gene families in Solanaceous species. Employing bioinformatics approaches, multiple full-length CaM genes were identified from tomato, N. benthamiana and potato (S. tuberosum) genomes, with tomato having 6 CaM genes, N. benthamiana having 7 CaM genes, and potato having 4 CaM genes. Sequence comparison analyses showed that three tomato genes, SlCaM3/4/5, two potato genes StCaM2/3, and two sets of N. benthamiana genes, NbCaM1/2/3/4 and NbCaM5/6, encode identical CaM proteins, yet the genes contain different intron/exon organization and are located on different chromosomes. Further sequence comparisons and gene structural and phylogenetic analyses reveal that Solanaceous species gained a new group of CaM genes during evolution. These new CaM genes are unusual in that they contain three introns in contrast to only a single intron typical of known CaM genes in plants. The tomato CaM (SlCaM) genes were found to be expressed in all organs. Prediction of cis-acting elements in 5' upstream sequences and expression analyses demonstrated that SlCaM genes have potential to be highly responsive to a variety of biotic and abiotic stimuli. Additionally, silencing of SlCaM2 and SlCaM6 altered expression of a set of signaling and defense-related genes and resulted in significantly lower resistance to Tobacco rattle virus and the oomycete pathogen, Pythium aphanidermatum. Conclusions The CaM gene families in the Solanaceous species tomato, N

  10. Consequences of recurrent gene flow from crops to wild relatives.

    PubMed Central

    Haygood, Ralph; Ives, Anthony R; Andow, David A

    2003-01-01

    Concern about gene flow from crops to wild relatives has become widespread with the increasing cultivation of transgenic crops. Possible consequences of such gene flow include genetic assimilation, wherein crop genes replace wild ones, and demographic swamping, wherein hybrids are less fertile than their wild parents, and wild populations shrink. Using mathematical models of a wild population recurrently receiving pollen from a genetically fixed crop, we find that the conditions for genetic assimilation are not stringent, and progress towards replacement can be fast, even for disfavoured crop genes. Demographic swamping and genetic drift relax the conditions for genetic assimilation and speed progress towards replacement. Genetic assimilation can involve thresholds and hysteresis, such that a small increase in immigration can lead to fixation of a disfavoured crop gene that had been maintained at a moderate frequency, even if the increase in immigration is cancelled before the gene fixes. Demographic swamping can give rise to 'migrational meltdown', such that a small increase in immigration can lead to not only fixation of a disfavoured crop gene but also drastic shrinkage of the wild population. These findings suggest that the spread of crop genes in wild populations should be monitored more closely. PMID:14561300

  11. Consequences of recurrent gene flow from crops to wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Haygood, Ralph; Ives, Anthony R; Andow, David A

    2003-09-22

    Concern about gene flow from crops to wild relatives has become widespread with the increasing cultivation of transgenic crops. Possible consequences of such gene flow include genetic assimilation, wherein crop genes replace wild ones, and demographic swamping, wherein hybrids are less fertile than their wild parents, and wild populations shrink. Using mathematical models of a wild population recurrently receiving pollen from a genetically fixed crop, we find that the conditions for genetic assimilation are not stringent, and progress towards replacement can be fast, even for disfavoured crop genes. Demographic swamping and genetic drift relax the conditions for genetic assimilation and speed progress towards replacement. Genetic assimilation can involve thresholds and hysteresis, such that a small increase in immigration can lead to fixation of a disfavoured crop gene that had been maintained at a moderate frequency, even if the increase in immigration is cancelled before the gene fixes. Demographic swamping can give rise to 'migrational meltdown', such that a small increase in immigration can lead to not only fixation of a disfavoured crop gene but also drastic shrinkage of the wild population. These findings suggest that the spread of crop genes in wild populations should be monitored more closely. PMID:14561300

  12. Rapid Determination of Gene Function by Virus-induced Gene Silencing in Wheat and Barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cereal crops are essential components to the human and animal food supply. Solutions to many of the problems challenging cereal production will require identification of genes responsible for particular traits. Unfortunately, the process of identifying gene function is very slow and complex in...

  13. Rapid Determination of Gene Function by Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Wheat and Barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cereal crops are essential components to the human and animal food supply. Solutions to many of the problems challenging cereal production will require identification of genes responsible for particular traits. Unfortunately, the process of identifying gene function is very slow and complex in ...

  14. COMT gene locus: new functional variants.

    PubMed

    Meloto, Carolina B; Segall, Samantha K; Smith, Shad; Parisien, Marc; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M; Gauthier, Josée; Tsao, Douglas; Convertino, Marino; Piltonen, Marjo H; Slade, Gary Dmitri; Fillingim, Roger B; Greenspan, Joel D; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Maixner, William; Zaykin, Dmitri; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-10-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. Numerous studies have linked COMT to pivotal brain functions such as mood, cognition, response to stress, and pain. Both nociception and risk of clinical pain have been associated with COMT genetic variants, and this association was shown to be mediated through adrenergic pathways. Here, we show that association studies between COMT polymorphic markers and pain phenotypes in 2 independent cohorts identified a functional marker, rs165774, situated in the 3' untranslated region of a newfound splice variant, (a)-COMT. Sequence comparisons showed that the (a)-COMT transcript is highly conserved in primates, and deep sequencing data demonstrated that (a)-COMT is expressed across several human tissues, including the brain. In silico analyses showed that the (a)-COMT enzyme features a distinct C-terminus structure, capable of stabilizing substrates in its active site. In vitro experiments demonstrated not only that (a)-COMT is catalytically active but also that it displays unique substrate specificity, exhibiting enzymatic activity with dopamine but not epinephrine. They also established that the pain-protective A allele of rs165774 coincides with lower COMT activity, suggesting contribution to decreased pain sensitivity through increased dopaminergic rather than decreased adrenergic tone, characteristic of reference isoforms. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of the (a)-COMT isoform in nociceptive signaling and suggest that genetic variations in (a)-COMT isoforms may contribute to individual variability in pain phenotypes. PMID:26207649

  15. Functions Encoded by Pyrrolnitrin Biosynthetic Genes from Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Kirner, Sabine; Hammer, Philip E.; Hill, D. Steven; Altmann, Annett; Fischer, Ilona; Weislo, Laura J.; Lanahan, Mike; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Ligon, James M.

    1998-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin is a secondary metabolite derived from tryptophan and has strong antifungal activity. Recently we described four genes, prnABCD, from Pseudomonas fluorescens that encode the biosynthesis of pyrrolnitrin. In the work presented here, we describe the function of each prn gene product. The four genes encode proteins identical in size and serology to proteins present in wild-type Pseudomonas fluorescens, but absent from a mutant from which the entire prn gene region had been deleted. The prnA gene product catalyzes the chlorination of l-tryptophan to form 7-chloro-l-tryptophan. The prnB gene product catalyzes a ring rearrangement and decarboxylation to convert 7-chloro-l-tryptophan to monodechloroaminopyrrolnitrin. The prnC gene product chlorinates monodechloroaminopyrrolnitrin at the 3 position to form aminopyrrolnitrin. The prnD gene product catalyzes the oxidation of the amino group of aminopyrrolnitrin to a nitro group to form pyrrolnitrin. The organization of the prn genes in the operon is identical to the order of the reactions in the biosynthetic pathway. PMID:9537395

  16. Functional epigenetic approach identifies frequently methylated genes in Ewing sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Alholle, Abdullah; Brini, Anna T; Gharanei, Seley; Vaiyapuri, Sumathi; Arrigoni, Elena; Dallol, Ashraf; Gentle, Dean; Kishida, Takeshi; Hiruma, Toru; Avigad, Smadar; Grimer, Robert; Maher, Eamonn R; Latif, Farida

    2013-11-01

    Using a candidate gene approach we recently identified frequent methylation of the RASSF2 gene associated with poor overall survival in Ewing sarcoma (ES). To identify effective biomarkers in ES on a genome-wide scale, we used a functionally proven epigenetic approach, in which gene expression was induced in ES cell lines by treatment with a demethylating agent followed by hybridization onto high density gene expression microarrays. After following a strict selection criterion, 34 genes were selected for expression and methylation analysis in ES cell lines and primary ES. Eight genes (CTHRC1, DNAJA4, ECHDC2, NEFH, NPTX2, PHF11, RARRES2, TSGA14) showed methylation frequencies of>20% in ES tumors (range 24-71%), these genes were expressed in human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC) and hypermethylation was associated with transcriptional silencing. Methylation of NPTX2 or PHF11 was associated with poorer prognosis in ES. In addition, six of the above genes also showed methylation frequency of>20% (range 36-50%) in osteosarcomas. Identification of these genes may provide insights into bone cancer tumorigenesis and development of epigenetic biomarkers for prognosis and detection of these rare tumor types. PMID:24005033

  17. Using PPI network autocorrelation in hierarchical multi-label classification trees for gene function prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ontologies and catalogs of gene functions, such as the Gene Ontology (GO) and MIPS-FUN, assume that functional classes are organized hierarchically, that is, general functions include more specific ones. This has recently motivated the development of several machine learning algorithms for gene function prediction that leverages on this hierarchical organization where instances may belong to multiple classes. In addition, it is possible to exploit relationships among examples, since it is plausible that related genes tend to share functional annotations. Although these relationships have been identified and extensively studied in the area of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, they have not received much attention in hierarchical and multi-class gene function prediction. Relations between genes introduce autocorrelation in functional annotations and violate the assumption that instances are independently and identically distributed (i.i.d.), which underlines most machine learning algorithms. Although the explicit consideration of these relations brings additional complexity to the learning process, we expect substantial benefits in predictive accuracy of learned classifiers. Results This article demonstrates the benefits (in terms of predictive accuracy) of considering autocorrelation in multi-class gene function prediction. We develop a tree-based algorithm for considering network autocorrelation in the setting of Hierarchical Multi-label Classification (HMC). We empirically evaluate the proposed algorithm, called NHMC (Network Hierarchical Multi-label Classification), on 12 yeast datasets using each of the MIPS-FUN and GO annotation schemes and exploiting 2 different PPI networks. The results clearly show that taking autocorrelation into account improves the predictive performance of the learned models for predicting gene function. Conclusions Our newly developed method for HMC takes into account network information in the learning phase: When

  18. Mycobacterial truncated hemoglobins: from genes to functions.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Bolognesi, Martino; Milani, Mario; Guertin, Michel; Visca, Paolo

    2007-08-15

    Infections caused by bacteria belonging to genus Mycobacterium are among the most challenging threats for human health. The ability of mycobacteria to persist in vivo in the presence of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species implies the presence in these bacteria of effective detoxification mechanisms. Mycobacterial truncated hemoglobins (trHbs) have recently been implicated in scavenging of reactive nitrogen species. Individual members from each trHb family (N, O, and P) can be present in the same mycobacterial species. The distinct features of the heme active site structure combined with different ligand binding properties and in vivo expression patterns of mycobacterial trHbs suggest that these globins may accomplish diverse functions. Here, recent genomic, structural and biochemical information on mycobacterial trHbs is reviewed, with the aim of providing further insights into the role of these globins in mycobacterial physiology. PMID:17532149

  19. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    SciTech Connect

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek; Kostrouchova, Marta

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. {yields} The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. {yields} Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. {yields} Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. {yields} New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  20. Association of a functional polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene with anxiety-related temperament and behavior problems in children: a longitudinal study from infancy to the mid-teens.

    PubMed

    Jorm, A F; Prior, M; Sanson, A; Smart, D; Zhang, Y; Easteal, S

    2000-09-01

    A polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) has been associated with anxiety-related personality traits in adults. Initial studies showed that the short allele was associated with higher neuroticism, anxiety and harm avoidance. However, most attempts to replicate these findings have been negative. Because the association of candidate polymorphisms with behavioral traits may vary with stage of development, we investigated the association using participants in a longitudinal study of childhood temperament. DNA was available for 660 children who had been assessed for temperament from 4-8 months to 15-16 years, and for behaviour problems from 3-4 years to 15-16 years. No significant associations were found at most ages. However, at ages 13-14 years and 15-16 years, the long/long genotype was associated with higher anxiety. These findings do not support an association of the short allele with anxiety-related traits in early life. PMID:11032389

  1. Drosha Regulates Gene Expression Independently of RNA Cleavage Function

    PubMed Central

    Gromak, Natalia; Dienstbier, Martin; Macias, Sara; Plass, Mireya; Eyras, Eduardo; Cáceres, Javier F.; Proudfoot, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Drosha is the main RNase III-like enzyme involved in the process of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in the nucleus. Using whole-genome ChIP-on-chip analysis, we demonstrate that, in addition to miRNA sequences, Drosha specifically binds promoter-proximal regions of many human genes in a transcription-dependent manner. This binding is not associated with miRNA production or RNA cleavage. Drosha knockdown in HeLa cells downregulated nascent gene transcription, resulting in a reduction of polyadenylated mRNA produced from these gene regions. Furthermore, we show that this function of Drosha is dependent on its N-terminal protein-interaction domain, which associates with the RNA-binding protein CBP80 and RNA Polymerase II. Consequently, we uncover a previously unsuspected RNA cleavage-independent function of Drosha in the regulation of human gene expression. PMID:24360955

  2. An integrative evolution theory of histo-blood group ABO and related genes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Fumiichiro; Cid, Emili; Yamamoto, Miyako; Saitou, Naruya; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Blancher, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    The ABO system is one of the most important blood group systems in transfusion/transplantation medicine. However, the evolutionary significance of the ABO gene and its polymorphism remained unknown. We took an integrative approach to gain insights into the significance of the evolutionary process of ABO genes, including those related not only phylogenetically but also functionally. We experimentally created a code table correlating amino acid sequence motifs of the ABO gene-encoded glycosyltransferases with GalNAc (A)/galactose (B) specificity, and assigned A/B specificity to individual ABO genes from various species thus going beyond the simple sequence comparison. Together with genome information and phylogenetic analyses, this assignment revealed early appearance of A and B gene sequences in evolution and potentially non-allelic presence of both gene sequences in some animal species. We argue: Evolution may have suppressed the establishment of two independent, functional A and B genes in most vertebrates and promoted A/B conversion through amino acid substitutions and/or recombination; A/B allelism should have existed in common ancestors of primates; and bacterial ABO genes evolved through horizontal and vertical gene transmission into 2 separate groups encoding glycosyltransferases with distinct sugar specificities. PMID:25307962

  3. Functional network analysis of genes differentially expressed during xylogenesis in soc1ful woody Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Davin, Nicolas; Edger, Patrick P; Hefer, Charles A; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Schuetz, Mathias; Smets, Erik; Myburg, Alexander A; Douglas, Carl J; Schranz, Michael E; Lens, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    Many plant genes are known to be involved in the development of cambium and wood, but how the expression and functional interaction of these genes determine the unique biology of wood remains largely unknown. We used the soc1ful loss of function mutant - the woodiest genotype known in the otherwise herbaceous model plant Arabidopsis - to investigate the expression and interactions of genes involved in secondary growth (wood formation). Detailed anatomical observations of the stem in combination with mRNA sequencing were used to assess transcriptome remodeling during xylogenesis in wild-type and woody soc1ful plants. To interpret the transcriptome changes, we constructed functional gene association networks of differentially expressed genes using the STRING database. This analysis revealed functionally enriched gene association hubs that are differentially expressed in herbaceous and woody tissues. In particular, we observed the differential expression of genes related to mechanical stress and jasmonate biosynthesis/signaling during wood formation in soc1ful plants that may be an effect of greater tension within woody tissues. Our results suggest that habit shifts from herbaceous to woody life forms observed in many angiosperm lineages could have evolved convergently by genetic changes that modulate the gene expression and interaction network, and thereby redeploy the conserved wood developmental program. PMID:26952251

  4. Age-related macular degeneration: Evidence of a major gene

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, S.; Warren, C.; Yang, H.

    1994-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a major cause of blindness in developing countries. It remains a very poorly understood disorder. Although environmental and genetic factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, none have been firmly implicated. The purpose of this study was to use pedigree analysis to evaluate the possible role of a major gene as a determinant of familial aggregation. Information was collected regarding occupation, smoking, sun exposure, associated medical problems and family history. 50 probands with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and 39 age, race and sex-matched controls were included in the study. In the ARMD group 15/50 (30%) of probands reported a positive family history; 22 out of 222 first degree relatives over age 60 were reported to be affected. In the control groups, none of the 138 first degree relatives over age 50 had a history of ARMD. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.0003), indicating that genetic factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ARMD. In the ARMD group more siblings as compared to parents (16/127 vs. 5/82) were affected. 5/50 (10%) of the ARMD probands also gave a history of a second degree relative affected with ARMD, compared to none known among the relatives of controls. Data from 50 pedigrees were analyzed by complex segregation analysis under a class A regressive logistic model using the REGD program implemented in the SAGE package. Preliminary results allow rejection of a polygenic model and suggest there is a major gene for ARMD in these families. The inheritance model most compatible with the observed familial aggregation is autosomal recessive. In conclusion, these results are suggestive of a major gene effect in the etiology of ARMD. Identification of a major gene effect is a first step to further pursue linkage analysis and to search for the gene(s) involved in the causation of ARMD.

  5. Selection and Validation of Reference Genes for Functional Studies in the Calliphoridae Family

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Gisele Antoniazzi; Matiolli, Cleverson Carlos; de Azeredo-Espin, Ana Maria Lima; Torres, Tatiana Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    The genera Cochliomyia and Chrysomya contain both obligate and saprophagous flies, which allows the comparison of different feeding habits between closely related species. Among the different strategies for comparing these habits is the use of qPCR to investigate the expression levels of candidate genes involved in feeding behavior. To ensure an accurate measure of the levels of gene expression, it is necessary to normalize the amount of the target gene with the amount of a reference gene having a stable expression across the compared species. Since there is no universal gene that can be used as a reference in functional studies, candidate genes for qPCR data normalization were selected and validated in three Calliphoridae (Diptera) species, Cochliomyia hominivorax Coquerel, Cochliomyia macellaria Fabricius, and Chrysomya albiceps Wiedemann. The expression stability of six genes (Actin, Gapdh, Rp49, Rps17, α-tubulin, and GstD1) was evaluated among species within the same life stage and between life stages within each species. The expression levels of Actin, Gapdh, and Rp49 were the most stable among the selected genes. These genes can be used as reliable reference genes for functional studies in Calliphoridae using similar experimental settings. PMID:25373149

  6. Transferred interbacterial antagonism genes augment eukaryotic innate immune function

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Seemay; Daugherty, Matthew D.; Peterson, S. Brook; Biboy, Jacob; Yang, Youyun; Jutras, Brandon L.; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Ferrin, Michael A.; Harding, Brittany N.; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine; Yang, X. Frank; Vollmer, Waldemar; Malik, Harmit S.

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) allows organisms to rapidly acquire adaptive traits1. Though documented instances of HGT from bacteria to eukaryotes remain rare, bacteria represent a rich source of new functions potentially available for co-option2. One benefit that genes of bacterial origin could provide to eukaryotes is the capacity to produce anti-bacterials, which have evolved in prokaryotes as the result of eons of interbacterial competition. The type VI secretion amidase effector (Tae) proteins are potent bacteriocidal enzymes that degrade the cell wall when delivered into competing bacterial cells by the type VI secretion system (T6SS)3. Here we show that tae genes have been transferred to eukaryotes on at least six occasions, and that the resulting domesticated amidase effector (dae) genes have been preserved for hundreds of millions of years via purifying selection. We show that the dae genes acquired eukaryotic secretion signals, are expressed within recipient organisms, and encode active antibacterial toxins that possess substrate specificity matching extant Tae proteins of the same lineage. Finally, we show that a dae gene in the deer tick Ixodes scapularis limits proliferation of Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease. Our work demonstrates that a family of horizontally acquired toxins honed to mediate interbacterial antagonism confers previously undescribed antibacterial capacity to eukaryotes. We speculate that the selective pressure imposed by competition between bacteria has produced a reservoir of genes encoding diverse antimicrobial functions that are tailored for facile co-option by eukaryotic innate immune systems. PMID:25470067

  7. Applications and advantages of virus-induced gene silencing for gene function studies in plants.

    PubMed

    Burch-Smith, Tessa M; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Martin, Gregory B; Dinesh-Kumar, S P

    2004-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a recently developed gene transcript suppression technique for characterizing the function of plant genes. The approach involves cloning a short sequence of a targeted plant gene into a viral delivery vector. The vector is used to infect a young plant, and in a few weeks natural defense mechanisms of the plant directed at suppressing virus replication also result in specific degradation of mRNAs from the endogenous plant gene that is targeted for silencing. VIGS is rapid (3-4 weeks from infection to silencing), does not require development of stable transformants, allows characterization of phenotypes that might be lethal in stable lines, and offers the potential to silence either individual or multiple members of a gene family. Here we briefly review the discoveries that led to the development of VIGS and what is known about the experimental requirements for effective silencing. We describe the methodology of VIGS and how it can be optimized and used for both forward and reverse genetics studies. Advantages and disadvantages of VIGS compared with other loss-of-function approaches available for plants are discussed, along with how the limitations of VIGS might be overcome. Examples are reviewed where VIGS has been used to provide important new insights into the roles of specific genes in plant development and plant defense responses. Finally, we examine the future prospects for VIGS as a powerful tool for assessing and characterizing the function of plant genes. PMID:15315635

  8. Chromosome substitution strains: gene discovery functional analysis and systems studies

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Joseph H.; Forejt, Jiri; Takada, Toyoyuki; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory mice are valuable in biomedical research in part because of the extraordinary diversity of genetic resources that are available for studies of complex genetic traits and as models for human biology and disease. Chromosome substitution strains (CSSs) are important in this resource portfolio because of their demonstrated use for gene discovery, genetic and epigenetic studies, functional characterizations, and systems analysis. CSSs are made by replacing a single chromosome in a host strain with the corresponding chromosome from a donor strain. A complete CSS panel involves a total of 22 engineered inbred strains, one for each of the 19 autosomes, one each for the X and Y chromosomes, and one for mitochondria. A genome survey simply involves comparing each phenotype for each of the CSSs with the phenotypes of the host strain. The CSS panels that are available for laboratory mice have been used to dissect a remarkable variety of phenotypes and to characterize an impressive array of disease models. These surveys have revealed considerable phenotypic diversity even among closely related progenitor strains, evidence for strong epistasis and for heritable epigenetic changes. Perhaps most importantly, and presumably because of their unique genetic constitution, CSSs, and congenic strains derived from them, the genetic variants underlying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are readily identified and functionally characterized. Together these studies show that CSSs are important resource for laboratory mice. PMID:22961226

  9. Identification of mycoparasitism-related genes in Clonostachys rosea 67-1 active against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhan-Bin; Sun, Man-Hong; Li, Shi-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Clonostachys rosea is a mycoparasite that has shown great potential in controlling various plant fungal pathogens. In order to find mycoparasitism-related genes in C. rosea, the transcriptome of the efficient isolate 67-1 in association with sclerotia of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was sequenced and analysed. The results identified 26,351 unigenes with a mean length of 1,102 nucleotides, among which 18,525 were annotated in one or more databases of NR, KEGG, Swiss-Prot, GO and COG. Differentially expressed genes at 8 h, 24 h and 48 h after sclerotial induction were analysed, and 6,890 unigenes were upregulated compared with the control without sclerotia. 713, 1,008 and 1,929 genes were specifically upregulated expressed, while 1,646, 283 and 529 genes were specifically downregulated, respectively. Gene ontology terms analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in metabolism of biological process, catalysis of molecular function and cellular component. The expression levels of 12 genes that were upregulated after encountering with S. sclerotiorum were monitored using real-time PCR. The results indicated that the quantitative detection was consistent with the transcriptome analysis. The study provides transcriptional gene expression information on C. rosea parasitizing S. sclerotiorum and forms the basis for further investigation of mycoparasitism-related genes of C. rosea. PMID:26657839

  10. Targeted capture and resequencing of 1040 genes reveal environmentally driven functional variation in grey wolves.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Rena M; Robinson, Jacqueline; Harrigan, Ryan; Silva, Pedro; Galverni, Marco; Musiani, Marco; Green, Richard E; Novembre, John; Wayne, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    In an era of ever-increasing amounts of whole-genome sequence data for individuals and populations, the utility of traditional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) array-based genome scans is uncertain. We previously performed a SNP array-based genome scan to identify candidate genes under selection in six distinct grey wolf (Canis lupus) ecotypes. Using this information, we designed a targeted capture array for 1040 genes, including all exons and flanking regions, as well as 5000 1-kb nongenic neutral regions, and resequenced these regions in 107 wolves. Selection tests revealed striking patterns of variation within candidate genes relative to noncandidate regions and identified potentially functional variants related to local adaptation. We found 27% and 47% of candidate genes from the previous SNP array study had functional changes that were outliers in sweed and bayenv analyses, respectively. This result verifies the use of genomewide SNP surveys to tag genes that contain functional variants between populations. We highlight nonsynonymous variants in APOB, LIPG and USH2A that occur in functional domains of these proteins, and that demonstrate high correlation with precipitation seasonality and vegetation. We find Arctic and High Arctic wolf ecotypes have higher numbers of genes under selection, which highlight their conservation value and heightened threat due to climate change. This study demonstrates that combining genomewide genotyping arrays with large-scale resequencing and environmental data provides a powerful approach to discern candidate functional variants in natural populations. PMID:26562361

  11. A Systematic Investigation into Aging Related Genes in Brain and Their Relationship with Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Guofeng; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Mei, Hongkang

    2016-01-01

    Aging, as a complex biological process, is accompanied by the accumulation of functional loses at different levels, which makes age to be the biggest risk factor to many neurological diseases. Even following decades of investigation, the process of aging is still far from being fully understood, especially at a systematic level. In this study, we identified aging related genes in brain by collecting the ones with sustained and consistent gene expression or DNA methylation changes in the aging process. Functional analysis with Gene Ontology to these genes suggested transcriptional regulators to be the most affected genes in the aging process. Transcription regulation analysis found some transcription factors, especially Specificity Protein 1 (SP1), to play important roles in regulating aging related gene expression. Module-based functional analysis indicated these genes to be associated with many well-known aging related pathways, supporting the validity of our approach to select aging related genes. Finally, we investigated the roles of aging related genes on Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). We found that aging and AD related genes both involved some common pathways, which provided a possible explanation why aging made the brain more vulnerable to Alzheimer’s Disease. PMID:26937969

  12. Loss of gene function and evolution of human phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hye Ji; Choi, Dongjin; Goh, Chul Jun; Hahn, Yoonsoo

    2015-01-01

    Humans have acquired many distinct evolutionary traits after the human-chimpanzee divergence. These phenotypes have resulted from genetic changes that occurred in the human genome and were retained by natural selection. Comparative primate genome analyses reveal that loss-of-function mutations are common in the human genome. Some of these gene inactivation events were revealed to be associated with the emergence of advantageous phenotypes and were therefore positively selected and fixed in modern humans (the “less-ismore” hypothesis). Representative cases of human gene inactivation and their functional implications are presented in this review. Functional studies of additional inactive genes will provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying acquisition of various human-specific traits. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(7): 373-379] PMID:25887751

  13. History of a prolific family: the Hes/Hey-related genes of the annelid Platynereis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Hes superfamily or Hes/Hey-related genes encompass a variety of metazoan-specific bHLH genes, with somewhat fuzzy phylogenetic relationships. Hes superfamily members are involved in a variety of major developmental mechanisms in metazoans, notably in neurogenesis and segmentation processes, in which they often act as direct effector genes of the Notch signaling pathway. Results We have investigated the molecular and functional evolution of the Hes superfamily in metazoans using the lophotrochozoan Platynereis dumerilii as model. Our phylogenetic analyses of more than 200 Metazoan Hes/Hey-related genes revealed the presence of five families, three of them (Hes, Hey and Helt) being pan-metazoan. Those families were likely composed of a unique representative in the last common metazoan ancestor. The evolution of the Hes family was shaped by many independent lineage specific tandem duplication events. The expression patterns of 13 of the 15 Hes/Hey-related genes in Platynereis indicate a broad functional diversification. Nevertheless, a majority of these genes are involved in two crucial developmental processes in annelids: neurogenesis and segmentation, resembling functions highlighted in other animal models. Conclusions Combining phylogenetic and expression data, our study suggests an unusual evolutionary history for the Hes superfamily. An ancestral multifunctional annelid Hes gene may have undergone multiples rounds of duplication-degeneration-complementation processes in the lineage leading to Platynereis, each gene copies ensuring their maintenance in the genome by subfunctionalisation. Similar but independent waves of duplications are at the origin of the multiplicity of Hes genes in other metazoan lineages. PMID:25250171

  14. Mining Disease-Resistance Genes in Roses: Functional and Molecular Characterization of the Rdr1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Terefe-Ayana, Diro; Yasmin, Aneela; Le, Thanh Loan; Kaufmann, Helgard; Biber, Anja; Kühr, Astrid; Linde, Marcus; Debener, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of roses with the leaf spot pathogen Diplocarpon rosae (the cause of black spot on roses) is an interesting pathosystem because it involves a long-lived woody perennial, with life history traits very different from most model plants, and a hemibiotrophic pathogen with moderate levels of gene flow. Here we present data on the molecular structure of the first monogenic dominant resistance gene from roses, Rdr1, directed against one isolate of D. rosae. Complete sequencing of the locus carrying the Rdr1 gene resulted in a sequence of 265,477 bp with a cluster of nine highly related TIR–NBS–LRR (TNL) candidate genes. After sequencing revealed candidate genes for Rdr1, we implemented a gene expression analysis and selected five genes out of the nine TNLs. We then silenced the whole TNL gene family using RNAi (Rdr1–RNAi) constructed from the most conserved sequence region and demonstrated a loss of resistance in the normally resistant genotype. To identify the functional TNL gene, we further screened the five TNL candidate genes with a transient leaf infiltration assay. The transient expression assay indicated a single TNL gene (muRdr1H), partially restoring resistance in the susceptible genotype. Rdr1 was found to localize within the muRdr1 gene family; the genes within this locus contain characteristic motifs of active TNL genes and belong to a young cluster of R genes. The transient leaf assay can be used to further analyze the rose black spot interaction and its evolution, extending the analyses to additional R genes and to additional pathogenic types of the pathogen. PMID:22639591

  15. Evolutionary change in the functional specificity of genes.

    PubMed

    Eizinger, A; Jungblut, B; Sommer, R J

    1999-05-01

    Species throughout the animal kingdom share not only housekeeping but also many key regulatory genes. Nonetheless, species differ from one another developmentally and thus, also morphologically. One of the general aims of comparative developmental genetics is to understand how similar molecules can generate the known diversity of biological form. Here, we argue that gene function can change in different ways during the evolution of developmental processes. Genes can be recruited to serve completely new functions in a new regulatory linkage (co-option), they can change their molecular specificity while remaining in the original (homologous) developmental program and can, at the same time, retain other functions. We describe evidence for such evolutionary patterns based on the comparison of loss-of-function mutations of homologous genes of the two free-living nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. Ultimately, it is the interplay of conservation and change of the specificity of genes and genetic networks that generates developmental novelty over evolutionary time. PMID:10322487

  16. PHYLOGENOMICS - GUIDED VALIDATION OF FUNCTION FOR CONSERVED UNKNOWN GENES

    SciTech Connect

    V, DE CRECY-LAGARD; D, HANSON A

    2012-01-03

    Identifying functions for all gene products in all sequenced organisms is a central challenge of the post-genomic era. However, at least 30-50% of the proteins encoded by any given genome are of unknown function, or wrongly or vaguely annotated. Many of these 'unknown' proteins are common to prokaryotes and plants. We accordingly set out to predict and experimentally test the functions of such proteins. Our approach to functional prediction is integrative, coupling the extensive post-genomic resources available for plants with comparative genomics based on hundreds of microbial genomes, and functional genomic datasets from model microorganisms. The early phase is computer-assisted; later phases incorporate intellectual input from expert plant and microbial biochemists. The approach thus bridges the gap between automated homology-based annotations and the classical gene discovery efforts of experimentalists, and is much more powerful than purely computational approaches to identifying gene-function associations. Among Arabidopsis genes, we focused on those (2,325 in total) that (i) are unique or belong to families with no more than three members, (ii) are conserved between plants and prokaryotes, and (iii) have unknown or poorly known functions. Computer-assisted selection of promising targets for deeper analysis was based on homology .. independent characteristics associated in the SEED database with the prokaryotic members of each family, specifically gene clustering and phyletic spread, as well as availability of functional genomics data, and publications that could link candidate families to general metabolic areas, or to specific functions. In-depth comparative genomic analysis was then performed for about 500 top candidate families, which connected ~55 of them to general areas of metabolism and led to specific functional predictions for a subset of ~25 more. Twenty predicted functions were experimentally tested in at least one prokaryotic organism via reverse

  17. Identification of genes related to beak deformity of chickens using digital gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hao; Zhu, Jing; Sun, Yanyan; Liu, Ranran; Liu, Nian; Li, Dongli; Wen, Jie; Chen, Jilan

    2014-01-01

    Frequencies of up to 3% of beak deformity (normally a crossed beak) occur in some indigenous chickens in China, such as and Beijing-You. Chickens with deformed beaks have reduced feed intake, growth rate, and abnormal behaviors. Beak deformity represents an economic as well as an animal welfare problem in the poultry industry. Because the genetic basis of beak deformity remains incompletely understood, the present study sought to identify important genes and metabolic pathways involved in this phenotype. Digital gene expression analysis was performed on deformed and normal beaks collected from Beijing-You chickens to detect global gene expression differences. A total of >11 million cDNA tags were sequenced, and 5,864,499 and 5,648,877 clean tags were obtained in the libraries of deformed and normal beaks, respectively. In total, 1,156 differentially expressed genes (DEG) were identified in the deformed beak with 409 being up-regulated and 747 down-regulated in the deformed beaks. qRT-PCR using eight genes was performed to verify the results of DGE profiling. Gene ontology (GO) analysis highlighted that genes of the keratin family on GGA25 were abundant among the DEGs. Pathway analysis showed that many DEGs were linked to the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids and glycerolipid metabolism. Combining the analyses, 11 genes (MUC, LOC426217, BMP4, ACAA1, LPL, ALDH7A1, GLA, RETSAT, SDR16C5, WWOX, and MOGAT1) were highlighted as potential candidate genes for beak deformity in chickens. Some of these genes have been identified previously, while others have unknown function with respect to thus phenotype. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide study to investigate the transcriptome differences in the deformed and normal beaks of chickens. The DEGs identified here are worthy of further functional characterization. PMID:25198128

  18. Aging alters the expression of genes for neuroprotection and synaptic function following acute estradiol treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aenlle, Kristina K.; Foster, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    This study used microarray analysis to examine age-related changes in gene expression 6 and 12 hr following a single estradiol injection in ovariectomized mice. Estradiol-responsive gene expression at the 6 hr time point was reduced in aged (18 mo) animals compared to young (4 mo) and middle-aged (MA, 12 mo) mice. Examination of gene clustering within biological and functional pathways indicated that young and MA mice exhibited increased expression of genes for cellular components of the synapse and decreased expression of genes related to oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial dysfunction. At the 12 hr time point, estradiol-responsive gene expression increased in aged animals and decreased in young and MA mice compared to the 6 hr time point. Gene clustering analysis indicated that aged mice exhibited increased expression of genes for signaling pathways that are rapidly influenced by estradiol. The age differences in gene expression for rapid signaling pathways may relate to disparity in basal pathway activity and estradiol mediated activation of rapid signaling cascades. PMID:19790252

  19. Gene-to-gene interaction between sodium channel-related genes in determining the risk of antiepileptic drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Lee, Kee-Ra; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Lee, Min-Cheol; Kim, Yo-Sik

    2009-02-01

    The pathogenesis of antiepileptic drug (AED) resistance is multifactorial. However, most candidate gene association studies typically assess the effects of candidate genes independently of each other, which is partly because of the limitations of the parametric-statistical methods for detecting the gene-to-gene interactions. A total of 200 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and 200 patients with drug-responsive epilepsy were genotyped for 3 representative the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the voltage-gated sodium channel genes (SCN1A, SCN1B, and SCN2A) by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing analysis. Besides the typical parametric statistical method, a new statistical method (multifactor dimensionality reduction [MDR]) was used to determine whether gene-to-gene interactions increase the risk of AED resistance. None of the individual genotypes or alleles tested in the present study showed a significant association with AED resistance, regardless of their theoretical functional value. With the MDR method, of three possible 2-locus genotype combinations, the combination of SCN2A-PM with SCN1B-PM was the best model for predicting susceptibility to AED resistance, with a p value of 0.0547. MDR, as an analysis paradigm for investigating multi-locus effects in complex disorders, may be a useful statistical method for determining the role of gene-to-gene interactions in the pathogenesis of AED resistance. PMID:19270815

  20. EpilepsyGene: a genetic resource for genes and mutations related to epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ran, Xia; Li, Jinchen; Shao, Qianzhi; Chen, Huiqian; Lin, Zhongdong; Sun, Zhong Sheng; Wu, Jinyu

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent chronic neurological disorders, afflicting about 3.5-6.5 per 1000 children and 10.8 per 1000 elderly people. With intensive effort made during the last two decades, numerous genes and mutations have been published to be associated with the disease. An organized resource integrating and annotating the ever-increasing genetic data will be imperative to acquire a global view of the cutting-edge in epilepsy research. Herein, we developed EpilepsyGene (http://61.152.91.49/EpilepsyGene). It contains cumulative to date 499 genes and 3931 variants associated with 331 clinical phenotypes collected from 818 publications. Furthermore, in-depth data mining was performed to gain insights into the understanding of the data, including functional annotation, gene prioritization, functional analysis of prioritized genes and overlap analysis focusing on the comorbidity. An intuitive web interface to search and browse the diversified genetic data was also developed to facilitate access to the data of interest. In general, EpilepsyGene is designed to be a central genetic database to provide the research community substantial convenience to uncover the genetic basis of epilepsy. PMID:25324312

  1. EpilepsyGene: a genetic resource for genes and mutations related to epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Xia; Li, Jinchen; Shao, Qianzhi; Chen, Huiqian; Lin, Zhongdong; Sun, Zhong Sheng; Wu, Jinyu

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent chronic neurological disorders, afflicting about 3.5–6.5 per 1000 children and 10.8 per 1000 elderly people. With intensive effort made during the last two decades, numerous genes and mutations have been published to be associated with the disease. An organized resource integrating and annotating the ever-increasing genetic data will be imperative to acquire a global view of the cutting-edge in epilepsy research. Herein, we developed EpilepsyGene (http://61.152.91.49/EpilepsyGene). It contains cumulative to date 499 genes and 3931 variants associated with 331 clinical phenotypes collected from 818 publications. Furthermore, in-depth data mining was performed to gain insights into the understanding of the data, including functional annotation, gene prioritization, functional analysis of prioritized genes and overlap analysis focusing on the comorbidity. An intuitive web interface to search and browse the diversified genetic data was also developed to facilitate access to the data of interest. In general, EpilepsyGene is designed to be a central genetic database to provide the research community substantial convenience to uncover the genetic basis of epilepsy. PMID:25324312

  2. Detecting Horizontal Gene Transfer between Closely Related Taxa.

    PubMed

    Adato, Orit; Ninyo, Noga; Gophna, Uri; Snir, Sagi

    2015-10-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the transfer of genetic material between organisms, is crucial for genetic innovation and the evolution of genome architecture. Existing HGT detection algorithms rely on a strong phylogenetic signal distinguishing the transferred sequence from ancestral (vertically derived) genes in its recipient genome. Detecting HGT between closely related species or strains is challenging, as the phylogenetic signal is usually weak and the nucleotide composition is normally nearly identical. Nevertheless, there is a great importance in detecting HGT between congeneric species or strains, especially in clinical microbiology, where understanding the emergence of new virulent and drug-resistant strains is crucial, and often time-sensitive. We developed a novel, self-contained technique named Near HGT, based on the synteny index, to measure the divergence of a gene from its native genomic environment and used it to identify candidate HGT events between closely related strains. The method confirms candidate transferred genes based on the constant relative mutability (CRM). Using CRM, the algorithm assigns a confidence score based on "unusual" sequence divergence. A gene exhibiting exceptional deviations according to both synteny and mutability criteria, is considered a validated HGT product. We first employed the technique to a set of three E. coli strains and detected several highly probable horizontally acquired genes. We then compared the method to existing HGT detection tools using a larger strain data set. When combined with additional approaches our new algorithm provides richer picture and brings us closer to the goal of detecting all newly acquired genes in a particular strain. PMID:26439115

  3. Detecting Horizontal Gene Transfer between Closely Related Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Adato, Orit; Ninyo, Noga; Gophna, Uri; Snir, Sagi

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the transfer of genetic material between organisms, is crucial for genetic innovation and the evolution of genome architecture. Existing HGT detection algorithms rely on a strong phylogenetic signal distinguishing the transferred sequence from ancestral (vertically derived) genes in its recipient genome. Detecting HGT between closely related species or strains is challenging, as the phylogenetic signal is usually weak and the nucleotide composition is normally nearly identical. Nevertheless, there is a great importance in detecting HGT between congeneric species or strains, especially in clinical microbiology, where understanding the emergence of new virulent and drug-resistant strains is crucial, and often time-sensitive. We developed a novel, self-contained technique named Near HGT, based on the synteny index, to measure the divergence of a gene from its native genomic environment and used it to identify candidate HGT events between closely related strains. The method confirms candidate transferred genes based on the constant relative mutability (CRM). Using CRM, the algorithm assigns a confidence score based on “unusual” sequence divergence. A gene exhibiting exceptional deviations according to both synteny and mutability criteria, is considered a validated HGT product. We first employed the technique to a set of three E. coli strains and detected several highly probable horizontally acquired genes. We then compared the method to existing HGT detection tools using a larger strain data set. When combined with additional approaches our new algorithm provides richer picture and brings us closer to the goal of detecting all newly acquired genes in a particular strain. PMID:26439115

  4. Tandem riboswitch architectures exhibit complex gene control functions.

    PubMed

    Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Hammond, Ming C; Block, Kirsten F; Welz, Rüdiger; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Roth, Adam; Breaker, Ronald R

    2006-10-13

    Riboswitches are structured RNAs typically located in the 5' untranslated regions of bacterial mRNAs that bind metabolites and control gene expression. Most riboswitches sense one metabolite and function as simple genetic switches. However, we found that the 5' region of the Bacillus clausii metE messenger RNA includes two riboswitches that respond to S-adenosylmethionine and coenzyme B12. This tandem arrangement yields a composite gene control system that functions as a two-input Boolean NOR logic gate. These findings and the discovery of additional tandem riboswitch architectures reveal how simple RNA elements can be assembled to make sophisticated genetic decisions without involving protein factors. PMID:17038623

  5. Functional analysis and nucleotide sequence of the promoter region of the murine hck gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lock, P; Stanley, E; Holtzman, D A; Dunn, A R

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of the promoter region and exon 1 of the murine hck gene have been characterized in detail. RNase protection analysis has established that hck transcripts initiate from heterogeneous start sites located within the hck gene. Fusion gene constructs containing hck 5'-flanking sequences and the bacterial Neor gene have been introduced into the hematopoietic cell lines FDC-P1 and WEHI-265 by using a self-inactivating retroviral vector. The transcriptional start sites of the fusion gene are essentially identical to those of the endogenous hck gene. Analysis of infected WEHI-265 cell lines treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reveals a 3- to 5-fold elevation in the levels of endogenous hck mRNA and a 1.4- to 2.6-fold increase in the level of Neor fusion gene transcripts, indicating that hck 5'-flanking sequences are capable of conferring LPS responsiveness on the Neor gene. The 5'-flanking region of the hck gene contains sequences similar to an element which is thought to be involved in the LPS responsiveness of the class II major histocompatibility gene A alpha k. A subset of these sequences are also found in the 5'-flanking regions of other LPS-responsive genes. Moreover, this motif is related to the consensus binding sequence of NF-kappa B, a transcription factor which is known to be regulated by LPS. Images PMID:2388619

  6. Mapping and annotating obesity-related genes in pig and human genomes.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Pier Luigi; Fontanesi, Luca; Piovesan, Damiano; Fariselli, Piero; Casadio, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Background. Obesity is a major health problem in both developed and emerging countries. Obesity is a complex disease whose etiology involves genetic factors in strong interplay with environmental determinants and lifestyle. The discovery of genetic factors and biological pathways underlying human obesity is hampered by the difficulty in controlling the genetic background of human cohorts. Animal models are then necessary to further dissect the genetics of obesity. Pig has emerged as one of the most attractive models, because of the similarity with humans in the mechanisms regulating the fat deposition. Results. We collected the genes related to obesity in humans and to fat deposition traits in pig. We localized them on both human and pig genomes, building a map useful to interpret comparative studies on obesity. We characterized the collected genes structurally and functionally with BAR+ and mapped them on KEGG pathways and on STRING protein interaction network. Conclusions. The collected set consists of 361 obesity related genes in human and pig genomes. All genes were mapped on the human genome, and 54 could not be localized on the pig genome (release 2012). Only for 3 human genes there is no counterpart in pig, confirming that this animal is a good model for human obesity studies. Obesity related genes are mostly involved in regulation and signaling processes/pathways and relevant connection emerges between obesity-related genes and diseases such as cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:23855670

  7. APOLIPOPROTEIN E GENE AND EARLY AGE-RELATED MACULOPATHY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene and early age-related maculopathy (ARM) in middle-aged persons. DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: Participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (n = 10139; age range, 49-73 ye...

  8. Core Promoter Functions in the Regulation of Gene Expression of Drosophila Dorsal Target Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Zehavi, Yonathan; Kuznetsov, Olga; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Developmental processes are highly dependent on transcriptional regulation by RNA polymerase II. The RNA polymerase II core promoter is the ultimate target of a multitude of transcription factors that control transcription initiation. Core promoters consist of core promoter motifs, e.g. the initiator, TATA box, and the downstream core promoter element (DPE), which confer specific properties to the core promoter. Here, we explored the importance of core promoter functions in the dorsal-ventral developmental gene regulatory network. This network includes multiple genes that are activated by different nuclear concentrations of Dorsal, an NFκB homolog transcription factor, along the dorsal-ventral axis. We show that over two-thirds of Dorsal target genes contain DPE sequence motifs, which is significantly higher than the proportion of DPE-containing promoters in Drosophila genes. We demonstrate that multiple Dorsal target genes are evolutionarily conserved and functionally dependent on the DPE. Furthermore, we have analyzed the activation of key Dorsal target genes by Dorsal, as well as by another Rel family transcription factor, Relish, and the dependence of their activation on the DPE motif. Using hybrid enhancer-promoter constructs in Drosophila cells and embryo extracts, we have demonstrated that the core promoter composition is an important determinant of transcriptional activity of Dorsal target genes. Taken together, our results provide evidence for the importance of core promoter composition in the regulation of Dorsal target genes. PMID:24634215

  9. A geminivirus-induced gene silencing system for gene function validation in cassava.

    PubMed

    Fofana, Ismael B F; Sangaré, Abdourahamane; Collier, Ray; Taylor, Christopher; Fauquet, Claude M

    2004-11-01

    We have constructed an African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) based gene-silencing vector as a reverse genetics tool for gene function analysis in cassava. The vector carrying a fragment from the Nicotiana tabacum sulfur gene (su), encoding one unit of the chloroplast enzyme magnesium chelatase, was used to induce the silencing of the cassava orthologous gene resulting in yellow-white spots characteristic of the inhibition of su expression. This result suggests that well developed sequence databases from model plants like Arabidopsis thaliana, Nicotiana benthamiana, N. tabacum, Lycopersicon esculentum and others could be used as a major source of information and sequences for functional genomics in cassava. Furthermore, a fragment of the cassava CYP79D2 endogenous gene, sharing 89% homology with CYP79D1 endogenous gene was inserted into the ACMV vector. The resultant vector was inducing the down regulation of the expression of these two genes which catalyze the first-dedicated step in the synthesis of linamarin, the major cyanogenic glycoside in cassava. At 21 days post-inoculation (dpi), a 76% reduction of linamarin content was observed in silenced leaves. Using transgenic plants expressing antisense RNA of CYP79D1 and CYP79D2, Siritunga and Sayre (2003) obtained several lines with a reduction level varying from 60% to 94%. This result provides the first example of direct comparison of the efficiency of a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system and the transgenic approach for suppression of a biosynthetic pathway. The ACMV VIGS system will certainly be a complement and in some cases an alternative to the transgenic approach, for gene discovery and gene function analysis in cassava. PMID:15630624

  10. Evolution of the vertebrate paralemmin gene family: ancient origin of gene duplicates suggests distinct functions.

    PubMed

    Hultqvist, Greta; Ocampo Daza, Daniel; Larhammar, Dan; Kilimann, Manfred W

    2012-01-01

    Paralemmin-1 is a protein implicated in plasma membrane dynamics, the development of filopodia, neurites and dendritic spines, as well as the invasiveness and metastatic potential of cancer cells. However, little is known about its mode of action, or about the biological functions of the other paralemmin isoforms: paralemmin-2, paralemmin-3 and palmdelphin. We describe here evolutionary analyses of the paralemmin gene family in a broad range of vertebrate species. Our results suggest that the four paralemmin isoform genes (PALM1, PALM2, PALM3 and PALMD) arose by quadruplication of an ancestral gene in the two early vertebrate genome duplications. Paralemmin-1 and palmdelphin were further duplicated in the teleost fish specific genome duplication. We identified a unique sequence motif common to all paralemmins, consisting of 11 highly conserved residues of which four are invariant. A single full-length paralemmin homolog with this motif was identified in the genome of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus and an isolated putative paralemmin motif could be detected in the genome of the lancelet Branchiostoma floridae. This allows us to conclude that the paralemmin gene family arose early and has been maintained throughout vertebrate evolution, suggesting functional diversification and specific biological roles of the paralemmin isoforms. The paralemmin genes have also maintained specific features of gene organisation and sequence. This includes the occurrence of closely linked downstream genes, initially identified as a readthrough fusion protein with mammalian paralemmin-2 (Palm2-AKAP2). We have found evidence for such an arrangement for paralemmin-1 and -2 in several vertebrate genomes, as well as for palmdelphin and paralemmin-3 in teleost fish genomes, and suggest the name paralemmin downstream genes (PDG) for this new gene family. Thus, our findings point to ancient roles for paralemmins and distinct biological functions of the gene duplicates. PMID:22855693

  11. How should we measure proportionality on relative gene expression data?

    PubMed

    Erb, Ionas; Notredame, Cedric

    2016-06-01

    Correlation is ubiquitously used in gene expression analysis although its validity as an objective criterion is often questionable. If no normalization reflecting the original mRNA counts in the cells is available, correlation between genes becomes spurious. Yet the need for normalization can be bypassed using a relative analysis approach called log-ratio analysis. This approach can be used to identify proportional gene pairs, i.e. a subset of pairs whose correlation can be inferred correctly from unnormalized data due to their vanishing log-ratio variance. To interpret the size of non-zero log-ratio variances, a proposal for a scaling with respect to the variance of one member of the gene pair was recently made by Lovell et al. Here we derive analytically how spurious proportionality is introduced when using a scaling. We base our analysis on a symmetric proportionality coefficient (briefly mentioned in Lovell et al.) that has a number of advantages over their statistic. We show in detail how the choice of reference needed for the scaling determines which gene pairs are identified as proportional. We demonstrate that using an unchanged gene as a reference has huge advantages in terms of sensitivity. We also explore the link between proportionality and partial correlation and derive expressions for a partial proportionality coefficient. A brief data-analysis part puts the discussed concepts into practice. PMID:26762323

  12. New gene functions in megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation

    PubMed Central

    Gieger, Christian; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Cvejic, Ana; Tang, Weihong; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Elling, Ulrich; Goodall, Alison H.; Labrune, Yann; Lopez, Lorna M.; Mägi, Reedik; Meacham, Stuart; Okada, Yukinori; Pirastu, Nicola; Sorice, Rossella; Teumer, Alexander; Voss, Katrin; Zhang, Weihua; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bis, Joshua C.; Ellinghaus, David; Gögele, Martin; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langenberg, Claudia; Kovacs, Peter; O’Reilly, Paul F.; Shin, So-Youn; Esko, Tõnu; Hartiala, Jaana; Kanoni, Stavroula; Murgia, Federico; Parsa, Afshin; Stephens, Jonathan; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Allayee, Hooman; Attwood, Antony; Balkau, Beverley; Bastardot, François; Basu, Saonli; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Biino, Ginevra; Bomba, Lorenzo; Bonnefond, Amélie; Cambien, François; Chambers, John C.; Cucca, Francesco; D’Adamo, Pio; Davies, Gail; de Boer, Rudolf A.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Erdmann, Jeanette; Evans, David M.; Falchi, Mario; Feng, Wei; Folsom, Aaron R.; Frazer, Ian H.; Gibson, Quince D.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Hammond, Chris; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hersch, Micha; Illig, Thomas; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Jolley, Jennifer; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kühnel, Brigitte; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Lumley, Thomas; Mangino, Massimo; Maschio, Andrea; Leach, Irene Mateo; McKnight, Barbara; Memari, Yasin; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nauck, Matthias; Navis, Gerjan; Nöthlings, Ute; Nolte, Ilja M.; Porteous, David J.; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Pullat, Janne; Ring, Susan M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ruggiero, Daniela; Ruokonen, Aimo; Sala, Cinzia; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Schlessinger, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, James; Smith, Nicholas L.; Snieder, Harold; Starr, John M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Taylor, Kent; Tenesa, Albert; Thein, Swee Lay; Tönjes, Anke; Uda, Manuela; Ulivi, Sheila; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Visscher, Peter M.; Völker, Uwe; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yang, Tsun-Po; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zitting, Paavo; Bradley, John R.; Dedoussis, George V.; Gasparini, Paolo; Hazen, Stanley L.; Metspalu, Andres; Pirastu, Mario; Shuldiner, Alan R.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Zwaginga, Jaap-Jan; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Deary, Ian J.; Franke, Andre; Froguel, Philippe; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Martin, Nicholas G.; Meisinger, Christa; Psaty, Bruce M.; Spector, Timothy D.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N.; Ciullo, Marina; Deloukas, Panos; Greinacher, Andreas; Jupe, Steve; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Khadake, Jyoti; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Penninger, Josef; Prokopenko, Inga; Stemple, Derek; Toniolo, Daniela; Wernisch, Lorenz; Sanna, Serena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Rendon, Augusto; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Soranzo, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are the second most abundant cell type in blood and are essential for maintaining haemostasis. Their count and volume are tightly controlled within narrow physiological ranges, but there is only limited understanding of the molecular processes controlling both traits. Here we carried out a high-powered meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in up to 66,867 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. We identified 68 genomic loci reliably associated with platelet count and volume mapping to established and putative novel regulators of megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation. These genes show megakaryocyte-specific gene expression patterns and extensive network connectivity. Using gene silencing in Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster, we identified 11 of the genes as novel regulators of blood cell formation. Taken together, our findings advance understanding of novel gene functions controlling fate-determining events during megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation, providing a new example of successful translation of GWAS to function. PMID:22139419

  13. Gamma and Related Functions Generalized for Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollerton, R. L.

    2008-01-01

    Given a sequence g[subscript k] greater than 0, the "g-factorial" product [big product][superscript k] [subscript i=1] g[subscript i] is extended from integer k to real x by generalizing properties of the gamma function [Gamma](x). The Euler-Mascheroni constant [gamma] and the beta and zeta functions are also generalized. Specific examples include…

  14. Relating Functional Groups to the Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struyf, Jef

    2009-01-01

    An introduction to organic chemistry functional groups and their ionic variants is presented. Functional groups are ordered by the position of their specific (hetero) atom in the periodic table. Lewis structures are compared with their corresponding condensed formulas. (Contains 5 tables.)

  15. From genes to functional classes in the study of biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shahrour, Fátima; Arbiza, Leonardo; Dopazo, Hernán; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Mínguez, Pablo; Montaner, David; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2007-01-01

    Background With the popularisation of high-throughput techniques, the need for procedures that help in the biological interpretation of results has increased enormously. Recently, new procedures inspired in systems biology criteria have started to be developed. Results Here we present FatiScan, a web-based program which implements a threshold-independent test for the functional interpretation of large-scale experiments that does not depend on the pre-selection of genes based on the multiple application of independent tests to each gene. The test implemented aims to directly test the behaviour of blocks of functionally related genes, instead of focusing on single genes. In addition, the test does not depend on the type of the data used for obtaining significance values, and consequently different types of biologically informative terms (gene ontology, pathways, functional motifs, transcription factor binding sites or regulatory sites from CisRed) can be applied to different classes of genome-scale studies. We exemplify its application in microarray gene expression, evolution and interactomics. Conclusion Methods for gene set enrichment which, in addition, are independent from the original data and experimental design constitute a promising alternative for the functional profiling of genome-scale experiments. A web server that performs the test described and other similar ones can be found at: . PMID:17407596

  16. Gene-environment interactions of circadian-related genes for cardiometabolic traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common circadian-related gene variants associate with increased risk for metabolic alterations including type 2 diabetes. However, little is known about whether diet and sleep could modify associations between circadian-related variants (CLOCK-rs1801260, CRY2-rs11605924, MTNR1B-rs1387153, MTNR1B-rs1...

  17. COMT but not serotonin-related genes modulates the influence of childhood abuse on anger traits

    PubMed Central

    Perroud, Nader; Jaussent, Isabelle; Guillaume, Sébastien; Bellivier, Frank; Baud, Patrick; Jollant, Fabrice; Leboyer, Marion; Lewis, Cathryn; Malafosse, Alain; Courtet, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Anger-related traits are regulated by genes as well as early environmental factors. Both childhood maltreatment and genes underlie vulnerability to suicidal behaviors, possibly by affecting the constitution of intermediate phenotypes such as anger traits. The aim of this study was to test the interaction between nine candidate genes and childhood maltreatment in modulating anger-related traits in 875 adult suicide attempters. The State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire were used to examine anger traits and traumatic childhood experiences respectively. The functional polymorphism of the catecholamine-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) gene Val158Met significantly modulated the association between sexual abuse and anger-trait level (p=0.001). In the presence of sexual abuse, individuals carrying the Val high-activity allele displayed greater disposition towards anger than individuals homozygous for the Met allele (p=0.0003). Notably, none of the serotonin-related genes influenced the effect of childhood abuse on anger traits. The results of the present study suggest that anger-trait level is influenced by the interaction between childhood abuse and functional polymorphism in the COMT gene. This study was carried out in a population with a high frequency of childhood abuse and a high disposition towards anger, and replication in healthy subjects is needed. PMID:20002200

  18. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Yiu Huen; Dogruluk, Turgut; Tedeschi, Philip M.; Wardwell-Ozgo, Joanna; Lu, Hengyu; Espitia, Maribel; Nair, Nikitha; Minelli, Rosalba; Chong, Zechen; Chen, Fengju; Chang, Qing Edward; Dennison, Jennifer B.; Dogruluk, Armel; Li, Min; Ying, Haoqiang; Bertino, Joseph R.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Ittmann, Michael; Kerrigan, John; Chen, Ken; Creighton, Chad J.; Eterovic, Karina; Mills, Gordon B.; Scott, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This approach reveals oncogenic activity for rare gene aberrations in genes including NAD Kinase (NADK), which regulates NADP(H) homeostasis and cellular redox state. We further validate mutant NADK, whose expression provides gain-of-function enzymatic activity leading to a reduction in cellular reactive oxygen species and tumorigenesis, and show that depletion of wild-type NADK in PDAC cell lines attenuates cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that annotating rare aberrations can reveal important cancer signalling pathways representing additional therapeutic targets. PMID:26806015

  19. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Yiu Huen; Dogruluk, Turgut; Tedeschi, Philip M; Wardwell-Ozgo, Joanna; Lu, Hengyu; Espitia, Maribel; Nair, Nikitha; Minelli, Rosalba; Chong, Zechen; Chen, Fengju; Chang, Qing Edward; Dennison, Jennifer B; Dogruluk, Armel; Li, Min; Ying, Haoqiang; Bertino, Joseph R; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Ittmann, Michael; Kerrigan, John; Chen, Ken; Creighton, Chad J; Eterovic, Karina; Mills, Gordon B; Scott, Kenneth L

    2016-01-01

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This approach reveals oncogenic activity for rare gene aberrations in genes including NAD Kinase (NADK), which regulates NADP(H) homeostasis and cellular redox state. We further validate mutant NADK, whose expression provides gain-of-function enzymatic activity leading to a reduction in cellular reactive oxygen species and tumorigenesis, and show that depletion of wild-type NADK in PDAC cell lines attenuates cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that annotating rare aberrations can reveal important cancer signalling pathways representing additional therapeutic targets. PMID:26806015

  20. Gene expression profiles of autophagy-related genes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Igci, Mehri; Baysan, Mehmet; Yigiter, Remzi; Ulasli, Mustafa; Geyik, Sirma; Bayraktar, Recep; Bozgeyik, İbrahim; Bozgeyik, Esra; Bayram, Ali; Cakmak, Ecir Ali

    2016-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an imflammatory disease of central nervous system caused by genetic and environmental factors that remain largely unknown. Autophagy is the process of degradation and recycling of damaged cytoplasmic organelles, macromolecular aggregates, and long-lived proteins. Malfunction of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases, and autophagy genes may modulate the T cell survival. We aimed to examine the expression levels of autophagy-related genes. The blood samples of 95 unrelated patients (aged 17-65years, 37 male, 58 female) diagnosed as MS and 95 healthy controls were used to extract the RNA samples. After conversion to single stranded cDNA using polyT priming: the targeted genes were pre-amplified, and 96×78 (samples×primers) qRT-PCR reactions were performed for each primer pair on each sample on a 96.96 array of Fluidigm BioMark™. Compared to age- and sex-matched controls, gene expression levels of ATG16L2, ATG9A, BCL2, FAS, GAA, HGS, PIK3R1, RAB24, RGS19, ULK1, FOXO1, HTT were significantly altered (false discovery rate<0.05). Thus, altered expression levels of several autophagy related genes may affect protein levels, which in turn would influence the activity of autophagy, or most probably, those genes might be acting independent of autophagy and contributing to MS pathogenesis as risk factors. The indeterminate genetic causes leading to alterations in gene expressions require further analysis. PMID:27125224

  1. Steroidogenesis-related gene expression in the rat ovary exposed to melatonin supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Gisele Negro; Maganhin, Carla Cristina; Simões, Ricardo Santos; Baracat, Maria Cândida Pinheiro; da Silva Sasso, Gisela Rodrigues; Fuchs, Luiz Fernando Portugal; de Jesus Simões, Manuel; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Júnior, José Maria Soares

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze steroidogenesis-related gene expression in the rat ovary exposed to melatonin supplementation. METHODS: Thirty-two virgin adult female rats were randomized to two groups as follows: the control group GI received vehicle and the experimental group GII received melatonin supplementation (10 µg/night per animal) for 60 consecutive days. After the treatment, animals were anesthetized and the collected ovaries were immediately placed in liquid nitrogen for complementary deoxyribonucleic acid microarray analyses. A GeneChip® Kit Rat Genome 230 2.0 Affymetrix Array was used for gene analysis and the experiment was repeated three times for each group. The results were normalized with the GeneChip® Operating Software program and confirmed through analysis with the secondary deoxyribonucleic acid-Chip Analyzer (dChip) software. The data were confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Genes related to ovarian function were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: We found the upregulation of the type 9 adenylate cyclase and inhibin beta B genes and the downregulation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element modulator and cytochrome P450 family 17a1 genes in the ovarian tissue of GII compared to those of the control group. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that melatonin supplementation decreases gene expression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, which changes ovarian steroidogenesis. PMID:25789524

  2. Differential expression of apoptosis-related genes in the cochlea of noise-exposed rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo Hua; Cai, Qunfeng; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Jiang, Haiyan; Ding, Dalian; Coling, Donald E.; Zheng, Guiliang; Salvi, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to intense noise induces apoptosis in hair cells in the cochlea. To identify the molecular changes associated with noise-induced apoptosis, we used quantitative real-time PCR to evaluate the changes in 84 apoptosis related genes in cochlear samples from the sensory epithelium and lateral wall. Sprague Dawley rats exposed to a continuous noise at 115 dB SPL for 2 h. The exposure caused a 40–60 dB threshold shift 4 h post-exposure that decreased to 20–30 dB 7 days post-exposure. These functional changes were associated with apoptotic markers including nuclear condensation and fragmentation and TUNEL staining. Immediately after the noise exposure, 12 genes were downregulated, whereas only one gene (Traf4) was upregulated. At 4 h post-exposure, 8 genes were upregulated; 3 (Tnrsf1a, Tnfrsf1b, Tnfrst5) belonged to the Tnfrsf family, 3 (Bir3, Mcl1 and Prok2) have anti-apoptotic properties and 1 (Gadd45a) is a target of p53. At 7 d post-exposure, all the upregulated genes returned to pre-noise levels. Interestingly, the normal control cochlea had high constitutive levels of several apoptosis-related genes. These constitutively expressed genes, together with the inducible genes, may participate in the induction of cochlear apoptotic activity. PMID:19348871

  3. Massive expansion of Ubiquitination-related gene families within the Chlamydiae.

    PubMed

    Domman, Daryl; Collingro, Astrid; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Gehre, Lena; Weinmaier, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Subtil, Agathe; Horn, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    Gene loss, gain, and transfer play an important role in shaping the genomes of all organisms; however, the interplay of these processes in isolated populations, such as in obligate intracellular bacteria, is less understood. Despite a general trend towards genome reduction in these microbes, our phylogenomic analysis of the phylum Chlamydiae revealed that within the family Parachlamydiaceae, gene family expansions have had pronounced effects on gene content. We discovered that the largest gene families within the phylum are the result of rapid gene birth-and-death evolution. These large gene families are comprised of members harboring eukaryotic-like ubiquitination-related domains, such as F-box and BTB-box domains, marking the largest reservoir of these proteins found among bacteria. A heterologous type III secretion system assay suggests that these proteins function as effectors manipulating the host cell. The large disparity in copy number of members in these families between closely related organisms suggests that nonadaptive processes might contribute to the evolution of these gene families. Gene birth-and-death evolution in concert with genomic drift might represent a previously undescribed mechanism by which isolated bacterial populations diversify. PMID:25069652

  4. Massive Expansion of Ubiquitination-Related Gene Families within the Chlamydiae

    PubMed Central

    Domman, Daryl; Collingro, Astrid; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Gehre, Lena; Weinmaier, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Subtil, Agathe; Horn, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Gene loss, gain, and transfer play an important role in shaping the genomes of all organisms; however, the interplay of these processes in isolated populations, such as in obligate intracellular bacteria, is less understood. Despite a general trend towards genome reduction in these microbes, our phylogenomic analysis of the phylum Chlamydiae revealed that within the family Parachlamydiaceae, gene family expansions have had pronounced effects on gene content. We discovered that the largest gene families within the phylum are the result of rapid gene birth-and-death evolution. These large gene families are comprised of members harboring eukaryotic-like ubiquitination-related domains, such as F-box and BTB-box domains, marking the largest reservoir of these proteins found among bacteria. A heterologous type III secretion system assay suggests that these proteins function as effectors manipulating the host cell. The large disparity in copy number of members in these families between closely related organisms suggests that nonadaptive processes might contribute to the evolution of these gene families. Gene birth-and-death evolution in concert with genomic drift might represent a previously undescribed mechanism by which isolated bacterial populations diversify. PMID:25069652

  5. Heterologous expression and functional analysis of the wheat group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins have been widely used as hallmarks of plant defense pathways, but their biological functions are still unknown. We report here the functional analysis of two basic PR-1 proteins following the identification of the wheat PR-1 gene family (Lu et al., 20...

  6. The evolution of cancer-related genes in hominoids.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lin; Michalak, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of cancer suppression is essential for the maintenance of multicellularity. The lack of correlation between body size and cancer risk across species, known as Peto's paradox, suggests that genetic variation in cancer resistance is sufficient to compensate for increases of cell numbers in bigger animals. To assess evolutionary dynamics of cancer-related genes, we analyzed Ka, Ks,and Ka/Ks values in 120 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSG) among seven hominoid species, including two extinct species, Neanderthal and Denisovan. Ka/Ks of tumor suppressor genes tended to be higher relative to that of oncogenes, consistent with relaxed purifying selection acting on the former. Ka/Ks values were positively correlated with TSG scores, but negatively correlated with oncogene scores, suggesting opposing selection pressures operating on the two groups of cancer-related genes. Additionally, we found 108 species-divergent substitutions that were prevalent germline genotypes in some species but in humans appeared only as somatic cancerous mutations. Better understanding the resistance to cancer may lead to new methods of cancer prevention in humans. PMID:25249249

  7. Titanium nanotubes activate genes related to bone formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pozio, Alfonso; Palmieri, Annalisa; Girardi, Ambra; Cura, Francesca; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: Titanium is used worldwide to make osseointegrable devices, thanks to its favorable characteristics as mechanical proprieties and biocompatibility, demonstrated by in vivo studies with animal models and clinical trials over a forty-year period. However, the exact genetic effect of the titanium layer on cells is still not well characterized. Materials and Methods: To investigate how titanium nanotubes stimulate osteoblasts differentiation and proliferation, some osteoblast genes (SP7, RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL, SPP1 and FOSL1) were analyzed by quantitative Real Time RT- PCR. Results: After 15 days, osteoblasts cultivated on titanium naotube showed the up-regulation of bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and SPP1 and the down-regulation of RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, and ALPL. After 30 days of treatment, the bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and RUNX2 were up-regulated while COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL and SPP1 were down-regulated. Conclusions: Our results, demonstrates that titanium nanotubes can lead to osteoblast differentiation and extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization in dental pulp stem cells by the activation of osteoblast related genes SPP1, FOSL1 and RUNX2. PMID:23814577

  8. X-linked intellectual disability related genes disrupted by balanced X-autosome translocations.

    PubMed

    Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Di Battista, Adriana; de Mello, Claudia Berlim; Bragagnolo, Silvia; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas; Carvalheira, Gianna Maria; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Detailed molecular characterization of chromosomal rearrangements involving X-chromosome has been a key strategy in identifying X-linked intellectual disability-causing genes. We fine-mapped the breakpoints in four women with balanced X-autosome translocations and variable phenotypes, in order to investigate the corresponding genetic contribution to intellectual disability. We addressed the impact of the gene interruptions in transcription and discussed the consequences of their functional impairment in neurodevelopment. Three patients presented with cognitive impairment, reinforcing the association between the disrupted genes (TSPAN7-MRX58, KIAA2022-MRX98, and IL1RAPL1-MRX21/34) and intellectual disability. While gene expression analysis showed absence of TSPAN7 and KIAA2022 expression in the patients, the unexpected expression of IL1RAPL1 suggested a fusion transcript ZNF611-IL1RAPL1 under the control of the ZNF611 promoter, gene disrupted at the autosomal breakpoint. The X-chromosomal breakpoint definition in the fourth patient, a woman with normal intellectual abilities, revealed disruption of the ZDHHC15 gene (MRX91). The expression assays did not detect ZDHHC15 gene expression in the patient, thus questioning its involvement in intellectual disability. Revealing the disruption of an X-linked intellectual disability-related gene in patients with balanced X-autosome translocation is a useful tool for a better characterization of critical genes in neurodevelopment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26290131

  9. Tributyltin increases the expression of apoptosis- and adipogenesis-related genes in rat ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyojin; Lim, Sojeong; Yun, Sujin; Yoon, Ayoung; Park, Gayoung

    2012-01-01

    Objective Tributyltin (TBT), an endocrine disrupting chemical, has been reported to decrease ovarian function by causing apoptosis in the ovary, but the mechanism is not fully understood. Therefore, we examined whether TBT increases the expression of adipogenesis-related genes in the ovary and the increased expression of these genes is associated with apoptosis induction. Methods Three-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were orally administered TBT (1 or 10 mg/kg body weight) or sesame oil as a control for 7 days. The ovaries were obtained and weighed on day 8, and then they were fixed for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) or frozen for RNA extraction. Using the total RNA of the ovaries, adipogenesis- and apoptosis-related genes were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results The ovarian weight was significantly decreased in rats administered 10 mg/kg TBT compared to that in control rats. As determined by the TUNEL assay, the number of apoptotic follicles in ovary was significantly increased in rats administered 10 mg/kg TBT. The real-time PCR results showed that the expression of adipogenesis-related genes such as PPARγ, aP2, CD36, and PEPCK was increased after TBT administration. In addition, apoptosis-related genes such as TNFα and TNFR1 were expressed more in the TBT-administered rats compared with the control rats. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that TBT induces the expression of adipogenesis- and apoptosis-related genes in the ovary leading to apoptosis in the ovarian follicles. These results suggest that the increased expression of adipogenesis-related genes in the ovary by TBT exposure might induce apoptosis resulting in a loss of ovarian function. PMID:22563546

  10. Cost-benefit theory and optimal design of gene regulation functions.

    PubMed

    Kalisky, Tomer; Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2007-11-01

    Cells respond to the environment by regulating the expression of genes according to environmental signals. The relation between the input signal level and the expression of the gene is called the gene regulation function. It is of interest to understand the shape of a gene regulation function in terms of the environment in which it has evolved and the basic constraints of biological systems. Here we address this by presenting a cost-benefit theory for gene regulation functions that takes into account temporally varying inputs in the environment and stochastic noise in the biological components. We apply this theory to the well-studied lac operon of E. coli. The present theory explains the shape of this regulation function in terms of temporal variation of the input signals, and of minimizing the deleterious effect of cell-cell variability in regulatory protein levels. We also apply the theory to understand the evolutionary tradeoffs in setting the number of regulatory proteins and for selection of feed-forward loops in genetic circuits. The present cost-benefit theory can be used to understand the shape of other gene regulatory functions in terms of environment and noise constraints. PMID:17991990

  11. Macular xanthophylls, lipoprotein-related genes, and age-related macular degeneration1234

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Euna; Neuringer, Martha; SanGiovanni, John Paul

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based macular xanthophylls (MXs; lutein and zeaxanthin) and the lutein metabolite meso-zeaxanthin are the major constituents of macular pigment, a compound concentrated in retinal areas that are responsible for fine-feature visual sensation. There is an unmet need to examine the genetics of factors influencing regulatory mechanisms and metabolic fates of these 3 MXs because they are linked to processes implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work we provide an overview of evidence supporting a molecular basis for AMD-MX associations as they may relate to DNA sequence variation in AMD- and lipoprotein-related genes. We recognize a number of emerging research opportunities, barriers, knowledge gaps, and tools offering promise for meaningful investigation and inference in the field. Overviews on AMD- and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)–related genes encoding receptors, transporters, and enzymes affecting or affected by MXs are followed with information on localization of products from these genes to retinal cell types manifesting AMD-related pathophysiology. Evidence on the relation of each gene or gene product with retinal MX response to nutrient intake is discussed. This information is followed by a review of results from mechanistic studies testing gene-disease relations. We then present findings on relations of AMD with DNA sequence variants in MX-associated genes. Our conclusion is that AMD-associated DNA variants that influence the actions and metabolic fates of HDL system constituents should be examined further for concomitant influence on MX absorption, retinal tissue responses to MX intake, and the capacity to modify MX-associated factors and processes implicated in AMD pathogenesis. PMID:24829491

  12. Variation analysis of transcriptome changes reveals cochlear genes and their associated functions in cochlear susceptibility to acoustic overstimulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuzhi; Cai, Qunfeng; Bard, Jonathan; Jamison, Jennifer; Wang, Jianmin; Yang, Weiping; Hu, Bo Hua

    2015-12-01

    Individual variation in the susceptibility of the auditory system to acoustic overstimulation has been well-documented at both the functional and structural levels. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this variation is unclear. The current investigation was designed to examine the variation patterns of cochlear gene expression using RNA-seq data and to identify the genes with expression variation that increased following acoustic trauma. This study revealed that the constitutive expressions of cochlear genes displayed diverse levels of gene-specific variation. These variation patterns were altered by acoustic trauma; approximately one-third of the examined genes displayed marked increases in their expression variation. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that the genes that exhibited increased variation were functionally related to cell death, biomolecule metabolism, and membrane function. In contrast, the stable genes were primarily related to basic cellular processes, including protein and macromolecular syntheses and transport. There was no functional overlap between the stable and variable genes. Importantly, we demonstrated that glutamate metabolism is related to the variation in the functional response of the cochlea to acoustic overstimulation. Taken together, the results indicate that our analyses of the individual variations in transcriptome changes of cochlear genes provide important information for the identification of genes that potentially contribute to the generation of individual variation in cochlear responses to acoustic overstimulation. PMID:26024952

  13. Recurrent Tandem Gene Duplication Gave Rise to Functionally Divergent Genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Long, Manyuan

    2008-01-01

    Tandem gene duplication is one of the major gene duplication mechanisms in eukaryotes, as illustrated by the prevalence of gene family clusters. Tandem duplicated paralogs usually share the same regulatory element, and as a consequence, they are likely to perform similar biological functions. Here, we provide an example of a newly evolved tandem duplicate acquiring novel functions, which were driven by positive selection. CG32708, CG32706, and CG6999 are 3 clustered genes residing in the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. CG6999 and CG32708 have been examined for their molecular population genetic properties (Thornton and Long 2005). We further investigated the evolutionary forces acting on these genes with greater sample sizes and a broader approach that incorporate between-species divergence, using more variety of statistical methods. We explored the possible functional implications by characterizing the tissue-specific and developmental expression patterns of these genes. Sequence comparison of species within D. melanogaster subgroup reveals that this 3-gene cluster was created by 2 rounds of tandem gene duplication in the last 5 Myr. Based on phylogenetic analysis, CG32708 is clearly the parental copy that is shared by all species. CG32706 appears to have originated in the ancestor of Drosophila simulans and D. melanogaster about 5 Mya, and CG6999 is the newest duplicate that is unique to D. melanogaster. All 3 genes have different expression profiles, and CG6999 has in addition acquired a novel transcript. Biased polymorphism frequency spectrum, linkage disequilibrium, nucleotide substitution, and McDonald–Kreitman analyses suggested that the evolution of CG6999 and CG32706 were driven by positive Darwinian selection. PMID:18408233

  14. The PMP22 gene and its related diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Parker, Brett; Martyn, Colin; Natarajan, Chandramohan; Guo, Jiasong

    2013-04-01

    Peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) is primarily expressed in the compact myelin of the peripheral nervous system. Levels of PMP22 have to be tightly regulated since alterations of PMP22 levels by mutations of the PMP22 gene are responsible for >50 % of all patients with inherited peripheral neuropathies, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth type-1A (CMT1A) with trisomy of PMP22, hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) with heterozygous deletion of PMP22, and CMT1E with point mutations of PMP22. While overexpression and point-mutations of the PMP22 gene may produce gain-of-function phenotypes, deletion of PMP22 results in a loss-of-function phenotype that reveals the normal physiological functions of the PMP22 protein. In this article, we will review the basic genetics, biochemistry and molecular structure of PMP22, followed by discussion of the current understanding of pathogenic mechanisms involving in the inherited neuropathies with mutations in PMP22 gene. PMID:23224996

  15. The PMP22 Gene and Its Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Parker, Brett; Martyn, Colin; Natarajan, Chandramohan; Guo, Jiasong

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) is primarily expressed in the compact myelin of the peripheral nervous system. Levels of PMP22 have to be tightly regulated since alterations of PMP22 levels by mutations of the PMP22 gene are responsible for >50% of all patients with inherited peripheral neuropathies, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth type-1A (CMT1A) with trisomy of PMP22, hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) with heterozygous deletion of PMP22, and CMT1E with point mutations of PMP22. While over-expression and point-mutations of the PMP22 gene may produce gain-of-function phenotypes, deletion of PMP22 results in a loss-of-function phenotype that reveals the normal physiological functions of the PMP22 protein. In this article, we will review the basic genetics, biochemistry and molecular structure of PMP22, followed by discussion of the current understanding of pathogenic mechanisms involving in the inherited neuropathies with mutations in PMP22 gene. PMID:23224996

  16. Presence and Functionality of Mating Type Genes in the Supposedly Asexual Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Ryuta; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Yamaguchi, Haruka; Yamamoto, Nanase; Wagu, Yutaka; Paoletti, Mathieu; Archer, David B.; Dyer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for sexual reproduction in Aspergillus oryzae was assessed by investigating the presence and functionality of MAT genes. Previous genome studies had identified a MAT1-1 gene in the reference strain RIB40. We now report the existence of a complementary MAT1-2 gene and the sequencing of an idiomorphic region from A. oryzae strain AO6. This allowed the development of a PCR diagnostic assay, which detected isolates of the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 genotypes among 180 strains assayed, including industrial tane-koji isolates. Strains used for sake and miso production showed a near-1:1 ratio of the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 mating types, whereas strains used for soy sauce production showed a significant bias toward the MAT1-2 mating type. MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isogenic strains were then created by genetic manipulation of the resident idiomorph, and gene expression was compared by DNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) methodologies under conditions in which MAT genes were expressed. Thirty-three genes were found to be upregulated more than 10-fold in either the MAT1-1 host strain or the MAT1-2 gene replacement strain relative to each other, showing that both the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 genes functionally regulate gene expression in A. oryzae in a mating type-dependent manner, the first such report for a supposedly asexual fungus. MAT1-1 expression specifically upregulated an α-pheromone precursor gene, but the functions of most of the genes affected were unknown. The results are consistent with a heterothallic breeding system in A. oryzae, and prospects for the discovery of a sexual cycle are discussed. PMID:22327593

  17. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Insights into Inflammatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ragazzo, Michele; Missiroli, Filippo; Borgiani, Paola; Angelucci, Francesco; Marsella, Luigi Tonino; Cusumano, Andrea; Novelli, Giuseppe; Ricci, Federico; Giardina, Emiliano

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects approximately 8.7% of elderly people worldwide (>55 years old). AMD is characterized by a multifactorial aetiology that involves several genetic and environmental risk factors (genes, ageing, smoking, family history, dietary habits, oxidative stress, and hypertension). In particular, ageing and cigarette smoking (including oxidative compounds and reactive oxygen species) have been shown to significantly increase susceptibility to the disease. Furthermore, different genes (CFH, CFI, C2, C3, IL-6, IL-8, and ARMS2) that play a crucial role in the inflammatory pathway have been associated with AMD risk. Several genetic and molecular studies have indicated the participation of inflammatory molecules (cytokines and chemokines), immune cells (macrophages), and complement proteins in the development and progression of the disease. Taking into consideration the genetic and molecular background, this review highlights the genetic role of inflammatory genes involved in AMD pathogenesis and progression. PMID:25478207

  18. Functional analysis of the aquaporin gene family in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunyi George; Lamitina, Todd; Agre, Peter; Strange, Kevin

    2007-05-01

    Aquaporin channels facilitate the transport of water, glycerol, and other small solutes across cell membranes. The physiological roles of many aquaporins remain unclear. To better understand aquaporin function, we characterized the aquaporin gene family in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Eight canonical aquaporin-encoding genes (aqp) are present in the worm genome. Expression of aqp-2, aqp-3, aqp-4, aqp-6, or aqp-7 in Xenopus oocytes increased water permeability five- to sevenfold. Glycerol permeability was increased three to sevenfold by expression of aqp-1, aqp-3, or aqp-7. Green fluorescent protein transcriptional and translational reporters demonstrated that aqp genes are expressed in numerous C. elegans cell types, including the intestine, excretory cell, and hypodermis, which play important roles in whole animal osmoregulation. To define the role of C. elegans aquaporins in osmotic homeostasis, we isolated deletion alleles for four aqp genes, aqp-2, aqp-3, aqp-4, and aqp-8, which are expressed in osmoregulatory tissues and mediate water transport. Single, double, triple, and quadruple aqp mutant animals exhibited normal survival, development, growth, fertility, and movement under normal and hypertonic culture conditions. aqp-2;aqp-3;aqp-4;aqp-8 quadruple mutants exhibited a slight defect in recovery from hypotonic stress but survived hypotonic stress as well as wild-type animals. These results suggest that C. elegans aquaporins are not essential for whole animal osmoregulation and/or that deletion of aquaporin genes activates mechanisms that compensate for loss of water channel function. PMID:17229810

  19. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Key Regulator of Cutaneous Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Granstein, Richard D.; Wagner, John A.; Stohl, Lori L.; Ding, Wanhong

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been viewed as a neuropeptide and vasodilator. However, CGRP is more appropriately thought of as a pleiotropic signaling molecule. Indeed, CGRP has key regulatory functions on immune and inflammatory processes within the skin. CGRP-containing nerves are intimately associated with epidermal LCs and CGRP has profound regulatory effects on Langerhans cell antigen-presenting capability. When LCs are exposed to CGRP in vitro, their ability to present antigen for in vivo priming of naïve mice or elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity is inhibited in at least some situations. Administration of CGRP intradermally inhibits acquisition of immunity to Th1-dominant haptens applied to the injected site while augmenting immunity to Th2-dominant haptens, although the cellular targets of activity in these experiments remains unclear. Although CGRP can be a pro-inflammatory agent, several studies have demonstrated that administration of CGRP can inhibit the elicitation of inflammation by inflammatory stimuli in vivo. In this regard, CGRP inhibits the release of certain chemokines by stimulated endothelial cells. This is likely to be physiologically relevant since cutaneous blood vessels are innervated by sensory nerves. Exciting new studies suggest a significant role for CGRP in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and, most strikingly, that CGRP inhibit the ability of LCs to transmit the human immunodeficiency virus 1 to T lymphocytes. A more complete understanding of the role of CGRP in the skin immune system may lead to new and novel approaches for the therapy of immune mediated skin disorders. PMID:25534428

  20. A patient with PMP22-related hereditary neuropathy and DBH-gene-related dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti-Stella, Anna; Chiaro, Giacomo; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Contin, Manuela; Scaglione, Cesa; Barletta, Giorgio; Cecere, Annagrazia; Garagnani, Paolo; Tieri, Paolo; Ferrarini, Alberto; Piras, Silvia; Franceschi, Claudio; Delledonne, Massimo; Cortelli, Pietro; Capellari, Sabina

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent focal neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a relatively frequent autosomal-dominant demyelinating neuropathy linked to peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene deletions. The combination of PMP22 gene mutations with other genetic variants is known to cause a more severe phenotype than expected. We present the case of a patient with severe orthostatic hypotension since 12 years of age, who inherited a PMP22 gene deletion from his father. Genetic double trouble was suspected because of selective sympathetic autonomic disturbances. Through exome-sequencing analysis, we identified two novel mutations in the dopamine beta hydroxylase gene. Moreover, with interactome analysis, we excluded a further influence on the origin of the disease by variants in other genes. This case increases the number of unique patients presenting with dopamine-β-hydroxylase deficiency and of cases with genetically proven double trouble. Finding the right, complete diagnosis is crucial to obtain adequate medical care and appropriate genetic counseling. PMID:26410747

  1. Genes related to high temperature tolerance during maize seed germination.

    PubMed

    Dutra, S M F; Von Pinho, E V R; Santos, H O; Lima, A C; Von Pinho, R G; Carvalho, M L M

    2015-01-01

    The identification of genes related to heat tolerance is fundamental for the development of high-quality seeds that are tolerant to heat stress condition. The objective of this study was to evaluate maize lineages and the gene expression involved in high temperature tolerance during germination using physiological tests, proteomics, and transcriptome analysis. Seeds from six maize lineages (30, 44, 54, 63, 64, and 91) with different levels of tolerance to high temperatures were used. Lineages 54 and 91 were observed to be more tolerant to high temperature conditions. The highest expression of α-amylase was observed in maize seeds from lineages 30 and 91 that were subjected to controlled deterioration. The highest expression of α-amylase was observed in maize seeds from lineages 30 and 91 that were subjected to controlled deterioration; with the controlled deterioration, the highest level of gene expression did not occur in the most tolerant materials; the association of lower expression of genes involved in heat-resistant protein systems was observed in seeds from lineage 44, which were more susceptible to high temperatures, and the highest gene expression of LEA D-34, ZmAN13, and AOX-1 was observed in seeds from lineage 64 when submitted to controlled deterioration. PMID:26782452

  2. Fenton-treated functionalized diamond nanoparticles as gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Martín, Roberto; Alvaro, Mercedes; Herance, José Raúl; García, Hermenegildo

    2010-01-26

    When raw diamond nanoparticles (Dnp, 7 nm average particle size) obtained from detonation are submitted to harsh Fenton-treatment, the resulting material becomes free of amorphous soot matter and the process maintains the crystallinity, reduces the particle size (4 nm average particle size), increases the surface OH population, and increases water solubility. All these changes are beneficial for subsequent Dnp covalent functionalization and for the ability of Dnp to cross cell membranes. Fenton-treated Dnps have been functionalized with thionine and the resulting sample has been observed in HeLa cell nuclei. A triethylammonium-functionalized Dnp pairs electrostatically with a plasmid having the green fluorescent protein gene and acts as gene delivery system permitting the plasmid to cross HeLa cell membrane, something that does not occur for the plasmid alone without assistance of polycationic Dnp. PMID:20047335

  3. Temporal expression analysis of angiogenesis-related genes in brain development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The current knowledge on molecular pathogenesis of cerebral vascular malformations (CVM), which are believed to arise during development, is very limited. To unravel the molecular mechanisms involved in CVMs, a detailed understanding of the brain vascular development at molecular level is crucial. In this study, we aimed to explore the temporal and comparative expression profile of angiogenesis-related genes in the establishment of brain vasculature. Methods Expression of a total of 113 angiogenesis-related genes during murine brain development has been analyzed using low-density array systems designed for angiogenesis-related genes. Bai1 (brain specific angiogenesis inhibitor-1), a recently identified novel anti-angiogenic gene, has been selected for further characterization. Results We found that 62 out of 113 analyzed genes have expression in brain development at varying levels. Nineteen of these were differentially expressed between embryonic and postnatal stages (>1.5 fold). Bai1 is strongly expressed on growing blood vessels of cerebral cortex and hippocampus, partially expressed in the lateral regions of striatum, but mostly absent on the thalamus. Conclusion By showing the comparative expression analysis of angiogenesis-related genes throughout brain development, the data presented here will be a crucial addition to further functional studies on cerebrovascular research. PMID:23020941

  4. Relations among Functional Systems in Behavior Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Travis

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes that an organism's integrated repertoire of operant behavior has the status of a biological system, similar to other biological systems, like the nervous, cardiovascular, or immune systems. Evidence from a number of sources indicates that the distinctions between biological and behavioral events is often misleading, engendering counterproductive explanatory controversy. A good deal of what is viewed as biological (often thought to be inaccessible or hypothetical) can become publicly measurable variables using currently available and developing technologies. Moreover, such endogenous variables can serve as establishing operations, discriminative stimuli, conjoint mediating events, and maintaining consequences within a functional analysis of behavior and need not lead to reductionistic explanation. I suggest that explanatory misunderstandings often arise from conflating different levels of analysis and that behavior analysis can extend its reach by identifying variables operating within a functional analysis that also serve functions in other biological systems. PMID:17575907

  5. Unknown unknowns: essential genes in quest for function.

    PubMed

    Danchin, Antoine; Fang, Gang

    2016-09-01

    The experimental design of a minimal synthetic genome revealed the presence of a large number of genes without ascribed function, in part because the abstract laws of life must be implemented within ad hoc material contraptions. Creating a function needs recruitment of some pre-existing structure and this reveals kludges in their set-up and history. Here, we show that looking for functions as an engineer would help in discovery of a significant number of those, proposed together with conceptual handles allowing investigators to pursue this endeavour in other contexts. PMID:27435445

  6. Nucleotide substitutions revealing specific functions of Polycomb group genes.

    PubMed

    Bajusz, Izabella; Sipos, László; Pirity, Melinda K

    2015-04-01

    POLYCOMB group (PCG) proteins belong to the family of epigenetic regulators of genes playing important roles in differentiation and development. Mutants of PcG genes were isolated first in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, resulting in spectacular segmental transformations due to the ectopic expression of homeotic genes. Homologs of Drosophila PcG genes were also identified in plants and in vertebrates and subsequent experiments revealed the general role of PCG proteins in the maintenance of the repressed state of chromatin through cell divisions. The past decades of gene targeting experiments have allowed us to make significant strides towards understanding how the network of PCG proteins influences multiple aspects of cellular fate determination during development. Being involved in the transmission of specific expression profiles of different cell lineages, PCG proteins were found to control wide spectra of unrelated epigenetic processes in vertebrates, such as stem cell plasticity and renewal, genomic imprinting and inactivation of X-chromosome. PCG proteins also affect regulation of metabolic genes being important for switching programs between pluripotency and differentiation. Insight into the precise roles of PCG proteins in normal physiological processes has emerged from studies employing cell culture-based systems and genetically modified animals. Here we summarize the findings obtained from PcG mutant fruit flies and mice generated to date with a focus on PRC1 and PRC2 members altered by nucleotide substitutions resulting in specific alleles. We also include a compilation of lessons learned from these models about the in vivo functions of this complex protein family. With multiple knockout lines, sophisticated approaches to study the consequences of peculiar missense point mutations, and insights from complementary gain-of-function systems in hand, we are now in a unique position to significantly advance our understanding of the molecular basis of

  7. Colorectal cancer risk genes are functionally enriched in regulatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xi; Cao, Mingming; Han, Su; Yang, Youlin; Zhou, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common complex disease caused by the combination of genetic variants and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been performed and reported some novel CRC susceptibility variants. However, the potential genetic mechanisms for newly identified CRC susceptibility variants are still unclear. Here, we selected 85 CRC susceptibility variants with suggestive association P < 1.00E-05 from the National Human Genome Research Institute GWAS catalog. To investigate the underlying genetic pathways where these newly identified CRC susceptibility genes are significantly enriched, we conducted a functional annotation. Using two kinds of SNP to gene mapping methods including the nearest upstream and downstream gene method and the ProxyGeneLD, we got 128 unique CRC susceptibility genes. We then conducted a pathway analysis in GO database using the corresponding 128 genes. We identified 44 GO categories, 17 of which are regulatory pathways. We believe that our results may provide further insight into the underlying genetic mechanisms for these newly identified CRC susceptibility variants. PMID:27146020

  8. Structure and function of pseudoknots involved in gene expression control

    PubMed Central

    Peselis, Alla; Serganov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Natural RNA molecules can have a high degree of structural complexity but even the most complexly-folded RNAs are assembled from simple structural building blocks. Among the simplest RNA elements are double-stranded helices that participate in the formation of different folding topologies and constitute the major fraction of RNA structures. One common folding motif of RNA is a pseudoknot, defined as a bipartite helical structure formed by base-pairing of the apical loop in the stem-loop structure with an outside sequence. Pseudoknots constitute integral parts of the RNA structures essential for various cellular activities. Among many functions of pseudoknotted RNAs is feedback regulation of gene expression, carried out through specific recognition of various molecules. Pseudoknotted RNAs autoregulate ribosomal and phage protein genes in response to downstream encoded proteins, while many metabolic and transport genes are controlled by cellular metabolites interacting with pseudoknotted RNA elements from the riboswitch family. Modulation of some genes also depends on metabolite-induced mRNA cleavage performed by pseudoknotted ribozymes. Several regulatory pseudoknots have been characterized biochemically and structurally in great detail. These studies have demonstrated a plethora of pseudoknot-based folds and have begun uncovering diverse molecular principles of the ligand-dependent gene expression control. The pseudoknot-mediated mechanisms of gene control and many unexpected and interesting features of the regulatory pseudoknots have significantly advanced our understanding of the genetic circuits and laid the foundation for modulation of their outcomes. PMID:25044223

  9. Weighted sharing of meromorphic functions relative to small functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Min; Yi, Hong-Xun

    2008-07-01

    Using the idea of weighted sharing, we prove some results on uniqueness of meromorphic functions with three weighted sharing values. The results in this paper improve those given by H.X. Yi, T.C. Alzahary and H.X. Yi, T.C. Alzahary, I. Lahiri and N. Mandal, and other authors.

  10. Association of genes with physiological functions by comparative analysis of pooled expression microarray data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Iuan-bor D; Rathi, Vinay K; DeAndrade, Diana S; Jay, Patrick Y

    2013-01-15

    The physiological functions of a tissue in the body are carried out by its complement of expressed genes. Genes that execute a particular function should be more specifically expressed in tissues that perform the function. Given this premise, we mined public microarray expression data to build a database of genes ranked by their specificity of expression in multiple organs. The database permitted the accurate identification of genes and functions known to be specific to individual organs. Next, we used the database to predict transcriptional regulators of brown adipose tissue (BAT) and validated two candidate genes. Based upon hypotheses regarding pathways shared between combinations of BAT or white adipose tissue (WAT) and other organs, we identified genes that met threshold criteria for specific or counterspecific expression in each tissue. By contrasting WAT to the heart and BAT, the two most mitochondria-rich tissues in the body, we discovered a novel function for the transcription factor ESRRG in the induction of BAT genes in white adipocytes. Because the heart and other estrogen-related receptor gamma (ESRRG)-rich tissues do not express BAT markers, we hypothesized that an adipocyte co-regulator acts with ESRRG. By comparing WAT and BAT to the heart, brain, kidney and skeletal muscle, we discovered that an isoform of the transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1) induces BAT markers in C2C12 myocytes in the presence of ESRRG. The results demonstrate a straightforward bioinformatic strategy to associate genes with functions. The database upon which the strategy is based is provided so that investigators can perform their own screens. PMID:23170034

  11. Use of functional gene arrays for elucidating in situ biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    Nostrand, Joy D. Van; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays have revolutionized the study of microbiology by providing a high-throughput method for examining thousands of genes with a single test and overcome the limitations of many culture-independent approaches. Functional gene arrays (FGA) probe a wide range of genes involved in a variety of functions of interest to microbial ecology (e.g., carbon degradation, N fixation, metal resistance) from many different microorganisms, cultured and uncultured. The most comprehensive FGA to date is the GeoChip array, which targets tens of thousands of genes involved in the geochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur, metal resistance and reduction, energy processing, antibiotic resistance and contaminant degradation as well as phylogenetic information (gyrB). Since the development of GeoChips, many studies have been performed using this FGA and have shown it to be a powerful tool for rapid, sensitive, and specific examination of microbial communities in a high-throughput manner. As such, the GeoChip is well-suited for linking geochemical processes with microbial community function and structure. This technology has been used successfully to examine microbial communities before, during, and after in situ bioremediation at a variety of contaminated sites. These studies have expanded our understanding of biodegradation and bioremediation processes and the associated microorganisms and environmental conditions responsible. This review provides an overview of FGA development with a focus on the GeoChip and highlights specific GeoChip studies involving in situ bioremediation. PMID:23049526

  12. Plant Ion Channels: Gene Families, Physiology, and Functional Genomics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ward, John M.; Mäser, Pascal; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Distinct potassium, anion, and calcium channels in the plasma membrane and vacuolar membrane of plant cells have been identified and characterized by patch clamping. Primarily owing to advances in Arabidopsis genetics and genomics, and yeast functional complementation, many of the corresponding genes have been identified. Recent advances in our understanding of ion channel genes that mediate signal transduction and ion transport are discussed here. Some plant ion channels, for example, ALMT and SLAC anion channel subunits, are unique. The majority of plant ion channel families exhibit homology to animal genes; such families include both hyperpolarization-and depolarization-activated Shaker-type potassium channels, CLC chloride transporters/channels, cyclic nucleotide–gated channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptor homologs. These plant ion channels offer unique opportunities to analyze the structural mechanisms and functions of ion channels. Here we review gene families of selected plant ion channel classes and discuss unique structure-function aspects and their physiological roles in plant cell signaling and transport. PMID:18842100

  13. Interaction-based discovery of functionally important genes in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ghersi, Dario; Singh, Mona

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in cancer genomics is uncovering genes with an active role in tumorigenesis from a potentially large pool of mutated genes across patient samples. Here we focus on the interactions that proteins make with nucleic acids, small molecules, ions and peptides, and show that residues within proteins that are involved in these interactions are more frequently affected by mutations observed in large-scale cancer genomic data than are other residues. We leverage this observation to predict genes that play a functionally important role in cancers by introducing a computational pipeline (http://canbind.princeton.edu) for mapping large-scale cancer exome data across patients onto protein structures, and automatically extracting proteins with an enriched number of mutations affecting their nucleic acid, small molecule, ion or peptide binding sites. Using this computational approach, we show that many previously known genes implicated in cancers are enriched in mutations within the binding sites of their encoded proteins. By focusing on functionally relevant portions of proteins—specifically those known to be involved in molecular interactions—our approach is particularly well suited to detect infrequent mutations that may nonetheless be important in cancer, and should aid in expanding our functional understanding of the genomic landscape of cancer. PMID:24362839

  14. Mapping functional transcription factor networks from gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Brian C.; Maier, Ezekiel J.; Kramer, Michael H.; Wang, Patricia I.; Brown, Holly; Brent, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    A critical step in understanding how a genome functions is determining which transcription factors (TFs) regulate each gene. Accordingly, extensive effort has been devoted to mapping TF networks. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, protein–DNA interactions have been identified for most TFs by ChIP-chip, and expression profiling has been done on strains deleted for most TFs. These studies revealed that there is little overlap between the genes whose promoters are bound by a TF and those whose expression changes when the TF is deleted, leaving us without a definitive TF network for any eukaryote and without an efficient method for mapping functional TF networks. This paper describes NetProphet, a novel algorithm that improves the efficiency of network mapping from gene expression data. NetProphet exploits a fundamental observation about the nature of TF networks: The response to disrupting or overexpressing a TF is strongest on its direct targets and dissipates rapidly as it propagates through the network. Using S. cerevisiae data, we show that NetProphet can predict thousands of direct, functional regulatory interactions, using only gene expression data. The targets that NetProphet predicts for a TF are at least as likely to have sites matching the TF's binding specificity as the targets implicated by ChIP. Unlike most ChIP targets, the NetProphet targets also show evidence of functional regulation. This suggests a surprising conclusion: The best way to begin mapping direct, functional TF-promoter interactions may not be by measuring binding. We also show that NetProphet yields new insights into the functions of several yeast TFs, including a well-studied TF, Cbf1, and a completely unstudied TF, Eds1. PMID:23636944

  15. Functional Studies of Regulatory Genes in the Sea Urchin Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Bernardo, Maria Di; Spinelli, Giovanni

    Sea urchin embryos are characterized by an extremely simple mode of development, rapid cleavage, high transparency, and well-defined cell lineage. Although they are not suitable for genetic studies, other approaches are successfully used to unravel mechanisms and molecules involved in cell fate specification and morphogenesis. Microinjection is the elective method to study gene function in sea urchin embryos. It is used to deliver precise amounts of DNA, RNA, oligonucleotides, peptides, or antibodies into the eggs or even into blastomeres. Here we describe microinjection as it is currently applied in our laboratory and show how it has been used in gene perturbation analyses and dissection of cis-regulatory DNA elements.

  16. System Review about Function Role of ESCC Driver Gene KDM6A by Network Biology Approach.

    PubMed

    Ran, Jihua; Li, Hui; Li, Huiwu

    2016-01-01

    Background. KDM6A (Lysine (K)-Specific Demethylase 6A) is the driver gene related to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In order to provide more biological insights into KDM6A, in this paper, we treat PPI (protein-protein interaction) network derived from KDM6A as a conceptual framework and follow it to review its biological function. Method. We constructed a PPI network with Cytoscape software and performed clustering of network with Clust&See. Then, we evaluate the pathways, which are statistically involved in the network derived from KDM6A. Lastly, gene ontology analysis of clusters of genes in the network was conducted. Result. The network includes three clusters that consist of 74 nodes connected via 453 edges. Fifty-five pathways are statistically involved in the network and most of them are functionally related to the processes of cell cycle, gene expression, and carcinogenesis. The biology themes of clusters 1, 2, and 3 are chromatin modification, regulation of gene expression by transcription factor complex, and control of cell cycle, respectively. Conclusion. The PPI network presents a panoramic view which can facilitate for us to understand the function role of KDM6A. It is a helpful way by network approach to perform system review on a certain gene. PMID:27294188

  17. System Review about Function Role of ESCC Driver Gene KDM6A by Network Biology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Jihua; Li, Hui; Li, Huiwu

    2016-01-01

    Background. KDM6A (Lysine (K)-Specific Demethylase 6A) is the driver gene related to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In order to provide more biological insights into KDM6A, in this paper, we treat PPI (protein-protein interaction) network derived from KDM6A as a conceptual framework and follow it to review its biological function. Method. We constructed a PPI network with Cytoscape software and performed clustering of network with Clust&See. Then, we evaluate the pathways, which are statistically involved in the network derived from KDM6A. Lastly, gene ontology analysis of clusters of genes in the network was conducted. Result. The network includes three clusters that consist of 74 nodes connected via 453 edges. Fifty-five pathways are statistically involved in the network and most of them are functionally related to the processes of cell cycle, gene expression, and carcinogenesis. The biology themes of clusters 1, 2, and 3 are chromatin modification, regulation of gene expression by transcription factor complex, and control of cell cycle, respectively. Conclusion. The PPI network presents a panoramic view which can facilitate for us to understand the function role of KDM6A. It is a helpful way by network approach to perform system review on a certain gene. PMID:27294188

  18. Effects of microcystin-LR on bacterial and fungal functional genes profile in rat gut.

    PubMed

    Lin, Juan; Chen, Jun; He, Jun; Chen, Jing; Yan, Qingyun; Zhou, Jizhong; Xie, Ping

    2015-03-01

    The short-term exposure to microcystin-LR (MC-LR, one of the most common and toxic variants generated by toxigenic cyanobacteria) induced gut dysfunction such as generation of reactive oxygen species, cell erosion and deficient intestinal absorption of nutrients. However, till now, little is known about its impact on gut microbial community, which has been considered as necessary metabolic assistant and stresses resistant entities for the host. This study was designed to reveal the shift of microbial functional genes in the gut of rat orally gavaged with MC-LR. GeoChip detected a high diversity of bacterial and fungal genes involved in basic metabolic processes and stress resistance. The results showed that the composition of functional genes was significantly changed in rat gut after one week of exposure to MC-LR, and we found some relatively enriched genes that are involved in carbon degradation including chitin, starch and limonene metabolism, and these genes were mainly derived from fungal and bacterial pathogens. In addition, we found large amounts of significantly enriched genes relevant to degradation of the specific carbon compounds, aromatics. The dysbiosis of bacterial and fungal flora gave an implication of pathogens invasion. The enriched gene functions could be linked to acute gastroenteritis induced by MC-LR. PMID:25617596

  19. g:Profiler-a web server for functional interpretation of gene lists (2016 update).

    PubMed

    Reimand, Jüri; Arak, Tambet; Adler, Priit; Kolberg, Liis; Reisberg, Sulev; Peterson, Hedi; Vilo, Jaak

    2016-07-01

    Functional enrichment analysis is a key step in interpreting gene lists discovered in diverse high-throughput experiments. g:Profiler studies flat and ranked gene lists and finds statistically significant Gene Ontology terms, pathways and other gene function related terms. Translation of hundreds of gene identifiers is another core feature of g:Profiler. Since its first publication in 2007, our web server has become a popular tool of choice among basic and translational researchers. Timeliness is a major advantage of g:Profiler as genome and pathway information is synchronized with the Ensembl database in quarterly updates. g:Profiler supports 213 species including mammals and other vertebrates, plants, insects and fungi. The 2016 update of g:Profiler introduces several novel features. We have added further functional datasets to interpret gene lists, including transcription factor binding site predictions, Mendelian disease annotations, information about protein expression and complexes and gene mappings of human genetic polymorphisms. Besides the interactive web interface, g:Profiler can be accessed in computational pipelines using our R package, Python interface and BioJS component. g:Profiler is freely available at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gprofiler/. PMID:27098042

  20. Globin gene expression in correlation with G protein-related genes during erythroid differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. G proteins are also implicated in erythroid differentiation, and some of them are expressed principally in hematopoietic cells. GPCRs-linked NO/cGMP and p38 MAPK signaling pathways already demonstrated potency for globin gene stimulation. By analyzing erythroid progenitors, derived from hematopoietic cells through in vitro ontogeny, our study intends to determine early markers and signaling pathways of globin gene regulation and their relation to GPCR expression. Results Human hematopoietic CD34+ progenitors are isolated from fetal liver (FL), cord blood (CB), adult bone marrow (BM), peripheral blood (PB) and G-CSF stimulated mobilized PB (mPB), and then differentiated in vitro into erythroid progenitors. We find that growth capacity is most abundant in FL- and CB-derived erythroid cells. The erythroid progenitor cells are sorted as 100% CD71+, but we did not find statistical significance in the variations of CD34, CD36 and GlyA antigens and that confirms similarity in maturation of studied ontogenic periods. During ontogeny, beta-globin gene expression reaches maximum levels in cells of adult blood origin (176 fmol/μg), while gamma-globin gene expression is consistently up-regulated in CB-derived cells (60 fmol/μg). During gamma-globin induction by hydroxycarbamide, we identify stimulated GPCRs (PTGDR, PTGER1) and GPCRs-coupled genes known to be activated via the cAMP/PKA (ADIPOQ), MAPK pathway (JUN) and NO/cGMP (PRPF18) signaling pathways. During ontogeny, GPR45 and ARRDC1 genes have the most prominent expression in FL-derived erythroid progenitor cells, GNL3 and GRP65 genes in CB-derived cells (high gamma-globin gene expression), GPR110 and GNG10 in BM-derived cells, GPR89C and GPR172A in PB-derived cells, and GPR44 and GNAQ genes in mPB-derived cells (high beta-globin gene expression). Conclusions These results

  1. Baculoviruses deficient in ie1 gene function abrogate viral gene expression in transduced mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Efrose, Rodica; Swevers, Luc; Iatrou, Kostas

    2010-10-25

    One of the newest niches for baculoviruses-based technologies is their use as vectors for mammalian cell transduction and gene therapy applications. However, an outstanding safety issue related to such use is the residual expression of viral genes in infected mammalian cells. Here we show that infectious baculoviruses lacking the major transcriptional regulator, IE1, can be produced in insect host cells stably transformed with IE1 expression constructs lacking targets of homologous recombination that could promote the generation of wt-like revertants. Such ie1-deficient baculoviruses are unable to direct viral gene transcription to any appreciable degree and do not replicate in normal insect host cells. Most importantly, the residual viral gene expression, which occurs in mammalian cells infected with wt baculoviruses is reduced 10 to 100 fold in cells infected with ie1-deficient baculoviruses. Thus, ie1-deficient baculoviruses offer enhanced safety features to baculovirus-based vector systems destined for use in gene therapy applications.

  2. Turkey fecal microbial community structure and functional gene diversity revealed by 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingrang; Domingo, Jorge Santo

    2008-10-01

    The primary goal of this study was to better understand the microbial composition and functional genetic diversity associated with turkey fecal communities. To achieve this, 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic clone libraries were sequenced from turkey fecal samples. The analysis of 382 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the most abundant bacteria were closely related to Lactobacillales (47%), Bacillales (31%), and Clostridiales (11%). Actinomycetales, Enterobacteriales, and Bacteroidales sequences were also identified, but represented a smaller part of the community. The analysis of 379 metagenomic sequences showed that most clones were similar to bacterial protein sequences (58%). Bacteriophage (10%) and avian viruses (3%) sequences were also represented. Of all metagenomic clones potentially encoding for bacterial proteins, most were similar to low G+C Gram-positive bacterial proteins, particularly from Lactobacillales (50%), Bacillales (11%), and Clostridiales (8%). Bioinformatic analyses suggested the presence of genes encoding for membrane proteins, lipoproteins, hydrolases, and functional genes associated with the metabolism of nitrogen and sulfur containing compounds. The results from this study further confirmed the predominance of Firmicutes in the avian gut and highlight the value of coupling 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic sequencing data analysis to study the microbial composition of avian fecal microbial communities. PMID:18974945

  3. Obtain osteoarthritis related molecular signature genes through regulation network.

    PubMed

    Li, Yawei; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guohua; Xiong, Guangzhong; Liu, Wei Dong; Li, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), also known as degenerative joint disease or osteoarthrosis, is the most common form of arthritis. OA occurs when cartilage in the joints wears down over time. We used the GSE1919 series to identify potential genes that correlated to OA. The aim of our study was to obtain a molecular signature of OA through the regulation network based on differentially expressed genes. From the result of regulation network construction in OA, a number of transcription factors (TFs) and pathways closely related to OA were linked by our method. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ also arises as hub nodes in our transcriptome network and certain TFs containing CEBPD, EGR2 and ETS2 were shown to be related to OA by a previous study. PMID:21946934

  4. Guidelines for the functional annotation of microRNAs using the Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Rachael P; Sitnikov, Dmitry; Orlic-Milacic, Marija; Balakrishnan, Rama; D'Eustachio, Peter; Gillespie, Marc E; Howe, Doug; Kalea, Anastasia Z; Maegdefessel, Lars; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Petri, Victoria; Smith, Jennifer R; Van Auken, Kimberly; Wood, Valerie; Zampetaki, Anna; Mayr, Manuel; Lovering, Ruth C

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNA regulation of developmental and cellular processes is a relatively new field of study, and the available research data have not been organized to enable its inclusion in pathway and network analysis tools. The association of gene products with terms from the Gene Ontology is an effective method to analyze functional data, but until recently there has been no substantial effort dedicated to applying Gene Ontology terms to microRNAs. Consequently, when performing functional analysis of microRNA data sets, researchers have had to rely instead on the functional annotations associated with the genes encoding microRNA targets. In consultation with experts in the field of microRNA research, we have created comprehensive recommendations for the Gene Ontology curation of microRNAs. This curation manual will enable provision of a high-quality, reliable set of functional annotations for the advancement of microRNA research. Here we describe the key aspects of the work, including development of the Gene Ontology to represent this data, standards for describing the data, and guidelines to support curators making these annotations. The full microRNA curation guidelines are available on the GO Consortium wiki (http://wiki.geneontology.org/index.php/MicroRNA_GO_annotation_manual). PMID:26917558

  5. Guidelines for the functional annotation of microRNAs using the Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    D'Eustachio, Peter; Smith, Jennifer R.; Zampetaki, Anna

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA regulation of developmental and cellular processes is a relatively new field of study, and the available research data have not been organized to enable its inclusion in pathway and network analysis tools. The association of gene products with terms from the Gene Ontology is an effective method to analyze functional data, but until recently there has been no substantial effort dedicated to applying Gene Ontology terms to microRNAs. Consequently, when performing functional analysis of microRNA data sets, researchers have had to rely instead on the functional annotations associated with the genes encoding microRNA targets. In consultation with experts in the field of microRNA research, we have created comprehensive recommendations for the Gene Ontology curation of microRNAs. This curation manual will enable provision of a high-quality, reliable set of functional annotations for the advancement of microRNA research. Here we describe the key aspects of the work, including development of the Gene Ontology to represent this data, standards for describing the data, and guidelines to support curators making these annotations. The full microRNA curation guidelines are available on the GO Consortium wiki (http://wiki.geneontology.org/index.php/MicroRNA_GO_annotation_manual). PMID:26917558

  6. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaoping; Meyers, Blake C; Kozik, Alexander; West, Marilyn AL; Morgante, Michele; St Clair, Dina A; Bent, Andrew F; Michelmore, Richard W

    2007-01-01

    Background Nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-encoding genes comprise the largest class of plant disease resistance genes. The 149 NBS-LRR-encoding genes and the 58 related genes that do not encode LRRs represent approximately 0.8% of all ORFs so far annotated in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Despite their prevalence in the genome and functional importance, there was little information regarding expression of these genes. Results We analyzed the expression patterns of ~170 NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis Col-0 using multiple analytical approaches: expressed sequenced tag (EST) representation, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS), microarray analysis, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR, and gene trap lines. Most of these genes were expressed at low levels with a variety of tissue specificities. Expression was detected by at least one approach for all but 10 of these genes. The expression of some but not the majority of NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes was affected by salicylic acid (SA) treatment; the response to SA varied among different accessions. An analysis of previously published microarray data indicated that ten NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes exhibited increased expression in wild-type Landsberg erecta (Ler) after flagellin treatment. Several of these ten genes also showed altered expression after SA treatment, consistent with the regulation of R gene expression during defense responses and overlap between the basal defense response and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Enhancer trap analysis indicated that neither jasmonic acid nor benzothiadiazole (BTH), a salicylic acid analog, induced detectable expression of the five NBS-LRR-encoding genes and one TIR-NBS-encoding gene tested; however, BTH did induce detectable expression of the other TIR-NBS-encoding gene analyzed. Evidence for alternative mRNA polyadenylation sites was observed for many of the tested genes. Evidence for alternative splicing

  7. Identifying novel genes and chemicals related to nasopharyngeal cancer in a heterogeneous network.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhandong; An, Lifeng; Li, Hao; Wang, ShaoPeng; Zhou, You; Yuan, Fei; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal cancer or nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the most common cancer originating in the nasopharynx. The factors that induce nasopharyngeal cancer are still not clear. Additional information about the chemicals or genes related to nasopharyngeal cancer will promote a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this cancer and the factors that induce it. Thus, a computational method NPC-RGCP was proposed in this study to identify the possible relevant chemicals and genes based on the presently known chemicals and genes related to nasopharyngeal cancer. To extensively utilize the functional associations between proteins and chemicals, a heterogeneous network was constructed based on interactions of proteins and chemicals. The NPC-RGCP included two stages: the searching stage and the screening stage. The former stage is for finding new possible genes and chemicals in the heterogeneous network, while the latter stage is for screening and removing false discoveries and selecting the core genes and chemicals. As a result, five putative genes, CXCR3, IRF1, CDK1, GSTP1, and CDH2, and seven putative chemicals, iron, propionic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide, isopropanol, erythrose 4-phosphate, β-D-Fructose 6-phosphate, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, were identified by NPC-RGCP. Extensive analyses provided confirmation that the putative genes and chemicals have significant associations with nasopharyngeal cancer. PMID:27149165

  8. Identifying novel genes and chemicals related to nasopharyngeal cancer in a heterogeneous network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhandong; An, Lifeng; Li, Hao; Wang, ShaoPeng; Zhou, You; Yuan, Fei; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal cancer or nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the most common cancer originating in the nasopharynx. The factors that induce nasopharyngeal cancer are still not clear. Additional information about the chemicals or genes related to nasopharyngeal cancer will promote a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this cancer and the factors that induce it. Thus, a computational method NPC-RGCP was proposed in this study to identify the possible relevant chemicals and genes based on the presently known chemicals and genes related to nasopharyngeal cancer. To extensively utilize the functional associations between proteins and chemicals, a heterogeneous network was constructed based on interactions of proteins and chemicals. The NPC-RGCP included two stages: the searching stage and the screening stage. The former stage is for finding new possible genes and chemicals in the heterogeneous network, while the latter stage is for screening and removing false discoveries and selecting the core genes and chemicals. As a result, five putative genes, CXCR3, IRF1, CDK1, GSTP1, and CDH2, and seven putative chemicals, iron, propionic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide, isopropanol, erythrose 4-phosphate, β-D-Fructose 6-phosphate, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, were identified by NPC-RGCP. Extensive analyses provided confirmation that the putative genes and chemicals have significant associations with nasopharyngeal cancer. PMID:27149165

  9. Functional neuroimaging of dressing-related skills.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg, George F; Lovelace, Christopher T; Foster, Donald J; Maldjian, Joseph A

    2014-09-01

    Restoration of motor function following stroke involves reorganization of motor output through intact pathways, with compensatory brain activity likely variable by task. One class of motor tasks, those involved in self-care, is particularly important in stroke rehabilitation. Identifying the brain areas that are engaged in self-care and how they reorganize after stroke may enable development of more effective rehabilitation strategies. We piloted a paradigm for functional MRI assessment of self-care activity. In two groups, young adults and older adults, two self-care tasks (buttoning and zipping) produce activation similar to a bimanual tapping task, with bilateral activation of primary and secondary motor cortices, primary sensory cortex, and cerebellum. Quantitative differences include more activation of sensorimotor cortex and cerebellum in buttoning than bimanual tapping. Pilot subjects with stroke showed greater superior parietal activity across tasks than controls, potentially representing an increased need for sensorimotor integration to perform motor tasks. PMID:23070748

  10. Functional neuroimaging of dressing-related skills

    PubMed Central

    Lovelace, Christopher T.; Foster, Donald J.; Maldjian, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of motor function following stroke involves reorganization of motor output through intact pathways, with compensatory brain activity likely variable by task. One class of motor tasks, those involved in self-care, is particularly important in stroke rehabilitation. Identifying the brain areas that are engaged in self-care and how they reorganize after stroke may enable development of more effective rehabilitation strategies. We piloted a paradigm for functional MRI assessment of self-care activity. In two groups, young adults and older adults, two self-care tasks (buttoning and zipping) produce activation similar to a bimanual tapping task, with bilateral activation of primary and secondary motor cortices, primary sensory cortex, and cerebellum. Quantitative differences include more activation of sensorimotor cortex and cerebellum in buttoning than bimanual tapping. Pilot subjects with stroke showed greater superior parietal activity across tasks than controls, potentially representing an increased need for sensorimotor integration to perform motor tasks. PMID:23070748

  11. Age Related Changes in Autonomic Functions

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Mohammed; Pakhare, Abhijit; Rathi, Preeti; Chaudhary, Lalita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) imbalance may trigger or enhance pathology in different organ systems that varies in different age groups hence objective of present study was to evaluate association of different Age-groups with autonomic functions. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 62 healthy volunteers in Department of Physiology LLRM Medical College Meerut, India. Volunteers were divided into three groups as younger (15-45 years), middle (45-60) and elder age (above 60), Autonomic functions were tested in three domains viz. Cardio-vagal, adrenergic and sudomotor functions. Numerical data was summarized as mean and standard deviation and categorical data as count and percentage. ANOVA and Chi-square test were used to find difference among groups, p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Mean ± standard deviation OHT(Orthostatic Hypotension Test) among of younger, middle and elder age groups were 8.80±2.28, 13.40±4.64 and 21.82±6.04 respectively which represent decrease in sympathetic functions with age (p<0.001). Cardio-vagal or parasympathetic responses indicated by DBT (Deep Breathing Test) Valsalva and 30:15 ratio of HR response to standing tests has shown statistically significant (p<0.001) decrease in mean response with increasing age. Sudomotor response appeared normal in younger and middle group but was interrupted in more than half of elderly people (p<0.001). Conclusion Sympathetic responses & para-sympathetic responses have shown the significant decline with increasing age group. Sudomotor responses were partially interrupted in elderly age group. PMID:27134865

  12. Structural and functional analysis of chicken U4 small nuclear RNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, M L; Korf, G M; McNamara, K J; Stumph, W E

    1986-01-01

    Two distinct chicken U4 RNA genes have been cloned and characterized. They are closely linked within 465 base pairs of each other and have the same transcriptional orientation. The downstream U4 homology is a true gene, based on the criteria that it is colinear with chicken U4B RNA and is expressed when injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes. The upstream U4 homology, however, contains seven base substitutions relative to U4B RNA. This sequence may be a nonexpressed pseudogene, but the pattern of base substitutions suggests that it more probably encodes a variant yet functional U4 RNA product not yet characterized at the RNA level. In support of this, the two U4 genes have regions of homology with each other in their 5'-flanking DNA at two positions known to be essential for the efficient expression of vertebrate U1 and U2 small nuclear RNA genes. In the case of U1 and U2 RNA genes, the more distal region (located near position-200 with respect to the RNA cap site) is known to function as a transcriptional enhancer. Although this region is highly conserved in overall structure and sequence among U1 and U2 RNA genes, it is much less conserved in the chicken U4 RNA genes reported here. Interestingly, short sequence elements present in the -200 region of the U4 RNA genes are inverted (i.e., on the complementary strand) relative to their usual orientation upstream of U1 and U2 RNA genes. Thus, the -200 region of the U4 RNA genes may represent a natural evolutionary occurrence of an enhancer sequence inversion. Images PMID:3025618

  13. Functional gene group analysis identifies synaptic gene groups as risk factor for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lips, E S; Cornelisse, L N; Toonen, R F; Min, J L; Hultman, C M; Holmans, P A; O'Donovan, M C; Purcell, S M; Smit, A B; Verhage, M; Sullivan, P F; Visscher, P M; Posthuma, D

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with a polygenic pattern of inheritance and a population prevalence of ∼1%. Previous studies have implicated synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia. We tested the accumulated association of genetic variants in expert-curated synaptic gene groups with schizophrenia in 4673 cases and 4965 healthy controls, using functional gene group analysis. Identifying groups of genes with similar cellular function rather than genes in isolation may have clinical implications for finding additional drug targets. We found that a group of 1026 synaptic genes was significantly associated with the risk of schizophrenia (P=7.6 × 10−11) and more strongly associated than 100 randomly drawn, matched control groups of genetic variants (P<0.01). Subsequent analysis of synaptic subgroups suggested that the strongest association signals are derived from three synaptic gene groups: intracellular signal transduction (P=2.0 × 10−4), excitability (P=9.0 × 10−4) and cell adhesion and trans-synaptic signaling (P=2.4 × 10−3). These results are consistent with a role of synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia and imply that impaired intracellular signal transduction in synapses, synaptic excitability and cell adhesion and trans-synaptic signaling play a role in the pathology of schizophrenia. PMID:21931320

  14. HuMiChip: Development of a Functional Gene Array for the Study of Human Microbiomes

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Q.; Deng, Ye; Lin, Lu; Hemme, Chris L.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Microbiomes play very important roles in terms of nutrition, health and disease by interacting with their hosts. Based on sequence data currently available in public domains, we have developed a functional gene array to monitor both organismal and functional gene profiles of normal microbiota in human and mouse hosts, and such an array is called human and mouse microbiota array, HMM-Chip. First, seed sequences were identified from KEGG databases, and used to construct a seed database (seedDB) containing 136 gene families in 19 metabolic pathways closely related to human and mouse microbiomes. Second, a mother database (motherDB) was constructed with 81 genomes of bacterial strains with 54 from gut and 27 from oral environments, and 16 metagenomes, and used for selection of genes and probe design. Gene prediction was performed by Glimmer3 for bacterial genomes, and by the Metagene program for metagenomes. In total, 228,240 and 801,599 genes were identified for bacterial genomes and metagenomes, respectively. Then the motherDB was searched against the seedDB using the HMMer program, and gene sequences in the motherDB that were highly homologous with seed sequences in the seedDB were used for probe design by the CommOligo software. Different degrees of specific probes, including gene-specific, inclusive and exclusive group-specific probes were selected. All candidate probes were checked against the motherDB and NCBI databases for specificity. Finally, 7,763 probes covering 91.2percent (12,601 out of 13,814) HMMer confirmed sequences from 75 bacterial genomes and 16 metagenomes were selected. This developed HMM-Chip is able to detect the diversity and abundance of functional genes, the gene expression of microbial communities, and potentially, the interactions of microorganisms and their hosts.

  15. Large-scale identification of human genes implicated in epidermal barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Toulza, Eve; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R; Galliano, Marie-Florence; Jonca, Nathalie; Dossat, Carole; Jacob, Daniel; de Daruvar, Antoine; Wincker, Patrick; Serre, Guy; Guerrin, Marina

    2007-01-01

    Background During epidermal differentiation, keratinocytes progressing through the suprabasal layers undergo complex and tightly regulated biochemical modifications leading to cornification and desquamation. The last living cells, the granular keratinocytes (GKs), produce almost all of the proteins and lipids required for the protective barrier function before their programmed cell death gives rise to corneocytes. We present here the first analysis of the transcriptome of human GKs, purified from healthy epidermis by an original approach. Results Using the ORESTES method, 22,585 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were produced that matched 3,387 genes. Despite normalization provided by this method (mean 4.6 ORESTES per gene), some highly transcribed genes, including that encoding dermokine, were overrepresented. About 330 expressed genes displayed less than 100 ESTs in UniGene clusters and are most likely to be specific for GKs and potentially involved in barrier function. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the relative expression of 73 genes in the basal and granular layers of epidermis by quantitative RT-PCR. Among these, 33 were identified as new, highly specific markers of GKs, including those encoding a protease, protease inhibitors and proteins involved in lipid metabolism and transport. We identified filaggrin 2 (also called ifapsoriasin), a poorly characterized member of the epidermal differentiation complex, as well as three new lipase genes clustered with paralogous genes on chromosome 10q23.31. A new gene of unknown function, C1orf81, is specifically disrupted in the human genome by a frameshift mutation. Conclusion These data increase the present knowledge of genes responsible for the formation of the skin barrier and suggest new candidates for genodermatoses of unknown origin. PMID:17562024

  16. Human chromosome 21/Down syndrome gene function and pathway database.

    PubMed

    Nikolaienko, Oleksii; Nguyen, Cao; Crinc, Linda S; Cios, Krzysztof J; Gardiner, Katheleen

    2005-12-30

    Down syndrome, trisomy of human chromosome 21, is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability. Correlating the increased expression, due to gene dosage, of the >300 genes encoded by chromosome 21 with specific phenotypic features is a goal that becomes more feasible with the increasing availability of large scale functional, expression and evolutionary data. These data are dispersed among diverse databases, and the variety of formats and locations, plus their often rapid growth, makes access and assimilation a daunting task. To aid the Down syndrome and chromosome 21 community, and researchers interested in the study of any chromosome 21 gene or ortholog, we are developing a comprehensive chromosome 21-specific database with the goals of (i) data consolidation, (ii) accuracy and completeness through expert curation, and (iii) facilitation of novel hypothesis generation. Here we describe the current status of data collection and the immediate future plans for this first human chromosome-specific database. PMID:16310977

  17. Gene Expression and Functional Annotation of the Human Ciliary Body Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Sarah F.; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; Bossers, Koen; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; Essing, Anke H. W.; Nagtegaal, Martijn; van der Spek, Peter J.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The ciliary body (CB) of the human eye consists of the non-pigmented (NPE) and pigmented (PE) neuro-epithelia. We investigated the gene expression of NPE and PE, to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the most important functions of the CB. We also developed molecular signatures for the NPE and PE and studied possible new clues for glaucoma. Methods We isolated NPE and PE cells from seven healthy human donor eyes using laser dissection microscopy. Next, we performed RNA isolation, amplification, labeling and hybridization against 44×k Agilent microarrays. For microarray conformations, we used a literature study, RT-PCRs, and immunohistochemical stainings. We analyzed the gene expression data with R and with the knowledge database Ingenuity. Results The gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the NPE and PE were highly similar. We found that the most important functionalities of the NPE and PE were related to developmental processes, neural nature of the tissue, endocrine and metabolic signaling, and immunological functions. In total 1576 genes differed statistically significantly between NPE and PE. From these genes, at least 3 were cell-specific for the NPE and 143 for the PE. Finally, we observed high expression in the (N)PE of 35 genes previously implicated in molecular mechanisms related to glaucoma. Conclusion Our gene expression analysis suggested that the NPE and PE of the CB were quite similar. Nonetheless, cell-type specific differences were found. The molecular machineries of the human NPE and PE are involved in a range of neuro-endocrinological, developmental and immunological functions, and perhaps glaucoma. PMID:23028713

  18. Combinatorial Gene Regulatory Functions Underlie Ultraconserved Elements in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Warnefors, Maria; Hartmann, Britta; Thomsen, Stefan; Alonso, Claudio R.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are discrete genomic elements conserved across large evolutionary distances. Although UCEs have been linked to multiple facets of mammalian gene regulation their extreme evolutionary conservation remains largely unexplained. Here, we apply a computational approach to investigate this question in Drosophila, exploring the molecular functions of more than 1,500 UCEs shared across the genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Our data indicate that Drosophila UCEs are hubs for gene regulatory functions and suggest that UCE sequence invariance originates from their combinatorial roles in gene control. We also note that the gene regulatory roles of intronic and intergenic UCEs (iUCEs) are distinct from those found in exonic UCEs (eUCEs). In iUCEs, transcription factor (TF) and epigenetic factor binding data strongly support iUCE roles in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In contrast, analyses of eUCEs indicate that they are two orders of magnitude more likely than the expected to simultaneously include protein-coding sequence, TF-binding sites, splice sites, and RNA editing sites but have reduced roles in transcriptional or epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, we use a Drosophila cell culture system and transgenic Drosophila embryos to validate the notion of UCE combinatorial regulatory roles using an eUCE within the Hox gene Ultrabithorax and show that its protein-coding region also contains alternative splicing regulatory information. Taken together our experiments indicate that UCEs emerge as a result of combinatorial gene regulatory roles and highlight common features in mammalian and insect UCEs implying that similar processes might underlie ultraconservation in diverse animal taxa. PMID:27247329

  19. Combinatorial Gene Regulatory Functions Underlie Ultraconserved Elements in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Warnefors, Maria; Hartmann, Britta; Thomsen, Stefan; Alonso, Claudio R

    2016-09-01

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are discrete genomic elements conserved across large evolutionary distances. Although UCEs have been linked to multiple facets of mammalian gene regulation their extreme evolutionary conservation remains largely unexplained. Here, we apply a computational approach to investigate this question in Drosophila, exploring the molecular functions of more than 1,500 UCEs shared across the genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Our data indicate that Drosophila UCEs are hubs for gene regulatory functions and suggest that UCE sequence invariance originates from their combinatorial roles in gene control. We also note that the gene regulatory roles of intronic and intergenic UCEs (iUCEs) are distinct from those found in exonic UCEs (eUCEs). In iUCEs, transcription factor (TF) and epigenetic factor binding data strongly support iUCE roles in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In contrast, analyses of eUCEs indicate that they are two orders of magnitude more likely than the expected to simultaneously include protein-coding sequence, TF-binding sites, splice sites, and RNA editing sites but have reduced roles in transcriptional or epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, we use a Drosophila cell culture system and transgenic Drosophila embryos to validate the notion of UCE combinatorial regulatory roles using an eUCE within the Hox gene Ultrabithorax and show that its protein-coding region also contains alternative splicing regulatory information. Taken together our experiments indicate that UCEs emerge as a result of combinatorial gene regulatory roles and highlight common features in mammalian and insect UCEs implying that similar processes might underlie ultraconservation in diverse animal taxa. PMID:27247329

  20. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Robinson, Gene E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization

  1. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Gene E.; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization

  2. Transcription Profile of Aging and Cognition-Related Genes in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ianov, Lara; Rani, Asha; Beas, Blanca S.; Kumar, Ashok; Foster, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive function depends on transcription; however, there is little information linking altered gene expression to impaired prefrontal cortex function during aging. Young and aged F344 rats were characterized on attentional set shift and spatial memory tasks. Transcriptional differences associated with age and cognition were examined using RNA sequencing to construct transcriptomic profiles for the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), white matter, and region CA1 of the hippocampus. The results indicate regional differences in vulnerability to aging. Age-related gene expression in the mPFC was similar to, though less robust than, changes in the dorsolateral PFC of aging humans suggesting that aging processes may be similar. Importantly, the pattern of transcription associated with aging did not predict cognitive decline. Rather, increased mPFC expression of genes involved in regulation of transcription, including transcription factors that regulate the strength of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, and neural activity-related immediate-early genes was observed in aged animals that exhibit delayed set shift behavior. The specificity of impairment on a mPFC-dependent task, associated with a particular mPFC transcriptional profile indicates that impaired executive function involves altered transcriptional regulation and neural activity/plasticity processes that are distinct from that described for impaired hippocampal function. PMID:27242522

  3. Application of a Novel Functional Gene Microarray to Probe the Functional Ecology of Ammonia Oxidation in Nitrifying Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Short, Michael D.; Abell, Guy C. J.; Bodrossy, Levente; van den Akker, Ben

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first study trialling a newly-developed, functional gene microarray (FGA) for characterising bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidisers in activated sludge. Mixed liquor (ML) and media biofilm samples from a full-scale integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) plant were analysed with the FGA to profile the diversity and relative abundance of ammonia-oxidising archaea and bacteria (AOA and AOB respectively). FGA analyses of AOA and AOB communities revealed ubiquitous distribution of AOA across all samples – an important finding for these newly-discovered and poorly characterised organisms. Results also revealed striking differences in the functional ecology of attached versus suspended communities within the IFAS reactor. Quantitative assessment of AOB and AOA functional gene abundance revealed a dominance of AOB in the ML and approximately equal distribution of AOA and AOB in the media-attached biofilm. Subsequent correlations of functional gene abundance data with key water quality parameters suggested an important functional role for media-attached AOB in particular for IFAS reactor nitrification performance and indicate possible functional redundancy in some IFAS ammonia oxidiser communities. Results from this investigation demonstrate the capacity of the FGA to resolve subtle ecological shifts in key microbial communities in nitrifying activated sludge and indicate its value as a tool for better understanding the linkages between the ecology and performance of these engineered systems. PMID:24155925

  4. Kluyveromyces lactis genome harbours a functional linker histone encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Staneva, Dessislava; Georgieva, Milena; Miloshev, George

    2016-06-01

    Linker histones are essential components of chromatin in eukaryotes. Through interactions with linker DNA and nucleosomes they facilitate folding and maintenance of higher-order chromatin structures and thus delicately modulate gene activity. The necessity of linker histones in lower eukaryotes appears controversial and dubious. Genomic data have shown that Schizosaccharomyces pombe does not possess genes encoding linker histones while Kluyveromyces lactis has been reported to have a pseudogene. Regarding this controversy, we have provided the first direct experimental evidence for the existence of a functional linker histone gene, KlLH1, in K. lactis genome. Sequencing of KlLH1 from both genomic DNA and copy DNA confirmed the presence of an intact open reading frame. Transcription and splicing of the KlLH1 sequence as well as translation of its mRNA have been studied. In silico analysis revealed homology of KlLH1p to the histone H1/H5 protein family with predicted three domain structure characteristic for the linker histones of higher eukaryotes. This strongly proves that the yeast K. lactis does indeed possess a functional linker histone gene thus entailing the evolutionary preservation and significance of linker histones. The nucleotide sequences of KlLH1 are deposited in the GenBank under accession numbers KT826576, KT826577 and KT826578. PMID:27189369

  5. Gene-Specific Function Prediction for Non-Synonymous Mutations in Monogenic Diabetes Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Liu, Xiaoming; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Polychronakos, Constantin; Qu, Hui-Qi

    2014-01-01

    The rapid progress of genomic technologies has been providing new opportunities to address the need of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) molecular diagnosis. However, whether a new mutation causes MODY can be questionable. A number of in silico methods have been developed to predict functional effects of rare human mutations. The purpose of this study is to compare the performance of different bioinformatics methods in the functional prediction of nonsynonymous mutations in each MODY gene, and provides reference matrices to assist the molecular diagnosis of MODY. Our study showed that the prediction scores by different methods of the diabetes mutations were highly correlated, but were more complimentary than replacement to each other. The available in silico methods for the prediction of diabetes mutations had varied performances across different genes. Applying gene-specific thresholds defined by this study may be able to increase the performance of in silico prediction of disease-causing mutations. PMID:25136813

  6. Expression and interaction analysis of Arabidopsis Skp1-related genes.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoki; Kuroda, Hirofumi; Kuromori, Takashi; Hirayama, Takashi; Seki, Motoaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Shimada, Hiroaki; Matsui, Minami

    2004-01-01

    Specific protein degradation has been observed in several aspects of development and differentiation in many organisms. One example of such proteolysis is regulated by protein polyubiquitination that is promoted by the SCF complex consisting of Skp1, cullin, and an F-box protein. We examined the activities of the Arabidopsis Skp1-related proteins (ASKs). Among 19 annotated ASK genes, we isolated 16 of the corresponding cDNAs (ASK1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19), and examined their gene products for interactions with 24 representatives of F-box proteins carrying various classes of the C-terminal domains using the yeast two-hybrid system. As a result, we found diverse binding specificities: ASK1, ASK2, ASK11 and ASK12 interacted well with COI1, FKF1, UFO-like protein, LRR-containing F-box proteins, and other F-box proteins with unknown C-terminal motifs. We also observed specific interaction between F-box proteins and ASK3, ASK9, ASK13, ASK14, ASK16 and ASK18. In contrast, we detected no interaction between any of the 12 ASK proteins and F-box proteins containing CRFA, CRFB or CRFC domains. Both histochemical and RT-PCR analysis of eight ASK genes expression revealed unique expression patterns for the respective genes. PMID:14749489

  7. Relating protein adduction to gene expression changes: a systems approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Shi, Zhiao; Duncan, Dexter T; Prodduturi, Naresh; Marnett, Lawrence J; Liebler, Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Modification of proteins by reactive electrophiles such as the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) plays a critical role in oxidant-associated human diseases. However, little is known about protein adduction and the mechanism by which protein damage elicits adaptive effects and toxicity. We developed a systems approach for relating protein adduction to gene expression changes through the integration of protein adduction, gene expression, protein-DNA interaction, and protein-protein interaction data. Using a random walk strategy, we expanded a list of responsive transcription factors inferred from gene expression studies to upstream signaling networks, which in turn allowed overlaying protein adduction data on the network for the prediction of stress sensors and their associated regulatory mechanisms. We demonstrated the general applicability of transcription factor-based signaling network inference using 103 known pathways. Applying our workflow on gene expression and protein adduction data from HNE-treatment not only rediscovered known mechanisms of electrophile stress but also generated novel hypotheses regarding protein damage sensors. Although developed for analyzing protein adduction data, the framework can be easily adapted for phosphoproteomics and other types of protein modification data. PMID:21594272

  8. The Drosophila gene escargot encodes a zinc finger motif found in snail-related genes.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, M; Noguchi, P D; Sensabaugh, S M; Odenwald, W F; Kassis, J A

    1992-02-01

    Two independent P-element enhancer detection lines were obtained that express lacZ in a pattern of longitudinal stripes early in germband elongation. In this paper, molecular and genetic characterization of a gene located near these transposons is presented. Sequence analysis of a cDNA clone from the region reveals that this gene has a high degree of similarity with the Drosophila snail gene (Boulay et al., 1987). The sequence similarity extends over 400 nucleotides, and includes a region encoding five tandem zinc finger motifs (72% nucleotide identity; 76% amino acid identity). This region is also conserved in the snail homologue from Xenopus laevis (76% nucleotide identity; 83% amino acid identity) (Sargent and Bennett, 1990). We have named the Drosophila snail-related gene escargot (esg), and the region of sequence conservation common to all three genes the 'snailbox'. A number of Drosophila genomic DNA fragments cross-hybridize to a probe from the snailbox region suggesting that snail and escargot are members of a multigene family. The expression pattern of escargot is dynamic and complex. Early in germband elongation, escargot RNA is expressed in a pattern of longitudinal stripes identical to the one observed in the two enhancer detection lines. Later in development, escargot is expressed in cells that will form the larval imaginal tissues, escargot is allelic with l(2)35Ce, an essential gene located near snail in the genome. PMID:1571289

  9. Differential regulation of the 70K heat shock gene and related genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Ellwood, M S; Craig, E A

    1984-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a family of genes related to Hsp70, the major heat shock gene of Drosophila melanogaster. The transcription of three of these genes, which show no conservation of sequences 5' to the protein-coding region, was analyzed. The 5' flanking regions from the three genes were fused to the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase structural gene and introduced into yeasts on multicopy plasmids, putting the beta-galactosidase production under yeast promoter control. Analysis of beta-galactosidase mRNA and protein production in these transformed strains revealed that transcription from the three promoters is differentially regulated. The number of transcripts from one promoter is vastly increased for a brief period after heat shock, whereas mRNA from another declines. Transcripts from a third gene are slightly enhanced upon heat shock; however, multiple 5' ends of the mRNA are found, and a minor species increases in amount after heat shock. Transcription of these promoters in their native state on the chromosome appears to be modulated in the same manner. Images PMID:6436685

  10. Ascorbate peroxidase-related (APx-R) is not a duplicable gene

    PubMed Central

    Dunand, Christophe; Mathé, Catherine; Lazzarotto, Fernanda; Margis, Rogério; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    Phylogenetic, genomic and functional analyses have allowed the identification of a new class of putative heme peroxidases, so called APx-R (APx-Related). These new class, mainly present in the green lineage (including green algae and land plants), can also be detected in other unicellular chloroplastic organisms. Except for recent polyploid organisms, only single-copy of APx-R gene was detected in each genome, suggesting that the majority of the APx-R extra-copies were lost after chromosomal or segmental duplications. In a similar way, most APx-R co-expressed genes in Arabidopsis genome do not have conserved extra-copies after chromosomal duplications and are predicted to be localized in organelles, as are the APx-R. The member of this gene network can be considered as unique gene, well conserved through the evolution due to a strong negative selection pressure and a low evolution rate. PMID:22231200

  11. Associations between DNA methylation and schizophrenia-related intermediate phenotypes a gene set enrichment analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Johanna; Walton, Esther; Wright, Carrie; Beyer, Andreas; Scholz, Markus; Turner, Jessica; Liu, Jingyu; Smolka, Michael N.; Roessner, Veit; Sponheim, Scott R.; Gollub, Randy L.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Multiple genetic approaches have identified microRNAs as key effectors in psychiatric disorders as they post-transcriptionally regulate expression of thousands of target genes. However, their role in specific psychiatric diseases remains poorly understood. In addition, epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, which affect the expression of both microRNAs and coding genes, are critical for our understanding of molecular mechanisms in schizophrenia. Using clinical, imaging, genetic, and epigenetic data of 103 patients with schizophrenia and 111 healthy controls of the Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium (MCIC) study of schizophrenia, we conducted gene set enrichment analysis to identify markers for schizophrenia-associated intermediate phenotypes. Genes were ranked based on the correlation between DNA methylation patterns and each phenotype, and then searched for enrichment in 221 predicted microRNA target gene sets. We found the predicted hsa-miR-219a-5p target gene set to be significantly enriched for genes (EPHA4, PKNOX1, ESR1, amongst others) whose methylation status is correlated with hippocampal volume independent of disease status. Our results were strengthened by significant associations between hsa-miR-219a-5p target gene methylation patterns and hippocampus-related neuropsychological variables. IPA pathway analysis of the respective predicted hsa-miR-219a-5p target genes revealed associated network functions in behaviour and developmental disorders. Altered methylation patterns of predicted hsa-miR-219a-5p target genes are associated with a structural aberration of the brain that has been proposed as a possible biomarker for schizophrenia. The (dys)regulation of microRNA target genes by epigenetic mechanisms may confer additional risk for developing psychiatric symptoms. Further study is needed to understand possible interactions between microRNAs and epigenetic changes and their impact on risk for brain-based disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID

  12. Functionally relevant diversity of closely related Nitrospira in activated sludge

    PubMed Central

    Gruber-Dorninger, Christiane; Pester, Michael; Kitzinger, Katharina; Savio, Domenico F; Loy, Alexander; Rattei, Thomas; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Nitrospira are chemolithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacteria that catalyze the second step of nitrification in most oxic habitats and are important for excess nitrogen removal from sewage in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). To date, little is known about their diversity and ecological niche partitioning within complex communities. In this study, the fine-scale community structure and function of Nitrospira was analyzed in two full-scale WWTPs as model ecosystems. In Nitrospira-specific 16S rRNA clone libraries retrieved from each plant, closely related phylogenetic clusters (16S rRNA identities between clusters ranged from 95.8% to 99.6%) within Nitrospira lineages I and II were found. Newly designed probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed the specific detection of several of these clusters, whose coexistence in the WWTPs was shown for prolonged periods of several years. In situ ecophysiological analyses based on FISH, relative abundance and spatial arrangement quantification, as well as microautoradiography revealed functional differences of these Nitrospira clusters regarding the preferred nitrite concentration, the utilization of formate as substrate and the spatial coaggregation with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria as symbiotic partners. Amplicon pyrosequencing of the nxrB gene, which encodes subunit beta of nitrite oxidoreductase of Nitrospira, revealed in one of the WWTPs as many as 121 species-level nxrB operational taxonomic units with highly uneven relative abundances in the amplicon library. These results show a previously unrecognized high diversity of Nitrospira in engineered systems, which is at least partially linked to niche differentiation and may have important implications for process stability. PMID:25148481

  13. First evidence for functional vomeronasal 2 receptor genes in primates.

    PubMed

    Hohenbrink, Philipp; Mundy, Nicholas I; Zimmermann, Elke; Radespiel, Ute

    2013-02-23

    Two classes of vomeronasal receptor genes, V1R and V2R, occur in vertebrates. Whereas, V1R loci are found in a wide variety of mammals, including primates, intact V2R genes have thus far only been described in rodents and marsupials. In primates, the V2R repertoire has been considered degenerate. Here, we identify for the first time two intact V2R loci in a strepsirrhine primate, the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), and demonstrate their expression in the vomeronasal organ. Putatively functional orthologues are present in two other strepsirrhines, whereas, both loci are pseudogenes in a range of anthropoid species. The functional significance of the loci is unknown, but positive selection on one of them is consistent with an adaptive role in pheromone detection. Finally, conservation of V2R loci in strepsirrhines is notable, given their high diversity and role in MUP and MHC detection in rodents. PMID:23269843

  14. Molecular cloning of allelopathy related genes and their relation to HHO in Eupatorium adenophorum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiming; Pei, Xixiang; Wan, Fanghao; Cheng, Hongmei

    2011-10-01

    In this study, conserved sequence regions of HMGR, DXR, and CHS (encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase and chalcone synthase, respectively) were amplified by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR from Eupatorium adenophorum. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the expression of CHS was related to the level of HHO, an allelochemical isolated from E. adenophorum. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that there was no significant difference in expression of genes among three different tissues, except for CHS. Southern blotting indicated that at least three CHS genes are present in the E. adenophorum genome. A full-length cDNA from CHS genes (named EaCHS1, GenBank ID: FJ913888) was cloned. The 1,455 bp cDNA contained an open reading frame (1,206 bp) encoding a protein of 401 amino acids. Preliminary bioinformatics analysis of EaCHS1 revealed that EaCHS1 was a member of CHS family, the subcellular localization predicted that EaCHS1 was a cytoplasmic protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of conserved sequences of these genes and of a full-length EaCHS1 gene in E. adenophorum. The results indicated that CHS gene is related to allelopathy of E. adenophorum. PMID:21127986

  15. Six family of homeobox genes and related mechanisms in tumorigenesis protocols.

    PubMed

    Armat, Marzieh; Ramezani, Fatemeh; Molavi, Ommoleila; Sabzichi, Mehdi; Samadi, Nasser

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the homeobox gene superfamily has been introduced as a master regulator in downstream target genes related to cell development and proliferation. An indispensable role of this family involved in organogenesis development has been widely demonstrated since expression of Six family led to a distinct increase in development of various organs. These functions of Six family genes are primarily based on structure as well as regulatory role in response to external or internal stimuli. In addition to these roles, mutation or aberrant expression of Six family plays a fundamental role in initiation of carcinogenesis, a multistep process including transformation, proliferation, angiogenesis, migration, and metastasis. This suggests that the Six superfamily members can be considered as novel target molecules to inhibit tumor growth and progression. This review focuses on the structure, function, and mechanisms of the Six family in cancer processes and possible strategies to apply these family members for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic purposes. PMID:27056337

  16. Remote Control of Gene Function by Local Translation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hosung; Gkogkas, Christos G.; Sonenberg, Nahum; Holt, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    The subcellular position of a protein is a key determinant of its function. Mounting evidence indicates that RNA localization, where specific mRNAs are transported subcellularly and subsequently translated in response to localized signals, is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to control protein localization. On-site synthesis confers novel signaling properties to a protein and helps to maintain local proteome homeostasis. Local translation plays particularly important roles in distal neuronal compartments, and dysregulated RNA localization and translation cause defects in neuronal wiring and survival. Here, we discuss key findings in this area and possible implications of this adaptable and swift mechanism for spatial control of gene function. PMID:24679524

  17. Impact of obesity-related genes in Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective was to investigate the association between BMI and single nucleotide polymorphisms previously identified of obesity-related genes in two Spanish populations. Forty SNPs in 23 obesity-related genes were evaluated in a rural population characterized by a high prevalence of obesity (869 subjects, mean age 46 yr, 62% women, 36% obese) and in an urban population (1425 subjects, mean age 54 yr, 50% women, 19% obese). Genotyping was assessed by using SNPlex and PLINK for the association analysis. Results Polymorphisms of the FTO were significantly associated with BMI, in the rural population (beta 0.87, p-value <0.001). None of the other SNPs showed significant association after Bonferroni correction in the two populations or in the pooled analysis. A weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) was constructed using the risk alleles of the Tag-SNPs with a positive Beta parameter in both populations. From the first to the fifth quintile of the score, the BMI increased 0.45 kg/m2 in Hortega and 2.0 kg/m2 in Pizarra. Overall, the obesity predictive value was low (less than 1%). Conclusion The risk associated with polymorphisms is low and the overall effect on BMI or obesity prediction is minimal. A weighted genetic risk score based on genes mainly acting through central nervous system mechanisms was associated with BMI but it yields minimal clinical prediction for the obesity risk in the general population. PMID:24267414

  18. Cloning the Gravity and Shear Stress Related Genes from MG-63 Cells by Subtracting Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu; Dai, Zhong-quan; Wang, Bing; Cao, Xin-sheng; Li, Ying-hui; Sun, Xi-qing

    2008-06-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to clone the gravity and shear stress related genes from osteoblast-like human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells by subtractive hybridization. Method MG-63 cells were divided into two groups (1G group and simulated microgravity group). After cultured for 60 h in two different gravitational environments, two groups of MG-63 cells were treated with 1.5Pa fluid shear stress (FSS) for 60 min, respectively. The total RNA in cells was isolated. The gravity and shear stress related genes were cloned by subtractive hybridization. Result 200 clones were gained. 30 positive clones were selected using PCR method based on the primers of vector and sequenced. The obtained sequences were analyzed by blast. changes of 17 sequences were confirmed by RT-PCR and these genes are related to cell proliferation, cell differentiation, protein synthesis, signal transduction and apoptosis. 5 unknown genes related to gravity and shear stress were found. Conclusion In this part of our study, our result indicates that simulated microgravity may change the activities of MG-63 cells by inducing the functional alterations of specific genes.

  19. Cloning of three human multifunctional de novo purine biosynthetic genes by functional complementation of yeast mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Schild, D; Brake, A J; Kiefer, M C; Young, D; Barr, P J

    1990-01-01

    Functional complementation of mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to clone three multifunctional human genes involved in de novo purine biosynthesis. A HepG2 cDNA library constructed in a yeast expression vector was used to transform yeast strains with mutations in adenine biosynthetic genes. Clones were isolated that complement mutations in the yeast ADE2, ADE3, and ADE8 genes. The cDNA that complemented the ade8 (phosphoribosylglycinamide formyltransferase, GART) mutation, also complemented the ade5 (phosphoribosylglycinamide synthetase) and ade7 [phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase (AIRS; also known as PAIS)] mutations, indicating that it is the human trifunctional GART gene. Supporting data include homology between the AIRS and GART domains of this gene and the published sequence of these domains from other organisms, and localization of the cloned gene to human chromosome 21, where the GART gene has been shown to map. The cDNA that complemented ade2 (phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase) also complemented ade1 (phosphoribosylaminoimidazole succinocarboxamide synthetase), supporting earlier data suggesting that in some organisms these functions are part of a bifunctional protein. The cDNA that complemented ade3 (formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase) is different from the recently isolated human cDNA encoding this enzyme and instead appears to encode a related mitochondrial enzyme. Images PMID:2183217

  20. The Equine Embryo Influences Immune-Related Gene Expression in the Oviduct.

    PubMed

    Smits, Katrien; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Govaere, Jan; Van Poucke, Mario; Peelman, Luc; Deforce, Dieter; Van Soom, Ann

    2016-02-01

    Although the equine oviduct clearly affects early embryo development and the selective transport of equine embryos through the oviduct indicates a reciprocal interaction, the influence of the embryo on gene expression in the oviduct remains to be determined in the horse. The aim of this study was to examine this by means of RNA sequencing. Four days after ovulation, epithelial cells ipsilateral and contralateral to the ovulation side from five cyclic and five pregnant mares were collected from the oviduct. RNA was extracted, samples were sequenced, and data analysis was performed to determine differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (P value ≤0.05 and absolute fold change ≥2) and to provide functional interpretation. A total of 10 743 transcripts were identified and 253 genes were found to be upregulated and 108 to be downregulated in the pregnant ipsilateral oviduct when compared to the cyclic ipsilateral oviduct. Comparison of the ipsilateral and the contralateral oviduct indicated 164 DEGs in pregnant mares and 77 DEGs in cyclic mares. Enriched functional categories were detected only in the comparison of pregnant and cyclic ipsilateral oviducts and showed that the equine embryo affects the expression of immune response-related genes<