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Sample records for fundamental nursing practice

  1. Spiritual care competence for contemporary nursing practice: A quantitative exploration of the guidance provided by fundamental nursing textbooks.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Fiona; Neill, Freda; Murphy, Maryanne; Begley, Thelma; Sheaf, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Spirituality is receiving unprecedented attention in the nursing literature. Both the volume and scope of literature on the topic is expanding, and it is clear that this topic is of interest to nurses. There is consensus that the spiritual required by clients receiving health ought to be an integrated effort across the health care team. Although undergraduate nurses receive some education on the topic, this is ad hoc and inconsistent across universities. Textbooks are clearly a key resource in this area however the extent to which they form a comprehensive guide for nursing students and nurses is unclear. This study provides a hitherto unperformed analysis of core nursing textbooks to ascertain spirituality related content. 543 books were examined and this provides a range of useful information about inclusions and omissions in this field. Findings revealed that spirituality is not strongly portrayed as a component of holistic care and specific direction for the provision of spiritual care is lacking. Fundamental textbooks used by nurses and nursing students ought to inform and guide integrated spiritual care and reflect a more holistic approach to nursing care. The religious and/or spiritual needs of an increasingly diverse community need to be taken seriously within scholarly texts so that this commitment to individual clients' needs can be mirrored in practice. PMID:25819014

  2. Fundamental patterns of knowing in nursing: the challenge of evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Porter, Sam

    2010-01-01

    This article reconsiders the fundamental patterns of knowing in nursing in light of the challenge of narrow empirics in the form of evidence-based practice. Objections to the dominance of evidence-based practice are reviewed, and the reasons for it are examined. It is argued that it is partially the result of weaknesses in the alternative patterns of ethical, personal, and esthetic knowing, the ineffability of which compromises accountability. This ineffability can be countered only by introducing a wider form of empirics than countenanced by evidence-based practice into all patterns of knowing, to demonstrate their salience and to make their use in practice transparent. PMID:19996934

  3. Getting past widgets and digits: the fundamental transformation of the foundations of nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Porter-O'Grady, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Health reform and transformation now call for the creation of a new landscape for nursing practice based on intentional translation application of value-driven measures of service, quality, and price. Nursing is a central driver in the effective recalibration of health care within the rubric of health transformation under the aegis of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Increasingly relying on a growing digital infrastructure, the nursing profession must now reframe both its practice foundations and patterns of practice to reflect emerging value-driven, health-grounded service requisites. Specific nursing responses are suggested, which position nursing to best coordinate, integrate, and facilitate health delivery in the emerging value-driven service environment. PMID:24569756

  4. Nursing, knowledge and practice.

    PubMed

    Allen, D

    1997-07-01

    Recent commentators have suggested that academic knowledge is irrelevant to nursing practice and may actually undermine nursing's traditional caring ethos. Furthermore, by making nursing more academic, it is claimed that 'natural' but non-academic carers are prevented from pursuing a career in nursing. Debates about the relationship between nursing, knowledge and practice have a long history and have to be understood in terms of wider political and economic issues relating to nursing, its status within society and the changing role of nurses within the health services division of labour. One crucial issue is nursing's status as women's work. Critics of developments in nurse education draw an ideological equation between nursing work and the traditional female role. From this perspective the qualities that make a good nurse cannot be taught, rather they are founded on 'natural' feminine skills. Irrespective of whether caring is 'natural' or not, it is questionable as to whether, for today's nurses, being caring is sufficient. The shape of nursing jurisdiction is a long way removed from its origins in the Victorian middle-class household. In addition to their traditional caring role, contemporary nurses may also have complex clinical, management and research responsibilities, as well as being crucial coordinators of service provision. It is suggested that these and future developments in health services make the need for an educated nursing workforce even more pressing. In order to adequately prepare nurses for practice, however, it is vital that nurse education reflects the reality of service provision. PMID:10180381

  5. Best nursing practice.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    As part of this year's centenary celebrations, the RCN is showcasing the best nursing practice, focusing on that which often goes unobserved. Nurses, healthcare assistants and nursing students are asked to share ideas and innovations for improving practice and patient care. These will contribute to the development of a library of good practice and the RCN will invest in a small number of the successful projects. The closing date is 31 December. PMID:27581898

  6. The new fundamentals in nursing: introducing beginning quality and safety education for nurses' competencies.

    PubMed

    Preheim, Gayle J; Armstrong, Gail E; Barton, Amy J

    2009-12-01

    This article describes the redesign of the fundamentals of nursing course using an organizing framework and teaching strategies identified in the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) initiative. Six QSEN competencies (patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics) are essential for nursing practice. Beginning knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) associated with each competency were identified in a preliminary Delphi survey as important to incorporate early in prelicensure nursing curricula. Redesign requires a shift in focus from task-training and psychomotor skills development to incorporation of a systems context, reflecting redefined values and interventions associated with safety, quality, and professional nursing roles. A course revision, based on the QSEN competencies definitions, selected beginning KSAs, exemplar resources, and teaching strategies, is described. The reframing of fundamentals of nursing is essential to prepare new graduates for contemporary practice. PMID:20000251

  7. Uncovering Racial Bias in Nursing Fundamentals Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Michelle M.

    2001-01-01

    The portrayal of African Americans in nursing fundamentals textbooks was analyzed, resulting in 11 themes in the areas of history, culture, and physical assessment. Few African American leaders were included, and racial bias and stereotyping were apparent. Differences were often discussed using Eurocentric norms, and language tended to minimize…

  8. Preparation for Advanced Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frik, Seigina M.; Pollock, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    Lehman College's graduate nursing program uses theory-based courses to prepare advanced nurse practitioners. Students increase scholarly inquiry skills and clinical decision making; use of nursing conceptual models helped them plan and evaluate their practice. (SK)

  9. Advanced practice registered nurse certification.

    PubMed

    Alleman, Kim; Houle, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) in nephrology began to be certified through the Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission (NNCC) in 2006. Since that time, the APRN Consensus Model has been developed, which addresses licensure, accreditation, certification, and education and which strongly recommends specialty certification for advanced practice nurses. This article discusses NNCC certification for advanced practice in nephrology nursing and describes the major components of the APRN Consensus Model. PMID:23923801

  10. Eliciting nursing knowledge from practice: the dualism of nursing.

    PubMed

    Ramprogus, Vince

    2002-01-01

    Nursing knowledge has traditionally been examined and developed through the main research approaches based on the positivist, interpretive or phenomenological philosophies. These approaches are used either from a single and individual stance or combined to address particular research questions. They all, however, retain a focus that deals primarily or exclusively with what can be measured, observed or expressed as a fundamental unit of analysis to reconstruct, interpret and explain nursing practice. In this paper, Vince Ramprogus challenges the traditional approach to how nursing knowledge is defined and the common understanding of the purpose of nursing research. It is argued that adhering to empirical rigour while investigating or measuring nursing practice interferes with the very act and experience of nursing. Indeed, it becomes an either/or situation. It is also argued that nursing is not an empirical subject, and, therefore, the purpose of researching nursing is not about seeking the truth but about improving practice to achieve better patient care. The arguments are intended to provoke discussion and debate rather than to present a set position. PMID:12405006

  11. The relationship between nursing theory and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Miller, A

    1985-09-01

    During the past two decades, redefinition of many of the beliefs and assumptions which underly nursing appears to have contributed to an increasing divergence between nursing theory and nursing practice. Nurses who are theorists and educationalists, and nurses who are engaged in nursing practice tend to use different vocabularies, to have differing perceptions of patients and of nursing, and to value different kinds of nursing knowledge. Some of the divergences between nursing theory and nursing practice are considered, and suggestions made about how theory and practice might be reconciled. PMID:3850907

  12. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    SciTech Connect

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  13. Fundamentals of Nursing Science: Units 1 through 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einstoss, Esther

    A description is provided of "Fundamentals of Nursing," a two-year college course designed to introduce nursing students to the basic principles of patient care. First, information is presented on the place of the course in the nursing curriculum, in-class time allotments, and course prerequisites. A section on course content includes a statement…

  14. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  15. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  16. School Nursing Practice: Roles and Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Susan Tonskemper; And Others

    This document is an application of the American Nurses' Association's (ANA's) "Standards of Clinical Nursing Practice" (1991) to the specialty of school nursing. It identifies specialty standards of practice for the school nurse subsumed under the standards of clinical practice which apply to all nurses. Chapter One focuses on the ANA standards…

  17. [Rediscovering practical knowledge in nursing].

    PubMed

    Medina Moya, José Luis

    2005-01-01

    The author demythologizes some arguments which blamed the victim and he works on the path to rediscover practical knowledge in nursing in the sense that a nurse becomes a "constructor" or a "maker" of knowledge and not a mere applicator of knowledge. PMID:16130684

  18. Communication in Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kourkouta, Lambrini; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2014-01-01

    Good communication between nurses and patients is essential for the successful outcome of individualized nursing care of each patient. To achieve this, however, nurses must understand and help their patients, demonstrating courtesy, kindness and sincerity. Also they should devote time to the patient to communicate with the necessary confidentiality, and must not forget that this communication includes persons who surround the sick person, which is why the language of communication should be understood by all those involved in it. Good communication also is not only based on the physical abilities of nurses, but also on education and experience. PMID:24757408

  19. [Nurses' practice in health audit].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Karina Araújo; de Melo, Cristina Maria Meira

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this investigation was to identify nurses' practice in heath audit. The hermeneutic-dialectic method was used for the analysis. The study was performed in three loci: the internal audit service of a hospital; the external audit service of a private health service buyer, and the state audit service of the public health system (SUS, acronym in Portuguese for Sistema Unico de Saúde-Unique Health System), in Bahia. Nine audit nurses were interviewed. In the SUS audit, the nurses report being fulfilled with their practice and with the valorization of their professional role. In the private audit--both inside and outside of health organizations--the nurses' activities are focused on meeting the interests of their contractors, and do not get much involved with the care delivered by the nursing team and with the needs of service users. PMID:20964043

  20. Resource requirements for a quality Doctor of Nursing Practice program.

    PubMed

    Frantz, Rita A

    2013-08-01

    Fundamental to planning, implementing, and sustaining a quality Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program is access to the resources needed to foster a learning environment that prepares nurses for advanced practice and leadership in the future redesigned health care system. This creates formidable challenges for schools and colleges of nursing as they endeavor to address the nation's need for an increased supply of advanced practice nurses to provide access to high-quality, cost-effective care for an aging population. This article describes the essential resources needed to support the delivery of a DNP program and the proposed strategies needed to address the resource challenges. PMID:23855341

  1. Nursing Practice Environment and Outcomes for Oncology Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R.; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. Objectives The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. Methods A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and χ2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Results Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Conclusions Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Implications for Practice Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses’ participation in hospital decision making. PMID:22751101

  2. Delegation in Correctional Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Frances

    2016-07-01

    Correctional nurses face daily challenges as a result of their work environment. Common challenges include availability of resources for appropriate care delivery, negotiating with custody staff for access to patients, adherence to scope of practice standards, and working with a varied staffing mix. Professional correctional nurses must consider the educational backgrounds and competency of other nurses and assistive personnel in planning for care delivery. Budgetary constraints and varied staff preparation can be a challenge for the professional nurse. Adequate care planning requires understanding the educational level and competency of licensed and unlicensed staff. Delegation is the process of assessing patient needs and transferring responsibility for care to appropriately educated and competent staff. Correctional nurses can benefit from increased knowledge about delegation. PMID:27302707

  3. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  4. An ontological view of advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia; Hicks, Frank D; Whall, Ann L; Algase, Donna L

    2005-01-01

    Identifying, developing, and incorporating nursing's unique ontological and epistemological perspective into advanced practice nursing practice places priority on delivering care based on research-derived knowledge. Without a clear distinction of our metatheoretical space, we risk blindly adopting the practice values of other disciplines, which may not necessarily reflect those of nursing. A lack of focus may lead current advanced practice nursing curricula and emerging doctorate of nursing practice programs to mirror the logical positivist paradigm and perspective of medicine. This article presents an ontological perspective for advanced practice nursing education, practice, and research. PMID:16350595

  5. Culturally Competent School Nurse Practice.

    PubMed

    Carr, Bette; Knutson, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    School nurses are among the professional specialty disciplines in the school environment that have the unique opportunity of exploring and building upon effective practices when working and providing service to diverse populations. As such, school nurses must not only acquire the skills to survive in the culture of education; they must also develop cultural competence by engaging in self-identity and reflection, understanding cultural differences, being culturally responsive, identifying social injustices, and engaging in life-long learning experiences. PMID:26515571

  6. A nursing diagnosis based model: guiding nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Krenz, M; Karlik, B; Kiniry, S

    1989-05-01

    Fiscal uncertainty, anxiety about nursing retention, and public scrutiny characterize the hospital milieu. During times such as these, introducing a conceptual model may appear inpractical and untimely. However, the conceptual model at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital has demonstrated many practical applications. It guides nursing practice and provides a framework for quality assurance, documentation of nursing care, and education of nurses in the hospital. Future plans include using the model as a basis for developing a computerized care planning system and a method for cost accounting for nursing. The authors describe how the model serves to unify, give direction, simplify, and improve nursing practice. PMID:2723785

  7. Practical Nursing: Where Are We Headed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandiford, Janice

    1977-01-01

    Due to a redefinition of nursing by the American Nursing Association and financial needs which are difficult to meet, postsecondary vocational health care programs, especially practical nursing, are in danger of being phased out. An appeal to vocational practical nurse educators and legislators to improve and continue these programs is made. (BM)

  8. TLS from fundamentals to practice

    PubMed Central

    Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Afonine, Pavel V.; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    The Translation-Libration-Screw-rotation (TLS) model of rigid-body harmonic displacements introduced in crystallography by Schomaker & Trueblood (1968) is now a routine tool in macromolecular studies and is a feature of most modern crystallographic structure refinement packages. In this review we consider a number of simple examples that illustrate important features of the TLS model. Based on these examples simplified formulae are given for several special cases that may occur in structure modeling and refinement. The derivation of general TLS formulae from basic principles is also provided. This manuscript describes the principles of TLS modeling, as well as some select algorithmic details for practical application. An extensive list of applications references as examples of TLS in macromolecular crystallography refinement is provided. PMID:25249713

  9. Fundamental Questions of Practical Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshev, Yurij; Teerikorpi, Pekka

    The book guides the reader (astronomer, physicist, university student) through central questions of Practical Cosmology, a term used by the late Allan Sandage to denote the modern scientific enterprise to find out the cosmological model best describing the universe of galaxies, its geometry, size, age, and material contents. The authors draw from their personal experience in astrophysics and cosmology to explain key concepts of cosmology, both observational and theoretical, and to highlight several items which give cosmology its special character: - idiosyncratic features of the "cosmic laboratory" - Malmquist bias in determination of cosmic distances - theory of gravitation as a cornerstone of cosmological models - crucial tests checking the reality of space expansion - methods of analyzing the structures of the universe as mapped by galaxies - usefulness of fractal as a model to describe the large-scale structure - new cosmological physics inherent in the Friedmann world model

  10. Starting a nursing consultation practice.

    PubMed

    Schulmeister, L

    1999-03-01

    Because the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role has been changed or eliminated in many hospital organizations, many CNSs in career transition are considering establishing collaborative or independent nursing consultation practices. Opportunities for consultants exist in diverse practice settings and specialties. Before starting a consultation practice, the CNS should carefully examine goals, identify resources, and begin contacting potential referral sources. He or she must also decide what form of business organization to establish and write a business plan to solidify ideas and prepare for the unexpected. Most CNS consultants rely on personal savings to cover initial business and personal expenses, and many continue working as a CNS until the consultation practice is established. Fees can be set based on community standards, what the market will bear, desired projected income, or a third-party payor's fee schedule. The consultation practice can be marketed by word of mouth, inexpensive advertising techniques such as distributing flyers and business cards, direct mall, and media advertising. In today's healthcare marketplace, opportunities abound for the CNS risk-taker interested in starting a nursing consultation practice. PMID:10382408

  11. Cultural characteristics of nursing practice in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Mayuko; Ishigaki, Kazuko; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Fujita, Junko; Katakura, Naoko; Ogata, Yasuko; Mochizuki, Yuki; Okamoto, Yuko; Shinohara, Yuko

    2016-04-01

    The population of Japan has become multi-cultural, and there is more demand for culturally competent nursing care. The purpose of this study was to explore cultural characteristics of nursing practice in Japan focusing on behaviour. We interviewed 25 professionals with experience in or knowledge of nursing practice both in Japan and either the United States, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Thailand or South Korea. Qualitative content analysis has yielded three themes for cultural characteristics of nursing practice in Japan: practice expectations, communication and relationships with patients. Practice expectations for nurses in Japan involved various aspects; nurses conducted a wide range of basic nursing tasks, including bed baths and toileting. They often relied on non-verbal communication to deliver thoughtfulness and perceptiveness. They typically show deference to doctors and colleagues, emphasizing building and maintaining harmony with them. This emphasis on a multifaceted, non-verbal, and harmonious approach seemed characteristic of practice among Japanese nurses. PMID:27184703

  12. Legal Considerations of Psychiatric Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Barloon, Linda Funk; Hilliard, Wanda

    2016-06-01

    There are major legal issues that affect psychiatric nursing and guidelines for practicing in a legal and responsible manner. Advances in understanding of psychiatric conditions and developments in how nurses care for psychiatric patients result in changes in regulations, case law, and policies that govern nursing practice. Professional development, keeping abreast of current research and literature regarding clinical practice and trends, and involvement in professional organizations are some of the ways that psychiatric nurses can meet the challenges of their profession. PMID:27229273

  13. Nursing Home Registered Nurses' and Licensed Practical Nurses' Knowledge of Causes of Falls.

    PubMed

    Gray-Miceli, Deanna; de Cordova, Pamela B; Crane, Giles L; Quigley, Patricia; Ratcliffe, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Reducing falls in nursing homes requires a knowledgeable nursing workforce. To test knowledge, 8 validated vignettes representing multifactorial fall causes were administered to 47 nurses from 3 nursing homes. Although licensed practical nurses scored higher than registered nurses in individual categories of falls, when we computed the average score of all 8 categories between groups of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, registered nurses scored higher (F = 4.106; P < .05) in identifying 8 causal reasons for older adults to fall. PMID:26421775

  14. [German hospital nurses' attitudes concerning evidence-based nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Köpke, Sascha; Koch, Frauke; Behncke, Anja; Balzer, Katrin

    2013-06-01

    The relevance of nurses' attitudes for establishing an evidence-based nursing practice (EBP) has been proven internationally. For German-speaking countries so far only few data are available. The present survey aims at assessing nurses' perceptions of relevant context factors for implementing an EBP. Therefore, 1384 nurses in 21 hospitals in Northern-Germany received a self-developed questionnaire based on established instruments in March and April 2012. 1023 (74 %) nurses responded. In principal, results show a positive attitude towards EBP. The majority of participants regards research as relevant for nursing practice. Support from superiors and colleagues is seen as important prerequisite. However, implementation remains a challenge. Nurses are not informed about recent research results. Original articles are hardly used. Only a minority is prepared to spend own money on congresses or to start academic nursing training in the near future. For the first time in German-speaking countries, the study provides meaningful data on nurses' attitudes towards EBP. Nurses confirm the value of research for their own practice. However, there is a lack of basic requirements to identify and implement relevant research findings as for example the use of recent scientific evidence. Nursing education in Germany should therefore focus more strongly on building competencies required for EBP, for example through properly designed academic nursing training. PMID:23732313

  15. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  16. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  17. Scope of practice issues in forensic nursing.

    PubMed

    Evans, A M; Wells, D

    2001-01-01

    1. There is significant role variation, across the Western world, in relation to how forensic nurses practice. 2. The authors conducted a pilot survey of forensic nurses in Australia, New Zealand, the United States, and the United Kingdom to examine forensic nursing practice, role definition, and role boundaries. 3. Issues arising from the data include the visibility of forensic nurses, the client group, forensic-specific education, and role development. PMID:11197994

  18. Faculty practice plan entrance strategy for nursing.

    PubMed

    Parsons, M A; Felton, G M; Chassie, M B

    1996-01-01

    Nursing is a practice discipline that places great value on members of the profession who excel as providers of direct care. With health care reform, nursing faculty have unprecedented opportunities for advanced practice and are implementing entrepreneurial ventures to meet their commitments to practice. The purpose of this article is to describe a nursing faculty practice plan in conjunction with a decentralized medical school plan. The major benefits and barriers to its adoption are addressed. PMID:9087037

  19. Specialty practice entrepreneur: the advanced practice nurse.

    PubMed

    Kowal, N

    1998-01-01

    There are many opportunities in the health care arena to make a difference. The structured sense of change is "old school." New "surfers" of the system will be entrepreneurial in spirit, energy, and flexibility. There is no job description for the perfect person, only a sense of excitement and innovation that gives one the feeling energetic change is about to happen. In nursing, the risk takers are abundant in the APN role. It is the reason why they walk the line of provider/nurse. Making a difference to patients is important. Riding the waves of clinical care is the excitement. The final results are "the big waves" of life--a patient's life. A provider who defines the reality of practice creates a vision and skillfully bridges the road between the two. Design the surfboard--catch the wave. PMID:9987328

  20. Clinical practice: new challenges for the advanced practice nurse.

    PubMed

    Bartel, J C; Buturusis, B

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the challenges for advanced practice nurses (APNs) relative to supply and demand issues. The article also includes opportunities with the Balanced Budget Act, physician acceptance of Advanced Practice Nurses, and expanding practice opportunities. The challenges include the nursing shortage (both in nursing students and faculty), the aging of the nursing workforce, and a lag in nursing salaries; increased demand for nursing based on aging baby boomers, increasing patient acuity and technology, and new arenas for practice. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 provided new opportunities for advanced practice nurses, including enhanced autonomy to provide services and bill independently of physicians. With these changes come new opportunities for advanced practice nurse entrepreneurs in the areas of independent practice, including opportunities to positively impact the health of families and communities in alignment with the Federal government's vision for "Healthy People 2010." As physician acceptance of advanced practice nurses continues to grow and in light of the changes in medical practice and education (residency reduction), opportunities to expand collaborative practice arrangements also exist. APNs are best suited to make the most of these changes. One example of an opportunity for independent practice, a Community Wellness Center, is developed as an entrepreneurial venture benefiting both the APN and the health of a community. Who better than registered nurses (RNs), especially those practicing at the advanced level, can ensure that these opportunities and challenges are addressed in an ethical manner and focused on the needs and health of the community? PMID:12029667

  1. Concept maps: linking nursing theory to clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Daley, B J

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer a different methodology for teaching and learning in continuing nursing education and staff development. This article describes a qualitative research study that analyzed how linkages are made between theoretical material and clinical nursing practice. Findings indicate that nursing students did not link the elements of nursing process together, that clinical preparation was not linked to theoretical material, that the meaning students made of the information was different than the instructors' and that concepts from the basic sciences were not incorporated into student meaning structures. Implications for the use of concept maps as an educational strategy in continuing nursing education are drawn. PMID:8576492

  2. The carrier bag theory of nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Maeve, M K

    1994-06-01

    The carrier bag theory of nursing practice is a reinterpretation of how nursing is known and practiced that explicitly acknowledges and values nursing's oral and experiential traditions. An assumption of this work is that the region of experience that is nursing has been effectively divided into two worlds--academia and the world of practice. This has resulted in a theory-practice gap and an elite class-working class gap, as well as a gap between epistemes, or "knowing that" versus "knowing how." This article describes the development of reflective practice and resulting narratives from a critical perspective as a way of creating a pathway between the two worlds of nursing and honoring scholarship in all the ways nursing is known and practiced. PMID:8092815

  3. Evidence-Based Practice and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2005-01-01

    School nurses need to demonstrate that their practice is based on the best evidence available, which is usually data obtained from research. Evidence-based practice involves combining the best evidence available with nursing expertise and patient and family preferences to determine optimum care. Evidence-based practice guidelines are developed by…

  4. Negotiating the role of the practice nurse in general practice.

    PubMed

    Atkin, K; Lunt, N

    1996-09-01

    The debate about the role of the practice nurse is not only about practice nursing per se, but raises broader issues about the organization of primary health care. Two related issues emerge as significant: the role of the practice nurse in providing primary health care; and the effective use of the practice nurse resource in the 'new' National Health Service. This paper, by drawing on material from a qualitative study, specifically examines the type of work performed by practice nurses and the factors that influence this. The responses of practice nurses, general practitioners, Family Health Service Authority (FHSA) advisers, community nurse purchasers and managers of community nursing provider units suggest that a consensus on the future development of practice nursing is unlikely. The different stakeholders emphasized different issues, reflecting their own priorities and backgrounds. Practice nurses' accounts of the future, for example, focused on professional issues. General practitioners stressed the importance of role development which met their General Medical Service responsibilities. Purchasing agencies, provider units and FHSAs adopted a wider perspective and were more concerned to develop an effective and integrated primary health care service. The tensions generated by their different interests and perspectives, and the subsequent organizational and policy initiatives that emerge, will provide the context in which the role of practice nurses will be negotiated. PMID:8876409

  5. State Regulations for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Susan; Zimmerman, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a state-by-state summary of rules and regulations governing school nursing practice in the United States. Official government and agency sites were reviewed to determine providers of services in schools, criteria for becoming a school nurse, protection of titling, mandates for school nursing, and the…

  6. Medication Administration Practices of School Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Reed, David

    2000-01-01

    Assessed medication administration practices among school nurses, surveying members of the National Association of School Nurses. Respondents were extremely concerned about medication administration. Errors in administering medications were reported by 48.5 percent of respondents, with missed doses the most common error. Most nurses followed…

  7. Marketing the nursing practice of obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Dill, P Z

    1991-01-01

    This article offers nurses a conceptual framework for marketing their skills and discusses how that framework can be applied to obstetric nursing practice. A thorough understanding of the framework presented will provide maternity nurses with the foundation they need to participate effectively in a marketing plan. Examples of the application of the framework to specific clinical situations are examined. PMID:1941295

  8. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Anderson, Linda J W; Rising, Shannon

    2016-06-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic survey on their use of public health interventions as defined by the wheel. Although 67% of the participants were not familiar with the Public Health Intervention Wheel, respondents reported conducting activities that were consistent with the Wheel interventions. Screening, referral and follow-up, case management, and health teaching were the most frequently performed interventions. Intervention use varied by educational level, age of nurse, years of practice, and student population. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a relevant and useful framework that provides a language to explain population-based school nursing practice. PMID:26404552

  9. Advanced or advancing nursing practice: what is the future direction for nursing?

    PubMed

    Gray, Alastair

    Advanced nursing practice roles have emerged over the last 25 years in response to two major challenges: first, the significant reduction in available doctors; and, second, the rise in numbers of patients with complex health needs. It is suggested that, with a major drive to respond to the first problem, with its emphasis on the development of medical skills, the development of advanced nursing practice (which has the potential to have a significant impact on the second challenge of the rise in long-term conditions) has very much taken second place. Moreover, advanced nursing practice roles have become so medically focused that not only is advanced nursing practice not evident, but neither are the recognised sub-roles that are fundamental to advancing practice. These include innovation, education, research and clinical leadership. This article argues that in the current climate it is essential that advanced nurse practitioners not only demonstrate advanced practice, but also actively embrace the concept of 'advancing' nursing practice as the dominant feature of new roles. PMID:26768039

  10. Crown II: the implications of nurse prescribing for practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Baird, A

    2000-09-01

    Certain limited prescribing rights have now been granted to district nurses and health visitors. Proposals to extend prescribing rights to other health professionals have recently been put forward in the Review of Prescribing. Supply and Administration of Medicines (DoH, 1999). Practice nurses are one group who are likely to apply for such rights. This article reports on selected findings from a small-scale qualitative study designed to investigate the current and potential future of practice nurse in prescribing. It was found that practice nurses exercise considerable influence over prescribing in diverse therapeutic areas within general practice. However, it may be difficult to accommodate the prescribing requirements inherent in such a broad scope of practice within the framework of the present proposals. Important issues of accountability and patient safety are raised, and recommendations made for policy, research and education. PMID:12192338

  11. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret A.

    A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the course…

  12. Cultural Congruence and Infusion Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Abitz, Tracey L

    2016-01-01

    The importance of cultural competence in every nursing practice setting in today's world cannot be understated. Unconscious bias can have detrimental effects on therapeutic relationships and health outcomes. Nursing models of cultural competence by Purnell, Leininger, and Campinha-Bacote are reviewed. The Kleinman Model and LEARN Model offer questions and guidelines to facilitate assessment of patients' understanding of illness and treatment. The Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice contains elements of diversity and cultural competence throughout. Self-reflection of one's own values, beliefs, biases, and practice as an infusion nurse will promote the development of cultural competence. PMID:26934161

  13. Is compassion essential to nursing practice?

    PubMed

    Hem, Marit Helene; Heggen, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    The Norwegian Nurses' Association recently (2001) approved a new code of ethics that included compassion as one of the basic values in nursing care. This paper examines the idea of compassion in the context of the Bible story of the Good Samaritan using an analysis of qualitative data from nurses' clinical work with psychiatric patients. The aim is to show how the idea of compassion challenges nursing practice. Thereafter, the paper discusses the benefits of and premises for compassion in care work. The results show that nurses tend not to be guided by compassion in their work with patients. The organisation of the day-to-day work in the hospital ward, the division of labour between nurses and doctors, and the nurses' approach to nursing were identified as influencing this tendency. The study shows that compassion is a radical concept with a potential to promote greater respect for patients' dignity. PMID:17929733

  14. Nursing faculty practice: benefits vs costs.

    PubMed

    Budden, L

    1994-06-01

    The transfer of nurse education from the hospital setting to the university sector has increased the dichotomy between theory and practice. Nurse academics have been exploring methods of maintaining clinical competence and credibility through organizational structures such as faculty practice. Faculty practice is a formal arrangement which exists between a clinical setting and a university which allows nurse academics to consult and deliver client care resulting in research and scholarly outcomes. The most important advantage of faculty practice is its potential to contribute to nursing knowledge and validate theories through the use of reflective practice and professional journaling by nurse academics which can help demystify and analyse the intricate elements of nursing. Other advantages of faculty practice are described as improving student's learning and client care through the application of an advanced knowledge base and facilitation by a faculty member. It also facilitates communication with clinical staff and assists in the professional development of nurse academics. The major barriers which need to be addressed to facilitate faculty practice are the allocation of time in the nurse academic's workload which incorporates consultation and faculty practice, organization and administrative support and the recognition of clinical competence in the promotion and tenure process of universities. PMID:7930106

  15. Assessing and redesigning the nursing practice environment.

    PubMed

    Eaton-Spiva, LeeAnna; Buitrago, Paola; Trotter, Lisa; Macy, Amy; Lariscy, Mary; Johnson, Donna

    2010-01-01

    With an aging population, aging nurse workforce, and high nurse vacancy rates, our hospital had a clear mandate to assess and redesign our practice environment. The authors describe a project created to provide a framework for current and ongoing evaluation of the practice environment. PMID:20010376

  16. School nurse practice: a decade of change.

    PubMed

    DeBell, Diane

    2006-10-01

    Good practice requires an evidence base and criteria for assessment, which was the subject of a scope review of school nurse practice across the four countries of the UK. The findings demonstrate a rich base of research into service practice, particularly in the last decade. School nursing practice has experienced a paradigm shift from a medical to a social model of care. The service now works from a public health ethos and has a preventive agenda. The focus is on the child rather than a service for schools and school nurses work in teams rather than alone. Under-resourcing continues to beleaguer school nurse practice and there are areas that need further study, particularly large-scale research into the costs and benefits of school nursing. PMID:17061663

  17. Lessons learned from advanced practice nursing payment.

    PubMed

    Sullivan-Marx, Eileen M

    2008-05-01

    For more than 25 years, advanced practice nurses have been incrementally included as a part of the health care financing structure. Following physician payment revisions at the federal level, advanced practice nurses were overtly recognized as Medicare providers and have participated in the establishment of current procedural terminology codes and the subsequent relative work values associated with payment. Success in this regard has been the result of business, political, and policy savvy that has important lessons for moving forward in any health care restructuring for both nurses and advanced practice nurses. Principles of valuing nurse work, time, and intensity in the Resource-Based Relative Value Scale are discussed with implications for future opportunities of measuring nursing work and any potential relationship to quality outcomes of care. PMID:18650417

  18. Developing an Expert System for Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ozbolt, Judy G.; Schultz, Samuel; Swain, Mary Ann P.; Abraham, Ivo L.; Farchaus-Stein, Karen

    1984-01-01

    The American Nurses' Association has set eight Standards of Nursing Practice related to the nursing process. Computer-aided information systems intended to facilitate the nursing process must be designed to promote adherence to these professional standards. For each of the eight standards, the paper tells how a hypothetical expert system could help nurses to meet the standard. A prototype of such an expert system is being developed. The paper describes issues in conceptualizing clinical decision-making and developing decision strategies for the prototype system. The process of developing the prototype system is described.

  19. Nurses' spiritual care practices: becoming less religious?

    PubMed

    Delgado, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that nurses do not consistently provide spiritual care, feel ill equipped to do so, and there is a lack of information as to the type of spiritual care practices nurses use. This exploratory descriptive study surveyed nurses (N = 123) about their spiritual care practices and perceptions of effectiveness, followed by qualitative interviews with volunteers (n = 5) from the surveyed group. The nurses favored spiritual interventions that are not overtly religious, but conveyed concern and support, such as listening and providing comforting touch. PMID:25898449

  20. Advanced Practice Nursing Education: Challenges and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Cynthia; Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira; Katz, Janet; Hirsch, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Nursing education programs may face significant difficulty as they struggle to prepare sufficient numbers of advanced practice registered nurses to fulfill the vision of helping to design an improved US healthcare system as described in the Institute of Medicine's “Future of nursing” report. This paper describes specific challenges and provides strategies to improve advanced practice nursing clinical education in order to ensure that a sufficient number of APRNs are available to work in educational, practice, and research settings. Best practices are identified through a review of classic and current nursing literature. Strategies include intensive interprofessional collaborations and radical curriculum revisions such as increased use of simulation and domestic and international service work. Nurse educators must work with all stakeholders to create effective and lasting change. PMID:22220273

  1. Magnet hospital nurses describe control over nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marlene; Schmalenberg, Claudia E

    2003-06-01

    Staff nurses describe control over nursing practice (C/NP) as a professional nursing function made up of a variety of activities and outcomes. Greater acclaim, status, and prestige for nursing in the organization are viewed as a result, not a precursor, of C/NP. Interviews with 279 staff nurses working in 14 magnet hospitals indicated that effective C/NP requires some kind of empowered, formal organizational structure, extends beyond clinical decision making at the patient care interface, and is the same as or highly similar to what the literature describes as professional autonomy. From constant comparative analysis of nurses' descriptions of C/NP activities, five ranked categories of this real-life event emerged. The basis for the categories and ranking was "who owned the problem, issue, and solution" and the "degree of effectiveness of control" as reflected in visibility, viability, and recognition of a formal structure allowing and encouraging nurses' control over practice. Hospital mergers and structural reorganization were reported to negatively affect the structure needed for effective C/NP. Almost 60% of these magnet hospital staff nurses stated and/or described little or no C/NP. PMID:12790058

  2. Intuition in nursing practice: deep connections.

    PubMed

    Leners, D W

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the phenomenon of intuition in nursing culture. The aims of the study were to (a) identify and describe terminology used with intuition in nursing care practice, (b) describe examples of experiential knowledge of intuition, (c) describe actions taken on intuitive experiences, (d) describe feelings associated with intuitive experience, and (e) compare and contrast patterns and processes of nursing intuition. The design of the study was ethnography. Sampling involved 40 nurses from all levels of the hospital and home health care practice. Intuition was found to (a) facilitate the depth of nurse-client relationships; (b) lead to a deeper understanding and connection with client patterns; (c) be acknowledged as a professional risk; (d) emphasize the significant influence of autonomy, independence, and assertiveness in nursing practice; and (e) contribute to excellence in nursing care. Intuition was identified as a manifestation of transpersonal caring in the art of nursing practice and was deeply connected to caring as the moral ideal of the nursing profession. PMID:1301422

  3. [From caring practices to nursing sciences].

    PubMed

    Pierre-Jeanguiot, Nicole

    2006-12-01

    Summary of the thesis: Nurse training was born in the 1870's spurred on by doctors from the Red Cross and in the state-owned hospitals of Paris. Leonie Chaptal played a fundamental role in the elaboration of the first curriculum, a curriculum based on the knowledge which is useful for the nurse to assist the doctor. However, school based in France from Florence Nightingale's trend emphasize the professional autonomy of the nurse. Nursing training and profession therefore evolve in an ambivalence which leads to develop either "caring techniques" close to medical techniques, or a financial autonomy claimed by the "appropriate role" and the nursing clinical approach. Today the nursing profession finds itself in the heart of reforms: transfer of competence, validation of the acquired knowledge from experience, reform of the curriculum with a possible connection with the university. Having defined the criteria of the science by taking example on the model of the sciences of education, the study of nursing research published in the ARSI from 1985 in 2005 shows that nursing research exits and gives a general idea of investigated subjects, often referred to human sciences; hence a first approach of reference sciences, on which nursing sciences can establish and develop, knowing that the title nursing sciences is only used in Quebec. PMID:17269611

  4. Advanced practice: the clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Sparacino, P

    1992-01-01

    Historically, the clinically expert nurse who wanted to continue in direct patient care had few career options. That dilemma is changing in response to the recognised need for greater knowledge and clinical expertise in the domain of patient care. The clinical nurse specialist role is an answer to this concern. The clinical nurse specialist practices within a framework of theoretically-based knowledge and combines that knowledge with clinical expertise. The role is also pivotal in the promotion of patient care focused scientific inquiry and in the generation and refinement of nursing theories. Career options are more versatile than for the educator, researcher, or administrator. While the clinical nurse specialist is an essential person in influencing quality care in the traditional practice settings, there are now opportunities with clientele and practice settings which have expanded beyond the conventional boundaries. PMID:1528295

  5. Privacy Questions from Practicing School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2004-01-01

    This Question and Answer (Q&A) article addresses practice issues related to school health records and school nursing documentation that were posed by school nurses in the field. Specifically, the questions addressed concern the following: education records, medication privacy issues, sharing of sensitive health information, privacy of individual…

  6. Practical Nursing, Volume I. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen W.; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by the practical nurse. The volume contains three sections and 24 instructional units: Personal Vocational Relationships (6 units), Nutrition (3 units), and Basic Nursing Principles and Applied Skills (15 units covering such topics as…

  7. Nursing control over practice and teamwork.

    PubMed

    Castner, Jessica; Ceravolo, Diane J; Foltz-Ramos, Kelly; Wu, Yow-Wu

    2013-01-01

    Nurses' control over practice is essential to nursing care quality and fosters teamwork at the point of care delivery. This article describes a study to measure the impact of nurses' control over their practice from the perspective of teamwork. The purpose of this study was to measure the relationship of control over practice to the five following dimensions of teamwork: team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication. The study method was a secondary analysis of 456 surveys from registered nurses working in a five-hospital system. Study results demonstrated that the global measure of teamwork correlated with control over practice and nursing experience, but not with teamwork training. All five individual dimensions of teamwork were perceived as better for those who had a high level of control over practice compared to those who did not. In the discussion section, we consider situation monitoring since this dimension demonstrated an interaction effect between teamwork training and control over practice. Nursing control over practice demonstrates a positive relationship with teamwork and should be considered in future education, policy, and research efforts. Further study is needed to understand control over practice as a potential moderator or mediator of other predecessors of effective teamwork. PMID:23758421

  8. Challenges facing internationalisation of nursing practice, nurse education and nursing workforce in Australia.

    PubMed

    Parker, Vicki; McMillan, Margaret

    2007-04-01

    This paper examines factors that have lead to increasing internationalisation in nursing workforce and nursing education and contends that education and support for nurse managers and nurse academics is required in order to better prepare them for the challenges they will face. There are many benefits to be gained from internationalisation of nursing, the most significant being greater cross-cultural understanding and improved practices in workplaces across countries. However, the way in which nursing and nurses contribute to the international agenda is crucial to maintaining standards of education and nursing care in Australia and in countries with whom Australians collaborate. Internationalisation poses numerous challenges that need to be carefully thought through. This paper seeks to unravel and scrutinize some of the issues central to internationalisation in nursing, particularly in the Australian context. PMID:17563321

  9. Defining currency of practice for nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Willem J; Olliver, Janet D; Andrew, Catherine M

    2002-11-01

    Recent Nursing Council of New Zealand (NCNZ) guidelines for competence-based practising certificates (NCNZ, 2001) and the fact that all nurse educators must have a current practising certificate prompted the Nursing Schools within the Tertiary Accord of New Zealand (TANZ) to explore issues surrounding current competency in practice and how this can be maintained by nurse educators. This is a topical debate as discussions related to competence-based practising certificates generally refer to competence only in terms of direct patient care. This article sets out to clarify the issue with specific reference to nurse educators who, by the nature of their scope of practice, often do not carry a patient caseload. The literature relating to currency of practice is explored to provide background to current definitions and existing strategies for maintaining competence. This article draws on the findings of a survey by the TANZ Nursing Schools and provides a position on how currency of practice applies to nurses working in educational settings. In addition, strategies to maintain clinical, teaching and scholarly currency are presented along with suggestions for providing evidence that currency of practice is maintained. PMID:12564520

  10. Ethical dilemmas in perioperative nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Reeder, J M

    1989-12-01

    Ethical dilemmas in perioperative nursing practice occur during all phases and in every practice setting. Awareness of commonly experienced dilemmas and understanding of a model available to analyze and resolve these dilemmas can benefit patients and perioperative nurses. Patients will benefit from nurse advocates who recognize and act to resolve actual and potential ethical dilemmas. Nurses will benefit when they are empowered with the knowledge and ethical skills to enhance patient autonomy, to protect dignity and confidentiality, and human rights. Perioperative nurses should reflect on previous dilemmas and use them to assist with resolution of similar dilemmas. They should be knowledgeable of personal, departmental, institutional, and professional resources available when faced with ethical dilemmas. The ANA code for Nurses and the AORN Statements of Competency in Perioperative Nursing are two resources available to perioperative nurses. In the increasingly complex, technologically laden surgical environment, patients who are sicker and living longer will require services of highly skilled and educated professionals. They are vulnerable in the surgical setting and need surgical teams to act on their behalf. Perioperative nurses with ethical skill are an asset to patients and other members of the surgical team when they seek to resolve ethical dilemmas in knowledgeable and systematic ways. PMID:2685781

  11. Tobacco cessation education for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Diane; Zucker, Steven B; Stone, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The predicted shortfall of primary care physicians and the millions of newly insured beginning in 2014 call for an increase in the number of advanced practice nurses (APRNs). Advanced practice nurses can significantly improve their clients' quality of life and increase their life expectancy through tobacco cessation education. The purpose of this study was to educate APRN students on smoking information and techniques to assist clients with quitting smoking in the primary care setting. PMID:24867074

  12. Nursing students learning to utilize nursing research in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Lea-Riitta; Eriksson, Elina

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the significance of a learning assignment in relation to research skills and learning of nursing students in clinical practice. The learning assignment included an oral presentation of a nursing research article, which the students gave to their fellow students and ward nurses. The students also chaired the discussion after the presentation. The target group for the study was nursing students of a Finnish polytechnic who had been studying for 2-2 1/2 years and had accomplished a minimum of 120 ECTS credits of the total of 210 ECTS credits. When participating in the study, the students were completing a six-week clinical practice of optional studies. The data were collected with a questionnaire designed for the study. It consisted of six open-ended questions. Three of the questions were related to learning of research skills. Two questions were concerned with learning during the ongoing clinical practice. The final question inquired the students' views on the development of the learning assignment. The students received the questionnaire before the commencement of their clinical practice, and they returned it to the other researcher after their clinical practice. The questionnaire was given to 80 students, of which 50 returned it; the response rate was 63%. The data were analysed by content analysis question by question. According to the results, the learning assignment advanced the understanding of research concepts for the majority of the students. In particular, the students reported that the oral presentation clarified the research concepts, and the structure of a scientific article was also elucidated. The students stated that the assignment generated ideas concerning the development of nursing care. In relation to the ongoing clinical practice, the assignment advanced patient encounters and interaction, and bearing responsibility the most. Proposals for the further development of the learning assignment were expressed by

  13. The Nature of Advanced Practice Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberle, Kathleen; Allen, Marion

    2001-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses are situated between general knowledge (knowing why, what, and how) and particular knowledge (knowing who--personal knowledge of patients). Integration of the two assists in knowing when a particular action would be most helpful. This practical wisdom is the hallmark of advanced practice. (Contains 45 references.) (SK)

  14. Practice nurses experiences of mentoring undergraduate nursing students in Australian general practice.

    PubMed

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Peters, Kath; McInnes, Susan

    2012-07-01

    Internationally, the delivery of health services has shifted from secondary to primary care, necessitating an exponential growth of the nursing workforce and expansion of the nursing role in general practice. This growth, and the subsequent need to develop this workforce, has created a need to expose undergraduate nurses to general practice nursing as a viable career option. Concurrently, universities are struggling to find sufficient clinical places for their undergraduate students to gain clinical experience. It is logical, therefore, to increase the number of undergraduate nursing student placements in general practice. Through qualitative research methods, this paper seeks to explore the experiences of practice nurses mentoring undergraduate students on clinical placements within the general practice setting. Findings are presented in the following three themes: (1) Promoting Practice Nursing: We really need to get students in, (2) Mentoring future co-workers: Patience and reassurance, and (3) Reciprocity in learning: It's a bit of a two way street, which show the benefits of such placements. Clinical placements in general practice settings can be mutually beneficial in terms of providing quality teaching and learning experiences for students. Conversely, the experience provides an impetus for practice nurses to maintain currency of their clinical skills and knowledge through mentoring student nurses. PMID:21908081

  15. Informed consent practices of Chinese nurse researchers.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Douglas P; Honghong Wang; Pang, Samantha

    2010-03-01

    Nursing research in China is at an early stage of development and little is known about the practices of Chinese nurse researchers. This interview study carried out at a university in central China explores the informed consent practices of Chinese nurse researchers and the cultural considerations of using a western technique. Nine semistructured interviews were conducted in English with assistance and simultaneous translation from a Chinese nurse with research experience. The interviews were analyzed by one western and two Chinese researchers and major themes were identified. All participants endorsed informed consent as ethically required. Differences were noted between some of the informed consent practices typically recommended in the USA and those identified in this study, such as: recruitment using local and government officials, recruiting directly from medical records without special permission, family consultation in consent and consent control, and not revealing randomization to intervention groups receiving different treatments. PMID:20185442

  16. Fundamental Nursing: Process-Oriented Guided-Inquiry Learning (POGIL) Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roller, Maureen C.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the effect of a Process-Oriented Guided-Inquiry Learning (POGIL) implementation in a fundamental baccalaureate-nursing course is one way to determine its effectiveness. To date, the use of POGIL from a research perspective in fundamental nursing has not been documented in the literature. The purpose of the study was to measure the…

  17. Novices in clinical practice settings: student nurses stories of learning the practice of nursing.

    PubMed

    Orland-Barak, Lily; Wilhelem, Dalit

    2005-08-01

    Drawing on 24 stories of clinical practice in an apprenticeship context of training in Israel, this qualitative study examined student nurses' perspectives towards learning to become a nurse, as revealed through the language and content of their written stories of clinical practice. As our findings suggest, student nurses' stories of learning to become a nurse in practice settings, are characterized by procedural language, by medical rather than nursing terminology, and by a focus on actions rather than on interactions. We have learned that, despite the rich content that characterizes clinical practice settings, the apprenticeship orientation of the training program, combined with student nurses' state of being a novice, yielded representations of the experience of learning to nurse which were characterized by an instrumental perspective towards the practice. We interpret these findings through four interrelated insights that emerge from the study: (1) an 'instrumental practice' orientation in the setting of caring, (2) knowledge of clinical facts-not knowledge of clinical principles, (3) the fragmented character of novices' learning to nurse in practice, and (4) rich content of practice alone does not yield rich content of learning. PMID:16005116

  18. Development of the Family Nursing Practice Scale.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Peggy; Tarrant, Marie

    2006-11-01

    This article describes the development and testing of the Family Nursing Practice Scale (FNPS). This self-report questionnaire is designed to measure perceived changes in family nursing practice including attitudes toward working with families, critical appraisal of their family nursing practice and reciprocity in the nurse-family relationship. Categories were derived from a needs assessment, competence as effective application of knowledge and skill and theoretical foundations for family assessment and intervention. Psychometric testing (content, construct validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability) was undertaken with 140 psychiatric nurses in Hong Kong. Practice appraisal and nurse-family relationships accounted for 56.4% of the variance. Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficients were .88 and .73 for the two subscales, respectively, and .86 for the scale overall. Test-retest reliability ranged from .62 to .93 on the individual items. The results provide preliminary evidence of the reliability and validity of the FNPS. The instrument provides quantitative and qualitative evaluation components. PMID:17099118

  19. Tracing detached and attached care practices in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Soffer, Ann Katrine B

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of skills labs in Danish nursing education can, in itself, be viewed as a complexity. The students are expected to eventually carry out their work in a situated hospital practice, but they learn their professional skills in a different space altogether, detached and removed from the hospitals and practising on plastic dummies. Despite the apparent artificiality of the skills lab, this article will show that it is possible to analyse some of the fundamental aspects of care in nursing by ethnographically following this phenomenon of simulation-based training. These particular aspects of care are not explicated in the curriculum or textbooks; however, they surfaced once this crooked approach to studying care in a simulated practice was applied. The article start from the assertion that detached engagements are not recognized within the field of nursing education as an equal component to attachments. Yet empirical cases from the skills lab and hospitals illustrate how students sometimes felt emotionally attached to plastic dummies and how experienced nurses sometimes practised a degree of detachment in relation to human patients. Detached engagements will therefore be presented as part of care practices of nurses - rendering the ability to detach in engagement with patients a professional skill that students also need to learn. In the analysis to follow, attached and detached engagements are located on an equal plane by integrating both into the same conceptual framework, rather than imposing a priori notions about their dialectic relation. The analysis shows that it is the particular intertwinement of attachment and detachment that gives care its fundamental meaning. In conclusion, the need for a conceptual shift from a strong emphasis on attached engagement to a more balanced analytical approach to care work, as involving both attached and detached engagement within Danish nursing education, is advocated. PMID:24528597

  20. Computer-Assisted Instruction in Practical Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Maureen

    1976-01-01

    Existing computer-assisted instructional programs for nursing students are studied and their application to the education of practical nurses is considered in the light of the recent history of nursing education. (Author)

  1. Effective communication skills in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Bramhall, Elaine

    2014-12-01

    This article highlights the importance of effective communication skills for nurses. It focuses on core communication skills, their definitions and the positive outcomes that result when applied to practice. Effective communication is central to the provision of compassionate, high-quality nursing care. The article aims to refresh and develop existing knowledge and understanding of effective communication skills. Nurses reading this article will be encouraged to develop a more conscious style of communicating with patients and carers, with the aim of improving health outcomes and patient satisfaction. PMID:25467362

  2. Nursing Education Leaders' Perceived Leadership Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLong, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the leadership practices perceived by nursing education leaders as measured by the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI). The framework used was a contemporary transformational leadership model described in "The Leadership Challenge" ("4th ed.") by Dr. James Kouzes and Dr. Barry Posner, which identifies the…

  3. How narratives can change nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Holly; Maw, Heather; Mee, Steve; Buckley, Alison; Corless, Louise

    This series has explored the value of patient narratives in enabling nurses to reflect on how their practice is perceived by, and affects, patients and their families. This article describes how two student learning disability nurses used patient and carer narratives to highlight the effect of a hospital trust's lack of toilet provision for people with physical impairments, using the stories to persuade the trust to develop appropriate facilities. PMID:27337789

  4. Mobile applications in nursing education and practice.

    PubMed

    Airth-Kindree, Norah; Vandenbark, R Todd

    2014-01-01

    Students in an RN-BSN completion program capstone course investigated and critically evaluated mobile medical applications using an information literacy conceptual framework. Students also analyzed their potential usefulness as a resource in nursing practice. Student evaluations focused on usability and applicability when recommending the use of mobile applications as a point-of-care reference tools. This pilot assignment offers an innovative teaching strategy for integrating 1 aspect of informatics instruction into the nursing curriculum. PMID:24937293

  5. Measuring nursing informatics competencies of practicing nurses in Korea: Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seon Yoon; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Informatics competencies are a necessity for contemporary nurses. However, few researchers have investigated informatics competencies for practicing nurses. A full set of Informatics competencies, an instrument to measure these competencies, and potential influencing factors have yet to be identified for practicing nurses. The Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire was designed, tested for psychometrics, and used to measure beginning and experienced levels of practice. A pilot study using 54 nurses ensured item comprehension and clarity. Internal consistency and face and content validity were established. A cross-sectional survey was then conducted on 230 nurses in Seoul, Korea, to determine construct validity, describe a complete set of informatics competencies, and explore possible influencing factors on existing informatics competencies. Principal components analysis, descriptive statistics, and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Principal components analysis gives support for the Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire construct validity. Survey results indicate that involvement in a managerial position and self-directed informatics-related education may be more influential for improving informatics competencies, whereas general clinical experience and workplace settings are not. This study provides a foundation for understanding how informatics competencies might be integrated throughout nurses' work lives and how to develop appropriate strategies to support nurses in their informatics practice in clinical settings. PMID:25393832

  6. [Nurses' autonomy and vulnerability in the Nursing Assistance Systematization practice].

    PubMed

    Menezes, Silvia Regina Tamae; Priel, Margareth Rose; Pereira, Luciane Lucio

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to recognize the autonomy and vulnerability of nurses in the implementation of the Sistema da Assistência de Enfermagem (SAE) Nursing Care System through an integrative literature review, using content analysis. A survey was conducted, and 40 articles published between 1998 and 2008 were selected based on their relevance. Results showed two main categories of meaning: Benefits associated to the SAE practice (to patients, to the profession and to the institution) and Determinants for the Implementation of SAE (nurse's competence, training and education, record-instruments, infrastructure and collective sharing-construction). From the integration of the two categories, the highlights were the autonomy in acting with freedom and responsibility, science-based decision-making, and being valued for their social work, as well as the vulnerability expressed by interpersonal relationships, the wear generated by professional stress and the risk inherent to the service. PMID:21876898

  7. A Trial of Nursing Cost Accounting using Nursing Practice Data on a Hospital Information System.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Akiko; Tada, Kazuko; Ishima, Masatoshi; Nagao, Hidenori; Miyamoto, Tadashi; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Takemura, Tadamasa

    2015-01-01

    Hospital administration is very important and many hospitals carry out activity-based costing under comprehensive medicine. However, nursing cost is unclear, because nursing practice is expanding both quantitatively and qualitatively and it is difficult to grasp all nursing practices, and nursing cost is calculated in many cases comprehensively. On the other hand, a nursing information system (NIS) is implemented in many hospitals in Japan and we are beginning to get nursing practical data. In this paper, we propose a nursing cost accounting model and we simulate a cost by nursing contribution using NIS data. PMID:26262246

  8. Nurse residency programs and the transition to child health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Delack, Sandi; Martin, Jean; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Sperhac, Arlene M

    2015-06-01

    Nurse residency programs for newly licensed RNs are a critical component in bridging the clinical practice gap between education and practice. In May 2013, the Institute of Pediatric Nursing invited leaders from pediatric nursing organizations and children's hospitals to attend a forum on nurse residency programs for pediatric nurses. This article presents a summary of the discussions that occurred during the forum and makes recommendations for addressing issues related to nurse residency programs. PMID:26010285

  9. Factors influencing evidence-based practice for community nurses.

    PubMed

    Baird, Lisa M Garland; Miller, Tess

    2015-05-01

    Factors influencing the development of evidence-based nursing practice (EBNP) were examined in Prince Edward Island, Canada. An adapted electronic questionnaire was distributed to practicing registered nurses and nurse practitioners (n=68). An analysis of variance revealed a significant difference between nurses' clinical practice setting and the EBNP scale. Significant differences were also found between age and education level when compared with the EBNP subscales where novice nurses were less likely to rely on experience and intuition, and expert nurses with a higher level of education reported being more skilful at synthesising and applying information from research findings into their nursing practice. PMID:25993372

  10. The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing: A Collaborative Model for Nursing Practice and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatier, Kathleen Hartman

    2002-01-01

    The Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing was developed collaboratively by the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and the Johns Hopkins Hospital Department of Nursing. The institute prepares nurses for practice, keeps practitioners current, and provides nursing staff development programs. (Contains 11 references.) (JOW)

  11. Identification of Desired Outcomes for School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selekman, Janice; Guilday, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The "Scope and Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice" states that school nurses should evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their practice. School nurses have not yet identified and adopted outcomes by which this effectiveness can be measured. This study used focus groups during a national meeting of school nurse leaders to…

  12. Epistemic Authority in Nursing Practice vs. Doctors' Orders.

    PubMed

    Reed, Pamela G

    2016-07-01

    The practice policy of doctors' orders is still deeply embedded in 21st century professional nurse practice, despite its profound incongruence with nursing's perspective, standards of practice, and advanced knowledge. The author in this article elaborates on the doctors' orders policy in relation to nursing's disciplinary perspective and epistemic authority in professional practice. PMID:27271139

  13. Structures and practices enabling staff nurses to control their practice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marlene; Schmalenberg, Claudia; Maguire, Patricia; Brewer, Barbara B; Burke, Rebecca; Chmielewski, Linda; Cox, Karen; Kishner, Janice; Krugman, Mary; Meeks-Sjostrom, Diana; Waldo, Mary

    2008-08-01

    This mixed-methods study uses interviews, participant observations, and the CWEQII empowerment tool to identify structures and attributes of structures that promote control over nursing practice (CNP). Nearly 3,000 staff nurses completed the Essentials of Magnetism (EOM), an instrument that measures CNP, one of the eight staff nurse-identified essential attributes of a productive work environment. Strategic sampling is used to identify 101 high CNP-scoring clinical units in 8 high-EOM scoring magnet hospitals. In addition to 446 staff nurses, managers, and physicians on these high-scoring units, chief nursing officers, chief operating officers, and representatives from other professional departments are interviewed; participant observations are made of all unit/departmental/hospital council and interdisciplinary meetings held during a 4 to 6 day site visit. Structures and components of viable shared governance structures that enabled CNP are identified through constant comparative analysis of interviews and observations, and through analysis of quantitative measures. PMID:18195080

  14. Enhancing assertiveness in district nurse specialist practice.

    PubMed

    Green, Julie

    2016-08-01

    District nurse (DN) care delivery has undergone substantial change in recent years due to changing demographics and service delivery demands that have called for a move of care delivery from secondary to primary care. The title District Nurse is recorded with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) on completion of the Specialist Practice Qualification in District Nursing (SPQ DN), which purports to be a 'transformational' course that prepares future caseload holders to manage their team and prioritise care delivery effectively. This article explores the need for assertiveness skills in this role in response to Australian research, and outlines the pedagogic interventions implemented during the SPQ DN course to enhance this skill. Assertiveness scores were monitored for the duration of the course and demonstrated a significant increase-a topic that is now the subject of a future, funded study. PMID:27479854

  15. Transformational leadership in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Doody, Owen; Doody, Catriona M

    Traditionally, nurses have been over-managed and led inadequately, yet today they face unprecedented challenges and opportunities. Organisations constantly face changes that require an increasingly adaptive and flexible leadership. This type of adaptive leadership is referred to as 'transformational'; under it, environments of shared responsibilities that influence new ways of knowing are created. Transformational leadership motivates followers by appealing to higher ideas and moral values, where the leader has a deep set of internal values and ideas. This leads to followers acting to sustain the greater good, rather than their own interests, and supportive environments where responsibility is shared. This article focuses on transformational leadership and its application to nursing through the four components of transformational leadership. These are: idealised influence; inspirational motivation; intellectual stimulation; and individual consideration. PMID:23132001

  16. When the Mission Is Teaching: Does Nursing Faculty Practice Fit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwen, Laurie

    1998-01-01

    Asserts that nursing programs in liberal arts colleges must document that clinical practice is scholarship and conforms to the teaching mission. Discusses scholarly practice from nursing literature and from the work of Schon and Boyer. (SK)

  17. Practical Nursing. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified employer competency profile for practical nursing. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  18. Advanced nursing practice: old hat, new design.

    PubMed

    De Grasse, C; Nicklin, W

    2001-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses positively impact the delivery of healthcare and client outcomes. However, in the past these positions have been seen to have variable value and were often vulnerable during budget cuts. Lack of a clear advanced nursing practice (ANP) framework probably contributed to the compromised effectiveness of these roles and evolution of roles with different titles, scopes of practice and reporting structures. To build the foundation for developing an ANP framework, a task force at The Ottawa Hospital (TOH) conducted a literature review related to ANP roles and completed a review of all clinical nursing roles at TOH. In addition, focus groups with nurses and other health professionals elicited ANP perceptions. The ANP framework includes a standardized job description that details competencies under five role components: clinical practice; consultation; research; education; and, leadership. Recommendations for assessment, implementation and evaluation of ANP roles are identified. The process undertaken by our ANP task force proved to be thorough and sound in developing a framework within which to move forward with ANP role implementation throughout TOH. This article, describing the process, may assist other organizations in defining ANP roles to better meet patient needs in changing health care environments. PMID:11803945

  19. Practice management skills for the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Sportsman, S; Hawley, L J; Pollock, S; Varnell, G

    2001-01-01

    The faculties of three schools of nursing involved in a collaborative family nurse practitioner (FNP) program designed a study to address issues involved in preparing the nurse practitioner for the challenges of practice management in the clinical environment. The purposes of the study were to (1) identify business concepts necessary to successfully manage a primary care practice; (2) determine which of these concepts should be incorporated into an FNP curriculum; and (3) clarify information to be taught regarding each identified concept. Fifty-four business concepts related to primary care were identified from a literature review. A survey was then developed to assess the extent to which the identified concepts were necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice. Seven experts and five FNP faculty responded to the survey. The Content Validity Index (CVI) defined by Lynn (1986) was applied and 20 concepts necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice were identified. A focus group that included nurse practitioners (both faculty and nonfaculty) from the three collaborative sites connected by interactive telecommunications determined that all 20 of the identified concepts should be included in an FNP curriculum. Additionally, the focus group clarified relevant information to be taught regarding each identified concept. PMID:11559878

  20. Practice Management Skills for the Nurse Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sportsman, Susan; Hawley, Linda J.; Pollock, Susan; Varnell, Gayle

    2001-01-01

    An expert panel identified 20 business concepts important for a family nurse practitioner curriculum. A focus group of practitioners verified the concepts and clarified relevant information to be taught. The business concepts center on management and operations of a clinical practice. (SK)

  1. Presence in nursing practice: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Hessel, Joy A

    2009-01-01

    Presence is an elusive concept in nursing practice that has been recognized as advantageous in the patient experience. Dictionary sources define presence as being with and attending to another; involvement, companionship. Nursing scholars and theorists have elaborated on the dictionary definition of presence to include a holistic definition inclusive of the patient experience and the connection experienced between both patient and provider. However, despite attempts to define presence as it relates to nursing practice, a definition that completely encompasses the substantial benefits on the patient experience is yet to be developed. As guided by Walker and Avant, this concept analysis was performed by selection of a concept, determination of the purpose of the analysis, evaluation of existing definitions, identification of defining attributes of the concept, formulation of patient cases that epitomize and contrast the concept, and identification of antecedents and empirical referents of the concept. Thus, in this concept analysis article, existing definitions of presence will be recognized and evaluated, cases demonstrating nursing presence explored, and a definition of presence in nursing developed. PMID:19713785

  2. Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Perry, R N Beth

    2009-01-01

    Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice is the focus of this paper. The phenomenological research study reported involved a group of 8 nurses identified by their colleagues as exemplary. The major theme revealed in this study was that these exemplary nurses were also excellent role models in the clinical setting. This paper details approaches used by these nurses that made them excellent role models. Specifically, the themes of attending to the little things, making connections, maintaining a light-hearted attitude, modeling, and affirming others are presented. These themes are discussed within the framework of Watson [Watson, J., 1989. Human caring and suffering: a subjective model for health services. In: Watson, J., Taylor, R. (Eds.), They Shall Not Hurt: Human Suffering and Human Caring. Colorado University, Boulder, CO] "transpersonal caring" and [Bandura, A., 1997. Social Learning Theory. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ] "Social Learning Theory." Particular emphasis in the discussion is on how positive role modeling by exemplary practitioners can contribute to the education of clinical nurses in the practice setting. PMID:18590978

  3. Developing voluntary standards for district nurse education and practice.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Mary

    2016-05-01

    This article charts the development of a project, funded by the Queen's Nursing Institute and Queen's Nursing Institute Scotland, to develop voluntary standards that reflect the contemporary and future practice of district nurses. The standards are designed to enhance, but not replace, the Nursing and Midwifery Council standards for district nurse specialist practice. The project encompassed the four UK countries and gathered data from a wide range of sources to inform the new standards that were launched in September 2015. PMID:27170408

  4. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01

    The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses…

  5. Practice nursing: an evaluation of a training practice initiative.

    PubMed

    Stark, S; Warne, T; Street, C

    2001-05-01

    Globally, health care is moving towards a primary care approach. In the UK initiatives for nurses wishing to gain experience in primary and community care may be crucial with the advent of Primary Care Groups (PCGs) and Primary Care Trusts (PCTs). This paper outlines an initiative in practice nursing, developed as a pilot study by a Health Authority. The training practice initiative was aimed at nurses returning to practice and offered them an experiential and supportive career pathway into primary care. The evaluation (carried out over 1 year), highlighted that those primarily involved in the initiative--the trainees, educators and general practitioners--felt it had been successful, especially in relation to professional development issues. The funding bodies for the initiative, who previously had concerns over the recruitment and retention of practice nurses, were also optimistic that the support networks which developed as a result of the initiative had raised morale. The paper suggests several educational, organizational and professional issues which arose from the evaluation exercise. Further, it suggests how this initiative, in an extended form, could provide an effective basis for the training and development of nursing staff in PCGs/PCTs. PMID:11339872

  6. Religion, bioethics and nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Marsha D

    2009-07-01

    This article calls nursing to engage in the study of religions and identifies six considerations that arise in religious studies and the ways in which religious faith is expressed. It argues that whole-person care cannot be realized, neither can there be a complete understanding of bioethics theory and decision making, without a rigorous understanding of religious-ethical systems. Because religious traditions differ in their cosmology, ontology, epistemology, aesthetic, and ethical methods, and because religious subtraditions interact with specific cultures, each religion and subtradition has something distinctive to offer to ethical discourse. A brief example is drawn from Native American religions, specifically their view of ;speech' and ;words'. Although the example is particular to an American context, it is intended to demonstrate a more general principle that an understanding of religion per se can yield new insights for bioethics. PMID:19528097

  7. Business law. Fundamentals for the occupational health nurse.

    PubMed

    D'Arruda, Kimberley A

    2002-05-01

    1. A basic understanding of the judicial system will enable occupational health nurses to read court opinions and have a better understanding of whether or how they or their companies are affected by the decision. With this knowledge, occupational health nurses can help their organization avoid legal liability by ensuring that the company does not act contrary to the decisions of the controlling courts. 2. As they are often involved in the process of contracting for goods and services, occupational health nurses need to be aware of general contract terminology and negotiating techniques so they will be better able to protect their companies. In addition, occupational health nurses can also assist in the actual contract drafting process with knowledge of a few concepts, such as the description, caption, operative language of the agreement, and definitions, of a contract. 3. Occupational health nurses are often called upon to be expert witnesses and can play an integral part in the litigation process. Because of the importance of expert witnesses, occupational health nurses must have an understanding of how to effectively provide expert witness testimony. PMID:12033091

  8. Telephone nursing: an emerging practice area.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Governments across Canada and internationally are implementing nurse telephone advice services to their populations as a means to address healthcare access issues. This paper briefly reviews the international and Canadian history of telephone nursing services and outlines the research that has established the relative safety of these services to patients. The standards, competencies and decision systems that support safe tele-practice are reviewed. The paper focuses on the realities of this emerging nursing practice. A number of concerns related to the marriage of clinical practice and call centres are identified that require further dialogue, research and debate within the profession. The call centre environment can lead to a focus on efficiency measures, such as call length and quick turnaround to the next call, without evidence to ensure that these are safe or desirable standards. Quality of work life for staff in call centres is also raised as an issue that requires more research and dialogue. Other issues include cross-jurisdictional licensure, patient safety, privatization and the differing models of telephone nursing services that are being implemented in Canada. PMID:18303723

  9. Sperm preservation: Fundamental cryobiology and practical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.F. ); Critser, J.K. ); Mazur, P. )

    1992-01-01

    Human spermatozoa were first frozen successfully almost 40 years ago. While developments in packaging and storing have occurred in the intervening period, there is still little known specifically about how spermatozoa are adversely affected by freezing and thawing. This is largely due to the fact that sufficient cells survive the challenge to give a reasonable expectation of fertilization, but the shift to the exclusive use of cryopreserved semen for donor insemination, occasioned by the awareness of the risks particularly of AIDS transmission, has resulted in a renewed critical interest in the process of cryopreservation. This review will cover the more significant contributions over the past few years, and develop an argument for a sustained fundamental approach to sperm cryobiology.

  10. Sperm preservation: Fundamental cryobiology and practical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.F.; Critser, J.K.; Mazur, P.

    1992-07-01

    Human spermatozoa were first frozen successfully almost 40 years ago. While developments in packaging and storing have occurred in the intervening period, there is still little known specifically about how spermatozoa are adversely affected by freezing and thawing. This is largely due to the fact that sufficient cells survive the challenge to give a reasonable expectation of fertilization, but the shift to the exclusive use of cryopreserved semen for donor insemination, occasioned by the awareness of the risks particularly of AIDS transmission, has resulted in a renewed critical interest in the process of cryopreservation. This review will cover the more significant contributions over the past few years, and develop an argument for a sustained fundamental approach to sperm cryobiology.

  11. NURSING EMERGING. ANA Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, (2015) 3rd Edition.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Carla

    2016-04-01

    AHNA Past-President Carla Mariano recently had the privilege of serving on the American Nurses Association's (ANA) Nursing Scope and Standards Revision Workgroup. Representing the specialty practice of holistic nursing, Carla's presence within this workgroup contributed greatly to the inclusion of holistic principles and values throughout the new 2015 Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, 3rd edition, the foundational document that informs and guides professional nursing practice within the United States. This is a significant step forward for holistic nursing and an indicator of our growing influence as specialty practice. PMID:27305802

  12. Documentation of Nursing Practice Using a Computerized Medical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Carol

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a definition of the content of the computerized nursing data base developed by the Nursing Department for the Clinical Center Medical Information System at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The author describes the theoretical framework for the content and presents a model to describe the organization of the nursing data components in relation to the process of nursing care delivery. Nursing documentation requirements of Nurse Practice Acts, American Nurses Association Standards of Practice and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals are also addressed as they relate to this data base. The advantages and disadvantages of such an approach to computerized documentation are discussed.

  13. The Relevance of Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Susan K.; Biordi, Diana L.; Zeller, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    This descriptive correlational study assessed school nurses' knowledge of and perceived relevance of the "Standards of Professional School Nursing Practice". Of the 1,162 Ohio school nurses sent questionnaires, 345 returned usable questionnaires (30%). The typical respondent was a 50-year-old Caucasian woman with 24 years of nursing experience, 12…

  14. Practical Nursing, Volume III. Health Occupations Education. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Jamee Noell

    This document is a comprehensive guide for instructors to use in teaching the final phase of the practical nursing program. This revised volume contains information related to medical-surgical nursing, mental health nursing, and career success. The section on medical-surgical nursing is composed of many units, dealing with the following subjects:…

  15. Nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Ella; Tabak, Nili

    2012-12-01

    Using Ajzen and Madden's Theory of Planned Behavior, this study investigates factors which influence nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines in their daily ward work. A convenience sample of 91 nurses in internal medicine wards in three Israeli hospitals answered four questionnaires. Data were processed by Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate regression. The main findings were that burnout was negatively correlated with the intention to work according to guidelines and that professionalism (in the sense of a tendency to follow taught procedure rather than personal judgment) was positively correlated with it. Furthermore, nurses who perceive their behavioral control and subjective norms to be positive will be the most determined to work according to guidelines, provided they personally command the necessary resources to do so. PMID:23447906

  16. When the mission is teaching: does nursing faculty practice fit?

    PubMed

    Sherwen, L N

    1998-01-01

    As nursing faculty practice becomes a part of academic life, nursing programs in liberal arts colleges, where the primary mission is teaching, must document not only that practice is scholarship but also that practice conforms to the teaching mission of the institution. Discussions of scholarly practice from the nursing literature, as well as from Schon and Boyer, serve to validate that nursing faculty practice is scholarship. Attributes of scholarly practice, to be used to evaluate nursing practice outcomes, are identified. Finally, the concept of "scholarship in support of teaching"--the standard used to evaluate scholarship at The College of New Jersey, a medium-sized liberal arts college with a school of nursing--is analyzed as a model to document that nursing faculty practice is not only scholarship but also supports the teaching mission of the institution. PMID:9610021

  17. Interactional nursing--a practice-theory in the dynamic field between the natural, human and social sciences.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Merry Elisabeth; Pedersen, Birthe D; Rosenkrands, Vibeke

    2008-12-01

    Nursing is often described from the point of view of either the natural or the human sciences. In contrast to this, the value foundation in Interactional nursing practice is understood from the point of view of the natural sciences as well as that of the human and social sciences. This article presents many-faceted practice-theory of nursing, which is situated in the dynamic field between these three sciences. The focus of the theory is on interaction and practice resulting in a caring practice. Here practice is based on Taylor's and MacIntyre's interpretation of this concept. Action in nursing is based on Habermas' three varied modes of action seen in the light of an understanding of the world as a system world and a life world. Nursing as an interactional practice-theory is presented with examples of interpretative nursing science, seen in the ethical action-oriented, socio-cultural framework of Taylor and Habermas. It is concluded that phenomenologic and socio-cultural research into caring practice as well as an in-depth, comprehensive interpretation of nursing practice are both highly suited to forming the fundamental theoretical framework in nursing, here seen as an interpretative nursing science. Finally, a comparison is drawn between Interactional nursing practice and Benner's theory of nursing practice. PMID:19068053

  18. [Construction of terminology subsets: contributions to clinical nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Clares, Jorge Wilker Bezerra; de Freitas, Maria Célia; Guedes, Maria Vilaní Cavalcante; da Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima

    2013-08-01

    The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®) is a classification system that unifies the elements of nursing practice (diagnoses, interventions and outcomes), enabling elucidation of elements of a specific nursing language through the construction of terminology subsets. In this reflective essay, aspects relevant to the construction of ICNP® terminology subsets are highlighted, as well as their contributions to clinical nursing practice. The development of subsets as a tool that contributes to making nursing language universal, facilitates the communication process, as well as the scientific and technological advancement of the profession, is discussed. Therefore, its use by nurses worldwide is encouraged. PMID:24310697

  19. inPractice: A Practical Nursing Package for Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Barry; Cavanna, Annlouise; Corbett, Beverley

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the recent development of a computer-assisted learning program--in Practice--at the School of Health Science, in the University of Wales Swansea. The project, which began in 2001, was developed in close collaboration with The Meningitis Trust, the aim being to produce a software package to increase nursing students' knowledge…

  20. Competencies of the Associate Degree Nurse on Entry into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nursing Outlook, 1978

    1978-01-01

    A list developed by the Council of Associate Degree Programs, National League for Nursing, presents competencies of graduates of associate degree nursing programs entering practice. Roles of practice defined include provider of care, client teacher, communicator, manager of client care, and member within the profession of nursing. (MF)

  1. GUIDES FOR DEVELOPING CURRICULA FOR THE EDUCATION OF PRACTICAL NURSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OREM, DOROTHEA E.

    THE RELATIVELY UNCHANGING FACTORS UNDERLYING NURSING AND ITS PRACTICE ARE PRESENTED AND APPLIED IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF CURRICULUMS FOR THE EDUCATION OF PRACTICAL NURSES. THE GUIDE FOR DEVELOPING CURRICULUMS WAS PREPARED BY A REGISTERED NURSE IN COOPERATION WITH SEVERAL GROUPS AND MANY INDIVIDUALS, INCLUDING TWO PROGRAM SPECIALISTS OF THE PRACTICAL…

  2. Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

  3. A closer look at the standards for nurse anesthesia practice.

    PubMed

    Neft, Michael; Quraishi, Jihan A; Greenier, Ewa

    2013-04-01

    As part of its ongoing work, the AANA's Practice Committee reviewed the Scope and Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice, particularly focusing on the Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice. Revisions and updates were made to the standards to ensure clarity and reflect current anesthesia practice. This article highlights several of the important revisions made to the Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice, specifically focusing on the importance of documentation, updates to Standard V-Patient Monitoring, and changes to other documents affected by the updates. This is not an exhaustive discussion of all changes made to the document. The updated Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice are presented in their entirety. PMID:23971226

  4. Kuwaiti high school students' perceptions of nursing as a profession: implications for nursing education and practice.

    PubMed

    Al-Kandari, Fatimah H; Lew, Irene

    2005-12-01

    The shortage of nurses in Kuwait is attributed to low production of indigenous nurses, resignation and emigration of foreign nurses, and expansion of health care facilities. This study explored Kuwaiti high school students' perceptions of nursing as a profession, their sources of information about nursing, and factors that affected their choice of nursing as a future career. Questionnaires from 289 students attending seven all-female high schools in Kuwait were analyzed. The results revealed that all of the participants were knowledgeable about the functional aspects of the nursing profession, and 35% of them received this information through contact with nurses during hospital visits. However, only 19% indicated they might consider nursing as a future career. The implications of the study for nursing education and practice, and strategies to attract and retain indigenous high school graduates into nursing programs in Kuwait are discussed. PMID:16402735

  5. Nurse drug diversion and nursing leader's responsibilities: legal, regulatory, ethical, humanistic, and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Tanga, Hazel Y

    2011-01-01

    Nurses who divert drugs pose significant threats to patient safety, but also become a liability to healthcare organizations and the nursing department where the diversion occurred. Healthcare and nursing leaders have a responsibility to ensure that security systems are in place to prevent diversion and protect patients if nursing impairment is suspected as a result of drug diversion. Nursing leaders must consider legal, regulatory, ethical, humanistic, and practical considerations in resolving this issue. PMID:21343743

  6. Nursing practice: compassionate deception and the Good Samaritan.

    PubMed

    Tuckett, A

    1999-09-01

    This article reviews the literature on deception to illuminate the phenomenon as a background for an appraisal within nursing. It then describes nursing as a practice of caring. The character of the Good Samaritan is recommended as indicative of the virtue of compassion that ought to underpin caring in nursing practice. Finally, the article concludes that a caring nurse, responding virtuously, acts by being compassionate, for a time recognizing the prima facie nature of the rules or principles of truth telling. PMID:10696185

  7. A renal nursing professional practice model: the next generation.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Lori; Downing, Linda; Ridley, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Professional practice models provide a structure for excellence in nursing practice. Our centre has had a long tradition of working with a professional practice model with proven nursing outcomes such as job satisfaction, empowerment and perceptions of improved patient care. Our model, in place since 1999, has provided an opportunity to discuss and articulate a vision for nursing practice based on the values of accountability, evidence-informed care and empowerment. In order for the model to effectively guide nursing practice, a revision was necessary to keep pace with the changes in the renal program and the health care environment. The revised model needed to address the enhancements in nursing roles, practice environment, corporate requirements and patient care needs. This paper describes a revised professional practice model unique to nephrology nursing. PMID:24344518

  8. Respect in forensic psychiatric nurse-patient relationships: a practical compromise.

    PubMed

    Rose, Donald N; Peter, Elizabeth; Gallop, Ruth; Angus, Jan E; Liaschenko, Joan

    2011-03-01

    The context of forensic psychiatric nursing is distinct from other psychiatric settings as, it involves placement of patients in secure environments with restrictions determined by the courts. Previous literature has identified that nurses morally struggle with respecting patients who have committed heinous offences, which can lead to the patient being depersonalized and dehumanized. Although respect is fundamental to ethical nursing practice, it has not been adequately explored conceptually or empirically. As a result, little knowledge exists that identifies how nurses develop, maintain, and express respect for patients. The purpose of this study is to analyze the concept of respect systematically, from a forensic psychiatric nurse's perspective using the qualitative methodology of focused ethnography. Forensic psychiatric nurses were recruited from two medium secure forensic rehabilitation units. In the first interview, 13 registered nurses (RNs) and two registered practical nurses (RPNs) participated, and although all informants were invited to the second interview, six RNs were lost to follow-up. Despite this loss, saturation was achieved and the data were interpreted through a feminist philosophical lens. Respect was influenced by factors categorized into four themes: (1) emotive-cognitive reactions, (2) nonjudgmental approach, (3) social identity and power, and (4) context. The data from the themes indicate that forensic psychiatric nurses strike a practical compromise, in their understanding and enactment of respect in therapeutic relationships with forensic psychiatric patients. PMID:21348929

  9. Theoretical framing of high-fidelity simulation with Carper's fundamental patterns of knowing in nursing.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Barb; Lapum, Jennifer; Clune, Laurie; Martin, Lori Schindel

    2013-01-01

    Many nursing programs integrate high-fidelity simulation(HFS) into the curriculum. The manikins used are modeled to resemble humans and are programmed to talk and reproduce physiological functions via computer interfaces.When HFS design negates a theoretical framework consistent with the interpersonal and relational nature of nursing,it can problematically focus simulation on psychomotor skills and the physical body. This article highlights a theorized approach to HFS design informed by Carper's seminal work on the fundamental patterns of knowing in nursing(i.e., empirics, esthetics, personal knowing, and ethics). It also describes how a team of Canadian nurse educators adopted these patterns of knowing as a theoretical lens to frame scenarios, learning objectives, and debriefing probes in the context of maternal and newborn assessment. Institutions and practitioners can draw on Carper's work to facilitate focusing on the whole person and expanding the epistemological underpinnings of HFS in nursing and other disciplines. PMID:23244195

  10. [Fundamental research in nursing sciences. Historical research on the foundations of a discipline].

    PubMed

    Nadot, Michel

    2012-06-01

    For lack of serious fundamental research in History on the standardization of its own discipline, the nursing profession continues to be fed by clichés, common sense, and relies on symbols and faiths stemming from the past as well as on what characterizes in a general way the female careers in our society. The lack of recognition experienced by the nursing profession is not so surprising from then on. At the time of the globalization of knowledge, which remains to this day, the only source of sustainable competitive advantage, the historian of the nursing discipline should start wondering about the international status of his discipline within the learned worlds. PMID:22880499

  11. Intelligent nursing: accounting for knowledge as action in practice.

    PubMed

    Purkis, Mary E; Bjornsdottir, Kristin

    2006-10-01

    This paper provides an analysis of nursing as a knowledgeable discipline. We examined ways in which knowledge operates in the practice of home care nursing and explored how knowledge might be fruitfully understood within the ambiguous spaces and competing temporalities characterizing contemporary healthcare services. Two popular metaphors of knowledge in nursing practice were identified and critically examined; evidence-based practice and the nurse as an intuitive worker. Pointing to faults in these conceptualizations, we suggest a different way of conceptualizing the relationship between knowledge and practice, namely practice as being activated by contextualized knowledge. This conceptualization is captured in an understanding of the intelligent creation of context by the nurse for nursing practice to be ethical and effective. PMID:16965306

  12. Alliances of cooperation: negotiating New Hampshire nurse practitioners' prescribing practice.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Deborah A

    2009-01-01

    Nurse practitioner legislation varies among states, particularly in relation to practice without physician oversight, altering the legal environment within which nurse practitioners can use knowledge and skills to meet patient needs. Using New Hampshire as a case study, this historical analysis of nurse practitioners' negotiations over time for independent practice, defined in state practice acts, illuminates the complex social and economic factors affecting nurses' struggle to gain legal rights over their own professional practice without supervision and intervention from another profession. In New Hampshire, not only did organized medicine oppose nurses rights to practice, but pharmacists demanded the right to control all aspects of medication management, including who could prescribe and under what circumstances prescribing could occur. Shifting social and political terrain as well as changes in legislative and state professional board leadership affected the environment and negotiations of a small group of nurses who were ultimately successful in obtaining the right to define their own professional practice. PMID:20067085

  13. Advanced practice nursing in Latin America and the Caribbean: regulation, education and practice

    PubMed Central

    Zug, Keri Elizabeth; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli; Pulcini, Joyce; Garcia, Alessandra Bassalobre; Aguirre-Boza, Francisca; Park, Jeongyoung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the current state of advanced practice nursing regulation, education and practice in Latin America and the Caribbean and the perception of nursing leaders in the region toward an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional design utilizing a web-based survey of 173 nursing leaders about their perceptions of the state of nursing practice and potential development of advanced practice nursing in their countries, including definition, work environment, regulation, education, nursing practice, nursing culture, and perceived receptiveness to an expanded role in primary health care. Result: the participants were largely familiar with the advanced practice nursing role, but most were unaware of or reported no current existing legislation for the advanced practice nursing role in their countries. Participants reported the need for increased faculty preparation and promotion of curricula reforms to emphasize primary health care programs to train advanced practice nurses. The vast majority of participants believed their countries' populations could benefit from an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care. Conclusion: strong legislative support and a solid educational framework are critical to the successful development of advanced practice nursing programs and practitioners to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. PMID:27508923

  14. Nursing practice. Report of a WHO expert committee.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Nursing is remarkable for the scope of activities that it includes. Nursing practice involves so many things in so many places that finding a definition that includes everything and applies everywhere is no easy task. This report by the WHO Expert Committee on Nursing Practice describes the basic functions of nursing practice and how they are manifested in different socioeconomic situations. Whatever the environment, the report concludes, there are certain core elements that are the responsibility of nurses the world over. The influence that social attitudes and political and economic policies have on nursing practice is examined. The report is honest in its admission that the situation in many places is far from ideal and that in most there is clear room for improvement. Policy-makers, legislators, managers, educators, researchers, other professionals and nurses themselves have important roles to play in a comprehensive approach to the development of nursing practice proposed by the Expert Committee. The report emphasizes the importance of a well educated and highly skilled nursing workforce that is consistent in maintaining quality of care but is also responsive to change. It points the way to international standards in nursing practice and lays the foundation for new strategies to ensure that nurses will be fully equipped to meet future challenges in the delivery of health care. PMID:8686331

  15. Nursing practice environment, quality of care, and morale of hospital nurses in Japan.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Eriko; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Japanese hospital nurses' perceptions of the nursing practice environment and examine its association with nurse-reported ability to provide quality nursing care, quality of patient care, and ward morale. A cross-sectional survey design was used including 223 nurses working in 12 acute inpatient wards in a large Japanese teaching hospital. Nurses rated their work environment favorably overall using the Japanese version of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Subscale scores indicated high perceptions of physician relations and quality of nursing management, but lower scores for staffing and resources. Ward nurse managers generally rated the practice environment more positively than staff nurses except for staffing and resources. Regression analyses found the practice environment was a significant predictor of quality of patient care and ward morale, whereas perceived ability to provide quality nursing care was most strongly associated with years of clinical experience. These findings support interventions to improve the nursing practice environment, particularly staffing and resource adequacy, to enhance quality of care and ward morale in Japan. PMID:23855754

  16. Hallmarks of the Professional Nursing Practice Environment. AACN White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Professional Nursing, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This white paper from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing depicts the current environment of nursing practice, including supply and demand. It describes work environments that support professional practice and outlines eight indicators for the practice environment. Contains 48 references and an appendix with suggested questions for…

  17. Impact of evidence and health policy on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Geurden, Bart; Adriaenssens, Jef; Franck, Erik

    2014-12-01

    The story of evidence-based practice in nursing is long, with many successes, contributors, leaders, scientists, and enthusiasts. Nurse educators have great advantages offered from a wide variety of educational resources for evidence-based practice. These resources offer students the opportunity to connect their emerging competencies with clinical needs for best practices in clinical and microsystem changes. PMID:25458138

  18. Penn Macy Initiative To Advance Academic Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Norma M.; Evans, Lois K.; Swan, Beth Ann

    2002-01-01

    The Penn School of Nursing and the Macy Foundation established a comprehensive institute and technical assistance program to help nursing schools advance academic nursing practice. The Penn School consulted with 21 participating schools, providing institutes, conferences, a listserv and a web-based knowledge center focused on integrating research,…

  19. The Competencies in Nutrition Essential for Comprehensive Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trooboff, Rebecca C.

    Faculty of nursing education programs within the Georgia university system were surveyed to ascertain their opinions about the nutrition competencies that they consider essential for comprehensive nursing practice and the level of nursing education program(s) to which these competencies are best suited. The survey instrument, 56 competency…

  20. A Phenomenographic Study Exploring Nursing Education and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degen, Greta M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to illuminate the qualitatively different ways in which three nurses with an associate degree (ADN) and three nurses with a baccalaureate degree (BSN) experience, conceptualize, perceive, and understand their own nursing practice within the context of their educational background. Using a phenomenographic methodology…

  1. [Communication in care: a fundamental task in nursing].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção

    2006-01-01

    The research debates the communication as basic instrument of the attention, articulated to the dynamic of the care and of the attention in the hospital. Interviews had been made, participant observation and consult to promptuaries. It was applied dense description and thematic analysis. It was identified diverse forms of communication: verbal and nonverbal. It was stood out the form as the professional approached and communicated with the customer, printing more or little attention and affection. The interaction in the attention emerged of the meeting and colloquies among the professionals and customers, integrating them to the attention. The act of talk is basic in the attention. Either of technician or ludic content, the colloquy implies in communication, that holds interaction, language, gestures and cognition. From there its importance for the nursing, art and science of the attention. PMID:17175722

  2. Satisfaction and comfort with nursing in Australian general practice.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The practice nursing workforce has grown exponentially in recent years. Whilst evidence has shown the important contributions of nurses to general practice service delivery, the consumer perspective of nursing in general practice has received limited attention. Given that acceptability of nurses is influenced by patient satisfaction which can in turn improve both treatment adherence and clinical outcomes, this is an important area for investigation. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate consumer satisfaction with chronic disease management by nurses in general practice (NiGP) and comfort with the tasks undertaken by nurses in general practice. Consumers receiving chronic disease services from nurses in general practice participating in a larger study were recruited to complete a survey. The survey comprised of demographic information, and items related to satisfaction with the nurse encounter (SPN-9) and consumer comfort with nurse roles in general practice (CPN-18). Eighty-one consumers participated in the study. Cronbach's alpha values of the SPN-9 and the CPN-18 were 0.95 and 0.97 respectively. SPN-9 results demonstrated high levels of satisfaction with PN consultations. Bivariate analysis did not show any significant differences within the consumer group relating to satisfaction. However, those who presented for diabetes-related reasons were more likely to report high comfort levels with the nurse encounter compare to those who presented to general practice for other chronic disease conditions (38% versus 14%, p = 0.016). The results of this study demonstrate that consumers are generally satisfied with nursing consultations in general practice related to chronic disease. However, further research evaluating consumer confidence, comfort and satisfaction with nursing care is needed to ensure that nursing services meet consumer needs. PMID:26281408

  3. Enhancing nursing practice by utilizing voice recognition for direct documentation.

    PubMed

    Fratzke, Jason; Tucker, Sharon; Shedenhelm, Heidi; Arnold, Jackie; Belda, Tom; Petera, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Innovative strategies that preserve nursing time for direct patient care activities are needed. This study examined the utility, feasibility, and acceptability of voice recognition (VR) software to document nursing care and patient outcomes in an electronic health record in a simulated nursing care environment. A phase 1 trial included 5 iterative experiments with observations and nurse participant feedback to allow enhancements to the speech detection capabilities and refinement of the technology, software, and processes. Utility ratings improved over time; however, interference on nursing care remained a concern throughout. Nurse participants favored keyboard entry electronic health record, largely due to software and technical issues, but also relative to the culture shift the new technology brings to nursing practice. Successful adoption of VR technology by nursing will be dependent on receptiveness of the nurses and perceived benefits, timely access to education and training, and minimization of barriers to using the software. PMID:24451445

  4. Effectiveness of simulation-based learning on student nurses' self-efficacy and performance while learning fundamental nursing skills.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    It was noted worldwide while learning fundamental skills and facing skills assessments, nursing students seemed to experience low confidence and high anxiety levels. Could simulation-based learning help to enhance students' self-efficacy and performance? Its effectiveness is mostly unidentified. This study was conducted to provide a shared experience to give nurse educators confidence and an insight into how simulation-based teaching can fit into nursing skills learning. A pilot study was completed with 50 second-year undergraduate nursing students, and the main study included 98 students where a pretest-posttest design was adopted. Data were gathered through four questionnaires and a performance assessment under scrutinized controls such as previous experiences, lecturers' teaching skills, duration of teaching, procedure of skills performance assessment and the inter-rater reliability. The results showed that simulation-based learning significantly improved students' self-efficacy regarding skills learning and the skills performance that nurse educators wish students to acquire. However, technology anxiety, examiners' critical attitudes towards students' performance and their unpredicted verbal and non-verbal expressions, have been found as possible confounding factors. The simulation-based learning proved to have a powerful positive effect on students' achievement outcomes. Nursing skills learning is one area that can benefit greatly from this kind of teaching and learning method. PMID:26444820

  5. Collaborative graduate education: executive nurse practice and health care leadership.

    PubMed

    Elaine, Hardy; DeBasio, Nancy; Warmbrodt, Lynn; Gartland, Myles; Bassett, William; Tansey, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Research College of Nursing and the Rockhurst University Helzberg School of Management Health Care Initiative collaborated to offer the Executive Nurse Practice: Health Care Leadership track to Research College of Nursing graduate students. This effort was not only cost effective, but also offered expert faculty in both the fields of nursing and business. The curriculum is an integration of both fields and faculties from both institutions as they communicate and collaborate each semester to successfully coordinate the track. PMID:15495758

  6. The NCLex Examination: preparing for future nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Wendt, A; Brown, P

    2000-01-01

    One nursing organization that closely tracks the direction of healthcare and nursing practice is the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc. As the developer of the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN examination), maintaining currency of the examination is of primary importance to the National Council. The authors discuss recent trends in the NCLEX-RN Test Plan. PMID:16646187

  7. MENTAL HEALTH AND PSYCHIATRIC NURSING IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRAWFORD, ANNIE L.

    THIRTY-ONE PROFESSIONAL NURSE EDUCATORS IN SCHOOLS OF PRACTICAL NURSING IN THE SOUTHEAST ATTENDED A TWO-WEEK CLINICAL WORKSHOP ON PSYCHIATRIC NURSING AT WESTERN STATE HOSPITAL, STAUNTON, VIRGINIA, IN AUGUST 1966. THEY RECONVENED FOR A THREE-DAY FOLLOW-UP CONFERENCE AT ATLANTA, GEORGIA, IN JANUARY 1967. THE PROJECT WAS UNDERTAKEN TO UPDATE THE…

  8. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  9. Perceived Dimensions of Nursing Practice: A Factor Analytic Study Using Nurse Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Barbara J.

    The applicability of a factor analytic approach to explore the nature of a complex job performance criterion for nursing practice and to determine the dimensions of this criterion was investigated. A national sample of 1,038 nurse educators from 85 randomly selected programs judged performance criteria contained in the Clinical Nursing Rating…

  10. Upgrading Licensed Practical Nurse to Registered Nurse Program, September 1971 - June 1973. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Sally

    Twenty Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) became Registered Nurses (RN) in a pilot program giving partial academic credit for their LPN training and building on their existing skills. The program revolved around three needs: (1) trained nurses; (2) eliminating the notion that jobs were dead-end; and (3) achieving upward mobility for hospital staff.…

  11. 200 years of nursing--a chief nurse's reflections on practice, theory, policy, education, and research.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jeanette Ives

    2012-01-01

    This bimonthly department, sponsored by the AONE, presents information to assist nurse leaders in shaping the future of healthcare through creative and innovative leadership. The strategic priorities of AONE anchor the editorial content. They reflect contemporary healthcare and nursing practice issues that challenge nurse executives as they strive to meet the needs of patients. PMID:22157375

  12. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses’ Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs in nursing homes. Design and Methods: The sample included 863 RNs working as staff RNs in 282 skilled nursing facilities in New Jersey. Two-level hierarchical linear modeling was used to account for the RNs nested by nursing homes. Results: Controlling for individual and nursing home characteristics, staff RNs’ participation in facility affairs, supportive manager, and resource adequacy were positively associated with RNs’ job satisfaction. Ownership status was significantly related to job satisfaction; RNs working in for-profit nursing homes were less satisfied. Implications: A supportive practice environment is significantly associated with higher job satisfaction among RNs working in nursing homes. Unlike other nursing home characteristics, specific dimensions of the nursing practice environment can be modified through administrative actions to enhance RN job satisfaction. PMID:21908803

  13. Articulation Matrix for Home Health Aide, Nursing Assistant, Patient Care Assistant, Practical Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This document demonstrates the relationships among four Florida nursing education programs (home health aide, nursing assistant, patient care assistant, and practical nursing) by listing student performance standards and indicating which ones are required in each program. The 268 student performance standards are arranged in 23 areas of…

  14. Intravenous Fluid Therapy Course for the Licensed Practical Nurse. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 10-unit intravenous (IV) therapy course for licensed practical nurses. Units contain from one to nine lessons. The first unit provides an introduction and orientation to the course. Subsequent units concern documentation, anatomy and physiology as applied to IV therapy, fundamental aspects of fluid…

  15. CE: Incorporating Acupressure into Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Judy

    2015-12-01

    Rooted in traditional Chinese medicine, the use of acupressure to alleviate symptoms, support the healing process, promote relaxation, and improve overall health has grown considerably in the West. The effects of acupressure--like those of acupuncture, with which it shares a theoretical framework--cannot always be explained in terms of Western anatomical and physiologic concepts, but this noninvasive practice involves minimal risk, can be easily integrated into nursing practice, and has been shown to be effective in treating nausea as well as low back, neck, labor, and menstrual pain. The author discusses potential clinical indications for the use of acupressure, describes the technique, explains how to evaluate patient outcomes, and suggests how future research into this integrative intervention might be improved. PMID:26559160

  16. Fundamentals of Adult Education: Issues and Practices for Lifelong Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poonwassie, Deo H., Ed.; Poonwassie, Anne, Ed.

    This document contains 20 papers on the fundamentals of adult education and foundations, practices, and issues for lifelong learning. The following papers are included: "The Metamorphoses of Andragogy" (James A. Draper); "Stages in the Development of Canadian Adult Education" (Gordon Selman); "Philosophical Considerations" (Mark Selman); "Theory…

  17. New Brunswick nurses' views on nursing research, and factors influencing their research activities in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Robichaud-Ekstrand, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    New Brunswick became the first province in Canada to require a baccalaureate degree in nursing as the entry to practice, yet nursing research in hospital settings remains quite low. This study examined clinical nurses' views on nursing research, and identified some contributing factors to the research-practice gap. This descriptive, cross-sectional multicenter study involved 1081 nurses working in the Francophone Regional Health Authority in New Brunswick, Canada. Nurses were eager to identify nursing-care problems to improve patient care (92.9%), and to be involved in collecting data for nursing research studies (95.2%). However, without research supervision, few had engaged in basic research activities, such as formulating or refining research questions (24.5%), presenting at research conferences (6.9%), or changing their practice based on research findings (27.2%). Younger, more educated nurses, nurse managers, and educators participated more readily in research. Sharing research and clinical expertise, as well as infrastructures between academic and clinical institutions is the key to enduring successful patient-centered nursing research in clinical settings. Concrete actions are proposed to build clinical nursing research. PMID:26822438

  18. The Impact of the Nursing Practice Environment on Missed Nursing Care

    PubMed Central

    Hessels, Amanda J.; Flynn, Linda; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.; Cadmus, Edna; Gershon, Robyn R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Missed nursing care is an emerging problem negatively impacting patient outcomes. There are gaps in our knowledge of factors associated with missed nursing care. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the nursing practice environment and missed nursing care in acute care hospitals. Methods This is a secondary analysis of cross sectional data from a survey of over 7.000 nurses from 70 hospitals on workplace and process of care. Ordinary least squares and multiple regression models were constructed to examine the relationship between the nursing practice environment and missed nursing care while controlling for characteristics of nurses and hospitals. Results Nurses missed delivering a significant amount of necessary patient care (10–27%). Inadequate staffing and inadequate resources were the practice environment factors most strongly associated with missed nursing care events. Conclusions This multi-site study examined the risk and risk factors associated with missed nursing care. Improvements targeting modifiable risk factors may reduce the risk of missed nursing care.

  19. The influence of logical positivism on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Whall, A L

    1989-01-01

    While logical positivism has been said to have had major influence on the development of nursing theory, whether this influence pervades other aspects of the discipline has not been discussed. One central aspect of logical positivism, the verificationist perspective, was used to examine texts, curricular guides and standards of practice that guided nursing practice in the decades in which logical positivism had influence on nursing theory construction. This review of the literature does not support the influence of logical positivism, as exemplified by the verificationist perspective, on nursing practice guidelines. PMID:2807333

  20. Advanced practice politics and the Oregon nurses' trail.

    PubMed

    Bifano, L C

    1996-01-01

    As health care reform continues to evolve, it is important to consider the context of politics, practice, and power through an examination of nursing's recent history and participation in legislative events. Through a retrospective chronicle that includes interviews, recorded events, and article reviews, the political and legislative history of Oregon nurses in establishing advanced practice for nurse practitioners within the Oregon Nurse Practice Act is described. Prescriptive authority, hospital admitting privileges, and important elements contained in the Oregon Health Plan and Medicare reform are discussed. Questions are posed for the future of health care reform, such as the role of government in determining the quality of care in managed health care. PMID:8710224

  1. The revised scope of nurse anesthesia practice embodies the broad continuum of nurse anesthesia services.

    PubMed

    Neft, Michael; Okechukwu, Kymika; Grant, Patricia; Reede, Lynn

    2013-10-01

    The AANA determines the scope of nurse anesthesia practice. It is important for all members to understand the scope of practice that governs their work to better practice their profession and mentorship. In January 2013, the AANA Board of Directors charged the Practice Committee to revise the Scope of Nurse Anesthesia Practice. A systematic review of literature, focus groups, and a survey were conducted. Major focus group themes were identified, and survey results were analyzed to identify relationships between variables. The literature search resulted in 8,739 abstracts. Forty-six articles were reviewed. Full scope of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) practice was a recurrent theme across the literature. Focus group themes include: (1) elements of nurse anesthesia practice; (2) future practice opportunities; (3) interprofessional collaboration; (4) full scope of practice; (5) autonomous practice; and (6) barriers to practice and recommendations. Of the 4,200 CRNA survey respondents, 44.6% are not permitted to practice to their full scope of practice. The revised Scope of Nurse Anesthesia Practice embodies the comprehensive span of nurse anesthesia practice. PMID:24354069

  2. Linking theory and practice in teaching basic nursing skills.

    PubMed

    Smith, B E

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to integrate theory and practice in baccalaureate nursing education, students were taught nursing skills with two cognitive strategies (Vee heuristics and concept maps) that consciously identify and reinforce connections between scientific theory and practice. The research showed that students using Vee heuristics and concept maps, rather than traditional modes, were significantly better able to identify scientific principles to describe why specific steps of a nursing skill were done. PMID:1312143

  3. The influence of human rights on district nurse practice.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2009-10-01

    In the decade since its introduction, the Human Rights Act 1998 has had a profound effect on the way district nurses practice. New laws underpinning the principles and obligations of human rights law have seen a gradual legalisation of health care and a reigning in of the discretionary powers of health professionals such as district nurses.This article reflects on the Human Rights Act 1998's influence on district nurse practice. PMID:19966686

  4. Applying research to practice. Practical guidelines for occupational health nurses.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Mary K

    2002-11-01

    Much has been written about the research practice gap--and there is no doubt this gap exists in occupational health nursing. It is an irony that the professionals who would benefit most from occupational health and safety research may be the ones who do not participate in or contribute to research. Closing the gap requires a commitment on the part of both practitioners and researchers. It behooves occupational health nurses to constantly seek ways to make the connection--to forge relationships that can continue to advance the specialty. Researchers must increase their efforts to conduct research in "real world" conditions, because this research is most likely to improve practice. Practitioners must be willing to familiarize themselves with research so they can become active participants in the ongoing effort to find answers to troubling occupational health and safety problems. Rosenheck (2001) presents an interesting perspective on the barriers to eliminating the research practice gap. He purports that, although professionals often are highly respectful of scientific endeavors, in reality, "daily decision making is shaped more by power structures, ingrained routines, and established resource configuration than by current scientific findings." In most organizations, standard operating procedures and behavioral norms are the major influences on workplace practices; scientific evidence plays a minor role (Rosenheck, 2001). Several reasons can be found for this lack of reliance on research as a basis for practice. Studies may demonstrate effectiveness among large groups. However, practitioners may not see the relevance or applicability of such studies to individuals or small groups of clients. Also, practitioners may fear that the implementation of new strategies will require more oversight than they are able to provide. Another logistical barrier is the application of the research may require the collaboration of multiple individuals--dynamic environments with

  5. Realities of mental health nursing practice in rural Australia.

    PubMed

    John Crowther, Andrew; Theresa Ragusa, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Mental health nursing as a distinct speciality has been in decline in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, for two decades. Arguably, this decline has worsened both consumer outcomes and the workplace experiences of mental health nurses. This article reports on a study designed to ascertain the nature of contemporary mental health nursing practice in New South Wales. The study utilised focus group research methodology, with participants recounting the realities of their day-to-day professional practice and perceptions of their professional identity. The findings indicate a contracting, if not moribund, profession; a decrease in the value attached to mental health nursing; and a pattern of persistent underfunding by successive governments of mental health services. An analysis of present and historical trends reveals there is a pressing need for a restructure and re-formation of mental health nursing in rural areas. This article links the shortage of mental health nurses in NSW to the closure of the mental health nursing register, a shift to comprehensive/generalist nurse education models, a perceived lack of nurses' professional standing, and natural attrition without suitably qualified replacements. Mental health nurses in this study perceived that they were not valued by other health professionals or by their own managers. Participants in this study reported mental health nursing in rural areas was an unattractive career choice. These findings are important to the understanding of recruitment and retention issues in rural mental health nursing in Australia. PMID:21767253

  6. Integration of theory and practice in learning mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Munnukka, T; Pukuri, T; Linnainmaa, P; Kilkku, N

    2002-02-01

    This article describes an action research project that aimed at a better integration of theory and practice in the education of mental health nursing students. Two partners, an institute of nursing and health care and a university hospital, collaborated to develop a new educational programme for mental health nursing. The blocks of theoretical studies were implemented simultaneously with practical training, and the theory content was taught by nursing teachers as well as by nurse practitioners who worked on the teaching wards. In addition, the students had their own personal nurse-preceptors on the wards. The nurse managers were responsible for the educational level of the teaching wards and the director of nursing planned the teaching arrangements together with the nursing teachers. In all, the project involved over 50 different actors and several researchers. The results are encouraging: all the participants - students, preceptors, nurse managers and nursing teachers - found the project rewarding and they want to continue to develop and improve the level of teaching and learning in mental health nursing education. All the participants grew and developed professionally during the project. PMID:11896851

  7. Financial literacy as an essential element in nursing management practice.

    PubMed

    Talley, Linda B; Thorgrimson, Diane H; Robinson, Nellie C

    2013-01-01

    Grooming nurses at all levels of the organization to master health care executive skills is critical to the organization's success and the individual's growth. Selecting and executing next steps for nursing leadership team development is critical to success. Leaders must make it their responsibility to provide nurses with increased exposure to quality, safety, and financial data, thereby allowing nurses to translate data while achieving and sustaining successful outcomes. The work of the CNO Dashboard to measure, report, trend, and translate clinical and non-clinical outcomes must be integrated throughout all levels of nursing staff so that nursing practice is positioned to continually strive for best practice. The education and evolution of nurses as business managers is critical to building a strong RN workforce. PMID:23691748

  8. A Study of Admission Procedures in Illinois Practical Nursing Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grippando, Gloria M.

    This study was designed to provide the College of Lake County with data to promote critical thinking and discussion about the revision of the present admission criteria for the practical nursing program. Subjects were the coordinators/directors of the 36 approved schools of practical nursing in Illinois. A letter and a questionnaire comprised of a…

  9. Making "cents" of the business side of nurse practitioner practice.

    PubMed

    Luster-Tucker, AtNena

    2016-03-15

    Nurse practitioners produce excellent patient outcomes and should be allowed to practice to the full extent of their education and training. In addition to clinical skills, nurse practitioners need to understand the business side of practice in order to ensure fair and equitable compensation. PMID:26886267

  10. [Foundations and construction of the ethical approach in nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Moutel, Grégoire

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of science and our society raises ethical questions in medical and nursing practice. These give rise to the requirement for individual and collective reflection in order to consider the consequences of decisions and to judge on sometimes complex choices. This reflection concerns both nursing practices and the organisation of the health system. PMID:26675100

  11. Sustaining excellence: clinical nurse specialist practice and magnet designation.

    PubMed

    Muller, Anne C; Hujcs, Marianne; Dubendorf, Phyllis; Harrington, Paul T

    2010-01-01

    Clinical nurse specialist practice is essential in providing the clinical expertise, leadership, and organizational influence necessary for attaining the excellence in care reflected by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Magnet designation. Clinical nurse specialists, prepared as advanced practice nurses, bring clinical expertise, knowledge of advanced physiology, and pathology and a system-wide vision for process improvements. This unique curriculum specifically prepares clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) to immediately practice as leaders of interdisciplinary groups to improve outcomes. Clinical nurse specialist graduates possess an understanding of complex adaptive systems theory, advanced physical assessment, and pathophysiology and knowledge of optimal learning modalities, all applicable to improving the health care environment. Their practice specifically links complex clinical data with multidisciplinary partnering and understanding of organizational systems. The basis for optimal clinical practice change and sustained process improvement, foundational to Magnet designation, is grounded in the combined educational preparation and systems impact of CNS practice. This article describes the role of the CNS in achieving and sustaining Magnet designation in an urban, academic quaternary care center. Using the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists model of spheres of influence, focus is on the CNS's contribution to improving clinical outcomes, nurse satisfaction, and patient satisfaction. Exemplars demonstrating use of a champion model to implement practice improvement and rapid adoption of optimal practice guidelines are provided. These exemplars reflect improved and sustained patient care outcomes, and implementation strategies used to achieve these improvements are discussed. PMID:20716978

  12. Practicing nurses perspectives of clinical scholarship: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of research published on clinical scholarship. Much of the conceptualisation has been conducted in the academy. Nurse academics espouse that the practice of nursing must be built within a framework of clinical scholarship. A key concept of clinical scholarship emerging from discussions in the literature is that it is an essential component of enabling evidence–based nursing and the development of best practice standards to provide for the needs of patients/clients. However, there is no comprehensive definition of clinical scholarship from the practicing nurses. The aim of this study was to contribute to this definitional discussion on the nature of clinical scholarship in nursing. Methods Naturalistic inquiry informed the method. Using an interpretative approach 18 practicing nurses from Australia, Canada and England were interviewed using a semi-structured format. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories and the components of clinical scholarship described by the participants compared to the scholarship framework of Boyer [JHEOE 7:5-18, 2010]. Results Clinical scholarship is difficult to conceptualise. Two of the essential elements of clinical scholarship are vision and passion. The other components of clinical scholarship were building and disseminating nursing knowledge, sharing knowledge, linking academic research to practice and doing practice-based research. Conclusion Academic scholarship dominated the discourse in nursing. However, in order for nursing to develop and to impact on health care, clinical scholarship needs to be explored and theorised. Nurse educators, hospital-based researchers and health organisations need to work together with academics to achieve this goal. Frameworks of scholarship conceptualised by nurse academics are reflected in the findings of this study with their emphasis on reading and doing research and translating it

  13. Predictors of practice patterns for lymphedema care among oncology advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joanne C; Cleland, Charles M; Fu, Mei R

    2012-09-01

    Lymphedema, a debilitating and chronic condition, is considered to be one of the most distressing adverse effects of cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to understand the practice patterns in lymphedema care and identify predictors influencing those patterns among oncology nurses, with a focus on advanced practice nurses. Random and purposive sampling was utilized to recruit 238 oncology nurses who completed the Web-based study. Participants included advanced practice nurses (nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists), nurse navigators/case managers, staff nurses, and directors/managers/coordinators. Data focused on perceived knowledge of and perceived competence in risk reduction, treatment, and self-management of lymphedema and practice patterns in lymphedema care. Actual knowledge of lymphedema care was evaluated. Descriptive, comparative, and regression analyses were performed. The study showed that perceived knowledge and perceived competence were highly correlated. Perceived competence was a predictor of practicing lymphedema care. Advanced practice nurses scored in the midrange for perceived knowledge and perceived competence in risk reduction and self-management, but obtained lower scores in perceived knowledge and perceived competence for treatment. The odds of advanced practice nurses delivering lymphedema care were less than those of staff nurses. This study identifies gaps and opportunities for advanced practice nurses to play an important role in providing lymphedema care, an essential aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:25031960

  14. Predictors of Practice Patterns for Lymphedema Care Among Oncology Advanced Practice Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Joanne C.; Cleland, Charles M.; Fu, Mei R.

    2012-01-01

    Lymphedema, a debilitating and chronic condition, is considered to be one of the most distressing adverse effects of cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to understand the practice patterns in lymphedema care and identify predictors influencing those patterns among oncology nurses, with a focus on advanced practice nurses. Random and purposive sampling was utilized to recruit 238 oncology nurses who completed the Web-based study. Participants included advanced practice nurses (nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists), nurse navigators/case managers, staff nurses, and directors/managers/coordinators. Data focused on perceived knowledge of and perceived competence in risk reduction, treatment, and self-management of lymphedema and practice patterns in lymphedema care. Actual knowledge of lymphedema care was evaluated. Descriptive, comparative, and regression analyses were performed. The study showed that perceived knowledge and perceived competence were highly correlated. Perceived competence was a predictor of practicing lymphedema care. Advanced practice nurses scored in the midrange for perceived knowledge and perceived competence in risk reduction and self-management, but obtained lower scores in perceived knowledge and perceived competence for treatment. The odds of advanced practice nurses delivering lymphedema care were less than those of staff nurses. This study identifies gaps and opportunities for advanced practice nurses to play an important role in providing lymphedema care, an essential aspect of cancer survivorship. PMID:25031960

  15. Knowledge sources for evidence-based practice in rheumatology nursing.

    PubMed

    Neher, Margit; Ståhl, Christian; Ellström, Per-Erik; Nilsen, Per

    2015-12-01

    As rheumatology nursing develops and extends, knowledge about current use of knowledge in rheumatology nursing practice may guide discussions about future knowledge needs. To explore what perceptions rheumatology nurses have about their knowledge sources and about what knowledge they use in their practice, 12 nurses working in specialist rheumatology were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The data were analyzed using conventional qualitative content analysis. The analysis yielded four types of knowledge sources in clinical practice: interaction with others in the workplace, contacts outside the workplace, written materials, and previous knowledge and experience. Colleagues, and physicians in particular, were important for informal learning in daily rheumatology practice. Evidence from the medical arena was accessed through medical specialists, while nursing research was used less. Facilitating informal learning and continuing formal education is proposed as a way toward a more evidence-based practice in extended roles. PMID:25059719

  16. The Psychiatric Family Nurse Practitioner: A Collaborator in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Patricia D.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner (Psych.F.N.P.) to contribute to family practice through physical care and mental health care exists in the here and now. This role is a synthesis of 2 advanced practice roles, the psychiatric clinical nurse specialist (Psych.C.N.S.) and family nurse practitioner (F.N.P.), both of which continue to have great utility independently. This synthesis is a practical application of concepts that have evolved to meet the changing patterns of health care delivery. At this time, dual certification as a Psych.C.N.S. and F.N.P. best reflects the broad practice expertise of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner. The experienced psychiatric family nurse practitioner provides direct care for both physical and psychological needs of patients in a family practice setting. PMID:15014701

  17. Sustaining secondary school nursing practice in Australia: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Guzys, Diana; Kenny, Amanda; Bish, Melanie

    2013-09-01

    This interpretive descriptive, qualitative study explored secondary school nurses' perceptions of factors that impact on their role and their views on how their role can be best supported. Nine secondary school nurses from four Department of Human Services regions in Victoria, Australia, participated in semistructured, in-depth interviews. Purposive sampling was used, with participants required to have a minimum of 2 years' experience as secondary school nurses. Data were thematically analyzed, revealing a complex and challenging role. The findings identified key factors necessary to support quality practice. All stakeholders need a shared understanding of the purpose and principles underpinning the secondary school nurse role and the nurse's professional obligations. Knowledge and experience are required that recognize the breadth and depth necessary for secondary school nurses to work effectively within their scope of practice. The adoption of a model of critical companionship is recommended to provide facilitated reflection on practice as a support mechanism for the role. PMID:23480208

  18. Seminar: Legal Perspectives of Nursing Practice. Nursing 89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Odette P.

    This course outline provides information to be used by students in conjunction with Nursing 89, a seminar on the legal aspects of nursing to be offered starting in Spring 1982 at Diablo University (California). General information is provided first, including a class calendar, a statement defining the purpose of the course, an outline of…

  19. Using the Framework for 21st-Century School Nursing Practice in Daily Practice.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Erin D; Duff, Carolyn; Wright, Janet

    2016-09-01

    NASN recently developed a Framework for 21st-Century School Nursing Practice (Framework) to guide school nursing activities. The principles and components of the Framework can be used as a guide in achieving high-quality school nurse practice. The purpose of this article is to share how school nurses can use the Framework in their daily practice, invite nurses to identify one new way the Framework can be used in your practice this school year, and implement and evaluate the change. PMID:27481475

  20. Factors influencing evidence-based nursing utilization intention in Korean practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee-Won; Ahn, Jeong-Ah; Park, Mi-Mi

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Korean nurses' perceptions, attitudes and utilization intention for evidence-based nursing (EBN), and to explore what factors influence utilization intention. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2012. Registered nurses directly involved in clinical practice were recruited at a medical centre in Korea. A total of 420 nurses completed a self-report questionnaire. Results showed that participants reported moderate scores regarding their perceptions and attitudes towards EBN, and rated themselves as higher than the median for utilization intention. Furthermore, this study revealed that perceptions of and attitudes towards EBN, occupational view and previous EBN education were significant factors affecting utilization intention. Nurse educators and managers should encourage nurses to have better attitudes towards EBN, help them be more satisfied with their work and provide them with appropriate education for EBN to establish evidence-based practice as a part of daily nursing care. PMID:24689706

  1. Reframing the Australian nurse teacher competencies: do they reflect the 'REAL' world of nurse teacher practice?

    PubMed

    Guy, Jacqui; Taylor, Christine; Roden, Janet; Blundell, Jennifer; Tolhurst, Gerda

    2011-04-01

    The Australian nurse teacher competencies were introduced in 1996; however, the researchers perceived that changes to the health care system and a nursing workforce shortage may have affected nurse teacher roles over the past decade. This study aimed to explore perceptions of nurse teachers on the applicability of the current Australian nurse teacher competencies to practice, and modify the nurse teacher competencies to better reflect current practice. Methodology utilized mixed methods, and data collection was via focus groups, telephone interviews, and survey data. Results revealed that participants were mostly positive about the original competency statements, although there were some variations between items. Themes that emerged from the qualitative data were: changing trends in health care; preparation for teaching; understanding of the competencies, contextual influences on education role; nurse teachers as change agents, and resource management. Conclusions were that the Australian nurse teacher competencies (1996) were reflective of the current generic roles of nurse teachers however some of the competencies needed reframing to meet the current needs of nurse teachers. However, changes needed to be made in areas such as reducing complex language, inclusion of technology, and cultural competencies. Nurse teachers were supportive of the research because they valued the teacher competencies for reflection on their practice and the development of portfolios, job descriptions and performance appraisals. PMID:21093124

  2. Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice: National Association of School Nurses.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The National Association of School Nurses (NASN) developed the Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice to reflect current school nurse practice. The Framework of practice was introduced in June 2015, and feedback was requested and obtained from practicing school nurses in a variety of ways. The final version of the Framework is introduced in this article. This article updates (and replaces) the articles in the July 2015 NASN School Nurse related to the Framework. Central to the Framework is student-centered nursing care that occurs within the context of the students' family and school community. Surrounding the student, family, and school community are the nonhierarchical, overlapping key principles of Care Coordination, Leadership, Quality Improvement, and Community/Public Health.These principles are surrounded by the fifth principle, Standards of Practice, which is foundational for evidence-based and clinically competent quality care. Each of these principles is further defined by practice components. Suggestions are provided regarding how the Framework can be used in a variety of settings to articulate and prioritize school nursing practice. The ultimate goal is to provide a resource to guide school nurses in their practice to help students be healthy, safe, and ready to learn. PMID:26739934

  3. Authentic leaders creating healthy work environments for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2006-05-01

    Implementation of authentic leadership can affect not only the nursing workforce and the profession but the healthcare delivery system and society as a whole. Creating a healthy work environment for nursing practice is crucial to maintain an adequate nursing workforce; the stressful nature of the profession often leads to burnout, disability, and high absenteeism and ultimately contributes to the escalating shortage of nurses. Leaders play a pivotal role in retention of nurses by shaping the healthcare practice environment to produce quality outcomes for staff nurses and patients. Few guidelines are available, however, for creating and sustaining the critical elements of a healthy work environment. In 2005, the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses released a landmark publication specifying 6 standards (skilled communication, true collaboration, effective decision making, appropriate staffing, meaningful recognition, and authentic leadership) necessary to establish and sustain healthy work environments in healthcare. Authentic leadership was described as the "glue" needed to hold together a healthy work environment. Now, the roles and relationships of authentic leaders in the healthy work environment are clarified as follows: An expanded definition of authentic leadership and its attributes (eg, genuineness, trustworthiness, reliability, compassion, and believability) is presented. Mechanisms by which authentic leaders can create healthy work environments for practice (eg, engaging employees in the work environment to promote positive behaviors) are described. A practical guide on how to become an authentic leader is advanced. A research agenda to advance the study of authentic leadership in nursing practice through collaboration between nursing and business is proposed. PMID:16632768

  4. Mapping the Future of Environmental Health and Nursing: Strategies for Integrating National Competencies into Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Laura S.; Butterfield, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are increasingly the primary contact for clients concerned about health problems related to their environment. In response to the need for nursing expertise in the field of environmental health, the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) have designed core competencies for the nursing profession. The IOM competencies focus on four areas: (1) knowledge and concepts; (2) assessment and referral; advocacy, ethics, and risk communication; and (4) legislation and regulation. The competencies establish a baseline of knowledge and awareness in order for nurses to prevent and minimize health problems associated with exposure to environmental agents. To address the known difficulties of incorporating new priorities into established practice, nurses attending an environmental health short course participated in a nominal group process focusing on the question, “What specific actions can we take to bring environmental health into the mainstream of nursing practice?” This exercise was designed to bring the concepts of the national initiatives (IOM, NINR, ATSDR) to the awareness of individual nurses involved in the direct delivery of care. Results include 38 action items nurses identified as improving awareness and utilization of environmental health principles. The top five ideas were: (1) get environmental health listed as a requirement or competency in undergraduate nursing education; (2) improve working relationships with interdepartmental persons—a team approach; (3) strategically place students in essential organizations such as NIOSH, ATSDR, or CDC; (4) educate nurse educators; and (5) create environmental health awards in nursing. The 38 original ideas were also reorganized into a five-tiered conceptual model. The concepts of this model include: (1) developing partnerships; (2) strengthening publications; (3) enhancing continuing education; (4) updating nursing

  5. Towards a strong virtue ethics for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Alan E

    2006-07-01

    Illness creates a range of negative emotions in patients including anxiety, fear, powerlessness, and vulnerability. There is much debate on the 'therapeutic' or 'helping' nurse-patient relationship. However, despite the current agenda regarding patient-centred care, the literature concerning the development of good interpersonal responses and the view that a satisfactory nursing ethics should focus on persons and character traits rather than actions, nursing ethics is dominated by the traditional obligation, act-centred theories such as consequentialism and deontology. I critically examine these theories and the role of duty-based notions in both general ethics and nursing practice. Because of well-established flaws, I conclude that obligation-based moral theories are incomplete and inadequate for nursing practice. I examine the work of Hursthouse on virtue ethics' action guidance and the v-rules. I argue that the moral virtues and a strong (action-guiding) version of virtue ethics provide a plausible and viable alternative for nursing practice. I develop an account of a virtue-based helping relationship and a virtue-based approach to nursing. The latter is characterized by three features: (1) exercising the moral virtues such as compassion; (2) using judgement; and (3) using moral wisdom, understood to include at least moral perception, moral sensitivity, and moral imagination. Merits and problems of the virtue-based approach are examined. I relate the work of MacIntyre to nursing and I conceive nursing as a practice: nurses who exercise the virtues and seek the internal goods help to sustain the practice of nursing and thus prevent the marginalization of the virtues. The strong practice-based version of virtue ethics proposed is context-dependent, particularist, and relational. Several areas for future philosophical inquiry and empirical nursing research are suggested to develop this account yet further. PMID:16774598

  6. Nursing faculties’ knowledge and attitude on evidence-based practice

    PubMed Central

    Mehrdad, Neda; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Joulaee, Azadeh; Bahrani, Naser

    2012-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is one of the main professional competencies for health care professionals and a priority for medicine and nursing curriculum as well. EBP leads to improve effective and efficient care and patient outcomes. Nurse educators have responsibility to teach the future nurses, and an opportunity to promote patient outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe nurse educators’ knowledge and attitude on EBP. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted in nursing faculties of two major universities of medical sciences affiliated to Ministry of Health and Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered using a three-section questionnaire. Content and face validity was further enhanced by submitting it to nursing research and education experts. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 11 software. Results: According the results, nursing faculties’ knowledge of EBP was mainly moderate (47.1%). Significant statistical relationship was found between the level of knowledge with education and teaching experience in different nursing programs. Nurses generally held positive attitudes toward EBP (88.6%) and there was no statistical significant relationship with demographic variables. Conclusion: Nursing educators are in a position to influence nursing research in clinical practice in the future. Therefore, it is critical to achieve implementation of EBP and be a change agent for a paradigm shift toward EBP. PMID:23922597

  7. Perceptions of Liberal Education of Two Types of Nursing Graduates: The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBrew, Jacqueline Kayler

    2010-01-01

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), which defines the expectations of a new baccalaureate-prepared nurse, includes a liberal education as a desired outcome for bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) graduates. A liberal education is thought to provide the professional nurse with the skills needed to practice nursing, including…

  8. Nursing practice as bricoleur activity: a concept explored.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Mary

    2005-06-01

    The debates concerning the nature of nursing practice are often rooted in tensions between artistic, scientific and magical/mythical practice. It is within this context that the case is argued for considering that nursing practice involves bricoleur activity. This stance, which is derived from the work of Levi-Strauss, conceives elements of nursing practice as an embodied, bricoleur practice where practitioners draw on the 'shards and fragments' of the situation-at-hand to resolve the needs of the individual patient for whom they care. This conceptualisation of nursing practice will be analysed with a particular emphasis on its implication for nursing epistemology, pedagogy and praxis. The evidence to support this argument is drawn from empirical work that investigated nurses' use of intuition, the work of Levi-Strauss, and issues in nursing epistemology and ontology. The paper itself is written from the perspective of a bricoleur who uses 'bits and pieces' from the domains of nursing, philosophy, psychology, education, sociology and anthropology. PMID:15892727

  9. Bridging nursing practice and education through a strategic global partnership.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Marilyn; Rajeswaran, Lakshmi; Dithole, Kefalotse; Hoke, Linda; Mampane, Patricia; Sebopelo, Sheila; Molefe, Margret; Muecke, Marjorie A; Rich, Victoria L; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2016-02-01

    To forge strong relationships among nurse scholars from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA (USA); University of Botswana School of Nursing, Gaborone, Botswana; the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Princess Marina Hospital (PMH), Gaborone; and the Ministry of Health of Botswana, a strategic global partnership was created to bridge nursing practice and education. This partnership focused on changing practice at PMH through the translation of new knowledge and evidence-based practice. Guided by the National Institutes of Health team science field guide, the conceptual implementation of this highly successful practice change initiative is described in detail, highlighting our strategies, challenges and continued collaboration for nurses to be leaders in improving health in Botswana. PMID:25355182

  10. The Nursing Students' Experience of Psychiatric Practice in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Eunju

    2015-10-01

    In 1995, South Korea passed the Mental Health Act, and since this time it has developed many mental health policies and facilities. The aim of this study is to understand and explore the experience of nursing students in the changed psychiatric practice environment since 1995. The present study is a qualitative thematic analysis. Interviews were conducted with 11 third and fourth grade nursing students who had experienced psychiatric practice in South Korea. A thematic analysis of 11 in-depth student interviews identified three themes: 'orientation before psychiatric practice', 'facing the mental hospital', and 'change and choice'. After practicing, nursing students developed positive attitude regarding psychiatry. Educators will have to focus more on education and support in order for the students to maintain positive attitude throughout their experience. The research herein shows that the role of the educators and psychiatric nurses is extremely important for nursing students in the elimination of a negative attitude towards psychiatry. PMID:26397441

  11. Woman-Centered Maternity Nursing Education and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Giarratano, Gloria

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this Heideggerian phenomenological study was to uncover the meanings of the clinical experiences of registered nurses working in maternity settings after they studied maternity nursing from a woman-centered, feminist perspective in a generic baccalaureate nursing program. Purposeful sampling was conducted to locate and recruit nurses who had graduated from this nursing program between the December 1996 and December 1998 semesters and were currently working in a maternal-newborn clinical setting. Each participant had taken the required woman-centered, maternity-nursing course during her/his undergraduate education. Data collection included an individual, open-ended interview that focused on the nurses' descriptions of their everyday practices as maternity nurses. Nineteen maternal-newborn nurses between the ages of 23 and 43 years who had been in practice from six months to three years were interviewed. The constitutive patterns identified from the interviews were: “Otherness,” “Being and Becoming Woman-Centered,” and “Tensions in Practicing Woman-Centered Care.” Findings revealed that the nurses had a raised awareness of oppressive maternity care practices and applied ideology of woman-centeredness as a framework for providing more humanistic care. Creating woman-centered maternity care meant negotiating tensions and barriers in medically focused maternity settings and looking for opportunities for advocacy and woman-empowerment. The barriers the nurses faced in implementing woman-centered care exposed limitations to childbearing choices and nursing practices that remain problematic in maternity care. PMID:17273327

  12. Clinical nurse specialists driving research and practice through Research Roundtables.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Schafer, Deborah J

    2009-01-01

    Providing patient care based on the best evidence is a priority for healthcare institutions across the country to improve practice and patient outcomes. Creating a culture of evidence-based practice (EBP) within an organization can be a challenging task. Literature has identified numerous barriers to EBP including negative attitudes and perceptions among nurses and lack of organizational support, time, resources, and confidence with these skills. Creating programs that help nurses appreciate the value and importance of nursing research for practice can be an effective approach in changing the culture. Research Roundtable is a collaborative partnership between a healthcare system and a baccalaureate nursing program to promote EBP and research skills in nurses and nursing students. Initial goals of the program focused on increasing the nurses' knowledge base of the research process and applying research to actual clinical problems. Over the course of 3 years, Roundtable evolved from development and implementation of research projects to concentrating on the identification of clinical problems that could be analyzed and solved through the use of EBP processes. The program has resulted in the completion of research studies, implementation of practice changes based on evidence uncovered in group work, and the approval of research projects in data collection phases. The positive impacts of Roundtable have been identified at the level of the staff nurse and the organization as a whole. This article describes the role of the clinical nurse specialist in the development and implementation of the Research Roundtable. PMID:19858901

  13. [Nursing development at the Solothurn hospitals. Towards clinically oriented nursing expertise and practice development].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ursi Barandun; Hirsbrunner, Therese; Jäger, Susanne; Näf, Ernst; Römmich, Sabine; Horlacher, Kathrin

    2011-02-01

    At the Solothurn Hospitals (soH), 13 academically educated nurses are responsible for the development of nursing care with the goal to improve patient-oriented, effective, appropriate, and economic care. The strategy contains three priorities: a) expert care of single patients in demanding situations, b) sustained application of organisational methods such as primary nursing, nursing process, and skill/grade mix, and c) design and management of practice development projects related to specific patient groups. A first evaluation with qualitative and quantitative methods showed that the exemplary care of single patients by expert nurses was evaluated as positive for the patients as well as for the teams on two wards by nurses who were interviewed. After the introduction of primary nursing, the application rate was 81 to 90 % and the introduction of fall prevention methods in geriatric rehabilitation decreased the fall rate from 8.2 to 5.5 per 1000 patient days. A comparision with the literature shows that the expert nurses of soH perform both, working at the bedside and being responsible for practice development projects, as specialised Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs). APNs at the Solothurn Hospitals work also as generalists when organisational methods need to be consolidated. Their successes depend from their integration into the hierarchy and both, into the nursing as well as into the interprofessional teams. Competencies in Transformational Leadership also are essential at all management levels. PMID:21274841

  14. Predictors of excess heart failure readmissions: implications for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Stamp, Kelly D; Flanagan, Jane; Gregas, Matt; Shindul-Rothschild, Judith

    2014-01-01

    In this study of California, Massachusetts, and New York hospitals, 6 factors predicted 27.6% of readmissions for patients with heart failure (HF). We found that higher admissions per bed, teaching hospitals, and poor nurse-patient communication increased HF readmissions. Conversely, the HF readmissions were lower when nurse staffing was greater, more patients reported receiving discharge information, and among hospitals in California. The implications for nursing practice in the delivery of care to patients with HF are discussed. PMID:24378355

  15. Practical ethical theory for nurses responding to complexity in care.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Roseanne Moody

    2010-05-01

    In the context of health care system complexity, nurses need responsive leadership and organizational support to maintain intrinsic motivation, moral sensitivity and a caring stance in the delivery of patient care. The current complexity of nurses' work environment promotes decreases in work motivation and moral satisfaction, thus creating motivational and ethical dissonance in practice. These and other work-related factors increase emotional stress and burnout for nurses, prompting both new and seasoned nurse professionals to leave their current position, or even the profession. This article presents a theoretical conceptual model for professional nurses to review and make sense of the ethical reasoning skills needed to maintain a caring stance in relation to the competing values that must coexist among nurses, health care administrators, patients and families in the context of the complex health care work environments in which nurses are expected to practice. A model, Nurses' Ethical Reasoning Skills, is presented as a framework for nurses' thinking through and problem solving ethical issues in clinical practice in the context of complexity in health care. PMID:20444776

  16. Comparing nurses' intent to leave or stay: differences of practice environment perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Yuan; Chiang, Hui-Ying; Chen, Ia-Ling

    2011-12-01

    Few existing studies have compared nurses' perceptions of the practice environment in relation to intent to leave or stay in employment and nursing concurrently. This study compared the differences between Taiwanese nurses' intent to leave or stay in employment and nursing, as related to their perceptions of the practice environment. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted at four hospitals in southern Taiwan. Questionnaires including the Chinese Nursing Practice Environment Scale, regarding intention in employment and nursing, were distributed to 535 nurses who provided direct patient care in Taiwan hospitals. Taiwanese nurses with intent to stay perceived the practice environment as better than nurses with intent to leave employment and nursing. The influences of the nursing practice environment on nurses' intent in employment and nursing were supported preliminarily. Targeting interventions to enhance participation in hospital affairs and adequacy of staffing and resources could be beneficial for a stable nursing workforce. PMID:22011072

  17. Development of the role of director of advanced practice nursing.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Catherine A; Fusilero, Jane; Williams, Christine M

    2010-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are integral to cost-effective delivery of health care in large health care organizations. Development of the leadership position of director of advanced practice nurses in a large teaching institution provides leadership to APNs in various settings, contributes to staff satisfaction, facilitates increased professional growth, and provides improved quality and fiscal outcomes. Job satisfaction, productivity, accountability, and communication may be enhanced through implementation of the role of director of advanced practice nursing and a committee structure of APNs, as was found in this academic health system. PMID:20306882

  18. Leadership redefined: educating the Doctorate of Nursing Practice nurse leader through innovation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Kathryn Lothschuetz

    2011-01-01

    In today's society, health care systems are characterized by change, unpredictability, increasing speed of information and knowledge exchanges, redefined organizational boundaries and hierarchy, emphasis on value, teamwork, interdisciplinary collaboration, diversity, and interconnectedness. This new reality has forced nurse educators to redefine nursing leadership and prepare the Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) leader through innovative courses offering experiential learning based on complex adaptive systems and quantum leadership theory. This article describes the experiential learning approach and integrated learning experience for DNP students. PMID:21654485

  19. A clinical ladder program based on Carper's Fundamental Patterns of Knowing in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lee A; Nelson, Deana; Godfrey, Leah

    2003-03-01

    Clinical and career ladder programs were popular adjuncts to recruitment and retention during the nursing shortage of the 1980s. Programs commonly used Benner's work as an organizing framework and typically used activities such as continuing education credit, committee participation, work experience, certifications, academic degrees, community service, and performance appraisal scores as criteria for advancement. The authors present a unique clinical ladder program based on Carper's Fundamental Patterns of Knowing in Nursing. This philosophical work has been debated in the literature for many years, yet to the authors' knowledge, this work has never been used as the conceptual basis for program development. The four patterns of knowing in nursing were found to be consistent with the definition of professional nursing, and provided a meaningful organizing framework that was well received by staff registered nurses. An overall history of clinical ladders is presented, followed by the organization's prior experience with these programs, and finally the details of development and implementation of the program with plans for evaluation. PMID:12629301

  20. Fostering Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambur, Betty

    1999-01-01

    Evidence-based nursing practice is impeded by low numbers of baccalaureate nurses, lack of critical perspectives toward research, the volume of information, and conflicting worldviews. Teaching strategies to address the challenge include fostering the ability to question and initiating teacher/student dialog. (SK)

  1. Psychiatric Nursing Faculty Practice: Care within the Community Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richie, Mary Fern; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing faculty practice offers the academic nurse opportunity to generate salary support and integrate students into the real world of mental health care. It promotes scholarship and knowledge-building and has a direct impact on the lives of patients. (Author/JOW)

  2. Australian Nurse Educators Identify Gaps in Expert Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelletier, Dianne; Duffield, Christine; Adams, Anne; Nagy, Sue; Crisp, Jackie; Mitten-Lewis, Suzanne

    2000-01-01

    A Delphi panel of 28 Australian nurse educators and 42 clinicians identified 58 practice items in which reality was far from ideal. In particular, for 16 items related to patient empowerment, nursing research, and technology policy, clinical behavior was rated below the median. (SK)

  3. Nurse-led general practice blazes a trail.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-02-24

    The nurse-led Cuckoo Lane Surgery in London has been rated outstanding by the Care Quality Commission. Nurses run the practice and deliver most of the care to patients. Patient satisfaction rates are very high, and staff say Cuckoo Lane is an exceptionally rewarding place to work. PMID:26907124

  4. Licensed Practical Nurses in Occupational Health. An Initial Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jane A.; And Others

    The study, conducted in 1971, assessed characteristics of licensed practical nurses (LPN's) who worked in occupational health nursing. The survey instrument, a questionnaire, was returned by 591 LPN's in occupational health and provided data related to: personal characteristics, work and setting, administrative and professional functioning,…

  5. A Self-Care Practice Theory of Nursing the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Toni J.; Munroe, Donna J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a practice theory of nursing for the elderly which focuses on maintaining the maximum amount of independence of elderly patients through a nursing focus on the full range of human functional abilities. Interrelates varied health related characteristics and requirements of the elderly with theoretical components of self-care nursing…

  6. Participation in the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) programme.

    PubMed

    Bartz, Claudia; Coenen, Amy; Hong, Woi-Hyun

    2006-01-01

    The International Council of Nurses (ICN) is a federation of 129 national nurses associations. The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) is a programme of the ICN. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and maintenance processes of the ICNP Programme that are used to increase participation. These include processes by which the ICNP was and continues to be developed, tested, distributed and implemented worldwide, with emphasis on the current version, ICNP Version 1.0. The ICNP is a unified nursing language that facilitates cross-mapping among local terms and existing terminologies. ICNP conforms to current terminology standards and criteria, for example, ISO standards and HL7. The ICNP Alpha and Beta Versions documented the progress of concept validation and classification of nursing phenomena and interventions. The ICNP Beta 2 Version was a combinatorial terminology organized in two multi-axial structures representing nursing phenomena and nursing actions. The ICNP Version 1.0, launched in 2005, changed the relatively straight-forward multi-axial structure into a compositional terminology through the application of description logics using Web Ontology Language (OWL) within Protégé, an ontology development environment. ICNP Version 1.0 is also represented in a multiaxial model (7-Axis) for nurses to compose nursing diagnosis, intervention and outcome statements. Language translations and clinical information systems applications are required to make the ICNP Version 1.0 available to nurses at the point of healthcare delivery. ICNP data collected in healthcare environments provide standardized terminology for nursing that allows comparison of nursing practice across health care settings, specialties and countries; facilitate data-based clinical and management decision making; and contribute to the development of guidelines and standards for best practices and optimal outcomes for patients, families and communities. PMID

  7. Nurse work engagement impacts job outcome and nurse-assessed quality of care: model testing with nurse practice environment and nurse work characteristics as predictors

    PubMed Central

    Van Bogaert, Peter; van Heusden, Danny; Timmermans, Olaf; Franck, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions, such as nurse–physician relationship, nurse management at the unit level and hospital management and organizational support, are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption. Background: Understanding how to support and guide nurse practice communities in their daily effort to answer complex care most accurate, alongside with the demand of a stable and healthy nurse workforce, is challenging. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: Based on earlier empirical findings, a structural equation model, designed with valid measurement instruments, was tested. The study population included registered acute care hospital nurses (N = 1201) in eight hospitals across Belgium. Results: Nurse practice environment dimensions predicted nurses’ ratings of job outcome variables as well as quality of care. Features of nurses’ work characteristics, e.g., perceived workload, decision latitude, social capital, and the three dimension of work engagement, played mediating roles between nurse practice environment and outcomes. A revised model, using various fit measures, explained 60% of job outcomes and 47% of nurse-assessed quality of care. Conclusion: The findings in this study show that nurse work characteristics as workload, decision latitude, and social capital, alongside with nurse work engagement (e.g., vigor, dedication, and absorption) influence nurses’ perspective of their nurse practice environment, job outcomes, and quality of care. The results underline aspects to considerate for various stakeholders, such as executives, nurse managers, physicians, and staff nurses, in setting up and organizing health care services. PMID:25431563

  8. Practical discourse in nursing: going beyond empiricism and historicism.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J L

    1985-07-01

    This discussion presents a critical appraisal of recent works in Advances in Nursing Science that have dealt with metatheoretical concerns. In metatheoretical analysis, such as that presented by Silva and Rothbart, nurses are beginning to focus on the traditions that have guided research. This process should be extended by reviewing historical stages of development in empiricist and postempiricist philosophy. Recent work in postempiricist philosophy is especially important since it can help nursing transcend historicist insights. Continental philosophy goes beyond historicist critique by focusing on practical discourse within a community of investigators. This is a stage of development that can be rationally decisive for the scientific development of nursing. PMID:3927830

  9. Best practices in nursing homes. Clinical supervision, management, and human resource practices.

    PubMed

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2008-07-01

    Human resource practices including supervision and management are associated with organizational performance. Evidence supportive of such an association in nursing homes is found in the results of numerous research studies conducted during the past 17 years. In this article, best practices related to this topic have been culled from descriptive, explanatory, and intervention studies in a range of interdisciplinary research journals published between 1990 and 2007. Identified best practices include implementation of training programs on supervision and management for licensed nurses, certified nursing assistant job enrichment programs, implementation of consistent nursing assignments, and the use of electronic documentation. Organizational barriers and facilitators of these best practices are described. PMID:20077964

  10. Instructional Practices: Interpersonal Relationships in Nursing Practice: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Ben W.; VanDenBerg, Evelyn

    1978-01-01

    Examines an interdisciplinary course offered by the Nursing and Speech Communication Departments at Miami University which is intended to supplement basic nursing education that doesn't include the concept of interpersonal relationships. (MH)

  11. e-Learning competency for practice nurses: an evaluation report.

    PubMed

    Heartfield, Marie; Morello, Andrea; Harris, Melanie; Lawn, Sharon; Pols, Vincenza; Stapleton, Carolyn; Battersby, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Practice nurses in Australia are now funded to facilitate chronic condition management, including self-management support. Chronic disease management requires an established rapport, support and proactivity between general practitioners, patients and the practice nurses. To achieve this, training in shared decision making is needed. e-Learning supports delivery and achievement of such policy outcomes, service improvements and skill development. However, e-learning effectiveness for health care professionals' is determined by several organisational, economic, pedagogical and individual factors, with positive e-learning experience linked closely to various supports. This paper reinforces previous studies showing nurses' expanding role across general practice teams and reports on some of the challenges of e-learning. Merely providing practice nurses with necessary information via web-based learning systems does not ensure successful learning or progress toward improving health outcomes for patients. PMID:24134876

  12. [Building up nursing knowledge by means of reflexive practice].

    PubMed

    Colina, J; Medina, J L

    1997-12-01

    After analyzing the prior questions which determine the nursing field contents, the authors propose "reflective practice" as the methodological and pedagogical philosophy of choice in the formation of nurses. According to the authors, the professor is responsible for developing the curriculum. As such, the professor makes decisions regarding course design, methodology, content development, and student evaluation in terms of aptitute, attitude and knowledge acquisition. Research studies seem to demonstrate that the knowledge which, in the end, aids in comprehending the context taught and which determines the decisions a professor takes, is that knowledge based on a reflective practice, a product of the professor's experiences, background, knowledge and active relationship with nursing practice. The contents in this article were presented as a conference in the Third Seminar of Professors of Nursing for General Practice and Surgery. PMID:9485855

  13. Practice environment for nurse practitioners in California. Identifying barriers.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, A L; Gilliss, C L; Yoder, L

    1996-01-01

    Barriers exist that prevent nurse practitioners from using their primary health care knowledge and skills. We present the incidence of and specific barriers experienced by nurse practitioner respondents in California, the state with the largest number of nurse practitioners in the nation. A January 1995 survey was sent to all nurse practitioners certified in California to elicit their experiences regarding legal or social barriers in their practice, with space for an open-ended response. Of an estimated 3,895 nurse practitioners in California, 2,741 (70%) returned surveys. Most nurse practitioner (65%) respondents in California are providing primary care. Perceived barriers to practice are lack of prescriptive authority, lack of support from physicians, reimbursement difficulties, and lack of public awareness. Current barriers to nurse practitioner practice in California are similar to national barriers discovered in 1992 data. The development of interprofessional dialogue and the recognition of the contributions of all primary care professionals are some of the steps that can be taken to reduce these barriers and increase the use and effectiveness of nurse practitioners in primary care. PMID:8987426

  14. Work engagement in nursing practice: a relational ethics perspective.

    PubMed

    Keyko, Kacey

    2014-12-01

    The concept of work engagement has existed in business and psychology literature for some time. There is a significant body of research that positively correlates work engagement with organizational outcomes. To date, the interest in the work engagement of nurses has primarily been related to these organizational outcomes. However, the value of work engagement in nursing practice is not only an issue of organizational interest, but of ethical interest. The dialogue on work engagement in nursing must expand to include the ethical importance of engagement. The relational nature of work engagement and the multiple levels of influence on nurses' work engagement make a relational ethics approach to work engagement in nursing appropriate and necessary. Within a relational ethics perspective, it is evident that work engagement enables nurses to have meaningful relationships in their work and subsequently deliver ethical care. In this article, I argue that work engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice. If engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice, the environmental and organizational factors that influence work engagement must be closely examined to pursue the creation of moral communities within healthcare environments. PMID:24714045

  15. Supporting Graduate Nurse Transition: Collaboration Between Practice and University.

    PubMed

    Bull, Rosalind; Shearer, Toniele; Phillips, Michelle; Fallon, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Making the transition from student to RN is challenging and demanding. In Australia, where nurses commonly graduate after 3 years in a Bachelor of Nursing program, graduate transition programs have been established in the workplace to support and socialize new graduates to nursing practice. These programs vary in content, rigor, and available support mechanisms, and no nationally agreed upon standards of expected graduate performance exist. Providing a structured, evidence-based, and clinically focused education and support program specific to the needs of graduate nurses contributes to quality care and patient safety and has significant benefits for the individual graduate, the employing organizations, and health care. This article presents the development and implementation of the Bachelor of Nursing With Clinical Honors (Transition to Practice) program offered by the University of Tasmania, in collaboration with St. Vincent's Private Hospital, Sydney, Australia. PMID:26352044

  16. Important interactional strategies for everyday public health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Porr, Caroline J

    2015-01-01

    This Clinical Concepts article concerns the relational tools required by public health nurses to establish relationships with single mothers living on public assistance, mothers who are vulnerable and often stigmatized. The implications of stigmatization for relationship building are highlighted based on previous research investigating how public health nurses working in Canadian jurisdictions establish professional caring relationships with this cohort of mothers. Public health nurses employed interactional strategies including engaging in a positive manner and offering verbal commendations which served as effective relational tools to break through mothers' walls of defensiveness and to resume the dynamic process of relationship building. Building Relationship is a key practice standard for public health nurses and is instrumental to their work at both individual and community levels to improve social determinants of health. The author concludes with recommendations to facilitate building relationships during everyday public health nursing practice. PMID:24320117

  17. Ethics in Nursing Practice and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1983-01-01

    The fact that ethics has become important to nurses is a reflection of two types of developments: (1) rapid expansion and application of biomedical technology, and (2) the human rights movement. Therefore, nursing involves an increasing number of activities with both moral and technical implications. (SSH)

  18. Nursing Interventions Core to Specialty Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Joanne Comi; Donahue, William; Bulechek, Gloria M.

    1998-01-01

    The identification of nursing interventions that are core to each clinical specialty will be useful in the development of nursing information systems, staff education programs and evaluations, referral networks, certification and licensing examinations, curricula, and research and theory construction. (Author/JOW)

  19. 78 FR 39738 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice for Request for Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education... Education and Practice (NACNEP). Authority: The National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice is... including the range of issues relating to the nurse workforce, nursing education, and nursing...

  20. Perceptions and Attitudes towards Evidence Based Practice among Nurses and Nursing Students in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Karki, S; Acharya, R; Budhwani, H; Shrestha, P; Chalise, P; Shrestha, U; Gautam, K; Wilson, L

    2015-01-01

    Background As the evidence based practice (EBP) movement expands, there is a need for health leaders and educators in each country to assess the extent to which health professional students and practitioners are prepared to locate, evaluate, and apply evidence to guide their practice. Objective The study objective was to explore nurses' and nursing students' perceptions and attitudes towards EBP. Method This was a descriptive cross-sectional survey administered to all 273 nurses and nursing students from Nepal who attended an EBP conference. The survey instrument that was used by Majid in Singapore was adapted for use in this study with permission from the author. Result In total, 121 nurses participated in the study. The majority (93%) of respondents reported that they had no previous training in EBP. The respondents' perceptions of their EBP knowledge and skills were variable, but most of them demonstrated positive attitudes toward EBP. Respondents identified a number of barriers that limit the implementation of EBP in Nepal. The greatest barriers were lack of time and resources, difficulty understanding research articles and translating the findings to practice, and limited autonomy to change practice based on evidence. Conclusion Although respondents had positive attitudes towards EBP, their knowledge and skills were limited and barriers to implementation existed. Nursing faculty can use the findings to guide implementation of EBP into curricula, and nursing administrators and clinicians can use the findings to guide practice to promote EBP. PMID:27423280

  1. Transfer-of-Care Communication: Nursing Best Practices.

    PubMed

    Chard, Robin; Makary, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    The successful and safe transfer of the patient from one phase of care to another is contingent on optimal communication by all team members. Nurses are often in a natural leadership position to improve safe practices during hand overs. A holistic understanding of the patient allows the perioperative nurse the opportunity to identify issues and choose a nursing diagnosis based on key elements of a patient's needs and goals--information that should be relayed during patient transfers. This article reviews best practices in transfer-of-care communication to enable perioperative RNs to take an active, leading role in hand-over processes. PMID:26411818

  2. Return-to-practice initiatives in nursing retention.

    PubMed

    Gould, Dinah

    Return-to-practice is an important issue for NHS employers and employees. However, little has been written on this area. This article reviews current literature from the perspective of nurses, employers and managers, and critiques a number of empirical studies. Findings from a recent telephone interview survey on the recruitment and retention of nurses in acute NHS trusts in England which was conducted as part of a larger study--the Nurses' Early Leaving Study (NEXT) commissioned by the European Union--are reported. This study may help to explain why return-to-practice programmes are not having the impact the government intended. PMID:16097197

  3. Promoting a Strategic Approach to Clinical Nurse Leader Practice Integration.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marjory; Avolio, Alice E; Ott, Karen M; Miltner, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    The Office of Nursing Services of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) piloted implementation of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) into the care delivery model and established a strategic goal in 2011 to implement the CNL role across the VA health care system. The VA Office of Nursing Services CNL Implementation and Evaluation (CNL I&E) Service was created as one mechanism to facilitate that goal in response to a need identified by facility nurse executives for consultative support for CNL practice integration. This article discusses strategies employed by the CNL I&E consultative team to help facility-level nursing leadership integrate CNLs into practice. Measures of success include steady growth in CNL practice capacity as well as positive feedback from nurse executives about the value of consultative engagement. Future steps to better integrate CNL practice into the VA include consolidation of lessons learned, collaboration to strengthen the evidence base for CNL practice, and further exploration of the transformational potential of CNL practice across the care continuum. PMID:26636231

  4. The Coppin State University Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program.

    PubMed

    Tilghman, Joan S

    2015-01-01

    The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program development was identified as a pivotal part of the Coppin State University (CSU) Helene Fuld School of Nursing's' Strategic Plan. The program was launched as early as 2009 with plans to be implemented before 2015. The program was developed in response to the October 2004 endorsement of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) position statement which recognizes the DNP as the appropriate credential for all advanced nursing practice roles by 2015. The Helene Fuld School of Nursing began its inaugural doctoral program in May 2015. The CSU DNP program will prepare graduates to address current and future practice issues. This program will prepare post baccalaureate graduates of nursing programs and post Master's advanced practice nurses to earn the DNP degree. The curriculum balances didactics, and clinical application in actual patient care facilities and health agencies relevant to course content. The DNP program fulfills CSU's goal to prepare graduates who distinguish themselves as leaders and service providers in critical and essential professions that offer life-long diverse employment, professional growth, and service opportunities. PMID:26665500

  5. Effects of an advanced surgical nursing module on clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Frost, J

    1994-04-01

    1. Innovation and changes in practice can be developed through continuing education. 2. By adapting appropriate change strategies, theories learned in class can be applied in practice. 3. Excellence in quality can be achieved by all qualified nurses by applying theory to practice. PMID:7513891

  6. Perceptions of the Role of the Doctor of Nursing Practice-Prepared Nurse: Clarity or Confusion.

    PubMed

    Udlis, Kimberly A; Mancuso, Josephine M

    2015-01-01

    Confusion and disagreement about the DNP degree and its implications continues despite the rapid and steady growth of DNP programs. There is a paucity of literature that examines nurses' perceptions of the role of the DNP-prepared nurse. The purpose of this study was to explore how nurses perceive the role of the DNP-prepared nurse and identify areas of ambiguity in understanding the roles that DNP-prepared nurses fulfill. A descriptive, cross-sectional design, using self-administered questionnaires, explored the perceptions of n = 340 nurses with various educational levels and backgrounds. Descriptives of the sample and instruments were conducted as well as chi-square analyses to detect differences in perceptions across levels of education. Results indicated that nurses clearly supported the DNP degree with a focus on the improvement of health care outcomes through the roles of leadership in health organizations, policy, interprofessionalism, and translation of evidence into practice. Multiple areas of confusion concerning the role of DNP-prepared nurse existed in academia, academia leadership, and scholarship. In order to reduce role ambiguity, the distinctive contributions of the DNP-prepared nurse must be embraced, valued, and operationalized. Otherwise, the role of the DNP-prepared nurse will continue to be discussed, debated, and challenged. PMID:26194957

  7. Advancing the quality of oncology nursing care: Interlink Community Cancer Nurses' model for reflective practice.

    PubMed

    Howell, D; Pelton, B

    2001-01-01

    Since 1996, Interlink Community Cancer Nurses have been using reflective practice as a team to share knowledge and experience amongst peers. The use of reflective practice enables the nurse to examine decision-making in patient situations and uncover the knowledge and artistry that is embedded in nursing practice. This article describes how reflection is practised by specialist cancer nurses to advance the quality of caregiving. The use of a structured framework for reflection which incorporates ways of knowing in nursing is an essential feature of the Interlink model for reflection. The development of a process for reflection within the Interlink program has at times been challenging. However, the Interlink nurses' experience with reflection is believed to be critical to the ongoing development of the program and the individual nurse. Interlink nurses have found that guided reflection, the creation of an environmental milieu for reflection and personal knowing, and self-evaluation are critical to the process of becoming a self-reflective practitioner. PMID:11842450

  8. Description of practice as an ambulatory care nurse: psychometric properties of a practice-analysis survey.

    PubMed

    Baghi, Heibatollah; Panniers, Teresa L; Smolenski, Mary C

    2007-01-01

    Changes within nursing demand that a specialty conduct periodic, appropriate practice analyses to continually validate itself against preset standards. This study explicates practice analysis methods using ambulatory care nursing as an exemplar. Data derived from a focus group technique were used to develop a survey that was completed by 499 ambulatory care nurses. The validity of the instrument was assessed using principal components analysis; reliability was estimated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The focus group with ambulatory care experts produced 34 knowledge and activity statements delineating ambulatory care nursing practice. The survey data produced five factors accounting for 71% of variance in the data. The factors were identified as initial patient assessment, professional nursing issues and standards, client care management skills, technical/clinical skills, and system administrative operations. It was concluded that practice analyses delineate a specialty and provide input for certification examinations aimed at measuring excellence in a field of nursing. PMID:17665821

  9. Representation of nurse's managerial practice in inpatient units: nursing staff perspective.

    PubMed

    Lima, Rogério Silva; Lourenço, Eliana Bernardes; Rosado, Sara Rodrigues; Fava, Silvana Maria Coelho Leite; Sanches, Roberta Seron; Dázio, Eliza Maria Rezende

    2016-03-01

    Objective To understand the meanings that nursing staff gives to nurse's managerial practice in the inpatient unit. Methods This is an exploratory and descriptive research with qualitative approach, conducted in a general hospital in a Southern city of Minas Gerais State. We used the Theory of Social Representations as theoretical framework. The study sample were composed by 23 nursing technicians and five nursing assistants. Data collection was conducted through semi-structured interviews, from December 2011 to January 2012. For data analysis we used the discourse analysis, according to social psychology framework. Results The meanings attributed to management occurred from the closeness/distance to staff and to patients` care actions. Conclusions The managerial nurse, perceived as a process apart from care, is classified as non familiar practice, of hard understanding and valuation. PMID:26934613

  10. My practice evolution: an appreciation of the discrepancies between the idealism of nursing education and the realities of hospital practice.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Danielle E K

    2010-01-01

    Newly graduated registered nurses face a barrage of physical and mental challenges in their first few years of practice, especially in the hospital setting. This article explores discrepancies between student nurse practice and professional nursing practice and the challenges that new nurses face in bridging the gap between idealistic theory and realistic practice. The author's subsequent graduate nursing education and continued practice in the field resulted in a personal evolution of practice that elicited a profound sense of appreciation for the field and a desire to share these experiences with other practicing nurses and students. PMID:20333920

  11. Factors enabling advanced practice nursing role integration in Canada.

    PubMed

    DiCenso, Alba; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Donald, Faith; Abelson, Julia; Bourgeault, Ivy; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Carter, Nancy; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Harbman, Patricia

    2010-12-01

    Although advanced practice nurses (APNs) have existed in Canada for over 40 years and there is abundant evidence of their safety and effectiveness, their full integration into our healthcare system has not been fully realized. For this paper, we drew on pertinent sections of a scoping review of the Canadian literature from 1990 onward and interviews or focus groups with 81 key informants conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing to identify the factors that enable role development and implementation across the three types of APNs: clinical nurse specialists, primary healthcare nurse practitioners and acute care nurse practitioners. For development of advanced practice nursing roles, many of the enabling factors occur at the federal/provincial/territorial (F/P/T) level. They include utilization of a pan-Canadian approach, provision of high-quality education, and development of appropriate legislative and regulatory mechanisms. Systematic planning to guide role development is needed at both the F/P/T and organizational levels. For implementation of advanced practice nursing roles, some of the enabling factors require action at the F/P/T level. They include recruitment and retention, role funding, intra-professional relations between clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners, public awareness, national leadership support and role evaluation. Factors requiring action at the level of the organization include role clarity, healthcare setting support, implementation of all role components and continuing education. Finally, inter-professional relations require action at both the F/P/T and organizational levels. A multidisciplinary roundtable formulated policy and practice recommendations based on the synthesis findings, and these are summarized in this paper. PMID:21478695

  12. MENTAL NURSING. LESSON PLANS PREPARED BY PRACTICAL NURSING INSTRUCTORS FOLLOWING JOINT CONFERENCE HELD AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board for Vocational Education, Murfreesboro. Vocational Curriculum Lab.

    THE LESSON PLANS FOR A UNIT ON MENTAL NURSING IN THE PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION PROGRAM WERE DEVELOPED BY A GROUP OF REGISTERED NURSES HOLDING TENNESSEE TEACHING CERTIFICATES. STUDENTS SELECTED FOR THE PROGRAM SHOULD BE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES OR EQUIVALENT. THE LESSONS DESIGNED FOR USE BY A REGISTERED NURSE CERTIFIED FOR TEACHING GIVE OBJECTIVES,…

  13. Future realities in nursing: partnerships, practice, and economics.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, G A; Davidhizar, R; Tiller, C M; Quinn, M E

    1999-01-01

    Health care reform, innovations in technology, and the need to make health care cost-effective have affected all aspects of health care practice and education. Critical thinking skills, interpersonal and communication skills, leadership and motivation skills, computer literacy, and cultural sensitivity are all capabilities nursing graduates must now possess if they are to practice effectively in the complex and competitive contexts that today define the health care marketplace. Partnerships with community agencies are essential if faculty are to prepare a new generation of nurses who will be proficient in the skills that 21st-century nursing practice will demand. Although academic institutions have made some changes to meet marketplace demands, nursing educators, practitioners, and researchers must thoroughly reconceptualize their philosophies and retool their curricula in response to these changes. PMID:10401398

  14. Leaving from and returning to nursing practice: contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Isabel; Taua, Chris

    2009-07-01

    Many nurses leave nursing and never return. Others return after a period of time. Given the global shortage of nurses a better understanding of these movements is needed. The present study focused on nurses who had been out of nursing for more than five years, and explored factors that influenced their leaving and return to practice. All the nurses who had undertaken a Competency Assessment Programme at a given New Zealand tertiary institution during 2005 were invited to participate. Of the 70 questionnaires mailed out 32 (44.5%) were completed and returned. Quantitative data were analysed using Microsoft Excel, and the qualitative data were coded and analysed by means of content analysis. For each, leaving and returning, three key issues emerged. Nurses left for personal reasons, to seek a career change, or because of poor working conditions. They returned when they had the personal freedom to do so, for fiscal reasons, or because they were motivated by some sense of unfinished business. These findings indicate that it is important for educators involved with Competency Assessment Programmes to collaborate with employers in ensuring that there are opportunities for re-entry to positive work environments, with a degree of flexibility that suits the demographic characteristics of those nurses returning to practice. PMID:19928648

  15. Student nurse socialisation in compassionate practice: a Grounded Theory study.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine; Horton, Khim; Smith, Pam

    2012-10-01

    Compassionate practice is expected of Registered Nurses (RNs) around the world while at the same time remaining a contested concept. Nevertheless, student nurses are expected to enact compassionate practice in order to become RNs. In order for this to happen they require professional socialisation within environments where compassion can flourish. However, there is concern that student nurse socialisation is not enabling compassion to flourish and be maintained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate this further, a glaserian Grounded Theory study was undertaken using in-depth, digitally recorded interviews with student nurses (n=19) at a university in the north of England during 2009 and 2010. Interviews were also undertaken with their nurse teachers (n=5) and data from National Health Service (NHS) patients (n=72,000) and staff (n=290,000) surveys were used to build a contextual picture of the student experience. Within the selected findings presented, analysis of the data indicates that students aspire to the professional ideal of compassionate practice although they have concerns about how compassionate practice might fit within the RN role because of constraints on RN practice. Students feel vulnerable to dissonance between professional ideals and practice reality. They experience uncertainty about their future role and about opportunities to engage in compassionate practice. Students manage their vulnerability and uncertainty by balancing between an intention to uphold professional ideals and challenge constraints, and a realisation they might need to adapt their ideals and conform to constraints. This study demonstrates that socialisation in compassionate practice is compromised by dissonance between professional idealism and practice realism. Realignment between the reality of practice and professional ideals, and fostering student resilience, are required if students are to be successfully socialised in compassionate practice and enabled

  16. Nursing education and research rounds: evaluation of a webinar-based education strategy to engage nurses and support practice.

    PubMed

    Black, Agnes T; Clauson, Marion; Fraser, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    Nursing Education and Research Rounds (NEARR), a webinar-based series of continuing education presentations focused on nursing research, was developed to engage nurses in discussion about evidence-based practice. Evaluation of NEARR indicated a large majority of participants considered the information provided useful in their practice and planned to attend future NEARR sessions. Nursing professional development specialists can use this approach to support evidence-based practice. PMID:24060661

  17. Providing empathetic care in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Alison; Corless, Louise; Mee, Steve

    The fifth in our seven-part series on patient narrative explores empathy. We focus on a patient story relevant to all fields of nursing and raise key issues about how health professionals convey empathy to patients. PMID:27400624

  18. Nurse triage in theory and in practice.

    PubMed Central

    George, S; Read, S; Westlake, L; Williams, B; Pritty, P; Fraser-Moodie, A

    1993-01-01

    'Nurse Triage' refers to the formal process of early assessment of patients attending an accident and emergency (A&E) department by a trained nurse, to ensure that they receive appropriate attention, in a suitable location, with the requisite degree of urgency. The benefits claimed for nurse triage include better patient outcomes, through clinical management reaching those in greatest need of it first. A recent study of nurse triage in a British A&E department failed to demonstrate the benefits claimed: patients undergoing triage were delayed, especially those in the most urgent groups. No differences were noted between the two study groups in levels of satisfaction with the A&E process. The results brought forth criticism from all quarters. In this paper the points made by the critics are considered, and an attempt to answer them is made. PMID:8216599

  19. Development of the Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice Australia

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith; Heartfield, Marie; Bryce, Julianne; Cox, Darlene; Waters, Donna; Gosby, Helen; Kelly, John; Dunn, Sandra V.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the context and development of the new Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice in Australia, which went into effect in January 2014. The researchers used a mixed-methods design to engage a broad range of stakeholders who brought both political and practice knowledge to the development of the new standards. Methods included interviews, focus groups, surveys, and work-based observation of nurse practitioner practice. Stakeholders varied in terms of their need for detail in the standards. Nonetheless, they invariably agreed that the standards should be clinically focussed attributes. The pillars common in many advanced practice nursing standards, such as practice, research, education, and leadership, were combined and expressed in a new and unique clinical attribute. PMID:26162455

  20. Development of the Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice Australia.

    PubMed

    Cashin, Andrew; Buckley, Thomas; Donoghue, Judith; Heartfield, Marie; Bryce, Julianne; Cox, Darlene; Waters, Donna; Gosby, Helen; Kelly, John; Dunn, Sandra V

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the context and development of the new Nurse Practitioner Standards for Practice in Australia, which went into effect in January 2014. The researchers used a mixed-methods design to engage a broad range of stakeholders who brought both political and practice knowledge to the development of the new standards. Methods included interviews, focus groups, surveys, and work-based observation of nurse practitioner practice. Stakeholders varied in terms of their need for detail in the standards. Nonetheless, they invariably agreed that the standards should be clinically focussed attributes. The pillars common in many advanced practice nursing standards, such as practice, research, education, and leadership, were combined and expressed in a new and unique clinical attribute. PMID:26162455

  1. Creating opportunities to support oncology nursing practice: surviving and thriving.

    PubMed

    Rashleigh, Laura; Cordon, Charissa; Wong, Jiahui

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to support that specialization in nursing leads to improved outcomes for patients, including increased QOL, improved symptom management, and fewer hospital admissions. Oncology nurses face several challenges in pursuing specialization, due to individual and system issues such as limited time and resources. To address these challenges, de Souza Institute launched a province-wide study group for nurses in Ontario who planned to write the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) Oncology Certification Exam. The study group was led by educators from de Souza and Princess Margaret Hospital and drew expertise from nursing leaders across Ontario who shared the same vision of oncology nursing excellence. The study group was innovative by embracing telemedicine and web-based technology, which enabled flexibility for nurses' work schedules, learning styles, physical location and practice experience. The study group utilized several theoretical perspectives and frameworks to guide the curriculum: Adult Learning Theories, Cooperative Learning, Generational Learning Styles, CANO standards for practice and the CNA exam competencies. This approach enabled 107 oncology nurses across the province in 17 different sites to connect, as a group, study interactively and fully engage in their learning. A detailed evaluation method was utilized to assess baseline knowledge, learning needs, cooperative group process, exam success rates, and document unexpected outcomes. Ninety-four per cent of participants passed the CNA Oncology Exam. Lessons learned and future implications are discussed. The commitment remains to enable thriving through generating new possibilities, building communities of practice, mentoring nurses and fostering excellence in oncology practice. PMID:21462874

  2. Practical Nursing for High Schools. Curriculum Bulletin 1973-74 Series No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    The bulletin, a revision of Practical Nursing for High Schools published in 1963, is a guide for the licensed teacher of nursing in educating the practical nurse student. The publication can be used as a resource for developing the program in individual schools of practical nursing or to develop the behavioral objectives for each procedure. Part…

  3. A comprehensive community nursing center model: maximizing practice income--a challenge to educators.

    PubMed

    Walker, P H

    1994-01-01

    The potential role of community nursing centers to generate revenue through faculty practice is critical for the survival of nursing centers in the future. A nursing center entrepreneurial model for faculty practice within the University of Rochester School of Nursing uses sound business principles to enhance financial success and challenges current paradigms in education, practice, and research. PMID:8034852

  4. Improving perceptions of patient care--a nursing education and nursing practice initiative.

    PubMed

    Watson, Pamela G; Marshall, David R; Sexton, Karen H

    2006-01-01

    In January 2005, the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) School of Nursing and the UTMB Hospitals and Clinics launched the first phase of a project to improve perceptions of patient care on the part of nursing faculty and nursing clinicians. A finding on the UTMB annual employee satisfaction survey that nursing faculty and clinicians tended to rate quality of UTMB patient care lower than other UTMB employees provided the impetus for the initiative. When UTMB colleagues noticed the findings, various entities including human resources and the Faculty Senate called for explanations from the dean of the School of Nursing, the chief nursing officer, and the CEO for the hospitals and clinics. In the process of attempting to give reasons for the findings, each of us determined we would take definitive action to address the situation. This article describes our accomplishments for Phase 1 of the initiative. Beginning with a vision for a productive professional community characterized by a pedagogical partnership between nursing education and practice, we share the processes we followed to (1) achieve mutual understanding among task force members, (2) obtain input on perceptions from nursing colleagues, (3) identify the clinical and nursing education aspects of the perceptions, (4) reach consensus on target perceptions for Phase 2 of the project, and (5) outline the next steps for the project. PMID:16990119

  5. Promoting mHealth in Nursing Practice in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yisi; Wu, Ying; Gong, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to reveal the status quo of mHealth application in clinical settings in China, especially in reducing patient falls and pressure ulcers and discuss how patient safety could be enhanced in the context of global collaboration on patient safety. The literature search resulted in a total of 290 articles. A steady increase is witnessed in the field of mHealth, especially after the year 2010. Personal digital assistant and electronic cart are the two main devices used in mobile nursing workstation. mHealth was mainly focused on two clinical areas, nursing practice (60.69%) and nursing management (25.86%). mHealth has begun to change the way of nursing process in prevention of adverse nurse events with an encouraging results in reducing the rate of pressure ulcer and falls. Healthcare educators should fully recognize the characteristics of mHealth and enhance a clinical informatics component in the curricula. PMID:27332160

  6. Israeli nurse practice environment characteristics, retention, and job satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an international nursing shortage. Improving the practice environment has been shown to be a successful strategy against this phenomenon, as the practice environment is associated with retention and job satisfaction. The Israeli nurse practice environment has not been measured. The purpose of this study was to measure practice environment characteristics, retention and job satisfaction and to evaluate the association between these variables. Methods A demographic questionnaire, the Practice Environment Scale, and a Job Satisfaction Questionnaire were administered to Israeli acute and intensive care nurses working in 7 hospitals across the country. Retention was measured by intent to leave the organization and work experience. A convenience sample of registered nurses was obtained using a bi-phasic, stratified, cluster design. Data were collected based on the preferences of each unit, either distribution during various shifts or at staff meetings; or via staff mailboxes. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample and results of the questionnaires. Pearson Product Moment Correlations were used to determine significant associations among the variables. A multiple regression model was designed where the criterion variable was the practice environment. Analyses of variance determined differences between groups on nurse practice environment characteristics. Results 610 nurses reported moderate levels of practice environment characteristics, where the lowest scoring characteristic was ‘appropriate staffing and resources’. Approximately 9% of the sample reported their intention to leave and the level of job satisfaction was high. A statistically significant, negative, weak correlation was found between intention to leave and practice environment characteristics, with a moderate correlation between job satisfaction and practice environment characteristics. ‘Appropriate staffing and resources’ was the only characteristic found to be

  7. Understanding and integrating mindfulness into psychiatric mental health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Tusaie, Kathleen; Edds, Kelly

    2009-10-01

    The practice of mindfulness is increasingly being integrated into Western clinical practice within the context of psychotherapy and stress management. Although it is based in ancient Buddhist philosophy, there remains confusion about the definition, antecedents, processes, and outcomes of mindfulness practice. This article reviews the literature on mindfulness, with a focus upon a clearer definition and understanding of the processes and integration into psychiatric mental health nursing practice. PMID:19766927

  8. A patient safety focused registered nurse transition to practice program.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Peter; Greenhill, Jennene

    2013-12-21

    Abstract As undergraduate rural nursing students approach completion of their degree and become eligible for registration as a nurse they anticipate becoming part of a transition to practice program. Promises of clinical support, guidance and being welcomed into the profession are provided. Unfortunately the reality for new graduate registered nurses is often quite different. Promised clinical support does not eventuate and patient safety is often compromised. Graduate nurse transition programs need to have the physical and human resources to deliver the clinical support that was promised in their prospectus. This paper describes the nature of professional support experienced by participants of transition to practice programs. Three core elements are recommended to ensure patient safety. PMID:24359268

  9. Preparing emotionally intelligent doctor of nursing practice leaders.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Michelle T; Rutledge, Carolyn; Shepherd, Laurel

    2012-08-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified the need for interdisciplinary teams that collaborate, communicate, and integrate care across settings to improve health care delivery. Focusing on innovative strategies that address leadership skills in graduate nursing education could have an effect on interdisciplinary partnerships, transformation of patient care, and new styles of leadership to change current practice models. In response to the IOM guidelines, we incorporated emotional intelligence as a component in our Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) leadership curriculum. This article describes a new action-oriented leadership model that prepares the DNP graduate for leadership roles to serve the public and the nursing discipline during a time of radical changes in health care. Behavioral profile, nontraditional readings, and online discussions form the basis of the model. The principles and strategies in this article can be applied to nursing education in multiple arenas, at both the undergraduate and graduate settings. PMID:22624564

  10. Compassion fatigue within nursing practice: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Siedine Knobloch; Klopper, Hester C

    2010-06-01

    "Compassion fatigue" was first introduced in relation to the study of burnout among nurses, but it was never defined within this context; it has since been adopted as a synonym for secondary traumatic stress disorder, which is far removed from the original meaning of the term. The aim of the study was to define compassion fatigue within nursing practice. The method that was used in this article was concept analysis. The findings revealed several categories of compassion fatigue: risk factors, causes, process, and manifestations. The characteristics of each of these categories are specified and a connotative (theoretical) definition, model case, additional cases, empirical indicators, and a denotative (operational) definition are provided. Compassion fatigue progresses from a state of compassion discomfort to compassion stress and, finally, to compassion fatigue, which if not effaced in its early stages of compassion discomfort or compassion stress, can permanently alter the compassionate ability of the nurse. Recommendations for nursing practice, education, and research are discussed. PMID:20602697